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Sample records for abbe diffraction limit

  1. What is the diffraction limit? From Airy to Abbe using direct numerical integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calm, Y. M.; Merlo, J. M.; Burns, M. J.; Kempa, K.; Naughton, M. J.

    The resolution of a conventional optical microscope is sometimes taken from Airy's point spread function (PSF), 0 . 61 λ / NA , and sometimes from Abbe, λ / 2 NA , where NA is the numerical aperture, however modern fluorescence and near-field optical microscopies achieve spatial resolution far better than either of these limits. There is a new category of 2D metamaterials called planar optical elements (POEs), which have a microscopic thickness (< λ), macroscopic transverse dimensions (> 100 λ), and are composed of an array of nanostructured light scatterers. POEs are found in a range of micro- and nano-photonic technologies, and will influence the future optical nanoscopy. With this pretext, we shed some light on the 'diffraction limit' by numerically evaluating Kirchhoff's scalar formulae (in their exact form) and identifying the features of highly non-paraxial, 3D PSFs. We show that the Airy and Abbe criteria are connected, and we comment on the design rules for a particular type of POE: the flat lens. This work is supported by the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  2. Bending the Rules: Widefield Microscopy and the Abbe Limit of Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Verdaasdonk, Jolien S.; Stephens, Andrew D.; Haase, Julian; Bloom, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    One of the most fundamental concepts of microscopy is that of resolution–the ability to clearly distinguish two objects as separate. Recent advances such as structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and point localization techniques including photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM), and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) strive to overcome the inherent limits of resolution of the modern light microscope. These techniques, however, are not always feasible or optimal for live cell imaging. Thus, in this review, we explore three techniques for extracting high resolution data from images acquired on a widefield microscope–deconvolution, model convolution, and Gaussian fitting. Deconvolution is a powerful tool for restoring a blurred image using knowledge of the point spread function (PSF) describing the blurring of light by the microscope, although care must be taken to ensure accuracy of subsequent quantitative analysis. The process of model convolution also requires knowledge of the PSF to blur a simulated image which can then be compared to the experimentally acquired data to reach conclusions regarding its geometry and fluorophore distribution. Gaussian fitting is the basis for point localization microscopy, and can also be applied to tracking spot motion over time or measuring spot shape and size. All together, these three methods serve as powerful tools for high-resolution imaging using widefield microscopy. PMID:23893718

  3. Sub-diffraction limit laser ablation via multiple exposures using a digital micromirror device.

    PubMed

    Heath, Daniel J; Grant-Jacob, James A; Feinaeugle, Matthias; Mills, Ben; Eason, Robert W

    2017-08-01

    We present the use of digital micromirror devices as variable illumination masks for pitch-splitting multiple exposures to laser machine the surfaces of materials. Ultrafast laser pulses of length 150 fs and 800 nm central wavelength were used for the sequential machining of contiguous patterns on the surface of samples in order to build up complex structures with sub-diffraction limit features. Machined patterns of tens to hundreds of micrometers in lateral dimensions with feature separations as low as 270 nm were produced in electroless nickel on an optical setup diffraction limited to 727 nm, showing a reduction factor below the Abbe diffraction limit of ∼2.7×. This was compared to similar patterns in a photoresist optimized for two-photon absorption, which showed a reduction factor of only 2×, demonstrating that multiple exposures via ablation can produce a greater resolution enhancement than via two-photon polymerization.

  4. Scalar limitations of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric G.; Hochmuth, Diane; Moharam, M. G.; Pommet, Drew

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, scalar limitations of diffractive optic components are investigated using coupled wave analyses. Results are presented for linear phase gratings and fanout devices. In addition, a parametric curve is given which correlates feature size with scalar performance.

  5. Printing colour at the optical diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karthik; Duan, Huigao; Hegde, Ravi S; Koh, Samuel C W; Wei, Jennifer N; Yang, Joel K W

    2012-09-01

    The highest possible resolution for printed colour images is determined by the diffraction limit of visible light. To achieve this limit, individual colour elements (or pixels) with a pitch of 250 nm are required, translating into printed images at a resolution of ∼100,000 dots per inch (d.p.i.). However, methods for dispensing multiple colourants or fabricating structural colour through plasmonic structures have insufficient resolution and limited scalability. Here, we present a non-colourant method that achieves bright-field colour prints with resolutions up to the optical diffraction limit. Colour information is encoded in the dimensional parameters of metal nanostructures, so that tuning their plasmon resonance determines the colours of the individual pixels. Our colour-mapping strategy produces images with both sharp colour changes and fine tonal variations, is amenable to large-volume colour printing via nanoimprint lithography, and could be useful in making microimages for security, steganography, nanoscale optical filters and high-density spectrally encoded optical data storage.

  6. Coherent imaging at the diffraction limit

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Pierre; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Menzel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    X-ray ptychography, a scanning coherent diffractive imaging technique, holds promise for imaging with dose-limited resolution and sensitivity. If the foreseen increase of coherent flux by orders of magnitude can be matched by additional technological and analytical advances, ptychography may approach imaging speeds familiar from full-field methods while retaining its inherently quantitative nature and metrological versatility. Beyond promises of high throughput, spectroscopic applications in three dimensions become feasible, as do measurements of sample dynamics through time-resolved imaging or careful characterization of decoherence effects. PMID:25177990

  7. Coherent imaging at the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Pierre; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Menzel, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    X-ray ptychography, a scanning coherent diffractive imaging technique, holds promise for imaging with dose-limited resolution and sensitivity. If the foreseen increase of coherent flux by orders of magnitude can be matched by additional technological and analytical advances, ptychography may approach imaging speeds familiar from full-field methods while retaining its inherently quantitative nature and metrological versatility. Beyond promises of high throughput, spectroscopic applications in three dimensions become feasible, as do measurements of sample dynamics through time-resolved imaging or careful characterization of decoherence effects.

  8. Nanofocusing beyond the near-field diffraction limit via plasmonic Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Song, Maowen; Wang, Changtao; Zhao, Zeyu; Pu, Mingbo; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Honglin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-21

    The past decade has witnessed a great deal of optical systems designed for exceeding the Abbe's diffraction limit. Unfortunately, a deep subwavelength spot is obtained at the price of extremely short focal length, which is indeed a near-field diffraction limit that could rarely go beyond in the nanofocusing device. One method to mitigate such a problem is to set up a rapid oscillatory electromagnetic field that converges at the prescribed focus. However, abrupt modulation of phase and amplitude within a small fraction of a wavelength seems to be the main obstacle in the visible regime, aggravated by loss and plasmonic features that come into function. In this paper, we propose a periodically repeated ring-disk complementary structure to break the near-field diffraction limit via plasmonic Fano resonance, originating from the interference between the complex hybrid plasmon resonance and the continuum of propagating waves through the silver film. This plasmonic Fano resonance introduces a π phase jump in the adjacent channels and amplitude modulation to achieve radiationless electromagnetic interference. As a result, deep subwavelength spots as small as 0.0045λ(2) at 36 nm above the silver film have been numerically demonstrated. This plate holds promise for nanolithography, subdiffraction imaging and microscopy.

  9. Sub-diffraction limit resolution in microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Ming (Inventor); Chen, Weinong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for visualizing sub-micron size particles employs a polarizing microscope wherein a focused beam of polarized light is projected onto a target, and a portion of the illuminating light is blocked from reaching the specimen, whereby to produce a shadow region, and projecting diffracted light from the target onto the shadow region.

  10. Nanofocusing beyond the near-field diffraction limit via plasmonic Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Maowen; Wang, Changtao; Zhao, Zeyu; Pu, Mingbo; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Honglin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a great deal of optical systems designed for exceeding the Abbe's diffraction limit. Unfortunately, a deep subwavelength spot is obtained at the price of extremely short focal length, which is indeed a near-field diffraction limit that could rarely go beyond in the nanofocusing device. One method to mitigate such a problem is to set up a rapid oscillatory electromagnetic field that converges at the prescribed focus. However, abrupt modulation of phase and amplitude within a small fraction of a wavelength seems to be the main obstacle in the visible regime, aggravated by loss and plasmonic features that come into function. In this paper, we propose a periodically repeated ring-disk complementary structure to break the near-field diffraction limit via plasmonic Fano resonance, originating from the interference between the complex hybrid plasmon resonance and the continuum of propagating waves through the silver film. This plasmonic Fano resonance introduces a π phase jump in the adjacent channels and amplitude modulation to achieve radiationless electromagnetic interference. As a result, deep subwavelength spots as small as 0.0045λ2 at 36 nm above the silver film have been numerically demonstrated. This plate holds promise for nanolithography, subdiffraction imaging and microscopy.The past decade has witnessed a great deal of optical systems designed for exceeding the Abbe's diffraction limit. Unfortunately, a deep subwavelength spot is obtained at the price of extremely short focal length, which is indeed a near-field diffraction limit that could rarely go beyond in the nanofocusing device. One method to mitigate such a problem is to set up a rapid oscillatory electromagnetic field that converges at the prescribed focus. However, abrupt modulation of phase and amplitude within a small fraction of a wavelength seems to be the main obstacle in the visible regime, aggravated by loss and plasmonic features that come into function. In this

  11. Higher-order harmonics of limited diffraction Bessel beams

    PubMed

    Ding; Lu

    2000-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the nonlinear propagation of the limited diffraction Bessel beam in nonlinear media, under the successive approximation of the KZK equation. The result shows that the nth-order harmonic of the Bessel beam, like its fundamental component, is radially limited diffracting, and that the main beamwidth of the nth-order harmonic is exactly 1/n times that of the fundamental.

  12. Physics issues in diffraction limited storage ring design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wei; Bai, ZhengHe; Gao, WeiWei; Feng, GuangYao; Li, WeiMin; Wang, Lin; He, DuoHui

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction limited electron storage ring is considered a promising candidate for future light sources, whose main characteristics are higher brilliance, better transverse coherence and better stability. The challenge of diffraction limited storage ring design is how to achieve the ultra low beam emittance with acceptable nonlinear performance. Effective linear and nonlinear parameter optimization methods based on Artificial Intelligence were developed for the storage ring physical design. As an example of application, partial physical design of HALS (Hefei Advanced Light Source), which is a diffraction limited VUV and soft X-ray light source, was introduced. Severe emittance growth due to the Intra Beam Scattering effect, which is the main obstacle to achieve ultra low emittance, was estimated quantitatively and possible cures were discussed. It is inspiring that better performance of diffraction limited storage ring can be achieved in principle with careful parameter optimization.

  13. Impact of workstations on criticality analyses at ABB combustion engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Tarko, L.B.; Freeman, R.S.; O'Donnell, P.F.

    1993-01-01

    During 1991, ABB Combustion Engineering (ABB C-E) made the transition from a CDC Cyber 990 mainframe for nuclear criticality safety analyses to Hewlett Packard (HP)/Apollo workstations. The primary motivation for this change was improved economics of the workstation and maintaining state-of-the-art technology. The Cyber 990 utilized the NOS operating system with a 60-bit word size. The CPU memory size was limited to 131 100 words of directly addressable memory with an extended 250000 words available. The Apollo workstation environment at ABB consists of HP/Apollo-9000/400 series desktop units used by most application engineers, networked with HP/Apollo DN10000 platforms that use 32-bitmore » word size and function as the computer servers and network administrative CPUS, providing a virtual memory system.« less

  14. ABB's advanced steam turbine program

    SciTech Connect

    Chellini, R.

    Demand for industrial steam turbines for combined-cycle applications and cogeneration plants has influenced turbine manufacturers to standardize their machines to reduce delivery time and cost. ABB, also a supplier of turnkey plants, manufactures steam turbines in Finspong, Sweden, at the former ASEA Stal facilities and in Nuernberg, Germany, at the former AEG facilities. The companies have joined forces, setting up the advanced Steam Turbine Program (ATP) that, once completed, will cover a power range from two to 100 MW. The company decided to use two criteria as a starting point, the high efficiency design of the Swedish turbines and themore » high reliability of the German machines. Thus, the main task was combining the two designs in standard machines that could be assembled quickly into predefined packages to meet specific needs of combined-cycle and cogeneration plants specified by customers. In carrying out this project, emphasis was put on cost reduction as one of the main goals. The first results of the ATP program, presented by ABB Turbinen Nuernberg, is the range of 2-30 MW turbines covered by two frame sizes comprising standard components supporting the thermodynamic module. An important feature is the standardization of the speed reduction gearbox.« less

  15. Breaking resolution limits in ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy.

    PubMed

    Baum, Peter; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2006-10-31

    Ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction are powerful techniques for the study of the time-resolved structures of molecules, materials, and biological systems. Central to these approaches is the use of ultrafast coherent electron packets. The electron pulses typically have an energy of 30 keV for diffraction and 100-200 keV for microscopy, corresponding to speeds of 33-70% of the speed of light. Although the spatial resolution can reach the atomic scale, the temporal resolution is limited by the pulse width and by the difference in group velocities of electrons and the light used to initiate the dynamical change. In this contribution, we introduce the concept of tilted optical pulses into diffraction and imaging techniques and demonstrate the methodology experimentally. These advances allow us to reach limits of time resolution down to regimes of a few femtoseconds and, possibly, attoseconds. With tilted pulses, every part of the sample is excited at precisely the same time as when the electrons arrive at the specimen. Here, this approach is demonstrated for the most unfavorable case of ultrafast crystallography. We also present a method for measuring the duration of electron packets by autocorrelating electron pulses in free space and without streaking, and we discuss the potential of tilting the electron pulses themselves for applications in domains involving nuclear and electron motions.

  16. Breaking resolution limits in ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Peter; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction are powerful techniques for the study of the time-resolved structures of molecules, materials, and biological systems. Central to these approaches is the use of ultrafast coherent electron packets. The electron pulses typically have an energy of 30 keV for diffraction and 100–200 keV for microscopy, corresponding to speeds of 33–70% of the speed of light. Although the spatial resolution can reach the atomic scale, the temporal resolution is limited by the pulse width and by the difference in group velocities of electrons and the light used to initiate the dynamical change. In this contribution, we introduce the concept of tilted optical pulses into diffraction and imaging techniques and demonstrate the methodology experimentally. These advances allow us to reach limits of time resolution down to regimes of a few femtoseconds and, possibly, attoseconds. With tilted pulses, every part of the sample is excited at precisely the same time as when the electrons arrive at the specimen. Here, this approach is demonstrated for the most unfavorable case of ultrafast crystallography. We also present a method for measuring the duration of electron packets by autocorrelating electron pulses in free space and without streaking, and we discuss the potential of tilting the electron pulses themselves for applications in domains involving nuclear and electron motions. PMID:17056711

  17. Unusual scaling laws for plasmonic nanolasers beyond the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suo; Wang, Xing-Yuan; Li, Bo; Chen, Hua-Zhou; Wang, Yi-Lun; Dai, Lun; Oulton, Rupert F; Ma, Ren-Min

    2017-12-01

    Plasmonic nanolasers are a new class of amplifiers that generate coherent light well below the diffraction barrier bringing fundamentally new capabilities to biochemical sensing, super-resolution imaging, and on-chip optical communication. However, a debate about whether metals can enhance the performance of lasers has persisted due to the unavoidable fact that metallic absorption intrinsically scales with field confinement. Here, we report plasmonic nanolasers with extremely low thresholds on the order of 10 kW cm -2 at room temperature, which are comparable to those found in modern laser diodes. More importantly, we find unusual scaling laws allowing plasmonic lasers to be more compact and faster with lower threshold and power consumption than photonic lasers when the cavity size approaches or surpasses the diffraction limit. This clarifies the long-standing debate over the viability of metal confinement and feedback strategies in laser technology and identifies situations where plasmonic lasers can have clear practical advantage.

  18. Diffraction-Limited Plenoptic Imaging with Correlated Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, Francesco V.; Di Lena, Francesco; Mazzilli, Aldo; Edrei, Eitan; Garuccio, Augusto; Scarcelli, Giuliano; D'Angelo, Milena

    2017-12-01

    Traditional optical imaging faces an unavoidable trade-off between resolution and depth of field (DOF). To increase resolution, high numerical apertures (NAs) are needed, but the associated large angular uncertainty results in a limited range of depths that can be put in sharp focus. Plenoptic imaging was introduced a few years ago to remedy this trade-off. To this aim, plenoptic imaging reconstructs the path of light rays from the lens to the sensor. However, the improvement offered by standard plenoptic imaging is practical and not fundamental: The increased DOF leads to a proportional reduction of the resolution well above the diffraction limit imposed by the lens NA. In this Letter, we demonstrate that correlation measurements enable pushing plenoptic imaging to its fundamental limits of both resolution and DOF. Namely, we demonstrate maintaining the imaging resolution at the diffraction limit while increasing the depth of field by a factor of 7. Our results represent the theoretical and experimental basis for the effective development of promising applications of plenoptic imaging.

  19. Diffraction-Limited Plenoptic Imaging with Correlated Light.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Francesco V; Di Lena, Francesco; Mazzilli, Aldo; Edrei, Eitan; Garuccio, Augusto; Scarcelli, Giuliano; D'Angelo, Milena

    2017-12-15

    Traditional optical imaging faces an unavoidable trade-off between resolution and depth of field (DOF). To increase resolution, high numerical apertures (NAs) are needed, but the associated large angular uncertainty results in a limited range of depths that can be put in sharp focus. Plenoptic imaging was introduced a few years ago to remedy this trade-off. To this aim, plenoptic imaging reconstructs the path of light rays from the lens to the sensor. However, the improvement offered by standard plenoptic imaging is practical and not fundamental: The increased DOF leads to a proportional reduction of the resolution well above the diffraction limit imposed by the lens NA. In this Letter, we demonstrate that correlation measurements enable pushing plenoptic imaging to its fundamental limits of both resolution and DOF. Namely, we demonstrate maintaining the imaging resolution at the diffraction limit while increasing the depth of field by a factor of 7. Our results represent the theoretical and experimental basis for the effective development of promising applications of plenoptic imaging.

  20. Higher-order harmonics of general limited diffraction Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, De-Sheng; Huang, Jin-Huang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we extensively study the higher-order harmonic generation of the general limited diffraction m-th-order Bessel beam. The analysis is based on successive approximations of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation. Asymptotic expansions are presented for higher-order harmonic Bessel beams in near and far fields. The validity of asymptotic approximation is also analyzed. The higher-order harmonic of the Bessel beam with the lowest zero-order is taken as a special example. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11074038 and 11374051).

  1. Diffraction-limited storage-ring vacuum technology

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dmour, Eshraq; Ahlback, Jonny; Einfeld, Dieter; Tavares, Pedro Fernandes; Grabski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Some of the characteristics of recent ultralow-emittance storage-ring designs and possibly future diffraction-limited storage rings are a compact lattice combined with small magnet apertures. Such requirements present a challenge for the design and performance of the vacuum system. The vacuum system should provide the required vacuum pressure for machine operation and be able to handle the heat load from synchrotron radiation. Small magnet apertures result in the conductance of the chamber being low, and lumped pumps are ineffective. One way to provide the required vacuum level is by distributed pumping, which can be realised by the use of a non-evaporable getter (NEG) coating of the chamber walls. It may not be possible to use crotch absorbers to absorb the heat from the synchrotron radiation because an antechamber is difficult to realise with such a compact lattice. To solve this, the chamber walls can work as distributed absorbers if they are made of a material with good thermal conductivity, and distributed cooling is used at the location where the synchrotron radiation hits the wall. The vacuum system of the 3 GeV storage ring of MAX IV is used as an example of possible solutions for vacuum technologies for diffraction-limited storage rings. PMID:25177979

  2. Shaping the spatial and spectral emissivity at the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Makhsiyan, Mathilde; MiNaO, Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures; Bouchon, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.bouchon@onera.fr

    Metasurfaces have attracted a growing interest for their ability to artificially tailor an electromagnetic response on various spectral ranges. In particular, thermal sources with unprecedented abilities, such as directionality or monochromaticity, have been achieved. However, these metasurfaces exhibit homogeneous optical properties whereas the spatial modulation of the emissivity up to the wavelength scale is at the crux of the design of original emitters. In this letter, we study an inhomogeneous metasurface made of a nonperiodic set of optical nano-antennas that spatially and spectrally control the emitted light up to the diffraction limit. Each antenna acts as an independent deep subwavelengthmore » emitter for given polarization and wavelength. Their juxtaposition at the subwavelength scale encodes far field multispectral and polarized images. This opens up promising breakthroughs for applications such as optical storage, anti-counterfeit devices, and multispectral emitters for biochemical sensing.« less

  3. Collective Effects in a Diffraction Limited Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Ryutaro; Bane, Karl L.F.

    Our paper gives an overview of collective effects that are likely to appear and possibly limit the performance in a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR) that stores a high-intensity ultra-low-emittance beam. Beam instabilities and other intensity-dependent effects that may significantly impact the machine performance are covered. The latter include beam-induced machine heating, Touschek scattering, intra-beam scattering, as well as incoherent tune shifts. The general trend that the efforts to achieve ultra-low emittance result in increasing the machine coupling impedance and the beam sensitivity to instability is reviewed. The nature of coupling impedance in a DLSR is described, followed by a seriesmore » of potentially dangerous beam instabilities driven by the former, such as resistive-wall, TMCI (transverse mode coupling instability), head-tail and microwave instabilities. Additionally, beam-ion and CSR (coherent synchrotron radiation) instabilities are also treated. Means to fight against collective effects such as lengthening of the bunch with passive harmonic cavities and bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback are introduced. Numerical codes developed and used to evaluate the machine coupling impedance, as well as to simulate beam instability using the former as inputs are described.« less

  4. Collective Effects in a Diffraction Limited Storage Ring

    DOE PAGES

    Nagaoka, Ryutaro; Bane, Karl L.F.

    2015-10-20

    Our paper gives an overview of collective effects that are likely to appear and possibly limit the performance in a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR) that stores a high-intensity ultra-low-emittance beam. Beam instabilities and other intensity-dependent effects that may significantly impact the machine performance are covered. The latter include beam-induced machine heating, Touschek scattering, intra-beam scattering, as well as incoherent tune shifts. The general trend that the efforts to achieve ultra-low emittance result in increasing the machine coupling impedance and the beam sensitivity to instability is reviewed. The nature of coupling impedance in a DLSR is described, followed by a seriesmore » of potentially dangerous beam instabilities driven by the former, such as resistive-wall, TMCI (transverse mode coupling instability), head-tail and microwave instabilities. Additionally, beam-ion and CSR (coherent synchrotron radiation) instabilities are also treated. Means to fight against collective effects such as lengthening of the bunch with passive harmonic cavities and bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback are introduced. Numerical codes developed and used to evaluate the machine coupling impedance, as well as to simulate beam instability using the former as inputs are described.« less

  5. Diffraction-limited lucky imaging with a 12" commercial telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Brian J.

    2014-08-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel lucky imaging camera which is designed to produce diffraction-limited imaging using small telescopes similar to ones used by many academic institutions for outreach and/or student training. We present a design that uses a Meade 12" SCT paired with an Andor iXon fast readout EMCCD. The PSF of the telescope is matched to the pixel size of the EMCCD by adding a simple, custom-fabricated, intervening optical system. We demonstrate performance of the system by observing both astronomical and terrestrial targets. The astronomical application requires simpler data reconstruction techniques as compared to the terrestrial case. We compare different lucky imaging registration and reconstruction algorithms for use with this imager for both astronomical and terrestrial targets. We also demonstrate how this type of instrument would be useful for both undergraduate and graduate student training. As an instructional aide, the instrument can provide a hands-on approach for teaching instrument design, standard data reduction techniques, lucky imaging data processing, and high resolution imaging concepts.

  6. Image contrast of diffraction-limited telescopes for circular incoherent sources of uniform radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackleford, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A simple approximate formula is derived for the background intensity beyond the edge of the image of uniform incoherent circular light source relative to the irradiance near the center of the image. The analysis applies to diffraction-limited telescopes with or without central beam obscuration due to a secondary mirror. Scattering off optical surfaces is neglected. The analysis is expected to be most applicable to spaceborne IR telescopes, for which diffraction can be the major source of off-axis response.

  7. A study of angular spectrum and limited diffraction beams for calculation of field of array transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jiqi; Lu, Jian-Yu

    2002-05-01

    Angular spectrum is one of the most powerful tools for field calculation. It is based on linear system theory and the Fourier transform and is used for the calculation of propagating sound fields at different distances. In this report, the generalization and interpretation of the angular spectrum and its intrinsic relationship with limited diffraction beams are studied. With an angular spectrum, the field at the surface of a transducer is decomposed into limited diffractions beams. For an array transducer, a linear relationship between the quantized fields at the surface of elements of the array and the propagating field at any point in space can be established. For an annular array, the field is decomposed into limited diffraction Bessel beams [P. D. Fox and S. Holm, IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 49, 85-93 (2002)], while for a two-dimensional (2-D) array the field is decomposed into limited diffraction array beams [J-y. Lu and J. Cheng, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 2397-2398 (2001)]. The angular spectrum reveals the intrinsic link between these decompositions. [Work supported in part by Grant 5RO1 HL60301 from NIH.

  8. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5–12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  9. Near-field limitations of Fresnel-regime coherent diffraction imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Pound, Benjamin A.; Barber, John L.; Nguyen, Kimberly; ...

    2017-08-04

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a rapidly developing form of imaging that offers the potential of wavelength-limited resolution without image-forming lenses. In CDI, the intensity of the diffraction pattern is measured directly by the detector, and various iterative phase retrieval algorithms are used to “invert” the diffraction pattern and reconstruct a high-resolution image of the sample. But, there are certain requirements in CDI that must be met to reconstruct the object. Although most experiments are conducted in the “far-field”—or Fraunhofer—regime where the requirements are not as stringent, some experiments must be conducted in the “near field” where Fresnel diffraction mustmore » be considered. According to the derivation of Fresnel diffraction, successful reconstructions can only be obtained when the small-angle number, a derived quantity, is much less than one. We show, however, that it is not actually necessary to fulfill the small-angle condition. The Fresnel kernel well approximates the exact kernel in regions where the phase oscillates slowly, and in regions of fast oscillations, indicated by large A n , the error between kernels should be negligible due to stationary-phase arguments. Finally we verify, by experiment, this conclusion with a helium neon laser setup and show that it should hold at x-ray wavelengths as well.« less

  10. Near-field limitations of Fresnel-regime coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Benjamin A.; Barber, John L.; Nguyen, Kimberly; Tyson, Matthew C.; Sandberg, Richard L.

    2017-08-01

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a rapidly developing form of imaging that offers the potential of wavelength-limited resolution without image-forming lenses. In CDI, the intensity of the diffraction pattern is measured directly by the detector, and various iterative phase retrieval algorithms are used to "invert" the diffraction pattern and reconstruct a high-resolution image of the sample. However, there are certain requirements in CDI that must be met to reconstruct the object. Although most experiments are conducted in the "far-field"—or Fraunhofer—regime where the requirements are not as stringent, some experiments must be conducted in the "near field" where Fresnel diffraction must be considered. According to the derivation of Fresnel diffraction, successful reconstructions can only be obtained when the small-angle number, a derived quantity, is much less than one. We show, however, that it is not actually necessary to fulfill the small-angle condition. The Fresnel kernel well approximates the exact kernel in regions where the phase oscillates slowly, and in regions of fast oscillations, indicated by large A n , the error between kernels should be negligible due to stationary-phase arguments. We experimentally verify this conclusion with a helium neon laser setup and show that it should hold at x-ray wavelengths as well.

  11. AbbVie Ltd., Barceloneta, PR Amended Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency's Region 2 Office (EPA) received an October 11,2017 submittal from the law firm of Toro, Colon, Mullet, Rivera & Sifre, P.S.c. on behalf of AbbVieLtd.

  12. Modified Linnik microscopic interferometry for quantitative depth evaluation of diffraction-limited microgroove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shiwei; Takahashi, Satoru; Michihata, Masaki; Takamasu, Kiyoshi

    2018-05-01

    The quality control of microgrooves is extremely crucial to ensure the performance and stability of microstructures and improve their fabrication efficiency. This paper introduces a novel optical inspection method and a modified Linnik microscopic interferometer measurement system to detect the depth of microgrooves with a width less than the diffraction limit. Using this optical method, the depth of diffraction-limited microgrooves can be related to the near-field optical phase difference, which cannot be practically observed but can be computed from practical far-field observations. Thus, a modified Linnik microscopic interferometer system based on three identical objective lenses and an optical path reversibility principle were developed. In addition, experiments for standard grating microgrooves on the silicon surface were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility and repeatability of the proposed method and developed measurement system.

  13. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping

    2015-09-21

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  14. Nondestructive strain depth profiling with high energy X-ray diffraction: System capabilities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhan; Wendt, Scott; Cosentino, Nicholas; Bond, Leonard J.

    2018-04-01

    Limited by photon energy, and penetration capability, traditional X-ray diffraction (XRD) strain measurements are only capable of achieving a few microns depth due to the use of copper (Cu Kα1) or molybdenum (Mo Kα1) characteristic radiation. For deeper strain depth profiling, destructive methods are commonly necessary to access layers of interest by removing material. To investigate deeper depth profiles nondestructively, a laboratory bench-top high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) system was previously developed. This HEXRD method uses an industrial 320 kVp X-Ray tube and the Kα1 characteristic peak of tungsten, to produces a higher intensity X-ray beam which enables depth profiling measurement of lattice strain. An aluminum sample was investigated with deformation/load provided using a bending rig. It was shown that the HEXRD method is capable of strain depth profiling to 2.5 mm. The method was validated using an aluminum sample where both the HEXRD method and the traditional X-ray diffraction method gave data compared with that obtained using destructive etching layer removal, performed by a commercial provider. The results demonstrate comparable accuracy up to 0.8 mm depth. Nevertheless, higher attenuation capabilities in heavier metals limit the applications in other materials. Simulations predict that HEXRD works for steel and nickel in material up to 200 µm, but experiment results indicate that the HEXRD strain profile is not practical for steel and nickel material, and the measured diffraction signals are undetectable when compared to the noise.

  15. Long-baseline optical intensity interferometry. Laboratory demonstration of diffraction-limited imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D.

    2015-08-01

    Context. A long-held vision has been to realize diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometer baselines. This will enable imaging of stellar surfaces and their environments, and reveal interacting gas flows in binary systems. An opportunity is now opening up with the large telescope arrays primarily erected for measuring Cherenkov light in air induced by gamma rays. With suitable software, such telescopes could be electronically connected and also used for intensity interferometry. Second-order spatial coherence of light is obtained by cross correlating intensity fluctuations measured in different pairs of telescopes. With no optical links between them, the error budget is set by the electronic time resolution of a few nanoseconds. Corresponding light-travel distances are approximately one meter, making the method practically immune to atmospheric turbulence or optical imperfections, permitting both very long baselines and observing at short optical wavelengths. Aims: Previous theoretical modeling has shown that full images should be possible to retrieve from observations with such telescope arrays. This project aims at verifying diffraction-limited imaging experimentally with groups of detached and independent optical telescopes. Methods: In a large optics laboratory, artificial stars (single and double, round and elliptic) were observed by an array of small telescopes. Using high-speed photon-counting solid-state detectors and real-time electronics, intensity fluctuations were cross-correlated over up to 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, producing coherence maps across the interferometric Fourier-transform plane. Results: These interferometric measurements were used to extract parameters about the simulated stars, and to reconstruct their two-dimensional images. As far as we are aware, these are the first diffraction-limited images obtained from an optical array only linked by electronic software, with no optical connections between the

  16. Compact high-resolution spectrographs for large and extremely large telescopes: using the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. Gordon; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2012-09-01

    As telescopes get larger, the size of a seeing-limited spectrograph for a given resolving power becomes larger also, and for ELTs the size will be so great that high resolution instruments of simple design will be infeasible. Solutions include adaptive optics (but not providing full correction for short wavelengths) or image slicers (which give feasible but still large instruments). Here we develop the solution proposed by Bland-Hawthorn and Horton: the use of diffraction-limited spectrographs which are compact even for high resolving power. Their use is made possible by the photonic lantern, which splits a multi-mode optical fiber into a number of single-mode fibers. We describe preliminary designs for such spectrographs, at a resolving power of R ~ 50,000. While they are small and use relatively simple optics, the challenges are to accommodate the longest possible fiber slit (hence maximum number of single-mode fibers in one spectrograph) and to accept the beam from each fiber at a focal ratio considerably faster than for most spectrograph collimators, while maintaining diffraction-limited imaging quality. It is possible to obtain excellent performance despite these challenges. We also briefly consider the number of such spectrographs required, which can be reduced by full or partial adaptive optics correction, and/or moving towards longer wavelengths.

  17. FRIDA: diffraction-limited imaging and integral-field spectroscopy for the GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Alan M.; Acosta-Pulido, José A.; Álvarez-Núñez, Luis C.; Bringas-Rico, Vicente; Cardiel, Nicolás.; Cardona, Salvador; Chapa, Oscar; Díaz García, José Javier; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Espejo, Carlos; Flores-Meza, Rubén. A.; Fuentes-Fernández, Jorge; Gallego, Jesús; Garcés Medina, José Leonardo; Garzón López, Francisco; Hammersley, Peter; Keiman, Carolina; Lara, Gerardo; López, José Alberto; López, Pablo L.; Lucero, Diana; Moreno Arce, Heidy; Pascual Ramirez, Sergio; Patrón Recio, Jesús; Prieto, Almudena; Rodríguez, Alberto José; Marco de la Rosa, José; Sánchez, Beatriz; Uribe, Jorge A.; Váldez Berriozabal, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    FRIDA is a diffraction-limited imager and integral-field spectrometer that is being built for the adaptive-optics focus of the Gran Telescopio Canarias. In imaging mode FRIDA will provide scales of 0.010, 0.020 and 0.040 arcsec/pixel and in IFS mode spectral resolutions of 1500, 4000 and 30,000. FRIDA is starting systems integration and is scheduled to complete fully integrated system tests at the laboratory by the end of 2017 and to be delivered to GTC shortly thereafter. In this contribution we present a summary of its design, fabrication, current status and potential scientific applications.

  18. Focusing metasurface quantum-cascade laser with a near diffraction-limited beam

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Luyao; Chen, Daguan; Itoh, Tatsuo; ...

    2016-10-17

    A terahertz vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser (VECSEL) is demonstrated using an active focusing reflectarray metasurface based on quantum-cascade gain material. The focusing effect enables a hemispherical cavity with flat optics, which exhibits higher geometric stability than a plano-plano cavity and a directive and circular near-diffraction limited Gaussian beam with M 2 beam parameter as low as 1.3 and brightness of 1.86 × 10 6 Wsr –1m –2. As a result, this work initiates the potential of leveraging inhomogeneous metasurface and reflectarray designs to achieve high-power and high-brightness terahertz quantum-cascade VECSELs.

  19. Adaptive conversion of a high-order mode beam into a near-diffraction-limited beam.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haichuan; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Haotong; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Yanxing; Xu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Yijun

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method for efficiently transforming a high-order mode beam into a nearly Gaussian beam with much higher beam quality. The method is based on modulation of phases of different lobes by stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm and coherent addition after phase flattening. We demonstrate the method by transforming an LP11 mode into a nearly Gaussian beam. The experimental results reveal that the power in the diffraction-limited bucket in the far field is increased by more than a factor of 1.5.

  20. High Quantum Efficiency Nanopillar Photodiodes Overcoming the Diffraction Limit of Light.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook-Jae; Senanayake, Pradeep; Farrell, Alan C; Lin, Andrew; Hung, Chung-Hong; Huffaker, Diana L

    2016-01-13

    InAs1-xSbx nanowires have recently attracted interest for infrared sensing applications due to the small bandgap and high thermal conductivity. However, previous reports on nanowire-based infrared sensors required low operating temperatures in order to mitigate the high dark current and have shown poor sensitivities resulting from reduced light coupling efficiency beyond the diffraction limit. Here, InAsSb nanopillar photodiodes with high quantum efficiency are achieved by partially coating the nanopillar with metal that excites localized surface plasmon resonances, leading to quantum efficiencies of ∼29% at 2390 nm. These high quantum efficiency nanopillar photodiodes, with 180 nm diameters and 1000 nm heights, allow operation at temperatures as high as 220 K and exhibit a detection wavelength up to 3000 nm, well beyond the diffraction limit. The InAsSb nanopillars are grown on low cost GaAs (111)B substrates using an InAs buffer layer, making our device architecture a promising path toward low-cost infrared focal plane arrays with high operating temperature.

  1. Space infrared telescope facility wide field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1988-01-01

    The wide-field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC) is capable of two-dimensional photometry in either a wide-field or diffraction-limited mode over the wavelength range from 2 to 30 microns with a possible extension to 120 microns. A low-doped indium antimonide detector was developed for 1.8 to 5.0 microns, detectors were tested and optimized for the entire 1.8 to 30 micron range, beamsplitters were developed and tested for the 1.8 to 30 micron range, and tradeoff studies of the camera's optical system performed. Data are presented on the performance of InSb, Si:In, Si:Ga, and Si:Sb array detectors bumpbonded to a multiplexed CMOS readout chip of the source-follower type at SIRTF operating backgrounds (equal to or less than 1 x 10 to the 8th ph/sq cm/sec) and temperature (4 to 12 K). Some results at higher temperatures are also presented for comparison to SIRTF temperature results. Data are also presented on the performance of IRAC beamsplitters at room temperature at both 0 and 45 deg angle of incidence and on the performance of the all-reflecting optical system baselined for the camera.

  2. Scanning digital lithography providing high speed large area patterning with diffraction limited sub-micron resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Sy-Bor; Bhaskar, Arun; Zhang, Hongjie

    2018-07-01

    A scanning digital lithography system using computer controlled digital spatial light modulator, spatial filter, infinity correct optical microscope and high precision translation stage is proposed and examined. Through utilizing the spatial filter to limit orders of diffraction modes for light delivered from the spatial light modulator, we are able to achieve diffraction limited deep submicron spatial resolution with the scanning digital lithography system by using standard one inch level optical components with reasonable prices. Raster scanning of this scanning digital lithography system using a high speed high precision x-y translation stage and piezo mount to real time adjust the focal position of objective lens allows us to achieve large area sub-micron resolved patterning with high speed (compared with e-beam lithography). It is determined in this study that to achieve high quality stitching of lithography patterns with raster scanning, a high-resolution rotation stage will be required to ensure the x and y directions of the projected pattern are in the same x and y translation directions of the nanometer precision x-y translation stage.

  3. Efficient photonic reformatting of celestial light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, D. G.; Harris, R. J.; Gris-Sánchez, I.; Morris, T. J.; Choudhury, D.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Spaleniak, I.; Arriola, A.; Birks, T. A.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2017-02-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive astronomical spectrograph is limited by the trade-off between throughput and the width of the entrance slit. Photonic guided wave transitions have been proposed as a route to bypass this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of incoherent seeing-limited light collected by the telescope into a linear array of single modes: a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis but diffraction-limited in the dispersion axis of the spectrograph. It is anticipated that the size of a single-object spectrograph fed with light in this manner would be essentially independent of the telescope aperture size. A further anticipated benefit is that such spectrographs would be free of `modal noise', a phenomenon that occurs in high-resolution multimode fibre-fed spectrographs due to the coherent nature of the telescope point spread function (PSF). We seek to address these aspects by integrating a multicore fibre photonic lantern with an ultrafast laser inscribed three-dimensional waveguide interconnect to spatially reformat the modes within the PSF into a diffraction-limited pseudo-slit. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and 1530 ± 80 nm stellar light, the device exhibits a transmission of 47-53 per cent depending upon the mode of AO correction applied. We also show the advantage of using AO to couple light into such a device by sampling only the core of the CANARY PSF. This result underscores the possibility that a fully optimized guided-wave device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  4. Reaching the Diffraction Limit - Differential Speckle and Wide-Field Imaging for the WIYN Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Nic J.; Howell, Steve; Horch, Elliott

    2016-01-01

    Speckle imaging allows telescopes to achieve diffraction limited imaging performance. The technique requires cameras capable of reading out frames at a very fast rate, effectively 'freezing out' atmospheric seeing. The resulting speckles can be correlated and images reconstructed that are at the diffraction limit of the telescope. These new instruments are based on the successful performance and design of the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI).The instruments are being built for the Gemini-N and WIYN telescopes and will be made available to the community via the peer review proposal process. We envision their primary use to be validation and characterization of exoplanet targets from the NASA, K2 and TESS missions and RV discovered exoplanets. Such targets will provide excellent follow-up candidates for both the WIYN and Gemini telescopes. We expect similar data quality in speckle imaging mode with the new instruments. Additionally, both cameras will have a wide-field mode and standard SDSS filters. They will be highly versatile instruments and it is that likely many other science programs will request time on the cameras. The limiting magnitude for speckle observations will remain around 13-14th at WIYN and 16-17th at Gemini, while wide-field, normal CCD imaging operation should be able to go to much fainter, providing usual CCD imaging and photometric capabilities. The instruments will also have high utility as scoring cameras for telescope engineering purposes, or other applications where high time resolution is needed. Instrument support will be provided, including a software pipeline that takes raw speckle data to fully reconstructed images.

  5. Programmable diffractive optic for multi-beam processing: applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gretzki, Patrick; Gillner, Arnold

    2017-08-01

    In the field of laser ablation, especially in the field of micro-structuring, the current challenge is the improvement of productivity. While many applications, e.g. surface fictionalization and structuring, drilling and thin film ablation, use relatively low pulse energies, industrial laser sources provide considerably higher average powers and pulse energies. The main challenge consist of the effective energy distribution and depositions. There are essential two complementary approaches for the up-scaling of (ultra) short pulse laser processes: Higher repetition frequency or higher pulse energies. Using lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz region can cause thermal issues like overheating, melt production and low ablation quality. In this paper we pursuit the second approach by using diffractive optics for parallel processing. We will discuss, which technologies can be used and which applications will benefit from the multi-beam approach and which increase in productivity can be expected. Additionally we will show, which quality attributes can be used to rate the performance of a diffractive optic and and which limitations and restrictions this technology has.

  6. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: TWO-ZONE PCE BIOREMEDIATION SYSTEM - ABB ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. - U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABB Environmental Services, Inc.'s (ABB-ES), research has demonstrated that sequential anaerobic/aerobic biodegradation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is feasible if the proper conditions can be established. The anaerobic process can potentially completely dechlorinate PCE. Howeve...

  7. Creation of diffraction-limited non-Airy multifocal arrays using a spatially shifted vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Han; Gu, Min

    2013-02-01

    Diffraction-limited non-Airy multifocal arrays are created by focusing a phase-modulated vortex beam through a high numerical-aperture objective. The modulated phase at the back aperture of the objective resulting from the superposition of two concentric phase-modulated vortex beams allows for the generation of a multifocal array of cylindrically polarized non-Airy patterns. Furthermore, we shift the spatial positions of the phase vortices to manipulate the intensity distribution at each focal spot, leading to the creation of a multifocal array of split-ring patterns. Our method is experimentally validated by generating the predicted phase modulation through a spatial light modulator. Consequently, the spatially shifted circularly polarized vortex beam adopted in a dynamic laser direct writing system facilitates the fabrication of a split-ring microstructure array in a polymer material by a single exposure of a femtosecond laser beam.

  8. Diffraction limited focusing and routing of gap plasmons by a metal-dielectric-metal lens

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Brian S.; Czaplewski, David A.; Haftel, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Passive optical elements can play key roles in photonic applications such as plasmonic integrated circuits. Here we experimentally demonstrate passive gap-plasmon focusing and routing in two-dimensions. This is accomplished using a high numerical-aperture metal-dielectric-metal lens incorporated into a planar-waveguide device. Fabrication via metal sputtering, oxide deposition, electron-and focused-ion-beam lithography, and argon ion-milling is reported on in detail. Diffraction-limited focusing is optically characterized by sampling out-coupled light with a microscope. The measured focal distance and full-width-half-maximum spot size agree well with the calculated lens performance. The surface plasmon polariton propagation length is measured by sampling light from multiple out-coupler slits. (C)more » 2015 Optical Society of America« less

  9. Diffraction limited focusing and routing of gap plasmons by a metal-dielectric-metal lens

    DOE PAGES

    Dennis, Brian S.; Czaplewski, David A.; Haftel, Michael I.; ...

    2015-08-12

    Passive optical elements can play key roles in photonic applications such as plasmonic integrated circuits. Here we experimentally demonstrate passive gap-plasmon focusing and routing in two-dimensions. This is accomplished using a high numerical-aperture metal-dielectric-metal lens incorporated into a planar-waveguide device. Fabrication via metal sputtering, oxide deposition, electron- and focused-ion- beam lithography, and argon ion-milling is reported on in detail. Diffraction-limited focusing is optically characterized by sampling out-coupled light with a microscope. The measured focal distance and full-width-half-maximum spot size agree well with the calculated lens performance. The surface plasmon polariton propagation length is measured by sampling light from multiple out-couplermore » slits.« less

  10. Optical Imaging of Nonuniform Ferroelectricity and Strain at the Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Vlasin, Ondrej; Casals, Blai; Dix, Nico; Gutiérrez, Diego; Sánchez, Florencio; Herranz, Gervasi

    2015-01-01

    We have imaged optically the spatial distributions of ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity at the diffraction limit. Contributions to the birefringence from electro-optics –linked to ferroelectricity– as well as strain –arising from converse piezoelectric effects– have been recorded simultaneously in a BaTiO3 thin film. The concurrent recording of electro-optic and piezo-optic mappings revealed that, far from the ideal uniformity, the ferroelectric and piezoelectric responses were strikingly inhomogeneous, exhibiting significant fluctuations over the scale of the micrometer. The optical methods here described are appropriate to study the variations of these properties simultaneously, which are of great relevance when ferroelectrics are downscaled to small sizes for applications in data storage and processing. PMID:26522345

  11. Coherent total internal reflection dark-field microscopy: label-free imaging beyond the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    von Olshausen, Philipp; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2013-10-15

    Coherent imaging is barely applicable in life-science microscopy due to multiple interference artifacts. Here, we show how these interferences can be used to improve image resolution and contrast. We present a dark-field microscopy technique with evanescent illumination via total internal reflection that delivers high-contrast images of coherently scattering samples. By incoherent averaging of multiple coherent images illuminated from different directions we can resolve image structures that remain unresolved by conventional (incoherent) fluorescence microscopy. We provide images of 190 nm beads revealing resolution beyond the diffraction limit and slightly increased object distances. An analytical model is introduced that accounts for the observed effects and which is confirmed by numerical simulations. Our approach may be a route to fast, label-free, super-resolution imaging in live-cell microscopy.

  12. Optical resonance imaging: An optical analog to MRI with sub-diffraction-limited capabilities.

    PubMed

    Allodi, Marco A; Dahlberg, Peter D; Mazuski, Richard J; Davis, Hunter C; Otto, John P; Engel, Gregory S

    2016-12-21

    We propose here optical resonance imaging (ORI), a direct optical analog to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proposed pulse sequence for ORI maps space to time and recovers an image from a heterodyne-detected third-order nonlinear photon echo measurement. As opposed to traditional photon echo measurements, the third pulse in the ORI pulse sequence has significant pulse-front tilt that acts as a temporal gradient. This gradient couples space to time by stimulating the emission of a photon echo signal from different lateral spatial locations of a sample at different times, providing a widefield ultrafast microscopy. We circumvent the diffraction limit of the optics by mapping the lateral spatial coordinate of the sample with the emission time of the signal, which can be measured to high precision using interferometric heterodyne detection. This technique is thus an optical analog of MRI, where magnetic-field gradients are used to localize the spin-echo emission to a point below the diffraction limit of the radio-frequency wave used. We calculate the expected ORI signal using 15 fs pulses and 87° of pulse-front tilt, collected using f /2 optics and find a two-point resolution 275 nm using 800 nm light that satisfies the Rayleigh criterion. We also derive a general equation for resolution in optical resonance imaging that indicates that there is a possibility of superresolution imaging using this technique. The photon echo sequence also enables spectroscopic determination of the input and output energy. The technique thus correlates the input energy with the final position and energy of the exciton.

  13. Characterization of Differential Toll-Like Receptor Responses below the Optical Diffraction Limit**

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Jesse S.; Carson, Bryan D.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Many membrane receptors are recruited to specific cell surface domains to form nanoscale clusters upon ligand activation. This step appears to be necessary to initiate signaling, including pathways in innate immune system activation. However, virulent pathogens such as Yersinia pestis (the causative agent of plague) are known to evade innate immune detection, in contrast to similar microbes (such as E. coli) that elicit a robust response. This disparity has been partly attributed to the structure of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the bacterial cell wall, which are recognized by the innate immune receptor TLR4. As such, we hypothesized that nanoscale differences would exist between the spatial clustering of TLR4 upon binding of LPS derived from Y. pestis and E. coli. Although optical imaging can provide exquisite details of the spatial organization of biomolecules, there is a mismatch between the scale at which receptor clustering occurs (<300 nm) and the optical diffraction limit (>400 nm). The last decade has seen the emergence of super-resolution imaging methods that effectively break the optical diffraction barrier to yield truly nanoscale information in intact biological samples. This study reports the first visualizations of TLR4 distributions on intact cells at image resolutions of <30 nm using a novel, dual-color stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique. This methodology permits distinction between receptors containing bound LPS from those without at the nanoscale. Importantly, we also show that LPS derived from immuno-stimulatory bacteria resulted in significantly higher LPS-TLR4 cluster sizes and a nearly two-fold greater ligand/receptor colocalization as compared to immuno-evading LPS. PMID:22807232

  14. Diffraction limited gamma-ray optics using Fresnel lenses for micro-arc second angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, G.; von Ballmoos, P.; Gehrels, N.; Krzmanic, J.

    2003-03-01

    Refractive indices at gamma-ray wavelengths are such that material thicknesses of the order of millimeters allow the phase of a wavefront to be changed by up to 2π . Thus a phase Fresnel lens can be made from a simple profiled thin disk of, for example, aluminium or plastic. Such a lens can easily have a collecting area of several square meters and an efficiency >90%. Ordinary engineering tolerances allow the manufacture of a lens which can be diffraction limited in the pico-meter wavelength band (up to ˜MeV) and thus provides a simple optical system with angular resolution better than a micro arc second i.e. the resolution necessary to resolve structures on the scale of the event horizon of super-massive black holes in AGN. However the focal length of such a lens is very long - up to a million km. Nevertheless studies have shown that a mission `Fresnel' using a detector and a phase Fresnel lens on two station-keeping spacecraft separated by such a distance is feasible. Results from these studies and work on other proof of concept studies are presented.

  15. Sub-Diffraction Limited Writing based on Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS).

    PubMed

    He, Xiaolong; Datta, Anurup; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-10-10

    Controlled fabrication of single and multiple nanostructures far below the diffraction limit using a method based on laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is presented. In typical LIPSS, multiple lines with a certain spatial periodicity, but often not well-aligned, were produced. In this work, well-controlled and aligned nanowires and nanogrooves with widths as small as 40 nm and 60 nm with desired orientation and length are fabricated. Moreover, single nanowire and nanogroove were fabricated based on the same mechanism for forming multiple, periodic structures. Combining numerical modeling and AFM/SEM analyses, it was found these nanostructures were formed through the interference between the incident laser radiation and the surface plasmons, the mechanism for forming LIPSS on a dielectric surface using a high power femtosecond laser. We expect that our method, in particular, the fabrication of single nanowires and nanogrooves could be a promising alternative for fabrication of nanoscale devices due to its simplicity, flexibility, and versatility.

  16. Sub-Diffraction Limited Writing based on Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS)

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaolong; Datta, Anurup; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-01-01

    Controlled fabrication of single and multiple nanostructures far below the diffraction limit using a method based on laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is presented. In typical LIPSS, multiple lines with a certain spatial periodicity, but often not well-aligned, were produced. In this work, well-controlled and aligned nanowires and nanogrooves with widths as small as 40 nm and 60 nm with desired orientation and length are fabricated. Moreover, single nanowire and nanogroove were fabricated based on the same mechanism for forming multiple, periodic structures. Combining numerical modeling and AFM/SEM analyses, it was found these nanostructures were formed through the interference between the incident laser radiation and the surface plasmons, the mechanism for forming LIPSS on a dielectric surface using a high power femtosecond laser. We expect that our method, in particular, the fabrication of single nanowires and nanogrooves could be a promising alternative for fabrication of nanoscale devices due to its simplicity, flexibility, and versatility. PMID:27721428

  17. Diffraction limited 1064nm monolithic DBR-master oscillator power amplifier with more than 7W output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Christof; Maaβdorf, André; Fricke, Jörg; Ressel, Peter; Maiwald, Martin; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2018-02-01

    High brightness diode lasers with a spectrally narrowband emission, several watts of output power with an almost diffraction limited beam quality are requested light sources for several applications. In this work, a monolithic master oscillator power amplifier will be presented. The resonator of the master oscillator is formed by a high-reflection DBR grating on the rear side and an internal DBR mirror. Its power is amplified in a ridge waveguide followed by a tapered section. The monolithic MOPA provides over 7 W at 1064 nm with a narrow spectral emission width below 20 pm and an almost diffraction limited beam.

  18. An experimental apparatus for diffraction-limited soft x-ray nano-focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Yuan, Sheng; McKinney, Wayne R.; Celestre, Richard; Mochi, Iacopo; Macdougall, James; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Rakawa, Senajith B.; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Realizing the experimental potential of high-brightness, next generation synchrotron and free-electron laser light sources requires the development of reflecting x-ray optics capable of wavefront preservation and high-resolution nano-focusing. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for diffraction-limited Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of wavefront-sensing tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity, including scanning-slit Hartmann tests, grating-based lateral shearing interferometry, and quantitative knife-edge testing. We describe the original experimental techniques and alignment methodology that have enabled us to optimally set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused, FWHM spot size of 150 nm, with 1 nm (1.24 keV) photons at 3.7 mrad numerical aperture. The predictions of wavefront measurement are confirmed by the knife-edge testing. The side-profiled elliptically bent mirror used in these one-dimensional focusing experiments was originally designed for a much different glancing angle and conjugate distances. Visible-light long-trace profilometry was used to pre-align the mirror before installation at the beamline. This work demonstrates that high-accuracy, at-wavelength wavefront-slope feedback can be used to optimize the pitch, roll, and mirror-bending forces in situ, using procedures that are deterministic and repeatable.

  19. The LBT experience of adaptive secondary mirror operations for routine seeing- and diffraction-limited science operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, J. C.; Brusa, G.; Christou, J.; Miller, D.; Ricardi, A.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Wagner, M.; Lefebvre, M.; Sosa, R.

    2013-09-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is unique in that it is currently the only large telescope (2 x 8.4m primary mirrors) with permanently mounted adaptive secondary mirrors (ASMs). These ASMs have been used for regular observing since early 2010 on the right side and since late 2011 on the left side. They are currently regularly used for seeing-limited observing as well as for selective diffraction-limited observing and are required to be fully operational every observing night. By comparison the other telescopes using ASMs, the Multi Mirrot Telescope (MMT) and more recently Magellan, use fixed secondaries of seeing-limited observing and switch in the ASMs for diffraction-limited observing. We will discuss the night-to-night operational requirements for ASMs specifically for seeing-limited but also for diffraction-limited observations based on the LBT experience. These will include preparation procedures for observing (mirror flattening and resting as examples); hardware failure statistics and how to deal with them such as for the actuators; observing protocols for; and current limitations of use due to the ASM technology such as the minimum elevation limit (25 degrees) and the hysteresis of the gravity-vector induced astigmatism. We will also discuss the impact of ASM maintenance and preparation

  20. High contrast stellar observations within the diffraction limit at the Palomar Hale telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennesson, B.; Hanot, C.; Serabyn, E.; Martin, S. R.; Liewer, K.; Loya, F.; Mawet, D.

    2010-07-01

    We report on high-accuracy, high-resolution (< 20mas) stellar measurements obtained in the near infrared ( 2.2 microns) at the Palomar 200 inch telescope using two elliptical (3m x 1.5m) sub-apertures located 3.4m apart. Our interferometric coronagraph, known as the "Palomar Fiber Nuller" (PFN), is located downstream of the Palomar adaptive optics (AO) system and recombines the two separate beams into a common singlemode fiber. The AO system acts as a "fringe tracker", maintaining the optical path difference (OPD) between the beams around an adjustable value, which is set to the central dark interference fringe. AO correction ensures high efficiency and stable injection of the beams into the single-mode fiber. A chopper wheel and a fast photometer are used to record short (< 50ms per beam) interleaved sequences of background, individual beam and interferometric signals. In order to analyze these chopped null data sequences, we developed a new statistical method, baptized "Null Self-Calibration" (NSC), which provides astrophysical null measurements at the 0.001 level, with 1 σ uncertainties as low as 0.0003. Such accuracy translates into a dynamic range greater than 1000:1 within the diffraction limit, demonstrating that the approach effectively bridges the traditional gap between regular coronagraphs, limited in angular resolution, and long baseline visibility interferometers, whose dynamic range is restricted to 100:1. As our measurements are extremely sensitive to the brightness distribution very close to the optical axis, we were able to constrain the stellar diameters and amounts of circumstellar emission for a sample of very bright stars. With the improvement expected when the PALM-3000 extreme AO system comes on-line at Palomar, the same instrument now equipped with a state of the art low noise fast read-out near IR camera, will yield 10-4 to 10-3 contrast as close as 30 mas for stars with K magnitude brighter than 6. Such a system will provide a unique and

  1. Computational-optical microscopy for 3D biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Ginni

    In recent years, super-resolution imaging has become an important fluorescent microscopy tool. It has enabled imaging of structures smaller than the optical diffraction limit with resolution less than 50 nm. Extension to high-resolution volume imaging has been achieved by integration with various optical techniques. In this thesis, development of a fluorescent microscope to enable high resolution, extended depth, three dimensional (3D) imaging is discussed; which is achieved by integration of computational methods with optical systems. In the first part of the thesis, point spread function (PSF) engineering for volume imaging is discussed. A class of PSFs, referred to as double-helix (DH) PSFs, is generated. The PSFs exhibit two focused spots in the image plane which rotate about the optical axis, encoding depth in rotation of the image. These PSFs extend the depth-of-field up to a factor of ˜5. Precision performance of the DH-PSFs, based on an information theoretical analysis, is compared with other 3D methods with conclusion that the DH-PSFs provide the best precision and the longest depth-of-field. Out of various possible DH-PSFs, a suitable PSF is obtained for super-resolution microscopy. The DH-PSFs are implemented in imaging systems, such as a microscope, with a special phase modulation at the pupil plane. Surface-relief elements which are polarization-insensitive and ˜90% light efficient are developed for phase modulation. The photon-efficient DH-PSF microscopes thus developed are used, along with optimal position estimation algorithms, for tracking and super-resolution imaging in 3D. Imaging at depths-of-field of up to 2.5 microm is achieved without focus scanning. Microtubules were imaged with 3D resolution of (6, 9, 39) nm, which is in close agreement with the theoretical limit. A quantitative study of co-localization of two proteins in volume was conducted in live bacteria. In the last part of the thesis practical aspects of the DH-PSF microscope are

  2. The Gaussian beam mode analysis of classical phase aberrations in diffraction-limited optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappe, Neil; Murphy, J. Anthony; Withington, Stafford

    2003-07-01

    Gaussian beam mode analysis (GBMA) offers a more intuitive physical insight into how light beams evolve as they propagate than the conventional Fresnel diffraction integral approach. In this paper we illustrate that GBMA is a computationally efficient, alternative technique for tracing the evolution of a diffracting coherent beam. In previous papers we demonstrated the straightforward application of GBMA to the computation of the classical diffraction patterns associated with a range of standard apertures. In this paper we show how the GBMA technique can be expanded to investigate the effects of aberrations in the presence of diffraction by introducing the appropriate phase error term into the propagating quasi-optical beam. We compare our technique to the standard diffraction integral calculation for coma, astigmatism and spherical aberration, taking—for comparison—examples from the classic text 'Principles of Optics' by Born and Wolf. We show the advantages of GBMA for allowing the defocusing of an aberrated image to be evaluated quickly, which is particularly important and useful for probing the consequences of astigmatism and spherical aberration.

  3. X-ray nanoprobes and diffraction-limited storage rings: opportunities and challenges of fluorescence tomography of biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Ryan, Christopher G.; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray nanoprobes require coherent illumination to achieve optic-limited resolution, and so will benefit directly from diffraction-limited storage rings. Here, the example of high-resolution X-ray fluorescence tomography is focused on as one of the most voracious demanders of coherent photons, since the detected signal is only a small fraction of the incident flux. Alternative schemes are considered for beam delivery, sample scanning and detectors. One must consider as well the steps before and after the X-ray experiment: sample preparation and examination conditions, and analysis complexity due to minimum dose requirements and self-absorption. By understanding the requirements and opportunities for nanoscale fluorescence tomography, one gains insight into the R&D challenges in optics and instrumentation needed to fully exploit the source advances that diffraction-limited storage rings offer. PMID:25177992

  4. 15x optical zoom and extreme optical image stabilisation: diffraction limited integral field spectroscopy with the Oxford SWIFT spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Roberts, Jennifer; Dekany, Richard

    2012-09-01

    When commissioned in November 2008 at the Palomar 200 inch Hale Telescope, the Oxford SWIFT I and z band integral field spectrograph, fed by the adaptive optics system PALAO, provided a wide (3×) range of spatial resolutions: three plate scales of 235 mas, 160 mas, and 80 mas per spaxel over a contiguous field-of-view of 89×44 pixels. Depending on observing conditions and guide star brightness we can choose a seeing limited scale of 235 mas per spaxel, or 160 mas and 80 mas per spaxel for very bright guide star AO with substantial increase of enclosed energy. Over the last two years PALAO was upgraded to PALM-3000: an extreme, high-order adaptive optics system with two deformable mirrors with more than 3000 actuators, promising diffraction limited performance in SWIFT's wavelength range. In order to take advantage of this increased spatial resolution we upgraded SWIFT with new pre-optics allowing us to spatially Nyquist sample the diffraction limited PALM-3000 point spread function with 16 mas resolution, reducing the spaxel scale by another factor of 5×. We designed, manufactured, integrated and tested the new pre-optics in the first half of 2011 and commissioned it in December 2011. Here we present the opto-mechanical design and assembly of the new scale changing optics, as well as laboratory and on-sky commissioning results. In optimal observing conditions we achieve substantial Strehl ratios, delivering the near diffraction limited spatial resolution in the I and z bands.

  5. Throughput of diffraction-limited field optics systems for infrared and millimetric telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, R. H.; Winston, R.

    1982-01-01

    Telescopes for submillimeter wavelengths have point spread functions some millimeters or centimeters in diameter, but the detectors may be only fractions of a millimeter in size. Thus a field aperture and collecting optics are needed. Optimizing the aperture by a calculation of the effects of diffraction on signal and resolution as a function of size of the collecting aperture is shown. Calculations are compared to experimental results from observations of Mars at submillimeter wavelengths.

  6. Covariance of lucky images for increasing objects contrast: diffraction-limited images in ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagigal, Manuel P.; Valle, Pedro J.; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Villó-Pérez, Isidro; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Images of stars adopt shapes far from the ideal Airy pattern due to atmospheric density fluctuations. Hence, diffraction-limited images can only be achieved by telescopes without atmospheric influence, e.g. spatial telescopes, or by using techniques like adaptive optics or lucky imaging. In this paper, we propose a new computational technique based on the evaluation of the COvariancE of Lucky Images (COELI). This technique allows us to discover companions to main stars by taking advantage of the atmospheric fluctuations. We describe the algorithm and we carry out a theoretical analysis of the improvement in contrast. We have used images taken with 2.2-m Calar Alto telescope as a test bed for the technique resulting that, under certain conditions, telescope diffraction limit is clearly reached.

  7. Diffraction-limited, 300-kW peak-power pulses from a coiled multimode fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Teodoro, Fabio; Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Moore, Sean W.; Kliner, Dahv A. V.

    2002-04-01

    We report a multimode, double-clad, Yb-doped fiber amplifier that produces diffraction-limited, 0.8-ns pulses with energies of 255 μJ and peak powers in excess of 300 kW at a repetition rate of ~8 kHz. Single-transverse-mode operation was obtained by bend-loss-induced mode filtering of the gain fiber.

  8. Matter-wave diffraction approaching limits predicted by Feynman path integrals for multipath interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnea, A. Ronny; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Even, Uzi

    2018-02-01

    Interference experiments have been paramount in our understanding of quantum mechanics and are frequently the basis of testing the superposition principle in the framework of quantum theory. In recent years, several studies have challenged the nature of wave-function interference from the perspective of Born's rule—namely, the manifestation of so-called high-order interference terms in a superposition generated by diffraction of the wave functions. Here we present an experimental test of multipath interference in the diffraction of metastable helium atoms, with large-number counting statistics, comparable to photon-based experiments. We use a variation of the original triple-slit experiment and accurate single-event counting techniques to provide a new experimental bound of 2.9 ×10-5 on the statistical deviation from the commonly approximated null third-order interference term in Born's rule for matter waves. Our value is on the order of the maximal contribution predicted for multipath trajectories by Feynman path integrals.

  9. Calculating the Weather: Deductive Reasoning and Disciplinary "Telos" in Cleveland Abbe's Rhetorical Transformation of Meteorology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majdik, Zoltan P.; Platt, Carrie Anne; Meister, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the rhetorical basis of a major paradigm change in meteorology, from a focus on inductive observation to deductive, mathematical reasoning. Analysis of Cleveland Abbe's "The Physical Basis of Long-Range Weather Forecasts" demonstrates how in his advocacy for a new paradigm, Abbe navigates the tension between piety to tradition…

  10. Diffraction-limited real-time terahertz imaging by optical frequency up-conversion in a DAST crystal.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shuzhen; Qi, Feng; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Takida, Yuma; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2015-03-23

    Real-time terahertz (THz) wave imaging has wide applications in areas such as security, industry, biology, medicine, pharmacy, and the arts. This report describes real-time room-temperature THz imaging by nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion in an organic 4-dimethylamino-N'-methyl-4'-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) crystal, with high resolution reaching the diffraction limit. THz-wave images were converted to the near infrared region and then captured using an InGaAs camera in a tandem imaging system. The resolution of the imaging system was analyzed. Diffraction and interference of THz wave were observed in the experiments. Videos are supplied to show the interference pattern variation that occurs with sample moving and tilting.

  11. Reconstruction from limited single-particle diffraction data via simultaneous determination of state, orientation, intensity, and phase

    SciTech Connect

    Donatelli, Jeffrey J.; Sethian, James A.; Zwart, Peter H.

    Free-electron lasers now have the ability to collect X-ray diffraction patterns from individual molecules; however, each sample is delivered at unknown orientation and may be in one of several conformational states, each with a different molecular structure. Hit rates are often low, typically around 0.1%, limiting the number of useful images that can be collected. Determining accurate structural information requires classifying and orienting each image, accurately assembling them into a 3D diffraction intensity function, and determining missing phase information. Additionally, single particles typically scatter very few photons, leading to high image noise levels. We develop a multitiered iterative phasing algorithmmore » to reconstruct structural information from singleparticle diffraction data by simultaneously determining the states, orientations, intensities, phases, and underlying structure in a single iterative procedure. We leverage real-space constraints on the structure to help guide optimization and reconstruct underlying structure from very few images with excellent global convergence properties. We show that this approach can determine structural resolution beyond what is suggested by standard Shannon sampling arguments for ideal images and is also robust to noise.« less

  12. Reconstruction from limited single-particle diffraction data via simultaneous determination of state, orientation, intensity, and phase

    DOE PAGES

    Donatelli, Jeffrey J.; Sethian, James A.; Zwart, Peter H.

    2017-06-26

    Free-electron lasers now have the ability to collect X-ray diffraction patterns from individual molecules; however, each sample is delivered at unknown orientation and may be in one of several conformational states, each with a different molecular structure. Hit rates are often low, typically around 0.1%, limiting the number of useful images that can be collected. Determining accurate structural information requires classifying and orienting each image, accurately assembling them into a 3D diffraction intensity function, and determining missing phase information. Additionally, single particles typically scatter very few photons, leading to high image noise levels. We develop a multitiered iterative phasing algorithmmore » to reconstruct structural information from singleparticle diffraction data by simultaneously determining the states, orientations, intensities, phases, and underlying structure in a single iterative procedure. We leverage real-space constraints on the structure to help guide optimization and reconstruct underlying structure from very few images with excellent global convergence properties. We show that this approach can determine structural resolution beyond what is suggested by standard Shannon sampling arguments for ideal images and is also robust to noise.« less

  13. OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY STARS WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL SPECKLE SURVEY INSTRUMENT. III. MEASURES BELOW THE DIFFRACTION LIMIT OF THE WIYN TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Horch, Elliott P.; Van Altena, William F.; Howell, Steve B.

    2011-06-15

    In this paper, we study the ability of CCD- and electron-multiplying-CCD-based speckle imaging to obtain reliable astrometry and photometry of binary stars below the diffraction limit of the WIYN 3.5 m Telescope. We present a total of 120 measures of binary stars, 75 of which are below the diffraction limit. The measures are divided into two groups that have different measurement accuracy and precision. The first group is composed of standard speckle observations, that is, a sequence of speckle images taken in a single filter, while the second group consists of paired observations where the two observations are taken onmore » the same observing run and in different filters. The more recent paired observations were taken simultaneously with the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument, which is a two-channel speckle imaging system. In comparing our results to the ephemeris positions of binaries with known orbits, we find that paired observations provide the opportunity to identify cases of systematic error in separation below the diffraction limit and after removing these from consideration, we obtain a linear measurement uncertainty of 3-4 mas. However, if observations are unpaired or if two observations taken in the same filter are paired, it becomes harder to identify cases of systematic error, presumably because the largest source of this error is residual atmospheric dispersion, which is color dependent. When observations are unpaired, we find that it is unwise to report separations below approximately 20 mas, as these are most susceptible to this effect. Using the final results obtained, we are able to update two older orbits in the literature and present preliminary orbits for three systems that were discovered by Hipparcos.« less

  14. High power broadband all fiber super-fluorescent source with linear polarization and near diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengfei; Huang, Long; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2016-01-25

    In this manuscript, a high power broadband superfluorescent source (SFS) with linear polarization and near-diffraction-limited beam quality is achieved based on an ytterbium-doped (Yb-doped), all fiberized and polarization-maintained master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The MOPA structure generates a linearly polarized output power of 1427 W with a slope efficiency of 80% and a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 11 nm, which is power scaled by an order of magnitude compared with the previously reported SFSs with linear polarization. In the experiment, both the polarization extinction ratio (PER) and beam quality (M(2) factor) are degraded little during the power scaling process. At maximal output power, the PER and M(2) factor are measured to be 19.1dB and 1.14, respectively. The root-mean-square (RMS) and peak-vale (PV) values of the power fluctuation at maximal output power are just 0.48% and within 3%, respectively. Further power scaling of the whole system is limited by the available pump sources. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of kilowatt level broadband SFS with linear polarization and near-diffraction-limited beam quality.

  15. High-Efficiency, Near-Diffraction Limited, Dielectric Metasurface Lenses Based on Crystalline Titanium Dioxide at Visible Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yaoyao; Liu, Hongzhan; Wang, Faqiang; Meng, Hongyun; Guo, Jianping; Li, Jinfeng; Wei, Zhongchao

    2018-04-28

    Metasurfaces are planar optical elements that hold promise for overcoming the limitations of refractive and conventional diffractive optics. Previous metasurfaces have been limited to transparency windows at infrared wavelengths because of significant optical absorption and loss at visible wavelengths. Here we report a polarization-insensitive, high-contrast transmissive metasurface composed of crystalline titanium dioxide pillars in the form of metalens at the wavelength of 633 nm. The focal spots are as small as 0.54 λ d , which is very close to the optical diffraction limit of 0.5 λ d . The simulation focusing efficiency is up to 88.5%. A rigorous method for metalens design, the phase realization mechanism and the trade-off between high efficiency and small spot size (or large numerical aperture) are discussed. Besides, the metalenses can work well with an imaging point source up to ±15° off axis. The proposed design is relatively systematic and can be applied to various applications such as visible imaging, ranging and sensing systems.

  16. Transverse Coherence Limited Coherent Diffraction Imaging using a Molybdenum Soft X-ray Laser Pumped at Moderate Pump Energies.

    PubMed

    Zürch, M; Jung, R; Späth, C; Tümmler, J; Guggenmos, A; Attwood, D; Kleineberg, U; Stiel, H; Spielmann, C

    2017-07-13

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) in the extreme ultraviolet has become an important tool for nanoscale investigations. Laser-driven high harmonic generation (HHG) sources allow for lab scale applications such as cancer cell classification and phase-resolved surface studies. HHG sources exhibit excellent coherence but limited photon flux due poor conversion efficiency. In contrast, table-top soft X-ray lasers (SXRL) feature excellent temporal coherence and extraordinary high flux at limited transverse coherence. Here, the performance of a SXRL pumped at moderate pump energies is evaluated for CDI and compared to a HHG source. For CDI, a lower bound for the required mutual coherence factor of |μ 12 | ≥ 0.75 is found by comparing a reconstruction with fixed support to a conventional characterization using double slits. A comparison of the captured diffraction signals suggests that SXRLs have the potential for imaging micron scale objects with sub-20 nm resolution in orders of magnitude shorter integration time compared to a conventional HHG source. Here, the low transverse coherence diameter limits the resolution to approximately 180 nm. The extraordinary high photon flux per laser shot, scalability towards higher repetition rate and capability of seeding with a high harmonic source opens a route for higher performance nanoscale imaging systems based on SXRLs.

  17. Breaking the acoustic diffraction limit via nonlinear effect and thermal confinement for potential deep-tissue high-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Baohong; Pei, Yanbo; Kandukuri, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Our recently developed ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF) imaging technique showed that it was feasible to conduct high-resolution fluorescence imaging in a centimeter-deep turbid medium. Because the spatial resolution of this technique highly depends on the ultrasound-induced temperature focal size (UTFS), minimization of UTFS becomes important for further improving the spatial resolution USF technique. In this study, we found that UTFS can be significantly reduced below the diffraction-limited acoustic intensity focal size via nonlinear acoustic effects and thermal confinement by appropriately controlling ultrasound power and exposure time, which can be potentially used for deep-tissue high-resolution imaging. PMID:23479498

  18. Diffraction-limited Mid-infrared Integral Field Spectroscopy of Io's Volcanic Activity with ALES on the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrutskie, Michael F.; de Kleer, Katherine R.; Stone, Jordan; Conrad, Al; Davies, Ashley; de Pater, Imke; Leisenring, Jarron; Hinz, Philip; Skemer, Andrew; Veillet, Christian; Woodward, Charles E.; Ertel, Steve; Spalding, Eckhart

    2017-10-01

    The Arizona Lenslet for Exoplanet Spectroscopy (ALES) is an enhancement to the Large Binocular Telescope's mid-infrared imager, LMIRcam, that permits low-resolution (R~20) spectroscopy between 2.8 and 4.2 μm of every diffraction-limited resolution element in a 2.5"x2.5" field-of-view on a 2048x2048 HAWAII-2RG 5.2 μm-cutoff array. The 1" disk of Io, dotted with powerful self-luminous volcanic eruptions, provides an ideal target for ALES, where the single 8.4-meter aperture diffraction-limited scale for Io at opposition ranges from 240 kilometers (80 milliarcseconds) at 2.8 μm to 360 kilometers (120 milliarcseconds) at 4.2 μm. ALES provides the capability to assess the color temperature of each volcanic thermal emission site as well as map broadband absorbers such as SO2 frost. A monitoring campaign in the Spring 2017 semester provided two global snapshots of Io's volcanic activity with ALES as well as characterization of a new brightening episode at Loki Patera over four epochs between January and May 2017.

  19. Ultra-broadband unidirectional launching of surface plasmon polaritons by a double-slit structure beyond the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianjun; Sun, Chengwei; Li, Hongyun; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-11-21

    Surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) launchers, which can couple the free space light to the SPPs on the metal surface, are among the key elements for the plasmonic devices and nano-photonic systems. Downscaling the SPP launchers below the diffraction limit and directly delivering the SPPs to the desired subwavelength plasmonic waveguides are of importance for high-integration plasmonic circuits. By designing a submicron double-slit structure with different slit widths, an ultra-broadband (>330 nm) unidirectional SPP launcher is realized theoretically and experimentally based on the different phase delays of SPPs propagating along the metal surface and the near-field interfering effect. More importantly, the broadband and unidirectional properties of the SPP launcher are still maintained when the slit length is reduced to a subwavelength scale. This can make the launcher occupy only a very small area of <λ(2)/10 on the metal surface. Such a robust unidirectional SPP launcher beyond the diffraction limit can be directly coupled to a subwavelength plasmonic waveguide efficiently, leading to an ultra-tight SPP source, especially as a subwavelength localized guided SPP source.

  20. Resolution enhancement by extrapolation of coherent diffraction images: a quantitative study on the limits and a numerical study of nonbinary and phase objects.

    PubMed

    Latychevskaia, T; Chushkin, Y; Fink, H-W

    2016-10-01

    In coherent diffractive imaging, the resolution of the reconstructed object is limited by the numerical aperture of the experimental setup. We present here a theoretical and numerical study for achieving super-resolution by postextrapolation of coherent diffraction images, such as diffraction patterns or holograms. We demonstrate that a diffraction pattern can unambiguously be extrapolated from only a fraction of the entire pattern and that the ratio of the extrapolated signal to the originally available signal is linearly proportional to the oversampling ratio. Although there could be in principle other methods to achieve extrapolation, we devote our discussion to employing iterative phase retrieval methods and demonstrate their limits. We present two numerical studies; namely, the extrapolation of diffraction patterns of nonbinary and that of phase objects together with a discussion of the optimal extrapolation procedure. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Stability limits and defect dynamics in Ag nanoparticles probed by Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Lopes, P. P.; Cha, W.; ...

    2017-02-10

    Dissolution is critical to nanomaterial stability, especially for partially dealloyed nanoparticle catalysts. Unfortunately, highly active catalysts are often not stable in their reactive environments, preventing widespread application. Thus, focusing on the structure–stability relationship at the nanoscale is crucial and will likely play an important role in meeting grand challenges. Recent advances in imaging capability have come from electron, X-ray, and other techniques but tend to be limited to specific sample environments and/or two-dimensional images. Here, we report investigations into the defect-stability relationship of silver nanoparticles to voltage-induced electrochemical dissolution imaged in situ in three dimensional detail by Bragg coherent diffractivemore » imaging. We first determine the average dissolution kinetics by stationary probe rotating disk electrode in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, which allows in situ measurement of Ag+ ion formation. We then observe the dissolution and redeposition processes in single nanocrystals, providing unique insight about the role of surface strain, defects, and their coupling to the dissolution chemistry. Finally, the methods developed and the knowledge gained go well beyond a “simple” silver electrochemistry and are applicable to all electrocatalytic reactions where functional links between activity and stability are controlled by structure and defect dynamics.« less

  2. Visible near-diffraction-limited lucky imaging with full-sky laser-assisted adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.

    2014-08-01

    Both lucky imaging techniques and adaptive optics require natural guide stars, limiting sky-coverage, even when laser guide stars are used. Lucky imaging techniques become less successful on larger telescopes unless adaptive optics is used, as the fraction of images obtained with well-behaved turbulence across the whole telescope pupil becomes vanishingly small. Here, we introduce a technique combining lucky imaging techniques with tomographic laser guide star adaptive optics systems on large telescopes. This technique does not require any natural guide star for the adaptive optics, and hence offers full sky-coverage adaptive optics correction. In addition, we introduce a new method for lucky image selection based on residual wavefront phase measurements from the adaptive optics wavefront sensors. We perform Monte Carlo modelling of this technique, and demonstrate I-band Strehl ratios of up to 35 per cent in 0.7 arcsec mean seeing conditions with 0.5 m deformable mirror pitch and full adaptive optics sky-coverage. We show that this technique is suitable for use with lucky imaging reference stars as faint as magnitude 18, and fainter if more advanced image selection and centring techniques are used.

  3. Stability limits and defect dynamics in Ag nanoparticles probed by Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Lopes, P. P.; Cha, W.

    Dissolution is critical to nanomaterial stability, especially for partially dealloyed nanoparticle catalysts. Unfortunately, highly active catalysts are often not stable in their reactive environments, preventing widespread application. Thus, focusing on the structure–stability relationship at the nanoscale is crucial and will likely play an important role in meeting grand challenges. Recent advances in imaging capability have come from electron, X-ray, and other techniques but tend to be limited to specific sample environments and/or two-dimensional images. Here, we report investigations into the defect-stability relationship of silver nanoparticles to voltage-induced electrochemical dissolution imaged in situ in three dimensional detail by Bragg coherent diffractivemore » imaging. We first determine the average dissolution kinetics by stationary probe rotating disk electrode in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, which allows in situ measurement of Ag+ ion formation. We then observe the dissolution and redeposition processes in single nanocrystals, providing unique insight about the role of surface strain, defects, and their coupling to the dissolution chemistry. Finally, the methods developed and the knowledge gained go well beyond a “simple” silver electrochemistry and are applicable to all electrocatalytic reactions where functional links between activity and stability are controlled by structure and defect dynamics.« less

  4. Achieving diffraction-limited nanometer-scale X-ray point focus with two crossed multilayer Laue lenses: alignment challenges

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Hanfei; Huang, Xiaojing; Bouet, Nathalie; ...

    2017-10-16

    In this article, we discuss misalignment-induced aberrations in a pair of crossed multilayer Laue lenses used for achieving a nanometer-scale x-ray point focus. We thoroughly investigate the impacts of two most important contributions, the orthogonality and the separation distance between two lenses. We find that misalignment in the orthogonality results in astigmatism at 45º and other inclination angles when coupled with a separation distance error. Theoretical explanation and experimental verification are provided. We show that to achieve a diffraction-limited point focus, accurate alignment of the azimuthal angle is required to ensure orthogonality between two lenses, and the required accuracy ismore » scaled with the ratio of the focus size to the aperture size.« less

  5. High-energy master oscillator power amplifier with near-diffraction-limited output based on ytterbium-doped PCF fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rao; Qiao, Zhi; Wang, Xiaochao; Fan, Wei; Lin, Zunqi

    2017-10-01

    With the development of fiber technologies, fiber lasers are able to deliver very high power beams and high energy pulses which can be used not only in scientific researches but industrial fields (laser marking, welding,…). The key of high power fiber laser is fiber amplifier. In this paper, we present a two-level master-oscillator power amplifier system at 1053 nm based on Yb-doped photonic crystal fibers. The system is used in the front-end of high power laser facility for the amplification of nano-second pulses to meet the high-level requirements. Thanks to the high gain of the system which is over 50 dB, the pulse of more than 0.89 mJ energy with the nearly diffraction-limited beam quality has been obtained.

  6. Large deflection angle, high-power adaptive fiber optics collimator with preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a monolithic adaptive fiber optics collimator, with a large deflection angle and preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality, that has been tested at a maximal output power at the 300 W level. Additionally, a new measurement method of beam quality (M2 factor) is developed. Experimental results show that the deflection angle of the collimated beam is in the range of 0-0.27 mrad in the X direction and 0-0.19 mrad in the Y direction. The effective working frequency of the device is about 710 Hz. By employing the new measurement method of the M2 factor, we calculate that the beam quality is Mx2=1.35 and My2=1.24, which is in agreement with the result from the beam propagation analyzer and is preserved well with the increasing output power.

  7. The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager: Diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths with large ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; Mackay, Craig; King, David; Rebolo-López, Rafael; Labadie, Lucas; Puga, Marta; Oscoz, Alejandro; González Escalera, Victor; Pérez Garrido, Antonio; López, Roberto; Pérez-Prieto, Jorge; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis; Velasco, Sergio; Villó, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    One of the continuing challenges facing astronomers today is the need to obtain ever higher resolution images of the sky. Whether studying nearby crowded fields or distant objects, with increased resolution comes the ability to probe systems in more detail and advance our understanding of the Universe. Obtaining these high-resolution images at visible wavelengths however has previously been limited to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) due to atmospheric effects limiting the spatial resolution of ground-based telescopes to a fraction of their potential. With HST now having a finite lifespan, it is prudent to investigate other techniques capable of providing these kind of observations from the ground. Maintaining this capability is one of the goals of the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI).Achieving the highest resolutions requires the largest telescope apertures, however, this comes at the cost of increased atmospheric distortion. To overcome these atmospheric effects, there are two main techniques employed today: adaptive optics (AO) and lucky imaging. These techniques individually are unable to provide diffraction limited imaging in the visible on large ground-based telescopes; AO currently only works at infrared wavelengths while lucky imaging reduces in effectiveness on telescopes greater than 2.5 metres in diameter. The limitations of both techniques can be overcome by combing them together to provide diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths on the ground.The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager is being developed as a European collaboration and combines AO and lucky imaging in a dedicated instrument for the first time. Initially for use on the 4.2 metre William Herschel Telescope, AOLI uses a low-order adaptive optics system to reduce the effects of atmospheric turbulence before imaging with a lucky imaging based science detector. The AO system employs a novel type of wavefront sensor, the non-linear Curvature Wavefront Sensor (nlCWFS) which provides

  8. Open innovation at the Abbe School of Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgert, Christian; Geiss, Reinhard; Nolte, Stefan; Eilenberger, Falk; Zakoth, David; Mauroner, Oliver; Pertsch, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    The Abbe School of Photonics (ASP) provides and coordinates the optics and photonics education of graduate and doctoral students at the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. The internationalized Master's degree program is the key activity in training students in the optical sciences. The program is designed to provide them with the skills necessary to fill challenging positions in industry and academia. Here, an essential factor is ASP's close collaboration with more than 20 German photonics companies. To sustain these partners' future economic development, the availability of highly qualified employees is constantly required. Accordingly, these industrial partners, the European Union, the local state and the federal German government are strongly involved in the sustainable development of ASP's curriculum by both conceptual and financial engagements. The main goal is to promote the students' academic careers and job experience in the photonics industry as well as in academia. To open up the program to students from all over the world, all ASP lectures and courses are taught in English. ASP's qualification strategy is fully research-oriented and based on the principles of academic freedom, competitive research conditions and internationalization at all levels. The education program is complemented by a structured doctoral student support and a prestigious guest professorship program. Recently, ASP and partners have started a project to build an open photonics laboratory in order to foster innovative and co-creative processes. The idea follows well-established open innovation schemes e.g. in electronics. This Photon Garage (German: "Lichtwerkstatt") will bring together professionals and interested laymen from different backgrounds to approach pertinent challenges in photonics. Here, we will share our latest insights into the potentials and opportunities offered by this novel educative approach.

  9. Optical Design of COATLI: A Diffraction-Limited Visible Imager with Fast Guiding and Active Optics Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Cuevas, S.; Watson, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    We present the optical design of COATLI, a two channel visible imager for a comercial 50 cm robotic telescope. COATLI will deliver diffraction-limited images (approximately 0.3 arcsec FWHM) in the riz bands, inside a 4.2 arcmin field, and seeing limited images (approximately 0.6 arcsec FWHM) in the B and g bands, inside a 5 arcmin field, by means of a tip-tilt mirror for fast guiding, and a deformable mirror for active optics, both located on two optically transferred pupil planes. The optical design is based on two collimator-camera systems plus a pupil transfer relay, using achromatic doublets of CaF2 and S-FTM16 and one triplet of N-BK7 and CaF2. We discuss the effciency, tolerancing, thermal behavior and ghosts. COATLI will be installed at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mártir, Baja California, Mexico, in 2018.

  10. Towards shot-noise limited diffraction experiments with table-top femtosecond hard x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Marcel; Hauf, Christoph; Weisshaupt, Jannick; Salvador, Antonio-Andres Hernandez; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Table-top laser-driven hard x-ray sources with kilohertz repetition rates are an attractive alternative to large-scale accelerator-based systems and have found widespread applications in x-ray studies of ultrafast structural dynamics. Hard x-ray pulses of 100 fs duration have been generated at the Cu K α wavelength with a photon flux of up to 10 9 photons per pulse into the full solid angle, perfectly synchronized to the sub-100-fs optical pulses from the driving laser system. Based on spontaneous x-ray emission, such sources display a particular noise behavior which impacts the sensitivity of x-ray diffraction experiments. We present a detailed analysis of the photon statistics and temporal fluctuations of the x-ray flux, together with experimental strategies to optimize the sensitivity of optical pump/x-ray probe experiments. We demonstrate measurements close to the shot-noise limit of the x-ray source.

  11. Improvement of Galilean refractive beam shaping system for accurately generating near-diffraction-limited flattop beam with arbitrary beam size.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haotong; Liu, Zejin; Jiang, Pengzhi; Xu, Xiaojun; Du, Shaojun

    2011-07-04

    We propose and demonstrate the improvement of conventional Galilean refractive beam shaping system for accurately generating near-diffraction-limited flattop beam with arbitrary beam size. Based on the detailed study of the refractive beam shaping system, we found that the conventional Galilean beam shaper can only work well for the magnifying beam shaping. Taking the transformation of input beam with Gaussian irradiance distribution into target beam with high order Fermi-Dirac flattop profile as an example, the shaper can only work well at the condition that the size of input and target beam meets R(0) ≥ 1.3 w(0). For the improvement, the shaper is regarded as the combination of magnifying and demagnifying beam shaping system. The surface and phase distributions of the improved Galilean beam shaping system are derived based on Geometric and Fourier Optics. By using the improved Galilean beam shaper, the accurate transformation of input beam with Gaussian irradiance distribution into target beam with flattop irradiance distribution is realized. The irradiance distribution of the output beam is coincident with that of the target beam and the corresponding phase distribution is maintained. The propagation performance of the output beam is greatly improved. Studies of the influences of beam size and beam order on the improved Galilean beam shaping system show that restriction of beam size has been greatly reduced. This improvement can also be used to redistribute the input beam with complicated irradiance distribution into output beam with complicated irradiance distribution.

  12. STED microscopy visualizes energy deposition of single ions in a solid-state detector beyond diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklas, M.; Henrich, M.; Jäkel, O.; Engelhardt, J.; Abdollahi, A.; Greilich, S.

    2017-05-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) allow for visualization of single-particle traversal in clinical ion beams. The point spread function of the confocal readout has so far hindered a more detailed characterization of the track spots—the ion’s characteristic signature left in the FNTD. Here we report on the readout of the FNTD by optical nanoscopy, namely stimulated emission depletion microscopy. It was firstly possible to visualize the track spots of carbon ions and protons beyond the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy with a resolving power of approximately 80 nm (confocal: 320 nm). A clear discrimination of the spatial width, defined by the full width half maximum of track spots from particles (proton and carbon ions), with a linear energy transfer (LET) ranging from approximately 2-1016 keV µm-1 was possible. Results suggest that the width depends on LET but not on particle charge within the uncertainties. A discrimination of particle type by width thus does not seem possible (as well as with confocal microscopy). The increased resolution, however, could allow for refined determination of the cross-sectional area facing substantial energy deposition. This work could pave the way towards development of optical nanoscopy-based analysis of radiation-induced cellular response using cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors.

  13. Diffraction-limited 577 nm true-yellow laser by frequency doubling of a tapered diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Mathias; Vilera, Mariafernanda; Noordegraaf, Danny; Hansen, Anders K.; Buß, Thomas; Jensen, Ole B.; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2018-02-01

    A wide range of laser medical treatments are based on coagulation of blood by absorption of the laser radiation. It has, therefore, always been a goal of these treatments to maximize the ratio of absorption in the blood to that in the surrounding tissue. For this purpose lasers at 577 nm are ideal since this wavelength is at the peak of the absorption in oxygenated hemoglobin. Furthermore, 577 nm has a lower absorption in melanin when compared to green wavelengths (515 - 532 nm), giving it an advantage when treating at greater penetration depth. Here we present a laser system based on frequency doubling of an 1154 nm Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) tapered diode laser, emitting 1.1 W of single frequency and diffraction limited yellow light at 577 nm, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 30.5%. The frequency doubling is performed in a single pass configuration using a cascade of two bulk non-linear crystals. The system is power stabilized over 10 hours with a standard deviation of 0.13% and the relative intensity noise is measured to be 0.064 % rms.

  14. Towards shot-noise limited diffraction experiments with table-top femtosecond hard x-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Marcel; Hauf, Christoph; Weisshaupt, Jannick; Salvador, Antonio-Andres Hernandez; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Table-top laser-driven hard x-ray sources with kilohertz repetition rates are an attractive alternative to large-scale accelerator-based systems and have found widespread applications in x-ray studies of ultrafast structural dynamics. Hard x-ray pulses of 100 fs duration have been generated at the Cu Kα wavelength with a photon flux of up to 109 photons per pulse into the full solid angle, perfectly synchronized to the sub-100-fs optical pulses from the driving laser system. Based on spontaneous x-ray emission, such sources display a particular noise behavior which impacts the sensitivity of x-ray diffraction experiments. We present a detailed analysis of the photon statistics and temporal fluctuations of the x-ray flux, together with experimental strategies to optimize the sensitivity of optical pump/x-ray probe experiments. We demonstrate measurements close to the shot-noise limit of the x-ray source. PMID:28795079

  15. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; ...

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper wemore » address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.« less

  16. Sub-diffraction Limit Localization of Proteins in Volumetric Space Using Bayesian Restoration of Fluorescence Images from Ultrathin Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gordon; Smith, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Photon diffraction limits the resolution of conventional light microscopy at the lateral focal plane to 0.61λ/NA (λ = wavelength of light, NA = numerical aperture of the objective) and at the axial plane to 1.4nλ/NA2 (n = refractive index of the imaging medium, 1.51 for oil immersion), which with visible wavelengths and a 1.4NA oil immersion objective is ∼220 nm and ∼600 nm in the lateral plane and axial plane respectively. This volumetric resolution is too large for the proper localization of protein clustering in subcellular structures. Here we combine the newly developed proteomic imaging technique, Array Tomography (AT), with its native 50–100 nm axial resolution achieved by physical sectioning of resin embedded tissue, and a 2D maximum likelihood deconvolution method, based on Bayes' rule, which significantly improves the resolution of protein puncta in the lateral plane to allow accurate and fast computational segmentation and analysis of labeled proteins. The physical sectioning of AT allows tissue specimens to be imaged at the physical optimum of modern high NA plan-apochormatic objectives. This translates to images that have little out of focus light, minimal aberrations and wave-front distortions. Thus, AT is able to provide images with truly invariant point spread functions (PSF), a property critical for accurate deconvolution. We show that AT with deconvolution increases the volumetric analytical fidelity of protein localization by significantly improving the modulation of high spatial frequencies up to and potentially beyond the spatial frequency cut-off of the objective. Moreover, we are able to achieve this improvement with no noticeable introduction of noise or artifacts and arrive at object segmentation and localization accuracies on par with image volumes captured using commercial implementations of super-resolution microscopes. PMID:22956902

  17. Sub-diffraction limit localization of proteins in volumetric space using Bayesian restoration of fluorescence images from ultrathin specimens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gordon; Smith, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Photon diffraction limits the resolution of conventional light microscopy at the lateral focal plane to 0.61λ/NA (λ = wavelength of light, NA = numerical aperture of the objective) and at the axial plane to 1.4nλ/NA(2) (n = refractive index of the imaging medium, 1.51 for oil immersion), which with visible wavelengths and a 1.4NA oil immersion objective is -220 nm and -600 nm in the lateral plane and axial plane respectively. This volumetric resolution is too large for the proper localization of protein clustering in subcellular structures. Here we combine the newly developed proteomic imaging technique, Array Tomography (AT), with its native 50-100 nm axial resolution achieved by physical sectioning of resin embedded tissue, and a 2D maximum likelihood deconvolution method, based on Bayes' rule, which significantly improves the resolution of protein puncta in the lateral plane to allow accurate and fast computational segmentation and analysis of labeled proteins. The physical sectioning of AT allows tissue specimens to be imaged at the physical optimum of modern high NA plan-apochormatic objectives. This translates to images that have little out of focus light, minimal aberrations and wave-front distortions. Thus, AT is able to provide images with truly invariant point spread functions (PSF), a property critical for accurate deconvolution. We show that AT with deconvolution increases the volumetric analytical fidelity of protein localization by significantly improving the modulation of high spatial frequencies up to and potentially beyond the spatial frequency cut-off of the objective. Moreover, we are able to achieve this improvement with no noticeable introduction of noise or artifacts and arrive at object segmentation and localization accuracies on par with image volumes captured using commercial implementations of super-resolution microscopes.

  18. High frame rate imaging system for limited diffraction array beam imaging with square-wave aperture weightings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Yu; Cheng, Jiqi; Wang, Jing

    2006-10-01

    A general-purpose high frame rate (HFR) medical imaging system has been developed. This system has 128 independent linear transmitters, each of which is capable of producing an arbitrary broadband (about 0.05-10 MHz) waveform of up to +/- 144 V peak voltage on a 75-ohm resistive load using a 12-bit/40-MHz digital-to-analog converter. The system also has 128 independent, broadband (about 0.25-10 MHz), and time-variable-gain receiver channels, each of which has a 12-bit/40-MHz analog-to-digital converter and up to 512 MB of memory. The system is controlled by a personal computer (PC), and radio frequency echo data of each channel are transferred to the same PC via a standard USB 2.0 port for image reconstructions. Using the HFR imaging system, we have developed a new limited-diffraction array beam imaging method with square-wave aperture voltage weightings. With this method, in principle, only one or two transmitters are required to excite a fully populated two-dimensional (2-D) array transducer to achieve an equivalent dynamic focusing in both transmission and reception to reconstruct a high-quality three-dimensional image without the need of the time delays of traditional beam focusing and steering, potentially simplifying the transmitter subsystem of an imager. To validate the method, for simplicity, 2-D imaging experiments were performed using the system. In the in vitro experiment, a custom-made, 128-element, 0.32-mm pitch, 3.5-MHz center frequency linear array transducer with about 50% fractional bandwidth was used to reconstruct images of an ATS 539 tissue-mimicking phantom at an axial distance of 130 mm with a field of view of more than 90 degrees. In the in vivo experiment of a human heart, images with a field of view of more than 90 degrees at 120-mm axial distance were obtained with a 128-element, 2.5-MHz center frequency, 0.15-mm pitch Acuson V2 phased array. To ensure that the system was operated under the limits set by the U.S. Food and Drug

  19. Over 10-watt pico-second diffraction-limited output from a Nd:YVO4 slab amplifier with a phase conjugate mirror.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Yasukuni; Nawata, Kouji; Omatsu, Takashige

    2005-10-31

    We have produced a high beam quality pico-second laser based on a continuous-wave diode pumped Nd:YVO4 slab amplifier with a photorefractive phase conjugate mirror. 12.8W diffraction-limited output with a pulse width of 8.7ps was obtained.

  20. Effect of Impact Damage on the Fatigue Response of TiAl Alloy-ABB-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, S. L.; Lerch, B. A.; Pereira, J. M.; Nathal, M. V.; Nazmy, M. Y.; Staubli, M.; Clemens, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of gamma-TiAl to withstand potential foreign or domestic object damage is a technical risk to the implementation of gamma-TiAl in low pressure turbine (LPT) blade applications. In the present study, the impact resistance of TiAl alloy ABB-2 was determined and compared to the impact resistance of Ti(48)Al(2)Nb(2)Cr. Specimens were impacted with four different impact conditions with impact energies ranging from 0.22 to 6.09 J. After impacting, the impact damage was characterized by crack lengths on both the front and backside of the impact. Due to the flat nature of gamma-TiAl's S-N (stress vs. cycles to failure) curve, step fatigue tests were used to determine the fatigue strength after impacting. Impact damage increased with increasing impact energy and led to a reduction in the fatigue strength of the alloy. For similar crack lengths, the fatigue strength of impacted ABB-2 was similar to the fatigue strength of impacted Ti(48)Al(2)Nb(2)Cr, even though the tensile properties of the two alloys are significantly different. Similar to Ti(48)Al(2)Nb(2)Cr, ABB-2 showed a classical mean stress dependence on fatigue strength. The fatigue strength of impacted ABB-2 could be accurately predicted using a threshold analysis.

  1. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. II. Stellar parameters of rotating stars from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjara, M.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Vakili, F.; Jankov, S.; Millour, F.; Meilland, A.; Khorrami, Z.; Chelli, A.; Baffa, C.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Lagarde, S.; Robbe-Dubois, S.

    2014-09-01

    , PArot = 65.6° ± 5°, for Fomalhaut. They were found to be compatible with previously published values from differential phase and visibility measurements, while we were able to determine, for the first time, the inclination angle i of Fomalhaut (i = 90° ± 9°) and δ Aquilae (i = 81° ± 13°), and the rotation-axis position angle PArot of δ Aquilae. Conclusions: Beyond the theoretical diffraction limit of an interferometer (ratio of the wavelength to the baseline), spatial super resolution is well suited to systematically estimating the angular diameters of rotating stars and their fundamental parameters with a few sets of baselines and the Earth-rotation synthesis provided a high enough spectral resolution. Based on observations performed at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under ESO AMBER-consortium GTO program IDs 084.D-0456 081.D-0293 and 082.C-0376.Figure 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Inverse Abbe-method for observing small refractive index changes in liquids.

    PubMed

    Räty, Jukka; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2015-05-01

    This study concerns an optical method for the detection of minuscule refractive index changes in the liquid phase. The proposed method reverses the operation of the traditional Abbe refractometer and thus utilizes the light dispersion properties of materials, i.e. it involves the dependence of the refractive index on light wavelength. In practice, the method includes the detection of light reflection spectra in the visible spectral range. This inverse Abbe method is suitable for liquid quality studies e.g. for monitoring water purity. Tests have shown that the method reveals less than per mil NaCl or ethanol concentrations in water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Abbe's number and Cauchy's constant of iodine and selenium doped poly (methylmethacrylate) and polystyrene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Sheetal, E-mail: smehta-29@yahoo.com; Das, Kallol, E-mail: smehta-29@yahoo.com; Keller, Jag Mohan, E-mail: smehta-29@yahoo.com

    2014-04-24

    Poly (methyl methacrylate) / Polystyrene and iodine / selenium hybrid matrixes have been prepared and characterized. Refractive index measurements were done at 390, 535, 590, 635 nm wavelengths. Abbe's number and Cauchy's constants of the iodine / selenium doped poly (methylmethacrylate) and polystyrene samples are being reported. The results also showed that the refractive index of the composite varies non-monotonically with the doping concentration at low iodine concentration or in the region of nanoparticles formation and is also dependent on thermal annealing.

  4. From Airy to Abbe: quantifying the effects of wide-angle focusing for scalar spherical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calm, Yitzi M.; Merlo, Juan M.; Burns, Michael J.; Naughton, Michael J.

    2017-10-01

    Recent advances in optical microscopy have enabled imaging with spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit. This limit is sometimes taken as one of several different criteria according to different conventions, including Rayleigh’s 0.61λ /NA, Abbe’s 0.5λ /NA, and Sparrow’s 0.47λ /NA. In this paper, we perform a parametric study, numerically integrating the scalar Kirchhoff diffraction integrals, and we propose new functional forms for the resolution limits derived from scalar focusing. The new expressions remain accurate under wide angle focusing, up to 90^\\circ . Our results could materially impact the design of high intensity focused ultrasound systems, and can be used as a qualitative guideline for the design of a particular type of planar optical element: the flat lens metasurface.

  5. High power, diffraction limited picosecond oscillator based on Nd:GdVO4 bulk crystal with σ polarized in-band pumping.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua; Guo, Jie; Gao, Peng; Yu, Hai; Liang, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-27

    We report on a high power passively mode-locked picosecond oscillator based on Nd:GdVO4 crystal with σ polarized in-band pumping. Thermal gradient and thermal aberration was greatly decreased with proposed configuration. Maximum output power of 37 W at 81 MHz repetition rate with 19.3 ps pulse duration was achieved directly from Nd:GdVO4 oscillator, corresponding to 51% optical efficiency. The oscillator maintained diffraction limited beam quality of M2 < 1.05 at different output coupling with pulse duration between 11.2 ps to 19.3 ps.

  6. Recent advance to 3 × 10(-5) rad near diffraction-limited beam divergence of dye laser with transverse-discharge flash-lamp pumping.

    PubMed

    Trusov, K K

    1994-02-20

    A new experimental setup of a Rhodamine 6G dye laser with a transverse-discharge flash-lamp-pumping system is presented. It differs from a previous setup [Sov. J. Quantum Electron. 16, 468-471 (1989)] in that it has a larger laser beam aperture (32 mm) and higher pumping energy (1 kJ), which made it possible to test the scalability and reach near diffraction-limited laser beam divergence of 3 × 10(-5) rad FWHM at beam energy 1.4 J. The effect of spectral dispersion in the active medium and of other optical elements on the beam divergence is also discussed.

  7. Prospects of high-resolution resonant X-ray inelastic scattering studies on solid materials, liquids and gases at diffraction-limited storage rings

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thorsten; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) will particularly profit from immensely improved brilliance of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs). In RIXS one measures the intensities of excitations as a function of energy and momentum transfer. DLSRs will allow for pushing the achievable energy resolution, signal intensity and the sampled spot size to new limits. With RIXS one nowadays probes a broad range of electronic systems reaching from simple molecules to complex materials displaying phenomena like peculiar magnetism, two-dimensional electron gases, superconductivity, photovoltaic energy conversion and heterogeneous catalysis. In this article the types of improved RIXS studies that will become possible with X-ray beams from DLSRs are envisioned. PMID:25177995

  8. Prospects of high-resolution resonant X-ray inelastic scattering studies on solid materials, liquids and gases at diffraction-limited storage rings.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Thorsten; de Groot, Frank M F; Rubensson, Jan Erik

    2014-09-01

    The spectroscopic technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) will particularly profit from immensely improved brilliance of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs). In RIXS one measures the intensities of excitations as a function of energy and momentum transfer. DLSRs will allow for pushing the achievable energy resolution, signal intensity and the sampled spot size to new limits. With RIXS one nowadays probes a broad range of electronic systems reaching from simple molecules to complex materials displaying phenomena like peculiar magnetism, two-dimensional electron gases, superconductivity, photovoltaic energy conversion and heterogeneous catalysis. In this article the types of improved RIXS studies that will become possible with X-ray beams from DLSRs are envisioned.

  9. Reaching the Diffraction Limit - Differential Speckle and Wide-Field Imaging for the Gemini-N Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Nic J.; Howell, Steve; Horch, Elliott

    2016-01-01

    Speckle imaging allows telescopes to achieve di raction limited imaging performance. The technique requires cameras capable of reading out frames at a very fast rate, e ectively `freezing out' atmospheric seeing. The resulting speckles can be correlated and images reconstructed that are at the di raction limit of the telescope. These new instruments are based on the successful performance and design of the Di erential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI) [2, 1]. The instruments are being built for the Gemini-N and WIYN telescopes and will be made available to the community via the peer review proposal process. We envision their primary use to be validation and characterization of exoplanet targets from the NASA K2 and TESS missions and RV discovered exoplanets. Such targets will provide excellent follow-up candidates for both the WIYN and Gemini telescopes [3]. Examples of DSSI data are shown in the gures below. We expect similar data quality in speckle imaging mode with the new instruments. Additionally, both cameras will have a wide- eld mode and standard SDSS lters. They will be highly versatile instruments and it is that likely many other science programs will request time on the cameras. The limiting magnitude for speckle observations, will remain around 13-14th at WIYN and 16-17th at Gemini, while wide- eld, normal CCD imaging operation should be able to go to much fainter, providing usual CCD imaging and photometric capabilities. The instruments will also have high utility as scoring cameras for telescope engineering purposes, or other applications where high time resolution is needed. Instrument support will be provided, including a software pipeline that takes raw speckle data to fully reconstructed images.

  10. Pair and triple correlations in the A+B-->B diffusion-controlled reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovkov, Vladimir; Kotomin, Eugene

    1994-03-01

    An exact solution for the one-dimensional kinetics of the diffusion-controlled reaction A+B-->B is obtained by means of the three-particle correlation functions. Because of a lattice discreteness each site could be occupied by a single particle only which leads to the so-called ``bus effect'': Recombination of any particle A is defined by a spatial configuration of two nearest particles B only surrounding A from its left and right. This results in the unusual algebraic decay law, n(t)~t-1, which asymptotically (as t-->∞) does not depend on the trap B concentration.

  11. 1030 nm high power polarization maintained fiber laser with narrow linewidth and near-diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Qiuhui; Zhao, Pengfei; Li, Chengyu; Wang, Bopeng; Lin, Honghuan; Guo, Chao; Liu, Yu; Jing, Feng; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2018-03-01

    A high power 1030 nm ytterbium-doped polarization maintained fiber laser with optimized parameters is presented in this paper. The master oscillator power amplifier system with counter-pumped amplifier is established. The output power is 900 W, along with a light-to-light efficiency of 64.2%. The amplified spontaneous emission suppression ratio of spectrum reaches to 40 dB with 3 dB linewidth of 0.14 nm. The polarization extinction ratio is 12 dB, and the beam quality factor is M2x=1.07, M2y=1.12. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of 1030 nm high power fiber laser with narrow linewidth, near linear polarization, and neardiffraction-limited beam quality

  12. Sub-MW peak power diffraction-limited chirped-pulse monolithic Yb-doped tapered fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Bobkov, Konstantin; Andrianov, Alexey; Koptev, Maxim; Muravyev, Sergey; Levchenko, Andrei; Velmiskin, Vladimir; Aleshkina, Svetlana; Semjonov, Sergey; Lipatov, Denis; Guryanov, Alexey; Kim, Arkady; Likhachev, Mikhail

    2017-10-30

    We demonstrate a novel amplification regime in a counter-pumped, relatively long (2 meters), large mode area, highly Yb-doped and polarization-maintaining tapered fiber, which offers a high peak power directly from the amplifier. The main feature of this regime is that the amplifying signal propagates through a thin part of the tapered fiber without amplification and experiences an extremely high gain in the thick part of the tapered fiber, where most of the pump power is absorbed. In this regime, we have demonstrated 8 ps pulse amplification to a peak power of up to 0.76 MW, which is limited by appearance of stimulated Raman scattering. In the same regime, 28 ps chirped pulses are amplified to a peak power of 0.35 MW directly from the amplifier and then compressed with 70% efficiency to 315 ± 10 fs, corresponding to an estimated peak power of 22 MW.

  13. Coherence and diffraction limited resolution in microscopic OCT by a unified approach for the correction of dispersion and aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Hildebrandt, H.; Münter, Michael; Ahrens, M.; Spahr, H.; Hillmann, D.; König, P.; Hüttmann, G.

    2018-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images scattering tissues with 5 to 15 μm resolution. This is usually not sufficient for a distinction of cellular and subcellular structures. Increasing axial and lateral resolution and compensation of artifacts caused by dispersion and aberrations is required to achieve cellular and subcellular resolution. This includes defocus which limit the usable depth of field at high lateral resolution. OCT gives access the phase of the scattered light and hence correction of dispersion and aberrations is possible by numerical algorithms. Here we present a unified dispersion/aberration correction which is based on a polynomial parameterization of the phase error and an optimization of the image quality using Shannon's entropy. For validation, a supercontinuum light sources and a costume-made spectrometer with 400 nm bandwidth were combined with a high NA microscope objective in a setup for tissue and small animal imaging. Using this setup and computation corrections, volumetric imaging at 1.5 μm resolution is possible. Cellular and near cellular resolution is demonstrated in porcine cornea and the drosophila larva, when computational correction of dispersion and aberrations is used. Due to the excellent correction of the used microscope objective, defocus was the main contribution to the aberrations. In addition, higher aberrations caused by the sample itself were successfully corrected. Dispersion and aberrations are closely related artifacts in microscopic OCT imaging. Hence they can be corrected in the same way by optimization of the image quality. This way microscopic resolution is easily achieved in OCT imaging of static biological tissues.

  14. HYBRID simulations of diffraction-limited focusing with Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors for a next-generation In Situ hard X-ray nanoprobe

    DOE PAGES

    Maser, Jorg; Shi, Xianbo; Reininger, Ruben; ...

    2016-02-22

    Next-generation hard X-ray nanoprobe beamlines such as the In Situ Nanoprobe (ISN) beamline being planned at the Advanced Photon Source aim at providing very high spatial resolution while also enabling very high focused flux, to study complex materials and devices using fast, multidimensional imaging across many length scales. The ISN will use diffractive optics to focus X-rays with a bandpass of ΔE/E = 10 –4 into a focal spot of 20 nm or below. Reflective optics in Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry will be used to focus X-rays with a bandpass as large as ΔE/E = 10 –2 into a focal spot ofmore » 50 nm. Diffraction-limited focusing with reflective optics is achieved by spatial filtering and use of a very long, vertically focusing mirror. Furthermore, to quantify the performance of the ISN beamline, we have simulated the propagation of both partially and fully coherent wavefronts from the undulator source, through the ISN beamline and into the mirror-based focal spot. Simulations were carried out using the recently developed software “HYBRID.”« less

  15. Sensitivity and Limitations of Structures from X-ray and Neutron-Based Diffraction Analyses of Transition Metal Oxide Lithium-Battery Electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Hao; Liu, Haodong; Lapidus, Saul H.; ...

    2017-06-21

    Lithium transition metal oxides are an important class of electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Binary or ternary (transition) metal doping brings about new opportunities to improve the electrode’s performance and often leads to more complex stoichiometries and atomic structures than the archetypal LiCoO 2. Rietveld structural analyses of X-ray and neutron diffraction data is a widely-used approach for structural characterization of crystalline materials. But, different structural models and refinement approaches can lead to differing results, and some parameters can be difficult to quantify due to the inherent limitations of the data. Here, through the example of LiNi 0.8Co 0.15Al 0.05Omore » 2 (NCA), we demonstrated the sensitivity of various structural parameters in Rietveld structural analysis to different refinement approaches and structural models, and proposed an approach to reduce refinement uncertainties due to the inexact X-ray scattering factors of the constituent atoms within the lattice. Furthermore, this refinement approach was implemented for electrochemically-cycled NCA samples and yielded accurate structural parameters using only X-ray diffraction data. The present work provides the best practices for performing structural refinement of lithium transition metal oxides.« less

  16. Sensitivity and Limitations of Structures from X-ray and Neutron-Based Diffraction Analyses of Transition Metal Oxide Lithium-Battery Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hao; Liu, Haodong; Lapidus, Saul H.

    Lithium transition metal oxides are an important class of electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Binary or ternary (transition) metal doping brings about new opportunities to improve the electrode’s performance and often leads to more complex stoichiometries and atomic structures than the archetypal LiCoO 2. Rietveld structural analyses of X-ray and neutron diffraction data is a widely-used approach for structural characterization of crystalline materials. But, different structural models and refinement approaches can lead to differing results, and some parameters can be difficult to quantify due to the inherent limitations of the data. Here, through the example of LiNi 0.8Co 0.15Al 0.05Omore » 2 (NCA), we demonstrated the sensitivity of various structural parameters in Rietveld structural analysis to different refinement approaches and structural models, and proposed an approach to reduce refinement uncertainties due to the inexact X-ray scattering factors of the constituent atoms within the lattice. Furthermore, this refinement approach was implemented for electrochemically-cycled NCA samples and yielded accurate structural parameters using only X-ray diffraction data. The present work provides the best practices for performing structural refinement of lithium transition metal oxides.« less

  17. HYBRID Simulations of Diffraction-Limited Focusing with Kirkpatrick-Baez Mirrors for a Next-Generation In Situ Hard X-ray Nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maser, Jörg; Shi, Xianbo; Reininger, Ruben; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Next-generation hard X-ray nanoprobe beamlines such as the In Situ Nanoprobe (ISN) beamline being planned at the Advanced Photon Source aim at providing very high spatial resolution while also enabling very high focused flux, to study complex materials and devices using fast, multidimensional imaging across many length scales. The ISN will use diffractive optics to focus X-rays with a bandpass of Δ E/ E = 10-4 into a focal spot of 20 nm or below. Reflective optics in Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry will be used to focus X-rays with a bandpass as large as Δ E/ E = 10-2 into a focal spot of 50 nm. Diffraction-limited focusing with reflective optics is achieved by spatial filtering and use of a very long, vertically focusing mirror. To quantify the performance of the ISN beamline, we have simulated the propagation of both partially and fully coherent wavefronts from the undulator source, through the ISN beamline and into the mirror-based focal spot. Simulations were carried out using the recently developed software " HYBRID."

  18. Watts-level, short all-fiber laser at 1.5 µm with a large core and diffraction-limited output via intracavity spatial-mode filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polynkin, Alexander; Polynkin, Pavel; Schülzgen, Axel; Mansuripur, Masud; Peyghambarian, N.

    2005-02-01

    We report over 2 W of single spatial-mode output power at 1.5 µm from an 8-cm-long, large-core phosphate fiber laser. The fiber has a numerical aperture of simeq 0.17 and a 25-µm-wide core, heavily doped with 1% Er+3 and 8% Yb+3. The laser utilizes a scalable evanescent-field-based pumping scheme and can be pumped by as many as eight individual multimode pigtailed diode laser sources at a wavelength of 975 nm. Nearly diffraction-limited laser output with a beam quality factor M^2 simeq 1.1 is achieved by use of a simple intracavity all-fiber spatial-mode filter. Both spectrally broadband and narrowband operation of the laser are demonstrated.

  19. Generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser in a cascade of nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anders K.; Jensen, Ole B.; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Andersen, Peter E.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-02-01

    Many applications, e.g., within biomedicine stand to benefit greatly from the development of diode laser-based multi- Watt efficient compact green laser sources. The low power of existing diode lasers in the green area (about 100 mW) means that the most promising approach remains nonlinear frequency conversion of infrared tapered diode lasers. Here, we describe the generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser, itself yielding 10 W at 1063 nm. This SHG is performed in single pass through a cascade of two PPMgO:LN crystals with re-focusing and dispersion compensating optics between the two nonlinear crystals. In the low-power limit, such a cascade of two crystals has the theoretical potential for generation of four times as much power as a single crystal without adding significantly to the complexity of the system. The experimentally achieved power of 3.5 W corresponds to a power enhancement greater than 2 compared to SHG in each of the crystals individually and is the highest visible output power generated by frequency conversion of a single diode laser. Such laser sources provide the necessary pump power for biophotonics applications, such as optical coherence tomography or multimodal imaging devices, e.g., FTCARS-OCT, based on a strongly pumped ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser.

  20. Athermalization and achromatization of visible/SWIR optics using instantaneous Abbe number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, J. L.

    2017-11-01

    With the move to more and more lightweight and cost-effective design, a move to multiband or multi-spectral optics is required. These systems are becoming more prevalent in the market as new detector technologies have been developed. However, the lens designs are only starting to be considered with the addition of new materials in the MWIR and the LWIR. For the VIS/SWIR region the designs have been possible, but a lack of detector technology has resulted in few designs being considered for actual manufacturing. These designs are also difficult due to changes in the Abbe number in the different wavebands. Where the glass map is robust in the visible region, there exists a lack of crown glasses in the SWIR, and one is left with mostly flint glasses. This proves challenging from a chromatic perspective. The challenge becomes even more difficult if one wants to incorporate athermalization.

  1. 75 FR 20384 - ABB, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Spherion Staffing, Dividend Staffing, Mystaff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ...-Site Leased Workers From Spherion Staffing, Dividend Staffing, Mystaff, and Zero Chaos, Wichita Falls... from Spherion Staffing, Dividend Staffing, MyStaff, and Zero Chaos were employed on-site by the Wichita..., Dividend Staffing, MyStaff, and Zero Chaos working on-site at the Wichita Falls, Texas location of ABB, Inc...

  2. 5.5 W near-diffraction-limited power from resonant leaky-wave coupled phase-locked arrays of quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirch, J. D.; Chang, C.-C.; Boyle, C.

    2015-02-09

    Five, 8.36 μm-emitting quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) have been monolithically phase-locked in the in-phase array mode via resonant leaky-wave coupling. The structure is fabricated by etch and regrowth which provides large index steps (Δn = 0.10) between antiguided-array elements and interelement regions. Such high index contrast photonic-crystal (PC) lasers have more than an order of magnitude higher index contrast than PC-distributed feedback lasers previously used for coherent beam combining in QCLs. Absorption loss to metal layers inserted in the interelement regions provides a wide (∼1.0 μm) range in interelement width over which the resonant in-phase mode is strongly favored to lase. Room-temperature, in-phase-mode operation withmore » ∼2.2 kA/cm{sup 2} threshold-current density is obtained from 105 μm-wide aperture devices. The far-field beam pattern has lobewidths 1.65× diffraction limit (D.L.) and 82% of the light in the main lobe, up to 1.8× threshold. Peak pulsed near-D.L. power of 5.5 W is obtained, with 4.5 W emitted in the main lobe. Means of how to increase the device internal efficiency are discussed.« less

  3. Light funneling from a photonic crystal laser cavity to a nano-antenna: overcoming the diffraction limit in optical energy transfer down to the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Mivelle, Mathieu; Viktorovitch, Pierre; Baida, Fadi I; El Eter, Ali; Xie, Zhihua; Vo, Than-Phong; Atie, Elie; Burr, Geoffrey W; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Rauch, Jean-Yves; Callard, Ségolène; Grosjean, Thierry

    2014-06-16

    We show that the near-field coupling between a photonic crystal microlaser and a nano-antenna can enable hybrid photonic systems that are both physically compact (free from bulky optics) and efficient at transferring optical energy into the nano-antenna. Up to 19% of the laser power from a micron-scale photonic crystal laser cavity is experimentally transferred to a bowtie aperture nano-antenna (BNA) whose area is 400-fold smaller than the overall emission area of the microlaser. Instead of a direct deposition of the nano-antenna onto the photonic crystal, it is fabricated at the apex of a fiber tip to be accurately placed in the microlaser near-field. Such light funneling within a hybrid structure provides a path for overcoming the diffraction limit in optical energy transfer to the nanoscale and should thus open promising avenues in the nanoscale enhancement and confinement of light in compact architectures, impacting applications such as biosensing, optical trapping, local heating, spectroscopy, and nanoimaging.

  4. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  5. Internationalized and research-oriented photonics education: Abbe School of Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgert, Christian; Nolte, Stefan; Pertsch, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The Abbe School of Photonics (ASP) provides and coordinates the optics and photonics education of graduate and doctoral students at the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. The internationalized Master's degree program is the key activity in training students in the optical sciences. The program is designed to provide them with the skills necessary to fill challenging positions in industry and academia. Here, an essential factor is ASP's close collaboration with more than 20 German photonics companies. To sustain these partners' future economic development, the availability of highly qualified employees is constantly required. Accordingly, these industrial partners, the European Union, the local state and the federal German government are strongly involved in the sustainable development of ASP's curriculum by both conceptual and financial engagements. The main goal is to promote the students' academic careers and job experience in the photonics industry as well as in academia. To open up the program to students from all over the world, all ASP lectures and courses are taught in English. Since 2009, more than 250 graduate students from more than 40 different countries have been enrolled at the School. Almost 90% of them of non-German nationality, fulfilling the essential ASP philosophy to locally establish an international education program. ASP's qualification strategy is fully research-oriented and based on the principles of academic freedom, competitive research conditions and internationalization at all levels. The education program is complemented by a structured doctoral student support and a prestigious guest professorship program.

  6. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  7. Dynamic diffraction artefacts in Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Wen; Huang, Xiaojing; Yan, Hanfei

    2018-02-01

    This article reports a theoretical study on the reconstruction artefacts in Bragg coherent diffractive imaging caused by dynamical diffraction effects. It is shown that, unlike the absorption and refraction effects that can be corrected after reconstruction, dynamical diffraction effects have profound impacts on both the amplitude and the phase of the reconstructed complex object, causing strong artefacts. At the dynamical diffraction limit, the reconstructed shape is no longer correct, as a result of the strong extinction effect. Simulations for hemispherical particles of different sizes show the type, magnitude and extent of the dynamical diffraction artefacts, as well as the conditionsmore » under which they are negligible.« less

  8. Dynamic diffraction artefacts in Bragg coherent diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen; Huang, Xiaojing; Yan, Hanfei

    2018-02-01

    This article reports a theoretical study on the reconstruction artefacts in Bragg coherent diffractive imaging caused by dynamical diffraction effects. It is shown that, unlike the absorption and refraction effects that can be corrected after reconstruction, dynamical diffraction effects have profound impacts on both the amplitude and the phase of the reconstructed complex object, causing strong artefacts. At the dynamical diffraction limit, the reconstructed shape is no longer correct, as a result of the strong extinction effect. Simulations for hemispherical particles of different sizes show the type, magnitude and extent of the dynamical diffraction artefacts, as well as the conditions under which they are negligible.

  9. Dynamic diffraction artefacts in Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hanfei

    2018-01-01

    This article reports a theoretical study on the reconstruction artefacts in Bragg coherent diffractive imaging caused by dynamical diffraction effects. It is shown that, unlike the absorption and refraction effects that can be corrected after reconstruction, dynamical diffraction effects have profound impacts on both the amplitude and the phase of the reconstructed complex object, causing strong artefacts. At the dynamical diffraction limit, the reconstructed shape is no longer correct, as a result of the strong extinction effect. Simulations for hemispherical particles of different sizes show the type, magnitude and extent of the dynamical diffraction artefacts, as well as the conditions under which they are negligible. PMID:29507549

  10. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the workingmore » bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.« less

  11. Real-time and sub-wavelength ultrafast coherent diffraction imaging in the extreme ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Zürch, M; Rothhardt, J; Hädrich, S; Demmler, S; Krebs, M; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A; Guggenmos, A; Kleineberg, U; Spielmann, C

    2014-12-08

    Coherent Diffraction Imaging is a technique to study matter with nanometer-scale spatial resolution based on coherent illumination of the sample with hard X-ray, soft X-ray or extreme ultraviolet light delivered from synchrotrons or more recently X-ray Free-Electron Lasers. This robust technique simultaneously allows quantitative amplitude and phase contrast imaging. Laser-driven high harmonic generation XUV-sources allow table-top realizations. However, the low conversion efficiency of lab-based sources imposes either a large scale laser system or long exposure times, preventing many applications. Here we present a lensless imaging experiment combining a high numerical aperture (NA = 0.8) setup with a high average power fibre laser driven high harmonic source. The high flux and narrow-band harmonic line at 33.2 nm enables either sub-wavelength spatial resolution close to the Abbe limit (Δr = 0.8λ) for long exposure time, or sub-70 nm imaging in less than one second. The unprecedented high spatial resolution, compactness of the setup together with the real-time capability paves the way for a plethora of applications in fundamental and life sciences.

  12. The Crystal Structure and Magnetic Behavior of Quinary Osmate and Ruthenate Double Perovskites La ABB'O 6 ( A = Ca, Sr; B = Co, Ni; B' = Ru, Os)

    DOE PAGES

    Morrow, Ryan; McGuire, Michael A.; Yan, Jiaqiang; ...

    2018-02-23

    In this work, six LaABB'O 6 (A = Ca, Sr; B = Co, Ni; B' = Ru, Os) double perovskites were synthesized, several for the first time, and their crystal structures and magnetic behavior were characterized with neutron powder diffraction and direct-current and alternating-current magnetometry. All six compounds crystallize with P2 1/n space group symmetry, resulting from a –a –c + octahedral tilting and complete rock salt ordering of transition-metal ions. Despite the electronic configurations of the transition-metal ions, either d 8–d 3 or d 7–d 3, not one of the six compounds shows ferromagnetism as predicted by the Goodenough–Kanamorimore » rules. LaSrNiOsO 6, LaSrNiRuO 6, and LaCaNiRuO 6 display long-range antiferromagnetic order, while LaCaNiOsO 6, LaCaCoOsO 6, and LaSrCoOsO 6 exhibit spin-glass behavior. These compounds are compared to the previously studied LaCaCoRuO 6 and LaSrCoRuO 6, both of which order antiferromagnetically. Lastly, the observed variations in magnetic properties can be attributed largely to the response of competing superexchange pathways due to changes in B–O–B' bond angles, differences in the radial extent of the 4d (B' = Ru) and 5d (B' = Os) orbitals, and filling of the t 2g orbitals of the 3d ion.« less

  13. The Crystal Structure and Magnetic Behavior of Quinary Osmate and Ruthenate Double Perovskites La ABB'O 6 ( A = Ca, Sr; B = Co, Ni; B' = Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, Ryan; McGuire, Michael A.; Yan, Jiaqiang

    In this work, six LaABB'O 6 (A = Ca, Sr; B = Co, Ni; B' = Ru, Os) double perovskites were synthesized, several for the first time, and their crystal structures and magnetic behavior were characterized with neutron powder diffraction and direct-current and alternating-current magnetometry. All six compounds crystallize with P2 1/n space group symmetry, resulting from a –a –c + octahedral tilting and complete rock salt ordering of transition-metal ions. Despite the electronic configurations of the transition-metal ions, either d 8–d 3 or d 7–d 3, not one of the six compounds shows ferromagnetism as predicted by the Goodenough–Kanamorimore » rules. LaSrNiOsO 6, LaSrNiRuO 6, and LaCaNiRuO 6 display long-range antiferromagnetic order, while LaCaNiOsO 6, LaCaCoOsO 6, and LaSrCoOsO 6 exhibit spin-glass behavior. These compounds are compared to the previously studied LaCaCoRuO 6 and LaSrCoRuO 6, both of which order antiferromagnetically. Lastly, the observed variations in magnetic properties can be attributed largely to the response of competing superexchange pathways due to changes in B–O–B' bond angles, differences in the radial extent of the 4d (B' = Ru) and 5d (B' = Os) orbitals, and filling of the t 2g orbitals of the 3d ion.« less

  14. Monitoring of temperature-mediated phase transitions of adipose tissue by combined optical coherence tomography and Abbe refractometry.

    PubMed

    Yanina, Irina Y; Popov, Alexey P; Bykov, Alexander V; Meglinski, Igor V; Tuchin, Valery V

    2018-01-01

    Observation of temperature-mediated phase transitions between lipid components of the adipose tissues has been performed by combined use of the Abbe refractometry and optical coherence tomography. The phase transitions of the lipid components were clearly observed in the range of temperatures from 24°C to 60°C, and assessed by quantitatively monitoring the changes of the refractive index of 1- to 2-mm-thick porcine fat tissue slices. The developed approach has a great potential as an alternative method for obtaining accurate information on the processes occurring during thermal lipolysis. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  15. Testing the limits of sensitivity in a solid-state structural investigation by combined X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state NMR, and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Filip, Xenia; Borodi, Gheorghe; Filip, Claudiu

    2011-10-28

    A solid state structural investigation of ethoxzolamide is performed on microcrystalline powder by using a multi-technique approach that combines X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data analysis based on direct space methods with information from (13)C((15)N) solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) and molecular modeling. Quantum chemical computations of the crystal were employed for geometry optimization and chemical shift calculations based on the Gauge Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method, whereas a systematic search in the conformational space was performed on the isolated molecule using a molecular mechanics (MM) approach. The applied methodology proved useful for: (i) removing ambiguities in the XRPD crystal structure determination process and further refining the derived structure solutions, and (ii) getting important insights into the relationship between the complex network of non-covalent interactions and the induced supra-molecular architectures/crystal packing patterns. It was found that ethoxzolamide provides an ideal case study for testing the accuracy with which this methodology allows to distinguish between various structural features emerging from the analysis of the powder diffraction data. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  16. Diode-pumped dual-wavelength Nd:LSO laser at 1059 and 1067  nm with nearly diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Lan, Jinglong; Lin, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Jun

    2016-04-10

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave simultaneous dual-wavelength Nd:LSO laser at 1059 and 1067 nm. By employing a specially coated output coupler with relatively high transmissions at high-gain emission lines of 1075 and 1079 nm, the two low-gain emission lines, 1059 and 1067 nm, can be achieved, for the first time to our knowledge, with maximum output power of 1.27 W and slope efficiency of about 29.2%. The output power is only limited by the available pump power. Output beam quality is also measured to be about 1.19 and 1.21 of the beam propagation factors in the x and y directions, respectively.

  17. Imaging Planet Formation Inside the Diffraction Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallum, Stephanie Elise

    For decades, astronomers have used observations of mature planetary systems to constrain planet formation theories, beginning with our own solar system and now the thousands of known exoplanets. Recent advances in instrumentation have given us a direct view of some steps in the planet formation process, such as large-scale protostar and protoplanetary disk features and evolution. However, understanding the details of how planets accrete and interact with their environment requires direct observations of protoplanets themselves. Transition disks, protoplanetary disks with inner clearings that may be caused by forming planets, are the best targets for these studies. Their large distances, compared to the stars normally targeted for direct imaging of exoplanets, make protoplanet detection difficult and necessitate novel imaging techniques. In this dissertation, I describe the results of using non-redundant masking (NRM) to search for forming planets in transition disk clearings. I first present a data reduction pipeline that I wrote to this end, using example datasets and simulations to demonstrate reduction and imaging optimizations. I discuss two transition disk NRM case studies: T Cha and LkCa 15. In the case of T Cha, while we detect significant asymmetries, the data cannot be explained by orbiting companions. The fluxes and orbital motion of the LkCa 15 companion signals, however, can be naturally explained by protoplanets in the disk clearing. I use these datasets and simulated observations to illustrate the effects of scattered light from transition disk material on NRM protoplanet searches. I then demonstrate the utility of the dual-aperture Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer's NRM mode on the bright B[e] star MWC 349A. I discuss the implications of this work for planet formation studies as well as future prospects for NRM and related techniques on next generation instruments.

  18. Diffraction-limited IR Microspectroscopy with IRENI

    Treesearch

    J. Sedlmair; B. Illman; M. Unger; C. Hirschmugl

    2012-01-01

    In a unique way, IRENI (Infrared environmental Imaging), operated at the Synchrotron Radiation Center in Madison, combines IR spectroscopy and IR imaging, revealing the chemical morphology of a sample. Most storage ring based IR confocal microscopes have to overcome a trade-off between spatial resolution versus...

  19. Local phytochemical response of Musa acuminata × balbisiana Colla cv. 'Bluggoe' (ABB) to colonization by Sternorrhyncha.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Dirk; Vollrath, Antje; Kai, Marco; Dhakshinamoorthy, Suganthaguntalam; Menezes, Riya C; Svatoš, Aleš; Schubert, Ulrich S; Buerkert, Andreas; Schneider, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of two Sternorrhyncha species, the banana aphid (Pentalonia nigronervosa Coquerel (Hemiptera: Aphididae, Aphidinae)), vector of the banana bunchy top virus (BBTV), and the latania scale (Hemiberlesia lataniae Signoret (Hemiptera: Diaspididae, Diaspidinae)) with Musa acuminata × balbisiana Colla (ABB Group) 'Bluggoe' (Musaceae) was investigated by a combination of conventional and spatially resolved analytical techniques, 1 H NMR, UHPLC-MS, and matrix-free UV-laser desorption/ionization MS imaging. After infestation, the feeding sites of P. nigronervosa on the pseudostem and the exocarp of banana fruit developed a red tinge, in which tissue-specific accumulations of phenylphenalenones were discovered. Phenylphenalenones were also detected in the black mats of sooty molds growing on the banana aphid exudates and in the dorsal scales of H. lataniae. This suggests that although these secondary metabolites play a role in the reaction of banana plants towards attack by sucking insects, an aphid and an armored scale have established mechanisms to exude these metabolites before they deploy their deleterious effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Collaborative Defense of Transmission and Distribution Protection and Control Devices Against Cyber Attacks (CODEF) DE-OE0000674. ABB Inc. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nuqui, Reynaldo

    This report summarizes the activities conducted under the DOE-OE funded project DEOE0000674, where ABB Inc. (ABB), in collaboration with University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Ameren-Illinois (Ameren-IL) pursued the development of a system of collaborative defense of electrical substation’s intelligent electronic devices against cyber-attacks (CODEF). An electrical substation with CODEF features will be more capable of mitigating cyber-attacks especially those that seek to control switching devices. It leverages the security extensions of IEC 61850 to empower existing devices to collaborate in identifying and blocking malicious intents to trip circuit breakers, mis-coordinate devices settings, even thoughmore » the commands and the measurements comply with correct syntax. The CODEF functions utilize the physics of electromagnetic systems, electric power engineering principles, and computer science to bring more in depth cyber defense closer to the protected substation devices.« less

  1. Birefringent coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Dmitry; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Rich, Hannah; Kryuchkov, Yuriy; Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, E.

    2016-10-01

    Directional dependence of the index of refraction contains a wealth of information about anisotropic optical properties in semiconducting and insulating materials. Here we present a novel high-resolution lens-less technique that uses birefringence as a contrast mechanism to map the index of refraction and dielectric permittivity in optically anisotropic materials. We applied this approach successfully to a liquid crystal polymer film using polarized light from helium neon laser. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of emergent brilliant X-ray sources. Applications of this novel imaging technique are in disruptive technologies, including novel electronic devices, in which both charge and spin carry information as in multiferroic materials and photonic materials such as light modulators and optical storage.

  2. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  3. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  4. Evaluation of the results of simultaneous open rhinoplasty and Abbe flap for the reconstruction of the secondary bilateral cleft and nasal deformity.

    PubMed

    Eski, Muhitdin; Aykan, Andac; Alhan, Dogan; Zor, Fatih; Isik, Selcuk

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the results of simultaneous rhinoplasty and Abbe flap for the reconstruction of the secondary bilateral cleft and nasal deformity by means of a newly developed software-based method. A total of 16 patients with the bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity received Abbe flap and simultaneous open rhinoplasty between 2004 and 2010. The mean age of the patients was 21 years, and the average follow-up time was 2.4 years. After the open rhinoplasty procedure, the upper lip was reconstructed with the Abbe flap. Preoperative and postoperative photographs that had been taken laterally were evaluated by using Adobe Photoshop(®) CS4 and Adobe InDesign(®) software. The length of the columella and the relative changes of the most anterior point of the upper lip to the vertical plane tangent to the most anterior point of the lower lip were measured in pixels on standardized preoperative and postoperative images. The differences were calculated and compared as a percentage (%). There was no flap loss and associated problems. The measurements of columellar length revealed an average increase of 51.8 ± 11.3%, while the relative change of the most anterior point of the upper lip revealed an average increase of 68.6 ± 11.2%. The results of the treatment modality were successfully evaluated by a newly developed software-based method. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Historical model for editor and Office of Research Integrity cooperation in handling allegations, investigation, and retraction in a contentious (Abbs) case of research misconduct.

    PubMed

    Price, Alan R; Daroff, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation between a journal editor and the federal Office of Research Integrity (ORI) in addressing investigations of research misconduct, each performing their own responsibilities while keeping each other informed of events and evidence, can be critical to the professional and regulatory resolution of a case. This paper describes the history of one of ORI's most contentious investigations that involved falsification of research on Parkinson's disease patients by James Abbs, Professor of Neurology, University of Wisconsin, published in the journal Neurology, which was handled cooperatively by the authors, who were the chief ORI investigator and the Editor-in-Chief of Neurology, respectively.

  6. Pinhole diffraction filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1977-01-01

    Multistage diffraction filter consisting of coalined series of pinholes on parallel sheets can be used as nondegradable UV filter. Beam is attenuated as each pinhole diffracts radiation in controlled manner into divergent beam, and following pinhole accepts only small part of that beam.

  7. Observables of QCD diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieskolainen, Mikael; Orava, Risto

    2017-03-01

    A new combinatorial vector space measurement model is introduced for soft QCD diffraction. The model independent mathematical construction resolves experimental complications; the theoretical framework of the approach includes the Good-Walker view of diffraction, Regge phenomenology together with AGK cutting rules and random fluctuations.

  8. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  9. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  10. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  11. Fraunhofer Diffraction and Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment for the intermediate undergraduate optics laboratory designed to illustrate simultaneously some aspects of the phenomena of diffraction; interference, coherence, apodization, the Fresnel-Arago law; as well as of the interrelations between these concepts. (HM)

  12. DIFFRACTION SYNCHRONIZATION OF LASERS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    semiconductor lasers while suppressing parasitic generation in the plane of the mirror. The diffraction coupling coefficient of open resonators is calculated, and the stability conditions of the synchronized system is determined.

  13. NOTE: Calculating diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Frank

    2003-05-01

    Following Marcella's approach to the double-slit experiment (Marcella T V 2002 Eur. J. Phys. 23 615-21), diffraction patterns for two-dimensional masks are calculated by Fourier transform of the Mask geometry into momentum space.

  14. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  15. Two-photon x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stohr, J.

    The interference pattern of a circular photon source has long been used to define the optical diffraction limit. Here we show the breakdown of conventional x-ray diffraction theory for the fundamental case of a “source”, consisting of a back-illuminated thin film in a circular aperture. When the conventional spontaneous x-ray scattering by atoms in the film is replaced at high incident intensity by stimulated resonant scattering, the film becomes the source of cloned photon twins and the diffraction pattern becomes self-focused beyond the diffraction limit. Furthermore, the case of cloned photon pairs is compared to and distinguished from entangled photonmore » pairs or biphotons.« less

  16. Two-photon x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Stohr, J.

    2017-01-11

    The interference pattern of a circular photon source has long been used to define the optical diffraction limit. Here we show the breakdown of conventional x-ray diffraction theory for the fundamental case of a “source”, consisting of a back-illuminated thin film in a circular aperture. When the conventional spontaneous x-ray scattering by atoms in the film is replaced at high incident intensity by stimulated resonant scattering, the film becomes the source of cloned photon twins and the diffraction pattern becomes self-focused beyond the diffraction limit. Furthermore, the case of cloned photon pairs is compared to and distinguished from entangled photonmore » pairs or biphotons.« less

  17. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  18. Diffraction radiation generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopalov, Viktor P.; Vertii, Aleksei A.; Ermak, Gennadii P.; Skrynnik, Boris K.; Khlopov, Grigorii I.; Tsvyk, Aleksei I.

    Research in the field of diffraction radiation generators (DRG) conducted at the Radio Physics and electronics Institute of the Ukranian Academy of Sciences over the past 25 years is reviewed. The effect of diffraction radiation is analyzed in detail, and various operating regimes of DRGs are discussed. The discussion then focuses on the principal requirements for the design of packaged DRGs and their principal parameters. Finally, applications of DRGs in various fields of science and technology are reviewed, including such applications as DRG spectroscopy, diagnostics of plasma, biological specimens, and vibration, and DRG radar systems.

  19. Efficient three-dimensional resist profile-driven source mask optimization optical proximity correction based on Abbe-principal component analysis and Sylvester equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pei-Chun; Yu, Chun-Chang; Chen, Charlie Chung-Ping

    2015-01-01

    As one of the critical stages of a very large scale integration fabrication process, postexposure bake (PEB) plays a crucial role in determining the final three-dimensional (3-D) profiles and lessening the standing wave effects. However, the full 3-D chemically amplified resist simulation is not widely adopted during the postlayout optimization due to the long run-time and huge memory usage. An efficient simulation method is proposed to simulate the PEB while considering standing wave effects and resolution enhancement techniques, such as source mask optimization and subresolution assist features based on the Sylvester equation and Abbe-principal component analysis method. Simulation results show that our algorithm is 20× faster than the conventional Gaussian convolution method.

  20. The Effects of Using Microsoft Power Point on EFL Learners' Attitude and Anxiety: Case Study of Two Master Students of Didactics of English as a Foreign Language, Djillali Liabes University, Sidi Bel Abbes, Algeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benghalem, Boualem

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of using ICT tools such as Microsoft PowerPoint on EFL students' attitude and anxiety. The participants in this study were 40 Master 2 students of Didactics of English as a Foreign Language, Djillali Liabes University, Sidi Bel Abbes Algeria. In order to find out the effects of Microsoft PowerPoint on EFL…

  1. DIFFRACTION FROM MODEL CRYSTALS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although calculating X-ray diffraction patterns from atomic coordinates of a crystal structure is a widely available capability, calculation from non-periodic arrays of atoms has not been widely applied to cellulose. Non-periodic arrays result from modeling studies that, even though started with at...

  2. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  3. A Diffraction-limited Survey for Direct Detection of Halpha Emitting/Accreting ExtraSolar Planets with the 6.5m Magellan Telescope and the MagAO Visible AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird

    steady diet of hydrogen gas. Such planets should then be quite bright in Halpha accretion emission. The key point is that: instead of a steep drop off in the luminosity of the planet’s atmosphere, the accretion luminosity of these planets will just linearly decrease with decreasing mass. At an accretion rate=6e-10 Msun/yr we find low mass (~1 Mjup) accreting gap planets are much (50-1000x) brighter (for 0-3.4 mag of Halpha extinction) in Halpha than at H band. PROOF-OF_CONCEPT: A 3 hour MagAO observation at Halpha of a transitional disk in April 2013 was made. The resulting deep diffraction-limited images discovered (at 10.5 sigma) an Halpha source that was 295% above the continuum just 0.083” from the star (edge of the inner 10 AU disk gap). We also detected (at 5 sigma) an excellent (though much fainter) ~1 Mjup mass Halpha planet candidate located auspiciously at the outer edge (145 AU) of the gap. If confirmed by our “second epoch” follow-up as common proper motion then this would be the lowest mass (~1 Mjup) planet ever imaged. SURVEY: Scaling off of this exciting success we propose to deeply image (120 min) all 14 nearby (D<250pc), bright (R<11 mag) , not edge-on (i<80 deg) , young (~5 Myr) transitional disks with MagAO simultaneously at Halpha and L’. In addition, we will use BrGamma instead of Halpha for 8 additional fainter (111 Mjup in mass, we integrate across our target list and find that, in the worst case of minimal masses (1+/-0.5 Mjup), and 3.4 mag extinction, at least seven ~1 Mjup planets should be discovered by this survey --meeting all three of our science goals above.

  4. Coherent x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitney, John Allen

    Conventional x-ray diffraction has historically been done under conditions such that the measured signal consists of an incoherent addition of scattering which is coherent only on a length scale determined by the properties of the beam. The result of the incoherent summation is a statistical averaging over the whole illuminated volume of the sample, which yields certain kinds of information with a high degree of precision and has been key to the success of x-ray diffraction in a variety of applications. Coherent x-ray scattering techniques, such as coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD) and x-ray intensity fluctuation spectroscopy (XIFS), attempt to reduce or eliminate any incoherent averaging so that specific, local structures couple to the measurement without being averaged out. In the case of XIFS, the result is analogous to dynamical light scattering, but with sensitivity to length scales less than 200 nm and time scales from 10-3 s to 103 s. When combined with phase retrieval, CXD represents an imaging technique with the penetration, in situ capabilities, and contrast mechanisms associated with x-rays and with a spatial resolution ultimately limited by the x-ray wavelength. In practice, however, the spatial resolution of CXD imaging is limited by exposure to about 100 A. This thesis describes CXD measurements of the binary alloy Cu3Au and the adaptation of phase retrieval methods for the reconstruction of real-space images of Cu3Au antiphase domains. The theoretical foundations of CXD are described in Chapter 1 as derived from the kinematical formulation for x-ray diffraction and from the temporal and spatial coherence of radiation. The antiphase domain structure of Cu 3Au is described, along with the associated reciprocal-space structure which is measured by CXD. CXD measurements place relatively stringent requirements on the coherence properties of the beam and on the detection mechanism of the experiment; these requirements and the means by which they have been

  5. Absolute angular encoder based on optical diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Zhou, Tingting; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Liqiang

    2015-08-01

    A new encoding method for absolute angular encoder based on optical diffraction was proposed in the present study. In this method, an encoder disc is specially designed that a series of elements are uniformly spaced in one circle and each element is consisted of four diffraction gratings, which are tilted in the directions of 30°, 60°, -60° and -30°, respectively. The disc is illuminated by a coherent light and the diffractive signals are received. The positions of diffractive spots are used for absolute encoding and their intensities are for subdivision, which is different from the traditional optical encoder based on transparent/opaque binary principle. Since the track's width in the disc is not limited in the diffraction pattern, it provides a new way to solve the contradiction between the size and resolution, which is good for minimization of encoder. According to the proposed principle, the diffraction pattern disc with a diameter of 40 mm was made by lithography in the glass substrate. A prototype of absolute angular encoder with a resolution of 20" was built up. Its maximum error was tested as 78" by comparing with a small angle measuring system based on laser beam deflection.

  6. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals

    PubMed Central

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Lourdu Xavier, Paulraj; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are predominantly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation is access to high-quality crystals, to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields sufficiently high-resolution information that the crystal structure can be solved. The observation that crystals with shrunken unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks1,2 hints that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity but rather by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern, equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid single molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and hence with an increased information content3. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed—and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins4 —they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5 Å limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to directly phase5 the pattern. With the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 Å as a constraint, we then obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at 3.5 Å resolution. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome long-supposed resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, with a method that puts great value in commonly encountered imperfect crystals and opens up the possibility for model-free phasing6,7. PMID:26863980

  7. Maladie thromboembolique veineuse dans la région de Sidi Bel Abbes, Algérie: fréquence et facteurs de risque

    PubMed Central

    Chalal, Nourelhouda; Demmouche, Abbassia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction La maladie thromboembolique veineuse (MTEV) présente par ses deux entités cliniques: thrombose veineuse profonde (TVP) et embolie pulmonaire (EP), est une pathologie fréquente ayant une forte morbi-mortalité. En Algérie, cette pathologie prend de plus en plus de l'ampleur, en l'absence de toute publication révélant sa fréquence et le pouvoir thrombogène des facteurs de risque qui lui sont corrélés. Notre étude a pour objectif de déterminer la fréquence et les facteurs de risque de ce type d'affection dans la région de Sidi Bel Abbes, Algérie. Méthodes Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective allant du 1er janvier 2006 au 10 juin 2012 ciblant les patients hospitalisés pour TVP et /ou EP au sein du service de cardiologie du CHU de Sidi Bel Abbes. Résultats 183 patients atteints de la MTEV dont 112 femmes (61.2%) d’âge moyen 46.4 ± 17.9 et 71 hommes (38.7%) d’âge moyen 51.5 ± 17.7 ont été notés. 146 cas parmi eux (79.7%) présentaient une TVP isolée, alors que 37 autres (20.2%) étaient atteints d'EP, dont 16 cas de TVP associée. Les facteurs de risque les plus fréquents enregistrés en cas de TVP sont surtout: l'immobilité, l'hypertension, la chirurgie, et la contraception orale, tandis que: l'immobilité, la chirurgie, l'hypertension et les fractures sont les facteurs de risques les plus incriminés en cas d'EP. 24.7% des patients présentaient plusieurs facteurs de risque. L'antécédent personnel de la MTEV, était présent dans 12.02% des cas. 97.5% des TVP ont touché les membres inférieurs mais seulement 2.5% des TVP étaient localisés au niveau des membres supérieurs. Conclusion Au terme de notre étude, et en dépit de sa fréquence non alarmante, il serait indispensable d'envisager l'adoption d'une stratégie prophylactique adéquate afin de lutter contre le développement redoutable de ce genre d'affection dans la région de Sidi Bel Abbes. PMID:24648858

  8. Profil épidémiologique des fibromes utérins dans la région de Sidi Bel Abbes, Algérie

    PubMed Central

    Chalal, Nourelhouda; Demmouche, Abbassia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Les léiomyomes ou fibromyomes plus communément dénommés fibromes, sont les tumeurs les plus répandues du tractus génital féminin. Ils affectent 20 à 25% des femmes en activité génitale. Notre étude vise à élucider la réalité de ce type de pathologie dans la région de sidi bel Abbes, nord-ouest d'Algérie. Méthodes A travers une étude rétrospective allant du 1er janvier 2008 au 1 mai 2011 portant sur les patientes opérées pour fibrome au sein de la maternité de Sidi Bel Abbes, nous avons relevé les particularités épidémiologiques et cliniques de cette pathologie. Résultats Au total 323 cas de fibromes ont été recensés. La tranche d'âge la plus touchée varie de 40 à 44 ans dans une fourchette d'âge comprise entre 20 et 74 ans. 37.83% des patientes étaient nullipares. Une prédominance des patientes dont l'âge de la ménarche est précoce, a été retenue (60.3%). 3% des femmes ont présenté un terrain familial prédisposant. La symptomatologie était dominée par les hémorragies génitales (35%). La majorité des patientes (51.70%) présentaient un utérus polymyomateux dont la localisation des fibromes était principalement corporéale (96%), sous séreuse (43%). Le traitement était conservateur dans 71.82% des cas. Conclusion Sur la base des résultats obtenus, la mise au point d'un programme national de sensibilisation et de dépistage précoce, s'impose PMID:23847704

  9. First report in Africa of two clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis carrying Salmonella genomic island (SGI1) variants, SGI1-PmABB and SGI1-W.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Toshi; El-Domany, Ramadan A; Nariya, Hirofumi; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2017-07-01

    Two Proteus mirabilis strains, designated PmTAN59 and PmKAF126, were isolated from two different Egyptian cities in 2014 and 2015, respectively. PmTAN59 was isolated from a sputum swab from a pneumonia patient in Tanta University Teaching Hospital. PmKAF126 was isolated from a patient with a diabetic foot infection in a hospital in the city of Kafr El-Sheikh. The two isolates were identified with bacterial small ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene amplification and sequencing and tested for antimicrobial sensitivity with a Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay. The two strains were resistant to amoxicillin/clavulante, ampicillin, cefotaxime, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, colistin, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, spectinomycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprime, and tetracycline, but sensitive to aztreonam, imipenem, and meropenem. Molecular characterization was used to map the entire backbone, including the multiple antibiotic resistance (MDR) region, of Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). Both isolates carried a structure similar to SGI1, with two different MDR regions corresponding to SGI1-PmABB in PmTAN59 and SGI1-W in PmKAF126. SGI1-PmABB carried an integron of ~1.5kb with a two-gene cassette, aacCA5-aadA7, which confers resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin, and spectinomycin, whereas SGI1-W carried an integron of ~1.9kb containing aadA2-lnuF, which confers resistance to spectinomycin, streptomycin, and lincosamides. PmKAF126 carried the entire SGI1 sequence, however PmTAN59 carried a SGI1 structure with a deletion in the region from ORF S005 to ORF S009 and accompanied by insertion of IS1359 (1258bp). Furthermore, PmTAN59 carried class 2 integron of ~2.2kb containing dfrA1-sat2-aadA1. An ERIC-PCR analysis detected no clonal relationship between the two strains. Molecular screening for other antimicrobial resistance genes and a plasmid analysis indicated that PmTAN59 carried an IncFIB plasmid type. This strain also carried bla

  10. Instrumentation for Laue diffraction (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helliwell, J. R.; Harrop, S.; Habash, J.; Magorrian, B. G.; Allinson, N. M.; Gomez, D.; Helliwell, M.; Derewenda, Z.; Cruickshank, D. W. J.

    1989-07-01

    Single-crystal x-ray diffraction data can be measured very quickly in Laue geometry compared with monochromatic methods. Alternatively, this gain factor can be used instead to reduce the sample volume for a fixed exposure time. In the latter case especially, there is a critical need to control parasitic scatter in the Laue camera. The use of Laue geometry as a means of quantitative data acquisition required the solution of some fundamental problems. The so-called ``overlapping orders problem'' has been found not to be limiting. It can be shown that the bulk of the Laue spots are single order, provided dhkl<2dmin where dhkl is the interplanar spacing and dmin is the resolution limit of the data. In addition, empirical wavelength normalization is required. This can be achieved by using the symmetry of the diffraction pattern. The fact that different equivalents occur at different wavelengths means that the differences in these intensities can be used to establish the ``λ curve.'' Successful wavelength normalization to date has used a relatively broad-band pass. The multiplicity distribution is the histogram of the number of spots of a given order. This distribution is determined by the ratio λmax/λmin (λmax =maximum wavelength, λmin =minimum wavelength in the beam). λmax is determined by the use of any filters in the beamline. λmin is determined either by the spectral curve or a critical cutoff if a mirror is used. A mirror can be usefully introduced to enhance the multiplicity distribution in favor of single wavelength spots or to focus the white beam; so far only vertical focussing has been used. The detector options used to date have been photographic film, Fuji image plate (at Photon Factory)/Kodak storage phosphor (at Cornell) and charge coupled device (CCD) (at Daresbury). It is useful to consider the joint theoretical spatial and energy distribution of spots in defining the detector specification and geometry. To date, we have processed Laue film data

  11. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  12. Diffractive Alvarez lens

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Ian M.; Dixit, Sham N.; Summers, Leslie J.

    2000-01-01

    A diffractive Alvarez lens is demonstrated that consists of two separate phase plates, each having complementary 16-level surface-relief profiles that contain cubic phase delays. Translation of these two components in the plane of the phase plates is shown to produce a variable astigmatic focus. Both spherical and cylindrical phase profiles are demonstrated with good accuracy, and the discrete surface-relief features are shown to cause less than {lambda}/10 wave-front aberration in the transmitted wave front over a 40 mmx80 mm region. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  13. Diffraction-Based Optical Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sperno, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for controllably redirecting a light beam, having a central wavelength lambda, from a first light-receiving site to a second light-receiving site. A diffraction grating is attached to or part of a piezoelectric substrate, which is connected to one or two controllable voltage difference sources. When a substrate voltage difference is changed and the diffraction grating length in each of one or two directions is thereby changed, at least one of the diffraction angle, the diffraction order and the central wavelength is controllably changed. A diffracted light beam component, having a given wavelength, diffraction angle and diffraction order, that is initially received at a first light receiving site (e.g., a detector or optical fiber) is thereby controllably shifted or altered and can be received at a second light receiving site. A polynomially stepped, chirped grating is used in one embodiment. In another embodiment, an incident light beam, having at least one of first and second wavelengths, lambda1 and lambda2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide a first diffracted beam. The first diffracted beam is received and diffracted at a second diffraction grating to produce a second diffracted beam. The second diffracted beam is received at a light-sensitive transducer, having at least first and second spaced apart light detector elements that are positioned so that, when the incident light beam has wavelength lambda1 or lambda2 (lambda1 not equal to lambda2), the second diffracted beam is received at the first element or at the second element, respectively; change in a selected physical parameter at the second grating can also be sensed or measured. A sequence of spaced apart light detector elements can be positioned along a linear or curvilinear segment with equal or unequal spacing.

  14. Diffracted diffraction radiation and its application to beam diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goponov, Yu. A.; Shatokhin, R. A.; Sumitani, K.; Syshchenko, V. V.; Takabayashi, Y.; Vnukov, I. E.

    2018-03-01

    We present theoretical considerations for diffracted diffraction radiation and also propose an application of this process to diagnosing ultra-relativistic electron (positron) beams for the first time. Diffraction radiation is produced when relativistic particles move near a target. If the target is a crystal or X-ray mirror, diffraction radiation in the X-ray region is expected to be diffracted at the Bragg angle and therefore be detectable. We present a scheme for applying this process to measurements of the beam angular spread, and consider how to conduct a proof-of-principle experiment for the proposed method.

  15. Planar Diffractive Lenses: Fundamentals, Functionalities, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun; Qin, Fei; Liu, Hong; Ye, Huapeng; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Teng, Jinghua

    2018-06-01

    Traditional objective lenses in modern microscopy, based on the refraction of light, are restricted by the Rayleigh diffraction limit. The existing methods to overcome this limit can be categorized into near-field (e.g., scanning near-field optical microscopy, superlens, microsphere lens) and far-field (e.g., stimulated emission depletion microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) approaches. However, they either operate in the challenging near-field mode or there is the need to label samples in biology. Recently, through manipulation of the diffraction of light with binary masks or gradient metasurfaces, some miniaturized and planar lenses have been reported with intriguing functionalities such as ultrahigh numerical aperture, large depth of focus, and subdiffraction-limit focusing in far-field, which provides a viable solution for the label-free superresolution imaging. Here, the recent advances in planar diffractive lenses (PDLs) are reviewed from a united theoretical account on diffraction-based focusing optics, and the underlying physics of nanofocusing via constructive or destructive interference is revealed. Various approaches of realizing PDLs are introduced in terms of their unique performances and interpreted by using optical aberration theory. Furthermore, a detailed tutorial about applying these planar lenses in nanoimaging is provided, followed by an outlook regarding future development toward practical applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by correctivemore » optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.« less

  17. Common arc method for diffraction pattern orientation.

    PubMed

    Bortel, Gábor; Tegze, Miklós

    2011-11-01

    Very short pulses of X-ray free-electron lasers opened the way to obtaining diffraction signal from single particles beyond the radiation dose limit. For three-dimensional structure reconstruction many patterns are recorded in the object's unknown orientation. A method is described for the orientation of continuous diffraction patterns of non-periodic objects, utilizing intensity correlations in the curved intersections of the corresponding Ewald spheres, and hence named the common arc orientation method. The present implementation of the algorithm optionally takes into account Friedel's law, handles missing data and is capable of determining the point group of symmetric objects. Its performance is demonstrated on simulated diffraction data sets and verification of the results indicates a high orientation accuracy even at low signal levels. The common arc method fills a gap in the wide palette of orientation methods. © 2011 International Union of Crystallography

  18. Coherent diffraction surface imaging in reflection geometry.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Shashidhara; Kim, S S; Kim, S N; Kim, Chan; Kang, H C; Nickles, P V; Noh, D Y

    2010-03-29

    We present a reflection based coherent diffraction imaging method which can be used to reconstruct a non periodic surface image from a diffraction amplitude measured in reflection geometry. Using a He-Ne laser, we demonstrated that a surface image can be reconstructed solely from the reflected intensity from a surface without relying on any prior knowledge of the sample object or the object support. The reconstructed phase image of the exit wave is particularly interesting since it can be used to obtain quantitative information of the surface depth profile or the phase change during the reflection process. We believe that this work will broaden the application areas of coherent diffraction imaging techniques using light sources with limited penetration depth.

  19. Diffraction and unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.

    2016-10-01

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  20. Diffraction and Unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  1. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1990-04-10

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages. 2 figs.

  2. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages.

  3. Refractive-index determination of solids from first- and second-order critical diffraction angles of periodic surface patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Meichner, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.meichner@uni-bayreuth.de; Kador, Lothar, E-mail: lothar.kador@uni-bayreuth.de; Schedl, Andreas E.

    2015-08-15

    We present two approaches for measuring the refractive index of transparent solids in the visible spectral range based on diffraction gratings. Both require a small spot with a periodic pattern on the surface of the solid, collimated monochromatic light, and a rotation stage. We demonstrate the methods on a polydimethylsiloxane film (Sylgard{sup ®} 184) and compare our data to those obtained with a standard Abbe refractometer at several wavelengths between 489 and 688 nm. The results of our approaches show good agreement with the refractometer data. Possible error sources are analyzed and discussed in detail; they include mainly the linewidthmore » of the laser and/or the angular resolution of the rotation stage. With narrow-band light sources, an angular accuracy of ±0.025{sup ∘} results in an error of the refractive index of typically ±5 ⋅ 10{sup −4}. Information on the sample thickness is not required.« less

  4. Diffraction-based optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for wavelength-based processing of a light beam. A light beam, produced at a chemical or physical reaction site and having at least first and second wavelengths, ?1 and ?2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide first and second diffracted beams, which are received and analyzed in terms of wavelength and/or time at two spaced apart light detectors. In a second embodiment, light from first and second sources is diffracted and compared in terms of wavelength and/or time to determine if the two beams arise from the same source. In a third embodiment, a light beam is split and diffracted and passed through first and second environments to study differential effects. In a fourth embodiment, diffracted light beam components, having first and second wavelengths, are received sequentially at a reaction site to determine whether a specified reaction is promoted, based on order of receipt of the beams. In a fifth embodiment, a cylindrically shaped diffraction grating (uniform or chirped) is rotated and translated to provide a sequence of diffracted beams with different wavelengths. In a sixth embodiment, incident light, representing one or more symbols, is successively diffracted from first and second diffraction gratings and is received at different light detectors, depending upon the wavelengths present in the incident light.

  5. Chromatic confocal microscope using hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayer, Mathieu; Mansfield, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A chromatic confocal microscope is a single point non-contact distance measurement sensor. For three decades the vast majority of the chromatic confocal microscope use refractive-based lenses to code the measurement axis chromatically. However, such an approach is limiting the range of applications. In this paper the performance of refractive, diffractive and Hybrid aspheric diffractive are compared. Hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses combine the low geometric aberration of a diffractive lens with the high optical power of an aspheric lens. Hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses can reduce the number of elements in an imaging system significantly or create large hyper- chromatic lenses for sensing applications. In addition, diffractive lenses can improve the resolution and the dynamic range of a chromatic confocal microscope. However, to be suitable for commercial applications, the diffractive optical power must be significant. Therefore, manufacturing such lenses is a challenge. We show in this paper how a theoretical manufacturing model can demonstrate that the hybrid aspheric diffractive configuration with the best performances is achieved by step diffractive surface. The high optical quality of step diffractive surface is then demonstrated experimentally. Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 5/10/14, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 5/19/14. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance.

  6. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Butler, Michael A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Senturia, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers).

  7. Detonation Diffraction in a Multi-Step Channel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    openings. This allowed the detonation wave diffraction transmission limits to be determined for hydrogen/air mixtures and to better understand...imaging systems to provide shock wave detail and velocity information. The images were observed through a newly designed explosive proof optical section...stepped openings. This allowed the detonation wave diffraction transmission limits to be determined for hydrogen/air mixtures and to better

  8. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  9. Every Good Virtue You Ever Wanted in a Q-switched Solid-state Laser and More: Monolithic, Diode-pumped, Self-q-switched, Highly Reproducible, Diffraction-limited Nd:yag Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Lee, K. K.

    1993-01-01

    The applications of Q-switched lasers are well known, for example, laser radar, laser remote sensing, satellite orbit determination, Moon orbit and 'moon quake' determination, satellite laser communication, and many nonlinear optics applications. Most of the applications require additional properties of the Q-switched lasers, such as single-axial and/or single-transverse mode, high repetition rate, stable pulse shape and pulse width, or ultra compact and rugged oscillators. Furthermore, space based and airborne lasers for lidar and laser communication applications require efficient, compact, lightweight, long-lived, and stable-pulsed laser sources. Diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL) have recently shown the potential for satisfying all of these requirements. We will report on the operating characteristics of a diode-pumped, monolithic, self-Q-switched Cr,Nd:YAG laser where the chromium ions act as a saturable absorber for the laser emission at 1064 nm. The pulse duration is 3.5 ns and the output is highly polarized with an extinction ratio of 700:1. It is further shown that the output is single-longitudinal-mode with transform-limited spectral line width without pulse-to-pulse mode competition. Consequently, the pulse-to-pulse intensity fluctuation is less than the instrument resolution of 0.25 percent. This self-stabilization mechanism is because the lasing mode bleaches the distributed absorber and establishes a gain-loss grating similar to that used in the distributed feedback semiconductor lasers. A repetition rate above 5 KHz has also been demonstrated. For higher power, this laser can be used for injection seeding an amplifier (or amplifier chain) or injection locking of a power oscillator pumped by diode lasers. We will discuss some research directions on the master oscillator for higher output energy per pulse as well as how to scale the output power of the diode-pumped amplifier(s) to multi-kilowatt average power.

  10. Collimation testing using slit Fresnel diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaohe; Hui, Mei; Wang, Shanshan; Hou, Yinlong; Zhou, Siyu; Zhu, Qiudong

    2018-03-01

    A simple collimation testing method based on slit Fresnel diffraction is proposed. The method needs only a CMOS and a slit with no requirement in dimensional accuracy. The light beam to be tested diffracts across the slit and forms a Fresnel diffraction pattern received by CMOS. After analysis, the defocusing amount and the distance between the primary peak point and secondary peak point of diffraction pattern fulfill an expression relationship and then the defocusing amount can be deduced from the expression. The method is applied to both the coherent beam and partially coherent beam, and these two beams are emitted from a laser and light-emitting diode (LED) with a spectrum width of about 50 nm in this paper. Simulations show that the wide spectrum of LED has the effect of smooth filtering to provide higher accuracy. Experiments show that the LED with a spectrum width of about 50 nm has a lower limitation error than the laser and can achieve up to 58.1601 μm with focal length 200 mm and slit width 15 mm.

  11. Single Hit Energy-resolved Laue Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shamim; Suggit, Matthew J.; Stubley, Paul G.

    2015-05-15

    In situ white light Laue diffraction has been successfully used to interrogate the structure of single crystal materials undergoing rapid (nanosecond) dynamic compression up to megabar pressures. However, information on strain state accessible via this technique is limited, reducing its applicability for a range of applications. We present an extension to the existing Laue diffraction platform in which we record the photon energy of a subset of diffraction peaks. This allows for a measurement of the longitudinal and transverse strains in situ during compression. Consequently, we demonstrate measurement of volumetric compression of the unit cell, in addition to the limitedmore » aspect ratio information accessible in conventional white light Laue. We present preliminary results for silicon, where only an elastic strain is observed. VISAR measurements show the presence of a two wave structure and measurements show that material downstream of the second wave does not contribute to the observed diffraction peaks, supporting the idea that this material may be highly disordered, or has undergone large scale rotation.« less

  12. Optical diffraction properties of multimicrogratings

    DOE PAGES

    Rothenbach, Christian A.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-27

    This paper shows the results of optical diffraction properties of multimicrograting structures fabricated by e-beam lithography. Multimicrograting consist of arrays of hexagonally shaped cells containing periodic one-dimensional (1D) grating lines in different orientations and arrayed to form large area patterns. We analyzed the optical diffraction properties of multimicrogratings by studying the individual effects of the several periodic elements of multimicrogratings. The observed optical diffraction pattern is shown to be the combined effect of the periodic and non-periodic elements that define the multimicrogratings and the interaction between different elements. We measured the total transverse electric (TE) diffraction efficiency of multimicrogratings andmore » found it to be 32.1%, which is closely related to the diffraction efficiency of 1D periodic grating lines of the same characteristics, measured to be 33.7%. Beam profiles of the optical diffraction patterns from multimicrogratings are captured with a CCD sensor technique. Interference fringes were observed under certain conditions formed by multimicrograting beams interfering with each other. Finally, these diffraction structures may find applications in sensing, nanometrology, and optical interconnects.« less

  13. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  14. Diffraction, chopping, and background subtraction for LDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Edward L.

    1988-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) will be an extremely sensitive infrared telescope if the noise due to the photons in the large thermal background is the only limiting factor. For observations with a 3 arcsec aperture in a broadband at 100 micrometers, a 20-meter LDR will emit 10(exp 12) per second, while the photon noise limited sensitivity in a deep survey observation will be 3,000 photons per second. Thus the background subtraction has to work at the 1 part per billion level. Very small amounts of scattered or diffracted energy can be significant if they are modulated by the chopper. The results are presented for 1-D and 2-D diffraction calculations for the lightweight, low-cost LDR concept that uses an active chopping quaternary to correct the wavefront errors introduced by the primary. Fourier transforms were used to evaluate the diffraction of 1 mm waves through this system. Unbalanced signals due to dust and thermal gradients were also studied.

  15. Performance evaluation of Bragg coherent diffraction imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Ozturk, Hande; Huang, X.; Yan, H.; ...

    2017-10-03

    In this study, we present a numerical framework for modeling three-dimensional (3D) diffraction data in Bragg coherent diffraction imaging (Bragg CDI) experiments and evaluating the quality of obtained 3D complex-valued real-space images recovered by reconstruction algorithms under controlled conditions. The approach is used to systematically explore the performance and the detection limit of this phase-retrieval-based microscopy tool. The numerical investigation suggests that the superb performance of Bragg CDI is achieved with an oversampling ratio above 30 and a detection dynamic range above 6 orders. The observed performance degradation subject to the data binning processes is also studied. Furthermore, this numericalmore » tool can be used to optimize experimental parameters and has the potential to significantly improve the throughput of Bragg CDI method.« less

  16. Performance evaluation of Bragg coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, H.; Huang, X.; Yan, H.; Robinson, I. K.; Noyan, I. C.; Chu, Y. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we present a numerical framework for modeling three-dimensional (3D) diffraction data in Bragg coherent diffraction imaging (Bragg CDI) experiments and evaluating the quality of obtained 3D complex-valued real-space images recovered by reconstruction algorithms under controlled conditions. The approach is used to systematically explore the performance and the detection limit of this phase-retrieval-based microscopy tool. The numerical investigation suggests that the superb performance of Bragg CDI is achieved with an oversampling ratio above 30 and a detection dynamic range above 6 orders. The observed performance degradation subject to the data binning processes is also studied. This numerical tool can be used to optimize experimental parameters and has the potential to significantly improve the throughput of Bragg CDI method.

  17. Electron diffraction covering a wide angular range from Bragg diffraction to small-angle diffraction.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Mori, Shigeo

    2018-04-09

    We construct an electron optical system to investigate Bragg diffraction (the crystal lattice plane, 10-2 to 10-3 rad) with the objective lens turned off by adjusting the current in the intermediate lenses. A crossover was located on the selected-area aperture plane. Thus, the dark-field imaging can be performed by using a selected-area aperture to select Bragg diffraction spots. The camera length can be controlled in the range of 0.8-4 m without exciting the objective lens. Furthermore, we can observe the magnetic-field dependence of electron diffraction using the objective lens under weak excitation conditions. The diffraction mode for Bragg diffraction can be easily switched to a small-angle electron diffraction mode having a camera length of more than 100 m. We propose this experimental method to acquire electron diffraction patterns that depict an extensive angular range from 10-2 to 10-7 rad. This method is applied to analyze the magnetic microstructures in three distinct magnetic materials, i.e. a uniaxial magnetic structure of BaFe10.35Sc1.6Mg0.05O19, a martensite of a Ni-Mn-Ga alloy, and a helical magnetic structure of Ba0.5Sr1.5Zn2Fe12O22.

  18. Tomography with energy dispersive diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, S. R.; Okasinski, J. S.; Woods, R.; Baldwin, J.; Madden, T.; Quaranta, O.; Rumaiz, A.; Kuczewski, T.; Mead, J.; Krings, T.; Siddons, P.; Miceli, A.; Almer, J. D.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray diffraction can be used as the signal for tomographic reconstruction and provides a cross-sectional map of the crystallographic phases and related quantities. Diffraction tomography has been developed over the last decade using monochromatic x-radiation and an area detector. This paper reports tomographic reconstruction with polychromatic radiation and an energy sensitive detector array. The energy dispersive diffraction (EDD) geometry, the instrumentation and the reconstruction process are described and related to the expected resolution. Results of EDD tomography are presented for two samples containing hydroxyapatite (hAp). The first is a 3D-printed sample with an elliptical crosssection and contains synthetic hAp. The second is a human second metacarpal bone from the Roman-era cemetery at Ancaster, UK and contains bio-hAp which may have been altered by diagenesis. Reconstructions with different diffraction peaks are compared. Prospects for future EDD tomography are also discussed.

  19. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

    1998-05-26

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating is disclosed. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers). 14 figs.

  20. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  1. Fresnel diffraction by spherical obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.

    1989-01-01

    Lommel functions were used to solve the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral for the case of a spherical obstacle. Comparisons were made between Fresnel diffraction theory and Mie scattering theory. Fresnel theory is then compared to experimental data. Experiment and theory typically deviated from one another by less than 10 percent. A unique experimental setup using mercury spheres suspended in a viscous fluid significantly reduced optical noise. The major source of error was due to the Gaussian-shaped laser beam.

  2. Quantum lithography beyond the diffraction limit via Rabi-oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, Mohammad; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2011-03-01

    We propose a quantum optical method to do the sub-wavelength lithography. Our method is similar to the traditional lithography but adding a critical step before dissociating the chemical bound of the photoresist. The subwavelength pattern is achieved by inducing the multi-Rabi-oscillation between the two atomic levels. The proposed method does not require multiphoton absorption and the entanglement of photons. This method is expected to be realizable using current technology. This work is supported by a grant from the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) under the NPRP project and a grant from the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST).

  3. Imaging atoms from resonance fluorescence spectrum beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, Mohammad; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2014-03-01

    We calculate the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a linear chain of two-level atoms driven by a gradient coherent laser field. The result shows that we can determine the positions of atoms from the spectrum even when the atoms locate within subwavelength range and the dipole-dipole interaction is significant. This far-field resonance fluorescence localization microscopy method does not require point-by-point scanning and it may be more time-efficient. We also give a possible scheme to extract the position information in an extended region without requiring more peak power of laser. We also briefly discuss how to do a 2D imaging based on our scheme. This work is supported by grants from the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) under the NPRP project.

  4. Analysis of XFEL serial diffraction data from individual crystalline fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Wojtas, David H.; Ayyer, Kartik; Liang, Mengning; Mossou, Estelle; Romoli, Filippo; Seuring, Carolin; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Bean, Richard J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Fleckenstein, Holger; Heymann, Michael; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barthelmess, Miriam; Ornithopoulou, Eirini; Galli, Lorenzo; Xavier, P. Lourdu; Ling, Wai Li; Frank, Matthias; Yoon, Chun Hong; White, Thomas A.; Bajt, Saša; Mitraki, Anna; Boutet, Sebastien; Aquila, Andrew; Barty, Anton; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Chapman, Henry N.; Millane, Rick P.

    2017-01-01

    Serial diffraction data collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source from crystalline amyloid fibrils delivered in a liquid jet show that the fibrils are well oriented in the jet. At low fibril concentrations, diffraction patterns are recorded from single fibrils; these patterns are weak and contain only a few reflections. Methods are developed for determining the orientation of patterns in reciprocal space and merging them in three dimensions. This allows the individual structure amplitudes to be calculated, thus overcoming the limitations of orientation and cylindrical averaging in conventional fibre diffraction analysis. The advantages of this technique should allow structural studies of fibrous systems in biology that are inaccessible using existing techniques. PMID:29123682

  5. When holography meets coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    The phase problem is inherent to crystallographic, astronomical and optical imaging where only the intensity of the scattered signal is detected and the phase information is lost and must somehow be recovered to reconstruct the object's structure. Modern imaging techniques at the molecular scale rely on utilizing novel coherent light sources like X-ray free electron lasers for the ultimate goal of visualizing such objects as individual biomolecules rather than crystals. Here, unlike in the case of crystals where structures can be solved by model building and phase refinement, the phase distribution of the wave scattered by an individual molecule must directly be recovered. There are two well-known solutions to the phase problem: holography and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI). Both techniques have their pros and cons. In holography, the reconstruction of the scattered complex-valued object wave is directly provided by a well-defined reference wave that must cover the entire detector area which often is an experimental challenge. CDI provides the highest possible, only wavelength limited, resolution, but the phase recovery is an iterative process which requires some pre-defined information about the object and whose outcome is not always uniquely-defined. Moreover, the diffraction patterns must be recorded under oversampling conditions, a pre-requisite to be able to solve the phase problem. Here, we report how holography and CDI can be merged into one superior technique: holographic coherent diffraction imaging (HCDI). An inline hologram can be recorded by employing a modified CDI experimental scheme. We demonstrate that the amplitude of the Fourier transform of an inline hologram is related to the complex-valued visibility, thus providing information on both, the amplitude and the phase of the scattered wave in the plane of the diffraction pattern. With the phase information available, the condition of oversampling the diffraction patterns can be relaxed, and the

  6. Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    synbolically by 6 0’A) elb + nrn] P e ( 55 )S... j.+sr),(.psr) where the points 0 and 0 and the distances sr and sd are indicated in Figure 10. The surface...diffracted ray caustic distance P5 iN shown in Figure 11. The quantities within brackets involving and.Cr In ( 55 ) ands~ 9A A (56) may be viewed as...gereralized dyadic coefficients for surface reflection and diffraction. respectively. It is noted that ( 55 ) and (56) are expressed inWariantly in terms of

  7. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection.

  8. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, R.J.

    1991-09-24

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection. 3 figures.

  9. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Changwu; Li, Peng; Jia, Zhenhong, E-mail: jzhh@xju.edu.cn

    2016-03-07

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensormore » was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.« less

  10. High-resolution three-dimensional partially coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Clark, J N; Huang, X; Harder, R; Robinson, I K

    2012-01-01

    The wave properties of light, particularly its coherence, are responsible for interference effects, which can be exploited in powerful imaging applications. Coherent diffractive imaging relies heavily on coherence and has recently experienced rapid growth. Coherent diffractive imaging recovers an object from its diffraction pattern by computational phasing with the potential of wavelength-limited resolution. Diminished coherence results in reconstructions that suffer from artefacts or fail completely. Here we demonstrate ab initio phasing of partially coherent diffraction patterns in three dimensions, while simultaneously determining the coherence properties of the illuminating wavefield. Both the dramatic improvements in image interpretability and the three-dimensional evaluation of the coherence will have broad implications for quantitative imaging of nanostructures and wavefield characterization with X-rays and electrons.

  11. Diffraction Plates for Classroom Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the computer generation of random and regular arrays of apertures on photographic film and their applications for classroom demonstrations of the Fraunhofer patterns produced by simple and complex apertures, Babinet's principle, resolution according to the Rayleigh criterion, and many other aspects of diffraction. (LC)

  12. Electro-Optic Diffraction Grating Tuned Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent concerns an electro - optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro - optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro - optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating.

  13. Statistical Limits to Super Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucy, L. B.

    1992-08-01

    The limits imposed by photon statistics on the degree to which Rayleigh's resolution limit for diffraction-limited images can be surpassed by applying image restoration techniques are investigated. An approximate statistical theory is given for the number of detected photons required in the image of an unresolved pair of equal point sources in order that its information content allows in principle resolution by restoration. This theory is confirmed by numerical restoration experiments on synthetic images, and quantitative limits are presented for restoration of diffraction-limited images formed by slit and circular apertures.

  14. Diffraction efficiency calculations of polarization diffraction gratings with surface relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, D.; Sharlandjiev, P.; Berberova, N.; Blagoeva, B.; Stoykova, E.; Nedelchev, L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the optical response of a stack of two diffraction gratings of equal one-dimensional periodicity. The first one is a surface-relief grating structure; the second, a volume polarization grating. This model is based on our experimental results from polarization holographic recordings in azopolymer films. We used films of commercially available azopolymer (poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt]), shortly denoted as PAZO. During the recording process, a polarization grating in the volume of the material and a relief grating on the film surface are formed simultaneously. In order to evaluate numerically the optical response of this “hybrid” diffraction structure, we used the rigorous coupled-wave approach (RCWA). It yields stable numerical solutions of Maxwell’s vector equations using the algebraic eigenvalue method.

  15. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  16. Deterministic Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Konstantin M; Punegov, Vasily I; Morgan, Kaye S; Schmalz, Gerd; Paganin, David M

    2017-04-25

    A deterministic variant of Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging is introduced in its kinematical approximation, for X-ray scattering from an imperfect crystal whose imperfections span no more than half of the volume of the crystal. This approach provides a unique analytical reconstruction of the object's structure factor and displacement fields from the 3D diffracted intensity distribution centred around any particular reciprocal lattice vector. The simple closed-form reconstruction algorithm, which requires only one multiplication and one Fourier transformation, is not restricted by assumptions of smallness of the displacement field. The algorithm performs well in simulations incorporating a variety of conditions, including both realistic levels of noise and departures from ideality in the reference (i.e. imperfection-free) part of the crystal.

  17. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging with nanofocused illumination.

    PubMed

    Schroer, C G; Boye, P; Feldkamp, J M; Patommel, J; Schropp, A; Schwab, A; Stephan, S; Burghammer, M; Schöder, S; Riekel, C

    2008-08-29

    Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging is an x-ray microscopy technique with the potential of reaching spatial resolutions well beyond the diffraction limits of x-ray microscopes based on optics. However, the available coherent dose at modern x-ray sources is limited, setting practical bounds on the spatial resolution of the technique. By focusing the available coherent flux onto the sample, the spatial resolution can be improved for radiation-hard specimens. A small gold particle (size <100 nm) was illuminated with a hard x-ray nanobeam (E=15.25 keV, beam dimensions approximately 100 x 100 nm2) and is reconstructed from its coherent diffraction pattern. A resolution of about 5 nm is achieved in 600 s exposure time.

  18. Spectromicroscopy and coherent diffraction imaging: focus on energy materials applications.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Adam P; Toney, Michael F

    2014-09-01

    Current and future capabilities of X-ray spectromicroscopy are discussed based on coherence-limited imaging methods which will benefit from the dramatic increase in brightness expected from a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR). The methods discussed include advanced coherent diffraction techniques and nanoprobe-based real-space imaging using Fresnel zone plates or other diffractive optics whose performance is affected by the degree of coherence. The capabilities of current systems, improvements which can be expected, and some of the important scientific themes which will be impacted are described, with focus on energy materials applications. Potential performance improvements of these techniques based on anticipated DLSR performance are estimated. Several examples of energy sciences research problems which are out of reach of current instrumentation, but which might be solved with the enhanced DLSR performance, are discussed.

  19. Comments on the paper "Bragg's law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis" by Josh Kacher, Colin Landon, Brent L. Adams & David Fullwood.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Claire; Fortunier, Roland; Driver, Julian; Day, Austin; Mingard, Ken; Meaden, Graham

    2010-06-01

    This comment on the paper "Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis" by Kacher et al. explains the limitations in determining elastic strains using synthetic EBSD patterns. Of particular importance are those due to the accuracy of determination of the EBSD geometry projection parameters. Additional references and supporting information are provided. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the molecular activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction are well established and they have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches, and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and nonspecialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present unit combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a detailed description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis, and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:27248784

  1. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and neutron diffraction are well established and have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and non-specialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present chapter combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a step-by-step description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:20517991

  2. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology.

    PubMed

    Egli, Martin

    2016-06-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the molecular activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction are well established and they have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last twenty years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches, and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and nonspecialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present unit combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a detailed description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis, and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Digital electron diffraction – seeing the whole picture

    PubMed Central

    Beanland, Richard; Thomas, Paul J.; Woodward, David I.; Thomas, Pamela A.; Roemer, Rudolf A.

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of convergent-beam electron diffraction for symmetry determination at the scale of a few nm are well known. In practice, the approach is often limited due to the restriction on the angular range of the electron beam imposed by the small Bragg angle for high-energy electron diffraction, i.e. a large convergence angle of the incident beam results in overlapping information in the diffraction pattern. Techniques have been generally available since the 1980s which overcome this restriction for individual diffracted beams, by making a compromise between illuminated area and beam convergence. Here a simple technique is described which overcomes all of these problems using computer control, giving electron diffraction data over a large angular range for many diffracted beams from the volume given by a focused electron beam (typically a few nm or less). The increase in the amount of information significantly improves the ease of interpretation and widens the applicability of the technique, particularly for thin materials or those with larger lattice parameters. PMID:23778099

  4. Relativistic electron diffraction at the UCLA Pegasus photoinjector laboratory.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M

    2008-10-01

    Electron diffraction holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment like a university laboratory at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. Currently the limit in time-resolution for conventional electron diffraction is set by how short an electron pulse can be made. A very promising solution to maintain the highest possible beam intensity without excessive pulse broadening from space charge effects is to increase the electron energy to the MeV level where relativistic effects significantly reduce the space charge forces. Rf photoinjectors can in principle deliver up to 10(7)-10(8) electrons packed in bunches of approximately 100-fs length, allowing an unprecedented time resolution and enabling the study of irreversible phenomena by single-shot diffraction patterns. The use of rf photoinjectors as sources for ultrafast electron diffraction has been recently at the center of various theoretical and experimental studies. The UCLA Pegasus laboratory, commissioned in early 2007 as an advanced photoinjector facility, is the only operating system in the country, which has recently demonstrated electron diffraction using a relativistic beam from an rf photoinjector. Due to the use of a state-of-the-art ultrashort photoinjector driver laser system, the beam has been measured to be sub-100-fs long, at least a factor of 5 better than what measured in previous relativistic electron diffraction setups. Moreover, diffraction patterns from various metal targets (titanium and aluminum) have been obtained using the Pegasus beam. One of the main laboratory goals in the near future is to fully develop the rf photoinjector-based ultrafast electron diffraction technique with particular attention to the optimization of the working point of the photoinjector in a low-charge ultrashort pulse regime, and to the development of suitable beam diagnostics.

  5. Optical diffraction interpretation: an alternative to interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouillet, S.; Audo, F.; Fréville, S.; Eupherte, L.; Rouyer, C.; Daurios, J.

    2015-08-01

    The Laser MégaJoule (LMJ) is a French high power laser project that requires thousands of large optical components. The wavefront performances of all those optics are critical to achieve the desired focal spot shape and to limit the hot spots that could damage the components. Fizeau interferometers and interferometric microscopes are the most commonly used tools to cover the whole range of interesting spatial frequencies. Anyway, in some particular cases like diffractive and/or coated and/or aspheric optics, an interferometric set-up becomes very expensive with the need to build a costly reference component or a specific to-the-wavelength designed interferometer. Despite the increasing spatial resolution of Fizeau interferometers, it may even not be enough, if you are trying to access the highest spatial frequencies of a transmitted wavefront for instance. The method we developed is based upon laser beam diffraction intermediate field measurements and their interpretation with a Fourier analysis and the Talbot effect theory. We demonstrated in previous papers that it is a credible alternative to classical methods. In this paper we go further by analyzing main error sources and discussing main practical difficulties.

  6. Growing Larger Crystals for Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining crystals of suitable size and high quality has been a major bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. With the advent of advanced X-ray sources and methods the question of size has rapidly dwindled, almost to the point where if one can see the crystal then it was big enough. Quality is another issue, and major national and commercial efforts were established to take advantage of the microgravity environment in an effort to obtain higher quality crystals. Studies of the macromolecule crystallization process were carried out in many labs in an effort to understand what affected the resultant crystal quality on Earth, and how microgravity improved the process. While technological improvements are resulting in a diminishing of the minimum crystal size required, neutron diffraction structural studies still require considerably larger crystals, by several orders of magnitude, than X-ray studies. From a crystal growth physics perspective there is no reason why these 'large' crystals cannot be obtained: the question is generally more one of supply than limitations mechanism. This talk will discuss our laboratory s current model for macromolecule crystal growth, with highlights pertaining to the growth of crystals suitable for neutron diffraction studies.

  7. Diffraction Effects in the SOFIA Telescope and Cavity Door

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Haas, M. R.; Davis, P. K.

    2005-12-01

    Calculations of diffraction phenomena for SOFIA (the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) are described. The analyses establish the diffraction-limited point-spread function for the planned central obscuration of the telescope, confirm the specification for the oversized primary mirror diameter, evaluate spider diffraction effects, and determine the variation in focal-plane flux with position of the telescope relative to the cavity door. The latter is a concern because motion between the door aperture and the telescope can vary the flux from a point source and the sky background by diffraction (even when the door aperture does not physically obstruct the geometrical beam). We find all these effects to be acceptable in terms of observatory performance, with the possible exception of fractional background variations 3E-3 at wavelengths 1mm. Fractional background variations larger than 1E-6 can exceed photon shot noise in one second for broad-band, background-limited infrared detectors systems. However, we expect that synchronous signal demodulation using the telescope's chopping secondary mirror will obviate this effect, assuming modulation of the diffracted sky radiation by the relative motion of the door and telescope occurs at frequencies well below the chopoper frequency. This work is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy havemore » further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.« less

  9. Compatibility of a Diffractive Pupil and Coronagraphic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendek, Eduardo; Belikov, Rusian; Pluzhnyk, Yevgeniy; Guyon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Detection and characterization of exo-earths require direct-imaging techniques that can deliver contrast ratios of 10(exp 10) at 100 milliarc-seconds or smaller angular separation. At the same time, astrometric data is required to measure planet masses and can help detect planets and constrain their orbital parameters. To minimize costs, a single space mission can be designed using a high efficiency coronograph to perform direct imaging and a diffractive pupil to calibrate wide-field distortions to enable high precision astrometric measurements. This paper reports the testing of a diffractive pupil on the high-contrast test bed at the NASA Ames Research Center to assess the compatibility of using a diffractive pupil with coronographic imaging systems. No diffractive contamination was found within our detectability limit of 2x10(exp -7) contrast outside a region of 12lambda/D and 2.5x10(exp -6) within a region spanning from 2 to 12lambda/D. Morphology of the image features suggests that no contamination exists even beyond the detectability limit specified or at smaller working angles. In the case that diffractive contamination is found beyond these stated levels, active wavefront control would be able to mitigate its intensity to 10(exp -7) or better contrast.

  10. Teaching Diffraction with Hands-On Optical Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although the observation of optical spectra is common practice in physics classes, students are usually limited to a passive, qualitative observation of nice colours. This paper discusses a diffraction-based spectrometer that allows students to take quantitative measurements of spectral bands. Students can build it within minutes from generic…

  11. Breaking the acoustic diffraction barrier with localization optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís.; Razansky, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    Diffraction causes blurring of high-resolution features in images and has been traditionally associated to the resolution limit in light microscopy and other imaging modalities. The resolution of an imaging system can be generally assessed via its point spread function, corresponding to the image acquired from a point source. However, the precision in determining the position of an isolated source can greatly exceed the diffraction limit. By combining the estimated positions of multiple sources, localization-based imaging has resulted in groundbreaking methods such as super-resolution fluorescence optical microscopy and has also enabled ultrasound imaging of microvascular structures with unprecedented spatial resolution in deep tissues. Herein, we introduce localization optoacoustic tomography (LOT) and discuss on the prospects of using localization imaging principles in optoacoustic imaging. LOT was experimentally implemented by real-time imaging of flowing particles in 3D with a recently-developed volumetric optoacoustic tomography system. Provided the particles were separated by a distance larger than the diffraction-limited resolution, their individual locations could be accurately determined in each frame of the acquired image sequence and the localization image was formed by superimposing a set of points corresponding to the localized positions of the absorbers. The presented results demonstrate that LOT can significantly enhance the well-established advantages of optoacoustic imaging by breaking the acoustic diffraction barrier in deep tissues and mitigating artifacts due to limited-view tomographic acquisitions.

  12. Stratified Diffractive Optic Approach for Creating High Efficiency Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.

    1998-01-01

    Gratings with high efficiency in a single diffracted order can be realized with both volume holographic and diffractive optical elements. However, each method has limitations that restrict the applications in which they can be used. For example, high efficiency volume holographic gratings require an appropriate combination of thickness and permittivity modulation throughout the bulk of the material. Possible combinations of those two characteristics are limited by properties of currently available materials, thus restricting the range of applications for volume holographic gratings. Efficiency of a diffractive optic grating is dependent on its approximation of an ideal analog profile using discrete features. The size of constituent features and, consequently, the number that can be used within a required grating period restricts the applications in which diffractive optic gratings can be used. These limitations imply that there are applications which cannot be addressed by either technology. In this paper we propose to address a number of applications in this category with a new method of creating high efficiency gratings which we call stratified diffractive optic gratings. In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. To illustrate the stratified diffractive optic grating concept we consider a specific application, a scanner for a space-based coherent wind lidar, with requirements that would be difficult to meet by either volume holographic or diffractive optic methods. The lidar instrument design specifies a transmissive scanner element with the input beam normally incident and the exiting beam deflected at a fixed angle from the optical axis. The element will be rotated about the optical axis to produce a conical scan pattern. The wavelength of the incident beam is 2.06 microns and the required deflection angle is 30 degrees, implying a grating period of approximately 4 microns

  13. Hard Diffraction in Hadron--Hadron Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, A.

    2002-11-01

    Breakdown of factorization observed recently in the diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic lepton induced and hadron induced processes is explained using the Good-Walker picture of diffraction dissociation. Numerical estimates agree with the recent data.

  14. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  15. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  16. Issues in Optical Diffraction Theory

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on unresolved or poorly documented issues pertaining to Fresnel’s scalar diffraction theory and its modifications. In Sec. 2 it is pointed out that all thermal sources used in practice are finite in size and errors can result from insufficient coherence of the optical field. A quarter-wave criterion is applied to show how such errors can be avoided by placing the source at a large distance from the aperture plane, and it is found that in many cases it may be necessary to use collimated light as on the source side of a Fraunhofer experiment. If these precautions are not taken the theory of partial coherence may have to be used for the computations. In Sec. 3 it is recalled that for near-zone computations the Kirchhoff or Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals are applicable, but fail to correctly describe the energy flux across the aperture plane because they are not continuously differentiable with respect to the assumed geometrical field on the source side. This is remedied by formulating an improved theory in which the field on either side of a semi-reflecting screen is expressed as the superposition of mutually incoherent components which propagate in the opposite directions of the incident and reflected light. These components are defined as linear combinations of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals, so that they are rigorous solutions of the wave equation as well as continuously differentiable in the aperture plane. Algorithms for using the new theory for computing the diffraction patterns of circular apertures and slits at arbitrary distances z from either side of the aperture (down to z = ± 0.0003 λ) are presented, and numerical examples of the results are given. These results show that the incident geometrical field is modulated by diffraction before it reaches the aperture plane while the reflected field is spilled into the dark space. At distances from the aperture which are large compared to the wavelength λ these field expressions are

  17. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  18. Evidence for color fluctuations in hadrons from coherent nuclear diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, L.; Miller, G.A.; Strikman, M.

    A QCD-based treatment of projectile size fluctuations is used to compute inelastic diffractive cross sections [sigma][sub diff] for coherent hadron-nuclear processes. We find that fluctuations near the average size give the major contribution to the cross section with [lt] few % contribution from small size configurations. The computed values of [sigma][sub diff] are consistent with the limited available data. The importance of coherent diffraction studies for a wide range of projectiles for high energy Fermilab fixed target experiments is emphasized. The implications of these significant color fluctuations for relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed.

  19. Translation position determination in ptychographic coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fucai; Peterson, Isaac; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Diaz, Ana; Berenguer, Felisa; Bean, Richard; Chen, Bo; Menzel, Andreas; Robinson, Ian K; Rodenburg, John M

    2013-06-03

    Accurate knowledge of translation positions is essential in ptychography to achieve a good image quality and the diffraction limited resolution. We propose a method to retrieve and correct position errors during the image reconstruction iterations. Sub-pixel position accuracy after refinement is shown to be achievable within several tens of iterations. Simulation and experimental results for both optical and X-ray wavelengths are given. The method improves both the quality of the retrieved object image and relaxes the position accuracy requirement while acquiring the diffraction patterns.

  20. Diffractive dijet production at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adloff, C.; Anderson, M.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Arkadov, V.; Arndt, C.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bähr, J.; Ban, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Barschke, R.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beck, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Behrend, H.-J.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bernardi, G.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Biddulph, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D. P.; Brückner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Calvet, D.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Chabert, E.; Charlet, M.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Cocks, S.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormack, C.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Davidsson, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; Diaconu, C.; Dirkmann, M.; Dixon, P.; Dlugosz, W.; Donovan, K. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Droutskoi, A.; Ebert, J.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Elsen, E.; Enzenberger, M.; Erdmann, M.; Fahr, A. B.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Fleischer, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gaede, F.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Gorelov, I.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Griffiths, R. K.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, C.; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, T.; Hampe, M.; Haustein, V.; Haynes, W. J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herynek, I.; Hewitt, K.; Hiller, K. H.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Holtom, T.; Horisberger, R.; Hudgson, V. L.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Işsever, Ç.; Itterbeck, H.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Jansen, D. M.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, H.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kander, M.; Kant, D.; Karlsson, M.; Kathage, U.; Katzy, J.; Kaufmann, O.; Kausch, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Riesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Könne, J. H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krämerkämper, T.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Küpper, A.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Laforge, B.; Lahmann, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Langenegger, U.; Lebedev, A.; Lehner, F.; Lemaitre, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobo, G.; Lubimov, V.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Malinovski, E.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martin, G.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; McMahon, T. R.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Metlica, F.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.-O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moeck, J.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Mroczko, E.; Müller, D.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Négri, I.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Nicholls, T. C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Niedzballa, Ch.; Niggli, H.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Oberlack, H.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Palmen, P.; Panaro, E.; Pascaud, C.; Passaggio, S.; Patel, G. D.; Pawletta, H.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pieuchot, A.; Pitzl, D.; Pösch, R.; Pope, G.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rick, H.; Riess, S.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schacht, P.; Scheins, J.; Schiek, S.; Schleif, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, G.; Schoeffe, L.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwab, B.; Sefkow, F.; Semenov, A.; Sheelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, M.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Specka, A.; Spiekermann, J.; Spitzer, H.; Squinabol, F.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Swart, M.; Tapprogge, S.; Taševský, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Theissen, J.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tobien, N.; Todenhagen, R.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Esch, P.; van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wengler, T.; Werner, M.; West, L. R.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wittek, C.; Wittmann, E.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zálešâk, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zini, P.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; Zurnedden, M.

    1999-01-01

    Interactions of the type ep → eXY are studied, where the component X of the hadronic final state contains two jets and is well separated in rapidity from a leading baryonic system Y. Analyses are performed of both resolved and direct photoproduction and of deep-inelastic scattering with photon virtualities in the range 7.5 < Q 2 < 80 GeV2. Cross sections are presented where Y has mass M Y < 1.6 GeV, the squared four-momentum transferred at the proton vertex satisfies |t| < 1 GeV2 and the two jets each have transverse momentum p {T/jet} > 5 GeV relative to the photon direction in the rest frame of X. Models based on a factorisable diffractive exchange with a gluon dominated structure, evolved to a scale set by the transverse momentum hat p_T of the outgoing partons from the hard interaction, give good descriptions of the data. Exclusive qbar q production, as calculated in perturbative QCD using the squared proton gluon density, represents at most a small fraction of the measured cross section. The compatibility of the data with a breaking of diffractive factorisation due to spectator interactions in resolved photoproduction is investigated.

  1. Coherent X-ray diffraction from collagenous soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Wenger, Marco P E; Bean, Richard J; Bozec, Laurent; Horton, Michael A; Robinson, Ian K

    2009-09-08

    Coherent X-ray diffraction has been applied in the imaging of inorganic materials with great success. However, its application to biological specimens has been limited to some notable exceptions, due to the induced radiation damage and the extended nature of biological samples, the last limiting the application of most part of the phasing algorithms. X-ray ptychography, still under development, is a good candidate to overcome such difficulties and become a powerful imaging method for biology. We describe herein the feasibility of applying ptychography to the imaging of biological specimens, in particular collagen rich samples. We report here speckles in diffraction patterns from soft animal tissue, obtained with an optimized small angle X-ray setup that exploits the natural coherence of the beam. By phasing these patterns, dark field images of collagen within tendon, skin, bone, or cornea will eventually be obtained with a resolution of 60-70 nm. We present simulations of the contrast mechanism in collagen based on atomic force microscope images of the samples. Simulations confirmed the 'speckled' nature of the obtained diffraction patterns. Once inverted, the patterns will show the disposition and orientation of the fibers within the tissue, by enhancing the phase contrast between protein and no protein regions of the sample. Our work affords the application of the most innovative coherent X-ray diffraction tools to the study of biological specimens, and this approach will have a significant impact in biology and medicine because it overcomes many of the limits of current microscopy techniques.

  2. Analysis of XFEL serial diffraction data from individual crystalline fibrils

    DOE PAGES

    Wojtas, David H.; Ayyer, Kartik; Liang, Mengning; ...

    2017-10-20

    Serial diffraction data collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source from crystalline amyloid fibrils delivered in a liquid jet show that the fibrils are well oriented in the jet. At low fibril concentrations, diffraction patterns are recorded from single fibrils; these patterns are weak and contain only a few reflections. Methods are developed for determining the orientation of patterns in reciprocal space and merging them in three dimensions. This allows the individual structure amplitudes to be calculated, thus overcoming the limitations of orientation and cylindrical averaging in conventional fibre diffraction analysis. In conclusion, the advantages of this technique should allowmore » structural studies of fibrous systems in biology that are inaccessible using existing techniques.« less

  3. Analysis of XFEL serial diffraction data from individual crystalline fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtas, David H.; Ayyer, Kartik; Liang, Mengning

    Serial diffraction data collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source from crystalline amyloid fibrils delivered in a liquid jet show that the fibrils are well oriented in the jet. At low fibril concentrations, diffraction patterns are recorded from single fibrils; these patterns are weak and contain only a few reflections. Methods are developed for determining the orientation of patterns in reciprocal space and merging them in three dimensions. This allows the individual structure amplitudes to be calculated, thus overcoming the limitations of orientation and cylindrical averaging in conventional fibre diffraction analysis. In conclusion, the advantages of this technique should allowmore » structural studies of fibrous systems in biology that are inaccessible using existing techniques.« less

  4. Nuclear surface diffuseness revealed in nucleon-nucleus diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, S.; Horiuchi, W.; Kohama, A.

    2018-05-01

    The nuclear surface provides useful information on nuclear radius, nuclear structure, as well as properties of nuclear matter. We discuss the relationship between the nuclear surface diffuseness and elastic scattering differential cross section at the first diffraction peak of high-energy nucleon-nucleus scattering as an efficient tool in order to extract the nuclear surface information from limited experimental data involving short-lived unstable nuclei. The high-energy reaction is described by a reliable microscopic reaction theory, the Glauber model. Extending the idea of the black sphere model, we find one-to-one correspondence between the nuclear bulk structure information and proton-nucleus elastic scattering diffraction peak. This implies that we can extract both the nuclear radius and diffuseness simultaneously, using the position of the first diffraction peak and its magnitude of the elastic scattering differential cross section. We confirm the reliability of this approach by using realistic density distributions obtained by a mean-field model.

  5. Femtosecond gas phase electron diffraction with MeV electrons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Guehr, Markus; Vecchione, Theodore; Robinson, Matthew S; Li, Renkai; Hartmann, Nick; Shen, Xiaozhe; Coffee, Ryan; Corbett, Jeff; Fry, Alan; Gaffney, Kelly; Gorkhover, Tais; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, Keith; Makasyuk, Igor; Reid, Alexander; Robinson, Joseph; Vetter, Sharon; Wang, Fenglin; Weathersby, Stephen; Yoneda, Charles; Wang, Xijie; Centurion, Martin

    2016-12-16

    We present results on ultrafast gas electron diffraction (UGED) experiments with femtosecond resolution using the MeV electron gun at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. UGED is a promising method to investigate molecular dynamics in the gas phase because electron pulses can probe the structure with a high spatial resolution. Until recently, however, it was not possible for UGED to reach the relevant timescale for the motion of the nuclei during a molecular reaction. Using MeV electron pulses has allowed us to overcome the main challenges in reaching femtosecond resolution, namely delivering short electron pulses on a gas target, overcoming the effect of velocity mismatch between pump laser pulses and the probe electron pulses, and maintaining a low timing jitter. At electron kinetic energies above 3 MeV, the velocity mismatch between laser and electron pulses becomes negligible. The relativistic electrons are also less susceptible to temporal broadening due to the Coulomb force. One of the challenges of diffraction with relativistic electrons is that the small de Broglie wavelength results in very small diffraction angles. In this paper we describe the new setup and its characterization, including capturing static diffraction patterns of molecules in the gas phase, finding time-zero with sub-picosecond accuracy and first time-resolved diffraction experiments. The new device can achieve a temporal resolution of 100 fs root-mean-square, and sub-angstrom spatial resolution. The collimation of the beam is sufficient to measure the diffraction pattern, and the transverse coherence is on the order of 2 nm. Currently, the temporal resolution is limited both by the pulse duration of the electron pulse on target and by the timing jitter, while the spatial resolution is limited by the average electron beam current and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detection system. We also discuss plans for improving both the temporal resolution and the spatial resolution.

  6. Future directions in high-pressure neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, M.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to manipulate structure and properties using pressure has been well known for many centuries. Diffraction provides the unique ability to observe these structural changes in fine detail on lengthscales spanning atomic to nanometre dimensions. Amongst the broad suite of diffraction tools available today, neutrons provide unique capabilities of fundamental importance. However, to date, the growth of neutron diffraction under extremes of pressure has been limited by the weakness of available sources. In recent years, substantial government investments have led to the construction of a new generation of neutron sources while existing facilities have been revitalized by upgrades. The timely convergence of these bright facilities with new pressure-cell technologies suggests that the field of high-pressure (HP) neutron science is on the cusp of substantial growth. Here, the history of HP neutron research is examined with the hope of gleaning an accurate prediction of where some of these revolutionary capabilities will lead in the near future. In particular, a dramatic expansion of current pressure-temperature range is likely, with corresponding increased scope for extreme-conditions science with neutron diffraction. This increase in coverage will be matched with improvements in data quality. Furthermore, we can also expect broad new capabilities beyond diffraction, including in neutron imaging, small angle scattering and inelastic spectroscopy.

  7. Evolution of diffraction and self-diffraction phenomena in thin films of Gelite Bloom/Hibiscus Sabdariffa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Lara, Miroslava; Severiano-Carrillo, Israel; Trejo-Durán, Mónica; Alvarado-Méndez, Edgar

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we present a study of non-linear optical response in thin films elaborated with Gelite Bloom and extract of Hibiscus Sabdariffa. Non-linear refraction and absorption effects were studied experimentally (Z-scan technique) and numerically, by considering the transmittance as non-linear absorption and refraction contribution. We observe large phase shifts to far field, and diffraction due to self-phase modulation of the sample. Diffraction and self-diffraction effects were observed as time function. The aim of studying non-linear optical properties in thin films is to eliminate thermal vortex effects that occur in liquids. This is desirable in applications such as non-linear phase contrast, optical limiting, optics switches, etc. Finally, we find good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  8. Quantitative analysis of thoria phase in Th-U alloys using diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Shital; Krishna, P. S. R.; Shinde, A. B.; Kumar, Raj; Roy, S. B.

    2017-05-01

    In the present study the quantitative phase analysis of Th-U alloys in bulk form namely Th-52 wt% U and Th-3wt%U has been performed over the data obtained from both X ray diffraction and neutron diffraction technique using Rietveld method of FULLPROF software. Quantifying thoria (ThO2) phase present in bulk of the sample is limited due to surface oxidation and low penetration of x rays in high Z material. Neutron diffraction study probing bulk of the samples has been presented in comparison with x-ray diffraction study.

  9. Nature, diffraction-free propagation via space-time correlations, and nonlinear generation of time-diffracting light beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, Miguel A.

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the properties of the recently introduced time-diffracting (TD) beams in free space. They are shown to be paraxial and quasimonochromatic realizations of spatiotemporal localized waves traveling undistorted at arbitrary speeds. The paraxial and quasimonochromatic regime is shown to be necessary to observe what can properly be named diffraction in time. In this regime, the spatiotemporal frequency correlations for diffraction-free propagation are approximated by parabolic correlations. Time-diffracting beams of finite energy traveling at quasiluminal velocities are seen to form substantially longer foci or needles of light than the so-called abruptly focusing and defocusing needle of light or limiting TD beam of infinite speed. Exploring the properties of TD beams under Lorentz transformations and their transformation by paraxial optical systems, we realize that the nonlinear polarization of material media induced by a strongly localized fundamental pump wave generates a TD beam at its second harmonic, whose diffraction-free behavior as a needle of light in free space can be optimized with a standard 4 f -imager system.

  10. Spectral methods in edge-diffraction theories

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.M.

    Spectral methods for the construction of uniform asymptotic representations of the field diffracted by an aperture in a plane screen are reviewed. These are separated into contrasting approaches, roughly described as physical and geometrical. It is concluded that the geometrical methods provide a direct route to the construction of uniform representations that are formally identical to the equivalent-edge-current concept. Some interpretive and analytical difficulties that complicate the physical methods of obtaining uniform representations are analyzed. Spectral synthesis proceeds directly from the ray geometry and diffraction coefficients, without any intervening current representation, and the representation is uniform at shadow boundaries andmore » caustics of the diffracted field. The physical theory of diffraction postulates currents on the diffracting screen that give rise to the diffracted field. The difficulties encountered in evaluating the current integrals are throughly examined, and it is concluded that the additional data provided by the physical theory of diffraction (diffraction coefficients off the Keller diffraction cone) are not actually required for obtaining uniform asymptotics at the leading order. A new diffraction representation that generalizes to arbitrary plane-convex apertures a formula given by Knott and Senior [Proc. IEEE 62, 1468 (1974)] for circular apertures is deduced. 34 refs., 1 fig.« less

  11. Facteurs de risques de mortalité néonatale dans l'hôpital de gynécologie-obstétrique de la wilaya de Sidi Bel Abbes, Algérie

    PubMed Central

    Noria, Harir; Sarah, Ourrad; Asmaa, Ourrad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Il s'est agit ici de déterminer la fréquence et les facteurs de risques de mortalité néonatale au service néonatologie de l'Etablissement Hospitalier Spécialisé Gynécologie Obstétrique de la wilaya de Sidi Bel Abbés (Ouest Algérien). Méthodes Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective a visée descriptive et analytique porté sur tous les décès de 2011-2012 survenus au service de néonatologie de Sidi Bel Abbes. Résultats Au total 1209 cas de mortalité néonatale ont été enregistré durant les deux années (2011-2012), soit une fréquence de 5.3%. Il s'agissait dans 96,85% des cas de mortalité précoce. La mortalité néonatale étant multifactorielle, l'analyse statistique a pu incriminer de façon majoritaire: l’âge maternel avancé (>35) (OR = 3.1; IC 95% (2.30 -4.40); p = 0.001); la multiparité (OR = 8.15; IC 95% (2.85-10.05); p = 0.001); l'infection génitale(OR = 5.3; IC 95% (2.5-6.7); p = 0.001); la prématurité (OR = 10.08; IC 95% (3.45-12.02); p = 0.001); le faible poids de naissance (OR = 4.5; IC 95% (1.6-10.5); p = 0.001); l'ictère (OR = 4.8; IC 95% (1.26-6.02; p = 0.001) et la souffrance fœtale aigue (OR = 3.4; IC 95% (0.89-5.14); p = 0.001). Conclusion Une prise en charge efficace de la grossesse et du nouveau-né dans sa première semaine de vie, devraient amélioraient le pronostic néonatal. PMID:26185577

  12. Diffraction Correlation to Reconstruct Highly Strained Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Douglas; Harder, Ross; Clark, Jesse; Kim, J. W.; Kiefer, Boris; Fullerton, Eric; Shpyrko, Oleg; Fohtung, Edwin

    2015-03-01

    Through the use of coherent x-ray diffraction a three-dimensional diffraction pattern of a highly strained nano-crystal can be recorded in reciprocal space by a detector. Only the intensities are recorded, resulting in a loss of the complex phase. The recorded diffraction pattern therefore requires computational processing to reconstruct the density and complex distribution of the diffracted nano-crystal. For highly strained crystals, standard methods using HIO and ER algorithms are no longer sufficient to reconstruct the diffraction pattern. Our solution is to correlate the symmetry in reciprocal space to generate an a priori shape constraint to guide the computational reconstruction of the diffraction pattern. This approach has improved the ability to accurately reconstruct highly strained nano-crystals.

  13. Anomalous Diffraction in Crystallographic Phase Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from crystals of biological macromolecules contain sufficient information to define atomic structures, but atomic positions are inextricable without having electron-density images. Diffraction measurements provide amplitudes, but the computation of electron density also requires phases for the diffracted waves. The resonance phenomenon known as anomalous scattering offers a powerful solution to this phase problem. Exploiting scattering resonances from diverse elements, the methods of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) now predominate for de novo determinations of atomic-level biological structures. This review describes the physical underpinnings of anomalous diffraction methods, the evolution of these methods to their current maturity, the elements, procedures and instrumentation used for effective implementation, and the realm of applications. PMID:24726017

  14. Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-03-26

    A finely detailed diffraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the diffraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating. 7 figures.

  15. Diffractive variable beam splitter: optimal design.

    PubMed

    Borghi, R; Cincotti, G; Santarsiero, M

    2000-01-01

    The analytical expression of the phase profile of the optimum diffractive beam splitter with an arbitrary power ratio between the two output beams is derived. The phase function is obtained by an analytical optimization procedure such that the diffraction efficiency of the resulting optical element is the highest for an actual device. Comparisons are presented with the efficiency of a diffractive beam splitter specified by a sawtooth phase function and with the pertinent theoretical upper bound for this type of element.

  16. Aircraft noise propagation. [sound diffraction by wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, W. J.; Pierce, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    Sound diffraction experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to study the acoustical implications of the engine over wing configuration (noise-shielding by wing) and to provide a data base for assessing various theoretical approaches to the problem of aircraft noise reduction are described. Topics explored include the theory of sound diffraction around screens and wedges; the scattering of spherical waves by rectangular patches; plane wave diffraction by a wedge with finite impedence; and the effects of ambient flow and distribution sources.

  17. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  18. Electron Diffraction Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Leonid A.; Gayle, Frank W.

    2001-01-01

    Electron diffraction via the transmission electron microscope is a powerful method for characterizing the structure of materials, including perfect crystals and defect structures. The advantages of electron diffraction over other methods, e.g., x-ray or neutron, arise from the extremely short wavelength (≈2 pm), the strong atomic scattering, and the ability to examine tiny volumes of matter (≈10 nm3). The NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory has a history of discovery and characterization of new structures through electron diffraction, alone or in combination with other diffraction methods. This paper provides a survey of some of this work enabled through electron microscopy. PMID:27500060

  19. Catastrophe optics of sharp-edge diffraction.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    A classical problem of diffraction theory, namely plane wave diffraction by sharp-edge apertures, is here reformulated from the viewpoint of the fairly new subject of catastrophe optics. On using purely geometrical arguments, properly embedded into a wave optics context, uniform analytical estimates of the diffracted wavefield at points close to fold caustics are obtained, within paraxial approximation, in terms of the Airy function and its first derivative. Diffraction from parabolic apertures is proposed to test reliability and accuracy of our theoretical predictions.

  20. The continuous reinvention of diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard C.

    2004-02-01

    We show in this paper how the field of diffractive optics has moved during these past twenty years from academic research to main stream industry and consumer electronics. We analyze the main driving forces, the various enabling technologies and techniques for both design, fabrication and mass production of diffractive optics, and the successive markets in which this technology has been able to provide economically viable solutions to specific industrials needs. More specifically, we will see how niche applications making use of special features of diffractive optics seem to survive the applications involving the same diffractives, issued from the successive main technology driven investment bubbles.

  1. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; London, Richard A.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1993-01-01

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described.

  2. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Hawryluk, A.M.; London, R.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1993-10-26

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described. 21 figures.

  3. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; London, Richard A.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1991-01-01

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed.

  4. Design of diffractive microlens array integration with focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sihai; Yi, Xinjian; Li, Yi; He, Miao; Chen, Sixiang; Kong, Lingbin

    2000-10-01

    The IR spectrum from 3 to 5micrometers has numerous applications in both military and civil industries. High performance at high operating temperature is often important in these applications. Conventional Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) without integration with concentrator such as microlens have poor sensitivity and low signal-to-noise ratio because of their lower fill factor. The binary optics microlens arrays reported in this paper are designed for integration with FPAs. Thus, the FPAs' fill factor, sensitivity, and signal- to-noise ratio can be improved while retaining a given image resolution and optical collection area. In the paper, we discussed the 256(Horizontal)x290(Vertical) microlens arrays designed for a center wavelength of 4micrometers , with 50micrometers (Horizontalx33micrometers (Vertical) quadrate pixel dimension and a speed (F number) of F/1.96. PtSi FPAs were fabricated on the front side of a 400-micrometers -thick Si substrate. The designed diffractive microlens arrays will be etched on the back side of the same wafer in a register fashion and it will be reported in other paper. Considering the diffraction efficiency, 8-phase-level approximation is enough. For the diffraction efficiency of 8-phase-level diffractive microlens reaches 95%. The process only need three mask-level, so we designed and fabricated three masks with the same dimension 4'x4'. Also, a set of fine verniers was designed and fabricated on each mask to allow accurate alignment during the fabrication process. Through a computer simulation, the microlens arrays are nearly diffraction limited, with the diffraction efficiency of 93%, a bit lower than the theoretical value of 95%. Introduction of microlens arrays has the ability to increase the FPAs' fill factor to 100%, while it is only about 21.6% without microlens. To our knowledge, this is the first trial of integration large area microlens arrays with FPAs at home.

  5. Phase sensitive diffraction sensor for high sensitivity refractive index measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumawat, Nityanand; Varma, Manoj; Kumar, Sunil

    2018-02-01

    In this study a diffraction based sensor has been developed for bio molecular sensing applications and performing assays in real time. A diffraction grating fabricated on a glass substrate produced diffraction patterns both in transmission and reflection when illuminated by a laser diode. We used zeroth order I(0,0) as reference and first order I(0,1) as signal channel and conducted ratiometric measurements that reduced noise by more than 50 times. The ratiometric approach resulted in a very simple instrumentation with very high sensitivity. In the past, we have shown refractive index measurements both for bulk and surface adsorption using the diffractive self-referencing approach. In the current work we extend the same concept to higher diffraction orders. We have considered order I(0,1) and I(1,1) and performed ratiometric measurements I(0,1)/I(1,1) to eliminate the common mode fluctuations. Since orders I(0,1) and I(1,1) behaved opposite to each other, the resulting ratio signal amplitude increased more than twice compared to our previous results. As a proof of concept we used different salt concentrations in DI water. Increased signal amplitude and improved fluid injection system resulted in more than 4 times improvement in detection limit, giving limit of detection 1.3×10-7 refractive index unit (RIU) compared to our previous results. The improved refractive index sensitivity will help significantly for high sensitivity label free bio sensing application in a very cost-effective and simple experimental set-up.

  6. Diffraction measurements using the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalliokoski, Matti

    2017-03-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system of the Large Hadron Collider protects the machine from beam induced damage by measuring the absorbed dose rates of beam losses, and by triggering beam dump if the rates increase above the allowed threshold limits. Although the detection time scales are optimized for multi-turn losses, information on fast losses can be recovered from the loss data. In this paper, methods in using the BLM system in diffraction studies are discussed.

  7. Potential of e-beam writing for diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Wyrowski, Frank

    1997-05-01

    E-beam lithography (EBL) is a powerful tool in optics. Optician can use the progress in EBL to fabricate optical components and systems with novel functions. However, EBL is dominated by microelectronics. Therefore the demands of optics are not always met by the exiting EBL technology. Some possibilities as well as limits of EBL in optics are discussed at the example of diffractive optics.

  8. Overlay improvement methods with diffraction based overlay and integrated metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Young-Sun; Kim, Sunny; Shin, Ju Hee; Choi, Young Sin; Yun, Sang Ho; Kim, Young Hoon; Shin, Si Woo; Kong, Jeong Heung; Kang, Young Seog; Ha, Hun Hwan

    2015-03-01

    To accord with new requirement of securing more overlay margin, not only the optical overlay measurement is faced with the technical limitations to represent cell pattern's behavior, but also the larger measurement samples are inevitable for minimizing statistical errors and better estimation of circumstance in a lot. From these reasons, diffraction based overlay (DBO) and integrated metrology (IM) were mainly proposed as new approaches for overlay enhancement in this paper.

  9. Exclusive, hard diffraction in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Andreas

    In the first chapter we give an introduction to hard diffractive scattering in QCD to introduce basic concepts and terminology, thus setting the stage for the following chapters. In the second chapter we make predictions for nondiagonal parton distributions in a proton in the LLA. We calculate the DGLAP-type evolution kernels in the LLA, solve the nondiagonal GLAP evolution equations with a modified version of the CTEQ-package and comment on the range of applicability of the LLA in the asymmetric regime. We show that the nondiagonal gluon distribution g(x1,x2,t,μ2) can be well approximated at small x by the conventional gluon density xG(x,μ2). In the third chapter, we discuss the algorithms used in the LO evolution program for nondiagonal parton distributions in the DGLAP region and discuss the stability of the code. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can reproduce the case of the LO diagonal evolution within less than 0.5% of the original code as developed by the CTEQ-collaboration. In chapter 4, we show that factorization holds for the deeply virtual Compton scattering amplitude in QCD, up to power suppressed terms, to all orders in perturbation theory. Furthermore, we show that the virtuality of the produced photon does not influence the general theorem. In chapter 5, we demonstrate that perturbative QCD allows one to calculate the absolute cross section of diffractive exclusive production of photons at large Q2 at HERA, while the aligned jet model allows one to estimate the cross section for intermediate Q2~2GeV2. Furthermore, we find that the imaginary part of the amplitude for the production of real photons is larger than the imaginary part of the corresponding DIS amplitude, leading to predictions of a significant counting rate for the current generation of experiments at HERA. We also find a large azimuthal angle asymmetry in ep scattering for HERA kinematics which allows one to directly measure the real part of the DVCS amplitude and hence the

  10. Evaluating diffraction-based overlay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Tan, Asher; Jung, JinWoo; Goelzer, Gary; Smith, Nigel; Hu, Jiangtao; Ham, Boo-Hyun; Kwak, Min-Cheol; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Nam, Suk-Woo

    2012-03-01

    We evaluate diffraction-based overlay (DBO) metrology using two test wafers. The test wafers have different film stacks designed to test the quality of DBO data under a range of film conditions. We present DBO results using traditional empirical approach (eDBO). eDBO relies on linear response of the reflectance with respect to the overlay displacement within a small range. It requires specially designed targets that consist of multiple pads with programmed shifts. It offers convenience of quick recipe setup since there is no need to establish a model. We measure five DBO targets designed with different pitches and programmed shifts. The correlations of five eDBO targets and the correlation of eDBO to image-based overlay are excellent. The targets of 800nm and 600nm pitches have better dynamic precision than targets of 400nm pitch, which agrees with simulated results on signal/noise ratio. 3σ of less than 0.1nm is achieved for both wafers using the best configured targets. We further investigate the linearity assumption of eDBO algorithm. Simulation results indicate that as the pitch of DBO targets gets smaller, the nonlinearity error, i.e., the error in the overlay measurement results caused by deviation from ideal linear response, becomes bigger. We propose a nonlinearity correction (NLC) by including higher order terms in the optical response. The new algorithm with NLC improves measurement consistency for DBO targets of same pitch but different programmed shift, due to improved accuracy. The results from targets with different pitches, however, are improved marginally, indicating the presence of other error sources.

  11. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning

    SciTech Connect

    Scarborough, Nicole M.; Godaliyadda, G. M. Dilshan P.; Ye, Dong Hye

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction,more » significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Furthermore, by usingin situtwo-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure

  12. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, Nicole M; Godaliyadda, G M Dilshan P; Ye, Dong Hye; Kissick, David J; Zhang, Shijie; Newman, Justin A; Sheedlo, Michael J; Chowdhury, Azhad U; Fischetti, Robert F; Das, Chittaranjan; Buzzard, Gregery T; Bouman, Charles A; Simpson, Garth J

    2017-01-01

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction, significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Using in situ two-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure on the crystal by

  13. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning

    PubMed Central

    Scarborough, Nicole M.; Godaliyadda, G. M. Dilshan P.; Ye, Dong Hye; Kissick, David J.; Zhang, Shijie; Newman, Justin A.; Sheedlo, Michael J.; Chowdhury, Azhad U.; Fischetti, Robert F.; Das, Chittaranjan; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Bouman, Charles A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2017-01-01

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction, significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Using in situ two-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure on the crystal by

  14. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning

    DOE PAGES

    Scarborough, Nicole M.; Godaliyadda, G. M. Dilshan P.; Ye, Dong Hye; ...

    2017-01-01

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction,more » significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Furthermore, by usingin situtwo-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure

  15. Inquiry with Laser Printer Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hook, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The pages of "The Physics Teacher" have featured several clever designs for homemade diffraction gratings using a variety of materials--cloth, lithographic film, wire, compact discs, parts of aerosol spray cans, and pseudoliquids and pseudosolids. A different and inexpensive method I use to make low-resolution diffraction gratings takes advantage…

  16. Diffraction experiments with infrared remote controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we describe an experiment in which radiation emitted by an infrared remote control is passed through a diffraction grating. An image of the diffraction pattern is captured using a cell phone camera and then used to determine the wavelength of the radiation.

  17. Multilayer diffraction at 104 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, Allen S.; Blake, Richard L.; Siddons, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the diffraction peak of a W:Si synthetic multilayer reflector at 104 keV using the High Energy Bonse-Hart Camera at the X-17B hard X-ray wiggler beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the diffraction peak are described and compared to theory.

  18. Uniform theory of the boundary diffraction wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umul, Yusuf Z.

    2009-04-01

    A uniform version of the potential function of the Maggi-Rubinowicz boundary diffraction wave theory is obtained by using the large argument expansion of the Fresnel integral. The derived function is obtained for the problem of diffraction of plane waves by a circular edge. The results are plotted numerically.

  19. White-Light Diffraction with a CD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov; Nikolaev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Various wave optics experiments can be carried out using an ordinary compact disc. The CD is suitable for use as a diffraction grating. For instance, a standard CD (700 MB) has 625 lines/mm. In this article, the authors describe two white-light diffraction demonstrations for a large audience, realizable using a CD (as reflection or transmission…

  20. X-ray diffraction from nonuniformly stretched helical molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prodanovic, Momcilo; Irving, Thomas C.; Mijailovich, Srboljub M.

    2016-04-18

    The fibrous proteins in living cells are exposed to mechanical forces interacting with other subcellular structures. X-ray fiber diffraction is often used to assess deformation and movement of these proteins, but the analysis has been limited to the theory for fibrous molecular systems that exhibit helical symmetry. However, this approach cannot adequately interpret X-ray data from fibrous protein assemblies where the local strain varies along the fiber length owing to interactions of its molecular constituents with their binding partners. To resolve this problem a theoretical formulism has been developed for predicting the diffraction from individual helical molecular structures nonuniformly strainedmore » along their lengths. This represents a critical first step towards modeling complex dynamical systems consisting of multiple helical structures using spatially explicit, multi-scale Monte Carlo simulations where predictions are compared with experimental data in a `forward' process to iteratively generate ever more realistic models. Here the effects of nonuniform strains and the helix length on the resulting magnitude and phase of diffraction patterns are quantitatively assessed. Examples of the predicted diffraction patterns of nonuniformly deformed double-stranded DNA and actin filaments in contracting muscle are presented to demonstrate the feasibly of this theoretical approach.« less

  1. Diffraction-controlled backscattering threshold and application to Raman gap

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey A.; Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544; Mounaix, Philippe

    2011-04-15

    In most classic analytical models of linear stimulated scatter, light diffraction is omitted, a priori. However, modern laser optic typically includes a variant of the random phase plate [Y. Kato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 1057 (1984)], resulting in diffraction limited laser intensity fluctuations - or localized speckles - which may result in explosive reflectivity growth as the average laser intensity approaches a critical value [H. A. Rose and D. F. DuBois, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2883 (1994)]. Among the differences between stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scatter is that the SRS scattered light diffracts more stronglymore » than the laser light with increase of electron density. This weakens the tendency of the SRS light to closely follow the most amplified paths, diminishing gain. Let G{sub 0} be the one-dimensional power gain exponent of the stimulated scatter. In this paper we show that differential diffraction gives rise to an increase of G{sub 0} at the SRS physical threshold with increase of electron density up to a drastic disruption of SRS as electron density approaches one fourth of its critical value from below. For three wave interaction lengths not small compared to a speckle length, this is a physically robust Raman gap mechanism.« less

  2. Structured illumination multimodal 3D-resolved quantitative phase and fluorescence sub-diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Eldridge, Will J.; Wax, Adam; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    Sub-diffraction resolution imaging has played a pivotal role in biological research by visualizing key, but previously unresolvable, sub-cellular structures. Unfortunately, applications of far-field sub-diffraction resolution are currently divided between fluorescent and coherent-diffraction regimes, and a multimodal sub-diffraction technique that bridges this gap has not yet been demonstrated. Here we report that structured illumination (SI) allows multimodal sub-diffraction imaging of both coherent quantitative-phase (QP) and fluorescence. Due to SI’s conventionally fluorescent applications, we first demonstrate the principle of SI-enabled three-dimensional (3D) QP sub-diffraction imaging with calibration microspheres. Image analysis confirmed enhanced lateral and axial resolutions over diffraction-limited QP imaging, and established striking parallels between coherent SI and conventional optical diffraction tomography. We next introduce an optical system utilizing SI to achieve 3D sub-diffraction, multimodal QP/fluorescent visualization of A549 biological cells fluorescently tagged for F-actin. Our results suggest that SI has a unique utility in studying biological phenomena with significant molecular, biophysical, and biochemical components. PMID:28663887

  3. Computer Generated Diffraction Patterns Of Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakels, Jan H.

    1989-03-01

    It is generally accepted, that optical methods are the most promising for the in-process measurement of surface finish. These methods have the advantages of being non-contacting and fast data acquisition. In the Micro-Engineering Centre at the University of Warwick, an optical sensor has been devised which can measure the rms roughness, slope and wavelength of turned and precision ground surfaces. The operation of this device is based upon the Kirchhoff-Fresnel diffraction integral. Application of this theory to ideal turned surfaces is straightforward, and indeed the theoretically calculated diffraction patterns are in close agreement with patterns produced by an actual optical instrument. Since it is mathematically difficult to introduce real surface profiles into the diffraction integral, a computer program has been devised, which simulates the operation of the optical sensor. The program produces a diffraction pattern as a graphical output. Comparison between computer generated and actual diffraction patterns of the same surfaces show a high correlation.

  4. Color characterization of coatings with diffraction pigments.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, A; Bernad, B; Campos, J; Perales, E; Velázquez, J L; Martínez-Verdú, F M

    2016-10-01

    Coatings with diffraction pigments present high iridescence, which needs to be characterized in order to describe their appearance. The spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) of six coatings with SpectraFlair diffraction pigments were measured using the robot-arm-based goniospectrophotometer GEFE, designed and developed at CSIC. Principal component analysis has been applied to study the coatings of BRDF data. From data evaluation and based on theoretical considerations, we propose a relevant geometric factor to study the spectral reflectance and color gamut variation of coatings with diffraction pigments. At fixed values of this geometric factor, the spectral BRDF component due to diffraction is almost constant. Commercially available portable goniospectrophotometers, extensively used in several industries (automotive and others), should be provided with more aspecular measurement angles to characterize the complex reflectance of goniochromatic coatings based on diffraction pigments, but they would not require either more than one irradiation angle or additional out-of-plane geometries.

  5. Diffraction based overlay re-assessed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, Philippe; Laidler, David; D'havé, Koen; Cheng, Shaunee

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, numerous authors have reported the advantages of Diffraction Based Overlay (DBO) over Image Based Overlay (IBO), mainly by comparison of metrology figures of merit such as TIS and TMU. Some have even gone as far as to say that DBO is the only viable overlay metrology technique for advanced technology nodes; 22nm and beyond. Typically the only reported drawback of DBO is the size of the required targets. This severely limits its effective use, when all critical layers of a product, including double patterned layers need to be measured, and in-die overlay measurements are required. In this paper we ask whether target size is the only limitation to the adoption of DBO for overlay characterization and control, or are there other metrics, which need to be considered. For example, overlay accuracy with respect to scanner baseline or on-product process overlay control? In this work, we critically re-assess the strengths and weaknesses of DBO for the applications of scanner baseline and on-product process layer overlay control. A comprehensive comparison is made to IBO. For on product process layer control we compare the performance on critical process layers; Gate, Contact and Metal. In particularly we focus on the response of the scanner to the corrections determined by each metrology technique for each process layer, as a measure of the accuracy. Our results show that to characterize an overlay metrology technique that is suitable for use in advanced technology nodes requires much more than just evaluating the conventional metrology metrics of TIS and TMU.

  6. Precision lens molding of asphero diffractive surfaces in chalcogenide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Scordato, M.; Schwertz, K.; Bagwell, J.

    2015-10-01

    Finished lens molding, and the similar process of precision lens molding, have long been practiced for high volume, accurate replication of optical surfaces on oxide glass. The physics surrounding these processes are well understood, and the processes are capable of producing high quality optics with great fidelity. However, several limitations exist due to properties inherent with oxide glasses. Tooling materials that can withstand the severe environmental conditions of oxide glass molding cannot easily be machined to produce complex geometries such as diffractive surfaces, lens arrays, and off axis features. Current machining technologies coupled with a limited selection of tool materials greatly limits the type of structures that can be molded into the finished optic. Tooling for chalcogenide glasses are not bound by these restrictions since the molding temperatures required are much lower than for oxide glasses. Innovations in tooling materials and manufacturing techniques have enabled the production of complex geometries to optical quality specifications and have demonstrated the viability of creating tools for molding diffractive surfaces, off axis features, datums, and arrays. Applications for optics having these features are found in automotive, defense, security, medical, and industrial domains. This paper will discuss results achieved in the study of various molding techniques for the formation of positive diffractive features on a concave spherical surface molded from As2Se3 chalcogenide glass. Examples and results of molding with tools having CTE match with the glass and non CTE match will be reviewed. The formation of stress within the glass during molding will be discussed, and methods of stress management will also be demonstrated and discussed. Results of process development methods and production of good diffractive surfaces will be shown.

  7. Coherent X-ray diffraction from collagenous soft tissues

    PubMed Central

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Wenger, Marco P. E.; Bean, Richard J.; Bozec, Laurent; Horton, Michael A.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2009-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction has been applied in the imaging of inorganic materials with great success. However, its application to biological specimens has been limited to some notable exceptions, due to the induced radiation damage and the extended nature of biological samples, the last limiting the application of most part of the phasing algorithms. X-ray ptychography, still under development, is a good candidate to overcome such difficulties and become a powerful imaging method for biology. We describe herein the feasibility of applying ptychography to the imaging of biological specimens, in particular collagen rich samples. We report here speckles in diffraction patterns from soft animal tissue, obtained with an optimized small angle X-ray setup that exploits the natural coherence of the beam. By phasing these patterns, dark field images of collagen within tendon, skin, bone, or cornea will eventually be obtained with a resolution of 60–70 nm. We present simulations of the contrast mechanism in collagen based on atomic force microscope images of the samples. Simulations confirmed the ‘speckled’ nature of the obtained diffraction patterns. Once inverted, the patterns will show the disposition and orientation of the fibers within the tissue, by enhancing the phase contrast between protein and no protein regions of the sample. Our work affords the application of the most innovative coherent X-ray diffraction tools to the study of biological specimens, and this approach will have a significant impact in biology and medicine because it overcomes many of the limits of current microscopy techniques. PMID:19706395

  8. [Medical discourse and poetical practice: the different figures of authority within the correspondance between Mme d'Epinay and the abbé Galiani].

    PubMed

    Redien-Collot, Renaud

    2007-01-01

    Letters containing medical data are not simple texts. They stem from a writing process which sees the authors constantly review the way they perceive both their bodies and the way they write. In order to limit the relativism inherent to such processes and reduce the ensuing variability of perspectives, most letter writers eventually assume a form of authority. In the second part of the 18th Century, the correspondence between the abbey Galliano and Mme D'Epinay reveals that while they exchanged details about their health, they also experimented with different positions of authority and adapted their writing process as the relationship evolved. This a salutary lesson for modern researchers who are often tempted to reduce the problematic meaning of the letter writing process, defining the letter as an isolated document. Medical correspondence is exemplary in this respect because it requires a certain level of knowledge and the expression of a certain intimacy, entailing the adoption of one or of several forms of authority.

  9. Excitation of phonons in medium-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M. A. Vicente; Ascolani, H.; Zampieri, G.

    1996-03-01

    The ``elastic'' backscattering of electrons from crystalline surfaces presents two regimes: a low-energy regime, in which the characteristic low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern is observed, and a medium-energy regime, in which the diffraction pattern is similar to those observed in x-ray photoemission diffraction (XPD) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) experiments. We present a model for the electron scattering which, including the vibrational degrees of freedom of the crystal, contains both regimes and explains the passage from one regime to the other. Our model is based on a separation of the electron and atomic motions (adiabatic approximation) and on a cluster-type formulation of the multiple scattering of the electron. The inelastic scattering events (excitation and/or absorption of phonons) are treated as coherent processes and no break of the phase relation between the incident and the exit paths of the electron is assumed. The LEED and the medium-energy electron diffraction regimes appear naturally in this model as the limit cases of completely elastic scattering and of inelastic scattering with excitation and/or absorption of multiple phonons. Intensity patterns calculated with this model are in very good agreement with recent experiments of electron scattering on Cu(001) at low and medium energies. We show that there is a correspondence between the type of intensity pattern and the mean number of phonons excited and/or absorbed during the scattering: a LEED-like pattern is observed when this mean number is less than 2, LEED-like and XPD/AED-like features coexist when this number is 3-4, and a XPD/AED-like pattern is observed when this number is greater than 5-6.

  10. X-ray diffraction microscopy on frozen hydrated specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Johanna

    X-rays are excellent for imaging thick samples at high resolution because of their large penetration depth compared to electrons and their short wavelength relative to visible light. To image biological material, the absorption contrast of soft X-rays, especially between the carbon and oxygen K-shell absorption edges, can be utilized to give high contrast, high resolution images without the need for stains or labels. Because of radiation damage and the desire for high resolution tomography, live cell imaging is not feasible. However, cells can be frozen in vitrified ice, which reduces the effect of radiation damage while maintaining their natural hydrated state. X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is an imaging technique which eliminates the limitations imposed by current focusing optics simply by removing them entirely. Far-field coherent diffraction intensity patterns are collected on a pixelated detector allowing every scattered photon to be collected within the limits of the detector's efficiency and physical size. An iterative computer algorithm is then used to invert the diffraction intensity into a real space image with both absorption and phase information. This technique transfers the emphasis away from fabrication and alignment of optics, and towards data processing. We have used this method to image a pair of freeze-dried, immuno-labeled yeast cells to the highest resolution (13 nm) yet obtained for a whole eukaryotic cell. We discuss successes and challenges in working with frozen hydrated specimens and efforts aimed at high resolution imaging of vitrified eukaryotic cells in 3D.

  11. Binary logic based purely on Fresnel diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamam, H.; de Bougrenet de La Tocnaye, J. L.

    1995-09-01

    Binary logic operations on two-dimensional data arrays are achieved by use of the self-imaging properties of Fresnel diffraction. The fields diffracted by periodic objects can be considered as the superimposition of weighted and shifted replicas of original objects. We show that a particular spatial organization of the input data can result in logical operations being performed on these data in the considered diffraction planes. Among various advantages, this approach is shown to allow the implementation of dual-track, nondissipative logical operators. Image algebra is presented as an experimental illustration of this principle.

  12. A scattering approach to sea wave diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, M. L., E-mail: letizia.corradini@unicam.it; Garbuglia, M., E-mail: milena.garbuglia@unicam.it; Maponi, P., E-mail: pierluigi.maponi@unicam.it

    This paper intends to show a model for the diffraction of sea waves approaching an OWC device, which converts the sea waves motion into mechanical energy and then electrical energy. This is a preliminary study to the optimisation of the device, in fact the computation of sea waves diffraction around the device allows the estimation of the sea waves energy which enters into the device. The computation of the diffraction phenomenon is the result of a sea waves scattering problem, solved with an integral equation method.

  13. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1996-02-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. X-ray diffraction on radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schiferl, D.; Roof, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray diffraction studies on radioactive materials are discussed with the aim of providing a guide to new researchers in the field. Considerable emphasis is placed on the safe handling and loading of not-too-exotic samples. Special considerations such as the problems of film blackening by the gamma rays and changes induced by the self-irradiation of the sample are covered. Some modifications of common diffraction techniques are presented. Finally, diffraction studies on radioactive samples under extreme conditions are discussed, with primary emphasis on high-pressure studies involving diamond-anvil cells.

  15. Novel diamond cells for neutron diffraction using multi-carat CVD anvils.

    PubMed

    Boehler, R; Molaison, J J; Haberl, B

    2017-08-01

    Traditionally, neutron diffraction at high pressure has been severely limited in pressure because low neutron flux required large sample volumes and therefore large volume presses. At the high-flux Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have developed new, large-volume diamond anvil cells for neutron diffraction. The main features of these cells are multi-carat, single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds, very large diffraction apertures, and gas membranes to accommodate pressure stability, especially upon cooling. A new cell has been tested for diffraction up to 40 GPa with an unprecedented sample volume of ∼0.15 mm 3 . High quality spectra were obtained in 1 h for crystalline Ni and in ∼8 h for disordered glassy carbon. These new techniques will open the way for routine megabar neutron diffraction experiments.

  16. Novel diamond cells for neutron diffraction using multi-carat CVD anvils

    DOE PAGES

    Boehler, R.; Molaison, J. J.; Haberl, B.

    2017-08-17

    Traditionally, neutron diffraction at high pressure has been severely limited in pressure because low neutron flux required large sample volumes and therefore large volume presses. At the high-flux Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have developed in this paper new, large-volume diamond anvil cells for neutron diffraction. The main features of these cells are multi-carat, single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds, very large diffraction apertures, and gas membranes to accommodate pressure stability, especially upon cooling. A new cell has been tested for diffraction up to 40 GPa with an unprecedented sample volume of ~0.15 mm 3.more » High quality spectra were obtained in 1 h for crystalline Ni and in ~8 h for disordered glassy carbon. Finally, these new techniques will open the way for routine megabar neutron diffraction experiments.« less

  17. Opto-mechanical design and development of a 460mm diffractive transmissive telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bo; Wang, Lihua; Cui, Zhangang; Bian, Jiang; Xiang, Sihua; Ma, Haotong; Fan, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Using lightweight, replicated diffractive optics, we can construct extremely large aperture telescopes in space.The transmissive primary significantly reduces the sensitivities to out of plane motion as compared to reflective systems while reducing the manufacturing time and costs. This paper focuses on the design, fabrication and ground demonstration of a 460mm diffractive transmissive telescope the primary F/# is 6, optical field of view is 0.2° imagine bandwidth is 486nm 656nm.The design method of diffractive optical system was verified, the ability to capture a high-quality image using diffractive telescope collection optics was tested.The results show that the limit resolution is 94lp/mm, the diffractive system has a good imagine performance with broad bandwidths. This technology is particularly promising as a means to achieve extremely large optical primaries from compact, lightweight packages.

  18. Dynamical effects in Bragg coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of finite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, A. G.; Yefanov, O. M.; Nosik, V. L.; Bushuev, V. A.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2017-08-01

    We present simulations of Bragg coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) data from finite crystals in the frame of the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction. The developed approach is based on a numerical solution of modified Takagi-Taupin equations and can be applied for modeling of a broad range of x-ray diffraction experiments with finite three-dimensional crystals of arbitrary shape also in the presence of strain. We performed simulations for nanocrystals of a cubic and hemispherical shape of different sizes and provided a detailed analysis of artifacts in the Bragg CXDI reconstructions introduced by the dynamical diffraction. Based on our theoretical analysis we developed an analytical procedure to treat effects of refraction and absorption in the reconstruction. Our results elucidate limitations for the kinematical approach in the Bragg CXDI and suggest a natural criterion to distinguish between kinematical and dynamical cases in coherent x-ray diffraction on a finite crystal.

  19. Femtosecond X-ray coherent diffraction of aligned amyloid fibrils on low background graphene.

    PubMed

    Seuring, Carolin; Ayyer, Kartik; Filippaki, Eleftheria; Barthelmess, Miriam; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Ringler, Philippe; Pardini, Tommaso; Wojtas, David H; Coleman, Matthew A; Dörner, Katerina; Fuglerud, Silje; Hammarin, Greger; Habenstein, Birgit; Langkilde, Annette E; Loquet, Antoine; Meents, Alke; Riek, Roland; Stahlberg, Henning; Boutet, Sébastien; Hunter, Mark S; Koglin, Jason; Liang, Mengning; Ginn, Helen M; Millane, Rick P; Frank, Matthias; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N

    2018-05-09

    Here we present a new approach to diffraction imaging of amyloid fibrils, combining a free-standing graphene support and single nanofocused X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration from an X-ray free-electron laser. Due to the very low background scattering from the graphene support and mutual alignment of filaments, diffraction from tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) filaments and amyloid protofibrils is obtained to 2.7 Å and 2.4 Å resolution in single diffraction patterns, respectively. Some TMV diffraction patterns exhibit asymmetry that indicates the presence of a limited number of axial rotations in the XFEL focus. Signal-to-noise levels from individual diffraction patterns are enhanced using computational alignment and merging, giving patterns that are superior to those obtainable from synchrotron radiation sources. We anticipate that our approach will be a starting point for further investigations into unsolved structures of filaments and other weakly scattering objects.

  20. Cloning and characterization of a novel stress-responsive WRKY transcription factor gene (MusaWRKY71) from Musa spp. cv. Karibale Monthan (ABB group) using transformed banana cells.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Upendra K Singh; Ganapathi, Thumballi R; Srinivas, Lingam

    2011-08-01

    WRKY transcription factor proteins play significant roles in plant stress responses. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a novel WRKY gene, MusaWRKY71 isolated from an edible banana cultivar Musa spp. Karibale Monthan (ABB group). MusaWRKY71, initially identified using in silico approaches from an abiotic stress-related EST library, was later extended towards the 3' end using rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique. The 1299-bp long cDNA of MusaWRKY71 encodes a protein with 280 amino acids and contains a characteristic WRKY domain in the C-terminal half. Although MusaWRKY71 shares good similarity with other monocot WRKY proteins the substantial size difference makes it a unique member of the WRKY family in higher plants. The 918-bp long 5' proximal region determined using thermal asymmetric interlaced-polymerase chain reaction has many putative cis-acting elements and transcription factor binding motifs. Subcellular localization assay of MusaWRKY71 performed using a GFP-fusion platform confirmed its nuclear targeting in transformed banana suspension cells. Importantly, MusaWRKY71 expression in banana plantlets was up-regulated manifold by cold, dehydration, salt, ABA, H2O2, ethylene, salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate treatment indicating its involvement in response to a variety of stress conditions in banana. Further, transient overexpression of MusaWRKY71 in transformed banana cells led to the induction of several genes, homologues of which have been proven to be involved in diverse stress responses in other important plants. The present study is the first report on characterization of a banana stress-related transcription factor using transformed banana cells.

  1. Flatland Photonics: Circumventing Diffraction with Planar Plasmonic Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, Jennifer Anne

    On subwavelength scales, photon-matter interactions are limited by diffraction. The diffraction limit restricts the size of optical devices and the resolution of conventional microscopes to wavelength-scale dimensions, severely hampering our ability to control and probe subwavelength-scale optical phenomena. Circumventing diffraction is now a principle focus of integrated nanophotonics. Surface plasmons provide a particularly promising approach to sub-diffraction-limited photonics. Surface plasmons are hybrid electron-photon modes confined to the interface between conductors and transparent materials. Combining the high localization of electronic waves with the propagation properties of optical waves, plasmons can achieve extremely small mode wavelengths and large local electromagnetic field intensities. Through their unique dispersion, surface plasmons provide access to an enormous phase space of refractive indices and propagation constants that can be readily tuned with material or geometry. In this thesis, we explore both the theory and applications of dispersion in planar plasmonic architectures. Particular attention is given to the modes of metallic core and plasmon slot waveguides, which can span positive, near-zero, and even negative indices. We demonstrate how such basic plasmonic geometries can be used to develop a suite of passive and active plasmonic components, including subwavelength waveguides, color filters, negative index metamaterials, and optical MOS field effect modulators. Positive index modes are probed by near- and far-field techniques, revealing plasmon wavelengths as small as one-tenth of the excitation wavelength. Negative index modes are characterized through direct visualization of negative refraction. By fabricating prisms comprised of gold, silicon nitride, and silver multilayers, we achieve the first experimental demonstration of a negative index material at visible frequencies, with potential applications for sub-diffraction-limited

  2. Diffraction analysis of customized illumination technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chang-Moon; Kim, Seo-Min; Eom, Tae-Seung; Moon, Seung Chan; Shin, Ki S.

    2004-05-01

    Various enhancement techniques such as alternating PSM, chrome-less phase lithography, double exposure, etc. have been considered as driving forces to lead the production k1 factor towards below 0.35. Among them, a layer specific optimization of illumination mode, so-called customized illumination technique receives deep attentions from lithographers recently. A new approach for illumination customization based on diffraction spectrum analysis is suggested in this paper. Illumination pupil is divided into various diffraction domains by comparing the similarity of the confined diffraction spectrum. Singular imaging property of individual diffraction domain makes it easier to build and understand the customized illumination shape. By comparing the goodness of image in each domain, it was possible to achieve the customized shape of illumination. With the help from this technique, it was found that the layout change would not gives the change in the shape of customized illumination mode.

  3. Diffractive Optic Fluid Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D.; Scalf, J.; Forouhar, S.; Muller, R.; Taugwalder, F.; Gharib, M.; Fourguette, D.; Modarress, D.

    2000-01-01

    Light scattering off particles flowing through a two-slit interference pattern can be used to measure the shear stress of the fluid. We have designed and fabricated a miniature diffractive optic sensor based on this principle.

  4. Diffractive optics for particle velocimetry and sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. W.; Gogna, P. K.; Chacon, R. J.; Muller, R. E.; Fourguette, D.; Modarress, D.; Taugwalder, F.; Svitek, P.; Gharib, M.

    2002-01-01

    Beam-shaping diffractive optical elements are used to create structured light patterns in fluid flows. Particle scattering results in detected signals that can be used to determine the particle size and velocity.

  5. X-ray Diffraction, Big and Small

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-30

    A conventional X-ray diffraction instrument left is the size of a large refrigerator, in contrast to the compact size of the Chemistry and Mineralogy CheMin instrument on NASA Curiosity rover top right.

  6. Development of a diffraction imaging flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kenneth M.; Lu, Jun Q.

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction images record angle-resolved distribution of scattered light from a particle excited by coherent light and can correlate highly with the 3D morphology of a particle. We present a jet-in-fluid design of flow chamber for acquisition of clear diffraction images in a laminar flow. Diffraction images of polystyrene spheres of different diameters were acquired and found to correlate highly with the calculated ones based on the Mie theory. Fast Fourier transform analysis indicated that the measured images can be used to extract sphere diameter values. These results demonstrate the significant potentials of high-throughput diffraction imaging flow cytometry for extracting 3D morphological features of cells. PMID:19794790

  7. Research on properties of an infrared imaging diffractive element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachoń, M.; Wegrzyńska, K.; Doch, M.; Kołodziejczyk, A.; Siemion, A.; Suszek, J.; Kakarenko, K.; Sypek, M.

    2014-09-01

    Novel thermovision imaging systems having high efficiency require very sophisticated optical components. This paper describes the diffractive optical elements which are designed for the wavelengths between 8 and 14 μm for the application in the FLIR cameras. In the current paper the authors present phase only diffractive elements manufactured in the etched gallium arsenide. Due to the simplicity of the manufacturing process only binary phase elements were designed and manufactured. Such solution exhibits huge chromatic aberration. Moreover, the performance of such elements is rather poor, which is caused by two factors. The first one is the limited diffraction efficiency (c.a. 40%) of binary phase structures. The second problem lies in the Fresnel losses coming from the reflection from the two surfaces (around 50%). Performance of this structures is limited and the imaging contrast is poor. However, such structures can be used for relatively cheap practical testing of the new ideas. For example this solution is sufficient for point spread function (PSF) measurements. Different diffractive elements were compared. The first one was the equivalent of the lens designed on the basis of the paraxial approximation. For the second designing process, the non-paraxial approach was used. It was due to the fact that f/# was equal to 1. For the non-paraxial designing the focal spot is smaller and better focused. Moreover, binary phase structures suffer from huge chromatic aberrations. Finally, it is presented that non-paraxially designed optical element imaging with extended depth of focus (light-sword) can suppress chromatic aberration and therefore it creates the image not only in the image plane.

  8. Diffractive optics fabricated by direct write methods with an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, Bernard; Zaleta, David; Daschner, Walter; Urquhart, Kris; Stein, Robert; Lee, Sing H.

    1993-01-01

    State-of-the-art diffractive optics are fabricated using e-beam lithography and dry etching techniques to achieve multilevel phase elements with very high diffraction efficiencies. One of the major challenges encountered in fabricating diffractive optics is the small feature size (e.g. for diffractive lenses with small f-number). It is not only the e-beam system which dictates the feature size limitations, but also the alignment systems (mask aligner) and the materials (e-beam and photo resists). In order to allow diffractive optics to be used in new optoelectronic systems, it is necessary not only to fabricate elements with small feature sizes but also to do so in an economical fashion. Since price of a multilevel diffractive optical element is closely related to the e-beam writing time and the number of etching steps, we need to decrease the writing time and etching steps without affecting the quality of the element. To do this one has to utilize the full potentials of the e-beam writing system. In this paper, we will present three diffractive optics fabrication techniques which will reduce the number of process steps, the writing time, and the overall fabrication time for multilevel phase diffractive optics.

  9. Improved Resolution Optical Time Stretch Imaging Based on High Efficiency In-Fiber Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoqing; Yan, Zhijun; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Chao

    2018-01-12

    Most overlooked challenges in ultrafast optical time stretch imaging (OTSI) are sacrificed spatial resolution and higher optical loss. These challenges are originated from optical diffraction devices used in OTSI, which encode image into spectra of ultrashort optical pulses. Conventional free-space diffraction gratings, as widely used in existing OTSI systems, suffer from several inherent drawbacks: limited diffraction efficiency in a non-Littrow configuration due to inherent zeroth-order reflection, high coupling loss between free-space gratings and optical fibers, bulky footprint, and more importantly, sacrificed imaging resolution due to non-full-aperture illumination for individual wavelengths. Here we report resolution-improved and diffraction-efficient OTSI using in-fiber diffraction for the first time to our knowledge. The key to overcome the existing challenges is a 45° tilted fiber grating (TFG), which serves as a compact in-fiber diffraction device offering improved diffraction efficiency (up to 97%), inherent compatibility with optical fibers, and improved imaging resolution owning to almost full-aperture illumination for all illumination wavelengths. 50 million frames per second imaging of fast moving object at 46 m/s with improved imaging resolution has been demonstrated. This conceptually new in-fiber diffraction design opens the way towards cost-effective, compact and high-resolution OTSI systems for image-based high-throughput detection and measurement.

  10. Edge Diffraction Coefficients around Critical Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkin, L.; Harmer, M.; Darmon, M.

    2014-04-01

    The classical GTD (Geometrical Theory of Diffraction) gives a recipe, based on high-frequency asymptotics, for calculating edge diffraction coefficients in the geometrical regions where only diffracted waves propagate. The Uniform GTD extends this recipe to transition zones between irradiated and silent regions, known as penumbra. For many industrial materials, e.g. steels, and frequencies utlized in industrial ultrasonic transducers, that is, around 5 MHz, asymptotics suggested for description of geometrical regions supporting the head waves or transition regions surrounding their boundaries, known as critical rays, prove unsatisfactory. We present a numerical extension of GTD, which is based on a regularized, variable step Simpson's method for evaluating the edge diffraction coefficients in the regions of interference between head waves, diffracted waves and/or reflected waves. In mathematical terms, these are the regions of coalescence of three critical points - a branch point, stationary point and/or pole, respectively. We show that away from the shadow boundaries, near the critical rays the GTD still produces correct values of the edge diffraction coefficients.

  11. Robust reconstruction of time-resolved diffraction from ultrafast streak cameras

    PubMed Central

    Badali, Daniel S.; Dwayne Miller, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    In conjunction with ultrafast diffraction, streak cameras offer an unprecedented opportunity for recording an entire molecular movie with a single probe pulse. This is an attractive alternative to conventional pump-probe experiments and opens the door to studying irreversible dynamics. However, due to the “smearing” of the diffraction pattern across the detector, the streaking technique has thus far been limited to simple mono-crystalline samples and extreme care has been taken to avoid overlapping diffraction spots. In this article, this limitation is addressed by developing a general theory of streaking of time-dependent diffraction patterns. Understanding the underlying physics of this process leads to the development of an algorithm based on Bayesian analysis to reconstruct the time evolution of the two-dimensional diffraction pattern from a single streaked image. It is demonstrated that this approach works on diffraction peaks that overlap when streaked, which not only removes the necessity of carefully choosing the streaking direction but also extends the streaking technique to be able to study polycrystalline samples and materials with complex crystalline structures. Furthermore, it is shown that the conventional analysis of streaked diffraction can lead to erroneous interpretations of the data. PMID:28653022

  12. Mesoscale Diffractive Photonics in Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minin, I. V.; Minin, O. V.

    2016-06-01

    The scattered light by various dielectric particles in atmosphere give information about the type of molecules and particles and their location, which are important to definition of propagation limitations through atmospheric and space weather variations, crisis communications, etc. Although these investigations explain far field properties of disturbed radiations, the solution of the physical problem requires simulations of the interactions in near-field. It has been shown that strongly localized EM field near the surface of single dielectric particle may be form by non-spherical and non-symmetrical mesoscale particles both as in transmitting as in reflection mode. It was also shown that the main lobe is narrower in case of 3 cube chain than single cube in far field, but there are many side-scattering lobes. It was mentioned that unique advantages provided by mesoscale dielectric photonic crystal based particles with three spatial dimensions of arbitrary shape allow developing a new types of micro/nano-probes with subwavelength resolution for ultra compact spectrometer-free sensor for on board a spacecraft or a plane.

  13. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Ernest; Stemmer, Susanne; Zheng, Haimei

    2014-02-25

    and spectroscopy with high spatial resolution without damaging their structure. The strong interaction of electrons with matter allows high-energy electron pulses to gather structural information before a sample is damaged. Electron ScatteringImaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy are the fundamental capabilities of electron-scattering instruments. The DOE BES-funded TEAM (Transmission Electron Aberration-corrected Microscope) project achieved unprecedented sub-atomic spatial resolution in imaging through aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. To further advance electron scattering techniques that directly enable groundbreaking science, instrumentation must advance beyond traditional two-dimensional imaging. Advances in temporal resolution, recording the full phase and energy spaces, and improved spatial resolution constitute a new frontier in electron microscopy, and will directly address the BES Grand Challenges, such as to “control the emergent properties that arise from the complex correlations of atomic and electronic constituents” and the “hidden states” “very far away from equilibrium”. Ultrafast methods, such as the pump-probe approach, enable pathways toward understanding, and ultimately controlling, the chemical dynamics of molecular systems and the evolution of complexity in mesoscale and nanoscale systems. Central to understanding how to synthesize and exploit functional materials is having the ability to apply external stimuli (such as heat, light, a reactive flux, and an electrical bias) and to observe the resulting dynamic process in situ and in operando, and under the appropriate environment (e.g., not limited to UHV conditions). To enable revolutionary advances in electron scattering and science, the participants of the workshop recommended three major new instrumental developments: A. Atomic-Resolution Multi-Dimensional Transmission Electron Microscope: This instrument would provide quantitative information over the entire

  14. Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Kirz, Janos; ...

    2009-11-01

    We report the first image of an intact, frozen hydrated eukaryotic cell using x-ray diffraction microscopy, or coherent x-ray diffraction imaging. By plunge freezing the specimen in liquid ethane and maintaining it below -170 °C, artifacts due to dehydration, ice crystallization, and radiation damage are greatly reduced. In this example, coherent diffraction data using 520 eV x rays were recorded and reconstructed to reveal a budding yeast cell at a resolution better than 25 nm. This demonstration represents an important step towards high resolution imaging of cells in their natural, hydrated state, without limitations imposed by x-ray optics.

  15. Expected values and variances of Bragg peak intensities measured in a nanocrystalline powder diffraction experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Öztürk, Hande; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2017-08-24

    A rigorous study of sampling and intensity statistics applicable for a powder diffraction experiment as a function of crystallite size is presented. Our analysis yields approximate equations for the expected value, variance and standard deviations for both the number of diffracting grains and the corresponding diffracted intensity for a given Bragg peak. The classical formalism published in 1948 by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] appears as a special case, limited to large crystallite sizes, here. It is observed that both the Lorentz probability expression and the statistics equations used in the classical formalism are inapplicable for nanocrystallinemore » powder samples.« less

  16. Expected values and variances of Bragg peak intensities measured in a nanocrystalline powder diffraction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Öztürk, Hande; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    A rigorous study of sampling and intensity statistics applicable for a powder diffraction experiment as a function of crystallite size is presented. Our analysis yields approximate equations for the expected value, variance and standard deviations for both the number of diffracting grains and the corresponding diffracted intensity for a given Bragg peak. The classical formalism published in 1948 by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] appears as a special case, limited to large crystallite sizes, here. It is observed that both the Lorentz probability expression and the statistics equations used in the classical formalism are inapplicable for nanocrystallinemore » powder samples.« less

  17. Near-field diffraction from amplitude diffraction gratings: theory, simulation and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedin, Kazi Monowar; Rahman, S. M. Mujibur

    2017-08-01

    We describe a computer simulation method by which the complete near-field diffract pattern of an amplitude diffraction grating can be generated. The technique uses the method of iterative Fresnel integrals to calculate and generate the diffraction images. Theoretical background as well as the techniques to perform the simulation is described. The program is written in MATLAB, and can be implemented in any ordinary PC. Examples of simulated diffraction images are presented and discussed. The generated images in the far-field where they reduce to Fraunhofer diffraction pattern are also presented for a realistic grating, and compared with the results predicted by the grating equation, which is applicable in the far-field. The method can be used as a tool to teach the complex phenomenon of diffraction in classrooms.

  18. Biological imaging by soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, David

    We have developed a microscope for soft x-ray diffraction imaging of dry or frozen hydrated biological specimens. This lensless imaging system does not suffer from the resolution or specimen thickness limitations that other short wavelength microscopes experience. The microscope, currently situated at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source, can collect diffraction data to 12 nm resolution with 750 eV photons and 17 nm resolution with 520 eV photons. The specimen can be rotated with a precision goniometer through an angle of 160 degrees allowing for the collection of nearly complete three-dimensional diffraction data. The microscope is fully computer controlled through a graphical user interface and a scripting language automates the collection of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional data. Diffraction data from a freeze-dried dwarf yeast cell, Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying the CLN3-1 mutation, was collected to 12 run resolution from 8 specimen orientations spanning a total rotation of 8 degrees. The diffraction data was phased using the difference map algorithm and the reconstructions provide real space images of the cell to 30 nm resolution from each of the orientations. The agreement of the different reconstructions provides confidence in the recovered, and previously unknown, structure and indicates the three dimensionality of the cell. This work represents the first imaging of the natural complex refractive contrast from a whole unstained cell by the diffraction microscopy method and has achieved a resolution superior to lens based x-ray tomographic reconstructions of similar specimens. Studies of the effects of exposure to large radiation doses were also carried out. It was determined that the freeze-dried cell suffers from an initial collapse, which is followed by a uniform, but slow, shrinkage. This structural damage to the cell is not accompanied by a diminished ability to see small features in the specimen. Preliminary measurements on frozen

  19. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley K.; Hoffmann, W. Clint

    2016-01-01

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected. PMID:27684589

  20. Probing the structure of heterogeneous diluted materials by diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Bleuet, Pierre; Welcomme, Eléonore; Dooryhée, Eric; Susini, Jean; Hodeau, Jean-Louis; Walter, Philippe

    2008-06-01

    The advent of nanosciences calls for the development of local structural probes, in particular to characterize ill-ordered or heterogeneous materials. Furthermore, because materials properties are often related to their heterogeneity and the hierarchical arrangement of their structure, different structural probes covering a wide range of scales are required. X-ray diffraction is one of the prime structural methods but suffers from a relatively poor detection limit, whereas transmission electron analysis involves destructive sample preparation. Here we show the potential of coupling pencil-beam tomography with X-ray diffraction to examine unidentified phases in nanomaterials and polycrystalline materials. The demonstration is carried out on a high-pressure pellet containing several carbon phases and on a heterogeneous powder containing chalcedony and iron pigments. The present method enables a non-invasive structural refinement with a weight sensitivity of one part per thousand. It enables the extraction of the scattering patterns of amorphous and crystalline compounds with similar atomic densities and compositions. Furthermore, such a diffraction-tomography experiment can be carried out simultaneously with X-ray fluorescence, Compton and absorption tomographies, enabling a multimodal analysis of prime importance in materials science, chemistry, geology, environmental science, medical science, palaeontology and cultural heritage.

  1. Enhancing resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Noh, Do Young; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong

    2016-12-14

    Achieving a resolution near 1 nm is a critical issue in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) for applications in materials and biology. Albeit with various advantages of CDI based on synchrotrons and newly developed x-ray free electron lasers, its applications would be limited without improving resolution well below 10 nm. Here, we review the issues and efforts in improving CDI resolution including various methods for resolution determination. Enhancing diffraction signal at large diffraction angles, with the aid of interference between neighboring strong scatterers or templates, is reviewed and discussed in terms of increasing signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, we discuss errors in image reconstruction algorithms-caused by the discreteness of the Fourier transformations involved-which degrade the spatial resolution, and suggest ways to correct them. We expect this review to be useful for applications of CDI in imaging weakly scattering soft matters using coherent x-ray sources including x-ray free electron lasers.

  2. Time Domain Diffraction by Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Frongillo, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    Time domain (TD) diffraction problems are receiving great attention because of the widespread use of ultra wide band (UWB) communication and radar systems. It is commonly accepted that, due to the large bandwidth of the UWB signals, the analysis of the wave propagation mechanisms in the TD framework is preferable to the frequency domain (FD) data processing. Furthermore, the analysis of transient scattering phenomena is also of importance for predicting the effects of electromagnetic pulses on civil structures. Diffraction in the TD framework represents a challenging problem and numerical discretization techniques can be used to support research and industry activities. Unfortunately, these methods become rapidly intractable when considering excitation pulses with high frequency content. This contribution deals with the TD diffraction phenomenon related to composite structures containing a dielectric wedge with arbitrary apex angle when illuminated by a plane wave. The approach is the same used in [1]-[3]. The transient diffracted field originated by an arbitrary function plane wave is evaluated via a convolution integral involving the TD diffraction coefficients, which are determined in closed form starting from the knowledge of the corresponding FD counterparts. In particular, the inverse Laplace transform is applied to the FD Uniform Asymptotic Physical Optics (FD-UAPO) diffraction coefficients available for the internal region of the structure and the surrounding space. For each observation domain, the FD-UAPO expressions are obtained by considering electric and magnetic equivalent PO surface currents located on the interfaces. The surface radiation integrals using these sources is assumed as starting point and manipulated for obtaining integrals able to be solved by means of the Steepest Descent Method and the Multiplicative Method. [1] G. Gennarelli and G. Riccio, "Time domain diffraction by a right-angled penetrable wedge," IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., Vol

  3. Rayleigh-wave diffractions due to a void in the layered half space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.; Nyquist, Jonathan E.

    2006-01-01

    Void detection is challenging due to the complexity of near-surface materials and the limited resolution of geophysical methods. Although multichannel, high-frequency, surface-wave techniques can provide reliable shear (S)-wave velocities in different geological settings, they are not suitable for detecting voids directly based on anomalies of the S-wave velocity because of limitations on the resolution of S-wave velocity profiles inverted from surface-wave phase velocities. Xia et al. (2006a) derived a Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation due to a void in the homogeneous half space. Encouraging results of directly detecting a void from Rayleigh-wave diffractions were presented (Xia et al., 2006a). In this paper we used four two-dimensional square voids in the layered half space to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting a void with Rayleigh-wave diffractions. Rayleigh-wave diffractions were recognizable for all these models after removing direct surface waves by F-K filtering. We evaluate the feasibility of applying the Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation to a void in the layered earth model. The phase velocity of diffracted Rayleigh waves is predominately determined by surrounding materials of a void. The modeling results demonstrate that the Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation due to a void in the homogeneous half space can be applied to the case of a void in the layered half space. In practice, only two diffraction times are necessary to define the depth to the top of a void and the average velocity of diffracted Rayleigh waves. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. Hard diffraction and deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    Since the advent of hard-collision physics, the study of diffractive processes - shadow physics - has been less prominent than before. However, there is now a renewed interest in the subject, especially in that aspect which synthesizes the short-distance, hard-collision phenomena with the classical physics of large rapidity-gaps. This is especially stimulated by the recent data on deep-inelastic scattering from HERA, as well as the theoretical work which relates to it. The word diffraction is sometimes used by high-energy physicists in a loose way. The author defines this term to mean: A diffractive process occurs if and only if theremore » is a large rapidity gap in the produced-particle phase space which is not exponentially suppressed. Here a rapidity gap means essentially no hadrons produced into the rapidity gap (which operates in the {open_quotes}lego{close_quotes} phase-space of pseudo-rapidity and azimuthal angle). And non-exponential suppression implies that the cross-section for creating a gap with width {Delta}{eta} does not have a power-law decrease with increasing subenergy s=e{sup {Delta}{eta}}, but behaves at most like some power of pseudorapidity {Delta}{eta}{approx}log(s). The term hard diffraction shall simply refer to those diffractive process which have jets in the final-state phase-space.« less

  5. Cryogenic X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy for Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Enju; Wiegart, Lutz; Pernot, Petra; Howells, Malcolm; Timmins, Joanna; Zontone, Federico; Madsen, Anders

    2009-11-01

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is well suited for nondestructive, high-resolution biological imaging, especially for thick samples, with the high penetration power of x rays and without limitations imposed by a lens. We developed nonvacuum, cryogenic (cryo-) XDM with hard x rays at 8 keV and report the first frozen-hydrated imaging by XDM. By preserving samples in amorphous ice, the risk of artifacts associated with dehydration or chemical fixation is avoided, ensuring the imaging condition closest to their natural state. The reconstruction shows internal structures of intact D. radiodurans bacteria in their natural contrast.

  6. Kirigami Nanocomposites as Wide-Angle Diffraction Gratings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lizhi; Wang, Xinzhi; Kim, Yoonseob; Shyu, Terry C; Lyu, Jing; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2016-06-28

    Beam steering devices represent an essential part of an advanced optics toolbox and are needed in a spectrum of technologies ranging from astronomy and agriculture to biosensing and networked vehicles. Diffraction gratings with strain-tunable periodicity simplify beam steering and can serve as a foundation for light/laser radar (LIDAR/LADAR) components of robotic systems. However, the mechanical properties of traditional materials severely limit the beam steering angle and cycle life. The large strain applied to gratings can severely impair the device performance both in respect of longevity and diffraction pattern fidelity. Here, we show that this problem can be resolved using micromanufactured kirigami patterns from thin film nanocomposites based on high-performance stiff plastics, metals, and carbon nanotubes, etc. The kirigami pattern of microscale slits reduces the stochastic concentration of strain in stiff nanocomposites including those made by layer-by-layer assembly (LBL). The slit patterning affords reduction of strain by 2 orders of magnitude for stretching deformation and consequently enables reconfigurable optical gratings with over a 100% range of period tunability. Elasticity of the stiff nanocomposites and plastics makes possible cyclic reconfigurability of the grating with variable time constant that can also be referred to as 4D kirigami. High-contrast, sophisticated diffraction patterns with as high as fifth diffraction order can be obtained. The angular range of beam steering can be as large as 6.5° for a 635 nm laser beam compared to ∼1° in surface-grooved elastomer gratings and ∼0.02° in MEMS gratings. The versatility of the kirigami patterns, the diversity of the available nanocomposite materials, and their advantageous mechanical properties of the foundational materials open the path for engineering of reconfigurable optical elements in LIDARs essential for autonomous vehicles and other optical devices with spectral range determined

  7. Optical diffraction tomography: accuracy of an off-axis reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostencka, Julianna; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    Optical diffraction tomography is an increasingly popular method that allows for reconstruction of three-dimensional refractive index distribution of semi-transparent samples using multiple measurements of an optical field transmitted through the sample for various illumination directions. The process of assembly of the angular measurements is usually performed with one of two methods: filtered backprojection (FBPJ) or filtered backpropagation (FBPP) tomographic reconstruction algorithm. The former approach, although conceptually very simple, provides an accurate reconstruction for the object regions located close to the plane of focus. However, since FBPJ ignores diffraction, its use for spatially extended structures is arguable. According to the theory of scattering, more precise restoration of a 3D structure shall be achieved with the FBPP algorithm, which unlike the former approach incorporates diffraction. It is believed that with this method one is allowed to obtain a high accuracy reconstruction in a large measurement volume exceeding depth of focus of an imaging system. However, some studies have suggested that a considerable improvement of the FBPP results can be achieved with prior propagation of the transmitted fields back to the centre of the object. This, supposedly, enables reduction of errors due to approximated diffraction formulas used in FBPP. In our view this finding casts doubt on quality of the FBPP reconstruction in the regions far from the rotation axis. The objective of this paper is to investigate limitation of the FBPP algorithm in terms of an off-axis reconstruction and compare its performance with the FBPJ approach. Moreover, in this work we propose some modifications to the FBPP algorithm that allow for more precise restoration of a sample structure in off-axis locations. The research is based on extensive numerical simulations supported with wave-propagation method.

  8. Electron coherent diffraction tomography of a nanocrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dronyak, Roman; Liang, Keng S.; Tsai, Jin-Sheng; Stetsko, Yuri P.; Lee, Ting-Kuo; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2010-05-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) with electron or x-ray sources is a promising technique for investigating the structure of nanoparticles down to the atomic scale. In electron CDI, a two-dimensional reconstruction is demonstrated using highly coherent illumination from a field-emission gun as a source of electrons. In a three-dimensional (3D) electron CDI, we experimentally determine the morphology of a single MgO nanocrystal using the Bragg diffraction geometry. An iterative algorithm is applied to invert the 3D diffraction pattern about a (200) reflection of the nanoparticle measured at an angular range of 1.8°. The results reveal a 3D image of the sample at ˜8 nm resolution, and agree with a simulation. Our work demonstrates an alternative approach to obtain the 3D structure of nanocrystals with an electron microscope.

  9. Data Exploration Toolkit for serial diffraction experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Zeldin, Oliver B.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; ...

    2015-01-23

    Ultrafast diffraction at X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has the potential to yield new insights into important biological systems that produce radiation-sensitive crystals. An unavoidable feature of the 'diffraction before destruction' nature of these experiments is that images are obtained from many distinct crystals and/or different regions of the same crystal. Combined with other sources of XFEL shot-to-shot variation, this introduces significant heterogeneity into the diffraction data, complicating processing and interpretation. To enable researchers to get the most from their collected data, a toolkit is presented that provides insights into the quality of, and the variation present in, serial crystallography datamore » sets. These tools operate on the unmerged, partial intensity integration results from many individual crystals, and can be used on two levels: firstly to guide the experimental strategy during data collection, and secondly to help users make informed choices during data processing.« less

  10. Diffraction and interference of walking drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Harris, Daniel M.; Bush, John W. M.

    2016-11-01

    A decade ago, Yves Couder and Emmanuel Fort discovered a wave-particle association on the macroscopic scale: a drop can bounce indefinitely on a vibrating bath of the same liquid and can be piloted by the waves that it generates. These walking droplets have been shown to exhibit several quantum-like features, including single-particle diffraction and interference. Recently, the original diffraction and interference experiments of Couder and Fort have been revisited and contested. We have revisited this system using an improved experimental set-up, and observed a strong dependence of the behavior on system parameters, including drop size and vibrational forcing. In both the single- and the double-slit geometries, the diffraction pattern is dominated by the interaction of the walking droplet with a planar boundary. Critically, in the double-slit geometry, the walking droplet is influenced by both slits by virtue of its spatially extended wave field. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  11. Adaptable Diffraction Gratings With Wavefront Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength. Traditional diffraction gratings have static planar, concave, or convex surfaces. However, if they could be made so that they can change the surface curvature at will, then they would be able to focus on particular segments, self-calibrate, or perform fine adjustments. This innovation creates a diffraction grating on a deformable surface. This surface could be bent at will, resulting in a dynamic wavefront transformation. This allows for self-calibration, compensation for aberrations, enhancing image resolution in a particular area, or performing multiple scans using different wavelengths. A dynamic grating gives scientists a new ability to explore wavefronts from a variety of viewpoints.

  12. Ultra-high density diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Padmore, Howard A.; Voronov, Dmytro L.; Cambie, Rossana; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2012-12-11

    A diffraction grating structure having ultra-high density of grooves comprises an echellette substrate having periodically repeating recessed features, and a multi-layer stack of materials disposed on the echellette substrate. The surface of the diffraction grating is planarized, such that layers of the multi-layer stack form a plurality of lines disposed on the planarized surface of the structure in a periodical fashion, wherein lines having a first property alternate with lines having a dissimilar property on the surface of the substrate. For example, in one embodiment, lines comprising high-Z and low-Z materials alternate on the planarized surface providing a structure that is suitable as a diffraction grating for EUV and soft X-rays. In some embodiments, line density of between about 10,000 lines/mm to about 100,000 lines/mm is provided.

  13. X-ray Diffraction Gratings for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerels, Frits

    2010-12-01

    Over the past year, we have celebrated the tenth anniversary of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. Both carry powerful, novel diffraction grating spectrometers, which have opened true X-ray spectroscopy for astrophysics. I will describe the design and operation of these instruments, as the background to some of the beautiful results they have produced. But these designs do not exhaust the versatility and essential simplicity of diffraction grating spectrometers, and I will discuss applications for the International X-ray Observatory IXO.

  14. Generation of a sub-diffraction hollow ring by shaping an azimuthally polarized wave

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Wu, Zhi-xiang; Yu, An-ping; Zhang, Zhi-hai; Wen, Zhong-quan; Zhang, Kun; Dai, Lu-ru; Jiang, Sen-lin; Li, Yu-yan; Chen, Li; Wang, Chang-tao; Luo, Xian-gang

    2016-01-01

    The generation of a sub-diffraction optical hollow ring is of great interest in various applications, such as optical microscopy, optical tweezers, and nanolithography. Azimuthally polarized light is a good candidate for creating an optical hollow ring structure. Various of methods have been proposed theoretically for generation of sub-wavelength hollow ring by focusing azimuthally polarized light, but without experimental demonstrations, especially for sub-diffraction focusing. Super-oscillation is a promising approach for shaping sub-diffraction optical focusing. In this paper, a planar sub-diffraction diffractive lens is proposed, which has an ultra-long focal length of 600 λ and small numerical aperture of 0.64. A sub-diffraction hollow ring is experimentally created by shaping an azimuthally polarized wave. The full-width-at-half-maximum of the hollow ring is 0.61 λ, which is smaller than the lens diffraction limit 0.78 λ, and the observed largest sidelobe intensity is only 10% of the peak intensity. PMID:27876885

  15. Planar super-oscillatory lens for sub-diffraction optical needles at violet wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guanghui; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Roy, Tapashree; Adamo, Giorgio; Shen, Zexiang; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-01-01

    Planar optical lenses are fundamental elements of miniaturized photonic devices. However, conventional planar optical lenses are constrained by the diffraction limit in the optical far-field due to the band-limited wavevectors supported by free-space and loss of high-spatial-frequency evanescent components. As inspired by Einstein's radiation ‘needle stick', electromagnetic energy can be delivered into an arbitrarily small solid angle. Such sub-diffraction optical needles have been numerically investigated using diffractive optical elements (DOEs) together with specially polarized optical beams, but experimental demonstration is extremely difficult due to the bulky size of DOEs and the required alignment precision. Planar super-oscillatory lenses (SOLs) were proposed to overcome these constraints and demonstrated that sub-diffraction focal spots can actually be formed without any evanescent waves, making far-field, label-free super-resolution imaging possible. Here we extend the super-oscillation concept into the vectorial-field regime to work with circularly polarized light, and experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a circularly polarized optical needle with sub-diffraction transverse spot size (0.45λ) and axial long depth of focus (DOF) of 15λ using a planar SOL at a violet wavelength of 405 nm. This sub-diffraction circularly polarized optical needle has potential applications in circular dichroism spectroscopy, super-resolution imaging, high-density optical storage, heat-assisted magnetic recording, nano-manufacturing and nano-metrology. PMID:25208611

  16. Multiple defocused coherent diffraction imaging: method for simultaneously reconstructing objects and probe using X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Makoto; Shimomura, Kei; Suzuki, Akihiro; Burdet, Nicolas; Takahashi, Yukio

    2016-05-30

    The sample size must be less than the diffraction-limited focal spot size of the incident beam in single-shot coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) based on a diffract-before-destruction scheme using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). This is currently a major limitation preventing its wider applications. We here propose multiple defocused CXDI, in which isolated objects are sequentially illuminated with a divergent beam larger than the objects and the coherent diffraction pattern of each object is recorded. This method can simultaneously reconstruct both objects and a probe from the coherent X-ray diffraction patterns without any a priori knowledge. We performed a computer simulation of the prposed method and then successfully demonstrated it in a proof-of-principle experiment at SPring-8. The prposed method allows us to not only observe broad samples but also characterize focused XFEL beams.

  17. Automated determination of fibrillar structures by simultaneous model building and fiber diffraction refinement.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, Wojciech; André, Ingemar

    2015-07-01

    For highly oriented fibrillar molecules, three-dimensional structures can often be determined from X-ray fiber diffraction data. However, because of limited information content, structure determination and validation can be challenging. We demonstrate that automated structure determination of protein fibers can be achieved by guiding the building of macromolecular models with fiber diffraction data. We illustrate the power of our approach by determining the structures of six bacteriophage viruses de novo using fiber diffraction data alone and together with solid-state NMR data. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of molecular replacement from monomeric and fibrillar templates by solving the structure of a plant virus using homology modeling and protein-protein docking. The generated models explain the experimental data to the same degree as deposited reference structures but with improved structural quality. We also developed a cross-validation method for model selection. The results highlight the power of fiber diffraction data as structural constraints.

  18. Programmable diffractive lens for ophthalmic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, María S.; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Romero, Lenny A.; Ramírez, Natalia

    2014-06-01

    Pixelated liquid crystal displays have been widely used as spatial light modulators to implement programmable diffractive optical elements, particularly diffractive lenses. Many different applications of such components have been developed in information optics and optical processors that take advantage of their properties of great flexibility, easy and fast refreshment, and multiplexing capability in comparison with equivalent conventional refractive lenses. We explore the application of programmable diffractive lenses displayed on the pixelated screen of a liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator to ophthalmic optics. In particular, we consider the use of programmable diffractive lenses for the visual compensation of refractive errors (myopia, hypermetropia, astigmatism) and presbyopia. The principles of compensation are described and sketched using geometrical optics and paraxial ray tracing. For the proof of concept, a series of experiments with artificial eye in optical bench are conducted. We analyze the compensation precision in terms of optical power and compare the results with those obtained by means of conventional ophthalmic lenses. Practical considerations oriented to feasible applications are provided.

  19. Diffractive Pedagogies: Dancing across New Materialist Imaginaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey-Moody, Anna; Palmer, Helen; Sayers, Esther

    2016-01-01

    We theorise an interdisciplinary arts practice university course and consider the forms of educational imaginary challenged by our curriculum. We argue for the disruptive and generative potential of what we call diffractive pedagogy as an example of the type of learning that can take place when materiality and entanglement are considered as vital…

  20. Diffraction-Based Optical Switching with MEMS

    DOE PAGES

    Blanche, Pierre-Alexandre; LaComb, Lloyd; Wang, Youmin; ...

    2017-04-19

    In this article, we are presenting an overview of MEMS-based (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) optical switch technology starting from the reflective two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) MEMS implementations. To further increase the speed of the MEMS from these devices, the mirror size needs to be reduced. Small mirror size prevents efficient reflection but favors a diffraction-based approach. Two implementations have been demonstrated, one using the Texas Instruments DLP (Digital Light Processing), and the other an LCoS-based (Liquid Crystal on Silicon) SLM (Spatial Light Modulator). These switches demonstrated the benefit of diffraction, by independently achieving high speed, efficiency, and high number of ports.more » We also demonstrated for the first time that PSK (Phase Shift Keying) modulation format can be used with diffraction-based devices. To be truly effective in diffraction mode, the MEMS pixels should modulate the phase of the incident light. We are presenting our past and current efforts to manufacture a new type of MEMS where the pixels are moving in the vertical direction. The original structure is a 32 x 32 phase modulator array with high contrast grating pixels, and we are introducing a new sub-wavelength linear array capable of a 310 kHz modulation rate« less

  1. Diffractive Optical Elements for Spectral Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D.; Maker, P.; Muller, R.; Mourolis, P.; Descour, M.; Volin, C.; Dereniak, E.

    2000-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements fabricated on flat and non-flat substrates frequently act as dispersive elements in imaging spectrometers. We describe the design and electron-beam fabrication of blazed and computer-generated-hologram gratings for slit and tomographic imaging spectrometer.

  2. Diffractive Optical Elements for Spectral Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D.; Maker, P.; Muller, R.; Maker, P.; Mouroulis, P.; Descour, M.; Volin, C.; Dereniak, E.

    2000-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements fabricated on flat and non-flat substrates frequently act as dispersive elements in imaging spectrometers. We describe the design and electron-beam fabrication of blazed and computer-generated-hologram gratings for slit and tomographic imaging spectrometers.

  3. Accessing the diffracted wavefield by coherent subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Benjamin; Gajewski, Dirk

    2017-10-01

    Diffractions have unique properties which are still rarely exploited in common practice. Aside from containing subwavelength information on the scattering geometry or indicating small-scale structural complexity, they provide superior illumination compared to reflections. While diffraction occurs arguably on all scales and in most realistic media, the respective signatures typically have low amplitudes and are likely to be masked by more prominent wavefield components. It has been widely observed that automated stacking acts as a directional filter favouring the most coherent arrivals. In contrast to other works, which commonly aim at steering the summation operator towards fainter contributions, we utilize this directional selection to coherently approximate the most dominant arrivals and subtract them from the data. Supported by additional filter functions which can be derived from wave front attributes gained during the stacking procedure, this strategy allows for a fully data-driven recovery of faint diffractions and makes them accessible for further processing. A complex single-channel field data example recorded in the Aegean sea near Santorini illustrates that the diffracted background wavefield is surprisingly rich and despite the absence of a high channel count can still be detected and characterized, suggesting a variety of applications in industry and academia.

  4. X-Ray Diffraction on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Eggert, J H; Wark, J

    2012-02-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently a 192 beam, 1.6 MJ laser. NIF Ramp-Compression Experiments have already made the relevant exo-planet pressure range from 1 to 50 Mbar accessible. We Proposed to Study Carbon Phases by X-Ray Diffraction on NIF. Just a few years ago, ultra-high pressure phase diagrams for materials were very 'simple'. New experiments and theories point out surprising and decidedly complex behavior at the highest pressures considered. High pressures phases of aluminum are also predicted to be complex. Recent metadynamics survey of carbon proposed a dynamic pathway among multiple phases. We need to develop diagnostics andmore » techniques to explore this new regime of highly compressed matter science. X-Ray Diffraction - Understand the phase diagram/EOS/strength/texture of materials to 10's of Mbar. Strategy and physics goals: (1) Powder diffraction; (2) Begin with diamond; (3) Continue with metals etc.; (4) Explore phase diagrams; (5) Develop liquid diffraction; and (6) Reduce background/improve resolution.« less

  5. Idealized powder diffraction patterns for cellulose polymorphs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cellulose samples are routinely analyzed by X-ray diffraction to determine their crystal type (polymorph) and crystallinity. However, the connection is seldom made between those efforts and the crystal structures of cellulose that have been determined with synchrotron X-radiation and neutron diffrac...

  6. Diffraction-Based Optical Switching with MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Blanche, Pierre-Alexandre; LaComb, Lloyd; Wang, Youmin

    In this article, we are presenting an overview of MEMS-based (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) optical switch technology starting from the reflective two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) MEMS implementations. To further increase the speed of the MEMS from these devices, the mirror size needs to be reduced. Small mirror size prevents efficient reflection but favors a diffraction-based approach. Two implementations have been demonstrated, one using the Texas Instruments DLP (Digital Light Processing), and the other an LCoS-based (Liquid Crystal on Silicon) SLM (Spatial Light Modulator). These switches demonstrated the benefit of diffraction, by independently achieving high speed, efficiency, and high number of ports.more » We also demonstrated for the first time that PSK (Phase Shift Keying) modulation format can be used with diffraction-based devices. To be truly effective in diffraction mode, the MEMS pixels should modulate the phase of the incident light. We are presenting our past and current efforts to manufacture a new type of MEMS where the pixels are moving in the vertical direction. The original structure is a 32 x 32 phase modulator array with high contrast grating pixels, and we are introducing a new sub-wavelength linear array capable of a 310 kHz modulation rate« less

  7. Engaging with Theoretical Diffraction in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanas, Maija; Rautio, Pauliina; Koskela, Anne; Kinnunen, Susanna; Viljamaa, Elina; Juutinen, Jaana

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a study in which we began with a question "how to teach theoretical reflectivity in teacher education," and ended with a sentence "there is theoretical diffraction in teacher education." The research presented in this paper took place in the context of a university course in which we have been involved for…

  8. Piezoelectric Diffraction-Based Optical Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan; Fuhr, Peter; Schipper, John

    2003-01-01

    Piezoelectric diffraction-based optoelectronic devices have been invented to satisfy requirements for switching signals quickly among alternative optical paths in optical communication networks. These devices are capable of operating with switching times as short as microseconds or even nanoseconds in some cases.

  9. Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    A finely detailed defraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the defraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating.

  10. Imaging electronic motions by ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2017-08-01

    Recently ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy have reached unprecedented temporal resolution, and transient structures with atomic precision have been observed in various reactions. It is anticipated that these extraordinary advances will soon allow direct observation of electronic motions during chemical reactions. We therefore performed a series of theoretical investigations and simulations to investigate the imaging of electronic motions in atoms and molecules by ultrafast electron diffraction. Three prototypical electronic motions were considered for hydrogen atoms. For the case of a breathing mode, the electron density expands and contracts periodically, and we show that the time-resolved scattering intensities reflect such changes of the charge radius. For the case of a wiggling mode, the electron oscillates from one side of the nucleus to the other, and we show that the diffraction images exhibit asymmetric angular distributions. The last case is a hybrid mode that involves both breathing and wiggling motions. Owing to the demonstrated ability of ultrafast electrons to image these motions, we have proposed to image a coherent population transfer in lithium atoms using currently available femtosecond electron pulses. A frequency-swept laser pulse adiabatically drives the valence electron of a lithium atom from the 2s to 2p orbitals, and a time-delayed electron pulse maps such motion. Our simulations show that the diffraction images reflect this motion both in the scattering intensities and the angular distributions.

  11. Transmissive Diffractive Optical Element Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard; Moynihan, Philip; Price, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Solar-thermal-radiation concentrators in the form of transmissive diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have been proposed as alternatives to mirror-type solar concentrators now in use. In comparison with functionally equivalent mirror-type solar concentrators, the transmissive, diffractive solar concentrators would weigh and cost less, and would be subject to relaxed mechanical tolerances. A DOE concentrator would be made from a thin, flat disk or membrane of a transmissive material having a suitable index of refraction. By virtue of its thinness, the DOE concentrator would have an areal mass density significantly less than that of a functionally equivalent conventional mirror. The DOE concentrator would have a relatively wide aperture--characterized by a focal-length/aperture-diameter ratio ('f number') on the order of 1. A kinoform (a surface-relief phase hologram) of high diffractive order would be microfabricated onto one face of the disk. The kinoform (see figure) would be designed to both diffract and refract incident solar radiation onto a desired focal region, without concern for forming an image of the Sun. The high diffractive order of this kinoform (in contradistinction to the low diffractive orders of some other kinoforms) would be necessary to obtain the desired f number of 1, which, in turn, would be necessary for obtaining a desired concentration ratio of 2,500 or greater. The design process of optimizing the concentration ratio of a proposed DOE solar concentrator includes computing convolutions of the optical bandwidth of the Sun with the optical transmission of the diffractive medium. Because, as in the cases of other non-imaging, light-concentrating optics, image quality is not a design requirement, the process also includes trading image quality against concentration ratio. A baseline design for one example calls for an aperture diameter of 1 m. This baseline design would be scalable to a diameter as large as 10 m, or to a smaller diameter for a

  12. A measurement of electron-wall interactions using transmission diffraction from nanofabricated gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwick, Brett; Gronniger, Glen; Yuan, Lu; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Batelaan, Herman

    2006-10-01

    Electron diffraction from metal coated freestanding nanofabricated gratings is presented, with a quantitative path integral analysis of the electron-grating interactions. Electron diffraction out to the 20th order was observed indicating the high quality of our nanofabricated gratings. The electron beam is collimated to its diffraction limit with ion-milled material slits. Our path integral analysis is first tested against single slit electron diffraction, and then further expanded with the same theoretical approach to describe grating diffraction. Rotation of the grating with respect to the incident electron beam varies the effective distance between the electron and grating bars. This allows the measurement of the image charge potential between the electron and the grating bars. Image charge potentials that were about 15% of the value for that of a pure electron-metal wall interaction were found. We varied the electron energy from 50to900eV. The interaction time is of the order of typical metal image charge response times and in principle allows the investigation of image charge formation. In addition to the image charge interaction there is a dephasing process reducing the transverse coherence length of the electron wave. The dephasing process causes broadening of the diffraction peaks and is consistent with a model that ascribes the dephasing process to microscopic contact potentials. Surface structures with length scales of about 200nm observed with a scanning tunneling microscope, and dephasing interaction strength typical of contact potentials of 0.35eV support this claim. Such a dephasing model motivated the investigation of different metallic coatings, in particular Ni, Ti, Al, and different thickness Au-Pd coatings. Improved quality of diffraction patterns was found for Ni. This coating made electron diffraction possible at energies as low as 50eV. This energy was limited by our electron gun design. These results are particularly relevant for the use of

  13. Generation of diffraction-free optical beams using wrinkled membranes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Yi, Hui; Hu, Xiao; Chen, Leng; Shi, Guangsha; Wang, Weimin; Yang, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Wrinkling has become a well developed bottom-up technique to make artificial surface textures in about the last decade. However, application of the optical properties of long range ordered wrinkles has been limited to one dimensional gratings to date. We report the demonstration of macroscopic optical focusing using wrinkled membranes, in which concentric wrinkle rings on a gold-PDMS bilayer membrane convert collimated illuminations to diffraction-free focused beams. Beam diameters of 300–400 μm have been observed in the visible range, which are dominantly limited by the eccentricity of the current devices. Based upon agreement between theoretical and experimental results on eccentricity effects, we predict a decrease of the beam diameter to no more than around 50 μm, if eccentricity is eliminated. PMID:24072139

  14. DMD-based quantitative phase microscopy and optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie

    2018-02-01

    Digital micromirror devices (DMDs), which offer high speed and high degree of freedoms in steering light illuminations, have been increasingly applied to optical microscopy systems in recent years. Lately, we introduced DMDs into digital holography to enable new imaging modalities and break existing imaging limitations. In this paper, we will first present our progress in using DMDs for demonstrating laser-illumination Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) with shotnoise limited detection. After that, we will present a novel common-path quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) system based on using a DMD. Building on those early developments, a DMD-based high speed optical diffraction tomography (ODT) system has been recently demonstrated, and the results will also be presented. This ODT system is able to achieve video-rate 3D refractive-index imaging, which can potentially enable observations of high-speed 3D sample structural changes.

  15. Limit characteristics of digital optoelectronic processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobrodov, V. G.; Tymchik, G. S.; Kolobrodov, M. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, the limiting characteristics of a digital optoelectronic processor are explored. The limits are defined by diffraction effects and a matrix structure of the devices for input and output of optical signals. The purpose of a present research is to optimize the parameters of the processor's components. The developed physical and mathematical model of DOEP allowed to establish the limit characteristics of the processor, restricted by diffraction effects and an array structure of the equipment for input and output of optical signals, as well as to optimize the parameters of the processor's components. The diameter of the entrance pupil of the Fourier lens is determined by the size of SLM and the pixel size of the modulator. To determine the spectral resolution, it is offered to use a concept of an optimum phase when the resolved diffraction maxima coincide with the pixel centers of the radiation detector.

  16. Diffraction Revisited: Position of Diffraction Spots upon Rotation of a Transmission Grating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are often used in the laboratory to determine the wavelength of laser light. What happens to the spots on the screen if the grating is rotated in this set-up? The answer is nontrivial and instructive.

  17. System design and verification of the precession electron diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Own, Christopher Su-Yan

    2005-07-01

    Bulk structural crystallography is generally a two-part process wherein a rough starting structure model is first derived, then later refined to give an accurate model of the structure. The critical step is the determination of the initial model. As materials problems decrease in length scale, the electron microscope has proven to be a versatile and effective tool for studying many problems. However, study of complex bulk structures by electron diffraction has been hindered by the problem of dynamical diffraction. This phenomenon makes bulk electron diffraction very sensitive to specimen thickness, and expensive equipment such as aberration-corrected scanning transmission microscopes or elaborate methodology such as high resolution imaging combined with diffraction and simulation are often required to generate good starting structures. The precession electron diffraction technique (PED), which has the ability to significantly reduce dynamical effects in diffraction patterns, has shown promise as being a "philosopher's stone" for bulk electron diffraction. However, a comprehensive understanding of its abilities and limitations is necessary before it can be put into widespread use as a standalone technique. This thesis aims to bridge the gaps in understanding and utilizing precession so that practical application might be realized. Two new PED systems have been built, and optimal operating parameters have been elucidated. The role of lens aberrations is described in detail, and an alignment procedure is given that shows how to circumvent aberration in order to obtain high-quality patterns. Multislice simulation is used for investigating the errors inherent in precession, and is also used as a reference for comparison to simple models and to experimental PED data. General trends over a large sampling of parameter space are determined. In particular, we show that the primary reflection intensity errors occur near the transmitted beam and decay with increasing angle and

  18. Photoelectron diffraction and holography: Some new directions

    SciTech Connect

    Fadley, C.S.

    1993-08-01

    Photoelectron diffraction has by now become a versatile and powerful technique for studying surface structures, with special capabilities for resolving chemical and magnetic states of atoms and deriving direct structural information from both forward scattering along bond directions and back-scattering path length differences. Further fitting experiment to theory can lead to structural accuracies in the {plus_minus}0.03 ){Angstrom} range. Holographic inversions of such diffraction data also show considerable promise for deriving local three-dimensional structures around a given emitter with accuracies of {plus_minus}0.2--0.3 {Angstrom}. Resolving the photoelectron spin in some way and using circularly polarized radiation for excitation provide added dimensions formore » the study of magnetic systems and chiral experimental geometries. Synchrotron radiation with the highest brightness and energy resolution, as well as variable polarization, is crucial to the full exploitation of these techniques.« less

  19. Tomographic diffractive microscopy with a wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Y; Bon, P; Mudry, E; Maire, G; Chaumet, P C; Giovannini, H; Belkebir, K; Talneau, A; Wattellier, B; Monneret, S; Sentenac, A

    2012-05-15

    Tomographic diffractive microscopy is a recent imaging technique that reconstructs quantitatively the three-dimensional permittivity map of a sample with a resolution better than that of conventional wide-field microscopy. Its main drawbacks lie in the complexity of the setup and in the slowness of the image recording as both the amplitude and the phase of the field scattered by the sample need to be measured for hundreds of successive illumination angles. In this Letter, we show that, using a wavefront sensor, tomographic diffractive microscopy can be implemented easily on a conventional microscope. Moreover, the number of illuminations can be dramatically decreased if a constrained reconstruction algorithm is used to recover the sample map of permittivity.

  20. Hard diffraction in the QCD dipole picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, A.; Peschanski, R.

    1996-02-01

    Using the QCD dipole picture of the BFKL pomeron, the gluon contribution to the cross-section for single diffractive dissociation in deep-inelastic high-energy scattering is calculated. The resulting contribution to the proton diffractive structure function integrated over t is given in terms of relevant variables, xP, Q2, and β = {x Bj}/{x P}. It factorizes into an explicit x P-dependent Hard Pomeron flux factor and structure function. The lux factor is found to have substantial logarithmic corrections which may account for the recent measurements of the Pomeron intercept in this process. The triple Pomeron coupling is shown to be strongly enhanced by the resummation of leading logs. The obtained pattern of scaling violation at small β is similar to that for F2 at small xBj.

  1. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Medecki, H.

    1998-11-10

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams. 8 figs.

  2. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Medecki, Hector

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams.

  3. Holographic diffractive structures for daylighting, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-10-01

    Advanced Environmental Research Group (AERG) has researched and developed a proprietary device which will passively track the Sun throughout a wide range of latitudes, hours of the day and seasons of the year. The Holographic Diffractive Structure (HDS), consists of novel holographic diffraction grating designs applied to a substrate suitable for mounting or incorporated into window glazings. The HDS installations will be a low cost system for the controlled management of sunlight in buildings for energy savings and an enhanced lighting environment. The HDSs act to intercept sunlight and redirect it away from the immediate window area towards the darker regions at the rear of the room, or (via light guides) to interior spaces without windows, or (used on the facade of a building) to redirect sunlight into dark urban canyons or onto the facades of other nearby buildings.

  4. DPEMC: A Monte Carlo for double diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonekamp, M.; Kúcs, T.

    2005-05-01

    We extend the POMWIG Monte Carlo generator developed by B. Cox and J. Forshaw, to include new models of central production through inclusive and exclusive double Pomeron exchange in proton-proton collisions. Double photon exchange processes are described as well, both in proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions. In all contexts, various models have been implemented, allowing for comparisons and uncertainty evaluation and enabling detailed experimental simulations. Program summaryTitle of the program:DPEMC, version 2.4 Catalogue identifier: ADVF Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVF Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: any computer with the FORTRAN 77 compiler under the UNIX or Linux operating systems Operating system: UNIX; Linux Programming language used: FORTRAN 77 High speed storage required:<25 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 399 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 639 950 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of the physical problem: Proton diffraction at hadron colliders can manifest itself in many forms, and a variety of models exist that attempt to describe it [A. Bialas, P.V. Landshoff, Phys. Lett. B 256 (1991) 540; A. Bialas, W. Szeremeta, Phys. Lett. B 296 (1992) 191; A. Bialas, R.A. Janik, Z. Phys. C 62 (1994) 487; M. Boonekamp, R. Peschanski, C. Royon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 251806; Nucl. Phys. B 669 (2003) 277; R. Enberg, G. Ingelman, A. Kissavos, N. Timneanu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 (2002) 081801; R. Enberg, G. Ingelman, L. Motyka, Phys. Lett. B 524 (2002) 273; R. Enberg, G. Ingelman, N. Timneanu, Phys. Rev. D 67 (2003) 011301; B. Cox, J. Forshaw, Comput. Phys. Comm. 144 (2002) 104; B. Cox, J. Forshaw, B. Heinemann, Phys. Lett. B 540 (2002) 26; V. Khoze, A. Martin, M. Ryskin, Phys. Lett. B 401 (1997) 330; Eur. Phys. J. C 14 (2000) 525; Eur. Phys. J. C 19 (2001) 477; Erratum, Eur. Phys. J. C 20 (2001) 599; Eur

  5. Autoindexing diffraction images with iMosflm

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Harold R.; Johnson, Owen; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2013-01-01

    An overview of autoindexing diffraction images based on one-­dimensional fast Fourier transforms is presented. The implementation of the algorithm in the Mosflm/iMosflm program suite is described with a discussion of practical issues that may arise and ways of assessing the success or failure of the procedure. Recent developments allow indexing of images that show multiple lattices, and several examples demonstrate the success of this approach in real cases. PMID:23793145

  6. Neutron Reflectivity and Grazing Angle Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Ankner, J. F.; Majkrzak, C. F.; Satija, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, neutron reflectivity has emerged as a powerful technique for the investigation of surface and interfacial phenomena in many different fields. In this paper, a short review of some of the work on neutron reflectivity and grazing-angle diffraction as well as a description of the current and planned neutron rcflectometers at NIST is presented. Specific examples of the characterization of magnetic, superconducting, and polymeric surfaces and interfaces are included. PMID:28053457

  7. Diffraction smoothing aperture for an optical beam

    DOEpatents

    Judd, O'Dean P.; Suydam, Bergen R.

    1976-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an aperture for an optical beam having an irregular periphery or having perturbations imposed upon the periphery to decrease the diffraction effect caused by the beam passing through the aperture. Such apertures are particularly useful with high power solid state laser systems in that they minimize the problem of self-focusing which frequently destroys expensive components in such systems.

  8. Neutron diffraction investigation of γ manganese hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, V. K.; Antonov, V. E.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Beskrovnyi, A. I.; Grosse, G.; Wagner, F. E.

    1998-08-01

    A profile analysis of the neutron diffraction spectrum of the fcc high pressure hydride λ-MnH 0.41 measured under ambient conditions showed that hydrogen is randomly distributed over the octahedral interstices of the fcc metal lattice and that the hydride is an antiferromagnet with the same collinear spin structure as pure λ-Mn, but with a smaller magnetic moment of about 1.9 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom.

  9. A public database of macromolecular diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Marek; Langner, Karol M; Cymborowski, Marcin; Porebski, Przemyslaw J; Sroka, Piotr; Zheng, Heping; Cooper, David R; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Elsliger, Marc André; Burley, Stephen K; Minor, Wladek

    2016-11-01

    The low reproducibility of published experimental results in many scientific disciplines has recently garnered negative attention in scientific journals and the general media. Public transparency, including the availability of `raw' experimental data, will help to address growing concerns regarding scientific integrity. Macromolecular X-ray crystallography has led the way in requiring the public dissemination of atomic coordinates and a wealth of experimental data, making the field one of the most reproducible in the biological sciences. However, there remains no mandate for public disclosure of the original diffraction data. The Integrated Resource for Reproducibility in Macromolecular Crystallography (IRRMC) has been developed to archive raw data from diffraction experiments and, equally importantly, to provide related metadata. Currently, the database of our resource contains data from 2920 macromolecular diffraction experiments (5767 data sets), accounting for around 3% of all depositions in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), with their corresponding partially curated metadata. IRRMC utilizes distributed storage implemented using a federated architecture of many independent storage servers, which provides both scalability and sustainability. The resource, which is accessible via the web portal at http://www.proteindiffraction.org, can be searched using various criteria. All data are available for unrestricted access and download. The resource serves as a proof of concept and demonstrates the feasibility of archiving raw diffraction data and associated metadata from X-ray crystallographic studies of biological macromolecules. The goal is to expand this resource and include data sets that failed to yield X-ray structures in order to facilitate collaborative efforts that will improve protein structure-determination methods and to ensure the availability of `orphan' data left behind for various reasons by individual investigators and/or extinct structural genomics

  10. Diffractive Hyperbola of a Skin Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubov, V. P.; Vaiman, E. V.; Shipilov, S. È.; Prasath, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    Based on an analysis of physics of the phase transition from the quasistatic state field to the running wave field of elementary electric and magnetic dipoles located in absorbing media, it is concluded that the skin layer is formed at the boundary of this phase transition. The possibility is considered of obtaining the diffractive hyperbola of the skin layer and its subsequent application for sensing of objects in strongly absorbing media.

  11. Diffraction imaging (topography) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Kuriyama, Masao; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Laor, Uri

    1988-01-01

    Structural information of special interest to crystal growers and device physicists is now available from high resolution monochromatic synchrotron diffraction imaging (topography). In the review, the importance of superior resolution in momentum transfer and in space is described, and illustrations are taken from a variety of crystals: gallium arsenide, cadmium telluride, mercuric iodide, bismuth silicon oxide, and lithium niobate. The identification and understanding of local variations in crystal growth processes are shown. Finally, new experimental opportunities now available for exploitation are indicated.

  12. Relief diffracted elements recorded on absorbent photopolymers.

    PubMed

    Gallego, S; Márquez, A; Ortuño, M; Francés, J; Pascual, I; Beléndez, A

    2012-05-07

    Relief surface changes provide interesting possibilities for storing diffractive optical elements on photopolymers and are an important source of information for characterizing and understanding the material behavior. In this paper we use a 3-dimensional model, based on direct parameter measurements, for predicting the relief structures generated on without-coverplate photopolymers. We have analyzed different spatial frequency and recording intensity distributions such as binary and blazed periodic patterns. This model was successfully applied to different photopolymers with different values of monomer diffusion.

  13. Digital diffraction analysis enables low-cost molecular diagnostics on a smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Im, Hyungsoon; Castro, Cesar M.; Shao, Huilin; Liong, Monty; Song, Jun; Pathania, Divya; Fexon, Lioubov; Min, Changwook; Avila-Wallace, Maria; Zurkiya, Omar; Rho, Junsung; Magaoay, Brady; Tambouret, Rosemary H.; Pivovarov, Misha; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-01-01

    The widespread distribution of smartphones, with their integrated sensors and communication capabilities, makes them an ideal platform for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis, especially in resource-limited settings. Molecular diagnostics, however, have been difficult to implement in smartphones. We herein report a diffraction-based approach that enables molecular and cellular diagnostics. The D3 (digital diffraction diagnosis) system uses microbeads to generate unique diffraction patterns which can be acquired by smartphones and processed by a remote server. We applied the D3 platform to screen for precancerous or cancerous cells in cervical specimens and to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. The D3 assay generated readouts within 45 min and showed excellent agreement with gold-standard pathology or HPV testing, respectively. This approach could have favorable global health applications where medical access is limited or when pathology bottlenecks challenge prompt diagnostic readouts. PMID:25870273

  14. High-resolution scanning precession electron diffraction: Alignment and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Jonathan S; Johnstone, Duncan N; Midgley, Paul A

    2017-03-01

    Methods are presented for aligning the pivot point of a precessing electron probe in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and for assessing the spatial resolution in scanning precession electron diffraction (SPED) experiments. The alignment procedure is performed entirely in diffraction mode, minimising probe wander within the bright-field (BF) convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) disk and is used to obtain high spatial resolution SPED maps. Through analysis of the power spectra of virtual bright-field images extracted from the SPED data, the precession-induced blur was measured as a function of precession angle. At low precession angles, SPED spatial resolution was limited by electronic noise in the scan coils; whereas at high precession angles SPED spatial resolution was limited by tilt-induced two-fold astigmatism caused by the positive spherical aberration of the probe-forming lens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evanescent Properties of Optical Diffraction from 2-Dimensional Hexagonal Photonic Crystals and Their Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Yang; Chen, Yung-Tsan; Chen, Chien-Chun; Huang, Jian-Jang

    2018-04-03

    The sensitivity of traditional diffraction grating sensors is limited by the spatial resolution of the measurement setup. Thus, a large space is required to improve sensor performance. Here, we demonstrate a compact hexagonal photonic crystal (PhC) optical sensor with high sensitivity. PhCs are able to diffract optical beams to various angles in azimuthal space. The critical wavelength that satisfies the phase matching or becomes evanescent was used to benchmark the refractive index of a target analyte applied on a PhC sensor. Using a glucose solution as an example, our sensor demonstrated very high sensitivity and a low limit of detection. This shows that the diffraction mechanism of hexagonal photonic crystals can be used for sensors when compact size is a concern.

  16. Digital diffraction analysis enables low-cost molecular diagnostics on a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyungsoon; Castro, Cesar M; Shao, Huilin; Liong, Monty; Song, Jun; Pathania, Divya; Fexon, Lioubov; Min, Changwook; Avila-Wallace, Maria; Zurkiya, Omar; Rho, Junsung; Magaoay, Brady; Tambouret, Rosemary H; Pivovarov, Misha; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-05-05

    The widespread distribution of smartphones, with their integrated sensors and communication capabilities, makes them an ideal platform for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis, especially in resource-limited settings. Molecular diagnostics, however, have been difficult to implement in smartphones. We herein report a diffraction-based approach that enables molecular and cellular diagnostics. The D3 (digital diffraction diagnosis) system uses microbeads to generate unique diffraction patterns which can be acquired by smartphones and processed by a remote server. We applied the D3 platform to screen for precancerous or cancerous cells in cervical specimens and to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. The D3 assay generated readouts within 45 min and showed excellent agreement with gold-standard pathology or HPV testing, respectively. This approach could have favorable global health applications where medical access is limited or when pathology bottlenecks challenge prompt diagnostic readouts.

  17. Characterization of X80 and X100 Microalloyed Pipeline Steel Using Quantitative X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiskel, J. B.; Li, X.; Ivey, D. G.; Henein, H.

    2018-06-01

    Quantitative X-ray diffraction characterization of four (4) X80 and three (3) X100 microalloyed steels was undertaken. The effect of through-thickness position, processing parameters, and composition on the measured crystallite size, microstrain, and J index (relative magnitude of crystallographic texture) was determined. Microstructure analysis using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron-backscattered diffraction was also undertaken. The measured value of microstrain increased with increasing alloy content and decreasing cooling interrupt temperature. Microstructural features corresponding to crystallite size in the X80 steels were both above and below the detection limit for quantitative X-ray diffraction. The X100 steels consistently exhibited microstructure features below the crystallite size detection limit. The yield stress of each steel increased with increasing microstrain. The increase in microstrain from X80 to X100 is also associated with a change in microstructure from predominantly polygonal ferrite to bainitic ferrite.

  18. Hybrid shearing and phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth Alan; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2003-06-03

    A new interferometry configuration combines the strengths of two existing interferometry methods, improving the quality and extending the dynamic range of both. On the same patterned mask, placed near the image-plane of an optical system under test, patterns for phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry and lateral shearing interferometry coexist. The former giving verifiable high accuracy for the measurement of nearly diffraction-limited optical systems. The latter enabling the measurement of optical systems with more than one wave of aberration in the system wavefront. The interferometry configuration is a hybrid shearing and point diffraction interferometer system for testing an optical element that is positioned along an optical path including: a source of electromagnetic energy in the optical path; a first beam splitter that is secured to a device that includes means for maneuvering the first beam splitter in a first position wherein the first beam splitter is in the optical path dividing light from the source into a reference beam and a test beam and in a second position wherein the first beam splitter is outside the optical path: a hybrid mask which includes a first section that defines a test window and at least one reference pinhole and a second section that defines a second beam splitter wherein the hybrid mask is secured to a device that includes means for maneuvering either the first section or the second section into the optical path positioned in an image plane that is created by the optical element, with the proviso that the first section of the hybrid mask is positioned in the optical path when first beam splitter is positioned in the optical path; and a detector positioned after the hybrid mask along the optical path.

  19. Miniaturized diffraction based interferometric distance measurement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungki

    In this thesis, new metrology hardware is designed, fabricated, and tested to provide improvements over current MEMS metrology. The metrology system is a micromachined scanning interferometer (muSI) having a sub-nm resolution in a compact design. The proposed microinterferometer forms a phase sensitive diffraction grating with interferomeric sensitivity, while adding the capability of better lateral resolution by focusing the laser to a smaller spot size. A detailed diffraction model of the microinterferometer was developed to simulate the device performance and to suggest the location of photo detectors for integrated optoelectronics. A particular device is fabricated on a fused silica substrate using aluminum to form the deformable diffraction grating fingers and AZ P4620 photo resist (PR) for the microlens. The details of the fabrication processes are presented. The structure also enables optoelectronics to be integrated so that the interferometer with photo detectors can fit in an area that is 1 mm x 1 mm. The scanning results using a fixed grating muSI demonstrated that it could measure vibration profile as well as static vertical (less than a half wave length) and lateral dimension of MEMS. The muSI, which is integrated with photo diodes, demonstrated its operation by scanning a cMUT. The PID control has been tested and resulted in improvement in scanned images. The integrated muSI demonstrated that the deformable grating could be used to tune the measurement keep the interferometer in quadrature for highest sensitivity.

  20. Advances in 6d diffraction contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, N.; Ludwig, W.

    2018-04-01

    The ability to measure 3D orientation fields and to determine grain boundary character plays a key role in understanding many material science processes, including: crack formation and propagation, grain coarsening, and corrosion processes. X-ray diffraction imaging techniques offer the ability to retrieve such information in a non-destructive manner. Among them, Diffraction Contrast Tomography (DCT) is a monochromatic beam, near-field technique, that uses an extended beam and offers fast mapping of 3D sample volumes. It was previously shown that the six-dimensional extension of DCT can be applied to moderately deformed samples (<= 5% total strain), made from materials that exhibit low levels of elastic deformation of the unit cell (<= 1%). In this article, we improved over the previously proposed 6D-DCT reconstruction method, through the introduction of both a more advanced forward model and reconstruction algorithm. The results obtained with the proposed improvements are compared against the reconstructions previously published in [1], using Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) measurements as a reference. The result was a noticeably higher quality reconstruction of the grain boundary positions and local orientation fields. The achieved reconstruction quality, together with the low acquisition times, render DCT a valuable tool for the stop-motion study of polycrystalline microstructures, evolving as a function of applied strain or thermal annealing treatments, for selected materials.

  1. Studies on X-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Huijie

    This dissertation includes three main parts: studies on coherence requirements for the diffraction microscopy experiments, ice formation on frozen-hydrated sample during data collection, and centering of the diffraction data sets. These three subjects are all in support of our groups overall goal of high resolution 3D imaging of frozen hydrated eukaryotic cells via x-ray diffraction microscopy. X-ray diffraction microscopy requires coherent illumination. However, the actual degree of coherence at some beamlines has never been tested. In research on coherence, our first aim is to determine the transverse coherence width at the sample plane at BL 9.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An analytical calculation of the coherence at the sample plane is presented. Experimental diffraction patterns of pinhole-pair samples were also taken at the beamline to determine the coherence. Due to the irregular shape of the pinholes and other optics complexity, it was very difficult to fit the data with known theoretical equations as it was traditionally done with 1D data. However, we found out that the auto-correlation function shows clearly three spots. Theoretical calculation have been carried out to show that the degree of coherence can be obtained from the intensities of the three spots. These results are compared with the results from the analytical calculation. We then perform a simulation, showing the required transverse coherence width for reconstructing samples with a given size. Ice accumulation has been a major problem in X-ray diffraction microscopy with frozen hydrated samples. Since the ice structure is different from point to point, we cannot subtract the scattering from ice, nor assume a completely "empty" region outside the finite support constraint area as required for reconstruction. Ice forms during the sample preparation and transfer. However, from the tests we did in September 2007, we found that the ice layer thickens

  2. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro, E-mail: psanchos@aemet.es

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza–Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light–matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchangemore » effects. - Highlights: • Kapitza–Dirac diffraction of entangled particles shows multiparticle interference. • There is a discontinuity in the set of joint detection patterns of entangled states. • We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. • Symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.« less

  3. Double diffraction in an atomic gravimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Malossi, N.; Bodart, Q.; Merlet, S.

    2010-01-15

    We demonstrate the realization of a scheme for cold-atom gravimetry based on the recently demonstrated use of double-diffraction beam splitters [T. Leveque, A. Gauguet, F. Michaud, F. Pereira Dos Santos, and A. Landragin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 080405 (2009)], where the use of two retro-reflected Raman beams allows symmetric diffraction in +-(Planck constant/2pi)k{sub eff} momenta. Although in principle restricted to the case of zero Doppler shift, for which the two pairs of Raman beams are simultaneously resonant, such diffraction pulses can remain efficient on atoms with nonzero velocity, such as in a gravimeter, when the frequency of one of themore » two Raman laser sources is modulated. Such pulses are used to realize an interferometer insensitive to laser phase noise and some of the dominant systematics. This approach reduces the technical requirements and would allow the realization of a simple atomic gravimeter. A sensitivity of 1.2x10{sup -7}g per shot is demonstrated.« less

  4. Discrete diffraction managed solitons: Threshold phenomena and rapid decay for general nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Mi-Ran; Hundertmark, Dirk; Lee, Young-Ran

    2017-10-01

    We prove a threshold phenomenon for the existence/non-existence of energy minimizing solitary solutions of the diffraction management equation for strictly positive and zero average diffraction. Our methods allow for a large class of nonlinearities; they are, for example, allowed to change sign, and the weakest possible condition, it only has to be locally integrable, on the local diffraction profile. The solutions are found as minimizers of a nonlinear and nonlocal variational problem which is translation invariant. There exists a critical threshold λcr such that minimizers for this variational problem exist if their power is bigger than λcr and no minimizers exist with power less than the critical threshold. We also give simple criteria for the finiteness and strict positivity of the critical threshold. Our proof of existence of minimizers is rather direct and avoids the use of Lions' concentration compactness argument. Furthermore, we give precise quantitative lower bounds on the exponential decay rate of the diffraction management solitons, which confirm the physical heuristic prediction for the asymptotic decay rate. Moreover, for ground state solutions, these bounds give a quantitative lower bound for the divergence of the exponential decay rate in the limit of vanishing average diffraction. For zero average diffraction, we prove quantitative bounds which show that the solitons decay much faster than exponentially. Our results considerably extend and strengthen the results of Hundertmark and Lee [J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 1-38 (2012) and Commun. Math. Phys. 309(1), 1-21 (2012)].

  5. Quantitative locomotion study of freely swimming micro-organisms using laser diffraction.

    PubMed

    Magnes, Jenny; Susman, Kathleen; Eells, Rebecca

    2012-10-25

    Soil and aquatic microscopic organisms live and behave in a complex three-dimensional environment. Most studies of microscopic organism behavior, in contrast, have been conducted using microscope-based approaches, which limit the movement and behavior to a narrow, nearly two-dimensional focal field.(1) We present a novel analytical approach that provides real-time analysis of freely swimming C. elegans in a cuvette without dependence on microscope-based equipment. This approach consists of tracking the temporal periodicity of diffraction patterns generated by directing laser light through the cuvette. We measure oscillation frequencies for freely swimming nematodes. Analysis of the far-field diffraction patterns reveals clues about the waveforms of the nematodes. Diffraction is the process of light bending around an object. In this case light is diffracted by the organisms. The light waves interfere and can form a diffraction pattern. A far-field, or Fraunhofer, diffraction pattern is formed if the screen-to-object distance is much larger than the diffracting object. In this case, the diffraction pattern can be calculated (modeled) using a Fourier transform.(2) C. elegans are free-living soil-dwelling nematodes that navigate in three dimensions. They move both on a solid matrix like soil or agar in a sinusoidal locomotory pattern called crawling and in liquid in a different pattern called swimming.(3) The roles played by sensory information provided by mechanosensory, chemosensory, and thermosensory cells that govern plastic changes in locomotory patterns and switches in patterns are only beginning to be elucidated.(4) We describe an optical approach to measuring nematode locomotion in three dimensions that does not require a microscope and will enable us to begin to explore the complexities of nematode locomotion under different conditions.

  6. Paraxial diffractive elements for space-variant linear transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teiwes, Stephan; Schwarzer, Heiko; Gu, Ben-Yuan

    1998-06-01

    Optical linear transform architectures bear good potential for future developments of very powerful hybrid vision systems and neural network classifiers. The optical modules of such systems could be used as pre-processors to solve complex linear operations at very high speed in order to simplify an electronic data post-processing. However, the applicability of linear optical architectures is strongly connected with the fundamental question of how to implement a specific linear transform by optical means and physical imitations. The large majority of publications on this topic focusses on the optical implementation of space-invariant transforms by the well-known 4f-setup. Only few papers deal with approaches to implement selected space-variant transforms. In this paper, we propose a simple algebraic method to design diffractive elements for an optical architecture in order to realize arbitrary space-variant transforms. The design procedure is based on a digital model of scalar, paraxial wave theory and leads to optimal element transmission functions within the model. Its computational and physical limitations are discussed in terms of complexity measures. Finally, the design procedure is demonstrated by some examples. Firstly, diffractive elements for the realization of different rotation operations are computed and, secondly, a Hough transform element is presented. The correct optical functions of the elements are proved in computer simulation experiments.

  7. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  8. Effect of recording condition on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram with magnetic garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2014-09-01

    A holographic memory has been attracting attention as recording media with high recording density and high data transfer rate. We have studied the magnetic garnets as a rewritable and long life media for magnetic holography. However, since the signal intensity of reconstructed image was relatively low, the effects of recording conditions on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram were investigated with experiments and the numerical simulation using COMSOL multi-physics. The diffraction efficiency tends to decrease as increasing the spatial frequency, and the use of short pulse laser with the pulse width of 50 ps was found to be effective to achieve high diffraction efficiency. This suggests that the formation of clear magnetic fringe similar to interference pattern can be obtained by the use of short pulse laser since undesirable heat diffusion during radiation does not occur. On the other hand, the diffraction efficiency increased as increasing the film thickness up to 3.1 μm but was saturated in the garnet film thicker than 3.1 μm in the case of spatial frequency of 1500 line pair/mm. The numerical simulation showed that the effective depth of magnetic fringe was limited about 1.8 μm irrespective of the garnet film thickness because the fringes were connected by thermal diffusion near the surface of the film, and the effective depth is limited due to this connection of the magnetic fringe. Avoiding this fringe connection, much higher diffraction efficiency will be achieved.

  9. Calculation of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from highly stressed polycrystalline materials

    DOE PAGES

    MacDonald, M. J.; Vorberger, J.; Gamboa, E. J.; ...

    2016-06-07

    Calculations of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from polycrystalline materials have typically been done in the limit of small deviatoric stresses. Although these methods are well suited for experiments conducted near hydrostatic conditions, more robust models are required to diagnose the large strain anisotropies present in dynamic compression experiments. A method to predict Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns for arbitrary strains has been presented in the Voigt (iso-strain) limit. Here, we present a method to calculate Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from highly stressed polycrystalline samples in the Reuss (iso-stress) limit. This analysis uses elastic constants to calculate lattice strains for all initial crystallite orientations, enablingmore » elastic anisotropy and sample texture effects to be modeled directly. Furthermore, the effects of probing geometry, deviatoric stresses, and sample texture are demonstrated and compared to Voigt limit predictions. An example of shock-compressed polycrystalline diamond is presented to illustrate how this model can be applied and demonstrates the importance of including material strength when interpreting diffraction in dynamic compression experiments.« less

  10. Photon Sieve Bandwidth Broadening by Reduction of Chromatic Aberration Effects Using Second-Stage Diffractive Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    A photon sieve is a lightweight diffractive optic which can be useful for space - based imaging applications. It is limited by chromatic...would also like to thank my sponsor, Dr. Matthew G. McHarg from the Space Physics and Atmospheric Research Center, United States Air Force Academy, as...Page 21. Radial Hole Spacing

  11. Calculation of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from highly stressed polycrystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M. J., E-mail: macdonm@umich.edu; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025; Vorberger, J.

    2016-06-07

    Calculations of Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from polycrystalline materials have typically been done in the limit of small deviatoric stresses. Although these methods are well suited for experiments conducted near hydrostatic conditions, more robust models are required to diagnose the large strain anisotropies present in dynamic compression experiments. A method to predict Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns for arbitrary strains has been presented in the Voigt (iso-strain) limit [Higginbotham, J. Appl. Phys. 115, 174906 (2014)]. Here, we present a method to calculate Debye-Scherrer diffraction patterns from highly stressed polycrystalline samples in the Reuss (iso-stress) limit. This analysis uses elastic constants to calculate latticemore » strains for all initial crystallite orientations, enabling elastic anisotropy and sample texture effects to be modeled directly. The effects of probing geometry, deviatoric stresses, and sample texture are demonstrated and compared to Voigt limit predictions. An example of shock-compressed polycrystalline diamond is presented to illustrate how this model can be applied and demonstrates the importance of including material strength when interpreting diffraction in dynamic compression experiments.« less

  12. Feasibility of detecting near-surface feature with Rayleigh-wave diffraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Nyquist, Jonathan E.; Xu, Y.; Roth, M.J.S.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    Detection of near-surfaces features such as voids and faults is challenging due to the complexity of near-surface materials and the limited resolution of geophysical methods. Although multichannel, high-frequency, surface-wave techniques can provide reliable shear (S)-wave velocities in different geological settings, they are not suitable for detecting voids directly based on anomalies of the S-wave velocity because of limitations on the resolution of S-wave velocity profiles inverted from surface-wave phase velocities. Therefore, we studied the feasibility of directly detecting near-surfaces features with surface-wave diffractions. Based on the properties of surface waves, we have derived a Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation. We also have solved the equation for the depth to the top of a void and an average velocity of Rayleigh waves. Using these equations, the depth to the top of a void/fault can be determined based on traveltime data from a diffraction curve. In practice, only two diffraction times are necessary to define the depth to the top of a void/fault and the average Rayleigh-wave velocity that generates the diffraction curve. We used four two-dimensional square voids to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting a void with Rayleigh-wave diffractions: a 2??m by 2??m with a depth to the top of the void of 2??m, 4??m by 4??m with a depth to the top of the void of 7??m, and 6??m by 6??m with depths to the top of the void 12??m and 17??m. We also modeled surface waves due to a vertical fault. Rayleigh-wave diffractions were recognizable for all these models after FK filtering was applied to the synthetic data. The Rayleigh-wave diffraction traveltime equation was verified by the modeled data. Modeling results suggested that FK filtering is critical to enhance diffracted surface waves. A real-world example is presented to show how to utilize the derived equation of surface-wave diffractions. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Rigorous diffraction analysis using geometrical theory of diffraction for future mask technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Gek S.; Tay, Cho J.; Quan, Chenggen; Lin, Qunying

    2004-05-01

    Advanced lithographic techniques such as phase shift masks (PSM) and optical proximity correction (OPC) result in a more complex mask design and technology. In contrast to the binary masks, which have only transparent and nontransparent regions, phase shift masks also take into consideration transparent features with a different optical thickness and a modified phase of the transmitted light. PSM are well-known to show prominent diffraction effects, which cannot be described by the assumption of an infinitely thin mask (Kirchhoff approach) that is used in many commercial photolithography simulators. A correct prediction of sidelobe printability, process windows and linearity of OPC masks require the application of rigorous diffraction theory. The problem of aerial image intensity imbalance through focus with alternating Phase Shift Masks (altPSMs) is performed and compared between a time-domain finite-difference (TDFD) algorithm (TEMPEST) and Geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Using GTD, with the solution to the canonical problems, we obtained a relationship between the edge on the mask and the disturbance in image space. The main interest is to develop useful formulations that can be readily applied to solve rigorous diffraction for future mask technology. Analysis of rigorous diffraction effects for altPSMs using GTD approach will be discussed.

  14. Active mode locking of lasers by piezoelectrically induced diffraction modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Krausz, F.; Turi, L.; Kuti, C.

    A new amplitude-modulation mode-locking technique is presented. Acoustic waves are generated directly on the faces of a resonant photoelastic medium. The created standing waves cause a highly efficient diffraction modulation of light. The modulation depth of standing-wave mode lockers is related to material and drive parameters and a figure of merit is introduced. With a lithium niobate crystal modulation depths over 10 are achieved at 1.054 {mu}m and 1 W of radio frequency power. Using this device for the active mode locking of a continuous-wave Nd:glass laser pulses as short as 3.8 ps are produced at a repetition rate ofmore » 66 MHz. Limitations of amplitude-modulation mode locking by standing acoustic waves are discussed.« less

  15. Active mode locking of lasers by piezoelectrically induced diffraction modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krausz, F.; Turi, L.; Kuti, Cs.; Schmidt, A. J.

    1990-04-01

    A new amplitude-modulation mode-locking technique is presented. Acoustic waves are generated directly on the faces of a resonant photoelastic medium. The created standing waves cause a highly efficient diffraction modulation of light. The modulation depth of standing-wave mode lockers is related to material and drive parameters and a figure of merit is introduced. With a lithium niobate crystal modulation depths over 10 are achieved at 1.054 μm and 1 W of radio frequency power. Using this device for the active mode locking of a continuous-wave Nd:glass laser pulses as short as 3.8 ps are produced at a repetition rate of 66 MHz. Limitations of amplitude-modulation mode locking by standing acoustic waves are discussed.

  16. Two-Photon Imaging with Diffractive Optical Elements

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Yuste, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Two-photon imaging has become a useful tool for optical monitoring of neural circuits, but it requires high laser power and serial scanning of each pixel in a sample. This results in slow imaging rates, limiting the measurements of fast signals such as neuronal activity. To improve the speed and signal-to-noise ratio of two-photon imaging, we introduce a simple modification of a two-photon microscope, using a diffractive optical element (DOE) which splits the laser beam into several beamlets that can simultaneously scan the sample. We demonstrate the advantages of DOE scanning by enhancing the speed and sensitivity of two-photon calcium imaging of action potentials in neurons from neocortical brain slices. DOE scanning can easily improve the detection of time-varying signals in two-photon and other non-linear microscopic techniques. PMID:19636390

  17. High-resolution structure of viruses from random diffraction snapshots

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinizadeh, A.; Schwander, P.; Dashti, A.; Fung, R.; D'Souza, R. M.; Ourmazd, A.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has made it possible to record diffraction snapshots of biological entities injected into the X-ray beam before the onset of radiation damage. Algorithmic means must then be used to determine the snapshot orientations and thence the three-dimensional structure of the object. Existing Bayesian approaches are limited in reconstruction resolution typically to 1/10 of the object diameter, with the computational expense increasing as the eighth power of the ratio of diameter to resolution. We present an approach capable of exploiting object symmetries to recover three-dimensional structure to high resolution, and thus reconstruct the structure of the satellite tobacco necrosis virus to atomic level. Our approach offers the highest reconstruction resolution for XFEL snapshots to date and provides a potentially powerful alternative route for analysis of data from crystalline and nano-crystalline objects. PMID:24914154

  18. High-resolution structure of viruses from random diffraction snapshots.

    PubMed

    Hosseinizadeh, A; Schwander, P; Dashti, A; Fung, R; D'Souza, R M; Ourmazd, A

    2014-07-17

    The advent of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has made it possible to record diffraction snapshots of biological entities injected into the X-ray beam before the onset of radiation damage. Algorithmic means must then be used to determine the snapshot orientations and thence the three-dimensional structure of the object. Existing Bayesian approaches are limited in reconstruction resolution typically to 1/10 of the object diameter, with the computational expense increasing as the eighth power of the ratio of diameter to resolution. We present an approach capable of exploiting object symmetries to recover three-dimensional structure to high resolution, and thus reconstruct the structure of the satellite tobacco necrosis virus to atomic level. Our approach offers the highest reconstruction resolution for XFEL snapshots to date and provides a potentially powerful alternative route for analysis of data from crystalline and nano-crystalline objects.

  19. Powder X-ray diffraction laboratory, Reston, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Dulong, Frank T.; Jackson, John C.; Folger, Helen W.

    2014-01-01

    The powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) laboratory is managed jointly by the Eastern Mineral and Environmental Resources and Eastern Energy Resources Science Centers. Laboratory scientists collaborate on a wide variety of research problems involving other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science centers and government agencies, universities, and industry. Capabilities include identification and quantification of crystalline and amorphous phases, and crystallographic and atomic structure analysis for a wide variety of sample media. Customized laboratory procedures and analyses commonly are used to characterize non-routine samples including, but not limited to, organic and inorganic components in petroleum source rocks, ore and mine waste, clay minerals, and glassy phases. Procedures can be adapted to meet a variety of research objectives.

  20. Sub-diffraction Laser Synthesis of Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James I.; Zhou, Nan; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate synthesis of silicon nanowires of tens of nanometers via laser induced chemical vapor deposition. These nanowires with diameters as small as 60 nm are produced by the interference between incident laser radiation and surface scattered radiation within a diffraction limited spot, which causes spatially confined, periodic heating needed for high resolution chemical vapor deposition. By controlling the intensity and polarization direction of the incident radiation, multiple parallel nanowires can be simultaneously synthesized. The nanowires are produced on a dielectric substrate with controlled diameter, length, orientation, and the possibility of in-situ doping, and therefore are ready for device fabrication. Our method offers rapid one-step fabrication of nano-materials and devices unobtainable with previous CVD methods. PMID:24469704

  1. High resolution powder diffraction at HASYLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroblewski, Thomas; Ihringer, Jorg; Maichle, Josef

    1988-04-01

    HASYLAB's beamline F1 was modified for powder diffraction in a triple-axis geometry. The diffractometer consists of two independent circles for θ and 2θ motion on either side of the beam. The θ circle can be translated along its axis. This makes the instrument highly flexible for the installation of different attachments like a cryostat which was used for low temperature measurements on the new high Tc superconductors. Measurements on zeolites demonstrate the excellent resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Novel measuring strategies concerning the use of multiple analyzers, the examination of phase transitions and anomalous dispersion are presented.

  2. Diffractive Scattering and Gauge/String Duality

    ScienceCinema

    Tan, Chung-I

    2018-05-11

    High-energy diffractive scattering will be discussed based on Gauge/String duality. As shown by Brower, Polchinski, Strassler and Tan, the ubiquitous Pomeron emerges naturally in gauge theories with string-theoretical descriptions. Its existence is intimately tied to gluons, and also to the energy-momentum tensor. With a confining dual background metric, the Pomeron can be interpreted as a 'massive graviton'. In a single unified step, both its infrared and ultraviolet properties are dealt with, reflecting confinement and conformal symmetry respectively. An effective field theory for high-energy scattering can be constructed. Applications based on this approach will also be described.

  3. Flexible filamentous virus structure from fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, Gerald; Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele

    2008-10-24

    Fiber diffraction data have been obtained from Narcissus mosaic virus, a potexvirus from the family Flexiviridae, and soybean mosaic virus (SMV), a potyvirus from the family Potyviridae. Analysis of the data in conjunction with cryo-electron microscopy data allowed us to determine the symmetry of the viruses and to make reconstructions of SMV at 19 {angstrom} resolution and of another potexvirus, papaya mosaic virus, at 18 {angstrom} resolution. These data include the first well-ordered data ever obtained for the potyviruses and the best-ordered data from the potexviruses, and offer the promise of eventual high resolution structure determinations.

  4. Reflective diffractive beam splitter for laser interferometers.

    PubMed

    Fahr, Stephan; Clausnitzer, Tina; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-08-20

    The first realization of a reflective 50/50 beam splitter based on a dielectric diffraction grating suitable for high-power laser interferometers is reported. The beam splitter is designed to operate at a wavelength of 1064 nm and in s polarization. To minimize the performance degradation of the device that is due to fabrication fluctuations, during the design process special attention was paid to achieve high fabrication tolerances especially of groove width and depth. Applying this beam splitter to high-power laser interferometers, such as future gravitational wave detectors, will avoid critical thermal lensing effects and allow for the free choice of substrate materials.

  5. Coherent diffractive imaging methods for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein, Patrick; Mochi, Iacopo; Rajeev, Rajendran; Fernandez, Sara; Ekinci, Yasin

    2017-12-01

    The paradigm shift of the semiconductor industry moving from deep ultraviolet to extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) brought about new challenges in the fabrication of illumination and projection optics, which constitute one of the core sources of cost of ownership for many of the metrology tools needed in the lithography process. For this reason, lensless imaging techniques based on coherent diffractive imaging started to raise interest in the EUVL community. This paper presents an overview of currently on-going research endeavors that use a number of methods based on lensless imaging with coherent light.

  6. Aplanatic and quasi-aplanatic diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Hettrick, M.C.

    1987-09-14

    A reflection diffraction grating having a series of transverse minute grooves of progressively varying spacing along a concave surface enables use of such gratings for x-ray or longer wavelength imaging of objects. The variable groove spacing establishes aplanatism or substantially uniform magnetification across the optical aperture. The grating may be sued, for example, in x-ray microscopes or telescopes of the imaging type and in x-ray microprobed. Increased spatial resolution and field of view may be realized in x-ray imaging. 5 figs.

  7. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer grating designs

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan; Tejnil, Edita

    2001-01-01

    In a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer, by sending the zeroth-order diffraction to the reference pinhole of the mask and the first-order diffraction to the test beam window of the mask, the test and reference beam intensities can be balanced and the fringe contrast improved. Additionally, using a duty cycle of the diffraction grating other than 50%, the fringe contrast can also be improved.

  8. On Babinet's principle and diffraction associated with an arbitrary particle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingqiang; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W; Mishchenko, Michael I

    2017-12-01

    Babinet's principle is widely used to compute the diffraction by a particle. However, the diffraction by a 3-D object is not totally the same as that simulated with Babinet's principle. This Letter uses a surface integral equation to exactly formulate the diffraction by an arbitrary particle and illustrate the condition for the applicability of Babinet's principle. The present results may serve to close the debate on the diffraction formalism.

  9. Determination of cellulose crystallinity from powder diffraction diagrams: Powder Diffraction Diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Langan, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Commonly one-dimensional (1D) (spherically averaged) powder diffraction diagrams are used to determine the degree of cellulose crystallinity in biomass samples. Here, it is shown using molecular modeling how disorder in cellulose fibrils can lead to considerable uncertainty in conclusions drawn concerning crystallinity based on 1D powder diffraction data alone. For example, cellulose microfibrils that contain both crystalline and noncrystalline segments can lead to powder diffraction diagrams lacking identifiable peaks, while microfibrils without any crystalline segments can lead to such peaks. Moreover, this leads to false positives, that is, assigning disordered cellulose as crystalline, and false negatives, that is, categorizing fibrilsmore » with crystalline segments as amorphous. Finally, the reliable determination of the fraction of crystallinity in any given biomass sample will require a more sophisticated approach combining detailed experiment and simulation.« less

  10. Light distribution in diffractive multifocal optics and its optimization.

    PubMed

    Portney, Valdemar

    2011-11-01

    To expand a geometrical model of diffraction efficiency and its interpretation to the multifocal optic and to introduce formulas for analysis of far and near light distribution and their application to multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) and to diffraction efficiency optimization. Medical device consulting firm, Newport Coast, California, USA. Experimental study. Application of a geometrical model to the kinoform (single focus diffractive optical element) was expanded to a multifocal optic to produce analytical definitions of light split between far and near images and light loss to other diffraction orders. The geometrical model gave a simple interpretation of light split in a diffractive multifocal IOL. An analytical definition of light split between far, near, and light loss was introduced as curve fitting formulas. Several examples of application to common multifocal diffractive IOLs were developed; for example, to light-split change with wavelength. The analytical definition of diffraction efficiency may assist in optimization of multifocal diffractive optics that minimize light loss. Formulas for analysis of light split between different foci of multifocal diffractive IOLs are useful in interpreting diffraction efficiency dependence on physical characteristics, such as blaze heights of the diffractive grooves and wavelength of light, as well as for optimizing multifocal diffractive optics. Disclosure is found in the footnotes. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. History and development of the apodized diffractive intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Davison, James A; Simpson, Michael J

    2006-05-01

    The ReSTOR intraocular lens presents a unique apodized diffractive design within a refractive foldable acrylic optic, which makes an unprecedented level of mulifocal optical performance available. We describe the history and principles of diffractive optics used in the development of this refractive-diffractive IOL.

  12. A new scheme for velocity analysis and imaging of diffractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng; Peng, Suping; Zhao, Jingtao; Cui, Xiaoqin; Du, Wenfeng

    2018-06-01

    Seismic diffractions are the responses of small-scale inhomogeneities or discontinuous geological features, which play a vital role in the exploitation and development of oil and gas reservoirs. However, diffractions are generally ignored and considered as interference noise in conventional data processing. In this paper, a new scheme for velocity analysis and imaging of seismic diffractions is proposed. Two steps compose of this scheme in our application. First, the plane-wave destruction method is used to separate diffractions from specular reflections in the prestack domain. Second, in order to accurately estimate migration velocity of the diffractions, the time-domain dip-angle gathers are derived from a Kirchhoff-based angle prestack time migration using separated diffractions. Diffraction events appear flat in the dip-angle gathers when imaged above the diffraction point with selected accurate migration velocity for diffractions. The selected migration velocity helps to produce the desired prestack imaging of diffractions. Synthetic and field examples are applied to test the validity of the new scheme. The diffraction imaging results indicate that the proposed scheme for velocity analysis and imaging of diffractions can provide more detailed information about small-scale geologic features for seismic interpretation.

  13. Clifford G. Shull, Neutron Diffraction, Hydrogen Atoms, and Neutron

    Science.gov Websites

    Analysis of NaH and NaD, DOE Technical Report, April 1947 The Diffraction of Neutrons by Crystalline Powders; DOE Technical Report; 1948 Neutron Diffraction Studies, DOE Technical Report, 1948 Laue Structure of Thorium and Zirconium Dihydrides by X-ray and Neutron Diffraction, DOE Technical Report, April

  14. Two-Dimensional Light Diffraction from an EPROM Chip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekkens, Tom

    2018-01-01

    In introductory physics classes, a laser pointer and a compact disc are all the items required to illustrate diffraction of light in a single dimension. If a two-dimensional diffraction pattern is desired, double axis diffraction grating material is available or a CCD sensor can be extracted from an unused electronics device. This article presents…

  15. 76 FR 8785 - ABB Inc.; License Amendment Request for Decommissioning of the ABB Inc., Combustion Engineering...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    .... Electronic Submissions (E-Filing) All documents filed in NRC adjudicatory proceedings, including a request... accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires... requirements of E-FilingFiling, at least ten (10) days prior to the filing deadline, the participant should...

  16. All-optical diffractive/transmissive switch based on coupled cycloidal diffractive waveplates.

    PubMed

    Serak, Svetlana V; Hakobyan, Rafael S; Nersisyan, Sarik R; Tabiryan, Nelson V; White, Timothy J; Bunning, Timothy J; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2012-02-27

    Pairs of cycloidal diffractive waveplates can be used to doubly diffract or collinearly propagate laser radiation of the appropriate wavelength. The use of a dynamic phase retarder placed in between the pair can be utilized to switch between the two optical states. We present results from the implementation of an azo-based retarder whose optical properties can be modulated using light itself. We show fast and efficient switching between the two states for both CW and single nanosecond laser pulses of green radiation. Contrasts greater than 100:1 were achieved. The temporal response as a function of light intensity is presented and the optical switching is shown to be polarization independent.

  17. High diffraction efficiency of three-layer diffractive optics designed for wide temperature range and large incident angle.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shan; Cui, Qingfeng; Piao, Mingxu; Zhao, Lidong

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical model of diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency affected by environment temperature change and incident angle for three-layer diffractive optics with different dispersion materials is put forward, and its effects are analyzed. Taking optical materials N-FK5 and N-SF1 as the substrates of multilayer diffractive optics, the effect on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency with intermediate materials POLYCARB is analyzed with environment temperature change as well as incident angle. Therefore, three-layer diffractive optics can be applied in more wide environmental temperature ranges and larger incident angles for refractive-diffractive hybrid optical systems, which can obtain better image quality. Analysis results can be used to guide the hybrid imaging optical system design for optical engineers.

  18. Metamaterials and Conformal Antenna Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    1.0 MET AMA TERIALS BASED OPTICAL COMPONENTS .............................................. ...... 2 1.1 Superresolution Imaging Using a 3D...several entirely new optical components including superlenses with superresolution imaging, and lenses that achieve superfocussing, using...metamaterials. 1.1 SUPERRESOLUTION IMAGING USING A 3D MET AMA TERIAL NANOLENS Superresolution imaging beyond Abbe’s diffraction limit can be achieved by

  19. Multidataset Refinement Resonant Diffraction, and Magnetic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Attfield, J. Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scope of Rietveld and other powder diffraction refinements continues to expand, driven by improvements in instrumentation, methodology and software. This will be illustrated by examples from our research in recent years. Multidataset refinement is now commonplace; the datasets may be from different detectors, e.g., in a time-of-flight experiment, or from separate experiments, such as at several x-ray energies giving resonant information. The complementary use of x rays and neutrons is exemplified by a recent combined refinement of the monoclinic superstructure of magnetite, Fe3O4, below the 122 K Verwey transition, which reveals evidence for Fe2+/Fe3+ charge ordering. Powder neutron diffraction data continue to be used for the solution and Rietveld refinement of magnetic structures. Time-of-flight instruments on cold neutron sources can produce data that have a high intensity and good resolution at high d-spacings. Such profiles have been used to study incommensurate magnetic structures such as FeAsO4 and β–CrPO4. A multiphase, multidataset refinement of the phase-separated perovskite (Pr0.35Y0.07Th0.04Ca0.04Sr0.5)MnO3 has been used to fit three components with different crystal and magnetic structures at low temperatures. PMID:27366599

  20. Single-electron pulses for ultrafast diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Aidelsburger, M.; Kirchner, F. O.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of atomic-scale structural motion by ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy requires electron packets of shortest duration and highest coherence. We report on the generation and application of single-electron pulses for this purpose. Photoelectric emission from metal surfaces is studied with tunable ultraviolet pulses in the femtosecond regime. The bandwidth, efficiency, coherence, and electron pulse duration are investigated in dependence on excitation wavelength, intensity, and laser bandwidth. At photon energies close to the cathode’s work function, the electron pulse duration shortens significantly and approaches a threshold that is determined by interplay of the optical pulse width and the acceleration field. An optimized choice of laser wavelength and bandwidth results in sub-100-fs electron pulses. We demonstrate single-electron diffraction from polycrystalline diamond films and reveal the favorable influences of matched photon energies on the coherence volume of single-electron wave packets. We discuss the consequences of our findings for the physics of the photoelectric effect and for applications of single-electron pulses in ultrafast 4D imaging of structural dynamics. PMID:21041681

  1. Neutron diffraction studies of viral fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jeremy P.; J. M. Darkes, Malcolm; Katsaras, John; Epand, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    Membrane fusion plays a vital role in a large and diverse number of essential biological processes. Despite this fact, the precise molecular events that occur during fusion are still not known. We are currently engaged on a study of membrane fusion as mediated by viral fusion peptides. These peptides are the N-terminal regions of certain viral envelope proteins that mediate the process of fusion between the viral envelope and the membranes of the host cell during the infection process. As part of this study, we have carried out neutron diffraction measurements at the ILL, BeNSC and Chalk River, on a range of viral fusion peptides. The peptides, from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), influenza A and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), were incorporated into stacked phospholipid bilayers. Some of the peptides had been specifically deuterated at key amino acids. Lamellar diffraction data were collected and analysed to yield information on the peptide conformation, location and orientation relative to the bilayer.

  2. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Del Río, M.; Gutiérrez-León, A.; Castro, G. R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Solís, C.; Sánchez-Hernández, R.; Robles-Camacho, J.; Rojas-Gaytán, J.

    2008-01-01

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few μg of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as añil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue.

  3. Diffraction of electrons at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascolani, H.; Barrachina, R. O.; Guraya, M. M.; Zampieri, G.

    1992-08-01

    We present a theory of the elastic scattering of electrons from crystalline surfaces that contains both low-energy-electron-diffraction (LEED) effects at low energies and x-ray-photoelectron- and Auger-electron-diffraction (XPD/AED) effects at intermediate energies. The theory is based on a cluster-type approach to the scattering problem and includes temperature effects. The transition from one regime to the other may be explained as follows: At low energies all the scattered waves add coherently, and the intensity is dominated by LEED effects. At intermediate energies the thermal vibration of the atoms destroys the long-range coherency responsible for the LEED peaks, but affects little the interference of those waves that share parts of their paths inside the solid. Thus, the interference of these waves comes to dominate the intensity, giving rise to structures similar to those observed in XPD/AED experiments. We perform a calculation of the elastic reflection of electrons from Cu(001) that is in good agreement with the experiment in the range 200-1500 eV. At low energies the intensity is dominated by LEED peaks; at 400 eV LEED peaks and XPD/AED structures coexist; and above this energy the intensity is dominated by the latter. We analyze the contributions to the intensity at intermediate energies of the interferences in the incoming and outgoing parts of the electron path.

  4. Diffraction effects in mechanically chopped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambhir, Samridhi; Singh, Mandip

    2018-06-01

    A mechanical beam chopper consists of a rotating disc of regularly spaced wide slits which allow light to pass through them. A continuous light beam, after passing through the rotating disc, is switched-on and switched-off periodically, and a series of optical pulses are produced. The intensity of each pulse is expected to rise and fall smoothly with time. However, a careful study has revealed that the edges of mechanically chopped laser light pulses consist of periodic intensity undulations which can be detected with a photo detector. In this paper, it is shown that the intensity undulations in mechanically chopped laser pulses are produced by diffraction of light from the rotating disc, and a detailed explanation is given of the intensity undulations in mechanically chopped laser pulses. An experiment presented in this paper provides an efficient method to capture a one dimensional diffraction profile of light from a straight sharp-edge in the time domain. In addition, the experiment accurately measures wavelengths of three different laser beams from the undulations in mechanically chopped laser light pulses.

  5. Unraveling protein catalysis through neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Dean

    Neutron scattering and diffraction are exquisitely sensitive to the location, concentration and dynamics of hydrogen atoms in materials and provide a powerful tool for the characterization of structure-function and interfacial relationships in biological systems. Modern neutron scattering facilities offer access to a sophisticated, non-destructive suite of instruments for biophysical characterization that provide spatial and dynamic information spanning from Angstroms to microns and from picoseconds to microseconds, respectively. Applications range from atomic-resolution analysis of individual hydrogen atoms in enzymes, through to multi-scale analysis of hierarchical structures and assemblies in biological complexes, membranes and in living cells. Here we describe how the precise location of protein and water hydrogen atoms using neutron diffraction provides a more complete description of the atomic and electronic structures of proteins, enabling key questions concerning enzyme reaction mechanisms, molecular recognition and binding and protein-water interactions to be addressed. Current work is focused on understanding how molecular structure and dynamics control function in photosynthetic, cell signaling and DNA repair proteins. We will highlight recent studies that provide detailed understanding of the physiochemical mechanisms through which proteins recognize ligands and catalyze reactions, and help to define and understand the key principles involved.

  6. Diffraction in neutron imaging-A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woracek, Robin; Santisteban, Javier; Fedrigo, Anna; Strobl, Markus

    2018-01-01

    Neutron imaging is a highly successful experimental technique ever since adequate neutron sources were available. In general, neutron imaging is performed with a wide wavelength spectrum for best flux conditions in transmission geometry. Neutrons provide outstanding features in the penetration of many structural materials, which often makes them more suited for bulk sample studies than other forms of radiation, often in particular as they are also highly sensitive to some light elements, especially Hydrogen. In contrast to neutron scattering applications, imaging resolves macroscopic structures, nowadays down to, in the best case, below 10 micrometre, directly in real space. However, since more than a decade there is a growing number of techniques and applications in neutron imaging that - supported by powerful neutron sources - are taking advantage of wavelength resolved measurements. In this review we summarize and discuss this outstanding development and how wavelength resolved transmission neutron imaging is successfully exploiting diffraction mechanisms to access crystal structure information in the Angstrom regime, which conventionally is probed in reciprocal space by diffraction techniques. In particular the combination of information gained in real space and on crystallographic length scales makes this neutron imaging technique a valuable tool for a wide range of new applications, while it also qualifies neutron imaging to fully profit from the new generation of powerful pulsed neutron sources.

  7. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    2000-01-01

    , the limited spatial resolution and the methods required for data reduction suggest that a more useful instrument needs to be developed. The category of interferometers known as common path interferometers can eliminate much of the vibration sensitivity associated with traditional interferometry as described above. In these devices, division of the amplitude of the wavefront following the test section produces the reference beam. Examples of these instruments include shearing and point diffraction interferometers. In the latter case, shown schematically, a lens focuses light passing through the test section onto a small diffracting object. Such objects are typically either a circle of material on a high quality glass plate or a small sphere in a glass cell. The size of the focused spot is several times larger than the object so that the light not intercepted by the diffracting object forms the test beam while the diffracted light generates a spherical reference beam. While this configuration is mechanically stable, phase shifting one beam with respect to the other is difficult due to the common path. Phase shifting enables extremely accurate measurements of the phase of the interferogram using only gray scale intensity measurements and is the de facto standard of industry. Mercer and Creath 2 demonstrated phase shifting in a point diffraction interferometer using a spherical spacer in a liquid crystal cell as the diffracting object. By changing the voltage across the cell, they were able to shift the phase of the undiffracted beam relative to the reference beam generated by diffraction from the sphere. While they applied this technology to fluid measurements, the device shifted phase so slowly that it was not useful for studying transient phenomena. We have identified several technical problems that precluded operation of the device at video frame rates and intend to solve them to produce a phase-shifting liquid crystal point-diffraction interferometer operating at

  8. Analysis of limited-diffractive and limited-dispersive X-waves generated by finite radial waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuscaldo, Walter; Pavone, Santi C.; Valerio, Guido; Galli, Alessandro; Albani, Matteo; Ettorre, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we analyze the spatial and temporal features of electromagnetic X-waves propagating in free space and generated by planar radiating apertures. The performance of ideal X-waves is discussed and compared to practical cases where the important effects related to the finiteness of the radiating aperture and the wavenumber dispersion are taken into account. In particular, a practical device consisting of a radial waveguide loaded with radiating slots aligned along a spiral path is considered for the practical case in the millimeter-wave range. A common mathematical framework is defined for a precise comparison of the spatiotemporal properties and focusing capabilities of the generated X-wave. It is clearly shown that the fractional bandwidth of the radiating aperture has a key role in the longitudinal confinement of an X-wave in both ideal and practical cases. In addition, the finiteness of the radiating aperture as well as the wavenumber dispersion clearly affect both the transverse and the longitudinal profiles of the generated radiation as it travels beyond the depth-of-field of the generated X-wave. Nevertheless, the spatiotemporal properties of the X-wave are preserved even in this "dispersive-finite" case within a defined region and duration related to the nondiffractive range and fractional bandwidth of the spectral components of the generated X-wave. The proposed analysis may open new perspectives for the efficient generation of X-waves over finite radiating apertures at millimeter waves where the dispersive behavior of realistic devices is no longer negligible.

  9. Optical-diffraction method for determining crystal orientation

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1982-05-07

    Disclosed is an optical diffraction technique for characterizing the three-dimensional orientation of a crystal sample. An arbitrary surface of the crystal sample is texture etched so as to generate a pseudo-periodic diffraction grating on the surface. A laser light beam is then directed onto the etched surface, and the reflected light forms a farfield diffraction pattern in reflection. Parameters of the diffraction pattern, such as the geometry and angular dispersion of the diffracted beam are then related to grating shape of the etched surface which is in turn related to crystal orientation. This technique may be used for examining polycrystalline silicon for use in solar cells.

  10. Diffraction of V-point singularities through triangular apertures.

    PubMed

    Ram, B S Bhargava; Sharma, Anurag; Senthilkumaran, P

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we present experimental studies on diffraction of V-point singularities through equilateral and isosceles right triangular apertures. When V-point index, also called Poincare-Hopf index (η), of the optical field is +1, the diffraction disintegrates it into two monstars/lemons. When V-point index η is -1, diffraction produces two stars. The diffraction pattern, unlike phase singularity, is insensitive to polarity of the polarization singularity and the intensity pattern remains invariant. Higher order V-point singularities are generated using Sagnac interferometer and it is observed that the diffraction disintegrates them into lower order C-points.

  11. Near-Field Diffraction Imaging from Multiple Detection Planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loetgering, L.; Golembusch, M.; Hammoud, R.; Wilhein, T.

    2017-06-01

    We present diffraction imaging results obtained from multiple near-field diffraction constraints. An iterative phase retrieval algorithm was implemented that uses data redundancy achieved by measuring near-field diffraction intensities at various sample-detector distances. The procedure allows for reconstructing the exit surface wave of a sample within a multiple constraint satisfaction framework neither making use of a priori knowledge as enforced in coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) nor exact scanning grid knowledge as required in ptychography. We also investigate the potential of the presented technique to deal with polychromatic radiation as important for potential application in diffraction imaging by means of tabletop EUV and X-ray sources.

  12. IOTA: integration optimization, triage and analysis tool for the processing of XFEL diffraction images.

    PubMed

    Lyubimov, Artem Y; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B; Brewster, Aaron S; Murray, Thomas D; Sauter, Nicholas K; Berger, James M; Weis, William I; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-06-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) uses an X-ray free-electron laser to extract diffraction data from crystals not amenable to conventional X-ray light sources owing to their small size or radiation sensitivity. However, a limitation of SFX is the high variability of the diffraction images that are obtained. As a result, it is often difficult to determine optimal indexing and integration parameters for the individual diffraction images. Presented here is a software package, called IOTA , which uses a grid-search technique to determine optimal spot-finding parameters that can in turn affect the success of indexing and the quality of integration on an image-by-image basis. Integration results can be filtered using a priori information about the Bravais lattice and unit-cell dimensions and analyzed for unit-cell isomorphism, facilitating an improvement in subsequent data-processing steps.

  13. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stefano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11–13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy. PMID:20368463

  14. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; ...

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  15. Diffractive Optical Analysis for Refractive Index Sensing using Transparent Phase Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Nityanand; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    We report the implementation of a micro-patterned, glass-based photonic sensing element that is capable of label-free biosensing. The diffractive optical analyzer is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk as well as surface refractive index changes. The differential read-out suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6 × 10−7 was achieved with this technique with scope for further improvement. PMID:26578408

  16. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; ...

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore » resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  17. Age Limits.

    PubMed

    Antfolk, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men-regardless of their age-have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes' age preferences is resolved according to women's preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years). Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men's age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men's sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  18. Inclusive transverse momentum distributions of charged particles in diffractive and non-diffractive photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Romeo, G. Cara; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Garcia, Y. Zamora; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Norman, D. J. P.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarębska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zając, J.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Große-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, L.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mańczak, O.; Monteiro, T.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Surrow, B.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zhou, J. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Kharchilava, A.; Leich, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Wulff, N.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Freidhof, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, J. I.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Mainusch, J.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. Y. H.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P. O.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Blair, G. A.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Daniels, D.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Luffman, P. E.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Schwarzer, O.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchula, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Ali, I.; Badgett, W. F.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Cardy, M. L.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1995-06-01

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of charged particles in photoproduction events in the laboratory pseudorapidity range -1.2<η<1.4 have been measured up to p T =8 GeV usign the ZEUS detector. Diffractive and non-diffractive reactions have been selected with an average γ p centre of mass (c.m.) energy of < W>=180 GeV. For diffractive reactions, the p T spectra of the photon dissociation events have been measured in two intervals of the dissociated photon mass with mean values < M X >=5 GeV and 10 GeV. The inclusive transverse momentum spectra fall exponentially in the low p T region. The non-diffractive data show a pronounced high p T tail departing from the exponential shape. The p T distributions are compared to lower energy photoproduction data and to hadron-hadron collisions at a similar c.m. energy. The data are also compared to the results of a next-to-leading order QCD calculation.

  19. Imaging spectroscopy using embedded diffractive optical arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Hinnrichs, Bradford

    2017-09-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed an infrared hyperspectral camera based on diffractive optic arrays. This approach to hyperspectral imaging has been demonstrated in all three infrared bands SWIR, MWIR and LWIR. The hyperspectral optical system has been integrated into the cold-shield of the sensor enabling the small size and weight of this infrared hyperspectral sensor. This new and innovative approach to an infrared hyperspectral imaging spectrometer uses micro-optics that are made up of an area array of diffractive optical elements where each element is tuned to image a different spectral region on a common focal plane array. The lenslet array is embedded in the cold-shield of the sensor and actuated with a miniature piezo-electric motor. This approach enables rapid infrared spectral imaging with multiple spectral images collected and processed simultaneously each frame of the camera. This paper will present our optical mechanical design approach which results in an infrared hyper-spectral imaging system that is small enough for a payload on a small satellite, mini-UAV, commercial quadcopter or man portable. Also, an application of how this spectral imaging technology can easily be used to quantify the mass and volume flow rates of hydrocarbon gases. The diffractive optical elements used in the lenslet array are blazed gratings where each lenslet is tuned for a different spectral bandpass. The lenslets are configured in an area array placed a few millimeters above the focal plane and embedded in the cold-shield to reduce the background signal normally associated with the optics. The detector array is divided into sub-images covered by each lenslet. We have developed various systems using a different number of lenslets in the area array. Depending on the size of the focal plane and the diameter of the lenslet array will determine the number of simultaneous different spectral images collected each frame of the camera. A 2 x 2 lenslet array will image

  20. Astrophysical targets of the Fresnel diffractive imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koechlin, L.; Deba, P.; Raksasataya, T.

    2017-11-01

    The Fresnel Diffractive imager is an innovative concept of distributed space telescope, for high resolution (milli arc-seconds) spectro-imaging in the IR, visible and UV domains. This paper presents its optical principle and the science that can be done on potential astrophysical targets. The novelty lies in the primary optics: a binary Fresnel array, akin to a binary Fresnel zone plate. The main interest of this approach is the relaxed manufacturing and positioning constraints. While having the resolution and imaging capabilities of lens or mirrors of equivalent size, no optical material is involved in the focusing process: just vacuum. A Fresnel array consists of millions void subapertures punched into a large and thin opaque membrane, that focus light by diffraction into a compact and highly contrasted image. The positioning law of the aperture edges drives the image quality and contrast. This optical concept allows larger and lighter apertures than solid state optics, aiming to high angular resolution and high dynamic range imaging, in particular for UV applications. Diffraction focusing implies very long focal distances, up to dozens of kilometers, which requires at least a two-vessel formation flying in space. The first spacecraft, "the Fresnel Array spacecraft", holds the large punched foil: the Fresnel Array. The second, the "Receiver spacecraft" holds the field optics and focal instrumentation. A chromatism correction feature enables moderately large (20%) relative wavebands, and fields of a few to a dozen arc seconds. This Fresnel imager is adapted to high contrast stellar environments: dust disks, close companions and (we hope) exoplanets. Specific to the particular grid-like pattern of the primary focusing zone plate, is the very high dynamic range achieved in the images, in the case of compact objects. Large stellar photospheres may also be mapped with Fresnel arrays of a few meters opertaing in the UV. Larger and more complex fields can be imaged with

  1. Diffractive elements for generating microscale laser beam patterns: a Y2K problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teiwes, Stephan; Krueger, Sven; Wernicke, Guenther K.; Ferstl, Margit

    2000-03-01

    Lasers are widely used in industrial fabrication for engraving, cutting and many other purposes. However, material processing at very small scales is still a matter of concern. Advances in diffractive optics could provide for laser systems that could be used for engraving or cutting of micro-scale patterns at high speeds. In our paper we focus on the design of diffractive elements which can be used for this special application. It is a common desire in material processing to apply 'discrete' as well as 'continuous' beam patterns. Especially, the latter case is difficult to handle as typical micro-scale patterns are characterized by bad band-limitation properties, and as speckles can easily occur in beam patterns. It is shown in this paper that a standard iterative design method usually fails to obtain diffractive elements that generate diffraction patterns with acceptable quality. Insights gained from an analysis of the design problems are used to optimize the iterative design method. We demonstrate applicability and success of our approach by the design of diffractive phase elements that generate a discrete and a continuous 'Y2K' pattern.

  2. Diffraction-based analysis of tunnel size for a scaled external occulter testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirbu, Dan; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2016-07-01

    For performance verification of an external occulter mask (also called a starshade), scaled testbeds have been developed to measure the suppression of the occulter shadow in the pupil plane and contrast in the image plane. For occulter experiments the scaling is typically performed by maintaining an equivalent Fresnel number. The original Princeton occulter testbed was oversized with respect to both input beam and shadow propagation to limit any diffraction effects due to finite testbed enclosure edges; however, to operate at realistic space-mission equivalent Fresnel numbers an extended testbed is currently under construction. With the longer propagation distances involved, diffraction effects due to the edge of the tunnel must now be considered in the experiment design. Here, we present a diffraction-based model of two separate tunnel effects. First, we consider the effect of tunnel-edge induced diffraction ringing upstream from the occulter mask. Second, we consider the diffraction effect due to clipping of the output shadow by the tunnel downstream from the occulter mask. These calculations are performed for a representative point design relevant to the new Princeton occulter experiment, but we also present an analytical relation that can be used for other propagation distances.

  3. Imaging whole Escherichia coli bacteria by using single-particle x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jianwei; Hodgson, Keith O.; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Legros, Mark A.; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    We report the first experimental recording, to our knowledge, of the diffraction pattern from intact Escherichia coli bacteria using coherent x-rays with a wavelength of 2 Å. By using the oversampling phasing method, a real space image at a resolution of 30 nm was directly reconstructed from the diffraction pattern. An R factor used for characterizing the quality of the reconstruction was in the range of 5%, which demonstrated the reliability of the reconstruction process. The distribution of proteins inside the bacteria labeled with manganese oxide has been identified and this distribution confirmed by fluorescence microscopy images. Compared with lens-based microscopy, this diffraction-based imaging approach can examine thicker samples, such as whole cultured cells, in three dimensions with resolution limited only by radiation damage. Looking forward, the successful recording and reconstruction of diffraction patterns from biological samples reported here represent an important step toward the potential of imaging single biomolecules at near-atomic resolution by combining single-particle diffraction with x-ray free electron lasers.

  4. Improving the diffraction of apoA-IV crystals through extreme dehydration.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaodi; Davidson, W Sean; Thompson, Thomas B

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoproteins are the protein component of high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which are necessary for mobilizing lipid-like molecules throughout the body. Apolipoproteins undergo self-association, especially at higher concentrations, making them difficult to crystallize. Here, the crystallization and diffraction of the core fragment of apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV), consisting of residues 64-335, is presented. ApoA-IV(64-335) crystallized readily in a variety of hexagonal (P6) morphologies with similar unit-cell parameters, all containing a long axis of nearly 550 Å in length. Preliminary diffraction experiments with the different crystal morphologies all resulted in limited streaky diffraction to 3.5 Å resolution. Crystal dehydration was applied to the different morphologies with variable success and was also used as a quality indicator of crystal-growth conditions. The results show that the morphologies that withstood the most extreme dehydration conditions showed the greatest improvement in diffraction. One morphology in particular was able to withstand dehydration in 60% PEG 3350 for over 12 h, which resulted in well defined intensities to 2.7 Å resolution. These results suggest that the approach of integrating dehydration with variation in crystal-growth conditions might be a general technique to optimize diffraction. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography. All rights reserved.

  5. Amplitude image processing by diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, Manuel P; Valle, Pedro J; Canales, V F

    2016-02-22

    In contrast to the standard digital image processing, which operates over the detected image intensity, we propose to perform amplitude image processing. Amplitude processing, like low pass or high pass filtering, is carried out using diffractive optics elements (DOE) since it allows to operate over the field complex amplitude before it has been detected. We show the procedure for designing the DOE that corresponds to each operation. Furthermore, we accomplish an analysis of amplitude image processing performances. In particular, a DOE Laplacian filter is applied to simulated astronomical images for detecting two stars one Airy ring apart. We also check by numerical simulations that the use of a Laplacian amplitude filter produces less noisy images than the standard digital image processing.

  6. Circular common-path point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongzhao; Feng, Guoying; Li, Hongru; Vargas, J; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2012-10-01

    A simple and compact point-diffraction interferometer with circular common-path geometry configuration is developed. The interferometer is constructed by a beam-splitter, two reflection mirrors, and a telescope system composed by two lenses. The signal and reference waves travel along the same path. Furthermore, an opaque mask containing a reference pinhole and a test object holder or test window is positioned in the common focal plane of the telescope system. The object wave is divided into two beams that take opposite paths along the interferometer. The reference wave is filtered by the reference pinhole, while the signal wave is transmitted through the object holder. The reference and signal waves are combined again in the beam-splitter and their interference is imaged in the CCD. The new design is compact, vibration insensitive, and suitable for the measurement of moving objects or dynamic processes.

  7. Coherent diffractive imaging using randomly coded masks

    DOE PAGES

    Seaberg, Matthew H.; d'Aspremont, Alexandre; Turner, Joshua J.

    2015-12-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an extension to coherent diffractive imaging that encodes additional information through the use of a series of randomly coded masks, removing the need for typical object-domain constraints while guaranteeing a unique solution to the phase retrieval problem. Phase retrieval is performed using a numerical convex relaxation routine known as “PhaseCut,” an iterative algorithm known for its stability and for its ability to find the global solution, which can be found efficiently and which is robust to noise. As a result, the experiment is performed using a laser diode at 532.2 nm, enabling rapid prototyping for future X-raymore » synchrotron and even free electron laser experiments.« less

  8. Laser diffraction of acicular particles: practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, David M.; Matsuyama, Tatsushi

    2014-08-01

    Commercial laser diffraction instruments are widely used to measure particle size distribution (PSD), but the results are distorted for non-spherical (acicular) particles often encountered in practical applications. Consequently the distribution, which is reported in terms of equivalent spherical diameter, requires interpretation. For rod-like and plate-like particles, the PSD tends to be bi-modal, with the two modal sizes closely related to the median length and width, or width and thickness, of the particles. Furthermore, it is found that the bi-modal PSD for at least one instrument can typically be approximated by a bi-lognormal distribution. By fitting such a function to the reported distribution, one may extract quantitative information useful for process or product development. This approach is illustrated by examples of such measurement on industrial samples of polymer particles, crystals, bacteria, and clays.

  9. Imaging scatterer planes by photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelmann-Eggebert, M.

    1997-04-01

    A novel direct crystallographic method CHRISDA (combined holographic real-space imaging by superimposed dimer function algorithm) is proposed which permits an assessment of the near-surface structure of a solid sample by analysis of a single core-level photoemission or Auger emission diffraction pattern (XPD or AED) recorded over the hemisphere of electron escape angles. Combining the elements of holography and real-space triangulation, the approach achieves a high spatial resolution (≈0.1 Å) and requires a knowledge of only a few non-structural parameters. To demonstrate the experimental efficacy of CHRISDA, a Sn film deposited on a CdTe(111) substrate is analyzed and yields the diamond structure characteristic of α-Sn.

  10. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  11. 2010 Diffraction Methods in Structural Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ana Gonzalez

    2011-03-10

    Advances in basic methodologies have played a major role in the dramatic progress in macromolecular crystallography over the past decade, both in terms of overall productivity and in the increasing complexity of the systems being successfully tackled. The 2010 Gordon Research Conference on Diffraction Methods in Structural Biology will, as in the past, focus on the most recent developments in methodology, covering all aspects of the process from crystallization to model building and refinement, complemented by examples of structural highlights and complementary methods. Extensive discussion will be encouraged and it is hoped that all attendees will participate by giving oralmore » or poster presentations, the latter using the excellent poster display area available at Bates College. The relatively small size and informal atmosphere of the meeting provides an excellent opportunity for all participants, especially younger scientists, to meet and exchange ideas with leading methods developers.« less

  12. Coherent diffractive imaging using randomly coded masks

    SciTech Connect

    Seaberg, Matthew H., E-mail: seaberg@slac.stanford.edu; Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025; D'Aspremont, Alexandre

    2015-12-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an extension to coherent diffractive imaging that encodes additional information through the use of a series of randomly coded masks, removing the need for typical object-domain constraints while guaranteeing a unique solution to the phase retrieval problem. Phase retrieval is performed using a numerical convex relaxation routine known as “PhaseCut,” an iterative algorithm known for its stability and for its ability to find the global solution, which can be found efficiently and which is robust to noise. The experiment is performed using a laser diode at 532.2 nm, enabling rapid prototyping for future X-ray synchrotron and even freemore » electron laser experiments.« less

  13. Tailored multivariate analysis for modulated enhanced diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Caliandro, Rocco; Guccione, Pietro; Nico, Giovanni

    2015-10-21

    Modulated enhanced diffraction (MED) is a technique allowing the dynamic structural characterization of crystalline materials subjected to an external stimulus, which is particularly suited forin situandoperandostructural investigations at synchrotron sources. Contributions from the (active) part of the crystal system that varies synchronously with the stimulus can be extracted by an offline analysis, which can only be applied in the case of periodic stimuli and linear system responses. In this paper a new decomposition approach based on multivariate analysis is proposed. The standard principal component analysis (PCA) is adapted to treat MED data: specific figures of merit based on their scoresmore » and loadings are found, and the directions of the principal components obtained by PCA are modified to maximize such figures of merit. As a result, a general method to decompose MED data, called optimum constrained components rotation (OCCR), is developed, which produces very precise results on simulated data, even in the case of nonperiodic stimuli and/or nonlinear responses. The multivariate analysis approach is able to supply in one shot both the diffraction pattern related to the active atoms (through the OCCR loadings) and the time dependence of the system response (through the OCCR scores). When applied to real data, OCCR was able to supply only the latter information, as the former was hindered by changes in abundances of different crystal phases, which occurred besides structural variations in the specific case considered. To develop a decomposition procedure able to cope with this combined effect represents the next challenge in MED analysis.« less

  14. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI is provided. The dual-domain PS/PDI combines the separate noise-suppression capabilities of the widely-used phase-shifting and Fourier-transform fringe pattern analysis methods. The dual-domain PS/PDI relies on both a more restrictive implementation of the image plane PS/PDI mask and a new analysis method to be applied to the interferograms generated and recorded by the modified PS/PDI. The more restrictive PS/PDI mask guarantees the elimination of spatial-frequency crosstalk between the signal and the scattered-light noise arising from scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam. The new dual-domain analysis method is then used to eliminate scattered-light noise arising from both the scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam and the scattered-reference-light interfering with the "true" pinhole-diffracted reference light. The dual-domain analysis method has also been demonstrated to provide performance enhancement when using the non-optimized standard PS/PDI design. The dual-domain PS/PDI is essentially a three-tiered filtering system composed of lowpass spatial-filtering the test-beam electric field using the more restrictive PS/PDI mask, bandpass spatial-filtering the individual interferogram irradiance frames making up the phase-shifting series, and bandpass temporal-filtering the phase-shifting series as a whole.

  15. Tailored multivariate analysis for modulated enhanced diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Caliandro, Rocco; Guccione, Pietro; Nico, Giovanni; ...

    2015-10-21

    Modulated enhanced diffraction (MED) is a technique allowing the dynamic structural characterization of crystalline materials subjected to an external stimulus, which is particularly suited forin situandoperandostructural investigations at synchrotron sources. Contributions from the (active) part of the crystal system that varies synchronously with the stimulus can be extracted by an offline analysis, which can only be applied in the case of periodic stimuli and linear system responses. In this paper a new decomposition approach based on multivariate analysis is proposed. The standard principal component analysis (PCA) is adapted to treat MED data: specific figures of merit based on their scoresmore » and loadings are found, and the directions of the principal components obtained by PCA are modified to maximize such figures of merit. As a result, a general method to decompose MED data, called optimum constrained components rotation (OCCR), is developed, which produces very precise results on simulated data, even in the case of nonperiodic stimuli and/or nonlinear responses. Furthermore, the multivariate analysis approach is able to supply in one shot both the diffraction pattern related to the active atoms (through the OCCR loadings) and the time dependence of the system response (through the OCCR scores). Furthermore, when applied to real data, OCCR was able to supply only the latter information, as the former was hindered by changes in abundances of different crystal phases, which occurred besides structural variations in the specific case considered. In order to develop a decomposition procedure able to cope with this combined effect represents the next challenge in MED analysis.« less

  16. Flat liquid crystal diffractive lenses with variable focus and magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, Pouria

    Non-mechanical variable lenses are important for creating compact imaging devices. Various methods employing dielectrically actuated lenses, membrane lenses, and liquid crystal lenses were previously proposed [1-4]. In This dissertation the design, fabrication, and characterization of innovative flat tunable-focus liquid crystal diffractive lenses (LCDL) are presented. LCDL employ binary Fresnel zone electrodes fabricated on Indium-Tin-Oxide using conventional micro-photolithography. The light phase can be adjusted by varying the effective refractive index of a nematic liquid crystal sandwiched between the electrodes and a reference substrate. Using a proper voltage distribution across various electrodes the focal length can be changed between several discrete values. Electrodes are shunted such that the correct phase retardation step sequence is achieved. If the number of 2pi zone boundaries is increased by a factor of m the focal length is changed from f to f/m based on the digitized Fresnel zone equation: f = rm2/2mlambda, where r m is mth zone radius, and lambda is the wavelength. The chromatic aberration of the diffractive lens is addressed and corrected by adding a variable fluidic lens. These LCDL operate at very low voltage levels (+/-2.5V ac input), exhibit fast switching times (20-150 ms), can have large apertures (>10 mm), and small form factor, and are robust and insensitive to vibrations, gravity, and capillary effects that limit membrane and dielectrically actuated lenses. Several tests were performed on the LCDL including diffraction efficiency measurement, switching dynamics, and hybrid imaging with a refractive lens. Negative focal lengths are achieved by adjusting the voltages across electrodes. Using these lenses in combination, magnification can be changed and zoom lenses can be formed. These characteristics make LCDL a good candidate for a variety of applications including auto-focus and zoom lenses in compact imaging devices such as camera

  17. Soft X-ray Foucault test: A path to diffraction-limited imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray-Chaudhuri, A. K.; Ng, W.; Liang, S.; Cerrina, F.

    1994-08-01

    We present the development of a soft X-ray Foucault test capable of characterizing the imaging properties of a soft X-ray optical system at its operational wavelength and its operational configuration. This optical test enables direct visual inspection of imaging aberrations and provides real-time feedback for the alignment of high resolution soft X-ray optical systems. A first application of this optical test was carried out on a Mo-Si multilayer-coated Schwarzschild objective as part of the MAXIMUM project. Results from the alignment procedure are presented as well as the possibility for testing in the hard X-ray regime.

  18. Space infrared telescope facility wide field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, G. G.

    1986-01-01

    IRAC focal plane detector technology was developed and studies of alternate focal plane configurations were supported. While any of the alternate focal planes under consideration would have a major impact on the Infrared Array Camera, it was possible to proceed with detector development and optical analysis research based on the proposed design since, to a large degree, the studies undertaken are generic to any SIRTF imaging instrument. Development of the proposed instrument was also important in a situation in which none of the alternate configurations has received the approval of the Science Working Group.

  19. Localization of atomic excitation beyond the diffraction limit using electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, J. A.; Das, Diptaranjan; Simmons, Z. J.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the localization of excitation between hyperfine ground states of 87Rb atoms to as small as λ /13 -wide spatial regions. We use ultracold atoms trapped in a dipole trap and utilize electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for the atomic excitation. The localization is achieved by combining a spatially varying coupling laser (standing wave) with the intensity dependence of EIT. The excitation is fast (150 ns laser pulses) and the dark-state fidelity can be made higher than 94% throughout the standing wave. Because the width of the localized regions is much smaller than the wavelength of the driving light, traditional optical imaging techniques cannot resolve the localized features. Therefore, to measure the excitation profile, we use an autocorrelation-like method where we perform two EIT sequences separated by a time delay, during which we move the standing wave.

  20. Spatiotemporal Imaging of Magnetization Dynamics at the Nanoscale: Breaking the Diffraction Limit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-09

    modulations frequency. In the future under our new AFOSR contract, we plan to fabricate a new generation of devices with appropriate impedance match to a...quantitatively extract relevant thermal parameters from our experiment including the temperature change and the magnto- thermoelectric coefficient. Response

  1. Super-Diffraction Limited Measurements through the Turbulent Atmosphere by Speckle Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-22

    independently confirmed by a submotion in the residuals to spectroscopically obtained radial velocities of the system. / (3) Atmospheric Turbulence Studies ...spectroscopically obtained radial velocities 1. (3) Atmospheric Turbulence Studies - The very extensive data accumu- lated under this project at the two... studies . I B. RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS 1. Observing Opportunities Observing time on the 1.8-meter telescope was provided by the Lowell Observatory3 on a

  2. Fabrication of sub-diffraction-limit molecular structures by scanning near-field photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducker, Robert E.; Montague, Matthew T.; Sun, Shuqing; Leggett, Graham J.

    2007-09-01

    Using a scanning near-field optical microscope coupled to a UV laser, an approach we term scanning near-field photolithography (SNP), structures as small as 9 nm (ca. λ/30) may be fabricated in self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on gold surfaces. Selective exposure of the adsorbate molecules in the near field leads to photoconversion of the alkylthiolate to a weakly bound alkylsulfonate which may be displaced readily be a contrasting thiol, leading to a chemical pattern, or used as a resist for the selective etching of the underlying metal. A novel ultra-mild etch for gold is reported, and used to etch structures as small as 9 nm. Photopatterning of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) terminated selfassembled monolayers facilitates the fabrication of biomolecular nanostructures. Selective removal of the protein-resistant OEG terminated adsorbates created regions that may be functionalized with a second thiol and derivatized with a biomolecule. Finally, the application of SNP to nanopatterning on oxide surfaces is demonstrated. Selective exposure of monolayers of phosphonic acids adsorbed onto aluminum oxide leads to cleavage of the P-C bond and desorption of the adsorbate molecule. Subsequent etching, using aqueous based, yields structures as small as 100 nm.

  3. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: new algorithms for sparse patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, Aaron S.; Sawaya, Michael R.; University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570

    2015-02-01

    Special methods are required to interpret sparse diffraction patterns collected from peptide crystals at X-ray free-electron lasers. Bragg spots can be indexed from composite-image powder rings, with crystal orientations then deduced from a very limited number of spot positions. Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of the Computational Crystallography Toolbox (cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data setmore » from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patterns with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented.« less

  4. The Scherrer equation and the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Francisco Tiago Leitão; Miranda, Marcus Aurélio Ribeiro; Morilla Dos Santos, Cássio; Sasaki, José Marcos

    2016-05-01

    The Scherrer equation is a widely used tool to determine the crystallite size of polycrystalline samples. However, it is not clear if one can apply it to large crystallite sizes because its derivation is based on the kinematical theory of X-ray diffraction. For large and perfect crystals, it is more appropriate to use the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. Because of the appearance of polycrystalline materials with a high degree of crystalline perfection and large sizes, it is the authors' belief that it is important to establish the crystallite size limit for which the Scherrer equation can be applied. In this work, the diffraction peak profiles are calculated using the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction for several Bragg reflections and crystallite sizes for Si, LaB6 and CeO2. The full width at half-maximum is then extracted and the crystallite size is computed using the Scherrer equation. It is shown that for crystals with linear absorption coefficients below 2117.3 cm(-1) the Scherrer equation is valid for crystallites with sizes up to 600 nm. It is also shown that as the size increases only the peaks at higher 2θ angles give good results, and if one uses peaks with 2θ > 60° the limit for use of the Scherrer equation would go up to 1 µm.

  5. Microscale optical cryptography using a subdiffraction-limit optical key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Yusuke; Aino, Masahiko; Tanida, Jun

    2018-04-01

    We present microscale optical cryptography using a subdiffraction-limit optical pattern, which is finer than the diffraction-limit size of the decrypting optical system, as a key and a substrate with a reflectance distribution as an encrypted image. Because of the subdiffraction-limit spatial coding, this method enables us to construct a secret image with the diffraction-limit resolution. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate, both qualitatively and quantitatively, that the secret image becomes recognizable when and only when the substrate is illuminated with the designed key pattern.

  6. Experiences with making diffraction image data available: what metadata do we need to archive?

    SciTech Connect

    Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J., E-mail: l.m.j.kroon-batenburg@uu.nl; Helliwell, John R.; Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht

    supposedly solely contained bound carboplatin, resulting in the analysis of partially occupied chlorine anomalous electron densities near the Pt-binding sites and the use of several criteria to more carefully assess the diffraction resolution limit. General arguments for archiving raw data, the possibilities of doing so and the requirement of resources are discussed. The problems associated with a partially unknown experimental setup, which preferably should be available as metadata, is discussed. Current thoughts on data compression are summarized, which could be a solution especially for pixel-device data sets with fine slicing that may otherwise present an unmanageable amount of data.« less

  7. Dark-field phase retrieval under the constraint of the Friedel symmetry in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Takayama, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-11-17

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a lensless imaging technique that is suitable for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with micrometer to sub-micrometer dimensions from material science and biology. One of the difficulties inherent to CXDI structural analyses is the reconstruction of electron density maps of specimen particles from diffraction patterns because saturated detector pixels and a beam stopper result in missing data in small-angle regions. To overcome this difficulty, the dark-field phase-retrieval (DFPR) method has been proposed. The DFPR method reconstructs electron density maps from diffraction data, which are modified by multiplying Gaussian masks with an observed diffraction pattern in the high-angle regions. In this paper, we incorporated Friedel centrosymmetry for diffraction patterns into the DFPR method to provide a constraint for the phase-retrieval calculation. A set of model simulations demonstrated that this constraint dramatically improved the probability of reconstructing correct electron density maps from diffraction patterns that were missing data in the small-angle region. In addition, the DFPR method with the constraint was applied successfully to experimentally obtained diffraction patterns with significant quantities of missing data. We also discuss this method's limitations with respect to the level of Poisson noise in X-ray detection.

  8. Tunable resonance-domain diffraction gratings based on electrostrictive polymers.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Ramon; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Golub, Michael A

    2017-03-01

    Critical combination of high diffraction efficiency and large diffraction angles can be delivered by resonance-domain diffractive optics with high aspect ratio and wavelength-scale grating periods. To advance from static to electrically tunable resonance-domain diffraction grating, we resorted to its replication onto 2-5 μm thick P(VDF-TrFE-CFE) electrostrictive ter-polymer membranes. Electromechanical and optical computer simulations provided higher than 90% diffraction efficiency, a large continuous deflection range exceeding 20°, and capabilities for adiabatic spatial modulation of the grating period and slant. A prototype of the tunable resonance-domain diffraction grating was fabricated in a soft-stamp thermal nanoimprinting process, characterized, optically tested, and provided experimental feasibility proof for the tunable sub-micron-period gratings on electrostrictive polymers.

  9. Experimental method for testing diffraction properties of reflection waveguide holograms.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Kang, Ming-Wu; Wang, Bao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Waveguide holograms' diffraction properties include peak wavelength and diffraction efficiency, which play an important role in determining their display performance. Based on the record and reconstruction theory of reflection waveguide holograms, a novel experimental method for testing diffraction properties is introduced and analyzed in this paper, which uses a plano-convex lens optically contacted to the surface of the substrate plate of the waveguide hologram, so that the diffracted light beam can be easily detected. Then an experiment is implemented. The designed reconstruction wavelength of the test sample is 530 nm, and its diffraction efficiency is 100%. The experimental results are a peak wavelength of 527.7 nm and a diffraction efficiency of 94.1%. It is shown that the tested value corresponds well with the designed value.

  10. Neutron diffraction study of the zeolite edingtonite

    SciTech Connect

    Kvick, A.; Smith, J.V.

    1983-09-01

    A neutron diffraction study at 294 K of a single crystal of edingtonite (Ba/sub 2/Al/sub 4/Si/sub 6/O/sub 20/ x 7H/sub 2/O; a 9.537(3) b 9.651(2) c 6.509(2) A; P2/sub 1/2/sub 1/2) utilized 1876 diffraction intensities from the Brookhaven National Laboratory high-flux beam reactor. The agreement factor R(F/sup 2/) = 0.055 for conventional anisotropic refinement was reduced to 0.045 for a Gram--Charlier expansion up to fourth order for the thermal factors of the water atoms. The Si--O and Al--O distances correlate inversely with the Si--O--Al angle as in scolecite. There is no indication of substitutional disorder. The barium atom is coordinatedmore » to three pairs of framework oxygens (2.89, 2.96, and 3.04 A) and two pairs of water oxygens (2.79 and 2.79 A). Two framework oxygens have weak hydrogen bonds to both water molecules (O(4)--OW(1) 2.87, -OW(2) 2.96; O(5) -OW(1) 3.02, -OW(2) 3.02 A) and the other three framework oxygens are each bonded to a Ba atom. The OW--H xxx O angles (163.5/sup 0/, 165.1/sup 0/, 173.9/sup 0/, and 178.0/sup 0/) are fairly close to 180/sup 0/, the H xxx O distances are long (1.91, 2.02, 2.09, and 2.10 A) and the observed uncorrected OW--H distances range from 0.928(6) to 0.959(4) A. Only seven out of the eight water positions are occupied (W(1) 84% occupancy; W(2) 91%). The average rms displacement of each hydrogen (0.32, 0.29, 0.27, and 0.24 A) correlates approximately with the hydrogen bond length (2.09, 2.10, 2.02, and 1.91 A). Third- and fourth-order tensor components in the displacements of the water molecules may result from anharmonic or curvilinear vibrations; however, the effect of the static displacements of the center-of-motion from interaction with unoccupied water sites may also be important.« less

  11. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, B. R., E-mail: maddox3@llnl.gov; Akin, M. C., E-mail: akin1@llnl.gov; Teruya, A.

    2016-08-15

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from themore » sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 7} molybdenum Kα photons.« less

  12. Serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging: diffraction background of superfluid helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Lei, Lei; Alghamdi, Maha; Oswalt, Andrew; Kong, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to solve the crystallization problem in crystallography, we have been engaged in developing a method termed "serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging" (SS-EDI). The unique features of SS-EDI are superfluid helium droplet cooling and field-induced orientation: together the two features constitute a molecular goniometer. Unfortunately, the helium atoms surrounding the sample molecule also contribute to a diffraction background. In this report, we analyze the properties of a superfluid helium droplet beam and its doping statistics, and demonstrate the feasibility of overcoming the background issue by using the velocity slip phenomenon of a pulsed droplet beam. Electron diffraction profiles and pair correlation functions of ferrocene-monomer-doped droplets and iodine-nanocluster-doped droplets are presented. The timing of the pulsed electron gun and the effective doping efficiency under different dopant pressures can both be controlled for size selection. This work clears any doubt of the effectiveness of superfluid helium droplets in SS-EDI, thereby advancing the effort in demonstrating the "proof-of-concept" one step further.

  13. High-mass diffraction in the QCD dipole picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, A.; Navelet, H.; Peschanski, R.

    1998-05-01

    Using the QCD dipole picture of the BFKL pomeron, the cross-section of single diffractive dissociation of virtual photons at high energy and large diffractively excited masses is calculated. The calculation takes into account the full impact-parameter phase-space and thus allows to obtain an exact value of the triple BFKL Pomeron vertex. It appears large enough to compensate the perturbative 6-gluon coupling factor (α/π)3 thus suggesting a rather appreciable diffractive cross-section.

  14. Diffraction of a Gaussian Beam by a Spherical Obstacle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.; Hovenac, Edward A.

    1993-01-01

    The Kirchhoff integral for diffraction in the near-forward direction is derived from the exact solution of the electromagnetic boundary value problem of a focused Gaussian laser beam incident on a spherical particle. The diffracted intensity in the vicinity of the particle is computed and the way in which the features of the diffraction pattern depend on the width of the Gaussian beam is commented on.

  15. Structural dynamics of free proteins in diffraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Milo M; Shorokhov, Dmitry; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-10-26

    Among the macromolecular patterns of biological significance, right-handed α-helices are perhaps the most abundant structural motifs. Here, guided by experimental findings, we discuss both ultrafast initial steps and longer-time-scale structural dynamics of helix-coil transitions induced by a range of temperature jumps in large, isolated macromolecular ensembles of an α-helical protein segment thymosin β(9) (Tβ(9)), and elucidate the comprehensive picture of (un)folding. In continuation of an earlier theoretical work from this laboratory that utilized a simplistic structure-scrambling algorithm combined with a variety of self-avoidance thresholds to approximately model helix-coil transitions in Tβ(9), in the present contribution we focus on the actual dynamics of unfolding as obtained from massively distributed ensemble-convergent MD simulations which provide an unprecedented scope of information on the nature of transient macromolecular structures, and with atomic-scale spatiotemporal resolution. In addition to the use of radial distribution functions of ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) simulations in gaining an insight into the elementary steps of conformational interconversions, we also investigate the structural dynamics of the protein via the native (α-helical) hydrogen bonding contact metric which is an intuitive coarse graining approach. Importantly, the decay of α-helical motifs and the (globular) conformational annealing in Tβ(9) occur consecutively or competitively, depending on the magnitude of temperature jump.

  16. Macromolecular powder diffraction : structure solution via molecular.

    SciTech Connect

    Doebbler, J.; Von Dreele, R.; X-Ray Science Division

    Macromolecular powder diffraction is a burgeoning technique for protein structure solution - ideally suited for cases where no suitable single crystals are available. Over the past seven years, pioneering work by Von Dreele et al. [1,2] and Margiolaki et al. [3,4] has demonstrated the viability of this approach for several protein structures. Among these initial powder studies, molecular replacement solutions of insulin and turkey lysozyme into alternate space groups were accomplished. Pressing the technique further, Margiolaki et al. [5] executed the first molecular replacement of an unknown protein structure: the SH3 domain of ponsin, using data from a multianalyzer diffractometer.more » To demonstrate that cross-species molecular replacement using image plate data is also possible, we present the solution of hen egg white lysozyme using the 60% identical human lysozyme (PDB code: 1LZ1) as the search model. Due to the high incidence of overlaps in powder patterns, especially in more complex structures, we have used extracted intensities from five data sets taken at different salt concentrations in a multi-pattern Pawley refinement. The use of image plates severely increases the overlap problem due to lower detector resolution, but radiation damage effects are minimized with shorter exposure times and the fact that the entire pattern is obtained in a single exposure. This image plate solution establishes the robustness of powder molecular replacement resulting from different data collection techniques.« less

  17. Primordial black hole detection through diffractive microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, T.; Mehrabi, A.; Rahvar, S.

    2018-05-01

    Recent observations of gravitational waves motivate investigations for the existence of primordial black holes (PBHs). We propose the observation of gravitational microlensing of distant quasars for the range of infrared to the submillimeter wavelengths by sublunar PBHs as lenses. The advantage of observations in the longer wavelengths, comparable to the Schwarzschild radius of the lens (i.e., Rsch≃λ ) is the detection of the wave optics features of the gravitational microlensing. The observation of diffraction pattern in the microlensing light curve of a quasar can break the degeneracy between the lens parameters and determine directly the lens mass as well as the distance of the lens from the observer. We estimate the wave optics optical-depth, also calculate the rate of ˜0.1 to ˜0.3 event per year per a quasar, assuming that hundred percent of dark matter is made of sublunar PBHs. Also, we propose a long-term survey of quasars with the cadence of almost one hour to few days to resolve the wave optics features of the light curves to discover PBHs and determine the fraction of dark matter made of sublunar PBHs as well as their mass function.

  18. Diffractive optical element in materials testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvennoinen, Raimo V. J.; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    1998-09-01

    The object of this paper is to present a sensor based on diffractive optics that can be applied for the materials testing. The present sensor, which is based on the use of a computer-generated hologram (CGH) exploits the holographic imagery. The CGH-sensor was introduced for inspection of surface roughness and flatness of metal surfaces. The results drawn out by the present sensor are observed to be in accordance with the experimental data. Together with the double exposure holographic interferometry (DEHI) and digital electronic speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) in elasticity inspection, the sensor was applied for the investigations of surface quality of opaque fragile materials, which are pharmaceutical compacts. The optical surface quality was observed to be related to the porosity of the pharmaceutical tablets. The CGH-sensor was also applied for investigations of optical quality of thin films as PLZT ceramics and coating of pharmaceutical compacts. The surfaces of PLZT samples showed fluctuations in optical curvature, and wedgeness for all the cases studied. For pharmaceutical compacts, the optical signals were observed to depend to a great extent on the optical constants of the coatings and the substrates, and in addition to the surface porosity under the coating.

  19. Achieving optimum diffraction based overlay performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, Philippe; Laidler, David; Cheng, Shaunee; Coogans, Martyn; Fuchs, Andreas; Ponomarenko, Mariya; van der Schaar, Maurits; Vanoppen, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Diffraction Based Overlay (DBO) metrology has been shown to have significantly reduced Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) compared to Image Based Overlay (IBO), primarily due to having no measurable Tool Induced Shift (TIS). However, the advantages of having no measurable TIS can be outweighed by increased susceptibility to WIS (Wafer Induced Shift) caused by target damage, process non-uniformities and variations. The path to optimum DBO performance lies in having well characterized metrology targets, which are insensitive to process non-uniformities and variations, in combination with optimized recipes which take advantage of advanced DBO designs. In this work we examine the impact of different degrees of process non-uniformity and target damage on DBO measurement gratings and study their impact on overlay measurement accuracy and precision. Multiple wavelength and dual polarization scatterometry are used to characterize the DBO design performance over the range of process variation. In conclusion, we describe the robustness of DBO metrology to target damage and show how to exploit the measurement capability of a multiple wavelength, dual polarization scatterometry tool to ensure the required measurement accuracy for current and future technology nodes.

  20. An amplitude and phase hybrid modulation Fresnel diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Cheng, Jiangao; Wang, Mengyu; Jin, Xueying; Wang, Keyi

    2018-04-01

    An Amplitude and Phase Hybrid Modulation Fresnel Diffractive Optical Element (APHMFDOE) is proposed here. We have studied the theory of APHMFDOE and simulated the focusing properties of it along the optical axis, which show that the focus can be blazed to other positions with changing the quadratic phase factor. Moreover, we design a Composite Fresnel Diffraction Optical Element (CFDOE) based on the characteristics of APHMFDOE. It greatly increases the outermost zone width without changing the F-number, which brings a lot of benefits to the design and processing of diffraction device. More importantly, the diffraction efficiency of the CFDOE is almost unchanged compared with AFZP at the same focus.

  1. Visible diffraction from quasi-crystalline arrays of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Timothy P.; Butt, Haider; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2015-08-01

    Large area arrays of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are patterned in a quasi-crystalline Penrose tile arrangement through electron beam lithography definition of Ni catalyst dots and subsequent nanotube growth by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. When illuminated with a 532 nm laser beam high-quality and remarkable diffraction patterns are seen. The diffraction is well matched to theoretical calculations which assume apertures to be present at the location of the VACNTs for transmitted light. The results show that VACNTs act as diffractive elements in reflection and can be used as spatially phased arrays for producing tailored diffraction patterns.

  2. Correlating sampling and intensity statistics in nanoparticle diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Öztürk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.

    2015-07-28

    It is shown in a previous article [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014).J. Appl. Cryst.47, 1016–1025] that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye–Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) themore » one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. For example, three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos θ, to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos θ B/cos θ, corrects this problem.« less

  3. Correlating Sampling and Intensity Statistics in Nanoparticle Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ozturk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.

    2015-08-01

    In this article, [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014). J. Appl. Cryst. 47, 1016-1025] it was shown that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye-Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys. (1948), 19, 742-753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this sizemore » range, (i) the one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. Three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos [theta], to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos [theta]B/cos [theta], corrects this problem.« less

  4. Status of the Neutron Imaging and Diffraction Instrument IMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockelmann, Winfried; Burca, Genoveva; Kelleher, Joe F.; Kabra, Saurabh; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Rhodes, Nigel J.; Schooneveld, Erik M.; Sykora, Jeff; Pooley, Daniel E.; Nightingale, Jim B.; Aliotta, Francesco; Ponterio, Rosa C.; Salvato, Gabriele; Tresoldi, Dario; Vasi, Cirino; McPhate, Jason B.; Tremsin, Anton S.

    A cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument, IMAT, is currently being constructed at the ISIS second target station. IMAT will capitalize on time-of-flight transmission and diffraction techniques available at a pulsed neutron source. Analytical techniques will include neutron radiography, neutron tomography, energy-selective neutron imaging, and spatially resolved diffraction scans for residual strain and texture determination. Commissioning of the instrument will start in 2015, with time-resolving imaging detectors and two diffraction detector prototype modules. IMAT will be operated as a user facility for material science applications and will be open for developments of time-of-flight imaging methods.

  5. Modeling spatially localized photonic nanojets from phase diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu. E.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    We investigated numerically the specific spatially localized intense optical structure, a photonic nanojet (PNJ), formed in the near-field scattering of optical radiation at phase diffraction gratings. The finite-difference time-domain technique was employed to study the PNJ key parameters (length, width, focal distance, and intensity) produced by diffraction gratings with the saw-tooth, rectangle, and hemispheric line profiles. Our analysis showed that each type of diffraction gratings produces a photonic jet with unique characteristics. Based on the numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the PNJ could be manipulated in a wide range through the variation of period, duty cycle, and shape of diffraction grating rulings.

  6. Diffraction of three-colour radiation on an acoustic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M

    We study acousto-optic Bragg diffraction of three-colour radiation having wavelengths of 488, 514 and 633 nm on a single acoustic wave propagating in a TeO{sub 2} crystal. A technique is developed that allows one to find diffraction regimes with a proportional change in the intensity of all radiations by varying the acoustic power. According to the technique, radiation with a maximum wavelength has to be in strict Bragg synchronism with the acoustic wave, while other radiations diffract during the synchronism detuning. The results obtained using this technique are experimentally confirmed. (diffraction of light)

  7. Towards anti-causal Green's function for three-dimensional sub-diffraction focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guancong; Fan, Xiying; Ma, Fuyin; de Rosny, Julien; Sheng, Ping; Fink, Mathias

    2018-06-01

    In causal physics, the causal Green's function describes the radiation of a point source. Its counterpart, the anti-causal Green's function, depicts a spherically converging wave. However, in free space, any converging wave must be followed by a diverging one. Their interference gives rise to the diffraction limit that constrains the smallest possible dimension of a wave's focal spot in free space, which is half the wavelength. Here, we show with three-dimensional acoustic experiments that we can realize a stand-alone anti-causal Green's function in a large portion of space up to a subwavelength distance from the focus point by introducing a near-perfect absorber for spherical waves at the focus. We build this subwavelength absorber based on membrane-type acoustic metamaterial, and experimentally demonstrate focusing of spherical waves beyond the diffraction limit.

  8. Dimensional stability. [of glass and glass-ceramic materials in diffraction telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochen, R.; Justie, B.

    1976-01-01

    The temporal stability of glass and glass-ceramic materials is important to the success of a large diffraction-limited telescope. The results are presented of an experimental study of the dimensional stability of glasses and glass ceramics being considered for substrates of massive diffraction-limited mirrors designed for several years of service in earth orbit. The purpose of the study was to measure the relative change in length of the candidate substrate materials, to the order of 5 parts in 10 to the 8th power, as a function of several years time. The development of monolithic test etalons, the development and improvement of two types of ultra-high precision interferometers, and certain aspects of tests data presently achieved are discussed.

  9. Imaging fully hydrated whole cells by coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Daewoong; Park, Jaehyun; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Naitow, Hisashi; Kunishima, Naoki; Yoshida, Takashi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale imaging of biological specimens in their native condition is of long-standing interest, in particular with direct, high resolution views of internal structures of intact specimens, though as yet progress has been limited. Here we introduce wet coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy capable of imaging fully hydrated and unstained biological specimens. Whole cell morphologies and internal structures better than 25 nm can be clearly visualized without contrast degradation.

  10. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Carbonate Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Hadi Y.; Leventouri, Theodora; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.

    1998-11-01

    Moghaddam H.Y., Leventouri Th.* (Dept. of Physics & Alloy Research Center, Florida Atlantic Univ.) Chakoumakos B.C. (Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Lab.**,kou@ornl.gov) We report Rietveld structural refinements of neutron diffraction data of a highly crystalline, single-phase natural carbonate apatite,(francolite of Epirus, Greece), in order to elucidate the details of carbonate substitution in the apatites. The composition is Ca9.56Na0.38Mg0.08(PO4)4.82(CO3)0.946(SO4)0.2F2.34, as determined by electron microprobe analysis. We report refinements of data for the native francolite as a function of temperature between 296K and 10K after the material had been heated at 750 °C to drive off adsorbed water and CO2. The neutron diffractioii@data were collected using a wavelength 1.0912 A on the HB4 high resolution powder diffractometer at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic displacement parameters can reveal the contribution from the temperature independent static positional disorder. Difference displacement parameters evaluated along various bonding directions are being used to describe the mechanics and dynamics of the carbonate for phosphate substitution.*Supported by a SURA-ORNL Summer Cooperative Research Program 1998.**Supported by the Division of Materials Sciences,U.S. D.O.E. (contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 with Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation).

  11. Pulsed Neutron Powder Diffraction for Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, T.

    2008-03-01

    The accelerator-based neutron diffraction began in the end of 60's at Tohoku University which was succeeded by the four spallation neutron facilities with proton accelerators at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan), Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos Laboratory (USA), and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). Since then, the next generation source has been pursued for 20 years, and 1MW-class spallation neutron sources will be appeared in about three years at the three parts of the world: Japan, UK and USA. The joint proton accelerator project (J-PARC), a collaborative project between KEK and JAEA, is one of them. The aim of the talk is to describe about J-PARC and the neutron diffractometers being installed at the materials and life science facility of J-PARC. The materials and life science facility of J-PARC has 23 neutron beam ports and will start delivering the first neutron beam of 25 Hz from 2008 May. Until now, more than 20 proposals have been reviewed by the review committee, and accepted proposal groups have started to get fund. Those proposals include five polycrystalline diffractometers: a super high resolution powder diffractometer (SHRPD), a 0.2%-resolution powder diffractometer of Ibaraki prefecture (IPD), an engineering diffractometers (Takumi), a high intensity S(Q) diffractometer (VSD), and a high-pressure dedicated diffractometer. SHRPD, Takumi and IPD are being designed and constructed by the joint team of KEK, JAEA and Ibaraki University, whose member are originally from the KEK powder group. These three instruments are expected to start in 2008. VSD is a super high intensity diffractometer with the highest resolution of Δd/d = 0.3%. VSD can measure rapid time-dependent phenomena of crystalline materials as well as glass, liquid and amorphous materials. The pair distribution function will be routinely obtained by the Fourier transiformation of S(Q) data. Q range of VSD will be as wide as 0.01 Å-1

  12. Mineral and Geochemical Classification From Spectroscopy/Diffraction Through Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferralis, N.; Grossman, J.; Summons, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    Spectroscopy and diffraction techniques are essential for understanding structural, chemical and functional properties of geological materials for Earth and Planetary Sciences. Beyond data collection, quantitative insight relies on experimentally assembled, or computationally derived spectra. Inference on the geochemical or geophysical properties (such as crystallographic order, chemical functionality, elemental composition, etc.) of a particular geological material (mineral, organic matter, etc.) is based on fitting unknown spectra and comparing the fit with consolidated databases. The complexity of fitting highly convoluted spectra, often limits the ability to infer geochemical characteristics, and limits the throughput for extensive datasets. With the emergence of heuristic approaches to pattern recognitions though machine learning, in this work we investigate the possibility and potential of using supervised neural networks trained on available public spectroscopic database to directly infer geochemical parameters from unknown spectra. Using Raman, infrared spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction from the publicly available RRUFF database, we train neural network models to classify mineral and organic compounds (pure or mixtures) based on crystallographic structure from diffraction, chemical functionality, elemental composition and bonding from spectroscopy. As expected, the accuracy of the inference is strongly dependent on the quality and extent of the training data. We will identify a series of requirements and guidelines for the training dataset needed to achieve consistent high accuracy inference, along with methods to compensate for limited of data.

  13. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  14. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit

    2001-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  15. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhurl, Avijit K.

    2000-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  16. Single-Slit Diffraction and the Uncertainty Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rioux, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of single-slit diffraction based on the Fourier transform between coordinate and momentum space is presented. The transform between position and momentum is used to illuminate the intimate relationship between single-slit diffraction and uncertainty principle.

  17. Phasor Analysis of Binary Diffraction Gratings with Different Fill Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Antonio; Sanchez-Lopez, Ma del Mar; Moreno, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we present a simple analysis of binary diffraction gratings with different slit widths relative to the grating period. The analysis is based on a simple phasor technique directly derived from the Huygens principle. By introducing a slit phasor and a grating phasor, the intensity of the diffracted orders and the grating's resolving…

  18. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  19. Determination of Particle Size by Diffraction of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinard, Phillip M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a simplified diffraction experiment offered in a workshop with the purpose of illustrating to high school students the relation of science to society. The radii determined for cigarette smoke particles range from 0.2 to 0.5 micrometer in this experiment. Included is a description of the diffraction theory. (CC)

  20. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of nanoengineered polymeric capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhina, S.; Pastorino, L.; Di Lisa, D.; Kiiamov, A. G.; Faizullina, A. R.; Tayurskii, D. A.; Iannotta, S.; Erokhin, V.

    2017-10-01

    For the first time, nanoengineered polymeric capsules and their architecture have been studied with coherent X-ray diffraction imaging technique. The use of coherent X-ray diffraction imaging technique allowed us to analyze the samples immersed in a liquid. We report about the significant difference between polymeric capsule architectures under dry and liquid conditions.