Science.gov

Sample records for abb lummus crest

  1. ABB Combustion Engineering nuclear technology

    SciTech Connect

    Matzie, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    The activities of ABB Combustion Engineering in the design and construction of nuclear systems and components are briefly reviewed. ABB Construction Engineering continues to improve the design and design process for nuclear generating stations. Potential improvements are evaluated to meet new requirements both of the public and the regulator, so that the designs meet the highest standards worldwide. Advancements necessary to meet market needs and to ensure the highest level of performance in the future will be made.

  2. ABB: active bandwidth broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kason; Law, Eddie

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss a novel design on the policy-based management for the Internet. This design deploys the concept of active networking. As opposed to the traditional network design, active network empowers network node with the ability to manipulate data and program code in packets, and configure the network properties according to the needs of different applications. The policy-based management can control network routers in order to realize end-to-end Quality of Service (QoS), such as differentiated and integrated services, across the Internet. For the moment, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has defined the framework of the policy-based management. It employs a simple client/server model that uses Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol to facilitate policy management and control. Our design of Active Bandwidth Broker (ABB) belongs to an active application. Our goals are to distribute centralized workload of the policy-based management over multiple active nodes in the active networks, introduce mobility of the bandwidth brokers, and allows load sharing to the policy-based management. This results a network-wide intelligent, highly available, and consistent QoS control that allows performance protection for voice, video and Internet business application while reducing costs for growing networks.

  3. 76 FR 8785 - ABB Inc.; License Amendment Request for Decommissioning of the ABB Inc., Combustion Engineering...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ...--Resident Farmer Thorium and Radium. August 2010. ML102310548. 5. ABB, Inc. Decommissioning Plan Revision 2.... ABB, Inc. Derivation of the Site Specific Soil DCGLs, Addendum, Soil DCGLs for thorium and...

  4. ABB`s LEBS activities -- A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Hein, R.J. von; Peletz, L.J. Jr.; Wesnor, J.D.; Bender, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. is one of three contractors executing Phases 1, 2 and 3 of the Department of Energy project entitled Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems (LEBS). Phase 1 has been completed and Phase 2 is scheduled for completion on September 30, 1996. The following major activities are being carried out in parallel in Phase 2 and this paper is a status report on this work: (1) in-furnace NOx reduction; (2) catalytic filter optimization; (3) add Kalina cycle to POCTF; and (4) POCTF design and licensing. The in-furnace NOx reduction work has been completed and, therefore, a description of this work comprises the major part of this paper.

  5. Crested caracara

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Smith, D.G.; Whaley, W.H.; Ellis, Catherine H.; Glinski, Richard L.; Pendleton, Beth Giron; Moss, Mary Beth; LeFranc, Maurice N.=; Millsap, Brian A.; Hoffman, Stephen W.

    1988-01-01

    The crested caracara's range extends from the southern United States south to Tierra del Fuego. Although the caracara has been recorded in all of the southwestern states, it occurs regularly only in southern Arizona and central, southern and coastal Texas. Its distribution is closely linked to the availability of carrion. Throughout its range, thecaracara is associated with open habitats such as desertscrub, grassland and savanna. Nesting pairs usually produce one brood each breeding season, which extends from December through August. Eggs are laid from March into early June and clutch size averages two to three eggs. Young fledge in June and July and may remain with the adults for several weeks. Management recommendations for the crested caracara include clarifying its status in the Southwest. using supplemental feeding and modifying habitats to encourage recolonization of previously occupied areas and movement into new areas.

  6. ABB Combustion Engineering`s nuclear experience and technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Matzie, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    ABB Combustion Engineering`s nuclear experience and technologies are outlined. The following topics are discussed: evolutionary approach using proven technology, substantial improvement to plant safety, utility perspective up front in developing design, integrated design, competitive plant cost, operability and maintainability, standardization, and completion of US NRC technical review.

  7. Creative Copper Crests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knab, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to create an art activity that would link the computer-created business cards of fourth-grade students with an upcoming school-wide medieval event. Creating family crests from copper foil would be a great connection, since they, like business cards, are an individual's way to identify themselves to others.…

  8. Six years of ABB-CE, petcoke and fluid beds

    SciTech Connect

    Tanca, M.

    1994-12-31

    Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB-CE) has constructed twenty circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers and 2 bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) boilers throughout North America. The units were designed to fire a wide range of fuels from anthracite culm to coals, lignites and biomasses. Based on fuels economics, some plants have decided to use petroleum coke as a replacement or supplemental fuel. The fluid bed boiler can inherently handle a wide range of fuel types without requiring modification or down-rating. ABB-CE units have a significant amount of petroleum coke operating experience firing 100% petroleum coke with no supplemental fuel ranging from the first commercial CFB unit at New Brunswick Power to the largest CFB unit at Texas New Mexico Power. Petroleum coke is also being co-fired with anthracite culm at the Scott Paper CFB. The world`s largest operating BFB, the 160 MWe unit at TVA`s Shawnee plant, has also been co-firing petroleum coke. The ability of the fluidized bed technology to fire low volatile fuels such as petroleum cokes, efficiently and in an environmentally acceptable manner will result in the use of this technology as a preferred means of power generation. This report gives a brief description of the petroleum coke firing experiences with ABB-CE fluid bed steam generators over the last six years.

  9. Incremental evolution of the neural crest, neural crest cells and neural crest-derived skeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brian K; Gillis, J Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Urochordates (ascidians) have recently supplanted cephalochordates (amphioxus) as the extant sister taxon of vertebrates. Given that urochordates possess migratory cells that have been classified as 'neural crest-like'- and that cephalochordates lack such cells--this phylogenetic hypothesis may have significant implications with respect to the origin of the neural crest and neural crest-derived skeletal tissues in vertebrates. We present an overview of the genes and gene regulatory network associated with specification of the neural crest in vertebrates. We then use these molecular data--alongside cell behaviour, cell fate and embryonic context--to assess putative antecedents (latent homologues) of the neural crest or neural crest cells in ascidians and cephalochordates. Ascidian migratory mesenchymal cells--non-pigment-forming trunk lateral line cells and pigment-forming 'neural crest-like cells' (NCLC)--are unlikely latent neural crest cell homologues. Rather, Snail-expressing cells at the neural plate of border of urochordates and cephalochordates likely represent the extent of neural crest elaboration in non-vertebrate chordates. We also review evidence for the evolutionary origin of two neural crest-derived skeletal tissues--cartilage and dentine. Dentine is a bona fide vertebrate novelty, and dentine-secreting odontoblasts represent a cell type that is exclusively derived from the neural crest. Cartilage, on the other hand, likely has a much deeper origin within the Metazoa. The mesodermally derived cellular cartilages of some protostome invertebrates are much more similar to vertebrate cartilage than is the acellular 'cartilage-like' tissue in cephalochordate pharyngeal arches. Cartilage, therefore, is not a vertebrate novelty, and a well-developed chondrogenic program was most likely co-opted from mesoderm to the neural crest along the vertebrate stem. We conclude that the neural crest is a vertebrate novelty, but that neural crest cells and their

  10. Calculating the Weather: Deductive Reasoning and Disciplinary "Telos" in Cleveland Abbe's Rhetorical Transformation of Meteorology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majdik, Zoltan P.; Platt, Carrie Anne; Meister, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the rhetorical basis of a major paradigm change in meteorology, from a focus on inductive observation to deductive, mathematical reasoning. Analysis of Cleveland Abbe's "The Physical Basis of Long-Range Weather Forecasts" demonstrates how in his advocacy for a new paradigm, Abbe navigates the tension between piety to tradition…

  11. Versatility of Abbe-Estlander Flap in Lip Reconstruction – A Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Premlatha M; Bhambar, Rohan Suhas; Gattumeedhi, Shashank Redddy; Kumar, Ram Mohan; Kumar, Harsh

    2014-01-01

    Aims & Objectives: Aim of this study was to evaluate the versatility of Abbe-Estlander flap in lip reconstruction with regard to function and aesthetic outcome and objectives were to present our experience and result in series of 10 cases of lip reconstruction by Abbe-Estlander flap. Materials and Methods: A total number of 10 patients were taken up in the study, age ranging from 35-71 y, mean age being 60. Out of 10 patients, 6 (60%) were male and 4 (40%) female. In all these patients, Abbe-Estlander flap that involved the commissure was used for reconstruction. Patients were recalled at intervals of three weeks, three months and six months for follow up. Results: All patients had satisfactory results in terms of aesthetic and functional outcome. Conclusion: Abbe-Estlander flap is safe and a reliable flap which is technically simple to perform, and provides functionally and aesthetically pleasing result and affords versatility in flap design. PMID:25478393

  12. Elimination of Abbe error method of large-scale laser comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianshuang; Zhang, Manshan; He, Mingzhao; Miao, Dongjing; Deng, Xiangrui; Li, Lianfu

    2015-02-01

    Abbe error is the inherent systematic error in all large-scale laser comparators because the standard laser axis is not in line with measured optical axis. Any angular error of the moving platform will result in the offset from the measured optical axis to the standard laser axis. This paper describes to an algorithm which could be used to calculate the displacement of an equivalent standard laser interferometer and to eliminate an Abbe error. The algorithm could also be used to reduce the Abbe error of a large-scale laser comparator. Experimental results indicated that the uncertainty of displacement measurement due to Abbe error could be effectively reduced when the position error of the measured optical axis was taken into account.

  13. Neural crest migration: trailblazing ahead

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic cell migration patterns are amazingly complex in the timing and spatial distribution of cells throughout the vertebrate landscape. However, advances in in vivo visualization, cell interrogation, and computational modeling are extracting critical features that underlie the mechanistic nature of these patterns. The focus of this review highlights recent advances in the study of the highly invasive neural crest cells and their migratory patterns during embryonic development. We discuss these advances within three major themes and include a description of computational models that have emerged to more rapidly integrate and test hypothetical mechanisms of neural crest migration. We conclude with technological advances that promise to reveal new insights and help translate results to human neural crest-related birth defects and metastatic cancer. PMID:25705385

  14. The Neural Crest in Cardiac Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Keyte, Anna; Hutson, Mary Redmond

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the function of neural crest as they relate to cardiovascular defects. The cardiac neural crest cells are a subpopulation of cranial neural crest discovered nearly 30 years ago by ablation of premigratory neural crest. The cardiac neural crest cells are necessary for normal cardiovascular development. We begin with a description of the crest cells in normal development, including their function in remodeling the pharyngeal arch arteries, outflow tract septation, valvulogenesis, and development of the cardiac conduction system. The cells are also responsible for modulating signaling in the caudal pharynx, including the second heart field. Many of the molecular pathways that are known to influence specification, migration, patterning and final targeting of the cardiac neural crest cells are reviewed. The cardiac neural crest cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various human cardiocraniofacial syndromes such as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial, CHARGE, Fetal Alcohol, Alagille, LEOPARD, and Noonan syndromes, as well as Retinoic Acid Embryopathy. The loss of neural crest cells or their dysfunction may not always directly cause abnormal cardiovascular development, but are involved secondarily because crest cells represent a major component in the complex tissue interactions in the head, pharynx and outflow tract. Thus many of the human syndromes linking defects in the heart, face and brain can be better understood when considered within the context of a single cardiocraniofacial developmental module with the neural crest being a key cell type that interconnects the regions. PMID:22595346

  15. Calibrating reaction rates for the CREST model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Caroline A.; Christie, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    The CREST reactive-burn model uses entropy-dependent reaction rates that, until now, have been manually tuned to fit shock-initiation and detonation data in hydrocode simulations. This paper describes the initial development of an automatic method for calibrating CREST reaction-rate coefficients, using particle swarm optimisation. The automatic method is applied to EDC32, to help develop the first CREST model for this conventional high explosive.

  16. Vagal neural crest cell migratory behavior: a transition between the cranial and trunk crest.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Bryan R; Erickson, Carol A

    2011-09-01

    Migration and differentiation of cranial neural crest cells are largely controlled by environmental cues, whereas pathfinding at the trunk level is dictated by cell-autonomous molecular changes owing to early specification of the premigratory crest. Here, we investigated the migration and patterning of vagal neural crest cells. We show that (1) vagal neural crest cells exhibit some developmental bias, and (2) they take separate pathways to the heart and to the gut. Together these observations suggest that prior specification dictates initial pathway choice. However, when we challenged the vagal neural crest cells with different migratory environments, we observed that the behavior of the anterior vagal neural crest cells (somite-level 1-3) exhibit considerable migratory plasticity, whereas the posterior vagal neural crest cells (somite-level 5-7) are more restricted in their behavior. We conclude that the vagal neural crest is a transitional population that has evolved between the head and the trunk.

  17. Effect of Impact Damage on the Fatigue Response of TiAl Alloy-ABB-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, S. L.; Lerch, B. A.; Pereira, J. M.; Nathal, M. V.; Nazmy, M. Y.; Staubli, M.; Clemens, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of gamma-TiAl to withstand potential foreign or domestic object damage is a technical risk to the implementation of gamma-TiAl in low pressure turbine (LPT) blade applications. In the present study, the impact resistance of TiAl alloy ABB-2 was determined and compared to the impact resistance of Ti(48)Al(2)Nb(2)Cr. Specimens were impacted with four different impact conditions with impact energies ranging from 0.22 to 6.09 J. After impacting, the impact damage was characterized by crack lengths on both the front and backside of the impact. Due to the flat nature of gamma-TiAl's S-N (stress vs. cycles to failure) curve, step fatigue tests were used to determine the fatigue strength after impacting. Impact damage increased with increasing impact energy and led to a reduction in the fatigue strength of the alloy. For similar crack lengths, the fatigue strength of impacted ABB-2 was similar to the fatigue strength of impacted Ti(48)Al(2)Nb(2)Cr, even though the tensile properties of the two alloys are significantly different. Similar to Ti(48)Al(2)Nb(2)Cr, ABB-2 showed a classical mean stress dependence on fatigue strength. The fatigue strength of impacted ABB-2 could be accurately predicted using a threshold analysis.

  18. Neural crest contributions to the lamprey head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCauley, David W.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    The neural crest is a vertebrate-specific cell population that contributes to the facial skeleton and other derivatives. We have performed focal DiI injection into the cranial neural tube of the developing lamprey in order to follow the migratory pathways of discrete groups of cells from origin to destination and to compare neural crest migratory pathways in a basal vertebrate to those of gnathostomes. The results show that the general pathways of cranial neural crest migration are conserved throughout the vertebrates, with cells migrating in streams analogous to the mandibular and hyoid streams. Caudal branchial neural crest cells migrate ventrally as a sheet of cells from the hindbrain and super-pharyngeal region of the neural tube and form a cylinder surrounding a core of mesoderm in each pharyngeal arch, similar to that seen in zebrafish and axolotl. In addition to these similarities, we also uncovered important differences. Migration into the presumptive caudal branchial arches of the lamprey involves both rostral and caudal movements of neural crest cells that have not been described in gnathostomes, suggesting that barriers that constrain rostrocaudal movement of cranial neural crest cells may have arisen after the agnathan/gnathostome split. Accordingly, neural crest cells from a single axial level contributed to multiple arches and there was extensive mixing between populations. There was no apparent filling of neural crest derivatives in a ventral-to-dorsal order, as has been observed in higher vertebrates, nor did we find evidence of a neural crest contribution to cranial sensory ganglia. These results suggest that migratory constraints and additional neural crest derivatives arose later in gnathostome evolution.

  19. [Vascularized iliac crest and distal radius reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Pic Gomis, L; Gomis, R

    2010-12-01

    The authors relate their experience concerning the vascularized iliac crest flap. In the first chapter, they detail the anatomic vascularized osteocutaneous iliac crest. Blood supply arises from the deep and superficial circonflexe iliac artery. Many anastomoses connect the two systems. In the second chapter, they detail the operative technique of free and pedicule hone iliac crest flap. Composite cutaneous bone flaps are also detailed. In the third chapter, they detail informations about treatment of distal radius bone defects with associated skeen flap if necessary.

  20. Abbe's number and Cauchy's constant of iodine and selenium doped poly (methylmethacrylate) and polystyrene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Sheetal Das, Kallol Keller, Jag Mohan

    2014-04-24

    Poly (methyl methacrylate) / Polystyrene and iodine / selenium hybrid matrixes have been prepared and characterized. Refractive index measurements were done at 390, 535, 590, 635 nm wavelengths. Abbe's number and Cauchy's constants of the iodine / selenium doped poly (methylmethacrylate) and polystyrene samples are being reported. The results also showed that the refractive index of the composite varies non-monotonically with the doping concentration at low iodine concentration or in the region of nanoparticles formation and is also dependent on thermal annealing.

  1. Neural crest development in fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan M; Garic, Ana; Flentke, George R; Berres, Mark E

    2014-09-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disability. Some affected individuals possess distinctive craniofacial deficits, but many more lack overt facial changes. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying these deficits would inform their diagnostic utility. Our understanding of these mechanisms is challenged because ethanol lacks a single receptor when redirecting cellular activity. This review summarizes our current understanding of how ethanol alters neural crest development. Ample evidence shows that ethanol causes the "classic" fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) face (short palpebral fissures, elongated upper lip, deficient philtrum) because it suppresses prechordal plate outgrowth, thereby reducing neuroectoderm and neural crest induction and causing holoprosencephaly. Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) at premigratory stages elicits a different facial appearance, indicating FASD may represent a spectrum of facial outcomes. PAE at this premigratory period initiates a calcium transient that activates CaMKII and destabilizes transcriptionally active β-catenin, thereby initiating apoptosis within neural crest populations. Contributing to neural crest vulnerability are their low antioxidant responses. Ethanol-treated neural crest produce reactive oxygen species and free radical scavengers attenuate their production and prevent apoptosis. Ethanol also significantly impairs neural crest migration, causing cytoskeletal rearrangements that destabilize focal adhesion formation; their directional migratory capacity is also lost. Genetic factors further modify vulnerability to ethanol-induced craniofacial dysmorphology and include genes important for neural crest development, including shh signaling, PDFGA, vangl2, and ribosomal biogenesis. Because facial and brain development are mechanistically and functionally linked, research into ethanol's effects on neural crest also informs our understanding of ethanol's CNS pathologies.

  2. Neural Crest Development in Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Susan M.; Garic, Ana; Flentke, George R.; Berres, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disability. Some affected individuals possess distinctive craniofacial deficits, but many more lack overt facial changes. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying these deficits would inform their diagnostic utility. Our understanding of these mechanisms is challenged because ethanol lacks a single receptor when redirecting cellular activity. This review summarizes our current understanding of how ethanol alters neural crest development. Ample evidence shows that ethanol causes the “classic” fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) face (short palpebral fissures, elongated upper lip, deficient philtrum) because it suppresses prechordal plate outgrowth, thereby reducing neuroectoderm and neural crest induction and causing holoprosencephaly. Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) at premigratory stages elicits a different facial appearance, indicating FASD may represent a spectrum of facial outcomes. PAE at this premigratory period initiates a calcium transient that activates CaMKII and destabilizes transcriptionally active β-catenin, thereby initiating apoptosis within neural crest populations. Contributing to neural crest vulnerability are their low antioxidant responses. Ethanol-treated neural crest produce reactive oxygen species, and free radical scavengers attenuate their production and prevent apoptosis. Ethanol also significantly impairs neural crest migration, causing cytoskeletal rearrangements that destabilize focal adhesion formation; their directional migratory capacity is also lost. Genetic factors further modify vulnerability to ethanol-induced craniofacial dysmorphology, and include genes important for neural crest development including shh signaling, PDFGA, vangl2, and ribosomal biogenesis. Because facial and brain development are mechanistically and functionally linked, research into ethanol’s effects on neural crest also informs our understanding of ethanol’s CNS pathologies

  3. [Neural crest and vertebrate evolution].

    PubMed

    Le Douarin, Nicole M; Creuzet, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) is a remarkable structure of the Vertebrate embryo, which forms from the lateral borders of the neural plate (designated as neural folds) during neural tube closure. As soon as the NC is formed, its constitutive cells detach and migrate away from the neural primordium along definite pathways and at precise periods of time according to a rostro-caudal progression. The NC cells aggregate in definite places in the developing embryo, where they differentiate into a large variety of cell types including the neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, the pigment cells dispersed throughout the body and endocrine cells such as the adrenal medulla and the calcitonin producing cells. At the cephalic level only, in higher Vertebrates (but along the whole neural axis in Fishes and Amphibians), the NC is also at the origin of mesenchymal cells differentiating into connective tissue chondrogenic and osteogenic cells. Vertebrates belong to the larger group of Cordates which includes also the Protocordates (Cephalocordates and the Urocordates). All Cordates are characterized by the same body plan with a dorsal neural tube and a notochord which, in Vertebrates, exists only at embryonic stages. The main difference between Protocordates and Vertebrates is the very rudimentary development of cephalic structures in the former. As a result, the process of cephalization is one of the most obvious characteristics of Vertebrates. It was accompanied by the apparition of the NC which can therefore be considered as an innovation of Vertebrates during evolution. The application of a cell marking technique which consists in constructing chimeric embryos between two species of birds, the quail and the chicken, has led to show that the vertebrate head is mainly formed by cells originating from the NC, meaning that this structure was an important asset in Vertebrate evolution. Recent studies, described in this article, have strengthened this view by showing

  4. Structure-activity relationship of (-) mammea A/BB derivatives against Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Brenzan, Mislaine Adriana; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Young, Maria Claudia M; Côrrea, Arlene Gonçalves; Alvim, Joel; dos Santos, Adriana Oliveira; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia

    2008-11-01

    To study the structure-activity relationship of coumarin (-) mammea A/BB isolated from the CH(2)Cl(2) extract of Calophyllum brasiliense leaves, we evaluated the antileishmanial activity of natural, synthetic and derivatives of this coumarin, against promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis, and their cytotoxicity to J774G8 murine macrophages. The derivatives were obtained by hydrogenation and methoxylation reactions. The compound structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. The compounds 5,7-dihydroxy-8-(2-methylbutanoyl)-6-(3-methylbutyl)-4-phenyl-chroman-2-one (3), 7-hydroxy-5-methoxy-8-(2-methylbutanoyl)-6-(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)-4-phenylcoumarin (4) and 5,7-dimethoxy-8-(1-methoxy-2-methylbutyl)-6-(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)-4 phenylcoumarin (6) were more biologically active than the compound (-) mammea A/BB (1) (7.4 microM), with IC(50) values from 0.9, 2.4 and 1.9 microM respectively; compound (3) displayed the highest activity. The compounds mammea B/BB (2), 5,7-dimethoxy-8-(2-methylbutanoyl)-6-(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)-4-phenylcoumarin (5) and 5,7-dihydroxy-4-phenylcoumarin (7) were less active than (-) mammea A/BB (1), with IC(50) of 30.1, 15.1 and 60.2 microM respectively; compound (7) showed the lowest antileishmanial activity of all. Compounds (1), (3), (4) and (6) were active not only against promastigote forms of L. amazonensis, but also against intracellular amastigote forms with IC(50) of 14.3, 0.6, 34.0 and 22.2 microM, respectively. Interestingly, compound (3) showed the most antileishmanial activity of all. This study demonstrated that several aspects of the structure were important for antileishmanial activity.

  5. Intramuscular and topical treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions in mice infected with Leishmania amazonensis using coumarin (-) mammea A/BB.

    PubMed

    Tiuman, Tatiana Shioji; Brenzan, Mislaine Adriana; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Filho, Benedito Prado Dias; Cortez, Diógenes Aparicio Garcia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2012-10-15

    Treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis remains limited to a few available options. Recent studies showed in vitro antileishmanial activity of (-) mammea A/BB, a coumarin isolated from leaves of Calophyllum brasiliense. Moreover, the dichloromethane crude extract and hexane fraction from this plant demonstrated in vivo activity in mice infected with Leishmania amazonensis. We evaluated the antileishmanial activity of (-) mammea A/BB in the L. amazonensis BALB/c mice model. The animals were given intramuscular and topical treatment with (-) mammea A/BB for 30 consecutive days. The results demonstrated that 18mg/kg/d intramuscularly or 0.2% topically of (-) mammea A/BB significantly reduced the size of skin lesions in footpads of mice compared with those in the control group (p<0.05). The activity of Glucantime(®) (corresponding to 27mg/kg/d of pentavalent antimony) administered intramuscularly was similar to that of (-) mammea A/BB (p<0.05) by both routes of administration. The histopathological evaluation showed no changes in the organs analyzed. These results indicate that the coumarin obtained from C. brasiliense is the antileishmanially active compound and can be used to control the development of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions caused by L. amazonensis.

  6. CREST Research: Advancing the Field for Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueda, Laura; Brandl, Bonnie; Otto, Joanne; Stiegel, Lori; Thomas, Randolph; Heisler, Candace

    2008-01-01

    An external advisory board consisting of members from the fields of geriatric internal medicine, family practice geriatrics, criminal prosecution, civil law, police force, adult protective services and victims advocacy was created to advise and guide the research conducted by the Consortium for Research in Elder Self-neglect of Texas (CREST). This panel of experts performed site visits and facilitated the research through responses to biweekly facts sheets and quarterly conference calls. This paper provides the perspective of five of the board members regarding the research findings that were presented at the CREST National Conference in 2006. The discussions outline the successes of the CREST research, describe obstacles and the necessary next steps for continuance of the scientific exploration of this syndrome, and highlight the practice implications of the current and proposed research. PMID:19016972

  7. An interferometric Abbe-type comparator for the calibration of internal and external diameter standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Ahn; Kim, Jae Wan; Kang, Chu-Shik; Eom, Tae Bong

    2010-07-01

    We developed an Abbe-type comparator using a laser interferometer and a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) probe as displacement sensors, which can measure the diameter of ring and plug gauges up to 300 mm. The measurement system is configured according to the Abbe principle, and consists of translation stages, a laser interferometer, an LVDT probe and an electronic controller. The main translation stage is made by using a precision ceramic guide and air bearing pads, and is driven by a backlash-free lead screw and a micro-stepping motor. The laser interferometer measures the displacement of a moving mirror aligned with the probe coaxially. The environmental effect is corrected automatically during the measurement. The effective diameter of the probe ball is calibrated using a reference gauge block. The performance of each component was evaluated through experiments and the measurement uncertainty of the overall system was analyzed. We measured three diameter artifacts, which are 11.95 mm and 100 mm ring gauges and a 98.5 mm plug gauge, and compared the measured values with the calibrated ones. They were consistent with each other within 0.3 µm, which is less than the expanded measurement uncertainty (k = 2).

  8. Secondary bilateral cleft lip-nose deformity correction by rhinoplasty with simultaneous Abbe flap

    PubMed Central

    Mokal, Nitin J.; Juneja, Manpreet

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this article is to review modification and outcome of secondary rhinoplasty along with Abbé flap for correction of secondary bilateral cleft lip deformity. Materials and Methods: A total of thirteen patients of secondary bilateral cleft lip-nose deformity having tight upper lip, lack of acceptable philtral column, Cupid's bow definition, irregular lip scars, and associated nasal deformity were selected. All the patients received Abbé flap and simultaneous nasal correction. All cases were treated during a period of three years. Mean patient age at the time of the operation was 21 years, and ranged from 16 to 27 years. The average follow-up period was three years. Results: Assessment of results was based on comparing preoperative and postoperative clinical photographs done by surgeon and patient relatives and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The columellar lengthening and upper lip vermillion correction achieved was satisfactory. There were no perioperative complications such as airway obstruction, bleeding, infection, wound disruption, or flap necrosis. PMID:24987200

  9. Division of labor during trunk neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Gammill, Laura S; Roffers-Agarwal, Julaine

    2010-08-15

    Neural crest cells, the migratory precursors of numerous cell types including the vertebrate peripheral nervous system, arise in the dorsal neural tube and follow prescribed routes into the embryonic periphery. While the timing and location of neural crest migratory pathways has been well documented in the trunk, a comprehensive collection of signals that guides neural crest migration along these paths has only recently been established. In this review, we outline the molecular cascade of events during trunk neural crest development. After describing the sequential routes taken by trunk neural crest cells, we consider the guidance cues that pattern these neural crest trajectories. We pay particular attention to segmental neural crest development and the steps and signals that generate a metameric peripheral nervous system, attempting to reconcile conflicting observations in chick and mouse. Finally, we compare cranial and trunk neural crest development in order to highlight common themes.

  10. The Health Connection at Cedar Crest College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Kerrie; Boland, Kathleen; Laffey, Joan M.

    2006-01-01

    The mission of Cedar Crest College, an independent women's college, is to provide students with excellent education that is grounded in the liberal arts and informed by humanistic values. In 2003, Student Affairs staff of the school looked closely at those students who were graduating and began to realize that though the college was providing…

  11. Neural crest induction at the neural plate border in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Milet, Cécile; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2012-06-01

    The neural crest is a transient and multipotent cell population arising at the edge of the neural plate in vertebrates. Recent findings highlight that neural crest patterning is initiated during gastrulation, i.e. earlier than classically described, in a progenitor domain named the neural border. This chapter reviews the dynamic and complex molecular interactions underlying neural border formation and neural crest emergence.

  12. Measurement of straightness without Abbe error using an enhanced differential plane mirror interferometer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Ji, Hudong; Hou, Wenmei; Le, Yanfen; Shen, Lu

    2017-01-20

    This paper presents an enhanced differential plane mirror interferometer with high resolution for measuring straightness. Two sets of space symmetrical beams are used to travel through the measurement and reference arms of the straightness interferometer, which contains three specific optical devices: a Koster prism, a wedge prism assembly, and a wedge mirror assembly. Changes in the optical path in the interferometer arms caused by straightness are differential and converted into phase shift through a particular interferometer system. The interferometric beams have a completely common path and space symmetrical measurement structure. The crosstalk of the Abbe error caused by pitch, yaw, and roll angle is avoided. The dead path error is minimized, which greatly enhances the stability and accuracy of the measurement. A measurement resolution of 17.5 nm is achieved. The experimental results fit well with the theoretical analysis.

  13. Cardiovascular Development and the Colonizing Cardiac Neural Crest Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Paige; Olaopa, Michael; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2008-01-01

    Although it is well established that transgenic manipulation of mammalian neural crest-related gene expression and microsurgical removal of premigratory chicken and Xenopus embryonic cardiac neural crest progenitors results in a wide spectrum of both structural and functional congenital heart defects, the actual functional mechanism of the cardiac neural crest cells within the heart is poorly understood. Neural crest cell migration and appropriate colonization of the pharyngeal arches and outflow tract septum is thought to be highly dependent on genes that regulate cell-autonomous polarized movement (i.e., gap junctions, cadherins, and noncanonical Wnt1 pathway regulators). Once the migratory cardiac neural crest subpopulation finally reaches the heart, they have traditionally been thought to participate in septation of the common outflow tract into separate aortic and pulmonary arteries. However, several studies have suggested these colonizing neural crest cells may also play additional unexpected roles during cardiovascular development and may even contribute to a crest-derived stem cell population. Studies in both mice and chick suggest they can also enter the heart from the venous inflow as well as the usual arterial outflow region, and may contribute to the adult semilunar and atrioventricular valves as well as part of the cardiac conduction system. Furthermore, although they are not usually thought to give rise to the cardiomyocyte lineage, neural crest cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can contribute to the myocardium and may have different functions in a species-dependent context. Intriguingly, both ablation of chick and Xenopus premigratory neural crest cells, and a transgenic deletion of mouse neural crest cell migration or disruption of the normal mammalian neural crest gene expression profiles, disrupts ventral myocardial function and/or cardiomyocyte proliferation. Combined, this suggests that either the cardiac neural crest secrete factor/s that

  14. Neural crest cells: from developmental biology to clinical interventions.

    PubMed

    Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent cells, which are specified in embryonic ectoderm in the border of neural plate and epiderm during early development by interconnection of extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic factors. Neural crest cells are capable of differentiating into various somatic cell types, including melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage and bone, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous cells, which supports their promise for cell therapy. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of wide aspects of neural crest cells from their developmental biology to applicability in medical research. We provide a simplified model of neural crest cell development and highlight the key external stimuli and intrinsic regulators that determine the neural crest cell fate. Defects of neural crest cell development leading to several human disorders are also mentioned, with the emphasis of using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model neurocristopathic syndromes.

  15. Searching transients in large-scale surveys. A method based on the Abbe value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowlavi, N.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: A new method is presented to identify transient candidates in large-scale surveys based on the variability pattern in their light curves. Methods: The method is based on the Abbe value, Ab, that estimates the smoothness of a light curve, and on a newly introduced value called the excess Abbe and denoted excessAb, that estimates the regularity of the light curve variability pattern over the duration of the observations. Results: Based on simulated light curves, transients are shown to occupy a specific region in the {diagram} diagram, distinct from sources presenting pulsating-like features in their light curves or having featureless light curves. The method is tested on real light curves taken from EROS-2 and OGLE-II surveys in a 0.50° × 0.17° field of the sky in the Large Magellanic Cloud centered at RA(J2000) = 5h25m56.5s and Dec(J2000) = -69d29m43.3s. The method identifies 43 EROS-2 transient candidates out of a total of 1300 variable stars, and 19 more OGLE-II candidates, 10 of which do not have any EROS-2 variable star matches and which would need further confirmation to assess their reliability. The efficiency of the method is further tested by comparing the list of transient candidates with known Be stars in the literature. It is shown that all Be stars known in the studied field of view with detectable bursts or outbursts are successfully extracted by the method. In addition, four new transient candidates displaying bursts and/or outbursts are found in the field, of which at least two are good new Be candidates. Conclusions: The new method proves to be a potentially powerful tool to extract transient candidates from large-scale multi-epoch surveys. The better the photometric measurement uncertainties are, the cleaner the list of detected transient candidates is. In addition, the diagram diagram is shown to be a good diagnostic tool to check the data quality of multi-epoch photometric surveys. A trend of instrumental and/or data reduction origin

  16. A crested theropod dinosaur from antarctica.

    PubMed

    Hammer, W R; Hickerson, W J

    1994-05-06

    Jurassic fossil vertebrates collected from the Falla Formation in the Central Transantarctic Mountains included a partial skull and postcranial elements of a crested theropod, Cryolophosaurus ellioti gen. nov. sp. nov. The theropod bears some resemblance to the large tetanurans of the Middle to Late Jurassic but also has primitive ceratosaurian features. Elements from a prosauropod, teeth from scavenging theropods, a pterosaur humerus, and a tritylodont molar were also recovered. The presence of this fauna suggests that a mild climate existed at high paleolatitude in this area of Gondwana during the Early Jurassic.

  17. The 1986 Crested Butte, Colorado earthquake swarm

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, I.G. Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff )

    1991-01-01

    In August and September of 1986, the towns of Crested Butte and Aspen were shaken by a series of earthquakes with Richter magnitudes up to 3.5. Many of the tremors were accompanied by unusual thunder-like sounds. These earthquakes were part of an intense swarm of several hundred events that may have its source along a set of conjugate faults with a system of dikes along the Ruby Range. The fault(s) were probably reactivated in a normal sense by contemporary extensional stresses that characterize much of western and central Colorado.

  18. Evolution of vertebrates: a view from the crest

    PubMed Central

    Bronner, Marianne E.

    2016-01-01

    The origin of vertebrates was accompanied by the advent of a novel cell type: the neural crest. Emerging from the central nervous system, these cells migrate to diverse locations and differentiate into numerous derivatives. By coupling morphological and gene regulatory information from vertebrates and other chordates, we describe how addition of the neural crest specification program may have enabled cells at the neural plate border to acquire multipotency and migratory ability. Analyzing the topology of the neural crest gene regulatory network can serve as a useful template for understanding vertebrate evolution, including elaboration of neural crest derivatives. PMID:25903629

  19. Evolution of vertebrates as viewed from the crest.

    PubMed

    Green, Stephen A; Simoes-Costa, Marcos; Bronner, Marianne E

    2015-04-23

    The origin of vertebrates was accompanied by the advent of a novel cell type: the neural crest. Emerging from the central nervous system, these cells migrate to diverse locations and differentiate into numerous derivatives. By coupling morphological and gene regulatory information from vertebrates and other chordates, we describe how addition of the neural-crest-specification program may have enabled cells at the neural plate border to acquire multipotency and migratory ability. Analysis of the topology of the neural crest gene regulatory network can serve as a useful template for understanding vertebrate evolution, including elaboration of neural crest derivatives.

  20. Cytoplasmic protein methylation is essential for neural crest migration

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Katie L.; Lidberg, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    As they initiate migration in vertebrate embryos, neural crest cells are enriched for methylation cycle enzymes, including S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH), the only known enzyme to hydrolyze the feedback inhibitor of trans-methylation reactions. The importance of methylation in neural crest migration is unknown. Here, we show that SAHH is required for emigration of polarized neural crest cells, indicating that methylation is essential for neural crest migration. Although nuclear histone methylation regulates neural crest gene expression, SAHH and lysine-methylated proteins are abundant in the cytoplasm of migratory neural crest cells. Proteomic profiling of cytoplasmic, lysine-methylated proteins from migratory neural crest cells identified 182 proteins, several of which are cytoskeleton related. A methylation-resistant form of one of these proteins, the actin-binding protein elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (EF1α1), blocks neural crest migration. Altogether, these data reveal a novel and essential role for post-translational nonhistone protein methylation during neural crest migration and define a previously unknown requirement for EF1α1 methylation in migration. PMID:24379414

  1. Comparing conventional and supercritical extraction of (-)-mammea A/BB and the antioxidant activity of Calophyllum brasiliense extracts.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Renata Menoci; Lemos, Caroline Ortega Terra; Leal, Ivana Correa Ramos; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; da Silva, Edson Antonio; Cabral, Vladimir Ferreira; Cardozo-Filho, Lúcio

    2013-05-24

    Calophyllum brasiliense is a rich source of bioactive coumarins, xanthones and biflavonoids. The aim of the study was to compare the phenol contents and the antioxidant activity of C. brasiliense extracts obtained by conventional and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) methods, as well as the quantification of crude extracts and (-)-mammea A/BB yields. Dichloromethane and hexane were used as solvents for the conventional extractions and SFE was developed using supercritical CO₂; the kinetic curves were modeled using a second-order empirical model. The dichloromethane extract presented the best total yield, although it showed the lowest content of (-)-mammea A/BB. The concentration of the coumarin was considerably higher in extracts obtained by the supercritical fluid method and a higher antioxidant activity was assigned to extracts obtained by this technique. Concerning the total phenolic contents, both the dichloro-methane and the supercritical extractions produced satisfactory amounts. The SFE method proved to be more promising than conventional methods.

  2. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE ABB COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE IN WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT DURING THE FALL OF 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Wade C. Adams

    2011-12-09

    From the mid-1950s until mid-2000, the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) site in Windsor, Connecticut (Figure A-1) was involved in the research, development, engineering, production, and servicing of nuclear fuels, systems, and services. The site is currently undergoing decommissioning that will lead to license termination and unrestricted release in accordance with the requirements of the License Termination Rule in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. Asea Brown Boveri Incorporated (ABB) has been decommissioning the CE site since 2001.

  3. "CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR THE ABB COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT DCN 5158-SR-02-2

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, WADE C

    2013-03-25

    The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor's procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE's decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys include gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

  4. Piping benchmark problems for the ABB/CE System 80+ Standardized Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K.

    1994-07-01

    To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for the ABB/Combustion Engineering System 80+ Standardized Plant, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the System 80+ standard design. It will be required that the combined license licensees demonstrate that their solution to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set. The first System 80+ piping benchmark is a uniform support motion response spectrum solution for one section of the feedwater piping subjected to safe shutdown seismic loads. The second System 80+ piping benchmark is a time history solution for the feedwater piping subjected to the transient loading induced by a water hammer. The third System 80+ piping benchmark is a time history solution of the pressurizer surge line subjected to the accelerations induced by a main steam line pipe break. The System 80+ reactor is an advanced PWR type.

  5. Drop Test Results for the Combustion Engineering Model No. ABB-2901 Fuel Pellet Package

    SciTech Connect

    Hafner, R S; Mok, G C; Hagler, L G

    2004-04-23

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) contracted with the Packaging Review Group (PRG) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct a single, 30-ft shallow-angle drop test on the Combustion Engineering ABB-2901 drum-type shipping package. The purpose of the test was to determine if bolted-ring drum closures could fail during shallow-angle drops. The PRG at LLNL planned the test, and Defense Technologies Engineering Division (DTED) personnel from LLNL's Site-300 Test Group executed the plan. The test was conducted in November 2001 using the drop-tower facility at LLNL's Site 300. Two representatives from Westinghouse Electric Company in Columbia, South Carolina (WEC-SC); two USNRC staff members; and three PRG members from LLNL witnessed the preliminary test runs and the final test. The single test clearly demonstrated the vulnerability of the bolted-ring drum closure to shallow-angle drops-the test package's drum closure was easily and totally separated from the drum package. The results of the preliminary test runs and the 30-ft shallow-angle drop test offer valuable qualitative understandings of the shallow-angle impact.

  6. A comparative study of crested gibbons (Nomascus).

    PubMed

    Mootnick, Alan R; Fan, Peng-Fei

    2011-02-01

    Crested gibbons (Nomascus) are in the rarest genus of the family Hylobatidae, with the Hainan gibbon (Nomascus hainanus) being the rarest primate in the world. In the past, the number of species in this genus has been at the center of much controversy, in part, because their color changes during immaturity as well as other factors, such as physical similarities in genitalia, creating difficulties in accurately determining the sex of individuals. Furthermore, owing to their rarity, illusiveness, and the rough terrain that comprises their native habitat, Nomascus is one of the least studied Hylobatidae. This article represents the most comprehensive dissemination of visual characteristics of the genus Nomascus to assist in the accurate identification of captive and wild crested gibbons. Through differences in pelage color, skeletal anatomy, dentition, vocalizations, behavior, distribution, and genetic studies, we are able to determine more accurately whether or not a subspecies should be elevated to species level. From the current data, there are six species and one subspecies in the genus Nomascus. However, reports of a recently identified light-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus sp.) in northeast Cambodia, Central Vietnam, and South Lao PDR, will add additional taxa to this genus.

  7. A taxonomic study of crested caracaras (Falconidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dove, C.J.; Banks, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    The taxonomic status of the crested caracaras (Caracara spp., Falconidae) has been unsettled for many years. Current sources such as the AOU Check-list recognize a single species that includes three taxa formerly considered distinct, citing observations by Hellmayr and Conover (1949) on two specimens considered to be intermediate. We studied plumage characters and measurements of over 392 museum specimens and found no evidence of clinal change between the northern and southern continental populations. Sixteen specimens from localities near the Amazon River where these two populations sporadically meet exhibit a mosaic of plumage elements from both forms. Measurements of wing chord, bill length, and bill depth indicate that size is positively correlated with latitude north and south of the equator and that females are larger than males in the northern population. These populations do not meet in western South America. We conclude that three biological species can be identified in the crested caracaras: the insular Guadalupe Caracara (Caracara lutosus); and two continental species, Northern (C. cheriway) and Southern caracara (C. plancus), neither of which shows subspecific variation.

  8. The Platform Switching Approach to Optimize Split Crest Technique

    PubMed Central

    Sammartino, G.; Cerone, V.; Gasparro, R.; Riccitiello, F.; Trosino, O.

    2014-01-01

    The split crest technique is a reliable procedure used simultaneously in the implant positioning. In the literature some authors describe a secondary bone resorption as postoperative complication. The authors show how platform switching can be able to avoid secondary resorption as complication of split crest technique. PMID:25165586

  9. Confetti clarifies controversy: neural crest stem cells are multipotent.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Marianne

    2015-03-05

    Neural crest precursors generate diverse cell lineages during development, which have been proposed to arise either from multipotent precursor cells or pools of heterogeneous, restricted progenitors. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Baggiolini et al. (2015) perform rigorous in vivo lineage tracing to show that individual neural crest precursors are multipotent.

  10. Lumbar Herniation of Kidney following Iliac Crest Bone Harvest

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The iliac crest is a popular source for autogenous bone harvesting, but the process is rife with complications. This case report presents a patient that experienced incisional lumbar herniation of her kidney following an iliac crest bone harvesting procedure. A discussion is included on the underappreciated complications of this procedure and recommendations for improving outcomes with more thorough evaluation and documentation. PMID:28042490

  11. INCREASING NATIVE PLANT DIVERSITY IN CRESTED WHEATGRASS STANDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crested wheatgrass was introduced to North America to improve degraded rangelands and has proven to be a successful revegetation species due to its ease of establishment, strong competitive ability, and grazing tolerance. However, crested wheatgrass may form monotypic stands with low plant diversit...

  12. The terminal crest: morphological features relevant to electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, D; Anderson, R H; Cabrera, J A; Climent, V; Martin, R; Farré, J; Ho, S Y

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the detailed anatomy of the terminal crest (crista terminalis) and its junctional regions with the pectinate muscles and intercaval area to provide the yardstick for structural normality. Design: 97 human necropsy hearts were studied from patients who were not known to have medical histories of atrial arrhythmias. The dimensions of the terminal crest were measured in width and thickness from epicardium to endocardium, at the four points known to be chosen as sites of ablation. Results: The pectinate muscles originating from the crest and extending along the wall of the appendage towards the vestibule of the tricuspid valve had a non-uniform trabecular pattern in 80% of hearts. Fine structure of the terminal crest studied using light and scanning electron microscopy consisted of much thicker and more numerous fibrous sheaths of endomysium with increasing age of the patient. 36 specimens of 45 (80%) specimens studied by electron microscopy had a predominantly uniform longitudinal arrangement of myocardial fibres within the terminal crest. In contrast, in all specimens, the junctional areas of the terminal crest with the pectinate muscles and with the intercaval area had crossing and non-uniform architecture of myofibres. Conclusions: The normal anatomy of the muscle fibres and connective tissue in the junctional area of the terminal crest/pectinate muscles and terminal crest/intercaval bundle favours non-uniform anisotropic properties. PMID:12231604

  13. Lumbo-sacral neural crest contributes to the avian enteric nervous system independently of vagal neural crest.

    PubMed

    Hearn, C; Newgreen, D

    2000-07-01

    Most of the avian enteric nervous system is derived from the vagal neural crest, but a minority of the neural cells in the hindgut, and to an even lesser extent in the midgut, are of lumbo-sacral crest origin. Since the lumbo-sacral contribution was not detected or deemed negligible in the absence of vagal cells, it had been hypothesised that lumbo-sacral neural crest cells require vagal crest cells to contribute to the enteric nervous system. In contrast, zonal aganglionosis, a rare congenital human bowel disease led to the opposite suggestion, that lumbo-sacral cells could compensate for the absence of vagal cells to construct a complete enteric nervous system. To test these notions, we combined E4 chick midgut and hindgut, isolated prior to arrival of neural precursors, with E1. 7 chick vagal and/or E2.7 quail lumbo-sacral neural tube as crest donors, and grafted these to the chorio-allantoic membrane of E9 chick hosts. Double and triple immuno-labelling for quail cells (QCPNA), neural crest cells (HNK-1), neurons and neurites (neurofilament) and glial cells (GFAP) indicated that vagal crest cells produced neurons and glia in large ganglia throughout the entire intestinal tissues. Lumbo-sacral crest contributed small numbers of neurons and glial cells in the presence or absence of vagal cells, chiefly in colorectum, but not in nearby small intestinal tissue. Thus for production of enteric neural cells the avian lumbo-sacral neural crest neither requires the vagal neural crest, nor significantly compensates for its lack. However, enteric neurogenesis of lumbo-sacral cells requires the hindgut microenvironment, whereas that of vagal cells is not restricted to a particular intestinal region.

  14. Trunk neural crest cells: formation, migration and beyond.

    PubMed

    Vega-Lopez, Guillermo A; Cerrizuela, Santiago; Aybar, Manuel J

    2017-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a multipotent, migratory cell population that generates an astonishingly diverse array of cell types during vertebrate development. The trunk neural crest has long been considered of particular significance. First, it has been held that the trunk neural crest has a morphogenetic role, acting to coordinate the development of the peripheral nervous system, secretory cells of the endocrine system and pigment cells of the skin. Second, the trunk neural crest additionally has skeletal potential. However, it has been demonstrated that a key role of the trunk neural crest streams is to organize the innervation of the intestine. Although trunk NCCs have a limited capacity for self-renewal, sometimes they become neural-crest-derived tumor cells and reveal the fact that that NCCs and tumor cells share the same molecular machinery. In this review we describe the routes taken by trunk NCCs and consider the signals and cues that pattern these trajectories. We also discuss recent advances in the characterization of the properties of trunk NCCs for various model organisms in order to highlight common themes. Finally, looking to the future, we discuss the need to translate the wealth of data from animal studies to the clinical area in order to develop treatments for neural crest-related human diseases.

  15. Crest line minimal model for sand dune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignier, Lucie; Valance, Alexandre; Lague, Dimitri

    2013-04-01

    In desert, complex patterns of dunes form. Under unidirectional wind, transverse rectilinear dunes or crescent shaped dunes called barchan dunes can appear, depending on the amount of sediment available. Most rectilinear transverse sand dunes are observed to fragment, for example at White Sands (New Mexico, United States of America) or Walvis Bay (Namibia). We develop a reduced complexity model to investigate the morphodynamics of sand dunes migrating over a non-erodible bed under unidirectional wind. The model is simply based on two physical ingredients, namely, the sand capture process at the slip face and the cross-wind sand transport. The efficiency of the sand capture process is taken to be dependent of the dune height and lateral diffusion is considered on both the windward and lee sides of the dune. In addition, the dune cross section is assumed to be scale invariant and is approximated by a triangular shape. In this framework, the dune dynamics is reduced to the motion of a string representing the dune crest line and is expressed as a set of two coupled nonlinear differential equations. This simple model reveals its ability to reproduce basic features of barchan and transverse dunes. Analytical predictions are drawn concerning dune equilibrium shape, stability and long-term dynamics. We derive, in particular, analytical solutions for barchan dunes, yielding explicit relationships between their shape and the lateral sand diffusion; and analytical predictions for the migration speed and equilibrium sand flux. A stability analysis of a rectilinear transverse dune allows us to predict analytically the wavelength emerging from fluctuations of the dune crest. We also determine the characteristic time needed for the rectilinear dune to fragment into a multitude of barchan dunes. These outcomes show that extremely simple ingredients can generate complex patterns for migrating dunes. From several dune field data, we are able to determine values of the model

  16. Worm drive detail, roller hoist mechanism, rolling crest roller gate ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Worm drive detail, roller hoist mechanism, rolling crest roller gate - plan and sections - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  17. 28. VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING WEST FROM CREST OF HILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING WEST FROM CREST OF HILL ABOVE EAST TOWER. NOTE SWAY CABLES ON EACH SIDE OF THE WALKWAY. March 1987 - Verde River Sheep Bridge, Spanning Verde River (Tonto National Forest), Cave Creek, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. 23. Detail, ridge cresting and finial elements, deteriorated slates, southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Detail, ridge cresting and finial elements, deteriorated slates, southeast roof slope, view to northwest from lift-bed truck, 135mm lens. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  19. 6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET WALL (LEFT) AND ENTRANCE TO DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL HEADWORKS (ALSO LEFT). VIEW TO WEST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  20. Flow structure in front of the broad-crested weir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachoval, Zbyněk; Roušar, Ladislav

    2015-05-01

    The paper deals with research focused on description of flow structure in front of broad-crested weir. Based on experimental measurement, the flow structure in front of the weir (the recirculation zone of flow and tornado vortices) and flow structure on the weir crest has been described. The determined flow character has been simulated using numerical model and based on comparing results the suitable model of turbulence has been recommended.

  1. Reprogramming Postnatal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes toward Functional Neural Crest Fates.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Kerosuo, Laura; Tseropoulos, Georgios; Cummings, Kirstie A; Wang, Xiaoyan; Lei, Pedro; Liu, Biao; Liu, Song; Popescu, Gabriela; Bronner, Marianne E; Andreadis, Stelios T

    2017-01-31

    During development, neural crest cells are induced by signaling events at the neural plate border of all vertebrate embryos. Initially arising within the central nervous system, neural crest cells subsequently undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition to migrate into the periphery, where they differentiate into diverse cell types. Here we provide evidence that postnatal human epidermal keratinocytes, in response to FGF2 and IGF1 signals, can be reprogrammed toward a neural crest fate. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses show that keratinocyte-derived neural crest cells are similar to those derived from human embryonic stem cells. Moreover, they give rise in vitro and in vivo to neural crest derivatives such as peripheral neurons, melanocytes, Schwann cells and mesenchymal cells (osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes and smooth muscle). By demonstrating that human KRT14+ keratinocytes can form neural crest cells, even from clones of single cells, our results have important implications in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Finite element Fourier and Abbe transform methods for generalization of aperture function and geometry in Fraunhofer diffraction theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, H.G. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper discusses methods for calculating Fraunhofer intensity fields resulting from diffraction through one- and two-dimensional apertures are presented. These methods are based on the geometric concept of finite elements and on Fourier and Abbe transforms. The geometry of the two-dimensional diffracting aperture(s) is based on biquadratic isoparametric elements, which are used to define aperture(s) of complex geometry. These elements are also used to build complex amplitude and phase functions across the aperture(s) which may be of continuous or discontinuous form. The transform integrals are accurately and efficiently integrated numerically using Gaussian quadrature. The power of these methods is most evident in two dimensions, where several examples are presented which include secondary obstructions, straight and curved secondary spider supports, multiple-mirror arrays, synthetic aperture arrays, segmented mirrors, apertures covered by screens, apodization, and phase plates. Typically, the finite element Abbe transform method results in significant gains in computational efficiency over the finite element Fourier transform method, but is also subject to some loss in generality.

  3. CREST--classification resources for environmental sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Lanzén, Anders; Jørgensen, Steffen L; Huson, Daniel H; Gorfer, Markus; Grindhaug, Svenn Helge; Jonassen, Inge; Øvreås, Lise; Urich, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Sequencing of taxonomic or phylogenetic markers is becoming a fast and efficient method for studying environmental microbial communities. This has resulted in a steadily growing collection of marker sequences, most notably of the small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene, and an increased understanding of microbial phylogeny, diversity and community composition patterns. However, to utilize these large datasets together with new sequencing technologies, a reliable and flexible system for taxonomic classification is critical. We developed CREST (Classification Resources for Environmental Sequence Tags), a set of resources and tools for generating and utilizing custom taxonomies and reference datasets for classification of environmental sequences. CREST uses an alignment-based classification method with the lowest common ancestor algorithm. It also uses explicit rank similarity criteria to reduce false positives and identify novel taxa. We implemented this method in a web server, a command line tool and the graphical user interfaced program MEGAN. Further, we provide the SSU rRNA reference database and taxonomy SilvaMod, derived from the publicly available SILVA SSURef, for classification of sequences from bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Using cross-validation and environmental datasets, we compared the performance of CREST and SilvaMod to the RDP Classifier. We also utilized Greengenes as a reference database, both with CREST and the RDP Classifier. These analyses indicate that CREST performs better than alignment-free methods with higher recall rate (sensitivity) as well as precision, and with the ability to accurately identify most sequences from novel taxa. Classification using SilvaMod performed better than with Greengenes, particularly when applied to environmental sequences. CREST is freely available under a GNU General Public License (v3) from http://apps.cbu.uib.no/crest and http://lcaclassifier.googlecode.com.

  4. Placement of the AbbVie PEG-J tube for the treatment of Parkinson's disease in the interventional radiology suite.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Mark L; Miner, Noel K; Soileau, Michael J; McDonald, Douglas K

    2016-10-01

    The primary treatment for Parkinson's disease is dopaminergic stimulation. Although levodopa has historically been administered orally, maintaining a predictable plasma concentration of the drug is challenging. As a result, enteral administration of carbidopa/levodopa (Duopa) has emerged as a promising tool in the treatment of the disease. This requires placement of an enteric catheter, two of which have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for delivery of Duopa. The approved tubes are placed using the "peroral" or "pull" technique, a method traditionally requiring endoscopy. This technical note describes placement of the AbbVie PEG-J tube by means of the peroral route while utilizing only sonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. After placing an orogastric tube and achieving percutaneous access to the stomach under fluoroscopic visualization, a snare catheter is advanced through the percutaneous access into the stomach. The orogastric tube is engaged with the snare and retracted, bringing the attached snare with it to the mouth. The AbbVie PEG tube is attached to the snare, pulled back down the esophagus and into the stomach before being retracted through the percutaneous access to the skin. Finally, the AbbVie J tube is advanced through the gastrostomy tube into the proximal jejunum and attached with the provided connectors. As demonstrated, the AbbVie PEG-J tube can be placed safely and effectively using a percutaneous image-guided technique without the use of an endoscope.

  5. Iliac Crest Avulsion Fracture in a Young Sprinter

    PubMed Central

    Casabianca, L.; Rousseau, R.; Loriaut, P.; Massein, A.; Mirouse, G.; Gerometta, A.; Khiami, F.

    2015-01-01

    Avulsion fracture of the iliac crest is an uncommon pathology. It usually occurs in teenagers during sport activities, more common in boys. We report a case of 16-year-old male competitive sprinter, who had an avulsion of a part of the iliac crest and the anterior-superior iliac spine during a competition. The traumatism occurred during the period of acceleration phase out of the blocks which corresponds to the maximum traction phase on the tendons. Then a total loss of function of the lower limb appears forcing him to stop the run. X-ray and CT scan confirmed the rare diagnosis of avulsion of the quasitotality of the iliac crest apophysis, corresponding to Salter 2 fracture. We performed an open reduction and internal fixation with two screws, allowing a return to sport after 3 months and his personal best record in the 100 meters at the 6th postoperative month. PMID:26421205

  6. Neural crest patterning and the evolution of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, C B; Miller, C T; Keynes, R J

    2001-01-01

    Here we present ideas connecting the behaviour of the cranial neural crest during development with the venerable, perhaps incorrect, view that gill-supporting cartilages of an ancient agnathan evolved into the skeleton of an early gnathostome's jaw. We discuss the pattern of migration of the cranial neural crest ectomesenchyme in zebrafish, along with the subsequent arrangement of postmigratory crest and head mesoderm in the nascent pharyngeal segments (branchiomeres), in diverse gnathostomes and in lampreys. These characteristics provide for a plausible von Baerian explanation for the problematic inside-outside change in topology of the gills and their supports between these 2 major groups of vertebrates. We consider it likely that the jaw supports did indeed arise from branchiomeric cartilages.

  7. Iris sector heterochromia as a marker for neural crest disease.

    PubMed

    Brazel, S M; Sullivan, T J; Thorner, P S; Clarke, M P; Hunter, W S; Morin, J D

    1992-02-01

    A 6-month-old female infant with biopsy-proved Hirschsprung's disease had associated sector heterochromia of the irides. The association between sector heterochromia and Hirschsprung's disease has been previously reported and both conditions have been ascribed to neural crest defects. Histologic characteristics of the ocular involvement have not previously been reported, to our knowledge. Histopathologic examination of the globes revealed decreased iris stroma, decreased pigmentation in the anterior stroma, and reduced numbers of pigment-producing cells in the affected areas. Both the ocular and gastrointestinal findings reflect abnormalities in tissues of neural crest origin.

  8. Expression of chondrogenic potential of mouse trunk neural crest cells by FGF2 treatment.

    PubMed

    Ido, Atsushi; Ito, Kazuo

    2006-02-01

    There is a significant difference between the developmental patterns of cranial and trunk neural crest cells in the amniote. Thus, whereas cranial neural crest cells generate bone and cartilage, trunk neural crest cells do not contribute to skeletal derivatives. We examined whether mouse trunk neural crest cells can undergo chondrogenesis to analyze how the difference between the developmental patterns of cranial and trunk neural crest cells arises. Our present data demonstrate that mouse trunk neural crest cells have chondrogenic potential and that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2 is an inducing factor for their chondrogenesis in vitro. FGF2 altered the expression patterns of Hox9 genes and Id2, a cranial neural crest cell marker. These results suggest that environmental cues may play essential roles in generating the difference between developmental patterns of cranial and trunk neural crest cells.

  9. 5. Rear view of lower dam showing crest, masonry pier ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Rear view of lower dam showing crest, masonry pier and sluice gate. Photograph taken from east bank of the sandy beach. VIEW SOUTH - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  10. 4. Side view of lower dam showing crest, overspill and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Side view of lower dam showing crest, overspill and apron. Photograph taken from east side of Millstone Creek. VIEW SOUTHWEST - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  11. 3. Side view of lower dam showing crest, overspill and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Side view of lower dam showing crest, overspill and apron. Photograph taken from west side of Millstone Creek. VIEW NORTHEAST - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  12. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM KACHESS DAM CREST, 1910 RIVER CUTOFF CHANNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM KACHESS DAM CREST, 1910 RIVER CUTOFF CHANNEL WITH CRIB STRUCTURE IN CENTER. BRIDGE FOOTING CRIB STRUCTURE AT RIGHT (Upstream face of Kachess Dam in foreground) - Kachess Dam, Cutoff Channel and Crib Structures, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  13. Aebp2 as an Epigenetic Regulator for Neural Crest Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hana; Kang, Keunsoo; Ekram, Muhammad B.; Roh, Tae-Young; Kim, Joomyeong

    2011-01-01

    Aebp2 is a potential targeting protein for the mammalian Polycomb Repression Complex 2 (PRC2). We generated a mutant mouse line disrupting the transcription of Aebp2 to investigate its in vivo roles. Aebp2-mutant homozygotes were embryonic lethal while heterozygotes survived to adulthood with fertility. In developing mouse embryos, Aebp2 is expressed mainly within cells of neural crest origin. In addition, many heterozygotes display a set of phenotypes, enlarged colon and hypopigmentation, similar to those observed in human patients with Hirschsprung's disease and Waardenburg syndrome. These phenotypes are usually caused by the absence of the neural crest-derived ganglia in hindguts and melanocytes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the majority of the genes involved in the migration and development process of neural crest cells are downstream target genes of AEBP2 and PRC2. Furthermore, expression analyses confirmed that some of these genes are indeed affected in the Aebp2 heterozygotes. Taken together, these results suggest that Aebp2 may regulate the migration and development of the neural crest cells through the PRC2-mediated epigenetic mechanism. PMID:21949878

  14. 3. CREST OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, SHOWING BLOCK HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. CREST OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, SHOWING BLOCK HOUSE (NOT ORIGINAL) COVERING THE ELECTRICALLY POWERED GATE-LIFTING MECHANISM THAT REPLACED THE ORIGINAL HAND-OPERATED LIFTING DEVICE, LOOKING NORTH. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, South Channel Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  15. 6. VIEW SHOWING CREST OF DAM AND OUTLET GATE WHEEL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SHOWING CREST OF DAM AND OUTLET GATE WHEEL, STEM AND STEM GUIDE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Milk Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 9.4 miles Northwest of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  16. FIELD PERFORMANCE OF WOODBURNING STOVES IN CRESTED BUTTE, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses field emissions from woodstoves measured in Crested Butte, Colorado, during the winters of 1988-89 and 1989-90. Both particulate matter and carbon monoxide emissions were measured. The database from this work is large, including conventional stoves and EPA-cer...

  17. The evolution of the neural crest: new perspectives from lamprey and invertebrate neural crest-like cells.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest is an embryonic cell population that gives rise to an array of tissues and structures in adult vertebrates including most of the head skeleton. Because neural crest cells (NCCs), and many of their derivatives, are unique to vertebrates, the evolution of the neural crest is thought to have potentiated vertebrate origins and diversification. However, the lack of clear NCC homologs in invertebrate chordates has made it difficult to reconstruct the evolutionary history of modern NCCs. In this review, the development of NCCs in the basal jawless vertebrate, lamprey, is compared with the development of neural crest-like cells in a range of invertebrates to deduce features of the first NCCs and their evolutionary precursors. These comparisons demonstrate that most of the defining attributes of NCCs are widespread features of invertebrate embryonic ectoderm. In addition, they suggest ancient origins for the neural border domain and chondroid skeletal tissue in the first bilaterian, and show that NCCs must have evolved in a chordate with an unduplicated invertebrate-type genome. On the basis of these observations, a stepwise model for the evolution of NCCs involving heterotopic and heterochronic activation of ancient ectodermal gene programs and new responsiveness to preexisting inducing signals is proposed. In light of the phylogenetic distribution of neural crest-like cells, the deep homology of developmental gene networks, and the central role of evolutionary loss in deuterostome evolution, this article concludes with suggestions for future studies in a broad range of bilaterians to test key aspects of this model. WIREs Dev Biol 2013, 2:1-15. doi: 10.1002/wdev.85 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  18. Transoral Cross-Lip (Abbé-Estlander) Flap as a Viable and Effective Reconstructive Option in Middle Lower Lip Defect Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Kim, Hyun Jee; Choi, Jin Young; Lee, Soo Young; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Jin Wou

    2017-01-01

    The Abbé-Estlander flap surgery is a cross-lip procedure that is valuable in repairing a defect on the lower lip using a full-thickness flap, consisting of the skin, muscle and mucosa, from the upper lip. As usefulness and practicality of the flap in reconstruction of lower lip surgical defects in Asian ethnicity have not been documented, the authors present a case of successful lower lip reconstruction with a staged, Abbé-Estlander lip switching flap with commissuroplasty as an illustrative example. A 71-year-old male has presented with an ulcerating lip nodule in the middle one third of the lower lip, measuring about 1.5×2 cm across its long and short axes. Wide excision of the tumor was followed by delineation of the triangular Abbé-Estlander flap from the upper lip, in which the medial hinge point of the base was chosen as the pedicle. Then, the flap elevation was carried out from the lateral commissure and then was transferred into the lower lip defect. Three weeks later, commissuroplasty was performed to correct the rounding at the new commissure. The patient is currently performing his daily activities with no apparent compromise in orbicularis oris strength or oral continence. Given the size of the primary defect and the flap-to-defect ratio of size, the degree of microstomia was acceptable. Even with other myriad of reconstructive options at surgeons' disposal, the Abbé-Estlander lip-switching flap is a reliable, and less morbid method of lower lip reconstruction for Asian surgical candidates. The authors illustrate an exemplary case in which a relatively large lower lip defect was successfully repaired using an upper lip flap of a significantly smaller size in an Asian subject of advanced age, without any remarkable long term sequelae which have traditionally been associated with the trans-oral lip switching flap technique. PMID:28392650

  19. Draxin, an axon guidance protein, affects chick trunk neural crest migration.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuhong; Naser, Iftekhar B; Islam, Shahidul M; Zhang, Sanbing; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Chen, Sandy; Shinmyo, Yohei; Kawakami, Minoru; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2009-12-01

    The neural crest is a multipotent population of migratory cells that arises in the central nervous system and subsequently migrates along defined stereotypic pathways. In the present work, we analyzed the role of a repulsive axon guidance protein, draxin, in the migration of neural crest cells. Draxin is expressed in the roof plate of the chick trunk spinal cord and around the early migration pathway of neural crest cells. Draxin modulates chick neural crest cell migration in vitro by reducing the polarization of these cells. When exposed to draxin, the velocity of migrating neural crest cells was reduced, and the cells changed direction so frequently that the net migration distance was also reduced. Overexpression of draxin also caused some early migrating neural crest cells to change direction to the dorsolateral pathway in the chick trunk region, presumably due to draxin's inhibitory activity. These results demonstrate that draxin, an axon guidance protein, can also affect trunk neural crest migration in the chick embryo.

  20. Local phytochemical response of Musa acuminata × balbisiana Colla cv. 'Bluggoe' (ABB) to colonization by Sternorrhyncha.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Dirk; Vollrath, Antje; Kai, Marco; Dhakshinamoorthy, Suganthaguntalam; Menezes, Riya C; Svatoš, Aleš; Schubert, Ulrich S; Buerkert, Andreas; Schneider, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of two Sternorrhyncha species, the banana aphid (Pentalonia nigronervosa Coquerel (Hemiptera: Aphididae, Aphidinae)), vector of the banana bunchy top virus (BBTV), and the latania scale (Hemiberlesia lataniae Signoret (Hemiptera: Diaspididae, Diaspidinae)) with Musa acuminata × balbisiana Colla (ABB Group) 'Bluggoe' (Musaceae) was investigated by a combination of conventional and spatially resolved analytical techniques, (1)H NMR, UHPLC-MS, and matrix-free UV-laser desorption/ionization MS imaging. After infestation, the feeding sites of P. nigronervosa on the pseudostem and the exocarp of banana fruit developed a red tinge, in which tissue-specific accumulations of phenylphenalenones were discovered. Phenylphenalenones were also detected in the black mats of sooty molds growing on the banana aphid exudates and in the dorsal scales of H. lataniae. This suggests that although these secondary metabolites play a role in the reaction of banana plants towards attack by sucking insects, an aphid and an armored scale have established mechanisms to exude these metabolites before they deploy their deleterious effect.

  1. Diachronic analysis of the occupation of the steppe area of the department of Sidi Bel Abbes (Western Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellal, B.; Ayache, A.; Ayad, N.; Hellal, T.

    2016-06-01

    Modes of occupation of the soil of the steppe area of the department of Sidi Bel Abbes (Western Algeria) know lots of mutations during the period 1987/2013; compromising the future of pastoral activity. This dissection based on supervised classification TSAVI values (Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index) using images of remote sensing of average spatial resolution of type Landsat-TM 5 and 8. The determination of the state of occupation of the ground and validation of remote sensing map shows that the status of the halophytic/psammophytic steppes and the Matorrals are detected in 38.38 % and 55,71 % of cases, respectively. On the other hand, the steppes chamaephytic mark -9,81 % regression only, agricultural land -24,51 %, and -46,24 % dense vegetation are correctly mapped. The sensing medium resolution is therefore, in the light of these figures, a management tool of the steppe field relevant and effective, which, in addition, allows enriching the field for a proper plan for the fight against desertification.

  2. Effects of (-) mammea A/BB isolated from Calophyllum brasiliense leaves and derivatives on mitochondrial membrane of Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Brenzan, M A; Santos, A O; Nakamura, C V; Filho, B P Dias; Ueda-Nakamura, T; Young, M C M; Côrrea, A G; Júnior, J Alvim; Morgado-Díaz, J A; Cortez, D A G

    2012-02-15

    We have previously demonstrated antileishmanial activity on Leishmania amazonensis of the natural (1-2), synthetic (7) and derivatives of coumarin (-) mammea A/BB (3-6) isolated from the dichloromethane extract of Calophyllum brasiliense leaves. The aim of the present study was to evaluate morphological and ultrastructural alterations in Leishmania amazonensis induced by these compounds. In promastigote forms, all seven compounds produced significant morphological and ultrastructural alterations, as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The compound 5,7-dihydroxy-8-(2-methylbutanoyl)-6-(3-methylbutyl)-4-phenyl-chroman-2-one (3), the most active antileishmanial with LD₅₀ of 0.9 μM), induced cell shrinkage and a rounded appearance of the cells. Parasites incubated in the presence of compound (3) showed ultrastructural changes, such as the appearance of mitochondrial swelling with a reduction in the density of the mitochondrial matrix and the presence of vesicles inside the mitochondrion, indicating damage and significant change in this organelle; abnormal chromatin condensation, alterations in the nuclear envelope, intense atypical cytoplasmic vacuolization, and the appearance of autophagic vacuoles were also observed. In addition, the compound (3) may be acting to depolarize the mitochondrial membrane potential of the cells, leading to death of the parasite.

  3. Environmental correlates of breeding in the Crested Caracara (Caracara Cheriway)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, J.L.; Pias, Kyle E.; Cohen, J.B.; Catlin, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of weather on reproduction of the Crested Caracara (Caracara cheriway) in an agricultural landscape in south-central Florida. We used a mixed logistic-regression modeling approach within an information-theoretic framework to examine the influence of total rainfall, rainfall frequency, and temperature on the number of breeding pairs, timing of breeding, nest success, and productivity of Crested Caracaras during 1994-2000. The best models indicated an influence of rainfall frequency and laying period on reproduction. More individuals nested and more pairs nested earlier during years with more frequent rainfall in late summer and early fall. Pairs that nested later in each breeding season had smaller clutches, lower nest success and productivity, and higher probability of nest failure. More frequent rainfall during early spring months that are usually characterized by water deficit (March-May), more frequent rainfall during the fall drawdown period (September-November), and a shorter winter dry period showed some association with higher probability of brood reduction and lower nest success. The proportion of nests that failed was higher in "wet" years, when total rainfall during the breeding season (September-April) was >10% above the 20-year average. Rainfall may influence reproduction in Crested Caracaras indirectly through food resources. As total rainfall increased during February-April, when most pairs are feeding nestlings or dependent fledglings, the proportion of drawdown-dependent species (those that become available as rainfall decreases and wetlands become isolated and shallow) in the diet of Crested Caracaras declined, which may indicate reduced availability of foraging habitat for this primarily terrestrial raptor. ?? The American Ornithologists' Union, 2009.

  4. Cranial neural crest migration: new rules for an old road.

    PubMed

    Kulesa, Paul M; Bailey, Caleb M; Kasemeier-Kulesa, Jennifer C; McLennan, Rebecca

    2010-08-15

    The neural crest serve as an excellent model to better understand mechanisms of embryonic cell migration. Cell tracing studies have shown that cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) emerge from the dorsal neural tube in a rostrocaudal manner and are spatially distributed along stereotypical, long distance migratory routes to precise targets in the head and branchial arches. Although the CNCC migratory pattern is a beautifully choreographed and programmed invasion, the underlying orchestration of molecular events is not well known. For example, it is still unclear how single CNCCs react to signals that direct their choice of direction and how groups of CNCCs coordinate their interactions to arrive at a target in an ordered manner. In this review, we discuss recent cellular and molecular discoveries of the CNCC migratory pattern. We focus on events from the time when CNCCs encounter the tissue adjacent to the neural tube and their travel through different microenvironments and into the branchial arches. We describe the patterning of discrete cell migratory streams that emerge from the hindbrain, rhombomere (r) segments r1-r7, and the signals that coordinate directed migration. We propose a model that attempts to unify many complex events that establish the CNCC migratory pattern, and based on this model we integrate information between cranial and trunk neural crest development.

  5. Chicken trunk neural crest migration visualized with HNK1.

    PubMed

    Giovannone, Dion; Ortega, Blanca; Reyes, Michelle; El-Ghali, Nancy; Rabadi, Maes; Sao, Sothy; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2015-04-01

    The development of the nervous system involves cells remaining within the neural tube (CNS) and a group of cells that delaminate from the dorsal neural tube and migrate extensively throughout the developing embryo called neural crest cells (NCC). These cells are a mesenchymal highly migratory group of cells that give rise to a wide variety of cell derivatives: melanocytes, sensory neurons, bone, Schwann cells, etc. But not all NCC can give rise to all derivatives, they have fate restrictions based on their axial level of origin: cranial, vagal, trunk and sacral. Our aim was to provide a thorough presentation on how does trunk neural crest cell migration looks in the chicken embryo, in wholemount and in sections using the unique chicken marker HNK1. The description presented here makes a good guideline for those interested in viewing trunk NCC migration patterns. We show how before HH14 there are few trunk NCC delaminating and migrating, but between HH15 through HH19 trunk NCC delaminate in large numbers. Melanocytes precursors begin to enter the dorsolateral pathway by HH17. We found that by HH20 HNK1 is not a valid good marker for NCC and that HNK1 is a better marker than Sox10 when looking at neural crest cells morphology and migration details.

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Neural-crest Derived Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Chen, Mo; Yang, Guodong; Xiang, Lusai; He, Ling; Hei, Thomas K.; Chotkowski, Gregory; Tarnow, Dennis P.; Finkel, Myron; Ding, Lei; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the endosteum of mesoderm-derived appendicular bones have been extensively studied. Neural crest-derived bones differ from appendicular bones in developmental origin, mode of bone formation and pathological bone resorption. Whether neural crest-derived bones harbor HSCs is elusive. Here, we discovered HSC-like cells in postnatal murine mandible, and benchmarked them with donor-matched, mesoderm-derived femur/tibia HSCs, including clonogenic assay and long-term culture. Mandibular CD34 negative, LSK cells proliferated similarly to appendicular HSCs, and differentiated into all hematopoietic lineages. Mandibular HSCs showed a consistent deficiency in lymphoid differentiation, including significantly fewer CD229 + fractions, PreProB, ProB, PreB and B220 + slgM cells. Remarkably, mandibular HSCs reconstituted irradiated hematopoietic bone marrow in vivo, just as appendicular HSCs. Genomic profiling of osteoblasts from mandibular and femur/tibia bone marrow revealed deficiencies in several HSC niche regulators among mandibular osteoblasts including Cxcl12. Neural crest derived bone harbors HSCs that function similarly to appendicular HSCs but are deficient in the lymphoid lineage. Thus, lymphoid deficiency of mandibular HSCs may be accounted by putative niche regulating genes. HSCs in craniofacial bones have functional implications in homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, immune functions, tumor metastasis and infections such as osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:28000662

  7. Neuroendocrine Cells of the Prostate Derive from the Neural Crest*

    PubMed Central

    Szczyrba, Jaroslaw; Wagner, Mathias; Wandernoth, Petra M.; Aumüller, Gerhard; Wennemuth, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    The histogenesis of prostatic neuroendocrine cells is controversial: a stem cell hypothesis with a urogenital sinus-derived progeny of all prostatic epithelial cells is opposed by a dual origin hypothesis, favoring the derivation of neuroendocrine cells from the neural crest, with the secretory and basal cells being of urogenital sinus origin. A computer-assisted 3D reconstruction was used to analyze the distribution of chromogranin A immunoreactive cells in serial sections of human fetal prostate specimens (gestation weeks 18 and 25). Immunohistochemical double labeling studies with YFP and serotonin antisera combined with electron microscopy were carried out on double-transgenic Wnt1-Cre/ROSA26-YFP mice showing stable YFP expression in all neural crest-derived cell populations despite loss of Wnt1 expression. 3D reconstruction of the distribution pattern of neuroendocrine cells in the human fetal prostate indicates a migration of paraganglionic cells passing the stroma and reaching the prostate ducts. Double-transgenic mice showed 55% double labeling of periurethral neuroendocrine cells expressing both serotonin and YFP, whereas single serotonin labeling was observed in 36% and exclusive YFP labeling in 9%. The results favor the assumption of a major fraction of neural crest-derived neuroendocrine cells in both the human and murine prostates. PMID:28003366

  8. Neural crest specification and migration independently require NSD3-related lysine methyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Jacques-Fricke, Bridget T.; Gammill, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest precursors express genes that cause them to become migratory, multipotent cells, distinguishing them from adjacent stationary neural progenitors in the neurepithelium. Histone methylation spatiotemporally regulates neural crest gene expression; however, the protein methyltransferases active in neural crest precursors are unknown. Moreover, the regulation of methylation during the dynamic process of neural crest migration is unclear. Here we show that the lysine methyltransferase NSD3 is abundantly and specifically expressed in premigratory and migratory neural crest cells. NSD3 expression commences before up-regulation of neural crest genes, and NSD3 is necessary for expression of the neural plate border gene Msx1, as well as the key neural crest transcription factors Sox10, Snail2, Sox9, and FoxD3, but not gene expression generally. Nevertheless, only Sox10 histone H3 lysine 36 dimethylation requires NSD3, revealing unexpected complexity in NSD3-dependent neural crest gene regulation. In addition, by temporally limiting expression of a dominant negative to migratory stages, we identify a novel, direct requirement for NSD3-related methyltransferase activity in neural crest migration. These results identify NSD3 as the first protein methyltransferase essential for neural crest gene expression during specification and show that NSD3-related methyltransferase activity independently regulates migration. PMID:25318671

  9. Tinea Incognita in a Patient with Crest Syndrome: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gorgievska-Sukarovska, Biljana; Skerlev, Mihael; Žele-Starčević, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Tinea incognita is a dermatophytic infection that is difficult to diagnose, usually modified by inappropriate topical or systemic corticosteroid therapy. We report an extensive case of tinea incognita caused by the zoophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton mentagrophytes (var. granulosa) in a 49-year-old female patient with CREST (Calcinosis; Raynaud phenomenon; Esophageal involvement; Sclerodactyly; Teleangiectasia) syndrome. Immunocompromised patients, as well as patients with keratinization disorders, seem to be especially susceptible to dermatophytic infections with atypical clinical presentation that is sometimes bizarre and difficult to recognize. Therefore, close monitoring and mycological skin examination is recommended in order to avoid misdiagnosis and to give the patient the best chance of recovery.

  10. [The Evolutionary Origin of Placodes and Neural Crest Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    The long-term goal of this NASA-supported research is to understand the evolutionary origin of placodes and neural crest cells, with particular reference to evolution of the inner ear, and their evolutionary and developmental relationships. The cephalochordcate amphioxus, the closest living invertebrate relative of the vertebrates is used as a stand-in for the ancestral vertebrate. The research, which has supported one graduate student, Jr-Kai Yu, has resulted in ten publications by the Holland laboratory in peer-reviewed journals.

  11. Autocrine regulation of neural crest cell development by steel factor.

    PubMed

    Guo, C S; Wehrle-Haller, B; Rossi, J; Ciment, G

    1997-04-01

    Steel factor (SLF) and its cognate receptor, c-kit, have been implicated in the generation of melanocytes from migrating neural crest (NC) cells during early vertebrate embryogenesis. However, the source of SLF in the early avian embryo and its precise role in melanogenesis are unclear. We report here that NC cells themselves express and release SLF protein, which in turn acts as an autocrine factor to induce melanogenesis in nearby NC cells. These results indicate that NC cell subpopulations play an active role in the determination of their cell fate and suggest a different developmental role for the embryonic microenvironment than what has been previously proposed.

  12. Historical model for editor and Office of Research Integrity cooperation in handling allegations, investigation, and retraction in a contentious (Abbs) case of research misconduct.

    PubMed

    Price, Alan R; Daroff, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation between a journal editor and the federal Office of Research Integrity (ORI) in addressing investigations of research misconduct, each performing their own responsibilities while keeping each other informed of events and evidence, can be critical to the professional and regulatory resolution of a case. This paper describes the history of one of ORI's most contentious investigations that involved falsification of research on Parkinson's disease patients by James Abbs, Professor of Neurology, University of Wisconsin, published in the journal Neurology, which was handled cooperatively by the authors, who were the chief ORI investigator and the Editor-in-Chief of Neurology, respectively.

  13. Double-crested cormorants along the upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirsch, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Upper Mississippi River is an important habitat corridor for migratory birds and other wildlife, and it supports an important commercial and sport fishery. A study was initiated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1991 to describe Double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) distribution and abundance on the Upper Mississippi River throughout the year to better understand the possible impacts of cormorants on fish resources and populations of other piscivorous birds. Double-crested Cormorants were common breeders and abundant during migration on the Upper Mississippi River during the 1940s. Numbers of cormorants declined in the 1960s and 1970s along the Upper Mississippi River as they did in other parts of the United States. In 1992, 418 cormorant pairs were estimated to have nested in four colonies on the Upper Mississippi River, and less than 7,000 cormorants were estimated to have migrated along the river during the fall and spring of 1991 and 1992. Recent public concern for fish resources has grown with a perceived growth of the local cormorant population. Migrating cormorants collected on the Upper Mississippi River took Gizzard Shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) primarily, but chicks were fed a wide variety of fish species.

  14. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  15. A neural crest origin for cohesinopathy heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Kevin; Leeke, Bryony; Meier, Michael; Wang, Yizhou; Newman, Trent; Burgess, Sean; Horsfield, Julia A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in subunits or regulators of cohesin cause a spectrum of disorders in humans known as the ‘cohesinopathies’. Cohesinopathies, including the best known example Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), are characterized by broad spectrum, multifactorial developmental anomalies. Heart defects occur at high frequency and can reach up to 30% in CdLS. The mechanisms by which heart defects occur are enigmatic, but assumed to be developmental in origin. In this study, we depleted cohesin subunit Rad21 by 70–80% in a zebrafish cohesinopathy model. The hearts of Rad21-depleted animals were smaller, often failed to loop, and functioned less efficiently than size-matched controls. Functional deficiency was accompanied by valve defects and reduced ejection fraction. Interestingly, neural crest cells failed to populate the heart and instead exhibited a wandering behavior. Consequently, these cells also failed to condense correctly into pharyngeal arches. Transcriptome analysis revealed that Wnt pathway, chemokine and cadherin genes are dysregulated at the time of cardiac neural crest development. Our results give insight into the etiology of heart defects in the cohesinopathies, and raise the possibility that mild mutations in cohesin genes may be causative of a fraction of congenital heart disease in human populations. PMID:26420840

  16. Erosional decay of the Yucca Mountain crest, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, K.; Robl, J.; Matthai, S.

    2009-07-01

    A simple numerical landscape evolution model is used to investigate the rate of erosional decay of the Yucca Mountain crest in Nevada, USA — a location proposed as a permanent repository for high level radioactive waste. The model is based on a stream power approach in which we assume that the rate of erosion is proportional to the size of the catchment as a proxy for water flux and to the square of the topographic gradient. The proportionality constants in the model are determined using the structural history of the region: extensional tectonics has dissected the region into a series of well-defined tilt blocks in the last 11 my and the ratio of fault displacement and gully incision during this time is used to scale the model. Forward predictions of our model into the future show that the crest will denude to the level of the proposed site between 500,000 years and 5 my. This prediction is based on conservative estimates for all involved parameters. Erosion may be more rapid if other processes are involved. For example, our model does not consider continuing uplift or catastrophic surface processes as they have been recorded in the region. We conclude that any "total system performance analysis" (TSPA — as has been performed for the Yucca Mountain region to predict geological events inside the ridge) must consider erosion as an integral part of its predictions.

  17. RBC broad-crested weirs for circular sewers and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmens, A. J.; Bos, M. G.; Replogle, J. A.

    1984-02-01

    In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the practical application of long-throated flumes and broad-crested weirs for flow measurements in irrigation canals. The modified RBC (Replogle-Bos-Clemmens) broad-crested weir has many advantages over related open-channel flow devices. These include high accuracy and reliability for a wide variety of shapes, low head-loss requirements which are predictable, and relatively simple inexpensive construction. In this paper we have extended the application of these weirs to circular pipes flowing partially full. The theoretical equations are presented for ideal flow from which approximate ratings can be obtained to within a reasonable accuracy with an empirical discharge coefficient, However, a mathematical model is available which accurately predicts these ratings by directly accounting for the effects of friction. The ratings for a wide variety of shapes and sizes of these weirs were computed with the model and fit to an empirical equation. The constants for this equation are plotted graphically for easy use. The resulting ratings should be well within ±3%. Design examples are given which show how to select the flume dimensions for maintaining free-flowing conditions (modular flow) and for minimizing sediment deposition. Once constructed, the rating for a given flume can be determined even when not constructed as planned.

  18. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N.R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development. PMID:26887292

  19. Personality of Wild Male Crested Macaques (Macaca nigra)

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Christof; Agil, Muhammad; Widdig, Anja; Engelhardt, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Animal personalities, i.e. consistent differences in behavior across time and/or context, have received increased attention of behavioral biologists over the last years. Recent research shows that personalities represent traits on which natural and sexual selection work and which can have substantial fitness consequences. The aim of this study is to establish the personality structure of crested macaque (Macaca nigra) males as foundation for future studies on its adaptive value. We collected behavioral data through focal animal sampling and additionally conducted two sets of playback experiments. Results of a factor analysis on the behavioral data revealed a four factor structure with components we labeled Anxiety, Sociability, Connectedness and Aggressiveness. Results from the experiments revealed an additional and independent Boldness factor but the absence of Neophilia. Overall, this structure resembles other macaque and animal species with the exception of Connectedness, which might be a consequence of the species' tolerant social style. Our results thus not only form the basis for future studies on the adaptive value of personality in crested macaques but also contribute an important data point for investigating the evolution of personality structure from a comparative perspective by refining, for example, which personality factors characterized the last common ancestor of hominids and macaques. PMID:23940517

  20. Determinants of immigration strategies in male crested macaques (Macaca nigra)

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Pascal R.; Hodges, Keith; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Immigration into a new group can produce substantial costs due to resistance from residents, but also reproductive benefits. Whether or not individuals base their immigration strategy on prospective cost-benefit ratios remains unknown. We investigated individual immigration decisions in crested macaques, a primate species with a high reproductive skew in favour of high-ranking males. We found two different strategies. Males who achieved low rank in the new group usually immigrated after another male had immigrated within the previous 25 days and achieved high rank. They never got injured but also had low prospective reproductive success. We assume that these males benefitted from immigrating into a destabilized male hierarchy. Males who achieved high rank in the new group usually immigrated independent of previous immigrations. They recieved injuries more frequently and therefore bore immigration costs. They, however, also had higher reproductive success prospects. We conclude that male crested macaques base their immigration strategy on relative fighting ability and thus potential rank in the new group i.e. potential reproductive benefits, as well as potential costs of injury. PMID:27535622

  1. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio–craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio–craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio–craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1. PMID:24996922

  2. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-07-04

    Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio-craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio-craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio-craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  3. Isotopic Discrimination in the Double-Crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus).

    PubMed

    Craig, Elizabeth C; Dorr, Brian S; Hanson-Dorr, Katie C; Sparks, Jed P; Curtis, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    The diet-tissue discrimination factor is the amount by which a consumer's tissue varies isotopically from its diet, and is therefore a key element in models that use stable isotopes to estimate diet composition. In this study we measured discrimination factors in blood (whole blood, red blood cells and plasma), liver, muscle and feathers of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) for stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. Cormorants exhibited discrimination factors that differed significantly among tissue types (for carbon and nitrogen), and differed substantially (in the context of the isotopic variation among relevant prey species) from those observed in congeneric species. The Double-crested Cormorant has undergone rapid population expansion throughout much of its historic range over the past three decades, leading to both real and perceived conflicts with fisheries throughout North America, and this study provides an essential link for the use of stable isotope analysis in researching foraging ecology, diet, and resource use of this widespread and controversial species.

  4. Isotopic Discrimination in the Double-Crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Elizabeth C.; Sparks, Jed P.; Curtis, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The diet-tissue discrimination factor is the amount by which a consumer’s tissue varies isotopically from its diet, and is therefore a key element in models that use stable isotopes to estimate diet composition. In this study we measured discrimination factors in blood (whole blood, red blood cells and plasma), liver, muscle and feathers of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) for stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. Cormorants exhibited discrimination factors that differed significantly among tissue types (for carbon and nitrogen), and differed substantially (in the context of the isotopic variation among relevant prey species) from those observed in congeneric species. The Double-crested Cormorant has undergone rapid population expansion throughout much of its historic range over the past three decades, leading to both real and perceived conflicts with fisheries throughout North America, and this study provides an essential link for the use of stable isotope analysis in researching foraging ecology, diet, and resource use of this widespread and controversial species. PMID:26473353

  5. Slit molecules prevent entrance of trunk neural crest cells in developing gut.

    PubMed

    Zuhdi, Nora; Ortega, Blanca; Giovannone, Dion; Ra, Hannah; Reyes, Michelle; Asención, Viviana; McNicoll, Ian; Ma, Le; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2015-04-01

    Neural crest cells emerge from the dorsal neural tube early in development and give rise to sensory and sympathetic ganglia, adrenal cells, teeth, melanocytes and especially enteric nervous system. Several inhibitory molecules have been shown to play important roles in neural crest migration, among them are the chemorepulsive Slit1-3. It was known that Slits chemorepellants are expressed at the entry to the gut, and thus could play a role in the differential ability of vagal but not trunk neural crest cells to invade the gut and form enteric ganglia. Especially since trunk neural crest cells express Robo receptor while vagal do not. Thus, although we know that Robo mediates migration along the dorsal pathway in neural crest cells, we do not know if it is responsible in preventing their entry into the gut. The goal of this study was to further corroborate a role for Slit molecules in keeping trunk neural crest cells away from the gut. We observed that when we silenced Robo receptor in trunk neural crest, the sympathoadrenal (somites 18-24) were capable of invading gut mesenchyme in larger proportion than more rostral counterparts. The more rostral trunk neural crest tended not to migrate beyond the ventral aorta, suggesting that there are other repulsive molecules keeping them away from the gut. Interestingly, we also found that when we silenced Robo in sacral neural crest they did not wait for the arrival of vagal crest but entered the gut and migrated rostrally, suggesting that Slit molecules are the ones responsible for keeping them waiting at the hindgut mesenchyme. These combined results confirm that Slit molecules are responsible for keeping the timeliness of colonization of the gut by neural crest cells.

  6. 50 CFR 21.48 - Depredation order for double-crested cormorants to protect public resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.48 Depredation order for double-crested cormorants to protect... not harmful to other nesting birds by the responsible Agency. (2) Double-crested cormorants may...

  7. 50 CFR 21.48 - Depredation order for double-crested cormorants to protect public resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.48 Depredation order for double-crested cormorants to protect... not harmful to other nesting birds by the responsible Agency. (2) Double-crested cormorants may...

  8. 50 CFR 21.48 - Depredation order for double-crested cormorants to protect public resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.48 Depredation order for double-crested cormorants to protect... not harmful to other nesting birds by the responsible Agency. (2) Double-crested cormorants may...

  9. Requirement for integrin-linked kinase in neural crest migration and differentiation and outflow tract morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neural crest defects lead to congenital heart disease involving outflow tract malformation. Integrin-linked-kinase (ILK) plays important roles in multiple cellular processes and embryogenesis. ILK is expressed in the neural crest, but its role in neural crest and outflow tract morphogenesis remains unknown. Results We ablated ILK specifically in the neural crest using the Wnt1-Cre transgene. ILK ablation resulted in abnormal migration and overpopulation of neural crest cells in the pharyngeal arches and outflow tract and a significant reduction in the expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and extracellular matrix components. ILK mutant embryos exhibited an enlarged common arterial trunk and ventricular septal defect. Reduced smooth muscle differentiation, but increased ossification and neurogenesis/innervation were observed in ILK mutant outflow tract that may partly be due to reduced transforming growth factor β2 (TGFβ2) but increased bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. Consistent with these observations, microarray analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-sorted neural crest cells revealed reduced expression of genes associated with muscle differentiation, but increased expression of genes of neurogenesis and osteogenesis. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that ILK plays essential roles in neural crest and outflow tract development by mediating complex crosstalk between cell matrix and multiple signaling pathways. Changes in these pathways may collectively result in the unique neural crest and outflow tract phenotypes observed in ILK mutants. PMID:24131868

  10. Formation of optical fields of stimulated Raman scattering with a resolution beyond the Abbe diffraction limit by spherical microlens cavities with whispering gallery modes: Near-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouravlev, M. V.

    2012-04-01

    We consider a significant lowering of the threshold of stimulated Raman scattering in solid fused silica spherical microlenses cavities that is caused by an increase in the integral overlap factor of whispering gallery modes. The structure of focal regions of a microlens is shown to have the shape of honeycombs, forming a photonic crystal or a photonic nanojet. We show that, at comparatively small numerical apertures NA = 0.7-0.8, which correspond to hemispherical microlenses, a spherical microlens cavity exhibits the possibility of focusing laser radiation beyond the Abbe diffraction limit. This enables the possibility of wide practical applications of microspheres as a focusing element the resolving power of which exceeds the Abbe diffraction limit in the near field. The whispering-gallery-mode spherical microlens cavity makes it possible to perform laser generation with a duration of a coherent pulse in the subfemtosecond range and to form a subwavelength focal region of the near field. This ensures the possibility of detecting single molecules of a substance in the subwavelength range in the near field and can be used to increase the sensitivity of intracavity spectroscopy methods and as microlasers for excitation of molecules in metal molecular nanoswitches and semiconductor heterostructures. From an array of microlens cavities, metamaterials with a negative refractive index can be formed.

  11. Shared Pluripotency Programs Suggest Derivation of Vertebrate Neural Crest from Blastula Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Delgado, Elsy; Nordin, Kara; Rao, Anjali; Geary, Lauren; LaBonne, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Neural Crest cells, unique to vertebrates, are derived from the ectoderm but also generate mesodermal cell types. This broad developmental potential persists past the time when most ectoderm-derived cells have become lineage restricted. The ability of neural crest to contribute mesodermal derivatives to the bauplan has raised questions about how this apparent gain in developmental potential is achieved. Here we describe shared molecular underpinnings of potency in neural crest and blastula cells. We show that in Xenopus, key neural crest regulatory factors are also expressed in blastula animal pole cells and promote pluripotency in both cell types. We suggest that neural crest cells may have evolved as a consequence of a subset of blastula animal pole cells retaining activity of the regulatory network underlying pluripotency. PMID:25931449

  12. Dual function of Slit2 in repulsion and enhanced migration of trunk, but not vagal, neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    De Bellard, Maria Elena; Rao, Yi; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-07-21

    Neural crest precursors to the autonomic nervous system form different derivatives depending upon their axial level of origin; for example, vagal, but not trunk, neural crest cells form the enteric ganglia of the gut. Here, we show that Slit2 is expressed at the entrance of the gut, which is selectively invaded by vagal, but not trunk, neural crest. Accordingly, only trunk neural crest cells express Robo receptors. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that trunk, not vagal, crest cells avoid cells or cell membranes expressing Slit2, thereby contributing to the differential ability of neural crest populations to invade and innervate the gut. Conversely, exposure to soluble Slit2 significantly increases the distance traversed by trunk neural crest cells. These results suggest that Slit2 can act bifunctionally, both repulsing and stimulating the motility of trunk neural crest cells.

  13. CREST: Center for Renewable Energy Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, Richard E.; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2012-03-20

    The DOE project addressed an approach to the hydrogen economy by researching hydrogen generation from low cost domestic fossil fuel sources. Specifically, the CREST research team developed new processes for extracting hydrogen from southwestern lignite for the production of clean synthetic fuels such as synthetic crude oil that is free of sulfur, carbon dioxide and other pollutants that can be shipped to nearby Texas refineries and power plants for development of transportation fuels and power generation. Research was also undertaken to convert any potential by-products of this process such as CO2 to useful chemicals and gases which may be recycled and used as feedstock to the synthetic fuel process. Finally, to ensure the proposed process is functional beyond bench scale, a detailed design of a pilot plant was completed. The overall project was divided into five tasks including a management task as outlined below.

  14. Diet of double-crested cormorants wintering in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campo, J.J.; Thompson, B.C.; Barron, J.C.; Telfair II, R. C.; Durocher, P.; Gutreuter, S.

    1993-01-01

    The diets of 420 Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) were studied during November 1986-March 1987 on eight public reservoirs in Texas. Prey included 29 fish species and the mean live weight of fish per bird was 122 g. Fishes a??415 mm long were ingested, but those a??125 mm accounted for 90% of cormorant food contents by number. Shad (Dorosoma spp.) and sunfishes (Lepomis spp.) accounted for 90% of the total food items by number. Consumption of fishes (percent by weight) was different for male vs. female and adult vs. juvenile cormorants. Total consumption of fish by weight was consistent throughout the period; however, fewer but much larger fish were consumed after 15 February. Cormorants ate fishes that were most abundant in reservoirs. Sport fishes made up a substantial portion of cormorant food by weight, but not by number on some reservoirs. Cormorants ate very few large sport fish, however.

  15. Neural crest stem cells: discovery, properties and potential for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Achilleos, Annita; Trainor, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells are a migratory cell population synonymous with vertebrate evolution. They generate a wide variety of cell and tissue types during embryonic and adult development including cartilage and bone, connective tissue, pigment and endocrine cells as well as neurons and glia amongst many others. Such incredible lineage potential combined with a limited capacity for self-renewal, which persists even into adult life, demonstrates that NC cells bear the key hallmarks of stem and progenitor cells. In this review, we describe the identification, characterization and isolation of NC stem and progenitor cells from different tissues in both embryo and adult organisms. We discuss their specific properties and their potential application in cell-based tissue and disease-specific repair. PMID:22231630

  16. Toxoplasma gondii in an African crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Moorman, Jamee Black; Bolin, Steven R; Grosjean, Nicole L; Lim, Ailam; Fitzgerald, Scott D

    2007-03-01

    An adult female crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata) was evaluated for acute onset of neurologic signs including head tilt, circling, and ataxia. She was found dead in her holding area 2 days after initially exhibiting clinical signs. Necropsy was unremarkable. Histopathology of brain tissue revealed the presence of protozoal cysts associated with inflammation as the underlying cause of clinical signs and death. Immunohistochemical staining of brain tissue for Toxoplasma gondii was strongly positive. PCR on fresh brain confirmed T. gondii as the causative organism. An adult male in the same enclosure has demonstrated similar neurologic signs over the past 3 years and has failed to respond to various medical treatments. Clinical disease associated with T. gondii has not been previously reported in this porcupine species or any other Old World porcupines, although there are several reports of clinical toxoplasmosis involving New World porcupine species.

  17. Hycrest crested wheatgrass accelerates the degradation of pentachlorophenol in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferro, A. M.; Sims, R. C.; Bugbee, B.

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the effects of vegetation on the fate of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in soil using a novel high-flow sealed test system. Pentachlorophenol has been widely used as a wood preservative, and this highly toxic biocide contaminates soil and ground water at many sites. Although plants are known to accelerate the rates of degradation of certain soil contaminants, this approach has not been thoroughly investigated for PCP. The fate of [14C]PCP, added to soil at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, was compared in three unplanted and three planted systems. The plant used was Hycrest, a perennial, drought-tolerant cultivar of crested wheatgrass [Agropyron desertorum (Fischer ex Link) Schultes]. The flow-through test system allowed us to maintain a budget for 14C-label as well as monitor mineralization (breakdown to 14CO2) and volatilization of the test compound in a 155-d trial. In the unplanted systems, an average of 88% of the total radiolabel remained in the soil and leachate and only 6% was mineralized. In the planted system, 33% of the radiolabel remained in the soil plus leachate, 22% was mineralized, and 36% was associated with plant tissue (21% with the root fraction and 15% with shoots). Mineralization rates were 23.1 mg PCP mineralized kg-1 soil in 20 wk in the planted system, and for the unplanted system 6.6 mg PCP kg-1 soil for the same time period. Similar amounts of volatile organic material were generated in the two systems (1.5%). Results indicated that establishing crested wheatgrass on PCP-contaminated surface soils may accelerate the removal of the contaminant.

  18. The ‘Unicorn’ Dinosaur That Wasn’t: A New Reconstruction of the Crest of Tsintaosaurus and the Early Evolution of the Lambeosaurine Crest and Rostrum

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Márquez, Albert; Wagner, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    The lambeosaurine Tsintaosaurus spinorhinus has traditionally been reconstructed with an elevated, hollow, spike-like crest composed entirely of the nasal bones, although this has been disputed. Here, we provide a new reconstruction of the skull of this species based on reexamination and reinterpretation of the morphology and articular relationships of the type and Paratype skulls and a fragmentary crest. We confirm the presence of a supracranial crest composed of the elevated nasal bones, but also including the premaxillae. We hypothesize that the crest is a tall, lobate, hollow structure that projects dorsally and slightly caudally a distance greater than the height of the skull along the quadrate. In our reconstruction, the nasal passage passes through the crest, but enters the skull rostral to the tubular process of the nasals, not through it. Tsintaosaurus spinorhinus is rediagnosed on the basis of a suite of cranial autapomorphies including a circumnarial fossa subdivided into three accessory fossae, prefrontal with ascending rostral process and lateral flange, nasals fused sagittally to form elongate tubular process that rises dorsally from skull roof, each nasal being expanded rostrocaudally into a rhomboid distal process, and medial processes of premaxillae at the summit of the cranial crest inserted between rhomboid processes of nasals. Tsintaosaurus spinorhinus lacks characters that are present in more derived lambeosaurines (parasaurolophins and lambeosaurins), such as rotation of the caudal margin of the crest to an acute angle with the skull roof, lateral processes of the nasals that enclose part of the intracranial cavity and participate in the formation of the walls of the common median chamber, and a smooth narial fossa lacking ridges and accessory fossae. We hypothesize that ancestrally the rostrum of lambeosaurines may have been more similar to that in Saurolophinae, and became subsequently reduced in complexity during evolution of the group

  19. The fate of cranial neural crest cells in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Rolf; Joss, Jean; Olsson, Lennart

    2008-06-15

    The cranial neural crest has been shown to give rise to a diversity of cells and tissues, including cartilage, bone and connective tissue, in a variety of tetrapods and in the zebrafish. It has been claimed, however, that in the Australian lungfish these tissues are not derived from the cranial neural crest, and even that no migrating cranial neural crest cells exist in this species. We have earlier documented that cranial neural crest cells do migrate, although they emerge late, in the Australian lungfish. Here, we have used the lipophilic fluorescent dye, DiI, to label premigratory cranial neural crest cells and follow their fate until stage 43, when several cranial skeletal elements have started to differentiate. The timing and extent of their migration was investigated, and formation of mandibular, hyoid and branchial streams documented. Cranial neural crest was shown to contribute cells to several parts of the head skeleton, including the trabecula cranii and derivatives of the mandibular arch (e.g., Meckel's cartilage, quadrate), the hyoid arch (e.g., the ceratohyal) and the branchial arches (ceratobranchials I-IV), as well as to the connective tissue surrounding the myofibers in cranial muscles. We conclude that cranial neural crest migration and fate in the Australian lungfish follow the stereotyped pattern documented in other vertebrates.

  20. Review: the role of neural crest cells in the endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Adams, Meghan Sara; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest is a pluripotent population of cells that arises at the junction of the neural tube and the dorsal ectoderm. These highly migratory cells form diverse derivatives including neurons and glia of the sensory, sympathetic, and enteric nervous systems, melanocytes, and the bones, cartilage, and connective tissues of the face. The neural crest has long been associated with the endocrine system, although not always correctly. According to current understanding, neural crest cells give rise to the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, chief cells of the extra-adrenal paraganglia, and thyroid C cells. The endocrine tumors that correspond to these cell types are pheochromocytomas, extra-adrenal paragangliomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although controversies concerning embryological origin appear to have mostly been resolved, questions persist concerning the pathobiology of each tumor type and its basis in neural crest embryology. Here we present a brief history of the work on neural crest development, both in general and in application to the endocrine system. In particular, we present findings related to the plasticity and pluripotency of neural crest cells as well as a discussion of several different neural crest tumors in the endocrine system.

  1. Should I stay or should I go? Cadherin function and regulation in the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Taneyhill, Lisa A; Schiffmacher, Andrew T

    2017-03-02

    Our increasing comprehension of neural crest cell development has reciprocally advanced our understanding of cadherin expression, regulation, and function. As a transient population of multipotent stem cells that significantly contribute to the vertebrate body plan, neural crest cells undergo a variety of transformative processes and exhibit many cellular behaviors, including epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), motility, collective cell migration, and differentiation. Multiple studies have elucidated regulatory and mechanistic details of specific cadherins during neural crest cell development in a highly contextual manner. Collectively, these results reveal that gradual changes within neural crest cells are accompanied by often times subtle, yet important, alterations in cadherin expression and function. The primary focus of this review is to coalesce recent data on cadherins in neural crest cells, from their specification to their emergence as motile cells soon after EMT, and to highlight the complexities of cadherin expression beyond our current perceptions, including the hypothesis that the neural crest EMT is a transition involving a predominantly singular cadherin switch. Further advancements in genetic approaches and molecular techniques will provide greater opportunities to integrate data from various model systems in order to distinguish unique or overlapping functions of cadherins expressed at any point throughout the ontogeny of the neural crest.

  2. The application of eDNA for monitoring of the Great Crested Newt in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Helen C; Bishop, Keith; Middleditch, David J; Patmore, James R M; Maddison, Ben C; Gough, Kevin C

    2014-01-01

    Current ecological surveys for great crested newts are time-consuming and expensive and can only be carried out within a short survey window. Additional survey methods which would facilitate the detection of rare or protected species such as the great crested newt (Triturus cristatus) would be extremely advantageous. Environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis has been utilized for the detection of great crested newts in Denmark. Here, the same methodology has been applied to water samples taken from UK ponds concurrently with conventional field surveying techniques. Our eDNA analysis exhibited an 84% success rate with a kappa coefficient of agreement between field and eDNA surveys of 0.86. One pond determined to be negative for great crested newt by field survey was positive by eDNA analysis, revealing the potential for improved detection rates using this methodology. Analysis of water samples collected in late summer indicates that eDNA analysis could be used to detect great crested newt after the optimal survey window for current field techniques had passed. Consequently, eDNA analysis could augment currently stipulated techniques for great crested newt surveying as a relatively quick and inexpensive tool for collecting great crested newt presence and distribution data within the UK instead of or prior to full field surveys. PMID:25505530

  3. Amphioxus and lamprey AP-2 genes: implications for neural crest evolution and migration patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulemans, Daniel; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    The neural crest is a uniquely vertebrate cell type present in the most basal vertebrates, but not in cephalochordates. We have studied differences in regulation of the neural crest marker AP-2 across two evolutionary transitions: invertebrate to vertebrate, and agnathan to gnathostome. Isolation and comparison of amphioxus, lamprey and axolotl AP-2 reveals its extensive expansion in the vertebrate dorsal neural tube and pharyngeal arches, implying co-option of AP-2 genes by neural crest cells early in vertebrate evolution. Expression in non-neural ectoderm is a conserved feature in amphioxus and vertebrates, suggesting an ancient role for AP-2 genes in this tissue. There is also common expression in subsets of ventrolateral neurons in the anterior neural tube, consistent with a primitive role in brain development. Comparison of AP-2 expression in axolotl and lamprey suggests an elaboration of cranial neural crest patterning in gnathostomes. However, migration of AP-2-expressing neural crest cells medial to the pharyngeal arch mesoderm appears to be a primitive feature retained in all vertebrates. Because AP-2 has essential roles in cranial neural crest differentiation and proliferation, the co-option of AP-2 by neural crest cells in the vertebrate lineage was a potentially crucial event in vertebrate evolution.

  4. Islet1 derivatives in the heart are of both neural crest and second heart field origin

    PubMed Central

    Engleka, Kurt A.; Manderfield, Lauren J.; Brust, Rachael D.; Li, Li; Cohen, Ashley; Dymecki, Susan M.; Epstein, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Islet1 (Isl1) has been proposed as a marker of cardiac progenitor cells derived from the second heart field and is utilized to identify and purify cardiac progenitors from murine and human specimens for ex vivo expansion. The use of Isl1 as a specific second heart field marker is dependent on its exclusion from other cardiac lineages such as neural crest. Objective Determine if Isl1 is expressed by cardiac neural crest. Methods and Results We used an intersectional fate-mapping system employing the RC::FrePe allele which reports dual Flpe and Cre recombination. Combining Isl11Cre/+, a SHF driver, and Wnt1::Flpe, a neural crest driver, with Rc::FrePe reveals that some Isl1 derivatives in the cardiac outflow tract derive from Wnt1-expressing neural crest progenitors. In contrast, no overlap was observed between Wnt1-derived neural crest and an alternative second heart field driver, Mef2c-AHF-Cre. Conclusions Isl1 is not restricted to second heart field progenitors in the developing heart but also labels cardiac neural crest. The intersection of Isl1 and Wnt1 lineages within the heart provides a caveat to using Isl1 as an exclusive second heart field cardiac progenitor marker and suggests that some Isl1-expressing progenitor cells derived from embryos, ES or iPS cultures may be of neural crest lineage. PMID:22394517

  5. Cadherin-6B undergoes macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis during cranial neural crest cell EMT

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Rangarajan; Taneyhill, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is important for the formation of migratory neural crest cells during development and is co-opted in human diseases such as cancer metastasis. Chick premigratory cranial neural crest cells lose intercellular contacts, mediated in part by Cadherin-6B (Cad6B), migrate extensively, and later form a variety of adult derivatives. Importantly, modulation of Cad6B is crucial for proper neural crest cell EMT. Although Cad6B possesses a long half-life, it is rapidly lost from premigratory neural crest cell membranes, suggesting the existence of post-translational mechanisms during EMT. We have identified a motif in the Cad6B cytoplasmic tail that enhances Cad6B internalization and reduces the stability of Cad6B upon its mutation. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Cad6B is removed from premigratory neural crest cells through cell surface internalization events that include clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Both of these processes are dependent upon the function of dynamin, and inhibition of Cad6B internalization abrogates neural crest cell EMT and migration. Collectively, our findings reveal the significance of post-translational events in controlling cadherins during neural crest cell EMT and migration. PMID:25795298

  6. Xenopus Nkx6.3 is a neural plate border specifier required for neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuming; Shi, Yu; Zhao, Shuhua; Li, Jiejing; Li, Chaocui; Mao, Bingyu

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrates, the neural plate border (NPB) is established by a group of transcription factors including Dlx3, Msx1 and Zic1. The crosstalk between these NPB specifiers governs the separation of the NPB region into placode and neural crest (NC) territories and also their further differentiation. Understanding the mechanisms of NPB formation and NC development is critical for our knowledge of related human diseases. Here we identified Nkx6.3, a transcription factor of the Nkx family, as a new NPB specifier required for neural crest development in Xenopus embryos. XNkx6.3 is expressed in the ectoderm of the neural plate border region at neurula stages, covering the epidermis, placode and neural crest territories, but not the neural plate. Inhibition of Nkx6.3 by dominant negative construct or specific morpholino leads to neural crest defects, while overexpression of Nkx6.3 induces ectopic neural crest in the anterior neural fold. In animal caps, Nkx6.3 alone is able to initiate the whole neural crest regulatory network and induces neural crest fate robustly. We showed that overexpression of Nkx6.3 affects multiple signaling pathways, creating a high-Wnt, low-BMP environment required for neural crest development. Gain- and loss-of-function of Nkx6.3 have compound effects on the expression of known NPB genes, which is largely opposite to that of Dlx3. Overexpression of Dlx3 blocks the NC inducing activity of Nkx6.3. The crosstalk between Nkx6.3, Dlx3 and Msx1 is likely crucial for proper NPB formation and neural crest development in Xenopus.

  7. Characterization of the trunk neural crest in the bamboo shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Marilyn; Reyes, Michelle; Coleman, Tiffany; Rotenstein, Lisa; Sao, Sothy; Martinez, Darwin; Jones, Matthew; Mackelprang, Rachel; De Bellard, Maria Elena

    2013-10-01

    The neural crest is a population of mesenchymal cells that after migrating from the neural tube gives rise to structure and cell types: the jaw, part of the peripheral ganglia, and melanocytes. Although much is known about neural crest development in jawed vertebrates, a clear picture of trunk neural crest development for elasmobranchs is yet to be developed. Here we present a detailed study of trunk neural crest development in the bamboo shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum. Vital labeling with dioctadecyl tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) and in situ hybridization using cloned Sox8 and Sox9 probes demonstrated that trunk neural crest cells follow a pattern similar to the migratory paths already described in zebrafish and amphibians. We found shark trunk neural crest along the rostral side of the somites, the ventromedial pathway, the branchial arches, the gut, the sensory ganglia, and the nerves. Interestingly, C. punctatum Sox8 and Sox9 sequences aligned with vertebrate SoxE genes, but appeared to be more ancient than the corresponding vertebrate paralogs. The expression of these two SoxE genes in trunk neural crest cells, especially Sox9, matched the Sox10 migratory patterns observed in teleosts. Also of interest, we observed DiI cells and Sox9 labeling along the lateral line, suggesting that in C. punctatum, glial cells in the lateral line are likely of neural crest origin. Although this has been observed in other vertebrates, we are the first to show that the pattern is present in cartilaginous fishes. These findings demonstrate that trunk neural crest cell development in C. punctatum follows the same highly conserved migratory pattern observed in jawed vertebrates.

  8. Roles of chromatin remodelers in maintenance mechanisms of multipotency of mouse trunk neural crest cells in the formation of neural crest-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kyohei; Ogawa, Ryuhei; Kawawaki, Syunsaku; Ito, Kazuo

    2014-08-01

    We analyzed roles of two chromatin remodelers, Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable-B (SWI/SNF-B), and Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP)/Wnt signaling in the maintenance of the multipotency of mouse trunk neural crest cells, leading to the formation of mouse neural crest-derived stem cells (mouse NCSCs). CHD7 was expressed in the undifferentiated neural crest cells and in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and sciatic nerve, typical tissues containing NCSCs. BMP/Wnt signaling stimulated the expression of CHD7 and participated in maintaining the multipotency of neural crest cells. Furthermore, the promotion of CHD7 expression maintained the multipotency of these cells. The inhibition of CHD7 and SWI/SNF-B expression significantly suppressed the maintenance of the multipotency of these cells. In addition, BMP/Wnt treatment promoted CHD7 expression and caused the increase of the percentage of multipotent cells in DRG. Thus, the present data suggest that the chromatin remodelers as well as BMP/Wnt signaling play essential roles in the maintenance of the multipotency of mouse trunk neural crest cells and in the formation of mouse NCSCs.

  9. Changes in the migratory properties of neural crest and early crest-derived cells in vivo following treatment with a phorbol ester drug.

    PubMed

    Sears, R; Ciment, G

    1988-11-01

    In previous work, we found that the phorbol ester drug 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) reversed the developmental restriction of melanogenesis that normally occurs in neural crest-derived Schwann cell precursors around embryonic Day 5 of quail development. That is, TPA treatment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from 7-day quail embryos caused Schwann cell precursors to regain the ability to give rise to melanocytes. In this paper, we examine other long-term effects of TPA on the differentiative and migratory properties of neural crest and crest-derived DRG cells, using heterospecific grafting methods. We report that TPA treatment in culture increased the extent of cell migration following grafting into host embryos, including some ectopic migration into the central nervous system and other locations. TPA did not, however, seem to change the fate of these crest-derived cells, except that some DRG cells underwent pigmentation, as had been observed previously. Interestingly, graft cells associated with peripheral nerves were found to be exclusively unpigmented, whereas graft cells found in all other locations, including the central nervous system, were both pigmented and unpigmented. This suggests that peripheral nerves may act in a fashion antagonistic to the effects of TPA. These findings are consistent with the notion that TPA treatment causes early crest-derived cells to regain developmental properties lost with developmental age.

  10. Methods for derivation of multipotent neural crest cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Avery, John; Dalton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Multipotent, neural crest cells (NCCs) produce a wide-range of cell types during embryonic development. This includes melanocytes, peripheral neurons, smooth muscle cells, osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. The protocol described here allows for highly-efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to a neural crest fate within 15 days. This is accomplished under feeder-free conditions, using chemically defined medium supplemented with two small molecule inhibitors that block glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling. This technology is well-suited as a platform to understand in greater detail the pathogenesis of human disease associated with impaired neural crest development/migration. PMID:25986498

  11. The Effects of Using Microsoft Power Point on EFL Learners' Attitude and Anxiety: Case Study of Two Master Students of Didactics of English as a Foreign Language, Djillali Liabes University, Sidi Bel Abbes, Algeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benghalem, Boualem

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of using ICT tools such as Microsoft PowerPoint on EFL students' attitude and anxiety. The participants in this study were 40 Master 2 students of Didactics of English as a Foreign Language, Djillali Liabes University, Sidi Bel Abbes Algeria. In order to find out the effects of Microsoft PowerPoint on EFL…

  12. L’abbé Gui de Mortessagnes (1714-1796), collaborateur de Faujas de Saint-Fond et pionnier de la volcanologie en Vivarais-Velay (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergoil, Jean; Mergoil-Daniel, Juliette

    2011-05-01

    Six letters from an enigmatic Abbé de Mortesagne are included in the famous book of Faujas de Saint-Fond (1778), Recherches sur les volcans éteints du Vivarais et du Velay. Examination of the records have allowed his identification as Gui de Mortessagnes and explains how this Jesuit, formerly Professor of Physics at the Montpellier College, started to make original observations about the high Vivarais-Velay volcanism. Mortessagnes first encountered Faujas at Montelimar, in 1767, as is attested by their two signatures on a legal document. Mortessagnes was after introduced to Geology in the low-Vivarais by Faujas, who then sent him to the high-Vivarais and Velay to extend their research. With accurate and original observations on volcanic products and their geological settings, he discussed the basalt nature, the interactions between basalt and sediments, and even resorted to experimental testing of basalt fusibility.

  13. Efficient three-dimensional resist profile-driven source mask optimization optical proximity correction based on Abbe-principal component analysis and Sylvester equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pei-Chun; Yu, Chun-Chang; Chen, Charlie Chung-Ping

    2015-01-01

    As one of the critical stages of a very large scale integration fabrication process, postexposure bake (PEB) plays a crucial role in determining the final three-dimensional (3-D) profiles and lessening the standing wave effects. However, the full 3-D chemically amplified resist simulation is not widely adopted during the postlayout optimization due to the long run-time and huge memory usage. An efficient simulation method is proposed to simulate the PEB while considering standing wave effects and resolution enhancement techniques, such as source mask optimization and subresolution assist features based on the Sylvester equation and Abbe-principal component analysis method. Simulation results show that our algorithm is 20× faster than the conventional Gaussian convolution method.

  14. Sacral neural crest-derived cells enter the aganglionic colon of Ednrb-/- mice along extrinsic nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Christopher S; Zaitoun, Ismail; Haberman, Kathryn M; Gosain, Ankush; Druckenbrod, Noah R; Epstein, Miles L

    2012-02-15

    Both vagal and sacral neural crest cells contribute to the enteric nervous system in the hindgut. Because it is difficult to visualize sacral crest cells independently of vagal crest, the nature and extent of the sacral crest contribution to the enteric nervous system are not well established in rodents. To overcome this problem we generated mice in which only the fluorescent protein-labeled sacral crest are present in the terminal colon. We found that sacral crest cells were associated with extrinsic nerve fibers. We investigated the source, time of appearance, and characteristics of the extrinsic nerve fibers found in the aganglionic colon. We observed that the pelvic ganglion neurons contributed a number of extrinsic fibers that travel within the hindgut between circular and longitudinal muscles and within the submucosa and serosa. Sacral crest-derived cells along these fibers diminished in number from fetal to postnatal stages. A small number of sacral crest-derived cells were found between the muscle layers and expressed the neuronal marker Hu. We conclude that sacral crest cells enter the hindgut by advancing on extrinsic fibers and, in aganglionic preparations, they form a small number of neurons at sites normally occupied by myenteric ganglia. We also examined the colons of ganglionated preparations and found sacral crest-derived cells associated with both extrinsic nerve fibers and nascent ganglia. Extrinsic nerve fibers serve as a route of entry for both rodent and avian sacral crest into the hindgut.

  15. Trunk lateral cells are neural crest-like cells in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis: insights into the ancestry and evolution of the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, William R; Chiba, Takuto; Krajka, Florian Razy; Deyts, Carole; Satoh, Nori; Joly, Jean-Stéphane

    2008-12-01

    Neural crest-like cells (NCLC) that express the HNK-1 antigen and form body pigment cells were previously identified in diverse ascidian species. Here we investigate the embryonic origin, migratory activity, and neural crest related gene expression patterns of NCLC in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. HNK-1 expression first appeared at about the time of larval hatching in dorsal cells of the posterior trunk. In swimming tadpoles, HNK-1 positive cells began to migrate, and after metamorphosis they were localized in the oral and atrial siphons, branchial gill slits, endostyle, and gut. Cleavage arrest experiments showed that NCLC are derived from the A7.6 cells, the precursors of trunk lateral cells (TLC), one of the three types of migratory mesenchymal cells in ascidian embryos. In cleavage arrested embryos, HNK-1 positive TLC were present on the lateral margins of the neural plate and later became localized adjacent to the posterior sensory vesicle, a staging zone for their migration after larval hatching. The Ciona orthologues of seven of sixteen genes that function in the vertebrate neural crest gene regulatory network are expressed in the A7.6/TLC lineage. The vertebrate counterparts of these genes function downstream of neural plate border specification in the regulatory network leading to neural crest development. The results suggest that NCLC and neural crest cells may be homologous cell types originating in the common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates and support the possibility that a putative regulatory network governing NCLC development was co-opted to produce neural crest cells during vertebrate evolution.

  16. [Incidence of Upupicola upupae in the crest of the hoopoe].

    PubMed

    Mester, H

    1977-11-01

    Hopoes belonging to waves of migrants through the Balearic Islands in August and September showed high rates of infestation by Upupicola upupae (77--85 p. c.). The parasite species was almost exclusively confined to the long and mobile feathers of the bird's crown. And at this time of the year the Mallophaga had put their egg cases on the crest feathers, too. A mean of 7 feather-lice was found at this localisation in 8 positive cases sampled. As some of the birds were moulting just these parts of their plumage, a relative high loss of the lice egg masses had to be expected. Evidently, in these cases, the lice didn't adaptively synchronise laying with the period during which moulting occurs. The wings of hopoes are conspiciously barred glossy-black and white. Here the relative dark coloured lice were sitting predominantly in a dark feather area. In these places they were much less visble than on a neighbouring white area. Thus the parasites hide themselves according to their colour.

  17. Generating trunk neural crest from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miller; Miller, Matthew L; McHenry, Lauren K; Zheng, Tina; Zhen, Qiqi; Ilkhanizadeh, Shirin; Conklin, Bruce R; Bronner, Marianne E; Weiss, William A

    2016-01-27

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are stem cells that generate different lineages, including neuroendocrine, melanocytic, cartilage, and bone. The differentiation potential of NCC varies according to the level from which cells emerge along the neural tube. For example, only anterior "cranial" NCC form craniofacial bone, whereas solely posterior "trunk" NCC contribute to sympathoadrenal cells. Importantly, the isolation of human fetal NCC carries ethical and scientific challenges, as NCC induction typically occur before pregnancy is detectable. As a result, current knowledge of NCC biology derives primarily from non-human organisms. Important differences between human and non-human NCC, such as expression of HNK1 in human but not mouse NCC, suggest a need to study human NCC directly. Here, we demonstrate that current protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) to NCC are biased toward cranial NCC. Addition of retinoic acid drove trunk-related markers and HOX genes characteristic of a posterior identity. Subsequent treatment with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) enhanced differentiation to sympathoadrenal cells. Our approach provides methodology for detailed studies of human NCC, and clarifies roles for retinoids and BMPs in the differentiation of human PSC to trunk NCC and to sympathoadrenal lineages.

  18. Design of the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial (CREST)

    PubMed Central

    Sheffet, Alice J.; Roubin, Gary; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia; Moore, Wesley; Meschia, James F.; Hobson, Robert W.; Brott, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and medical therapy were shown superior to medical therapy alone for symptomatic (≥50%) and asymptomatic (≥60%) stenosis. Carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS) offers a less invasive alternative. Establishing safety, efficacy, and durability of CAS requires rigorous comparison with CEA in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Aims The objective is to compare the efficacy of CAS versus CEA in patients with symptomatic (≥50%) or asymptomatic (≥60%) extracranial carotid stenosis. Design The Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs. Stenting Trial (CREST) is a prospective, randomized, parallel, two-arm, multi-center trial with blinded endpoint adjudication. Primary endpoints are analyzed using standard time-to-event statistical modeling with adjustment for major baseline covariates. Primary analysis is on an intent-to-treat basis. Study Outcomes The primary outcome is the occurrence of any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during a 30-day peri-procedural period, and ipsilateral stroke during follow-up of up to four years. Secondary outcomes include restenosis and health-related quality of life. PMID:20088993

  19. Neural crest cell-derived VEGF promotes embryonic jaw extension

    PubMed Central

    Wiszniak, Sophie; Mackenzie, Francesca E.; Anderson, Peter; Kabbara, Samuela; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Schwarz, Quenten

    2015-01-01

    Jaw morphogenesis depends on the growth of Meckel’s cartilage during embryogenesis. However, the cell types and signals that promote chondrocyte proliferation for Meckel’s cartilage growth are poorly defined. Here we show that neural crest cells (NCCs) and their derivatives provide an essential source of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to enhance jaw vascularization and stabilize the major mandibular artery. We further show in two independent mouse models that blood vessels promote Meckel’s cartilage extension. Coculture experiments of arterial tissue with NCCs or chondrocytes demonstrated that NCC-derived VEGF promotes blood vessel growth and that blood vessels secrete factors to instruct chondrocyte proliferation. Computed tomography and X-ray scans of patients with hemifacial microsomia also showed that jaw hypoplasia correlates with mandibular artery dysgenesis. We conclude that cranial NCCs and their derivatives provide an essential source of VEGF to support blood vessel growth in the developing jaw, which in turn is essential for normal chondrocyte proliferation, and therefore jaw extension. PMID:25922531

  20. 76 FR 22393 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Cancellation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy... and Wildlife Service for the proposed Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project....

  1. 77 FR 47628 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy... Management Act and the Federal Power Act), on the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric...

  2. 76 FR 69225 - Migratory Bird Permits; Double-Crested Cormorant Management in the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ..., and across international borders. Under the current regulations, control activities are proposed and... revised regulations governing the management of double- crested cormorants. Under current regulations...) Modifying the current depredation orders; (3) Allowing the depredation orders to expire; or (4) Adopting...

  3. Sox2-mediated regulation of adult neural crest precursors and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Adam P W; Naska, Sibel; Jones, Karen; Jinno, Hiroyuki; Kaplan, David R; Miller, Freda D

    2013-01-01

    Nerve-derived neural crest cells are essential for regeneration in certain animals, such as newts. Here, we asked whether they play a similar role during mammalian tissue repair, focusing on Sox2-positive neural crest precursors in skin. In adult skin, Sox2 was expressed in nerve-terminal-associated neural crest precursor cells (NCPCs) around the hair follicle bulge, and following injury was induced in nerve-derived cells, likely dedifferentiated Schwann cell precursors. At later times postinjury, Sox2-positive cells were scattered throughout the regenerating dermis, and lineage tracing showed that these were all neural-crest-derived NCPCs. These Sox2-positive NCPCs were functionally important, since acute deletion of Sox2 prior to injury caused a decrease of NCPCs in the wound and aberrant skin repair. These data demonstrate that Sox2 regulates skin repair, likely by controlling NCPCs, and raise the possibility that nerve-derived NCPCs may play a general role in mammalian tissue repair.

  4. Randomized control trial of non-vascularized fibular and iliac crest graft for mandibular reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Amiya; Mehrotra, Divya; Mohammad, Shadab; Singh, R.K.; Kumar, Santhosh; Pal, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mandibular reconstruction of segmental defects caused by trauma or tumor excision is a challenge despite numerous advances in surgical and fixation techniques. Bone grafts from fibula or iliac crest are most frequently used to reconstruct mandible. Methods A prospective randomized study was performed in 20 patients with benign mandibular pathology, to compare non-vascularized fibular and iliac crest bone graft for graft success, improvement in esthetics and function, and any associated donor site complications. Results No significant difference in graft success, esthetics, function, or donor site complication were found between the two groups. Function improvement was significantly higher in fibula group as compared to iliac crest. An interesting finding of positive association between length of defect and complication was seen irrespective of the graft used, implying that patients with larger defects had higher complication rates. Conclusion Non-vascularized fibular bone graft is as better as iliac crest for reconstruction of mandibular defects of optimal length. PMID:25737842

  5. A potential inhibitory function of draxin in regulating mouse trunk neural crest migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sanbing; Su, Yuhong; Gao, Jinbao; Zhang, Chenbing; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Draxin is a repulsive axon guidance protein that plays important roles in the formation of three commissures in the central nervous system and dorsal interneuron 3 (dI3) in the chick spinal cord. In the present study, we report the expression pattern of mouse draxin in the embryonic mouse trunk spinal cord. In the presence of draxin, the longest net migration length of a migrating mouse trunk neural crest cell was significantly reduced. In addition, the relative number of apolar neural crest cells increased as the draxin treatment time increased. Draxin caused actin cytoskeleton rearrangement in the migrating trunk neural crest cells. Our data suggest that draxin may regulate mouse trunk neural crest cell migration by the rearrangement of cell actin cytoskeleton and by reducing the polarization activity of these cells subsequently.

  6. Clarifying Potential Successional Trajectories in Sagebrush Communities Historically Seeded with Crested Wheatgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum [L.] Gaertn.) has been historically seeded on thousands of hectares of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingenis) communities. Initially used to improve degraded rangeland, its use has become controversial in the current management set...

  7. Does pond water reflectance influence double-crested cormorant selection of aquaculture pond?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) are a frequent and major avian predator on channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and other aquaculture species throughout the southeastern USA. Although cormorant movements and occurrence within the aquaculture production region are understood, no s...

  8. The Development of a Primary Neural Crest Assay for Neuroblastoma Oncogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0090 TITLE: The Development of a Primary Neural Crest Assay for Neuroblastoma Oncogenesis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Development of a Primary Neural Crest Assay for Neuroblastoma Oncogenesis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1...identification of novel oncogenic drivers of neuroblastoma as a starting point for the development of new therapies. Furthermore to use this technology to

  9. Human Deciduous Teeth Stem Cells (SHED) Display Neural Crest Signature Characters

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-García, Luis R.

    2017-01-01

    Human dental tissues are sources of neural crest origin multipotent stem cells whose regenerative potential is a focus of extensive studies. Rational programming of clinical applications requires a more detailed knowledge of the characters inherited from neural crest. Investigation of neural crest cells generated from human pluripotent stem cells provided opportunity for their comparison with the postnatal dental cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the culture conditions in the expression by dental cells of neural crest characters. The results of the study demonstrate that specific neural crest cells requirements, serum-free, active WNT signaling and inactive SMAD 2/3, are needed for the activity of the neural crest characters in dental cells. Specifically, the decreasing concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) from regularly used for dental cells 10% to 2% and below, or using serum-free medium, led to emergence of a subset of epithelial-like cells expressing the two key neural crest markers, p75 and HNK-1. Further, the serum-free medium supplemented with neural crest signaling requirements (WNT inducer BIO and TGF-β inhibitor REPSOX), induced epithelial-like phenotype, upregulated the p75, Sox10 and E-Cadherin and downregulated the mesenchymal genes (SNAIL1, ZEB1, TWIST). An expansion medium containing 2% FBS allowed to obtain an epithelial/mesenchymal SHED population showing high proliferation, clonogenic, multi-lineage differentiation capacities. Future experiments will be required to determine the effects of these features on regenerative potential of this novel SHED population. PMID:28125654

  10. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition: new and old insights from the classical neural crest model

    PubMed Central

    Pablo H., Strobl-Mazzulla; Marianne E., Bronner

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important event converting compact and ordered epithelial cells into migratory mesenchymal cells. Given the molecular and cellular similarities between pathological and developmental EMTs, studying this event during neural crest development offers and excellent in vivo model for understanding the mechanisms underlying this process. Here, we review new and old insight into neural crest EMT in search of commonalities with cancer progression that might aid in the design of specific therapeutic prevention. PMID:22575214

  11. Adrenergic innervation of the developing chick heart: neural crest ablations to produce sympathetically aneural hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, M.; Stewart, D.

    1984-11-01

    Ablation of various regions of premigratory trunk neural crest which gives rise to the sympathetic trunks was used to remove sympathetic cardiac innervation. Neuronal uptake of (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine was used as an index of neuronal development in the chick atrium. Following ablation of neural crest over somites 10-15 or 15-20, uptake was significantly decreased in the atrium at 16 and 17 days of development. Ablation of neural crest over somites 5-10 and 20-25 caused no decrease in (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine uptake. Removal of neural crest over somites 5-25 or 10-20 caused approximately equal depletions of (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine uptake in the atrium. Cardiac norepinephrine concentration was significantly depressed following ablation of neural crest over somites 5-25 but not over somites 10-20. Light-microscopic and histofluorescent preparations confirmed the absence of sympathetic trunks in the region of the normal origin of the sympathetic cardiac nerves following neural crest ablation over somites 10-20. The neural tube and dorsal root ganglia were damaged in the area of the neural-crest ablation; however, all of these structures were normal cranial and caudal to the lesioned area. Development of most of the embryos as well as the morphology of all of the hearts was normal following the lesion. These results indicate that it is possible to produce sympathetically aneural hearts by neural-crest ablation; however, sympathetic cardiac nerves account for an insignificant amount of cardiac norepinephrine.

  12. Experimental investigation on discharge coefficient for a combined broad crested weir-box culvert structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, A.; Hassan, M.; Sabir, Shahin

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates the hydraulic characteristics of simultaneous flow over broad crested weir and through box (square) culverts experimentally. The variation of discharge coefficient (Cd) of the combined structure with various affective parameters such as upstream head, length of culvert, culvert inlet shape, culvert internal dimension, weir crest height, weir side slope angle, and weir width was analyzed. For this purpose 12 glass models of combined broad crested weirs and box culverts were manufactured and tested in a laboratory flume of 12 m. Discharge coefficient predicting equations were developed as a function of the dimensionless terms. The overall results showed that Cd increases as the ratio of the total head of water above the weir crest to the height of the weir crest H/P increases for all the models and for each flow state (weir and combined). Cd values increased as the head increased for all the models tested as culvert flow only, and also with decreasing of the angle between crest of the weir with the sides.

  13. Migratory patterns and developmental potential of trunk neural crest cells in the axolotl embryo.

    PubMed

    Epperlein, Hans-Henning; Selleck, Mark A J; Meulemans, Daniel; Mchedlishvili, Levan; Cerny, Robert; Sobkow, Lidia; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2007-02-01

    Using cell markers and grafting, we examined the timing of migration and developmental potential of trunk neural crest cells in axolotl. No obvious differences in pathway choice were noted for DiI-labeling at different lateral or medial positions of the trunk neural folds in neurulae, which contributed not only to neural crest but also to Rohon-Beard neurons. Labeling wild-type dorsal trunks at pre- and early-migratory stages revealed that individual neural crest cells migrate away from the neural tube along two main routes: first, dorsolaterally between the epidermis and somites and, later, ventromedially between the somites and neural tube/notochord. Dorsolaterally migrating crest primarily forms pigment cells, with those from anterior (but not mid or posterior) trunk neural folds also contributing glia and neurons to the lateral line. White mutants have impaired dorsolateral but normal ventromedial migration. At late migratory stages, most labeled cells move along the ventromedial pathway or into the dorsal fin. Contrasting with other anamniotes, axolotl has a minor neural crest contribution to the dorsal fin, most of which arises from the dermomyotome. Taken together, the results reveal stereotypic migration and differentiation of neural crest cells in axolotl that differ from other vertebrates in timing of entry onto the dorsolateral pathway and extent of contribution to some derivatives.

  14. Endocranial anatomy of lambeosaurine hadrosaurids (Dinosauria: Ornithischia): a sensorineural perspective on cranial crest function.

    PubMed

    Evans, David C; Ridgely, Ryan; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2009-09-01

    Brain and nasal cavity endocasts of four corythosaurian lambeosaurines (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) were investigated to test hypotheses of cranial crest function related to sensorineural systems. Endocasts were generated through computed tomography and three-dimensional rendering and visualization software. The sample comprises a range of ontogenetic stages from the taxa Lambeosaurus, Corythosaurus, and Hypacrosaurus. Results show that the morphology of brain endocasts differs little from that of hadrosaurines. The strikingly convoluted nasal vestibule of Hypacrosaurus altispinus, when interpreted in the context of lambeosaurine phylogeny, suggests selective pressure for nasal cavity function independent from changes in the external shape of the crest and associated visual display function. The plesiomorphically small olfactory bulbs and apparently small olfactory region of the nasal cavity argues against the hypothesis that increased olfactory acuity played a causal role in crest evolution. The elongate cochlea of the inner ear reveals that hearing in lambeosaurines emphasized low frequencies consistent with the hypothesized low-frequency calls made by the crests under the resonation model of crest function. The brain is relatively large in lambeosaurines compared with many other large dinosaurs, and the cerebrum is relatively larger than that of all non-hadrosaurian ornithischians and large theropods, but compares favorably with hadrosaurine hadrosaurids as well as some maniraptoran theropods. It is concluded that the large brains of lambeosaurines are consistent with the range of social behaviors inferred when the crest is interpreted as an intraspecific signaling structure.

  15. The mother superior mutation ablates foxd3 activity in neural crest progenitor cells and depletes neural crest derivatives in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Montero-Balaguer, Mercedes; Lang, Michael R; Sachdev, Sherri Weiss; Knappmeyer, Christiane; Stewart, Rodney A; De La Guardia, Ana; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K; Knapik, Ela W

    2006-12-01

    The zebrafish mutation mother superior (mosm188) leads to a depletion of neural crest (NC) derivatives including the craniofacial cartilage skeleton, the peripheral nervous system (sympathetic neurons, dorsal root ganglia, enteric neurons), and pigment cells. The loss of derivatives is preceded by a reduction in NC-expressed transcription factors, snail1b, sox9b, sox10, and a specific loss of foxd3 expression in NC progenitor cells. We employed genetic linkage analysis and physical mapping to place the mosm188 mutation on zebrafish chromosome 6 in the vicinity of the foxd3 gene. Furthermore, we found that mosm188 does not complement the sym1/foxd3 mutation, indicating that mosm188 resides within the foxd3 locus. Injection of PAC clones containing the foxd3 gene into mosm188 embryos restored foxd3 expression in NC progenitors and suppressed the mosm188 phenotype. However, sequencing the foxd3 transcribed area in mosm188 embryos did not reveal nucleotide changes segregating with the mosm188 phenotype, implying that the mutation most likely resides outside the foxd3-coding region. Based on these findings, we propose that the mosm188 mutation perturbs a NC-specific foxd3 regulatory element. Further analysis of mosm188 mutants and foxd3 morphants revealed that NC cells are initially formed, suggesting that foxd3 function is required to maintain the pool of NC progenitors.

  16. An exclusively mesodermal origin of fin mesenchyme demonstrates that zebrafish trunk neural crest does not generate ectomesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Knapik, Ela W; Thiery, Jean Paul; Carney, Thomas J

    2013-07-01

    The neural crest is a multipotent stem cell population that arises from the dorsal aspect of the neural tube and generates both non-ectomesenchymal (melanocytes, peripheral neurons and glia) and ectomesenchymal (skeletogenic, odontogenic, cartilaginous and connective tissue) derivatives. In amniotes, only cranial neural crest generates both classes, with trunk neural crest restricted to non-ectomesenchyme. By contrast, it has been suggested that anamniotes might generate derivatives of both classes at all axial levels, with trunk neural crest generating fin osteoblasts, scale mineral-forming cells and connective tissue cells; however, this has not been fully tested. The cause and evolutionary significance of this cranial/trunk dichotomy, and its absence in anamniotes, are debated. Recent experiments have disputed the contribution of fish trunk neural crest to fin osteoblasts and scale mineral-forming cells. This prompted us to test the contribution of anamniote trunk neural crest to fin connective tissue cells. Using genetics-based lineage tracing in zebrafish, we find that these fin mesenchyme cells derive entirely from the mesoderm and that neural crest makes no contribution. Furthermore, contrary to previous suggestions, larval fin mesenchyme cells do not generate the skeletogenic cells of the adult fin, but persist to form fibroblasts associated with adult fin rays. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish trunk neural crest does not generate ectomesenchymal derivatives and challenge long-held ideas about trunk neural crest fate. These findings have important implications for the ontogeny and evolution of the neural crest.

  17. Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (Rgs2) regulates neural crest development through Pparδ-Sox10 cascade.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng-Jia; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Shih, Hung-Yu; Hsu, Li-Sung; Yeh, Tu-Hsueh; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Lin, Ching-Yu; Cheng, Yi-Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent progenitors that migrate extensively and differentiate into numerous derivatives. The developmental plasticity and migratory ability of neural crest cells render them an attractive model for studying numerous aspects of cell progression. We observed that zebrafish rgs2 was expressed in neural crest cells. Disrupting Rgs2 expression by using a dominant negative rgs2 construct or rgs2 morpholinos reduced GTPase-activating protein activity, induced the formation of neural crest progenitors, increased the proliferation of nonectomesenchymal neural crest cells, and inhibited the formation of ectomesenchymal neural crest derivatives. The transcription of pparda (which encodes Pparδ, a Wnt-activated transcription factor) was upregulated in Rgs2-deficient embryos, and Pparδ inhibition using a selective antagonist in the Rgs2-deficient embryos repaired neural crest defects. Our results clarify the mechanism through which the Rgs2-Pparδ cascade regulates neural crest development; specifically, Pparδ directly binds to the promoter and upregulates the transcription of the neural crest specifier sox10. This study reveals a unique regulatory mechanism, the Rgs2-Pparδ-Sox10 signaling cascade, and defines a key molecular regulator, Rgs2, in neural crest development.

  18. Probing dark matter crests with white dwarfs and IMBHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, P.; Casanellas, J.; Schödel, R.; Davidson, E.; Cuadra, J.

    2016-06-01

    White dwarfs (WDs) are the most promising captors of dark matter (DM) particles in the crests that are expected to build up in the cores of dense stellar clusters. The DM particles could reach sufficient densities in WD cores to liberate energy through self-annihilation. The extinction associated with our Galactic Centre makes it impossible to detect the potential-associated luminosities, contrary to smaller stellar systems which are close enough to us and not heavily extincted, such as -Cen. We investigate the prospects of detection of DM-burning WDs in a stellar cluster harbouring an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH), which leads to higher densities of DM at the centre. We calculate the capture rate and estimate the luminosity that a WD would emit depending on its distance to the centre of the cluster. Direct-summation N-body simulations of -Cen yield a non-negligible number of WDs in the range of radii of interest. We apply our assumption to published Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of stars in the centre of -Cen and, although we are not able to identify any evident candidate, we proof that their bunching up at high luminosities would be unique. We predict that DM burning will lead to a truncation of the cooling sequence at the faint end. The detection of DM burning in future observations of dense stellar clusters could allow us to probe different models of DM distributions and characteristics. On the other hand, if DM-burning WDs really exist, their number and properties could give hints to the existence of IMBHs.

  19. Enteric neural crest cells regulate vertebrate stomach patterning and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Faure, Sandrine; McKey, Jennifer; Sagnol, Sébastien; de Santa Barbara, Pascal

    2015-01-15

    In vertebrates, the digestive tract develops from a uniform structure where reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions pattern this complex organ into regions with specific morphologies and functions. Concomitant with these early patterning events, the primitive GI tract is colonized by the vagal enteric neural crest cells (vENCCs), a population of cells that will give rise to the enteric nervous system (ENS), the intrinsic innervation of the GI tract. The influence of vENCCs on early patterning and differentiation of the GI tract has never been evaluated. In this study, we report that a crucial number of vENCCs is required for proper chick stomach development, patterning and differentiation. We show that reducing the number of vENCCs by performing vENCC ablations induces sustained activation of the BMP and Notch pathways in the stomach mesenchyme and impairs smooth muscle development. A reduction in vENCCs also leads to the transdifferentiation of the stomach into a stomach-intestinal mixed phenotype. In addition, sustained Notch signaling activity in the stomach mesenchyme phenocopies the defects observed in vENCC-ablated stomachs, indicating that inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway is essential for stomach patterning and differentiation. Finally, we report that a crucial number of vENCCs is also required for maintenance of stomach identity and differentiation through inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway. Altogether, our data reveal that, through the regulation of mesenchyme identity, vENCCs act as a new mediator in the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions that control stomach development.

  20. Simulations of the equatorial thermosphere anomaly: Physical mechanisms for crest formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jiuhou; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Wang, Wenbin; Luan, Xiaoli; Dou, Xiankang; Roble, Raymond

    2012-06-01

    Several mechanisms including heat transport due to zonal winds, chemical heating and field-aligned ion drag have been proposed to explain the formation of the Equatorial Thermosphere Anomaly (ETA), but the cause of the ETA crests in thermosphere temperature is still a mystery. Our companion study (Lei et al., 2012) has revealed that the field-aligned ion drag mainly contributes to the ETA trough, but has little effect on the ETA crests. In this study, the mechanisms of heat transport associated with zonal winds and chemical heating due to recombination are examined to assess their contributions to the production of the ETA crests on the basis of National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR-TIEGCM) simulations. Our sensitivity simulations demonstrate that neither heat transport due to zonal winds nor chemical heating is able to explain the formation of the ETA crests. Instead, we found that the formation of the ETA crests is attributed to plasma-neutral heating which has two peaks in the topside ionosphere aside the magnetic equator. These two peaks, which are largely controlled by the magnetic field, are the results of energy transfer from thermal electrons and ions to the neutrals through collisions due to their temperature differences, albeit the ultimate source of this heating is solar radiation which produces photoelectrons that mainly depend on solar zenith angle. The TIEGCM simulations show that the crests of the ETA always locate poleward by 10°-15° with respect to those of the Equatorial Ionosphere Anomaly (EIA), although the trough location of the ETA resembles that of the EIA. The location of the ETA crests is associated with the two-hump structure in plasma-neutral collision heating which is small inside the EIA region and larger at the poleward edge of this region.

  1. Crest evolution in newts: implications for reconstruction methods, sexual selection, phenotypic plasticity and the origin of novelties.

    PubMed

    Wiens, J J; Sparreboom, M; Arntzen, J W

    2011-10-01

    The dorsal crest of newts (Salamandridae) is a novel, phenotypically plastic, sexually selected trait that may evolve in association with complex courtship behaviours. We estimated a near-comprehensive, time-calibrated phylogeny for salamandrids and analysed the evolution of their crests and display behaviour. Different models give conflicting reconstructions for crest evolution, showing that likelihood can estimate incorrect ancestral states with strong statistical support. The best-fitting model suggests that crests evolved once and were lost repeatedly, supporting the hypothesis that sexually selected traits may be frequently lost. We demonstrate the correlated evolution of crests and courtship behaviour and show that species with larger numbers of crest-related traits have larger repertoires of behaviours. We also show that phenotypically plastic morphological traits can be maintained over long macroevolutionary timescales (∼25-48 Myr). Finally, we use salamandrids to address how novel structures may arise, and support a model involving the expansion and subdivision of pre-existing structures.

  2. Convergent Evolution of Head Crests in Two Domesticated Columbids Is Associated with Different Missense Mutations in EphB2

    PubMed Central

    Vickrey, Anna I.; Domyan, Eric T.; Horvath, Martin P.; Shapiro, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Head crests are important display structures in wild bird species and are also common in domesticated lineages. Many breeds of domestic rock pigeon (Columba livia) have crests of reversed occipital feathers, and this recessive trait is associated with a nonsynonymous coding mutation in the intracellular kinase domain of EphB2 (Ephrin receptor B2). The domestic ringneck dove (Streptopelia risoria) also has a recessive crested morph with reversed occipital feathers, and interspecific crosses between crested doves and pigeons produce crested offspring, suggesting a similar genetic basis for this trait in both species. We therefore investigated EphB2 as a candidate for the head crest phenotype of ringneck doves and identified a nonsynonymous coding mutation in the intracellular kinase domain that is significantly associated with the crested morph. This mutation is over 100 amino acid positions away from the crest mutation found in rock pigeons, yet both mutations are predicted to negatively affect the function of ATP-binding pocket. Furthermore, bacterial toxicity assays suggest that “crest” mutations in both species severely impact kinase activity. We conclude that head crests are associated with different mutations in the same functional domain of the same gene in two different columbid species, thereby representing striking evolutionary convergence in morphology and molecules. PMID:26104009

  3. Cardiac neural crest is dispensable for outflow tract septation in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Hoon; Saint-Jeannet, Jean-Pierre

    2011-05-01

    In vertebrate embryos, cardiac precursor cells of the primary heart field are specified in the lateral mesoderm. These cells converge at the ventral midline to form the linear heart tube, and give rise to the atria and the left ventricle. The right ventricle and the outflow tract are derived from an adjacent population of precursors known as the second heart field. In addition, the cardiac neural crest contributes cells to the septum of the outflow tract to separate the systemic and the pulmonary circulations. The amphibian heart has a single ventricle and an outflow tract with an incomplete spiral septum; however, it is unknown whether the cardiac neural crest is also involved in outflow tract septation, as in amniotes. Using a combination of tissue transplantations and molecular analyses in Xenopus we show that the amphibian outflow tract is derived from a second heart field equivalent to that described in birds and mammals. However, in contrast to what we see in amniotes, it is the second heart field and not the cardiac neural crest that forms the septum of the amphibian outflow tract. In Xenopus, cardiac neural crest cells remain confined to the aortic sac and arch arteries and never populate the outflow tract cushions. This significant difference suggests that cardiac neural crest cell migration into the cardiac cushions is an amniote-specific characteristic, presumably acquired to increase the mass of the outflow tract septum with the evolutionary need for a fully divided circulation.

  4. Zebrafish Endzone Regulates Neural Crest-Derived Chromatophore Differentiation and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Arduini, Brigitte L.; Gallagher, Glen R.; Henion, Paul D.

    2008-01-01

    The development of neural crest-derived pigment cells has been studied extensively as a model for cellular differentiation, disease and environmental adaptation. Neural crest-derived chromatophores in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) consist of three types: melanophores, xanthophores and iridiphores. We have identified the zebrafish mutant endzone (enz), that was isolated in a screen for mutants with neural crest development phenotypes, based on an abnormal melanophore pattern. We have found that although wild-type numbers of chromatophore precursors are generated in the first day of development and migrate normally in enz mutants, the numbers of all three chromatophore cell types that ultimately develop are reduced. Further, differentiated melanophores and xanthophores subsequently lose dendricity, and iridiphores are reduced in size. We demonstrate that enz function is required cell autonomously by melanophores and that the enz locus is located on chromosome 7. In addition, zebrafish enz appears to selectively regulate chromatophore development within the neural crest lineage since all other major derivatives develop normally. Our results suggest that enz is required relatively late in the development of all three embryonic chromatophore types and is normally necessary for terminal differentiation and the maintenance of cell size and morphology. Thus, although developmental regulation of different chromatophore sublineages in zebrafish is in part genetically distinct, enz provides an example of a common regulator of neural crest-derived chromatophore differentiation and morphology. PMID:18665240

  5. Ancient evolutionary origin of vertebrate enteric neurons from trunk-derived neural crest.

    PubMed

    Green, Stephen A; Uy, Benjamin R; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-20

    The enteric nervous system of jawed vertebrates arises primarily from vagal neural crest cells that migrate to the foregut and subsequently colonize and innervate the entire gastrointestinal tract. Here we examine development of the enteric nervous system in the basal jawless vertebrate the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) to gain insight into its evolutionary origin. Surprisingly, we find no evidence for the existence of a vagally derived enteric neural crest population in the lamprey. Rather, labelling with the lipophilic dye DiI shows that late-migrating cells, originating from the trunk neural tube and associated with nerve fibres, differentiate into neurons within the gut wall and typhlosole. We propose that these trunk-derived neural crest cells may be homologous to Schwann cell precursors, recently shown in mammalian embryos to populate post-embryonic parasympathetic ganglia, including enteric ganglia. Our results suggest that neural-crest-derived Schwann cell precursors made an important contribution to the ancient enteric nervous system of early jawless vertebrates, a role that was largely subsumed by vagal neural crest cells in early gnathostomes.

  6. cMyc Regulates the Size of the Premigratory Neural Crest Stem Cell Pool.

    PubMed

    Kerosuo, Laura; Bronner, Marianne E

    2016-12-06

    The neural crest is a transient embryonic population that originates within the central nervous system (CNS) and then migrates into the periphery and differentiates into multiple cell types. The mechanisms that govern neural crest stem-like characteristics and self-renewal ability are poorly understood. Here, we show that the proto-oncogene cMyc is a critical factor in the chick dorsal neural tube, where it regulates the size of the premigratory neural crest stem cell pool. Loss of cMyc dramatically decreases the number of emigrating neural crest cells due to reduced self-renewal capacity, increased cell death, and shorter duration of the emigration process. Interestingly, rather than via E-Box binding, cMyc acts in the dorsal neural tube by interacting with another transcription factor, Miz1, to promote self-renewal. The finding that cMyc operates in a non-canonical manner in the premigratory neural crest highlights the importance of examining its role at specific time points and in an in vivo context.

  7. Neural crest derivatives in ocular development: discerning the eye of the storm.

    PubMed

    Williams, Antionette L; Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2015-06-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are vertebrate-specific transient, multipotent, migratory stem cells that play a crucial role in many aspects of embryonic development. These cells emerge from the dorsal neural tube and subsequently migrate to different regions of the body, contributing to the formation of diverse cell lineages and structures, including much of the peripheral nervous system, craniofacial skeleton, smooth muscle, skin pigmentation, and multiple ocular and periocular structures. Indeed, abnormalities in neural crest development cause craniofacial defects and ocular anomalies, such as Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and primary congenital glaucoma. Thus, understanding the molecular regulation of neural crest development is important to enhance our knowledge of the basis for congenital eye diseases, reflecting the contributions of these progenitors to multiple cell lineages. Particularly, understanding the underpinnings of neural crest formation will help to discern the complexities of eye development, as these NCCs are involved in every aspect of this process. In this review, we summarize the role of ocular NCCs in eye development, particularly focusing on congenital eye diseases associated with anterior segment defects and the interplay between three prominent molecules, PITX2, CYP1B1, and retinoic acid, which act in concert to specify a population of neural crest-derived mesenchymal progenitors for migration and differentiation, to give rise to distinct anterior segment tissues. We also describe recent findings implicating this stem cell population in ocular coloboma formation, and introduce recent evidence suggesting the involvement of NCCs in optic fissure closure and vascular development.

  8. Production of chick embryo extract for the cultivation of murine neural crest stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pajtler, Kristian; Bohrer, Anna; Maurer, Jochen; Schorle, Hubert; Schramm, Alexander; Eggert, Angelika; Schulte, Johannes Hubertus

    2010-11-27

    The neural crest arises from the neuro-ectoderm during embryogenesis and persists only temporarily. Early experiments already proofed pluripotent progenitor cells to be an integral part of the neural crest(1). Phenotypically, neural crest stem cells (NCSC) are defined by simultaneously expressing p75 (low-affine nerve growth factor receptor, LNGFR) and SOX10 during their migration from the neural crest(2,3,4,5). These progenitor cells can differentiate into smooth muscle cells, chromaffin cells, neurons and glial cells, as well as melanocytes, cartilage and bone(6,7,8,9). To cultivate NCSC in vitro, a special neural crest stem cell medium (NCSCM) is required(10). The most complex part of the NCSCM is the preparation of chick embryo extract (CEE) representing an essential source of growth factors for the NCSC as well as for other types of neural explants. Other NCSCM ingredients beside CEE are commercially available. Producing CCE using laboratory standard equipment it is of high importance to know about the challenging details as the isolation, maceration, centrifugation, and filtration processes. In this protocol we describe accurate techniques to produce a maximized amount of pure and high quality CEE.

  9. [Population and distribution of western black crested gibbon (Nomascus concolor) at Ailao Mountain, Xinping, Yunnan].

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Song; Yang, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Li, Wei

    2011-12-01

    The western black crested gibbon (Nomascus concolor) is mainly distributed in Yunnan, China. Ailao Mountain is located in central Yunnan and divided into three prefectures and six counties. This mountain forms the principle distribution range for western black crested gibbon; however, there are no published data on the gibbon population inhabiting the Xinping administrative. Take the interview results conducted in 2007 and 2009 with local people as the reference, this study conducted an extensive field survey covering all possible habitats from November 2009 to January 2010 using call surveys. Among the one hundred and twenty-four gibbon groups which were confirmed across the Ailao Mountain, the largest known population of western black crested gibbons yet, 85 groups inhabit the national nature reserve and adjacent national forest, 30 groups inhabit the provincial nature reserve and nine groups inhabit the collective forest located outside the reserve and national forest. We found that the western black crested gibbons here have a patchy distribution pattern and occur at higher densities in certain areas. Moreover, the population distribution density and elevation gradient distribution decline from north to south. The results also demonstrated the importance of Ailao Mountain in the western black crested gibbon protection.

  10. Final Report-Confirmatory Survey Results for the ABB Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, Connecticut; Revision 1 (DCN 5158-SR-02-1) (Docket No. 030-03754; RFTA No. 12-003)

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, WADE C

    2013-01-28

    The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor's procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE's decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys included gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

  11. Age-related plasma chemistry findings in the buff-crested bustard (Eupodotis ruficrista gindiana).

    PubMed

    Bailey, T A; Wernery, U; Howlett, J; Naldo, J; Samour, J H

    1998-12-01

    Blood samples were obtained from adult (> 1.5 years) and juvenile (2-8 weeks, 9-16 weeks and 17-24 weeks) captive buff-crested bustards (Eupodotis ruficrista gindiana) to study age-related changes. A total of twelve different tests were conducted using a Hitachi 90011 wet chemistry analyzer. A comparison of the values obtained was made between adult and juvenile buff-crested bustards and from the literature with other bustard species. Significant differences between adult and juvenile buff-crested bustards were found for glucose, uric acid, total protein, alkaline phosphatase, asparatate amino transferase and calcium. The results obtained from this study provide blood chemistry values for this species and demonstrate age-related differences between adult and juvenile birds.

  12. Radionuclide diagnosis and therapy of neural crest tumors using iodine-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Voute, P.A.; de Kraker, J.; Marcuse, H.R.

    1987-03-01

    The successful application of (/sup 131/I)metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in diagnosis and therapy of pheochromocytoma has led to its use in other tumors which derive from the neural crest and potentially concentrate this radiopharmaceutical as well. In the present series, (/sup 131/)MIBG total-body scintigraphy was used for detection of neuroblastoma in 47 patients and 47 cases of other neural crest tumors. The method was found to be as reliable in neuroblastoma (sensitivity 95%, specificity 100%), as it is in pheochromocytoma. Although other neural crest tumors may concentrate (/sup 131/I)MIBG, this is not a consistent finding; however, it is useful to investigate which tumors do, as this may provide an alternative treatment modality for some patients. Although followup is still very short, preliminary results of therapeutic use of (/sup 131/I) MIBG in 21 patients indicate that this treatment modality may be effective in neuroblastoma and malignant pheochromocytoma.

  13. The Hippo pathway member YAP enhances human neural crest cell fate and migration.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher J; Condurat, Alexandra Larisa; Menon, Vishal; Thomas, Ria; Azmitia, Luis M; Davis, Jason A; Pruszak, Jan

    2016-03-16

    The Hippo/YAP pathway serves as a major integrator of cell surface-mediated signals and regulates key processes during development and tumorigenesis. The neural crest is an embryonic tissue known to respond to multiple environmental cues in order to acquire appropriate cell fate and migration properties. Using multiple in vitro models of human neural development (pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells; LUHMES, NTERA2 and SH-SY5Y cell lines), we investigated the role of Hippo/YAP signaling in neural differentiation and neural crest development. We report that the activity of YAP promotes an early neural crest phenotype and migration, and provide the first evidence for an interaction between Hippo/YAP and retinoic acid signaling in this system.

  14. Elongator Protein 3 (Elp3) stabilizes Snail1 and regulates neural crest migration in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiangcai; Li, Jiejing; Zeng, Wanli; Li, Chaocui; Mao, Bingyu

    2016-01-01

    Elongator protein 3 (Elp3) is the enzymatic unit of the elongator protein complex, a histone acetyltransferase complex involved in transcriptional elongation. It has long been shown to play an important role in cell migration; however, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we showed that Elp3 is expressed in pre-migratory and migrating neural crest cells in Xenopus embryos, and knockdown of Elp3 inhibited neural crest cell migration. Interestingly, Elp3 binds Snail1 through its zinc-finger domain and inhibits its ubiquitination by β-Trcp without interfering with the Snail1/Trcp interaction. We showed evidence that Elp3-mediated stabilization of Snail1 was likely involved in the activation of N-cadherin in neural crest cells to regulate their migratory ability. Our findings provide a new mechanism for the function of Elp3 in cell migration through stabilizing Snail1, a master regulator of cell motility. PMID:27189455

  15. Evolutionary and Developmental Origins of the Cardiac Neural Crest: Building a Divided Outflow Tract

    PubMed Central

    Keyte, Anna L.; Alonzo-Johnsen, Martha; Hutson, Mary R.

    2015-01-01

    The cardiac neural crest cells (CNCCs) have played an important role in the evolution and development of the vertebrate cardiovascular system: from reinforcement of the developing aortic arch arteries early in vertebrate evolution, to later orchestration of aortic arch artery remodeling into the great arteries of the heart, and finally outflow tract septation in amniotes. A critical element necessary for the evolutionary advent of outflow tract septation was the co-evolution of the cardiac neural crest cells with the second heart field. This review highlights the major transitions in vertebrate circulatory evolution, explores the evolutionary developmental origins of the CNCCs from the third stream cranial neural crest, and explores candidate signaling pathways in CNCC and outflow tract evolution drawn from our knowledge of DiGeorge Syndrome. PMID:25227322

  16. Is Radiologic Assessment of Alveolar Crest Height Useful to Monitor Periodontal Disease Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Hattan; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Hausmann, Ernest; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary While the mainstay of periodontal assessment is clinical probing, radiographic assessment is also commonly employed and has the potential to provide facile quantitative information on the status of tooth-supporting bone. This article provides a brief review of standard methods to assess periodontal structures, including basic tenants of radiograph acquisition, assessment of alveolar crest levels, and typical patterns of bone loss seen in periodontal patients. Studies of the use of computer technology to objectively assess loss of alveolar crest from standardized and non-standardized radiographs are reviewed. Several recent developments in computer-assisted quantitation of alveolar crest height are described. Although probing measurements continue to be viewed as more practical than radiographic measurements, radiographic assessment can be made quantitative and likely easier and more precise than probing for routine assessment of periodontal disease activity. PMID:26427571

  17. Solar Simulation for the CREST Preflight Thermal-Vacuum Test at B-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    In June 2011, the multi-university sponsored Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope (CREST) has undergone thermal-vacuum qualification testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, Sandusky, Ohio. The testing was performed in the B- 2 Space Propulsion Facility vacuum chamber. The CREST was later flown over the Antarctic region as the payload of a stratospheric balloon. Solar simulation was provided by a system of planar infrared lamp arrays specifically designed for CREST. The lamp arrays, in conjunction with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled cryoshroud, achieved the required thermal conditions for the qualification tests. This report focuses on the design and analysis of the planar arrays based on first principles. Computational spreadsheets are included in the report.

  18. Tfap2a and Foxd3 regulate early steps in the development of the neural crest progenitor population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Der; Melville, David B; Montero-Balaguer, Mercedes; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K; Knapik, Ela W

    2011-12-01

    The neural crest is a stem cell-like population exclusive to vertebrates that gives rise to many different cell types including chondrocytes, neurons and melanocytes. Arising from the neural plate border at the intersection of Wnt and Bmp signaling pathways, the complexity of neural crest gene regulatory networks has made the earliest steps of induction difficult to elucidate. Here, we report that tfap2a and foxd3 participate in neural crest induction and are necessary and sufficient for this process to proceed. Double mutant tfap2a (mont blanc, mob) and foxd3 (mother superior, mos) mob;mos zebrafish embryos completely lack all neural crest-derived tissues. Moreover, tfap2a and foxd3 are expressed during gastrulation prior to neural crest induction in distinct, complementary, domains; tfap2a is expressed in the ventral non-neural ectoderm and foxd3 in the dorsal mesendoderm and ectoderm. We further show that Bmp signaling is expanded in mob;mos embryos while expression of dkk1, a Wnt signaling inhibitor, is increased and canonical Wnt targets are suppressed. These changes in Bmp and Wnt signaling result in specific perturbations of neural crest induction rather than general defects in neural plate border or dorso-ventral patterning. foxd3 overexpression, on the other hand, enhances the ability of tfap2a to ectopically induce neural crest around the neural plate, overriding the normal neural plate border limit of the early neural crest territory. Although loss of either Tfap2a or Foxd3 alters Bmp and Wnt signaling patterns, only their combined inactivation sufficiently alters these signaling gradients to abort neural crest induction. Collectively, our results indicate that tfap2a and foxd3, in addition to their respective roles in the differentiation of neural crest derivatives, also jointly maintain the balance of Bmp and Wnt signaling in order to delineate the neural crest induction domain.

  19. Evolution of neural crest and placodes: amphioxus as a model for the ancestral vertebrate?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. Z.; Holland, N. D.

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies of protochordates (ascidian tunicates and amphioxus) have given insights into possible ancestors of 2 of the characteristic features of the vertebrate head: neural crest and placodes. The neural crest probably evolved from cells on either side of the neural plate-epidermis boundary in a protochordate ancestral to the vertebrates. In amphioxus, homologues of several vertebrate neural crest marker genes (BMP2/4, Pax3/7, Msx, Dll and Snail) are expressed at the edges of the neural plate and/or adjacent nonneural ectoderm. Some of these markers are also similarly expressed in tunicates. In protochordates, however, these cells, unlike vertebrate neural crest, neither migrate as individuals through embryonic tissues nor differentiate into a wide spectrum of cell types. Therefore, while the protochordate ancestor of the vertebrates probably had the beginnings of a genetic programme for neural crest formation, this programme was augmented in the earliest vertebrates to attain definitive neural crest. Clear homologues of vertebrate placodes are lacking in protochordates. However, both amphioxus and tunicates have ectodermal sensory cells. In tunicates these are all primary neurons, sending axons to the central nervous system, while in amphioxus, the ectodermal sensory cells include both primary neurons and secondary neurons lacking axons. Comparisons of developmental gene expression suggest that the anterior ectoderm in amphioxus may be homologous to the vertebrate olfactory placode, the only vertebrate placode with primary, not secondary, neurons. Similarly, biochemical, morphological and gene expression data suggest that amphioxus and tunicates also have homologues of the adenohypophysis, one of the few vertebrate structures derived from nonneurogenic placodes. In contrast, the origin of the other vertebrate placodes is very uncertain.

  20. Reduced Dependence of Crested Ibis on Winter-Flooded Rice Fields: Implications for Their Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yiwen; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Wang, Tiejun; van Gils, Hein A. M. J.; Wang, Qi; Qing, Baoping; Ding, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    The Crested Ibis Nipponia nippon was once thought to be extinct in the wild until seven birds were discovered in a remote mountain village in China in 1981. Studies suggested that winter-flooded rice fields play an essential role in nest site selection by the Crested Ibis and hence in their survival. Considerable efforts were therefore made to conserve the winter-flooded rice fields, but these have caused conflicts between the agricultural and conservation communities. The population and geographical range of the wild Crested Ibis has expanded greatly since 1981, but there is no spatial information on the winter-flooded rice fields, nor on the current association of nest sites and winter-flooded rice fields. We mapped winter-flooded rice fields across the entire current range of Crested Ibis using innovative remote sensing and geographical information systems (GIS) techniques. The spatial relationships between the nest site clusters and winter-flooded rice fields were quantified using Ward's hierarchical clustering method and Ripley's K-function. We show that both have significantly clumped distribution patterns and that they are positively associated. However, the dependence of Crested Ibis on the winter-flooded rice fields varied significantly among the nest site clusters and has decreased over the years, indicating the absence of winter-flooded rice fields is not constraining their recovery and population expansion. We therefore recommend that efforts should be made to protect the existing winter-flooded rice fields and to restore the functionality of natural and semi-natural wetlands, to encourage both in-situ conservation and the re-introduction of the Crested Ibis. In addition, we recommend that caution should be exercised when interpreting the habitat requirements of species with a narrow distribution, particularly when that interpretation is based only on their current habitat. PMID:24874870

  1. Effects of epidermal growth factor on neural crest cells in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, C.A.; Turley, E.A.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates the release of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) from quail trunk neural crest cultures in a dose-dependent fashion. It also promotes the expression of cell-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) as detected by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation of the /sup 3/H-labeled proteoglycan. Furthermore, EGF stimulates (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into total cell DNA. These results raise the possibility that EGF or an analogous growth factor is involved in regulation of neural crest cell morphogenesis.

  2. Independent expression of the adrenergic phenotype by neural crest cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, A M

    1977-01-01

    Neural crest cells obtained from Japanese quail and grown in vitro without other embryonic tissues differentiate into adrenergic cells. These cells show intense catecholamine-specific histochemical fluorescence, and some have long, varicose neuronal processes. Ultrastructural examination shows two populations of cells, one with small (about 90 nm) dense-core vesicles resembling principal sympathetic neurons and the other with larger (about 150 nm) dense-core granules resembling chromaffin or small intensely fluorescent cells. Neuronal cells without adrenergic characteristics are also present. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that a population of cells determined along neuronal lines exists in the neural crest prior to migration. Images PMID:268641

  3. Density of bunches of native bluebunch wheatgrass and alien crested wheatgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, W.H.

    1985-10-01

    The density of bunches of bluebunch wheatgrass in a natural undisturbed stand averaged 3.28 per m/sup 2/ as compared to 2.96 per m/sup 2/ for a nearby stand of crested wheatgrass that was planted 30 years ago. Bunch density was similar in both stands indicating that spacing is a response to an environment deficient in soil water. Bunches of crested wheatgrass on the average weighed 3.5 times more than bunches of bluebunch wheatgrass and they also produced a greater weight of seedheads.

  4. Isolation and characterization of eight novel microsatellite loci in the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Dacey; Haig, Susan; Mullins, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus). Genetic variability was assessed using 60 individuals from three populations. All loci were variable with the number of alleles ranging from two to 17 per locus, and observed heterozygosity varying from 0.05 to 0.89. No loci showed signs of linkage disequilibrium and all loci conformed to Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium frequencies. Further, all loci amplified and were polymorphic in two related Phalacrocorax species. These loci should prove useful for population genetic studies of the double-crested cormorant and other pelecaniform species.

  5. Characterization of the hydraulics at natural step crests in step-pool streams via weir flow concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dust, David; Wohl, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    The hydraulics of step-pool streams are characterized by rapidly varied flow at the step crest, a hydraulic jump, and gradually varied flow in the pool unit of the step-pool sequence. The flow characteristics at the step crests act as the hydraulic control for the water surface profile within the upstream pool unit. Using both field and flume investigations, we demonstrate the use of weir flow concepts for assessing and categorizing the hydraulic characteristics of natural step-crests in step-pool streams. We categorize the results of our investigations in terms of the crest-clast, planform, longitudinal, and instream wood geometries of the step crests. The broad-crested weir equation can be expressed asQ = C* g0.5Wh3/2, where Q is the flowrate, C* is a dimensionless discharge coefficient, W is the crest width, g is the acceleration of gravity, and h is the upstream flow depth above the step crest. Although the flow over a natural step is generally more complex than for an engineered weir, the results of our investigations indicate that the C*-value for simulated and natural steps increases linearly as a function of the upstream head (h), with C* values ranging from 0.15 to 0.97. As a result, the application of weir flow concepts to natural steps provides means for (1) indirectly estimating flow rates; (2) characterizing the hydraulics for individual steps; (3) defining external and/or internal boundary conditions at step crests for hydraulic model simulations of natural or restored step-pool streams; and (4) estimating the upstream pressure force acting on step-crest clasts.

  6. Highly transparent and flexible bio-based polyimide/TiO2 and ZrO2 hybrid films with tunable refractive index, Abbe number, and memory properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tzu-Tien; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Tateyama, Seiji; Kaneko, Tatsuo; Liou, Guey-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    The novel bio-based polyimide (4ATA-PI) and the corresponding PI hybrids of TiO2 or ZrO2 with excellent optical properties and thermal stability have been prepared successfully. The highly transparent 4ATA-PI containing carboxylic acid groups in the backbone could provide reaction sites for organic-inorganic bonding to obtain homogeneous hybrid films. These PI hybrid films showed a tunable refractive index (1.60-1.81 for 4ATA-PI/TiO2 and 1.60-1.80 for 4ATA-PI/ZrO2), and the 4ATA-PI/ZrO2 hybrid films revealed a higher optical transparency and Abbe's number than those of the 4ATA-PI/TiO2 system due to a larger band gap of ZrO2. By introducing TiO2 and ZrO2 as the electron acceptor into the 4ATA-PI system, the hybrid materials have a lower LUMO energy level which could facilitate and stabilize the charge transfer complex. Therefore, memory devices derived from these PI hybrid films exhibited tunable memory properties from DRAM, SRAM, to WORM with a different TiO2 or ZrO2 content from 0 wt% to 50 wt% with a high ON/OFF ratio (108). In addition, the different energy levels of TiO2 and ZrO2 revealed specifically unique memory characteristics, implying the potential application of the prepared 4ATA-PI/TiO2 and 4ATA-PI/ZrO2 hybrid films in highly transparent memory devices.The novel bio-based polyimide (4ATA-PI) and the corresponding PI hybrids of TiO2 or ZrO2 with excellent optical properties and thermal stability have been prepared successfully. The highly transparent 4ATA-PI containing carboxylic acid groups in the backbone could provide reaction sites for organic-inorganic bonding to obtain homogeneous hybrid films. These PI hybrid films showed a tunable refractive index (1.60-1.81 for 4ATA-PI/TiO2 and 1.60-1.80 for 4ATA-PI/ZrO2), and the 4ATA-PI/ZrO2 hybrid films revealed a higher optical transparency and Abbe's number than those of the 4ATA-PI/TiO2 system due to a larger band gap of ZrO2. By introducing TiO2 and ZrO2 as the electron acceptor into the 4ATA-PI system

  7. Highly transparent and flexible bio-based polyimide/TiO2 and ZrO2 hybrid films with tunable refractive index, Abbe number, and memory properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu-Tien; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Tateyama, Seiji; Kaneko, Tatsuo; Liou, Guey-Sheng

    2016-07-07

    The novel bio-based polyimide (4ATA-PI) and the corresponding PI hybrids of TiO2 or ZrO2 with excellent optical properties and thermal stability have been prepared successfully. The highly transparent 4ATA-PI containing carboxylic acid groups in the backbone could provide reaction sites for organic-inorganic bonding to obtain homogeneous hybrid films. These PI hybrid films showed a tunable refractive index (1.60-1.81 for 4ATA-PI/TiO2 and 1.60-1.80 for 4ATA-PI/ZrO2), and the 4ATA-PI/ZrO2 hybrid films revealed a higher optical transparency and Abbe's number than those of the 4ATA-PI/TiO2 system due to a larger band gap of ZrO2. By introducing TiO2 and ZrO2 as the electron acceptor into the 4ATA-PI system, the hybrid materials have a lower LUMO energy level which could facilitate and stabilize the charge transfer complex. Therefore, memory devices derived from these PI hybrid films exhibited tunable memory properties from DRAM, SRAM, to WORM with a different TiO2 or ZrO2 content from 0 wt% to 50 wt% with a high ON/OFF ratio (10(8)). In addition, the different energy levels of TiO2 and ZrO2 revealed specifically unique memory characteristics, implying the potential application of the prepared 4ATA-PI/TiO2 and 4ATA-PI/ZrO2 hybrid films in highly transparent memory devices.

  8. 78 FR 26358 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With the Bureau of Land Management a. Date and Time of Meeting: Wednesday, May 8, 2013... with the staff of the Bureau of Land Management to improve agency coordination and discuss the...

  9. 78 FR 25263 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With the Bureau of Land Management a. Date and Time of Meeting: Wednesday, May 8, 2013... meet with the staff of the Bureau of Land Management to improve agency coordination and discuss...

  10. 77 FR 43280 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Management Act and the Federal Power Act), on the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project. e. All... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With the Bureau of Land Management a. Date and Time of Meeting: Wednesday, August...

  11. Combinatorial transcriptional interaction within the Cardiac Neural Crest: a pair of HANDs in heart formation

    PubMed Central

    Firulli, Anthony B.; Conway, Simon J.

    2008-01-01

    The cardiac neural crest migrate from rostral dorsal neural folds and populate the branchial arches, which directly contribute to cardiac-outflow structures. Although neural crest cell specification is associated with a number of morphogenic factors, little is understood about the mechanisms by which transcription factors actually implement the transcriptional programs that dictate cell migration and later the differentiation into the proper cell types within the heart. It is clear from genetic evidence that members of the paired box family and basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors from the twist family of proteins are expressed in and play an important function in cardiac neural crest specification and differentiation. Interestingly, both paired box and bHLH factors can function as dimers and in the case of twist family bHLH factors partner choice can clearly dictate a change in transcriptional program. The focus of this review is to consider the role that the protein-protein interactions of these transcription factors may play determining cardiac neural crest specification and differentiation and how genetic alteration of transcription factor stoichiometry within the cell may reflect more than a simple null event. PMID:15269889

  12. T-CREST: A Time-Predictable Multi-Core Platform for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, Martin; Silva, Claudio; Rocha, Andre

    2014-08-01

    Space systems are hard real-time systems, where the worst-case execution time (WCET) of tasks needs to be known to prove absence of deadline misses. For simple processor and memory architectures it is possible to statically derive a safe upper bound of the WCET. However, future requirements in more autonomous missions require more processing power. This increase in processing power is approached by multi-core processors. However, current multi-core processors are not WCET analyzable.The mission of T-CREST is to develop tools and build a multi-core system that provides high performance, but be WCET analyzable. The T-CREST time-predictable system will simplify the safety argument with respect to the maximum execution time and increase the performance with multi-core technology. Thus the T-CREST system will result in lower costs for safety-relevant applications, reducing system complexity, simultaneously providing faster time-predictable execution. Most of the T-CREST technology is available in open-source.

  13. Evolution of cranial development and the role of neural crest: insights from amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Hanken, James; Gross, Joshua B

    2005-01-01

    Contemporary studies of vertebrate cranial development document the essential role played by the embryonic neural crest as both a source of adult tissues and a locus of cranial form and patterning. Yet corresponding and basic features of cranial evolution, such as the extent of conservation vs. variation among species in the contribution of the neural crest to specific structures, remain to be adequately resolved. Investigation of these features requires comparable data from species that are both phylogenetically appropriate and taxonomically diverse. One key group are amphibians, which are uniquely able to inform our understanding of the ancestral patterns of ontogeny in fishes and tetrapods as well as the evolution of presumably derived patterns reported for amniotes. Recent data support the hypothesis that a prominent contribution of the neural crest to cranial skeletal and muscular connective tissues is a fundamental property that evolved early in vertebrate history and is retained in living forms. The contribution of the neural crest to skull bones appears to be more evolutionarily labile than that of cartilages, although significance of the limited comparative data is difficult to establish at present. Results underline the importance of accurate and reliable homology assessments for evaluating the contrasting patterns of derivation reported for the three principal tetrapod models: mouse, chicken and frog. PMID:16313386

  14. 76 FR 15971 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference a. Date and Time of Meeting: Friday, April 15, 2011 at 9 a.m. (Pacific Time)....

  15. 76 FR 22699 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference a. Date and Time of Meeting: Friday, May 6, 2011 at 1 p.m. (Pacific Time)....

  16. Defining properties of neural crest-derived progenitor cells from the apex of human developing tooth.

    PubMed

    Degistirici, Ozer; Jaquiery, Claude; Schönebeck, Bodo; Siemonsmeier, Jürgen; Götz, Werner; Martin, Ivan; Thie, Michael

    2008-02-01

    The connective tissue of the human tooth arises from cells that are derived from the cranial neural crest and, thus, are termed as "ectomesenchymal cells." Here, cells being located in a pad-like tissue adjacent to the apex of the developing tooth, which we designated the third molar pad, were separated by the microexplant technique. When outgrowing from the explant, dental neural crest-derived progenitor cells (dNC-PCs) adhered to plastic, proliferated steadily, and displayed a fibroblast-like morphology. At the mRNA level, dNC-PCs expressed neural crest marker genes like Sox9, Snail1, Snail2, Twist1, Msx2, and Dlx6. Cytofluorometric analysis indicated that cells were positive for CD49d (alpha4 integrin), CD56 (NCAM), and PDGFRalpha, while negative for CD31, CD34, CD45, and STRO-1. dNC-PCs could be differentiated into neurogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages and were shown to produce bone matrix in athymic mice. These results demonstrate that human third molar pad possesses neural crest-derived cells that represent multipotent stem/progenitor cells. As a rather large amount of dNC-PCs could be obtained from each single third molar, cells may be used to regenerate a wide range of tissues within the craniofacial region of humans.

  17. OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCES CELL DEATH IN CD-1 MOUSE CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCES CELL DEATH IN CD-1 MOUSE CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO. J.B. Smith, K.K. Sulik, E.S. Hunter III. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.
    The induction of craniofacial defects by ethanol exposure is mediated in part by...

  18. Donor Site Evaluation: Anterior Iliac Crest Following Secondary Alveolar Bone Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Vura, Nandagopal; Reddy K., Rajiv; R., Sudhir; G., Rajasekhar; Kaluvala, Varun Raja

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The use of autogenous bone graft for Secondary alveolar bone grafting is well established in the treatment of cleft lip and palate patients. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate post-operative morbidity of anterior iliac crest graft after secondary alveolar bone grafting in cleft patients. Material and Methods: Forty patients during the period from July 2008 to March 2013, who underwent secondary alveolar bone grafting by harvesting graft from anterior iliac crest in Mamata Dental Hospital, Khammam, Andhra Pradesh, India are included in the present study. Unilateral and bilateral cleft patients who had undergone secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) with anterior iliac crest as their donor site have been selected and post- operative complications from the surgery were evaluated with the help of a questionnaire which included pain, gait disturbances, numbness and scar problems (infection, irritation). Results: Patients who were operated gave maximum score for pain as 8 on visual analogue scale. No pain was observed in any of the cases after 8 days, gait disturbances were seen in all patients (limping) for 2-6 days, there was no post-operative numbness with all the patients returning to their routine in 6- 15 days and 90% of the patients gave a satisfied response towards scar. Conclusion: From the results in our study the morbidity after harvesting bone from iliac crest was found to be moderate to low, which had minimal complications and were well tolerated and greater acceptance from the patient. PMID:24392424

  19. Neural Crest Derivatives in Ocular Development: Discerning the Eye of the Storm

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Antionette L.; Bohnsack, Brenda L.

    2017-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are vertebrate-specific transient, multipotent, migratory stem cells that play a crucial role in many aspects of embryonic development. These cells emerge from the dorsal neural tube and subsequently migrate to different regions of the body, contributing to the formation of diverse cell lineages and structures, including much of the peripheral nervous system, craniofacial skeleton, smooth muscle, skin pigmentation, and multiple ocular and periocular structures. Indeed, abnormalities in neural crest development cause craniofacial defects and ocular anomalies, such as Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and primary congenital glaucoma. Thus, understanding the molecular regulation of neural crest development is important to enhance our knowledge of the basis for congenital eye diseases, reflecting the contributions of these progenitors to multiple cell lineages. Particularly, understanding the underpinnings of NC formation will help to discern the complexities of eye development, as these NCCs are involved in every aspect of this process. In this review, we summarize the role of ocular NCCs in eye development, particularly focusing on congenital eye diseases associated with anterior segment defects and the interplay between three prominent molecules, Pitx2, Cyp1b1, and RA, which act in concert to specify a population of neural crest-derived mesenchymal progenitors for migration and differentiation, to give rise to distinct anterior segment tissues. We also describe recent findings implicating this stem cell population in ocular coloboma formation, and introduce recent evidence suggesting the involvement of NCCs in optic fissure closure and vascular angiogenesis. PMID:26043871

  20. Evolution of cranial development and the role of neural crest: insights from amphibians.

    PubMed

    Hanken, James; Gross, Joshua B

    2005-11-01

    Contemporary studies of vertebrate cranial development document the essential role played by the embryonic neural crest as both a source of adult tissues and a locus of cranial form and patterning. Yet corresponding and basic features of cranial evolution, such as the extent of conservation vs. variation among species in the contribution of the neural crest to specific structures, remain to be adequately resolved. Investigation of these features requires comparable data from species that are both phylogenetically appropriate and taxonomically diverse. One key group are amphibians, which are uniquely able to inform our understanding of the ancestral patterns of ontogeny in fishes and tetrapods as well as the evolution of presumably derived patterns reported for amniotes. Recent data support the hypothesis that a prominent contribution of the neural crest to cranial skeletal and muscular connective tissues is a fundamental property that evolved early in vertebrate history and is retained in living forms. The contribution of the neural crest to skull bones appears to be more evolutionarily labile than that of cartilages, although significance of the limited comparative data is difficult to establish at present. Results underline the importance of accurate and reliable homology assessments for evaluating the contrasting patterns of derivation reported for the three principal tetrapod models: mouse, chicken and frog.

  1. Ridge Expansion by Flapless Split Crest and Immediate Implant Placement: Evolution of the Technique.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Antonio; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Amato, Massimo; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Various treatment strategies and techniques have been proposed to perform alveolar bone augmentation; most common are guided bone regeneration, split crest, and autologous bone grafting. All of these techniques are reported to possess bone regenerative properties of osteoinduction and osteoconduction in relation to regenerated bone survival. Split crest resulted to be one of the most reliable bone augmentation techniques. In this study, we describe a new flapless-modified split crest technique on 4 patients to optimize the bone regeneration with bone augmentation implant insertion in 1 single stage. The rationale of this technique is to obtain a proper buccal cortex expansion preserving its vascular supply and avoiding periosteal elevation for better cortical bone preservation. The main advantages of this technique consist in a single surgical stage without donor sites, vascular periosteal preservation of vestibular cortical walls, preservation of alveolar bone height avoiding bone loss after implant kit drilling, and preservation of proper cortical thickness on both sides, thereby saving periosteal nourishment on the vestibular side. Indication for this technique could be extended to almost every implant insertion for alveolar height saving at drilling time for implant insertion, because of the alveolar crest shape.

  2. The hypoxia factor Hif-1α controls neural crest chemotaxis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Barriga, Elias H.; Maxwell, Patrick H.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important mechanisms that promotes metastasis is the stabilization of Hif-1 (hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1). We decided to test whether Hif-1α also was required for early embryonic development. We focused our attention on the development of the neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population whose behavior has been likened to cancer metastasis. Inhibition of Hif-1α by antisense morpholinos in Xenopus laevis or zebrafish embryos led to complete inhibition of neural crest migration. We show that Hif-1α controls the expression of Twist, which in turn represses E-cadherin during epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of neural crest cells. Thus, Hif-1α allows cells to initiate migration by promoting the release of cell–cell adhesions. Additionally, Hif-1α controls chemotaxis toward the chemokine SDF-1 by regulating expression of its receptor Cxcr4. Our results point to Hif-1α as a novel and key regulator that integrates EMT and chemotaxis during migration of neural crest cells. PMID:23712262

  3. The Pluripotency of Neural Crest Cells and Their Role in Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Le Douarin, Nicole M; Dupin, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) is, in the Chordate phylum, an innovation of vertebrates, which exhibits several original characteristics: its component cells are pluripotent and give rise to both ectodermal and mesodermal cell types. Moreover, during the early stages of neurogenesis, the NC cells exert a paracrine stimulating effect on the development of the preotic brain.

  4. Decline of traditional rice farming constrains the recovery of the endangered Asian crested ibis (Nipponia nippon).

    PubMed

    Sun, Yiwen; Wang, Tiejun; Skidmore, Andrew K; Wang, Qi; Ding, Changqing

    2015-12-01

    Traditional agriculture benefits a rich diversity of plants and animals. The winter-flooded rice fields in the Qinling Mountains, China, are the last refuge for the endangered Asian crested ibis (Nipponia nippon), and intensive efforts have been made to protect this anthropogenic habitat. Analyses of multi-temporal satellite data indicate that winter-flooded rice fields have been continuously reduced across the current range of crested ibis during the past two decades. The rate of loss of these fields in the core-protected areas has unexpectedly increased to a higher level than that in non-protected areas in the past decade. The best fit (R (2) = 0.87) numerical response model of the crested ibis population shows that a reduction of winter-flooded rice fields decreases population growth and predicts that the population growth will be constrained by the decline of traditional winter-flooded rice fields in the coming decades. Our findings suggest that the decline of traditional rice farming is likely to continue to pose a threat to the long-term survival and recovery of the crested ibis population in China.

  5. Cdon promotes neural crest migration by regulating N-cadherin localization.

    PubMed

    Powell, Davalyn R; Williams, Jason S; Hernandez-Lagunas, Laura; Salcedo, Ernesto; O'Brien, Jenean H; Artinger, Kristin Bruk

    2015-11-15

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are essential embryonic progenitor cells that are unique to vertebrates and form a remarkably complex and coordinated system of highly motile cells. Migration of NCCs occurs along specific pathways within the embryo in response to both environmental cues and cell-cell interactions within the neural crest population. Here, we demonstrate a novel role for the putative Sonic hedgehog (Shh) receptor and cell adhesion regulator, cdon, in zebrafish neural crest migration. cdon is expressed in developing premigratory NCCs but is downregulated once the cells become migratory. Knockdown of cdon results in aberrant migration of trunk NCCs: crestin positive cells can emigrate out of the neural tube but stall shortly after the initiation of migration. Live cell imaging analysis demonstrates reduced directedness of migration, increased velocity and mispositioned cell protrusions. In addition, transplantation analysis suggests that cdon is required cell-autonomously for directed NCC migration in the trunk. Interestingly, N-cadherin is mislocalized following cdon knockdown suggesting that the role of cdon in NCCs is to regulate N-cadherin localization. Our results reveal a novel role for cdon in zebrafish neural crest migration, and suggest a mechanism by which Cdon is required to localize N-cadherin to the cell membrane in migratory NCCs for directed migration.

  6. Forensic age estimation through evaluation of the apophyseal ossification of the iliac crest in Western Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kui; Dong, Xiao-ai; Chen, Xiao-gang; Li, Yuan; Deng, Zhen-hua

    2015-07-01

    The criminal age estimation procedures have gained greatest significance to date, a reliable age diagnostics may depend on data of skeletal maturation from different socioeconomic status. In order to establish the iliac crest apophysis as a possible criterion for forensic age estimation in a different socioeconomic status, and to examine the pace of ossification for the iliac crest apophysis in Western Chinese, one thousand seven hundreds and seventy-seven conventional pelvic radiographs relating to West China Han group routinely taken between January 2010 and June 2012 have been sighted. The data was analysed with separation of the sexes. The results indicated that stage 2a was last observed in females at the age of 17.00 and in males at the age of 18.01, stage 3a was first achieved in females at the age of 14.46 and in males at the age of 15.31, stage 4 was observed between 17.95 and 25.98 years for male and between 18.36 and 25.95 years for female. By comparison with previous studies, our research indicated that Western Chinese presents a delaying development for the iliac crest apophysis. Furthermore, the present study with eight stages of ossification for the iliac crest offers a valuable alternative method of estimation of 18 years of age for Western Chinese.

  7. Nest box use and productivity of great crested flycatchers in prescribed-burned longleaf pine forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Seginak, J.T.

    2000-01-01

    Managing for the endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker (Picoides borealis) on federal lands requires burning large tracts of mature pine forests every 3-5 yr. Many cavity trees that serve as potential nest sites for primary and secondary hole-nesting birds are destroyed by fire. We assessed the efficacy of a nest box program for the Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus) at Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge, an area intensively managed for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. During 1996-1998, we installed and monitored 330 (30 in each of 11 sites) nest boxes in mature (>60 yr) longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) tracts that were burned either in April-June (warm season) or December-March (cool season). Prescribed-burned sites were nearly devoid of snags; we estimated only 0.8/ ha in cool-season burns and 1.7/ha in warm-season burns. Great Crested Flycatchers built nests in 20% of the boxes available to them. Clutch sizes were larger in warm-season burns than in cool-season burns, but fledging success (fledglings/nest hatching -1 egg) was lower. Twenty-two of 59 Great Crested Flycatcher nests were depredated and the proportions in each burn class were similar. We recommend the installation of nest boxes for Great Crested Flycatchers in prescribed-burned pine forests, but additional research is needed in these habitats on nest depredation rates and causes.

  8. 77 FR 4274 - Migratory Bird Permits; Double-Crested Cormorant Management in the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AX82 Migratory Bird Permits; Double-Crested Cormorant Management in the United States AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Request for...

  9. 50 CFR 21.47 - Depredation order for double-crested cormorants at aquaculture facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.47 Depredation order for double-crested cormorants at..., taped calls, or other devices to lure within gun range birds committing or about to commit...

  10. 50 CFR 21.47 - Depredation order for double-crested cormorants at aquaculture facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.47 Depredation order for double-crested cormorants at... order may use decoys, taped calls, or other devices to lure within gun range birds committing or...

  11. 50 CFR 21.47 - Depredation order for double-crested cormorants at aquaculture facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.47 Depredation order for double-crested cormorants at..., taped calls, or other devices to lure within gun range birds committing or about to commit...

  12. Disseminated pulmonary adiaspiromycosis in a crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Morandi, Federico; Galuppi, Roberta; Buitrago, Maria J; Delogu, Mauro; Lowenstine, Linda J; Panarese, Serena; Benazzi, Cinzia; Sarli, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Adiaspiromycosis is primarily a necrotizing granulomatous pneumonia caused by a dimorphic fungus of the genus Emmonsia. A young crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata) found dead showed multiple fractures, chronic pleuritis, and granulomatous pneumonia. Microscopically, cystic structures were consistent with adiaspiromycosis by Emmonsia crescens. The diagnosis was confirmed using molecular methods.

  13. Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by an Incarcerated Hernia after Iliac Crest Bone Harvest

    PubMed Central

    d'Hondt, Steven; Soysal, Savas; Kirchhoff, Philipp; Oertli, Daniel; Heizmann, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    The iliac crest has become an often used site for autogenous bone graft, because of the easy access it affords. One of the less common complications that can occur after removal is a graft-site hernia. It was first reported in 1945 (see the work by Oldfield, 1945). We report a case of iliac crest bone hernia in a 53-year-old male who was admitted for elective resection of a pseudarthrosis and reconstruction of the left femur with iliac crest bone from the right side. One and a half months after initial surgery, the patient presented with increasing abdominal pain and signs of bowel obstruction. A CT scan of the abdominal cavity showed an obstruction of the small bowel caused by the bone defect of the right iliac crest. A laparoscopy showed a herniation of the small bowel. Due to collateral vessels of the peritoneum caused by portal hypertension, an IPOM (intraperitoneal onlay-mesh) occlusion could not be performed. We performed a conventional ventral hernia repair with an onlay mesh. The recovery was uneventful. PMID:22084778

  14. 50 CFR 21.47 - Depredation order for double-crested cormorants at aquaculture facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...? This depredation order applies to commercial freshwater aquaculture facilities and to State and Federal... freshwater aquaculture stocks to take, without a Federal permit, double-crested cormorants when they are... only during daylight hours and only within the boundaries of freshwater commercial...

  15. Id expression in amphioxus and lamprey highlights the role of gene cooption during neural crest evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulemans, Daniel; McCauley, David; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    Neural crest cells are unique to vertebrates and generate many of the adult structures that differentiate them from their closest invertebrate relatives, the cephalochordates. Id genes are robust markers of neural crest cells at all stages of development. We compared Id gene expression in amphioxus and lamprey to ask if cephalochordates deploy Id genes at the neural plate border and dorsal neural tube in a manner similar to vertebrates. Furthermore, we examined whether Id expression in these cells is a basal vertebrate trait or a derived feature of gnathostomes. We found that while expression of Id genes in the mesoderm and endoderm is conserved between amphioxus and vertebrates, expression in the lateral neural plate border and dorsal neural tube is a vertebrate novelty. Furthermore, expression of lamprey Id implies that recruitment of Id genes to these cells occurred very early in the vertebrate lineage. Based on expression in amphioxus we postulate that Id cooption conferred sensory cell progenitor-like properties upon the lateral neurectoderm, and pharyngeal mesoderm-like properties upon cranial neural crest. Amphioxus Id expression is also consistent with homology between the anterior neurectoderm of amphioxus and the presumptive placodal ectoderm of vertebrates. These observations support the idea that neural crest evolution was driven in large part by cooption of multipurpose transcriptional regulators from other tissues and cell types.

  16. HALOACETIC ACIDS AND KINASE INHIBITORS PERTURB MOUSE NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    HUNTER, E.S.1, J. SMITH2, J. ANDREWS1. 1 Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park and 2 Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Haloacetic acids and kinase inhibitors perturb mouse neural crest cells in vi...

  17. Enteric neurogenesis by neural crest-derived branchial arch mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Ciment, G; Weston, J A

    We have previously described a monoclonal antibody (E/C8) that recognizes an avian-specific epitope present in a variety of embryonic cells, including some cultured neural crest cells, both central and peripheral neurones in vivo, and apparently non-neuronal neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells of the posterior (third and fourth) branchial arches. The branchial arches are transient embryonic structures that serve as the lateral and ventral walls of the primitive pharynx of vertebrates and are contiguous with the developing gut. We report here that E/C8-positive mesenchymal cells of the arches can develop into neurones spontaneously in culture, or can migrate into aneural guts with which they are co-cultured and form enteric ganglia. In contrast, these cells do not develop into melanocytes--another derivative of the neural crest--in various permissive conditions. These results demonstrate that the mesenchymal cells of the posterior branchial arches are a developmentally restricted population of neural crest-derived cells, and some may serve as precursors for neurones of the enteric nervous system.

  18. 50 CFR 21.48 - Depredation order for double-crested cormorants to protect public resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... oiling must use 100 percent corn oil, a substance exempted from regulation by the U.S. Environmental... Director deems the activity a threat to the long-term sustainability of double-crested cormorants or any... resource (e.g., biological, environmental, and socioeconomic); and (vi) A discussion of how control...

  19. 50 CFR 21.48 - Depredation order for double-crested cormorants to protect public resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... oiling must use 100 percent corn oil, a substance exempted from regulation by the U.S. Environmental... Director deems the activity a threat to the long-term sustainability of double-crested cormorants or any... resource (e.g., biological, environmental, and socioeconomic); and (vi) A discussion of how control...

  20. Multiple Cranial Organ Defects after Conditionally Knocking Out Fgf10 in the Neural Crest

    PubMed Central

    Teshima, Tathyane H. N.; Lourenco, Silvia V.; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2016-01-01

    Fgf10 is necessary for the development of a number of organs that fail to develop or are reduced in size in the null mutant. Here we have knocked out Fgf10 specifically in the neural crest driven by Wnt1cre. The Wnt1creFgf10fl/fl mouse phenocopies many of the null mutant defects, including cleft palate, loss of salivary glands, and ocular glands, highlighting the neural crest origin of the Fgf10 expressing mesenchyme surrounding these organs. In contrast tissues such as the limbs and lungs, where Fgf10 is expressed by the surrounding mesoderm, were unaffected, as was the pituitary gland where Fgf10 is expressed by the neuroepithelium. The circumvallate papilla of the tongue formed but was hypoplastic in the conditional and Fgf10 null embryos, suggesting that other sources of FGF can compensate in development of this structure. The tracheal cartilage rings showed normal patterning in the conditional knockout, indicating that the source of Fgf10 for this tissue is mesodermal, which was confirmed using Wnt1cre-dtTom to lineage trace the boundary of the neural crest in this region. The thyroid, thymus, and parathyroid glands surrounding the trachea were present but hypoplastic in the conditional mutant, indicating that a neighboring source of mesodermal Fgf10 might be able to partially compensate for loss of neural crest derived Fgf10. PMID:27826253

  1. CSUB CREST Research on Climate Change and the San Joaquin Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krugh, W. C.; Negrini, R. M.; Baron, D.; Gillespie, J.; Horton, R. A.; Montoya, E.; Cruz-Boone, C.; Andrews, G. D.; Guo, J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the NSF-supported Centers for Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST), student and faculty researchers at California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB) have been investigating the regional impacts of climate change as well as evaluating the potential of local contributions to its abatement. Highlights of this research include; 1) the development of a high-resolution climate record from Tulare Lake sediments that spans the past 20,000 years, 2) the quantitative analysis and prediction of climate change impacts on Sierra Nevada snowpack, 3) the detailed subsurface characterization of San Joaquin Valley oilfields targeted for CO2 sequestration, and 4) the evaluation of proposed host rock suitability under simulated CO2 injection conditions. To date, CSUB CREST supported research has resulted in 26 contributions to peer-reviewed journals (currently published or in-review). A primary goal of CSUB CREST is to improve the recruitment, retention, and success of students from the local community, the majority of whom are from backgrounds under-represented in STEM disciplines. More than 28 students have been directly involved in the basic and applied research projects supported by this program. The majority of these students have received, or are on track to receive, an M.S. degree and have ultimately gained employment in a STEM field or been accepted into a Ph.D. program. This presentation, and others in this session, will focus on the accomplishments, challenges, and strategies for success gleaned from CSUB CREST Phase 1.

  2. Identification of 24 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus).

    PubMed

    Fike, Jennifer A; Devault, Travis L; Rhodes, Olin E

    2009-07-01

    Twenty-four polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus). The number of alleles ranged from two to 13 and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.032 to 0.871. The use of these loci should enable researchers and biologists to learn more about the population structure and ecology of this species.

  3. An evaluation of the crest-stage gage program in Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbert, R.A.; Carlson, D.D.; Wiche, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The crest-stage gage program in Louisiana was evaluated to determine if the data were adequate for use in developing regional flood-frequency equations and to determine if any crest-stage gages could be discontinued. An abundance of data at many crest-stage stations and a lack of data for urban area and flat-slope areas indicated a need for a shift in the number, type, and locations of gages. Extensive correlations and comparisons of annual peak flows and watershed characteristics of 96 sites resulted in a reduced network of 25 stations that could potentially be used as index sites. The adequacy of the reduced network for development and verification of regional flood-frequency equations was tested by comparing a set of regional flood-frequency equations developed using data from the full network with a set developed using data from the reduced network. The results indicate that the crest-stage gage network can be reduced to 25 stations and still provide adequate information for future flood-frequency analyses. (USGS)

  4. Crew Escape Technologies (CREST) Mission Area Requirements Study Current and Future Crew Escape Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    anthropometry and the type and location of the equipment worn by the test suboect. Based upon the data taken In the early nineteen sixties it was...3.1.1 of the CREST Specification describes the system as having -Flow stagnation fence to reduce windblast Induced loads on the head, torso and upper

  5. Development of extraocular muscles require early signals from periocular neural crest and the developing eye

    PubMed Central

    Bohnsack, Brenda L.; Gallina, Donika; Thompson, Hannah; Kasprick, Daniel; Lucarelli, Mark J.; Dootz, Gregory; Nelson, Christine; McGonnell, Imelda M.; Kahana, Alon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Identify and explain morphologic changes of the extraocular muscles (EOMs) in anophthalmic patients. Methods Retrospective chart review of patients with congenital anophthalmia, using MRI and intraoperative findings to characterize EOM morphology. We then employ molecular biology techniques in zebrafish and chick embryos to determine the relationships among the developing eye, periocular neural crest, and EOMs. Results In three human patients with bilateral congenital anophthalmia and preoperative orbital imaging, we observed a spectrum of EOM morphologies ranging from indiscernible muscle tissue to well-formed, organized EOMs. Timing of eye loss in zebrafish and chick embryos correlated with the morphology of EOM organization in the orbit (“eye socket”). In congenitally eyeless Rx3 zebrafish mutants, or following genetic ablation of the cranial neural crest cells, EOMs failed to organize, which was independent of other craniofacial muscle development. Conclusions Orbital development is dependent on interactions between the eye, neural crest, and developing EOMs. Timing of the ocular insult, in relation to neural crest migration and EOM development, is a key determinant of aberrant EOM organization. Additional research will be required to study patients with unilateral and syndromic anophthalmia, and assess for possible differences in clinical outcomes among patients with varied EOM morphology. Clinical relevance The presence and organization of EOMs in anophthalmic sockets may serve as a marker for the timing of genetic or teratogenic insults, improving genetic counseling, and assisting with surgical reconstruction and family counseling efforts. PMID:21482859

  6. Solar Simulation for the CREST Preflight Thermal-Vacuum Test at B-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011, the multi-university sponsored Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope (CREST) has undergone thermal-vacuum qualification testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, Sandusky, Ohio. The testing was performed in the B-2 Space Propulsion Facility vacuum chamber. The CREST was later flown over the Antarctic region as the payload of a stratospheric balloon. Solar simulation was provided by a system of planar infrared lamp arrays specifically designed for CREST. The lamp arrays, in conjunction with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled cold wall, achieved the required thermal conditions for the qualification tests. The following slides accompanied the presentation of the report entitled Solar Simulation for the CREST Preflight Thermal-Vacuum Test at B-2, at the 27th Aerospace Testing Seminar, October 2012. The presentation described the test article, the test facility capability, the solar simulation requirements, the highlights of the engineering approach, and the results achieved. The presentation was intended to generate interest in the report and in the B-2 test facility.

  7. Caldesmon regulates actin dynamics to influence cranial neural crest migration in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Shuyi; Kee, Yun; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Caldesmon (CaD) is an important actin modulator that associates with actin filaments to regulate cell morphology and motility. Although extensively studied in cultured cells, there is little functional information regarding the role of CaD in migrating cells in vivo. Here we show that nonmuscle CaD is highly expressed in both premigratory and migrating cranial neural crest cells of Xenopus embryos. Depletion of CaD with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides causes cranial neural crest cells to migrate a significantly shorter distance, prevents their segregation into distinct migratory streams, and later results in severe defects in cartilage formation. Demonstrating specificity, these effects are rescued by adding back exogenous CaD. Interestingly, CaD proteins with mutations in the Ca2+-calmodulin–binding sites or ErK/Cdk1 phosphorylation sites fail to rescue the knockdown phenotypes, whereas mutation of the PAK phosphorylation site is able to rescue them. Analysis of neural crest explants reveals that CaD is required for the dynamic arrangements of actin and, thus, for cell shape changes and process formation. Taken together, these results suggest that the actin-modulating activity of CaD may underlie its critical function and is regulated by distinct signaling pathways during normal neural crest migration. PMID:21795398

  8. Ontogeny in the tube-crested dinosaur Parasaurolophus (Hadrosauridae) and heterochrony in hadrosaurids

    PubMed Central

    Chok, Derek J.; Herrero, Annisa; Scolieri, Brandon; Werning, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The tube-crested hadrosaurid dinosaur Parasaurolophus is remarkable for its unusual cranial ornamentation, but little is known about its growth and development, particularly relative to well-documented ontogenetic series for lambeosaurin hadrosaurids (such as Corythosaurus, Lambeosaurus, and Hypacrosaurus). The skull and skeleton of a juvenile Parasaurolophus from the late Campanian-aged (∼75.5 Ma) Kaiparowits Formation of southern Utah, USA, represents the smallest and most complete specimen yet described for this taxon. The individual was approximately 2.5 m in body length (∼25% maximum adult body length) at death, with a skull measuring 246 mm long and a femur 329 mm long. A histological section of the tibia shows well-vascularized, woven and parallel-fibered primary cortical bone typical of juvenile ornithopods. The histological section revealed no lines of arrested growth or annuli, suggesting the animal may have still been in its first year at the time of death. Impressions of the upper rhamphotheca are preserved in association with the skull, showing that the soft tissue component for the beak extended for some distance beyond the limits of the oral margin of the premaxilla. In marked contrast with the lengthy tube-like crest in adult Parasaurolophus, the crest of the juvenile specimen is low and hemicircular in profile, with an open premaxilla-nasal fontanelle. Unlike juvenile lambeosaurins, the nasal passages occupy nearly the entirety of the crest in juvenile Parasaurolophus. Furthermore, Parasaurolophus initiated development of the crest at less than 25% maximum skull size, contrasting with 50% of maximum skull size in hadrosaurs such as Corythosaurus. This early development may correspond with the larger and more derived form of the crest in Parasaurolophus, as well as the close relationship between the crest and the respiratory system. In general, ornithischian dinosaurs formed bony cranial ornamentation at a relatively younger age and smaller size

  9. Static histomorphometry of human iliac crest and vertebral trabecular bone: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, J S; Ebbesen, E N; Mosekilde, Li

    2002-01-01

    We recently developed a new, rapid method for conducting static histomorphometry on large histologic sections. This method has now been applied on both iliac crest and lumbar vertebral bone to compare the age-related changes at these two skeletal sites and to investigate the correlation between the histomorphometric measures at the iliac crest and the vertebral body. The material comprised matched sets of unilateral transiliac crest bone biopsies and lumbar vertebral bodies (L-2) from 24 women (19-96 years) and 24 men (23-95 years) selected from a larger autopsy material. Three female subjects (80, 88, and 90 years) had a known vertebral fracture of L-2. The iliac crest biopsies and 9-mm-thick mediolateral slices of half the entire vertebral bodies were embedded in methylmetacrylate, stained with aniline blue, and scanned into a computer with a flatbed image scanner at a high resolution. With a custom-made computer program the following static histomorphometric measures were determined: trabecular bone volume; marrow and bone space star volume; node-strut analysis; trabecular bone pattern factor; trabecular thickness; trabecular number; trabecular separation; and anisotropy of bone and marrow phase. In addition, connectivity density was measured (ConnEulor method). The results showed that the age-related changes in the static histomorphometric measures are generally similar in the iliac crest and the vertebral body, and that these age-related changes are independent of gender. An exception, however, is connectivity density, where the age-related changes are similar for women and men in the vertebral body but significantly different in the iliac crest. Furthermore, the results showed that the histomorphometric measures were weakly intercorrelated between the iliac crest and the vertebral body, despite the generally similar pattern in age-related changes at these two skeletal sites. The highest correlation coefficient was found for trabecular separation (Tb.Sp; r = 0

  10. Differential response in chick survival to diet in least and crested auklets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gall, Adrian E.; Roby, D.D.; Irons, D.B.; Rose, I.C.

    2006-01-01

    Least auklets Aethia pusilla and crested auklets A. cristatella are abundant planktivorous seabirds found throughout the Bering Sea and are inextricably linked to the secondary productivity of this northern marine ecosystem. We assessed the relationship between productivity and diet in least and crested auklets by examining breeding chronology, daily survival rates (DSR) of chicks, and nestling diet composition at 2 mixed colonies on St. Lawrence Island in the northern Bering Sea during the 2000 to 2002 breeding seasons. Nestlings of both least and crested auklets hatched earlier, had higher survival rates, and were fed more of the large, oceanic copepod Neocalanus cristatus in 2002 compared to the 2 yr of lower chick survival. In contrast, during the year of lowest DSR for both auklet species (2001), the small copepod Calanus marshallae was more prevalent in the diet of least auklets and the mid-sized copepod N. flemingeri was more prevalent in the diet of crested auklets compared to the other 2 yr. The prevalence of oceanic copepods in meals fed to chicks explained much of the annual variation in DSR in least auklets. Interannual differences in timing of nest initiation, nest survival, and diet of least and crested auklets may be associated with the strength of the cold, nutrient-rich Anadyr Current, which passes in close proximity to St. Lawrence Island and has important influences on zooplankton productivity and distribution. Auklet productivity and diet composition may serve as key indicators in the overall effort to monitor the impact of climate change on the productivity of the Bering Sea.

  11. Embryonic requirements for ErbB signaling in neural crest development and adult pigment pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Budi, Erine H.; Patterson, Larissa B.; Parichy, David M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate pigment cells are derived from neural crest cells and are a useful system for studying neural crest-derived traits during post-embryonic development. In zebrafish, neural crest-derived melanophores differentiate during embryogenesis to produce stripes in the early larva. Dramatic changes to the pigment pattern occur subsequently during the larva-to-adult transformation, or metamorphosis. At this time, embryonic melanophores are replaced by newly differentiating metamorphic melanophores that form the adult stripes. Mutants with normal embryonic/early larval pigment patterns but defective adult patterns identify factors required uniquely to establish, maintain, or recruit the latent precursors to metamorphic melanophores. We show that one such mutant, picasso, lacks most metamorphic melanophores and results from mutations in the ErbB gene erbb3b, encoding an EGFR-like receptor tyrosine kinase. To identify critical periods for ErbB activities, we treated fish with pharmacological ErbB inhibitors and also knocked-down erbb3b by morpholino injection. These analyses reveal an embryonic critical period for ErbB signaling in promoting later pigment pattern metamorphosis, despite the normal patterning of embryonic/early larval melanophores. We further demonstrate a peak requirement during neural crest migration that correlates with early defects in neural crest pathfinding and peripheral ganglion formation. Finally, we show that erbb3b activities are both autonomous and non-autonomous to the metamorphic melanophore lineage. These data identify a very early, embryonic, requirement for erbb3b in the development of much later metamorphic melanophores, and suggest complex modes by which ErbB signals promote adult pigment pattern development. PMID:18508863

  12. Identification and dissection of a key enhancer mediating cranial neural crest specific expression of transcription factor, Ets-1.

    PubMed

    Barembaum, Meyer; Bronner, Marianne E

    2013-10-15

    Neural crest cells form diverse derivatives that vary according to their level of origin along the body axis, with only cranial neural crest cells contributing to facial skeleton. Interestingly, the transcription factor Ets-1 is uniquely expressed in cranial but not trunk neural crest, where it functions as a direct input into neural crest specifier genes, Sox10 and FoxD3. We have isolated and interrogated a cis-regulatory element, conserved between birds and mammals, that drives reporter expression in a manner that recapitulates that of endogenous Ets-1 expression in the neural crest. Within a minimal Ets-1 enhancer region, mutation of putative binding sites for SoxE, homeobox, Ets, TFAP2 or Fox proteins results in loss or reduction of neural crest enhancer activity. Morpholino-mediated loss-of-function experiments show that Sox9, Pax7, Msx1/2, Ets-1, TFAP2A and FoxD3, all are required for enhancer activity. In contrast, mutation of a putative cMyc/E-box sequence augments reporter expression, consistent with this being a repressor binding site. Taken together, these results uncover new inputs into Ets-1, revealing critical links in the cranial neural crest gene regulatory network.

  13. Neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells require Wnt signaling for their development and drive invagination of the telencephalic midline.

    PubMed

    Choe, Youngshik; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic neural crest cells contribute to the development of the craniofacial mesenchyme, forebrain meninges and perivascular cells. In this study, we investigated the function of ß-catenin signaling in neural crest cells abutting the dorsal forebrain during development. In the absence of ß-catenin signaling, neural crest cells failed to expand in the interhemispheric region and produced ectopic smooth muscle cells instead of generating dermal and calvarial mesenchyme. In contrast, constitutive expression of stabilized ß-catenin in neural crest cells increased the number of mesenchymal lineage precursors suggesting that ß-catenin signaling is necessary for the expansion of neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, the loss of neural crest-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) leads to failure of telencephalic midline invagination and causes ventricular system defects. This study shows that ß-catenin signaling is required for the switch of neural crest cells to MSCs and mediates the expansion of MSCs to drive the formation of mesenchymal structures of the head. Furthermore, loss of these structures causes striking defects in forebrain morphogenesis.

  14. A statistical study of single crest phenomenon in the equatorial ionospheric anomaly region using Swarm A satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, Adel; Ghamry, Essam

    2017-03-01

    Though the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly (EIA) is represented by two crests within ±15° latitude, a single crest is also observed in the entire ionosphere. Few studies have addressed single crest phenomena. A statistical study of 2237 single crest phenomenon from the in situ electron density measurements of Swarm A satellite was investigated during December 2013-December 2015. Our analysis focused on local time, seasonal, and both geographic and geomagnetic latitudinal variations. Our results show the following observations: 1 - The maximum number of events peaks mainly in the dayside region around 0800-1200 LT and these occur mainly within the magnetic equator. 2 - The maximum amplitude of the single crests take place most prominently during equinoxes. 3 - The majority of single crests occur in the northern hemisphere. 4 - The seasonal distribution of the events shows that the summer events are located further from the magnetic equator in the northern hemisphere and shift their locations into the southern hemisphere in winter, while spring events are centered along the magnetic equator. 5 - Dayside single crest events appear close to the magnetic equator and more centered on the equator in winter season. 6 - Dawn, night and dusk side events reverse their location from northern hemisphere in summer to southern hemisphere in winter.

  15. Pax3 and Zic1 drive induction and differentiation of multipotent, migratory, and functional neural crest in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Milet, Cécile; Maczkowiak, Frédérique; Roche, Daniel D; Monsoro-Burq, Anne Hélène

    2013-04-02

    Defining which key factors control commitment of an embryonic lineage among a myriad of candidates is a longstanding challenge in developmental biology and an essential prerequisite for developing stem cell-based therapies. Commitment implies that the induced cells not only express early lineage markers but further undergo an autonomous differentiation into the lineage. The embryonic neural crest generates a highly diverse array of derivatives, including melanocytes, neurons, glia, cartilage, mesenchyme, and bone. A complex gene regulatory network has recently classified genes involved in the many steps of neural crest induction, specification, migration, and differentiation. However, which factor or combination of factors is sufficient to trigger full commitment of this multipotent lineage remains unknown. Here, we show that, in contrast to other potential combinations of candidate factors, coactivating transcription factors Pax3 and Zic1 not only initiate neural crest specification from various early embryonic lineages in Xenopus and chicken embryos but also trigger full neural crest determination. These two factors are sufficient to drive migration and differentiation of several neural crest derivatives in minimal culture conditions in vitro or ectopic locations in vivo. After transplantation, the induced cells migrate to and integrate into normal neural crest craniofacial target territories, indicating an efficient spatial recognition in vivo. Thus, Pax3 and Zic1 cooperate and execute a transcriptional switch sufficient to activate full multipotent neural crest development and differentiation.

  16. A New Brachylophosaurin Hadrosaur (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) with an Intermediate Nasal Crest from the Campanian Judith River Formation of Northcentral Montana

    PubMed Central

    Freedman Fowler, Elizabeth A.; Horner, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brachylophosaurini is a clade of hadrosaurine dinosaurs currently known from the Campanian (Late Cretaceous) of North America. Its members include: Acristavus gagslarsoni, which lacks a nasal crest; Brachylophosaurus canadensis, which possesses a flat paddle-shaped nasal crest projecting posteriorly over the dorsal skull roof; and Maiasaura peeblesorum, which possesses a dorsally-projecting nasofrontal crest. Acristavus, from the lower Two Medicine Formation of Montana (~81–80 Ma), is hypothesized to be the ancestral member of the clade. Brachylophosaurus specimens are from the middle Oldman Formation of Alberta and equivalent beds in the Judith River Formation of Montana; the upper Oldman Formation is dated 77.8 Ma. Methodology/Principal Findings A new brachylophosaurin hadrosaur, Probrachylophosaurus bergei (gen. et sp. nov.) is described and phylogenetically analyzed based on the skull and postcranium of a large individual from the Judith River Formation of northcentral Montana (79.8–79.5 Ma); the horizon is equivalent to the lower Oldman Formation of Alberta. Cranial morphology of Probrachylophosaurus, most notably the nasal crest, is intermediate between Acristavus and Brachylophosaurus. In Brachylophosaurus, the nasal crest lengthens and flattens ontogenetically, covering the supratemporal fenestrae in large adults. The smaller nasal crest of Probrachylophosaurus is strongly triangular in cross section and only minimally overhangs the supratemporal fenestrae, similar to an ontogenetically earlier stage of Brachylophosaurus. Sutural fusion and tibial osteohistology reveal that the holotype of Probrachylophosaurus was relatively more mature than a similarly large Brachylophosaurus specimen; thus, Probrachylophosaurus is not simply an immature Brachylophosaurus. Conclusions/Significance The small triangular posteriorly oriented nasal crest of Probrachylophosaurus is proposed to represent a transitional nasal morphology between that of a non-crested

  17. Role of cranial neural crest cells in visceral arch muscle positioning and morphogenesis in the Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Rolf; Cerny, Robert; Falck, Pierre; Olsson, Lennart

    2004-10-01

    The role of cranial neural crest cells in the formation of visceral arch musculature was investigated in the Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum. DiI (1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine, perchlorate) labeling and green fluorescent protein (GFP) mRNA injections combined with unilateral transplantations of neural folds showed that neural crest cells contribute to the connective tissues but not the myofibers of developing visceral arch muscles in the mandibular, hyoid, and branchial arches. Extirpations of individual cranial neural crest streams demonstrated that neural crest cells are necessary for correct morphogenesis of visceral arch muscles. These do, however, initially develop in their proper positions also in the absence of cranial neural crest. Visceral arch muscles forming in the absence of neural crest cells start to differentiate at their origins but fail to extend toward their insertions and may have a frayed appearance. Our data indicate that visceral arch muscle positioning is controlled by factors that do not have a neural crest origin. We suggest that the cranial neural crest-derived connective tissues provide directional guidance important for the proper extension of the cranial muscles and the subsequent attachment to the insertion on the correct cartilage. In a comparative context, our data from the Mexican axolotl support the view that the cranial neural crest plays a fundamental role in the development of not only the skeleton of the vertebrate head but also in the morphogenesis of the cranial muscles and that this might be a primitive feature of cranial development in vertebrates.

  18. Novel Tfap2-mediated control of soxE expression facilitated the evolutionary emergence of the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Van Otterloo, Eric; Li, Wei; Garnett, Aaron; Cattell, Maria; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans; Cornell, Robert A

    2012-02-01

    Gene duplication has been proposed to drive the evolution of novel morphologies. After gene duplication, it is unclear whether changes in the resulting paralogs' coding-regions, or in their cis-regulatory elements, contribute most significantly to the assembly of novel gene regulatory networks. The Transcription Factor Activator Protein 2 (Tfap2) was duplicated in the chordate lineage and is essential for development of the neural crest, a tissue that emerged with vertebrates. Using a tfap2-depleted zebrafish background, we test the ability of available gnathostome, agnathan, cephalochordate and insect tfap2 paralogs to drive neural crest development. With the exception of tfap2d (lamprey and zebrafish), all are able to do so. Together with expression analyses, these results indicate that sub-functionalization has occurred among Tfap2 paralogs, but that neo-functionalization of the Tfap2 protein did not drive the emergence of the neural crest. We investigate whether acquisition of novel target genes for Tfap2 might have done so. We show that in neural crest cells Tfap2 directly activates expression of sox10, which encodes a transcription factor essential for neural crest development. The appearance of this regulatory interaction is likely to have coincided with that of the neural crest, because AP2 and SoxE are not co-expressed in amphioxus, and because neural crest enhancers are not detected proximal to amphioxus soxE. We find that sox10 has limited ability to restore the neural crest in Tfap2-deficient embryos. Together, these results show that mutations resulting in novel Tfap2-mediated regulation of sox10 and other targets contributed to the evolution of the neural crest.

  19. Novel Tfap2-mediated control of soxE expression facilitated the evolutionary emergence of the neural crest

    PubMed Central

    Van Otterloo, Eric; Li, Wei; Garnett, Aaron; Cattell, Maria; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans; Cornell, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication has been proposed to drive the evolution of novel morphologies. After gene duplication, it is unclear whether changes in the resulting paralogs’ coding-regions, or in their cis-regulatory elements, contribute most significantly to the assembly of novel gene regulatory networks. The Transcription Factor Activator Protein 2 (Tfap2) was duplicated in the chordate lineage and is essential for development of the neural crest, a tissue that emerged with vertebrates. Using a tfap2-depleted zebrafish background, we test the ability of available gnathostome, agnathan, cephalochordate and insect tfap2 paralogs to drive neural crest development. With the exception of tfap2d (lamprey and zebrafish), all are able to do so. Together with expression analyses, these results indicate that sub-functionalization has occurred among Tfap2 paralogs, but that neo-functionalization of the Tfap2 protein did not drive the emergence of the neural crest. We investigate whether acquisition of novel target genes for Tfap2 might have done so. We show that in neural crest cells Tfap2 directly activates expression of sox10, which encodes a transcription factor essential for neural crest development. The appearance of this regulatory interaction is likely to have coincided with that of the neural crest, because AP2 and SoxE are not co-expressed in amphioxus, and because neural crest enhancers are not detected proximal to amphioxus soxE. We find that sox10 has limited ability to restore the neural crest in Tfap2-deficient embryos. Together, these results show that mutations resulting in novel Tfap2-mediated regulation of sox10 and other targets contributed to the evolution of the neural crest. PMID:22241841

  20. The function of the cranial crest and jaws of a unique pterosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Alexander W A; Campos, Diogenes de Almeida

    2002-07-19

    The discovery of a previously undescribed pterosaur, Thalassodromeus sethi, yields information on the function of cranial crests and the feeding strategy developed by these extinct flying reptiles. The material consists of a large skull (length: 1420 millimeters, including the crest) with a huge bony crest that was well irrigated by blood vessels and may have been used for regulation of its body temperature. The rostrum consists of two bladelike laminae, the arrangement of which is analogous to the condition found in the bird Rynchops, which skims over the water to catch food, indicating that T. sethi also may have been a skimmer.

  1. Use of random amplified polymorphic DNA to identify several novel markers for sex identification in the crested serpent eagle and crested goshawk.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H A; Wang, P H; Chao, M C; Chan, F T; Wang, L M; Lin, P I; Chang, C H; Yuan, H W; Ding, S T

    2009-10-01

    The crested serpent eagle (Spilornis cheela hoya) has no distinct sexual dimorphic traits. In the current study, we report the results of an EE0.6 (EcoRI 0.6-kb fragment) sequence applied to S. cheela hoya and a novel random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker that can be used to sex individuals within the species S. cheela hoya and Accipiter trivigatus formosae (crested goshawk). We used sex-specific primers for the avian CHD1 (chromo-helicase-DNA-binding 1) gene and the EE0.6 sequence in PCR assays to determine sex. In addition, 120 random primers were used for RAPD fingerprinting to search for novel sex-specific fragments of S. cheela hoya. The OPBB08 random primer generated a 1241-bp sex-specific fragment in all female S. cheela hoya. From the nucleotide sequence, PCR primers were designed to amplify 553-, 895-, and 194-bp sex-specific fragments present in all female S. cheela hoya. One of these primer pairs (ScBB08-7F/R) also amplified a male/female common fragment that can be used as an internal control (543bp). Moreover, one of the primer pairs (ScBB08-5aF/5bR) could be used to identify genders of A. trivigatus formosae. In conclusion, we identified novel sex-specific DNA markers of S. cheela hoya and A. trivigatus formosae that can be used for rapid and accurate sex identification.

  2. Implant-Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Bilateral Agenesis of Maxillary Lateral Incisors with a Mini Split Crest

    PubMed Central

    Figliuzzi, M. M.; Giudice, A.; Pileggi, S.; Pacifico, D.; Marrelli, M.; Tatullo, M.; Fortunato, L.

    2016-01-01

    The reported clinical case describes the surgical procedure of ridge augmentation by using a “split crest” technique with a partial thickness flap and a subsequent implant-prosthetic rehabilitation aimed at treating a bilateral agenesis of the upper lateral incisors. In such cases with vestibule-palatal and mesial-distal scarce bone thicknesses associated with the need of a proper functional and aesthetic rehabilitation, the split crest technique is particularly suitable. In the case we reported, because of the poor bone thicknesses, we performed a minimally invasive split crest which allowed a correct insertion of the fixtures. This technique allowed us to achieve an optimal functional and aesthetic rehabilitation; moreover, we obtained a good emergency profile, ensuring the vitality of the close teeth and ensuring a good primary stability and the following osseointegration of dental implants. PMID:27190658

  3. Major histocompatibility complex variation in the endangered crested ibis Nipponia nippon and implications for reintroduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Xi, Yong-Mei

    2006-04-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), with its extraordinary levels of genetic variation, is thought to be an essential aspect of the ability of an organism to recognize different parasites and pathogens. It has also been proposed to regulate reproductive processes in many aspects. Here we examine the genetic variation of the second exon of the MHC class II B genes of the crested ibis, an endangered species known to descend from just two breeding pairs rediscovered in 1981. Only five alleles are identified by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of 36 samples taken from both wild and captive populations, and a comparatively low level of divergence between MHC alleles is observed. We suggest that representative sampling of individuals with most of the different MHC allele genotypes to constitute a founder population, together with the monitoring of the pathogen status of candidate sites before release, is of great importance for raising the success rate of reintroduction for the crested ibis.

  4. Fryns syndrome with Hirschsprung disease: support for possible neural crest involvement.

    PubMed

    Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Lin, Angela E; Irons, Mira B; Kimonis, Virginia E

    2005-01-15

    Fryns syndrome is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome characterized by coarse face, distal limb hypoplasia, and diaphragmatic anomalies. We describe a newborn girl with Fryns syndrome and Hirschsprung disease, an association that has been reported in five previous cases. These patients support the hypothesis that the neural crest plays a role in the pathogenesis of Fryns syndrome. Clinically asymptomatic or subtle anomalies that are in the spectrum of neural crest maldevelopment should be sought in all patients with Fryns syndrome including stillbirths, neonatal deaths, as well as long-term survivors. We suspect that the clinical observation about Hirschsprung disease and Fryns syndrome may provide insight into its molecular mechanisms and candidate genes.

  5. Chemical immobilization of crested porcupines with tiletamine HCl and zolazepam HCl (Zoletil) under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Massolo, Alessandro; Sforzi, Andrea; Lovari, Sandro

    2003-07-01

    The combination of tiletamine HCl and zolazepam HCl has been used on many species of wild mammals. Short induction time, low dosage, satisfactory safety margins, relatively constant immobilization time, and smooth recovery are benefits reported. This combination (Zoletil 100) was used during a study on behavioural ecology of the crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata) in a Mediterranean coastal area (Maremma Regional Park, Tuscany, Italy). We used this mixture 42 times on 31 individuals. Mean adult dose was (+/- SE) 7.24 +/- 0.37 mg/kg (74.0 +/- 3.0 mg/individual). Average adult induction time was 5.3 min (+/- 1.1) and average adult immobilization time was 22.6 min (+/- 6.0). One adult male porcupine died after chemical restraints. The use of tiletamine-zolazepam seems adequate for chemical immobilization of crested porcupines under field conditions, mainly because of its short induction time, small volume to be injected and wide safety margin.

  6. Genomic diversity and evolution of the head crest in the rock pigeon.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael D; Kronenberg, Zev; Li, Cai; Domyan, Eric T; Pan, Hailin; Campbell, Michael; Tan, Hao; Huff, Chad D; Hu, Haofu; Vickrey, Anna I; Nielsen, Sandra C A; Stringham, Sydney A; Hu, Hao; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Yandell, Mark; Zhang, Guojie; Wang, Jun

    2013-03-01

    The geographic origins of breeds and the genetic basis of variation within the widely distributed and phenotypically diverse domestic rock pigeon (Columba livia) remain largely unknown. We generated a rock pigeon reference genome and additional genome sequences representing domestic and feral populations. We found evidence for the origins of major breed groups in the Middle East and contributions from a racing breed to North American feral populations. We identified the gene EphB2 as a strong candidate for the derived head crest phenotype shared by numerous breeds, an important trait in mate selection in many avian species. We also found evidence that this trait evolved just once and spread throughout the species, and that the crest originates early in development by the localized molecular reversal of feather bud polarity.

  7. Directed differentiation of human pluripotent cells to neural crest stem cells.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Laura; Kulik, Michael J; Page, Austin T; Park, Sarah S; Lauderdale, James D; Cunningham, Michael L; Dalton, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) have the potential to generate a wide range of cell types including melanocytes; peripheral neurons; and smooth muscle, bone, cartilage and fat cells. This protocol describes in detail how to perform a highly efficient, lineage-specific differentiation of human pluripotent cells to a NCSC fate. The approach uses chemically defined media under feeder-free conditions, and it uses two small-molecule compounds to achieve efficient conversion of human pluripotent cells to NCSCs in ~15 d. After completion of this protocol, NCSCs can be used for numerous applications, including the generation of sufficient cell numbers to perform drug screens, for the development of cell therapeutics on an industrial scale and to provide a robust model for human disease. This protocol can be also be applied to patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and thus used to further the knowledge of human disease associated with neural crest development, for example, Treacher-Collins Syndrome.

  8. Johns Hopkins University Announces Frederick CREST Classes for Fall 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Johns Hopkins University’s (JHU) Advanced Academic Programs (AAP) division recently announced two classes that will be hosted at the Frederick Center for Research and Education in Science and Technology (CREST) this fall. According to a JHU press release, the classes are Biochemistry, which is part of the M.S. in Biotechnology program at JHU AAP, and Molecular Biology, a part of the M.S. in Bioinformatics program at JHU AAP.

  9. Computed tomography evaluation of the iliac crest apophysis: age estimation in living individuals.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Inci, Ercan; Erdil, Irem; Hocaoglu, Elif; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Kazimoglu, Cemal; Reisoglu, Ali; Can, Ismail Ozgur

    2016-07-01

    Determination of the ossification properties of the iliac apophysis is important not only in the clinical evaluation of patients undergoing orthopedic surgery but also in age estimation studies for forensic purposes. The literature includes both anthropological and radiological (conventional radiography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging modalities) investigations of the different staging systems used for these purposes. In this study, we assessed the utility of computed tomography (CT) of the iliac crest apophysis in estimating forensic age. CT scans of the iliac crest apophysis of 380 patients (187 females, 193 males, and 10-29 years of age) were evaluated according to the four-stage system. Further subclassification did not give data properly due to the reference length measurement of the iliac wing with CT. Thus, in our series, stage 2 was first seen in 12 years of age and stage 3 in those 14 years of age in both sexes and on both sides of the pelvis. Stage 4 was first seen in 17 years of both sexes but only on the right side; on the left side, it appeared in females 18 years of age and in males 17 years of age. Present data was found consistent with previous pelvic radiographic findings. First seen ages for stage 2 and 3 are 12 and 14 years respectively which presented valuable information for legally important age thresholds. However, disadvantages of CT, including high-dose radiation exposure to gonads, the difficulty of evaluating the iliac crest, and the age boundary of 17 years, could make this method infeasible, as compared with hand wrist and pelvic radiographic methods. CT of the iliac crest has probably a greater utility where preexisting CT scans of the pelvic region are available, and it may be considered as a supportive method for age-estimation purposes.

  10. The iliac crest in forensic age diagnostics: evaluation of the apophyseal ossification in conventional radiography.

    PubMed

    Wittschieber, Daniel; Vieth, Volker; Domnick, Christoph; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Schmeling, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Due to the increasing significance of forensic age estimations in the age of globalisation, novel radiographic criteria besides clavicles and hand bones may provide additional certainty for forensic age expertises. The present study analyses the suitability of the iliac crest apophysis by means of 643 pelvic radiographs of patients between 10 and 30 years of age. Retrospective assessments were carried out according to the forensically established classification and sub-classification systems modified after Kreitner et al. (Rofo 166(6):481-486, 1997) and Kellinghaus et al. (Int J Legal Med 124(4):321-325, 2010). The basic ossification stages range from 1 to 4, and the sub-stages of stage 2 and 3 range from a to c. While stage 3c was first achieved at the age of 15 by both sexes, stage 4 was first observed in females at the age of 16 and in males at the age of 17. This indicates the possibility of a valid diagnosis of both the age of 14 and the age of 16 years which represent legally relevant age thresholds in numerous countries. Applied as targeted radiography on the iliac crest, the exposure to radiation would range between other radiographic techniques recently applied. Therefore, the iliac crest apophysis appears principally suitable as novel possible criterion for forensic age estimation in the living. However, for the establishment of the iliac crest apophysis in routine diagnostics, further studies are needed focussing on the comparison of different grading systems and different radiological techniques.

  11. Foxc1 and Foxc2 in the Neural Crest Are Required for Ocular Anterior Segment Development

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seungwoon; Chen, Lisheng; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhao, Demin; Schultz, Kathryn M.; Sasman, Amy; Liu, Ting; Zhang, Hao F.; Gage, Philip J.; Kume, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The large Forkhead (Fox) transcription factor family has essential roles in development, and mutations cause a wide range of ocular and nonocular disease. One member, Foxc2 is expressed in neural crest (NC)-derived periocular mesenchymal cells of the developing murine eye; however, its precise role in the development, establishment, and maintenance of the ocular surface has yet to be investigated. Methods To specifically delete Foxc2 from NC-derived cells, conditional knockout mice for Foxc2 (NC-Foxc2−/−) were generated by crossing Foxc2F mice with Wnt1-Cre mice. Similarly, we also generated compound NC-specific mutations of Foxc2 and a closely related gene, Foxc1 (NC-Foxc1−/−;NC-Foxc2−/−) in mice. Results Neural crest-Foxc2−/− mice show abnormal thickness in the peripheral-to-central corneal stroma and limbus and displaced pupils with irregular iris. The neural crest-specific mutation in Foxc2 also leads to ectopic neovascularization in the cornea, as well as impaired ocular epithelial cell identity and corneal conjunctivalization. Compound, NC-specific Foxc1; Foxc2 homozygous mutant mice have more severe defects in structures of the ocular surface, such as the cornea and eyelids, accompanied by significant declines in the expression of another key developmental factor, Pitx2, and its downstream effector Dkk2, which antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling. Conclusions The neural crest-Foxc2 mutation is associated with corneal conjunctivalization, ectopic corneal neovascularization, and disrupted ocular epithelial cell identity. Furthermore, Foxc2 and Foxc1 cooperatively function in NC-derived mesenchymal cells to ensure proper morphogenesis of the ocular surface via the regulation of Wnt signaling. Together, Foxc2 is required in the NC lineage for mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in corneal and ocular surface development. PMID:28253399

  12. New Results from the NOAA CREST Lidar Network (CLN) Observations in the US Eastcoast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshary, Fred; Han, Zaw; Wu, Yonghua; Gross, Barry; Wesloh, Daniel; Hoff, Raymond M.; Delgado, Ruben; Su, Jia; Lei, Liqiao; Lee, Robert B.; McCormick, M. Pat; Diaz, Jesus; Cruz, Carlos; Parsiani, Hamed

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents coordinated ground-based observations by the NOAA-CREST Lidar Network (CLN) for profiling of aerosols, cloud, water vapor, and wind along the US east coast including Caribbean region at Puerto Rico. The instrumentation, methodology and observation capability are reviewed. The applications to continental and intercontinental-scale transport of smoke and dust plumes, and their large scale regional impact are discussed.

  13. Iliac crest autograft versus alternative constructs for anterior cervical spine surgery: Pros, cons, and costs

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Grafting choices available for performing anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion (ACDF) procedures have become a major concern for spinal surgeons, and their institutions. The “gold standard”, iliac crest autograft, may still be the best and least expensive grafting option; it deserves to be reassessed along with the pros, cons, and costs for alternative grafts/spacers. Methods: Although single or multilevel ACDF have utilized iliac crest autograft for decades, the implant industry now offers multiple alternative grafting and spacer devices; (allografts, cages, polyether-etherketone (PEEK) amongst others). While most studies have focused on fusion rates and clinical outcomes following ACDF, few have analyzed the “value-added” of these various constructs (e.g. safety/efficacy, risks/complications, costs). Results: The majority of studies document 95%-100% fusion rates when iliac crest autograft is utilized to perform single level ACDF (X-ray or CT confirmed at 6-12 postoperative months). Although many allograft studies similarly quote 90%-100% fusion rates (X-ray alone confirmed at 6-12 postoperative months), a recent “post hoc analysis of data from a prospective multicenter trial” (Riew KD et. al., CSRS Abstract Dec. 2011; unpublished) revealed a much higher delayed fusion rate using allografts at one year 55.7%, 2 years 87%, and four years 92%. Conclusion: Iliac crest autograft utilized for single or multilevel ACDF is associated with the highest fusion, lowest complication rates, and significantly lower costs compared with allograft, cages, PEEK, or other grafts. As spinal surgeons and institutions become more cost conscious, we will have to account for the “value added” of these increasingly expensive graft constructs. PMID:22905321

  14. Cell Motility and Invasiveness of Neurofibromin-Deficient Neural Crest Cells and Malignant Triton Tumor Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    derived cells, we isolated first branchial arch mesenchymal populations, as well as trigeminal ganglion non- neuronal cells, from mouse embryos and measured...for the source of MPNSTs, peripheral nerve, by pooling tissues (sciatic nerve and trigeminal ganglia ) dissected from several mice of the same genotype...neural crest-derived cell types can be isolated prior to this stage and maintained in culture. Sensory and sympathetic neurons isolated from Nfl

  15. What Crested Butte Mountain Resort Feels the Ski Industry Is, In General, Looking for in College Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jernigan, Rick

    This paper describes general employment requirements for employment candidates in the skiing industry, as seen by Crested Butte Mountain Resort personnel. General educational requirements are primarily business skills, including: communications, computers, math, finance, accounting, economics, personnel administration, and psychology. Other…

  16. Habitat use and food selection of small mammals near a sagebrush/crested wheatgrass interface in southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, D.K. ); Anderson, S.H. )

    1991-09-01

    Research has been conducted on various aspects of the ecology of wildlife residing on and adjacent to the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) and one other low-level radioactive waste disposal site on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho. Habitat use and food selection data were collected for deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), montane voles (Microtus montanus), Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii), and Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii) near a sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)/crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum) interface. Significantly more captures occurred in the native sagebrush habitat than in areas planted in crested wheatgrass or in disturbed sites. Crested wheatgrass, a prolific seed producer, still accounted for over 30% of the total captures. Montane voles and Townsend's ground squirrels (during periods of aboveground activity) used the crested wheatgrass habitat throughout the summer, while deer mice and Ord's kangaroo rats exhibited heavy use after seed set.

  17. The formation of the superior and jugular ganglia: insights into the generation of sensory neurons by the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hannah; Blentic, Aida; Watson, Sheona; Begbie, Jo; Graham, Anthony

    2010-02-01

    The superior and jugular ganglia (S/JG) are the proximal ganglia of the IXth and Xth cranial nerves and the sensory neurons of these ganglia are neural crest derived. However, it has been unclear the extent to which their differentiation resembles that of the Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRGs). In the DRGs, neural crest cells undergo neuronal differentiation just after the onset of migration and there is evidence suggesting that these cells are pre-specified towards a sensory fate. We have analysed sensory neuronal differentiation in the S/JG. We show, in keeping with previous studies, that neuronal differentiation initiates long after the cessation of neural crest migration. We also find no evidence for the existence of migratory neural crest cells pre-specified towards a sensory phenotype prior to ganglion formation. Rather our results suggest that sensory neuronal differentiation in the S/JG is the result of localised spatiotemporal cues.

  18. Evidence of secondary consumption of invertebrate prey by Double-crested Cormorants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.H.; Ross, R.M.; Smith, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The piscivorous nature of the Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is well documented. However, many researchers who have used regurgitated pellets to describe the diet of cormorants report that invertebrates compose a small but consistent portion of the diet. We examined the hypothesis that invertebrates found in pellets are primarily the result of secondary consumption. We used odds ratio analysis to examine associations in 2,846 individual pellets between the presence of specific invertebrate prey and the presence of fish species known to consume those invertebrate taxa. Significant (P < 0.05) relationships occurred between gastropods and pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) and ictalurids, and between decapods and rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu). Significant (P < 0.05) relationships were also found between pelecypods and pumpkinseed and ictalurids. We suggest that the invertebrate prey we observed in pellets were present in the digestive tracts of fish that were consumed by Double-crested Cormorants and hence represent secondary consumption by cormorants. We conclude that consumption of invertebrates by Double-crested Cormorants may be overestimated in the literature in instances where the diet was described using pellets.

  19. Outcomes and treatments of mal fractures caused by the split-crest technique in the mandible.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Yasuyuki; Yabase, Akiko; Ishida, Suguru; Kobayashi, Masaki; Komori, Takahide

    2014-09-26

    In this study, we investigated cases of mal fracture occurring during the split-crest procedure. In all subjects (six patients), the free cortical bone segment caused by the mal fracture was carefully maintained in the lateral position without fixation using a titanium plate or screw. On pre- and postoperative multiplanar reconstruction CT, the average total alveolar increase was 5.0 mm in the lower portion 1 mm from the top of the alveolar ridge, and the average total alveolar increase in the lower portion 11 mm from the top of the alveolar ridge was 2.2 mm. A total of 11 dental implants were placed immediately at the same time as the split-crest procedure, while three dental implants were placed after a waiting period of 4-11 months from bone augmentation. During an average follow-up of 27.8 months, there were no complications or cases of failed implants. Consequently, among the patients who experienced mal fracture during the split-crest technique, a sufficient volume of alveolar bone was obtained without the need for rigid fixation of the free bone segment, and the dental implants placed within the area of the mal fracture showed a good prognosis.

  20. Signatures of Crested Ibis MHC Revealed by Recombination Screening and Short-Reads Assembly Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanhong; Xiong, Zijun; Fu, Dongke; Li, Bo; Wei, Shuguang; Xu, Xun; Li, Shengbin; Yuan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing has become a routine method in genome research over the past decade. However, the assembly of highly polymorphic regions in WGS projects remains a challenge, especially for large genomes. Employing BAC library constructing, PCR screening and Sanger sequencing, traditional strategy is laborious and expensive, which hampers research on polymorphic genomic regions. As one of the most highly polymorphic regions, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a central role in the adaptive immunity of all jawed vertebrates. In this study, we introduced an efficient procedure based on recombination screening and short-reads assembly. With this procedure, we constructed a high quality 488-kb region of crested ibis MHC that consists of 3 superscaffolds and contains 50 genes. Our sequence showed comparable quality (97.29% identity) to traditional Sanger assembly, while the workload was reduced almost 7 times. Comparative study revealed distinctive features of crested ibis by exhibiting the COL11A2-BLA-BLB-BRD2 cluster and presenting both ADPRH and odorant receptor (OR) gene in the MHC region. Furthermore, the conservation of the BF-TAP1-TAP2 structure in crested ibis and other vertebrate lineages is interesting in light of the hypothesis that coevolution of functionally related genes in the primordial MHC is responsible for the appearance of the antigen presentation pathways at the birth of the adaptive immune system. PMID:27997612

  1. Neural crest cell signaling pathways critical to cranial bone development and pathology.

    PubMed

    Mishina, Yuji; Snider, Taylor Nicholas

    2014-07-15

    Neural crest cells appear early during embryogenesis and give rise to many structures in the mature adult. In particular, a specific population of neural crest cells migrates to and populates developing cranial tissues. The ensuing differentiation of these cells via individual complex and often intersecting signaling pathways is indispensible to growth and development of the craniofacial complex. Much research has been devoted to this area of development with particular emphasis on cell signaling events required for physiologic development. Understanding such mechanisms will allow researchers to investigate ways in which they can be exploited in order to treat a multitude of diseases affecting the craniofacial complex. Knowing how these multipotent cells are driven towards distinct fates could, in due course, allow patients to receive regenerative therapies for tissues lost to a variety of pathologies. In order to realize this goal, nucleotide sequencing advances allowing snapshots of entire genomes and exomes are being utilized to identify molecular entities associated with disease states. Once identified, these entities can be validated for biological significance with other methods. A crucial next step is the integration of knowledge gleaned from observations in disease states with normal physiology to generate an explanatory model for craniofacial development. This review seeks to provide a current view of the landscape on cell signaling and fate determination of the neural crest and to provide possible avenues of approach for future research.

  2. Beak and feather dystrophy in wild sulphur-crested cockatoos (Cacatua galerita).

    PubMed

    McOrist, S; Black, D G; Pass, D A; Scott, P C; Marshall, J

    1984-04-01

    Three flocks of wild sulphur-crested cockatoos in southeastern Australia had a 10-20% prevalence of feather and beak deformities. In affected birds, the crest, tail, contour and down feathers were lost or reduced in length owing to a "pinching off" 0.5-1 cm above the skin. The underlying skin was discolored brown. Flight feathers appeared normal and could sustain flight. In mildly affected birds, only the crest and down feathers were involved. Histological examination of affected feathers showed necrosis of developing cells in their epidermal collars. The epidermis was moderately hyperplastic and contained numerous large macrophages, with large intracytoplasmic granules. Electron microscopic examination showed these granules to consist of regular lattices of 17-20-nm-diameter particles, resembling parvovirus particles. In some birds the upper beak was enlarged and had longitudinal cracks. Histological examination of the beak showed necrosis of its epidermis. It was concluded that a viral infection may have caused feather and beak dystrophy in these birds.

  3. Sox10-dependent neural crest origin of olfactory microvillous neurons in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ankur; Peng, Brian N; Bronner, Marianne E

    2013-01-01

    The sense of smell in vertebrates is detected by specialized sensory neurons derived from the peripheral nervous system. Classically, it has been presumed that the olfactory placode forms all olfactory sensory neurons. In contrast, we show that the cranial neural crest is the primary source of microvillous sensory neurons within the olfactory epithelium of zebrafish embryos. Using photoconversion-based fate mapping and live cell tracking coupled with laser ablation, we followed neural crest precursors as they migrated from the neural tube to the nasal cavity. A subset that coexpressed Sox10 protein and a neurogenin1 reporter ingressed into the olfactory epithelium and differentiated into microvillous sensory neurons. Timed loss-of-function analysis revealed a critical role for Sox10 in microvillous neurogenesis. Taken together, these findings directly demonstrate a heretofore unknown contribution of the cranial neural crest to olfactory sensory neurons in zebrafish and provide important insights into the assembly of the nascent olfactory system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00336.001 PMID:23539289

  4. Hippo signaling is required for Notch-dependent smooth muscle differentiation of neural crest

    PubMed Central

    Manderfield, Lauren J.; Aghajanian, Haig; Engleka, Kurt A.; Lim, Lillian Y.; Liu, Feiyan; Jain, Rajan; Li, Li; Olson, Eric N.; Epstein, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling has well-defined roles in the assembly of arterial walls and in the development of the endothelium and smooth muscle of the vasculature. Hippo signaling regulates cellular growth in many tissues, and contributes to regulation of organ size, in addition to other functions. Here, we show that the Notch and Hippo pathways converge to regulate smooth muscle differentiation of the neural crest, which is crucial for normal development of the aortic arch arteries and cranial vasculature during embryonic development. Neural crest-specific deletion of the Hippo effectors Yap and Taz produces neural crest precursors that migrate normally, but fail to produce vascular smooth muscle, and Notch target genes such as Jagged1 fail to activate normally. We show that Yap is normally recruited to a tissue-specific Jagged1 enhancer by directly interacting with the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). The Yap-NICD complex is recruited to chromatin by the DNA-binding protein Rbp-J in a Tead-independent fashion. Thus, Hippo signaling can modulate Notch signaling outputs, and components of the Hippo and Notch pathways physically interact. Convergence of Hippo and Notch pathways by the mechanisms described here might be relevant for the function of these signaling cascades in many tissues and in diseases such as cancer. PMID:26253400

  5. JUSTIFICATION FOR A REDUCTION IN THE CREST-STAGE GAGE PROGRAM IN LOUISIANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbert, Richard A.; Carlson, Darrell D.; Wiche, Gregg J.

    1985-01-01

    The crest-stage gage program in Louisiana was evaluated to determine if the data were adequate for use in developing regional flood-frequency equations and to determine if any crest-stage gage stations could be discontinued. An abundance of data at many crest-stage gage stations and a lack of data for urban areas and flat-slope areas indicated a need for a shift in the number, type, and locations of gages. Correlations and comparisons of annual peak discharges and watershed characteristics of 96 existing stations resulted in the elimination of 72 stations and the addition of one new station, reducing the total network to 25 stations that could be used for future flood-frequency analyses. The adequacy of the reduced network for development and verification of regional flood-frequency equations was tested by comparing a set of regional flood-frequency equations developed using data from the full network with a set developed using data from the reduced network.

  6. Defective neural crest migration revealed by a Zebrafish model of Alx1-related frontonasal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Dee, Chris T; Szymoniuk, Christoph R; Mills, Peter E D; Takahashi, Tokiharu

    2013-01-15

    Frontonasal dysplasia (FND) refers to a class of midline facial malformations caused by abnormal development of the facial primordia. The term encompasses a spectrum of severities but characteristic features include combinations of ocular hypertelorism, malformations of the nose and forehead and clefting of the facial midline. Several recent studies have drawn attention to the importance of Alx homeobox transcription factors during craniofacial development. Most notably, loss of Alx1 has devastating consequences resulting in severe orofacial clefting and extreme microphthalmia. In contrast, mutations of Alx3 or Alx4 cause milder forms of FND. Whilst Alx1, Alx3 and Alx4 are all known to be expressed in the facial mesenchyme of vertebrate embryos, little is known about the function of these proteins during development. Here, we report the establishment of a zebrafish model of Alx-related FND. Morpholino knock-down of zebrafish alx1 expression causes a profound craniofacial phenotype including loss of the facial cartilages and defective ocular development. We demonstrate for the first time that Alx1 plays a crucial role in regulating the migration of cranial neural crest (CNC) cells into the frontonasal primordia. Abnormal neural crest migration is coincident with aberrant expression of foxd3 and sox10, two genes previously suggested to play key roles during neural crest development, including migration, differentiation and the maintenance of progenitor cells. This novel function is specific to Alx1, and likely explains the marked clinical severity of Alx1 mutation within the spectrum of Alx-related FND.

  7. The positive transcriptional elongation factor (P-TEFb) is required for neural crest specification.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Victoria L; Marin-Barba, Marta; Moxon, Simon; Ford, Christopher T; Ward, Nicole J; Tomlinson, Matthew L; Desanlis, Ines; Hendry, Adam E; Hontelez, Saartje; van Kruijsbergen, Ila; Veenstra, Gert Jan C; Münsterberg, Andrea E; Wheeler, Grant N

    2016-08-15

    Regulation of gene expression at the level of transcriptional elongation has been shown to be important in stem cells and tumour cells, but its role in the whole animal is only now being fully explored. Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a multipotent population of cells that migrate during early development from the dorsal neural tube throughout the embryo where they differentiate into a variety of cell types including pigment cells, cranio-facial skeleton and sensory neurons. Specification of NCCs is both spatially and temporally regulated during embryonic development. Here we show that components of the transcriptional elongation regulatory machinery, CDK9 and CYCLINT1 of the P-TEFb complex, are required to regulate neural crest specification. In particular, we show that expression of the proto-oncogene c-Myc and c-Myc responsive genes are affected. Our data suggest that P-TEFb is crucial to drive expression of c-Myc, which acts as a 'gate-keeper' for the correct temporal and spatial development of the neural crest.

  8. The Cross-Stream Structure of the Crests of Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, J. H.; Diorio, J. D.; Liu, X.

    2008-11-01

    Surface profiles and flow fields in the crests of breaking waves are usually measured in vertical stream-wise planes. However, measurements of the turbulent flow in boundary layers along flat rigid walls have indicated the importance of streamwise flow structures. In the present study, breaking waves are examined in a tank that is 12.8 m long and 1.2 m wide with a water depth of 0.91 m. A programmable wave maker is used to generate wave packets (central frequencies 1.15 - 1.42 Hz) that create breakers by dispersive focusing. Different amplitudes of the wave maker motion are used to generate various breaking waves ranging from weakly spilling to plunging breakers. A cinematic 2D LIF technique is used to measure the crest profile histories and the light-sheet plane is oriented to measure both the stream-wise and cross-stream crest profiles in separate experiments. It is found that the development of ripples due to turbulence-free surface interactions is highly repeatable and that even though the waves are two-dimensional before breaking, the amplitude of the cross-stream components quickly reaches 50% of the stream-wise ripple amplitude.

  9. Cell surface beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase functions during neural crest cell migration and neurulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Mesenchymal cell migration and neurite outgrowth are mediated in part by binding of cell surface beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase) to N-linked oligosaccharides within the E8 domain of laminin. In this study, we determined whether cell surface GalTase functions during neural crest cell migration and neural development in vivo using antibodies raised against affinity-purified chicken serum GalTase. The antibodies specifically recognized two embryonic proteins of 77 and 67 kD, both of which express GalTase activity. The antibodies also immunoprecipitated and inhibited chick embryo GalTase activity, and inhibited neural crest cell migration on laminin matrices in vitro. Anti-GalTase antibodies were microinjected into the head mesenchyme of stage 7-9 chick embryos or cranial to Henson's node of stage 6 embryos. Anti-avian GalTase IgG decreased cranial neural crest cell migration on the injected side but did not cross the embryonic midline and did not affect neural crest cell migration on the uninjected side. Anti-avian GalTase Fab crossed the embryonic midline and perturbed cranial neural crest cell migration throughout the head. Neural fold elevation and neural tube closure were also disrupted by Fab fragments. Cell surface GalTase was localized to migrating neural crest cells and to the basal surfaces of neural epithelia by indirect immunofluorescence, whereas GalTase was undetectable on neural crest cells prior to migration. These results suggest that, during early embryogenesis, cell surface GalTase participates during neural crest cell migration, perhaps by interacting with laminin, a major component of the basal lamina. Cell surface GalTase also appears to play a role in neural tube formation, possibly by mediating neural epithelial adhesion to the underlying basal lamina. PMID:1560031

  10. Minimal-resource computer program for automatic generation of ocean wave ray or crest diagrams in shoaling waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Lecroy, S. R.; Morris, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program for studying linear ocean wave refraction is described. The program features random-access modular bathymetry data storage. Three bottom topography approximation techniques are available in the program which provide varying degrees of bathymetry data smoothing. Refraction diagrams are generated automatically and can be displayed graphically in three forms: Ray patterns with specified uniform deepwater ray density, ray patterns with controlled nearshore ray density, or crest patterns constructed by using a cubic polynomial to approximate crest segments between adjacent rays.

  11. Targeted deletion of Hand2 in cardiac neural crest-derived cells influences cardiac gene expression and outflow tract development

    PubMed Central

    Holler, Kristen L.; Hendershot, Tyler J.; Troy, Sophia E.; Vincentz, Joshua W.; Firulli, Anthony B.; Howard, Marthe J.

    2010-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix DNA binding protein Hand2 has critical functions in cardiac development both in neural crest-derived and mesoderm-derived structures. Targeted deletion of Hand2 in the neural crest has allowed us to genetically dissect Hand2-dependent defects specifically in outflow tract and cardiac cushion independent of Hand2 functions in mesoderm-derived structures. Targeted deletion of Hand2 in the neural crest results in misalignment of the aortic arch arteries and outflow tract, contributing to development of double outlet right ventricle (DORV) and ventricular septal defects (VSD). These neural crest-derived developmental anomalies are associated with altered expression of Hand2-target genes we have identified by gene profiling. A number of Hand2 direct target genes have been identified using ChIP and ChIP-on-chip analyses. We have identified and validated a number of genes related to cell migration, proliferation/cell cycle and intracellular signaling whose expression is affected by Hand2 deletion in the neural crest and which are associated with development of VSD and DORV. Our data suggest that Hand2 is a multifunctional DNA binding protein affecting expression of target genes associated with a number of functional interactions in neural crest-derived cells required for proper patterning of the outflow tract, generation of the appropriate number of neural crest-derived cells for elongation of the conotruncus and cardiac cushion organization. Our genetic model has made it possible to investigate the molecular genetics of neural crest contributions to outflow tract morphogenesis and cell differentiation. PMID:20144608

  12. Differential requirements of BMP and Wnt signalling during gastrulation and neurulation define two steps in neural crest induction.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Ben; Araya, Claudio; Linker, Claudia; Kuriyama, Sei; Mayor, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The neural crest is induced by a combination of secreted signals. Although previous models of neural crest induction have proposed a step-wise activation of these signals, the actual spatial and temporal requirement has not been analysed. Through analysing the role of the mesoderm we show for the first time that specification of neural crest requires two temporally and chemically different steps: first, an induction at the gastrula stage dependent on signals arising from the dorsolateral mesoderm; and second, a maintenance step at the neurula stage dependent on signals from tissues adjacent to the neural crest. By performing tissue recombination experiments and using specific inhibitors of different inductive signals, we show that the first inductive step requires Wnt activation and BMP inhibition, whereas the later maintenance step requires activation of both pathways. This change in BMP necessity from BMP inhibition at gastrula to BMP activation at neurula stages is further supported by the dynamic expression of BMP4 and its antagonists, and is confirmed by direct measurements of BMP activity in the neural crest cells. The differential requirements of BMP activity allow us to propose an explanation for apparently discrepant results between chick and frog experiments. The demonstration that Wnt signals are required for neural crest induction by mesoderm solves an additional long-standing controversy. Finally, our results emphasise the importance of considering the order of exposure to signals during an inductive event.

  13. SOX10-Nano-Lantern Reporter Human iPS Cells; A Versatile Tool for Neural Crest Research

    PubMed Central

    Horikiri, Tomoko; Ohi, Hiromi; Shibata, Mitsuaki; Ikeya, Makoto; Ueno, Morio; Sotozono, Chie; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest is a source to produce multipotent neural crest stem cells that have a potential to differentiate into diverse cell types. The transcription factor SOX10 is expressed through early neural crest progenitors and stem cells in vertebrates. Here we report the generation of SOX10-Nano-lantern (NL) reporter human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS) by using CRISPR/Cas9 systems, that are beneficial to investigate the generation and maintenance of neural crest progenitor cells. SOX10-NL positive cells are produced transiently from hiPS cells by treatment with TGFβ inhibitor SB431542 and GSK3 inhibitor CHIR99021. We found that all SOX10-NL-positive cells expressed an early neural crest marker NGFR, however SOX10-NL-positive cells purified from differentiated hiPS cells progressively attenuate their NL-expression under proliferation. We therefore attempted to maintain SOX10-NL-positive cells with additional signaling on the plane and sphere culture conditions. These SOX10-NL cells provide us to investigate mass culture with neural crest cells for stem cell research. PMID:28107504

  14. The evolutionary origin of the vertebrate neural crest and its developmental gene regulatory network--insights from amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jr-Kai Sky

    2010-01-01

    The neural crest is an embryonic cell population unique to vertebrates. During vertebrate embryogenesis, neural crest cells are first induced from the neural plate border; subsequently, they delaminate from the dorsal neural tube and migrate to their destination, where they differentiate into a wide variety of derivatives. The emergence of the neural crest is thought to be responsible for the evolution of many complex novel structures of vertebrates that are lacking in invertebrate chordates. Despite its central importance in understanding the origin of vertebrates, the evolutionary origin of the neural crest remains elusive. The basal chordate amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae) occupies an outgroup position that is useful for investigating this question. In this review, I summarize recent genomic and comparative developmental studies between amphioxus and vertebrates and discuss their implications for the evolutionary origin of neural crest cells. I focus mainly on the origin of the gene regulatory network underlying neural crest development, and suggest several hypotheses regarding how this network could have been assembled during early vertebrate evolution.

  15. [Phenotypic plasticity of neural crest-derived melanocytes and Schwann cells].

    PubMed

    Dupin, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Melanocytes, the pigmented cells of the skin, and the glial Schwann cells lining peripheral nerves are developmentally derived from an early and transient ectodermal structure of the vertebrate embryo, the neural crest, which is also at the origin of multiple neural and non-neural cell types. Besides melanocytes and neural cells of the peripheral nervous system, the neural crest cells give rise to mesenchymal cell types in the head, which form most of the craniofacial skeleton, dermis, fat tissue and vascular musculo-connective components. How such a wide diversity of differentiation fates is established during embryogenesis and is later maintained in adult tissues are among key questions in developmental and stem cell biology. The analysis of the developmental potentials of single neural crest cells cultured in vitro led to characterizing multipotent stem/progenitor cells as well as more restricted precursors in the early neural crest of avian and mammalian embryos. Data support a hierarchical model of the diversification of neural crest lineages through progressive restrictions of multipotent stem cell potentials driven by local environmental factors. In particular, melanocytes and glial Schwann cells were shown to arise from a common bipotent progenitor, which depends upon the peptide endothelin-3 for proliferation and self-renewal ability. In vivo, signaling by endothelin-3 and its receptor is also required for the early development of melanocytes and proper pigmentation of the vertebrate body. It is generally assumed that, after lineage specification and terminal differentiation, specialized cell types, like the melanocytes and Schwann cells, do not change their identity. However, this classic notion that somatic cell differentiation is a stable and irreversible process has been challenged by emerging evidence that dedifferentiation can occur in different biological systems through nuclear transfer, cell fusion, epigenetic modifications and ectopic gene

  16. A comparative evaluation of the in vitro penetration performance of the improved Crest complete toothbrush versus the Current Crest complete toothbrush, the Colgate Precision toothbrush and the Oral-B P40 toothbrush.

    PubMed

    Volpenhein, D W; Handel, S E; Hughes, T J; Wild, J

    1996-01-01

    Removal of plaque and debris from interproximal surfaces during toothbrushing has generally been difficult to achieve, in large part because traditional flat-bristled toothbrushes do not offer good interproximal penetration. As a result, a number of varying bristle designs have been developed, with the rippled-design brush shown to be particularly effective at removing interproximal plaque. Recently, an existing brush, the original Crest Complete, was modified to offer a more deeply rippled version. This study evaluated the interproximal penetration of four bristle designs: rippled pattern (original Crest Complete), deeper rippled pattern (improved Crest Complete), multi-level (Colgate Precision), and flat-tufted (Oral-B P40). The study used a previously reported in vitro model for determining interproximal penetration of manual toothbrushes (J Clin Dent 5:27-33, 1994). In order to effectively mimic the in-use characteristics of toothbrushing, this model is based on analysis of videotaped consumer brushing habits, tooth morphology, and in vivo plaque tenacity characteristics and uses the three most predominantly used brushing techniques (circular, up-and-down, and back-and-forth, with the brush held at both 45 and 90 degrees to the tooth surface). In addition, the model's brush stroke length, brush force, and brush speed are likewise based on analysis of consumer brushing patterns. The results of the study indicate that the new Crest Complete with deeper rippled bristles provided significantly superior (p < or = 0.05) interproximal penetration than the Colgate Precision and Oral-B brushes overall and for three of the four brush strokes tested. In addition, the new Crest Complete was found to provide significantly superior interproximal penetration to the original Crest Complete overall and in circular and up-and-down strokes, and the original Crest Complete provided superior overall interproximal penetration to the Colgate and Oral-B brushes.

  17. Alpha 1 beta 1 integrin on neural crest cells recognizes some laminin substrata in a Ca(2+)-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Neural crest cells migrate along pathways containing laminin and other extracellular matrix molecules. In the present study, we functionally and biochemically identify an alpha 1 beta 1 integrin heterodimer which bears the HNK-1 epitope on neural crest cells. Using a quantitative cell adhesion assay, we find that this heterodimer mediates attachment to laminin substrata prepared in the presence of Ca2+. Interestingly, neural crest cells bind to laminin-Ca2+ substrata in the presence or absence of divalent cations in the cell attachment medium. In contrast, the attachment of neural crest cells to laminin substrata prepared in the presence of EDTA, heparin, Mg2+, or Mn2+ requires divalent cations. Interactions with these laminin substrata are mediated by a different integrin heterodimer, since antibodies against beta 1 but not alpha 1 integrins inhibit neural crest cell attachment. Thus, the type of laminin substratum appears to dictate the choice of laminin receptor used by neural crest cells. The laminin conformation is determined by the ratio of laminin to Ca2+, though incorporation of heparin during substratum polymerization alters the conformation even in the presence of Ca2+. Once polymerized, the substratum appears stable, not being altered by soaking in either EDTA or divalent cations. Our findings demonstrate: (a) that the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin can bind to some forms of laminin in the absence of soluble divalent cations; (b) that substratum preparation conditions alter the conformation of laminin such that plating laminin in the presence of Ca2+ and/or heparin modulates its configuration; and (c) that neural crest cells utilize different integrins to recognize different laminin conformations. PMID:1280273

  18. A negative modulatory role for rho and rho-associated kinase signaling in delamination of neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Groysman, Maya; Shoval, Irit; Kalcheim, Chaya

    2008-01-01

    Background Neural crest progenitors arise as epithelial cells and then undergo a process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition that precedes the generation of cellular motility and subsequent migration. We aim at understanding the underlying molecular network. Along this line, possible roles of Rho GTPases that act as molecular switches to control a variety of signal transduction pathways remain virtually unexplored, as are putative interactions between Rho proteins and additional known components of this cascade. Results We investigated the role of Rho/Rock signaling in neural crest delamination. Active RhoA and RhoB are expressed in the membrane of epithelial progenitors and are downregulated upon delamination. In vivo loss-of-function of RhoA or RhoB or of overall Rho signaling by C3 transferase enhanced and/or triggered premature crest delamination yet had no effect on cell specification. Consistently, treatment of explanted neural primordia with membrane-permeable C3 or with the Rock inhibitor Y27632 both accelerated and enhanced crest emigration without affecting cell proliferation. These treatments altered neural crest morphology by reducing stress fibers, focal adhesions and downregulating membrane-bound N-cadherin. Reciprocally, activation of endogenous Rho by lysophosphatidic acid inhibited emigration while enhancing the above. Since delamination is triggered by BMP and requires G1/S transition, we examined their relationship with Rho. Blocking Rho/Rock function rescued crest emigration upon treatment with noggin or with the G1/S inhibitor mimosine. In the latter condition, cells emigrated while arrested at G1. Conversely, BMP4 was unable to rescue cell emigration when endogenous Rho activity was enhanced by lysophosphatidic acid. Conclusion Rho-GTPases, through Rock, act downstream of BMP and of G1/S transition to negatively regulate crest delamination by modifying cytoskeleton assembly and intercellular adhesion. PMID:18945340

  19. Dune crests serve as preferential habitats for perennial plants during frequent drought years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidron, Giora J.

    2015-03-01

    Following frequent droughts in the last 19 years, high mortality of perennial plants was noted in the Hallamish dune field in the Negev Desert (P = 95 mm). To evaluate the vegetation change, vegetation cover and species composition were studied in 20 plots located at the semi-stable non-crusted dune crest (CR) and 20 plots located at the crusted interdune (ID) during the summer of 2012 and compared to data from 1994. In addition, periodical moisture measurements were carried out in a pair of plots, 50-100 m apart, at CR and ID between October 2009 and September 2012. The findings exhibit a substantial decrease in the living perennials (mainly consisting of shrubs), with ID exhibiting the highest reduction in living shrubs. The findings are in agreement with measurements of the available water content, AWC (i.e., above the wilting point) during 2010-2012. While being recorded at >60 cm at CR, AWC was not recorded at ID at 60-120 cm depth during the summer months. Lower evaporation rates due to higher albedo and especially subsurface flow from the adjacent highly active crest are mainly seen responsible for deeper infiltration and higher AWC at CR. It is concluded that while sufficient AWC was present at CR to sustain most of the perennial shrubs also during frequent drought years, insufficient moisture was retained at ID to sustain most perennials. Non-crusted dune crests may thus serve as preferential habitats (fertility belts) for perennial plants, providing refugia for shrubs during frequent drought years.

  20. Organochlorine contaminants in bald eagles and double-crested cormorants nesting along the lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, J.; Schuler, C.; Anthony, R.; Tillitt, D.

    1995-12-31

    The Columbia River receives numerous contaminants from municipal and industrial permitted discharges, nonpoint pollution, accidental spills, and hazardous waste sites. Poor reproductive success has been documented in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nesting along the river, and concentrations of DDE and PCBs in eagle eggs has been correlated with reduced productivity and significant eggshell thinning. Recently, elevated 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) concentrations also were detected in embryos of bald eagles and double-crested cormorants. The authors collected eggs from 11 bald eagle nest sites in 1994 and from 10 cormorant nest sites in 1993 and 1994 and found organochlorines at concentrations potentially harmful to the species. DDE, PCBS, and 2,3,7,8-TCDD in bald eagle eggs averaged 6.84 parts per million (ppm), 6.15 ppm, and 30 parts per trillion (pptr)fresh weight, respectively. In cormorant eggs, fresh weight values ranged from 1.14 to 13.1 ppm for DDE, 0.98 to 9.67 for total PCBS, and 4.8 to 58 pptr for 2,3,7,8-TCDD. Cormorant eggs subjected to a H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay indicated the amounts of TCDD-Equivalents (TCDD-EQs) present would relate to a 23% egg mortality when compared to dose-response relationships between H4IIE-derived TCDD-EQs and egg mortality rates in double-crested cormorants in the Great Lakes. Preliminary results suggest DDE continues to impair reproductive success in Columbia River bald eagles, and dioxin and PCB concentrations may be impacting double-crested cormorants. Further egg analysis and productivity studies will be conducted in 1995.

  1. Odd-skipped related-1 controls neural crest chondrogenesis during tongue development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Lan, Yu; Xu, Jingyue; Chang, Ching-Fang; Brugmann, Samantha A; Jiang, Rulang

    2013-11-12

    The tongue is a critical element of the feeding system in tetrapod animals for their successful adaptation to terrestrial life. Whereas the oral part of the mammalian tongue contains soft tissues only, the avian tongue has an internal skeleton extending to the anterior tip. The mechanisms underlying the evolutionary divergence in tongue skeleton formation are completely unknown. We show here that the odd-skipped related-1 (Osr1) transcription factor is expressed throughout the neural crest-derived tongue mesenchyme in mouse, but not in chick, embryos during early tongue morphogenesis. Neural crest-specific inactivation of Osr1 resulted in formation of an ectopic cartilage in the mouse tongue, reminiscent in shape and developmental ontogeny of the anterior tongue cartilage in chick. SRY-box containing gene-9 (Sox9), the master regulator of chondrogenesis, is widely expressed in the nascent tongue mesenchyme at the onset of tongue morphogenesis but its expression is dramatically down-regulated concomitant with activation of Osr1 expression in the developing mouse tongue. In Osr1 mutant mouse embryos, expression of Sox9 persisted in the developing tongue mesenchyme where chondrogenesis is subsequently activated to form the ectopic cartilage. Furthermore, we show that Osr1 binds to the Sox9 gene promoter and that overexpression of Osr1 suppressed expression of endogenous Sox9 mRNAs and Sox9 promoter-driven reporter. These data indicate that Osr1 normally prevents chondrogenesis in the mammalian tongue through repression of Sox9 expression and suggest that changes in regulation of Osr1 expression in the neural crest-derived tongue mesenchyme underlie the evolutionary divergence of birds from other vertebrates in tongue morphogenesis.

  2. Backfill for iliac-crest donor sites: a prospective, randomized study of coralline hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Bojescul, John A; Polly, David W; Kuklo, Timothy R; Allen, Thomas W; Wieand, Kay E

    2005-08-01

    We report on a prospective randomized study of coralline hydroxyapatite (CH) used as backfill for iliac-crest donor sites. Autogenous iliac-crest bone graft is routinely harvested for spinal fusion. Donor-site morbidity is underappreciated; the presumption is that donor sites regenerate. In this study, we assessed the biological viability of the backfill CH (Pro OsteonTM Implant 500 Hydroxyapatite Bone Void Filler; Interpore, Irvine, Calif) and compared donor-site morbidity after harvest. Twelve patients (11 men, 1 woman) were enrolled: 5 in the backfill group and 7 in the no-backfill group. As part of routine evaluations done preoperatively and 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively, plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans were used to assess bone ingrowth, and technetium bone scans were used to assess biological activity. Postoperative pain analysis was also done. Ten patients (9 men, 1 woman) completed the study. Of the 4 completers in the backfill group, 3 (75%) showed bony ingrowth on plain radiographs and CT scans at 1 year; the fourth patient showed bony ingrowth only on plain radiographs. All 4 patients showed biological activity on bone scans and reported mild pain to no pain. Of the 6 completers in the no-backfill group, 1 (17%) showed bony ingrowth on plain radiographs and CT scans. No patient showed biological activity on bone scans at 1 year. CH aids in iliac-crest healing after bone-graft harvesting by acting as a biological osteoconductive matrix. Postoperative pain at the bone-graft site is potentially reduced. More studies of larger numbers of patients are needed to assess the true long-term benefits of this material in a clinical setting.

  3. Resurrection of Bronchocela burmana Blanford, 1878 for the Green Crested Lizard (Squamata, Agamidae) of southern Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Zug, George R.; Mulcahy, Daniel G.; Vindum, Jens V.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Recent fieldwork in southern Tanintharyi revealed the presence of a small Green Crested Lizard in the wet evergreen forest. We generated mtDNA sequence data (ND2) that demonstrates that this population’s nearest relative is Bronchocela rayaensis Grismer et al., 2015 of Pulau Langkawi, northwestern Peninsular Malaysia and Phuket Island. Morphologically the Burmese Bronchocela shares many features with Bronchocela rayaensis, which potentially would make this recently described Thai-Malay species a synonym of Bronchocela burmana Blanford, 1878; however, we interpret the genetic and morphological differences to reflect evolutionary divergence and recommend the recognition of both species. PMID:28331413

  4. Isolation and culture of neural crest stem cells from human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Xu, Xiaowei

    2013-04-06

    Hair follicles undergo lifelong growth and hair cycle is a well-controlled process involving stem cell proliferation and quiescence. Hair bulge is a well-characterized niche for adult stem cells. This segment of the outer root sheath contains a number of different types of stem cells, including epithelial stem cells, melanocyte stem cells and neural crest like stem cells. Hair follicles represent an accessible and rich source for different types of human stem cells. We and others have isolated neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) from human fetal and adult hair follicles. These human stem cells are label-retaining cells and are capable of self-renewal through asymmetric cell division in vitro. They express immature neural crest cell markers but not differentiation markers. Our expression profiling study showed that they share a similar gene expression pattern with murine skin immature neural crest cells. They exhibit clonal multipotency that can give rise to myogenic, melanocytic, and neuronal cell lineages after in vitro clonal single cell culture. Differentiated cells not only acquire lineage-specific markers but also demonstrate appropriate functions in ex vivo conditions. In addition, these NCSCs show differentiation potential toward mesenchymal lineages. Differentiated neuronal cells can persist in mouse brain and retain neuronal differentiation markers. It has been shown that hair follicle derived NCSCs can help nerve regrowth, and they improve motor function in mice transplanted with these stem cells following transecting spinal cord injury. Furthermore, peripheral nerves have been repaired with stem cell grafts, and implantation of skin-derived precursor cells adjacent to crushed sciatic nerves has resulted in remyelination. Therefore, the hair follicle/skin derived NCSCs have already shown promising results for regenerative therapy in preclinical models. Somatic cell reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has shown enormous potential for

  5. Restenosis after carotid artery stenting and endarterectomy: a secondary analysis of CREST, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Brajesh K.; Beach, Kirk W.; Roubin, Gary S.; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Moore, Wesley S.; Malas, Mahmoud B.; Chiu, David; Gonzales, Nicole R.; Burke, J. Lee; Rinaldi, Michael; Elmore, James R.; Weaver, Fred A.; Narins, Craig R.; Foster, Malcolm; Hodgson, Kim J.; Shepard, Alexander D.; Meschia, James F.; Bergelin, Robert O.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Howard, George; Brott, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background In the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST), the composite primary endpoint of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period or ipsilateral stroke thereafter did not differ between carotid artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis. A secondary aim of this randomised trial was to compare the composite endpoint of restenosis or occlusion. Methods Patients with stenosis of the carotid artery who were asymptomatic or had had a transient ischaemic attack, amaurosis fugax, or a minor stroke were eligible for CREST and were enrolled at 117 clinical centres in the USA and Canada between Dec 21, 2000, and July 18, 2008. In this secondary analysis, the main endpoint was a composite of restenosis or occlusion at 2 years. Restenosis and occlusion were assessed by duplex ultrasonography at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 months and were defined as a reduction in diameter of the target artery of at least 70%, diagnosed by a peak systolic velocity of at least 3·0 m/s. Studies were done in CREST-certified laboratories and interpreted at the Ultrasound Core Laboratory (University of Washington). The frequency of restenosis was calculated by Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and was compared during a 2-year follow-up period. We used proportional hazards models to assess the association between baseline characteristics and risk of restenosis. Analyses were per protocol. CREST is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00004732. Findings 2191 patients received their assigned treatment within 30 days of randomisation and had eligible ultrasonography (1086 who had carotid artery stenting, 1105 who had carotid endarterectomy). In 2 years, 58 patients who underwent carotid artery stenting (Kaplan-Meier rate 6·0%) and 62 who had carotid endarterectomy (6·3%) had restenosis or occlusion (hazard ratio [HR] 0·90, 95% CI 0·63–1·29; p=0·58). Female sex (1·79, 1·25–2

  6. Effects of laminar boundary layer on a model broad-crested weir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, L. T.

    1981-09-01

    An approximate method for the analysis of flow with a laminar boundary layer over a model broad crested weir is described. The method was used to demonstrate the effects of the laminar boundary layer and the results show that these effects are significant. If the energy is calculated from depth and discharge measurements, large energy losses appear to occur at low flow rates in laboratory experiments. Losses real and apparent, are explained and the methods presented may be used to estimate the correct energy values.

  7. In vitro differentiation of quail neural crest cells into sensory-like neuroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieber-Blum, Maya; Kumar, Sanjiv R.; Riley, Danny A.

    1988-01-01

    Data are presented that demonstrate the ability of quail neural-crest embrionic cells grown as primary culture to differentiate in vitro into sensorylike neuroblasts. After 7-14 days of growth as primary culture, many of the putative sensory neuroblasts displayed substance P (SP)-like immunoreactivity and some exhibited histochemical carbonic anhydrase activity. Double staining experiments showed that the SP-like immunoreactive neuroblasts did not contain detectable levels of tyrosine hydroxylase or dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. The neuronal nature of the cultured sensorylike neuroblasts was further documented by double labeling for antibodies against the 68 kDa neurofilament polypeptide and substance P.

  8. A Rap GTPase interactor, RADIL, mediates migration of neural crest precursors.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Gromoslaw A; Schott, Benjamin J; Stewart, Rodney A; Diederichs, Sven; Muir, Beth; Provencher, Heather L; Look, A Thomas; Sgroi, Dennis C; Peterson, Randall T; Haber, Daniel A

    2007-09-01

    The neural crest (NC) is a highly motile cell population that gives rise to multiple tissue lineages during vertebrate embryogenesis. Here, we identify a novel effector of the small GTPase Rap, called RADIL, and show that it is required for cell adhesion and migration. Knockdown of radil in the zebrafish model results in multiple defects in NC-derived lineages such as cartilage, pigment cells, and enteric neurons. We specifically show that these defects are primarily due to the diminished migratory capacity of NC cells. The identification of RADIL as a regulator of NC migration defines a role for the Rap pathway in this process.

  9. A career at the interface of cell and developmental biology: a view from the crest.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Marianne E

    2012-11-01

    Just as neural crest cells migrate great distances through the embryo, my journey has taken me from a childhood in a distant land to a career as a biologist. My mentoring relationships have shaped not only the careers of my trainees, but also the trajectory of my own science. One of the most satisfying aspects of mentoring comes from helping to empower the next generation of scientists to do more tomorrow than is possible today. This, together with a passion for discovery and learning new things, motivates me and makes science such a rewarding career.

  10. Feasibility Study of Canine Epidermal Neural Crest Stem Cell Transplantation in the Spinal Cords of Dogs

    PubMed Central

    McMahill, Barbara G.; Spriet, Mathieu; Sisó, Sílvia; Manzer, Michael D.; Mitchell, Gaela; McGee, Jeannine; Garcia, Tanya C.; Borjesson, Dori L.; Sieber-Blum, Maya; Nolta, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot feasibility study aimed to determine the outcome of canine epidermal neural crest stem cell (cEPI-NCSC) grafts in the normal spinal cords of healthy bred-for-research dogs. This included developing novel protocols for (a) the ex vivo expansion of cEPI-NCSCs, (b) the delivery of cEPI-NCSCs into the spinal cord, and (c) the labeling of the cells and subsequent tracing of the graft in the live animal by magnetic resonance imaging. A total of four million cEPI-NCSCs were injected into the spinal cord divided in two locations. Differences in locomotion at baseline and post-treatment were evaluated by gait analysis and compared with neurological outcome and behavioral exams. Histopathological analyses of the spinal cords and cEPI-NCSC grafts were performed at 3 weeks post-transplantation. Neurological and gait parameters were minimally affected by the stem cell injection. cEPI-NCSCs survived in the canine spinal cord for the entire period of investigation and did not migrate or proliferate. Subsets of cEPI-NCSCs expressed the neural crest stem cell marker Sox10. There was no detectable expression of markers for glial cells or neurons. The tissue reaction to the cell graft was predominantly vascular in addition to a degree of reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation. In the present study, we demonstrated that cEPI-NCSC grafts survive in the spinal cords of healthy dogs without major adverse effects. They persist locally in the normal spinal cord, may promote angiogenesis and tissue remodeling, and elicit a tissue response that may be beneficial in patients with spinal cord injury. Significance It has been established that mouse and human epidermal neural crest stem cells are somatic multipotent stem cells with proved innovative potential in a mouse model of spinal cord injury (SCI) offering promise of a valid treatment for SCI. Traumatic SCI is a common neurological problem in dogs with marked similarities, clinically and pathologically, to the syndrome

  11. No One Saw this Coming: Endoparasitic Mites Behind the Eyes of a Double-crested Cormorant.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Kate L; Spicer, Greg S; OConnor, Barry M; Hechinger, Ryan F

    2017-02-06

    We found hundreds of mites behind the eyes of a Double-crested Cormorant, Phalacrocorax auritus (Suliformes: Phalacrocoracidae). The mites were Neottialges evansi (Acari: Hypoderatidae), representing the first report of this parasite in P. auritus from western North America. Deutonymphs of N. evansi are endoparasites, typically reported infecting fat deposits over the pectoral muscles, axillary areas, and vent of cormorants. Here, mites infected only orbital tissues, a new infection site for hypoderatid mites. We suggest a lack of reports of this infection site could be explained by limited scrutiny of orbits, and deutonymphs mites infecting orbits may be more common than expected.

  12. Assessment and Surgical Treatment of Calcinosis of the Shoulder Associated with CREST Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Breusch, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report an unusual case of a 65-year-old lady with CREST syndrome with multiple upper and lower limb calcinosis, who presented with severe shoulder pain and stiffness, with widespread intra- and extra-articular calcinosis, which was refractory to conservative measures. We were able to identify the main cause of her symptoms through serial diagnostic injections as calcific biceps tendinosis. We will discuss her assessment and surgical management and the pathophysiology and various treatment modalities for managing the soft tissue calcinosis in rheumatological diseases. PMID:27437158

  13. Myocardial function and perfusion in the CREST syndrome variant of progressive systemic sclerosis. Exercise radionuclide evaluation and comparison with diffuse scleroderma

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Owens, G.R.; Steen, V.D.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-09-01

    Myocardial function and perfusion were evaluated in 22 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with the CREST syndrome using exercise and radionuclide techniques, pulmonary function testing, and chest roentgenography. The results were compared with a similar study of 26 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma. The prevalence of thallium perfusion abnormalities was similar in the groups with CREST syndrome and diffuse scleroderma, (64 percent versus 77 percent), but the defects were significantly smaller in the CREST syndrome (p less than 0.01). Reperfusion thallium defects in the absence of extramural coronary artery disease were seen in 38 percent of patients with diffuse scleroderma. This finding was not seen in any of the patients with the CREST syndrome. In diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of both right and left ventricular function were related to larger thallium perfusion defects. In the CREST syndrome, abnormalities of left ventricular function were minor, were seen only during exercise, and were unrelated to thallium perfusion defects. Abnormal resting right ventricular function was seen in 36 percent of the patients with the CREST syndrome and was associated with an isolated decrease in diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. It is concluded that the cardiac manifestations of the CREST syndrome are distinct from those found in diffuse scleroderma. Unlike diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of left ventricular function in the CREST syndrome are minor and are unrelated to abnormalities of coronary perfusion. Right ventricular dysfunction in the CREST syndrome appears to be primarily related to pulmonary vascular disease.

  14. The different effects on cranial and trunk neural crest cell behaviour following exposure to a low concentration of alcohol in vitro.

    PubMed

    Czarnobaj, Joanna; Bagnall, Keith M; Bamforth, J Steven; Milos, Nadine C

    2014-05-01

    Embryonic neural crest cells give rise to large regions of the face and peripheral nervous system. Exposure of these cells to high alcohol concentrations leads to cell death in the craniofacial region resulting in facial defects. However, the effects of low concentrations of alcohol on neural crest cells are not clear. In this study, cranial neural crest cells from Xenopus laevis were cultured in an ethanol concentration approximately equivalent to one drink. Techniques were developed to study various aspects of neural crest cell behaviour and a number of cellular parameters were quantified. In the presence of alcohol, a significant number of cranial neural crest cells emigrated from the explant on fibronectin but the liberation of individual cells was delayed. The cells also remained close to the explant and their morphology changed. Cranial neural crest cells did not grow on Type 1 collagen. For the purposes of comparison, the behaviour of trunk neural crest cells was also studied. The presence of alcohol correlated with increased retention of single cells on fibronectin but left other parameters unchanged. The behaviour of trunk neural crest cells growing on Type 1 collagen in the presence of alcohol did not differ from controls. Low concentrations of alcohol therefore significantly affected both cranial and trunk neural crest cells, with a wider variety of effects on cells from the cranial as opposed to the trunk region. The results suggest that low concentrations of alcohol may be more detrimental to early events in organ formation than currently suspected.

  15. Constitutively active Notch1 converts cranial neural crest-derived frontonasal mesenchyme to perivascular cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sophie R.; Perera, Surangi N.; Baker, Clare V. H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Perivascular/mural cells originate from either the mesoderm or the cranial neural crest. Regardless of their origin, Notch signalling is necessary for their formation. Furthermore, in both chicken and mouse, constitutive Notch1 activation (via expression of the Notch1 intracellular domain) is sufficient in vivo to convert trunk mesoderm-derived somite cells to perivascular cells, at the expense of skeletal muscle. In experiments originally designed to investigate the effect of premature Notch1 activation on the development of neural crest-derived olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OECs), we used in ovo electroporation to insert a tetracycline-inducible NotchΔE construct (encoding a constitutively active mutant of mouse Notch1) into the genome of chicken cranial neural crest cell precursors, and activated NotchΔE expression by doxycycline injection at embryonic day 4. NotchΔE-targeted cells formed perivascular cells within the frontonasal mesenchyme, and expressed a perivascular marker on the olfactory nerve. Hence, constitutively activating Notch1 is sufficient in vivo to drive not only somite cells, but also neural crest-derived frontonasal mesenchyme and perhaps developing OECs, to a perivascular cell fate. These results also highlight the plasticity of neural crest-derived mesenchyme and glia. PMID:28183698

  16. Neural crest requires Impdh2 for development of the enteric nervous system, great vessels, and craniofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jonathan I; Avetisyan, Marina; Zimmermann, Albert G; Heuckeroth, Robert O

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that impair the proliferation of enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCDC) cause Hirschsprung disease, a potentially lethal birth defect where the enteric nervous system (ENS) is absent from distal bowel. Inosine 5' monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity is essential for de novo GMP synthesis, and chemical inhibition of IMPDH induces Hirschsprung disease-like pathology in mouse models by reducing ENCDC proliferation. Two IMPDH isoforms are ubiquitously expressed in the embryo, but only IMPDH2 is required for life. To further understand the role of IMPDH2 in ENS and neural crest development, we characterized a conditional Impdh2 mutant mouse. Deletion of Impdh2 in the early neural crest using the Wnt1-Cre transgene produced defects in multiple neural crest derivatives including highly penetrant intestinal aganglionosis, agenesis of the craniofacial skeleton, and cardiac outflow tract and great vessel malformations. Analysis using a Rosa26 reporter mouse suggested that some or all of the remaining ENS in Impdh2 conditional-knockout animals was derived from cells that escaped Wnt1-Cre mediated DNA recombination. These data suggest that IMPDH2 mediated guanine nucleotide synthesis is essential for normal development of the ENS and other neural crest derivatives.

  17. The viability of cells obtained using the Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator system and in bone graft from the iliac crest.

    PubMed

    Uppal, H S; Peterson, B E; Misfeldt, M L; Della Rocca, G J; Volgas, D A; Murtha, Y M; Stannard, J P; Choma, T J; Crist, B D

    2013-09-01

    We hypothesised that cells obtained via a Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator (RIA) system retain substantial osteogenic potential and are at least equivalent to graft harvested from the iliac crest. Graft was harvested using the RIA in 25 patients (mean age 37.6 years (18 to 68)) and from the iliac crest in 21 patients (mean age 44.6 years (24 to 78)), after which ≥ 1 g of bony particulate graft material was processed from each. Initial cell viability was assessed using Trypan blue exclusion, and initial fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis for cell lineage was performed. After culturing the cells, repeat FACS analysis for cell lineage was performed and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for osteocalcin, and Alizarin red staining to determine osteogenic potential. Cells obtained via RIA or from the iliac crest were viable and matured into mesenchymal stem cells, as shown by staining for the specific mesenchymal antigens CD90 and CD105. For samples from both RIA and the iliac crest there was a statistically significant increase in bone production (both p < 0.001), as demonstrated by osteocalcin production after induction. Medullary autograft cells harvested using RIA are viable and osteogenic. Cell viability and osteogenic potential were similar between bone grafts obtained from both the RIA system and the iliac crest.

  18. Differential distribution of competence for panplacodal and neural crest induction to non-neural and neural ectoderm.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Mareike; Ahrens, Katja; Rink, Elke; Peter, Annette; Schlosser, Gerhard

    2012-03-01

    It is still controversial whether cranial placodes and neural crest cells arise from a common precursor at the neural plate border or whether placodes arise from non-neural ectoderm and neural crest from neural ectoderm. Using tissue grafting in embryos of Xenopus laevis, we show here that the competence for induction of neural plate, neural plate border and neural crest markers is confined to neural ectoderm, whereas competence for induction of panplacodal markers is confined to non-neural ectoderm. This differential distribution of competence is established during gastrulation paralleling the dorsal restriction of neural competence. We further show that Dlx3 and GATA2 are required cell-autonomously for panplacodal and epidermal marker expression in the non-neural ectoderm, while ectopic expression of Dlx3 or GATA2 in the neural plate suppresses neural plate, border and crest markers. Overexpression of Dlx3 (but not GATA2) in the neural plate is sufficient to induce different non-neural markers in a signaling-dependent manner, with epidermal markers being induced in the presence, and panplacodal markers in the absence, of BMP signaling. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a non-neural versus neural origin of placodes and neural crest, respectively, strongly implicate Dlx3 in the regulation of non-neural competence, and show that GATA2 contributes to non-neural competence but is not sufficient to promote it ectopically.

  19. Fgf20b is required for the ectomesenchymal fate establishment of cranial neural crest cells in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Hajime; Goto, Mami; Katayama, Mika; Miyake, Ayumi; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} The establishment of the ectomesenchymal lineage within the cranial neural crest is of great significance. {yields} Fgf20b knockdown zebrafish embryos showed dysplasticneurocranial and pharyngeal cartilages. {yields} Fgf20b is required for ectomesenchymal fate establishment via the activation of Fgfr1 in zebrafish. -- Abstract: In cranial skeletal development, the establishment of the ectomesenchymal lineage within the cranial neural crest is of great significance. Fgfs are polypeptide growth factors with diverse functions in development and metabolism. Fgf20b knockdown zebrafish embryos showed dysplastic neurocranial and pharyngeal cartilages. Ectomesenchymal cells from cranial neural crest cells were significantly decreased in Fgf20b knockdown embryos, but cranial neural crest cells with a non-ectomesnchymal fate were increased. However, the proliferation and apoptosis of cranial neural crest cells were essentially unchanged. Fgfr1 knockdown embryos also showed dysplastic neurocranial and pharyngeal cartilages. The present findings indicate that Fgf20b is required for ectomesenchymal fate establishment via the activation of Fgfr1 in zebrafish.

  20. An amphioxus winged helix/forkhead gene, AmphiFoxD: insights into vertebrate neural crest evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jr-Kai; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.

    2002-01-01

    During amphioxus development, the neural plate is bordered by cells expressing many genes with homologs involved in vertebrate neural crest induction. However, these amphioxus cells evidently lack additional genetic programs for the cell delaminations, migrations, and differentiations characterizing definitive vertebrate neural crest. We characterize an amphioxus winged helix/forkhead gene (AmphiFoxD) closely related to vertebrate FoxD genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the AmphiFoxD is basal to vertebrate FoxD1, FoxD2, FoxD3, FoxD4, and FoxD5. One of these vertebrate genes (FoxD3) consistently marks neural crest during development. Early in amphioxus development, AmphiFoxD is expressed medially in the anterior neural plate as well as in axial (notochordal) and paraxial mesoderm; later, the gene is expressed in the somites, notochord, cerebral vesicle (diencephalon), and hindgut endoderm. However, there is never any expression in cells bordering the neural plate. We speculate that an AmphiFoxD homolog in the common ancestor of amphioxus and vertebrates was involved in histogenic processes in the mesoderm (evagination and delamination of the somites and notochord); then, in the early vertebrates, descendant paralogs of this gene began functioning in the presumptive neural crest bordering the neural plate to help make possible the delaminations and cell migrations that characterize definitive vertebrate neural crest. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Genetics and evolution of plumage color in Crested Ibis: Analysis of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R).

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Liu, X; Zhang, J; Qing, B; Lu, B

    2015-08-28

    The melanocortin-1-recepter gene (MC1R), an important regulator in melanin synthesis, may cause different plumage color patterns in birds: gain-of-function mutations lead to the synthesis of eumelanin, whereas loss-of-function mutations help to generate pheomelanin synthesis. We had chosen MC1R as a candidate gene for the depigmentation of crested ibis, cloned and sequenced the crested ibis MC1R gene the first time. The crested ibis MC1R sequence, highly conserved with other birds during evolution, had seven transmembrane domains which played an indispensable function through evolution. We did not found any substitution on this sequence among all the sample individuals. The phylogenetic tree showed that crested ibis separated early in the evolution of birds. TYR, TYRP1, TYRP2 and MC1R were expressed in blood and the expression of the four genes showed no significant difference (p>0.05) between normal and albinism individuals, and this result demonstrated that melanic pigments are not involved in the production of red pigmentation in birds. Further study of the crested ibis albinism should focus on analyzing carotenoid-based genes.

  2. Comparison of outcome of microvascular bony head and neck reconstructions using the fibular free flap and the iliac crest flap.

    PubMed

    Mücke, Thomas; Loeffelbein, Denys J; Kolk, Andreas; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Kanatas, Anastasios; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mitchell, David A; Kesting, Marco R

    2013-09-01

    Several microvascular free flaps are available for reconstruction of the osseous components after resections for head and neck cancer. We have prospectively evaluated patients treated by bony microsurgical reconstruction to identify predictors of adverse outcomes for delayed wound healing and failure of free flaps. All patients from July 2007 to June 2011 who had reconstructions with microvascular fibular or iliac crest flaps immediately after resection of the tumour were evaluated. There were a total of 156 bony free flaps: 120 (77%) fibular and 36 (23%) iliac crest flaps. A total of 133 (85%) were successful. Delayed wound healing was more common with the iliac crest flap (p=0.01) at the intraoral site (p=0.04). Significantly more iliac crest free flaps failed (p=0.02). Anastomosis to the facial artery (p=0.05) and facial vein (p=0.04), and duration of overall operating time were associated with a significantly higher risk of failure of the flap. Patients with cancer of the head and neck who require microsurgical bony reconstruction are at increased risk of postoperative complications. Significantly more complications were found with the iliac crest flap, whereas the fibular flap was associated with a significantly longer operating time.

  3. Neural crest requires Impdh2 for development of the enteric nervous system, great vessels, and craniofacial skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Jonathan I.; Avetisyan, Marina; Zimmermann, Albert G.; Heuckeroth, Robert O.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that impair the proliferation of enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCDC) cause Hirschsprung disease, a potentially lethal birth defect where the enteric nervous system (ENS) is absent from distal bowel. Inosine 5′ monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity is essential for de novo GMP synthesis, and chemical inhibition of IMPDH induces Hirschsprung disease-like pathology in mouse models by reducing ENCDC proliferation. Two IMPDH isoforms are ubiquitously expressed in the embryo, but only IMPDH2 is required for life. To further understand the role of IMPDH2 in ENS and neural crest development, we characterized a conditional Impdh2 mutant mouse. Deletion of Impdh2 in the early neural crest using the Wnt1-Cre transgene produced defects in multiple neural crest derivatives including highly penetrant intestinal aganglionosis, agenesis of the craniofacial skeleton, and cardiac outflow tract and great vessel malformations. Analysis using a Rosa26 reporter mouse suggested that some or all of the remaining ENS in Impdh2 conditional-knockout animals was derived from cells that escaped Wnt1-Cre mediated DNA recombination. These data suggest that IMPDH2 mediated guanine nucleotide synthesis is essential for normal development of the ENS and other neural crest derivatives. PMID:26546974

  4. Connecting Teratogen-Induced Congenital Heart Defects to Neural Crest Cells and Their Effect on Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga H.; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest is in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies. PMID:25220155

  5. Connecting teratogen-induced congenital heart defects to neural crest cells and their effect on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga H; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M; Jenkins, Michael W; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies.

  6. Parentage and relatedness in polyandrous comb-crested jacanas using ISSRs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.; Mace, Terrence R.; Mullins, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    In this article we present the first analysis of parentage and relatedness in a natural vertebrate population, using Intersimple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) markers. Thus, 28 ISSR markers were used in a study of a sex-role reversed, simultaneously polyandrous shorebird from northeastern Australia, the comb-crested jacana (Irediparra gallinacea). Assessment of parentage was based on comparison of field observations, novel bands, individual-specific bands found in 7/9 males and 4/6 females, and a 99% CI exclusion criteria. Integrating results from these approaches resulted in confirmation of paternity in all 36 chicks. In only one case (2.8% of chicks) was a co-mate assigned paternity. Thus, comb-crested jacanas appear to be genetically monogamous. These results showed resemblance to sequentially polyandrous birds but differed from the simultaneously polyandrous wattled jacana ( Jacana jacana; Emlen et al. 1998). A significant relationship between relatedness and ISSR similarity resulted in recognition that 14/15 adults sampled may be related to at least one other adult by 0.25 or more. Lack of dispersal may be explained by physical limitations and adequate regional habitat. ISSRs proved to be simple and helpful in resolving these issues.

  7. Using human neural crest-derived progenitor cells to investigate osteogenesis: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Degistirici, Ozer; Grabellus, Florian; Irsen, Stephan; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Thie, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Human tooth contains a distinct population of neural crest-derived progenitor cells (dNC-PCs) which are known to give rise to specialized daughter cells of an osteogenic lineage. We hypothesised that dNC-PCs could develop into neural crest-derived bone in a self-propagating and extracorporal culture system. Thus, we examined the three-dimensional structure obtained from osteogenic-stimulated dNC-PCs by morphological, biochemical and spectroscopic methods. After the onset of stimulation, cells formed a multilayer with outer cells covering the surface and inner cells secreting a hyaline matrix. With prolonged culture, multilayers contracted and formed a three-dimensional construct which subsequently converted to a calcified mass. Differentiation of progenitor cells was associated with apoptosis. Cell types which survived were smooth muscle actin-positive cells and bone-like cells. The expression of osteoblastic markers and the secretion of a collagenous matrix indicate that the bone cells had acquired their functional phenotype. Furthermore, these cells produced and secreted membrane-bound vesicles into the newly forming matrix. Consequently, an early biomineralized extracellular matrix was found with calcium phosphate deposits being associated with the newly formed collagen matrix framework. The molar calcium-phosphorus-ratio of the mineralized collagen indicated that amorphous calcium phosphate was present within this matrix. The data suggest that stimulated cultures of dNC-PCs are able to recapitulate some processes of the early phase of osteogenesis.

  8. Lgr5 Marks Neural Crest Derived Multipotent Oral Stromal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Boddupally, Keerthi; Wang, Guangfang; Chen, Yibu; Kobielak, Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that multipotent stem cells with neural crest (NC) origin persist into adulthood in oral mucosa. However their exact localization and role in normal homeostasis is unknown. In this study, we discovered that Lgr5 is expressed in NC cells during embryonic development, which give rise to the dormant stem cells in the adult tongue and oral mucosa. Those Lgr5 positive oral stromal stem cells display properties of NC stem cells including clonal growth and multipotent differentiation. RNA sequencing revealed that adult Lgr5+ oral stromal stem cells express high number of neural crest related markers like Sox9, Twist1, Snai1, Myc, Ets1, Crabp1, Epha2, and Itgb1. Using lineage-tracing experiments, we show that these cells persist more than a year in the ventral tongue and some areas of the oral mucosa and give rise to stromal progeny. In vivo transplantation demonstrated that these cells reconstitute the stroma. Our studies show for the first time that Lgr5 is expressed in the NC cells at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) and is maintained during embryonic development and postnataly in the stroma of the ventral tongue, and some areas of the oral mucosa and that Lgr5+ cells participate in the maintenance of the stroma.

  9. Zebrafish heart development is regulated via glutaredoxin 2 dependent migration and survival of neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Carsten; Poschmann, Gereon; Stühler, Kai; Holmgren, Arne; Bräutigam, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 2 is a vertebrate specific oxidoreductase of the thioredoxin family of proteins modulating the intracellular thiol pool. Thereby, glutaredoxin 2 is important for specific redox signaling and regulates embryonic development of brain and vasculature via reversible oxidative posttranslational thiol modifications. Here, we describe that glutaredoxin 2 is also required for successful heart formation. Knock-down of glutaredoxin 2 in zebrafish embryos inhibits the invasion of cardiac neural crest cells into the primary heart field. This leads to impaired heart looping and subsequent obstructed blood flow. Glutaredoxin 2 specificity of the observed phenotype was confirmed by rescue experiments. Active site variants of glutaredoxin 2 revealed that the (de)-glutathionylation activity is required for proper heart formation. Our data suggest that actin might be one target during glutaredoxin 2 regulated cardiac neural crest cell migration and embryonic heart development. In summary, this work represents further evidence for the general importance of redox signaling in embryonic development and highlights additionally the importance of glutaredoxin 2 during embryogenesis.

  10. High glucose environment inhibits cranial neural crest survival by activating excessive autophagy in the chick embryo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Yu; Li, Shuai; Wang, Guang; Ma, Zheng-Lai; Chuai, Manli; Cao, Liu; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    High glucose levels induced by maternal diabetes could lead to defects in neural crest development during embryogenesis, but the cellular mechanism is still not understood. In this study, we observed a defect in chick cranial skeleton, especially parietal bone development in the presence of high glucose levels, which is derived from cranial neural crest cells (CNCC). In early chick embryo, we found that inducing high glucose levels could inhibit the development of CNCC, however, cell proliferation was not significantly involved. Nevertheless, apoptotic CNCC increased in the presence of high levels of glucose. In addition, the expression of apoptosis and autophagy relevant genes were elevated by high glucose treatment. Next, the application of beads soaked in either an autophagy stimulator (Tunicamycin) or inhibitor (Hydroxychloroquine) functionally proved that autophagy was involved in regulating the production of CNCC in the presence of high glucose levels. Our observations suggest that the ERK pathway, rather than the mTOR pathway, most likely participates in mediating the autophagy induced by high glucose. Taken together, our observations indicated that exposure to high levels of glucose could inhibit the survival of CNCC by affecting cell apoptosis, which might result from the dysregulation of the autophagic process. PMID:26671447

  11. Neural Crest Cells Contribute an Astrocyte-like Glial Population to the Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Barlow-Anacker, Amanda J.; Fu, Ming; Erickson, Christopher S.; Bertocchini, Federica; Gosain, Ankush

    2017-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are multi-potent cells of ectodermal origin that colonize diverse organs, including the gastrointestinal tract to form the enteric nervous system (ENS) and hematopoietic organs (bone marrow, thymus) where they participate in lymphocyte trafficking. Recent studies have implicated the spleen as an anatomic site for integration of inflammatory signals from the intestine with efferent neural inputs. We have previously observed alterations in splenic lymphocyte subsets in animals with defective migration of NCC that model Hirschsprung’s disease, leading us to hypothesize that there may be a direct cellular contribution of NCC to the spleen. Here, we demonstrate that NCC colonize the spleen during embryogenesis and persist into adulthood. Splenic NCC display markers indicating a glial lineage and are arranged anatomically adjacent to blood vessels, pericytes and nerves, suggesting an astrocyte-like phenotype. Finally, we identify similar neural-crest derived cells in both the avian and non-human primate spleen, showing evolutionary conservation of these cells. PMID:28349968

  12. Inca: a novel p21-activated kinase-associated protein required for cranial neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Xu, Yanhua; Hoffman, Trevor L; Zhang, Tailin; Schilling, Thomas; Sargent, Thomas D

    2007-04-01

    Inca (induced in neural crest by AP2) is a novel protein discovered in a microarray screen for genes that are upregulated in Xenopus embryos by the transcriptional activator protein Tfap2a. It has no significant similarity to any known protein, but is conserved among vertebrates. In Xenopus, zebrafish and mouse embryos, Inca is expressed predominantly in the premigratory and migrating neural crest (NC). Knockdown experiments in frog and fish using antisense morpholinos reveal essential functions for Inca in a subset of NC cells that form craniofacial cartilage. Cells lacking Inca migrate successfully but fail to condense into skeletal primordia. Overexpression of Inca disrupts cortical actin and prevents formation of actin "purse strings", which are required for wound healing in Xenopus embryos. We show that Inca physically interacts with p21-activated kinase 5 (PAK5), a known regulator of the actin cytoskeleton that is co-expressed with Inca in embryonic ectoderm, including in the NC. These results suggest that Inca and PAK5 cooperate in restructuring cytoskeletal organization and in the regulation of cell adhesion in the early embryo and in NC cells during craniofacial development.

  13. Isolation of neural crest derived chromaffin progenitors from adult adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuei-Fang; Sicard, Flavie; Vukicevic, Vladimir; Hermann, Andreas; Storch, Alexander; Huttner, Wieland B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2009-10-01

    Chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla are neural crest-derived cells of the sympathoadrenal lineage. Unlike the closely-related sympathetic neurons, a subpopulation of proliferation-competent cells exists even in the adult. Here, we describe the isolation, expansion, and in vitro characterization of proliferation-competent progenitor cells from the bovine adrenal medulla. Similar to neurospheres, these cells, when prevented from adherence to the culture dish, grew in spheres, which we named chromospheres. These chromospheres were devoid of mRNA specific for smooth muscle cells (MYH11) or endothelial cells (PECAM1). During sphere formation, markers for differentiated chromaffin cells, such as phenylethanolamine-N-methyl transferase, were downregulated while neural progenitor markers nestin, vimentin, musashi 1, and nerve growth factor receptor, as well as markers of neural crest progenitor cells such as Sox1 and Sox9, were upregulated. Clonal analysis and bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-incorporation analysis demonstrated the self-renewing capacity of chromosphere cells. Differentiation protocols using NGF and BMP4 or dexamethasone induced neuronal or endocrine differentiation, respectively. Electrophysiological analyses of neural cells derived from chromospheres revealed functional properties of mature nerve cells, such as tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels and action potentials. Our study provides evidence that proliferation and differentiation competent chromaffin progenitor cells can be isolated from adult adrenal medulla and that these cells might harbor the potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease.

  14. Sulfur isotopes link overwinter habitat use and breeding condition in Double-crested Cormorants.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Craig E; Bur, Michael; Sherman, David; Shutt, J Laird

    2008-04-01

    North American Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) populations have increased greatly. Both breeding and overwintering ground factors have likely contributed to these increases. However, demonstrating how overwintering conditions may affect breeding birds has not been possible because of the difficulty in linking breeding birds to their wintering grounds. Here, we demonstrate the utility of stable sulfur isotopes to elucidate overwintering habitat use by cormorants breeding on Lake Erie. Sulfur isotopes in feathers grown on overwintering grounds provided insights into the degree to which birds used freshwater vs. marine environments. The proportion of birds utilizing freshwater habitats increased through time. This change may have reflected increases in freshwater aquaculture (i.e., catfish) in the U.S. south. Examination of body condition in birds returning to breed on Lake Erie indicated that those individuals that solely used marine habitats for at least a portion of the overwintering period were in poorer condition than birds using freshwater. Enhanced foraging opportunities at aquaculture facilities may improve the fitness of individuals that have returned to breed after overwintering at such locations. This study is the first to demonstrate a linkage between overwinter habitat use and breeding ground parameters in Double-crested Cormorants. These results underscore that factors throughout the Mississippi flyway are likely acting together to regulate cormorant populations.

  15. Diet of the double-crested cormorant in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bur, Michael T.; Tinnirello, Sandra L.; Lovell, Charles D.; Tyson, Jeff T.

    1999-01-01

    Sport and commercial fishing interest groups are concerned about potential impacts double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) may have on fish species. Our objectives for this study were to determine the diet of the cormorant in western Lake Erie and the diet overlap and competition for resources with piscivorous fish, such as walleye (Stizostedion vitreum). The stomach contents of 302 double-crested cormorants collected in western Lake Erie consisted primarily of young-of-the-year gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), emerald shiner (Notropis atherinoides), and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens). In the spring, freshwater drum were the most frequently occurring food in the stomachs and constituted the greatest portion of the diet by weight. Young gizzard shad became the most abundant prey and made up the largest percentage of the diet by weight in the stomachs from the end of July through October. Emerald shiners were abundant in the diet during June, September, and October. The fish species that cormorants ate resembled, by proportion, the species mix found in trawl catches. The diets of cormorants and walleyes were similar from July to October with significant overlap. Results from this study suggest impacts of cormorants at current population levels in Lake Erie are not detrimental to sport and commercial fishing. Therefore, control for the purpose of reducing competition for prey fish with walleye is not warranted at this time.

  16. Matrigel supports neural, melanocytic and chondrogenic differentiation of trunk neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Hryb, Ana B; Da-Costa, Meline C; Trentin, Andréa G; Calloni, Giordano W

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) is composed of highly multipotent precursor cells able to differentiate into both neural and mesenchymal phenotypes. Until now, most studies focusing on NC cell differentiation have been performed with traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture systems. However, such culture systems do not reflect the complex three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments of in vivo NC cells. To address this limitation, we have developed a method of Matrigel™ coating to create 2D and 3D microenvironments in the same culture well. When we performed cultures of trunk neural crest cells (TNCCs) on three different lots of basement membrane matrix (Matrigel™), we observed that all analyzed Matrigel™ lots were equally efficient in allowing the appearance of glial cells, neurons, melanocytes, smooth muscle cells and chondrocytes. We further observed that chondrocytes were found predominantly in the 3D microenvironment, whereas smooth muscle cells were almost exclusively located in the 2D microenvironment. Glial cells were present in both environments, but with broader quantities on the 2D surface. Melanocytes and neurons were equally distributed in both 2D and 3D microenvironments, but with distinct morphologies. It is worth noting the higher frequency of chondrocytes detected in this study using the 3D Matrigel™ microenvironment compared to previous reports of chondrogenesis obtained from TNCCs on traditional 2D cultures. In conclusion, Matrigel™ represents an attractive scaffold to study NC multipotentiality and differentiation, since it permits the appearance of the major NC phenotypes.

  17. Experimental investigation on statistical properties of wave heights and crests in crossing sea conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Alessandro D.; Serio, Marina

    2015-05-01

    Some theoretical and numerical studies highlighted that the occurrence of rogue waves could increase in the presence of crossing sea. This sea state is characterized by the coexistence of two wave systems with different directions of propagations and is considered one of the most common causes of ship accidents in bad weather conditions. In particular, the angle between the two interacting wavetrains, Δθ, was found to be an important parameter that could lead to an enhanced probability of extreme events. We present an experimental investigation on wave heights and crest for surface elevation mechanically generated in different crossing sea conditions (10° < Δθ < 40°). The results of statistical analysis confirm that the probability of extreme events increases with the angle between the two systems, but does not exceed the values of the unidirectional case, which also presents waves with greater heights. Moreover, the correlation between the heights, crests, and troughs of consecutive waves assumes higher values for the case of 40°, when compared to the unidirectional case: this could mean that it is easier to find waves of the same height within a packet in the conditions Δθ = 40° with respect to the unidirectional or other Δθ conditions considered.

  18. Genomic organization of the crested ibis MHC provides new insight into ancestral avian MHC structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Cheng; Lan, Hong; Sun, Li; Deng, Yan-Li; Tang, Ke-Yi; Wan, Qiu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in immune response. Avian MHCs are not well characterized, only reporting highly compact Galliformes MHCs and extensively fragmented zebra finch MHC. We report the first genomic structure of an endangered Pelecaniformes (crested ibis) MHC containing 54 genes in three regions spanning ~500 kb. In contrast to the loose BG (26 loci within 265 kb) and Class I (11 within 150) genomic structures, the Core Region is condensed (17 within 85). Furthermore, this Region exhibits a COL11A2 gene, followed by four tandem MHC class II αβ dyads retaining two suites of anciently duplicated “αβ” lineages. Thus, the crested ibis MHC structure is entirely different from the known avian MHC architectures but similar to that of mammalian MHCs, suggesting that the fundamental structure of ancestral avian class II MHCs should be “COL11A2-IIαβ1-IIαβ2.” The gene structures, residue characteristics, and expression levels of the five class I genes reveal inter-locus functional divergence. However, phylogenetic analysis indicates that these five genes generate a well-supported intra-species clade, showing evidence for recent duplications. Our analyses suggest dramatic structural variation among avian MHC lineages, help elucidate avian MHC evolution, and provide a foundation for future conservation studies. PMID:25608659

  19. Involvement of Neptune in induction of the hatching gland and neural crest in the Xenopus embryo.

    PubMed

    Kurauchi, Takayuki; Izutsu, Yumi; Maéno, Mitsugu

    2010-01-01

    Neptune, a Krüppel-like transcription factor, is expressed in various regions of the developing Xenopus embryo and it has multiple functions in the process of development in various organs. In situ hybridization analysis showed that Neptune is expressed in the boundary region between neural and non-neural tissues at the neurula stage, but little is known about the function of Neptune in this region. Here, we examined the expression and function of Neptune in the neural plate border (NPB) in the Xenopus embryo. Depletion of Neptune protein in developing embryos by using antisense MO caused loss of the hatching gland and otic vesicle as well as malformation of neural crest-derived cranial cartilages and melanocytes. Neptune MO also suppressed the expression of hatching gland and neural crest markers such as he, snail2, sox9 and msx1 at the neurula stage. Subsequent experiments showed that Neptune is necessary and sufficient for the differentiation of hatching gland cells and that it is located downstream of pax3 in the signal regulating the differentiation of these cells. Thus, Neptune is a new member of hatching gland specifier and plays a physiological role in determination and specification of multiple lineages derived from the NPB region.

  20. Comparison of the trabecular and cortical tissue moduli from human iliac crests.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, J L; Goldstein, S A; Choi, K; London, M; Feldkamp, L A; Matthews, L S

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a method to produce and test mechanically microspecimens of trabecular and cortical tissue from human iliac crests, and compare their measured moduli. Rectangular beam specimens were prepared on a low-speed diamond blade saw and a miniature milling machine. The final specimen dimensions ranged from approximately 50-200 microns for base and height. The modulus of each specimen was measured using three-point bending tests across a span length of 1.04 mm and performed at a constant rate of displacement. A subset of specimens was recovered for a radiographic estimation of degree of mineralization. The results showed the mean trabecular tissue modulus of all iliac crest specimens to be 3.81 GPa, whereas cortical tissue specimens averaged 4.89 GPa. This was a significant difference according to a two-way analysis of variance that controlled for differences between donors. No strong correlations were found between modulus and mineral density. Future investigations that consider other microstructural characteristics and their contributions to modulus, and specimen size effects, are indicated.

  1. Can footwall unloading explain late Cenozoic uplift of the Sierra Nevada crest?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, G.A.; Parsons, T.

    2009-01-01

    Globally, normal-fault displacement bends and warps rift flanks upwards, as adjoining basins drop downwards. Perhaps the most evident manifestations are the flanks of the East African Rift, which cuts across the otherwise minimally deformed continent. Flank uplift was explained by Vening Meinesz (1950, Institut Royal Colonial Belge, Bulletin des Seances, v. 21, p. 539-552), who recognized that isostasy should cause uplift of a normal-faulted footwall and subsidence of its hanging wall. Uplift occurs because slip on a dipping normal fault creates a broader root of less-dense material beneath the footwall, and a narrowed one beneath the hanging wall. In this paper, we investigate the potential influence of this process on the latest stages of Sierra Nevada uplift. Through theoretical calculations and 3D finite element modelling, we find that cumulative slip of about 4km on range-front faults would have produced about 1.3km peak isostatic uplift at the ridge crest. Numerical models suggest that the zone of uplift is narrow, with the width controlled by bending resistance of the seismogenic crust. We conclude that footwall unloading cannot account for the entire elevation of the Sierran crest above sea level, but if range-front faulting initiated in an already elevated plateau like the adjacent Basin and Range Province, then a hybrid model of pre-existing regional uplift and localized footwall unloading can account for the older and newer uplift phases suggested by the geologic record.

  2. Ascaris spp. and Capillaria caudinflata infections in captive-bred crested ibis (Nipponia nippon) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Qiao, Ji Ying; Wu, Xiao Min; Ma, Qing Yi; Hu, Han; Wang, Jing; Che, Li Feng

    2015-01-01

    Crested ibis (Nipponia nippon), an endan gered native bird, was called the "precious stone" of oriental birds. N. nippon was considered a critically endangered species in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and a first-class national protected animal in China. The Chinese government had exerted considerable effort to protect the N. nippon population. An effective approach to increase the number of these birds was captive breeding. However, several pathogens, including parasites, could jeopardize the health of this species. The present study used the fecal flotation method to determine prevalence of intestinal parasites in fresh stool samples by wet mount smearing and iodine staining. Samples were obtained from 63 randomly selected crested ibis bred in Shaanxi Rare Wildlife Rescuing and Breeding Research Center in Zhouzhi County, Xi'an City, Shaanxi Province, China. In the 63 captive individuals, 38 were found positive for intestinal parasites (60.3%, 38/63). Of positive birds, high prevalence of Ascaris spp. (84.2%, 32/38) and Capillaria caudinflata (50.0%, 19/38) were detected. Coccidea (7.8%, 3/38), Fasciolidae (23.7%, 9/38), Blastocystis spp. (15.8%, 6/38), and Entamoeba histolytica (7.8%, 3/38) showed relatively low prevalence rates. This study focuses on the morphological identification of Ascaris spp. and C. caudinflata and their transmission in the N. nippon population. We introduce strategies to improve the breeding management of the birds, enhance their health, and stimulate population productivity.

  3. Ectoparasite load in the crested porcupine Hystrix cristata Linnaeus, 1758 in Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Mori, Emiliano; Sforzi, Andrea; Menchetti, Mattia; Mazza, Giuseppe; Lovari, Sandro; Pisanu, Benoît

    2015-06-01

    The crested porcupine Hystrix cristata is a large body-sized rodent, occurring in Europe only in the Italian Peninsula, where it may have been introduced in early Medieval times. Its parasite fauna is currently poorly known and limited to few anecdotal observations. We have analyzed the ectoparasite load of 165 crested porcupines from Tuscany and Latium (Central Italy). Both captured and road-killed individuals were checked for fleas and ticks. Overall, only 39 porcupines were infested by four species of ticks and five of fleas. Abundance of ectoparasites was higher in areas with higher habitat richness, with respect to densely wooded areas. The most frequent species was the flea Pulex irritans (25%), whose prevalence peaked in winter probably because of optimal abiotic conditions in the porcupine's den. The remaining species of both hard ticks (Rhipicephalus bursa, Pholeoixodes hexagonus, and Ixodes ventalloi) and fleas (Paraceras melis, Ctenocephalides canis, Dasypsyllus gallinulae, and Hystrichopsylla talpae), all with prevalence lower than 5%, could be due to den sharing with other vertebrates, mainly carnivores such as, e.g., red foxes and badgers. The second most prevalent species was the generalist tick Ixodes ricinus (21%). An adult male-biased parasitism for ticks has been detected, suggesting a possible role of testosterone related immune-depressive effect. The low richness in dominant ectoparasite species, built up by locally acquired generalist taxa, provides support to the allochthonous origin of this rodent in Italy.

  4. Field evaluation of some bait additives against Indian crested porcupine (Hystrix indica) (Rodentia: Hystricidae).

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Hussain, Iftikhar; Mian, Afsar; Munir, Shahid; Ahmed, Irfan; Khan, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    This research study evaluated the effect of different additives on the bait consumption by Indian crested porcupine, a serious forest and agricultural pest, under field conditions. Different additives (saccharin, common salt, bone meal, fish meal, peanut butter, egg yolk, egg shell powder, yeast powder, mineral oil and coconut oil) at 2 and 5% each were tested for their relative preference, using groundnut-maize (1:1) as basic bait. All the additives were tested under a no-choice test pattern. For control tests, no additive was mixed with the basic bait. Saccharin at 5% concentration significantly enhanced the consumption of bait over the basic bait, while 2% saccharin supplemented bait resulted in a non-significant bait consumption. All other additives did not enhance the consumption of the bait material; rather, these worked as repellents. However, the repellency was lowest with the common salt, followed by egg yolk, egg shell powder, bone meal, peanut butter, mineral oil, fish meal and yeast powder, while coconut remained the most repellent compound. The present study suggested that groundnut-maize (1:1) supplemented with 5% saccharin was the preferred bait combination, and can be used with different rodenticides for the management of Indian crested porcupine.

  5. Modelling shock to detonation transition in PETN using HERMES and CREST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswaran, Mary-Ann; Curtis, John; Reaugh, Jack

    2013-06-01

    The High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus (HERMES) model has been developed to address High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR). It is a material model for use in the both the LS-DYNA finite element and ALE3D hydrocodes that enables the modelling of both shock to detonation (SDT) and deflagration to detonation (DDT) transition. As part of its ongoing development and application, model parameters for the explosive PETN were found by using experimental data for PETN at different densities. PETN was selected because of the availability of both SDT and DDT data. To model SDT and DDT, HERMES uses a subset of the CREST reactive burn model with the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state (EOS) for the unreacted explosive and a look-up table for the gas EOS as generated by Cheetah. The unreacted EOS parameters were found first by calculating the principal isentrope of unreacted PETN at TMD from PETN shock Hugoniot data. Then Pop-plot data for PETN was used to fit the CREST parameters at each density. The resulting new PETN HERMES material model provides a platform for further investigations of SDT and DDT in low density PETN powder. JER's activity was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and partially funded by the Joint US DoD/DOE Munitions Technology Development Program.

  6. Pathways of avian neural crest cell migration in the developing gut.

    PubMed

    Tucker, G C; Ciment, G; Thiery, J P

    1986-08-01

    The NC-1 and E/C8 monoclonal antibodies recognize a similar population of neural crest cells as they migrate from vagal levels of the neural tube and colonize the branchial arch region of 2- to 3-day-old chicken embryos. Some of these immunoreactive cells then appear to enter the gut mesenchyme on the third day of incubation just caudal to the third branchial cleft. After entering the gut, these cells migrate in a rostral-caudal direction, using primarily the superficial splanchnic mesodermal epithelium of the gut as a substratum. The antigen-positive cells remain preferentially associated with the splanchnopleure. Few antigenic cells enter the mesenchyme surrounding the endoderm at anterior levels whereas they are found throughout the mesenchyme when nearing the umbilicus. At postumbilical levels, immunoreactive cells are distributed on both sides of the differentiating muscle layer but not within it. Although fibronectin immunoreactivity can be found throughout the wall of the gut, there is no apparent relationship between the distribution of fibronectin and the location of the immunoreactive cells. These results suggest that a mechanism more complex than a mere interaction with fibronectin may account for migration of crest-derived cells in the gut.

  7. Inhibition of FGF signaling accelerates neural crest cell differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jaroonwitchawan, Thiranut; Muangchan, Pattamon; Noisa, Parinya

    2016-12-02

    Neural crest (NC) is a transient population, arising during embryonic development and capable of differentiating into various somatic cells. The defects of neural crest development leads to neurocristopathy. Several signaling pathways were revealed their significance in NC cell specification. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) is recognized as an important signaling during NC development, for instance Xenopus and avian; however, its contributions in human species are remained elusive. Here we used human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to investigate the consequences of FGF inhibition during NC cell differentiation. The specific-FGF receptor inhibitor, SU5402, was used in this investigation. The inhibition of FGF did not found to affect the proliferation or death of hPSC-derived NC cells, but promoted hPSCs to commit NC cell fate. NC-specific genes, including PAX3, SLUG, and TWIST1, were highly upregulated, while hPSC genes, such as OCT4, and E-CAD, rapidly reduced upon FGF signaling blockage. Noteworthy, TFAP-2α, a marker of migratory NC cells, abundantly presented in SU5402-induced cells. This accelerated NC cell differentiation could be due to the activation of Notch signaling upon the blockage of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, since NICD was increased by SU5402. Altogether, this study proposed the contributions of FGF signaling in controlling human NC cell differentiation from hPSCs, the crosstalk between FGF and Notch, and might imply to the influences of FGF signaling in neurocristophatic diseases.

  8. Determination of detonation wave boundary angles via hydrocode simulations using CREST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, N. J.; Childs, M.

    2017-01-01

    A key input parameter to Detonation Shock Dynamics models is the angle that the propagating detonation wave makes with the charge edge. This is commonly referred to as the boundary angle, and is a property of the explosive/confiner material combination. Such angles can be determined: (i) experimentally from measured detonation wave-shapes, (ii) theoretically, or (iii) via hydrocode simulations using a reactive burn model. Of these approaches: (i) is difficult because of resolution, (ii) breaks down for certain configurations, while (iii) requires a well validated model. In this paper, the CREST reactive burn model, which has previously been successful in modelling a wide range of explosive phenomena, is used to simulate recent Detonation Confinement Sandwich Tests conducted at LANL using the insensitive high explosive PBX 9502. Simulated detonation wave-shapes in PBX 9502 for a number of different confiner materials and combinations closely match those recorded from the experiments. Boundary angles were subsequently extracted from the simulated results via a wave-shape analysis toolkit. The results shown demonstrate the usefulness of CREST in determining detonation wave boundary angles for a range of explosive/confiner material combinations.

  9. Imidacloprid Exposure Suppresses Neural Crest Cells Generation during Early Chick Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Wang, Guang; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Meng; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; He, Xiao-Song; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-06-15

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide that is widely used in the control pests found on crops and fleas on pets. However, it is still unclear whether imidacloprid exposure could affect early embryo development-despite some studies having been conducted on the gametes. In this study, we demonstrated that imidacloprid exposure could lead to abnormal craniofacial osteogenesis in the developing chick embryo. Cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) are the progenitor cells of the chick cranial skull. We found that the imidacloprid exposure retards the development of gastrulating chick embryos. HNK-1, PAX7, and Ap-2α immunohistological stainings indicated that cranial NCCs generation was inhibited after imidacloprid exposure. Double immunofluorescent staining (Ap-2α and PHIS3 or PAX7 and c-Caspase3) revealed that imidacloprid exposure inhibited both NCC proliferation and apoptosis. In addition, it inhibited NCCs production by repressing Msx1 and BMP4 expression in the developing neural tube and by altering expression of EMT-related adhesion molecules (Cad6B, E-Cadherin, and N-cadherin) in the developing neural crests. We also determined that imidacloprid exposure suppressed cranial NCCs migration and their ability to differentiate. In sum, we have provided experimental evidence that imidacloprid exposure during embryogenesis disrupts NCCs development, which in turn causes defective cranial bone development.

  10. Effects of egg size on Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) egg composition and hatchling phenotype.

    PubMed

    Dzialowski, Edward M; Reed, Wendy L; Sotherland, Paul R

    2009-02-01

    Maternal investment of yolk and albumen in avian eggs varies with egg mass and contributes to variation in hatchling mass. Here we use the natural variation in mass and composition of Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs to examine consequences of variation in yolk and albumen mass on hatchling phenotype. The Double-crested Cormorant, a large bird with altricial young, lays eggs ranging in mass from 40 to 60 g and containing an average of 82% albumen and 18% yolk. Variation in Cormorant egg mass arises primarily from variation in the amount of albumen and water in the eggs; yolk mass remains relatively constant, contributing only 10% to egg mass variation. Likewise, variation in hatchling mass correlates positively with albumen mass and albumen solids contribute to hatchling dry mass. Thus, variation in Cormorant egg mass is primarily the result of variation in the amount of egg albumen, which contributes most to variation in hatchling mass. Similarities in egg composition of altricial birds, along with data presented here, suggest that variation in hatchling mass of all altricial birds may depend most on the amount of egg albumen, unlike species with precocial young that hatch from eggs with substantially more yolk.

  11. Dynamics of the double-crested cormorant population on Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackwell, Bradley F.; Stapanian, Martin A.; Weseloh, D.V. Chip

    2002-01-01

    After nearly 30 years of recolonization and expansion across North America, the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) occupies the role of a perceived and, in some situations, realized threat to fish stocks and other resources. However, population data necessary to plan, defend, and implement management of this species are few. Our purpose was to gain insight into the relative contribution of various population parameters to the overall rate of population growth and identify data needs critical to improving our understanding of the dynamics of double-crested cormorant populations. We demonstrated the construction of a biologically reasonable representation of cormorant population growth on Lake Ontario (1979-2000) by referencing literature values for fertility, age at first breeding, and survival. These parameters were incorporated into a deterministic stage-classified matrix model. By calculating the elasticity of matrix elements (i.e., statgspecific fertility and survival), we found that cormorant population growth on Lake Ontario was most sensitive to survival of birds about to turn age 3 and older. Finally, we demonstrated how this information could be used to evaluate management scenarios and direct future research by simulating potential environmental effects on fertility and survival, as well as a 5-year egg-oiling program. We also demonstrated that survival of older birds exerts more effective population control than changes in fertility.

  12. The Cross-Stream Structure of the Crests of Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diorio, J. D.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2009-11-01

    The cross-stream profiles of spilling breaking waves (wavelengths 80-120 cm) are investigated experimentally. A programmable wave maker is used to generate Froude scaled wave packets (central frequencies 1.15 - 1.40 Hz and various wave maker amplitudes) that create breakers via dispersive focusing. A cinematic 2D LIF technique is used to measure the crest profile histories both in stream-wise and cross-stream planes. It is found that the cross-stream averaged amplitude undergoes periodic oscillations due to the passage of large streamwise (oriented parallel to the wave crest) ripples. Cross-stream ripples, while initially small, grow rapidly as breaking develops. These cross-stream ripples are in the range of 1-4 cm in wavelength and can have amplitudes comparable in size to the streamwise ripples. The amplitude of the cross-stream ripples grows with the gravity wavelength to the third power and shows periodic peaks that coincide with the troughs of the streamwise ripples. The cross-stream surface gradients show thin persistent surface ``scars'' that appear to be generated in the troughs of the streamwise ripples. The connection between these observations and a possible vortical model is discussed.

  13. Piezoelectric surgery in mandibular split crest technique with immediate implant placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Belleggia, F; Pozzi, A; Rocci, M; Barlattani, A; Gargari, M

    2008-10-01

    Implant supported rehabilitation of thin edentulous ridges with horizontal atrophy necessitates a regenerative approach. Within the procedures for horizontal bone defects augmentation, ridge expansion techniques permit dislocation of the buccal bone plate in a labial direction and simultaneous implant insertion in single-stage surgery, abbreviating overall treatment time.The piezoelectric ridge expansion technique permits to obtain the expansion of very mineralized bone crests without excessive traumas or the risk of ridge fractures. The case reported shows an implant treatment for partial edentulous lower arch rehabilitation. A full-split thickness flap was raised. The mucoperiosteal reflection permitted to identify alveolar crest contour where osteotomies had to be performed. Split thickness dissection allowed periosteal blood supply to be mainteined on the buccal bone plate. After horizontal and vertical osteotomies were performed with OT7 piezoelectric microsaw (Piezo-surgery, Mectron), a single-bevel scalpel was used to move the buccal bone plate to the labial. Two Straumann TE 3.3/4.8 mm wide implants were inserted in the lower right premolar area, and 1 Straumann 4.8 mm Wide Neck implant was inserted to replace lower right first molar. The amount of bone expansion was equal to the cervical diameter of the placed implants (4.8 mm) and residual bone gap was packed with Bio-Oss granules (Geistlich). Healing was uneventful and 3 months later final restorations with implant-supported porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns were cemented.

  14. Enhancer divergence and cis-regulatory evolution in the human and chimp neural crest.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Sara L; Srinivasan, Rajini; Marchetto, Maria Carolina; Grishina, Irina; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Selleri, Licia; Gage, Fred H; Swigut, Tomek; Wysocka, Joanna

    2015-09-24

    cis-regulatory changes play a central role in morphological divergence, yet the regulatory principles underlying emergence of human traits remain poorly understood. Here, we use epigenomic profiling from human and chimpanzee cranial neural crest cells to systematically and quantitatively annotate divergence of craniofacial cis-regulatory landscapes. Epigenomic divergence is often attributable to genetic variation within TF motifs at orthologous enhancers, with a novel motif being most predictive of activity biases. We explore properties of this cis-regulatory change, revealing the role of particular retroelements, uncovering broad clusters of species-biased enhancers near genes associated with human facial variation, and demonstrating that cis-regulatory divergence is linked to quantitative expression differences of crucial neural crest regulators. Our work provides a wealth of candidates for future evolutionary studies and demonstrates the value of "cellular anthropology," a strategy of using in-vitro-derived embryonic cell types to elucidate both fundamental and evolving mechanisms underlying morphological variation in higher primates.

  15. Organochlorine contaminants and reproductive success of double-crested cormorants from Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Hines, R.K.; Gutreuter, S.; Stromborg, K.L.; Allen, P.D.; Melancon, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994 and 1995, nesting success of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) was measured at Cat Island, in southern Green Bay, Lake Michigan, Wisconsin, USA. Sample eggs at pipping and unhatched eggs were collected and analyzed for organochlorines (including total polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs] and DDE), hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) activity in embryos, and eggshell thickness. Of 1,570 eggs laid, 32% did not hatch and 0.4% had deformed embryos. Of 632 chicks monitored from hatching to 12 d of age, 9% were missing or found dead; no deformities were observed. The PCB concentrations in sample eggs from clutches with deformed embryos (mean = 10.2 μg/g wet weight) and dead embryos (11.4 μg/g) were not significantly higher than concentrations in sample eggs from nests where all eggs hatched (12.1 μg/g). A logistic regression of hatching success versus DDE, dieldrin, and PCB concentrations in sibling eggs identified DDE and not dieldrin or PCBs as a significant risk factor. A logistic regression of hatching success versus DDE and eggshell thickness implicated DDE and not eggshell thickness as a significant risk factor. Even though the insecticide DDT was banned in the early 1970s, we suggest that DDE concentrations in double-crested cormorant eggs in Green Bay are still having an effect on reproduction in this species.

  16. Generation of Neural Crest-Like Cells From Human Periodontal Ligament Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Hynes, Kim; Ng, Jia; Menicanin, Danijela; Camp, Esther; Arthur, Agnes; Gronthos, Stan; Mark Bartold, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) hold great promise for tissue engineering, however the inability to easily obtain large numbers of NCC is a major factor limiting their use in studies of regenerative medicine. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are emerging as a novel candidate that could provide an unlimited source of NCC. In the present study, we examined the potential of neural crest tissue-derived periodontal ligament (PDL) iPSC to differentiate into neural crest-like cells (NCLC) relative to iPSC generated from a non-neural crest derived tissue, foreskin fibroblasts (FF). We detected high HNK1 expression during the differentiation of PDL and FF iPSC into NCLC as a marker for enriching for a population of cells with NCC characteristics. We isolated PDL iPSC- and FF iPSC-derived NCLC, which highly expressed HNK1. A high proportion of the HNK1-positive cell populations generated, expressed the MSC markers, whilst very few cells expressed the pluripotency markers or the hematopoietic markers. The PDL and FF HNK1-positive populations gave rise to smooth muscle, neural, glial, osteoblastic and adipocytic like cells and exhibited higher expression of smooth muscle, neural, and glial cell-associated markers than the PDL and FF HNK1-negative populations. Interestingly, the HNK1-positive cells derived from the PDL-iPSC exhibited a greater ability to differentiate into smooth muscle, neural, glial cells and adipocytes, than the HNK1-positive cells derived from the FF-iPSC. Our work suggests that HNK1-enriched NCLC from neural crest tissue-derived iPSC more closely resemble the phenotypic and functional hallmarks of NCC compared to the HNK1-low population and non-neural crest iPSC-derived NCLC. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 402-416, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Conotruncal anomalies in the trisomy 16 mouse: an immunohistochemical analysis with emphasis on the involvement of the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Waller, B R; McQuinn, T; Phelps, A L; Markwald, R R; Lo, C W; Thompson, R P; Wessels, A

    2000-11-01

    The trisomy 16 (Ts16) mouse is generally considered a model for human Down's syndrome (trisomy 21). However, many of the cardiac defects in the Ts16 mouse do not reflect the heart malformations seen in patients suffering from this chromosomal disorder. In this study we describe the conotruncal malformations in mice with trisomy 16. The development of the outflow tract was immunohistochemically studied in serially sectioned hearts from 34 normal and 26 Ts16 mouse embryos ranging from 8.5 to 14.5 embryonic days. Conotruncal malformations observed in the Ts 16 embryos included double outlet right ventricle, persistent truncus arteriosus, Tetralogy of Fallot, and right-sided aortic arch. This spectrum of malformations is remarkably similar to that seen in humans suffering from DiGeorge syndrome (DGS). As perturbation of neural crest development has been proposed in the pathogenesis of DGS we specifically focussed on the fate of neural crest derived cells during outflow tract development of the Ts16 mouse using an antibody that enabled us to trace these cells during development. Severe perturbation of the neural crest-derived cell population was observed in each trisomic specimen. The abnormalities pertained to: 1) the size of the columns of neural crest-derived cells (or prongs); 2) the spatial orientation of these prongs within the mesenchymal tissues of the outflow tract; and 3) the location in which the neural crest cells interact with the myocardium. The latter abnormality appeared to be responsible for ectopic myocardialization found in trisomic embryos. Our observations strongly suggest that abnormal neural crest cell behavior is involved in the pathogenesis of the conotruncal malformations in the Ts16 mouse.

  18. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Natsuki; Nishioka, Masahiro; Nakatake, Yuhki; Yulan, Piao; Mochizuki, Hiromi; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Goshima, Naoki; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural crest cells (NC cells) are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+) cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells. PMID:26873953

  19. Segregation of developmental abilities in neural-crest-derived cells: identification of partially restricted intermediate cell types in the branchial arches of avian embryos.

    PubMed

    Ciment, G; Weston, J A

    1985-09-01

    The neural crest of early vertebrate embryos gives rise to a wide variety of cell types. One way in which phenotypic diversity may be generated in neural-crest-derived cells is by a series of partial developmental restrictions. In order to test the possibility that the crest-derived mesenchymal cells of the branchial arches (BAs) of avian embryos are partially restricted intermediates during this segregation of developmental fates, we examined some of their phenotypic and developmental properties. We found that the mesenchymal cells of the posterior BAs differ from those of the anterior BAs in that the posterior BA cells express the neuron-specific antigen NAPA-73, whereas the anterior BA cells do not. This phenotypic difference first appears in the different populations of migrating neural crest cells which populate the different BAs. Anterior and posterior BA cells also differ in their abilities to give rise to various crest derivatives in heterospecific grafting experiments. Whereas anterior BA cells only produce connective tissue derivatives, posterior BA cells give rise to neurons, glial cells, and glandular tissue, in addition to the connective tissues. However, neither anterior nor posterior BA grafts give rise to melanocytes--another neural crest derivative. This developmental restriction of melanogenic potential occurs either during crest migration, or shortly after colonization of the BAs. These results are consistent with the notion that the mesenchyme of both anterior and posterior BAs contain different partially restricted intermediate cell types derived from the neural crest.

  20. Arteriovenous fistula of the superior gluteal artery as a complication of posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting: 3D-CT angiography and arterial embolization

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chae-Gwan; Won, Yoo-Dong; Riew, K. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Superior gluteal artery injuries are rare, but potentially serious complications that occur during posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting. The authors reported an arteriovenous fistula of the superior gluteal artery, which occurred as a complication during posterior iliac crest bone graft harvesting and was diagnosed with 3D-CT angiography, then treated with arterial embolization. PMID:19294431

  1. Exploring Evidence for Possible Recent N-S Extension Along the Himalayan Crest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. A.; Hodges, K.; Whipple, K. X.; van Soest, M. C.

    2010-12-01

    The tectonic significance of the formation and maintenance of the physiographic transition from the low-relief Tibetan plateau to the high peaks, rugged topography and deep gorges of the Himalaya is debated. Although many consider extrusion of the greater Himalayan sequence during concurrent motion on the MCT and STFS to play a critical role in the evolution of the Himalaya, most models restrict activity on the STFS to Early-Middle Miocene. Such a scenario would entail >10 Myr of erosional etching of the topographic front developed during active extrusion. Intriguingly, transverse rivers that head on the Tibetan Plateau commonly exhibit an abrupt increase in gradient (a knickpoint) near the crest of the Himalaya, marking the start of deep gorges downstream. These knickpoints typically correspond to an abrupt increase in hillslope and local relief to the south suggesting an abrupt increase in erosion rate downstream of the knickpoints which should cause upstream knickpoint migration as a function of drainage area. However, larger drainages have not cut farther back into the plateau than smaller ones, suggesting that these knickpoints may be fixed in space. Although orographic rainfall patterns and relative sediment loads likely play a role, differential uplift across young (Quaternary) faults is the simplest explanation for such pinned knickpoints - if uplift balances the faster erosion rates downstream of knickpoints, no migration of the knickpoint is expected. The geometry requires uplift of the Himalaya relative to the southern plateau, consistent with the persistence of N-S extension on fault systems near the range crest at least into the Quaternary. We explore this possibility in three field sites where river profiles indicate potentially active faults: 1) the Ama Drime Range near Everest in southernmost Tibet, 2) the Kali Gandaki and Myagdi Khola valleys in the Dhaulagiri and Annapurna Himalaya, central Nepal, and 3) the Bhote Khosi River valley near Nyalam

  2. Calcium-mediated repression of β-catenin and its transcriptional signaling mediates neural crest cell death in an avian model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Flentke, George R; Garic, Ana; Amberger, Ed; Hernandez, Marcos; Smith, Susan M

    2011-07-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a common birth defect in many societies. Affected individuals have neurodevelopmental disabilities and a distinctive craniofacial dysmorphology. These latter deficits originate during early development from the ethanol-mediated apoptotic depletion of cranial facial progenitors, a population known as the neural crest. We showed previously that this apoptosis is caused because acute ethanol exposure activates G-protein-dependent intracellular calcium within cranial neural crest progenitors, and this calcium transient initiates the cell death. The dysregulated signals that reside downstream of ethanol's calcium transient and effect neural crest death are unknown. Here we show that ethanol's repression of the transcriptional effector β-catenin causes the neural crest losses. Clinically relevant ethanol concentrations (22-78 mM) rapidly deplete nuclear β-catenin from neural crest progenitors, with accompanying losses of β-catenin transcriptional activity and downstream genes that govern neural crest induction, expansion, and survival. Using forced expression studies, we show that β-catenin loss of function (via dominant-negative T cell transcription factor [TCF]) recapitulates ethanol's effects on neural crest apoptosis, whereas β-catenin gain-of-function in ethanol's presence preserves neural crest survival. Blockade of ethanol's calcium transient using Bapta-AM normalizes β-catenin activity and prevents the neural crest losses, whereas ionomycin treatment is sufficient to destabilize β-catenin. We propose that ethanol's repression of β-catenin causes the neural crest losses in this model of FAS. β-Catenin is a novel target for ethanol's teratogenicity. β-Catenin/Wnt signals participate in many developmental events and its rapid and persistent dysregulation by ethanol may explain why the latter is such a potent teratogen.

  3. Cranial Neural Crest Cell Contribution to Craniofacial Formation, Pathology, and Future Directions in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Taylor Nicholas; Mishina, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the state and future directions of development and pathology in the craniofacial complex in the context of Cranial Neural Crest Cells (CNCC). CNCC are a multipotent cell population that is largely responsible for forming the vertebrate head. We focus on findings that have increased the knowledge of gene regulatory networks and molecular mechanisms governing CNCC migration and the participation of these cells in tissue formation. Pathology due to aberrant migration or cell death of CNCC, termed neurocristopathies, is discussed in addition to craniosynostoses. Finally, we discuss tissue engineering applications that take advantage of recent advancements in genome editing and the multipotent nature of CNCC. These applications have relevance to treating diseases due directly to the failure of CNCC, and also in restoring tissues lost due to a variety of reasons. PMID:25227212

  4. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  5. CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS ON THE MOVE: THEIR ROLES IN CRANIOFACIAL DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Dwight R.; Brugmann, Samantha; Chu, Yvonne; Bajpai, Ruchi; Jame, Maryam; Helms, Jill A.

    2010-01-01

    The craniofacial region is assembled through the active migration of cells and the rearrangement and sculpting of facial prominences and pharyngeal arches, which consequently make it particularly susceptible to a large number of birth defects. Genetic, molecular, and cellular processes must be temporally and spatially regulated to culminate in the three-dimension structures of the face. The starting constituent for the majority of skeletal and connective tissues in the face is a pluripotent population of cells, the cranial neural crest cells (NCCs). In this review we discuss the newest scientific findings in the development of the craniofacial complex as related to NCCs. Furthermore, we present recent findings on NCC diseases called neurocristopathies and, in doing so, provide clinicians with new tools for understanding a growing number of craniofacial genetic disorders. PMID:21271641

  6. Feeding flights of breeding double-crested cormorants at two Wisconsin colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Bunck, C.

    1992-01-01

    Unmarked Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus ) were followed by airplane from Cat Island and Spider Island, two nesting colonies in Wisconsin, to their first landing site. Cormorants flew an average of 2.0 km from Cat Island (maximum 40 km) and 2.4 km from Spider Island (maximum 12 km). The mean direction of landing sites differed seasonally for flights from Spider Island, but not from Cat Island, Cormorants generally landed in Green Bay or Lake Michigan and rarely landed in inland lakes or ponds. The most frequent water depth at landing sites for each colony was < 9.1 m. Water depths greater than or equal to 9.1 m were used less frequently than available within the maximum observed flight distance for each colony. The average flight speed for cormorants was 61 km/h.

  7. Feeding flights of breeding double-crested cormorants at two Wisconsin colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Bunck, C.

    1992-01-01

    Unmarked Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) (n = 523) were followed by airplane from Cat Island and Spider Island, two nesting colonies in Wisconsin, to their first landing site. Cormorants flew an average of 2.0 km from Cat Island (maximum 40 km) and 2.4 km from Spider Island (maximum12 km). The mean direction of landing sites differed seasonally for fights from Spider Island, but not from Cat Island. Cormorants generally landed in Green Bay or Lake Michigan (>99%) and rarely landed in inland lakes or ponds. The most frequent (> 80%) water depth at landing sites for each colony was 9.l m were used less frequently than available within the maximum observed flight distance for each colony. The average flight speed for cormorants was 61 km/h.

  8. Bill malformations in double-crested cormorants with low exposure to organochlorines

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, T.; Fox, G.A.; Danesik, K.L.

    1999-12-01

    Eight of 20 newly hatched double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), captured at Dore Lake (Saskatchewan, Canada) and raised in captivity, developed malformed bills when they were 2 to 3 weeks old. Malformation was characterized by abnormal flexure and rotation of the maxilla and mandible, resulting in a crossed bill. By radiography, the premaxillary and dental bones were misshapen. Morphologically similar malformed bills in free-living comorants have been attributed to exposure to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. However, the concentrations of total PCBs in the livers of these captive cormorants with malformed bills and in their diet were lower than have been previously associated with such malformations and were considered too low to have been the cause. The bill malformations may have been caused by deficiency of vitamin D{sub 3}, because the cormorants were kept indoors without exposure to ultraviolet light and were fed frozen fish that may have been deficient in this vitamin.

  9. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  10. Differentiation and migration of neural crest stem cells are stimulated by pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Elena N; Jansson, Leif

    2009-06-17

    Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) migrate during embryonic development towards the endoderm-derived pancreas and the interaction between NCSCs and beta-cell progenitors is crucial for their mutual differentiation. In diabetes, loss of beta-cells or impaired beta-cell function is accompanied by nerve degeneration, which contributes to the progression of the disease. Here we show that adult pancreatic islets markedly promote differentiation of NCSCs towards neuronal phenotype in vitro and in vivo after transplantation and increase their migration towards islets. These findings indicate that pancreatic islets can be used to promote differentiation of NCSCs towards neuronal phenotype and that this in-vitro system may help elucidate interactions between NCSCs and healthy or diseased beta-cells.

  11. Nymphal Linguatulosis in Indian Crested Porcupines (Histrix Indica) in Southwest of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rajabloo, Mohammad; Razavi, Seyed Mostafa; Shayegh, Hossein; Alavi, Amir Mootabi

    2015-01-01

    Linguatula serrata is one of the important zoonotic parasites. Carnivores serve as definitive host. The larvae existed in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), liver, lungs, etc of intermediate herbivores. The definitive host becomes infected by ingesting viscera containing the infective nymphal stage. Humans may be infected with Linguatula either by ingestion of nymphs resulting in a condition called nasopharyngeal linguatulosis or Halzoun syndrome or by ingestion of infective eggs which develop in internal organs resulting in visceral linguatulosis. Indian crested porcupine (Hystrix indica) is a common rodent in Middle East. Based on some tradition, consumption of Histrix meat and viscera is common in some parts of Iran. The present study reports the occurrence of Linguatula serrata nymph in H. indica as a new intermediate host from southwest of Iran. PMID:26114151

  12. Nymphal Linguatulosis in Indian Crested Porcupines (Histrix Indica) in Southwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Rajabloo, Mohammad; Razavi, Seyed Mostafa; Shayegh, Hossein; Alavi, Amir Mootabi

    2015-06-01

    Linguatula serrata is one of the important zoonotic parasites. Carnivores serve as definitive host. The larvae existed in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), liver, lungs, etc of intermediate herbivores. The definitive host becomes infected by ingesting viscera containing the infective nymphal stage. Humans may be infected with Linguatula either by ingestion of nymphs resulting in a condition called nasopharyngeal linguatulosis or Halzoun syndrome or by ingestion of infective eggs which develop in internal organs resulting in visceral linguatulosis. Indian crested porcupine (Hystrix indica) is a common rodent in Middle East. Based on some tradition, consumption of Histrix meat and viscera is common in some parts of Iran. The present study reports the occurrence of Linguatula serrata nymph in H. indica as a new intermediate host from southwest of Iran.

  13. Avian pox infection in a free-living crested serpent eagle (Spilornis cheela) in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Pei, K J C; Lee, F R; Tzeng, M P; Chang, T C

    2011-03-01

    Avian pox viruses (APVs) have been reported to cause infection in diverse avian species worldwide. Herein we report the first case of APV infection in a free-living bird, a subadult crested serpent eagle (Spilornis cheela), in Taiwan. In addition to the typical wart-like lesions distributed on the cere, eyelid, and face, there were also yellowish nodules below the tongue and on the hard palate. Phylogenetic analysis of the 4b core protein gene showed that the APV is very close to that found in white-tailed sea eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) in Japan recently. Because both cases are located on the same major flyway for migratory birds, the impact of this virus with regard to the wild and migratory raptor species along the East Asian-Australasian Flyway and West Pacific Flyway requires immediate investigation.

  14. Perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia after iliac crest bone graft - a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of perforated diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia constitutes an extremely rare condition. Case presentation We report a case of a 66 year old Caucasian woman presenting with perforated sigmoid diverticulitis localized in a lumbar hernia following iliac crest bone graft performed 18 years ago. Emergency treatment consisted of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. Elective sigmoid resection was scheduled four months later. At the same time a laparoscopic hernia repair with a biologic mesh graft was performed. Conclusion This case shows a very seldom clinical presentation of lumbar hernia. Secondary colonic resection and concurrent hernia repair with a biologic implant have proven useful in treating this rare condition. PMID:25051974

  15. Effects of contaminants on Double-crested Cormorant reproduction in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Stromborg, K.L.; Melancon, M.J.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    In 1994 and 1995, Double-crested Cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus were monitored from egg-laying through 12 days of age at Cat Island, Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA. Sample eggs at hatching were analysed for organochlorines (including total PCBs, PCB congeners, and DDE), hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) activity in livers of embryos, and eggshell thickness. The number of eggs per nest that hatched and survived to i 2 days of age was estimated to be 2.2 in 1994 and 2.0 in 1995. Hatching success of eggs was not correlated with PCBs, the toxicity of PCBs based on congeners, or EROD activity. Hatching success was correlated with eggshell thickness and negatively correlated with DDE concentrations. Even though the insecticide DDT was banned in the early 1970s, we suggest that DDE concentrations in cormorant eggs in Green Bay are still having an affect on reproduction in this species.

  16. Effects of contaminants on Double-crested Cormorant reproduction in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Stromborg, K.L.; Melancon, M.J.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994 and 1995, Double-crested Cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus were monitored from egg-laying through 12 days of age at Cat Island, Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA. Sample eggs at hatching were analysed for organochlorines (including total PCBs, PCB congeners, and DDE), hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) activity in livers of embryos, and eggshell thickness. The number of eggs per nest that hatched and survived to i 2 days of age was estimated to be 2.2 in 1994 and 2.0 in 1995. Hatching success of eggs was not correlated with PCBs, the toxicity of PCBs based on congeners, or EROD activity. Hatching success was correlated with eggshell thickness and negatively correlated with DDE concentrations. Even though the insecticide DDT was banned in the early 1970s, we suggest that DDE concentrations in cormorant eggs in Green Bay are still having an affect on reproduction in this species.

  17. 76 FR 30757 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing the Salmon-Crested Cockatoo as Threatened...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ...-curving, deep salmon-pink crest; the bill is large and gray-black; and the underwing and undertail are.... 280-281; Sweeney 2000, p. 130). Sexual dimorphism is exhibited by iris color; dark brown to black in..., fluttering flights. The nest is a high hole in a mature tree (Juniper and Parr 1998, p. 281). The...

  18. CREST biorepository for translational studies on malignant mesothelioma, lung cancer and other respiratory tract diseases: Informatics infrastructure and standardized annotation

    PubMed Central

    UGOLINI, DONATELLA; NERI, MONICA; BENNATI, LUCA; CANESSA, PIER ALDO; CASANOVA, GEORGIA; LANDO, CECILIA; LEONCINI, GIACOMO; MARRONI, PAOLA; PARODI, BARBARA; SIMONASSI, CLAUDIO; BONASSI, STEFANO

    2012-01-01

    Advances in molecular epidemiology and translational research have led to the need for biospecimen collection. The Cancer of the Respiratory Tract (CREST) biorepository is concerned with pleural malignant mesothelioma (MM) and lung cancer (LC). The biorepository staff has collected demographic and epidemiological data directly from consenting subjects using a structured questionnaire, in agreement with The Public Population Project in Genomics (P3G). Clinical and follow-up data were collected. Sample data were also recorded. The architecture is based on a database designed with Microsoft Access. Data standardization was carried out to conform with established conventions or procedures. As from January 31, 2011, the overall number of recruited subjects was 1,857 (454 LC, 245 MM, 130 other cancers and 1,028 controls). Due to its infrastructure, CREST was able to join international projects, sharing samples and/or data with other research groups in the field. The data management system allows CREST to be involved, through a minimum data set, in the national project for the construction of the Italian network of Oncologic BioBanks (RIBBO), and in the infrastructure of a pan-European biobank network (BBMRI). The CREST biorepository is a valuable tool for translational studies on respiratory tract diseases, because of its simple and efficient infrastructure. PMID:22969926

  19. INHIBITION OF NEURAL CREST CELL MIGRATION BY THE WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS DICHLORO-, DIBROMO-, AND BROMOCHLORO-ACETIC ACID.

    EPA Science Inventory

    INHIBITION OF NEURAL CREST CELL MIGRATION BY THE WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS DICHLORO-, DIBROMO- AND BROMOCHLORO-ACETIC ACID. JE Andrews, H Nichols, J Schmid 1, and ES Hunter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, 1Research Support Division, NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    ...

  20. Phylogenetic and pathogenic analyses of two virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated from Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon) in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Hao, Huafang; Liu, Qingtian; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Xinglong; Du, Enqi; Yang, Zengqi

    2013-06-01

    The crested ibis is one of the most endangered birds in the world, found only in Shaanxi Province in Central China, and it has been reintroduced in Sadogashima in Japan. Two Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates were collected from sick crested ibises, and their pathogenic and phylogenetic characteristics were investigated. The results showed that they are virulent, with intracerebral pathogenicity indices of 1.46-1.83 and a mean time of death of 54.4-84.4 h. They shared the same virulent motif (112)-R-R-Q-K-R-F-(117) at the F protein cleavage site. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that both isolates were clustered with class II NDVs, with one in genotype VIId and another in a novel genotype (provisionally designated as VIi). The two isolates shared high homology with the strains isolated from poultry flocks in the same region from 2006 to 2010. We first isolated and characterised the NDV isolates from crested ibises, one of which showed new genetic characteristics and formed a new subgenotype with isolates from pigeons and ostriches in the same area. These data are useful for further epidemiological studies on NDV and the protection of crested ibises.

  1. In Vivo Tumorigenesis Was Observed after Injection of In Vitro Expanded Neural Crest Stem Cells Isolated from Adult Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Neirinckx, Virginie; Hennuy, Benoit; Swingland, James T.; Laudet, Emerence; Sommer, Lukas; Shakova, Olga; Bours, Vincent; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells alters the functional and biological properties of those cells, leading to the accumulation of genetic aberrations. Recent studies described bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as mixed populations of cells including mesenchymal (MSC) and neural crest stem cells (NCSC). Here, we report the transformation of NCSC into tumorigenic cells, after in vitro long-term passaging. Indeed, the characterization of 6 neural crest-derived clones revealed the presence of one tumorigenic clone. Transcriptomic analyses of this clone highlighted, among others, numerous cell cycle checkpoint modifications and chromosome 11q down-regulation (suggesting a deletion of chromosome 11q) compared with the other clones. Moreover, unsupervised analysis such as a dendrogram generated after agglomerative hierarchical clustering comparing several transcriptomic data showed important similarities between the tumorigenic neural crest-derived clone and mammary tumor cell lines. Altogether, it appeared that NCSC isolated from adult bone marrow represents a potential danger for cellular therapy, and consequently, we recommend that phenotypic, functional and genetic assays should be performed on bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells before in vivo use, to demonstrate whether their biological properties, after ex vivo expansion, remain suitable for clinical application. PMID:23071568

  2. The lamprey: a jawless vertebrate model system for examining origin of the neural crest and other vertebrate traits.

    PubMed

    Green, Stephen A; Bronner, Marianne E

    2014-01-01

    Lampreys are a group of jawless fishes that serve as an important point of comparison for studies of vertebrate evolution. Lampreys and hagfishes are agnathan fishes, the cyclostomes, which sit at a crucial phylogenetic position as the only living sister group of the jawed vertebrates. Comparisons between cyclostomes and jawed vertebrates can help identify shared derived (i.e. synapomorphic) traits that might have been inherited from ancestral early vertebrates, if unlikely to have arisen convergently by chance. One example of a uniquely vertebrate trait is the neural crest, an embryonic tissue that produces many cell types crucial to vertebrate features, such as the craniofacial skeleton, pigmentation of the skin, and much of the peripheral nervous system (Gans and Northcutt, 1983). Invertebrate chordates arguably lack unambiguous neural crest homologs, yet have cells with some similarities, making comparisons with lampreys and jawed vertebrates essential for inferring characteristics of development in early vertebrates, and how they may have evolved from nonvertebrate chordates. Here we review recent research on cyclostome neural crest development, including research on lamprey gene regulatory networks and differentiated neural crest fates.

  3. Substrate-mediated reprogramming of human fibroblasts into neural crest stem-like cells and their applications in neural repair.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ting-Chen; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Cell- and gene-based therapies have emerged as promising strategies for treating neurological diseases. The sources of neural stem cells are limited while the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have risk of tumor formation. Here, we proposed the generation of self-renewable, multipotent, and neural lineage-related neural crest stem-like cells by chitosan substrate-mediated gene transfer of a single factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3) for the use in neural repair. A simple, non-toxic, substrate-mediated method was applied to deliver the naked FOXD3 plasmid into human fibroblasts. The transfection of FOXD3 increased cell proliferation and up-regulated the neural crest marker genes (FOXD3, SOX2, and CD271), stemness marker genes (OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2), and neural lineage-related genes (Nestin, β-tubulin and GFAP). The expression levels of stemness marker genes and neural crest maker genes in the FOXD3-transfected fibroblasts were maintained until the fifth passage. The FOXD3 reprogrammed fibroblasts based on the new method significantly rescued the neural function of the impaired zebrafish. The chitosan substrate-mediated delivery of naked plasmid showed feasibility in reprogramming somatic cells. Particularly, the FOXD3 reprogrammed fibroblasts hold promise as an easily accessible cellular source with neural crest stem-like behavior for treating neural diseases in the future.

  4. Cryptic crested newt diversity at the Eurasian transition: the mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of Near Eastern Triturus newts.

    PubMed

    Wielstra, B; Themudo, G Espregueira; Güçlü, O; Olgun, K; Poyarkov, N A; Arntzen, J W

    2010-09-01

    Crested newts of the Triturus karelinii group occur in a phylogeographically understudied region: the Near East. Controversy surrounds the systematic position of these newts within the complete crested newt assemblage (the Triturus cristatus superspecies). We explore the situation using mitochondrial sequence data (ND2 and ND4, approximately 1.7kb) and employing different methods of phylogenetic inference (Bayesian inference and Maximum Likelihood using mixed models) and molecular dating (r8s and BEAST). The T. karelinii group is monophyletic and constitutes one of four main lineages in the T. cristatus superspecies. The separation of the T. karelinii group from the remaining crested newts around 9Ma is related to the formation of the Mid-Aegean Trench, which separated the Balkan and Anatolian landmasses. The T. karelinii group comprises three geographically structured clades (eastern, central and western). The genetic divergence shown by these clades is comparable to that among recognized crested newt species. We suggest the uplift of the Armenian Plateau to be responsible for the separation of the eastern clade around 7Ma, and the re-establishment of a marine connection between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean at the end of the Messinian Salinity Crisis to have caused the split between the central and western clade around 5.5Ma. Genetic structuring within the three clades dates to the Quaternary Ice Age (<2.59Ma) and is associated with alternating periods of isolation and reconnection caused by periodic changes in sea level and surface runoff.

  5. Strength of the pin-bone interface of external fixation pins in the iliac crest. A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lai, K A; Chou, Y L

    1995-01-01

    The iliac crest is a frequent insertion site for external fixation pins in treating unstable pelvic or acetabular fractures and in iliofemoral distraction for superiorly dislocated hips. The pin-bone interface is critical for the success of treatment, but studies of the iliac crest are lacking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the strength of the pin-bone interface of different pins and different insertion methods. Four types of commercial pins, Wagner pins, Orthofix cortical and cancellous screws, and AO pins, were driven into sheep iliac crests by 2 methods: the intercortical and the transcortical. Specimens were tested for pullout and bending with an Instron testing machine (Model 1343) at a extension rate of 0.02 mm/sec to failure. The results revealed that the intercortical method had a stronger pullout force than the transcortical in all types of screws (p < 0.05), probably caused by longer insertion in the bone. In the pullout tests, the Wagner pins were the strongest and the Orthofix cancellous screws were the weakest. There were no differences in bending. In the iliac crest, the intercortical method was the better way of driving pins, and the new Orthofix screws were not proven to be stronger than the Wagner pins, nor were the cancellous screws more suitable than the cortical ones.

  6. Reversal of a developmental restriction in neural crest-derived cells of avian embryos by a phorbol ester drug.

    PubMed

    Ciment, G; Glimelius, B; Nelson, D M; Weston, J A

    1986-12-01

    Neural crest cells and some of the crest-derived cells of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of early avian embryos give rise to pigment cells when placed in culture. DRG from older embryos, however, fail to do so under comparable culture conditions. This age-dependent loss of melanogenic ability might be explained either by the death of a subpopulation of latent melanoblasts within early DRG, or the imposition of additional developmental restrictions in multipotent DRG cells. We show here that 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) causes some DRG cells to undergo pigmentation in cultures from older embryos, indicating that the loss of melanogenic ability in older embryos is not due to cell death. These pigment cells also display morphogenetic properties of normal melanocytes, including the ability to invade feather primordia. In addition to DRG, various other neural crest-derivatives contain cells similarly affected by TPA, including cells within sympathetic ganglia and peripheral nerves. We suggest that TPA reverses the developmental restriction of melanogenic ability that is normally imposed on neural crest-derived cells that migrate to various sites in avian embryos where melanogenesis does not normally occur.

  7. Gastrointestinal Helminth Parasites of Double-Crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) at Four Sites in Saskatchewan, Canada, 2006-2007.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the gastrointestinal parasite fauna of adult double-crested cormorants from breeding colonies on four very different lakes spanning a major ecotone from prairie to boreal forest in Saskatchewan, Canada. Our objectives were to document regional parasite fauna, and identify potential diff...

  8. Waterbird numbers and double-crested cormorants movement patterns within aquaculture production areas of the lower Mississippi River, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past seven consecutive years (1999-2007), aerial surveys by fixed-wing aircraft were conducted to monitor and quantify the wintering cormorant numbers. In addition, during the past two winters 2005-2006 and 2006-2007, 20 double-crested cormorants were captured, leg banded, and fitted wit...

  9. Prenuptial perfume: Alloanointing in the social rituals of the crested auklet ( Aethia cristatella) and the transfer of arthropod deterrents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Hector D.

    2008-01-01

    Alloanointing, the transfer of chemicals between conspecifics, is known among mammals, but hitherto, the behavior has not been documented for birds. The crested auklet ( Aethia cristatella), a colonial seabird of Alaskan and Siberian waters, alloanoints during courtship with fragrant aldehydes that are released from specialized wick-like feathers located in the interscapular region. Crested auklets solicit anointment at the colony, and prospective mates rub bill, breast, head, and neck over wick feathers of their partners. This distributes aldehydes over the head, neck, and face where the birds cannot self-preen. The resulting chemical concentrations are sufficient to deter ectoparasites. Auklets that emit more odorant can transfer more defensive chemicals to mates and are thus more sexually attractive. Behavioral studies showed that crested auklets are attracted to their scent. Wild birds searched for dispensers that emitted their scent and rubbed their bills on the dispensers and engaged in vigorous anointment behaviors. In captive experiments, naïve crested auklets responded more strongly to synthetic auklet scent than controls, and the greatest behavioral response occurred during early courtship. This study extends scientific knowledge regarding functions of alloanointing. Alloanointing had previously been attributed to scent marking and individual recognition in vertebrates. Alloanointing is described here in the context of an adaptive social cue — the transfer of arthropod deterrents between prospective mates.

  10. The endothelin receptor-B is required for the migration of neural crest-derived melanocyte and enteric neuron precursors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Ok; Levorse, John M; Shin, Myung K

    2003-07-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding endothelin receptor-B (Ednrb) and its ligand endothelin-3 (Edn3) affect the development of two neural crest-derived cell types, melanocytes and enteric neurons. EDNRB signaling is exclusively required between E10.5 and E12.5 during the migratory phase of melanoblast and enteric neuroblast development. To determine the fate of Ednrb-expressing cells during this critical period, we generated a strain of mice with the bacterial beta-galactosidase (lacZ) gene inserted downstream of the endogenous Ednrb promoter. The expression of the lacZ gene was detected in melanoblasts and precursors of the enteric neuron system (ENS), as well as other neural crest cells and nonneural crest-derived lineages. By comparing Ednrb(lacZ)/+ and Ednrb(lacZ)/Ednrb(lacZ) embryos, we determined that the Ednrb pathway is not required for the initial specification and dispersal of melanoblasts and ENS precursors from the neural crest progenitors. Rather, the EDNRB-mediated signaling is required for the terminal migration of melanoblasts and ENS precursors, and this pathway is not required for the survival of the migratory cells.

  11. Role of DNMT3B in the regulation of early neural and neural crest specifiers.

    PubMed

    Martins-Taylor, Kristen; Schroeder, Diane I; LaSalle, Janine M; Lalande, Marc; Xu, Ren-He

    2012-01-01

    The de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B functions in establishing DNA methylation patterns during development. DNMT3B missense mutations cause immunodeficiency, centromere instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome. The restriction of Dnmt3b expression to neural progenitor cells, as well as the mild cognitive defects observed in ICF patients, suggests that DNMT3B may play an important role in early neurogenesis. We performed RNAi knockdown of DNMT3B in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in order to investigate the mechanistic contribution of DNMT3B to DNA methylation and early neuronal differentiation. While DNMT3B was not required for early neuroepithelium specification, DNMT3B deficient neuroepithelium exhibited accelerated maturation with earlier expression, relative to normal hESCs, of mature neuronal markers (such as NEUROD1) and of early neuronal regional specifiers (such as those for the neural crest). Genome-wide analyses of DNA methylation by MethylC-seq identified novel regions of hypomethylation in the DNMT3B knockdowns along the X chromosome as well as pericentromeric regions, rather than changes to promoters of specific dysregulated genes. We observed a loss of H3K27me3 and the polycomb complex protein EZH2 at the promoters of early neural and neural crest specifier genes during differentiation of DNMT3B knockdown but not normal hESCs. Our results indicate that DNMT3B mediates large-scale methylation patterns in hESCs and that DNMT3B deficiency in the cells alters the timing of their neuronal differentiation and maturation.

  12. Human epidermal neural crest stem cells as a source of Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Motoharu; Sieber-Blum, Maya

    2015-01-01

    We show that highly pure populations of human Schwann cells can be derived rapidly and in a straightforward way, without the need for genetic manipulation, from human epidermal neural crest stem cells [hEPI-NCSC(s)] present in the bulge of hair follicles. These human Schwann cells promise to be a useful tool for cell-based therapies, disease modelling and drug discovery. Schwann cells are glia that support axons of peripheral nerves and are direct descendants of the embryonic neural crest. Peripheral nerves are damaged in various conditions, including through trauma or tumour-related surgery, and Schwann cells are required for their repair and regeneration. Schwann cells also promise to be useful for treating spinal cord injuries. Ex vivo expansion of hEPI-NCSC isolated from hair bulge explants, manipulating the WNT, sonic hedgehog and TGFβ signalling pathways, and exposure of the cells to pertinent growth factors led to the expression of the Schwann cell markers SOX10, KROX20 (EGR2), p75NTR (NGFR), MBP and S100B by day 4 in virtually all cells, and maturation was completed by 2 weeks of differentiation. Gene expression profiling demonstrated expression of transcripts for neurotrophic and angiogenic factors, as well as JUN, all of which are essential for nerve regeneration. Co-culture of hEPI-NCSC-derived human Schwann cells with rodent dorsal root ganglia showed interaction of the Schwann cells with axons, providing evidence of Schwann cell functionality. We conclude that hEPI-NCSCs are a biologically relevant source for generating large and highly pure populations of human Schwann cells. PMID:26251357

  13. Evidence of Altered Matrix Composition in Iliac Crest Biopsies from Patients with Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, IJ; Chiodo, V; Ma, Y; Boskey, AL

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis (IJO) is a rare condition in children, characterized by bone pain, long bone and vertebral fractures. Previously, IJO bone was solely characterized by histomorphometry and quantitative computed tomography. The goal of this study is to describe IJO bone composition. Materials and Methods Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI), a vibrational spectroscopic technique providing spatially resolved images of chemical composition, was used to determine whether iliac crest biopsies from children with IJO differed in composition from and age- and sex-matched controls, and, as a secondary analysis, whether IJO-bone showed the same disease dependent change in composition as do iliac crest bone biopsies from women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). Wilcoxon rank-tests and linear regressions were used to analyze FTIRI variables (mineral-to-matrix ratio, carbonate-to-phosphate ratio, crystallinity, acid-phosphate substitution, collagen maturity) and their individual pixel distributions (Heterogeneity). Results Mineral-to-matrix ratio was comparable in IJO and age-matched controls. Contrastingly, collagen maturity (also known as collagen cross-link ratio) was higher in cortical and cancellous IJO bone compared to juvenile controls. Acid-phosphate substitution was greater in IJO cancellous bone than in age-matched controls, suggesting IJO bone mineral is formed more recently, reflecting a slower mineralization process. This agrees with findings of increased heterogeneity for mineral-to-matrix and collagen maturity ratios in IJO cancellous bone. There were negative correlations between cancellous collagen maturity and previously reported histomorphometric bone formation markers. There were no correlations with indices of remodeling. Conclusions IJO bone, similar to PMO bone, had elevated collagen maturity relative to its age-matched controls. This emphasizes the importance of the collagen matrix for bone health. IJO bone differed

  14. Gene regulatory evolution and the origin of macroevolutionary novelties: insights from the neural crest.

    PubMed

    Van Otterloo, Eric; Cornell, Robert A; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans; Garnett, Aaron T

    2013-07-01

    The appearance of novel anatomic structures during evolution is driven by changes to the networks of transcription factors, signaling pathways, and downstream effector genes controlling development. The nature of the changes to these developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is poorly understood. A striking test case is the evolution of the GRN controlling development of the neural crest (NC). NC cells emerge from the neural plate border (NPB) and contribute to multiple adult structures. While all chordates have a NPB, only in vertebrates do NPB cells express all the genes constituting the neural crest GRN (NC-GRN). Interestingly, invertebrate chordates express orthologs of NC-GRN components in other tissues, revealing that during vertebrate evolution new regulatory connections emerged between transcription factors primitively expressed in the NPB and genes primitively expressed in other tissues. Such interactions could have evolved by two mechanisms. First, transcription factors primitively expressed in the NPB may have evolved new DNA and/or cofactor binding properties (protein neofunctionalization). Alternately, cis-regulatory elements driving NPB expression may have evolved near genes primitively expressed in other tissues (cis-regulatory neofunctionalization). Here we discuss how gene duplication can, in principle, promote either form of neofunctionalization. We review recent published examples of interspecies gene-swap, or regulatory-element-swap, experiments that test both models. Such experiments have yielded little evidence to support the importance of protein neofunctionalization in the emergence of the NC-GRN, but do support the importance of novel cis-regulatory elements in this process. The NC-GRN is an excellent model for the study of gene regulatory and macroevolutionary innovation.

  15. Zebrafish Zic2a and Zic2b regulate neural crest and craniofacial development

    PubMed Central

    TeSlaa, Jessica J.; Keller, Abigail N.; Nyholm, Molly K.; Grinblat, Yevgenya

    2013-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE), the most common malformation of the human forebrain, is associated with defects of the craniofacial skeleton. ZIC2, a zinc-finger transcription factor, is strongly linked to HPE and to a characteristic set of dysmorphic facial features in humans. We have previously identified important functions for zebrafish Zic2 in the developing forebrain. Here, we demonstrate that ZIC2 orthologs zic2a and zic2b also regulate the forming zebrafish craniofacial skeleton, including the jaw and neurocranial cartilages, and use the zebrafish to study Zic2-regulated processes that may contribute to the complex etiology of HPE. Using temporally controlled Zic2a overexpression, we show that the developing craniofacial cartilages are sensitive to Zic2 elevation prior to 24hpf. This window of sensitivity overlaps the critical expansion and migration of the neural crest (NC) cells, which migrate from the developing neural tube to populate vertebrate craniofacial structures. We demonstrate that zic2b influences the induction of NC at the neural plate border, while both zic2a and zic2b regulate NC migratory onset and strongly contribute to chromatophore development. Both Zic2 depletion and early ectopic Zic2 expression cause moderate, incompletely penetrant mispatterning of the NC-derived jaw precursors at 24hpf, yet by 2dpf these changes in Zic2 expression result in profoundly mispatterned chondrogenic condensations. We attribute this discrepancy to an additional role for Zic2a and Zic2b in patterning the forebrain primordium, an important signaling source during craniofacial development. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that transplanted Zic2-deficient cells can contribute to craniofacial cartilages in a wild-type background. Collectively, these data suggest that zebrafish Zic2 plays a dual role during craniofacial development, contributing to two disparate aspects of craniofacial morphogenesis: (1) Neural crest induction and migration, and (2) early

  16. CHD7 cooperates with PBAF to control multipotent neural crest formation.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Ruchi; Chen, Denise A; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Zhang, Junmei; Xiong, Yiqin; Helms, Jill; Chang, Ching-Pin; Zhao, Yingming; Swigut, Tomek; Wysocka, Joanna

    2010-02-18

    Heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding the CHD (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding domain) member CHD7, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller homologous to the Drosophila trithorax-group protein Kismet, result in a complex constellation of congenital anomalies called CHARGE syndrome, which is a sporadic, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by malformations of the craniofacial structures, peripheral nervous system, ears, eyes and heart. Although it was postulated 25 years ago that CHARGE syndrome results from the abnormal development of the neural crest, this hypothesis remained untested. Here we show that, in both humans and Xenopus, CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest (NC), a transient cell population that is ectodermal in origin but undergoes a major transcriptional reprogramming event to acquire a remarkably broad differentiation potential and ability to migrate throughout the body, giving rise to craniofacial bones and cartilages, the peripheral nervous system, pigmentation and cardiac structures. We demonstrate that CHD7 is essential for activation of the NC transcriptional circuitry, including Sox9, Twist and Slug. In Xenopus embryos, knockdown of Chd7 or overexpression of its catalytically inactive form recapitulates all major features of CHARGE syndrome. In human NC cells CHD7 associates with PBAF (polybromo- and BRG1-associated factor-containing complex) and both remodellers occupy a NC-specific distal SOX9 enhancer and a conserved genomic element located upstream of the TWIST1 gene. Consistently, during embryogenesis CHD7 and PBAF cooperate to promote NC gene expression and cell migration. Our work identifies an evolutionarily conserved role for CHD7 in orchestrating NC gene expression programs, provides insights into the synergistic control of distal elements by chromatin remodellers, illuminates the patho-embryology of CHARGE syndrome, and suggests a broader function for CHD7 in the regulation of cell

  17. Trabecular bone microstructure and local gene expression in iliac crest biopsies of men with idiopathic osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Patsch, Janina M; Kohler, Thomas; Berzlanovich, Andrea; Muschitz, Christian; Bieglmayr, Christian; Roschger, Paul; Resch, Heinrich; Pietschmann, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Male idiopathic osteoporosis (MIO) is a metabolic bone disease that is characterized by low bone mass, microstructural alterations, and increased fracture risk in otherwise healthy men. Although the detailed pathophysiology of MIO has yet to be clarified, evidence increasingly suggests an osteoblastic defect as the underlying cause. In this study we tested the hypothesis that the expression profile of certain osteoblastic or osteoblast-related genes (ie, WNT10B, RUNX2, Osterix, Osteocalcin, SOST, RANKL, and OPG) is different in iliac crest biopsies of MIO patients when compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, we investigated the relation of local gene expression characteristics with histomorphometric, microstructural, and clinical features. Following written informed consent and diligent clinical patient characterization, iliac crest biopsies were performed in nine men. While RNA extraction, reverse-transcription, and real-time polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were performed on one biopsy, a second biopsy of each patient was submitted for histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography (µCT). Age-matched bone samples from forensic autopsies served as controls. MIO patients displayed significantly reduced WNT10B, RUNX2, RANKL, and SOST expression. Performing µCT for the first time in MIO biopsies, we found significant decreases in trabecular number and connectivity density. Trabecular separation was increased significantly, but trabecular thickness was similar in both groups. Histomorphometry revealed decreased BV/TV and osteoid volume and fewer osteoclasts in MIO. By providing evidence for reduced local WNT10B, RUNX2, and RANKL gene expression and histomorphometric low turnover, our data support the osteoblast dysfunction model discussed for MIO. Further, MIO seems to lead to a different microstructural pathology than age-related bone loss.

  18. [Sonogram structure and timing of duets of western black crested gibbon in Wuliang Mountain].

    PubMed

    Fan, Peng-Fei; Jiang, Xue-Long; Liu, Chang-Ming; Luo, Wen-Shou

    2010-06-01

    We studied the sonogram and timing of duets of three groups of Central Yunnan western black crested gibbons (Nomascus concolor jingdongensis) in Dazhaizi, Mt. Wuliang. The study was based on a 13-month field observation period, from March 2003 to March 2004. A Sony TC-D5 Pro2 recorder, Sony C-76 directed microphone, and Sony tape were used to record the duet bouts in March 2007 and March 2008. Signal/RTS 4.0 was used to analyze the sonogram of the duet. We first presented sonograms of all kinds of sound units in the duets made by western black crested gibbons. The adult male could produce boom, aa notes and modulated figures. Adult females produced great call or abortive great call. The two adult females in each group usually produced great calls synchronously. After the great call, males always immediately produced a modulated figure to coordinate with the female. The interval between the modulated figure and great call was 2.7 s. On average, groups sang on 53% of days monitored, and sang 1.09 duet bouts per singing day. 91.5% of the duets were produced between half an hour before and three hours after the sunrise. The average duration of the duets was 12.9 min, and females produced 4.6 great calls during one duet bout. The intervals between two successive great calls were generally 115 s. There was no significant difference in the duration and frequency of the duet bouts, but there was significant difference in the number of the great calls and intervals between great calls among groups.

  19. Flank Hernia Repair with Suture Anchor Mesh Fixation to the Iliac Crest.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kaushik; Miller, Richard S

    2017-03-01

    Traumatic or postsurgical flank hernias are complex and prone to recurrence, particularly at the border of the iliac crest. We reviewed our experience using suture anchors drilled into the iliac crest to fixate the mesh to bone. Our study of 10 repairs in eight patients was Institutional Review Board exempt. We obtained demographics, body mass index, diabetes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) history, smoking status, steroid use, number of prior repairs, defect size, mesh size, number of anchors, and recurrence and infection at follow-up. We performed Kaplan-Meier analysis using a composite of recurrence or infection. Three of eight (interquartile range, 37.5%) patients were male. Median age and body mass index were 47.5 years (31.0, 54.7) and 32.2 (29.0, 36.0), respectively. Three patients had prior repairs, one each with two, three, and five prior attempts at fixation. One of eight patients (12.5%) had a history of MRSA infection. One of eight patients (12.5%) had a history of intermittent steroid use for sarcoidosis. Defect size was 90 cm2 (62.2, 165) and mesh size was 155 cm2 (150, 232) with four anchors (4, 5.5). Procedural complications included 2/10 (20%) with recurrence and 1/10 (10%) with postoperative MRSA infection. Follow-up was 12 months (3.0, 25.0). Mean freedom from recurrence and mesh infection (Kaplan-Meier) was 43.5 months (95%confidence interval = 24.2, 62.8). In conclusion, our series is one of the largest in the literature involving the suture anchor technique. Despite a high-risk patient population due to trauma, obesity, and prior smoking and MRSA history, we achieved an acceptable recurrence rate. Further study may benefit from a randomized trial design.

  20. Nesting habitat relationships of sympatric Crested Caracaras, Red-tailed Hawks, and White-tailed Hawks in South Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Actkinson, M.A.; Kuvlesky, W.P.; Boal, C.W.; Brennan, L.A.; Hernandez, F.

    2007-01-01

    We quantified nesting-site habitats for sympatric White-tailed Hawks (Buteo albicaudatus) (n = 40), Red-tailed Hawks (B. jamaicensis) (n = 39), and Crested Caracaras (Caracara cheriway) (n = 24) in the Coastal Sand Plain of south Texas. White-tailed Hawks and Crested Caracara nest sites occurred in savannas, whereas Red-tailed Hawk nest sites occurred in woodlands on the edge of savannas. White-tailed Hawk nest sites were in shrubs and trees that were shorter (3.5 ?? 1.0 m) and had smaller canopy diameters (5.5 ?? 2.1 m) than those of Red-tailed Hawks (10.1 ?? 2.0 m, 13.7 ?? 5.8 m) and Crested Caracaras (5.6 ?? 1.7 m, 8.5 ?? 3.5 m). Red-tailed Hawk nest sites had higher woody densities (15.7 ?? 9.6 plants) and more woody cover (84 ?? 19%) than those of White-tailed Hawks (5.6 ?? 5.8 plants, 20 ?? 21%) and Crested Caracaras (9.9 ?? 6.7 plants, 55 ?? 34%). Crested Caracara nest sites were in dense, multi-branched shrubs composed of more living material (97 ?? 3%) than those of White-tailed (88 ?? 18%) and Red-tailed hawks (88 ?? 18%). Nest sites of White-tailed Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Crested Caracaras were similar to random samples from the surrounding habitat indicating that preferred nesting habitat was available for each of these species at least within 60 m of active nest sites. Nest tree height, along with woody plant and native grass cover best discriminated nest sites among the three raptor species. There was no overlap at Red-tailed and White-tailed hawk nest sites in vegetation structure, while Crested Caracara nests were in habitat intermediate between the two other species. Partitioning of nesting habitat may be how these raptor species co-exist at the broader landscape scale of our study area in the Coastal Sand Plain of Texas.

  1. Distance of the alveolar antral artery from the alveolar crest. Related factors and surgical considerations in sinus floor elevation

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Centelles, Pablo; Loira-Gago, María; Gonzalez-Mosquera, Antonio; Seoane-Romero, Juan M.; Garcia-Martin, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In a variable proportion of maxillary sinuses alveolar antral artery is located close to the residual ridge, increasing the chances for haemorrhagic complications during sinus floor elevation procedures. Material and Methods Retrospective observational study of CBCT explorations performed for implant-treatment planning. The upper first molar area was selected for this study. The relative uncertainty (standard deviation of the measurement divided by its mean and expressed as a percentage from 0% to 100%) was chosen for determining the observational errors. For modeling the chances of AAA detection, the generalized additive models (GAM) approach was chosen. Results A total of 240 maxillary sinuses were studied (46.25% males) whose median median age was 58 years old (IQR: 52-66). Univariate models showed that the chances for an AAA-alvelar crest distance ≤15mm increase in wider sinuses with lower, subsinusally edentulous crests. When distance is considered as a continuous variable, the best mutivariate model showed an explained deviance of 67% and included AAA diameter, distance AAA-sinus floor, sinus width, and shape, height and width of the residual ridge. Thinner AAAs are found closer to the crest (within the ≤15mm safe distance). Conclusions Bearing in mind the inclusion criteria and the limitations of this investigation, it is concluded that there is a high proportion of maxillary sinuses where AAA describes a course close to the alveolar crest (≤15mm), which was classically considered a safe distance for SFE. This position is related to the presence of atrophic crests (depressed ridge form) and wide maxillary sinuses where the distance of the vessel to the floor of the sinus is small. This information may permit a better surgical planning of SFE procedures. Key words:Cone-beam computed tomography, blood vessels, sinus floor augmentation, intraoperative complications. PMID:27694790

  2. New technique for feline carbon dioxide laser onychectomy by resection of the redundant epidermis of the ungual crest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, William P.

    2000-05-01

    A new technique for feline carbon dioxide laser onychectomy can further minimize postoperative pain and complications in any age animal. This procedure is accomplished by resection of the redundant epidermis over the ungual crest. Resection of the redundant epidermis allows complete dissection and removal of the claw from a strictly cranio-dorsal approach, thereby minimizing trauma to the surrounding tissues and post- operative complications. The laser setting is preferred at four to six watts continuous power. The epidermis of the ungual crest is resected in a circumferential manner at its most distal edge. This tissue is pushed proximally over the ungual crest. A second circumferential incision is made 3 mm proximal to the first incision. Deeper subcutaneous fascia is also pushed proximally over the ungual crest. An incision of the extensor tendon is made at its insertion on the ungual crest keeping the redundant epidermis proximal to this incision. The incision through the extensor tendon is continued deeper to the synovium of PII and PIII. Gentle traction in a palmar direction will disarticulate the joint space between PII and PIII. Incisions into the lateral and medial collateral ligaments from a cranio-dorsal origin in palmar direction further disarticulate the joint. Care must be exercised to preserve all epidermal tissue lying immediately adjacent to the collateral ligaments. Continual palmar traction will expose the base of PIII and the insertion of the flexor tendon. A dorsal incision is made into the flexor tendon in a palmar direction. Extreme palmar rotation of PIII will allow the dissection of the subcutaneous tissue of the pad from PIII. The redundant epidermal tissue will now cover the majority of the onychectomy site. No sutures or tissue adhesive are advised.

  3. Facteurs de risques de mortalité néonatale dans l'hôpital de gynécologie-obstétrique de la wilaya de Sidi Bel Abbes, Algérie

    PubMed Central

    Noria, Harir; Sarah, Ourrad; Asmaa, Ourrad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Il s'est agit ici de déterminer la fréquence et les facteurs de risques de mortalité néonatale au service néonatologie de l'Etablissement Hospitalier Spécialisé Gynécologie Obstétrique de la wilaya de Sidi Bel Abbés (Ouest Algérien). Méthodes Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective a visée descriptive et analytique porté sur tous les décès de 2011-2012 survenus au service de néonatologie de Sidi Bel Abbes. Résultats Au total 1209 cas de mortalité néonatale ont été enregistré durant les deux années (2011-2012), soit une fréquence de 5.3%. Il s'agissait dans 96,85% des cas de mortalité précoce. La mortalité néonatale étant multifactorielle, l'analyse statistique a pu incriminer de façon majoritaire: l’âge maternel avancé (>35) (OR = 3.1; IC 95% (2.30 -4.40); p = 0.001); la multiparité (OR = 8.15; IC 95% (2.85-10.05); p = 0.001); l'infection génitale(OR = 5.3; IC 95% (2.5-6.7); p = 0.001); la prématurité (OR = 10.08; IC 95% (3.45-12.02); p = 0.001); le faible poids de naissance (OR = 4.5; IC 95% (1.6-10.5); p = 0.001); l'ictère (OR = 4.8; IC 95% (1.26-6.02; p = 0.001) et la souffrance fœtale aigue (OR = 3.4; IC 95% (0.89-5.14); p = 0.001). Conclusion Une prise en charge efficace de la grossesse et du nouveau-né dans sa première semaine de vie, devraient amélioraient le pronostic néonatal. PMID:26185577

  4. Culture bag systems for clinical applications of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Facing the challenging treatment of neurodegenerative diseases as well as complex craniofacial injuries such as those common after cancer therapy, the field of regenerative medicine increasingly relies on stem cell transplantation strategies. Here, neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) offer many promising applications, although scale up of clinical-grade processes prior to potential transplantations is currently limiting. In this study, we aimed to establish a clinical-grade, cost-reducing cultivation system for NCSCs isolated from the adult human nose using cGMP-grade Afc-FEP bags. Methods We cultivated human neural crest-derived stem cells from inferior turbinate (ITSCs) in a cell culture bag system using Afc-FEP bags in human blood plasma-supplemented medium. Investigations of viability, proliferation and expression profile of bag-cultured ITSCs were followed by DNA-content and telomerase activity determination. Cultivated ITSCs were introduced to directed in vitro differentiation assays to assess their potential for mesodermal and ectodermal differentiation. Mesodermal differentiation was determined using an enzyme activity assay (alkaline phosphatase, ALP), respective stainings (Alizarin Red S, Von Kossa and Oil Red O), and RT-PCR, while immunocytochemistry and synaptic vesicle recycling were applied to assay neuroectodermal differentiation of ITSCs. Results When cultivated within Afc-FEP bags, ITSCs grew three-dimensionally in a human blood plasma-derived matrix, thereby showing unchanged morphology, proliferation capability, viability and expression profile in comparison to three dimensionally-cultured ITSCs growing in standard cell culture plastics. Genetic stability of bag-cultured ITSCs was further accompanied by unchanged telomerase activity. Importantly, ITSCs retained their potential to differentiate into mesodermal cell types, particularly including ALP-active, Alizarin Red S-, and Von Kossa-positive osteogenic cell types, as well as

  5. Ultrasound: a new tool for precisely locating posterior iliac crests to obtain adequate bone marrow trephine biopsy specimen.

    PubMed

    Islam, Anwarul

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasound imaging has evolved as a very useful tool in medical science. However, the technique of ultrasound-guided bone marrow trephine biopsy (BMTB) has not been routinely used by haematologists and oncologists to help locate the posterior iliac crest during the BMTB procedure. We have used the technique of ultrasound-guided BMTB in 20 patients diagnosed with various haematological and non-haematological malignant conditions. We found the technique simple and useful in precisely locating the posterior iliac crest. As a result, it facilitates the extraction of a satisfactory core sample or aspiration biopsy and is more surgically precise than when access to the target bone is based only on external landmarks and blind biopsy.

  6. Ewing's sarcoma cells with CD57-associated increase of tumorigenicity and with neural crest-like differentiation capacity.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Joachim; Bogatyreva, Liubov; Boukamp, Petra; Rojewski, Markus; van Valen, Frans; Fiedler, Jörg; Hipp, Nora; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2010-09-01

    The Ewing family of tumors (EFT) is an important group of pediatric malignancies with a guarded prognosis. Little is known about the heterogeneity of EFT cells, and the cellular origin of EFT is disputed. We now add evidence that EFT are heterogeneous by showing that EFT cells from spheres growing in serum-free medium are markedly more tumorigenic than adherently growing EFT cells. Furthermore, EFT cells strongly expressing CD57 (HNK-1), a surface marker for migrating and proliferating neural crest cells, are more tumorigenic than cells with low expression of CD57, possibly mediated in part by enhanced adhesion and invasion. We contribute to the controversy about the cellular origin of EFT by clonal analysis, showing that EFT cells can differentiate similar to neural crest cells. These data increase our knowledge about the pathogenesis and heterogeneity of EFT.

  7. A comparative analysis of double-crested cormorant diets from stomachs and pellets from two Lake Ontario colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Ross, Robert M.; McCullough, Russell D.; Mathers, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    Double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) diets were compared with evidence from the stomachs of shot birds and from regurgitated pellets at High Bluff Island and Little Galloo Island, Lake Ontario. The highest similarity in diets determined by stomach and pellet analyses occurred when both samples were collected on the same day. Diet overlap dropped substantially between the two methods when collection periods were seven to ten days apart, which suggested differences in prey availability between the two periods. Since the average number of fish recovered in pellets was significantly higher than that in stomachs, use of pellets to determine fish consumption of double-crested cormorants may be more valid than stomach analysis because pellet content represent an integrated sampling of food consumed over approximately 24 hours.

  8. Developing nondestructive techniques for managing conflicts between fisheries and double-crested cormorant colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suzuki, Yasuko; Roby, Daniel D.; Lyons, Donald E.; Courtot, Karen; Collis, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) have been identified as the source of significant mortality to juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the Columbia River Basin. Management plans for reducing the size of a large colony on East Sand Island (OR, USA) in the Columbia River estuary are currently being developed. We evaluated habitat enhancement and social attraction as nondestructive techniques for managing cormorant nesting colonies during 2004–2007. We tested these techniques on unoccupied plots adjacent to the East Sand Island cormorant colony. Cormorants quickly colonized these plots and successfully raised young. Cormorants also were attracted to nest and raised young on similar plots at 2 islands approximately 25 km from East Sand Island; 1 island had a history of successful cormorant nesting whereas the other was a site where cormorants had previously nested unsuccessfully. On a third island with no history of cormorant nesting or nesting attempts, these techniques were unsuccessful at attracting cormorants to nest. Our results suggest that some important factors influencing attraction of nesting cormorants using these techniques include history of cormorant nesting, disturbance, and presence of breeding cormorants nearby. These techniques may be effective in redistributing nesting cormorants away from areas where fish stocks of conservation concern are susceptible to predation, especially if sites with a recent history of cormorant nesting are available within their foraging or dispersal range. Published 2015. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  9. Fibulin-1 is required for morphogenesis of neural crest-derived structures

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Marion A.; Kern, Christine B.; Fresco, Victor M.; Wessels, Andy; Thompson, Robert P.; McQuinn, Tim C.; Twal, Waleed O.; Mjaatvedt, Corey H.; Drake, Christopher J.; Argraves, W. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Here we report that mouse embryos homozygous for a gene trap insertion in the fibulin-1 (Fbln1) gene are deficient in Fbln1 and exhibit cardiac ventricular wall thinning and ventricular septal defects with double outlet right ventricle or overriding aorta. Fbln1 nulls also display anomalies of aortic arch arteries, hypoplasia of the thymus and thyroid, underdeveloped skull bones, malformations of cranial nerves and hemorrhagic blood vessels in the head and neck. The spectrum of malformations is consistent with Fbln1 influencing neural crest cell (NCC)-dependent development of these tissues. This is supported by evidence that Fbln1 expression is associated with streams of cranial NCCs migrating adjacent to rhombomeres 2–7 and that Fbln1-deficient embryos display patterning anomalies of NCCs forming cranial nerves IX and X, which derive from rhombomeres 6 and 7. Additionally, Fbln1-deficient embryos show increased apoptosis in areas populated by NCCs derived from rhombomeres 4, 6 and 7. Based on these findings, it is concluded that Fbln1 is required for the directed migration and survival of cranial NCCs contributing to the development of pharyngeal glands, craniofacial skeleton, cranial nerves, aortic arch arteries, cardiac outflow tract and cephalic blood vessels. PMID:18538758

  10. SOXE neofunctionalization and elaboration of the neural crest during chordate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Andrew; Cheung, Martin; Huang, Yong-Heng; Jauch, Ralf; Bronner, Marianne E.; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.

    2016-01-01

    During chordate evolution, two genome-wide duplications facilitated acquisition of vertebrate traits, including emergence of neural crest cells (NCCs), in which neofunctionalization of the duplicated genes are thought to have facilitated development of craniofacial structures and the peripheral nervous system. How these duplicated genes evolve and acquire the ability to specify NC and their derivatives are largely unknown. Vertebrate SoxE paralogues, most notably Sox9/10, are essential for NC induction, delamination and lineage specification. In contrast, the basal chordate, amphioxus, has a single SoxE gene and lacks NC-like cells. Here, we test the hypothesis that duplication and divergence of an ancestral SoxE gene may have facilitated elaboration of NC lineages. By using an in vivo expression assay to compare effects of AmphiSoxE and vertebrate Sox9 on NC development, we demonstrate that all SOXE proteins possess similar DNA binding and homodimerization properties and can induce NCCs. However, AmphiSOXE is less efficient than SOX9 in transactivation activity and in the ability to preferentially promote glial over neuronal fate, a difference that lies within the combined properties of amino terminal and transactivation domains. We propose that acquisition of AmphiSoxE expression in the neural plate border led to NCC emergence while duplication and divergence produced advantageous mutations in vertebrate homologues, promoting elaboration of NC traits. PMID:27734831

  11. High frequency of cephalic neural crest cells shows coexistence of neurogenic, melanogenic, and osteogenic differentiation capacities

    PubMed Central

    Calloni, Giordano W.; Le Douarin, Nicole M.; Dupin, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) is a vertebrate innovation that distinguishes vertebrates from other chordates and was critical for the development and evolution of a “New Head and Brain.” In early vertebrates, the NC was the source of dermal armor of fossil jawless fish. In extant vertebrates, including mammals, the NC forms the peripheral nervous system, melanocytes, and the cartilage and bone of the face. Here, we show that in avian embryos, a large majority of cephalic NC cells (CNCCs) have the ability to differentiate into cell types as diverse as neurons, melanocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. Moreover, we find that the morphogen Sonic hedgehog (Shh) acts on CNCCs to increase endochondral osteogenesis while having no effect on osteoblasts prone to membranous ossification. We have developed culture conditions that demonstrate that “neural–mesenchymal” differentiation abilities are present in more than 90% of CNCCs. A highly multipotent progenitor (able to yield neurons, glia, melanocytes, myofibroblasts, chondrocytes, and osteocytes) comprises 7–13% of the clonogenic cells in the absence and presence of Shh, respectively. This progenitor is a good candidate for a cephalic NC stem cell. PMID:19447928

  12. Evolutionary changes affecting rapid identification of 2008 Newcastle disease viruses isolated from double-crested cormorants.

    PubMed

    Rue, Cary A; Susta, Leonardo; Brown, Corrie C; Pasick, John M; Swafford, Seth R; Wolf, Paul C; Killian, Mary Lea; Pedersen, Janice C; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2010-07-01

    A morbidity-mortality event involving virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in wild double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) occurred in North America in the summer of 2008. All 22 viruses isolated from cormorants were positively identified by the USDA-validated real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay targeting the matrix gene. However, the USDA-validated reverse transcription-PCR assay targeting the fusion gene that is specific for virulent isolates identified only 1 of these 22 isolates. Additionally, several of these isolates have been sequenced, and this information was used to identify genomic changes that caused the failure of the test and to revisit the evolution of NDV in cormorants. The forward primer and fusion probe were redesigned from the 2008 cormorant isolate sequence, and the revised fusion gene test successfully identified all 22 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses using both the full fusion sequence and the partial 374-nucleotide sequence identified these isolates as genotype V, with their nearest ancestor being an earlier isolate collected from Nevada in 2005. Histopathological analysis of this ancestral strain revealed morphological changes in the brain consistent with that of the traditional mesogenic pathotypes in cormorants. Intracerebral pathogenicity assays indicated that each of these isolates is virulent with values of >0.7 but not more virulent than earlier isolates reported from Canada.

  13. Prospect of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells in Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qian; Lu, Qiqi; Gao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) represent a transient and multipotent cell population that contributes to numerous anatomical structures such as peripheral nervous system, teeth, and cornea. NCSC maldevelopment is related to various human diseases including pigmentation abnormalities, disorders affecting autonomic nervous system, and malformations of teeth, eyes, and hearts. As human pluripotent stem cells including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can serve as an unlimited cell source to generate NCSCs, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs can be a valuable tool to study the underlying mechanisms of NCSC-associated diseases, which paves the way for future therapies for these abnormalities. In addition, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs with the capability of differentiating to various cell types are highly promising for clinical organ repair and regeneration. In this review, we first discuss NCSC generation methods from human pluripotent stem cells and differentiation mechanism of NCSCs. Then we focus on the clinical application potential of hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs on peripheral nerve injuries, corneal blindness, tooth regeneration, pathological melanogenesis, Hirschsprung disease, and cardiac repair and regeneration. PMID:28090209

  14. Genomic characterisation of two virulent Newcastle disease viruses isolated from crested ibis (Nipponia nippon) in China.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huafang; Chen, Shengli; Wu, Pengpeng; Wang, Jie; Duan, Xuji; Du, Enqi; Wang, Xinglong; Yang, Zengqi

    2014-12-15

    This paper describes the complete genomic sequences of two virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates, Shaanxi06 (prevalent genotype VIId) and Shaanxi10 (novel sub-genotype VIi), from sick crested ibises. The genomes of both isolates were 15,192 nt long and consisted of six genes in the order of 3'-NP-P-M-F-HN-L-5'. The genomes of the two isolates were highly similar to other reference NDV strains. However, some unique features were found in the HN protein of Shaanxi06 and the F gene end of Shaanxi10. Shaanxi06 and Shaanxi10 shared the same virulent motif (112-)R-R-Q-K-R-F(-117) at the F protein cleavage site, which coincided with previous pathogenicity test results. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both isolates were clustered within class II NDV, with Shaanxi06 in genotype VII and Shaanxi10 in genotype VI. Both isolates shared high homology with the prevalent genotype NDV strains that circulate in fowls and waterfowls. This study is the first to provide genomic information about a novel sub-genotype VIi NDV strain and another genotype VIId virus, which will be useful for subsequent investigations.

  15. The epidermal melanocyte population in the skin of ultraviolet-irradiated crested newt

    SciTech Connect

    Losa, M.; Zavanella, T.; Milani, S.

    1982-02-01

    The response of the epidermal melanocyte population to repeated ultraviolet (UV) exposure (wavelength spectrum 275-350 nm) has been investigated in the crested newt, Triturus cristatus carnifex. The effects of different doses of UV light were studied. The animals were killed 7 months after the first UV exposure. Only a slight decrease in the number of pigment cells was found after 85 sequential irradiations with a total dose of 1.3 x 10(5) J/m2, whereas striking decreases were observed when the same total dose was fractionated into 14 exposures or when a double dose was given in 57 exposures. The relationship between the square roots of the epidermal melanocyte densities and single doses appeared to be roughly linear, at least over the range of doses administered. The main factor in melanocyte damage seemed to be the single dose of irradiation rather than the cumulative dose administered. Decreased melanin content of the keratinocytes was observed in most irradiated animals.

  16. Neural crest cell-autonomous roles of fibronectin in cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Astrof, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The chemical and mechanical properties of extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate diverse aspects of cellular fates; however, how regional heterogeneity in ECM composition regulates developmental programs is not well understood. We discovered that fibronectin 1 (Fn1) is expressed in strikingly non-uniform patterns during mouse development, suggesting that regionalized synthesis of the ECM plays cell-specific regulatory roles during embryogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we ablated Fn1 in the neural crest (NC), a population of multi-potent progenitors expressing high levels of Fn1. We found that Fn1 synthesized by the NC mediated morphogenesis of the aortic arch artery and differentiation of NC cells into vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) by regulating Notch signaling. We show that NC Fn1 signals in an NC cell-autonomous manner through integrin α5β1 expressed by the NC, leading to activation of Notch and differentiation of VSMCs. Our data demonstrate an essential role of the localized synthesis of Fn1 in cardiovascular development and spatial regulation of Notch signaling. PMID:26552887

  17. Controlled levels of canonical Wnt signaling are required for neural crest migration.

    PubMed

    Maj, Ewa; Künneke, Lutz; Loresch, Elisabeth; Grund, Anita; Melchert, Juliane; Pieler, Tomas; Aspelmeier, Timo; Borchers, Annette

    2016-09-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays a dominant role in the development of the neural crest (NC), a highly migratory cell population that generates a vast array of cell types. Canonical Wnt signaling is required for NC induction as well as differentiation, however its role in NC migration remains largely unknown. Analyzing nuclear localization of β-catenin as readout for canonical Wnt activity, we detect nuclear β-catenin in premigratory but not migratory Xenopus NC cells suggesting that canonical Wnt activity has to decrease to basal levels to enable NC migration. To define a possible function of canonical Wnt signaling in Xenopus NC migration, canonical Wnt signaling was modulated at different time points after NC induction. This was accomplished using either chemical modulators affecting β-catenin stability or inducible glucocorticoid fusion constructs of Lef/Tcf transcription factors. In vivo analysis of NC migration by whole mount in situ hybridization demonstrates that ectopic activation of canonical Wnt signaling inhibits cranial NC migration. Further, NC transplantation experiments confirm that this effect is tissue-autonomous. In addition, live-cell imaging in combination with biophysical data analysis of explanted NC cells confirms the in vivo findings and demonstrates that modulation of canonical Wnt signaling affects the ability of NC cells to perform single cell migration. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that canonical Wnt signaling needs to be tightly controlled to enable migration of NC cells.

  18. Reiterative AP2a activity controls sequential steps in the neural crest gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    de Crozé, Noémie; Maczkowiak, Frédérique; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2011-01-04

    The neural crest (NC) emerges from combinatorial inductive events occurring within its progenitor domain, the neural border (NB). Several transcription factors act early at the NB, but the initiating molecular events remain elusive. Recent data from basal vertebrates suggest that ap2 might have been critical for NC emergence; however, the role of AP2 factors at the NB remains unclear. We show here that AP2a initiates NB patterning and is sufficient to elicit a NB-like pattern in neuralized ectoderm. In contrast, the other early regulators do not participate in ap2a initiation at the NB, but cooperate to further establish a robust NB pattern. The NC regulatory network uses a multistep cascade of secreted inducers and transcription factors, first at the NB and then within the NC progenitors. Here we report that AP2a acts at two distinct steps of this cascade. As the earliest known NB specifier, AP2a mediates Wnt signals to initiate the NB and activate pax3; as a NC specifier, AP2a regulates further NC development independent of and downstream of NB patterning. Our findings reconcile conflicting observations from various vertebrate organisms. AP2a provides a paradigm for the reiterated use of multifunctional molecules, thereby facilitating emergence of the NC in vertebrates.

  19. Sox2 acts as a rheostat of epithelial to mesenchymal transition during neural crest development

    PubMed Central

    Mandalos, Nikolaos; Rhinn, Muriel; Granchi, Zoraide; Karampelas, Ioannis; Mitsiadis, Thimios; Economides, Aris N.; Dollé, Pascal; Remboutsika, Eumorphia

    2014-01-01

    Precise control of self-renewal and differentiation of progenitor cells into the cranial neural crest (CNC) pool ensures proper head development, guided by signaling pathways such as BMPs, FGFs, Shh and Notch. Here, we show that murine Sox2 plays an essential role in controlling progenitor cell behavior during craniofacial development. A “Conditional by Inversion” Sox2 allele (Sox2COIN) has been employed to generate an epiblast ablation of Sox2 function (Sox2EpINV). Sox2EpINV/+(H) haploinsufficient and conditional (Sox2EpINV/mosaic) mutant embryos proceed beyond gastrulation and die around E11. These mutant embryos exhibit severe anterior malformations, with hydrocephaly and frontonasal truncations, which could be attributed to the deregulation of CNC progenitor cells during their epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This irregularity results in an exacerbated and aberrant migration of Sox10+ NCC in the branchial arches and frontonasal process of the Sox2 mutant embryos. These results suggest a novel role for Sox2 as a regulator of the epithelial to mesenchymal transitions (EMT) that are important for the cell flow in the developing head. PMID:25309446

  20. Dental Implantation of Atrophic Jaws Reconstructed with Iliac Bone Graft Crest - Outcome of Seven Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bllaca, Florian; Toci, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Iliac bone grafts are used to augment alveolar ridges followed by subsequent dental implants in completely edentulous patients. In Albania the information about these issues is scarce. AIM: To describe the procedure of iliac bone grafts augmentation of alveolar ridges and evaluate the survival rate of dental implants in completely edentulous patients in Albania. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seven totally edentulous patients (three males, average age 45.9 years) presenting at Durrës Regional Hospital during 2008-2015 and seeking a solution to their problem through implantation procedures were included in the study. Patients were thoroughly examined, evaluated and the best augmentation procedure, using iliac crest bone grafts, and dental implantation technique was chosen. The number of dental implants placed was recorded and their survival rate was calculated. RESULTS: The most common intervention site was maxillae (in 71.4% of cases). Dental implants were installed six months after augmentation, all fixed on the very stable augmented alveolar ridge. On average between 20%-30% of bone grafts, volume was resorbed. Of 37 implants settled, 36 of them or 97.3% survived. CONCLUSION: Iliac bone grafts are a suitable augmentation source of bone in a patient suffering from complete edentulism in Albania. The survival rate of dental implants is very satisfactory. PMID:28028420

  1. Pathological Reaction of Crested Wheatgrass Cultivars to Four Meloidogyne chitwoodi Populations.

    PubMed

    Griffin, G D; Asay, K H

    1989-10-01

    Meloidogyne chitwoodi populations from Tulelake, California; Ft. Hall, Idaho; Beryl, Utah; and Prosser, Washington, significantly (P < 0.05) reduced dry shoot weights of crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum L., Gaertn. and A. desertorum, Fisch. ex Link, Schult.) cultivars Hycrest, Fairway, and Nordan in experiments conducted in a greenhouse and growth chamber. Shoot growth depression, root galling, and nematode reproduction indices were greatest (P < 0.05) on plants inoculated with 5,000 eggs/plant. Nematode populations from Tulelake, Ft. Hall, and Beryl significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the growth of the three grass cultivars at 15, 20, 25, and 30 C; the greatest reductions occurred at 20 and 25 C. There were significant differences in the virulence of the nematode populations at high (30 C) and low (15 C) soil temperatures. At 15 C, plant growth was reduced more by the Beryl and Tulelake than by the Ft. Hall population; whereas at 30 C, the Ft. Hall population was more virulent than the Beryl and Tulelake populations. Root galling and nematode reproduction were greater on plants inoculated with Beryl and Tulelake populations at 15 C than on plants inoculated with the Ft. Hall population, while the Ft. Hall population had the most pronounced effects at 30 C.

  2. Molecular detection of bacteria in the families Rickettsiaceae and Anaplasmataceae in northern crested caracaras (Caracara cheriway)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, John A.; Fitak, Robert R.; Dwyer, James F.; Morrison, Joan L.; Culver, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens of the families Anaplasmataceae and Rickettsiaceae are often spread to humans or other animals from bites from infected arthropod hosts. Recently, an increasing number of studies have implicated migratory birds in the circulation of these pathogens through the spread of arthropod vectors. However, few studies have examined the potential for resident bird populations to serve as reservoirs for these zoonoses. In this study, we used nested PCRs of the GroESL and 17 kDa genes to screen for Anaplasmataceae and Rickettsiaceae, respectively, in a resident population of the northern crested caracara (Caracara cheriway) from Florida (n = 55). Additionally, a small number (n = 6) of captive individuals from Texas were included. We identified one individual (1.64%) positive for Rickettsia felis and one (1.64%) positive for Ehrlichia chaffeensis; both these individuals were from Florida. Presence of these pathogens demonstrates that these birds are potential hosts; however, the low prevalence of infections suggests that these populations likely do not function as an ecological reservoir.

  3. Proximity association in polygynous western black crested gibbons (Nomascus concolor jingdongensis): network structure and seasonality.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhen-Hua; Huang, Bei; Ning, Wen-He; Ni, Qing-Yong; Jiang, Xue-Long

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the structure and seasonality of the proximity network in a group of polygynous western black crested gibbons (Nomascus concolor) using social network analysis. The spatial proximity changed seasonally and was affected by temperature and rainfall. Preferred proximity association was not distributed randomly among individuals. Kinship was one explanation for the social structure, as offspring preferred to maintain close proximity with their mothers. The proximity of infants to mothers decreased with age, and independent offspring had lower proximity to mothers than dependent ones. We found that the adult male had different proximity relationships with two different adult females. The frequency of proximity between the male and the infant-carrying female was significantly higher than that between the male and the female who had immigrated carrying one offspring of uncertain paternity into the group. Infanticide avoidance and/or predation protection for dependent infants might explain the proximity relationship differences. Temperature influenced group proximity association, with individual proximity increasing in the cold months and decreasing in the hot months. Group proximity decreased in months with higher anthropogenic disturbance.

  4. Somatolactin selectively regulates proliferation and morphogenesis of neural-crest derived pigment cells in medaka

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Shoji; Sugimoto, Masazumi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro

    2004-01-01

    Species-specific colors and patterns on animal body surfaces are determined primarily by neural-crest-derived pigment cells in the skin (chromatophores). However, even closely related species display widely differing patterns. These contrasting aspects of chromatophores (i.e., the fixed developmental control within species and extreme diversity among species) seem to be a curious and suitable subject for understanding evolution and diversity of organisms. Here we identify a gene responsible for medaka “color interfere” mutants by positional cloning. These mutants do not show any obvious morphological and physiological defects other than defects in chromatophore proliferation and morphogenesis. The mutation has been identified as an 11-base deletion in somatolactin, which causes truncation 91 aa upstream of the C terminus of the protein's 230 aa. Somatolactin transcription changed dramatically during morphological body color adaptation to different backgrounds. This genetic evidence explains somatolactin function. Studying this mutant will provide further insights into the development and regulation of chromatophores and clues for reassessing other functions of somatolactin suggested in other fish. PMID:15249680

  5. Roles of Hoxb5 in the development of vagal and trunk neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Kam, Mandy K M; Lui, Vincent C H

    2015-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NC) are a group of multipotent stem cells uniquely present in vertebrates. They are destined to form various organs according to their anterior-posterior (A-P) levels of origin in the neural tube (NT). They develop into a wide spectrum of cell lineages under the influence of signaling cascades, neural plate border genes and NC specifier genes. Although this complex gene regulatory network (GRN) specifies the fate of NC and the combinatory action of Hox genes executed at the time of NC induction governs the patterning of NC for the formation of specific structures along the A-P axis, not much information on how GRN and Hox genes directly interact and orchestrate is available. This review summarizes recent findings on the multiple roles of Hoxb5 on the survival and cell lineage differentiation of vagal and trunk NC cells during early development, by direct transcriptional regulation of NC specifier genes (Sox9 and Foxd3) of the GRN. We will also review findings on the transcriptional regulation of Ret by Hoxb5 in the population of the vagal NC that are committed to the enteric neuron and glia lineages. Functional redundancy between Hox proteins (Hoxa5 and Hoxc5) from the same paralogue group as Hoxb5, and the cooperative effects of Hox cofactors, collaborators and transcription factors in the Hoxb5 transcriptional regulation of target genes will also be discussed.

  6. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system. PMID:26136659

  7. Fibronectin promotes differentiation of neural crest progenitors endowed with smooth muscle cell potential

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Silva, Bruno; Coelho da Costa, Meline; Melo, Fernanda Rosene; Neves, Cynara Mendes; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Calloni, Giordano Wosgrau; Trentin, Andrea Goncalves

    2009-04-01

    The neural crest (NC) is a model system used to investigate multipotency during vertebrate development. Environmental factors control NC cell fate decisions. Despite the well-known influence of extracellular matrix molecules in NC cell migration, the issue of whether they also influence NC cell differentiation has not been addressed at the single cell level. By analyzing mass and clonal cultures of mouse cephalic and quail trunk NC cells, we show for the first time that fibronectin (FN) promotes differentiation into the smooth muscle cell phenotype without affecting differentiation into glia, neurons, and melanocytes. Time course analysis indicated that the FN-induced effect was not related to massive cell death or proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Finally, by comparing clonal cultures of quail trunk NC cells grown on FN and collagen type IV (CLIV), we found that FN strongly increased both NC cell survival and the proportion of unipotent and oligopotent NC progenitors endowed with smooth muscle potential. In contrast, melanocytic progenitors were prominent in clonogenic NC cells grown on CLIV. Taken together, these results show that FN promotes NC cell differentiation along the smooth muscle lineage, and therefore plays an important role in fate decisions of NC progenitor cells.

  8. Distribution of organochlorine contaminants in double-crested cormorant eggs and sibling embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Stromborg, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    Double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) fresh eggs and sibling embryos at pipping were collected from a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated colony in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA. Egg contents were analyzed for organochlorine (OC) contaminants, including 15 arylhydrocarbon-active PCB congeners. In order to determine the significance of tissue removal on the subsequent estimate of contaminant burden, embryos were decapitated and the heads, yolk sac, liver, fecal sac (allantois), and carcass remainder were analyzed separately. The distribution of contaminant concentration in the embryos was yolk sac > liver > carcass > head > fecal sac. The distribution of contaminant mass in the embryos was yolk sac > carcass > liver > head > fecal sac. For example, mass of total PCBs (TPCB) was yolk sac = 58%, carcass = 31%, liver = 5%, head = 3%, and fecal sac = 1%. Eighteen additional OCs, including 13 PCB congeners, had distribution patterns similar to that of TPCB concentration and mass. Excluding the head of the embryo from the chemical analysis overestimated TPCB concentrations by 15% (16 vs 14 mu g/g). In contrast, excluding the liver from the chemical analysis underestimated TPCB concentration by only 4% (13.5 vs 14 mu g/g). Mean concentrations of OCs were not significantly different between fresh eggs and sibling embryos.

  9. Carpels in Brasenia (Cabombaceae) are Completely Ascidiate Despite a Long Stigmatic Crest

    PubMed Central

    ENDRESS, PETER K.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims The morphological structure of anthetic carpels of Brasenia (Cabombaceae), a member of the phylogenetically basal ANITA grade, has not been studied before. The carpel has a long stigmatic crest on the ventral side and could give the impression of a conduplicate structure. This is in contrast to the carpel structure in other genera of the ANITA grade. Therefore, a study of carpel development and carpel structure at anthesis was carried out. • Methods Carpels of Brasenia schreberi were studied at different developmental stages up to anthesis by means of microtome section series and SEM to analyse and reconstruct the outer and inner carpel morphology. • Key Results Carpels of Brasenia are extremely ascidiate up to anthesis. The elongate stigma originates around the mouth of the young carpel, which is slightly curved toward the centre of the flower. Subsequently, the stigmatic zone below the mouth expands by massive intercalary elongation. • Conclusions In their ascidiate shape, carpels of Brasenia are similar to carpels of Cabomba, the other genus of Cabombaceae, which, in contrast, has a short stigma restricted to the tip of the carpel. Thus, the morphological structure is independent of the extent (and one-sidedness) of the stigma. The outer shape of carpels at anthesis does not allow the inference of the inner morphological surface. If an angiosperm carpel has a one-sided stigma it can be extremely conduplicate or extremely ascidiate. Therefore, caution has to be used in the interpretion of the structure of fossil carpels. PMID:15928008

  10. Early neural crest induction requires an initial inhibition of Wnt signals.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Ben; Mayor, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Neural crest (NC) induction is a long process that continues through gastrula and neurula stages. In order to reveal additional stages of NC induction we performed a series of explants where different known inducing tissues were taken along with the prospective NC. Interestingly the dorso-lateral marginal zone (DLMZ) is only able to promote the expression of a subset of neural plate border (NPB) makers without the presence of specific NC markers. We then analysed the temporal requirement for BMP and Wnt signals for the NPB genes Hairy2a and Dlx5, compared to the expression of neural plate (NP) and NC genes. Although the NP is sensitive to BMP levels at early gastrula stages, Hairy2a/Dlx5 expression is unaffected. Later, the NP becomes insensitive to BMP levels at late gastrulation when NC markers require an inhibition. The NP requires an inhibition of Wnt signals prior to gastrulation, but becomes insensitive during early gastrula stages when Hairy2a/Dlx5 requires an inhibition of Wnt signalling. An increase in Wnt signalling is then important for the switch from NPB to NC at late gastrula stages. In addition to revealing an additional distinct signalling event in NC induction, this work emphasizes the importance of integrating both timing and levels of signalling activity during the patterning of complex tissues such as the vertebrate ectoderm.

  11. The anomalous canal between two accessory foramina on the mandibular ramus: the temporal crest canal

    PubMed Central

    Han, S-S; Hwang, J-J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The temporal crest canal (TCC) is a variation of the bony canal with two accessory foramina that correspond to an entrance and an exit on the mandibular ramus. This study investigated the anatomical characteristics of the TCC using CBCT. Methods: The study population consisted 446 patients who had undergone CBCT. Sagittal, cross-sectional and three-dimensional images were evaluated for the presence of a TCC. The canals were classified into two types according to the configuration, and the location of the posterior accessory foramen of the TCC was also recorded. Results: 6 TCCs were present in 4 of 446 patients (0.90% of the total population). All of the TCCs were observed in males, and all of the posterior foramina were located superior to the mandibular foramina on the medial aspect of the mandibular ramus. There were five noticeably curved and increasingly narrow canals (Type 1) and one slightly curved and uniformly wide canal (Type 2). Conclusions: Precise knowledge of the TCC is clinically important for suitable local anaesthetic nerve block and the planning of surgical procedures that involve the mandibular ramus. Three-dimensional images of CBCT data are particularly effective for confirming the presence of this variation. PMID:24959708

  12. Roles of collagen and periostin expression by cranial neural crest cells during soft palate development.

    PubMed

    Oka, Kyoko; Honda, Masaki J; Tsuruga, Eichi; Hatakeyama, Yuji; Isokawa, Keitaro; Sawa, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    The tissue in the palatal region can be divided into the hard and the soft palates, each having a specialized function such as occlusion, speech, or swallowing. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of palatogenesis in relation to the function of each region is important. However, in comparison with the hard palate, there is still a lack of information about the mechanisms of soft palate development. In this study, the authors investigated the contribution of cranial neural crest (CNC) cells to development of both hard and soft palates. They also demonstrated a unique pattern of periostin expression during soft palate development, which was closely related to that of collagen type I (Col I) in palatine aponeurosis. Furthermore, organ culture analysis showed that exogenous transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induced the expression of both periostin and Col I. These novel patterns of expression in the extracellular matrix (ECM) induced by CNC cells suggest that these cells may help to determine the character of both the hard and soft palates through ECM induction. TGF-β signaling appears to be one of the mediators of Col I and periostin expression in the formation of functional structures during soft palate development.

  13. A predictive model to inform adaptive management of double-crested cormorants and fisheries in Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsehaye, Iyob; Jones, Michael L.; Irwin, Brian J.; Fielder, David G.; Breck, James E.; Luukkonen, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of double-crested cormorants (DCCOs; Phalacrocorax auritus) in North America has raised concerns over their potential negative impacts on game, cultured and forage fishes, island and terrestrial resources, and other colonial water birds, leading to increased public demands to reduce their abundance. By combining fish surplus production and bird functional feeding response models, we developed a deterministic predictive model representing bird–fish interactions to inform an adaptive management process for the control of DCCOs in multiple colonies in Michigan. Comparisons of model predictions with observations of changes in DCCO numbers under management measures implemented from 2004 to 2012 suggested that our relatively simple model was able to accurately reconstruct past DCCO population dynamics. These comparisons helped discriminate among alternative parameterizations of demographic processes that were poorly known, especially site fidelity. Using sensitivity analysis, we also identified remaining critical uncertainties (mainly in the spatial distributions of fish vs. DCCO feeding areas) that can be used to prioritize future research and monitoring needs. Model forecasts suggested that continuation of existing control efforts would be sufficient to achieve long-term DCCO control targets in Michigan and that DCCO control may be necessary to achieve management goals for some DCCO-impacted fisheries in the state. Finally, our model can be extended by accounting for parametric or ecological uncertainty and including more complex assumptions on DCCO–fish interactions as part of the adaptive management process.

  14. Numbers and distribution of double-crested cormorants on the upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirsch, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Historic records indicate that Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) were common breeders and abundant during migration on the Upper Mississippi River from St. Paul, Minnesota, to St. Louis, Missouri, during the 1940s and 1950s. Their numbers declined in the mid-to late-1950s, remained low through the 1970s, and began to increase somewhat in the late 1980s. Aerial surveys of migrating cormorants and ground surveys at cormorant colonies during 1991-1993, indicate that numbers have not returned to historic levels. Only 500-2,000 cormorants were seen during spring migration 1992-1993; and 5,000-7,000 during fall migration 1991-1992; whereas, tens of thousands were reported in the 1940s and 1950s. Four hundred ninety-six nests were counted at 4 colonies in 1992, and 545 nests were counted in 9 colonies in 1993; whereas, during the 1940s and 1950s, about 2,500 birds were reported nesting in 4 locations. Pools 6 and 13 have always attracted breeding and migrating cormorants, currently attract the largest numbers of cormorants during migration, and still support breeding colonies.

  15. Vangl-dependent planar cell polarity signalling is not required for neural crest migration in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Sophie E.; Massa, Valentina; Savery, Dawn; Andre, Philipp; Yang, Yingzi; Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling in neural crest (NC) development is unclear. The PCP dependence of NC cell migration has been reported in Xenopus and zebrafish, but NC migration has not been studied in mammalian PCP mutants. Vangl2Lp/Lp mouse embryos lack PCP signalling and undergo almost complete failure of neural tube closure. Here we show, however, that NC specification, migration and derivative formation occur normally in Vangl2Lp/Lp embryos. The gene family member Vangl1 was not expressed in NC nor ectopically expressed in Vangl2Lp/Lp embryos, and doubly homozygous Vangl1/Vangl2 mutants exhibited normal NC migration. Acute downregulation of Vangl2 in the NC lineage did not prevent NC migration. In vitro, Vangl2Lp/Lp neural tube explants generated emigrating NC cells, as in wild type. Hence, PCP signalling is not essential for NC migration in mammals, in contrast to its essential role in neural tube closure. PCP mutations are thus unlikely to mediate NC-related birth defects in humans. PMID:25038043

  16. CREST modelling of PBX 9502 corner turning experiments at different initial temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, N. J.

    2014-05-01

    Corner turning is an important problem in regard to detonation wave propagation in TATB-based explosives. Experimentally, a sudden change in the direction of the propagating wave, such as turning a sharp corner, can result in dead-zones being left behind in the corner turn region, with the observed behaviour being particularly sensitive to the initial temperature of the explosive. In this paper, the entropy-dependent CREST reactive burn model is used to simulate corner turning experiments on the TATB-based explosive PBX 9502. Calculated results of double cylinder tests at three different initial temperatures (-54°C, ~23°C, and 75°C), and a "hockey puck" experiment at ambient temperature, are compared to the corresponding test measurements. The results show that the model is able to: (i) calculate persistent dead-zones in PBX 9502 without recourse to any shock desensitisation treatment, and (ii) predict changes in corner turning behaviour with initial temperature using one set of coefficients.

  17. CREST Modelling of PBX 9502 Corner Turning Experiments at Different Initial Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    Corner turning is an important problem in regard to detonation wave propagation in TATB-based explosives. Experimentally, a sudden change in direction of the propagating wave, such as turning a sharp corner, can result in dead-zones being left behind in the corner turn region, with the observed behaviour being particularly sensitive to the initial temperature of the explosive. In this paper, the entropy-dependent CREST reactive burn model is used to simulate corner turning experiments on the TATB-based explosive PBX 9502. Calculated results of double cylinder tests at three different initial temperatures (-54°C, 25°C, and 75°C), and a ``hockey puck'' experiment at ambient temperature, are compared to the corresponding test measurements. The results show that the model is able to: (i) calculate persistent dead-zones in PBX 9502 without recourse to any shock desensitisation treatment, and (ii) predict changes in corner turning behaviour with initial temperature using one set of coefficients.

  18. Myxofibroma of the maxilla. Reconstruction with iliac crest graft and dental implants after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Martínez-de-Fuentes, Rafael; García-Perla-García, Alberto; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes

    2011-07-01

    Odontogenic fibromyxomas are benign odontogenic tumors of mesenchymal origin of rare presentation in the oral cavity, which exhibit locally aggressive behavior and are prone to local recurrence. The controversy has mainly been on therapeutic management with recommendations varying, depending on the clinical cases, from simple curettage of lesion to segmental bone resection. We present a case report describing the reconstruction of an osseous defect in the maxilla and the restoration with dental implants in a 32 year old female patient after radical surgical excision due to an odontogenic fibromyxoma with locally aggressive behavior. The primary reconstruction of maxillary discontinuity defect was carried out by an immediate non-vascularized cortico-cancellous iliac crest graft. Using a computer-guided system for the implant treatment-planning, three dental implants were secondary placed in the bone graft by means of flapless implant surgery. The patient was subsequently restored with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis that has remained in continuous function for a period of three years. The surgical, reconstructive and restorative treatment sequence and techniques are discussed.

  19. Distribution of organochlorine contaminants in double-crested cormorant eggs and sibling embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, C.M.; Stromborg, K.L.

    1997-08-01

    Double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) fresh eggs and sibling embryos at pipping were collected from a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated colony in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA. Egg contents were analyzed for organochlorine (OC) contaminants, including 15 arylhydrocarbon-active PCB congeners. In order to determine the significance of tissue removal on the subsequent estimate of contaminant burden, embryos were decapitated and the heads, yolk sac, liver, fecal sac, and carcass remainder were analyzed separately. The distribution of contaminant concentration in the embryos was yolk sac > liver > carcass > head > fecal sac. The distribution of contaminant mass in the embryos was yolk sac > carcass > liver > head > fecal sac. For example, mass of total PCBs (TPCB) was yolk sac = 58%, carcass = 31%, liver = 5%, head = 3%, and fecal sac = 1%. Eighteen additional OCs, including 13 PCB congeners, had distribution patterns similar to that of TPCB concentration and mass. Excluding the head of the embryo from the chemical analysis overestimated TPCB concentrations by 15%. In contrast, excluding the liver from the chemical analysis underestimated TPCB concentration by only 4%. Mean concentrations of OCs were not significantly different between fresh eggs and sibling embryos.

  20. The 1992 epizootic of Newcastle disease in double-crested cormorants in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glaser, L.C.; Barker, I.K.; Weseloh, D.V.C.; Ludwig, J.; Windingstad, R.M.; Key, D.W.; Bollinger, T.K.

    1999-01-01

    In the summer of 1992, morbidity and mortality in juvenile double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus; DCC) attributable to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was observed for the first time in seven northern USA states and one Canadian province, and recurred in three western Canadian provinces. Based on clinical signs and laboratory diagnostic findings, DCC mortality from NDV occurred in 59 of the 63 nesting colonies and two of three non-colony sites investigated. An estimate of in excess of 20,000 DCC died, with mortality rates ranging from < 1 to 37% in Great Lakes colonies to 20 to 92% in Minnesota (USA) and North and South Dakota (USA) colonies. Sick juvenile white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) exhibiting signs similar to sick cormorants, and dead pelicans were observed in Minnesota and North Dakota. Mortality rates in pelican colonies were as high as in the adjacent cormorant colonies, but no cause for the mortality of an estimated 5,000 pelicans was determined. No evidence of NDV was found in other species nesting in proximity to affected cormorants. Although the source of the NDV infection is unknown in cormorants, the simultaneous onset of the epizootics in juvenile birds over a wide geographic area implies that the virus was acquired by adults prior to migration and was carried back to nest sites, exposing susceptible nestlings. The possible transmission of this virus from free-ranging wild birds to domestic poultry is a concern. Based on repeated epizootics in cormorants since 1990, NDV seems to be established in DCC.

  1. Immune function, sex ratios, and gonadal histopathology in double-crested cormorant chicks

    SciTech Connect

    Burull, E.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Sileo, L.; Dale, T.; Allen, P.D.; Stromborg, K.L.; Larson, J.X.; Fry, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    There is evidence that environmental contaminants may be associated with endocrine and reproductive system abnormalities in colonial water birds. Little information is available on immune system response in chicks. Two double-crested cormorant (Phalocrocrozax auritus) colonies were monitored in 1993 for a comparative immune function study. Higher concentrations of organochlorines occurred in one colony. Parameters measured included: CBC, T and B-cell function, heterophil phagocytosis, lymphoid organ size and histopathology, and selected serum hormone analysis. Significant differences at the contaminated site included marked dysplasia and hypertrophy of thyroid gland, higher T3, lower cortisol, lower eosinophil counts, and increase phagocytosis at the contaminated site. Gonads of 101 deformed (cross-bill) chicks, siblings, and normal control chicks collected in 1992 and 1993 were examined microscopically because a sex-ration skewed towards females had been noted. Cross-billed chicks aged 12 to 15 days had disorganized or delayed follicular development which normalized by 20 days of age. Cross-billed or otherwise abnormal chicks aged 18 to 23 days had hypertrophic seminiferous tubules, a decreased interstitium, and decreased evidence of active Leydig cells.

  2. Daily foraging patterns of adult Double-crested Cormorants during the breeding season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, J.T.H.; Richmond, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    We recorded the daily presence of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) at the nesting island on Oneida Lake, New York, by monitoring the activities of 15 radio-tagged adults from July through September, 2000, using an automated data-logging receiver. A total of 24,464 acceptable detections was obtained for adult cormorants actively attempting to nest on the lake. Tagged cormorants had a bimodal dally activity pattern during the first month, with the fewest birds detected on the island at 09.00 h and 15.00 h Eastern daylight time. The pattern of activity appeared to change slightly in the second month of the study, representative of a post-breeding period for the colony, with a shift from a less synchronous pattern of departures to a greater focus on morning activity also centered around 09.30 h. These results correspond with daily observations of Great Cormorant (P. carbo) foraging activities reported for colonies in Africa and Poland. The data also support the possibility of nocturnal foraging activity, not previously reported for this species on their summer breeding grounds. No correlation was found between total number of daily detections and climatalogical factors or events.

  3. Development of methods for avian oil toxicity studies using the double crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus).

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Fred; Dean, Karen; Hanson-Dorr, Katie; Harr, Kendal; Healy, Kate; Horak, Katherine; Link, Jane; Shriner, Susan; Bursian, Steven; Dorr, Brian

    2017-03-24

    Oral and external dosing methods replicating field exposure were developed using the double crested cormorant (DCCO) to test the toxicity of artificially weathered Deepwater Horizon Mississippi Canyon 252 oil. The majority of previous oil dosing studies conducted on wild-caught birds used gavage methods to dose birds with oil and determine toxicity. However, rapid gut transit time of gavaged oil likely reduces oil absorption. In the present studies, dosing relied on injection of oil into live feeder fish for oral dosing of these piscivorous birds, or applying oil to body contour feathers resulting in transdermal oil exposure and oral exposure through preening. Both oral and external oil dosing studies identified oil-related toxicity endpoints associated with oxidative stress such as hemolytic anemia, liver and kidney damage, and immuno-modulation or compromise. External oil application allowed for controlled study of thermoregulatory stress as well. Infrared thermal images indicated significantly greater surface temperatures and heat loss in treated birds following external oil applications; however, measurements collected by coelomically implanted temperature transmitters showed that internal body temperatures were stable over the course of the study period. Birds exposed to oil externally consumed more fish than control birds, indicating metabolic compensation for thermal stress. Conversely, birds orally dosed with oil experienced hypothermia and consumed less fish compared to control birds.

  4. Numbers and distribution of Double-crested Cormorants on the upper Mississippi river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirsch, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Historic records indicate that Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) were common breeders and abundant during migration on the Upper Mississippi River from St. Paul, Minnesota, to St. Louis, Missouri, during the 1940s and 1950s. Their numbers declined in the mid- to late-1950s, remained low through the 1970s, and began to increase somewhat in the late 1980s. Aerial surveys of migrating cormorants and ground surveys at cormorant colonies during 1991-1993, indicate that numbers have not returned to historic levels. Only 500-2,000 cormorants were seen during spring migration 1992-1993; and 5,000-7,000 during fall migration 1991-1992; whereas, tens of thousands were reported in the 1940s and 1950s. Four hundred ninety-six nests were counted at 4 colonies in 1992, and 545 nests were counted in 9 colonies in 1993; whereas, during the 1940s and 1950s, about 2,500 birds were reported nesting in 4 locations. Pools 6 and 13 have always attracted breeding and migrating cormorants, currently attract the largest numbers of cormorants during migration, and still support breeding colonies.

  5. Immunohistochemical and morphological features of a small bowel leiomyoma in a black crested macaque (Macaca nigra)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spontaneous gastrointestinal neoplasms in non-human primates are commonly seen in aged individuals. Due to genetic similarities between human and non-human primates, scientists have shown increasing interest in terms of comparative oncology studies. Case presentation The present study is related to a case of an intestinal leiomyoma in a black crested macaque (Macaca nigra), kept on captivity by Matecaña Zoo, Pereira City, Colombia. The animal had abdominal distension, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and behavioral changes. Clinical examination showed an increased volume in the upper right abdominal quadrant caused by a neoplastic mass. The patient died during the surgical procedure. Necropsy revealed several small nodules in the peritoneum with adhesion to different portions of the small and large intestines, liver, stomach and diaphragm. Tissue samples were collected, routinely processed and stained by H&E. Microscopic examination revealed a mesenchymal tumor limited to tunica muscularis, resembling normal smooth muscle cells. Neoplastic cells were positive for alpha-smooth muscle actin and vimentin, and negative for cytokeratin AE1/AE3 by immunohistochemistry. Those morphological and immunohistochemical findings allowed to diagnose the intestinal leiomyoma referred above. Conclusion Neoplastic diseases in primates have multifaceted causes. Their manifestations are understudied, leading to a greater difficulty in detection and measurement of the real impact provides by this disease. PMID:22747606

  6. Polychlorinated biphenyl residues and egg mortality in double-crested cormorants from the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, D.E.; Ankley, G.T.; Giesy, J.P.; Ludwig, J.P.; Kurita-Matsuba, H.; Weseloh, D.V.; Ross, P.S.; Bishop, C.A.; Sileo, L.; Stromborg, K.L.; Larson, J.; Kubiak, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the overall potency of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-containing extracts from double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritis) eggs with an in vitro bioassay system, the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay. Results from the H4IIE bioassay were strongly correlated with the hatching success of eggs in the colonies, whereas conventional methods of PCB analysis correlated poorly with hatching success of eggs from the same colonies. These observations suggest that even though concentrations of total PCB residues have declined in almost all compartments of the environment, their effects are still being observed. The significance of this observation is that the adverse symptoms presently observed in certain Great Lakes fish-eating waterbird populations do not appear to be caused by some as yet unidentified industrial chemical or chemicals and seem not to be the result of pesticides, but rather to the dioxin-like activity of PCBs. Evidence is presented to suggest that the relative enrichment of the potency of PCBs in the environment may play a role in the persistence of the observed adverse symptoms.

  7. A zebrafish melanoma model reveals emergence of neural crest identity during melanoma initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Charles K.; Mosimann, Christian; Fan, Zi Peng; Yang, Song; Thomas, Andrew; Ablain, Julien; Tan, Justin L.; Fogley, Rachel D.; van Rooijen, Ellen; Hagedorn, Elliott; Ciarlo, Christie; White, Richard; Matos, Dominick; Puller, Ann-Christin; Santoriello, Cristina; Liao, Eric; Young, Richard A.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2016-01-01

    The “cancerized field” concept posits that cells in a given tissue share an oncogenic mutation or insult and are thus cancer-prone, yet only discreet clones within the field initiate tumors. Nearly all benign nevi carry oncogenic BRAFV600E mutations, but they only rarely become melanoma. The zebrafish crestin gene is expressed embryonically in neural crest progenitors (NCP’s) and is specifically re-expressed in melanoma. We show by live imaging of transgenic zebrafish crestin reporters that, within a cancerized field (BRAFV600E-mutant; p53-deficient), a single melanocyte reactivates the NCP state, and this establishes that a fate change occurs at melanoma initiation in this model. We show the crestin element is regulated by NCP transcription factors, including sox10. Forced sox10 overexpression in melanocytes accelerated melanoma formation, consistent with activation of a NCP gene signature and super-enhancers leading to melanoma. Our work highlights the importance of NCP state reemergence as a key event in melanoma initiation. PMID:26823433

  8. CRES-T, an effective gene silencing system utilizing chimeric repressors.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Matsui, Kyoko; Ikeda, Miho; Nakata, Masaru; Oshima, Yoshimi; Nagatoshi, Yukari; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Chimeric REpressor gene Silencing Technology (CRES-T) is a useful tool for functional analysis of plant transcription factors. In this system, a chimeric repressor that is produced by fusion of a transcription factor to the plant-specific EAR-motif repression domain (SRDX) suppresses target genes of a transcription factor dominantly over the activity of endogenous and functionally redundant transcription factors. As a result, the transgenic plants that express a chimeric repressor exhibit phenotypes similar to loss-of-function of the alleles of the gene encoding the transcription factor. This system is simple and effective and can be used as a powerful tool not only for functional analysis of redundant transcription factors but also for the manipulation of plant traits by active suppression of the gene expression. Strategies for construction of the chimeric repressors and their expression in transgenic plants are described. Transient effector-reporter assays for functional analysis of transcription factors and detection of protein-protein interactions using the trans-repressive activity of SRDX repression domain are also described.

  9. Crest-stage gaging stations in Oregon: a compilation of peak data collected from October 1952 to September 1974

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friday, John

    1974-01-01

    A crest-stage gaging station provides an excellent means for determining peak water-surface elevations at a selected location on a stream channel. When related to streamflow, these data provide hydrologists with a knowledge of the flood experience of a drainage basin. If an adequate flood history is known, it is possible to estimate the probable magnitude and frequency of floods likely to occur in that basin, and this information is a valuable asset to anyone who must estimate design floods at proposed drainage structures. However, most design problems involve estimating peak flows on ungaged streams. This is difficult because the rate of storm runoff is not the same in all basins due to the influence of various basin characteristics which can either assist or retard the runoff. The crest-stage gaging program in Oregon is designed to provide a representative sampliing of peak flows at basins having a wide range in characteristics. Then, after sufficient data are collected, a statistical analysis can be made which will provide a means for estimating design floods at ungaged sites on the basis of known basin characteristics.This report is one of a series presenting a compilation of peak data collected at 232 crest-stage gaging stations in Oregon. The collection and publication of these data are made possible through mutual funding by State and Federal agencies. The Geological Survey, the Oregon State Highway Commission, the Federal Highway Administration, and the Bureau of Land Management are currently supporting 160 active crest-stage stations in Oregon.

  10. Negative effect of Hox gene expression on the development of the neural crest-derived facial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Creuzet, Sophie; Couly, Gérard; Vincent, Christine; Le Douarin, Nicole M

    2002-09-01

    Diencephalic, mesencephalic and metencephalic neural crest cells are skeletogenic and derive from neural folds that do not express Hox genes. In order to examine the influence of Hox gene expression on skull morphogenesis, expression of Hoxa2, Hoxa3 and Hoxb4 in conjunction with that of the green fluorescent protein has been selectively targeted to the Hox-negative neural folds of the avian embryo prior to the onset of crest cell emigration. Hoxa2 expression precludes the development of the entire facial skeleton. Transgenic Hoxa2 embryos such as those from which the Hox-negative domain of the cephalic neural crest has been removed have no upper or lower jaws and no frontonasal structures. Embryos subjected to the forced expression of Hoxa3 and Hoxb4 show severe defects in the facial skeleton but not a complete absence of facial cartilage. Hoxa3 prevents the formation of the skeleton derived from the first branchial arch, but allows the development (albeit reduced) of the nasal septum. Hoxb4, by contrast, hampers the formation of the nasal bud-derived skeleton, while allowing that of a proximal (but not distal) segment of the lower jaw. The combined effect of Hoxa3 and Hoxb4 prevents the formation of facial skeletal structures, comparable with Hoxa2. None of these genes impairs the formation of neural derivatives of the crest. These results suggest that over the course of evolution, the absence of Hox gene expression in the anterior part of the chordate embryo was crucial in the vertebrate phylum for the development of a face, jaws and brain case, and, hence, also for that of the forebrain.

  11. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew J; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-05-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  12. Double-crested Cormorant Management Plan to Reduce Predation of Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    techniques (setting up decoys and broadcasting audio playback of bird calls to encourage nesting) were tested within and outside the Columbia River...Supplemental Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion called for the Corps to “…develop a cormorant management plan (including...Double-crested Cormorants Satellite-tagged on East Sand Island within the Affected Environment. #of Birds Act ive+ t hat %of Birds #of %of Active

  13. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  14. Winter and summer home ranges and core use areas of double-crested cormorants captured near aquaculture facilities in the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Migration patterns of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) wintering in the southeastern United States are poorly understood. Movement data was analyzed from 28 cormorants captured in Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi and equipped with satellite transmitters. Four (3 immatur...

  15. Local time, seasonal, and solar cycle dependency of longitudinal variations of TEC along the crest of EIA over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunda, Surendra; Vyas, B. M.

    2013-10-01

    global wave number 4 structure in the Indian longitudinal region spanning from ~70 to 95°E forming the upward slope of the peak in the total electron content (TEC) are reported along the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The continuous and simultaneous measurements from five GPS stations of GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) network are used in this study. The long-term database (2004-2012) is utilized for examining the local time, seasonal, and solar cycle dependency on the longitudinal variations of TEC. Our results confirm the existence of longitudinal variations of TEC in accordance with wave number 4 longitudinal structure including its strength. The results suggest that these variations, in general, start to develop at ~09 LT, achieve maximum strength at 12-15 LT, and decay thereafter, the decay rate depending on the season. They are more pronounced in equinoctial season followed by summer and winter. The longitudinal variations persist beyond midnight in equinox seasons, whereas in winter, they are conspicuously absent. Interestingly, they also exhibit significant solar cycle dependence in the solstices, whereas in the equinoxes, they are independent of solar activity. The comparison of crest-to-trough ratio (CTR) in the eastern (92°E) and western (72°E) extreme longitudes reveals higher CTR on the eastern side than over the western extreme, suggesting the role of nonmigrating tides in modulating the ExB vertical drift and the consequential EIA crest formation.

  16. Hematocrit and plasma chemistry values in adult collared scops owls (Otus lettia) and crested serpent eagles (Spilornis cheela hoya).

    PubMed

    Chan, Fang-Tse; Lin, Pei-I; Chang, Geng-Ruei; Wang, Hsien-Chi; Hsu, Tien-Huan

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we report hematocrit and plasma chemistry values for adult captive collared scops owls (Otus lettia) and crested serpent eagles (Spilornis cheela hoya). In particular, we address the gender-specific differences within these values. We measured hematocrit (HCT) and plasma chemistry values for uric acid (UA), plasma urea nitrogen (BUN), total protein (TP), albumin (ALB), glucose (GLU), cholesterol (CHO), triglyceride (TG), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin (TBIL), creatine (CRE), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), amylase (AMY), calcium (CA), ionic phosphorous (IP) and sodium (NA), potassium (K) and chloride ions (CL) in 37 adult captive collared scops owls and 39 adult captive crested serpent eagles. Significant differences between the sexes were found for UA, GLU and CPK in the collared scope owls. UA and GLU concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.01 and P<0.05) among males than females, while the CPK concentration was significantly lower (P<0.05) in males. There were no significant differences in of all of the measured parameters between male and female eagles. These finding suggested that HCT and plasma chemistry values of raptors vary individually according to species and sex. Our results provide the 1st available reference data for ranges of plasma values in adult captive collared scops owls and crested serpent eagles, making them a potentially useful complementary diagnostic tool for veterinary care of individuals for both species in captivity.

  17. Improving the accuracy of mandibular reconstruction with vascularized iliac crest flap: Role of computer-assisted techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Bo; Yu, Yao; Wang, Yang; Mao, Chi; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Guo, Chuan-Bin; Yu, Guang-Yan; Peng, Xin

    2016-11-01

    While vascularized iliac crest flap is widely used for mandibular reconstruction, it is often challenging to predict the clinical outcome in a conventional operation based solely on the surgeon's experience. Herein, we aimed to improve this procedure by using computer-assisted techniques. We retrospectively reviewed records of 45 patients with mandibular tumor who underwent mandibulectomy and reconstruction with vascularized iliac crest flap from January 2008 to June 2015. Computer-assisted techniques including virtual plan, stereomodel, pre-bending individual reconstruction plate, and surgical navigation were used in 15 patients. The other 30 patients underwent conventional surgery based on the surgeon's experience. Condyle position and reconstructed mandible contour were evaluated based on post-operative computed tomography. Complications were also evaluated during the follow-up. Flap success rate of the patients was 95.6% (43/45). Those in the computer-assisted group presented with better outcomes of the mandibular contour (p = 0.001) and condyle position (p = 0.026). Further, they also experienced beneficial dental restoration (p = 0.011) and postoperative appearance (p = 0.028). The difference between postoperative effect and virtual plan was within the acceptable error margin. There is no significant difference in the incidence of post-operative complications. Thus, computer-assisted techniques can improve the clinical outcomes of mandibular reconstruction with vascularized iliac crest flap.

  18. Levee crest elevation profiles derived from airborne lidar-based high resolution digital elevation models in south Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Thatcher, Cindy A.; Barras, John A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the feasibility of using airborne lidar surveys to construct high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) and develop an automated procedure to extract levee longitudinal elevation profiles for both federal levees in Atchafalaya Basin and local levees in Lafourche Parish, south Lousiana. This approach can successfully accommodate a high degree of levee sinuosity and abrupt changes in levee orientation (direction) in planar coordinates, variations in levee geometries, and differing DEM resolutions. The federal levees investigated in Atchafalaya Basin have crest elevations between 5.3 and 12 m while the local counterparts in Lafourche Parish are between 0.76 and 2.3 m. The vertical uncertainty in the elevation data is considered when assessing federal crest elevation against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers minimum height requirements to withstand the 100-year flood. Only approximately 5% of the crest points of the two federal levees investigated in the Atchafalaya Basin region met this requirement.

  19. ACUTE TEARING OF THE OBLIQUE ABDOMINAL WALL INSERTION ONTO THE ILIAC CREST IN AN AUSTRALIAN FOOTBALL PLAYER: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Stockden, Marshall; Breidahl, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Background Tears of the abdominal obliques have previously been reported in the vicinity of the lower ribs but they have not been reported in the vicinity of the iliac crest. The purpose of this case report is to describe the mechanism of injury and diagnosis of a distal abdominal oblique tear and subsequent rehabilitation programming. Case Description A 21-year-old male Australian football player experienced acute right-sided abdominal pain during a game while performing a commonly executed rotation skill. He was assessed clinically before being further examined with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging which revealed a rupture of the abdominal oblique wall at its insertion onto the iliac crest. The player then underwent a structured and graduated rehabilitation program with clear key performance indicators to optimize return to play and prevent recurrence. Outcomes The player was able to return to play at 35 days post injury and had no recurrence or complications at 12 month follow up post injury. Discussion This is the first time an abdominal oblique wall rupture at its insertion onto the iliac crest has been reported. In players with acute abdominal pain following twisting an insertional oblique tear should be considered as a differential diagnosis. A structured rehabilitation program may also help optimize an athlete's return to play after distal abdominal oblique rupture. PMID:27999726

  20. Morphologic and molecular identifications of digenetic trematodes in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) from the Mississippi Delta, USA.

    PubMed

    O'Hear, Mary; Pote, Linda; Yost, Marlena; Doffitt, Cynthia; King, Tommy; Panuska, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in the Mississippi River Delta, USA, have been observed over the past few decades. This piscivorous bird is a definitive host for numerous digenetic trematodes, some of which may cause pathology in a fish host. We conducted a 2-yr survey of intestinal trematodes in 35 Double-crested Cormorants collected in the Mississippi Delta. We counted gastrointestinal trematodes, identified them to species using morphometric and molecular techniques, and sequenced the 18S and cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes. We collected 4,909 trematodes, representing five digenetic species: Drepanocephalus spathans, Hysteromorpha triloba, Pseudopsilostoma varium, Austrodiplostomum ostrowskiae, and Ascocotyle longa. The most prevalent trematode of the Double-crested Cormorants was D. spathans (91%), followed by H. triloba (78%), P. varium (74%), A. ostrowskiae (57%), and A. longa (29%). Among these, the life cycles are only known for H. triloba and A. longa. Novel DNA sequences of the COI gene were obtained for D. spathans, A. ostrowskiae, P. varium, and A. longa adults. Using these DNA sequences, the identification and confirmation of the larval stages of these parasites in the fish and snail hosts will be possible.

  1. Modified Iliac Crest Reconstruction with Bone Cement for Reduction of Donor Site Pain and Morbidity after Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seong; Park, Yong Jee; Wang, Lih; Chang, Yong Suk; Shetty, Gautam M.; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was to determine the efficacy of iliac crest reconstruction using bone cement in reducing pain and morbidity at the donor site in patients undergoing open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) with tricortical iliac crest autologous graft. Materials and Methods Thirty-three patients who underwent iliac crest reconstruction using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement (group A) and thirty patients who had no iliac crest reconstruction (group B) were enrolled in this study. All patients were evaluated for pain and functional disability related to graft harvesting using the pain and functional visual analogue scale (VAS) score during hospital stay and at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Results There was significant difference between the two groups in terms of pain and function. The pain VAS score was significantly lower in group A than group B during the first 2 weeks postoperatively (p=0.04) and the functional VAS score was also significantly lower in group A during the first 2 weeks postoperatively (p<0.001) in terms of breathing, sitting up from the supine position, and standing up with crutches from the sitting position. Conclusions Iliac crest donor site reconstruction using PMMA bone cement in patients undergoing OWHTO significantly decreased pain and improved function during the first 2 weeks postoperatively when compared to patients who underwent OWHTO without iliac crest reconstruction. PMID:27894174

  2. Cloning and characterization of a novel stress-responsive WRKY transcription factor gene (MusaWRKY71) from Musa spp. cv. Karibale Monthan (ABB group) using transformed banana cells.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Upendra K Singh; Ganapathi, Thumballi R; Srinivas, Lingam

    2011-08-01

    WRKY transcription factor proteins play significant roles in plant stress responses. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a novel WRKY gene, MusaWRKY71 isolated from an edible banana cultivar Musa spp. Karibale Monthan (ABB group). MusaWRKY71, initially identified using in silico approaches from an abiotic stress-related EST library, was later extended towards the 3' end using rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique. The 1299-bp long cDNA of MusaWRKY71 encodes a protein with 280 amino acids and contains a characteristic WRKY domain in the C-terminal half. Although MusaWRKY71 shares good similarity with other monocot WRKY proteins the substantial size difference makes it a unique member of the WRKY family in higher plants. The 918-bp long 5' proximal region determined using thermal asymmetric interlaced-polymerase chain reaction has many putative cis-acting elements and transcription factor binding motifs. Subcellular localization assay of MusaWRKY71 performed using a GFP-fusion platform confirmed its nuclear targeting in transformed banana suspension cells. Importantly, MusaWRKY71 expression in banana plantlets was up-regulated manifold by cold, dehydration, salt, ABA, H2O2, ethylene, salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate treatment indicating its involvement in response to a variety of stress conditions in banana. Further, transient overexpression of MusaWRKY71 in transformed banana cells led to the induction of several genes, homologues of which have been proven to be involved in diverse stress responses in other important plants. The present study is the first report on characterization of a banana stress-related transcription factor using transformed banana cells.

  3. Fish losses to double-crested cormorant predation in Eastern Lake Ontario, 1992-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Robert M.; Johnson, James H.

    1999-01-01

    We examined 4,848 regurgitated digestive pellets of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) over a 6-year period (1992–97) to estimate annual predation on sport and other fishes in the eastern basin of Lake Ontario. We found more than 51,000 fish of 28 species. Using a model that incorporates annual colony nest counts; fledgling production rates; adult, immature, and young-of-year residence times (seasonal); estimates of mean number of fish per pellet and mean fish size; and a fecal pathway correction factor (4.0 percent), we estimate total annual number of fish consumed by cormorants in the eastern basin of Lake Ontario to range from 37 million to 128 million fish for 1993–97. This fish loss equates to an estimated 0.93 million to 3.21 million kg (mean 2.07 million kg) of fish consumed per year, principally alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus, 42.3 percent) and yellow perch (Perca flavescens, 18.4 percent). Forage fish (alewife, cyprinids, trout-perch [Percopsis omiscomaycus], and other minor components) accounted for 65 percent of the diet, and panfish contributed 34 percent of the diet for the 5-year period. Game fish were minor components of the diet, in view of an average estimated annual consumption of 900,000 smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui, 1.1 percent) and 168,000 salmonines (mostly lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, 0.2 percent). Cormorant predation on lake trout fingerlings stocked in May 1993 and June 1994 was estimated through the use of coded wire tag recoveries from pellets collected on Little Galloo Island 1 and 4 days after stocking events. We estimated losses of 13.6 percent and 8.8 percent, respectively, of the fish stocked for the two events, an average of 11.2 percent. Such losses may be reduced through alteration of existing stocking practices.

  4. Modeling the Flushing Response to the Construction of a Low Crested Weir in the Banana River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberi, A.; Weaver, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The ADCIRC hydrodynamic model coupled with a Lagrangian Particle Tracking Model (LPTM) is applied to study circulation in the Banana River. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which constructing a low crested weir adjacent to Port Canaveral can improve flushing in this region. The Banana River a 50 km long sub-basin of the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), located on the central-east coast of Florida in Brevard County between Cape Canaveral and Merritt Island. Although Banana River has an outlet to the ocean through the Port Canaveral locks, the locks remain closed when there is no passing vessel resulting in limited circulation, long flushing time and poor water quality. Recent high mortality events of different species, e.g. dolphins, manatees and pelicans in the lagoon ecosystem, can be linked to the decline in the water quality. ADCIRC is used to simulate the hydrodynamic properties of the study area and determine the 2D depth-averaged velocity field for two separate cases: one with only tidal and another with both tidal and meteorological forces considered. Simulations are run, first to establish the baseline hydrodynamics of the unmodified system, and then to predict the effects of modifying the domain. Passive particles are placed in the Banana River portion of our domain, and the movement of these particles is tracked using LPTM for both cases. Flushing and residence time are then computed. Results indicate an improvement in flushing in both the Banana River and the central Indian River Lagoon, driven by an induced southerly current. In the portion of the Banana River to the south of the port complex, tidal flushing time is significantly reduced for the case of modified domain. In this southern region the flushing time based on 50% renewal time, is decreased from 100 days down to 15 days, after the addition of the weir to the domain.

  5. One Species, Three Pleistocene Evolutionary Histories: Phylogeography of the Italian Crested Newt, Triturus carnifex

    PubMed Central

    Canestrelli, Daniele; Salvi, Daniele; Maura, Michela; Bologna, Marco A.; Nascetti, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Phylogeographic patterns of temperate species from the Mediterranean peninsulas have been investigated intensively. Nevertheless, as more phylogeographies become available, either unique patterns or new lines of concordance continue to emerge, providing new insights on the evolution of regional biotas. Here, we investigated the phylogeography and evolutionary history of the Italian crested newt, Triturus carnifex, through phylogenetic, molecular dating and population structure analyses of two mitochondrial gene fragments (ND2 and ND4; overall 1273 bp). We found three main mtDNA lineages having parapatric distribution and estimated divergence times between Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene. One lineage (S) was widespread south of the northern Apennine chain and was further geographically structured into five sublineages, likely of Middle Pleistocene origin. The second lineage (C) was widespread throughout the Padano–Venetian plain and did not show a clear phylogeographic structure. The third lineage (N) was observed in only two populations located on western Croatia/Slovenia. Results of analysis of molecular variance suggested that partitioning populations according to the geographic distribution of these lineages and sublineages explains 76% of the observed genetic variation. The phylogeographic structure observed within T. carnifex and divergence time estimates among its lineages, suggest that responses to Pleistocene environmental changes in this single species have been as diverse as those found previously among several codistributed temperate species combined. Consistent with the landscape heterogeneity, physiographic features, and palaeogeographical evolution of its distribution range, these responses encompass multiple refugia along the Apennine chain, lowland refugia in large peri-coastal plains, and a ‘cryptic’ northern refugium. PMID:22848590

  6. Neural crest contribution to lingual mesenchyme, epithelium and developing taste papillae and taste buds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Mishina, Yuji; Mistretta, Charlotte M

    2012-08-15

    The epithelium of mammalian tongue hosts most of the taste buds that transduce gustatory stimuli into neural signals. In the field of taste biology, taste bud cells have been described as arising from "local epithelium", in distinction from many other receptor organs that are derived from neurogenic ectoderm including neural crest (NC). In fact, contribution of NC to both epithelium and mesenchyme in the developing tongue is not fully understood. In the present study we used two independent, well-characterized mouse lines, Wnt1-Cre and P0-Cre that express Cre recombinase in a NC-specific manner, in combination with two Cre reporter mouse lines, R26R and ZEG, and demonstrate a contribution of NC-derived cells to both tongue mesenchyme and epithelium including taste papillae and taste buds. In tongue mesenchyme, distribution of NC-derived cells is in close association with taste papillae. In tongue epithelium, labeled cells are observed in an initial scattered distribution and progress to a clustered pattern between papillae, and within papillae and early taste buds. This provides evidence for a contribution of NC to lingual epithelium. Together with previous reports for the origin of taste bud cells from local epithelium in postnatal mouse, we propose that NC cells migrate into and reside in the epithelium of the tongue primordium at an early embryonic stage, acquire epithelial cell phenotypes, and undergo cell proliferation and differentiation that is involved in the development of taste papillae and taste buds. Our findings lead to a new concept about derivation of taste bud cells that include a NC origin.

  7. Intense mixing of lower thermocline water on the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    St Laurent, Louis C; Thurnherr, Andreas M

    2007-08-09

    Buoyancy exchange between the deep and the upper ocean, which is essential for maintaining global ocean circulation, mainly occurs through turbulent mixing. This mixing is thought to result primarily from instability of the oceanic internal wave field, but internal waves tend to radiate energy away from the regions in which they are generated rather than dissipate it locally as turbulence and the resulting distribution of turbulent mixing remains unknown. Another, more direct, mixing mechanism involves the generation of turbulence as strong flows pass through narrow passages in topography, but the amount of turbulence generated at such locations remains poorly quantified owing to a lack of direct measurements. Here we present observations from the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean that suggest that passages in rift valleys and ridge-flank canyons provide the most energetic sites for oceanic turbulence. Our measurements show that diffusivities as large as 0.03 m2 s(-1) characterize the mixing downstream of a sill in a well-stratified boundary layer, with mixing levels remaining of the order of 10(-4) m2 s(-1) at the base of the main thermocline. These mixing rates are significantly higher than the diffusivities of the order of 10(-5) m2 s(-1) that characterize much of the global thermocline and the abyssal ocean. Our estimates suggest that overflows associated with narrow passages on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the North Atlantic Ocean produce as much buoyancy flux as has previously been estimated for the entire Romanche fracture zone, a large strait in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that connects the North and South Atlantic basins. This flux is equivalent to the interior mixing that occurs in the entire North Atlantic basin at the depth of the passages, suggesting that turbulence generated in narrow passages on mid-ocean ridges may be important for buoyancy flux at the global scale.

  8. Cardiovascular malformations in Fryns syndrome: is there a pathogenic role for neural crest cells?

    PubMed

    Lin, Angela E; Pober, Barbara R; Mullen, Mary P; Slavotinek, Anne M

    2005-12-15

    additional support for an etiologic role of genes related to neural crest cell development in the pathogenesis of Fryns syndrome and hence, congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

  9. A biomimetic growth factor delivery strategy for enhanced regeneration of iliac crest defects.

    PubMed

    Huri, Pinar Yilgor; Huri, Gazi; Yasar, Umit; Ucar, Yurdanur; Dikmen, Nurten; Hasirci, Nesrin; Hasirci, Vasif

    2013-08-01

    The importance of provision of growth factors in the engineering of tissues has long been shown to control the behavior of the cells within the construct and several approaches were applied toward this end. In nature, more than one type of growth factor is known to be effective during the healing of tissue defects and their peak concentrations are not always simultaneous. One of the most recent strategies includes the delivery of a combination of growth factors with the dose and timing to mimic the natural regeneration cascade. The sequential delivery of bone morphogenetic proteins BMP-2 and BMP-7 which are early and late appearing factors during bone regeneration, respectively, was shown in vitro to enhance osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. In the present study, the aim was to study the effectiveness of this delivery strategy in a rabbit iliac crest model. 3D plotted poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds were loaded with BMP carrying nanoparticles to achieve: (a) single BMP-2 or BMP-7 delivery, and (b) their combined delivery in a simultaneous or (c) sequential (biomimetic) fashion. After eight weeks of implantation, computed tomography and biomechanical tests showed better mineralized matrix formation and bone-implant union strength at the defect site in the case of sequential delivery compared to single or simultaneous delivery modes. Bone mineral density (BMD) and push-out stress were: 33.65±2.25 g cm(-3) and 14.5±2.28 MPa, respectively, and almost 2.5 fold higher in comparison to those without growth factors (BMD: 14.14±1.21 g cm(-3); PS: 6.59±0.65 MPa). This study, therefore, supports those obtained in vitro and emphasizes the importance of mimicking the natural timing of bioavailability of osteogenic factors in improving the regeneration of critical-sized bone defects.

  10. Iliac Crest Bone Graft versus Local Autograft or Allograft for Lumbar Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, Alexander; Brodke, Darrel S.; Youssef, Jim A.; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R.; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S. Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) and local autologous bone and allograft in the lumbar spine. Methods  A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases identified studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with degenerative joint disease using ICBG, local autograft, or allograft in the thoracolumbar spine. Results  Six comparative studies met our inclusion criteria. A “low” strength of the overall body of evidence suggested no difference in fusion percentages in the lumbar spine between local autograft and ICBG. We found no difference in fusion percentages based on low evidence comparing allograft with ICBG autograft. There were no differences in pain or functional results comparing local autograft or allograft with ICBG autograft. Donor site pain and hematoma/seroma occurred more frequently in ICBG autograft group for lumbar fusion procedures. There was low evidence around the estimate of patients with donor site pain following ICBG harvesting, ranging from 16.7 to 20%. With respect to revision, low evidence demonstrated no difference between allograft and ICBG autograft. There was no evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with local autograft for fusion, pain, functional, and safety outcomes. Conclusion  In the lumbar spine, ICBG, local autograft, and allograft have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes. However, ICBG is associated with an increased risk for donor site-related complications. Significant limitations exist in the available literature when comparing ICBG, local autograft, and allograft for lumbar fusion, and thus ICBG versus other fusion methods necessitates further investigation. PMID:27556001

  11. Environmental factors unveil dormant developmental capacities in multipotent progenitors of the trunk neural crest.

    PubMed

    Coelho-Aguiar, Juliana M; Le Douarin, Nicole M; Dupin, Elisabeth

    2013-12-01

    The neural crest (NC), an ectoderm-derived structure of the vertebrate embryo, gives rise to the melanocytes, most of the peripheral nervous system and the craniofacial mesenchymal tissues (i.e., connective, bone, cartilage and fat cells). In the trunk of Amniotes, no mesenchymal tissues are derived from the NC. In certain in vitro conditions however, avian and murine trunk NC cells (TNCCs) displayed a limited mesenchymal differentiation capacity. Whether this capacity originates from committed precursors or from multipotent TNCCs was unknown. Here, we further investigated the potential of TNCCs to develop into mesenchymal cell types in vitro. We found that, in fact, quail TNCCs exhibit a high ability to differentiate into myofibroblasts, chondrocytes, lipid-laden adipocytes and mineralizing osteoblasts. In single cell cultures, both mesenchymal and neural cell types coexisted in TNCC clonal progeny: 78% of single cells yielded osteoblasts together with glial cells and neurons; moreover, TNCCs generated heterogenous clones with adipocytes, myofibroblasts, melanocytes and/or glial cells. Therefore, alike cephalic NCCs, early migratory TNCCs comprised multipotent progenitors able to generate both mesenchymal and melanocytic/neural derivatives, suggesting a continuum in NC developmental potentials along the neural axis. The skeletogenic capacity of the TNC, which was present in the exoskeletal armor of the extinct basal forms of Vertebrates and which persisted in the distal fin rays of extant teleost fish, thus did not totally disappear during vertebrate evolution. Mesenchymal potentials of the TNC, although not fulfilled during development, are still present in a dormant state in Amniotes and can be disclosed in in vitro culture. Whether these potentials are not expressed in vivo due to the presence of inhibitory cues or to the lack of permissive factors in the trunk environment remains to be understood.

  12. Crested wheatgrass-cheatgrass seedling competition in a mixed-density design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francis, Mark G.; Pyke, David A.

    1996-01-01

    Plant competition experiments have historically used designs that are difficult to interpret due to confounding problems. Recently, designs based on a 'response function' approach have been proposed and tested in various plant mixture settings. For this study, 3 species were used that are important in current revegetation practices in the Intermountain West. 'Nordan' (Agropyron desertorum [Fish. ex Link] Shult.) and 'Hycrest' (A. cristatum [L.] Gaertn. x desertorum) crested wheatgrass are commonly-used revegetation species on rangelands susceptible to cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) invasion, although little quantitative data exist that compare their competitive abilities. We evaluated the competitive ability of Hycrest and Nordan seedlings in 2-species mixtures with cheatgrass in a greenhouse study. Linear and nonlinear models were developed for a range of densities (130- 520 seeds m-2) for each species to predict median above-ground biomass and tiller numbers and to further test the usefulness of this design for evaluating species to rehabilitate rangelands. In both experiments, increasing Hycrest and Nordan densities reduced their own biomass and tiller production while increasing Hycrest densities reduced cheatgrass biomass and tiller production. Nordan did not affect cheatgrass biomass and tiller production. However, increasing cheatgrass densities reduced Hycrest and Nordan biomass and tiller production, and its own biomass and tiller production. The competition index i.e. substitution rate, indicated that Hycrest seedlings were better competitors with cheatgrass than Nordan, although in all mixtures, cheatgrass plants were the superior competitors. Further field research using this design, where environmental inputs are less optimal and diverse, is needed to validate these results and to further evaluate the use of this approach in examining effects of intra- and interspecific competition.

  13. Sonic hedgehog is a chemotactic neural crest cell guide that is perturbed by ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Ezequiel J; Fernández-Zapico, Martín E; Battiato, Natalia L; Rovasio, Roberto A

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to understand the involvement of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) morphogen in the oriented distribution of neural crest cells (NCCs) toward the optic vesicle and to look for potential disorders of this guiding mechanism after ethanol exposure. In vitro directional analysis showed the chemotactic response of NCCs up Shh gradients and to notochord co-cultures (Shh source) or to their conditioned medium, a response inhibited by anti-Shh antibody, receptor inhibitor cyclopamine and anti-Smo morpholino (MO). Expression of the Ptch-Smo receptor complex on in vitro NCCs was also shown. In whole embryos, the expression of Shh mRNA and protein was seen in the ocular region, and of Ptch, Smo and Gli/Sufu system on cephalic NCCs. Anti-Smo MO or Ptch-mutated plasmid (Ptch1(Δloop2)) impaired cephalic NCC migration/distribution, with fewer cells invading the optic region and with higher cell density at the homolateral mesencephalic level. Beads embedded with cyclopamine (Smo-blocking) or Shh (ectopic signal) supported the role of Shh as an in vivo guide molecule for cephalic NCCs. Ethanol exposure perturbed in vitro and in vivo NCC migration. Early stage embryos treated with ethanol, in a model reproducing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, showed later disruptions of craniofacial development associated with abnormal in situ expression of Shh morphogen. The results show the Shh/Ptch/Smo-dependent migration of NCCs toward the optic vesicle, with the support of specific inactivation with genetic and pharmacological tools. They also help to understand mechanisms of accurate distribution of embryonic cells and of their perturbation by a commonly consumed teratogen, and demonstrate, in addition to its other known developmental functions, a new biological activity of cellular guidance for Shh.

  14. Nuanced but significant: how ethanol perturbs avian cranial neural crest cell actin cytoskeleton, migration and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Oyedele, Olusegun O; Kramer, Beverley

    2013-08-01

    Children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) display striking craniofacial abnormalities. These features are proposed to result from perturbations in the morphology and function of cranial neural crest cells (cNCCs), which contribute significantly to the craniofacial complex. While certain pathways by which this may occur have been suggested, precise teratogenic mechanisms remain intensely investigated, as does the question of the teratogenic dose. The present study focused on examining how avian cNCC actin cytoskeleton, migratory distance, and proliferation are affected ex vivo by exposure to ethanol concentrations that simulate maternal intoxication. Chick cNCCs were cultured in 0.2% and 0.4% v/v ethanol. Distances migrated by both ethanol-treated and control cells at 24 and 48 h were recorded. Following phalloidin immunocytochemistry, treated and control cNCCs were compared morphologically and quantitatively. Apoptosis and proliferation in control versus treated cNCCs were also studied. Chick cNCCs cultured in ethanol lost their spindle-like shapes and their ordered cytoskeleton. There was a significant stage-dependent effect on cNCC migration at 24 h (p = 0.035), which was greatest at stage 10 (HH). Ethanol treatment for 48 h revealed a significant main effect for ethanol, chiefly at the 0.4% level. There was also an interaction effect between ethanol dose and stage of development (stage 9 HH). Actin microfilament disruption was quantitatively increased by ethanol at the doses studied while cNCC proliferation was increased but not significantly. Ethanol had no effect on cNCC apoptosis. At ethanol levels likely to induce human FAS, avian cNCCs exhibit various subtle, potentially significant changes in morphology, migration, and proliferation, with possible consequences for fated structures.

  15. Regulation of Boundary Cap Neural Crest Stem Cell Differentiation After Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aldskogius, Hakan; Berens, Christian; Kanaykina, Nadezda; Liakhovitskaia, Anna; Medvinsky, Alexander; Sandelin, Martin; Schreiner, Silke; Wegner, Michael; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Kozlova, Elena N

    2009-01-01

    Success of cell replacement therapies for neurological disorders will depend largely on the optimization of strategies to enhance viability and control the developmental fate of stem cells after transplantation. Once transplanted, stem/progenitor cells display a tendency to maintain an undifferentiated phenotype or differentiate into inappropriate cell types. Gain and loss of function experiments have revealed key transcription factors which drive differentiation of immature stem/progenitor cells toward more mature stages and eventually to full differentiation. An attractive course of action to promote survival and direct the differentiation of transplanted stem cells to a specific cell type would therefore be to force expression of regulatory differentiation molecules in already transplanted stem cells, using inducible gene expression systems which can be controlled from the outside. Here, we explore this hypothesis by employing a tetracycline gene regulating system (Tet-On) to drive the differentiation of boundary cap neural crest stem cells (bNCSCs) toward a sensory neuron fate after transplantation. We induced the expression of the key transcription factor Runx1 in Sox10-expressing bNCSCs. Forced expression of Runx1 strongly increased transplant survival in the enriched neurotrophic environment of the dorsal root ganglion cavity, and was sufficient to guide differentiation of bNCSCs toward a nonpeptidergic nociceptive sensory neuron phenotype both in vitro and in vivo after transplantation. These findings suggest that exogenous activation of transcription factors expression after transplantation in stem/progenitor cell grafts can be a constructive approach to control their survival as well as their differentiation to the desired type of cell and that the Tet-system is a useful tool to achieve this. PMID:19544468

  16. Induction of osteoblastic differentiation of neural crest-derived stem cells from hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Urano-Morisawa, Eri; Takami, Masamichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Akifumi; Osumi, Noriko; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) arises near the neural tube during embryo development. NC cells migrate throughout the embryo and have potential to differentiate into multiple cell types, such as peripheral nerves, glial, cardiac smooth muscle, endocrine, and pigment cells, and craniofacial bone. In the present study, we induced osteoblast-like cells using whisker follicles obtained from the NC of mice. Hair follicle cells derived from the NC labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were collected from protein zero-Cre/floxed-EGFP double transgenic mice and cultured, then treated and cultured in stem cell growth medium. After growth for 14 days, results of flow cytometry analysis showed that 95% of the EGFP-positive (EGFP+) hair follicle cells derived from the NC had proliferated and 76.2% of those expressed mesenchymal stem cells markers, such as platelet-derived growth factor α and stem cell antigen-1, and also showed constitutive expression of Runx2 mRNA. Cells stimulated with bone morphogenetic protein-2 expressed osteocalcin, osterix, and alkaline phosphatase mRNA, resulting in production of mineralized matrices, which were detected by von Kossa and alizarin red staining. Moreover, EGFP+ hair follicle cells consistently expressed macrophage colony-stimulating factor and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Addition of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] (10-8 M) to the cultures suppressed OPG expression and induced RANKL production in the cells. Furthermore, multinucleated osteoclasts appeared within 6 days after starting co-cultures of bone marrow cells with EGFP+ cells in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 and PGE2. These results suggest that NC-derived hair follicle cells possess a capacity for osteoblastic differentiation and may be useful for developing new bone regenerative medicine therapies.

  17. Patterns of spatial overlap in a monogamous large rodent, the crested porcupine.

    PubMed

    Mori, Emiliano; Lovari, Sandro; Sforzi, Andrea; Romeo, Giorgia; Pisani, Caterina; Massolo, Alessandro; Fattorini, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    The crested porcupine Hystrix cristata is a large rodent which pairs for life. We studied the space use of 17 female and 9 male radio-tracked porcupines in an evergreen coastal woodland ("macchia", EW) and in an agricultural estate (AE), with special reference to the use of cultivations. Home range sizes of male porcupines (4.72-323.40) ranged around 114ha (median) during the warm period (April-September) and 162ha during the cold one (October-March). Home ranges of females (2.48-323.40) were c. 91ha during the warm period and c. 143ha during the cold one. Habitat composition and selection changed from the cold to the warm months, with porcupines being present in agricultural areas especially in the latter. Home range overlap between members of the same pair varied from 57% to 97% (median, 75%). Habitat selection was analyzed at the second (within study area) and at the third (within home range) order of selection. Within study areas, porcupines avoided cultivations and selected habitats with dense vegetation, providing cover and food. Within home ranges, in the warm period, porcupines selected agricultural areas in EW, where this habitat represented a minor portion of the study site. In that season, the Mediterranean "macchia" is a poor source of food, forcing porcupines to travel long distances to reach feeding sites. No significant difference of habitat selection within home ranges was detected between members of the same pair. Cultivations may play a key-role for porcupine survival, especially in poor habitats, as they provide abundant food resources in the warm period.

  18. Snow temperature profiles and heat fluxes measured on the Greenland crest by an automatic weather station

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, C.R.; Weidner, G A.

    1992-03-01

    In June 1989 three automatic weather station (AWS) units were installed on the Greenland crest at the GISP2 (78.58 N, 38.46 W, 3265 m) and GRIP (78.57 N, 37.62 W, 3230 m) ice coring sites and at Kenton (72.28 N, 38.80 W, 3185 m), the air sampling site. The purpose of the AWS units is to measure the local meteorological variables, including snow temperatures at various depths, in support of ice coring studies. The AWS units measure wind speed and direction, air temperature, and relative humidity at a nominal height of 3.6 meters, air pressure at the electronics enclosure, and air temperature difference between 3.6 m and 0.5 m. The AWS units at GISP2 and GRIP also measure solar radiation, and seven snow temperatures from the surface to a depth of approximately 4 m in the snow. The data are updated at 10-minute intervals and transmitted to the ARGOS data collection system on board the NOAA series of polar-orbiting satellites. The air temperature and snow temperatures are presented as a function of time for the period from June 8, 1989 to August 31, 1990 and as tautochrones at 30-day intervals. The heat flux into the snow is determined from the daily mean snow temperature between the day after and the day before using the volumetric heat capacity of the snow assuming a snow density of 300 kg m-3. The daily mean heat flux into the snow between the highest and the lowest levels of snow temperature is presented as a function of time.

  19. Neural Crest Migration and Survival Are Susceptible to Morpholino-Induced Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Cicely A.

    2016-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) is a stem cell-like embryonic population that is essential for generating and patterning the vertebrate body, including the craniofacial skeleton and peripheral nervous system. Defects in NC development underlie many birth defects and contribute to formation of some of the most malignant cancers in humans, such as melanoma and neuroblastoma. For these reasons, significant research efforts have been expended to identify genes that control NC development, as it is expected to lead to a deeper understanding of the genetic mechanisms controlling vertebrate development and identify new treatments for NC-derived diseases and cancers. However, a number of inconsistencies regarding gene function during NC development have emerged from comparative analyses of gene function between mammalian and non-mammalian systems (chick, frog, zebrafish). This poses a significant barrier to identification of single genes and/or redundant pathways to target in NC diseases. Here, we determine whether technical differences, namely morpholino-based approaches used in non-mammalian systems, could contribute to these discrepancies, by examining the extent to which NC phenotypes in fascin1a (fscn1a) morphant embryos are similar to or different from fscn1a null mutants in zebrafish. Analysis of fscn1a morphants showed that they mimicked early NC phenotypes observed in fscn1a null mutants; however, these embryos also displayed NC migration and derivative phenotypes not observed in null mutants, including accumulation of p53-independent cell death. These data demonstrate that morpholinos can cause seemingly specific NC migration and derivative phenotypes, and thus have likely contributed to the inconsistencies surrounding NC gene function between species. We suggest that comparison of genetic mutants between different species is the most rigorous method for identifying conserved genetic mechanisms controlling NC development and is critical to identify new treatments for NC

  20. Reproductive success, developmental anomalies and environmental contaminants in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, J.M.; Karasov, W.H.; Sileo, L.; Stromborg, K.L.; Hanbidge, B.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Jones, P.D.; Tillitt, D.E.; Verbrugge, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    To test an association between environmental contaminants and the prevalence of congenital anomalies in colonial waterbirds, we collected representative eggs for chemical analysis from double-crested cormorant nests at colonies in Lake Michigan, Wisconsin, USA, and Lake Winnipegosis, Manitoba, Canada, and periodically revisited the nests to determine the hatching success, survivorship of hatchlings, and number of deformed hatchlings in the remainder of each clutch. Total concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in eggs were determined by capillary gas chromatography. The combined activity of planar chlorinated hydrocarbons (PCHs) in the eggs was measured in an in vitro bioassay based on the induction of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in rat hepatoma cells. The combined EROD induction activity was expressed as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ). Total concentrations of PCBs and TCDD-EQ were seven to eight times greater in eggs from Lake Michigan (7.8 μg/g and 138 pg/g, respectively) than in those from Lake Winnipegosis (1.0 μg/g and 19 pg/g, respectively). The proportion of eggs hatching at the Lake Michigan colony (59%) was less (p < 0.05) than at Lake Winnipegosis (70%), and the prevalence of hatchlings with deformed bills was greater (p < 0.001) at Lake Michigan (0.79 vs. 0.06%). However, within the Lake Michigan colony, concentrations of PCBs and TCDD-EQ were not correlated with either hatching success or the occurrence of deformities in nestlings.

  1. Regulated expression of neurofibromin in migrating neural crest cells of avian embryos.

    PubMed

    Stocker, K M; Baizer, L; Coston, T; Sherman, L; Ciment, G

    1995-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common human genetic disease involving various neural crest (NC)-derived cell types, in particular, Schwann cells and melanocytes. The gene responsible for NF1 encodes the protein neurofibromin, which contains a domain with amino acid sequence homology to the ras-guanosine triphosphatase activating protein, suggesting that neurofibromin may play a role in intracellular signaling pathways regulating cellular proliferation or differentiation, or both. To determine whether neurofibromin plays a role in NC cell development, we used antibodies raised against human neurofibromin fusion proteins in western blot and immunocytochemical studies of early avian embryos. These antibodies specifically recognized the 235 kD chicken neurofibromin protein, which was expressed in migrating trunk and cranial NC cells of early embryos (E1.5 to E2), as well as in endothelial and smooth muscle cells of blood vessels and in a subpopulation of non-NC-derived cells in the dermamyotome. At slightly later stages (E3 to E5), neurofibromin immunostaining was observed in various NC derivatives, including dorsal root ganglia and peripheral nerves, as well as non-NC-derived cell types, including heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney. At still later stages (E7 to E9), neurofibromin immunoreactivity was found in almost all tissues in vivo. To determine whether the levels of neurofibromin changed during melanocyte and Schwann cell development, tissue culture experiments were performed. Cultured NC cells were found to express neurofibromin at early time points in culture, but the levels of immunoreactivity decreased as the cells underwent pigmentation. Schwann cells, on the other hand, continued to express neurofibromin in culture. These data suggest, therefore, that neurofibromin may play a role in the development of both NC cells and a variety of non-NC-derived tissues.

  2. Satellite Based Soil Moisture Product Validation Using NOAA-CREST Ground and L-Band Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Campo, C.; Temimi, M.; Lakhankar, T.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture content is among most important physical parameters in hydrology, climate, and environmental studies. Many microwave-based satellite observations have been utilized to estimate this parameter. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is one of many remotely sensors that collects daily information of land surface soil moisture. However, many factors such as ancillary data and vegetation scattering can affect the signal and the estimation. Therefore, this information needs to be validated against some "ground-truth" observations. NOAA - Cooperative Remote Sensing and Technology (CREST) center at the City University of New York has a site located at Millbrook, NY with several insitu soil moisture probes and an L-Band radiometer similar to Soil Moisture Passive and Active (SMAP) one. This site is among SMAP Cal/Val sites. Soil moisture information was measured at seven different locations from 2012 to 2015. Hydra probes are used to measure six of these locations. This study utilizes the observations from insitu data and the L-Band radiometer close to ground (at 3 meters height) to validate and to compare soil moisture estimates from AMSR2. Analysis of the measurements and AMSR2 indicated a weak correlation with the hydra probes and a moderate correlation with Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS probes). Several differences including the differences between pixel size and point measurements can cause these discrepancies. Some interpolation techniques are used to expand point measurements from 6 locations to AMSR2 footprint. Finally, the effect of penetration depth in microwave signal and inconsistencies with other ancillary data such as skin temperature is investigated to provide a better understanding in the analysis. The results show that the retrieval algorithm of AMSR2 is appropriate under certain circumstances. This validation algorithm and similar study will be conducted for SMAP mission. Keywords: Remote Sensing, Soil

  3. Temporal Changes in Periprocedural Events in the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST)

    PubMed Central

    Howard, George; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Moore, Wesley S.; Katzen, Barry T.; Chakhtoura, Elie; Morrish, William F.; Ferguson, Robert D.; Hye, Robert J.; Shawl, Fayaz A.; Harrigan, Mark R.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Howard, Virginia J.; Lal, Brajesh K.; Meschia, James F.; Brott, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Post-hoc, we hypothesized that over the recruitment period of the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy Versus Stenting Trial (CREST), increasing experience and improved patient selection with carotid stenting (CAS), and to a lesser extent, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) would contribute to lower periprocedural event rates. Methods Three study periods with approximately the same number of patients were defined to span recruitment. Composite and individual rates of periprocedural stroke, myocardial infarction and death rate were calculated separately by treatment assignment (CAS/CEA). Temporal changes in unadjusted event rates, and rates after adjustment for temporal changes in patient characteristics, were assessed. Results For patients randomized to CAS, there was no significant temporal change in the unadjusted composite rates, that declined from 6.2% in the first period, to 4.9% in the second, and 4.6% in the third (p = 0.28). Adjustment for patient characteristics attenuated the rates to 6.0%, 5.9%, and 5.6% (p = 0.85). For CEA-randomized patients, both the composite and the combined stroke and death outcome decreased between period 1 and 2, and then increased in period 3. Conclusion The hypothesized temporal reduction of stroke + death events for CAS-treated patients was not observed. Further adjustment for changes in patient characteristics between periods, including the addition of asymptomatic patients and a > 50% decrease in proportion of octogenarians enrolled, resulted in practically identical rates. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier:NCT00004732. PMID:26173731

  4. Changes in crested wheatgrass root exudation caused by flood, drought, and nutrient stress.

    PubMed

    Henry, Amelia; Doucette, William; Norton, Jeanette; Bugbee, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Root exudates can chelate inorganic soil contaminants, change rhizosphere pH, and may increase degradation of organic contaminants by microbial cometabolism. Root-zone stress may increase exudation and enhance phytoremediation. We studied the effects of low K+, high NH4+/NO3- ratio, drought, and flooding on the quantity and composition of exudates. Crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum) was grown in Ottawa sand in sealed, flow-through glass columns under axenic conditions for 70 d. Root exudates were collected and analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC) and organic acid content to compare treatment effects. Plants in the low K+ treatment exuded 60% more TOC per plant per day (p = 0.01) than the unstressed control. Drought stress increased cumulative TOC exuded per gram dry plant by 71% (p = 0.05). The flooded treatment increased TOC exuded per gram dry plant by 45%, although this was not statistically significant based on the two replicate plants in this treatment. Exudation from the high NH4+/NO3- ratio treatment was 10% less than the control. Exudation rates in this study ranged from 8 to 50% of rates in four other published studies. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis indicated that malic acid was the predominant organic acid exuded. Fumaric, malonic, succinic, and oxalic acids were also detected in the exudates of all treatments. These results demonstrate that nutrient and water stress have significant effects on the quantity and composition of root exudates. Cultural manipulations to induce stress may change the quantity of root exudates and thus increase the effectiveness of phytoremediation.

  5. Overlap in offshore habitat use by double-crested cormorants and boaters in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Bur, Michael T.

    2002-01-01

    Double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) and boats of 2 length classes (≤ 8 m and > 8 m) were counted from a boat along 31 established strip transects in western Lake Erie from 24 April to 1 September 2000. Each transect included only one of the following habitats: (1) offshore of a breeding island or roosting/loafing area for cormorants (“refuge”), (2) reefs or shoals, (3) open water, or (4) offshore of an island shoreline that had evidence of development by humans. Foraging cormorants were recorded most often offshore of refuges and least often on open water. There was no difference between the numbers of foraging cormorants/km2 recorded offshore of developed shorelines and on reefs and shoals. More than half of all boats recorded were on transects that were within 1 km of developed shorelines. Among those transects > 1 km from developed shorelines, there were no differences among the habitats for the number of boats of either length class. The respective ranks of the 31 transect means of the numbers of cormorants/km2 and the numbers of boats/km2 in either length class were uncorrelated. The results suggest that (1) cormorants select foraging habitats based mainly on shoreline type, distance from shoreline, and depth, and (2) the amount of boat traffic is influenced by proximity to port and trip objectives, including sport angling and recreational boating. Although there is overlap in habitat use by cormorants and humans, this overlap is not complete. The perception of cormorants as a threat to fish populations may in part be due to this overlap.

  6. Coupled dynamics of territorial damselfishes and juvenile corals on the reef crest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, J. M.; Choat, J. H.; Connolly, S. R.

    2015-03-01

    Territories of grazing fishes in the family Pomacentridae have been documented to cover a substantial proportion of shallow, exposed coral reef fronts, and these fishes can have profound effects on benthic community composition, including the recruitment and post-settlement survival of scleractinian corals. However, current studies of territorial grazer effects on corals have focused on back-reef habitats. Territorial damselfishes occur in distinct behavioural guilds ranging from indeterminate territorial grazers with thin algal turfs and low rates of territorial aggression to intensive territorial grazers with thick turfs and high rates of aggression. To determine the impact of territorial grazers on the establishment of juvenile corals, we surveyed the reef crest habitat of Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, using fixed transects to assess the effects of indeterminate and intensive territorial grazers on juvenile coral abundance and taxonomic composition. In addition, the turnover of territorial pomacentrids was monitored as well as the effects of turnover on juvenile coral assemblages. Intensive territorial grazers were associated with a significantly lower juvenile coral abundance (34 % decrease), but neither intensive nor indeterminate grazer territories impacted juvenile coral taxonomic composition. Over the course of 1 yr, there was a high rate of territorial turnover (39.7 %). Turnover from control plots to intensive damselfish territories was accompanied by a 44 % decrease in juvenile corals; conversely, turnover from intensive damselfish territories to control plots coincided with a 48 % increase in juvenile corals. These findings reveal two main conclusions. Firstly, the association between damselfish territories and the abundance and spatial turnover of juvenile corals strongly implies that territorial grazers have a negative effect on juvenile coral populations. Secondly, the unexpectedly high temporal turnover of damselfish territories indicates that

  7. Sex ratios, bill deformities, and PCBs in nestling double-crested cormorants

    SciTech Connect

    Stromborg, K.L.; Sileo, L.; Tuinen, P. van

    1995-12-31

    Deformed double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) nestlings examined from 1988--1992 had a sex ratio highly skewed toward females (66 of 81) compared to normal nestlings (43 of 80) (P < 0.005). The collection site, Green Bay, WI, is heavily contaminated with PCBs and the possibility of gender alteration was investigated in a designed study by comparing the sex of nestling birds determined using three techniques. These nestlings were collected at five sites, both contaminated and uncontaminated. Genetic sex was determined by cytogenetic techniques and phenotypic sex was determined by macroscopic and histologic examination of gonads. Differences between techniques resulted in a few instances of classifying genetic males as females by one or the other gonadal examinations. Sex ratios of the nestlings from the five sites were compared to binomial distributions assuming equal probabilities of males and females. Sex ratios of normal nestlings were not different from expected regardless of sex determination technique (P > 0.10). Deformed nestlings sexed cytogenetically or histologically did not differ from expected (P > 0.40), but deformed nestlings tended to be classified , macroscopically as females at a higher rate than expected (P = 0.092). The observed sex ratios obtained by macroscopic techniques did not differ between the 1968--1992 observational study and the designed study (P > 0.50). Histologic examination suggested two explanations for the skewed sex ratio: nestlings with undeterminable macroscopic sex usually had testes and, some gonads which grossly resembled ovaries were, in fact, testes. If phenotypic gender alteration is present in these birds, it is more evident at the gross structural level than at the histologic level.

  8. Reproductive success, developmental anomalies, and environmental contaminants in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus)

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J.M.; Karasov, W.H.; Sileo, L.; Stromborg, K.L.; Giesy, J.P.; Jones, P.D.; Tillitt, D.E.; Verbrugge, D.A.; Hanbidge, B.A.

    1996-04-01

    To test an association between environmental contaminants and the prevalence of congenital anomalies in colonial waterbirds, the authors collected representative eggs for chemical analysis from double-crested cormorant nests at colonies in Lake Michigan, Wisconsin, USA, and Lake Winnipegosis, Manitoba, Canada, and periodically revisited the nests to determine the hatching success, survivorship of hatchlings, and number of deformed hatchlings in the remainder of each clutch. Total concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in eggs were determined by capillary gas chromatography. The combined activity of planar chlorinated hydrocarbons (PCHs) in the eggs was measured in an in vitro bioassay based on the induction of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in rat hepatoma cells. The combined EROD induction activity was expressed as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ). Total concentrations of PCBs and TCDD-EQ were seven to eight times greater in eggs from Lake Michigan (7.8 {micro}g/g and 138 pg/g, respectively) than in those from Lake Winnipegosis (1.0 {micro}g/g and 19 pg/g, respectively). The proportion of eggs hatching at the Lake Michigan colony (59%) was less (p < 0.05) than at Lake Winnipegosis (70%), and the prevalence of hatchlings with deformed bills was greater (p < 0.001) at Lake Michigan (0.79 vs. 0.06%). However, within the Lake Michigan colony, concentrations of PCBs and TCDD-EQ were not correlated with either hatching success or the occurrence of deformities in nestlings.

  9. Mercury contamination in bank swallows and double-crested cormorants from the Carson River, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, R.; Brewer, R.; Peterson, S.C.; Mach, C.

    1995-12-31

    An ecological risk assessment was performed in conjunction with a remedial investigation at the Carson River Mercury Site (CRMS) in northwestern Nevada. Large quantities of mercury used in the processing of gold and silver during mining operations in the mid to late 1800s are distributed throughout the Carson River ecosystem. Previous investigations indicated elevated levels of mercury in soil, sediment, water, and the aquatic food chain. Bird exposure to mercury was determined by measuring total mercury and monomethyl mercury in blood and feather samples from 15 unfledged double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), and in blood, feather, and liver samples from 18 juvenile bank swallows (Riparia riparia) at both the CRMS and uncontaminated background locations. Monomethyl mercury accounted for 90 to 98% of the total mercury in the samples. Total mercury concentrations in bird tissues collected at the CRMS were significantly higher than at background locations. Average total mercury concentrations (wet weight) for the swallow blood, liver, and feather samples collected at the CRMS were 2.63, 3.96, and 2.01 mg/kg, respectively; compared with 0.74, 1,03, and 1.84 mg/kg, respectively at the background area. Average total mercury concentrations for cormorant samples collected at the CRMS were 17.07 mg/kg for blood, and 105.1 1 mg/kg for feathers. Cormorant samples collected at the background location had average total mercury concentrations of 0.49 mg/kg for blood and 8.99 mg/kg for feathers. Results are compared with published residue-effects levels to evaluate avian risks.

  10. Spring prey use by double-crested cormorants on the Penobscot River, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackwell, B.F.; Krohn, W.B.; Dube, N.R.; Godin, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    We analyzed 2 sets of data for Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) stomach contents (including esophageal contents) that were collected from April through June of 1986-1988 (N = 580) and 1992-1993 (N = 200) on the Penobscot River, Maine. Our objectives were to examine temporal and spatial variation in the spring diet and estimate the importance of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts to the cormorant diet. We analyzed stomach contents relative to samples from 3 river sections: 5 mainstem dams collectively, above the head of tide, and free-flowing areas above and below the head of tide. Between years composition of taxa lists were compared (P = 0.05) relative to time and river section. We estimated taxon importance for data collected during 1992-1993 by ranking taxa according to 3 statistics: frequency of occurrence, mean percent volume, and numerical abundance. Data from 1986-88 were analyzed by frequency of occurrence only. Across the 3 river sections, the number of prey species recovered from cormorant stomachs increased from 15 in late April to at least 31 through May. Cormorants collected above the head of tide consumed 12 fish species (including freshwater, anadromous, and catadromous types), whereas birds collected below the head of tide consumed 28 freshwater and seasonally-available estuarine, marine benthic, and pelagic species. Salmon smolts were not recovered from stomachs collected in April, rare in stomach samples during the first week of June, and absent from the diet thereafter. In contrast, smolts were among the 5 most frequently occurring (1986-88) and highest ranking (1992-1993) prey taxa across the 3 river sections through May.

  11. Oxidative stress in laboratory-incubated double-crested cormorant eggs collected from the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Hilscherova, K; Blankenship, A; Kannan, K; Nie, M; Williams, L L; Coady, K; Upham, B L; Trosko, J E; Bursian, S; Giesy, J P

    2003-11-01

    Double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs were collected in 1998 from three sites on Lakes Huron and Superior and either analyzed for 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-like residues or artifically incubated. Some of the incubated eggs were injected with vitamin E (antioxidant) or piperonyl butoxide (CYPIA blocker) to examine the role of CYPIA and oxidative stress in normal bird development. Embryos (day 23) were analyzed for hepatic ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity and different measures of oxidative stress. Glutathione-related parameters were also measured in brain. In contrast to the historical data, there were no statistically significant differences in concentrations of chlorinated dioxins, furans, dioxin-like PCBs, or total TCDD-equivalents (TEQs) in eggs among sites. Survival and incidence of abnormalities were comparable at all study sites. Slight differences in liver, heart, and egg weight were observed among sites. A greater incidence of eye deformities was observed in embryos treated with vitamin E. Treatment with the CYPIA blocker, piperonyl butoxide, decreased the body weights of embryos. EROD activities were similar at all locations, but measures of oxidative stress varied among locations. There were greater levels of oxidized glutathione and oxidative DNA damage at Little Charity Island in Saginaw Bay. There was relatively great interindividual variation in biochemical responses and significant interrelation of the parameters of oxidative stress. While exposure to PCDD/DF and PCBs does not seem to explain the observed oxidative stress, the potential of these compounds to cause the observed effects can not be completely excluded.

  12. Differential trends in mercury concentrations in double-crested cormorant populations of the Canadian Prairies.

    PubMed

    Hall, Britt D; Doucette, Jennifer L; Bates, Lara M; Bugajski, Aleksandra; Niyogi, Som; Somers, Christopher M

    2014-04-01

    Mercury and selenium concentrations were measured in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), piscivorous fish, and common prey items in five lakes in two ecoregions in Saskatchewan, Canada. Hg and Se concentrations in cormorants were within the natural ranges of birds living in un-impacted sites. Site explained a significant proportion of the variation in total Hg (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in both cormorant breast muscle and livers. Birds nesting on more northern lakes in the Boreal Plain ecoregion (THg range 0.11-1.06 and 0.26-9.27 μg g(-1) wet weight, for breast and liver respectively) had lower THg concentrations compared to those from lakes in the Prairie ecoregion (THg range 0.60-4.26 μg g(-1) ww and 1.59-25.11 μg g(-1), for breast and liver respectively). Concentrations of MeHg in livers was also lower in birds from northern sites (0.06-1.15 μg g(-1) ww) compared to those from prairie sites (0.22-4.06 μg g(-1) ww). We documented a wide range of %MeHg in livers (4.5-52 %), indicative of detoxifying MeHg via demethylation to inorganic Hg. Our data suggest that the threshold value where demethylation rates increase substantially appears to be ~10 μg g(-1) ww MeHg, similar to thresholds in other wildlife. Molar ratios of Hg:Se suggests that some birds from highly saline Reed Lake in the prairie region had insufficient Se available to bind to Hg, thereby removing Se binding as a mitigative strategy for high Hg levels for these birds.

  13. Foraging location and site fidelity of the Double-crested Cormorant on Oneida Lake, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, J.T.H.; Richmond, M.E.; Rudstam, L. G.; Mattison, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the foraging behavior of the Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) on Oneida Lake, New York, by monitoring the activities of 27 radio-tagged birds in July and August of 1999 and 2000. A total of 224 locations were obtained of cormorants actively diving, and presumed foraging, at the time of detection. A geographic information system was used to examine foraging distances from the nesting island, the water depth and type of substrate at preferred foraging sites, and to estimate kernel home ranges for analysis of individual foraging site fidelity. An explanatory model was developed to determine parameters affecting the distance to cormorant foraging sites. The mean distance to foraging locations of tagged cormorants from the colony site was 2,920 m (SE ?? 180 m, max = 14,190 m), and 52% of the locations were within 2,000 m of the nesting island. No cormorant was observed making daily foraging trips to outside water bodies. Mean foraging distance was greater during morning than in the afternoon, and there was a significant effect of the time of day on distance. There was no significant effect of sex date, a seasonal measure on distance to foraging location. Individual cormorants exhibited fidelity to specific foraging sites. Most cormorants foraged in close proximity to the nesting island much of the time, while those detected further from the island tended to return repeatedly to the same locations. Ninety percent of the foraging locations were in water depths ???7.5 m, and most were in water 2.5-5 m deep. Compositional analysis of habitat use revealed a preference for these depths, along with substrates of cobble with rubble, and silt with clay.

  14. Cardiac responses to first ever submergence in double-crested cormorant chicks (Phalacrocorax auritus).

    PubMed

    Enstipp, M R; Andrews, R D; Jones, D R

    1999-12-01

    Heart rates were recorded from double-crested cormorant chicks during their first ever and subsequent voluntary head submergences and dives, as well as during longer dives made after the chicks were accustomed to diving. Despite variation between chicks, the cardiac response to first ever and subsequent voluntary submergence (head submergences and dives) was similar to the response observed in adult cormorants. Upon submersion the heart rate fell rapidly when pre-submersion heart rate was high (325-350 beats min-1). The heart rate established within the first second of voluntary submergence was between 230 and 285 beats min-1, well above resting heart rate (143 beats min-1). The same initial cardiac response occurred during longer dives performed after the chicks were accustomed to diving. In these dives the heart rate remained at the level established on submersion, unlike the response observed in shallow diving adult cormorants in which the heart rate declined throughout the dive. The heart rate was also monitored in a separate group of chicks in which the first exposure to water was during whole body forced submergence. Again, the observed response was similar to the adult response, although the cardiac response of chicks to forced submergence was more extreme than to voluntary submergence. Our results do not support the hypothesis that learning (by conditioning or habituation) is involved in the cardiac adjustments to voluntary submergence. It is suggested that the initial cardiac adjustments are reflex in nature and this reflex is fully developed by the first submergence event. Although the nature of this reflex pathway is obscure, cessation of breathing before submersion and the close linkage between breathing and heart rate might provide a plausible mechanism.

  15. Foraging patterns of Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants in the Columbia River estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, Donald E.; Roby, D.D.; Collis, K.

    2007-01-01

    We examined spatial and temporal foraging patterns of Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants nesting in the Columbia River estuary, to potentially identify circumstances where juvenile salmonids listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act might be more vulnerable to predation by these avian piscivores. Data were collected during the 1998 and 1999 breeding seasons, using point count surveys of foraging birds at 40 sites along the river's banks, and using aerial strip transect counts throughout the estuary for terns. In 1998, terns selected tidal flats and sites with roosting beaches nearby for foraging, making greater use of the marine/mixing zone of the estuary later in the season, particularly areas near the ocean jetties. In 1999, cormorants selected foraging sites in freshwater along the main channel with pile dikes present, particularly early in the season. Foraging trends in the other year for each species were generally similar to the above but usually not significant. During aerial surveys we observed 50% of foraging and commuting terns within 8 km of the Rice Island colony, and ??? 5% of activity occurred ??? 27 km from this colony in both years. Disproportionately greater cormorant foraging activity at pile dikes may indicate greater vulnerability of salmonids to predation at those features. Colony relocations to sites at sufficient distance from areas of relatively high salmonid abundance may be a straightforward means of reducing impacts of avian predation on salmonids than habitat alterations within the Columbia River estuary, at least for terns. ?? 2007 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling the Effects of Climate Change on Whitebark Pine Along the Pacific Crest Trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. S.; Nguyen, A.; Gill, N.; Kannan, S.; Patadia, N.; Meyer, M.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), one of eight National Scenic Trails, stretches 2,650 miles from Mexico to the Canadian border. At high elevations along this trail, within Inyo and Sierra National Forests, populations of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) have been diminishing due to infestation of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and are threatened due to a changing climate. Understanding the current and future condition of whitebark pine is a primary goal of forest managers due to its high ecological and economic importance, and it is currently a candidate for protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Using satellite imagery, we analyzed the rate and spatial extent of whitebark pine tree mortality from 1984 to 2011 using the Landsat-based Detection of Trends in Disturbance and Recovery (LandTrendr) program. Climate data, soil properties, and biological features of the whitebark pine were incorporated in the Physiological Principles to Predict Growth (3-PG) model to predict future rates of growth and assess its applicability in modeling natural whitebark pine processes. Finally, the Random Forest algorithm was used with topographic data alongside recent and future climate data from the IPCC A2 and B1 climate scenarios for the years 2030, 2060, and 2090 to model the future distribution of whitebark pine. LandTrendr results indicate beetle related mortality covering 14,940 km2 of forest, 2,880 km2 of which are within whitebark pine forest. By 2090, our results show that under the A2 climate scenario, whitebark pine suitable habitat may be reduced by as much as 99.97% by the year 2090 within our study area. Under the B1 climate scenario, which has decreased CO2 emissions, 13.54% more habitat would be preserved in 2090.

  17. Fractal properties of cancellous bone of the iliac crest in vertebral crush fracture.

    PubMed

    Fazzalari, N L; Parkinson, I H

    1998-07-01

    Fractal analysis is a method for describing complex shapes, including the cancellous structure of bone. It describes the surface texture and form of individual trabecular profiles and the overall cancellous structure. Sixty-four postmenopausal women with symptoms of back pain were referred for investigation for osteoporosis. The patients were divided into two groups for comparison: vertebral crush fracture (n = 31, mean age 68.58 +/- 6.47 years), and no vertebral crush fracture (n = 33, mean age 63.36 +/- 7.21 years). Cores of cancellous bone, 3 mm in diameter, were taken from the iliac crest and sectioned. A box-counting method implemented on an image analyzer was used to measure the fractal dimension. Three fractal dimensions describing trabecular surface texture (fractal 1), trabecular shape (fractal 2), and trabecular arrangement (fractal 3) were measured, indicating that cancellous bone has sectional self-similarity. Conventional histomorphometry was also performed on the samples. The results show that fractal 2 is significantly lower in the vertebral crush fracture group than in the nonfracture group (1.15 +/- 0.10 < 1.23 +/- 0.090, p < 0.0013). The histomorphometric analysis shows that bone surface total volume (p < 0.0002), trabecular number (p < 0.0001), and osteoid surface bone surface (p < 0.028) are significantly lower in the fracture group than the nonfracture group. Eroded surface/bone surface (p < 0.056) follows this trend, whereas trabecular separation (p < 0.001) is significantly higher in the fracture group than in the nonfracture group. Fractal 1 and fractal 3 were not significantly different between study groups. The fractal dimension detects changes in the cancellous architecture and gives information about iliac bone transformation in postmenopausal women with vertebral fracture.

  18. Canine epidermal neural crest stem cells: characterization and potential as therapy candidate for a large animal model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gericota, Barbara; Anderson, Joseph S; Mitchell, Gaela; Borjesson, Dori L; Sturges, Beverly K; Nolta, Jan A; Sieber-Blum, Maya

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of multipotent neural crest-derived stem cells, named epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSC), that persist postnatally in an easy-to-access location-the bulge of hair follicles-opens a spectrum of novel opportunities for patient-specific therapies. We present a detailed characterization of canine EPI-NCSC (cEPI-NCSC) from multiple dog breeds and protocols for their isolation and ex vivo expansion. Furthermore, we provide novel tools for research in canines, which currently are still scarce. In analogy to human and mouse EPI-NCSC, the neural crest origin of cEPI-NCSC is shown by their expression of the neural crest stem cell molecular signature and other neural crest-characteristic genes. Similar to human EPI-NCSC, cEPI-NCSC also expressed pluripotency genes. We demonstrated that cEPI-NCSC can generate all major neural crest derivatives. In vitro clonal analyses established multipotency and self-renewal ability of cEPI-NCSC, establishing cEPI-NCSC as multipotent somatic stem cells. A critical analysis of the literature on canine spinal cord injury (SCI) showed the need for novel treatments and suggested that cEPI-NCSC represent viable candidates for cell-based therapies in dog SCI, particularly for chondrodystrophic dogs. This notion is supported by the close ontological relationship between neural crest stem cells and spinal cord stem cells. Thus, cEPI-NCSC promise to offer not only a potential treatment for canines but also an attractive and realistic large animal model for human SCI. Taken together, we provide the groundwork for the development of a novel cell-based therapy for a condition with extremely poor prognosis and no available effective treatment.

  19. Canine Epidermal Neural Crest Stem Cells: Characterization and Potential as Therapy Candidate for a Large Animal Model of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gericota, Barbara; Anderson, Joseph S.; Mitchell, Gaela; Borjesson, Dori L.; Sturges, Beverly K.; Nolta, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of multipotent neural crest-derived stem cells, named epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSC), that persist postnatally in an easy-to-access location—the bulge of hair follicles—opens a spectrum of novel opportunities for patient-specific therapies. We present a detailed characterization of canine EPI-NCSC (cEPI-NCSC) from multiple dog breeds and protocols for their isolation and ex vivo expansion. Furthermore, we provide novel tools for research in canines, which currently are still scarce. In analogy to human and mouse EPI-NCSC, the neural crest origin of cEPI-NCSC is shown by their expression of the neural crest stem cell molecular signature and other neural crest-characteristic genes. Similar to human EPI-NCSC, cEPI-NCSC also expressed pluripotency genes. We demonstrated that cEPI-NCSC can generate all major neural crest derivatives. In vitro clonal analyses established multipotency and self-renewal ability of cEPI-NCSC, establishing cEPI-NCSC as multipotent somatic stem cells. A critical analysis of the literature on canine spinal cord injury (SCI) showed the need for novel treatments and suggested that cEPI-NCSC represent viable candidates for cell-based therapies in dog SCI, particularly for chondrodystrophic dogs. This notion is supported by the close ontological relationship between neural crest stem cells and spinal cord stem cells. Thus, cEPI-NCSC promise to offer not only a potential treatment for canines but also an attractive and realistic large animal model for human SCI. Taken together, we provide the groundwork for the development of a novel cell-based therapy for a condition with extremely poor prognosis and no available effective treatment. PMID:24443004

  20. Latex beads as probes of a neural crest pathway: effects of laminin, collagen, and surface charge on bead translocation

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    In the trunk region of avian embryos, neural crest cells migrate along two pathways: dorsally just under the ectoderm, and ventrally between the neural tube and the somites. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that uncoated latex beads are able to translocate along the ventral neural crest pathway after injection into young embryos; however, beads coated with fibronectin are restricted from the ventral route ( Bronner -Fraser, M.E., 1982, Dev. Biol., 91: 50-63). Here, we extend these observations to determine the effects of other macromolecules on bead distribution. The data show that laminin-coated beads, like fibronectin-coated beads, are restricted from the ventral pathway. In contrast, beads coated with type I collagen translocate ventrally after injection. Because macromolecules have characteristic charge properties, changes in surface charge caused by coating the beads may confound interpretation of the results. Electrostatic effects on bead movement were examined by coating the latex beads with polyamino acids in order to predictably alter the initial surface charge. The surface charge before injection was measured for beads coated with amino acid polymers or with various biologically important macromolecules; the subsequent translocation ability of these beads was then monitored in the embryo. Polylysine-coated beads (positively charged) were restricted from the ventral pathway as were fibronectin and laminin-coated beads, even though fibronectin and laminin beads were both negatively charged. In contrast, polytyrosine -coated beads ( neutrally charged) translocated ventrally as did negatively charged collagen-coated or uncoated beads. The results demonstrate that no correlation exists between the charge properties on the latex bead surface and their subsequent ability to translocate along the ventral pathway. Therefore, an adhesion mechanism independent of surface charge effects must explain the restriction or translocation of latex beads on a

  1. Efficient animal-serum free 3D cultivation method for adult human neural crest-derived stem cell therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Greiner, J F W; Hauser, S; Widera, D; Müller, J; Qunneis, F; Zander, C; Martin, I; Mallah, J; Schuetzmann, D; Prante, C; Schwarze, H; Prohaska, W; Beyer, A; Rott, K; Hütten, A; Gölzhäuser, A; Sudhoff, H; Kaltschmidt, C; Kaltschmidt, B

    2011-12-17

    Due to their broad differentiation potential and their persistence into adulthood, human neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) harbour great potential for autologous cellular therapies, which include the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and replacement of complex tissues containing various cell types, as in the case of musculoskeletal injuries. The use of serum-free approaches often results in insufficient proliferation of stem cells and foetal calf serum implicates the use of xenogenic medium components. Thus, there is much need for alternative cultivation strategies. In this study we describe for the first time a novel, human blood plasma based semi-solid medium for cultivation of human NCSCs. We cultivated human neural crest-derived inferior turbinate stem cells (ITSCs) within a blood plasma matrix, where they revealed higher proliferation rates compared to a standard serum-free approach. Three-dimensionality of the matrix was investigated using helium ion microscopy. ITSCs grew within the matrix as revealed by laser scanning microscopy. Genetic stability and maintenance of stemness characteristics were assured in 3D cultivated ITSCs, as demonstrated by unchanged expression profile and the capability for self-renewal. ITSCs pre-cultivated in the 3D matrix differentiated efficiently into ectodermal and mesodermal cell types, particularly including osteogenic cell types. Furthermore, ITSCs cultivated as described here could be easily infected with lentiviruses directly in substrate for potential tracing or gene therapeutic approaches. Taken together, the use of human blood plasma as an additive for a completely defined medium points towards a personalisable and autologous cultivation of human neural crest-derived stem cells under clinical grade conditions.

  2. Spatial ecology of the critically endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, in an extremely dense population: implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Suzanne F; Biciloa, Pita; Harlow, Peter S; Keogh, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Critically Endangered Fijian crested iguana, Brachylophus vitiensis, occurs at extreme density at only one location, with estimates of >10,000 iguanas living on the 70 hectare island of Yadua Taba in Fiji. We conducted a mark and recapture study over two wet seasons, investigating the spatial ecology and intraspecific interactions of the strictly arboreal Fijian crested iguana. This species exhibits moderate male-biased sexual size dimorphism, which has been linked in other lizard species to territoriality, aggression and larger male home ranges. We found that male Fijian crested iguanas exhibit high injury levels, indicative of frequent aggressive interactions. We did not find support for larger home range size in adult males relative to adult females, however male and female residents were larger than roaming individuals. Males with established home ranges also had larger femoral pores relative to body size than roaming males. Home range areas were small in comparison to those of other iguana species, and we speculate that the extreme population density impacts considerably on the spatial ecology of this population. There was extensive home range overlap within and between sexes. Intersexual overlap was greater than intrasexual overlap for both sexes, and continuing male-female pairings were observed among residents. Our results suggest that the extreme population density necessitates extensive home range overlap even though the underlying predictors of territoriality, such as male biased sexual size dimorphism and high aggression levels, remain. Our findings should be factored in to conservation management efforts for this species, particularly in captive breeding and translocation programs.

  3. Evolution of Long Waves with Finite-Crest over a Sloping Beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, U.; Aydin, B.; Koroglu, B.; Moore, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a new analytical solution to study the propagation and runup of long waves with a finite-crest over constant sloping beach under two-dimensional linear shallow water-wave equations. Even though an analytical solution for this problem might help to understand unusually pronounced runup observations from recent events, limited numbers of solutions are available. Koshimura et al. (1999, Coastal Eng Japan, v. 41(2), pp. 151-164) solved the canonical problem, i.e., a linearly sloping beach preceding a constant-depth region, in the presence of a vertical wall at the shoreline and obtained a solution in terms of series expansion in Laguerre polynomials. The same form of solution is also appeared for the propagation of edge waves, which are modeled in Fujima et al. (2000, Coastal Eng Japan, v. 42(2), pp. 211-236) and recently by Geist (2013, Pure Appl Geophys, doi: 10.1007/s00024-012-0491-7). Carrier (1995, in: Tsunami: Progress in Prediction, Disaster Prevention and Warning, Tsuchiya and Shuto (eds.), pp. 1-20), on the other hand, started with the nonlinear shallow-water wave equations and reduced the problem into a linear initial-value problem. As an initial wave profile, Carrier (1995) imposed product of two independent single-variable functions, representing cross-sections in each spatial coordinate, and further provided results for runup. Recently, Kanoglu et al. (2013, Proc R Soc A, v. 469, 20130015, doi: 10.1098/rspa.2013.0015) introduced a new exact analytical solution to study the propagation of a finite strip source over constant-depth using the linear shallow-water wave theory. They showed the existence of focusing points for N-wave-type initial displacements, i.e. points where unexpectedly large wave heights may be observed. Here, we start with the linear equations and follow the solution methodology as in Carrier (1995). However, we differ in defining the initial condition, where we follow Kanoglu et al. (2013), which is more realistic such as

  4. Isolation and culture of neural crest cells from embryonic murine neural tube.

    PubMed

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R; Mundell, Nathan A; Labosky, Patricia A

    2012-06-02

    The embryonic neural crest (NC) is a multipotent progenitor population that originates at the dorsal aspect of the neural tube, undergoes an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migrates throughout the embryo, giving rise to diverse cell types. NC also has the unique ability to influence the differentiation and maturation of target organs. When explanted in vitro, NC progenitors undergo self-renewal, migrate and differentiate into a variety of tissue types including neurons, glia, smooth muscle cells, cartilage and bone. NC multipotency was first described from explants of the avian neural tube. In vitro isolation of NC cells facilitates the study of NC dynamics including proliferation, migration, and multipotency. Further work in the avian and rat systems demonstrated that explanted NC cells retain their NC potential when transplanted back into the embryo. Because these inherent cellular properties are preserved in explanted NC progenitors, the neural tube explant assay provides an attractive option for studying the NC in vitro. To attain a better understanding of the mammalian NC, many methods have been employed to isolate NC populations. NC-derived progenitors can be cultured from post-migratory locations in both the embryo and adult to study the dynamics of post-migratory NC progenitors, however isolation of NC progenitors as they emigrate from the neural tube provides optimal preservation of NC cell potential and migratory properties. Some protocols employ fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to isolate a NC population enriched for particular progenitors. However, when starting with early stage embryos, cell numbers adequate for analyses are difficult to obtain with FACS, complicating the isolation of early NC populations from individual embryos. Here, we describe an approach that does not rely on FACS and results in an approximately 96% pure NC population based on a Wnt1-Cre activated lineage reporter. The method presented here is adapted from

  5. Analysis of trunk neural crest cell migration using a modified Zigmond chamber assay.

    PubMed

    Walheim, Christopher C; Zanin, Juan Pablo; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2012-01-19

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a transient population of cells present in vertebrate development that emigrate from the dorsal neural tube (NT) after undergoing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Following EMT, NCCs migrate large distances along stereotypic pathways until they reach their targets. NCCs differentiate into a vast array of cell types including neurons, glia, melanocytes, and chromaffin cells. The ability of NCCs to reach and recognize their proper target locations is foundational for the appropriate formation of all structures containing trunk NCC-derived components. Elucidating the mechanisms of guidance for trunk NCC migration has therefore been a matter of great significance. Numerous molecules have been demonstrated to guide NCC migration. For instance, trunk NCCs are known to be repelled by negative guidance cues such as Semaphorin, Ephrin, and Slit ligands. However, not until recently have any chemoattractants of trunk NCCs been identified. Conventional in vitro approaches to studying the chemotactic behavior of adherent cells work best with immortalized, homogenously distributed cells, but are more challenging to apply to certain primary stem cell cultures that initially lack a homogenous distribution and rapidly differentiate (such as NCCs). One approach to homogenize the distribution of trunk NCCs for chemotaxis studies is to isolate trunk NCCs from primary NT explant cultures, then lift and replate them to be almost 100% confluent. However, this plating approach requires substantial amounts of time and effort to explant enough cells, is harsh, and distributes trunk NCCs in a dissimilar manner to that found in in vivo conditions. Here, we report an in vitro approach that is able to evaluate chemotaxis and other migratory responses of trunk NCCs without requiring a homogenous cell distribution. This technique utilizes time-lapse imaging of primary, unperturbed trunk NCCs inside a modified Zigmond chamber (a standard Zigmond chamber is

  6. Using Transportable Array and CREST data to define seismicity in the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, J.; Sheehan, A. F.; Bilek, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Active low strain-rate deformation across the Rio Grande Rift within the Western U.S. presents the possibility that strain is released through widespread small magnitude earthquakes. In order to define seismicity across the rift and understand its tectonic significance, we construct a catalog of small magnitude earthquakes from 2007-2010. Colorado has never had a statewide seismic network, thus previous catalogs are limited to that from the USGS and from short-term temporary seismometer deployments. New Mexico seismicity is monitored with regional networks around Socorro and Carlsbad, though not statewide. This study is the first opportunity to locate events in a spatially and temporally comprehensive network from the USArray Transportable Array (TA) experiment supplemented by the Colorado Rockies Experiment and Seismic Transects (CREST) seismic experiment (Karlstrom et al., 2012). Our earthquake catalog will supplement the USArray Array Network Facility (ANF) catalog with smaller magnitude events and refined regional velocity models. We use earthquake detection and location programs to create a raw catalog of associated events and initial locations from 254 seismic stations surrounding the Rio Grande Rift. Detection processing and event association parameters have been chosen specifically to extend the magnitude threshold relative to the ANF catalog (from 3.0 to approximately 1.5) . Mine blasts will be removed by manual waveform identification from the final catalog. The catalog is compared with catalogs of existing small seismic networks near and in the rift, for example, the New Mexico Tech Seismic Network. Questions of interest include: 1) Can earthquakes be identified that are rift-related? 2) What do the patterns of seismicity tell us about the tectonics of the Rio Grande Rift? Preliminary results show event associations to ML 0.0, although magnitude completeness is higher, and several hundred events are identified each month in 2008. Tectonic events will be

  7. Immunohistochemical localization of irisin in skin, eye, and thyroid and pineal glands of the crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Gençer Tarakçı, B; Girgin, A; Timurkaan, S; Yalçın, M H; Gür, F M; Karan, M

    2016-08-01

    Irisin was first identified in muscle cells. We detected irisin immunoreactivity in various organs of the crested porcupine (Hystrix cristata). In the epidermis, irisin immunoreactivity was localized mainly in stratum basale, stratum spinosum and stratum granulosum layers; immunoreactivity was not observed in the stratum corneum. In the dermis, irisin was found in the external and internal root sheath, cortex and medulla of hair follicles, and in sebaceous glands. Irisin immunoreactivity was found in the neural retina and skeletal muscle fibers associated with the eye. The pineal and thyroid glands also exhibited irisin immunoreactivity.

  8. Characteristics of short-crested waves and currents behind offshore man-made island type power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeno, Masaaki; Kajima, Ryoichi; Matsuyama, Masafumi; Sakakiyama, Tsutomu

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the diffracted waves with breaking and the nearshore currents caused by short-crested waves, behind a man-made island, on which nuclear power plants are constructed. Firstly, hydraulic model tests with a multi-directional wave maker were performed. Effects of the irregularity and directional spreading of waves, and the effects of cooling water intake flow on diffracted waves and nearshore currents behind a man-made island, were investigated experimentally. Secondly, a numerical model was developed to simulate deformation of multi-directional irregular waves and nearshore currents. The validity of the numerical model was verified through comparison with the experimental results.

  9. Recent population size, trends, and limiting factors for the double-crested Cormorant in Western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adkins, Jessica Y.; Roby, Daniel D.; Lyons, Donald E.; Courtot, Karen N.; Collis, Ken; Carter, Harry R.; Shuford, W. David; Capitolo, Phillip J.

    2014-01-01

    The status of the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) in western North America was last evaluated during 1987–2003. In the interim, concern has grown over the potential impact of predation by double-crested cormorants on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchusspp.), particularly in the Columbia Basin and along the Pacific coast where some salmonids are listed for protection under the United States Endangered Species Act. Recent re-evaluations of double-crested cormorant management at the local, flyway, and federal level warrant further examination of the current population size and trends in western North America. We collected colony size data for the western population (British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, and the portions of Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico west of the Continental Divide) by conducting aircraft-, boat-, or ground-based surveys and by cooperating with government agencies, universities, and non-profit organizations. In 2009, we estimated approximately 31,200 breeding pairs in the western population. We estimated that cormorant numbers in the Pacific Region (British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California) increased 72% from 1987–1992 to circa 2009. Based on the best available data for this period, the average annual growth rate (λ) of the number of breeding birds in the Pacific Region was 1.03, versus 1.07 for the population east of the Continental Divide during recent decades. Most of the increase in the Pacific Region can be attributed to an increase in the size of the nesting colony on East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary, which accounts for about 39% of all breeding pairs in the western population and is the largest known breeding colony for the species (12,087 breeding pairs estimated in 2009). In contrast, numbers of breeding pairs estimated in coastal British Columbia and Washington have declined by approximately 66% during this same period. Disturbance at breeding

  10. Impact of iliac crest bone graft harvesting on fusion rates and postoperative pain during instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllopoulos, Dimitrios; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Stafylas, Kosmas

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the influence of bone harvesting on postoperative pain and fusion rates. Group 1 patients received iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) either alone or augmented with local bone. Group 2 received only local bone. No statistical significance was found in radiological union or in the Oswestry Disability Index scores. Visual Analogue Scale scores showed less pain in group 2. Logistic regression showed no correlation between residual pain and occurrence of fusion. Harvesting ICBG did not appear to increase fusion rates and no relation was found between radiological non-union and pain. PMID:17724591

  11. UV-induced Wnt7a in the human skin microenvironment specifies the fate of neural crest -like cells via suppression of Notch

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Hristova, Denitsa M.; Wang, Joshua X.; Li, Ling; Heppt, Markus V.; Wei, Zhi; Gyurdieva, Alexandra; Webster, Marie R.; Oka, Masahiro; Weeraratna, Ashani T.; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells with neural crest-like properties have been identified in the dermis of human skin. These neural crest stem cell (NCSC)-like cells display self-renewal capacity and differentiate into neural crest derivatives, including epidermal pigment-producing melanocytes. NCSC-like cells share many properties with aggressive melanoma cells, such as high migratory capabilities and expression of the neural crest markers. However, little is known about which intrinsic or extrinsic signals determine the proliferation or differentiation of these neural crest-like stem cells. Here, we show that in NCSC-like cells, Notch signaling is highly activated, similar to melanoma cells. Inhibition of Notch signaling reduced proliferation of NCSC-like cells, induced cell death, and down-regulated non-canonical Wnt5a, suggesting that the Notch pathway contributes to the maintenance and motility of these stem cells. In three-dimensional skin reconstructs, canonical Wnt signaling promoted the differentiation of NCSC-like cells into melanocytes. This differentiation was triggered by the endogenous Notch inhibitor Numb, which is up-regulated in the stem cells by Wnt7a derived from UV-irradiated keratinocytes. Together, these data reveal a crosstalk between the two conserved developmental pathways in postnatal human skin, and highlight the role of the skin microenvironment in specifying the fate of stem cells. PMID:25705850

  12. Comparison of the breeding biology of sympatric red-tailed Hawks, White-tailed Hawks, and Crested Caracaras in south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Actkinson, M.A.; Kuvlesky, W.P.; Boal, C.W.; Brennan, L.A.; Hernandez, F.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the breeding biology of sympatric nesting Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), White-tailed Hawks (Buteo albicaudatus), and Crested Caracaras (Caracara cheriway) in south Texas during 2003 and 2004. We monitored 46 breeding attempts by Red-tailed Hawks, 56 by White-tailed Hawks, and 27 by Crested Caracaras. Observed nesting success was similar for Red-tailed Hawks (62%) and Crested Caracaras (61%), but lower for White-tailed Hawks (51%). Daily survival rates (0.99) were the same for all three species. Red-tailed Hawks and White-tailed Hawks both fledged 1.13 young per nesting pair and Crested Caracaras fledged 1.39 young per nesting pair. All three species nested earlier in 2004 than in 2003; in addition, the overall nesting density of these three species almost doubled from 2003 (1.45 pairs/km2) to 2004 (2.71 pairs/km2). Estimated productivity of all three species was within the ranges reported from other studies. Given extensive and progressive habitat alteration in some areas of south Texas, and the limited distributions of White-tailed Hawks and Crested Caracaras, the presence of large ranches managed for free-range cattle production and hunting leases likely provides important habitat and may be key areas for conservation of these two species. ?? 2009 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  13. Analyses of fugu hoxa2 genes provide evidence for subfunctionalization of neural crest cell and rhombomere cis-regulatory modules during vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    McEllin, Jennifer A; Alexander, Tara B; Tümpel, Stefan; Wiedemann, Leanne M; Krumlauf, Robb

    2016-01-15

    Hoxa2 gene is a primary player in regulation of craniofacial programs of head development in vertebrates. Here we investigate the evolution of a Hoxa2 neural crest enhancer identified originally in mouse by comparing and contrasting the fugu hoxa2a and hoxa2b genes with their orthologous teleost and mammalian sequences. Using sequence analyses in combination with transgenic regulatory assays in zebrafish and mouse embryos we demonstrate subfunctionalization of regulatory activity for expression in hindbrain segments and neural crest cells between these two fugu co-orthologs. hoxa2a regulatory sequences have retained the ability to mediate expression in neural crest cells while those of hoxa2b include cis-elements that direct expression in rhombomeres. Functional dissection of the neural crest regulatory potential of the fugu hoxa2a and hoxa2b genes identify the previously unknown cis-element NC5, which is implicated in generating the differential activity of the enhancers from these genes. The NC5 region plays a similar role in the ability of this enhancer to mediate reporter expression in mice, suggesting it is a conserved component involved in control of neural crest expression of Hoxa2 in vertebrate craniofacial development.

  14. Gene transfer of lacZ into avian neural tube and neural crest cells by retroviral infection of grafted embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Stocker, K M; Brown, A M; Ciment, G

    1993-01-01

    We describe here a new method for transferring genes into cells of the neural tube and neural crest of early avian embryos in vivo. Using the marker gene lacZ as an example, we infected dissected neural tubes from Hamburger-Hamilton stage 12-13 quail embryos with a replication-defective retrovirus carrying lacZ during a 2 hr period of exposure to the virus in culture. Infected neural tubes were then grafted into uninfected host chicken embryos in ovo and, after continued development for several days, the chimeric embryos were processed for beta-galactosidase histochemistry to identify the progeny of infected cells. We show that virus-infected neural tubes grafted isotopically into the trunk region of host embryos gave rise to cells of both the spinal cord and neural crest. Infected neural crest cells localized within dorsal root ganglia, sympathetic ganglia, peripheral nerves, and within the skin, where they were likely to give rise to melanocytes. These data are consistent with those using other cell marking techniques applied to the neural crest, indicating that retrovirus infection in culture, grafting, and beta-galactosidase expression has a neutral effect on neural crest cell migration and localization. These results indicate the heterospecific grafting of early avian tissues infected with retroviruses carrying foreign genes may be an effective strategy for testing the biological role of various gene products during development.

  15. Facilitating permeability of landscapes impacted by roads for protected amphibians: patterns of movement for the great crested newt

    PubMed Central

    Petrovan, Silviu; Ward, Alastair I.; Wheeler, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Amphibian populations are highly vulnerable to road mortality and habitat fragmentation caused by road networks. Wildlife road tunnels are considered the most promising road mitigation measure for amphibians yet generally remain inadequately monitored, resulting in mixed success rates in the short-term and uncertain conservation benefits in the long-term. We monitored a complex multi-tunnel and fence system over five years and investigated the impact of the scheme on movement patterns of two newt species, including the largest known UK population of the great crested newt (Triturus cristatus), a European Protected Species. We used a stage descriptive approach based on capture positions to quantify newt movement patterns. Newt species successfully used the mitigation but the system constituted a bottleneck to movements from the fences to the tunnels. Crossing rates varied widely among years and were skewed towards autumn dispersal rather than spring breeding migration. There was a substantial negative bias against adult male great crested newts using the system. This study indicates that road tunnels could partially mitigate wider connectivity loss and fragmentation at the landscape scale for newt species. However, the observed bottleneck effects and seasonal bias could have population-level effects which must be better understood, especially for small populations, so that improvements can be made. Current requirements for monitoring mitigation schemes post-implementation are probably too short to assess their effectiveness in maintaining connectivity and to adequately understand their population-level impacts. PMID:28265490

  16. A nonsynonymous mutation in the transcriptional regulator lbh is associated with cichlid craniofacial adaptation and neural crest cell development.

    PubMed

    Powder, Kara E; Cousin, Hélène; McLinden, Gretchen P; Craig Albertson, R

    2014-12-01

    Since the time of Darwin, biologists have sought to understand the origins and maintenance of life's diversity of form. However, the nature of the exact DNA mutations and molecular mechanisms that result in morphological differences between species remains unclear. Here, we characterize a nonsynonymous mutation in a transcriptional coactivator, limb bud and heart homolog (lbh), which is associated with adaptive variation in the lower jaw of cichlid fishes. Using both zebrafish and Xenopus, we demonstrate that lbh mediates migration of cranial neural crest cells, the cellular source of the craniofacial skeleton. A single amino acid change that is alternatively fixed in cichlids with differing facial morphologies results in discrete shifts in migration patterns of this multipotent cell type that are consistent with both embryological and adult craniofacial phenotypes. Among animals, this polymorphism in lbh represents a rare example of a coding change that is associated with continuous morphological variation. This work offers novel insights into the development and evolution of the craniofacial skeleton, underscores the evolutionary potential of neural crest cells, and extends our understanding of the genetic nature of mutations that underlie divergence in complex phenotypes.

  17. A Nonsynonymous Mutation in the Transcriptional Regulator lbh Is Associated with Cichlid Craniofacial Adaptation and Neural Crest Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Powder, Kara E.; Cousin, Hélène; McLinden, Gretchen P.; Craig Albertson, R.

    2014-01-01

    Since the time of Darwin, biologists have sought to understand the origins and maintenance of life’s diversity of form. However, the nature of the exact DNA mutations and molecular mechanisms that result in morphological differences between species remains unclear. Here, we characterize a nonsynonymous mutation in a transcriptional coactivator, limb bud and heart homolog (lbh), which is associated with adaptive variation in the lower jaw of cichlid fishes. Using both zebrafish and Xenopus, we demonstrate that lbh mediates migration of cranial neural crest cells, the cellular source of the craniofacial skeleton. A single amino acid change that is alternatively fixed in cichlids with differing facial morphologies results in discrete shifts in migration patterns of this multipotent cell type that are consistent with both embryological and adult craniofacial phenotypes. Among animals, this polymorphism in lbh represents a rare example of a coding change that is associated with continuous morphological variation. This work offers novel insights into the development and evolution of the craniofacial skeleton, underscores the evolutionary potential of neural crest cells, and extends our understanding of the genetic nature of mutations that underlie divergence in complex phenotypes. PMID:25234704

  18. Geologic map of the Jam Up Cave and Pine Crest quadrangles, Shannon, Texas, and Howell Counties, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weary, David J.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Repetski, John E.

    2013-01-01

    The Jam Up Cave and Pine Crest 7.5-minute quadrangles are located in south-central Missouri within the Salem Plateau region of the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province. About 2,400 to 3,100 feet (ft) of flat-lying to gently dipping Lower Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, mostly dolomite, chert, sandstone, and orthoquartzite, overlie Mesoproterozoic igneous basement rocks. Unconsolidated residuum, colluvium, terrace deposits, and alluvium overlie the sedimentary rocks. Numerous karst features, such as sinkholes, caves, and springs, have formed in the carbonate rocks. Many streams are spring fed. The topography is a dissected karst plain with elevations ranging from about 690 ft where the Jacks Fork River exits the northeastern corner of the Jam Up Cave quadrangle to about 1,350 ft in upland areas along the north-central edge and southwestern corner of the Pine Crest quadrangle. The most prominent physiographic feature is the valley of the Jacks Fork River. This reach of the upper Jacks Fork, with its clean, swiftly-flowing water confined by low cliffs and bluffs, provides one of the most beautiful canoe float trips in the nation. Most of the land in the quadrangles is privately owned and used primarily for grazing cattle and horses and growing timber. A large minority of the land within the quadrangles is publicly owned by the Ozark National Scenic Riverways of the National Park Service. Geologic mapping for this investigation was conducted in 2005 and 2006.

  19. Tail-like anther crest aids pollination by manipulating pollinator’s behaviour in a wild ginger

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong-Li; Li, Qing-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Innovative floral organs are widely distributed taxonomically in angiosperms, and some of them are conspicuous and curious in morphology. Floral organs have long been supposed to play a crucial role in fertilization by pollinators. However, why innovative organs occur, how they are adapted for pollinators and what sexual roles they play are still puzzling. Here we focused on a wild ginger (Zingiber densissimum, Zingiberaceae) and tested the function of the curious anther crest, an innovative floral structure widely distributed in Zingiberaceae. The anther crest is a specialized anther appendage that extends up from the top of the anther to form a tail-like structure, about 150% as long as the anther. We found this structure promoted both the male and the female functions of plants by manipulating its pollinators and causing pollinators to adopt a position ideal for pollen removal and receipt. This study provides a novel example of structure adaptation in which both the male and the female functions are enhanced by resource allocation on a male organ, expanding the knowledge of the sexual roles