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Sample records for abbott medical optics

  1. Polycapillary optics for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C. A.; Petruccelli, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    Polycapillary optics can be designed for a wide variety of x-ray applications, including x-ray fluorescence for non-destructive materials analysis and diffraction applications such as protein crystallography. Of particular interest are medical applications, including the removal of Compton scattering with the resultant improvement in contrast and resolution in mammography, the production of monochromatic parallel beams for high-contrast imaging in clinical settings and the localization of radioactive tracers. A recent development is the use of polycapillary optics to improve beam coherence for x-ray phase imaging. Conventional radiographic techniques depend on attenuation, which provides only low contrast between soft tissues. Phase imaging can yield significantly higher contrast but requires spatially coherent beams. Conventional sources small enough to produce high coherence are necessarily low power, requiring long exposures. Polycapillary optics employed to create a small secondary source from high power sources have been shown to yield strong phase effects. Polycapillary optics can also be combined with other x-ray optics. A combination of a toroidally bent crystal with a polycapillary optic has been shown to produce enhanced resolution in a magnified image. Another x-ray imaging technique which does not rely on the small attenuation contrast is the capture of coherently scattered radiation, for which polycapillary optics could be used as angular filters to collect the beam, resulting in a map of tissue or material type.

  2. Medical Information on Optical Disc*

    PubMed Central

    Schipma, Peter B.; Cichocki, Edward M.; Ziemer, Susan M.

    1987-01-01

    Optical discs may permit a revolutionary change in the distribution and use of medical information. A single compact disc, similar in size to that used for digital audio recording, can contain over 500 million characters of information that is accessible by a Personal Computer. These discs can be manufactured at a cost lower than that of print on paper, at reasonable volumes. Software can provide the health care professional with nearly instantaneous access to the information. Thus, for the first time, the opportunity exists to have large local medical information collections. This paper describes an application of this technology in the field of Oncology.

  3. Avoidance of generic competition by Abbott Laboratories' fenofibrate franchise.

    PubMed

    Downing, Nicholas S; Ross, Joseph S; Jackevicius, Cynthia A; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2012-05-14

    The ongoing debate concerning the efficacy of fenofibrate has overshadowed an important aspect of the drug's history: Abbott Laboratories, the maker of branded fenofibrate, has produced several bioequivalent reformulations that dominate the market, although generic fenofibrate has been available for almost a decade. This continued use of branded formulations, which cost twice as much as generic versions of fenofibrate, imposes an annual cost of approximately $700 million on the US health care system. Abbott Laboratories maintained its dominance of the fenofibrate market in part through a complex switching strategy involving the sequential launch of branded reformulations that had not been shown to be superior to the first-generation product and patent litigation that delayed the approval of generic formulations. The small differences in dose of the newer branded formulations prevented their substitution with generics of older-generation products. As soon as direct generic competition seemed likely at the new dose level, where substitution would be allowed, Abbott would launch another reformulation, and the cycle would repeat. Based on the fenofibrate example, our objective is to describe how current policy can allow pharmaceutical companies to maintain market share using reformulations of branded medications, without demonstrating the superiority of next-generation products.

  4. Preconcepts in Physics. Report to the John Abbott College Research and Development Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickie, L. O.

    This study was conducted to examine the basic conceptual knowledge and understanding of physics possessed by students enrolled in introductory physics, mechanics and waves and optics courses at John Abbott College (JAC). The study used a 36-item multiple-choice test of physics preconcepts developed by Halloun and Hestenes. The Halloun and Hestenes…

  5. Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Poeggel, Sven; Tosi, Daniele; Duraibabu, DineshBabu; Leen, Gabriel; McGrath, Deirdre; Lewis, Elfed

    2015-01-01

    This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas. PMID:26184228

  6. Product development: the making of the Abbott ARCHITECT.

    PubMed

    Kisner, H J

    1997-01-01

    Many laboratorians have a limited perspective on what is involved in developing an instrument and bringing it to market. This article traces the product development process used by Abbott Diagnostics Division that resulted in Abbott being named the 1996 Concurrent Engineering Company of the Year for the design of the ARCHITECT.

  7. 78 FR 950 - Medical Devices; Availability of Safety and Effectiveness Summaries for Premarket Approval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ...-M-0734....... Abbott Medical Healon July 2, 2012. Optics, Inc. EndoCoat OpViscosurgical Ophthalmic... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket Nos. FDA-2012-M-0712, FDA-2012-M-0713, FDA-2012-M-0734, FDA- 2012-M-0735, FDA-2012-M-0814, FDA-2012-M-0833, FDA-2012-M-0893, FDA- 2012-M-0965,...

  8. Subsurface damage distribution characterization of ground surfaces using Abbott-Firestone curves.

    PubMed

    Laheurte, Raynald; Darnis, Philippe; Darbois, Nathalie; Cahuc, Olivier; Neauport, Jérôme

    2012-06-04

    Measurement of subsurface damage (SSD) induced by grinding process is of major interest in the development of high laser damage fused silica optical components manufacturing processes. Most SSD measurements methods give only access to the peak to peak value. We herein report on the benefit of using Abbott-Firestone curves to get an insight of the SSD distribution inside the optical material. We evidence on various diamond wheel ground fused silica substrates that such an approach is complementary to a classical SSD peak to peak measurement and bring useful information to optimize a grinding process.

  9. Optical polymers for laser medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanova, Nina G.; Kasarova, Stefka N.; Nikolov, Ivan D.

    2016-01-01

    In medicine, optical polymers are used not only in ophthalmology but in many laser surgical, diagnostic and therapeutic systems. The application in lens design is determined by their refractive and dispersive properties in the considered spectral region. We have used different measuring techniques to obtain precise refractometric data in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Dispersive, thermal and other important optical characteristics of polymers have been studied. Design of a plastic achromatic objective, used in a surgical stereo-microscope at 1064 nm laser wavelength, is accomplished. Geometrical and wavefront aberrations are calculated. Another example of application of polymers is the designed all-mirror apochromatic micro-lens, intended for superluminescent diode fiber coupling in medical systems.

  10. Fiber optic temperature sensors for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaafsma, David T.; Palmer, Gail; Bechtel, James H.

    2003-07-01

    Recent developments in fiber-optic sensor technology have demonstrated the utility of fiber-optic sensors for both medical and industrial applications. Fiber sensors based on fluorescent decay of rare earth doped materials allow rapid and accurate temperature measurement in challenging environments. Here we review the principles of operation of these sensors with a rare earth doped probe material and demonstrate why this material is an excellent choice for these types of sensors. The decay time technique allows accurate temperature determination from two measurements of the fluorescence intensity at a well-defined time interval. With this method, all instrumental and extraneous environmental effect will cancel, thus providing an accurate temperature measurement. Stability data will be presented for the fiber-optic probes. For medical applications, new breakthroughs in RF ablation technology and electro-surgical procedures are being introduced as alternative, less invasive treatment for removal of small tumors and for removal of plaque within arteries as a preventive treatment that avoids open heart surgery. The availability of small diameter temperature probes (230 microns or 450 microns in diameter) offers a whole new scope to temperature measurement. Accurate and reliable temperature monitoring during any laser treatment procedure or RF ablation at the surgical site is critical. Precise, NIST traceable reliable results are needed to prevent overheating or underheating during treatment. In addition, how interventional catheters are used in hyperthermia studies and the advantages to having flexible cables and multiple sensors are discussed. Preliminary data is given from an animal study where temperature was monitored in a pig during an RF study.

  11. Optical parametric oscillators for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloster, Lawrie A. W.; Golding, Paul S.; King, Terence A.

    1996-04-01

    In recent years optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) have undergone a renaissance largely due to the discovery of new nonlinear materials capable of wide continuous tuning ranges spanning from the UV to the near-infrared spectral regions. To date, however, OPOs have not been exploited in the medical field despite their advantages over the dye laser in terms of tuning range and solid state structure. We consider the development of an OPO based on barium borate (BBO) which can be tailored to suit applications in medicine. Converting the maximum number of pump photons to tunable signal and idler photons is of great importance to secure high-fluence radiation necessary for many treatments. With this in mind, we report on an all- solid-state system using BBO which has been optimized by computer modeling with the potential of delivering amplification factors of typically up to 20 over a continuous tuning range of 700 nm to 1000 nm. As an example of its biomedical application, we describe the selective excitation of biomolecules and chromophores for cell destruction using malachite green isothiocyanate labelled bacteria. The potential for development is reviewed towards other medical applications such as diagnostic sensing and phototherapy.

  12. 76 FR 4283 - Foreign-Trade Zone 153-San Diego, CA; Application for Manufacturing Authority; Abbott...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 153--San Diego, CA; Application for Manufacturing Authority; Abbott Cardiovascular Systems, Inc. (Cardiovascular Device Manufacturing); Riverside County, CA An... of FTZ 153, requesting manufacturing authority on behalf of Abbott Cardiovascular Systems,...

  13. The Abbott Districts in 2005-06: Progress and Challenges, Spring 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Lesley

    2006-01-01

    New Jersey's urban--or "Abbott"--schools have improved at the preschool and elementary school level, but lag when it comes to middle and high school performance. These are the key findings of an Abbott Indicators Project report entitled, "The Abbott Districts in 2005-06: Progress and Challenges." The report was prepared by…

  14. Women in History--Grace Abbott: A Leader in Social Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Shari Cole

    2006-01-01

    This article profiles Grace Abbott, one of the earlier 20th century American women leaders in Progressivism. Abbott's heritage influenced her lifetime commitment to social improvement. She was born on November 17, 1878 in Grand Island, Nebraska into a family of activists. Her Quaker mother, Elizabeth Griffin Abbott, came from an abolitionist…

  15. 42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to peaks of Outter Lodge, completed in 1964. Construction of the lake got underway in 1964. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  16. Integrating Students of Limited English Proficiency into Standards-Based Reform in the Abbott Districts. Abbott Implementation Resource Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Tamara; Villegas, Ana Maria

    2004-01-01

    In 1999-2000, over one-third of all students in the 30 Abbott districts spoke a native language other than English, and more than one-tenth were considered limited English proficient (LEP). The proportions of LEP students varied considerably across the districts, but they comprised between 5% and 29% of total enrollments in 18 of the districts.…

  17. Optical properties of plastic materials for medical vision applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanova, N. G.; Kasarova, S. N.; Nikolov, I. D.

    2012-12-01

    Several types of optical polymer materials suitable for ophthalmic or medical vision applications have been studied. We have measured refractive indices of studied plastics at various wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Important optical characteristics as Abbe numbers, dispersion coefficients and curves, principal and relative partial dispersion have been evaluated. Calculated refractometric data at many laser emission wavelengths used for medical surgery, therapy and diagnostics is included. As an example of a medical vision application of plastics, optical design of a micro-triplet for use in disposable endoscopes is presented.

  18. Large Scale Medical Databases On Digital Optical Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rann, Leonard S.

    1985-04-01

    Since 1974, Micromedex Inc., has authored and published three widely used medical databases on microfiche. An integrated medical database system has been designed to run on an IBM-PC compatible computer utilizing digital optical discs as the primary mass storage medium.

  19. Optical medical imaging: from glass to man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Mark

    2016-11-01

    A formidable challenge in modern respiratory healthcare is the accurate and timely diagnosis of lung infection and inflammation. The EPSRC Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (IRC) `Proteus' seeks to address this challenge by developing an optical fibre based healthcare technology platform that combines physiological sensing with multiplexed optical molecular imaging. This technology will enable in situ measurements deep in the human lung allowing the assessment of tissue function and characterization of the unique signatures of pulmonary disease and is illustrated here with our in-man application of Optical Imaging SmartProbes and our first device Versicolour.

  20. Medical imaging with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging modality which can generate high resolution, cross-sectional and three dimensional images of microstructure in biological systems. OCT is analogous to ultrasound B mode imaging, except that it uses light instead of sound. Imaging is performed by measuring the echo time delay of optical backscattering in the tissue as a function of transverse position. The penetration depth of OCT imaging is limited by attenuation from optical scattering to ˜ 2 to 3 mm in most tissues, however image resolutions of 1-10 um may be achieved. OCT functions as a type of ``optical biopsy" enabling in situ visualization of tissue microstructure with resolutions approaching that of conventional histopathology. Imaging can be performed in real time without the need to remove and process a specimen as in conventional biopsy. OCT technology utilizes advances in photonics and fiber optics such as femtosecond broadband lasers, high speed wavelength swept lasers and line scan camera technologies. Recent developments using Fourier domain detection achieve dramatic improvements in resolution and imaging speed. Three dimensional, volumetric imaging with extremely high voxel density is now possible, enabling microstructure and pathology to be visualized and rendered in a manner analogous to MR imaging. OCT is now widely accepted as a standard diagnostic in clinical ophthalmology, where it can image retinal pathology with unprecedented resolution improving the sensitivity of diagnosis and monitoring response to treatment. OCT is also being developed for other applications ranging from intravascular imaging in cardiology to endoscopic imaging for cancer detection. This presentation will discuss OCT technology and its applications.

  1. Micro fibre optic flow checker for the medical analysis application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danping

    2007-01-01

    Two micro fibre optic flow checkers are presented in this paper. They are used for a medical analysis to control a solvent flow up to 1microl/min resolution. A fibre optic sensor as well as a hydraulic system are the principle components of these flow checkers. This paper describes the principle and the experiment setup. It gives the linearity, the repeatability and the stability results.

  2. 77 FR 75610 - Foreign-Trade Zone 22-Chicago, IL, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Abbott...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 22--Chicago, IL, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Abbott Laboratories, Inc., AbbVie, Inc. (Pharmaceutical Production), North Chicago, IL, Area Abbott... authority within Subzones 22F and 22S, at sites located in the North Chicago and Lake County, Illinois,...

  3. Abbott Preschool Program Longitudinal Effects Study: Fifth Grade Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, W. Steven; Jung, Kwanghee; Youn, Min-Jong; Frede, Ellen C.

    2013-01-01

    New Jersey's Abbott Preschool program is of broad national and international interest because the Abbott program provides a model for building a high-quality system of universal pre-K through public-private partnerships that transform the existing system. The program offers high-quality pre-K to all children in 31 New Jersey communities with high…

  4. The Abbott Preschool Program: Fifth Year Report on Enrollment and Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applewhite, Erain; Hirsch, Lesley

    2003-01-01

    The New Jersey Supreme Court's 1998 ruling in Abbott v. Burke represents the first judicial directive in the nation that public education must include a high-quality, well-planned preschool program starting at age three. This decision applies to 30 urban school districts, known as the Abbott districts, that serve approximately 25 percent of the…

  5. Implementation of an optical disk system for medical record storage.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, M E

    1990-09-01

    MARS was a joint developmental effort between Maine Medical Center and Advanced Healthcare Systems, Inc. It has taken nearly three years to get the system (hardware, software, and staff) to a point where it can now meet daily production requirements. This project was truly unique, so there was no opportunity to learn from the experiences of others. The optical disk system has been an attractive solution to some of the problems experienced at Maine Medical Center. The result was worth the effort in terms of both dollars and other less quantifiable benefits that have had a positive impact on patient care.

  6. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1992-01-01

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts.

  7. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1992-10-06

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip is described. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts. 10 figs.

  8. Adapting smartphones for low-cost optical medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Vollet-Filho, José D.; Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Blanco, Kate; Inada, Natalia M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Optical images have been used in several medical situations to improve diagnosis of lesions or to monitor treatments. However, most systems employ expensive scientific (CCD or CMOS) cameras and need computers to display and save the images, usually resulting in a high final cost for the system. Additionally, this sort of apparatus operation usually becomes more complex, requiring more and more specialized technical knowledge from the operator. Currently, the number of people using smartphone-like devices with built-in high quality cameras is increasing, which might allow using such devices as an efficient, lower cost, portable imaging system for medical applications. Thus, we aim to develop methods of adaptation of those devices to optical medical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence. Particularly, smartphones covers were adapted to connect a smartphone-like device to widefield fluorescence imaging systems. These systems were used to detect lesions in different tissues, such as cervix and mouth/throat mucosa, and to monitor ALA-induced protoporphyrin-IX formation for photodynamic treatment of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia. This approach may contribute significantly to low-cost, portable and simple clinical optical imaging collection.

  9. Toxic optic neuropathy following ingestion of homeopathic medication Arnica-30.

    PubMed

    Venkatramani, Devendra V; Goel, Shubhra; Ratra, Vineet; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of acute, bilateral and severe vision loss after inadvertent consumption of a large quantity of the homoeopathic medication Arnica-30. Severe vomiting which required hospitalization preceded visual symptoms. In the acute stage, pupillary responses to light were absent and fundus examination was normal. Vision loss followed a fluctuating course, with profound loss noted after 6 weeks along with bilateral optic disc pallor. Neuro-ophthalmic examination and detailed investigations were performed, including magnetic resonance imaging, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potentials (VEP). Ocular coherence tomography (OCT) showed gross thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer. While a differential diagnosis of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy was kept in mind, these findings supported a diagnosis of bilateral toxic optic neuropathy. Arnica-30 is popularly used to accelerate wound healing, including after oculoplastic surgery. While homeopathic medicines are generally considered safe due to the very low concentrations involved, Arnica-30 may be neurotoxic if consumed internally in large quantities.

  10. Wideband optical detector of ultrasound for medical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Amir; Kellnberger, Stephan; Omar, Murad; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-05-11

    Optical sensors of ultrasound are a promising alternative to piezoelectric techniques, as has been recently demonstrated in the field of optoacoustic imaging. In medical applications, one of the major limitations of optical sensing technology is its susceptibility to environmental conditions, e.g. changes in pressure and temperature, which may saturate the detection. Additionally, the clinical environment often imposes stringent limits on the size and robustness of the sensor. In this work, the combination of pulse interferometry and fiber-based optical sensing is demonstrated for ultrasound detection. Pulse interferometry enables robust performance of the readout system in the presence of rapid variations in the environmental conditions, whereas the use of all-fiber technology leads to a mechanically flexible sensing element compatible with highly demanding medical applications such as intravascular imaging. In order to achieve a short sensor length, a pi-phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating is used, which acts as a resonator trapping light over an effective length of 350 µm. To enable high bandwidth, the sensor is used for sideway detection of ultrasound, which is highly beneficial in circumferential imaging geometries such as intravascular imaging. An optoacoustic imaging setup is used to determine the response of the sensor for acoustic point sources at different positions.

  11. European multicentre evaluation of the ABBOTT Spectrum clinical chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Blijenberg, B G; Braconnier, F; Vallez, J M; Burlina, A; Plebani, M; Celadin, M; Haeckel, R; Römer, M; Hänseler, E; De Schrijver, G

    1989-06-01

    The analytical performance of the selective multitest ABBOTT Spectrum analyser was studied according to the ECCLS guidelines and partly the CERMAB protocol in a multicentre evaluation involving laboratories from six European countries. Fifteen analytes, including the electrolytes sodium, potassium and chloride, were measured each in at least 3 laboratories, all at 37 degrees C, except the electrolytes, which are measured at room temperature. The trial lasted approximately three months and involved the collection of over 60,000 data points. It yielded the following results: 1. The precision was at least as good as the precision obtained with the comparison instruments. The majority of the coefficients of variation were between 1 and 4%. 2. The recovery for method assigned control sera values was, with few exceptions, within 10%. 3. Good agreement with respect to the method assigned values of control materials and method comparison with patient specimens to different instruments (e.g. SMAC, Hitachi 737, RA 1000) was found. 4. No drift was observed. 5. Reagent-related carry-over was not found. Specimen-related carry-over was detected in some cases, the deviation being of little or no clinical significance. 6. The manufacturer's claims regarding method linearity were as stated or exceeded. 7. The open system capability was tested and rated as very convenient. 8. The practicability of the instrument was very good.

  12. Medical Applications Of CO2 Laser Fiber Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    In 1978, Hughes Laboratories reported development of fiber optics that were capable of transmitting CO2 laser energy. These fibers are now being tested for medical applications. Wide ranging medical investigation with CO2 lasers has occurred during the twelve years since the first observations of laser hemostasis. Specialists in ophthalmology, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, otolaryngology, maxillo-facial/plastic surgery, dermatology, and oncology among others, have explored its use. In principle, all these specialists use CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 microns to thermally destroy diseased tissues. As such, CO2 lasers compare and compete with electrosurgical devices. The fundamental difference between these modalities lies in how they generate heat in treated tissue.

  13. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-04-13

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  14. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors.

    PubMed

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-07-13

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2-10 nm/kPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cm H2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k = 10.7 pm/K, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes.

  15. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. PMID:25871010

  16. Fulfilling the Promise of Abbott: The Lighthouse Assessment Process--Improving Programs through Measured Outcomes. Policy Progress, Spring 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Children of New Jersey, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In an attempt to better prepare young children for the challenges of kindergarten and first grade, the Supreme Court of New Jersey, in its 1998 landmark decision of "Abbott v. Burke" (Abbott V), required the State's poorest school districts to implement high quality, intensive preschool for all 3-and 4-year old children. To take…

  17. Partnering for Preschool: A Study of Center Directors in New Jersey's Mixed-Delivery Abbott Program. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitebook, Marcy; Ryan, Sharon; Kipnis, Fran; Sakai, Laura

    2008-01-01

    In a series of New Jersey Supreme Court decisions known as Abbott v. Burke, the 28 (now 31) urban school districts serving the state's poorest students were ordered to create systems of high-quality preschool for all three- and four-year-old children, beginning in the 1999-2000 school year. The Abbott Preschool Program now serves approximately…

  18. 78 FR 23220 - Foreign-Trade Zone 22-Chicago, Illinois, Authorization of Production Activity, Abbott...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 22--Chicago, Illinois, Authorization of Production Activity, Abbott Laboratories, Inc., AbbVie, Inc. (Pharmaceutical Production), North Chicago, Illinois, Area On... production authority within Subzones 22F and 22S, respectively, at sites located in the North Chicago...

  19. 78 FR 54487 - Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic-Hematology; Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Employment and Training Administration Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic--Hematology; Including On-Site Leased... Laboratories, Diagnostic--Hematology division, including on-site leased workers from Manpower Service Group... to the production of hematology reagents and instruments. The company reports that workers...

  20. 75 FR 340 - Approval for Expansion of Subzone 22F, Abbott Molecular, Inc. (Pharmaceutical and Molecular...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 2 (Tuesday, January 5, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 340-341] [FR Doc No: E9-31315] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Order No. 1654] Approval for Expansion of Subzone 22F, Abbott Molecular, Inc. (Pharmaceutical and Molecular Diagnostic Products),...

  1. Film shows hospital's neighborliness. Depicts Abbott Northwestern's work with Phillips neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, worked with Twist, a production company also located in Minneapolis, to create a six-minute documentary about its role in the community. It affirms the hospital's commitment to the Phillips neighborhood and uses interviews with local residents, hoping to stimulate community action.

  2. Breaking Ground: Rebuilding New Jersey's Urban Schools. The Abbott School Construction Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponessa, Joan

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a brief history of the Abbott School Construction Program, describes the implementation to date, lays out some current challenges, and outlines lessons learned from the process so far--what is known now about how such an initiative should be planned and carried out. The report is intended to illuminate the complex process of…

  3. Engaging Parents, Families and the Community to Improve Student Achievement. Abbott Implementation Resource Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Anne

    2004-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, a statewide committee of representative educational stakeholders on "cooperative rulemaking" was convened jointly by the Department of Education and the Education Law Center. The Supreme Court in "Abbott X" had directed the establishment of this committee to develop new regulations more consistent…

  4. Trends in optical coherence tomography applied to medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    The number of publications on optical coherence tomography (OCT) continues to double every three years. Traditionally applied to imaging the eye, OCT is now being extended to fields outside ophthalmology and optometry. Widening its applicability, progress in the core engine of the technology, and impact on development of novel optical sources, make OCT a very active and rapidly evolving field. Trends in the developments of different specific devices, such as optical sources, optical configurations and signal processing will be presented. Encompassing studies on both the configurations as well as on signal processing themes, current research in Kent looks at combining spectral domain with time domain imaging for long axial range and simultaneous imaging at several depths. Results of the collaborative work of the Applied Optics Group in Kent with organisers of this conference will be presented, with reference to 3D monitoring of abfraction.

  5. Introduction: feature issue on phantoms for the performance evaluation and validation of optical medical imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeeseong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Nordstrom, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue on "Phantoms for the Performance Evaluation and Validation of Optical Medical Imaging Devices." This topic was the focus of a technical workshop that was held on November 7-8, 2011, in Washington, D.C. The feature issue includes 13 contributions from workshop attendees.

  6. Liver Rapid Reference Set Application: Hemken - Abbott (2015) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The aim for this testing is to find a small panel of biomarkers (n=2-5) that can be tested on the Abbott ARCHITECT automated immunoassay platform for the early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This panel of biomarkers should perform significantly better than alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) alone based on multivariate statistical analysis. This testing of the EDRN reference set will help expedite the selection of a small panel of ARCHITECT biomarkers for the early detection of HCC. The panel of ARCHITECT biomarkers Abbott plans to test include: AFP, protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II), golgi protein 73 (GP73), hepatocellular growth factor (HGF), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) and DPP4/seprase (surface expressed protease) heterodimer hybrid. PIVKA-II is abnormal des-carboxylated prothrombin (DCP) present in vitamin K deficiency.

  7. BRSCW Reference Set Application: Karen Abbott -University of Arkansas (2014) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Our earlier glycoproteomic studies have identified bisecting glycoslyation and core fucosylation changes on particular glycoproteins in endometrioid ovarian cancer tissues and plasma (Abbott et al, 2010, Proteomics). We have validated that these glycan changes occur on the same glycoproteins in serous ovarian cancer plasma using a lectin-pull down western blot assays. We would like to used pooled reference samples to develop a sensitive magnetic bead-based assay to detect these glycoproteins with bisecting and core fucosylation changes.

  8. Revisiting Abbott Thayer: non-scientific reflections about camouflage in art, war and zoology

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Roy R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the achievements of Abbott Handerson Thayer (1849–1921), an American painter and naturalist whose pioneering writings on animal camouflage addressed shared concerns among artists, zoologists and military tacticians. It discusses his beliefs about camouflage (both natural and military) in the context of his training as an artist, with particular emphasis on three of his major ideas: countershading, ruptive (or disruptive) coloration and background picturing. PMID:19000975

  9. Regional medical information network using optical memory cards and integrated services for digital network.

    PubMed

    Ogushi, Y; Misawa, T; Hayashi, Y; Ohta, Y; Suzuki, S; Horie, M; Sakashita, Y

    1995-01-01

    Since 1986, we have been developing a regional health and welfare system using optical memory cards. We have expanded the system and performed model experiments and evaluations this time. There are approximately 3000 card-holders and 23 card-reader terminals in use. They cover 50 percent of the medical facilities in the city of Isehara. Two medical clinics within neighboring cities have joined our project. Standard Deviation Index (SDI) has been introduced to standardize the numeric results of examinations. The terminals are connected with Integrated Services for Digital Network (ISDN) allowing remote access to the optical memory cards. This enhanced connectivity has allowed greater cooperation in delivering quality medical services.

  10. Abbott AxSYM Vancomycin II assay: multicenter evaluation and interference studies.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, H M; Chou, P P; Tsushima, J H; Troxil, S; Gordon, M; Avers, R J; Chiappetta, E; Duh, S H; Christenson, R H

    1998-04-01

    The authors evaluated the performance characteristics of the Abbott AxSYM Vancomycin II immunoassay in sera of patients with (n = 93 samples) and without (n = 327 patients) renal dysfunction. Correlation of vancomycin measurements with the Abbott AxSYM Vancomycin, Abbott TDx/TDxFLx, Syva enzyme-multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT), DuPont automated chemistry analyzer (ACA), and high-performance liquid chromatography methods showed acceptable correlation as indicated by: slope values >0.95, r-values >0.97, y-intercepts <1.7 microg/ml, and S(y/x) ranging from 9% to 15% of the average vancomycin value. The AxSYM Vancomycin II assay showed acceptable correlation with AxSYM vancomycin, TDx/TDxFLx, and high-performance liquid chromatography methods in 93 samples from patients with renal dysfunction. This monoclonal antibody-based assay showed no apparent interference from the presence of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) or the microbiologically inactive vancomycin crystalline degradation product (CDP). The authors conclude that the AxSYM Vancomycin II assay showed satisfactory agreement with other methods tested in this study.

  11. Optical tomography: Development of a new medical imaging modality

    SciTech Connect

    Hebden, Jeremy C.

    1998-08-28

    The demonstrated success of near-infrared spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in medicine has encouraged physicists to pursue the development of an imaging technique based on the transmittance of optical wavelengths through tissue. Potential clinical applications include a means of detecting breast disease, and a cerebral imaging modality for mapping oxygenation and haemodynamics in the brain of newborn infants. Imaging of tissues with light is severely restricted by the overwhelming scatter which occurs when optical radiation propagates through tissue. However, recent innovations in technology and the development of new tomographic reconstruction procedures suggest that a clinically viable imaging modality is achievable. In this paper the recent progress in this field of research is reviewed, and the prospects for ultimate success are discussed.

  12. THz optical design considerations and optimization for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Shijun; Garritano, James; Bajwa, Neha; Nowroozi, Bryan; Llombart, Nuria; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary D.

    2014-09-01

    THz imaging system design will play an important role making possible imaging of targets with arbitrary properties and geometries. This study discusses design consideration and imaging performance optimization techniques in THz quasioptical imaging system optics. Analysis of field and polarization distortion by off-axis parabolic (OAP) mirrors in THz imaging optics shows how distortions are carried in a series of mirrors while guiding the THz beam. While distortions of the beam profile by individual mirrors are not significant, these effects are compounded by a series of mirrors in antisymmetric orientation. It is shown that symmetric orientation of the OAP mirror effectively cancels this distortion to recover the original beam profile. Additionally, symmetric orientation can correct for some geometrical off-focusing due to misalignment. We also demonstrate an alternative method to test for overall system optics alignment by investigating the imaging performance of the tilted target plane. Asymmetric signal profile as a function of the target plane's tilt angle indicates when one or more imaging components are misaligned, giving a preferred tilt direction. Such analysis can offer additional insight into often elusive source device misalignment at an integrated system. Imaging plane tilting characteristics are representative of a 3-D modulation transfer function of the imaging system. A symmetric tilted plane is preferred to optimize imaging performance.

  13. Novel x-ray optics for medical diagnostic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuyumchyan, A.; Arvanian, V.; Kuyumchyan, D.; Aristov, V.; Shulakov, E.

    2009-08-01

    A new hard X - ray hologram with using crystal Fresnel zone plates (ZP) has been described. An image of Fourier hologram for hard X- ray is presented. X-ray phase contrast methods for medical diagnostics techniques are presented. We have developed an X-ray microscope, based on micro focus source which is capable of high resolution phasecontrast imaging and holograms. We propose a new imaging technique with the x-ray energy 8 keV. The method is expected to have wide applications in imaging of low absorbing samples such as biological and medical tissue. We used FIB to reproduction three dimension structures of damaged spinal cord of rat before and after combined treatment with NT3 and NR2D. PUBLISHER'S NOTE 12/16/09: This SPIE Proceedings paper has been updated with an erratum correcting several issues throughout the paper. The corrected paper was published in place of the earlier version on 9/1/2009. If you purchased the original version of the paper and no longer have access, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service at CustomerService@SPIEDigitalLibrary.org for assistance.

  14. Principles for new optical techniques in medical diagnostics for mHealth applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsam, Joshua Michael

    Medical diagnostics is a critical element of effective medical treatment. However, many modern and emerging diagnostic technologies are not affordable or compatible with the needs and conditions found in low-income and middle-income countries and regions. Resource-poor areas require low-cost, robust, easy-to-use, and portable diagnostics devices compatible with telemedicine (i.e. mHealth) that can be adapted to meet diverse medical needs. Many suitable devices will need to be based on optical technologies, which are used for many types of biological analyses. This dissertation describes the fabrication and detection principles for several low-cost optical technologies for mHealth applications including: (1) a webcam based multi-wavelength fluorescence plate reader, (2) a lens-free optical detector used for the detection of Botulinum A neurotoxin activity, (3) a low cost micro-array reader that allows the performance of typical fluorescence based assays demonstrated for the detection of the toxin staphylococcal enterotoxin (SEB), and (4) a wide-field flow cytometer for high throughput detection of fluorescently labeled rare cells. This dissertation discusses how these technologies can be harnessed using readily available consumer electronics components such as webcams, cell phones, CCD cameras, LEDs, and laser diodes. There are challenges in developing devices with sufficient sensitivity and specificity, and approaches are presented to overcoming these challenges to create optical detectors that can serve as low cost medical diagnostics in resource-poor settings for mHealth.

  15. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Bliss, D.E.

    1997-02-01

    Implementation of optical imagery in a diffuse inhomogeneous medium such as biological tissue requires an understanding of photon migration and multiple scattering processes which act to randomize pathlength and degrade image quality. The nature of transmitted light from soft tissue ranges from the quasi-coherent properties of the minimally scattered component to the random incoherent light of the diffuse component. Recent experimental approaches have emphasized dynamic path-sensitive imaging measurements with either ultrashort laser pulses (ballistic photons) or amplitude modulated laser light launched into tissue (photon density waves) to increase image resolution and transmissive penetration depth. Ballistic imaging seeks to compensate for these {open_quotes}fog-like{close_quotes} effects by temporally isolating the weak early-arriving image-bearing component from the diffusely scattered background using a subpicosecond optical gate superimposed on the transmitted photon time-of-flight distribution. The authors have developed a broadly wavelength tunable (470 nm -2.4 {mu}m), ultrashort amplifying optical gate for transillumination spectral imaging based on optical parametric amplification in a nonlinear crystal. The time-gated image amplification process exhibits low noise and high sensitivity, with gains greater than 104 achievable for low light levels. We report preliminary benchmark experiments in which this system was used to reconstruct, spectrally upcovert, and enhance near-infrared two-dimensional images with feature sizes of 65 {mu}m/mm{sup 2} in background optical attenuations exceeding 10{sup 12}. Phase images of test objects exhibiting both absorptive contrast and diffuse scatter were acquired using a self-referencing Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor in combination with short-pulse quasi-ballistic gating. The sensor employed a lenslet array based on binary optics technology and was sensitive to optical path distortions approaching {lambda}/100.

  16. Capillary waveguide optrodes: an approach to optical sensing in medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippitsch, Max E.; Draxler, Sonja; Kieslinger, Dietmar; Lehmann, Hartmut; Weigl, Bernhard H.

    1996-07-01

    Glass capillaries with a chemically sensitive coating on the inner surface are used as optical sensors for medical diagnostics. A capillary simultaneously serves as a sample compartment, a sensor element, and an inhomogeneous optical waveguide. Various detection schemes based on absorption, fluorescence intensity, or fluorescence lifetime are described. In absorption-based capillary waveguide optrodes the absorption in the sensor layer is analyte dependent; hence light transmission along the inhomogeneous waveguiding structure formed by the capillary wall and the sensing layer is a function of the analyte concentration. Similarly, in fluorescence-based capillary optrodes the fluorescence intensity or the fluorescence lifetime of an indicator dye fixed in the sensing layer is analyte dependent; thus the specific property of fluorescent light excited in the sensing layer and thereafter guided along the inhomogeneous waveguiding structure is a function of the analyte concentration. Both schemes are experimentally demonstrated, one with carbon dioxide as the analyte and the other one with oxygen. The device combines optical sensors with the standard glass capillaries usually applied to gather blood drops from fingertips, to yield a versatile diagnostic instrument, integrating the sample compartment, the optical sensor, and the light-collecting optics into a single piece. This ensures enhanced sensor performance as well as improved handling compared with other sensors. waveguide, blood gases, medical diagnostics.

  17. An application of an optical disk filing system to the management of medical records.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, K; Miura, T

    1990-07-01

    An optical disk filing system is a promising new method to memorize the contents of medical records. However, due to problems of image quality, input speed and durability with the disk, this has not yet been put to practical use. In the present study the image quality of the laser disk system installed in our hospital were checked, and this system was thought to be useful to store discharge summary. We developed discharge summary management system by inputting into the optical disks the discharge summary written freely by doctors and the discharge abstract automatically formed by computer.

  18. Smart medical textiles with embedded optical fibre sensors for continuous monitoring of respiratory movements during MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, J.; Narbonneau, F.; Schukar, M.; Krebber, K.; De Jonckheere, J.; Jeanne, M.; Kinet, D.; Paquet, B.; Depré, A.; D'Angelo, L. T.; Thiel, T.; Logier, R.

    2010-09-01

    We report on three respiration sensors based on pure optical technologies developed during the FP6 EU project OFSETH. The developed smart medical textiles can sense elongation up to 3%, while maintaining the stretching properties of the textile substrates for a good comfort of the patient. The sensors, based on silica and polymer fibre, are developed for monitoring of patients during MRI examination. The OFSETH harness allows a continuous measurement of respiration movements while all vitals organs are free for medical staff actions. The sensors were tested in MRI environment and on healthy adults.

  19. Comparison of the Abbott Realtime HIV-1 and HCV viral load assays with commercial competitor assays.

    PubMed

    Schutten, Martin

    2008-07-01

    The introduction of commercially available quantitative HIV-1 RNA detection methods at the end of the last century has had a significant impact on the management of patients requiring treatment. Similarly for hepatitis C virus (HCV), clinical decision-making with respect to initiation and prolonging therapy is largely based on data from viral load assays. The methods developed in the early 1990s and further improved since then still have significant drawbacks. For example, they are labor intensive, have a small dynamic range and are contamination sensitive. The development of real-time detection techniques for reverse transcription PCR has in part solved these problems. In the present review the advantages and disadvantages of the recently marketed Abbott Realtime HCV and HIV-1 viral load assays relative to their competitors will be discussed.

  20. The children's republic of science in the antebellum literature of Samuel Griswold Goodrich and Jacob Abbott.

    PubMed

    Pandora, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    The antebellum years in the United States were marked by vigorous debates about national identity in which issues of hierarchy, authority, and democratic values came under intense scrutiny. During this period, a prime objective of indigenous authors writing for American children was educating the young so they would be ready to assume their republican responsibilities. The question of how depictions and discussions about nature and science were deployed toward this end is explored by examining key texts about nature and science from the era's two most prolific and popular children's authors--Samuel Griswold Goodrich (1793-1860) and Jacob Abbott (1803-79)--and highlighting assumptions within these works about what the proper relationship should be between the search for scientific knowledge and the larger polity.

  1. Evaluating lubricating capacity of vegetal oils using Abbott-Firestone curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, C.; Cristea, G. C.; Dima, C.; Deleanu, L.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the change of functional parameters defined on the Abbott-Firestone curve in order to evaluate the surface quality of the balls from the four ball tester, after tests done with several vegetable oils. The tests were done using two grades of rapeseed oil (degummed and refined) and two grades of soybean oil (coarse and degummed) and a common transmission oil (T90). Test parameters were 200 N and 0.576 m/s (1500 rpm) for 60 minutes. For the refined rapeseed oil, the changes in shape of the Abbott-Firestone curves are more dramatic, these being characterized by high values of Spk (the average value for the wear scars on the three balls), thus being 40% of the sum Svk + Sk + Spk, percentage also obtained for the soybean oil, but the value Spk being lower. For the degummed soybean oil, the profile height of the wear scars are taller than those obtained after testing the coarse soybean oil, meaning that the degumming process has a negative influence on the worn surface quality and the lubricating capacity of this oil. Comparing the surface quality of the wear scars on fixed tested balls is a reliable method to point out the lubricant properties of the vegetable oils, especially if they are compared to a “classical” lubricant as a non-additivated transmission mineral oil T90. The best surface after testing was obtained for the soybean oil, followed by T90 oil and the degummed grades of the soybean oil and rapeseed oil (these three giving very close values for the functional parameters), but the refined rapeseed oil generated the poorest quality of the wear scars on the balls, under the same testing conditions.

  2. Gas bremsstrahlung shielding calculation for first optic enclosure of ILSF medical beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigzadeh Jalali, H.; Salimi, E.; Rahighi, J.

    2016-10-01

    Gas bremsstrahlung is generated in high energy electron storage ring accompanies the synchrotron radiation into the beamlines and strike the various components of the beamline. In this paper, radiation shielding calculation for secondary gas bremsstrahlung is performed for the first optics enclosure (FOE) of medical beamline of the Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF). Dose equivalent rate (DER) calculation is accomplished using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. A comprehensive study of DER distribution at the back wall, sides and roof is given.

  3. 3D shape tracking of minimally invasive medical instruments using optical frequency domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Francois; Kanti Mandal, Koushik; Loranger, Sebastien; Watanabe Fernandes, Eric Hideki; Kashyap, Raman; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    We propose here a new alternative to provide real-time device tracking during minimally invasive interventions using a truly-distributed strain sensor based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) in optical fibers. The guidance of minimally invasive medical instruments such as needles or catheters (ex. by adding a piezoelectric coating) has been the focus of extensive research in the past decades. Real-time tracking of instruments in medical interventions facilitates image guidance and helps the user to reach a pre-localized target more precisely. Image-guided systems using ultrasound imaging and shape sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBG)-embedded optical fibers can provide retroactive feedback to the user in order to reach the targeted areas with even more precision. However, ultrasound imaging with electro-magnetic tracking cannot be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suite, while shape sensors based on FBG embedded in optical fibers provides discrete values of the instrument position, which requires approximations to be made to evaluate its global shape. This is why a truly-distributed strain sensor based on OFDR could enhance the tracking accuracy. In both cases, since the strain is proportional to the radius of curvature of the fiber, a strain sensor can provide the three-dimensional shape of medical instruments by simply inserting fibers inside the devices. To faithfully follow the shape of the needle in the tracking frame, 3 fibers glued in a specific geometry are used, providing 3 degrees of freedom along the fiber. Near real-time tracking of medical instruments is thus obtained offering clear advantages for clinical monitoring in remotely controlled catheter or needle guidance. We present results demonstrating the promising aspects of this approach as well the limitations of using the OFDR technique.

  4. [Correction of light refraction and reflection in medical transmission optical tomography].

    PubMed

    Tereshchenko, S A; Potapov, D A

    2002-01-01

    The effects of light refraction and reflection on the quality of image reconstruction in medical transmission optical tomography of high-scattering media are considered. It has been first noted that light refraction not only distorts the geometric scheme of measurements, but may lead to the appearance of object areas that cannot be scanned. Some ways of decreasing the effect of refraction on the reconstruction of spatial distribution of the extinction coefficient are stated.

  5. Capillary waveguide optrodes: an approach to optical sensing in medical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Lippitsch, M E; Draxler, S; Kieslinger, D; Lehmann, H; Weigl, B H

    1996-07-01

    Glass capillaries with a chemically sensitive coating on the inner surface are used as optical sensors for medical diagnostics. A capillary simultaneously serves as a sample compartment, a sensor element, and an inhomogeneous optical waveguide. Various detection schemes based on absorption, fluorescence intensity, or fluorescence lifetime are described. In absorption-based capillary waveguide optrodes the absorption in the sensor layer is analyte dependent; hence light transmission along the inhomogeneous waveguiding structure formed by the capillary wall and the sensing layer is a function of the analyte concentration. Similarly, in fluorescence-based capillary optrodes the fluorescence intensity or the fluorescence lifetime of an indicator dye fixed in the sensing layer is analyte dependent; thus the specific property of fluorescent light excited in the sensing layer and thereafter guided along the inhomogeneous waveguiding structure is a function of the analyte concentration. Both schemes are experimentally demonstrated, one with carbon dioxide as the analyte and the other one with oxygen. The device combines optical sensors with the standard glass capillaries usually applied to gather blood drops from fingertips, to yield a versatile diagnostic instrument, integrating the sample compartment, the optical sensor, and the light-collecting optics into a single piece. This ensures enhanced sensor performance as well as improved handling compared with other sensors.

  6. Development of optical FBG force measurement system for the medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hoseok; Kim, Kiyoung; Suh, Jungwook; Lee, Jungju

    2009-12-01

    Haptic feedback plays a very important role in medical surgery. In minimally invasive surgery (MIS), however, very long and stiff bar of instruments take haptic feeling away from the surgeon. In minimally invasive robotic surgery (MIRS), moreover, haptic feelings are totally eliminated. Previous researchers have reported that the absence of force feedback increased the average force magnitude applied to the tissue by at least 50%, and increased the peakforce magnitude by at least a factor of two. Therefore, it is very important to provide haptic information in MIRS. Recently, many sensors are being developed for MIS or MIRS, but they have some obstacles in their application to real situations of medical surgery. The most critical problems are size limit and sterilizability. Optical fiber sensors are one of the most suitable sensors for this environment. Especially, optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor has one additional advantage than the other optical fiber sensors. FBG sensor is not influenced by intensity of light source. In this paper, we would like to present the initial results of study on the application of the FBG sensor to measure reflected forces in MIRS environments and then suggest the possibility of successful application to the MIRS systems.

  7. Development of optical FBG force measurement system for the medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hoseok; Kim, Kiyoung; Suh, Jungwook; Lee, Jungju

    2010-03-01

    Haptic feedback plays a very important role in medical surgery. In minimally invasive surgery (MIS), however, very long and stiff bar of instruments take haptic feeling away from the surgeon. In minimally invasive robotic surgery (MIRS), moreover, haptic feelings are totally eliminated. Previous researchers have reported that the absence of force feedback increased the average force magnitude applied to the tissue by at least 50%, and increased the peakforce magnitude by at least a factor of two. Therefore, it is very important to provide haptic information in MIRS. Recently, many sensors are being developed for MIS or MIRS, but they have some obstacles in their application to real situations of medical surgery. The most critical problems are size limit and sterilizability. Optical fiber sensors are one of the most suitable sensors for this environment. Especially, optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor has one additional advantage than the other optical fiber sensors. FBG sensor is not influenced by intensity of light source. In this paper, we would like to present the initial results of study on the application of the FBG sensor to measure reflected forces in MIRS environments and then suggest the possibility of successful application to the MIRS systems.

  8. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy. PMID:18458764

  9. Low-cost medical image storage and manipulation using optical disk subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, William V., Jr.; Marx, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    Traditionally, medical imaging has required large capital investments into workstations and storage subsystems. Many vendors have chosen to offer proprietary systems which are expensive to develop and costly to the institutions which purchase them. Our experience has been that this is unnecessary; most traditional imaging functions in the digital modalities of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MM) can be performed using off-the-shelf hardware with relatisely inexpensive software. In order to reduce the cost of medical imaging, our approach has been to choose computers and storage subsystems that are efficient, inexpensive, and easy-to-use (after all, the users are interested in practicing medicine, not computer science.) With these goals in mind, we chose to use a general purpose computer (the Apple Macintosh Ilci) with two types of high-capacity optical storage devices (both magneto-optical and write once, read multiple (WORM) disc subsystems.) We have developed a powerful, yet user-friendly medical imaging workstation oriented towards radiologists, orthopadic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and other users of medical images. In addition to providing inexpensive storage, the workstation is capable of multiplanar reformatting (MPR), 3D MM angiography, and other image processing functions. The resulting images may be annotated, windowed, and filmed on to 14x17" radiology film for presentation to the referring physicians and their patients. This system can be considered to be a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) for private physicians and small clinics; further, it is small enough for desktop environments and inexpensive enough for clinicians to purchase.

  10. Survey of fishes and environmental conditions in Abbotts Lagoon, Point Reyes National Seashore, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, M.K.; Martin, B.A.

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to gain a better understanding of fishery resources in Abbotts Lagoon, Point Reyes National Seashore. During February/March, May, August, and November 1999, fish were sampled with floating variable-mesh gill nets and small minnow traps from as many as 14 sites in the lagoon. Water temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, total ammonia(NH3 + NH4+), salinity, turbidity, water depth, and bottom substrate composition were also measured at each site. A total of 2,656 fish represented by eight species was captured during the study. Gill nets captured Sacramento perch, Archoplites interruptus; largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides; Pacific herring, Clupea pallasi; prickly sculpin, Cottus asper, silver surfperch, Hyperprosopon ellipticum; longfin smelt, Spirinchus thaleichthys; and striped bass, Morone saxatilis; whereas minnow traps captured Sacramento perch; prickly sculpin; and threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus. Cluster analysis (Ward's minimum variance method of fish catch statistics identified two major species assemblages-the first dominated by Sacramento perch and, to a lesser extent, by largemouth bass, and the second dominated by Pacific herring and threespine stickleback. Simple discriminant analysis of environmental variables indicated that salinity contributed the most towards separating the two assemblages.

  11. Hidden processes in structural representations: A reply to Abbott, Austerweil, and Griffiths (2015).

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael N; Hills, Thomas T; Todd, Peter M

    2015-07-01

    In recent work exploring the semantic fluency task, we found evidence indicative of optimal foraging policies in memory search that mirror search in physical environments. We determined that a 2-stage cue-switching model applied to a memory representation from a semantic space model best explained the human data. Abbott, Austerweil, and Griffiths demonstrate how these patterns could also emerge from a random walk applied to a network representation of memory based on human free-association norms. However, a major representational issue limits any conclusions that can be drawn about the process model comparison: Our process model operated on a memory space constructed from a learning model, whereas their model used human behavioral data from a task that is quite similar to the behavior they attempt to explain. Predicting semantic fluency (e.g., how likely it is to say cat after dog in a sequence of animals) from free association (how likely it is to say cat when given dog as a cue) should be possible with a relatively simple retrieval mechanism. The 2 tasks both tap memory, but they also share a common process of retrieval. Assuming that semantic memory is a network from free-association behavior embeds variance due to the shared retrieval process directly into the representation. A simple process mechanism is then sufficient to simulate semantic fluency because much of the requisite process complexity may already be hidden in the representation. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Anisotropic optical distribution of powder phosphor materials applied in medical imaging instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaparinos, P. F.

    2016-02-01

    Image quality for medical purposes is related to the useful diagnostic information that can be extracted from an image. The performance of indirect X-ray detectors, which in turn affects the quality of the medical image, can be significantly influenced by the characteristics of the phosphor, employed to convert incident radiation into emitted light. Given the technological and medical importance of phosphor materials, understanding the fundamental effects of optical anisotropy is crucial. The purpose of the present paper was to examine the influence of optical anisotropy in optical diffusion within the powder phosphor-based X-ray detectors. The present investigation was based on Mie scattering theory and Monte Carlo simulation techniques. The variation of the anisotropy factor was examined for: (1) light wavelengths in the range 400-700 nm, (2) particle refractive index between 1.5 and 2 and (3) three regions of particle sizes: nanoscale (from 10 up to 100 nm), submicron scale (from 100 nm up to 1 μm), and microscale (from 1 up to 10 μm). In addition, optical diffusion performance was carried out considering: (a) anisotropy factor values 0.2, 0.5, 0.8 which represent different aspects of light propagation after scattering and (b) phosphors of different layer thickness, 100 (thin layer) and 300 μm (thick layer), respectively. Results showed that the highest variation on the anisotropy factor was observed in the submicron scale, and, in particular, for grain diameters between 100 and 600 nm (increase from 0.1 up to 0.8). In addition, Monte Carlo simulations showed that the spread of light photons decreases (i.e., high spatial resolution) with the decrease in the anisotropy factor. In particular, the FWHM was found to decrease with the anisotropy factor: (1) 11.4 % at 100 μm and 4.2 %, at 300 μm layer thickness, for light extinction coefficient 0.217 μm-1 and (2) 1.9 % at 100 μm and 2.0 %, at 300 μm layer thickness, for light extinction coefficient 3 μm-1

  13. Complete optical stack modeling for CMOS-based medical x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyazin, Alexander S.; Peters, Inge M.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a simulation tool for modeling the performance of CMOS-based medical x-ray detectors, based on the Monte Carlo toolkit GEANT4. Following the Fujita-Lubberts-Swank approach recently reported by Star-Lack et al., we calculate modulation transfer function MTF(f), noise power spectrum NPS(f) and detective quantum efficiency DQE(f) curves. The complete optical stack is modeled, including scintillator, fiber optic plate (FOP), optical adhesive and CMOS image sensor. For critical parts of the stack, detailed models have been developed, taking into account their respective microstructure. This includes two different scintillator types: Gd2O2S:Tb (GOS) and CsI:Tl. The granular structure of the former is modeled using anisotropic Mie scattering. The columnar structure of the latter is introduced into calculations directly, using the parameterization capabilities of GEANT4. The underlying homogeneous CsI layer is also incorporated into the model as well as the optional reflective layer on top of the scintillator screen or the protective polymer top coat. The FOP is modeled as an array of hexagonal bundles of fibers. The simulated CMOS stack consists of layers of Si3N4 and SiO2 on top of a silicon pixel array. The model is validated against measurements of various test detector structures, using different x-ray spectra (RQA5 and RQA-M2), showing good match between calculated and measured MTF(f) and DQE(f) curves.

  14. A practical application of computer pattern recognition research: the Abbott ADC-500 differential classifier.

    PubMed

    Green, J E

    1979-01-01

    The ADC-500 is a new blood cell differential classifier manufactured by Abbott Laboratories. It performs 500-cell leukocyte differentials on both normal and abnormal cells, evaluates red cell morphology and estimates platelet sufficiency at a rate of 40 to 50 samples per hour in stand-alone operation. The ADC-500 system consists of a spinner which prepares a uniform blood monolayer on a slide, a stainer which reproducibly stains the slide with Wright's stain, an encoder which attaches an instrument and human readable identification to the slide and an analyzer which accepts a stack of up to 50 slides, evaluates these slides and prints the results and the slide identification on report forms. The system's analysis rate, which represents a 5- to 10-fold increase over other commercially available differential counters, requires a number of specialized techniques for its realization. One key to this performance is the development of a high speed X-Y slide positioning stage which can move to a new cell and settle in 50 msec. Another is the high degree of parallelism used in the system structure and the pipelining of the data processing. A third is the development of uniform and repeatable sample preparation modules. Within the analyzer module, the autofocus, white cell acquisition and high resolution cell analysis systems are independent and operate in parallel. At the same time within the high resolution cell analysis system, one cell is acquired; the digitized image of a second processed; and a third is classified using pattern recognition techniques. All of these tasks, except focus, are under the control of a minicomputer system. Tests of the system reveal good accuracy and an improvement in precision due to the increase in the number of counted cells.

  15. Evaluation of the Abbott IMx automated immunoassay of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Vessella, R L; Noteboom, J; Lange, P H

    1992-10-01

    We detail the performance characteristics of the new IMx PSA immunoassay developed by Abbott Laboratories, addressing PSA recovery, assay reproducibility, standard curve storage, lower limit of detection, dilution linearity, and correlation with the Hybritech Tandem-R PSA immunoassay. We analyzed 686 sera for PSA retrospectively, testing 555 of these concurrently with the IMx and the Tandem-R immunoassays. The IMx PSA standard curve was linear from 0 to 100 micrograms/L, and curve storage was maintained for 4 weeks. The lower limit of detection of the IMx PSA assay was < or = 0.03 microgram/L; allowing for the assay precision yielded a biological detection limit of 0.06 microgram/L. We conservatively set the clinical threshold at 0.1 microgram/L. Regression analysis of dilution linearity involving 10 samples (0.44-200 micrograms/L) resulted in coefficients of correlation ranging from 0.9972 to 1.000. Reproducibility studies with 18 specimens within the range of 0.39-413.67 micrograms/L gave intra- and interassay CVs < 6.5%. The interassay 95% confidence interval for a specimen containing 0.06 microgram of PSA per liter was 0.03-0.09 microgram/L. Correlation between IMx and Tandem-R PSA assay results was excellent: r = 0.9909 and slope = 0.95. Overall, the IMx PSA immunoassay, with the conveniencies of automation, curve storage, and nonisotopic handling, provided an improved lower limit of PSA detection, which allows for earlier indication of residual or recurrent disease after radical prostatectomy.

  16. Optical Characteristics Investigation of the Cold Argon Plasma Jet for the Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Kuok, Shi; Malakhov, Yury; Bach, Sy Minh; Korotkikh, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    The medical setup was designed for the treatment of wounds, disinfection of inflammation, for the destruction of damaged cells. The results of experimental determination of the optical characteristics of Argon cold plasma at atmospheric pressure are presented in the paper. The main components of the experimental setup are plasma torch, spectrometer, photo-electron multiplier, oscilloscope, gas consumption QAr = 1 - 20 l/min. Spectrum of the plasma jet is obtained using the grating spectrometer Spectra with radiometric calibration, operating in the visible range λ = 380 - 760 nm. The sun-blind photodetector was used for determination of the intensity of radiation in the UV range λ = 190 - 380 nm. The emission spectrum consists of a continuous radiation and the emissions of atoms and ions ArI and ArII. The analysis of spectral lines was carried out.

  17. Optical fiber-based MR-compatible sensors for medical applications: an overview.

    PubMed

    Taffoni, Fabrizio; Formica, Domenico; Saccomandi, Paola; Di Pino, Giovanni; Schena, Emiliano

    2013-10-18

    During last decades, Magnetic Resonance (MR)--compatible sensors based on different techniques have been developed due to growing demand for application in medicine. There are several technological solutions to design MR-compatible sensors, among them, the one based on optical fibers presents several attractive features. The high elasticity and small size allow designing miniaturized fiber optic sensors (FOS) with metrological characteristics (e.g., accuracy, sensitivity, zero drift, and frequency response) adequate for most common medical applications; the immunity from electromagnetic interference and the absence of electrical connection to the patient make FOS suitable to be used in high electromagnetic field and intrinsically safer than conventional technologies. These two features further heightened the potential role of FOS in medicine making them especially attractive for application in MRI. This paper provides an overview of MR-compatible FOS, focusing on the sensors employed for measuring physical parameters in medicine (i.e., temperature, force, torque, strain, and position). The working principles of the most promising FOS are reviewed in terms of their relevant advantages and disadvantages, together with their applications in medicine.

  18. Optical Fiber-Based MR-Compatible Sensors for Medical Applications: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Taffoni, Fabrizio; Formica, Domenico; Saccomandi, Paola; Di Pino, Giovanni; Schena, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    During last decades, Magnetic Resonance (MR)—compatible sensors based on different techniques have been developed due to growing demand for application in medicine. There are several technological solutions to design MR-compatible sensors, among them, the one based on optical fibers presents several attractive features. The high elasticity and small size allow designing miniaturized fiber optic sensors (FOS) with metrological characteristics (e.g., accuracy, sensitivity, zero drift, and frequency response) adequate for most common medical applications; the immunity from electromagnetic interference and the absence of electrical connection to the patient make FOS suitable to be used in high electromagnetic field and intrinsically safer than conventional technologies. These two features further heightened the potential role of FOS in medicine making them especially attractive for application in MRI. This paper provides an overview of MR-compatible FOS, focusing on the sensors employed for measuring physical parameters in medicine (i.e., temperature, force, torque, strain, and position). The working principles of the most promising FOS are reviewed in terms of their relevant advantages and disadvantages, together with their applications in medicine. PMID:24145918

  19. Optical sensors for therapeutic drug monitoring of antidepressants for a better medication adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Anne K.; Hess, Stefan; Gauglitz, Günter

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring provides the attending physicians with detailed information on a patient's individual serum level especially during long-term medication. Due to the fact that each patient tolerates drugs or their metabolites differently a medication adjustment can reduce the number and intensity of noticeable side-effects. In particular, psychotropic drugs can cause unpleasant side-effects that affect a patient's life almost as much as the mental disease itself. The tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline is commonly used for treatment of depressions and was selected for the development of an immunoassay using the direct optical sensor technique Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (RIfS). RIfS is a simple, robust and label-free method for direct monitoring of binding events on glass surfaces. Binding to the surface causes a shift of the interference spectrum by a change of the refractive index or physical thickness. This technique can be used for time-resolved observation of association and dissociation of amitriptyline (antigen) and a specific antibody using the binding inhibition test format. An amitriptyline derivative is immobilized on the sensor surface and a specific amount of antibodies can bind to the surface unless the binding is inhibited by free amitriptyline in a sample. No fluorescent label is needed making the whole assay less expensive than label-based methods. With this recently developed immunoassay amitriptyline concentrations in buffer (PBS) can easily be detected down to 500 ng/L.

  20. Optical Emission Spectroscopy in PECVD Helps Modulate Key Features in Biofunctional Coatings for Medical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Miguel; Michael, Praveesuda; Filipe, Elysse; Wise, Steven; Bilek, Marcela; University of Sydney Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We explore the use of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) diagnostic tools as a process feedback control strategy in plasma-assisted deposition of biofunctional coatings. Hydrogenated carbon nitride coatings are deposited on medical-grade metallic substrates using radio-frequency (rf) discharges sustained in C2H2/N2/Ar gaseous mixtures. The discharge is generated by capacitively coupling the rf power (supplied at f = 13.56 MHz) to the plasma and the substrates are electrically biased using a pulse generator to provide microsecond square profiled pulses at voltages in the range |Vbias| = 250 V - 1000 V. Nitrogen content and CN bonding configurations in the coatings follow similar trends to those of CN radicals and nitrogen molecular ions in the discharge. OES is used as a non-intrusive diagnostic technique to identify a suitable window of process parameters and ultimately achieve biofunctional interfaces compatible with current clinical demands. Importantly, we demonstrate that key features of the coatings can be modulated and made suitable for blood and/or tissue contacting medical implants, such as coronary stents and orthopaedic implants. The coatings are mechanically robust, inherently non-thrombogenic and can be readily modified, enabling an easy functionalization through the immobilization of biological molecules in a bioactive conformation.

  1. Final Report for The University of Texas at Arlington Optical Medical Imaging Section of Advanced Imaging Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Khosrow Behbehani

    2013-02-26

    The goal of this project was to create state-of-the-art optical medical imaging laboratories for the Biomedical Engineering faculty and student researchers of the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) on the campus of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). This has been successfully achieved. These laboratories provide an unprecedented opportunity for the bioengineers (from UTA) to bring about new breakthroughs in medical imaging using optics. Specifically, three major laboratories have been successfully established and state-of-the-art scientific instruments have been placed in the labs. As a result of this grant, numerous journal and conference publications have been generated, patents for new inventions have been filed and received, and many additional grants for the continuation of the research has been received.

  2. Medical and safety monitoring system over an in-cabin optical wireless network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinos, D.; Leonidas, F.; Vlissidis, N.; Giovanis, C.; Pagiatakis, G.; Aidinis, C.; Vassilopoulos, C.; Pistner, T.; Schmitt, N.; Klaue, J.

    2011-02-01

    An integrated health and safety monitoring system for aircraft environments using commercially available medical sensor modules and custom made safety sensors in conjunction with an appropriate database supervised through a human-machine interface is implemented. The application described aims at preventing critical health- or safety-related situations during the flight. The health monitoring part of the system is capable of collecting all relevant data, essential in analysing a passenger's health profile. These data, comprising of body temperature, blood pressure, pulse oximetry and electrocardiogram, are throughput and transmitted over a wireless optical intra-cabin link to a server. Furthermore, and in order to reduce the cabin crew workload, along with the health data from a specific passenger group, seat-embedded safety sensors provide information for all passengers' flight safety parameters (such as table upright, seat-belt closed, etc.). The data gathered by the system in a central server can, in its entirety, be stored, processed or acted upon in real time.

  3. Medical devices utilizing optical fibers for simultaneous power, communications and control

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Hagans, Karla G.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter; Benett, William J.; Clough, Robert E.; DaSilva, Luiz B.; Celliers, Peter M.

    2003-06-10

    A medical device is constructed in the basic form of a catheter having a distal end for insertion into and manipulation within a body and a proximal end providing for a user to control the manipulation of the distal end within the body. A fiberoptic cable is disposed within the catheter and having a distal end proximate to the distal end of the catheter and a proximal end for external coupling of laser light energy. A laser-light-to-mechanical-power converter is connected to receive light from the distal end of the fiber optic cable and may include a photo-voltaic cell and an electromechanical motor or a heat-sensitive photo-thermal material. An electronic sensor is connected to receive electrical power from said distal end of the fiberoptic cable and is connected to provide signal information about a particular physical environment and communicated externally through the fiberoptic cable to the proximal end thereof. A mechanical sensor is attached to the distal end of the fiberoptic cable and connected to provide light signal information about a particular physical environment and communicated externally through the fiberoptic cable.

  4. Body-monitoring and health supervision by means of optical fiber-based sensing systems in medical textiles.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Brit M; Scherer, Lukas J; Boesel, Luciano F; Wolf, Martin; Bona, Gian-Luca; Rossi, René M

    2015-02-18

    Long-term monitoring with optical fibers has moved into the focus of attention due to the applicability for medical measurements. Within this Review, setups of flexible, unobtrusive body-monitoring systems based on optical fibers and the respective measured vital parameters are in focus. Optical principles are discussed as well as the interaction of light with tissue. Optical fiber-based sensors that are already used in first trials are primarily selected for the section on possible applications. These medical textiles include the supervision of respiration, cardiac output, blood pressure, blood flow and its saturation with hemoglobin as well as oxygen, pressure, shear stress, mobility, gait, temperature, and electrolyte balance. The implementation of these sensor concepts prompts the development of wearable smart textiles. Thus, current sensing techniques and possibilities within photonic textiles are reviewed leading to multiparameter designs. Evaluation of these designs should show the great potential of optical fibers for the introduction into textiles especially due to the benefit of immunity to electromagnetic radiation. Still, further improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio is often necessary to develop a commercial monitoring system.

  5. [Analytical performances of real-time PCR by Abbott RealTime CMV with m2000 for the detection of cytomegalovirus in urine].

    PubMed

    De Monte, Anne; Cannavo, Isabelle; Caramella, Anne; Ollier, Laurence; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the leading cause of sensoneurinal disability due to infectious congenital disease. The diagnosis of congenital CMV infection is based on the search of CMV in the urine within the first two weeks of life. Viral culture of urine is the gold standard. However, the PCR is highly sensitive and faster. It is becoming an alternative choice. The objective of this study is the validation of real-time PCR by Abbott RealTime CMV with m2000 for the detection of cytomegalovirus in urine. Repeatability, reproducibility, detection limit and inter-sample contamination were evaluated. Urine samples from patients (n=141) were collected and analyzed simultaneously in culture and PCR in order to assess the correlation of these two methods. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR were also calculated. The Abbott RealTime CMV PCR in urine is an automated and sensitive method (detection limit 200 UI/mL). Fidelity is very good (standard deviation of repeatability: 0.08 to 0.15 LogUI/mL and reproducibility 0.18 LogUI/mL). We can note a good correlation between culture and Abbott RealTime CMV PCR (kappa 96%). When considering rapid culture as reference, real-time PCR was highly sensitive (100%) and specific (98.2%). The real-time PCR by Abbott RealTime CMV with m2000 is optimal for CMV detection in urine.

  6. Comparison of Perceptions of "Preparedness" of John Abbott C.E.G.E.P. Nursing Graduates: Prior to Graduation and After.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iton, Carmen; Sabiston, Judy

    A study of John Abbott College's nursing graduates was conducted to determine how well prepared for their professional responsibilities the graduates saw themselves just prior to graduation and later after working in the nursing field. A sample of 98 nursing students who graduated between 1986 and 1988 was surveyed, with 93% responding to the…

  7. Industrywide studies report: a walk through survey of Ross Laboratories (Division of Abbott Laboratories), Columbus, Ohio. [Ethylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Greife, A.; Steenland, K.

    1985-10-02

    A walk-through survey was conducted at Ross Laboratories, a Division of Abbott Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio in August, 1985. The purpose of the survey was to determine the feasibility of including the facility in a NIOSH industry wide mortality/industrial hygiene survey of ethylene oxide. The facility produced infant formula and infant related products, including nipples. The company had a full time nurse on the first and second shifts. A physician was available on a contract basis. New employees were given preemployment physicals. Employees received annual physicals until 1982 after which they became optional. The physicals did not include any components relating to ethylene-oxide exposure. The authors conclude that the personnel records are not adequate to identify a cohort of exposed individuals at the facility. The facility will not be included in the NIOSH study.

  8. The Abbott Architect c8000: analytical performance and productivity characteristics of a new analyzer applied to general chemistry testing.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Daniela; Seyfarth, Michael; Dibbelt, Leif

    2005-01-01

    Applying basic potentiometric and photometric assays, we evaluated the fully automated random access chemistry analyzer Architect c8000, a new member of the Abbott Architect system family, with respect to both its analytical and operational performance and compared it to an established high-throughput chemistry platform, the Abbott Aeroset. Our results demonstrate that intra- and inter-assay imprecision, inaccuracy, lower limit of detection and linear range of the c8000 generally meet actual requirements of laboratory diagnosis; there were only rare exceptions, e.g. assays for plasma lipase or urine uric acid which apparently need to be improved by additional rinsing of reagent pipettors. Even with plasma exhibiting CK activities as high as 40.000 U/l, sample carryover by the c8000 could not be detected. Comparison of methods run on the c8000 and the Aeroset revealed correlation coefficients of 0.98-1.00; if identical chemistries were applied on both analyzers, slopes of regression lines approached unity. With typical laboratory workloads including 10-20% STAT samples and up to 10% samples with high analyte concentrations demanding dilutional reruns, steady-state throughput numbers of 700 to 800 tests per hour were obtained with the c8000. The system generally responded to STAT orders within 2 minutes yielding analytical STAT order completion times of 5 to 15 minutes depending on the type and number of assays requested per sample. Due to its extended test and sample processing capabilities and highly comfortable software, the c8000 may meet the varying needs of clinical laboratories rather well.

  9. 78 FR 11208 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... approval application for the MitraClip Delivery System sponsored by Abbott Vascular. The system consists...

  10. 75 FR 81282 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... PMA supplement for the RX Acculink Carotid Stent System, sponsored by Abbott Vascular. The RX...

  11. Rare-earth-doped materials with application to optical signal processing, quantum information science, and medical imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, R. L.; Thiel, C. W.; Sun, Y.; Böttger, Thomas; Macfarlane, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Unique spectroscopic properties of isolated rare earth ions in solids offer optical linewidths rivaling those of trapped single atoms and enable a variety of recent applications. We design rare-earth-doped crystals, ceramics, and fibers with persistent or transient "spectral hole" recording properties for applications including high-bandwidth optical signal processing where light and our solids replace the high-bandwidth portion of the electronics; quantum cryptography and information science including the goal of storage and recall of single photons; and medical imaging technology for the 700-900 nm therapeutic window. Ease of optically manipulating rare-earth ions in solids enables capturing complex spectral information in 105 to 108 frequency bins. Combining spatial holography and spectral hole burning provides a capability for processing high-bandwidth RF and optical signals with sub-MHz spectral resolution and bandwidths of tens to hundreds of GHz for applications including range-Doppler radar and high bandwidth RF spectral analysis. Simply stated, one can think of these crystals as holographic recording media capable of distinguishing up to 108 different colors. Ultra-narrow spectral holes also serve as a vibration-insensitive sub-kHz frequency reference for laser frequency stabilization to a part in 1013 over tens of milliseconds. The unusual properties and applications of spectral hole burning of rare earth ions in optical materials are reviewed. Experimental results on the promising Tm3+:LiNbO3 material system are presented and discussed for medical imaging applications. Finally, a new application of these materials as dynamic optical filters for laser noise suppression is discussed along with experimental demonstrations and theoretical modeling of the process.

  12. Field evaluation of Abbott Real Time HIV-1 Qualitative test for early infant diagnosis using dried blood spots samples in comparison to Roche COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Qual test in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joy; Omuomo, Kenneth; Anyango, Emily; Kingwara, Leonard; Basiye, Frank; Morwabe, Alex; Shanmugam, Vedapuri; Nguyen, Shon; Sabatier, Jennifer; Zeh, Clement; Ellenberger, Dennis

    2014-08-01

    Timely diagnosis and treatment of infants infected with HIV are critical for reducing infant mortality. High-throughput automated diagnostic tests like Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Qual Test (Roche CAPCTM Qual) and the Abbott Real Time HIV-1 Qualitative (Abbott Qualitative) can be used to rapidly expand early infant diagnosis testing services. In this study, the performance characteristics of the Abbott Qualitative were evaluated using two hundred dried blood spots (DBS) samples (100 HIV-1 positive and 100 HIV-1 negative) collected from infants attending the antenatal facilities in Kisumu, Kenya. The Abbott Qualitative results were compared to the diagnostic testing completed using the Roche CAPCTM Qual in Kenya. The sensitivity and specificity of the Abbott Qualitative were 99.0% (95% CI: 95.0-100.0) and 100.0% (95% CI: 96.0-100.0), respectively, and the overall reproducibility was 98.0% (95% CI: 86.0-100.0). The limits of detection for the Abbott Qualitative and Roche CAPCTM Qual were 56.5 and 6.9copies/mL at 95% CIs (p=0.005), respectively. The study findings demonstrate that the Abbott Qualitative test is a practical option for timely diagnosis of HIV in infants.

  13. Miniature fiber optic pressure sensor for medical applications: an opportunity for intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, E.; Pham, A.; Rioux, S.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we present how a miniature fiber optic pressure sensor based on micro-optical mechanical systems (MOMS) could solve most of the problems associated with fluidic pressure transduction presently used for triggering purposes in IABP therapy. The small size of the MOMS (0 550 μm) allows a positioning of the sensor directly at the tip of the intra-aortic catheter, exactly where the pressure should be monitored. With outstanding performances in terms of resolution and frequency fidelity, this absolute pressure sensor can precisely detect small pressure variations such as the dicrotic notch in the intra-aortic pressure waveform, which is used as a trigger point in IABP therapy. Such technology could probably help in the development of a less invasive therapy with reduced catheter size associated with reduction of vascular complications such as ischemia. The presented optical fiber sensor has intrinsic immunity to electromagnetic fields and noise perturbations. Furthermore, the patented white-light cross-correlation technology of the signal conditioner makes it immune to optical fiber binding and highly tolerant to optical losses. Such solution is extremely well adapted for in situ pressure monitoring in many medical applications.

  14. Development of optical fiber Bragg grating force-reflection sensor system of medical application for safe minimally invasive robotic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hoseok; Kim, Kiyoung; Lee, Jungju

    2011-07-01

    Force feedback plays a very important role in medical surgery. In minimally invasive surgery (MIS), however, the very long and stiff bars of surgical instruments greatly diminish force feedback for the surgeon. In the case of minimally invasive robotic surgery (MIRS), force feedback is totally eliminated. Previous researchers have reported that the absence of force feedback increased the average force magnitude applied to the tissue by at least 50%, and increased the peak force magnitude by at least a factor of two. Therefore, it is very important to provide force information in MIRS. Recently, many sensors are being developed for MIS and MIRS, but some obstacles to their application in actual medical surgery must be surmounted. The most critical problems are size limit and sterilizability. Optical fiber sensors are among the most suitable sensors for the surgical environment. The optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor, in particular, offers an important additional advantage over other optical fiber sensors in that it is not influenced by the intensity of the light source. In this paper, we present the initial results of a study on the application of a FBG sensor to measure reflected forces in MIRS environments and suggest the possibility of successful application to MIRS systems.

  15. Fully automated quantification of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in whole blood with the new sensitive Abbott RealTime CMV assay in the era of the CMV international standard.

    PubMed

    Schnepf, Nathalie; Scieux, Catherine; Resche-Riggon, Matthieu; Feghoul, Linda; Xhaard, Alienor; Gallien, Sébastien; Molina, Jean-Michel; Socié, Gérard; Viglietti, Denis; Simon, François; Mazeron, Marie-Christine; Legoff, Jérôme

    2013-07-01

    Fully standardized reproducible and sensitive quantification assays for cytomegalovirus (CMV) are needed to better define thresholds for antiviral therapy initiation and interruption. We evaluated the newly released Abbott RealTime CMV assay for CMV quantification in whole blood (WB) that includes automated extraction and amplification (m2000 RealTime system). Sensitivity, accuracy, linearity, and intra- and interassay variability were validated in a WB matrix using Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD) panels and the WHO international standard (IS). The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 1.37% and 2.09% at 5 log10 copies/ml and 2.41% and 3.80% at 3 log10 copies/ml, respectively. According to expected values for the QCMD and Abbott RealTime CMV methods, the lower limits of quantification were 104 and <50 copies/ml, respectively. The conversion factor between international units and copies (2.18), determined from serial dilutions of the WHO IS in WB, was significantly different from the factor provided by the manufacturer (1.56) (P = 0.001). Results from 302 clinical samples were compared with those from the Qiagen artus CMV assay on the same m2000 RealTime system. The two assays provided highly concordant results (concordance correlation coefficient, 0.92), but the Abbott RealTime CMV assay detected and quantified, respectively, 20.6% and 47.8% more samples than the Qiagen/artus CMV assay. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the results, along with the automation, fulfilled the quality requirements for implementation of the Abbott RealTime CMV assay in clinical settings. Our results highlight the need for careful validation of conversion factors provided by the manufacturers for the WHO IS in WB to allow future comparison of results obtained with different assays.

  16. Fully Automated Quantification of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in Whole Blood with the New Sensitive Abbott RealTime CMV Assay in the Era of the CMV International Standard

    PubMed Central

    Schnepf, Nathalie; Scieux, Catherine; Resche-Riggon, Matthieu; Feghoul, Linda; Xhaard, Alienor; Gallien, Sébastien; Molina, Jean-Michel; Socié, Gérard; Viglietti, Denis; Simon, François; Mazeron, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    Fully standardized reproducible and sensitive quantification assays for cytomegalovirus (CMV) are needed to better define thresholds for antiviral therapy initiation and interruption. We evaluated the newly released Abbott RealTime CMV assay for CMV quantification in whole blood (WB) that includes automated extraction and amplification (m2000 RealTime system). Sensitivity, accuracy, linearity, and intra- and interassay variability were validated in a WB matrix using Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD) panels and the WHO international standard (IS). The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 1.37% and 2.09% at 5 log10 copies/ml and 2.41% and 3.80% at 3 log10 copies/ml, respectively. According to expected values for the QCMD and Abbott RealTime CMV methods, the lower limits of quantification were 104 and <50 copies/ml, respectively. The conversion factor between international units and copies (2.18), determined from serial dilutions of the WHO IS in WB, was significantly different from the factor provided by the manufacturer (1.56) (P = 0.001). Results from 302 clinical samples were compared with those from the Qiagen artus CMV assay on the same m2000 RealTime system. The two assays provided highly concordant results (concordance correlation coefficient, 0.92), but the Abbott RealTime CMV assay detected and quantified, respectively, 20.6% and 47.8% more samples than the Qiagen/artus CMV assay. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the results, along with the automation, fulfilled the quality requirements for implementation of the Abbott RealTime CMV assay in clinical settings. Our results highlight the need for careful validation of conversion factors provided by the manufacturers for the WHO IS in WB to allow future comparison of results obtained with different assays. PMID:23616450

  17. Comparison of the clinical performances of the AdvanSure HPV Screening Real-Time PCR, the Abbott Real-Time High-Risk HPV Test, and the Hybrid Capture High-Risk HPV DNA Test for Cervical Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hae-Sun; Hahm, Chorong; Lee, Miae

    2014-09-01

    The clinical performance of three human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA commercial assays for cervical cancer screening was evaluated; the AdvanSure HPV Screening Real-Time PCR (AdvanSure PCR; LG Life Sciences) that was developed recently for the detection of both high-risk and low-risk genotypes, the Abbott RealTime High-Risk HPV Test (Abbott PCR; Abbott Molecular) and the Hybrid Capture High-Risk HPV DNA test (HC2; Qiagen). The three different HPV DNA tests were compared using cytology samples obtained from 619 women who underwent routine cervical cancer screening. The gold-standard assay was histopathological confirmation of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade 2 or worse. The clinical sensitivities of the AdvanSure PCR, the Abbott PCR and the HC2 for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade 2 or worse were 95.5%, 95.5% and 100%, respectively, while the clinical specificities were 61.6%, 86.4% and 83.3%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the clinical sensitivities of the Abbott PCR and the AdvanSure PCR compared to the HC2. The clinical specificities of the Abbott PCR and the AdvanSure PCR for the detection of HPV types 16/18 were 97.8% and 98.5%, respectively. For cervical cancer screening, all three tests showed relatively good clinical sensitivities, but the AdvanSure PCR had lower clinical specificity than the Abbott PCR and the HC2. The AdvanSure PCR and the Abbott PCR assays have the advantage of being automated and the ability to distinguish between HPV types 16/18 and other HPV types. The two real-time PCR assays could be useful tools in HPV testing for cervical cancer screening.

  18. OFSETH: optical technologies embedded in smart medical textile for continuous monitoring of respiratory motions under magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narbonneau, F.; De Jonckheere, J.; Jeanne, M.; Kinet, D.; Witt, J.; Krebber, K.; Paquet, B.; Depré, A.; D'Angelo, L. T.; Thiel, T.; Logier, R.

    2010-04-01

    The potential impact of optical fiber sensors embedded into medical textiles for the continuous monitoring of the patient during Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is now proved. We report how two pure optical technologies can successfully sense textile elongation between, 0% and 3%, while maintaining the stretching properties of the textile substrates for a good comfort of the patient. Investigating influence of different patients' morphology as well as textile integration issues to let free all vitals organs for medical staff actions, the OFSETH harness allows a continuous measurement of respiration movements. For example, anaesthesia for MRI examination uses the same drugs as for any surgical procedure. Even if spontaneous respiration can be preserved most of the time, spontaneous respiration is constantly at risk of being impaired by anaesthetic drugs or by upper airway obstruction. Monitoring of the breathing activity is needed to assess adequate ventilation or to detect specific obstruction patterns. Moreover artefacts due to physiological motions induce a blooming effect on the MRI result. The use of synchronisation devices allows reducing these effects. Positioned at certain strategic places according to the investigated organ, the presented sensors could constitute an efficient and adapted solution for respiratory synchronisation of the MRI acquisition.

  19. WASTE MINIMIZATION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: OPTICAL FABRICATION LABORATORY - FITZSIMMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) program, RREL has taken the initiative to merge the experience and resources of the EPA with other Federal agencies. At the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center (FAMC) in Aurora, Colorado, the Army and the EPA cooperated ...

  20. Impact of the New Abbott mPLUS Feature on Clinical Laboratory Efficiencies of Abbott RealTime Assays for Detection of HIV-1, Hepatitis C Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sara; Wiesneth, Russ; Barry, Cathy; Webb, Erika; Belova, Larissa; Dolan, Peggy; Ho, Shiaolan; Abravaya, Klara; Cloherty, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic laboratories are under increasing pressure to improve and expand their services. Greater flexibility in sample processing is a critical factor that can improve the time to results while reducing reagent waste, making laboratories more efficient and cost-effective. The introduction of the Abbott mPLUS feature, with the capacity for extended use of amplification reagents, significantly increases the flexibility of the m2000 platform and enables laboratories to customize their workflows based on sample arrival patterns. The flexibility in sample batch size offered by mPLUS enables significant reductions in processing times. For hepatitis B virus tests, a reduction in sample turnaround times of up to 30% (105 min) was observed for batches of 12 samples compared with those for batches of 24 samples; for Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae tests, the ability to run batches of 24 samples reduced the turnaround time by 83% (54 min) compared with that for batches of 48 samples. Excellent correlations between mPLUS and m2000 standard condition results were observed for all RealTime viral load assays evaluated in this study, with correlation r values of 0.998 for all assays tested. For the qualitative RealTime C. trachomatis/N. gonorrhoeae assay, the overall agreements between the two conditions tested were >98% for C. trachomatis and 100% for N. gonorrhoeae. Comparable precision results were observed for the two conditions tested for all RealTime assays. The enhanced mPLUS capability provides clinical laboratories with increased efficiencies to meet increasingly stringent turnaround time requirements without increased costs associated with discarding partially used amplification reagents. PMID:24088850

  1. High-NA HPCS optical fibers for medical diagnosis and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skutnik, Bolesh J.

    2010-02-01

    Hard Plastic Clad Silica (HPCS) optical fibers with pure silica cores have been developed which are robust and have NA(Numerical Aperture)>0.50. Improved clad only HPCS fibers have been produced for both new 'standard' and 'high' NA versions. Based on new cladding formulations, the 'standard' NA fiber has an NA of 0.41, while the new ultrahigh NA fiber has an NA of 0.54. Mechanical strength and preliminary fatigue data are presented along with spectral characterization data. For the first time significant results were obtained for clad only high NA fibers, The fibers are useful for diagnostic and surgical applications. Short to medium length time to failure results, indicate that the static fatigue parameters of the new high numerical aperture (NA) optical fibers are at least as good as those for former standard NA (0.37) HPCS fibers, which is an advance from previous results on the older formulation high NA fibers.

  2. Premarket Evaluations of the IMDx C. difficile for Abbott m2000 Assay and the BD Max Cdiff Assay

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A. A.; Maceira, V. P.; Nattanmai, S. M.; Butt, S. A.; Wroblewski, D.; Hannett, G. E.; Musser, K. A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a well-recognized complication of antibiotic use. Historically, diagnosing C. difficile has been difficult, as antigen assays are insensitive and culture-based methods require several days to yield results. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are quickly becoming the standard of care. We compared the performance of two automated investigational/research use only (IUO/RUO) NAATs for the detection of C. difficile toxin genes, the IMDx C. difficile for Abbott m2000 Assay (IMDx) and the BD Max Cdiff Assay (Max). A prospective analysis of 111 stool specimens received in the laboratory for C. difficile testing by the laboratory's test of record (TOR), the BD GeneOhm Cdiff Assay, and a retrospective analysis of 88 specimens previously determined to be positive for C. difficile were included in the study. One prospective specimen was excluded due to loss to follow-up discrepancy analysis. Of the remaining 198 specimens, 90 were positive by all three methods, 9 were positive by TOR and Max, and 3 were positive by TOR only. One negative specimen was initially inhibitory by Max. The remaining 95 specimens were negative by all methods. Toxigenic C. difficile culture was performed on the 12 discrepant samples. True C. difficile-positive status was defined as either positive by all three amplification assays or positive by toxigenic culture. Based on this definition, the sensitivity and specificity were 96.9% and 95% for Max and 92.8% and 100% for IMDx. In summary, both highly automated systems demonstrated excellent performance, and each has individual benefits, which will ensure that they will both have a niche in clinical laboratories. PMID:24554744

  3. Evaluation of the semiautomated Abbott LCx Mycobacterium tuberculosis assay for direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Ausina, V; Gamboa, F; Gazapo, E; Manterola, J M; Lonca, J; Matas, L; Manzano, J R; Rodrigo, C; Cardona, P J; Padilla, E

    1997-01-01

    Five hundred twenty processed respiratory specimens from 326 patients received for the diagnosis of tuberculosis or other mycobacterial infections were tested by means of the LCx Mycobacterium tuberculosis Assay from Abbott Laboratories, which uses ligase chain reaction technology for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens. The results of the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay were compared with the results of culture and staining techniques. After a combination of culture results and the patient's clinical data, a total of 195 specimens were collected from 110 patients who were positively diagnosed as having pulmonary tuberculosis. Twenty-three of these 195 specimens which corresponded to 10 patients with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and anti-TB treatment ranging from 1 to 6 months were culture negative. The other 172 specimens were culture positive for M. tuberculosis. With an overall positivity rate of 37.5% (195 of 520 specimens), the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 90.8, 100, 100, and 94.7%, respectively, for the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay; 88.2, 100, 100, and 93.4%, respectively, for culture; and 82.6, 92, 72.9, and 97.6%, respectively, for acid-fast staining. For 161 specimens (82.6%) from patients smear positive for the disease and 34 specimens (17.4%) from patients smear negative for the disease, the sensitivity values for the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay were 98.8 and 53%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the sensitivities and specificities between the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay and culture (P > 0.05). Conclusively, the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay has proved to have an acceptable sensitivity and a high specificity in detecting M. tuberculosis and has the potential of reducing the diagnosis time to an 8-h working day. PMID:9230369

  4. Premarket evaluations of the IMDx C. difficile for Abbott m2000 Assay and the BD Max Cdiff Assay.

    PubMed

    Stellrecht, K A; Espino, A A; Maceira, V P; Nattanmai, S M; Butt, S A; Wroblewski, D; Hannett, G E; Musser, K A

    2014-05-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a well-recognized complication of antibiotic use. Historically, diagnosing C. difficile has been difficult, as antigen assays are insensitive and culture-based methods require several days to yield results. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are quickly becoming the standard of care. We compared the performance of two automated investigational/research use only (IUO/RUO) NAATs for the detection of C. difficile toxin genes, the IMDx C. difficile for Abbott m2000 Assay (IMDx) and the BD Max Cdiff Assay (Max). A prospective analysis of 111 stool specimens received in the laboratory for C. difficile testing by the laboratory's test of record (TOR), the BD GeneOhm Cdiff Assay, and a retrospective analysis of 88 specimens previously determined to be positive for C. difficile were included in the study. One prospective specimen was excluded due to loss to follow-up discrepancy analysis. Of the remaining 198 specimens, 90 were positive by all three methods, 9 were positive by TOR and Max, and 3 were positive by TOR only. One negative specimen was initially inhibitory by Max. The remaining 95 specimens were negative by all methods. Toxigenic C. difficile culture was performed on the 12 discrepant samples. True C. difficile-positive status was defined as either positive by all three amplification assays or positive by toxigenic culture. Based on this definition, the sensitivity and specificity were 96.9% and 95% for Max and 92.8% and 100% for IMDx. In summary, both highly automated systems demonstrated excellent performance, and each has individual benefits, which will ensure that they will both have a niche in clinical laboratories.

  5. Applications of optical fibers and miniature photonic elements in medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaszczak, Urszula; Gilewski, Marian; Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej; Kukwa, Andrzej; Kukwa, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    Construction of endoscopes which are known for decades, in particular in small devices with the diameter of few millimetres, are based on the application of fibre optic imaging bundles or bundles of fibers in the illumination systems (usually with a halogen source). Cameras - CCD and CMOS - with the sensor size of less than 5 mm emerging commercially and high power LED solutions allow to design and construct modern endoscopes characterized by many innovative properties. These constructions offer higher resolution. They are also relatively cheaper especially in the context of the integration of the majority of the functions on a single chip. Mentioned features of the CMOS sensors reduce the cycle of introducing the newly developed instruments to the market. The paper includes a description of the concept of the endoscope with a miniature camera built on the basis of CMOS detector manufactured by Omni Vision. The set of LEDs located at the operator side works as the illuminating system. Fibre optic system and the lens of the camera are used in shaping the beam illuminating the observed tissue. Furthermore, to broaden the range of applications of the endoscope, the illuminator allows to control the spectral characteristics of emitted light. The paper presents the analysis of the basic parameters of the light-and-optical system of the endoscope. The possibility of adjusting the magnifications of the lens, the field of view of the camera and its spatial resolution is discussed. Special attention was drawn to the issues related to the selection of the light sources used for the illumination in terms of energy efficiency and the possibility of providing adjusting the colour of the emitted light in order to improve the quality of the image obtained by the camera.

  6. 200 ps FWHM and 100 MHz repetition rate ultrafast gated camera for optical medical functional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhring, Wilfried; Poulet, Patrick; Hanselmann, Walter; Glazenborg, René; Zint, Virginie; Nouizi, Farouk; Dubois, Benoit; Hirschi, Werner

    2012-04-01

    The paper describes the realization of a complete optical imaging device to clinical applications like brain functional imaging by time-resolved, spectroscopic diffuse optical tomography. The entire instrument is assembled in a unique setup that includes a light source, an ultrafast time-gated intensified camera and all the electronic control units. The light source is composed of four near infrared laser diodes driven by a nanosecond electrical pulse generator working in a sequential mode at a repetition rate of 100 MHz. The resulting light pulses, at four wavelengths, are less than 80 ps FWHM. They are injected in a four-furcated optical fiber ended with a frontal light distributor to obtain a uniform illumination spot directed towards the head of the patient. Photons back-scattered by the subject are detected by the intensified CCD camera; there are resolved according to their time of flight inside the head. The very core of the intensified camera system is the image intensifier tube and its associated electrical pulse generator. The ultrafast generator produces 50 V pulses, at a repetition rate of 100 MHz and a width corresponding to the 200 ps requested gate. The photocathode and the Micro-Channel-Plate of the intensifier have been specially designed to enhance the electromagnetic wave propagation and reduce the power loss and heat that are prejudicial to the quality of the image. The whole instrumentation system is controlled by an FPGA based module. The timing of the light pulses and the photocathode gating is precisely adjustable with a step of 9 ps. All the acquisition parameters are configurable via software through an USB plug and the image data are transferred to a PC via an Ethernet link. The compactness of the device makes it a perfect device for bedside clinical applications.

  7. Optical design of low cost imaging systems for mobile medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, Alexander; Slyper, Ronit; Levitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Colposcopes, the gold standard devices for imaging the cervix at high magnfication, are expensive and sparse in low resource settings. Using a lens attachment, any smartphone camera can be turned into an imaging device for tissues such as the cervix. We create a smartphone-based colposcope using a simple lens design for high magnification. This particular design is useful because it allows parameters such as F-number, depth of field, and magnification to be controlled easily. We were therefore able to determine a set of design steps which are general to mobile medical imaging devices and allow them to maintain requisite image quality while still being rugged and affordable.

  8. Medical-grade Sterilizable Target for Fluid-immersed Fetoscope Optical Distortion Calibration.

    PubMed

    Nikitichev, Daniil I; Shakir, Dzhoshkun I; Chadebecq, François; Tella, Marcel; Deprest, Jan; Stoyanov, Danail; Ourselin, Sébastien; Vercauteren, Tom

    2017-02-23

    We have developed a calibration target for use with fluid-immersed endoscopes within the context of the GIFT-Surg (Guided Instrumentation for Fetal Therapy and Surgery) project. One of the aims of this project is to engineer novel, real-time image processing methods for intra-operative use in the treatment of congenital birth defects, such as spina bifida and the twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome. The developed target allows for the sterility-preserving optical distortion calibration of endoscopes within a few minutes. Good optical distortion calibration and compensation are important for mitigating undesirable effects like radial distortions, which not only hamper accurate imaging using existing endoscopic technology during fetal surgery, but also make acquired images less suitable for potentially very useful image computing applications, like real-time mosaicing. In this paper proposes a novel fabrication method to create an affordable, sterilizable calibration target suitable for use in a clinical setup. This method involves etching a calibration pattern by laser cutting a sandblasted stainless steel sheet. This target was validated using the camera calibration module provided by OpenCV, a state-of-the-art software library popular in the computer vision community.

  9. Optical Fiber Transmission In A Picture Archiving And Communication System For Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Gilles; Bonnard, Rene

    1984-03-01

    In an hospital, the need for an electronic communication network is increasing along with the digitization of pictures. This local area network is intended to link some picture sources such as digital radiography, computed tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance, ultrasounds etc...with an archiving system. Interactive displays can be used in examination rooms, physicians offices and clinics. In such a system, three major requirements must be considered : bit-rate, cable length, and number of devices. - The bit-rate is very important because a maximum response time of a few seconds must be guaranteed for several mega-bit pictures. - The distance between nodes may be a few kilometers in some large hospitals. - The number of devices connected to the network is never greater than a few tens because picture sources and computers represent important hardware, and simple displays can be concentrated. All these conditions are fulfilled by optical fiber transmissions. Depending on the topology and the access protocol, two solutions are to be considered - Active ring - Active or passive star Finally Thomson-CSF developments of optical transmission devices for large networks of TV distribution bring us a technological support and a mass produc-tion which will cut down hardware costs.

  10. Characterization of optically actuated MRI-compatible active needles for medical interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Richard J.; Ryu, Seokchang; Moslehi, Behzad; Costa, Joannes M.

    2014-03-01

    The development of a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) compatible optically-actuated active needle for guided percutaneous surgery and biopsy procedures is described. Electrically passive MRI-compatible actuation in the small diameter needle is provided by non-magnetic materials including a shape memory alloy (SMA) subject to precise fiber laser operation that can be from a remote (e.g., MRI control room) location. Characterization and optimization of the needle is facilitated using optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensors arrays. Active bending of the needle during insertion allows the needle to be accurately guided to even relatively small targets in an organ while avoiding obstacles and overcoming undesirable deviations away from the planned path due to unforeseen or unknowable tissue interactions. This feature makes the needle especially suitable for use in image-guided surgical procedures (ranging from MRI to CT and ultrasound) when accurate targeting is imperative for good treatment outcomes. Such interventions include reaching small tumors in biopsies, delineating freezing areas in, for example, cryosurgery and improving the accuracy of seed placement in brachytherapy. Particularly relevant are prostate procedures, which may be subject to pubic arch interference. Combining diagnostic imaging and actuation assisted biopsy into one treatment can obviate the need for a second exam for guided biopsy, shorten overall procedure times (thus increasing operating room efficiencies), address healthcare reimbursement constraints and, most importantly, improve patient comfort and clinical outcomes.

  11. Fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for remote label-free sensing of medical device surface contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Moinuddin; Tan, Xin; Welle, Elissa; Ilev, Ilko

    2013-05-01

    As a potential major source of biochemical contamination, medical device surfaces are of critical safety concerns in the clinical practice and public health. The development of innovative sensing methods for accurate and real-time detection of medical device surface contamination is essential to protect patients from high risk infection. In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative fiber-optic Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy based sensing approach for remote, non-contact, and label-free detection of biochemical contaminants in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) region. The sensing probe is designed using mid-IR hollow fibers and FTIR measurements are carried out in reflection mode. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and bacterial endotoxin of different concentrations under thoroughly dry condition are used to evaluate the detection sensitivity. The devised system can identify ≤0.0025% (≤4 × 1011 molecules) BSA and 0.5% (0.5 EU/ml) endotoxin concentration. The developed sensing approach may be applied to detect various pathogens that pose public health threats.

  12. Analytical and clinical performance characteristics of the Abbott RealTime MTB RIF/INH Resistance, an assay for the detection of rifampicin and isoniazid resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pulmonary specimens.

    PubMed

    Kostera, Joshua; Leckie, Gregor; Tang, Ning; Lampinen, John; Szostak, Magdalena; Abravaya, Klara; Wang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    Clinical management of drug-resistant tuberculosis patients continues to present significant challenges to global health. To tackle these challenges, the Abbott RealTime MTB RIF/INH Resistance assay was developed to accelerate the diagnosis of rifampicin and/or isoniazid resistant tuberculosis to within a day. This article summarizes the performance of the Abbott RealTime MTB RIF/INH Resistance assay; including reliability, analytical sensitivity, and clinical sensitivity/specificity as compared to Cepheid GeneXpert MTB/RIF version 1.0 and Hain MTBDRplus version 2.0. The limit of detection (LOD) of the Abbott RealTime MTB RIF/INH Resistance assay was determined to be 32 colony forming units/milliliter (cfu/mL) using the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strain H37Rv cell line. For rifampicin resistance detection, the Abbott RealTime MTB RIF/INH Resistance assay demonstrated statistically equivalent clinical sensitivity and specificity as compared to Cepheid GeneXpert MTB/RIF. For isoniazid resistance detection, the assay demonstrated statistically equivalent clinical sensitivity and specificity as compared to Hain MTBDRplus. The performance data presented herein demonstrate that the Abbott RealTime MTB RIF/INH Resistance assay is a sensitive, robust, and reliable test for realtime simultaneous detection of first line anti-tuberculosis antibiotics rifampicin and isoniazid in patient specimens.

  13. Trap depth optimization to improve optical properties of diopside-based nanophosphors for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldiney, Thomas; Lecointre, Aurélie; Viana, Bruno; Bessière, Aurélie; Gourier, Didier; Bessodes, Michel; Richard, Cyrille; Scherman, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Regarding its ability to circumvent the autofluorescence signal, persistent luminescence was recently shown to be a powerful tool for in vivo imaging and diagnosis applications in living animal. The concept was introduced with lanthanide-doped persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNP), from a lanthanide-doped silicate host Ca0.2Zn0.9Mg0.9Si2O6:Eu2+, Mn2+, Dy3+ emitting in the near-infrared window. In order to improve the behaviour of these probes in vivo and favour diagnosis applications, we showed that biodistribution could be controlled by varying the hydrodynamic diameter, but also the surface charges and functional groups. Stealth PLNP, with neutral surface charge obtained by polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, can circulate for longer time inside the mice body before being uptaken by the reticulo-endothelial system. However, the main drawback of this first generation of PLNP was the inability to witness long-term monitoring, mainly due to the decay kinetic after several decades of minutes, unveiling the need to work on new materials with improved optical characteristics. We investigated a modified silicate host, diopside CaMgSi2O6, and increased its persistent luminescence properties by studying various Ln3+ dopants (for instance Ce, Pr, Nd, Tm, Ho). Such dopants create electron traps that control the long lasting phosphorescence (LLP). We showed that Pr3+ was the most suitable Ln3+ electron trap in diopside lattice, providing optimal trap depth, and resulting in the most intense luminescence decay curve after UV irradiation. A novel composition CaMgSi2O6:Eu2+,Mn2+,Pr3+ was obtained for in vivo imaging, displaying a strong near-infrared persistent luminescence centred on 685 nm, allowing improved and sensitive detection through living tissues.

  14. Comparison of the Cepheid GeneXpert and Abbott M2000 HIV-1 real time molecular assays for monitoring HIV-1 viral load and detecting HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Ceffa, Susanna; Luhanga, Richard; Andreotti, Mauro; Brambilla, Davide; Erba, Fulvio; Jere, Haswel; Mancinelli, Sandro; Giuliano, Marina; Palombi, Leonardo; Marazzi, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Assessing treatment efficacy and early infant diagnosis (EID) are critical issues in HIV disease management. Point-of-care assays may greatly increase the possibility to access laboratory monitoring also in rural areas. Recently two new laboratory tests have been developed by Cepheid (Sunnyvale, California) the Xpert HIV-1 Viral Load for viral load determination and the Xpert HIV-1 Qualitative for early infant diagnosis. We conducted a study in Blantyre, Malawi, comparing the 2 methods versus the Abbott real time quantitative and qualitative assays, for viral load and EID respectively. We tested 300 plasma samples for viral load determination and 200 samples for infant diagnosis. HIV-1 RNA values of the 274 samples quantified by both assays were highly correlated (Pearson r=0.95, R(2)=0.90). In 90.9% of the cases the two methods were concordant in defining the HIV-1 RNA levels as detectable or undetectable. For EID, the Xpert HIV-1 Qualitative assay yielded the same identical results as the Abbott assay. Both the quantitative and the qualitative Xpert assays are promising tools to monitor treatment efficacy in HIV patients receiving treatment and for early diagnosis in HIV-exposed infants.

  15. Detection of antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen using the Abbott ARCHITECT anti-HBc assay: analysis of borderline reactive sera.

    PubMed

    Ollier, Laurence; Laffont, Catherine; Kechkekian, Aurore; Doglio, Alain; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2008-12-01

    Routine use of the automated chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay Abbott ARCHITECT anti-HBc for diagnosis of hepatitis B is limited in case of borderline reactive sera with low signal close to the cut-off index. In order to determine the significance of anti-HBc detection when borderline reactivity occurs using the ARCHITECT anti-HBc assay, a comparative study was designed. 3540 serum samples collected over a 2-month period in the hospital of Nice were examined for markers of HBV infection (HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HBc). One hundred seven samples with sufficient volume and with borderline reactivity by the ARCHITECT assay were tested by two other anti-HBc assays, a microparticle enzyme immunoassay (MEIA, AxSYM Core, Abbott Laboratories, IL, USA) and an enzyme linked fluorescent assay (ELFA, VIDAS Anti-HBc Total II, bioMérieux, Lyon, France). Only 46 samples were confirmed by the AxSYM and the VIDAS assays. Additional serological information linked to patient history showed that the remaining samples (61) were false positives (11), had low titer of anti-HBc antibodies (13), or were inconclusive (37). This comparative study highlighted the existence of a grey zone around the cut-off index. Confirmative results through a different immunoassay are needed to confirm the diagnosis of HBV on borderline reactive sera using the ARCHITECT anti-HBc assay.

  16. Linear and nonlinear studies at RHIC interaction regions and optical design of the rapid cycling medical synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Javier Fernando

    Development and application of the action and phase technique used to evaluate and correct local errors, linear and non linear (skew quadrupole errors, gradient errors and sextupole errors), at RHIC interaction regions is presented in the first part of this thesis. The skew quadrupole errors have their origin on the roll angles of the quadrupoles. It is then possible to estimate the skew quadrupole error present in a RHIC triplet if all the roll angles of the quadrupoles of a particular triplet are known. These values were estimated with the measured roll angles during the 2002 RHIC shutdown period and compared to the measured skew quadrupole errors obtained with the action and phase technique. The agreement is fairly good validating the action and phase technique for at least skew quadrupole errors. Another way of validating the action and phase technique is by intentionally introducing known values of errors while attempting to measure the values with the technique. This was done for skew quadrupole errors and gradient errors with excellent results. Analysis of some of the experiments shows that the set errors can be reproduced by the technique with accuracies below 5 percent. Same experiments were repeated for sextupole errors an a clear correlation between the measured and the set error was found but the precision in this case is not as good as for the linear errors case. The optical design of the Rapid Cycling Medical Synchrotron and related efforts to optimize the design are presented in the second part of this thesis. An interesting outcome of this work is the development of the so called IBEFUMFO technique which allow a better understanding of the optical parameters involved in a lattice design and hence facilitate the task of the designer. The rapid repetition frequency of the RCMS has raised concerns about the sextupole components induced in the beam due to strong Eddy currents. Tracking simulations with Marylie have been done in order to evaluate the

  17. Comparative evaluation of the Abbott HIV-1 RealTime™ assay with the Standard Roche COBAS® Amplicor™ HIV-1 Monitor® Test, v1.5 for determining HIV-1 RNA levels in plasma specimens from Pune, India.

    PubMed

    Khopkar, Priyanka; Mallav, Vikas; Chidrawar, Shweta; Kulkarni, Smita

    2013-07-01

    The implementation of cost effective HIV-1 viral load assays in resource-limited settings have been an impediment for monitoring HIV-1 therapy. A study involving the comparative analytical performance of two HIV-1 viral load assays - Standard Roche COBAS(®) Amplicor™ HIV-1 Monitor(®) Test, version 1.5 (Roche Diagnostics, Basel, Switzerland) and Abbott HIV-1 RealTime™ assay (Abbott Molecular, Wiesbaden, Germany) was performed using 125 specimens in Pune, India. A strong correlation was observed between the manual endpoint reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay and the recent real time polymerase chain reaction assay (r=0.989, p value<0.0001) and agreement was 94.4%. Results of the study indicate a higher sensitivity of the Abbott HIV-1 RealTime™ assay for HIV-1 Virology Quality Assurance copy controls as compared to the Standard Roche COBAS(®) Amplicor™ HIV-1 Monitor(®) Test, version 1.5. Furthermore, features of the Abbott m2000rt RealTime™ PCR assay platform such as higher analytical sensitivity, automated/manual extraction platforms for high/low sample throughputs and ability to quantify a variety of infectious agents (Hepatitis B virus, Hepatitis C virus, Human Papillomavirus and Neisseria gonorrhoeae/Chlamydia trachomatis) justify its suitability in resource-limited Indian settings. Besides, the study also highlights utility of the precise Virology Quality Assurance validation template in performance evaluation of various quantitative viral load assays.

  18. Comparison of the artus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) PCR kit and the Abbott RealTime EBV assay for measuring plasma EBV DNA loads in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Vinuesa, Víctor; Solano, Carlos; Giménez, Estela; Navarro, David

    2017-02-24

    The ability of the artus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) PCR kit and the Abbott RealTime EBV PCR assay to detect and quantify plasma EBV DNAemia was compared. The agreement between these assays was 95.8%. The EBV DNA loads measured by the two assays significantly correlated (P=< 0.0001).

  19. Assessment of hydrologic and water quality data collected in Abbotts Lagoon watershed, Point Reyes National Seashore, California, during water years 1999 and 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, Charles R.; Saleh, Dina K.; Zamora, Celia

    2006-01-01

    Abbotts Lagoon is part of Point Reyes National Seashore, located about 40 miles northwest of San Francisco and about 20 miles south of Bodega Bay. Water-quality samples were collected quarterly during water year 1999 at a site in each of three connected lagoons that make up Abbotts Lagoon and at a site in its most significant tributary. The quarterly samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, and chlorophyll-a. A bed-sediment sample was collected in each lagoon during August 1999 and was analyzed for organic carbon, iron, and total phosphorus. Seven tributaries were sampled during a February 1999 storm and four during an April 1999 storm. These samples were analyzed only for nutrients. One storm sample collected in April 1999 from a tributary downstream of the I Ranch dairy was analyzed for a suite of 47 compounds indicative of wastewater. Continuous water-level recorders were installed in the most significant tributary and the two largest lagoons for portions of the study. A water budget analysis for an April 2000 storm indicated that the main tributary accounted for 85 percent of surface inflows to Abbotts Lagoon. The portion of the surface inflow from the main tributary was lower in the February 1999 storms and is a function of upstream storage and vegetative growth in the tributary basins. Another water budget analysis for a period of no surface inflow (June and July 2000) indicated that the net ground-water contribution was an outflow (seepage) from Abbotts Lagoon of about 0.3 ft3/s. Salinity increased and nutrient concentrations decreased from upstream to downstream in the chain of lagoons. The lower lagoon, nearest the ocean, had less organic carbon and total phosphorus in the bed sediment than the upper lagoons. The two tributaries originating in the I Ranch dairy had the highest concentrations of nutrients in storm runoff, and the highest loading rates and yields of ammonia and phosphorus. These tributaries account for only 10.3 percent of the area

  20. Evaluation of a commercial ligase chain reaction kit (Abbott LCx) for direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, E; Lavinia, F; Simonetti, M T

    1997-01-01

    Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by means of a commercial ligase chain reaction DNA amplification method (LCx M. tuberculosis; Abbott Diagnostics Division, Abbott Park, Ill.) was investigated with 511 (including 147 extrarespiratory) specimens collected from 358 patients. LCx results were compared with standard microbiological data, and conflicting cases were resolved according to the final clinical diagnosis. M. tuberculosis was detected in 45 of 358 subjects by means of the LCx test. The test was negative for all 30 specimens with mycobacteria other than M. tuberculosis. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the LCx test, compared with culture results, were 93.90, 92.31, 70.00, and 98.75%, respectively; these values rose in resolved cases to 95.53, 99.25, 97.27, and 98.75%, respectively. With respiratory specimens, for which the LCx system is licensed, the sensitivity reached 98.97%. In patients with a final clinical diagnosis of tuberculosis the sensitivity of the LCx system was 89.36% compared to 82.98% for cultures and 78.72% for microscopy. We conclude that the LCx test is user friendly, rapid, fairly sensitive, and highly specific. It can also be effectively used on extrapulmonary specimens provided possible false-negative results are taken into account. However, the use of LCx test appears to be less appropriate for the monitoring of antituberculosis therapy, as the majority of samples from treated tuberculosis patients gave consistently positive results, despite the sterilization of cultures. PMID:9276432

  1. Effect of lubricants and a vaginal spermicide gel on the detection of prostate specific antigen, a biomarker of semen exposure, using a quantitative (Abbott ARCHITECT) assay☆, ☆☆, ★

    PubMed Central

    Snead, Margaret C.; Melendez, Johan H.; Kourtis, Athena P.; Chaney, Dorothy M.; Brown, Teresa M.; Black, Carolyn M.; Mauck, Christine K.; Schwartz, Jill L.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Macaluso, Maurizio; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the effects of commonly used lubricants on detection of biomarkers of semen exposure. We investigated the in vitro effect of Gynol®, K-Y Jelly®, Replens®, Astroglide®, Carbopol, and Silicorel on quantitative detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Study Design A predetermined concentration of each of the gels was added to serially diluted semen samples. Additionally, serial dilutions of each of the gels were added to three different semen dilutions (high, medium, or low). The resulting samples were tested for PSA on the Abbott ARCHITECT System. Results When using the Abbott ARCHITECT system, the only products that inhibited PSA detection were Gynol® and Replens®. The inhibition caused by Gynol® was dose-dependent, but that of Replens was dose-independent. K-Y Jelly®-spiked samples had higher PSA values than controls. Conclusions Caution is warranted when using the Abbott quantitative assay for PSA detection as a biomarker of semen exposure in settings where Gynol®, Replens® or K-Y Jelly® might also have been used. Neither Astroglide® nor Silicorel inhibited PSA detection. Additional studies evaluating other vaginal products, including microbicides, and their effects on other assays, are needed. In vivo studies will be especially important to optimize PSA detection from clinical samples. Implications Researchers should consider the potential for specific lubricants or any vaginal products to affect the particular assay used for semen biomarker detection. The Abbott ARCHITECT’s total PSA assay should not be used with the product Replens. Caution is warranted when using the assay in settings where Gynol or K-Y jelly may have been used. PMID:24314911

  2. Field evaluation of an open and polyvalent universal HIV-1/SIVcpz/SIVgor quantitative RT-PCR assay for HIV-1 viral load monitoring in comparison to Abbott RealTime HIV-1 in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Guichet, Emilande; Aghokeng, Avelin; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Vidal, Nicole; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Mpoudi Ngole, Eitel; Delaporte, Eric; Ciaffi, Laura; Peeters, Martine

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing demand of HIV viral load (VL) tests in resource-limited countries (RLCs) there is a need for assays at affordable cost and able to quantify all known HIV-1 variants. VLs obtained with a recently developed open and polyvalent universal HIV-1/SIVcpz/SIVgor RT-qPCR were compared to Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay in Cameroon. On 474 plasma samples, characterized by a wide range of VLs and a broad HIV-1 group M genetic diversity, 97.5% concordance was observed when using the lower detection limit of each assay. When using the threshold of 3.00 log10 copies/mL, according to WHO guidelines to define virological failure (VF) in RLCs, the concordance was 94.7%, 360/474 versus 339/474 patients were identified with VF with the new assay and Abbott RealTime HIV-1, respectively. Higher VLs were measured with the new assay, +0.47 log10 copies/mL (95% CI; 0.42-0.52) as shown with Bland-Altman analysis. Eleven samples from patients on VF with drug resistance were not detected by Abbott RealTime HIV-1 versus two only with the new assay. Overall, our study showed that the new assay can be easily implemented in a laboratory in RLCs with VL experience and showed good performance on a wide diversity of HIV-1 group M variants.

  3. Age- and Gender-Specific Reference Intervals for Fasting Blood Glucose and Lipid Levels in School Children Measured With Abbott Architect c8000 Chemistry Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Waleed; Albanyan, Esam; Altwaijri, Yasmin; Tamim, Hani; Alhussein, Fahad

    2012-04-01

    Reference intervals for pubertal characteristics are influenced by genetic, geographic, dietary and socioeconomic factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish age-specific reference intervals of glucose and lipid levels among local school children. This was cross-sectional study, conducted among Saudi school children. Fasting blood samples were collected from 2149 children, 1138 (53%) boys and 1011 (47%) girls, aged 6 to 18 years old. Samples were analyzed on the Architect c8000 Chemistry System (Abbott Diagnostics, USA) for glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL. Reference intervals were established by nonparametric methods between the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles. Significant differences were observed between boys and girls for cholesterol and triglycerides levels in all age groups (P < 0.02). Only at age 6-7 years and at adolescents, HDL and LDL levels were found to be significant (P < 0.001). No significant differences were seen in glucose levels except at age 12 to 13 years. Saudi children have comparable serum cholesterol levels than their Western counterparts. This may reflect changing dietary habits and increasing affluence in Saudi Arabia. Increased lipid screening is anticipated, and these reference intervals will aid in the early assessment of cardiovascular and diabetes risk in Saudi pediatric populations.

  4. Comparison of FT4 with log TSH on the Abbott Architect ci8200: Pediatric reference intervals for free thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Steven J; Cheng, Luke L; Lam, Lisa Y; Werner, Alice; Le, Alexander D; Soldin, Offie P

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated the clinical validity of serum FT4 measurements by assessing its correlation with log TSH. To provide pediatric reference intervals (representative ranges) for FT4, and TSH on the Architect ci8200 integrated system. Methods This population-based study encompassed 6023 children (3369 females and 2654 males). The percentile and Hoffmann approaches for obtaining reference intervals on these analytes were also compared. Results: FT4 correlation with log TSH was poor ( r=0.010 for males and 0.050 for females). Reference intervals were established. TSH and FT4 did not show a significant sex difference; moreover, the intervals decreased with age for FT4 and TSH. Conclusions Whereas in a previous study ultrafiltration tandem mass spectrometry yielded a correlation of r=0.90 for FT4 vs. log TSH this present study reveals a poor FT4 vs. log TSH correlation in the pediatric population studied and indicates the FT4 immunoassay conducted on the Abbott Architect ci8200 is less useful clinically than might have been expected. Reference intervals using the Hoffmann approach for pediatric in- and out-patients compare well with previously published results utilizing the percentile approach. PMID:19931524

  5. [Influence of "optical illusion" on detectability in diagnosis for head CT images: participation of optical illusion of light perception in medical image reading and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Henmi, Shuichi

    2006-07-20

    Even if the visual impression of the photographic density of the brain in head CT images is shown as physically the same, it is known that optical illusions of lightness perception (assimilation, contrast, picture frame effect, etc.) occur and that practical density can be observed psychologically differently, according to differences in the color of the skull and background, and differences in cases (differences in picture pattern). Therefore, in this study, in order to clarify the influence of optical illusion on detectability in diagnosis, the author attempted to compare detectability in four sample cases, consisting of acute cerebral infarction (1), acute epidural hematoma (1), and chronic subdural hematoma (2), using visual subjective evaluation. In the case of acute cerebral infarction, there was no significant difference in detectability between the original image and the virtual images. Further, it clarified that the original head CT image (acute epidural hematoma) with the high-density hematoma recognized at the marginal limited part of the brain was inferior to virtual images in detectability, while it clarified that the original head CT image (chronic subdural hematoma) with the low-density hematoma was superior to virtual images in detectability, because of visual psychological emphasis on the difference of the film contrast between the hematoma and white skull.

  6. Fast segmentation and high-quality three-dimensional volume mesh creation from medical images for diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Ghadyani, Hamid; Mastanduno, Michael A.; Turner, Wes; Davis, Scott C.; Dehghani, Hamid; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-08-01

    Multimodal approaches that combine near-infrared (NIR) and conventional imaging modalities have been shown to improve optical parameter estimation dramatically and thus represent a prevailing trend in NIR imaging. These approaches typically involve applying anatomical templates from magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography/ultrasound images to guide the recovery of optical parameters. However, merging these data sets using current technology requires multiple software packages, substantial expertise, significant time-commitment, and often results in unacceptably poor mesh quality for optical image reconstruction, a reality that represents a significant roadblock for translational research of multimodal NIR imaging. This work addresses these challenges directly by introducing automated digital imaging and communications in medicine image stack segmentation and a new one-click three-dimensional mesh generator optimized for multimodal NIR imaging, and combining these capabilities into a single software package (available for free download) with a streamlined workflow. Image processing time and mesh quality benchmarks were examined for four common multimodal NIR use-cases (breast, brain, pancreas, and small animal) and were compared to a commercial image processing package. Applying these tools resulted in a fivefold decrease in image processing time and 62% improvement in minimum mesh quality, in the absence of extra mesh postprocessing. These capabilities represent a significant step toward enabling translational multimodal NIR research for both expert and nonexpert users in an open-source platform.

  7. Comparison of the analytical and clinical performances of Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV, Hybrid Capture 2, and DNA Chip assays in gynecology patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungman; Kang, Youjin; Kim, Dong Geun; Kim, Eui-Chong; Park, Sung Sup; Seong, Moon-Woo

    2013-08-01

    The detection of high-risk (HR) HPV in cervical cancer screening is important for early diagnosis of cervical cancer or pre-cancerous lesions. We evaluated the analytical and clinical performances of 3 HR HPV assays in Gynecology patients. A total of 991 specimens were included in this study: 787 specimens for use with a Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) and 204 specimens for a HPV DNA microarray (DNA Chip). All specimens were tested using an Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV assay (Real-time HR), PGMY PCR, and sequence analysis. Clinical sensitivities for severe abnormal cytology (severe than high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) were 81.8% for Real-time HR, 77.3% for HC2, and 66.7% for DNA Chip, and clinical sensitivities for severe abnormal histology (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+) were 91.7% for HC2, 87.5% for Real-time HR, and 73.3% for DNA Chip. As compared to results of the sequence analysis, HC2, Real-time HR, and DNA Chip showed concordance rates of 94.3% (115/122), 90.0% (117/130), and 61.5% (16/26), respectively. The HC2 assay and Real-time HR assay showed comparable results to each other in both clinical and analytical performances, while the DNA Chip assay showed poor clinical and analytical performances. The Real-time HR assay can be a good alternative option for HR HPV testing with advantages of allowing full automation and simultaneous genotyping of HR types 16 and 18.

  8. Medical diagnosis system and method with multispectral imaging. [depth of burns and optical density of the skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Reilly, T. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A skin diagnosis system includes a scanning and optical arrangement whereby light reflected from each incremental area (pixel) of the skin is directed simultaneously to three separate light filters, e.g., IR, red, and green. As a result, the three devices simultaneously produce three signals which are directly related to the reflectance of light of different wavelengths from the corresponding pixel. These three signals for each pixel after processing are used as inputs to one or more output devices to produce a visual color display and/or a hard copy color print, for one usable as a diagnostic aid by a physician.

  9. A review of consensus test methods for established medical imaging modalities and their implications for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefer, Joshua; Agrawal, Anant

    2012-03-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in development of consensus, tissue-phantom-based approaches for assessment of biophotonic imaging systems, with the primary goal of facilitating clinical translation of novel optical technologies. Well-characterized test methods based on tissue phantoms can provide useful tools for performance assessment, thus enabling standardization and device inter-comparison during preclinical development as well as quality assurance and re-calibration in the clinical setting. In this review, we study the role of phantom-based test methods as described in consensus documents such as international standards for established imaging modalities including X-ray CT, MRI and ultrasound. Specifically, we focus on three image quality characteristics - spatial resolution, spatial measurement accuracy and image uniformity - and summarize the terminology, metrics, phantom design/construction approaches and measurement/analysis procedures used to assess these characteristics. Phantom approaches described are those in routine clinical use and tend to have simplified morphology and biologically-relevant physical parameters. Finally, we discuss the potential for applying knowledge gained from existing consensus documents in the development of standardized, phantom-based test methods for optical coherence tomography.

  10. [A specific feature of the procedure for determination of optical properties of turbid biological tissues and media in calculation tasks of medical noninvasive spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Rogatkin, D A

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to discuss the problems of accuracy and reliability of the procedure for determination of optical per-unit-length properties of light-scattering biological tissues and media in medical noninvasive spectrophotometry. The determination procedure is based on the two-flux Kubelka-Munk approach. A simple one-dimensional model problem is formulated. The accurate solution of this problem is compared to its solution based on the Kubelka-Munk approach in various approximations. It is shown that in the general case of light-scattering and absorbing medium use of two independent transport coefficients (for scattering and absorption processes), as suggested in the conventional Kubelka-Munk approach, leads to errors of direct calculation of properties of backscattered and transmitted radiation in biological tissues. More valid and accurate expressions for transport coefficients can be obtained on the basis of a particular solution of the problem for a surface element of the model medium with known photometrical properties. This method makes it possible to determine accurately the radiation flux at the external boundary of the medium using the Kubelka-Munk approach. It is expected that solution of the inverse problem would make it possible to reconstruct accurately the optical properties of biological tissues from the experimental data.

  11. Rapid virological response assessment by Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus assay for predicting sustained virological responses in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 treated with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Su, Pei-Yuan; Yen, Hsu-Heng; Hsu, Yu-Chun; Wu, Shun-Sheng; Kor, Chew-Teng; Su, Wei-Wen

    2016-07-01

    The lower limits of virus detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA detection assays are continuously improving. We aimed to assess the utility of more precise definition of 4(th) week viral load [rapid virological response (RVR)] in predicting sustained virological response (SVR) in HCV genotype 1 patients treated with pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin. Clinical data of treatment-naïve HCV genotype 1 patients were retrospectively collected from 2009 to 2014. Patients were grouped according to 4(th) week viral load as follows: undetectable (n = 90) and detectable but not quantifiable (< 12 IU/mL, n = 27). All patients received PEG-IFNα-2a or -2b and ribavirin for 24 weeks. Serum HCV RNA levels were measured by Abbott RealTime (ART; Abbott Molecular, Abbott Park, IL, USA) HCV assay. SVR was 95.5% and 63% in the undetectable group and < 12 IU/mL group of 4(th) week viral load, respectively. The between-group difference in SVR was significant (p < 0.001). We determined 4(th) week viral load was independently associated with SVR (odds ratio = 19.28; p = 0.002) and a good predictor of SVR [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.775; p = 0.001]. ART HCV assays had a stronger SVR predictive value in HCV genotype 1 patients, indicating that only the undetectable group of 4(th) week viral load patients measured by ART HCV assay should be considered for shorter treatment time (24 weeks) with PEG-IFN and ribavirin.

  12. Novel applications using maximum-likelihood estimation in optical metrology and nuclear medical imaging: Point-diffraction interferometry and BazookaPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ryeojin

    This dissertation aims to investigate two different applications in optics using maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation. The first application of ML estimation is used in optical metrology. For this application, an innovative iterative search method called the synthetic phase-shifting (SPS) algorithm is proposed. This search algorithm is used for estimation of a wavefront that is described by a finite set of Zernike Fringe (ZF) polynomials. In this work, we estimate the ZF coefficient, or parameter values of the wavefront using a single interferogram obtained from a point-diffraction interferometer (PDI). In order to find the estimates, we first calculate the squared-difference between the measured and simulated interferograms. Under certain assumptions, this squared-difference image can be treated as an interferogram showing the phase difference between the true wavefront deviation and simulated wavefront deviation. The wavefront deviation is defined as the difference between the reference and the test wavefronts. We calculate the phase difference using a traditional phase-shifting technique without physical phase-shifters. We present a detailed forward model for the PDI interferogram, including the effect of the nite size of a detector pixel. The algorithm was validated with computational studies and its performance and constraints are discussed. A prototype PDI was built and the algorithm was also experimentally validated. A large wavefront deviation was successfully estimated without using null optics or physical phase-shifters. The experimental result shows that the proposed algorithm has great potential to provide an accurate tool for non-null testing. The second application of ML estimation is used in nuclear medical imaging. A high-resolution positron tomography scanner called BazookaPET is proposed. We have designed and developed a novel proof-of-concept detector element for a PET system called BazookaPET. In order to complete the PET configuration, at least

  13. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects) By Barbara Cone, Patricia Dorn, Dawn Konrad- ... Audiology Information Series [PDF]. What Is Ototoxicity? Certain medications can damage the ear, resulting in hearing loss, ...

  14. Ultrahigh Frequency (100 MHz–300 MHz) Ultrasonic Transducers for Optical Resolution Medical Imagining

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chunlong; Chiu, Chi Tat; Chen, Xiaoyang; Chen, Zeyu; Ma, Jianguo; Zhu, Benpeng; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2016-01-01

    High resolution ultrasonic imaging requires high frequency wide band ultrasonic transducers, which produce short pulses and highly focused beam. However, currently the frequency of ultrasonic transducers is limited to below 100 MHz, mainly because of the challenge in precise control of fabrication parameters. This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of sensitive broadband lithium niobate (LiNbO3) single element ultrasonic transducers in the range of 100–300 MHz, as well as their applications in high resolution imaging. All transducers were built for an f-number close to 1.0, which was achieved by press-focusing the piezoelectric layer into a spherical curvature. Characterization results demonstrated their high sensitivity and a −6 dB bandwidth greater than 40%. Resolutions better than 6.4 μm in the lateral direction and 6.2 μm in the axial direction were achieved by scanning a 4 μm tungsten wire target. Ultrasonic biomicroscopy images of zebrafish eyes were obtained with these transducers which demonstrate the feasibility of high resolution imaging with a performance comparable to optical resolution. PMID:27329379

  15. Ultrahigh Frequency (100 MHz–300 MHz) Ultrasonic Transducers for Optical Resolution Medical Imagining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Chunlong; Chiu, Chi Tat; Chen, Xiaoyang; Chen, Zeyu; Ma, Jianguo; Zhu, Benpeng; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2016-06-01

    High resolution ultrasonic imaging requires high frequency wide band ultrasonic transducers, which produce short pulses and highly focused beam. However, currently the frequency of ultrasonic transducers is limited to below 100 MHz, mainly because of the challenge in precise control of fabrication parameters. This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of sensitive broadband lithium niobate (LiNbO3) single element ultrasonic transducers in the range of 100–300 MHz, as well as their applications in high resolution imaging. All transducers were built for an f-number close to 1.0, which was achieved by press-focusing the piezoelectric layer into a spherical curvature. Characterization results demonstrated their high sensitivity and a ‑6 dB bandwidth greater than 40%. Resolutions better than 6.4 μm in the lateral direction and 6.2 μm in the axial direction were achieved by scanning a 4 μm tungsten wire target. Ultrasonic biomicroscopy images of zebrafish eyes were obtained with these transducers which demonstrate the feasibility of high resolution imaging with a performance comparable to optical resolution.

  16. Measures of Viral Load using Abbott Real-Time HIV-1 Assay on Venous and Fingerstick Dried Blood Spots from Provider-Collected Specimens in Malawian District Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rutstein, Sarah E.; Kamwendo, Deborah; Lugali, Lebah; Thengolose, Isaac; Tegha, Gerald; Fiscus, Susan A.; Nelson, Julie A. E.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Gupta, Sundeep; Chimbwandira, Frank; Mwenda, Reuben; Mataya, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral suppression is a key indicator of antiretroviral therapy (ART) response among HIV-infected patients. Dried blood spots (DBS) are an appealing alternative to conventional plasma-based virologic testing, improving access to monitoring in resource-limited settings. However, validity of DBS obtained from fingerstick in field settings remains unknown. Objectives Investigate feasibility and accuracy of DBS vs plasma collected by healthcare workers in real-world settings of remote hospitals in Malawi. Compare venous DBS to fingerstick DBS for identifying treatment failure. Study design We recruited patients from ART clinics at two district hospitals in Malawi, collecting plasma, venous DBS (vDBS), and fingerstick DBS (fsDBS) cards for the first 149 patients, and vDBS and fsDBS only for the subsequent 398 patients. Specimens were tested using Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Assay (lower detection limit 40 copies/ml (plasma) and 550 copies/ml (DBS)). Results 21/149 (14.1%) had detectable viremia (>1.6 log copies/ml), 13 of which were detectable for plasma, vDBS, and fsDBS. Linear regression demonstrated high correlation for plasma vs. DBS (vDBS: β=1.19, R2 0.93 (p<0.0001); fsDBS β=1.20, R2 0.90 (p<0.0001)) and vDBS vs. fsDBS (β=0.88, R2 0.73, (p<0.0001)). Mean difference between plasma and vDBS was 0.51 log copies/ml [SD: 0.33] and plasma and fsDBS 0.46 log copies/ml [SD: 0.30]. At 5000 copies/ml, sensitivity was 100%, and specificity was 98.6% and 97.8% for vDBS and fsDBS, respectively, compared to plasma. Conclusions DBS from venipuncture and fingerstick perform well at the failure threshold of 5000 copies/ml. Fingerstick specimen source may improve access to virologic treatment monitoring in resource-limited settings given task-shifting in high-volume, low-resource facilities. PMID:24906641

  17. Comparison of clinical and analytical performance of the Abbott Realtime High Risk HPV test to the performance of hybrid capture 2 in population-based cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Mario; Ostrbenk, Anja; Seme, Katja; Ucakar, Veronika; Hillemanns, Peter; Bokal, Eda Vrtacnik; Jancar, Nina; Klavs, Irena

    2011-05-01

    The clinical performance of the Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV (human papillomavirus) test (RealTime) and that of the Hybrid Capture 2 HPV DNA test (hc2) were prospectively compared in the population-based cervical cancer screening setting. In women >30 years old (n = 3,129), the clinical sensitivity of RealTime for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade 2 (CIN2) or worse (38 cases) and its clinical specificity for lesions of less than CIN2 (3,091 controls) were 100% and 93.3%, respectively, and those of hc2 were 97.4% and 91.8%, respectively. A noninferiority score test showed that the clinical specificity (P < 0.0001) and clinical sensitivity (P = 0.011) of RealTime were noninferior to those of hc2 at the recommended thresholds of 98% and 90%. In the total study population (women 20 to 64 years old; n = 4,432; 57 cases, 4,375 controls), the clinical sensitivity and specificity of RealTime were 98.2% and 89.5%, and those of hc2 were 94.7% and 87.7%, respectively. The analytical sensitivity and analytical specificity of RealTime in detecting targeted HPV types evaluated with the largest sample collection to date (4,479 samples) were 94.8% and 99.8%, and those of hc2 were 93.4% and 97.8%, respectively. Excellent analytical agreement between the two assays was obtained (kappa value, 0.84), while the analytical accuracy of RealTime was significantly higher than that of hc2. RealTime demonstrated high intralaboratory reproducibility and interlaboratory agreement with 500 samples retested 61 to 226 days after initial testing in two different laboratories. RealTime can be considered to be a reliable and robust HPV assay clinically comparable to hc2 for the detection of CIN2+ lesions in a population-based cervical cancer screening setting.

  18. Optical Demonstration of a Medical Imaging System with an EMCCD-Sensor Array for Use in a High Resolution Dynamic X-ray Imager.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bin; Huang, Ying; Wang, Weiyuan; Sharma, Prateek; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew T; Cartwright, Alexander N; Titus, Albert H; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-10-30

    Use of an extensible array of Electron Multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) in medical x-ray imager applications was demonstrated for the first time. The large variable electronic-gain (up to 2000) and small pixel size of EMCCDs provide effective suppression of readout noise compared to signal, as well as high resolution, enabling the development of an x-ray detector with far superior performance compared to conventional x-ray image intensifiers and flat panel detectors. We are developing arrays of EMCCDs to overcome their limited field of view (FOV). In this work we report on an array of two EMCCD sensors running simultaneously at a high frame rate and optically focused on a mammogram film showing calcified ducts. The work was conducted on an optical table with a pulsed LED bar used to provide a uniform diffuse light onto the film to simulate x-ray projection images. The system can be selected to run at up to 17.5 frames per second or even higher frame rate with binning. Integration time for the sensors can be adjusted from 1 ms to 1000 ms. Twelve-bit correlated double sampling AD converters were used to digitize the images, which were acquired by a National Instruments dual-channel Camera Link PC board in real time. A user-friendly interface was programmed using LabVIEW to save and display 2K × 1K pixel matrix digital images. The demonstration tiles a 2 × 1 array to acquire increased-FOV stationary images taken at different gains and fluoroscopic-like videos recorded by scanning the mammogram simultaneously with both sensors. The results show high resolution and high dynamic range images stitched together with minimal adjustments needed. The EMCCD array design allows for expansion to an M×N array for arbitrarily larger FOV, yet with high resolution and large dynamic range maintained.

  19. Mercury contamination from mine and natural sources in Harley Gulch, downstream from the Abbott and Turkey Run Mercury Mines, Lake County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hothem, R. L.; Rytuba, J. J.; Goldstein, D.; Brussee, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Abbott and Turkey Run Mercury (Hg) mine area in central California has released Hg tailings into the Harley Gulch watershed since 1862. Harley Gulch flows into Cache Creek which is a significant source of Hg into San Francisco Bay Delta. Thermal mine water effluent emanating from the Turkey Run adit flows into the upper part of the watershed. Despite remediation efforts, Hg tailings and enriched sediment remain in the Harley Gulch wetlands and in the creek downstream from the mine area. Water, sediment, and biota have been sampled from below the mine area to 15 km downstream to the confluence with Cache Creek in order to assess the impact of Hg on water quality and biota. Two previously unrecognized natural sources of Hg in the watershed are connate groundwater with elevated levels of Hg, and biogenic sediment composed of phytoplankton that accumulates in the upper part of the watershed during the dry season. The connate groundwater source contains isotopically-heavy Mg-Ca-Cl-CO3-SO4 water that has elevated concentrations of Ba, W, Ti, and Hg. This water first enters Harley Gulch in the central part of the wetland immediately downstream from the mine area and continues to contribute water downstream for a distance of 1.5 km. It is both chemically and isotopically distinct from the thermal mine water effluent from the Turkey Run adit. The biogenic source consists of blooms of phytoplankton that accumulate to a thickness of up to 0.2 m. Phytoplankton have a large bioaccumulation factor of Hg and monomethyl mercury (MMeHg) that results in a high concentrations of Hg and MMeHg (Hg: 5-25 μg/g, MMeHg 5.2 ng/g) in the biogenic sediment. The tan biogenic sediment at the surface consists of living diatoms and below it is a layer of black reduced biogenic sediment consisting of diatom fragments with micron- to submicron-sized FeS, HgS, and barite grains. Sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce sulfate to sulfide in the pore waters of the biogenic sediment that reacts with

  20. New methods for optical distance indicator and gantry angle quality control tests in medical linear accelerators: image processing by using a 3D phantom

    PubMed Central

    Shandiz, Mahdi Heravian; Anvari, Kazem; Khalilzadeh, Mohammadmahdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In order to keep the acceptable level of the radiation oncology linear accelerators, it is necessary to apply a reliable quality assurance (QA) program. Materials and Methods The QA protocols, published by authoritative organizations, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), determine the quality control (QC) tests which should be performed on the medical linear accelerators and the threshold levels for each test. The purpose of this study is to increase the accuracy and precision of the selected QC tests in order to increase the quality of treatment and also increase the speed of the tests to convince the crowded centers to start a reliable QA program. A new method has been developed for two of the QC tests; optical distance indicator (ODI) QC test as a daily test and gantry angle QC test as a monthly test. This method uses an image processing approach utilizing the snapshots taken by the CCD camera to measure the source to surface distance (SSD) and gantry angle. Results The new method of ODI QC test has an accuracy of 99.95% with a standard deviation of 0.061 cm and the new method for gantry angle QC has a precision of 0.43°. The automated proposed method which is used for both ODI and gantry angle QC tests, contains highly accurate and precise results which are objective and the human-caused errors have no effect on the results. Conclusion The results show that they are in the acceptable range for both of the QC tests, according to AAPM task group 142. PMID:25874177

  1. In vitro diagnostic company recalls and medical laboratory practices: an Italian case

    PubMed Central

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Brocco, Giorgio; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In vitro human diagnostic (IVD) company recalls are a common practice aimed to either minimize a potential error or eliminate an existing failure. In this case report, we aim to provide a critical analysis of a recent IVD recall and to provide a practical framework about what to do when an IVD company recalls product(s) based on the International Organization for Standardization - ISO 15189:2012 standard. Case report In 2014, Abbott Laboratories® (Green Oaks, IL) published an urgent field safety notice regarding a product recall (Architect Intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) Assay List Number 8K25) with immediate action required. The IVD company explained the reasons for the recall as follows: i) Abbott has confirmed that a performance shift in the Architect Intact PTH assay has the potential to generate falsely elevated results on patient samples; ii) results generated with impacted lots may demonstrate a positive shift relative to those generated with previous reagent and/or calibrator lots. This issue may also impact established Architect Intact PTH reference ranges; iii) the magnitude of shift averages approximately 13% to 45%; iv) Abbott Architect Intact PTH controls do not detect the shift; and v) all current reagent, calibrator, and control inventory are impacted. The recall could have resulted in ~40,000 inaccurate laboratory tests reported by 18 laboratories from Italy (Lombardy region). Conclusion IVD company recalls have a serious impact on the patient safety and require a thorough investigation and responsible approach to minimize the possible damage. Medical laboratories accredited according to the ISO 15189 standard have procedures in place to manage such situations and ensure that patient safety is maintained when such recalls are issued. PMID:26110040

  2. Comparison of Gen-probe transcription-mediated amplification, Abbott PCR, and Roche PCR assays for detection of wild-type and mutant plasmid strains of Chlamydia trachomatis in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Pedersen, Lisbeth Nørum; Persson, Kenneth

    2008-12-01

    The clinical performance of two nucleic acid amplification assays targeting the cryptic plasmid and two assays targeting rRNA molecules in Chlamydia trachomatis was examined. First-catch urine samples from Malmoe, Sweden, were tested for C. trachomatis with the Abbott real-time PCR assay m2000 and an in-house PCR for the new variant strain of C. trachomatis with a deletion in the cryptic plasmid. Aliquots of the urine samples were sent to Aarhus, Denmark, and further examined with the Roche COBAS Amplicor CT (RCA) PCR, the Gen-Probe Aptima Combo 2 assay (AC2) targeting the C. trachomatis 23S rRNA, and the Aptima C. trachomatis assay (ACT) targeting the 16S rRNA molecule. A positive prevalence of 9% (163/1,808 urine samples examined) was detected according to the combined reference standard. The clinical sensitivity and specificity of the four assays were as follows: for ACT, 100% (163/163) and 99.9% (1,643/1,645), respectively; for AC2, 100% (163/163) and 99.6% (1,640/1,645); for m2000, 68.7% (112/163) and 99.9% (1,644/1,645); for RCA, 63.8% (104/163) and 99.9% (1,643/1,645). The two Gen-Probe assays detected all mutant strains characterized by the in-house PCR as having the deletion in the cryptic plasmid, whereas the Roche and the Abbott PCRs targeting the plasmid were both unable to detect the plasmid mutant. The difference in clinical sensitivity between the plasmid PCR assays m2000 and RCA, on the one hand, and the rRNA assays AC2 and ACT, on the other, could be attributed almost exclusively to the presence of the plasmid mutant in about one-quarter of the Chlamydia-positive samples examined.

  3. Grazing incidence angle based sensing approach integrated with fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared (FO-FTIR) spectroscopy for remote and label-free detection of medical device contaminations

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Moinuddin Ilev, Ilko

    2014-10-15

    Contamination of medical devices has become a critical and prevalent public health safety concern since medical devices are being increasingly used in clinical practices for diagnostics, therapeutics and medical implants. The development of effective sensing methods for real-time detection of pathogenic contamination is needed to prevent and reduce the spread of infections to patients and the healthcare community. In this study, a hollow-core fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methodology employing a grazing incidence angle based sensing approach (FO-FTIR-GIA) was developed for detection of various biochemical contaminants on medical device surfaces. We demonstrated the sensitivity of FO-FTIR-GIA sensing approach for non-contact and label-free detection of contaminants such as lipopolysaccharide from various surface materials relevant to medical device. The proposed sensing system can detect at a minimum loading concentration of approximately 0.7 μg/cm{sup 2}. The FO-FTIR-GIA has the potential for the detection of unwanted pathogen in real time.

  4. Grazing incidence angle based sensing approach integrated with fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared (FO-FTIR) spectroscopy for remote and label-free detection of medical device contaminations.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Moinuddin; Ilev, Ilko

    2014-10-01

    Contamination of medical devices has become a critical and prevalent public health safety concern since medical devices are being increasingly used in clinical practices for diagnostics, therapeutics and medical implants. The development of effective sensing methods for real-time detection of pathogenic contamination is needed to prevent and reduce the spread of infections to patients and the healthcare community. In this study, a hollow-core fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methodology employing a grazing incidence angle based sensing approach (FO-FTIR-GIA) was developed for detection of various biochemical contaminants on medical device surfaces. We demonstrated the sensitivity of FO-FTIR-GIA sensing approach for non-contact and label-free detection of contaminants such as lipopolysaccharide from various surface materials relevant to medical device. The proposed sensing system can detect at a minimum loading concentration of approximately 0.7 μg/cm(2). The FO-FTIR-GIA has the potential for the detection of unwanted pathogen in real time.

  5. Oral Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  6. Quantitation of estrogen receptor in seventy-five specimens of breast cancer: comparison between an immunoassay (Abbott ER-EIA monoclonal) and a (3H)estradiol binding assay based on isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel

    SciTech Connect

    Pousette, A.; Gustafsson, S.A.; Thoernblad, A.M.N.; Nordgren, A.; Saellstroem, J.Li.; Lindgren, A.; Sundelin, P.; Gustafsson, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    Quantitation of estrogen receptor has been performed in cytosol prepared from 75 specimens of breast cancer tissue from patients who had not received hormonal therapy. The study was performed in order to compare an immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL) with our currently used method for estrogen receptor analysis based on isoelectric focusing of (/sup 3/H)estradiol-receptor complex in polyacrylamide gels. Using linear regression analysis, a regression coefficient (slope) of 1.30 and a correlation coefficient of 0.75 were calculated. The differences in results between the two methods are probably partly explained by the fact that the ligand-based method only measures unoccupied receptor, whereas the immunoassay detects the total amount of receptor, resulting in generally slightly higher concentrations with the latter method. However, in five of 75 specimens the ligand-based method gave a considerably higher concentration of estrogen receptor. This was most probably explained by partial proteolysis resulting in the formation of receptor fragment(s), which was undetectable with the immunoassay but detectable with the ligand-based method. These observations underline the importance of careful handling of specimens during the whole immunoassay procedure.

  7. Optical design and testing: introduction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi Chin; Liang, Chao-Wen; Koshel, John; Sasian, Jose; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Wang, Yongtian; Zavisian, James M

    2015-10-01

    Optical design and testing have numerous applications in industrial, military, consumer, and bio-medical settings. This issue features original research ranging from the optical design of image and nonimage optical stimuli for human perception, optics applications, bio-optics applications, displays, and solar energy systems to novel imaging modalities from deep UV to infrared spectral imaging, a systems perspective to imaging, as well as optical measurement. In addition, new concepts and trends for optics and further optical systems will be especially highlighted in this special issue.

  8. Optical design and testing: introduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chao-Wen; Koshel, John; Sasian, Jose; Breault, Robert; Wang, Yongtian; Fang, Yi Chin

    2014-10-10

    Optical design and testing has numerous applications in industrial, military, consumer, and medical settings. Assembling a complete imaging or nonimage optical system may require the integration of optics, mechatronics, lighting technology, optimization, ray tracing, aberration analysis, image processing, tolerance compensation, and display rendering. This issue features original research ranging from the optical design of image and nonimage optical stimuli for human perception, optics applications, bio-optics applications, 3D display, solar energy system, opto-mechatronics to novel imaging or nonimage modalities in visible and infrared spectral imaging, modulation transfer function measurement, and innovative interferometry.

  9. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  10. Abbott RealTime Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HCV Assays for Prediction of Sustained Virological Response to Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients ▿

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hasegawa, Izumi; Ohno, Tomoyoshi; Tokuda, Hiroshi; Kurbanov, Fuat; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Nojiri, Shunsuke; Joh, Takashi; Mizokami, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    Two commercial real-time PCR assays are currently available for sensitive hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA quantification: the Abbott RealTime HCV assay (ART) and Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HCV assay (CAP/CTM). We assessed whether the two real-time PCR assays were more effective than Roche Cobas Amplicor HCV Monitor test, v.2.0 (CAM) for prediction of the sustained virological response (SVR) to pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) in chronic hepatitis C. Sixty patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1b (37 males and 23 females, 53 ± 12 years of age) were treated with PEG-IFNα2b plus RBV for 48 weeks. Stored specimens at nine time points for each patient (at baseline, on treatment, and 24 weeks after treatment) were tested by the two real-time PCR assays and CAM. Twenty-six (43.3%) patients reached SVR. The positive predictive values (PPVs) for SVR of undetectable HCV RNA at week 12 by CAM, ART, and CAP/CTM were 74.3%, 88.0%, and 95.2%, respectively. An undetectable HCV RNA level by CAM, ART, and CAP/CTM correctly predicted SVR at week 4 in 100%, 100%, and 100% of patients, at weeks 5 to 8 in 91.7%, 100%, and 100% of patients, at weeks 9 to 12 in 55.6%, 75%, and 87.5% of patients, and at weeks 13 to 24 in 0%, 26.7%, and 40% of patients, respectively. Of 16 patients who relapsed after treatment, HCV RNA was detectable in 2 patients at the end of treatment by CAP/CTM but undetectable by ART and CAM. HCV RNA tests using ART and CAP/CTM are considered to be more effective at predicting SVR than CAM, and the PPV for SVR was slightly higher in CAP/CTM than in ART. PMID:19091819

  11. Evaluation of the Abbott RealTime MTB and RealTime MTB INH/RIF Assays for Direct Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Resistance Markers in Respiratory and Extrapulmonary Specimens.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Thiel, Sabine; Molodtsov, Nikolay; Antonenka, Uladzimir; Hoffmann, Harald

    2016-12-01

    The Abbott RealTime MTB (RT MTB) assay is a new automated nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in clinical specimens. In combination with the RealTime MTB INH/RIF (RT MTB INH/RIF) resistance assay, which can be applied to RT MTB-positive specimens as an add-on assay, the tests also indicate the genetic markers of resistance to isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF). We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of RT MTB using different types of respiratory and extrapulmonary specimens and to compare performance characteristics directly with those of the FluoroType MTB assay. The resistance results obtained by RT MTB INH/RIF were compared to those from the GenoType MTBDRplus and from phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. A total of 715 clinical specimens were analyzed. Compared to culture, the overall sensitivity of RT MTB was 92.1%; the sensitivity rates for smear-positive and smear-negative samples were 100% and 76.2%, respectively. The sensitivities of smear-negative specimens were almost identical for respiratory (76.3%) and extrapulmonary (76%) specimens. Specificity rates were 100% and 95.8% for culture-negative specimens and those that grew nontuberculous mycobacteria, respectively. RT MTB INH/RIF was applied to 233 RT MTB-positive samples and identified resistance markers in 7.7% of samples. Agreement with phenotypic and genotypic drug susceptibility testing was 99.5%. In conclusion, RT MTB and RT MTB INH/RIF allow for the rapid and accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in different types of specimens and reliably indicate resistance markers. The strengths of this system are the comparably high sensitivity with paucibacillary specimens, its ability to detect INH and RIF resistance, and its high-throughput capacities.

  12. Comparison of the Abbott RealTime High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV), Roche Cobas HPV, and Hybrid Capture 2 assays to direct sequencing and genotyping of HPV DNA.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongjung; Lee, Eunhee; Choi, Jonghyeon; Jeong, Seri; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2012-07-01

    Infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes is an important risk factor for cervical cancers. We evaluated the clinical performances of two new real-time PCR assays for detecting HR HPVs compared to that of the Hybrid Capture 2 test (HC2). A total of 356 cervical swab specimens, which had been examined for cervical cytology, were assayed by Abbott RealTime HR and Roche Cobas HPV as well as HC2. Sensitivities and specificities of these assays were determined based on the criteria that concordant results among the three assays were regarded as true-positive or -negative and that the results of genotyping and sequencing were considered true findings when the HPV assays presented discrepant results. The overall concordance rate among the results for the three assays was 82.6%, and RealTime HR and Cobas HPV assays agreed with HC2 in 86.1% and 89.9% of cases, respectively. The two real-time PCR assays agreed with each other for 89.6% of the samples, and the concordance rate between them was equal to or greater than 98.0% for detecting HPV type 16 or 18. HC2 demonstrated a sensitivity of 96.6% with a specificity of 89.1% for detecting HR HPVs, while RealTime HR presented a sensitivity of 78.3% with a specificity of 99.2%. The sensitivity and specificity of Cobas HPV for detecting HR HPVs were 91.7% and 97.0%. The new real-time PCR assays exhibited lower sensitivities for detecting HR HPVs than that of HC2. Nevertheless, the newly introduced assays have an advantage of simultaneously identifying HPV types 16 and 18 from clinical samples.

  13. Teaching of laser medical topics: Latvian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis

    2002-10-01

    Pilot program for Master's studies on Biomedical Optics has been developed and launched at University of Latvia in 1995. The Curriculum contains several basic subjects like Fundamentals of Biomedical Optics, Medical Lightguides, Anatomy and Physiology, Lasers and Non-coherent Light Sources, Optical Instrumentation for Healthcare, Optical Methods for Patient Treatment, Basic Physics, etc. Special English Terminology and Laboratory-Clinical Praxis are also involved, and the Master Theses is the final step for the degree award. Recently a new extensive short course for medical laser users "Lasers and Bio-optics in Medicine" has been prepared in the PowerPoint format and successfully presented in Latvia, Lithuania and Sweden.

  14. Capillary waveguide optrodes for Medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieslinger, Dietmar; Weigl, Bernhard H.; Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-01-01

    Glass capillaries with a chemically sensitive coating on the inner surface are used as optical sensors for medical diagnostics. The capillary simultaneously serves as a sample compartment, a sensor element, and an inhomogeneous optical waveguide. Different optical setups have been investigated and compared regarding its waveguiding properties.

  15. Introduction to Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Ashley J.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    The first two parts of this book describe various theories associated with light propagation in tissue and the resulting response. If coherence or polarization information is not needed, we assume that the transport equation governs the optical interaction of light with tissue and the heat conduction equation provides the basis for estimating the thermal response of tissue to laser radiation. In part III of this book, the theory for optical and thermal interactions of laser light with tissue are used to analyze medical applications. In particular, the concepts of parts I and II

  16. Medical Transcriptionists

    MedlinePlus

    ... have an understanding of medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, grammar, and word-processing software. Pay The median ... must become familiar with medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, diagnostic procedures, pharmacology, and treatment assessments. Their ability ...

  17. Medical ethics

    PubMed Central

    Markose, Aji; Krishnan, Ramesh; Ramesh, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Mutual trust and relationship between doctors and patients is an important factor of treatment plan. Changing trends in medical field does affect this relationship. This article reviews the basic code of conduct for every medical practitioner. PMID:27829735

  18. ADHD Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... ADHD medications work by increasing the levels of brain chemicals called neurotransmitters . Neurotransmitters help send messages between nerve cells in the brain. There are two main kinds of ADHD medications: ...

  19. Abortion - medical

    MedlinePlus

    ... an undesired pregnancy. The medicine helps remove the fetus and placenta from the mother's womb (uterus). There are different types of medical abortions: Therapeutic medical abortion is done because the woman ...

  20. MEDICAL "DEPRIVATION."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUCHMAN, EDWARD A.

    THE SOCIAL AND MEDICAL PROBLEM TODAY HAS SHIFTED FROM PROVIDING FOR THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL NEEDS OF THE INDIGENT SICK TO RAISING THE LEVEL OF LOWER CLASS PARTICIPATION IN THE BENEFITS OF MODERN MEDICINE. GREATER ATTENTION IS BEING FOCUSED ON MEDICAL DEPRIVATION SUFFERED BY LARGE SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION WHO DO NOT SHARE EQUALLY IN MEDICAL…

  1. Medical Assistants

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical assistants often fill out insurance forms or code patients’ medical information. They often answer telephones and ... charts and diagnoses. They may be required to code a patient’s medical records for billing purposes. Detail ...

  2. Oral medications.

    PubMed

    Albretsen, Jay C

    2002-03-01

    Many medications are available today by prescription or in over-the-counter preparations. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, toxicity, clinical signs, and management procedures necessary for some oral medications. The medications reviewed include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, amphetamines or amphetamine like drugs, carprofen, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, pseudoephedrine, calcium channel blockers, and baclofen.

  3. Medication safety.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W

    2008-03-01

    Patient safety is a state of mind, not a technology. The technologies used in the medical setting represent tools that must be properly designed, used well, and assessed on an on-going basis. Moreover, in all settings, building a culture of safety is pivotal for improving safety, and many nontechnologic approaches, such as medication reconciliation and teaching patients about their medications, are also essential. This article addresses the topic of medication safety and examines specific strategies being used to decrease the incidence of medication errors across various clinical settings.

  4. Medical marijuana: Irresponsible medical care?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nayvin

    2017-03-01

    Illness should continue to be treated by health professionals employing scientific evidence. This is responsible policy. It is not appropriate or medically justified for family physicians to refer patients to medical marijuana clinics; instead, they should inform their patients that medical treatment must be based on scientific evidence.

  5. Wogonin prevents TLR4-NF-κB-medicated neuro-inflammation and improves retinal ganglion cells survival in retina after optic nerve crush

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin; Lu, Xi; Wang, Jiawei; Xu, Fan; Yu, Shanshan; Huang, Jingjing; Liang, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Chronic neuro-inflammation is involved in the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in glaucoma. The aim of this study is to determine whether wogonin can suppress inflammatory responses and rescue RGCs death after optic nerve crush (ONC), an ideal animal model of glaucoma. Wogonin was administered intraperitoneally 10 min after establishment of ONC model. In this study, wogonin treatment reduced RGCs loss and inhibited RGCs apoptosis demonstrated by the increased Brn3a labeling RGCs at day 14 and the decreased cleaved caspase-3 expression at day 7 after ONC, respectively. In ONC model, number of GFAP-positive glial cells and iba1-positive microglial cells were increased, combined of the elevated level of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in retina at day 7. However, most of these responses were inhibited after wogonin treatment. The level of TLR4 expression, NF-κB-P65 nucleus location and NF-κB-P65 phosphorylation were increased in retina at day 1 after ONC, which was significantly reduced after wogonin treatment. These results demonstrated that wogonin protected RGCs survival and suppressed neuro-inflammation in retina after ONC by inhibiting TLR4-NF-κB pathways. We conclude that wogonin could be a possible strategy for the treatment of glaucoma. PMID:27756890

  6. Optomechanical medical devices (instruments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Roger S.

    2004-03-01

    Optomechanical Medical Devices (Instruments) use lightwaves (UV, Visible, IR) for one or more of the following functions; to observe, to measure, to record, to test (align) and or to cut/repair. The evolution of Optomechanical Medical Devices probably started when the first torch or candle or petrochemical lamp used a polished reflector (possibly with a concave configuration) to examine a part of a patient's body (possibly a wound).Once the glass lens was invented, light sources of any type could be forcussed to increase illuminating power on a selected area. Medical Devices have come a great distance since these early items. Skipping across time to three rather significant inventions and advancements, we are well into the era of Laser and Fiber Optics and Advanced Photodetectors, all being integrated into Medical Devices. The most notable fields have been Ophthalmology, Dermatology, and Surgery. All three fields have been able to incorporate both the use of the Laser and the use of Fiber Optics (and at times the use of Photodetectors), into a single device (instrument). Historical: Philipp Bozzini (a Doctor, maybe) in the early 1800's used a hollow tube (tube material not identified) to project the light of a candle through the tube to view a patient's 'what ever'. Only Philipp, the patient and G-d knows what was being viewed. This ws the first recorded information on what could be considered the very first 'Endoscope examination'

  7. A high-field 3He metastability exchange optical pumping polarizer operating in a 1.5 T medical scanner for lung magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, G.; Pałasz, T.; Wojna, A.; Głowacz, B.; Suchanek, M.; Olejniczak, Z.; Dohnalik, T.

    2013-05-01

    After being hyperpolarized using the technique of Metastability Exchange Optical Pumping (MEOP), 3He can be used as a contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MEOP is usually performed at low magnetic field (˜1 mT) and low pressure (˜1 mbar), which results in a low magnetization production rate. Polarization preserving compression with a compression ratio of order 1000 is also required. It was demonstrated in sealed cells that high nuclear polarization values can be obtained at higher pressures with MEOP, if performed at high magnetic field (non-standard conditions). In this work, the feasibility of building a high-field polarizer that operates within a commercial 1.5 T scanner was evaluated. Preliminary measurements of nuclear polarization with sealed cells filled at different 3He gas pressures (1.33 to 267 mbar) were performed. The use of an annular shape for the laser beam increased by 25% the achievable nuclear polarization equilibrium value (Meq) at 32 and 67 mbar as compared to a Gaussian beam shape. Meq values of 66.4% and 31% were obtained at 32 and 267 mbar, respectively, and the magnetization production rate was increased by a factor of 10 compared to the best results obtained under standard conditions. To study the reproducibility of the method in a polarizing system, the same experiments were performed with small cells connected to a gas handling system. Despite careful cleaning procedure, the purity of the 3He gas could not be matched to that of the sealed cells. Consequently, the polarization build-up times were approximately 3 times longer in the 20-30 mbar range of pressure than those obtained for the 32 mbar sealed cell. However, reasonable Meq values of 40%-60% were achieved in a 90 ml open cell. Based on these findings, a novel compact polarizing system was designed and built. Its typical output is a 3He gas flow rate of 15 sccm with a polarization of 33%. In-vivo lung MRI ventilation images (Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of

  8. Standards Based Reform. Abbott Implementation Resource Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passantino, Claire; Kenyon, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this guide is to provide information, support and practical tools that may help educators design, implement, and evaluate their school's standards-based education program. In order to work, a comprehensive, standards-based educational program must, by definition, be the organizing structure upon which the school program operates.…

  9. [Euthanasia: medications and medical procedures].

    PubMed

    Lossignol, D

    2008-09-01

    The Belgian law relative to euthanasia has been published in 2002. A physician is allowed to help a patient with intractable suffering (physical or psychological). Legal conditions are clear. However, nothing is said about medical procedures or medications to be used. The present paper will present specific clinical situations at the end of life, practical procedures and medications. A special focus is made on psychological impact of euthanasia.

  10. Monitoring medication.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Matt

    2016-08-17

    A recent study from researchers at Ghent University in Belgium, involving 503 community-based adults aged 80 and over, found that 58% were taking five or more long-term medications daily, but few were taking them appropriately. The underuse of prescribed medication occurred in 67% of those studied and misuse occurred in 56%, with some overlap.

  11. Medical Scientists

    MedlinePlus

    ... scientists typically have a Ph.D., usually in biology or a related life science. Some medical scientists ... specialize in this field seek to understand the biology of aging and investigate ways to improve the ...

  12. ADHD Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... under a psychiatrist's or other doctor's care. ADHD medications have helped teens with ADHD in all sorts of areas, even helping reduce things like substance abuse, injuries, and automobile accidents. ADHD medicines also can ...

  13. Medication Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than one type of medication. Alpha Agonist Company Brand Name Generic Name Alcon, Inc. Iopidine® Apraclonidine ... drowsiness, dry mouth and dry nose. Beta Blockers Company Brand Name Generic Name Akorn Ophthalmics Timolol Maleate ...

  14. Medical Electronics and Physiological Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, T.

    1989-01-01

    Described are developments in medical electronics and physiological measurement. Discussed are electrocardiology, audiology, and urology as mature applications; applied potential tomography, magnetic stimulation of nerves, and laser Doppler flowmetry as new techniques; and optical sensors, ambulatory monitoring, and biosensors as future…

  15. Medical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2016-01-01

    The use of medicinal marijuana is increasing. Marijuana has been shown to have therapeutic effects in certain patients, but further research is needed regarding the safety and efficacy of marijuana as a medical treatment for various conditions. A growing body of research validates the use of marijuana for a variety of healthcare problems, but there are many issues surrounding the use of this substance. This article discusses the use of medical marijuana and provides implications for home care clinicians.

  16. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  17. The Optics of Bruising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise Lyngsnes; Skallerud, Bjørn; Langlois, Neil E. I.; Haugen, Olav Anton; Svaasand, Lars Othar

    Forensic medicine is a field of medicine where technology plays an increasingly important role in securing and evaluating evidence in, for example, child abuse cases and cases of domestic violence. Methods from chemistry and biological sciences have found a wide application within forensic medicine. Optical technologies like microscopy are also widely used. Despite this, in vivo or post mortem optical diagnostics by spectroscopy have traditionally not had an important role in clinical or forensic examinations. Forensic medical optics as a field might include all kinds of optical analysis for use within forensic science. This includes everything from microscopic techniques to methods for examination of evidence from a crime scene. This chapter will, however, focus on the use of optical diagnostics for examining skin, with a focus on identification, characterization and age determination of minor traumatic injuries like skin bruises.

  18. Medical Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2015-06-01

    The Medical Renaissance started as the regular Renaissance did in the early 1400s and ended in the late 1600s. During this time great medical personalities and scholar humanists made unique advances to medicine and surgery. Linacre, Erasmus, Leonicello and Sylvius will be considered first, because they fit the early classic Renaissance period. Andreas Vesalius and Ambroise Paré followed thereafter, making outstanding anatomical contributions with the publication of the "Human Factory" (1543) by Vesalius, and describing unique surgical developments with the publication of the "The Apologie and Treatise of Ambroise Paré." At the end of the Renaissance and beginning of the New Science, William Harvey, noted British medical doctor and cardiovascular researcher, discovered the general circulation. He published his findings in "The Motu Cordis" in 1628 (Figure 1). The Medical Renaissance, in summary, included a great number of accomplished physicians and surgeons who made especial contributions to human anatomy; Vesalius assembled detailed anatomical information; Paré advanced surgical techniques; and Harvey, a medical genius, detailed the circulatory anatomy and physiology.

  19. Medical Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    For more than two decades, Biotechnology and Bioengineering has documented research focused on natural and engineered microbial biofilms within aquatic and subterranean ecosystems, wastewater and waste-gas treatment systems, marine vessels and structures, and industrial bioprocesses. Compared to suspended culture systems, intentionally engineered biofilms are heterogeneous reaction systems that can increase reactor productivity, system stability, and provide inherent cell: product separation. Unwanted biofilms can create enormous increases in fluid frictional resistances, unacceptable reductions in heat transfer efficiency, product contamination, enhanced material deterioration, and accelerated corrosion. Missing from B&B has been an equivalent research dialogue regarding the basic molecular microbiology, immunology, and biotechnological aspects of medical biofilms. Presented here are the current problems related to medical biofilms; current concepts of biofilm formation, persistence, and interactions with the host immune system; and emerging technologies for controlling medical biofilms. PMID:18366134

  20. Intelligent distributed medical image management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Hong-Mei C.; Yun, David Y.

    1995-05-01

    The rapid advancements in high performance global communication have accelerated cooperative image-based medical services to a new frontier. Traditional image-based medical services such as radiology and diagnostic consultation can now fully utilize multimedia technologies in order to provide novel services, including remote cooperative medical triage, distributed virtual simulation of operations, as well as cross-country collaborative medical research and training. Fast (efficient) and easy (flexible) retrieval of relevant images remains a critical requirement for the provision of remote medical services. This paper describes the database system requirements, identifies technological building blocks for meeting the requirements, and presents a system architecture for our target image database system, MISSION-DBS, which has been designed to fulfill the goals of Project MISSION (medical imaging support via satellite integrated optical network) -- an experimental high performance gigabit satellite communication network with access to remote supercomputing power, medical image databases, and 3D visualization capabilities in addition to medical expertise anywhere and anytime around the country. The MISSION-DBS design employs a synergistic fusion of techniques in distributed databases (DDB) and artificial intelligence (AI) for storing, migrating, accessing, and exploring images. The efficient storage and retrieval of voluminous image information is achieved by integrating DDB modeling and AI techniques for image processing while the flexible retrieval mechanisms are accomplished by combining attribute- based and content-based retrievals.

  1. Medical leasing.

    PubMed

    Holden, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Leases for medical space can have far-reaching (and sometimes unintentional) consequences for the future of the practice and the costs of the business. In order to prevent hardship and expense down the line, it is especially important to review the lease to make sure that it reflects the practice's goals, needs, and structure. This article provides a number of provisions that are especially crucial to review and negotiate when leasing medical space, including use restrictions, assignment and subleasing clauses, build-out terms, and legal compliance requirements.

  2. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  3. Overview of Fiber-Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Moore, Emery L.

    1987-01-01

    Design, development, and sensitivity of sensors using fiber optics reviewed. State-of-the-art and probable future developments of sensors using fiber optics described in report including references to work in field. Serves to update previously published surveys. Systems incorporating fiber-optic sensors used in medical diagnosis, navigation, robotics, sonar, power industry, and industrial controls.

  4. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  5. Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieck, Hans Paetz Gen.

    The recent progress in medical imaging techniques such as magnetic-resonance imaging (nmr or mri), computer tomography (CT with X-rays), and positron-emission tomography (PET scanning using short-lived radioactive nuclei) has been impressive. Two areas where diagnostic tools lacked behind have been tomography of the blood vessels of the brain and of the bronchi.

  6. Medic Bleep.

    PubMed

    2017-03-15

    Medic Bleep is a secure instant messaging app that enables clinicians to discuss patient care quickly, securely and legally. It looks and feels like WhatsApp, but has been designed for the healthcare market to enable staff to communicate with each other, and to help speed up conversations between clinicians to increase efficiency.

  7. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration A to Z Index Follow ... Practices National Patient Safety Foundation To Err is Human: ... Errors: Quality Chasm Series National Coordinating Council for Medication Error ...

  8. Glaucoma medications.

    PubMed

    Chae, Bora; Cakiner-Egilmez, Tulay; Desai, Manishi

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a common eye condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide, making it the second-leading cause of blindness. Because glaucoma is associated with increased IOP level, the primary goal in treatment of glaucoma includes lowering IOP to prevent further progression of the disease. While various surgical interventions exist, medical therapy is currently the first line of treatment. Medical treatment of glaucoma includes topical beta-blockers, alpha-2 agonists, prostaglandins, parasympathomimetics and CAIs. Anti-glaucoma agents help reduce IOP by affecting the production of aqueous humor or increasing the outflow of aqueous through the trabecular or uveoscleral pathway. Choosing an appropriate medical regimen can be challenging and various factors such as efficacy, safety, cost and patient compliance must be considered. First-line treatment is often topical beta-blockers or prostaglandin analogs. However, beta-blocking agents can be associated with systemic side effects and need to be used cautiously in patients with serious concomitant cardiopulmonary disease. Alpha-2 agonists and parasympathomimetics are often considered second- or third-line treatment options but good adjunctive agents. Oral CAIs are often indicated for patients with elevated IOP in an acute setting or for patients resistant to other glaucoma medications and patients who are not good surgical candidates.

  9. [Medical geography].

    PubMed

    Hauri, D

    2007-10-17

    Hippocrates already noted that geographical factors such as climate, relief, geology but also settlement patterns had influenced the distribution of diseases. The task of medical geography is to investigate the associations between geographical factors and diseases. Thereby, geographic techniques and concepts are applied on health problems. Of particular importance is the mapping of diseases whose causes are environmental-related. In addition, epidemiological, ecological but also social scientific studies play an important part in the investigation of the associations between geographical factors and diseases. In order to understand the associations between the spatial distribution of diseases and environmental exposures, geographic information systems as well as statistical analyses have recently become more important. Some authors regard medical geography merely as supporting discipline of medicine. Nevertheless, as men and environment future and as they play an important part in the diffusion of diseases being regarded as defeated, medical geography will play an important part concerning medical questions. Especially travel medicine will rely on geographic knowledge, if a patient has to be consulted who plans to travel to an unknown country of which knowledge on the geographical distribution and ecology of diseases will be necessary.

  10. Medical tourism.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Olga S

    2010-01-01

    Medical tourism is becoming popular as an alternative to the high cost of health care in the United States and as an inexpensive resource for cosmetic surgery. The occupational health nurse is an excellent resource to assist in the pre-decision due diligence and post-decision travel health counseling.

  11. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Medical Devices Medical Device Safety Medical Device Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 17 More Medical Device Recalls Recent Medical Device Safety Communications FDA analyses and recommendations for patients and ...

  12. Optic neuritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. The ... brain , including special images of the optic nerve Visual acuity testing Visual field testing Examination of the ...

  13. Evaluation of performance across the dynamic range of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay as compared to VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0 and AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR v1.5 using serial dilutions of 39 group M and O viruses.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Priscilla; Huang, Shihai; Abravaya, Klara; de Mendoza, Carmen; Soriano, Vincent; Devare, Sushil G; Hackett, John

    2007-04-01

    Performance of the Abbott m2000 instrument system and the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay was evaluated using a panel of 37 group M (subtypes A-D, F, G, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG and unique recombinant forms) and 2 group O virus isolates. Testing was performed on 273 sample dilutions and compared to VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0 (bDNA) and AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR v1.5 (Monitor v1.5) test results. RealTime HIV-1, bDNA, and Monitor v1.5 tests quantified 87%, 78%, and 81% of samples, respectively. RealTime HIV-1 detected an additional 31 samples at < 40 copies/mL. For group M, RealTime HIV-1 dilution profiles and viral loads were highly correlated with bDNA and Monitor v1.5 values; 87% and 89% of values were within 0.5 log(10) copies/mL. In contrast, the group O viruses were not detected by Monitor v1.5 and were substantially underquantified by approximately 2 log(10) copies/mL in bDNA relative to the RealTime HIV-1 assay. Sequence analysis revealed that RealTime HIV-1 primer/probe binding sites are highly conserved and exhibit fewer nucleotide mismatches relative to Monitor v1.5. The automated m2000 system and RealTime HIV-1 assay offer the advantages of efficient sample processing and throughput with reduced "hands-on" time while providing improved sensitivity, expanded dynamic range and reliable quantification of genetically diverse HIV-1 strains.

  14. Medical tourism.

    PubMed

    Reed, Christie M

    2008-11-01

    Searches of the literature or Internet using the term "medical tourism" produce two sets of articles: travel for the purpose of delivering health care or travel for the purpose of seeking health care. The first usage primarily appears in the medical literature and is beyond the scope of this article, which focuses on travel to seek health care. Still, there are some aspects these two topics have in common: both are affected by ease and speed of international travel and communication associated with globalization, and both raise questions about continuity of care as well as issues related to cultural, language, and legal differences; both also raise questions about ethics. This article describes some of the motivating factors, contributing elements, and challenges in elucidating trends, as well as implications for clinicians who provide pretravel advice and those who care for ill returning travelers.

  15. Medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Alex

    2005-07-01

    Diagnostic medical imaging is a fundamental part of the practice of modern medicine and is responsible for the expenditure of considerable amounts of capital and revenue monies in healthcare systems around the world. Much research and development work is carried out, both by commercial companies and the academic community. This paper reviews briefly each of the major diagnostic medical imaging techniques—X-ray (planar and CT), ultrasound, nuclear medicine (planar, SPECT and PET) and magnetic resonance. The technical challenges facing each are highlighted, with some of the most recent developments. In terms of the future, interventional/peri-operative imaging, the advancement of molecular medicine and gene therapy are identified as potential areas of expansion.

  16. Phase synchronization of oxygenation waves in the frontal areas of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder detected by optical diffusion spectroscopy correlates with medication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigal, Sharon B.; Polzonetti, Chiara M.; Stehli, Annamarie; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    The beneficial effects of pharmacotherapy on children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are well documented. We use near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) methodology to determine reorganization of brain neurovascular properties following the medication treatment. Twenty-six children with ADHD (ages six through 12) participated in a modified laboratory school protocol to monitor treatment response with lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX; Vyvanse, Shire US Inc.). All children refrained from taking medication for at least two weeks (washout period). To detect neurovascular reorganization, we measured changes in synchronization of oxy (HbO2) and deoxy (HHb) hemoglobin waves between the two frontal lobes. Participants without medication displayed average baseline HbO2 phase difference at about -7-deg. and HHb differences at about 240-deg.. This phase synchronization index changed after pharmacological intervention. Medication induced an average phase changes of HbO2 after first medication to 280-deg. and after medication optimization to 242-deg.. Instead first medication changed of the average HHb phase difference at 186-deg. and then after medication optimization to 120-deg. In agreement with findings of White et al., and Varela et al., we associated the phase synchronization differences of brain hemodynamics in children with ADHD with lobe specific hemodynamic reorganization of HbO2- and HHB oscillations following medication status.

  17. Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccara, A. Claude; Mordon, Serge

    2015-10-01

    In re-listening to the lectures of Charles Townes shortly after the invention of the laser (e.g., in the Boston Science Museum), one can already have a realistic vision of the potentialities of this new tool in the field of medical therapy, as evidenced by the use of the laser in ophthalmology to cure retinal detachment in the 1960's. Since then, applications have flourished in the domain of therapy. We will thus illustrate here only some of the main fields of application of medical lasers. On the opposite, the use of lasers in medical imaging is, with one exception in ophthalmology, still at the development level. It is becoming a diagnostic tool in addition to high performance imaging facilities that are often very expensive (such as CT scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging). Even if progress is sometimes slow, one can now image with light inside the human body, in spite of the strong scattering of light by tissues, in the same way as a pathologist sees surgical specimens.

  18. Accuracy of optical navigation systems for automatic head surgery: optical tracking versus optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Díaz, Jesús; Riva, Mauro H.; Majdani, Omid; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    The choice of a navigation system highly depends on the medical intervention and its accuracy demands. The most commonly used systems for image guided surgery (IGS) are based on optical and magnetic tracking systems. This paper compares two optical systems in terms of accuracy: state of the art triangulation-based optical tracking (OT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). We use an experimental setup with a combined OCT and cutting laser, and an external OT. We simulate a robotic assisted surgical intervention, including planning, navigation, and processing, and compare the accuracies reached at a specific target with each navigation system.

  19. Optic nerve aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lisi; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    We report a 55-year-old woman with optic nerve Aspergillosis. Aspergillus is an ubiquitous airborne saprophytic fungus. Inhaled Aspergillus conidia are normally eliminated in the immunocompetent host by innate immune mechanisms; however, in immunosuppressed patients, they can cause disease. The woman had a past medical history of hypertension and migraines. She presented 1 year prior to death with a new onset headache behind the left eye and later developed blurred vision and scotoma. A left temporal artery biopsy was negative for giant cell arteritis. One month prior to the current admission, she had an MRI showing optic nerve thickening with no other findings. Because of the visual loss and a positive antinuclear antibody test, she was given a trial of high dose steroids and while it significantly improved her headache, her vision did not improve. At autopsy, the left optic nerve at the level of the cavernous sinus and extending into the optic chiasm was enlarged in diameter and there was a 1.3 cm firm nodule surrounding the left optic nerve. Histologically, an abscess surrounded and involved the left optic nerve. Acute angle branching, angioinvasive fungal hyphae were identified on Grocott's methenamine silver stained sections, consistent with Aspergillus spp. No gross or microscopic evidence of systemic vasculitis or infection was identified in the body. The literature on optic nerve Aspergillosis is reviewed.

  20. Medical revolution in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ballarin, V L; Isoardi, R A

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the major Argentineans contributors, medical physicists and scientists, in medical imaging and the development of medical imaging in Argentina. The following are presented: history of medical imaging in Argentina: the pioneers; medical imaging and medical revolution; nuclear medicine imaging; ultrasound imaging; and mathematics, physics, and electronics in medical image research: a multidisciplinary endeavor.

  1. Medical History: Compiling Your Medical Family Tree

    MedlinePlus

    ... family medical history, sometimes called a medical family tree, is a record of illnesses and medical conditions ... to consult family documents, such as existing family trees, baby books, old letters, obituaries or records from ...

  2. Medical electromechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Y. M.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Osipov, O. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The first part of the article presentsdevices of rehabilitation electromechatronics.As a research work, the author's team has performed sketch and technical developments on this subject, which are protected by patents of the Russian Federation. The second part providesan overview of medical robotic surgery, which is ideal for imperfections removing.It also describes capabilities of the author's team in development of active driveline based "iron" hands.Scalpels never tremble in the iron hands, which are not afraid of the aftershocks and never get tired.They can perform operations during not less than 48 consecutive hours.

  3. Medical clip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, R. M. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An X-ray transparent and biological inert medical clip for treating aneurisms and the like is described. A graphite reinforced composite film is molded into a unitary structure having a pair of hourglass-like cavities hinged together with a pair of jaws for grasping the aneurism extending from the wall of one cavity. A silicone rubber pellet is disposed in the other cavity to exert a spring force through the hinge area to normally bias the jaws into contact with each other.

  4. Ultraviolet Communication for Medical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-C-0043 TITLE: Ultraviolet Communication for Medical Applications PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR Jeff Guy Directed Energy , Inc...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Report contains color. 14. ABSTRACT Under this Phase II SBIR effort, Directed Energy Inc.’s (DEI) proprietary ultraviolet (UV...non-line-of-sight (NLOS) optical communication data links operating in the solar blind region (200–280 nm). The intended application is covert

  5. Optical microspectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2004-05-25

    An optical microspectrometer comprises a grism to disperse the spectra in a line object. A single optical microspectrometer can be used to sequentially scan a planar object, such as a dye-tagged microchip. Because the optical microspectrometer is very compact, multiple optical microspectrometers can be arrayed to provide simultaneous readout across the width of the planar object The optical microspectrometer can be fabricated with lithographic process, such as deep X-ray lithography (DXRL), with as few as two perpendicular exposures.

  6. Medical robotics.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Baroni, Guido; Casolo, Federico; De Momi, Elena; Gini, Giuseppina; Matteucci, Matteo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronics play a basic role in medical robotics and computer-aided therapy. In the last three decades, in fact, ICT technology has strongly entered the health-care field, bringing in new techniques to support therapy and rehabilitation. In this frame, medical robotics is an expansion of the service and professional robotics as well as other technologies, as surgical navigation has been introduced especially in minimally invasive surgery. Localization systems also provide treatments in radiotherapy and radiosurgery with high precision. Virtual or augmented reality plays a role for both surgical training and planning and for safe rehabilitation in the first stage of the recovery from neurological diseases. Also, in the chronic phase of motor diseases, robotics helps with special assistive devices and prostheses. Although, in the past, the actual need and advantage of navigation, localization, and robotics in surgery and therapy has been in doubt, today, the availability of better hardware (e.g., microrobots) and more sophisticated algorithms(e.g., machine learning and other cognitive approaches)has largely increased the field of applications of these technologies,making it more likely that, in the near future, their presence will be dramatically increased, taking advantage of the generational change of the end users and the increasing request of quality in health-care delivery and management.

  7. Optically tunable optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Robert T. B.; Wah, Christopher; Iizuka, Keigo; Shimotahira, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an optically tunable optical filter that uses photorefractive barium titanate. With our filter we implement a spectrum analyzer at 632.8 nm with a resolution of 1.2 nm. We simulate a wavelength-division multiplexing system by separating two semiconductor laser diodes, at 1560 nm and 1578 nm, with the same filter. The filter has a bandwidth of 6.9 nm. We also use the same filter to take 2.5-nm-wide slices out of a 20-nm-wide superluminescent diode centered at 840 nm. As a result, we experimentally demonstrate a phenomenal tuning range from 632.8 to 1578 nm with a single filtering device.

  8. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    MedlinePlus

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ... People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ...

  9. Medical Misuse of Controlled Medications Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; West, Brady T.; Cranford, James A.; Ross-Durow, Paula; Young, Amy; Teter, Christian J.; Boyd, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the past-year medical misuse prevalence for 4 controlled medication classes (pain, stimulant, sleeping, and antianxiety) among adolescents, and to assess substance use outcomes among adolescents who report medical misuse. Design A Web-based survey was self-administered by 2744 secondary school students in 2009-2010. Setting Two southeastern Michigan school districts. Participants The sample had a mean age of 14.8 years and was 51.1% female. The racial/ethnic distribution was 65.0% white, 29.5% African American, 3.7% Asian, 1.3% Hispanic, and 0.5% other. Main Outcome Measures Past-year medical use and misuse of 4 controlled medication classes. Results Eighteen percent of the sample reported past-year medical use of at least 1 prescribed controlled medication. Among past-year medical users, 22.0% reported misuse of their controlled medications, including taking too much, intentionally getting high, or using to increase alcohol or other drug effects. Medical misusers were more likely than nonmisusers to divert their controlled medications and to abuse other substances. The odds of a positive screening result for drug abuse were substantially higher among medical misusers (adjusted odds ratio, 7.8; 95% confidence interval, 4.3-14.2) compared with medical users who used their controlled medications appropriately. The odds of drug abuse did not differ between medical users who used their controlled medications appropriately and nonusers. Conclusions Most adolescents who used controlled medications took their medications appropriately. Substance use and diversion of controlled medications were more prevalent among adolescents who misused their controlled medications. Careful therapeutic monitoring could reduce medical misuse and diversion of controlled medications among adolescents. PMID:21810634

  10. [MEDICAL CANNABIS].

    PubMed

    Naftali, Timna

    2016-02-01

    The cannabis plant has been known to humanity for centuries as a remedy for pain, diarrhea and inflammation. Current research is inspecting the use of cannabis for many diseases, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dystonia, and chronic pain. In inflammatory conditions cannabinoids improve pain in rheumatoid arthritis and:pain and diarrhea in Crohn's disease. Despite their therapeutic potential, cannabinoids are not free of side effects including psychosis, anxiety, paranoia, dependence and abuse. Controlled clinical studies investigating the therapeutic potential of cannabis are few and small, whereas pressure for expanding cannabis use is increasing. Currently, as long as cannabis is classified as an illicit drug and until further controlled studies are performed, the use of medical cannabis should be limited to patients who failed conventional better established treatment.

  11. First gravitational-wave burst GW150914: MASTER optical follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Kornilov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Tiurina, N.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Greiner, J.; Vladimirov, V.; Vlasenko, D.; Chazov, V.; Kuvshinov, D.; Gabovich, A.; Potter, S. B.; Kniazev, A.; Crawford, S.; Rebolo Lopez, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Lodieu, N.; Gress, O.; Budnev, N.; Ivanov, K.; Poleschuk, V.; Yazev, S.; Tlatov, A.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V.; Dormidontov, D.; Parkhomenko, A.; Sergienko, Yu.; Podesta, R.; Levato, H.; Lopez, C.; Saffe, C.; Podesta, F.; Mallamaci, C.

    2017-03-01

    The Advanced LIGO observatory recently reported the first direct detection of the gravitational waves (GWs) predicted by Einstein & Sitzungsber. We report on the first optical observations of the GW source GW150914 error region with the Global MASTER Robotic Net. Between the optical telescopes of electromagnetic support, the covered area is dominated by MASTER with an unfiltered magnitude up to 19.9 mag (5σ). We detected several optical transients, which proved to be unconnected with the GW event. The main input to investigate the final error box of GW150914 was made by the MASTER-SAAO robotic telescope, which covered 70 per cent of the final GW error box and 90 per cent of the common localization area of the LIGO and Fermi events. Our result is consistent with the conclusion (Abbott et al. 2016a) that GWs from GW150914 were produced in a binary black hole merger. At the same time, we cannot exclude that MASTER OT J040938.68-541316.9 exploded on 2015 September 14.

  12. Medical Surveillance Requirements For Nonionizing Radiation Workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, James A.

    1980-10-01

    The potential value of medical surveillance examinations for laser workers and other workers potentially exposed to high intensity optical radiation is evaluated. A review of the known adverse biological effects leads to the conclusion that most effects are related to acute and subacute exposures which do not lend themselves to effective medical surveillance. In addition, surveys of thousands of laser workers conducted since 1965 demonstrated that routine periodic medical surveillance has been unnecessary and/or impractical using currently available ophthalmic screening methods. Examination techniques to detect early changes in cataract formation or retinal degeneration (two potential chronic effects of optical radiation) are not sufficiently reliable or specific to be of value as routine screening tests. Epidemiologic studies of large worker groups are suggested to evaluate the potential for these chronic conditions to develop as the result of job exposure; however, specific recommendations for routine medical surveillance are limited to preplacement and termination examinations with appropriate evaluation of individuals following acute injury.

  13. Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    Seventy percent of our body is made up of water. For that reason, radiation based medical imaging techniques operate in spectral regions where water absorption is low (Fig. 18.1, panel). Well known modalities are MRI that operates at radio frequencies, and PET/SPECT which work in the high frequency range. Water absorption is also low around the part of the spectrum that is visible to the human eye. In this spectral region, scattering of the light by tissue structures roughly decreases with wavelength. Therefore, most optical imaging techniques such as (confocal) microscopy, optical tomography and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) use wavelengths between 650 and 1300 nm to allow reasonable imaging depths.

  14. Development of optical sciences in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    Research and technical communities for optics, photonics and optoelectronics is grouped in this country in several organizations and institutions. These are: Photonics Society of Poland (PSP), Polish Committee of Optoelectronics of SEP, Photonics Section of KEiT PAN, Laser Club at WAT, and Optics Section of PTF. Each of these communities keeps slightly different specificity. PSP publishes a quarterly journal Photonics Letters of Poland, stimulates international cooperation, and organizes conferences during Industrial Fairs on Innovativeness. PKOpto SEP organizes didactic diploma competitions in optoelectronics. KEiT PAN takes patronage over national conferences in laser technology, optical fiber technology and communications, and photonics applications. SO-PTF has recently taken a decision to organize a cyclic event "Polish Optical Conference". The third edition of this conference PKO'2013 was held in Sandomierz on 30.06-04.07.2013. The conference scientific and technical topics include: quantum and nonlinear optics, photon physics, optic and technology of lasers and other sources of coherent radiation, optoelectronics, optical integrated circuits, optical fibers, medical optics, instrumental optics, optical spectroscopy, optical metrology, new optical materials, applications of optics, teaching in optics. This paper reviews chosen works presented during the III Polish Optical Conference (PKO'2013), representing the research efforts at different national institutions.

  15. 78 FR 17415 - Medical Devices; Availability of Safety and Effectiveness Summaries for Premarket Approval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Assist System. P120008, FDA-2012-M-1176 Abbott Laboratories.. ARCHITECT AFP Assay, November 28, 2012. ARCHITECT AFP Calibrators and ARCHITECT AFP Controls. II. Electronic Access Persons with access to...

  16. Optical Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    2005-08-01

    1. Optical solitons in fibres: theoretical review A. Hasegawa; 2. Solitons in optical fibres: an experimental account L. F. Mollenauer; 3. All-optical long-distance soliton-based transmission systems K. Smith and L. F. Mollenauer; 4. Nonlinear propagation effects in optical fibres: numerical studies K. J. Blow and N. J. Doran; 5. Soliton-soliton interactions C. Desem and P. L. Chu; 6. Soliton amplification in erbium-doped fibre amplifiers and its application to soliton communication M. Nakazawa; 7. Nonlinear transformation of laser radiation and generation of Raman solitons in optical fibres E. M. Dianov, A. B. Grudinin, A. M. Prokhorov and V. N. Serkin; 8. Generation and compression of femtosecond solitons in optical fibers P. V. Mamyshev; 9. Optical fibre solitons in the presence of higher order dispersion and birefringence C. R. Menyuk and Ping-Kong A. Wai; 10. Dark optical solitons A. M. Weiner; 11. Soliton Raman effects J. R. Taylor; Bibliography; Index.

  17. Optical Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1992-04-01

    1. Optical solitons in fibres: theoretical review A. Hasegawa; 2. Solitons in optical fibres: an experimental account L. F. Mollenauer; 3. All-optical long-distance soliton-based transmission systems K. Smith and L. F. Mollenauer; 4. Nonlinear propagation effects in optical fibres: numerical studies K. J. Blow and N. J. Doran; 5. Soliton-soliton interactions C. Desem and P. L. Chu; 6. Soliton amplification in erbium-doped fibre amplifiers and its application to soliton communication M. Nakazawa; 7. Nonlinear transformation of laser radiation and generation of Raman solitons in optical fibres E. M. Dianov, A. B. Grudinin, A. M. Prokhorov and V. N. Serkin; 8. Generation and compression of femtosecond solitons in optical fibers P. V. Mamyshev; 9. Optical fibre solitons in the presence of higher order dispersion and birefringence C. R. Menyuk and Ping-Kong A. Wai; 10. Dark optical solitons A. M. Weiner; 11. Soliton Raman effects J. R. Taylor; Bibliography; Index.

  18. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  19. Miniaturised optical encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, John; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.; Weston, Nick; McKendrick, David; Cunningham, Graeme; McFarland, Geoff; Meredith, Wyn; McKee, Andrew; Langton, Conrad; Eddie, Iain

    2008-08-01

    Optical encoders are pervasive in many sectors of industry including metrology, motion systems, electronics, medical, scanning/ printing, scientific instruments, space research and specialist machine tools. The precision of automated manufacture and assembly has been revolutionised by the adoption of optical diffractive measurement methods. Today's optical encoders comprise discrete components: light source(s), reference and analyser gratings, and a photodiode array that utilise diffractive optic methods to achieve high resolution. However the critical alignment requirements between the optical gratings and to the photodiode array, the bulky nature of the encoder devices and subsequent packaging mean that optical encoders can be prohibitively expensive for many applications and unsuitable for others. We report here on the design, manufacture and test of a miniaturised optical encoder to be used in precision measurement systems. Microsystems manufacturing techniques facilitate the monolithic integration of the traditional encoder components onto a single compound semiconductor chip, radically reducing the size, cost and set-up time. Fabrication of the gratings at the wafer level, by standard photo-lithography, allows for the simultaneous alignment of many devices in a single process step. This development coupled with a unique photodiode configuration not only provides increased performance but also significantly improves the alignment tolerances in both manufacture and set-up. A National Research and Development Corporation type optical encoder chip has been successfully demonstrated under test conditions on both amplitude and phase scales with pitches of 20 micron, 8 micron and 4 micron, showing significantly relaxed alignment tolerances with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 60:1. Various reference mark schemes have also been investigated. Results are presented here.

  20. Optical keyboard

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; Feichtner, John D.; Phillips, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

  1. Immunosuppressive Medications.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Alexander C

    2016-02-05

    Immunosuppressive agents are commonly used in the nephrologist's practice in the treatment of autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases and transplantation, and they are investigational in the treatment of AKI and ESRD. Drug development has been rapid over the past decades as mechanisms of the immune response have been better defined both by serendipity (the discovery of agents with immunosuppressive activity that led to greater understanding of the immune response) and through mechanistic study (the study of immune deficiencies and autoimmune diseases and the critical pathways or mutations that contribute to disease). Toxicities of early immunosuppressive agents, such as corticosteroids, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide, stimulated intense investigation for agents with more specificity and less harmful effects. Because the mechanisms of the immune response were better delineated over the past 30 years, this specialty is now bestowed with a multitude of therapeutic options that have reduced rejection rates and improved graft survival in kidney transplantation, provided alternatives to cytotoxic therapy in immune-mediated diseases, and opened new opportunities for intervention in diseases both common (AKI) and rare (atypical hemolytic syndrome). Rather than summarizing clinical indications and clinical trials for all currently available immunosuppressive medications, the purpose of this review is to place these agents into mechanistic context together with a brief discussion of unique features of development and use that are of interest to the nephrologist.

  2. Immunosuppressive Medications

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are commonly used in the nephrologist’s practice in the treatment of autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases and transplantation, and they are investigational in the treatment of AKI and ESRD. Drug development has been rapid over the past decades as mechanisms of the immune response have been better defined both by serendipity (the discovery of agents with immunosuppressive activity that led to greater understanding of the immune response) and through mechanistic study (the study of immune deficiencies and autoimmune diseases and the critical pathways or mutations that contribute to disease). Toxicities of early immunosuppressive agents, such as corticosteroids, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide, stimulated intense investigation for agents with more specificity and less harmful effects. Because the mechanisms of the immune response were better delineated over the past 30 years, this specialty is now bestowed with a multitude of therapeutic options that have reduced rejection rates and improved graft survival in kidney transplantation, provided alternatives to cytotoxic therapy in immune-mediated diseases, and opened new opportunities for intervention in diseases both common (AKI) and rare (atypical hemolytic syndrome). Rather than summarizing clinical indications and clinical trials for all currently available immunosuppressive medications, the purpose of this review is to place these agents into mechanistic context together with a brief discussion of unique features of development and use that are of interest to the nephrologist. PMID:26170177

  3. Medical muddle.

    PubMed

    Gartrell, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    Nanette Gartrell, MD, is a psychiatrist and researcher whose investigations have documented the mental health and psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people over the past four decades. Nanette is the principal investigator of an ongoing longitudinal study of lesbian families in which the children were conceived by donor insemination. Now in its 27th year, this project has been cited internationally in the debates over equality in marriage, foster care, and adoption. Previously on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of California, San Francisco, Nanette is currently a Visiting Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law. In 2013, Nanette received the Association of Women Psychiatrists Presidential Commendation Award for "selfless and enduring vision, leadership, wisdom, and mentorship in the fields of women's mental health, ethics, and gender research." At the age of 63, Nanette experienced a 3 ½ month period of intractable, incapacitating dizziness for which there was never a clear diagnosis.

  4. Optical Micromachining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) with Marshall Space Flight Center, Potomac Photonics, Inc., constructed and demonstrated a unique tool that fills a need in the area of diffractive and refractive micro-optics. It is an integrated computer-aided design and computer-aided micro-machining workstation that will extend the benefits of diffractive and micro-optic technology to optical designers. Applications of diffractive optics include sensors and monitoring equipment, analytical instruments, and fiber optic distribution and communication. The company has been making diffractive elements with the system as a commercial service for the last year.

  5. Fluidic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesides, George M.; Tang, Sindy K. Y.

    2006-09-01

    Fluidic optics is a new class of optical system with real-time tunability and reconfigurability enabled by the introduction of fluidic components into the optical path. We describe the design, fabrication, operation of a number of fluidic optical systems, and focus on three devices, liquid-core/liquid-cladding (L2) waveguides, microfluidic dye lasers, and diffraction gratings based on flowing, crystalline lattices of bubbles, to demonstrate the integration of microfluidics and optics. We fabricate these devices in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with soft-lithographic techniques. They are simple to construct, and readily integrable with microanalytical or lab-on-a-chip systems.

  6. Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lynn K

    2016-10-28

    Optic nerve diseases arise from many different etiologies including inflammatory, neoplastic, genetic, infectious, ischemic, and idiopathic. Understanding some of the characteristics of the most common optic neuropathies along with therapeutic approaches to these diseases is helpful in designing recommendations for individual patients. Although many optic neuropathies have no specific treatment, some do, and it is those potentially treatable or preventable conditions which need to be recognized in order to help patients regain their sight or develop a better understanding of their own prognosis. In this chapter several diseases are discussed including idiopathic intracranial hypertension, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathies, hereditary optic neuropathies, trauma, and primary tumors of the optic nerve. For each condition there is a presentation of the signs and symptoms of the disease, in some conditions the evaluation and diagnostic criteria are highlighted, and where possible, current therapy or past trials are discussed.

  7. Medical imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Kreel, L.

    1991-01-01

    There is now a wide choice of medical imaging to show both focal and diffuse pathologies in various organs. Conventional radiology with plain films, fluoroscopy and contrast medium have many advantages, being readily available with low-cost apparatus and a familiarity that almost leads to contempt. The use of plain films in chest disease and in trauma does not need emphasizing, yet there are still too many occasions when the answer obtainable from a plain radiograph has not been available. The film may have been mislaid, or the examination was not requested, or the radiograph had been misinterpreted. The converse is also quite common. Examinations are performed that add nothing to patient management, such as skull films when CT will in any case be requested or views of the internal auditory meatus and heal pad thickness in acromegaly, to quote some examples. Other issues are more complicated. Should the patient who clinically has gall-bladder disease have more than a plain film that shows gall-stones? If the answer is yes, then why request a plain film if sonography will in any case be required to 'exclude' other pathologies especially of the liver or pancreas? But then should cholecystography, CT or scintigraphy be added for confirmation? Quite clearly there will be individual circumstances to indicate further imaging after sonography but in the vast majority of patients little or no extra information will be added. Statistics on accuracy and specificity will, in the case of gall-bladder pathology, vary widely if adenomyomatosis is considered by some to be a cause of symptoms or if sonographic examinations 'after fatty meals' are performed. The arguments for or against routine contrast urography rather than sonography are similar but the possibility of contrast reactions and the need to limit ionizing radiation must be borne in mind. These diagnostic strategies are also being influenced by their cost and availability; purely pragmatic considerations are not

  8. Medical photogrammetric measurement: overview and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, H. L.; Newton, I.

    Since the earliest days of photogrammetry, there have been photogrammetrists who have directed research effort towards medical measurement. Although the specific motivation for these studies has not always been disclosed, it is probably because of the various benefits that photogrammetry can offer to humanity as a painless and non-invasive means of providing medical practitioners with spatial measurement relating to the human body. The intention of this paper is to reflect on the place of the many medical developments within the photogrammetric world. The various photogrammetric applications in medicine are summarised to identify the characteristics of medical photogrammetry, and it becomes evident that medical photogrammetrists have developed a range of body measurements using widely varying photogrammetric techniques, in response to the demands for specialised spatial measurement tools for a wide variety of medical ends. This volume of research activity has made medical measurement a substantial and varied sector of non-mapping photogrammetry. It is also clear that there are numerous challenges to the design of medical photogrammetric systems. They must give paramount consideration to the human patients and their comfort; they must yield not simply spatial data about the body but rather specific medical information. At the same time, it is of concern that non-photogrammetric scientists and engineers have developed medical measurement systems based on both photogrammetric and other optical techniques. Fortunately, photogrammetrists can also contribute to medical problems through their spatial data experiences. It is concluded that the many distinctive challenges mean that medical photogrammetry has not yet been as successful at changing the world as the extensive efforts applied to it suggest, but nevertheless, medical photogrammetry deserves to be recognised as a category of close range photogrammetry which remains a valuable pursuit which should not be abandoned

  9. Teaching Medical Ethics to Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewy, Erich H.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution and goals of teaching medical ethics, the nature of medical ethics, and integrating such teaching into the curriculum are examined. Because moral considerations are as much a part of medical decisions as technical considerations, teaching is best done in the context of real cases. (Author/MLW)

  10. A chip of fiber optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Heming; Hu, Huizhu; Zhang, Lei; Ge, Xiaojia; Shen, Yu

    2016-10-01

    A chip of fiber optical trap paves the way to realize the miniaturization and portability of devices based on dual beam optical trap, without loss of stability. We have designed two types of chip of fiber optical trap according to our theoretical simulation. The first one integrates dual beam optical trap with microfluidic chip, called a chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap. It is generally used in chemical, biological, medical and other high-throughput experiments. The second one is a chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap. It is used to measure precisely the coefficient of viscosity or the Brownian movement of micro-object's in liquid. This paper focuses on the chip of fiber optical trap. We present two types of chips of fiber optical trap and detail their designs, fabrication and validation. The chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap is integrated with optical fiber and microfluidic chip made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). We have achieved the micro-sized alignment of optical paths and the trapping of micro-sized particles in the chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap. In addition, it is easy to fabrication and clean. The chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap was based on a cubic micro-cavity made by a rectangular capillary tube and sealed by PDMS. We have achieved micro-sized alignment accuracy, high trapping efficiency and better trapping stability in the chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap as well.

  11. Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Facts / Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids) Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids) Print What is prescription opioid misuse? Also ... Hillbilly Heroin, OC, or Vikes Prescription opioids are medications that are chemically similar to endorphins – opioids that ...

  12. Medications: Using Them Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medications: Using Them Safely KidsHealth > For Parents > Medications: Using ... Disposal en español Medicamentos: Utilizarlos de forma segura Medication Safety Giving kids medicine safely can be complicated. ...

  13. Medication Use during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Medication Use During Pregnancy Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... are taking only medications that are necessary. What Medications Can Cause Birth Defects? We know that taking ...

  14. Medications After the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... intensive care unit (NICU) > Medications after the NICU Medications after the NICU E-mail to a friend ... from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on medication for apnea, reflux or respiratory problems. Apnea is ...

  15. Improper Use of Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prescription and Illicit Drug Abuse Improper Use of Medications Improper Use on the Rise Taking a prescription ... addictive drugs such as sleeping pills. Problems Taking Medications Many older adults take medications that play an ...

  16. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Conditions Asthma and Pregnancy Asthma Medications Asthma Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... for both mother and child. Making Decisions about Medication During Pregnancy It is important that your asthma ...

  17. When Medication Is Prescribed

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression When Medication Is Prescribed Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... you have about the medicine. —NIMH Types of Medications There are several types of medications used to ...

  18. Medicalization, medical necessity, and feminist medicine.

    PubMed

    Purdy, L

    2001-06-01

    New and proposed medical technologies continually challenge our vision of what constitutes appropriate medical treatment. As scholars and consumers grapple with the meaning of innovation, one common critical theme to surface is that it constitutes undesirable medicalization. But we are embodied creatures who can often benefit from medical knowledge; in addition, rejection of medicalization may be in some cases based on an untenable appeal to nature. Harnessing the power of medicine for women's welfare requires us to rethink the goals of medicine as well as implement fundamental reforms.

  19. Optical Metacages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Ali; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-11-01

    We suggest a novel strategy for spectrally selective optical shielding of arbitrary shaped volumes by arranging specifically designed two- or three-layer nanowires around an area that needs to be protected. We show that such nanowire shields preserve their functionality for almost arbitrary geometry, and we term such structures optical metacages. We analyze several designs of such optical metacages made from either metallic or dielectric materials with experimentally measured parameters. We employ a semianalytical approach and also verify our results by numerical simulations. We further study optical properties of the introduced metacages in both near- and far-field regions, as well as analyze their frequency selectivity and the vanishing backscattering regime.

  20. Optical engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T T

    1998-01-01

    The Optical Engineering thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was created in the summer of 1996 with the following main objectives: (1) to foster and stimulate leading edge optical engineering research and efforts key to carrying out LLNL's mission and enabling major new programs; (2) to bring together LLNL's broad spectrum of high level optical engineering expertise to support its programs. Optical engineering has become a pervasive and key discipline, with applications across an extremely wide range of technologies, spanning the initial conception through the engineering refinements to enhance revolutionary application. It overlaps other technologies and LLNL engineering thrust areas.

  1. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  2. Optical computing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroke, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Applications of the optical computer include an approach for increasing the sharpness of images obtained from the most powerful electron microscopes and fingerprint/credit card identification. The information-handling capability of the various optical computing processes is very great. Modern synthetic-aperture radars scan upward of 100,000 resolvable elements per second. Fields which have assumed major importance on the basis of optical computing principles are optical image deblurring, coherent side-looking synthetic-aperture radar, and correlative pattern recognition. Some examples of the most dramatic image deblurring results are shown.

  3. Optic Neuritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Parent Resources Highlighted Resources Member Resources Membership Management Subscribe to AOJ Allied Health Resources for School Nurses About AAPOS Our Association Staff Contacts Medical ...

  4. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  5. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  6. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  7. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  8. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass...

  9. Optically controlled integrated optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soref, R. A.

    1986-02-01

    This invention relates to an optically controlled integrated optical switch having a body made up of entirely crystalline silicon. More specifically, the body has a pair of channel waveguides intersecting at an X-like configuration forming therein an intersection crossover region. An electrically controlled optical source is positioned over the crossover region to shine intense, short-wave light on the crossover region in order to generate numerous electron-hole pairs in the waveguide material. These charge carriers alter the refractive index of the intersection region. A controllable current source is used to adjust the optical output power of the optical source. This, in turn, changes the amount of optical cross coupling of light between the intersecting waveguides.

  10. Optical interconnection of optical modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamschula, Marius P.; Caulfield, H. J.; Shamir, Joseph

    1990-12-01

    The most plausible possible uses of nonlinear optics as the bases for interconnections among complex optical modules are evaluated, with a view to such applications as neural networks that entail large numbers of interconnections and numerous stages. Optical interconnection allows such a system to be composed of many modules as well as to incorporate switching- and amplification-function optical nonlinearities. While it is possible to achieve a pixel-by-pixel, diffraction-limited flat-field relay with nonlinearity, where the interconnect allows for cascadability, the wave-particle duality is destroyed between stages.

  11. Optical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyant, James; Hochberg, Eric; Breault, Robert; Greivenkamp, John; Hunt, Gary; Mason, Pete; Mcguire, James; Meinel, Aden; Morris, Mike; Scherr, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Optical testing is one of the most vital elements in the process of preparing an optical instrument for launch. Without well understood, well controlled, and well documented test procedures, current and future mission goals will be jeopardized. We should keep in mind that the reason we test is to provide an opportunity to catch errors, oversights, and problems on the ground, where solutions are possible and difficulties can be rectified. Consequently, it is necessary to create tractable test procedures that truly provide a measure of the performance of all optical elements and systems under conditions which are close to those expected in space. Where testing is not feasible, accurate experiments are required in order to perfect models that can exactly predict the optical performance. As we stretch the boundaries of technology to perform more complex space and planetary investigations, we must expand the technology required to test the optical components and systems which we send into space. As we expand the observational wavelength ranges, so must we expand our range of optical sources and detectors. As we increase resolution and sensitivity, our understanding of optical surfaces to accommodate more stringent figure and scatter requirements must expand. Only with research and development in these areas can we hope to achieve success in the ever increasing demands made on optical testing by the highly sophisticated missions anticipated over the next two decades. Technology assessment and development plan for surface figure, surface roughness, alignment, image quality, radiometric quantities, and stray light measurement are presented.

  12. Camera Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    The camera presents an excellent way to illustrate principles of geometrical optics. Basic camera optics of the single-lens reflex camera are discussed, including interchangeable lenses and accessories available to most owners. Several experiments are described and results compared with theoretical predictions or manufacturer specifications.…

  13. Optical Techniques in Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Lakshminarayananan, Vasudevan

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics is an innovative technique for optical control of cells. This field has exploded over the past decade or so and has given rise to great advances in neuroscience. A variety of applications both from the basic and applied research have emerged, turning the early ideas into a powerful paradigm for cell biology, neuroscience and medical research. This review aims at highlighting the basic concepts that are essential for a comprehensive understanding of optogenetics and some important biological/biomedical applications. Further, emphasis is placed on advancement in optogenetics-associated light-based methods for controlling gene expression, spatially-controlled optogenetic stimulation and detection of cellular activities. PMID:26412943

  14. Optical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. PMID:27365039

  15. Medical imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V

    2012-07-24

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  16. GREAT optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Gentner, Armin; Graf, Urs U.; Philipp, Martin; Rabanus, David; Stutzki, Jürgen

    2004-10-01

    The German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies (GREAT) is a first generation PI instrument for the SOFIA telescope, developed by a collaboration between the MPIfR, KOSMA, DLR, and the MPAe. The first three institutes each contribute one heterodyne receiver channel to operate at 1.9, 2.7 and 4.7 THz, respectively. A later addition of a e.g. 1.4 THz channel is planned. The GREAT instrument is developed to carry two cryostats at once. That means that any two of the three frequencies can be observed simultaneously. Therefore, we need to be able to quickly exchange the optics benches, the local oscillator (LO) subsystems, and the cryostats containing the mixer devices. This demands a high modularity and flexibility of our receiver concept. Our aim is to avoid the need for realignment when swapping receiver channels. After an overview of the common GREAT optics, a detailed description of several parts (optics benches, calibration units, diplexer, focal plane imager) is given. Special emphasis is given to the LO optics of the KOSMA 1.9 THz channel, because its backward wave oscillator has an astigmatic output beam profile, which has to be corrected for. We developed astigmatic off-axis mirrors to compensate this astigmatism. The mirrors are manufactured in-house on a 5 axis CNC milling machine. We use this milling machine to obtain optical components with highest surface accuracy (about 5 microns) appropriate for these wavelengths. Based on the CNC machining capabilities we present our concept of integrated optics, which means to manufacture optical subsystems monolithically. The optics benches are located on three point mounts, which in conjunction with the integrated optics concept ensure the required adjustment free optics setup.

  17. STS-3 medical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The medical operations report for STS-3, which includes a review of the health of the crew before, during, and immediately after the third Shuttle orbital flight is presented. Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical 'kit' carried in flight, tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results, hematology and immunology analyses, medical microbiology, food and nutrition, potable water, shuttle toxicology, radiological health, and cabin acoustic noise. Environmental effects of shuttle launch and landing medical information management, and management, planning, and implementation of the medical program are also dicussed.

  18. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  19. Optical-fiber sensors challenge the competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giallorenzi, T. G.; Bucaro, J. A.; Dandridge, A.; Cole, J. H.

    1986-09-01

    Optical-fiber sensors which are based on intensity modulation of light are examined. The optical-fiber sensors consists of a glass core, a cladding, a light emitting diode or laser, and a photodetector, and are applicable to measuring instruments, medical probes, control systems, and military surveillance and navigation systems. The designs and capabilities of microbend sensors and interferometric fiber sensors are described. The development of fiber temperature sensors and fiber-optic acceleration sensors is considered. Procedures for measuring flow and liquid level with fiber sensors are discussed. The utilization of fiber-optic sensors in hydrophones, gyroscopes, and magnetometers is being studied.

  20. Successful fiber sensor for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Brett A.

    1993-05-01

    The use of fiber optics in communications and data transmission applications has become wide spread in the last decade. At the same time fiber optic sensors have not gained wide commercial acceptance even though many are known and indeed numerous U.S. and foreign patents have been granted. Camino Laboratories a small medical device concern has successfully marketed a fiber optic pressure monitoring system and become a leader in the area of intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. Some curiosity about the company and its products has been expressed. This presentation will briefly give a background of the company, an explanation of the product, an account of the transfer from concept to volume manufacture and a word on limiting drawbacks of an intensity modulating fiber optic sensor.

  1. ICG fluorescence imaging and its medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Mitsuharu; Shikayama, Takahiro

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a novel optical angiography system, and introduces its medical applications. We developed the optical enhanced imaging system which can observe the blood and lymphatic vessels as the Indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence image. The imaging system consists of 760nm light emitted diode (LED) as excite light, CCD camera as a detector, a high-pass optical filter in front of the CCD and video processing system. The advantage of ICG fluorescence method is safe (radiation free), high sensitive, real time monitoring of blood and/or lymphatic flow, small size, easy to operate and cost effective compared to conventional X-ray angiography or scintigraphy. We have applied this method to several clinical applications such as breast cancer sentinel lymph node (SLN) navigation, lymph edema diagnostic and identification of liver segmentation. In each application, ICG fluorescence method shows useful result. It's indicated that this method is promising technique as optical angiography.

  2. Optical Tecnology Developments in Biomedicine: History, Current and Future

    PubMed Central

    Nioka, Shoko; Chen, Yu

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical optics is a rapidly emerging field for medical imaging and diagnostics. This paper reviews several biomedical optical technologies that have been developed and translated for either clinical or pre-clinical applications. Specifically, we focus on the following technologies: 1) near-infrared spectroscopy and tomography, 2) optical coherence tomography, 3) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, and 4) optical molecular imaging. There representative biomedical applications are also discussed here. PMID:23905030

  3. Optical detection of intravenous infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    Infiltration of medications during infusion therapy results in complications ranging from erythema and pain to tissue necrosis requiring amputation. Infiltration occurs from improper insertion of the cannula, separation of the cannula from the vein, penetration of the vein by the cannula during movement, and response of the vein to the medication. At present, visual inspection by the clinical staff is the primary means for detecting intravenous (IV) infiltration. An optical sensor was developed to monitor the needle insertion site for signs of IV infiltration. Initial studies on simulated and induced infiltrations on a swine model validated the feasibility of the methodology. The presence of IV infiltration was confirmed by visual inspection of the infusion site and/or absence of blood return in the IV line. Potential sources of error due to illumination changes, motion artifacts, and edema were also investigated. A comparison of the performance of the optical device and blinded expert observers showed that the optical sensor has higher sensitivity and specificity, and shorter detection time than the expert observers. An improved model of the infiltration monitoring device was developed and evaluated in a clinical study on induced infiltrations of healthy adult volunteers. The performance of the device was compared with the observation of a blinded expert observer. The results show that the rates of detection of infiltrations are 98% and 82% for the optical sensor and the observer, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the optical sensor are 0.97 and 0.98, respectively.

  4. Optical Firmware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A.

    1989-01-01

    Data-processing system exploits high speeds inherent in optical elements. Instruction sets for different computer operations reside on different external memory chips. Laser diodes activated for each operation generate light, reflected by holographic optical element to designated receptors in arithmetic and logic unit. Pattern of light beams embodies instruction set at given instant. With potential ability to reprogram in real time, conceptual system applicable to task-driven programming or artificial intelligence.

  5. Optical disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Swafford, B.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the different types of optical storage technology is presented. Research efforts to integrate this technology into the VAX/VMS environment are discussed. In addition, plans for future applications of optical disk technology are described. The applications should prove to be beneficial to the NSSDC user community as a whole. Of particular interest is the concentration on the collaboration with the Dynamics Explorer project.

  6. Stitching Techniques Advance Optics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Because NASA depends on the fabrication and testing of large, high-quality aspheric (nonspherical) optics for applications like the James Webb Space Telescope, it sought an improved method for measuring large aspheres. Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Goddard Space Flight Center, QED Technologies, of Rochester, New York, upgraded and enhanced its stitching technology for aspheres. QED developed the SSI-A, which earned the company an R&D 100 award, and also developed a breakthrough machine tool called the aspheric stitching interferometer. The equipment is applied to advanced optics in telescopes, microscopes, cameras, medical scopes, binoculars, and photolithography."

  7. STS-1 medical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The report includes a review of the health of the crew before, during and immediately after the first Shuttle orbital flight (April 12-14, 1981). Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical kit carried inflight; tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results; hematology and immunology analyses; medical microbiology; food and nutrition; potable water; shuttle toxicology; radiological health; cabin acoustical noise. Also included is information on: environmental effects of Shuttle launch and landing, medical information management; and management, planning and implementation of the medical program.

  8. Medical spa marketing.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Neil S; Dinkes, Adam; Oskin, Larry

    2008-07-01

    Medical spas are different. We are not just selling medical and dermatology services; we are offering clients viable new solutions to their skin care, body care, and hair care challenges. Traditional medical marketing becomes blurred today, as the expansion and acceptance of medical spas helps you to effectively compete with traditional skin care clinics, salons, and spas, while offering more therapeutic treatments from professionally licensed doctors, nurses, aestheticians, massage therapists, spa professionals, and medical practitioners. We recommend that you make the choice to successfully and competitively become a market-driven medical spa with an annual strategic plan, rather than an operationally driven business.

  9. Medications for Memory Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... memory loss, confusion, and problems with thinking and reasoning) of Alzheimer's disease. There is also a medication ... the latest Alzheimer's medications available today, and the clinical trials that may bring us closer to new ...

  10. American Medical Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Association American Medical Association AMA Store AMA Wire The JAMA Network AMA Journal of Ethics Become ... care Search the AMA Latest News from AMA Wire Ethics of physician well-being: What the AMA ...

  11. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care During ... médica durante el embarazo The Importance of Prenatal Care Millions of American women give birth every year, ...

  12. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePlus

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They range ... may need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep instructions ...

  13. After the Transplant: Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risks Cancer Types Risk Factors Prevention & Early Detection Medications After transplants, the focus for patients transitions from ... a donor organ to learning how to manage medications and their side effects as part of daily ...

  14. Using Medications Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safely My Medicine List How to Administer Using Medications Safely Pharmacists in hospitals and health systems play an important role in preventing medication errors. To make sure you use medicines safely ...

  15. Choosing Your Medical Specialty

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Ethics Become a Member Sign In Create Account Search Menu Education Education Overview Creating the Medical ... for licensing exams. Life & Career Life & Career Overview Financial Management Discover various discounts, medical student loan financing ...

  16. Kids' Medical Dictionary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Kids' Medical Dictionary Symptoms, inhaler, tonsillectomy - what do all ...

  17. General Medical Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is presented. The purpose of the General Medical Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the program are discussed.

  18. Medical Treatments for Fibroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Medical Treatments for Fibroids Skip sharing on social media ... Page Content Your health care provider may suggest medical treatments to reduce the symptoms of fibroids or ...

  19. Emergency Medical Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and ... emergencies, you need help where you are. Emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, do specific rescue jobs. They ...

  20. Understanding Medical Words

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), a test that uses images of your body Medical Dictionary: A direct link to the MedlinePlus.gov medical dictionary Go to medlineplus.gov/medicalwords/ Summer 2009 Issue: Volume 4 Number 3 Page Backcover

  1. Marijuana: modern medical chimaera.

    PubMed

    Lamarine, Roland J

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous other uses. This article reviews the research literature related to medical applications of various forms of cannabis. Benefits related to medical use of cannabinoids are examined and a number of potential risks associated with cannabis use, both medical and recreational, are considered. There is a clearly identified need for further research to isolate significant benefits from the medical application of cannabinoids and to establish dosage levels, appropriate delivery mechanisms and formulations, and to determine what role, if any, cannabinoids might play in legitimate medical applications. It is also imperative to determine if reported dangers pose a significant health risks to users.

  2. [Perspectives in medical liability].

    PubMed

    Pizarro W, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The progressive increase of medical negligence law suits requires an updated analysis of the current situation of medical liability in Chile. The application of a new criminal procedure will avoid criminal prosecution of doctors, transferring to the civil courts the pecuniary sanctions for malpractice. Medical negligence and damage inflicted by doctors that require compensation are explained. The most likely evolution of medical liability is proposed, through an increase in civil liability insurance and the necessary standardization of rules applicable to professional liability.

  3. Teaching Medical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, A. P.; Cook, E.; Newing, A.

    2006-07-01

    Medical Physics provides immediate and accessible examples that can assist in the teaching of a range of science subjects. To help teachers, we have produced a teaching pack that will be sent to all UK secondary schools in June 2006 and will be available from www.teachingmedicalphysics.org.uk. Here we discuss the advantages of teaching using applications drawn from Medical Physics, careers in Medical Physics, and some sources of other Medical Physics-related teaching resources.

  4. Religion and medical neglect.

    PubMed

    Sinal, Sara H; Cabinum-Foeller, Elaine; Socolar, Rebecca

    2008-07-01

    This is a literature review of religion-associated medical neglect of children. It attempts to document the most common denominations involved in religion-associated medical neglect. There is a discussion of the history of religious exemptions to medical care and health risks to children as a result of religious exemption. Suggestions are made for the clinician regarding recognition and management of religion-associated medical neglect in children.

  5. [Historiography of medical objects].

    PubMed

    Cid, Felip

    2008-01-01

    It has become acceptable among historians of medicine to profess a predilection for the historiography of medical ideas. But it is justified all the same to ask whether the logical connection really caused the origin, the change, or the disappearance of the medical objects. The interaction of ideas and medical objects assure as much objectivity as possible. In consequence, the contents of the museums, medical objects, is an aspect rather that a branch of the history of medicine.

  6. Optical processing architecture and its potential application for digital and analog radiography.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Xu, J; Fajardo, L L

    1999-04-01

    In this report we introduce the fundamental architectures and the potential applications of optical processing techniques in medical imaging. Three basic optical processing architectures were investigated for digital and analog radiography. The processors consist of a module that converts either the analog or the digital radiograph into a coherent light distribution; a coherent optical processing architecture that performs various mathematical operations; a programmable digital-optical interface and other accessories. Optical frequency filters were implemented for mammographic and other clinical feature enhancement. In medical image processing, digital computers offer the advantages of programmability and flexibility. In contrast, optical processors perform parallel image processing with high speed. Optical processors also offer analog nature, compact size, and cost effectiveness. With technical advances of digital-optical interface devices, the medical image processor, in the foreseeable future, may be a hybrid device, namely, a programmable optical architecture.

  7. Reagentless optical biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, Karen M.; Goeller, Roy M.; Grace, W. K.; Kolar, Jerome D.; Morrison, Leeland J.; Sweet, Martin R.; Wiig, L. G.; Reed, Scott M.; Lauer, Sabine A.; Little, Kristin M.; Bustos, Gerrie L.; Anderson, Aaron S.; Swanson, Basil I.

    2004-03-01

    Critical to our ability to respond effectively to a biothreat attack is the development of sensitive and specific sensor systems that can easily be used for rapid screening of potential victims for infection due to biothreat agents and detection of pathogens in the environment. To help address these needs, we have developed a Reagentless Optical Biosensor (ROB) based on protein specific assays and waveguide-based evanescent fluorescence excitation. Modeled on host pathogen interactions, the sensor's membrane based assay provides rapid, sensitive detection without the addition of reagents. We report here the development of two waveguide based detection systems: a laboratory sensor test-bed system and a handheld, battery operated, prototype. Evanescent fluorescence excitation using planar optical waveguides provides spatial filtering of background auto-fluorescence found in many natural samples, thereby permitting direct analysis of complex environmental and medical samples. The waveguide based assay is fully self-contained in a small, exchangeable cartridge that is optically coupled to the sensor detection system making ROB simple to use and offering the possibility of inexpensive, disposable sensor elements. Using assays for cholera toxin we compare results using flourimetry of vesicle solutions against results for our waveguide based test-bed and prototype sensor systems.

  8. Cardiovascular Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Taishi; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    The potential of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for intravascular imaging and assessing the microstructure of atherosclerosis was suggested already by Huang et al. at the very beginning of OCT [1]. For ophthalmology, the eye provides a natural window for OCT to image the retinal microstructure, and OCT has rapidly become the standard imaging modality to diagnose retinal disease and assess disease progression and response to therapy [1, 2]. Intravascular imaging is more invasive by nature and requires imaging through a catheter probe. This has triggered the development of advanced fiber-optic OCT systems with compact, rotating fiber probes, to image the vessel by circumferentially scanning the luminal wall [3, 4]. In 1998, we established the first cardiac OCT research group at the Massachusetts General Hospital to explore the clinical applications of OCT. The first imaging of rabbit aorta was reported by Fujimoto et al. [5], followed by the first swine measurements in vivo by Tearney et al. [6], and finally the first assessment of coronary arteries in patients by Jang et al. [7]. The scope of this chapter is to highlight the steps taken to bring intravascular OCT from bench to bedside over the last 15 years. We will give a general description of atherosclerosis and its pathophysiology and the specific technical implementation of OCT for intravascular imaging through a fiber-optic probe. The motivation is to provide sufficient medical details to provide a basic introduction to the terminology, principles, and challenges of intracoronary imaging.

  9. Your Medical Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Your Medical Records KidsHealth > For Teens > Your Medical Records A ... Records? en español Tus historias clínicas What Are Medical Records? Each time you climb up on a ...

  10. Marijuana: Modern Medical Chimaera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamarine, Roland J.

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana has been used medically since antiquity. In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in medical applications of various cannabis preparations. These drugs have been cited in the medical literature as potential secondary treatment agents for severe pain, muscle spasticity, anorexia, nausea, sleep disturbances, and numerous…

  11. [Forward medical air evacuation].

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Erik; Le Dorze, Patrick Causse; Hersan, Olivier; Pohl, Jean-Baptiste; Angot, Emmanuel

    2014-09-01

    The medical chain which assures the treatment of casualties from the theatre of operations back to France comprises several links connected by medical air transport. Whether it is tactical or strategic, it forms an integral part of the treatment pathway and offers casualties the best possible conditions for medical treatment with a high degree of safety, speed and traceability.

  12. Dependents’ Medical Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1962-04-25

    Mental Disorders ------------- 3 (7) Dental Care as a Necessary Adjunct to Medical or Surgical Treatment -------- 4 8’ Adjuncts to Medical Care...acute Medical Conditions ------------------ 27 e. Domiciliary Care ------------------------------ 28 f. Treatment -Procedures/Outpatient Care... treatment of complications of pregnancy. (4) Diciliary Care. Care which is normally given in a nursing home, convalescent home, or similar institution

  13. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking firmly to ... Before and After Starting HIV Medicines . What is medication adherence? Adherence means “to stick firmly.” So for ...

  14. The Integrated Medical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Douglas J.; Kerstman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the goals and approach for the Integrated Medical Model (IMM). The IMM is a software decision support tool that forecasts medical events during spaceflight and optimizes medical systems during simulations. It includes information on the software capabilities, program stakeholders, use history, and the software logic.

  15. Normalized medical information visualization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Somolinos, Roberto; Castro, Antonio; Velázquez, Iker; Moreno, Oscar; García-Pacheco, José L; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H

    2015-01-01

    A new mark-up programming language is introduced in order to facilitate and improve the visualization of ISO/EN 13606 dual model-based normalized medical information. This is the first time that visualization of normalized medical information is addressed and the programming language is intended to be used by medical non-IT professionals.

  16. Conducting the Medical History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Martin A.; Alexander, Randell A.

    2011-01-01

    A key portion of the medical evaluation of child sexual abuse is the medical history. This differs from interviews or histories obtained by other professionals in that it is focuses more on the health and well-being of the child. Careful questions should be asked about all aspects of the child's medical history by a skilled, compassionate,…

  17. Medication/Drug Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... every time after the offending medication is taken. Penicillin and other antibiotics are the medication that most commonly cause allergic reactions. Women appear to have an increased risk for adverse reactions to medications. Facts about Allergies The tendency to develop allergies may be inherited. ...

  18. The Medical University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piel, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    Success, it is suggested, has brought the medical school into critical new responsibility for the welfare of the university as a whole. An urgent topic for inquiry in the university is seen as the expansion of the medical economy and the attendant growth of medical schools. (MLW)

  19. Medics in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Some time ago a flyer on "Medics in Primary School" came the author's way. It described a programme for making placements in primary schools available to medical students. The benefits of the program to medical students and participating schools were highlighted, including opportunities to develop communication skills and demystify…

  20. Mission Medical Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Joe, John C.; Follansbee, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Mission Medical Information System (MMIS). The topics include: 1) What is MMIS?; 2) MMIS Goals; 3) Terrestrial Health Information Technology Vision; 4) NASA Health Information Technology Needs; 5) Mission Medical Information System Components; 6) Electronic Medical Record; 7) Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH); 8) Methods; and 9) Data Submission Agreement (example).

  1. Frequency-Domain Optical Mammogram

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    spectral features of all the tumors. Task 2. Perform the optical measurements on breast-like phantoms (Months 19-24) a. Prepare the breast-like phantoms ...a tur- ygen saturation measurements to within 15% of the bid medium can be modeled with the first-order actual values in phantoms and have reported...31. Y. Yamashita and M. Kaneko, "Visible and infrared diaphanog- ized abnormalities embedded within tissuelike phantoms ," raphy for medical diagnosis

  2. Optical memory

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  3. CODEX optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delabre, Bernard; Manescau, Antonio

    2010-07-01

    CODEX is a high resolution spectrograph for the ESO E-ELT. A classical spectrograph can only achieve a resolution of about 120.000 on a 42 m telescope with extremely large echelle gratings and cameras. This paper describes in detail the optical concept of CODEX, which uses only optical elements size similar to those in current high resolution spectrographs. This design is based on slicers, anamorphic beams and slanted VPHG as cross dispersers. In this new version of the CODEX design, no special expensive materials as calcium fluoride or abnormal dispersion glasses are needed. The optical quality is excellent and compatible with 10K x 10K detectors with 10 μm pixels.

  4. Kindergarten' optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Costa, Manuel F.; Campos, Júlia; Lira, Madalena; Franco, Sandra

    2009-06-01

    The introduction to our school' students of the wonders of light and optics and its understanding can and should be made as extensively as possible. As soon as at kindergarten level! A hands-on approach leading the students to observe experiment and discover themselves in a critical committed and active way the different aspects of light and optics should be employed at all school levels and must be the main driving pedagogical practice of all learning process of science and technology. In this communication we present a series of experiments and support material designed in this hands-on perspective to be used to introduce the study of optics to kindergarten and early basic school students. A critical evaluation of the first results of the application of these material with students aged 4 to 10 years will be presented.

  5. Optical coupler

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2004-06-15

    In a camera or similar radiation sensitive device comprising a pixilated scintillation layer, a light guide and an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, wherein there exists so-called dead space between adjacent photomultiplier tubes the improvement comprising a two part light guide comprising a first planar light spreading layer or portion having a first surface that addresses the scintillation layer and optically coupled thereto at a second surface that addresses the photomultiplier tubes, a second layer or portion comprising an array of trapezoidal light collectors defining gaps that span said dead space and are individually optically coupled to individual position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. According to a preferred embodiment, coupling of the trapezoidal light collectors to the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is accomplished using an optical grease having about the same refractive index as the material of construction of the two part light guide.

  6. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  7. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  8. Optical Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotariu, Steven S.

    1991-01-01

    Pattern recognition may supplement or replace certain navigational aids on spacecraft in docking or landing activities. The need to correctly identify terrain features remains critical in preparation of autonomous planetary landing. One technique that may solve this problem is optical correlation. Correlation has been successfully demonstrated under ideal conditions; however, noise significantly affects the ability of the correlator to accurately identify input signals. Optical correlation in the presence of noise must be successfully demonstrated before this technology can be incorporated into system design. An optical correlator is designed and constructed using a modified 2f configuration. Liquid crystal televisions (LCTV) are used as the spatial light modulators (SLM) for both the input and filter devices. The filter LCTV is characterized and an operating curve is developed. Determination of this operating curve is critical for reduction of input noise. Correlation of live input with a programmable filter is demonstrated.

  9. The research and development of the adaptive optics in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuhan; Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Weilin

    2015-08-01

    Recently the combination of adaptive optics and ophthalmology has made great progress and become highly effective. The retina disease is diagnosed by retina imaging technique based on scanning optical system, so the scanning of eye requires optical system characterized by great ability of anti-moving and optical aberration correction. The adaptive optics possesses high level of adaptability and is available for real time imaging, which meets the requirement of medical retina detection with accurate images. Now the Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope and the Optical Coherence Tomography are widely used, which are the core techniques in the area of medical retina detection. Based on the above techniques, in China, a few adaptive optics systems used for eye medical scanning have been designed by some researchers from The Institute of Optics And Electronics of CAS(The Chinese Academy of Sciences); some foreign research institutions have adopted other methods to eliminate the interference of eye moving and optical aberration; there are many relevant patents at home and abroad. In this paper, the principles and relevant technique details of the Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope and the Optical Coherence Tomography are described. And the recent development and progress of adaptive optics in the field of eye retina imaging are analyzed and summarized.

  10. Therapeutic Antioxidant Medical Gas

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Atsunori; Sugimoto, Ryujiro; Billiar, Timothy R; McCurry, Kenneth R

    2009-01-01

    Medical gases are pharmaceutical gaseous molecules which offer solutions to medical needs and include traditional gases, such as oxygen and nitrous oxide, as well as gases with recently discovered roles as biological messenger molecules, such as carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulphide. Medical gas therapy is a relatively unexplored field of medicine; however, a recent increasing in the number of publications on medical gas therapies clearly indicate that there are significant opportunities for use of gases as therapeutic tools for a variety of disease conditions. In this article, we review the recent advances in research on medical gases with antioxidant properties and discuss their clinical applications and therapeutic properties. PMID:19177183

  11. Mixing with Medics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Historians are increasingly required to produce research that makes an impact. This is particularly the case for medical historians, partly because of our funders' expectations, but also because there is a sense that medical history can inform today's thorny debates about health. Unfortunately, many historians struggle to make an impact. I suggest that participating in medical conferences (broadly defined), not only provides opportunities to make an impact on the medical community, but also offers chances to observe and participate in medical history as it happens.

  12. A Course in Medical Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froelich, Robert E.

    1969-01-01

    Course develops medical interviewing skills of students through a programed manual, role-playing exercises, programed patients and medical interviewing films, and the writing of medical histories. (IR)

  13. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  14. Holographic data processing methods for medical prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, V. A.; Grosmann, M. H.; Kartavenko, V. I.; Larkin, A. I.; Trukhanov, K. A.

    2015-10-01

    The various methods of laser coherent photonic implementations of multiparametric classification are discussed in this paper. The holographic and optical data processing methods for medical application are considered. Inverse two-phase coding and analysis of light distribution in the correlation plane enables us to realize a number of algorithms: search for a precedent, Hamming distance measurement, Bayes probability algorithm, deterministic and ‘correspondence’ algorithms. The experimental holographic results for medicine prognosis are shown.

  15. The Nurse's Medication Day

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski; Sandelowski, Margarete; Mark, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The medication administration stage of the medication-use process is especially vulnerable to error because errors are least likely to be caught before reaching the patient. Medication administration, however, remains poorly understood. In this article we describe medication administration as observed in an ethnographic study conducted on one medical and one surgical unit. A central finding was that medication administration entailed a complex mixture of varied and often competing demands that temporally structured the nurses' entire workday. Articulation work was evident in time management strategies nurses used to handle demands from institutional policies, technical devices, patients, the physical environment, and the medications themselves. The average number of doses of medication per patient was more than double the number policy groups have indicated. Medication administration is neither simply the giving of drugs nor does it have clearly defined temporal boundaries. Because of its inseparability from other nurses' work, medication administration inherently entails interruption, thereby calling into question the current emphasis on reducing interruptions as a tactic to decrease medication errors. PMID:21693688

  16. Optical components and subsystems: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Lee, P.; Zhu, T.; Lee, G.; Xu, K.; Wang, R.

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a brief review and discussion on the opportunities and challenges facing the optical components and sub-systems vendors. Specifically, this paper discusses some of the current components and sub-system development on the low loss CWDM filters, wavelength blockers, PLC switch arrays, wavelength selective switches, optical protection switching sub-systems, tunable filters and DCMs, and in addition, the fiber-coupled short-wavelength diode-lasers for medical applications.

  17. Novel fibre-optic-based ionization radiation probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David A.

    2004-06-01

    CsI ionization radiation probes interrogated via a fiber optic transceiver link for monitoring medical procedures such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy and Nuclear Medicine are presented together with potential industrial, environmental and military applications.

  18. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L. )

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland, OR, Houston, TX, and Galveston, TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulation of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  19. Diophantine Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, D.

    2016-09-01

    What I call Diophantine optics is the exploitation in optics of some remarkable algebraic relations between powers of integers. The name comes from Diophantus of Alexandria, a greek mathematician, known as the father of algebra. He studied polynomial equations with integer coefficients and integer solutions, called diophantine equations. Since constructive or destructive interferences are playing with optical path differences which are multiple integer (odd or even) of λ/2 and that the complex amplitude is a highly non-linear function of the optical path difference (or equivalently of the phase), one can understand that any Taylor development of this amplitude implies powers of integers. This is the link with Diophantine equations. We show how, especially in the field of interferometry, remarkable relations between powers of integers can help to solve several problems, such as achromatization of a phase shifter or deep nulling efficiency. It appears that all the research that was conducted in this frame of thinking, relates to the field of detection of exoplanets, a very active domain of astrophysics today.

  20. Optical profilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieloszyńska, Aleksandra; StrÄ kowski, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The profilometry plays a huge role in the most fields of science and technology. It allows to measure the profile of the surface with high-resolution. This technique is used in the fields like optic, electronic, medicine, automotive, and much more. The aim of the current work was to design and build optical profilometer based on the interference phenomena. The developed device has been working with He-Ne laser (632.8 nm). The optical parts have been chosen in order to reach the sized 2.0 mm x 1.6 mm of scanning area. The setup of the profilometer is based on Twyman-Green interferometer. Therefore, the phase distribution of the backreflected light from measured surface is recorded. The measurements are carried out with the aid of multiframe algorithms. In this approach we have used the Hariharan algorithm to obtain the exact value of the recorded phase. During tests, which have been carried out in order to check the functionality of the device, the interference patterns have been recoded and processed in order to obtain the 3D profile of measured surface. In this contribution the setup of the optical system, as well as signal processing methods are going to be presented. The brief discussion about the advantages and disadvantages, and usefulness of this approach will be carried out.

  1. Pulsed Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirlimann, C.

    Optics is the field of physics which comprises knowledge on the interaction between light and matter. When the superposition principle can be applied to electromagnetic waves or when the properties of matter do not depend on the intensity of light, one speaks of linear optics. This situation occurs with regular light sources such as light bulbs, low-intensity light-emitting diodes and the sun. With such low-intensity sources the reaction of matter to light can be characterized by a set of parameters such as the index of refraction, the absorption and reflection coefficients and the orientation of the medium with respect to the polarization of the light. These parameters depend only on the nature of the medium. The situation changed dramatically after the development of lasers in the early sixties, which allowed the generation of light intensities larger than a kilowatt per square centimeter. Actual large-scale short-pulse lasers can generate peak powers in the petawatt regime. In that large-intensity regime the optical parameters of a material become functions of the intensity of the impinging light. In 1818 Fresnel wrote a letter to the French Academy of Sciences in which he noted that the proportionality between the vibration of the light and the subsequent vibration of matter was only true because no high intensities were available. The intensity dependence of the material response is what usually defines nonlinear optics.

  2. Optical pantograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert R. (Inventor); Davis, Donald E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An optical pantograph for directing light beams and the like from a source to a receiver according to the movement of a pointer. The device can be used for, among other things, directing a laser beam and the like to a target for etching patterns on a target according to the movement of a pointer relative to a pattern trace.

  3. Skin optics

    SciTech Connect

    van Gemert, M.J.; Jacques, S.L.; Sterenborg, H.J.; Star, W.M.

    1989-12-01

    Quantitative dosimetry in the treatment of skin disorders with (laser) light requires information on propagation of light in the skin related to the optical properties of the individual skin layers. This involves the solution of the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer in a model representing skin geometry, as well as experimental methods to determine the optical properties of each skin layer. These activities are unified under the name skin optics. This paper first reviews the current status of tissue optics, distinguishing between the cases of: dominant absorption, dominant scattering, and scattering about equal to absorption. Then, previously published data as well as some current unpublished data on (human) stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis, have been collected and/or (re)analyzed in terms of absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and anisotropy factor of scattering. The results are that the individual skin layers show strongly forward scattering (anisotropy factors between 0.7 and 0.9). The absorption and scattering data show that for all wavelengths considered scattering is much more important than absorption. Under such circumstances, solutions to the transport equation for a multilayer skin model and finite beam laser irradiation are currently not yet available. Hence, any quantitative dosimetry for skin treated with (laser) light is currently lacking.

  4. Optical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of chaos in nonlinear optics and laser physics will be reviewed. Attention will then be focused on the possibility of chaotic behavior in individual atoms and molecules driven by intense radiation fields. 46 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Optical Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Ronald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the production and structure of a sequence of optical crystals which can serve as one-, two-, and three-dimensional diffraction plates to illustrate diffraction patterns by using light rather than x-rays or particles. Applications to qualitative presentations of Laue theory at the secondary and college levels are recommended. (CC)

  6. Optical Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2013-03-01

    Part I. Principles and Techniques: 1. General principles and characteristics of optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, E. B. Alexandrov and D. Budker; 2. Quantum noise in atomic magnetometers M. V. Romalis; 3. Quantum noise, squeezing, and entanglement in radio-frequency optical magnetometers K. Jensen and E. S. Polzik; 4. Mx and Mz magnetometers E. B. Alexandrov and A. K. Vershovskiy; 5. Spin-exchange-relaxation-free (serf) magnetometers I. Savukov and S. J. Seltzer; 6. Optical magnetometry with modulated light D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. Pustelny, V. V. Yashchuk and D. Budker; 7. Microfabricated atomic magnetometers S. Knappe and J. Kitching; 8. Optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond V. M. Acosta, D. Budker, P. R. Hemmer, J. R. Maze and R. L. Walsworth; 9. Magnetometry with cold atoms W. Gawlik and J. M. Higbie; 10. Helium magnetometers R. E. Slocum, D. D. McGregor and A. W. Brown; 11. Surface coatings for atomic magnetometry S. J. Seltzer, M.-A. Bouchiat and M. V. Balabas; 12. Magnetic shielding V. V. Yashchuk, S.-K. Lee and E. Paperno; Part II. Applications: 13. Remote detection magnetometry S. M. Rochester, J. M. Higbie, B. Patton, D. Budker, R. Holzlöhner and D. Bonaccini Calia; 14. Detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with atomic magnetometers M. P. Ledbetter, I. Savukov, S. J. Seltzer and D. Budker; 15. Space magnetometry B. Patton, A. W. Brown, R. E. Slocum and E. J. Smith; 16. Detection of biomagnetic fields A. Ben-Amar Baranga, T. G. Walker and R. T. Wakai; 17. Geophysical applications M. D. Prouty, R. Johnson, I. Hrvoic and A. K. Vershovskiy; Part III. Broader Impact: 18. Tests of fundamental physics with optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. K. Lamoreaux and T. E. Chupp; 19. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscopes E. A. Donley and J. Kitching; 20. Commercial magnetometers and their application D. C. Hovde, M. D. Prouty, I. Hrvoic and R. E. Slocum; Index.

  7. Medical Physicists and AAPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amols, Howard

    2006-03-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), a member society of the AIP is the largest professional society of medical physicists in the world with nearly 5700 members. Members operate in medical centers, university and community hospitals, research laboratories, industry, and private practice. Medical physics specialties include radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. The majority of AAPM members are based in hospital departments of radiation oncology or radiology and provide technical support for patient diagnosis and treatment in a clinical environment. Job functions include support of clinical care, calibration and quality assurance of medical devices such as linear accelerators for cancer therapy, CT, PET, MRI, and other diagnostic imaging devices, research, and teaching. Pathways into a career in medical physics require an advanced degree in medical physics, physics, engineering, or closely related field, plus clinical training in one or more medical physics specialties (radiation therapy physics, imaging physics, or radiation safety). Most clinically based medical physicists also obtain certification from the American Board of Radiology, and some states require licensure as well.

  8. Bipolar Medications and Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    Bipolar medications and weight gain Do all bipolar medications cause weight gain? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M. ... disorder can be treated with a number of medications. Some of these medications can increase your appetite ...

  9. Association of American Medical Colleges

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Awards Careers at AAMC Missions Medical Education Medical Research Patient Care Diversity and Inclusion Advocacy Testimony and ... teaching hospitals. Quick Links Medical Education Patient Care Medical Research Diversity Academic Medicine® Publications Annual Report 2015 Resources ...

  10. 77 FR 13232 - Abbott Laboratories; Filing of Food Additive Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... regulations be amended to provide for the expanded safe use of vitamin D 3 as a nutrient supplement in food... for the safe use of vitamin D 3 as a nutrient supplement in meal replacement beverages and...

  11. Soft optics in intelligent optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shue, Chikong; Cao, Yang

    2001-10-01

    In addition to the recent advances in Hard-optics that pushes the optical transmission speed, distance, wave density and optical switching capacity, Soft-optics provides the necessary intelligence and control software that reduces operational costs, increase efficiency, and enhances revenue generating services by automating optimal optical circuit placement and restoration, and enabling value-added new services like Optical VPN. This paper describes the advances in 1) Overall Hard-optics and Soft-optics 2) Layered hierarchy of Soft-optics 3) Component of Soft-optics, including hard-optics drivers, Management Soft-optics, Routing Soft-optics and System Soft-optics 4) Key component of Routing and System Soft-optics, namely optical routing and signaling (including UNI/NNI and GMPLS signaling). In summary, the soft-optics on a new generation of OXC's enables Intelligent Optical Networks to provide just-in-time service delivery and fast restoration, and real-time capacity management that eliminates stranded bandwidth. It reduces operational costs and provides new revenue opportunities.

  12. Biphoton optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry Vladimirovich

    1997-10-01

    The subject of this dissertation is the study of the two- photon entanglement. This phenomenon has been paid a great deal of attention since 1935, when A. Einstein, B. Podolsky and N. Rosen asked their famous question, 'Can quantum-mechanical description of physical reality be considered complete?' An entangled system behavior is inconsistent with many classical concepts. Therefore, the understanding of two-photon entanglement is important for the foundations of quantum theory. A two-photon entangled sate represents a two-photon, or a biphoton, rather than two photons. The concept of biphoton as a single nonlocal quantum object is fundamentally different from the concept of a photon pair, as has been experimentally demonstrated in the present dissertation. Two-photon entanglement gives rise to unusual 'ghost' interference and diffraction, nonlocal geometrical phase, and other quantum phenomena originally studied in the present dissertation. The variety of available results calls for bringing them into a general system which we call Biphoton Optics. This is the main goal of this dissertation. Biphoton optics operate with two-photon wave packets, or with an equivalent concept of advanced wave. We show that in the framework of the advanced wave concept two-photon phenomena can be effectively described in terms of classical optics. Therefore the biphoton optics has the same structure as the classical optics. It includes two- photon geometrical optics, dispersion and frequency beating, polarization effects, interference, diffraction, and geometrical phase. All these two-photon effects are represented by experiments included in this dissertation. Our approach does not make two-photon quantum effects 'classical', however. It should be understood that the advanced wave model operates with counter-propagation in time which does not correspond to any real physical process. Therefore it is just a model, but it is clearly a great advantage to have such a model that is both

  13. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  14. DESIGN OF THE RCMS LATTICE OPTICS.

    SciTech Connect

    CARDONA,J.; KEWISCH,J.; PEGGS,S.

    2002-06-02

    THE RAPID CYCLING MEDICAL SYNCHROTRON (RCMS) IS DESIGNED TO BE A VERY LIGHT AND INEXPENSIVE ACCELERATOR. THIS IS POSSIBLE DUE TO THE SMALL BEAM SIZE THAT HAS BEEN CHOSEN EARLY DURING THE DESIGN STAGE. THIS CHOICE HAS IMPLICATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF THE LATTICE OPTICS. IN THIS PAPER, WE PRESENT AN OVERVIEW OF THE RCMS OPTICS LATTICE, THE KIND OF MAGNETS TO BE USED AND ALSO A DESCRIPTION OF A SPECIAL OPTIC MODULE THAT MATCHES THE ROTATING GANTRY WITH THE REST OF THE FIXED ACCELERATOR. TECHNIQUESDEVELOPED TO WIN ADDITIONAL SPACE BETWEEN QUADRUPOLES WITHOUT DISTRUBING BETA FUNCTIONS ARE ALSO PRESENTED.

  15. Optic nerve atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  16. Medical tourism in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vijay; Das, Poonam

    2012-06-01

    The term 'medical tourism' is under debate because health care is a serious business and rarely do patients combine the two. India is uniquely placed by virtue of its skilled manpower, common language, diverse medical conditions that doctors deal with, the volume of patients, and a large nonresident Indian population overseas. Medical tourism requires dedicated services to alleviate the anxiety of foreign patients. These include translation, currency conversion, travel, visa, posttreatment care system,and accommodation of patient relatives during and after treatment.

  17. Medical waste management plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.

    2004-12-01

    This plan describes the process for managing research generated medical waste at Sandia National Laboratories/California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of medical waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to medical waste.

  18. Sterilization of Medical Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-06

    possible use with medical instruments and skin catheters. To address this challenge, MicroStructure Technologies (MicroST) is developing an...Project: DARPA - Sterilization of Medical Instruments Contract: # FA9550-06-C-0054 Principal Investigator: Joseph Birmingham Report: FINAL Report 1...as medical instruments and skin catheters. To address this challenge, MicroStructure Technologies (MicroST) is proposing a compact, low maintenance

  19. Medications and the Ostomate.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Richard

    2015-07-01

    More than one million Americans have had ostomy surgery, and there are more than 130,000 new ostomy surgeries every year. Therefore, pharmacists need to understand how an ostomy can affect medications and how medications may affect the ostomate. This article reviews the application of basic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles of medication use as it relates to the ostomy patient. Among the topics discussed include the use of controlled-release medications, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, discoloration of the stool and urine, and electrolye imbalance.

  20. Demonopolizing medical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sanjeev; Thornton, Karla; Komaromy, Miriam; Kalishman, Summers; Katzman, Joanna; Duhigg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In the past 100 years, there has been an explosion of medical knowledge-and in the next 50 years, more medical knowledge will be available than ever before. Regrettably, current medical practice has been unable to keep pace with this explosion of medical knowledge. Specialized medical knowledge has been confined largely to academic medical centers (i.e., teaching hospitals) and to specialists in major cities; it has been disconnected from primary care clinicians on the front lines of patient care. To bridge this disconnect, medical knowledge must be demonopolized, and a platform for collaborative practice amongst all clinicians needs to be created. A new model of health care and education delivery called Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes), developed by the first author, does just this. Using videoconferencing technology and case-based learning, ECHO's medical specialists provide training and mentoring to primary care clinicians working in rural and urban underserved areas so that the latter can deliver the best evidence-based care to patients with complex health conditions in their own communities. The ECHO model increases access to care in rural and underserved areas, and it demonopolizes specialized medical knowledge and expertise.

  1. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects.

  2. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area.

  3. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  4. Optical gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Goss, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    Instrument uses phase difference between two beams of light to measure rotation. It is considerably simpler and more reliable than conventional spinning-mass gyroscopes used for inertial guidance and is more compact, lighter, and potentially less expensive. Moreover, optical gyroscope requires no warmup period. Although conceived for spacecraft and satellite stabilization, gyroscope should also find applications in flight instruments for private, commercial, and military aircraft.

  5. Optics Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Introduction vii Reports on Optics Research xi Organization xv I. LASER TECHNOLOGY AND PROPAGATION 1 A. CW Theory 1 1. Laser Propagation Through a...show that CW thermal bloom- ing can be considerably reduced by an initial phase correction of the laser beam. Several experiments were performed to...Teoste, R. Zimmerman, M. D. I. LASER TECHNOLOGY AND PROPAGATION A. CW THEORY 1. Laser Propagation Through a Turbulent Medium In

  6. Ocean Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    sensing and lidar , through measurements and models. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Remote sensing , ocean optics, lidar , underwater imaging, underwater turbulence...scanning system taking advantage of compressive sensing imaging techniques (B. O^ang et al.). Modeling is key in system design and performance...effect has been simulated using a fvlonte Carlo method (Z. Xu and D. K. P. Yue). Active sensing by the means of lidar eliminates many of the issues

  7. Optical Refrigeration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    1Optical Science and Engineering, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of New Mexico , Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA 2Los Alamos National...Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA *e-mail: msb@unm.edu The term ‘laser cooling’ is most often associated with cooling dilute gases of...TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of New Mexico ,Department of Physics & Astronomy

  8. Optical aeronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, S.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Optical measurements of thermospheric and ionospheric processes and their interpretation are reviewed and the chemical reactions and their effects on emissions are discussed. Also included are the phenomena which excite the airglow and aurora, i.e., the solar UV/EUV flux and auroral particle precipitation. Consideration is given to solar flux, atomic emissions, molecular emissions, hydrogen geocorona, and molecular oxygen and the green line nightglow.

  9. Foveated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Kyle R.

    2016-05-01

    Foveated imaging can deliver two different resolutions on a single focal plane, which might inexpensively allow more capability for military systems. The following design study results provide starting examples, lessons learned, and helpful setup equations and pointers to aid the lens designer in any foveated lens design effort. Our goal is to put robust sensor in a small package with no moving parts, but still be able to perform some of the functions of a sensor in a moving gimbal. All of the elegant solutions are out (for various reasons). This study is an attempt to see if lens designs can solve this problem and realize some gains in performance versus cost for airborne sensors. We determined a series of design concepts to simultaneously deliver wide field of view and high foveal resolution without scanning or gimbals. Separate sensors for each field of view are easy and relatively inexpensive, but lead to bulky detectors and electronics. Folding and beam-combining of separate optical channels reduces sensor footprint, but induces image inversions and reduced transmission. Entirely common optics provide good resolution, but cannot provide a significant magnification increase in the foveal region. Offsetting the foveal region from the wide field center may not be physically realizable, but may be required for some applications. The design study revealed good general guidance for foveated optics designs with a cold stop. Key lessons learned involve managing distortion, telecentric imagers, matching image inversions and numerical apertures between channels, reimaging lenses, and creating clean resolution zone splits near internal focal planes.

  10. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-01-01

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  11. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-02-07

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  12. Optical gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifollahi, Alireza

    It is said that future of the world is based on space exploration which leads us to think more about low cost and light weight instruments. Cheap and sensitive instruments should be de-signed and replace the expensive ones. One of the required instruments in space ships is gyroscope controls the direction of space ship. In this article I am going to give an idea to use optical properties in a new gyroscope which will be cheaper as well as more sensitive in com-pare with most of the being used normal gyroscope nowadays. This instrument uses an optical system to measure the angular changes in the direction of a space craft movements in any of the three axels. Any movement, even very small one, will move a crystal bulb which is lashed by some narrow elastic bands in a fixed box surrounded by three optical sources and light meters. Light meters measure the attitude and the angel of changes in the light beams going through the bulb which is related to the amount of changes in the space craft directions. The system will be very sensitive even against movement around its access. As an electro digital device in connection to a Main Process Unit (MPU) it can be used in Stability Augmentation System (SAS) in a space ship. The sensitivity rate of the instrument will be based on the quality and sensitivity of the light meters.

  13. The Intersection of Medical Child Abuse and Medical Complexity.

    PubMed

    Petska, Hillary W; Gordon, John B; Jablonski, Debra; Sheets, Lynn K

    2017-02-01

    Children with medical complexity and victims of medical child abuse may have similar clinical presentations. Atypical or unexplained signs and symptoms due to rare diseases may lead providers to suspect medical child abuse when not present. Conversely, medical child abuse may be the cause of or coexist with medical complexity. Careful consideration of whether or not medical child abuse is present is essential when assessing a child with medical complexity since either diagnosis has significant consequences for children and families.

  14. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  15. A Fibre-Optic Communications Network for Teaching Clinical Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robin

    1985-01-01

    Describes an interactive television system based on fiber-optic communications technology which is used to facilitate participation by University of London medical students in lecture/tutorials by teachers in different hospital locations. Highlights include advantages of fiber-optics, cable manufacture and installation, opto-electronic interface,…

  16. [Bilateral ischemic optic neuropathy secondary to acute ergotism].

    PubMed

    Sommer, S; Delemazure, B; Wagner, M; Xenard, L; Rozot, P

    1998-02-01

    We report a case of a 31 year-old man who presented a bilateral ischemic optic neuropathy associated with headaches and severe systemic hypertension. This episode appeared after administration of ergotamine tartrate and macrolides. This medication probably led to a vasospasm which occurs in patients with hypertension. The cardiovascular and serum lipid evaluations were normal. A migraine optic neuropathy can be evoked.

  17. Medical Services: Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Form 7397-R will be locally reproduced on 8 1/2- by 11-inch paper unless available electronically. A copy for reproduction purposes is located at the...Antihistamines c. Narcotic analgesics 2. a. Hypnotics and sedatives Avoid taking alcohol with this medication unless advised by physician. b. Oral hypoglycemic

  18. Power optics

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonov, V V

    2014-02-28

    By using the theory we developed in the early 1970s, a broad range of phenomena is considered for an optical surface of a solid body that is exposed to radiation arbitrarily varying in time and producing temperature fields, thermoelastic stresses and thermal deformations on the surface layer. The examination is based on the relations (which are similar to Duhamel's integral formula from the theory of heat conduction) between the quantities characterising the thermal stress state in any nonstationary regimes of energy input into a solid. A peculiar feature of the analysis of the thermal stress state in this case consists in the fact that this relation comprises time as a parameter, which in turn is a consequence of incoherence of the quasi-stationary problem of thermoelasticity. This phenomenon is particularly important for the optics of high-power, high-pulse repetition rate lasers, which are being actively developed. In the review, we have recently published in Laser Physics, the thermal stress state of a solid is analysed. In this state, time is treated as an independent variable used in differentiation. Such an approach greatly reduces the applicability of the method. The review published contains data on the use of capillary porous structures made of various materials with different degrees of the surface development. Moreover, such structures can be efficiently employed to increase the heat exchange at a temperature below the boiling point of the coolant. In the present review we discuss the dependences of the limiting laser intensities on the duration of a pulse or a pulse train, corresponding to the three stages of the state of the reflecting surface and leading to unacceptable elastic deformations of the surface, to the plastic yield of the material accompanied by the formation of residual stresses and to the melting of the surface layer. We also analyse the problem of heat exchange in the surface layer with a liquid metal coolant pumped through it. The

  19. Parallel optical sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Skogen, Erik J; Vawter, Gregory A

    2014-05-20

    An optical sampler includes a first and second 1.times.n optical beam splitters splitting an input optical sampling signal and an optical analog input signal into n parallel channels, respectively, a plurality of optical delay elements providing n parallel delayed input optical sampling signals, n photodiodes converting the n parallel optical analog input signals into n respective electrical output signals, and n optical modulators modulating the input optical sampling signal or the optical analog input signal by the respective electrical output signals, and providing n successive optical samples of the optical analog input signal. A plurality of output photodiodes and eADCs convert the n successive optical samples to n successive digital samples. The optical modulator may be a photodiode interconnected Mach-Zehnder Modulator. A method of sampling the optical analog input signal is disclosed.

  20. Optical correlators: systems and domains of applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragulinescu, Andrei; Cojoc, Dan

    2005-08-01

    The paper presents the basic concepts of the optical correlators. In our knowledge, it is the first systematic presentation of the applications of optical correlators. The main three types of optical correlators: the optical correlator in incoherent light, the optical correlator in coherent light (VanderLugt) and the joint transform correlator are presented. The optical correlators are very powerll systems used for image recognition, that perform a correlation between a bidimensional function which represents a Scene that must be analyzed and another bidimensional function that contains information about the reference function. This correlation is optically realized by a Fourier transform between the two functions. The optical Correlators have found a lot of applications for image recognition and target detection in various fields, such as the military field, robotics, medical field, industry a.s.o. Among the various applications of the optical correlators we can mention: digital fingerprints identification, credit card security, antique scripts recognition, determination of the cosmic ships and satellites behavior, amelioration of cancer tests precision, quality control etc.

  1. Medical Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

  2. Medical School Hotline

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Winona K

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of an ongoing series describing various components of the John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) medical education curricula, activities, and initiatives relevant to the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) accreditation standards.1 JABSOM's LCME visit will take place in early 2017. This article provides an overview of JABSOM's diversity/pipeline programs and partnerships. PMID:27437165

  3. Cheating in Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierles, Frederick; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A study to determine the frequency and correlates of cheating among medical students found that cheating is extremely frequent (87.6 percent) among premedical students and less frequent (58.2 percent) but still significant among medical students. The most disturbing finding was the positive correlation between cheating in school and cheating in…

  4. [Medical education and professionalism].

    PubMed

    Martins e Silva, João

    2013-01-01

    Is briefly analyzed the evolution that the objectives, strategies and models of medical education have had since their presentation and subsequent implementation of the famous model of Abraham Flexner, is now 103 years. Although globally accepted in their original pedagogical principles and instruments, that model does not have avoided the continuing dissatisfaction by the medical community and students and, most markedly in recent decades, the demanding of a most efficient health care by society, in general, and by patients in particular. In response to these ambitions, the medical community felt that it was essential to review the traditional criteria of medical professionalism, adapting them to a new paradigm of society and an appropriate and more efficient model of medical education. In this respect, are analyzed strategies and methodologies, apparently more suitable proposals for the inclusion of the principles and responsibilities of medical professionalism since the early period of pre-graduated medical education. It is assumed that the emphasis in teaching and practice of reflection throughout the course will have positive and lasting repercussions during active working life. However, the author believes that the success of the measures to be introduced in medical education programs to a new model of professionalism continues to depend, above all, of the humanistic and cognitive attributes of the students to be chosen, and the pedagogical quality, professional and academic of their teachers.

  5. Medications and Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... medication without first talking with your doctor. SIDE EFFECT Lack of energy/ fatigue/ sleepiness Dry mouth Weight gain ... 16 © 2004 Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance SIDE ... of day take medication is taken. I Go to sleep and wake up at the same time every ...

  6. Medical Knowledge Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Randolph A.; Giuse, Nunzia B.

    1991-01-01

    Few commonly available, successful computer-based tools exist in medical informatics. Faculty expertise can be included in computer-based medical information systems. Computers allow dynamic recombination of knowledge to answer questions unanswerable with print textbooks. Such systems can also create stronger ties between academic and clinical…

  7. Emergency Medical Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of emergency medical technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 4 units specific to the occupation of emergency medical technician. The following…

  8. Administering Eye Medications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on administering eye medications is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. A brief discussion follows of…

  9. Medical Physics Professional Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mower, Herbert W.

    2008-03-01

    In the United States, two professional organizations provide support and educational activities for the medical physicist: the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American College of Medical Physics. The questions to be answered are: (1) what services are provided by each group; (2) how do they differ; and what are the benefits of membership?

  10. Medical Services Assistant Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeman, Phyllis A.

    Designed to develop 12th-grade multiple competencies courses, this curriculum prepares the student to assist a physician, dentist, or other health professional with the management of a medical office and to perform basic health services procedures. Course descriptions are provided for the two courses in the curriculum: medical services assistant…

  11. The Medical Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old The Medical ... > For Parents > The Medical Home Print A A A What's ...

  12. Skylab medical program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    The following major medical subsystems in Skylab are outlined: (1) operational equipment; (2) life science experiments; (3) medical operations; and (4) operational experience. Throughout the Skylab flight program, alterations in equipment and procedures were made for each succeeding mission to capitalize on the flight experience of the previous mission.

  13. Silicones in medical electronics.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The use of silicones, although already extensive, is set to grow in medical electronics. Silicones used in medical device applications as tubing or moulded parts should also be considered for electronic applications in the same device. This article outlines the potential reduction in complexity that this solution offers. Benefits include eliminating negative materials interactions and avoiding bonding problems.

  14. [Ethics in medical journals.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The title of this reflection evokes several contents that may encompass from ethics in research; fraud in science; ethics in medical advertising and relations between sponsors and science; and, finally, papers related to ethic content. This paper is limited to the ethic responsibilities of the medical writers or "scriptwriters."

  15. Commercial Crew Medical Ops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbaugh, Randall; Cole, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Provide commercial partners with: center insight into NASA spaceflight medical experience center; information relative to both nominal and emergency care of the astronaut crew at landing site center; a basis for developing and sharing expertise in space medical factors associated with returning crew.

  16. Medication and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Laurie L.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical syndrome which relates most frequently to the reading-disabled child is the attention deficity disorder. The child psychiatrist will generally resort to medication only when behavioral management techniques have failed. The two most frequently used medications are Ritalin and Dexedrine, central nervous system stimulants. (JN)

  17. Access to Medical Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy

    Although confidentiality with regard to medical records is supposedly protected by the American Medical Associaton's principles of Ethics and the physician-patient privilege, there are a number of laws that require a physician to release patient information to public authorities without the patient's consent. These exceptions include birth and…

  18. History of Medical Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, John S.

    1983-01-01

    Traces the development of basic radiation physics that underlies much of today's medical physics and looks separately at the historical development of two major subfields of medical physics: radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. Indicates that radiation physics has made important contributions to solving biomedical problems in medical…

  19. Understanding Medical Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... you hear about the results of a new medical research study. Sometimes the results of one study seem ... when reading or listening to reports of new medical findings. Some questions that can help you evaluate ... was the research done? If a new treatment was being tested, ...

  20. Ending pregnancy with medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... or an emergency room. Getting Ready for a Medical Abortion The health care provider will: Do a physical exam and ultrasound Go ... vaginal intercourse for about a week after a medical abortion. You can ... care provider about what birth control to use. You should ...

  1. Medical Practice Makes Perfect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Cedaron Medical Inc., was founded in 1990 as a result of a NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) grant from Johnson Space Center to develop a Hand Testing and Exercise Unit for use in space. From that research came Dexter, a comprehensive workstation that creates a paperless environment for medical data management.

  2. Image reconstruction in optical tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Arridge, S R; Schweiger, M

    1997-01-01

    Optical tomography is a new medical imaging modality that is at the threshold of realization. A large amount of clinical work has shown the very real benefits that such a method could provide. At the same time a considerable effort has been put into theoretical studies of its probable success. At present there exist gaps between these two realms. In this paper we review some general approaches to inverse problems to set the context for optical tomography, defining both the terms forward problem and inverse problem. An essential requirement is to treat the problem in a nonlinear fashion, by using an iterative method. This in turn requires a convenient method of evaluating the forward problem, and its derivatives and variance. Photon transport models are described for obtaining analytical and numerical solutions for the most commonly used ones are reviewed. The inverse problem is approached by classical gradient-based solution methods. In order to develop practical implementations of these methods, we discuss the important topic of photon measurement density functions, which represent the derivative of the forward problem. We show some results that represent the most complex and realistic simulations of optical tomography yet developed. We suggest, in particular, that both time-resolved, and intensity-modulated systems can reconstruct variations in both optical absorption and scattering, but that unmodulated, non-time-resolved systems are prone to severe artefact. We believe that optical tomography reconstruction methods can now be reliably applied to a wide variety of real clinical data. The expected resolution of the method is poor, meaning that it is unlikely that the type of high-resolution images seen in computed tomography or medical resonance imaging can ever be obtained. Nevertheless we strongly expect the functional nature of these images to have a high degree of clinical significance. PMID:9232860

  3. Fiber-Coupled Acousto-Optical-Filter Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Kenneth H.; Li, Frank Yanan

    1993-01-01

    Fiber-coupled acousto-optical-filter spectrometer steps rapidly through commanded sequence of wavelengths. Sample cell located remotely from monochromator and associated electronic circuitry, connected to them with optical fibers. Optical-fiber coupling makes possible to monitor samples in remote, hazardous, or confined locations. Advantages include compactness, speed, and no moving parts. Potential applications include control of chemical processes, medical diagnoses, spectral imaging, and sampling of atmospheres.

  4. Dominant optic atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    , otherwise unexplained visual loss related to optic discs pallor or atrophy, and typically occurring in the context of a family history of DOA. Optical Coherence Tomography further discloses non-specific thinning of retinal nerve fiber layer, but a normal morphology of the photoreceptors layers. Abnormal visual evoked potentials and pattern ERG may also reflect the dysfunction of the RGCs and their axons. Molecular diagnosis is provided by the identification of a mutation in the OPA1 gene (75% of DOA patients) or in the OPA3 gene (1% of patients). Prognosis Visual loss in DOA may progress during puberty until adulthood, with very slow subsequent chronic progression in most of the cases. On the opposite, in DOA patients with associated extra-ocular features, the visual loss may be more severe over time. Management To date, there is no preventative or curative treatment in DOA; severely visually impaired patients may benefit from low vision aids. Genetic counseling is commonly offered and patients are advised to avoid alcohol and tobacco consumption, as well as the use of medications that may interfere with mitochondrial metabolism. Gene and pharmacological therapies for DOA are currently under investigation. PMID:22776096

  5. Style in medical journals.

    PubMed Central

    Adams Smith, D E

    1983-01-01

    A study of medical journals from 1962 showed a constant preoccupation with style. Editors and contributors on both sides of the Atlantic revile unnecessary obscurity and complexity and the use of jargon, barbarisms, vogue words, and weak impersonal constructions. They bewail the pompous use of verbiage and the "medspeak" typified by acronyms and neologisms created by affixation. Suggestions for possible causes of poor medical style range from editorial demands for compression and a general ignorance of the principles of good writing to faulty logic and the subordination of communication to status seeking. The consequences of bad writing may include the fragmentation of knowledge, an increase in the importance of abstracting services, a trend towards free glossy medical newspapers, and, as remedial measures, workshops and courses in medical writing. Some implications for English language teachers working with foreign medical graduates and preclinical students are discussed. PMID:6414596

  6. A medical geographical anniversary.

    PubMed

    Barrett, F A

    1993-09-01

    It is now 200 years since L. L. Finke wrote his treatise on a global medical geography, Versuch einer allgemeinen medicinisch-praktischen Geographie. It was both the most extensive book in substantive content, and the most detailed in conceptual discussion on medical geography written to that point. Although it is one of the foundation pieces of medical geography, modern day practitioners seldom refer to Finke's work. There are two main reasons for this: with the exception of two passages, the work has never been translated from the original German, and many contemporary medical geographers believe that the field only developed in the mid-twentieth century. This paper's purpose is to demonstrate that this last point is unfounded and that recognition of Finke's seminal contribution is long over-due. On the 200th anniversary of the publication of An Attempt at a General Medical-Practical Geography Finke's great achievement is honoured.

  7. Skylab medical operational support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Spross, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    To support the medical research and the maintenance of crew health during the three Skylab missions, a medical operational support team was organized. The functions of this team ranged from medical data management to medical systems engineering monitoring during the flights. The capability to expand preflight and postflight medical research and analysis was supplied through the use of the Skylab mobile laboratories. These mobile laboratories were not only capable of being transported to the recovery ship for postflight use, but also served as a preflight test area for gathering crewman baseline data. The laboratories contained experiment hardware identical to that of the flight orbital workshop and a laboratory diagnostic facility that duplicated many of the capabilities of ground-based clinical laboratories.

  8. EDITORIAL: Recent developments in biomedical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2004-04-01

    The rapid growth in laser and photonic technology has resulted in new tools being proposed and developed for use in the medical and biological sciences. Specifically, a discipline known as biomedical optics has emerged which is providing a broad variety of optical techniques and instruments for diagnostic, therapeutic and basic science applications. New laser sources, detectors and measurement techniques are yielding powerful new methods for the study of diseases on all scales, from single molecules, to specific tissues and whole organs. For example, novel laser microscopes permit spectroscopic and force measurements to be performed on single protein molecules; new optical devices provide information on molecular dynamics and structure to perform `optical biopsy' non-invasively and almost instantaneously; and optical coherence tomography and diffuse optical tomography allow visualization of specific tissues and organs. Using genetic promoters to derive luciferase expression, bioluminescence methods can generate molecular light switches, which serve as functional indicator lights reporting cellular conditions and responses in living animals. This technique could allow rapid assessment of and response to the effects of anti-tumour drugs, antibiotics, or antiviral drugs. This issue of Physics in Medicine and Biology highlights recent research in biomedical optics, and is based on invited contributions to the International Conference on Advanced Laser Technology (Focused on Biomedical Optics) held at Cranfield University at Silsoe on 19--23 September 2003. This meeting included sessions devoted to: diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy; optical coherence tomography and coherent domain techniques; optical sensing and applications in life science; microscopic, spectroscopic and opto-acoustic imaging; therapeutic and diagnostic applications; and laser interaction with organic and inorganic materials. Twenty-one papers are included in this special issue. The first paper

  9. Designated Medical Directors for Emergency Medical Services: Recruitment and Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Freeman, Victoria A.; Patterson, P. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Context: Emergency medical services (EMS) agencies rely on medical oversight to support Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) in the provision of prehospital care. Most states require EMS agencies to have a designated medical director (DMD), who typically is responsible for the many activities of medical oversight. Purpose: To assess rural-urban…

  10. Optical Limiting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    Organic Materials’, M.J. Soileau, T.H. Wei, M. Sheik- Bahae , D.J. Hagan, Martine Sence, and E.W. Van Stryland, I International Topical Meeting on Optics...Coulter and Joe Perry of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for providing samples and their expertise on materials. I . M. Sheik- bahae , A.A. Said, and E.W...Form Approved AD A 5 1 INPAGE I OPml No. 0704-0188 lillill l I I ll (ll it1111 1 ~ ~ ae ’ Do e or .ewove. *MIraong the teffe ’Of re.-owng

  11. Optical Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    34 Optics Letters, 2 (1), 1-3 (1978). 7. Grossberg, S., "Adaptive Resonance in Development, Perception and Cognition ," SIAM-AMS Proc., 13, 107-156...Illusions," Biol. Cybernetics, 23, 187-202, (1976b). 11. Grossberg, S., "How Does A Brain Build a Cognitive Code?", Psychol. Review, 87 (1), 1-51 (1980...34perceptron" (F. Rosenblatt, Principles of Neurodynamics ), workers in the neural network field have been seeking to understand how neural networks can perform

  12. Optical Couplers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    market . In general, the fiber diameter and cladding thickness choices that give the highest (best) packing fraction also give the highest (worst...57) Using Eqs (54) and (57). the worst case fractional power ratio for the radia.l data bus is R P* mLm *l£lfkIm^o 2N N-l (58) From...Galileo fiber optic bundles at the LED and de- tector interface, Eq (58) becomes where m, 1*6 .7 R mLm *T.6 TfkTfNao P* 16 (140) .75

  13. Optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Chaves, Julio C.; Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-07-13

    An optical manifold for efficiently combining a plurality of blue LED outputs to illuminate a phosphor for a single, substantially homogeneous output, in a small, cost-effective package. Embodiments are disclosed that use a single or multiple LEDs and a remote phosphor, and an intermediate wavelength-selective filter arranged so that backscattered photoluminescence is recycled to boost the luminance and flux of the output aperture. A further aperture mask is used to boost phosphor luminance with only modest loss of luminosity. Alternative non-recycling embodiments provide blue and yellow light in collimated beams, either separately or combined into white.

  14. Optical microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-01-11

    An optical microphone includes a laser and beam splitter cooperating therewith for splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and a signal beam. A reflecting sensor receives the signal beam and reflects it in a plurality of reflections through sound pressure waves. A photodetector receives both the reference beam and reflected signal beam for heterodyning thereof to produce an acoustic signal for the sound waves. The sound waves vary the local refractive index in the path of the signal beam which experiences a Doppler frequency shift directly analogous with the sound waves.

  15. Optical microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Kotz, K.T.; Noble, K.A.; Faris, G.W.

    2004-09-27

    We present a method for the control of small droplets based on the thermal Marangoni effect using laser heating. With this approach, droplets covering five orders of magnitude in volume ({approx}1.7 {mu}L to 14 pL), immersed in decanol, were moved on an unmodified polystyrene surface, with speeds of up to 3 mm/s. When two droplets were brought into contact, they spontaneously fused and rapidly mixed in less than 33 ms. This optically addressed microfluidic approach has many advantages for microfluidic transport, including exceptional reconfigurability, low intersample contamination, large volume range, extremely simple substrates, no electrical connections, and ready scaling to large arrays.

  16. Medical respiratory monitoring sensors based on microbend fiber loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Zhouxiao, Liuting; Yang, Jian; Li, Xianjing

    2016-11-01

    In this work, a medical respiratory monitoring sensor based on the microbend effect of optical fiber on light transmission is proposed. The microbend effect of multimode optical fiber is analyzed theoretically using optical theory. A respiratory signal modulator with a "sandwich" microbender structure is designed enabling the noninvasive real-time monitoring. In vitro testing showed that the proposed sensor has excellent following characteristics and can automatically discern respiratory condition, the signal-to-noise ratio can be better than 28dB.

  17. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  18. Development of a personal computer's viewing station for the IS&C magneto-optical disk.

    PubMed

    Ando, Y; Kunieda, E; Tsukamoto, N; Kawaguchi, O; Shigematsu, N; Kubo, A; Arai, Y

    1995-01-01

    We developed a display station for the medical images stored in the IS&C (Image Save and Carry) magneto-optical disk. This station consisted of the personal computer and the magneto-optical disk drive. The performance of this system was evaluated and was compared with the Unix workstations. We found that the personal computer system had an adequate ability to display medical images. It provided, moreover, for portability and practical use of medical information.

  19. Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David; Wu, Jimmy; Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember. This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this goal and our current areas of interest. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to identify medical conditions of concern during exploration missions. The list was derived from space flight medical incidents, the shuttle medical checklist, the International Space Station medical checklist, and expert opinion. The conditions on the list were prioritized according to mission type by a panel comprised of flight surgeons, physician astronauts, engineers, and scientists. From the prioritized list, the ExMC element determined the capabilities needed to address the medical conditions of concern. Where such capabilities were not currently available, a gap was identified. The element s research plan outlines these gaps and the tasks identified to achieve the desired capabilities for exploration missions. This poster is being presented to inform the audience of the gaps and tasks being investigated by ExMC and to encourage discussions of shared interests and possible future collaborations.

  20. Medication counselling: physicians' perspective.

    PubMed

    Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Lisby, Marianne; Eskildsen, Anette Gjetrup; Saedder, Eva Aggerholm; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-12-01

    Medication reviews have the potential to lower the incidence of prescribing errors. To benefit from a medication review, the prescriber must adhere to medication counselling. Adherence rates vary from 39 to 100%. The aim of this study was to examine counselling-naive hospital physicians' perspectives and demands to medication counselling as well as study factors that might increase adherence to the counselling. The study was conducted as a questionnaire survey among physicians at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire was developed based on focus group interviews and literature search, and was pilot-tested among 30 physicians before being sent to 669 physicians. The questionnaire consisted of 35 items divided into four categories: attitudes (19 items), behaviours (3 items), assessment (8 items) and demographics (5 items). The response rate was 60% (400/669). Respondents were employed at psychiatric, medical or surgical departments. Eighty-five per cent of respondents agreed that patients would benefit of an extra medication review, and 72% agreed that there was a need for external medication counselling. The most important factor that could increase adherence was the clinical relevance of the counselling as 78% rated it of major importance. The most favoured method for receiving counselling was via the electronic patient record.

  1. Medical instrument data exchange.

    PubMed

    Gumudavelli, Suman; McKneely, Paul K; Thongpithoonrat, Pongnarin; Gurkan, D; Chapman, Frank M

    2008-01-01

    Advances in medical devices and health care has been phenomenal during the recent years. Although medical device manufacturers have been improving their instruments, network connection of these instruments still rely on proprietary technologies. Even if the interface has been provided by the manufacturer (e.g., RS-232, USB, or Ethernet coupled with a proprietary API), there is no widely-accepted uniform data model to access data of various bedside instruments. There is a need for a common standard which allows for internetworking with the medical devices from different manufacturers. ISO/IEEE 11073 (X73) is a standard attempting to unify the interfaces of all medical devices. X73 defines a client access mechanism that would be implemented into the communication controllers (residing between an instrument and the network) in order to access/network patient data. On the other hand, MediCAN technology suite has been demonstrated with various medical instruments to achieve interfacing and networking with a similar goal in its open standardization approach. However, it provides a more generic definition for medical data to achieve flexibility for networking and client access mechanisms. In this paper, a comparison between the data model of X73 and MediCAN will be presented to encourage interoperability demonstrations of medical instruments.

  2. [New Medical Device Evaluation].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Koji

    2016-01-01

    In this presentation, as a member of the Harmonization by Doing (HBD) project, I discuss the significance of regulatory science in global medical device development and our experience in the international collaboration process for medical devices. In Japan, most innovative medical therapeutic devices were previously developed and exported by foreign-based companies. Due to this device lag, Japanese had minimal opportunities for receiving treatment with innovative medical devices. To address this issue, the Japanese government has actively accepted foreign clinical trial results and promoted global clinical trials in projects such as HBD. HBD is a project with stakeholders from academia, regulatory authorities, and industry in the US and Japan to promote global clinical trials and reduce device lags. When the project started, medical device clinical trials were not actively conducted in Japan at not just hospitals but also at medical device companies. We started to identify issues under the concept of HBD. After 10 years, we have now become key members in global clinical trials and able to obtain approvals without delay. Recently, HBD has started promoting international convergence. Physicians and regulatory authorities play central roles in compiling guidelines for the clinical evaluation of medical device development, which will be a more active field in the near future. The guidelines compiled will be confirmed with members of academia and regulatory authorities in the United Sates.

  3. Benjamin Franklin's Medical Imprints

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Jane Quale

    1965-01-01

    The printing house of Benjamin Franklin produced several works of a medical nature in Colonial America at a time when very few medical treatises were being written or printed. Benjamin Franklin was also indirectly responsible for the founding of the first medical library in this country. For these reasons he was, in addition to his many other talents, an early contributor to American medical literature. Included in this bibliography are all the known medical books, pamphlets, and broadsides in English with Benjamin Franklin's name in the imprint, issued in America. These eighteen titles span the years 1732 to 1765 and are presented chronologically with indications of their relation to the practice and practitioners of Colonial medicine. Benjamin Franklin's press produced as wide a variety of contributions as did his versatile life, and the early history of medicine in this country bears the influence of both. I am pleased with your scheme of a Medical Library at the Hospital, and I fancy I can procure you some donations among my medical friends here, if you will send me a catalogue of what books you already have. Enclosed I send you the only book of the kind in my possession here, having just received it as a present from the author.—Benjamin Franklin to Dr. Cadwallader Evans, London, May 5, 1767 (1). PMID:14223741

  4. Medical Services: Armed Forces Medical Examiner System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Armed Forces Medical Examiner system Procedural Guide. 3–4. Forensic dental identification The Forensic Dentistry Section of the Department of Oral...Pathology at AFIP and special consultants in forensic dentistry to the surgeons general of the Armed Forces will serve as the principal advisers to the...a. Courses and programs. (1) Forensic dentistry /odontology. (2) Aerospace pathology. (3) Basic forensic pathology. (4) Advanced forensic pathology

  5. Teaching Ethics in Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewan, Christine

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the literature regarding the teaching of ethics in medical schools. Defines medical ethics and attempts to determine the scope of medical ethics teaching. Discusses ways medical ethics could be taught and how that teaching can be assessed. Calls for increased attention into the teaching of medical ethics. (TW)

  6. Medical marijuana: Medical necessity versus political agenda

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter A.; Capuzzi, Kevin; Fick, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Summary Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as an illegal Schedule I drug which has no accepted medical use. However, recent studies have shown that medical marijuana is effective in controlling chronic non-cancer pain, alleviating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, treating wasting syndrome associated with AIDS, and controlling muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis. These studies state that the alleviating benefits of marijuana outweigh the negative effects of the drug, and recommend that marijuana be administered to patients who have failed to respond to other therapies. Despite supporting evidence, the DEA refuses to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule II drug, which would allow physicians to prescribe marijuana to suffering patients. The use of medical marijuana has continued to gain support among states, and is currently legal in 16 states and the District of Columbia. This is in stark contrast to the federal government’s stance of zero-tolerance, which has led to a heated legal debate in the United States. After reviewing relevant scientific data and grounding the issue in ethical principles like beneficence and nonmaleficence, there is a strong argument for allowing physicians to prescribe marijuana. Patients have a right to all beneficial treatments and to deny them this right violates their basic human rights. PMID:22129912

  7. Medical devices: US medical device regulation.

    PubMed

    Jarow, Jonathan P; Baxley, John H

    2015-03-01

    Medical devices are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Center for Devices and Radiological Health is responsible for protecting and promoting the public health by ensuring the safety, effectiveness, and quality of medical devices, ensuring the safety of radiation-emitting products, fostering innovation, and providing the public with accurate, science-based information about the products we oversee, throughout the total product life cycle. The FDA was granted the authority to regulate the manufacturing and marketing of medical devices in 1976. It does not regulate the practice of medicine. Devices are classified based on complexity and level of risk, and "pre-1976" devices were allowed to remain on the market after being classified without FDA review. Post-1976 devices of lower complexity and risk that are substantially equivalent to a marketed "predicate" device may be cleared through the 510(k) premarket notification process. Clinical data are typically not needed for 510(k) clearance. In contrast, higher-risk devices typically require premarket approval. Premarket approval applications must contain data demonstrating reasonable assurance of safety and efficacy, and this information typically includes clinical data. For novel devices that are not high risk, the de novo process allows FDA to simultaneously review and classify new devices. Devices that are not legally marketed are permitted to be used for clinical investigation purposes in the United States under the Investigational Device Exemptions regulation.

  8. Medical education: creating physicians or medical technicians?

    PubMed

    Berkow, Robert

    2002-02-01

    The 20th century witnessed phenomenal growth in scientific medical knowledge and technology, enabling physicians to more accurately diagnose and effectively treat a wide range of diseases. However, these advances led to longer and more complex training periods for physicians and increasing specialization and dependence on the new technology. An adverse outcome of these changes has been the development of many physicians who are less able to communicate with their patients and deal with them in a humanistic and personally caring manner; ie, the development of finely trained medical technologists as opposed to caring physicians. Their behavior and their blind trust in science and technology without understanding the patients in whom illness occurs often leads to making incorrect, incomplete, or inappropriate diagnoses or to unnecessary failures of treatment. It also results in excessive costs, hazardous procedures, and ill will from patients. Unfortunately, such technologically oriented physicians are often the primary role models for students. The best hope for a remedy to the problem lies in recognizing that it exists, understanding its causes, and modifying medical education accordingly. Providing students with good role models and some rudimentary techniques can lead to significant gains, but sophisticated programs have been designed only in some schools.

  9. Optical diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Tavassoly, M Taghi; Amiri, Mohammad; Darudi, Ahmad; Aalipour, Rasoul; Saber, Ahad; Moradi, Ali-Reza

    2009-03-01

    Interference of light has numerous metrological applications because the optical path difference (OPD) can be varied at will between the interfering waves in the interferometers. We show how one can desirably change the optical path difference in diffraction. This leads to many novel and interesting metrological applications including high-precision measurements of displacement, phase change, refractive index profile, temperature gradient, diffusion coefficient, and coherence parameters, to name only a few. The subject fundamentally differs from interferometry in the sense that in the latter the measurement criterion is the change in intensity or fringe location, while in the former the criterion is the change in the visibility of fringes with an already known intensity profile. The visibility can vary from zero to one as the OPD changes by a half-wave. Therefore, measurements with the accuracy of a few nanometers are quite feasible. Also, the possibility of changing the OPD in diffraction allows us to use Fresnel diffraction in Fourier spectrometry, to enhance or suppress diffracted fields, and to build phase singularities that have many novel and useful applications.

  10. Optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkel, Mitchell W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner for imaging lines in an object plane onto a linear array in a focal plane either continuously or discretely is described. The scanner consists of a set of four mutually perpendicularly oriented plane corner mirrors which provide a reflecting path that describes a parallelogram. In addition, there is a plane parallel scanning mirror with a front and back reflecting surface located midway between the first and fourth corner mirrors. It is oriented so that in the mid-scan position it is parallel to the first corner mirror, and therefore perpendicular to the fourth corner mirror. As the scan mirror rotates, rays incident from a plurality of lines in the object plane are selectively directed through the optical system arriving at a common intersection on the back surface of the scanning mirror where the rays are colinearly directed toward a lens and then imaged onto the linear array in the focal plane. A set of compensating mirrors may be introduced just before the imaging lens to compensate for a small and generally negligible path difference delta sub l between the axial and marginal rays.

  11. Optical Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Precision Lapping and Optical Co. has developed a wide variety of hollow retroreflector systems for applications involving the entire optical spectrum; they are, according to company literature, cheaper, more accurate, lighter and capable of greater size than solid prisms. Precision Lapping's major customers are aerospace and defense companies, government organizations, R&D and commercial instrument companies. For example, Precision Lapping supplies hollow retroreflectors for the laser fire control system of the Army's Abrams tank, and retroreflectors have been and are being used in a number of space tests relative to the Air Force's Strategic Defense Initiative research program. An example of a customer/user is Chesapeake Laser Systems, producer of the Laser Tracker System CMS-2000, which has applications in SDI research and industrial robotics. Another customer is MDA Scientific, Inc., manufacturer of a line of toxic gas detection systems used to monitor hazardous gases present in oil fields, refineries, offshore platforms, chemical plants, waste storage sites and other locations where gases are released into the environment.

  12. Optical Nanodozers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshid, Ahmed; Reisner, Walter; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2015-03-01

    Experiment, simulation and scaling analytics are converging on a comprehensive picture regarding the equilibrium behaviour of nanochannel confined semiflexible, self-avoiding chains. Yet, strongly non-equilibrium behaviour of confined polymers is largely unexplored from either an experimental or theoretical point of view. Combining optical trapping and nanofluidics, we have developed a ``nanodozer'' assay for quantifying confined polymer dynamics. An optical trap is used to slide a nanosphere at a fixed velocity along a nanochannel. The trapped bead acts as a permeable gasket, letting fluid escape but preventing the polymer from passing. As the sliding bead comes in contact with a nanochannel extended DNA, the molecule is dynamically compressed, undergoing transient dynamics characterized by a traveling concentration ``shockwave'' before reaching a final steady state with a ramp-like concentration profile. Remarkably, these strongly non-equilibrium measurements can be quantified via a simple nonlinear convective-diffusion formalism and yield insights into the local blob statistics, allowing us to conclude that the compressed nanochannel confined chain exhibits mean-field behaviour.

  13. Kennedy Space Center Medical Operations and Medical Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the emergency medical operations at Kennedy Space center, the KSC launch and landing contingency modes, the triage site, the medical kit, and the medications available.

  14. Optic for an endoscope/borescope having high resolution and narrow field of view

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary F.; Trebes, James E.

    2003-10-28

    An optic having optimized high spatial resolution, minimal nonlinear magnification distortion while at the same time having a limited chromatic focal shift or chromatic aberrations. The optic located at the distal end of an endoscopic inspection tool permits a high resolution, narrow field of view image for medical diagnostic applications, compared to conventional optics for endoscopic instruments which provide a wide field of view, low resolution image. The image coverage is over a narrow (<20 degrees) field of view with very low optical distortion (<5% pin cushion or barrel distortion. The optic is also optimized for best color correction as well as to aid medical diagnostics.

  15. Ocular medications in children.

    PubMed

    Wallace, D K; Steinkuller, P G

    1998-11-01

    Many ocular medications are used by pediatricians or ophthalmologists caring for pediatric patients. Topical antibiotics are commonly prescribed for bacterial conjunctivitis, nasolacrimal duct obstructions, and ophthalmia neonatorum. Many new antiallergy eye drops are now available for the treatment of seasonal (hay fever) conjunctivitis. Dilating eye drops and antiglaucoma medications are generally used or prescribed by ophthalmologists, but pediatricians must be aware of their potentially serious systemic side effects. Before initiating treatment, physicians should evaluate the risks and benefits of ophthalmic medications, establish minimum dosages necessary to achieve a therapeutic benefit, and monitor children for local and systemic side effects.

  16. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Plöckinger, U.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs), dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided. PMID:22550484

  17. Medical marijuana and children.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Sam

    2014-11-01

    Medical marijuana is legal for use by minors in many states, but not Delaware. Anecdotes have accumulated suggesting efficacy in managing seizures in children and several other conditions in adults. Currently well-designed studies in children are lacking. Challenges to effective pediatric medical marijuana use remain at the level of biochemistry, the individual patient, and society. Appropriate and effective use of medical marijuana in children will require significant legislative changes at the state and federal level, as well as high-quality research and standardization of marijuana strains.

  18. Travel Medical Kit.

    PubMed

    Terry, Anne C; Haulman, N Jean

    2016-03-01

    "The traveler's medical kit is an essential tool for both the novice and expert traveler. It is designed to treat travel-related illness and injury and to ensure preexisting medical conditions are managed appropriately. Travelers are at increased risk for common gastrointestinal issues during travel. Respiratory illnesses make up approximately 8% of the ailments present in returned international travelers. Approximately 12% of travelers experience a travel-related skin condition. First aid treatment for minor injuries is essential to all travel medical kits. The complexity ranges from a small, simple case for the urban traveler to a larger, extensive case for wilderness travel."

  19. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that

  20. Medical Evaluation Before Operation

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Diane L.; Linz, Douglas H.; Kane, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    Surgical outcome can be optimized by anticipation and prevention of medical complications. General considerations that apply to all patients include evaluation for coagulation disorders, prior anesthetic complications and drug history. Evaluation for organ-specific risk factors allows identification of patients at high surgical risk, minimization of risk and anticipation of postoperative complications. Review of the recent literature and a practical guide to therapy is presented for the major medical considerations before surgical procedures: cardiac disease, hypertension, pulmonary disease, endocrine considerations and hepatic disease. Attention to these areas and communication among internists, anesthesiologists and surgeons should provide optimal treatment of surgical patients with medical disease. PMID:7179956

  1. Origins of Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Collen, Morris F.

    1986-01-01

    Medical informatics is a new knowledge domain of computer and information science, engineering and technology in all fields of health and medicine, including research, education and practice. Medical informatics has evolved over the past 30 years as medicine learned to exploit the extraordinary capabilities of the electronic digital computer to better meet its complex information needs. The first articles on this subject appeared in the 1950s, the number of publications rapidly increased in the 1960s and medical informatics was identified as a new specialty in the 1970s. PMID:3544507

  2. Congenital optic tract hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Fujio, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Masanori; Taylor, David

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of isolated unilateral optic tract hypoplasia, described only twice previously. Bilateral optic disk hypoplasia was seen ophthalmoscopically and visual field studies showed an incongruous right homonymous hemianopia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral hypoplasia of both optic nerves and the left optic tract. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography mapping correlated well with the visual field studies.

  3. Precision Fiber Optic Sensor Market Forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeff D.; Glasco, Jon; Dixon, Frank W.

    1986-01-01

    The worldwide market for precision fiber optic sensors is forecasted, 1984-1994. The forecast is based upon o Analysis of fiber optic sensor and related component current technology, and a forecast of technology advancement o Review and projection of demand for precision sensing, and the penetration which fiber optics will make into this market The analysis and projections are based mainly on interviews conducted worldwide with research teams, government agencies, systems contractors, medical and industrial laboratories, component suppliers and others. The worldwide market for precision (interferometric) fiber optic sensing systems is forecasted to exceed $0.8 billion by 1994. The forecast is segmented by geographical region (Europe, Japan and North America) and by function; o Gyroscope o Sonar o Gradiometer/Magnetometer o Other - Chemical Composition - Atmospheric Acoustic - Temperature - Position - Pressure Requirements for components are reviewed. These include special fiber, emitters and detectors, modulators, couplers, switches, integrated optical circuits and integrated optoelectronics. The advancement in component performance is forecasted. The major driving forces creating fiber optic sensor markets are reviewed. These include fiber optic sensor technical and economic advantages, increasingly stringent operational requirements, and technology evolution. The leading fiber optic sensor and related component development programs are reviewed. Component sources are listed. Funding sources for sensor and component development are outlined, and trends forecasted.

  4. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology for many products and applications today. Probably the most prestigious examples are the diffractive light shaping elements used in high-end DUV lithography steppers. Highly-efficient refractive and diffractive micro-optical elements are used for precise beam and pupil shaping. Micro-optics had a major impact on the reduction of aberrations and diffraction effects in projection lithography, allowing a resolution enhancement from 250 nm to 45 nm within the past decade. Micro-optics also plays a decisive role in medical devices (endoscopes, ophthalmology), in all laser-based devices and fiber communication networks, bringing high-speed internet to our homes. Even our modern smart phones contain a variety of micro-optical elements. For example, LED flash light shaping elements, the secondary camera, ambient light and proximity sensors. Wherever light is involved, micro-optics offers the chance to further miniaturize a device, to improve its performance, or to reduce manufacturing and packaging costs. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication is based on technology established by the semiconductor industry. Thousands of components are fabricated in parallel on a wafer. This review paper recapitulates major steps and inventions in wafer-scale micro-optics technology. The state-of-the-art of fabrication, testing and packaging technology is summarized.

  5. Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... products that are not commonly stocked in hospital pharmacies. Examples include: Salagen ® , Evoxac ® , and Restasis ® Eye drops, ... prescription and OTC medications/products in their labeled pharmacy container or packaging. This is important in case ...

  6. Psychotropic Medications for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordoba, Oscar A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the clinical conditions and medications used with children who have emotional and behavioral problems including hyperactivity, enuresis, anxiety, depression, mental retardation, and Tourette's Syndrome. Discusses the role of the social worker, ethical issues, and training needs. (JAC)

  7. Medical problems in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Bhaskar; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of medical problems in pregnancy is increasing because of a complex interplay between demographic and lifestyle factors, and developments in modern medicine. Maternal mortality and morbidity resulting from treatable medical conditions, such as venous thromboembolism, epilepsy and autoimmune disease, have not decreased in recent years. This is despite a marked decrease in overall maternal mortality. It is vital that all physicians acquire a basic knowledge and understanding of medical problems in pregnancy. This includes prepregnancy measures such as counselling and optimisation of medical therapy, as well as multidisciplinary management throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute and chronic illness is of clear benefit, and most drugs and many radiological investigations may be used in pregnancy.

  8. Medical Issues: Breathing

    MedlinePlus

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > breathing Breathing Breathing problems are the most common cause of illness for children with SMA. Breathing Risks In healthy individuals, the muscles between the ...

  9. Medications for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Medications for Arrhythmia Updated:Dec 21,2016 When taken exactly as ... health. This content was last reviewed September 2016. Arrhythmia • Home • About Arrhythmia • Why Arrhythmia Matters • Understand Your ...

  10. Medical Issues in Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to ... any medical tests the child has had the child's development in relation to standard age milestones, such as ...

  11. Medical Issues: Equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > equipment Equipment Individuals with SMA often require a range of ... you can submit an equipment pool request. Helpful Equipment The following is a list of equipment that ...

  12. Medications (for IBS)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best used in irritable bowel syndrome ( ... take for a therapeutic effect counts as a medicine. It can be readily available over-the-counter, ...

  13. Medical Issues in Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... any medical tests the child has had the child's development in relation to standard age milestones, such as sitting up, walking, or talking a description of personality and relationships with others information about the child's care since ...

  14. The earliest medical texts.

    PubMed

    Frey, E F

    The first civilization known to have had an extensive study of medicine and to leave written records of its practices and procedures was that of ancient Egypt. The oldest extant Egyptian medical texts are six papyri from the period between 2000 B.C. and 1500 B.C.: the Kahun Medical Papyrus, the Ramesseum IV and Ramesseum V Papyri, the Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus, The Ebers Medical Papyrus and the Hearst Medical Papyrus. These texts, most of them based on older texts dating possibly from 3000 B.C., are comparatively free of the magician's approach to treating illness. Egyptian medicine influenced the medicine of neighboring cultures, including the culture of ancient Greece. From Greece, its influence spread onward, thereby affecting Western civilization significantly.

  15. American Podiatric Medical Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... at The National Learn More about The National Advertisement Advertisement @APMA Tweets by @APMA Follow @APMA Featured Webinars ... take advantage of early-bird rates! Register now! Advertisement © 2017 American Podiatric Medical Association, Inc. All rights ...

  16. Mental Health Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... antipsychotic medications during pregnancy can lead to birth defects, especially if they are taken during the first trimester and in combination with other drugs, but the risks vary widely and depend on ...

  17. Medications to Treat Cushing's

    MedlinePlus

    ... common of these medications block the adrenal glands production of cortisol. This group includes ketoconazole, mitotane, and metyrapone. Ketoconazole, an antibiotic used in the treatment of fungal infections, has ...

  18. Broadening medical horizons.

    PubMed

    Harper, C Mark

    2003-02-01

    In the rush to acquire ever more and detailed knowledge, the medical profession appears to have forgotten that there are other academic disciplines, the study of which would benefit both doctors and patients.

  19. Kinking of medical tubes.

    PubMed

    Ingles, David

    2004-05-01

    The phenomenon of kinking in medical tubing remains a problem for some applications, particularly critical ones such as transporting gasses or fluids. Design features are described to prevent its occurrence.

  20. Medical Issues: Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > nutrition Nutrition Good nutrition is essential to health and growth. ... must make decisions based on their own needs. Nutrition Considerations Since we are still waiting for clinical ...

  1. Medications: Myths Versus Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements can take a toll on your body’s chemistry and alter the effectiveness of some medications. One ... Dr. Fletcher said. Natural supplements are better than pharmaceuticals . While many patients feel natural supplements or vitamins ...

  2. Medical Assisting Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the medical assisting program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories; Foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); Admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); Program…

  3. Medical futility and nursing.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C

    1995-01-01

    Defining medical futility is central to the efforts of clinicians and ethicists who seek to identify the limits of patient autonomy. This article is a critique of current efforts to define and then use policies of medical futility to justify refusing requests for treatment and care that have no perceived medical benefit. After exploring the current definitions of medical futility in the bioethics and clinical literature, comparisons of the advantages and disadvantages of the following three options are provided: allowing patients to decide all but physiologic futility, allowing clinicians to decide futility, and pursuing negotiated compromise. The third option--negotiated compromise--is recommended. A role is developed for nurses in preventing and resolving conflict about futile treatment.

  4. Secure medical digital libraries.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, I; Chrissikopoulos, V; Polemi, D

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, a secure medical digital library is presented. It is based on the CORBA specifications for distributed systems. The described approach relies on a three-tier architecture. Interaction between the medical digital library and its users is achieved through a Web server. The choice of employing Web technology for the dissemination of medical data has many advantages compared to older approaches, but also poses extra requirements that need to be fulfilled. Thus, special attention is paid to the distinguished nature of such medical data, whose integrity and confidentiality should be preserved at all costs. This is achieved through the employment of Trusted Third Parties (TTP) technology for the support of the required security services. Additionally, the proposed digital library employs smartcards for the management of the various security tokens that are used from the above services.

  5. Medical Ghost-Writing

    PubMed Central

    Langdon-Neuner, Elise

    2008-01-01

    Any assistance an author receives with writing a scientific article that is not acknowledged in the article is described as ghost-writing. Articles ghost-written by medical writers engaged by pharmaceutical companies who have a vested interest in the content have caused concern after scandals revealed misleading content in some articles. A key criterion of authorship in medical journals is final approval of the article submitted for publication. Authors are responsible for the content of their articles and for acknowledging any assistance they receive. Action taken by some journals and medical writer associations to encourage acknowledgement is an uphill task in the light of disinterest from the pharmaceutical industry and ignorance or similar lack of interest by those who agree to be named authors. However, acknowledgment alone is not sufficient to resolve medical ghost-writing; issues of how the acknowledgement is formulated, permission to acknowledge and access to raw data also need to be tackled. PMID:22013363

  6. Dystonia Medical Research Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Member Joins Peer Review of DOD Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program More News Support Groups Join the DMRF ... of Dystonia Research Research News Funding Programs Current Research Dystonia Coalition ... Connect Contact Us Privacy Policy Support Groups Calendar

  7. Your Medical Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes, but many health care providers now keep electronic records. You might hear medical people call these EHRs — short for electronic health records . Electronic records make it easier for ...

  8. Your Pet's Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly used types of medications in dogs and cats, but is by no means a complete list ... from a viral infection. Examples in dogs and cats include penicillin, trimethoprim-sulfa, cephalexin and enrofloxacin. Non- ...

  9. Reducing medical waste.

    PubMed

    Conrardy, Julie; Hillanbrand, Mary; Myers, Sandra; Nussbaum, George F

    2010-06-01

    Medical waste is a necessary by-product of any hospital environment; however, the majority of regulated medical waste is produced in the OR from the use of disposable surgical supplies (eg, drapes, gowns, basins, gloves, sponges). We conducted a concept comparison project in the ORs of two large medical centers in Bethesda, Maryland, and Washington, DC, to evaluate the effects of using reusable surgical basins, gowns, and table and Mayo stand covers in place of disposable products. Survey results indicated that surgeons and surgical technologists found the reusable products to be preferable to the disposable products currently in use. In addition, using reusable products provided a means to decrease regulated medical waste generated in the OR by an average of 65% as well as reduce the cost of waste disposal. AORN recommends evaluating the environmental effects of using reusable, reposable, and disposable products; our findings provide evidence that may be useful to surgical facilities that seek to adopt a "green" approach.

  10. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intracraneal en Espanol. STORE Shop the IHRF Store Medication and Surgery Medication and Surgery Both drugs and surgery are used ... to treat the headache that accompanies chronic IH. Medications for chronic headache like tricyclic anti-depressants, beta- ...

  11. Managing High Blood Pressure Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Managing High Blood Pressure Medications Updated:Jan 3,2017 When your doctor prescribes ... Download a printable medicine tracker . Quick Tips for Medication Use Understand your medication. Know what it's for, ...

  12. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Medications for High Blood Pressure Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... all their lives. back to top Types of Medications FDA has approved many medications to treat high ...

  13. Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library ▸ Medications and drug allergic reactions TTR Share | Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions This article has been ... by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Everyone reacts to medications differently. One person may develop a rash while ...

  14. Medical coding in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Babre, Deven

    2010-01-01

    Data generated in all clinical trial are recorded on the data collection instrument Case report Form / Electronic Case Report Form by investigators located at various sites in various countries. In multicentric clinical trials since different investigator or medically qualified experts are from different sites / centers recording the medical term(s) uniformly is a big challenge. Medical coders from clinical data management team process these terms and perform medical coding. Medical coding is performed to categorize the medical terms reported appropriately so that they can be analyzed/reviewed. This article describes process which is used for medical coding in clinical data management and two most commonly used medical dictionaries MedDRA and WHO-DDE in brief. It is expected to help medical coders to understand the process of medical coding in clinical data management. Few common issues which the medical coder faces while performing medical coding, are also highlighted.

  15. Integrated optics for fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minford, W. J.; Depaula, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress achieved in the field of fiber-optic sensor applications is discussed with emphasis placed on LiNbO3-based integrated optics (IO). Particular consideration is given to advanced electromagnetic-field sensors, an integrated laser vibrometer system, and a fiber-optic gyroscope system. It is shown that the multifunction IO chips have enabled high perforamance fiber-optic sensors (e.g., fiber-optic gyros), provided advanced and unique signal processing capabilities and advanced architectures, and have a potential of making fiber-optic sensors at low cost.

  16. Medical rare book provenance.

    PubMed Central

    Overmier, J A; Sentz, L

    1987-01-01

    Provenance is defined as the record of a book's ownership history. Its value and uses are explored. A survey of provenance practices in medical school rare book libraries found that only 21% of the reporting libraries maintain this important file. Examples of the uses and value of a provenance file in a medical rare book collection are presented. Decisions necessary to institute and maintain such a file are outlined and discussed. PMID:3828606

  17. High resolution optical DNA mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baday, Murat

    Many types of diseases including cancer and autism are associated with copy-number variations in the genome. Most of these variations could not be identified with existing sequencing and optical DNA mapping methods. We have developed Multi-color Super-resolution technique, with potential for high throughput and low cost, which can allow us to recognize more of these variations. Our technique has made 10--fold improvement in the resolution of optical DNA mapping. Using a 180 kb BAC clone as a model system, we resolved dense patterns from 108 fluorescent labels of two different colors representing two different sequence-motifs. Overall, a detailed DNA map with 100 bp resolution was achieved, which has the potential to reveal detailed information about genetic variance and to facilitate medical diagnosis of genetic disease.

  18. Optical manifold

    DOEpatents

    Falicoff, Waqidi; Chaves, Julio C.; Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-02-23

    Optical systems are described that have at least one source of a beam of blue light with divergence under 15.degree.. A phosphor emits yellow light when excited by the blue light. A collimator is disposed with the phosphor and forms a yellow beam with divergence under 15.degree.. A dichroic filter is positioned to transmit the beam of blue light to the phosphor and to reflect the beam of yellow light to an exit aperture. In different embodiments, the beams of blue and yellow light are incident upon said filter with central angles of 15.degree., 22.degree., and 45.degree.. The filter may reflect all of one polarization and part of the other polarization, and a polarization rotating retroreflector may then be provided to return the unreflected light to the filter.

  19. Optical Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncali, E.; Tavitian, B.; Texier, I. E.; Peltié, P.; Perraut, F.; Boutet, J.; Cognet, L.; Lounis, B.; Marguet, D.; Thoumine, O.; Tramier, M.

    Fluorescence is a physical phenomenon described for the first time in 1852 by the British scientist George G. Stokes, famous for his work in mathematics and hydrodynamics. He observed the light emitted by a mineral after excitation (absorption of light by the mineral) by UV light. He then formulated what has become known as Stokes’ law, which says that the wavelength of fluorescence emission is longer than the excitation wavelength used to generate it. Some phenomena departing from this rule were later discovered, but do not in fact invalidate it. The possibility of visible excitation was subsequently developed, with the discovery of many fluorescing aromaticmolecules, called fluorophores. The identification of these compounds and improved control over the physical phenomenon meant that by 1930 research tools had been developed in biology, e.g., labeling certain tissues and bacteria so as to observe them by fluorescence. The optical microscope as it had existed since the nineteenth century thus gave rise to the fluorescence microscope: a reflection system to supply the light required to excite the fluorophores was added to the standard microscope, together with a suitable filtering system. Fluorescence microscopy soon became an important tool for biological analysis both in vitro and ex vivo, and other applications of light emission were also devised (light-emission phenomena of which fluorescence is a special case, described further in Sect. 7.2). It became possible to study phenomena that could not be observed by standard optical microscopy. Among other things, the location of molecules inside cells, monitoring of intracellular processes, and detection of single molecules all become feasible by means of fluorescence microscopy.

  20. [Realization of optic activatory mechanism in laser-medication impact].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, M Iu; Skovorod'ko, S N; Kondakova, O A; Varavva, A S; Barybin, V F; Mendeleev, V Ia

    2006-01-01

    Clinical, biochemical, experimental, heat physical studies and mathematical calculations have shown that combined effect of drug-laser can be differentiated into the following effects: photophoresis, light pressure and photodynamic effect.

  1. Medical education: changes and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Gruppen, Larry D; Ba, Denian

    2013-08-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international trends, Chinese medical education has seen unique transformations that reflect its particular culture and history.

  2. Fabrication of an optical component

    DOEpatents

    Nichols, Michael A.; Aikens, David M.; Camp, David W.; Thomas, Ian M.; Kiikka, Craig; Sheehan, Lynn M.; Kozlowski, Mark R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for forming optical parts used in laser optical systems such as high energy lasers, high average power lasers, semiconductor capital equipment and medical devices. The optical parts will not damage during the operation of high power lasers in the ultra-violet light range. A blank is first ground using a fixed abrasive grinding method to remove the subsurface damage formed during the fabrication of the blank. The next step grinds and polishes the edges and forms bevels to reduce the amount of fused-glass contaminants in the subsequent steps. A loose abrasive grind removes the subsurface damage formed during the fixed abrasive or "blanchard" removal process. After repolishing the bevels and performing an optional fluoride etch, the surface of the blank is polished using a zirconia slurry. Any subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind will be removed during this zirconia polish. A post polish etch may be performed to remove any redeposited contaminants. Another method uses a ceria polishing step to remove the subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind. However, any residual ceria may interfere with the optical properties of the finished part. Therefore, the ceria and other contaminants are removed by performing either a zirconia polish after the ceria polish or a post ceria polish etch.

  3. Medication safety during your hospital stay

    MedlinePlus

    Five-rights - medication; Medication administration - hospital; Medical errors - medication; Patient safety - medication safety ... Medication safety means you get the right medicine, the right dose, at the right times. During your ...

  4. Principles and practice of medical audit (medical care evaluation).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, M; Sharma, D K

    1992-01-01

    1. Medical audit is a philosophy in the field of medical science which has reached to an advanced stage of practice in Western World, but yet to reach and percolate into Indian medical community. 2. Of late, community is getting increasingly aware of its health rights, gradually community participation in health matters including quantum and quality of case, has started increasing. Thus community leaders have started demanding for quality of medical care and accountability of those, responsible for delivery of medical care at various levels. 3. Medical audit or Evaluation of medical care is an answer to ensure the quality of care. But there are misgivings and distrust about medical audit due to its terminology. 4. There is need to education the medical, nursing and paramedical staff regarding medical audit and its sole purpose of self education and improvement of patient care activity. The present paper spells out fundamentals of medical audit, its scope and limitations.

  5. Computer-Based Medical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    SYMED, Inc., developed a unique electronic medical records and information management system. The S2000 Medical Interactive Care System (MICS) incorporates both a comprehensive and interactive medical care support capability and an extensive array of digital medical reference materials in either text or high resolution graphic form. The system was designed, in cooperation with NASA, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of physician practices. The S2000 is a MS (Microsoft) Windows based software product which combines electronic forms, medical documents, records management, and features a comprehensive medical information system for medical diagnostic support and treatment. SYMED, Inc. offers access to its medical systems to all companies seeking competitive advantages.

  6. Grazing-Incidence Neutron Optics based on Wolter Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.; Ramsey, B. D.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of grazing-incidence neutron imaging optics based on the Wolter geometries have been successfully demonstrated. Biological microscopy, neutron radiography, medical imaging, neutron crystallography and boron neutron capture therapy would benefit from high resolution focusing neutron optics. Two bounce optics can also be used to focus neutrons in SANS experiments. Here, the use of the optics would result in lower values of obtainable scattering angles. The high efficiency of the optics permits a decrease in the minimum scattering vector without lowering the neutron intensity on sample. In this application, a significant advantage of the reflective optics over refractive optics is that the focus is independent of wavelength, so that the technique can be applied to polychromatic beams at pulsed neutron sources.

  7. Optical data latch

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2010-08-31

    An optical data latch is formed on a substrate from a pair of optical logic gates in a cross-coupled arrangement in which optical waveguides are used to couple an output of each gate to an photodetector input of the other gate. This provides an optical bi-stability which can be used to store a bit of optical information in the latch. Each optical logic gate, which can be an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter) or an optical NOR gate, includes a waveguide photodetector electrically connected in series with a waveguide electroabsorption modulator. The optical data latch can be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or GaAs substrate) from III-V compound semiconductor layers. A number of optical data latches can be cascaded to form a clocked optical data shift register.

  8. Optics at westinghouse.

    PubMed

    Ivey, H F

    1972-05-01

    Past and present work in optics at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation is surveyed. The areas discussed include lamps and illumination, industrial optical applications, television and imaging systems, and lasers and coherent optics.

  9. Biosensors and other medical and environmental probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    The author presents a overview of work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory directed toward the development of biosensors which can be used to monitor for an array of medical and environmental effects. The article describes the variety of problems which have been addressed by development of such sensors, and the range of staff who have been actively involved in this effort. The first such sensor developed at ORNL was an optical fiber whose end was treated with an antibody which would react with the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Section titles from the article provide an idea of the breadth of applications addressed: medical telesensors; microcantilevers; detecting cancer and health abnormalities; bioreporters; miniaturized devices; biosensors and DNA analysis; lipids in bacteria and human fingerprints; and anthropometry.

  10. Fiber optic multiplex optical transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A multiplex optical transmission system which minimizes external interference while simultaneously receiving and transmitting video, digital data, and audio signals is described. Signals are received into subgroup mixers for blocking into respective frequency ranges. The outputs of these mixers are in turn fed to a master mixer which produces a composite electrical signal. An optical transmitter connected to the master mixer converts the composite signal into an optical signal and transmits it over a fiber optic cable to an optical receiver which receives the signal and converts it back to a composite electrical signal. A de-multiplexer is coupled to the output of the receiver for separating the composite signal back into composite video, digital data, and audio signals. A programmable optic patch board is interposed in the fiber optic cables for selectively connecting the optical signals to various receivers and transmitters.

  11. Functionalized Nanodiamonds for Biological and Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S

    2015-02-01

    Nanodiamond is a promising material for biological and medical applications, owning to its relatively inexpensive and large-scale synthesis, unique structure, and superior optical properties. However, most biomedical applications, such as drug delivery and bio-imaging, are dependent upon the precise control of the surfaces, and can be significantly affected by the type, distribution and stability of chemical funtionalisations of the nanodiamond surface. In this paper, recent studies on nanodiamonds and their biomedical applications by conjugating with different chemicals are reviewed, while highlighting the critical importance of surface chemical states for various applications.

  12. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  13. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.; Findakly, T.; Innarella, R.

    1982-01-01

    The status and near term potential of materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electro-optical components are discussed. Issues discussed are host material and orientation, waveguide formation, optical loss mechanisms, wavelength selection, polarization effects and control, laser to integrated optics coupling fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, sources, and detectors. Recommendations of the best materials, technology, and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are given.

  14. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew; Colston, Billy W.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  15. Optics Toolbox: An Intelligent Relational Database System For Optical Designers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Scott W.; Hopkins, Robert E.

    1986-12-01

    Optical designers were among the first to use the computer as an engineering tool. Powerful programs have been written to do ray-trace analysis, third-order layout, and optimization. However, newer computing techniques such as database management and expert systems have not been adopted by the optical design community. For the purpose of this discussion we will define a relational database system as a database which allows the user to specify his requirements using logical relations. For example, to search for all lenses in a lens database with a F/number less than two, and a half field of view near 28 degrees, you might enter the following: FNO < 2.0 and FOV of 28 degrees ± 5% Again for the purpose of this discussion, we will define an expert system as a program which contains expert knowledge, can ask intelligent questions, and can form conclusions based on the answers given and the knowledge which it contains. Most expert systems store this knowledge in the form of rules-of-thumb, which are written in an English-like language, and which are easily modified by the user. An example rule is: IF require microscope objective in air and require NA > 0.9 THEN suggest the use of an oil immersion objective The heart of the expert system is the rule interpreter, sometimes called an inference engine, which reads the rules and forms conclusions based on them. The use of a relational database system containing lens prototypes seems to be a viable prospect. However, it is not clear that expert systems have a place in optical design. In domains such as medical diagnosis and petrology, expert systems are flourishing. These domains are quite different from optical design, however, because optical design is a creative process, and the rules are difficult to write down. We do think that an expert system is feasible in the area of first order layout, which is sufficiently diagnostic in nature to permit useful rules to be written. This first-order expert would emulate an expert

  16. Can medicalization be good? Situating medicalization within bioethics.

    PubMed

    Sadler, John Z; Jotterand, Fabrice; Lee, Simon Craddock; Inrig, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Medicalization has been a process articulated primarily by social scientists, historians, and cultural critics. Comparatively little is written about the role of bioethics in appraising medicalization as a social process. The authors consider what medicalization means, its definition, functions, and criteria for assessment. A series of brief case sketches illustrate how bioethics can contribute to the analysis and public policy discussion of medicalization.

  17. Medical Waste Management Implications for Small Medical Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrns, George; Burke, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the Medical Waste Management Act of 1988 for small medical facilities, public health, and the environment. Reviews health and environmental risks associated with medical waste, current regulatory approaches, and classifications. Concludes that the health risk of medical wastes has been overestimated; makes…

  18. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Optic Nerve Decompression John Lee, MD Introduction Optic nerve decompression is a surgical procedure aimed at ...

  19. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1993-10-05

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

  20. Optical Beam Control Using Adaptive Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    30 1. Principles of Operation......................................................................31 VI. USING ZERNIKE POLYNOMIALS TO...help patience in helping me to understand the underlying principles of optics. xiv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY...correct this using adaptive optics. Adaptive Optics first got its start in 215 AD with the destruction of the Roman Fleet by Archimedes (Lamberson

  1. Optical-to-optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, A. D.; Bleha, W. P.; Miller, L.; Grinberg, J.; Fraas, L.; Margerum, D.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop an optical-to-optical interface device capable of performing real-time incoherent-to-incoherent optical image conversion. The photoactivated liquid crystal light valve developed earlier represented a prototype liquid crystal light valve device capable of performing these functions. A device was developed which had high performance and extended lifetime.

  2. Ascertaining Problems with Medication Histories

    PubMed Central

    Halapy, Henry; Kertland, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Background: Accurate and complete medication histories are not always obtained in clinical practice. Objective: This qualitative research study was undertaken to explore the barriers to and facilitators of obtaining accurate medication histories. Methods: Individual interviews, based on a structured interview guide, were conducted with 25 patients from both inpatient and ambulatory care clinic settings. Focus groups, based on a semistructured interview guide, were conducted with pharmacists, medical residents, and nurses. Transcribed data were analyzed by forming coded units and assessing these units for emerging themes. Results: Major themes that emerged from the patient interviews included patient ownership of health and medication knowledge (with knowledge of medications and their side effects and how to take medications being seen as important), patient-specific strategies to improve medication histories (e.g., use of regularly updated medication lists), and suggestions for system-level facilitators to improve medication histories (e.g., centralized databases of medication histories, increased patient education regarding the use and purpose of medications). Major themes also emerged from focus groups with health care professionals, including shared responsibility for medication history-taking among all 3 health care professions, perceptions about the barriers to medication history-taking (including patients not knowing their medications and not bringing their medication lists), and suggestions to improve medication histories (e.g., educating patients to bring medication vials to hospital admissions and appointments, using a centralized computer database for medication histories). Conclusions: Key recommendations resulting from this study include using standardized documentation techniques for medication histories, recording of medication history information in centralized electronic databases, educating patients to bring medications to every health care visit

  3. Comparing syntactic complexity in medical and non-medical corpora.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D A; Johnson, S B

    2001-01-01

    With the growing use of Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques as solutions in Medical Informatics, the need to quickly and efficiently create the knowledge structures used by these systems has grown concurrently. Automatic discovery of a lexicon for use by an NLP system through machine learning will require information about the syntax of medical language. Understanding the syntactic differences between medical and non-medical corpora may allow more efficient acquisition of a lexicon. Three experiments designed to quantify the syntactic differences in medical and non-medical corpora were conducted. The results show that the syntax of medical language shows less variation than non-medical language and is likely simpler. The differences were great enough to question the applicability of general language tools on medical language. These differences may reduce the difficulty of some free text machine learning problems by capitalizing on the simpler nature of narrative medical syntax.

  4. Medical Tourism Abroad

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Saleh S.; Al-Busaidi, Ahmed S.; Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to understand why people seek medical advice abroad given the trouble and expense this entails. The types of medical problems for which treatment abroad was sought, preferred destinations and satisfaction with the treatment were explored. A secondary aim was to give feedback to stakeholders in the health care system on how to handle this issue and meet the needs of the community. Methods: 45 patients who had recently travelled abroad for treatment were asked to complete a questionnaire or were interviewed by telephone. Results: 40 questionnaires were received. 68% of the respondents were male. Orthopaedic diseases were the most common conditions leading patients to seek treatment abroad. Thailand was the most popular destination followed by India (50% and 30% respectively). 85% of respondents went abroad for treatment only, 10% for treatment and tourism and 2.5% were healthy, but travelled abroad for a checkup. Interestingly, 15% of the participants went abroad without first seeking medical care locally. Out of those initially treated in Oman, 38.2% had no specific diagnosis and 38.2% had received treatment, but it was not effective. 73% of respondents obtained information on treatment abroad from a friend. The Internet and medical tourism offices were the least used sources of information. 15% of the patients experienced complications after their treatment abroad. Conclusion: Various facts about medical treatment abroad need to be disseminated to the public. This will necessitate greater effort in public health promotion and education. PMID:22087396

  5. Gender and medical careers.

    PubMed

    Riska, Elianne

    2011-03-01

    The concerns about physicians' career advancement tend to be raised in gender terms, because women presently constitute close to and will soon form a majority of the medical students in most western societies. The question is to what extent female and male medical students and residents today make similar or different career and lifestyle choices? Two major mechanisms have been referred to as the reason for gender differences in career paths for physicians. The major theoretical framework tends to be the socialization or sex-role theory and later versions of this explanatory framework. The other mechanism referred to is structural and points to the barriers or the concrete support that women and men experience in making their career decisions. Studies of medical students in the UK and US have shown that women students expected family demands to hamper career plans, while male students were less influenced by family concerns. The importance of role models and mentors in setting the career goals of medical students and residents has recently confirmed early studies of the topic. A number of studies have documented that early negative experiences or lack of encouragement in medical school deter women from choosing surgery as a career. Recent studies suggest that lifestyle choices rather than merely career advancement influence both female and male surgeons' career plans.

  6. Medical education in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Stefan; Brännström, Thomas; Hanse, Eric; Ledin, Torbjörn; Nilsson, Gunnar; Sandler, Stellan; Tidefelt, Ulf; Donnér, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education in Sweden has moved from nationally regulated, subject-based courses to programmes integrated either around organ systems or physiological and patho-physiological processes, or organised around basic medical science in conjunction with clinical specialities, with individual profiles at the seven medical schools. The national regulations are restricted to overall academic and professional outcomes. The 5½ year long university undergraduate curriculum is followed by a mandatory 18 months internship, delivered by the County Councils. While quality control and accreditation for the university curriculum is provided by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education, no such formal control exists for the internship; undergraduate medical education is therefore in conflict with EU directives from 2005. The Government is expected to move towards 6 years long university undergraduate programmes, leading to licence, which will facilitate international mobility of both Swedish and foreign medical students and doctors. Ongoing academic development of undergraduate education is strengthened by the Bologna process. It includes outcome (competence)-based curricula, university Masters level complying with international standards, progression of competence throughout the curriculum, student directed learning, active participation and roles in practical clinical education and a national assessment model to assure professional competence. In the near future, the dimensioning of Swedish undergraduate education is likely to be decided more by international demands and aspects of quality than by national demands for doctors.

  7. Cynicism among medical students.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, L

    1983-10-21

    The thesis that medical students become more cynical than students of other professions seems justified in light of psychological studies and reports from medical students. This article explores whether this might be due, in part, to disappointment about how important ideals are followed. Psychological tests themselves offer an opportunity to examine this, because the medical profession espouses the goals of gaining proper consent from all subjects, including students, and of giving appropriate attention to excellence of research design and method. When studies used to evaluate medical students' attitudes are viewed from this perspective, however, weaknesses on both scores seem apparent. Students seem well aware of some of these flaws. Although such testing is a small part of medical education, it confirms students' views that there is cause for disillusionment about how certain goals are realized. It also suggests a way to cure some students' cynicism. Students should be taught consistently, both by example as well as by precept of their profession's sincere commitment to professed goals. In practical terms this means, for example, that studies using students as subjects should have a proper review by the institutional review board, with adequate attention given to excellence of design, confidentiality, and methods of gaining informed and unpressured consent. Such studies could then serve as paradigms to students. Other goals of the profession should also be applied to students, and applied for students.

  8. Financing medical education.

    PubMed

    Petersdorf, R G

    1991-02-01

    The cost of a medical education may dissuade qualified young people from entering the medical profession or may so load them with debt that they cannot pursue relatively low-paid careers in primary care or clinical investigation. Three aspects of this problem are examined: (1) the cost of medical school, (2) the magnitude of student indebtedness, and (3) the effects of this indebtedness on career choices. High tuition and fees require many students to assume sizable educational debts, some of which are so large that the trainees will be unable to repay them unless they enter highly remunerative specialties. Also, high levels of indebtedness may increase default levels once graduates feel the full impact of scheduled repayments. Several steps would help to alleviate this problem, but are unlikely to solve it. First, medical schools should lower tuition or at least declare a moratorium on increases. Second, limits should be imposed on the amount of total education debt a student is allowed to assume. Third, hospitals with extensive residency programs should assume some responsibility for helping trainees manage their finances. Fourth, the government should institute a loan forgiveness program that addresses the need for physician-investigators, primary care physicians, those willing to practice in underserved areas, and those from underrepresented minorities. And fifth, all institutions involved in medical training and its finance should work together to advise students on managing their debts.

  9. Medical School Hotline

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Norimitsu; Yamashita, Miu; Yee, Keolamau; Kurahara, David

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese Medical Education system has been influenced by political events throughout the country's history. From long periods of isolation from the western world to the effect of world wars, Japan's training system for physicians has had to adapt in many ways and will continue to change. The Japanese medical education system was recently compared to the “Galapagos Islands” for its unusual and singular evolution, in a speech by visiting professor Dr. Gordon L. Noel at the University of Tokyo International Research center.1 Japanese medical schools are currently working to increase their students' clinical hours or else these students may not be able to train in the United States for residencies. Knowing the history of the Japanese Medical education system is paramount to understanding the current system in place today. Studying the historical foundation of this system will also provide insight on how the system must change in order to produce better clinicians. This article provides a glimpse into the medical system of another nation that may encourage needed reflection on the state of current healthcare training in the United States. PMID:25821652

  10. Transportation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  11. BC Medication Management Project

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Natalie; Tsao, Nicole; Gastonguay, Louise; Lynd, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Background: The BC Medication Management Project (BCMMP) was developed by the BC Ministry of Health and the BC Pharmacy Association. This pilot project ran from September 2010 to January 2012. Pharmacists reviewed patients’ medication histories, discussed best use of medications, provided education and monitored for adverse effects, developed a plan to deal with medication issues and created a best possible medication history. Methods: To evaluate the experience of participating in the BCMMP, challenges and strengths of the project and the alignment of these experiences with the overarching goals, focus groups and interviews were conducted with 6 stakeholder groups. Themes were compared within and across stakeholder type and descriptively analyzed. Results: A total of 88 people participated in the focus groups/interviews. Pharmacists stated that providing BCMMP services was professionally satisfying and concurred with patients that the service did benefit them. However, participating in the BCMMP was not seen as financially sustainable by pharmacy owners, and there were concerns about patient selection. Physicians expressed concerns about increased workload associated with the BCMMP, for which they were not compensated. The computer system and burden of documentation were identified as the greatest problems. Conclusions: The BCMMP pilot project was enthusiastically received by pharmacists and patients who felt that it benefited patients and moved the pharmacy profession in a positive direction. It was widely felt that the BCMMP could be successful and sustainable if the identified challenges are addressed. PMID:25983759

  12. Integrated Medical Model Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J.; Boley, L.; Foy, M.; Goodenow, D.; Griffin, D.; Keenan, A.; Kerstman, E.; Melton, S.; McGuire, K.; Saile, L.; Shah, R.; Garcia, Y.; Sirmons. B.; Walton, M.; Reyes, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) Project represents one aspect of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) to quantitatively assess medical risks to astronauts for existing operational missions as well as missions associated with future exploration and commercial space flight ventures. The IMM takes a probabilistic approach to assessing the likelihood and specific outcomes of one hundred medical conditions within the envelope of accepted space flight standards of care over a selectable range of mission capabilities. A specially developed Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) maintains evidence-based, organizational knowledge across a variety of data sources. Since becoming operational in 2011, version 3.0 of the IMM, the supporting iMED, and the expertise of the IMM project team have contributed to a wide range of decision and informational processes for the space medical and human research community. This presentation provides an overview of the IMM conceptual architecture and range of application through examples of actual space flight community questions posed to the IMM project.

  13. Urologic medications and ophthalmologic side effects: a review

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Johan; Perlis, Nathan; Radomski, Sidney B.

    2012-01-01

    Commonly prescribed urologic medications can have significant ophthalmologic side effects. The existing information can be conflicting. We looked at alpha-blockers and intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS), phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors and non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and lastly anticholinergic medications and glaucoma. There is no conclusive scientific data on what to do if the risk of urinary retention is low to moderate, however, we recommend that patients having cataract surgery should stop alpha-blocker medications preoperatively. If there is a high risk of urinary retention, the alpha-blocker should not be withheld, with the active involvement of the ophthalmologist. The role of using 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) can be considered. There is no convincing evidence that PDE5 inhibitors cause non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), but patients should be advised of the possible risk of visual loss, especially in patients with risk factors of ischemic heart disease. Acute angle closure glaucoma (AACG or closed angle glaucoma) is very rarely caused by anticholinergic medications in patients with narrow angle anterior eye chambers. However, these medications are safe in patients with open angle glaucoma or treated closed angle glaucoma. Urologists should inquire about the patient’s glaucoma history from his/her ophthalmologist before starting an anticholinergic medication. PMID:22396371

  14. Illusion optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yun; Ng, Jack; Chen, Huan-Yang; Zhang, Zhao-Qing; Chan, C. T.

    2010-09-01

    The technique of “transformation optics” establishes a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material constitutive parameters. Most of the transformation optics mappings give metamaterials that have graded positive refractive indices that can steer light in curves defined by the coordinate transformation. We will focus on those “folded-geometry mappings” that give negative refractive index materials that have special wave scattering properties. One interesting example is a kind of remote illusion device that can transform the stereoscopic image of an object into the illusion of some other object of our choice. The conceptual device can create the illusion without touching or encircling the object. For any incident wave, the device transforms the scattered waves of the original object into that of the object chosen for illusion outside a virtual boundary. We will illustrate some possible applications of this type of metamaterial remote device, including “cloaking at a distance,” partial cloaking, cloaking from an embedded device, revealing a hidden object inside a container, turning the image of one object into that of another object, and seeing through a wall. The feasibility of building this remote illusion device by metamaterials will also be discussed.

  15. CCAT optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padin, S.; Hollister, M.; Radford, S.; Sayers, J.; Woody, D.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Cortes-Medellin, G.; Sebring, T.; Stacey, G.

    2010-07-01

    CCAT will be a 25 m diameter, submillimeter-wave telescope. It will be located on Cerro Chajnantor in the Atacama Desert, near ALMA. CCAT will be an on-axis, Ritchey-Chrétien design with an active primary to compensate gravitational deformations. The primary mirror will have 162 segments, each with ~0.5 × 0.5 m reflecting tiles on a ~2×2 m, insulated, carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic subframe. CCAT will be equipped with wide-field, multi-color cameras and multi-object spectrometers at its Nasmyth foci. These instruments will cover all the atmospheric windows in the λ = 0.2 to 2 mm range. The field of view at the Nasmyth foci will be 1°, so CCAT will be able to support cameras with a few ×104 detectors (spaced 2 beamwidths) at λ = 1 mm to a few ×106 detectors (spaced half a beamwidth) at λ = 350 μm. Single instruments of this size are probably impractical, so we will break the field into smaller pieces, with a separate sub-field camera for each piece. The cameras will require some relay optics to couple the fairly slow beam from the telescope to the detectors. A reflective relay for 1° field of view is too large to be practical, so we plan to use a compact, cold, refractive relay in each sub-field camera.

  16. Noninvasive blood pressure measurement scheme based on optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianxuan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Yangan

    2016-10-01

    Optical fiber sensing has many advantages, such as volume small, light quality, low loss, strong in anti-jamming. Since the invention of the optical fiber sensing technology in 1977, optical fiber sensing technology has been applied in the military, national defense, aerospace, industrial, medical and other fields in recent years, and made a great contribution to parameter measurement in the environment under the limited condition .With the rapid development of computer, network system, the intelligent optical fiber sensing technology, the sensor technology, the combination of computer and communication technology , the detection, diagnosis and analysis can be automatically and efficiently completed. In this work, we proposed a noninvasive blood pressure detection and analysis scheme which uses optical fiber sensor. Optical fiber sensing system mainly includes the light source, optical fiber, optical detector, optical modulator, the signal processing module and so on. wavelength optical signals were led into the optical fiber sensor and the signals reflected by the human body surface were detected. By comparing actual testing data with the data got by traditional way to measure the blood pressure we can establish models for predicting the blood pressure and achieve noninvasive blood pressure measurement by using spectrum analysis technology. Blood pressure measurement method based on optical fiber sensing system is faster and more convenient than traditional way, and it can get accurate analysis results in a shorter period of time than before, so it can efficiently reduce the time cost and manpower cost.

  17. Optical NAND gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J.; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2011-08-09

    An optical NAND gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator and a photodetector. One pair of the optical waveguide devices is electrically connected in parallel to operate as an optical AND gate; and the other pair of the optical waveguide devices is connected in series to operate as an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter). The optical NAND gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NAND function output. The optical NAND gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  18. Molecular Diffuse Optical Tomography for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    1996).3V. Ntziachristos, A. H. Hielscher , A. G. Yodh et al., "Diffuse optical tomography of highly heterogeneous media," leee Transactions on...1995). 11 V. Ntziachristos, A. Hielscher , A.G. Yodh, B. Chance, submitted to IEEE transactions on Medical Imaging (2000) [In part published at...jNtziachristos V., Hielscher A.H., Yodh A.G., Chance B., in Biomedical Optics : Advances in Optical Imaging, Photon Migration and Tissue Optics, OSA

  19. Motivation in medical education().

    PubMed

    Pelaccia, Thierry; Viau, Rolland

    2017-02-01

    Motivation is a concept which has fascinated researchers for many decades. The field of medical education has become interested in motivation recently, having always assumed that medical students must be motivated because of their commitment to highly specific training, leading to a very specific profession. However, motivation is a major determinant of the quality of learning and success, the lack of which may well explain why teachers sometimes observe medical students who are discouraged, have lost interest or abandon their studies, with a feeling of powerlessness or resignation. After describing the importance of motivation for learning in medicine, this Guide will define the concept of motivation, setting it within the context of a social cognitive approach. In the second part of this Guide, recommendations are made, based upon the so-called "motivational dynamic model", which provides a multitude of various strategies with positive effects on students' motivation to learn.

  20. Medical Yoga Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Medical yoga is defined as the use of yoga practices for the prevention and treatment of medical conditions. Beyond the physical elements of yoga, which are important and effective for strengthening the body, medical yoga also incorporates appropriate breathing techniques, mindfulness, and meditation in order to achieve the maximum benefits. Multiple studies have shown that yoga can positively impact the body in many ways, including helping to regulate blood glucose levels, improve musculoskeletal ailments and keeping the cardiovascular system in tune. It also has been shown to have important psychological benefits, as the practice of yoga can help to increase mental energy and positive feelings, and decrease negative feelings of aggressiveness, depression and anxiety. PMID:28208599