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Sample records for abbreviated injury scale

  1. [The Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Options and problems in application].

    PubMed

    Haasper, C; Junge, M; Ernstberger, A; Brehme, H; Hannawald, L; Langer, C; Nehmzow, J; Otte, D; Sander, U; Krettek, C; Zwipp, H

    2010-05-01

    The new AIS (Abbreviated Injury Scale) was released with an update by the AAAM (Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine) in 2008. It is a universal scoring system in the field of trauma applicable in clinic and research. In engineering it is used as a classification system for vehicle safety. The AIS can therefore be considered as an international, interdisciplinary and universal code of injury severity. This review focuses on a historical overview, potential applications and new coding options in the current version and also outlines the associated problems. PMID:20376615

  2. Using Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) codes to classify Computed Tomography (CT) features in the Marshall System

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) is to code various types of Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) based on their anatomical location and severity. The Marshall CT Classification is used to identify those subgroups of brain injured patients at higher risk of deterioration or mortality. The purpose of this study is to determine whether and how AIS coding can be translated to the Marshall Classification Methods Initially, a Marshall Class was allocated to each AIS code through cross-tabulation. This was agreed upon through several discussion meetings with experts from both fields (clinicians and AIS coders). Furthermore, in order to make this translation possible, some necessary assumptions with regards to coding and classification of mass lesions and brain swelling were essential which were all approved and made explicit. Results The proposed method involves two stages: firstly to determine all possible Marshall Classes which a given patient can attract based on allocated AIS codes; via cross-tabulation and secondly to assign one Marshall Class to each patient through an algorithm. Conclusion This method can be easily programmed in computer softwares and it would enable future important TBI research programs using trauma registry data. PMID:20691038

  3. Comparisons of the Outcome Prediction Performance of Injury Severity Scoring Tools Using the Abbreviated Injury Scale 90 Update 98 (AIS 98) and 2005 Update 2008 (AIS 2008)

    PubMed Central

    Tohira, Hideo; Jacobs, Ian; Mountain, David; Gibson, Nick; Yeo, Allen

    2011-01-01

    The Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) was revised in 2005 and updated in 2008 (AIS 2008). We aimed to compare the outcome prediction performance of AIS-based injury severity scoring tools by using AIS 2008 and AIS 98. We used all major trauma patients hospitalized to the Royal Perth Hospital between 1994 and 2008. We selected five AIS-based injury severity scoring tools, including Injury Severity Score (ISS), New Injury Severity Score (NISS), modified Anatomic Profile (mAP), Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) and A Severity Characterization of Trauma (ASCOT). We selected survival after injury as a target outcome. We used the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (AUROC) as a performance measure. First, we compared the five tools using all cases whose records included all variables for the TRISS (complete dataset) using a 10-fold cross-validation. Second, we compared the ISS and NISS for AIS 98 and AIS 2008 using all subjects (whole dataset). We identified 1,269 and 4,174 cases for a complete dataset and a whole dataset, respectively. With the 10-fold cross-validation, there were no clear differences in the AUROCs between the AIS 98- and AIS 2008-based scores. With the second comparison, the AIS 98-based ISS performed significantly worse than the AIS 2008-based ISS (p<0.0001), while there was no significant difference between the AIS 98- and AIS 2008-based NISSs. Researchers should be aware of these findings when they select an injury severity scoring tool for their studies. PMID:22105401

  4. Test Review: Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Sarah M.; Floyd, Randy G.

    2013-01-01

    The Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Second Edition (WASI-II; Wechsler, 2011) is a brief intelligence test designed for individuals aged 6 through 90 years. It is a revision of the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI; Wechsler, 1999). During revision, there were three goals: enhancing the link between the Wechsler…

  5. Development of the Abbreviated Masculine Gender Role Stress Scale

    PubMed Central

    Swartout, Kevin M.; Parrott, Dominic J.; Cohn, Amy M.; Hagman, Brett T.; Gallagher, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Data gathered from six independent samples (n = 1,729) that assessed men’s masculine gender role stress in college and community males were aggregated used to determine the reliability and validity of an abbreviated version of the Masculine Gender Role Stress Scale (MGRS scale). The 15 items with the highest item-to-total scale correlations were used to create an abbreviated MGRS scale. Psychometric properties of each of the 15-items were examined with Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis, using the discrimination and threshold parameters. IRT results showed that the abbreviated scale may hold promise at capturing the same amount of information as the full 40-item scale. Relative to the 40-item scale, the total score of the abbreviated MGRS scale demonstrated comparable convergent validity using the measurement domains of masculine identity, hyper-masculinity, trait anger, anger expression, and alcohol involvement. An abbreviated MGRS scale may be recommended for use in clinical practice and research settings to reduce cost, time, and patient/participant burden. Additionally, IRT analyses identified items with higher discrimination and threshold parameters that may be used to screen for problematic gender role stress in men who may be seen in routine clinical or medical practice. PMID:25528163

  6. Test Review: Review of the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Second Edition (WASI-II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrimmon, Adam W.; Smith, Amanda D.

    2013-01-01

    The Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Second Edition (WASI-II; Wechsler, 2011), published by Pearson, is a newly updated abbreviated measure of cognitive intelligence designed for individuals 6 to 90 years of age. Primarily used in clinical, psychoeducational, and research settings, the WASI-II was developed to quickly and accurately…

  7. Adaptation of abbreviated mathematics anxiety rating scale for engineering students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Sayed Kushairi Sayed; Samat, Khairul Fadzli; Sultan, Al Amin Mohamed; Halim, Bushra Abdul; Ismail, Siti Fatimah; Mafazi, Nurul Wirdah

    2015-05-01

    Mathematics is an essential and fundamental tool used by engineers to analyse and solve problems in their field. Due to this, most engineering education programs involve a concentration of study in mathematics courses whereby engineering students have to take mathematics courses such as numerical methods, differential equations and calculus in the first two years and continue to do so until the completion of the sequence. However, the students struggled and had difficulties in learning courses that require mathematical abilities. Hence, this study presents the factors that caused mathematics anxiety among engineering students using Abbreviated Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale (AMARS) through 95 students of Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM). From 25 items in AMARS, principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that there are four mathematics anxiety factors, namely experiences of learning mathematics, cognitive skills, mathematics evaluation anxiety and students' perception on mathematics. Minitab 16 software was used to analyse the nonparametric statistics. Kruskal-Wallis Test indicated that there is a significant difference in the experience of learning mathematics and mathematics evaluation anxiety among races. The Chi-Square Test of Independence revealed that the experience of learning mathematics, cognitive skills and mathematics evaluation anxiety depend on the results of their SPM additional mathematics. Based on this study, it is recommended to address the anxiety problems among engineering students at the early stage of studying in the university. Thus, lecturers should play their part by ensuring a positive classroom environment which encourages students to study mathematics without fear.

  8. The conners' Abbreviated Teacher Rating Scale: a factor analysis study in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brito, G N

    1987-01-01

    A total of 1068 school children were rated by their teachers on the Conners' Abbreviated Teacher Rating Scale (CATRS). The data were subjected to factor analysis using the principal components solution with orthogonal rotation and the varimax criterion. Three factors with eigenvalues greater than unity were extracted. The factor structure of the CATRS in Brazil was compared to reports from other countries.

  9. The Abbreviation of Personality, or how to Measure 200 Personality Scales with 200 Items

    PubMed Central

    Yarkoni, Tal

    2010-01-01

    Personality researchers have recently advocated the use of very short personality inventories in order to minimize administration time. However, few such inventories are currently available. Here I introduce an automated method that can be used to abbreviate virtually any personality inventory with minimal effort. After validating the method against existing measures in Studies 1 and 2, a new 181-item inventory is generated in Study 3 that accurately recaptures scores on 8 different broadband inventories comprising 203 distinct scales. Collectively, the results validate a powerful new way to improve the efficiency of personality measurement in research settings. PMID:20419061

  10. An Abbreviated Impulsiveness Scale (ABIS) Constructed through Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the BIS-11

    PubMed Central

    Coutlee, Christopher G.; Politzer, Cary S.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Huettel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsiveness is a personality trait that reflects an urge to act spontaneously, without thinking or planning ahead for the consequences of your actions. High impulsiveness is characteristic of a variety of problematic behaviors including attention deficit disorder, hyperactivity, excessive gambling, risk-taking, drug use, and alcoholism. Researchers studying attention and self-control often assess impulsiveness using personality questionnaires, notably the common Barratt Impulsiveness Scale version 11 (BIS-11; last revised in 1995). Advances in techniques for producing personality questionnaires over the last 20 years prompted us to revise and improve the BIS-11. We sought to make the revised scale shorter – so that it would be quicker to administer – and better matched to current behaviors. We analyzed responses from 1549 adults who took the BIS-11 questionnaire. Using a statistical technique called factor analysis, we eliminated 17 questions that did a poor job of measuring the three major types of impulsiveness identified by the scale: inattention, spontaneous action, and lack of planning. We constructed our ABbreviated Impulsiveness Scale (ABIS) using the remaining 13 questions. We showed that the ABIS performed well when administered to additional groups of 657 and 285 adults. Finally, we showed expected relationships between the ABIS and other personality measurements related to impulsiveness, and showed that the ABIS can help predict alcohol consumption. We present the ABIS as a useful and efficient tool for researchers interested in measuring impulsive personality. PMID:26258000

  11. Construct Validity of the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence and Wide Range Intelligence Test: Convergent and Structural Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canivez, Gary L.; Konold, Timothy R.; Collins, Jason M.; Wilson, Greg

    2009-01-01

    The Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI; Psychological Corporation, 1999) and the Wide Range Intelligence Test (WRIT; Glutting, Adams, & Sheslow, 2000) are two well-normed brief measures of general intelligence with subtests purportedly assessing verbal-crystallized abilities and nonverbal-fluid-visual abilities. With a sample of 152…

  12. Performance of an Abbreviated Version of the Lubben Social Network Scale among Three European Community-Dwelling Older Adult Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubben, James; Blozik, Eva; Gillmann, Gerhard; Iliffe, Steve; von Renteln-Kruse, Wolfgang; Beck, John C.; Stuck, Andreas E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: There is a need for valid and reliable short scales that can be used to assess social networks and social supports and to screen for social isolation in older persons. Design and Methods: The present study is a cross-national and cross-cultural evaluation of the performance of an abbreviated version of the Lubben Social Network Scale…

  13. Validity and Reliability of the Abbreviated Barratt Impulsiveness Scale in Spanish (BIS-15S)*

    PubMed Central

    Orozco-Cabal, Luis; Rodríguez, Maritza; Herin, David V.; Gempeler, Juanita; Uribe, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study determined the validity and reliability of a new, abbreviated version of the Spanish Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-15S) in Colombian subjects. Method The BIS-15S was tested in non-clinical (n=283) and clinical (n=164) native Spanish-speakers. Intra-scale reliability was calculated using Cronbach’s α, and test-retest reliability was measured with Pearson correlations. Psychometric properties were determined using standard statistics. A factor analysis was performed to determine BIS-15S factor structure. Results 447 subjects participated in the study. Clinical subjects were older and more educated compared to non-clinical subjects. Impulsivity scores were normally distributed in each group. BIS-15S total, motor, non-planning and attention scores were significantly lower in non-clinical vs. clinical subjects. Subjects with substance-related disorders had the highest BIS-15S total scores, followed by subjects with bipolar disorders and bulimia nervosa/binge eating. Internal consistency was 0.793 and test-retest reliability was 0.80. Factor analysis confirmed a three-factor structure (attention, motor, non-planning) accounting for 47.87% of the total variance in BIS-15S total scores. Conclusions The BIS-15S is a valid and reliable self-report measure of impulsivity in this population. Further research is needed to determine additional components of impulsivity not investigated by this measure. PMID:21152412

  14. Rating depression over brief time intervals with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale: standard vs. abbreviated scales.

    PubMed

    Luckenbaugh, David A; Ameli, Rezvan; Brutsche, Nancy E; Zarate, Carlos A

    2015-02-01

    Although antidepressant trials typically use weekly ratings to examine changes in symptoms over six to 12 weeks, antidepressant treatments may improve symptoms more quickly. Thus, rating scales must be adapted to capture changes over shorter intervals. We examined the use of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) to evaluate more rapid changes. Data were examined from 58 patients with major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder enrolled in double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies who received a single infusion of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) or placebo over 40 min then crossed over to the other condition. HDRS subscales, a single HDRS Depressed mood item, and a visual analogue scale were used at baseline, after a brief interval (230 min), and one week post-infusion. Effect sizes for the ketamine-placebo difference were moderate (d > 0.50), but one and two-item HDRS subscales had the smallest effects. Response rates on active drug were lowest for the complete HDRS (43%); the remaining scales had higher response rates to active drug, but the shortest subscales had higher response rates to placebo. Correlations between the changes from baseline to 230 min post-ketamine across scores were similar for most subscales (r = 0.82-0.97), but correlations using the single items were lower (r < 0.74). Overall, effect sizes for drug-placebo differences and correlations between changes were lower for one- and two-item measures. Response rates were lower with the full HDRS scale. The data suggest that, to best identify rapid antidepressant effects, a scale should have more than two items, but fewer items than a full scale.

  15. Self efficacy for fruit, vegetable and water intakes: Expanded and abbreviated scales from item response modeling analyses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To improve an existing measure of fruit and vegetable intake self efficacy by including items that varied on levels of difficulty, and testing a corresponding measure of water intake self efficacy. Design Cross sectional assessment. Items were modified to have easy, moderate and difficult levels of self efficacy. Classical test theory and item response modeling were applied. Setting One middle school at each of seven participating sites (Houston TX, Irvine CA, Philadelphia PA, Pittsburg PA, Portland OR, rural NC, and San Antonio TX). Subjects 714 6th grade students. Results Adding items to reflect level (low, medium, high) of self efficacy for fruit and vegetable intake achieved scale reliability and validity comparable to existing scales, but the distribution of items across the latent variable did not improve. Selecting items from among clusters of items at similar levels of difficulty along the latent variable resulted in an abbreviated scale with psychometric characteristics comparable to the full scale, except for reliability. Conclusions The abbreviated scale can reduce participant burden. Additional research is necessary to generate items that better distribute across the latent variable. Additional items may need to tap confidence in overcoming more diverse barriers to dietary intake. PMID:20350316

  16. Development of the Sport Injury Anxiety Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rex, Camille C.; Metzler, Jonathan N.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a measure of sport injury anxiety (SIA), defined as the tendency to make threat appraisals in sport situations where injury is seen as possible and/or likely. The Sport Injury Anxiety Scale (SIAS) was developed in three stages. In Stage 1, expert raters evaluated items to determine their adequacy. In…

  17. Math Anxiety Assessment with the Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale: Applicability and Usefulness: Insights from the Polish Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Cipora, Krzysztof; Szczygieł, Monika; Willmes, Klaus; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Math anxiety has an important impact on mathematical development and performance. However, although math anxiety is supposed to be a transcultural trait, assessment instruments are scarce and are validated mainly for Western cultures so far. Therefore, we aimed at examining the transcultural generality of math anxiety by a thorough investigation of the validity of math anxiety assessment in Eastern Europe. We investigated the validity and reliability of a Polish adaptation of the Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale (AMAS), known to have very good psychometric characteristics in its original, American-English version as well as in its Italian and Iranian adaptations. We also observed high reliability, both for internal consistency and test-retest stability of the AMAS in the Polish sample. The results also show very good construct, convergent and discriminant validity: The factorial structure in Polish adult participants (n = 857) was very similar to the one previously found in other samples; AMAS scores correlated moderately in expected directions with state and trait anxiety, self-assessed math achievement and skill as well temperamental traits of emotional reactivity, briskness, endurance, and perseverance. Average scores obtained by participants as well as gender differences and correlations with external measures were also similar across cultures. Beyond the cultural comparison, we used path model analyses to show that math anxiety relates to math grades and self-competence when controlling for trait anxiety. The current study shows transcultural validity of math anxiety assessment with the AMAS.

  18. Math Anxiety Assessment with the Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale: Applicability and Usefulness: Insights from the Polish Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Cipora, Krzysztof; Szczygieł, Monika; Willmes, Klaus; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Math anxiety has an important impact on mathematical development and performance. However, although math anxiety is supposed to be a transcultural trait, assessment instruments are scarce and are validated mainly for Western cultures so far. Therefore, we aimed at examining the transcultural generality of math anxiety by a thorough investigation of the validity of math anxiety assessment in Eastern Europe. We investigated the validity and reliability of a Polish adaptation of the Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale (AMAS), known to have very good psychometric characteristics in its original, American-English version as well as in its Italian and Iranian adaptations. We also observed high reliability, both for internal consistency and test-retest stability of the AMAS in the Polish sample. The results also show very good construct, convergent and discriminant validity: The factorial structure in Polish adult participants (n = 857) was very similar to the one previously found in other samples; AMAS scores correlated moderately in expected directions with state and trait anxiety, self-assessed math achievement and skill as well temperamental traits of emotional reactivity, briskness, endurance, and perseverance. Average scores obtained by participants as well as gender differences and correlations with external measures were also similar across cultures. Beyond the cultural comparison, we used path model analyses to show that math anxiety relates to math grades and self-competence when controlling for trait anxiety. The current study shows transcultural validity of math anxiety assessment with the AMAS. PMID:26648893

  19. Development of a new injury cost scale.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, F; Pletschen, B; Scheunert, D; Mattern, B; Alt, B; Miksch, T; Eichendorf, W; Reiss, S

    1993-12-01

    The Automobile Technique Research Association at Frankfurt, the Institute for Forensic Medicine at Mainz, the Federal Highway Research Institute at Bergisch-Gladbach, the German Motor Vehicle Inspection Association at Stuttgart, and the German Worker's Compensation at St. Augustin have completed a joint research project dealing with injury costs due to automobile accidents. The data for this social cost analysis were based on costs for administrative expenses, medical treatment, rehabilitation measures, social security payment, and loss of income, which were all paid by Worker's Compensation for single, well-documented injuries to the working population in West Germany (15 to 65 years old). The data base used included 15,407 injured and 1,026 fatal road accident victims. Tables are presented which show the costs associated with various injury levels. The result is an injury cost scale (ICS) that might be a base for establishing priorities of safety measures. The ICS has to be seen as supplemental to the AIS.

  20. Development of a new injury cost scale.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, F; Pletschen, B; Scheunert, D; Mattern, B; Alt, B; Miksch, T; Eichendorf, W; Reiss, S

    1993-12-01

    The Automobile Technique Research Association at Frankfurt, the Institute for Forensic Medicine at Mainz, the Federal Highway Research Institute at Bergisch-Gladbach, the German Motor Vehicle Inspection Association at Stuttgart, and the German Worker's Compensation at St. Augustin have completed a joint research project dealing with injury costs due to automobile accidents. The data for this social cost analysis were based on costs for administrative expenses, medical treatment, rehabilitation measures, social security payment, and loss of income, which were all paid by Worker's Compensation for single, well-documented injuries to the working population in West Germany (15 to 65 years old). The data base used included 15,407 injured and 1,026 fatal road accident victims. Tables are presented which show the costs associated with various injury levels. The result is an injury cost scale (ICS) that might be a base for establishing priorities of safety measures. The ICS has to be seen as supplemental to the AIS. PMID:8297436

  1. Development of Athletic Injury Psychological Acceptance Scale

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Tomonori

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The world of competitive sports has its own unique subculture which at times works towards covering up psychological problems faced by athletes with injuries. The purpose of this study was to develop an “Athletic Injury Psychological Acceptance Scale (AIPAS)” to screen athletes for serious psychological problems resulting from injury. [Subjects] A total of 189 subjects responded to the survey, of which 168 (mean age= 19.93 years; average number of days unable to participate in sports= 71.84 days, SD = 88.01 days) valid responses were subjected to analysis. [Methods] A provisional version of the AIPAS was created from question items based on face-to-face subject interviews and content validity testing by specialists. In order to test criterion-related validity of the AIPAS, subjects were asked to complete indices that would serve as an external criterion. For this purpose, indices that measure athletic rehabilitation dedication and time perspective were designed. [Results] Item analysis of the provisional AIPAS was conducted to confirm the discrimination of each item. Exploratory factor analysis identified “Self-motivation” and “Focus on the Present” as two factors of the provisional scale. Confirmatory factor analysis supported these results. The Cronbach’s alpha was used to measure the internal consistency. Since α=0.81, the reliability of the scale was confirmed. A significant correlation was found between AIPAS and external indices, indicating criterion-related validity. [Conclusion] AIPAS is a reliable and valid scale composed of two subscales. PMID:24259799

  2. Creating Abbreviated Rating Scales to Monitor Classroom Inattention-Overactivity, Aggression, and Peer Conflict: Reliability, Validity, and Treatment Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpe, Robert J.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    Rating scales developed to measure child emotional and behavioral problems typically are so long as to make their use in progress monitoring impractical in typical school settings. This study examined two methods of selecting items from existing rating scales to create shorter instruments for use in assessing response to intervention. The…

  3. Node-injury scale to evaluate root injury by corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Oleson, James D; Park, Yong-Lak; Nowatzki, Timothy M; Tollefson, Jon J

    2005-02-01

    Corn rootworm larval feeding on corn roots can significantly reduce grain yield by interfering with photosynthetic rates, limiting the uptake of water and nutrients, and by increasing the plant's susceptibility to lodging. Of the techniques developed to measure the efficacy of corn rootworm larval control tactics, root damage ratings have generally been adopted as the standard because sampling roots is relatively efficient. Historically, the primary scales used for scoring root injury from corn rootworm larval feeding have been the 1-6 and 1-9 scales. A critical deficiency of those scales, however, is that each increase in a root-rating score does not reflect a linear increase in the actual amount of injury to the root system. This results in injury scores that are expressed qualitatively. We developed the node-injury scale to more accurately quantify corn rootworm larval injury based on the proportion of nodal roots that contain feeding injury. With the node-injury scale, the relationship between the numerical scale and the amount of root injury is linear and intuitive. In this article, we describe the node-injury scale, discuss sampling issues to consider when using the scale, and suggest the minimum node-injury score that causes economic damage under varying degrees of environmental stress.

  4. The King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury and Injury Severity and Outcome Measures in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Sophie; Miller, Helen E.; Curran, Andrew; Hameed, Biju; McCarter, Renee; Edwards, Richard J.; Hunt, Linda; Sharples, Peta Mary

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate discharge King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI) category to injury severity and detailed outcome measures obtained in the first year post-traumatic brain injury (TBI). We used a prospective cohort study. Eighty-one children with TBI were studied: 29 had severe, 15 moderate, and 37 mild TBI. The…

  5. Application of an injury surveillance system to injuries at an industrial facility.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, C S; Cloeren, M; Schwartz, B S

    1993-08-01

    We developed a computerized surveillance database employing the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and sampled three months of nonfatal injuries at a large industrial facility. Data from 197 injury visits to the plant medical department were collected. With the addition of some new AIS codes for injuries specific to the workplace, most injuries could be coded and severity scores calculated with good interrater reliability. Neither Maximum AIS nor Injury Severity Score (ISS) predicted restricted or lost work time. Because of its ease of automation and reliability, the AIS can serve as a useful tool for occupational injury surveillance, but its current severity scoring system is not predictive of disability.

  6. Assessment scale of risk for surgical positioning injuries 1

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Camila Mendonça de Moraes; Haas, Vanderlei José; Dantas, Rosana Aparecida Spadoti; de Oliveira, Cheila Gonçalves; Galvão, Cristina Maria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to build and validate a scale to assess the risk of surgical positioning injuries in adult patients. Method: methodological research, conducted in two phases: construction and face and content validation of the scale and field research, involving 115 patients. Results: the Risk Assessment Scale for the Development of Injuries due to Surgical Positioning contains seven items, each of which presents five subitems. The scale score ranges between seven and 35 points in which, the higher the score, the higher the patient's risk. The Content Validity Index of the scale corresponded to 0.88. The application of Student's t-test for equality of means revealed the concurrent criterion validity between the scores on the Braden scale and the constructed scale. To assess the predictive criterion validity, the association was tested between the presence of pain deriving from surgical positioning and the development of pressure ulcer, using the score on the Risk Assessment Scale for the Development of Injuries due to Surgical Positioning (p<0.001). The interrater reliability was verified using the intraclass correlation coefficient, equal to 0.99 (p<0.001). Conclusion: the scale is a valid and reliable tool, but further research is needed to assess its use in clinical practice. PMID:27579925

  7. Abbreviations and acronyms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This booklet provides a partial list of acronyms, abbreviations, and other short word forms, including their definitions, used in documents at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This list does not preclude the use of other short forms of less general usage, as long as these short forms are identified the first time they appear in a document and are defined in a glossary in the document in which they are used. This document supplements information in the GSFC Scientific and Technical Information Handbook (GHB 2200.2/April 1989). It is not intended to contain all short word forms used in GSFC documents; however, it was compiled of actual short forms used in recent GSFC documents. The entries are listed first, alphabetically by the short form, and then again alphabetically by definition.

  8. 40 CFR 88.303-93 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES Clean-Fuel Fleet Program § 88.303-93 Abbreviations. The abbreviations in subpart A of this part and in 40 CFR part 86 apply to this subpart. The abbreviations in this section apply...

  9. A comparison of muscle activations during traditional and abbreviated tennis serves.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Matthew K; Uhl, Tim L; McCrory, Jean; McGinn, Patricia; Kibler, W Ben; Shapiro, Robert

    2008-05-01

    The abbreviated tennis serve is a relatively novel modification of the traditional serve that has been reported to provide performance advantages over the traditional technique. However, there are limited objective data regarding the benefits and biomechanics of the abbreviated serve; no data exist that describe shoulder muscle activations during the abbreviated serve. The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activations between the traditional and abbreviated serves. Electromyographic data were collected for the anterior and posterior deltoid, infraspinatus, middle trapezius, latissimus dorsi, serratus anterior, and pectoralis major. When muscle activations were compared during each serve phase, no significant differences were observed between the traditional and abbreviated tennis serve techniques, indicating that the traditional and abbreviated serves are similar regarding shoulder muscle activations. These results could have implications for performance of and injury related to the abbreviated versus traditional serve technique. Although the abbreviated serve has anecdotally been described as advantageous, the present data do not indicate any significant advantages or disadvantages in performing the abbreviated serve technique versus the traditional serve. PMID:18610776

  10. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect

    Woodard, C.T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-05-01

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  11. Measuring Moral Injury: Psychometric Properties of the Moral Injury Events Scale in Two Military Samples.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Bryan, AnnaBelle O; Anestis, Michael D; Anestis, Joye C; Green, Bradley A; Etienne, Neysa; Morrow, Chad E; Ray-Sannerud, Bobbie

    2016-10-01

    As the construct of moral injury has gained increased conceptual and empirical attention among military personnel and veterans, preliminary attempts to operationalize and measure the construct have emerged. One such measure is the Moral Injury Event Scale (MIES). The aim of the current study was to further evaluate the MIES's psychometric properties in two military samples: a clinical sample of Air Force personnel and a nonclinical sample of Army National Guard personnel. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses across both samples supported a three-factor solution: transgressions by others, transgressions by self, and betrayal. Transgressions-Others was most strongly associated with posttraumatic stress; Transgressions-Self was most strongly associated with hopelessness, pessimism, and anger; and Betrayal was most strongly associated with posttraumatic stress and anger. Results support the construct validity of the MIES, although areas for improvement are indicated and discussed.

  12. 40 CFR 86.1203-85 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1203-85 Abbreviations. The abbreviations in § 86.079-3 apply...

  13. 40 CFR 86.1203-85 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1203-85 Abbreviations. The abbreviations in § 86.079-3 apply...

  14. 40 CFR 86.098-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.098-3 Abbreviations. (a) The abbreviations in §...

  15. 40 CFR 86.096-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.096-3 Abbreviations. (a) The abbreviations in §...

  16. 40 CFR 86.096-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.096-3 Abbreviations. (a) The abbreviations in §...

  17. 40 CFR 86.098-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.098-3 Abbreviations. (a) The abbreviations in §...

  18. Evaluating the Measurement Structure of the Abbreviated HIV Stigma Scale in a Sample of African Americans Living with HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eboneé T.; Yaghmaian, Rana A.; Best, Andrew; Chan, Fong; Burrell, Reginald, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the 10-item version of the HIV Stigma Scale (HSS-10) in a sample of African Americans with HIV/AIDS. Method: One hundred and ten African Americans living with HIV/AIDS were recruited from 3 case management agencies in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Measurement structure of the HSS-10 was evaluated using…

  19. 15 CFR 995.5 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS General § 995.5 Abbreviations. CEDCertified NOAA ENC Distributor CEVADCertified NOAA...

  20. 15 CFR 995.5 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS General § 995.5 Abbreviations. CEDCertified NOAA ENC Distributor CEVADCertified NOAA...

  1. 15 CFR 995.5 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS General § 995.5 Abbreviations. CEDCertified NOAA ENC Distributor CEVADCertified NOAA...

  2. 15 CFR 995.5 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS General § 995.5 Abbreviations. CEDCertified NOAA ENC Distributor CEVADCertified NOAA...

  3. 15 CFR 995.5 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS General § 995.5 Abbreviations. CEDCertified NOAA ENC Distributor CEVADCertified NOAA...

  4. 40 CFR 600.503-78 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for Model Year... Automobiles)-Procedures for Determining Manufacturer's Average Fuel Economy and Manufacturer's Average Carbon-Related Exhaust Emissions § 600.503-78 Abbreviations. The abbreviations in § 600.003 apply to this subpart....

  5. 40 CFR 600.003-77 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-General Provisions § 600.003-77 Abbreviations. (a) The abbreviations used in this subpart have the same meaning as those in 40 CFR part 86,...

  6. Frequency of uncommon abbreviations in medical journals.

    PubMed

    Shocket, E

    1995-03-01

    Although the use of abbreviations not understood by the average reader is discouraged by journal editors, I nevertheless found that 43% of 147 articles published during June 1993 in eight general and surgical journals contained uncommon abbreviations. In 26 (18%) of the 147 articles, all the abbreviations and their explanatory decoding words appeared at the front of the article, either in the abstract or in the first paragraph. This up front position makes easier the reader's back-search. In 37 other articles (25%), at least one uncommon abbreviation was decoded somewhere in the body of the article. In 21 articles (14%) the uncommon abbreviations appeared in the concluding or summating paragraph(s) and the explanatory decoding words were buried in the body of the article, thus making difficult the reader's back-search. Corrective action might include (1) editorial and peer review enforcement of the "no nonstandard abbreviation" policy, which is easily done with computerized word processing; (2) tabulation of all abbreviations with their decoding words either just below the abstract at the front of the article or just above the bibliography at the rear; or (3) expansion of each abbreviation in a footnote at the bottom of the appropriate page.

  7. 40 CFR 116.2 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abbreviations. 116.2 Section 116.2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DESIGNATION OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES § 116.2 Abbreviations. ppm=parts per million mg=milligram(s) kg=kilogram(s) mg/l=milligrams(s)...

  8. 40 CFR 600.003 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Abbreviations. 600.003 Section 600.003 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES General Provisions § 600.003 Abbreviations....

  9. 40 CFR 600.003 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abbreviations. 600.003 Section 600.003 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES General Provisions § 600.003 Abbreviations....

  10. Acronyms, initialisms, and abbreviations: Fourth Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Tolman, B.J.

    1994-04-01

    This document lists acronyms used in technical writing. The immense list is supplemented by an appendix containing chemical elements, classified information access, common abbreviations used for functions, conversion factors for selected SI units, a flowcharting template, greek alphabet, metrix terminology, proofreader`s marks, signs and symbols, and state abbreviations.

  11. 40 CFR 86.094-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.094-3 Abbreviations. (a) The abbreviations in § 86... Petroleum Gas NMHC—Nonmethane Hydrocarbons NMHCE—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Equivalent PM—Particulate...

  12. 40 CFR 86.094-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.094-3 Abbreviations. (a) The abbreviations in § 86... Petroleum Gas NMHC—Nonmethane Hydrocarbons NMHCE—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Equivalent PM—Particulate...

  13. 40 CFR 600.403-77 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Dealer Availability of Fuel Economy Information § 600.403-77 Abbreviations....

  14. 40 CFR 600.403-77 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Dealer Availability of Fuel Economy Information § 600.403-77 Abbreviations....

  15. 40 CFR 600.203-77 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy Values § 600.203-77 Abbreviations....

  16. 40 CFR 600.503-78 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 1978 Passenger Automobiles and for 1979 and Later Model Year Automobiles (Light Trucks and Passenger Automobiles)-Procedures for Determining Manufacturer's Average Fuel Economy § 600.503-78 Abbreviations....

  17. 40 CFR 86.090-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The abbreviations in this section apply to this subpart, and also to subparts B, E, F, M, N, and P of.... GC—Gas chromatograph. HPLC—High-pressure liquid chromatography. MeOH—Methanol (CH3OH)....

  18. 40 CFR 86.090-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) The abbreviations in this section apply to this subpart, and also to subparts B, E, F, M, N, and P of.... GC—Gas chromatograph. HPLC—High-pressure liquid chromatography. MeOH—Methanol (CH3OH)....

  19. 40 CFR 86.090-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) The abbreviations in this section apply to this subpart, and also to subparts B, E, F, M, N, and P of.... GC—Gas chromatograph. HPLC—High-pressure liquid chromatography. MeOH—Methanol (CH3OH)....

  20. 40 CFR 86.090-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The abbreviations in this section apply to this subpart, and also to subparts B, E, F, M, N, and P of.... GC—Gas chromatograph. HPLC—High-pressure liquid chromatography. MeOH—Methanol (CH3OH)....

  1. 40 CFR 86.090-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) The abbreviations in this section apply to this subpart, and also to subparts B, E, F, M, N, and P of.... GC—Gas chromatograph. HPLC—High-pressure liquid chromatography. MeOH—Methanol (CH3OH)....

  2. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-09-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  3. Injuries among Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Miners in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Kyeremateng-Amoah, E.; Clarke, Edith E.

    2015-01-01

    Artisanal and small-scale gold miners are confronted with numerous hazards often resulting in varying degrees of injuries and fatalities. In Ghana, like many developing countries, there is paucity of information on the causes and nature of the accidents that result in the injuries. The study was a retrospective, cross sectional type that examined the records of injuries of artisanal and small-scale gold miners presented to the emergency department of a district hospital in the Eastern Region of Ghana from 2006 to 2013. The causes, types, and outcomes of reported injuries were analyzed for 72 cases. Occurrences of mining accidents reported in selected Ghanaian media during the year 2007–2012 were also analyzed to corroborate the causes of the accidents. Fractures and contusions constituted the most frequently occurring injuries, with collapse of the mine pits and falls being the most frequent cause of accidents reported both by the hospital and media records. This study shows that though varied degrees of injuries occur among the miners, the potential for serious injuries is substantial. Measures to reduce the incidence of injuries and fatalities should include education and training on the use of safe working tools and means of creating a safe working environment. PMID:26404345

  4. An international comparison of childhood injuries in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C.; Cheng, J; Wong, T; Chow, C; Luis, B.; Cheung, W; Chan, K.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—This study describes 7813 childhood injuries in Shatin, Hong Kong. Supplementary analyses include developmental specificity of external causes and comparison with international childhood injury data. Methods—Children aged 0–15 attending the accident and emergency (A&E) department of the Prince of Wales Hospital in Hong Kong were recruited for the study. Attendance records of participants from the A&E department were analyzed. Details concerning the injury, including the International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, external cause of injury (E code), nature of injury (N code), abbreviated injury scale, and injury severity scale constitute core measurements, along with participants' age, gender, and respective A&E procedural data. Results—Males (65.7%) and fall related injuries (44.2%) predominate, while contusion (34.6%) is the prevailing nature of injury. Two age external cause dimensions are derived from a correspondence analysis. Children 0–1 years old are associated with falls, poisoning, scalds, and machinery related injury. Adolescents aged 12–15 are associated with motor related injury, animal related injury, and cuts/piercings. In comparison with international data, unintentional child injuries in Hong Kong comprised more falls but fewer poisonings and burns. Conclusion—A large proportion of falls, along with low proportion of poisonings and burns, are characteristics of childhood injury profile in Hong Kong. From the results of age external cause correspondence analysis, prevention strategies for different external cause should be developmentally specific. PMID:10728536

  5. Injury Risk Factors in a Small-Scale Gold Mining Community in Ghana's Upper East Region.

    PubMed

    Long, Rachel N; Sun, Kan; Neitzel, Richard L

    2015-07-24

    Occupational injury is one of many health concerns related to small-scale gold mining (ASGM), but few data exist on the subject, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In 2011 and 2013, we examined accidents, injuries, and potential risk factors in a Ghanaian ASGM community. In 2011, 173 participants were surveyed on occupational history and health, and 22 of these were surveyed again in 2013. Injury rates were estimated at 45.5 and 38.5 injuries per 100 person-years in 2011 and in 2013, respectively; these rates far surpass those of industrialized mines in the U.S. and South Africa. Demographic and job characteristics generally were not predictive of injury risk, though there was a significant positive association with injury risk for males and smokers. Legs and knees were the most common body parts injured, and falling was the most common cause of injury. The most common type of injuries were cuts or lacerations, burns and scalds, and contusions and abrasions. Only two miners had ever received any occupational safety training, and PPE use was low. Our results suggest that injuries should be a priority area for occupational health research in ASGM.

  6. 40 CFR 92.102 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definitions and abbreviations. 92.102... Definitions and abbreviations. The definitions and abbreviations of subpart A of this part apply to this subpart. The following definitions and abbreviations, as well as those found in § 92.132...

  7. Purpose, development and use of injury indicators.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Ronan A; Brophy, Sinead; Pockett, Rhys; John, Gareth

    2005-12-01

    Injury indicators can be used to give policy makers an estimate of the scale of injuries and their long-term effects. They can help compare injury levels in different areas and countries and can be used to help measure the effectiveness of interventions. Work on severity related indicators is promising. However there are no perfect indicators to date as many are hampered with difficulties in case definition and under reporting. For example, mortality rates are affected by improvements in care even if the incidence of an injury remains the same, the abbreviated injury scale (AIS) takes 10-20 minutes to code and so is not used in health service databases, surveys have problems with recall bias, definition of injury and response rates. If we accept that we need to make the best out of imperfect indicators and imperfect data then we should use multiple sources of data and accept that no one indicator can be used universally but needs to be selected for the purpose. For example, one possible new indicator of the incidence of non-fatal injury might be fracture data in the emergency department. Fractures are painful and so nearly always end up with a hospital attendance. This might give a means to compare incidence of non-fatal injury in different areas and countries. In conclusion, we need injury indicators to progress in injury prevention. Imperfect indicators can be used for targeting and evaluating interventions as long as we know and adjust for their limitations. PMID:16471152

  8. Motor vehicle occupant injuries in noncrash events.

    PubMed

    Agran, P F

    1981-06-01

    Data on injuries sustained by child occupants in motor vehicles occurring in noncrash events are generally unrecorded. This study was undertaken to ascertain the occurrence of medically confirmed injuries sustained by child occupants in motor vehicles as a result of noncrash events. Seventy-nine children were seen in the emergency room for evaluation of injuries that they incurred as occupants in motor vehicle incidents over a period of 18 months. The majority of injuries occurred in crash events. However, 18 (23%) were injured in noncrash events. These events included sudden stops, swerves, turns, and movement of an unrestrained child within the vehicle. The mechanism of injury was either ejection from the vehicle or impact with an interior area of the vehicle. In five of the 18 cases safety restraint use could not be established. Of the 13 cases in which information was obtained, no child was restrained. Although the injuries were predominantly minor (Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 1), two children sustained moderate injury (AIS 2), and one child sustained severe injury (AIS 3). These results need to be confirmed by a larger study and if confirmed, the additional hazard of injury from noncrash events should be incorporated into health education messages that currently place primary emphasis on the potential for injury in crash events. PMID:7232048

  9. Childhood injuries in rural north India.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Kumar, Adarsh; Varghese, Mathew

    2010-03-01

    This article reports the results of 100% household injury surveillance project conducted over a 1-year period in nine contiguous villages with a total population of 22,883 persons in north India. Fourteen trained field workers did the health and injury survey by visiting 16-20 households every day. In this article, we document the epidemiology of injuries among children in rural households. A person was considered injured if the injury prevented the victim from continuing a normal daily routine as understood by the family and the victim. A total of 2029 injury cases were recorded. Children in the age group 0-14 years accounted for 611 (30%) of all injury cases of which 42% were injured at home (28% for >14 years), 35% on roads (30% for >14 years), 8% on farms (31% for >14 years) and 6% on playgrounds. The maximum number of injuries was due to falls (35%). Eighty per cent of the injuries were minor (Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 1), 18% were moderate or serious (AIS 2-3); none were severe (AIS 4) and one child had a critical injury (AIS 5). The injury rates per 100,000 children in different age groups were 5354, 6962 and 8060 for 0-4, 5-9 and 10-14 years per year.

  10. An animal-to-human scaling law for blast-induced traumatic brain injury risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Aurélie; Nyein, Michelle K.; Zheng, James Q.; Moore, David F.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Radovitzky, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent efforts to understand blast effects on the human brain, there are still no widely accepted injury criteria for humans. Recent animal studies have resulted in important advances in the understanding of brain injury due to intense dynamic loads. However, the applicability of animal brain injury results to humans remains uncertain. Here, we use advanced computational models to derive a scaling law relating blast wave intensity to the mechanical response of brain tissue across species. Detailed simulations of blast effects on the brain are conducted for different mammals using image-based biofidelic models. The intensity of the stress waves computed for different external blast conditions is compared across species. It is found that mass scaling, which successfully estimates blast tolerance of the thorax, fails to capture the brain mechanical response to blast across mammals. Instead, we show that an appropriate scaling variable must account for the mass of protective tissues relative to the brain, as well as their acoustic impedance. Peak stresses transmitted to the brain tissue by the blast are then shown to be a power function of the scaling parameter for a range of blast conditions relevant to TBI. In particular, it is found that human brain vulnerability to blast is higher than for any other mammalian species, which is in distinct contrast to previously proposed scaling laws based on body or brain mass. An application of the scaling law to recent experiments on rabbits furnishes the first physics-based injury estimate for blast-induced TBI in humans. PMID:25267617

  11. An animal-to-human scaling law for blast-induced traumatic brain injury risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Jean, Aurélie; Nyein, Michelle K; Zheng, James Q; Moore, David F; Joannopoulos, John D; Radovitzky, Raúl

    2014-10-28

    Despite recent efforts to understand blast effects on the human brain, there are still no widely accepted injury criteria for humans. Recent animal studies have resulted in important advances in the understanding of brain injury due to intense dynamic loads. However, the applicability of animal brain injury results to humans remains uncertain. Here, we use advanced computational models to derive a scaling law relating blast wave intensity to the mechanical response of brain tissue across species. Detailed simulations of blast effects on the brain are conducted for different mammals using image-based biofidelic models. The intensity of the stress waves computed for different external blast conditions is compared across species. It is found that mass scaling, which successfully estimates blast tolerance of the thorax, fails to capture the brain mechanical response to blast across mammals. Instead, we show that an appropriate scaling variable must account for the mass of protective tissues relative to the brain, as well as their acoustic impedance. Peak stresses transmitted to the brain tissue by the blast are then shown to be a power function of the scaling parameter for a range of blast conditions relevant to TBI. In particular, it is found that human brain vulnerability to blast is higher than for any other mammalian species, which is in distinct contrast to previously proposed scaling laws based on body or brain mass. An application of the scaling law to recent experiments on rabbits furnishes the first physics-based injury estimate for blast-induced TBI in humans. PMID:25267617

  12. Sleep-related risk of occupational injuries in Japanese small and medium-scale enterprises.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Akinori; Ikeda, Tomoko; Takahashi, Masaya; Haratani, Takashi; Fujioka, Yosei; Fukui, Satoe; Swanson, Naomi G; Hojou, Minoru; Araki, Shunichi

    2005-01-01

    A cross-sectional study evaluated the contribution of daily sleep habits to occupational injuries. A self-administered questionnaire solicited answers about sleep, symptoms of depression, occupational injury, demographics, presence of diseases and lifestyle factors from 2,903 workers between the ages of 16-83 (mean 45) yr in small and medium-scale enterprises. Eight sleep habits were queried and dichotomized: 1) less or more than 6 hr of daily sleep, 2) taking more or less than 30 min to fall asleep (Difficulty initiating sleep; DIS), 3) awakening during sleep more or less than 3 times/wk (Difficulty maintaining sleep; DMS), 4) early morning awakening more or less than 3 times/wk (EMA), 5) definitely/somewhat difficulty waking up or not, 6) sleeping very poorly/not so well at night or not, 7) definitely/somewhat insufficient nightly sleep or not, and 8) difficulty in breathing during sleep more than once/week or less. Occupational injury was assessed by asking subjects 'Have you ever been injured during your work, including minor scratches and cuts (Yes/No)?' Both sleep and injury were assessed over the previous one year period. One-third of workers answered that they had experienced injury. Workers with sleep features of DIS, sleeping poorly at night, insufficient sleep, and insomnia had a significantly higher prevalence for injury after adjusting for multiple confounders. The findings suggest that poor nocturnal sleep habits are associated with self-reported occupational injury. PMID:15732310

  13. Injury Profiles Associated with Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Tarkwa, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Calys-Tagoe, Benedict N L; Ovadje, Lauretta; Clarke, Edith; Basu, Niladri; Robins, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is inherently risky, but little is known about mining-associated hazards and injuries despite the tremendous growth worldwide of ASGM and the benefits it offers. The current study aimed to characterize the physical injuries associated with ASGM in Ghana to guide policy formulation. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Tarkwa mining district of the Western Region of Ghana in 2014. A total of 404 small-scale miners were recruited and interviewed regarding their occupational injury experiences over the preceding 10 years using a paper-based structured questionnaire. Nearly one-quarter (23.5%) of the miners interviewed reported getting injured over the previous 10 years, and the overall injury rate was calculated to be 5.39 per 100 person years. The rate was significantly higher for women (11.93 per 100 person years) and those with little mining experience (e.g., 25.31 per 100 person years for those with less than one year of work experience). The most injury-prone mining activities were excavation (58.7%) and crushing (23.1%), and over 70% of the injuries were reported to be due to miners being hit by an object. The majority of the injuries (57%) were lacerations, and nearly 70% of the injuries were to the upper or lower limbs. Approximately one-third (34.7%) of the injuries resulted in miners missing more than two weeks of work. One-quarter of the injured workers believed that abnormal work pressure played a role in their injuries, and nearly two-fifths believed that their injuries could have been prevented, with many citing personal protective equipment as a solution. About one-quarter of the employees reported that their employers never seemed to be interested in the welfare or safety of their employees. These findings greatly advance our understanding of occupational hazards and injuries amongst ASGM workers and help identify several intervention points.

  14. Injury Profiles Associated with Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Tarkwa, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Calys-Tagoe, Benedict N. L.; Ovadje, Lauretta; Clarke, Edith; Basu, Niladri; Robins, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is inherently risky, but little is known about mining-associated hazards and injuries despite the tremendous growth worldwide of ASGM and the benefits it offers. The current study aimed to characterize the physical injuries associated with ASGM in Ghana to guide policy formulation. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Tarkwa mining district of the Western Region of Ghana in 2014. A total of 404 small-scale miners were recruited and interviewed regarding their occupational injury experiences over the preceding 10 years using a paper-based structured questionnaire. Nearly one-quarter (23.5%) of the miners interviewed reported getting injured over the previous 10 years, and the overall injury rate was calculated to be 5.39 per 100 person years. The rate was significantly higher for women (11.93 per 100 person years) and those with little mining experience (e.g., 25.31 per 100 person years for those with less than one year of work experience). The most injury-prone mining activities were excavation (58.7%) and crushing (23.1%), and over 70% of the injuries were reported to be due to miners being hit by an object. The majority of the injuries (57%) were lacerations, and nearly 70% of the injuries were to the upper or lower limbs. Approximately one-third (34.7%) of the injuries resulted in miners missing more than two weeks of work. One-quarter of the injured workers believed that abnormal work pressure played a role in their injuries, and nearly two-fifths believed that their injuries could have been prevented, with many citing personal protective equipment as a solution. About one-quarter of the employees reported that their employers never seemed to be interested in the welfare or safety of their employees. These findings greatly advance our understanding of occupational hazards and injuries amongst ASGM workers and help identify several intervention points. PMID:26184264

  15. Road Traffic Related Injury Severity in Truck Drivers: A Prospective Medical and Technical Analysis of 582 Truck Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Sebastian; Otte, Dietmar; Muller, Christian Walter; Omar, Mohamed; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl; Brand, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Background While cyclists and pedestrians are known to be at significant risk for severe injuries when exposed to road traffic accidents (RTA) involving trucks, little is known about RTA injury risk for truck drivers. Objectives The aim of this study was to analyze the injury severity in truck drivers following RTAs. Patients and Methods Our local accident research unit prospectively documented 43000 RTAs involving 582 trucks between 2000 and 2011. Injury severity, including the abbreviated injury scale (AIS) and the maximum abbreviated injury scale (MAIS) were analyzed. Technical parameters (e.g. delta-v, direction of impact), the location of accident, and its dependency on the road type were also taken into consideration. Results Thirteen percent (77/582) of truck drivers were injured. Extremities were found to be at highest risk of injury with the lower extremities (36x) being injured most severely (10x: AIS 2 and 3). Death occurred only after collisions with other trucks, and severity of injuries increased with an increased speed limit. The maximum abbreviated injury scale was higher in the crash opponents (56x MAIS ≥ 3) compared to the truck drivers (8x MAIS ≥ 3). Overall, 82% of the crash opponents were injured. Conclusions The safety of truck drivers is assured by their vehicles, the consequence being that the risk of becoming injured is likely to be low. However, the legs especially are at high risk for severe injuries during RTAs. This probability increases in the instance of a collision with another truck. Nevertheless, in RTAs involving trucks and regular passenger vehicles, the other party is in higher risk of injury.

  16. Road Traffic Related Injury Severity in Truck Drivers: A Prospective Medical and Technical Analysis of 582 Truck Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Sebastian; Otte, Dietmar; Muller, Christian Walter; Omar, Mohamed; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl; Brand, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Background While cyclists and pedestrians are known to be at significant risk for severe injuries when exposed to road traffic accidents (RTA) involving trucks, little is known about RTA injury risk for truck drivers. Objectives The aim of this study was to analyze the injury severity in truck drivers following RTAs. Patients and Methods Our local accident research unit prospectively documented 43000 RTAs involving 582 trucks between 2000 and 2011. Injury severity, including the abbreviated injury scale (AIS) and the maximum abbreviated injury scale (MAIS) were analyzed. Technical parameters (e.g. delta-v, direction of impact), the location of accident, and its dependency on the road type were also taken into consideration. Results Thirteen percent (77/582) of truck drivers were injured. Extremities were found to be at highest risk of injury with the lower extremities (36x) being injured most severely (10x: AIS 2 and 3). Death occurred only after collisions with other trucks, and severity of injuries increased with an increased speed limit. The maximum abbreviated injury scale was higher in the crash opponents (56x MAIS ≥ 3) compared to the truck drivers (8x MAIS ≥ 3). Overall, 82% of the crash opponents were injured. Conclusions The safety of truck drivers is assured by their vehicles, the consequence being that the risk of becoming injured is likely to be low. However, the legs especially are at high risk for severe injuries during RTAs. This probability increases in the instance of a collision with another truck. Nevertheless, in RTAs involving trucks and regular passenger vehicles, the other party is in higher risk of injury. PMID:27679790

  17. Telemark skiing injuries: an 11-year study.

    PubMed

    Made, C; Borg, H; Thelander, D; Elmqvist, L G

    2001-11-01

    This study evaluated telemark injuries in a Swedish ski area in terms of injury ratio, location, and causes over time. During the seasons of 1989-2000 all injured telemark skiers ( n=94) who attended the medical center in Tärnaby, Sweden, within 48 h after the accident were registered and asked to fill in an injury form. A control group of noninjured telemark skiers were interviewed in the season of 1999-2000. The most common cause of injury was fall (70%) and the injury ratio was 1.2. There was a higher proportion of beginners in the injured population, and they had a fall/run ratio of 0.7, compared with 0.3 for average and advanced skiers. Ankle/foot injuries were most common (28% of injuries) followed by knee (20%) and head/neck (17%). The ankle/foot injuries decreased from 35% to 22% in the seasons 1989-1995 to 1995-2000. Beginners had more ankle/foot injuries than skilled participants. The severity of ankle/foot injuries classified as the Abbreviated Injury Scale group 2 or higher decreased from 33% to 21% during the study period. Twenty-seven percent used plastic and 73% leather boots. We found no association between boot material and ankle/foot injuries. The proportion of high boots with two or more buckles was 51%. High boots appeared to be protective against ankle/foot injuries. The proportion of high boots increased from 24% to 67% during the study period. Thus ankle/foot injuries were the most common injury location, but have decreased over time. The severity of these injuries has also decreased. A possible explanation could be the increased use of high boots.

  18. 40 CFR 600.103-78 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abbreviations. 600.103-78 Section 600.103-78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1978 and...

  19. 40 CFR 600.303-77 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abbreviations. 600.303-77 Section 600.303-77 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and...

  20. 40 CFR 86.000-3 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with the 2000 model year: A/C—Air conditioning FTP—Federal Test Procedure SFTP—Supplemental Federal... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abbreviations. 86.000-3 Section 86.000-3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  1. 40 CFR 86.203-94 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abbreviations. 86.203-94 Section 86.203-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Later Model Year Gasoline-Fueled New Light-Duty Vehicles, New Light-Duty Trucks and New...

  2. 14 CFR 34.2 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Abbreviations. 34.2 Section 34.2 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES General Provisions § 34.2...

  3. 77 FR 7517 - Definitions and Abbreviations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  4. 77 FR 7546 - Definitions and Abbreviations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ...-AA87 Definitions and Abbreviations AGENCY: Rural Business-Cooperative Service, Rural Utilities Service... cost for default interest, penalty interest, and late charges calculated and submitted on a final... interest with prior Agency approval. By defining ``interest'' in the definition section of the...

  5. 14 CFR 34.2 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Abbreviations. 34.2 Section 34.2 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES General Provisions § 34.2...

  6. 32 CFR 552.162 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Abbreviations. 552.162 Section 552.162 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  7. 32 CFR 552.162 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Abbreviations. 552.162 Section 552.162 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  8. 32 CFR 552.162 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Abbreviations. 552.162 Section 552.162 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  9. 32 CFR 552.162 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abbreviations. 552.162 Section 552.162 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville §...

  10. 32 CFR 552.162 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Abbreviations. 552.162 Section 552.162 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort Lewis, Yakima Training...

  11. 40 CFR 300.4 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abbreviations. 300.4 Section 300.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND... Agriculture Note: Reference is made in the NCP to both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the...

  12. 14 CFR 34.2 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Abbreviations. 34.2 Section 34.2 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES General Provisions § 34.2...

  13. 49 CFR 172.308 - Authorized abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... shipping name marking except as authorized in this section. (b) The abbreviation “ORM” may be used in place... column 2 of the § 172.101 table (e.g., “TNT” and “PCB”) are authorized....

  14. 49 CFR 172.308 - Authorized abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... shipping name marking except as authorized in this section. (b) The abbreviation “ORM” may be used in place... column 2 of the § 172.101 table (e.g., “TNT” and “PCB”) are authorized....

  15. 49 CFR 172.308 - Authorized abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... shipping name marking except as authorized in this section. (b) The abbreviation “ORM” may be used in place... column 2 of the § 172.101 table (e.g., “TNT” and “PCB”) are authorized....

  16. 49 CFR 172.308 - Authorized abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... shipping name marking except as authorized in this section. (b) The abbreviation “ORM” may be used in place... column 2 of the § 172.101 table (e.g., “TNT” and “PCB”) are authorized....

  17. 49 CFR 172.308 - Authorized abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... shipping name marking except as authorized in this section. (b) The abbreviation “ORM” may be used in place... column 2 of the § 172.101 table (e.g., “TNT” and “PCB”) are authorized....

  18. 40 CFR 96.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Budget Trading Program General Provisions § 96.3 Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms used in this part are defined as follows:...

  19. 40 CFR 96.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Budget Trading Program General Provisions § 96.3 Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms used in this part are defined as follows:...

  20. 7 CFR 762.102 - Abbreviations and definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Abbreviations and definitions. 762.102 Section 762.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.102 Abbreviations and definitions. Abbreviations...

  1. 7 CFR 762.102 - Abbreviations and definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Abbreviations and definitions. 762.102 Section 762.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.102 Abbreviations and definitions. Abbreviations...

  2. Head injury predominance: pedal-cyclists vs motor-cyclists.

    PubMed

    McDermott, F T; Klug, G L

    1985-09-16

    A study of the pattern of head injuries in pedal- and motor-cyclist casualties treated at four teaching hospitals in Melbourne was undertaken to determine whether significant differences occurred between the two groups. The injuries were coded according to the 1980 revision of the Abbreviated Injury Scale of the American Association for Automotive Medicine and the data subjected to statistical analysis. Although motor-cyclist casualties sustained more severe injuries to the body, the results show that pedal-cyclist casualties sustained more frequent and severe head injuries. It is considered that the differences are due, at least in part, to a far lower use of protective helmets among pedal-cyclists. Education to increase community awareness of this safety measure followed by legislation for the compulsory wearing of approved safety helmets is urged.

  3. A model of personality change after traumatic brain injury and the development of the Brain Injury Personality Scales

    PubMed Central

    Obonsawin, M C; Jefferis, S; Lowe, R; Crawford, J R; Fernandes, J; Holland, L; Woldt, K; Worthington, E; Bowie, G

    2007-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to develop models of personality change after traumatic brain injury (TBI) based on information provided by the TBI survivor and a significant other (SO), and to compare the models generated from the two different sources of information. Methods Individuals with and without TBI and an SO were interviewed separately about their current personality. The SOs were also interviewed about the personality of the TBI survivor before the injury. A subset of TBI survivors and their SOs were interviewed twice to assess test–retest reliability. Items which were not associated with personality change after TBI, which could not be measured reliably or which did not contribute to the model, were excluded. Results Of the 123 original items, 29 items from the interview with the survivor and 31 items from the interview with the SO were retained to form the Brain Injury Personality Scales. Separate factor analyses of ratings from each interview (survivor and SO) resulted in seven first order factors. The second order factor analyses for each interview resulted in four factors. Concordance between the information obtained from the two interviews was low. Conclusions The information obtained from the interviews with the TBI survivors and the SOs produced two models with a similar structure: three superordinate factors of personality items (affective regulation, behavioural regulation and engagement) and one superordinate factor of items relevant to mental state (restlessness and range of thought). Despite the similarity in structure, the content of the information obtained from the two interviews was different. PMID:17259352

  4. Pediatric Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (PaedsCTAS) as a Measure of Injury Severity

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Morgan Thorn; Ishikawa, Takuro; Schneeberg, Amy; Brussoni, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    This research explored whether the pediatric version of the Canadian Triage Acuity Scale (PaedsCTAS) represented a valid alternative indicator for surveillance of injury severity. Every patient presenting in a Canadian emergency department is assigned a CTAS or PaedsCTAS score in order to prioritize access to care and to predict the nature and scope of care that is likely to be required. The five-level PaedsCTAS score ranges from I (resuscitation) to V (non-urgent). A total of 256 children, 0 to 17-years-old, who attended a pediatric hospital for an injury were followed longitudinally. Of these children, 32.4% (n = 83) were hospitalized and 67.6% (n = 173) were treated in the emergency department and released. They completed the PedsQLTM, a validated measure of health related quality of life, at baseline (pre-injury status), one-month, four- to six-months, and 12-months post-injury. In this secondary data analysis, PaedsCTAS was found to be significantly associated with hospitalization and length of stay, sensitive to the differences between PaedsCTAS II and III, and related to physical but not psychosocial HRQoL. The findings suggest that PaedsCTAS may be a useful proxy measure of injury severity to supplement or replace hospitalization status and/or length of stay, currently proxy measures. PMID:27399743

  5. Use of text message abbreviations and literacy skills in children with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Veater, Helen M; Plester, Beverly; Wood, Clare

    2011-02-01

    This small-scale study compared 10 to 13-year-old dyslexic children's use of text message abbreviations with that of reading age- and chronological age-matched controls. There were no significant differences in the proportion of textisms used between the dyslexic children and the two control groups, although a preference for non-phonetic text abbreviations was observed in the dyslexic group. Unlike the controls, there was little evidence of an association between phonological awareness and textism use in children with dyslexia. These results are discussed in relation to strategy use by dyslexic children when decoding text.

  6. Analysis of fatal injuries to motorcyclists by helmet type.

    PubMed

    Hitosugi, Masahito; Shigeta, Akio; Takatsu, Akihiro; Yokoyama, Tomoko; Tokudome, Shogo

    2004-06-01

    To clarify the characteristics of injuries of motorcyclists dying in accidents in relation to helmet type, we retrospectively analyzed forensic autopsies of 36 helmeted motorcycle riders. The presence of major injuries and injury severity were evaluated with the injury severity score and the 1990 revision of the Abbreviated Injury Scale. Persons with open-face helmets (19 cases) were significantly more likely to have sustained severe head and neck injuries, especially brain contusions, than were persons with full-face helmets (17 cases). Furthermore, major injuries of the chest or abdomen, rib fractures, lung injuries, and liver injuries were each present in more than one quarter of all cases (26.3% to 70.6%), but their prevalences did not differ significantly between riders with different types of helmet. Because many types of head and neck injuries cannot be prevented and fatal chest and abdominal injuries occur despite the use of full-face helmets, more effective helmets and devices for protecting the chest and abdomen are needed to decrease deaths from motorcycle accidents. PMID:15166762

  7. Measurement Structure of the Trait Hope Scale in Persons with Spinal Cord Injury: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedema, Susan Miller; Pfaller, Joseph; Moser, Erin; Tu, Wei-Mo; Chan, Fong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the measurement structure of the Trait Hope Scale (THS) among individuals with spinal cord injury. Design: Confirmatory factor analysis and reliability and validity analyses were performed. Participants: 242 individuals with spinal cord injury. Results: Results support the two-factor measurement model for the THS with agency…

  8. The factor structure of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in individuals with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Schönberger, Michael; Ponsford, Jennie

    2010-10-30

    There is a lack of validated scales for screening for anxiety and depression in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of this study was to examine the factor structure of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in individuals with TBI. A total of 294 individuals with TBI (72.1% male; mean age 37.1 years, S.D. 17.5, median post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) duration 17 days) completed the HADS 1 year post-injury. A series of confirmatory factor analyses was conducted to examine the fit of a one-, two- and three-factor solution, with and without controlling for item wording effects (Multi-Trait Multi-Method approach). The one-, two- or three-factor model fit the data only when controlling for negative item wording. The results are in support of the validity of the original anxiety and depression subscales of the HADS and demonstrate the importance of evaluating item wording effects when examining the factor structure of a questionnaire. The results would also justify the use of the HADS as a single scale of emotional distress. However, even though the three-factor solution fit the data, alternative scales should be used if the purpose of the assessment is to measure stress symptoms separately from anxiety and depression.

  9. Measuring functional and quality of life outcomes following major head injury: common scales and checklists.

    PubMed

    Nichol, A D; Higgins, A M; Gabbe, B J; Murray, L J; Cooper, D J; Cameron, P A

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health issue, which results in significant mortality and long term disability. The profound impact of TBI is not only felt by the individuals who suffer the injury but also their care-givers and society as a whole. Clinicians and researchers require reliable and valid measures of long term outcome not only to truly quantify the burden of TBI and the scale of functional impairment in survivors, but also to allow early appropriate allocation of rehabilitation supports. In addition, clinical trials which aim to improve outcomes in this devastating condition require high quality measures to accurately assess the impact of the interventions being studied. In this article, we review the properties of an ideal measure of outcome in the TBI population. Then, we describe the key components and performance of the measurement tools most commonly used to quantify outcome in clinical studies in TBI. These measurement tools include: the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSe); Disability Rating Scale (DRS); Functional Independence Measure (FIM); Functional Assessment Measure (FAM); Functional Status Examination (FSE) and the TBI-specific and generic quality of life measures used in TBI patients (SF-36 and SF-12, WHOQOL-BREF, SIP, EQ-5D, EBIQ, and QOLIBRI).

  10. Quantification method analysis of the relationship between occupant injury and environmental factors in traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yong Han; Sohn, So Young

    2011-01-01

    Injury analysis following a vehicle crash is one of the most important research areas. However, most injury analyses have focused on one-dimensional injury variables, such as the AIS (Abbreviated Injury Scale) or the IIS (Injury Impairment Scale), at a time in relation to various traffic accident factors. However, these studies cannot reflect the various injury phenomena that appear simultaneously. In this paper, we apply quantification method II to the NASS (National Automotive Sampling System) CDS (Crashworthiness Data System) to find the relationship between the categorical injury phenomena, such as the injury scale, injury position, and injury type, and the various traffic accident condition factors, such as speed, collision direction, vehicle type, and seat position. Our empirical analysis indicated the importance of safety devices, such as restraint equipment and airbags. In addition, we found that narrow impact, ejection, air bag deployment, and higher speed are associated with more severe than minor injury to the thigh, ankle, and leg in terms of dislocation, abrasion, or laceration. PMID:21094332

  11. Forelimb Locomotor Assessment Scale (FLAS): Novel Assessment of Forelimb Dysfunction After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kim D.; Sharp, Kelli G.; Hofstadter, Maura; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Murray, Marion; Steward, Oswald

    2009-01-01

    We describe here a novel Forelimb Locomotor Assessment Scale (FLAS) that assesses forelimb use during locomotion in rats injured at the cervical level. A quantitative scale was developed that measures movements of shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints, forepaw position and digit placement, forelimb-hindlimb coordination, compensatory behaviors adopted while walking, and balance. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received graded cervical contusions ranging from 200–230 (“mild”, n=11) and 250–290 kilodynes (“moderate”, n=13) between C5–8. Rats were videotaped post-injury as they walked along an alley to determine deficits and recovery of forelimb function. Recovery of shoulder and elbow joint movement occurred rapidly (within 1–7 days post-injury), whereas recovery of wrist joint movement was slower and more variable. Most rats in all groups displayed persistent deficits in forepaw and digit movement, but developed compensatory behaviors to allow functional forward locomotion within 1–2 weeks post-injury. Recovery of forelimb function as measured by the FLAS reached a plateau by 3 weeks post-injury in all groups. Rats with mild contusions displayed greater locomotor recovery than rats with moderate contusions, but exhibited persistent deficits compared to sham controls. Reliability was tested by having seven raters (3 internal, 4 external) from different laboratories, independently and blindly score videos of all rats. The multivariate correlation between all raters, all animals, and all time-points ranged from r2=0.88–0.96 (p<0.0001), indicating a high inter-rater reliability. Thus, the FLAS is a simple, inexpensive, sensitive, and reliable measure of forelimb function during locomotion following cervical SCI. PMID:19733168

  12. Measuring scales used for assessment of patients with traumatic brain injury: multicenter studies

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarz, Robert; Jabłońska, Renata; Królikowska, Agnieszka; Haor, Beata; Barczykowska, Ewa; Biercewicz, Monika; Głowacka, Mariola; Szrajda, Justyna

    2015-01-01

    Background Application of adequate numeric scales is essential for assessment of a patient’s condition. The scales most commonly used by the therapeutic team for assessment of a patient with traumatic brain injury (TBI) include deficit scales, functional scales, and scales assessing quality of life. The purpose of this study was to establish the relationships between the particular scales used for assessment of patients with TBI. Methods This multicenter study included 159 patients with TBI. The direct observation technique was used. Two measurements were made (at hospital admission and discharge) using standardized assessment scales, ie, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), the Functional Capacity Scale (FCS), the Functional Index “Repty” (FIR), and the Glasgow Outcome Scale. Results Patients with mild impairment of consciousness were most numerous in the examined group at both admission and discharge, ie, 118 (78.8%) and 134 patients (89.3%), respectively. The mean score for functional capacity measured with the FCS was 34.41 points (71.7%) on the day of admission and 41.87 points (87.2%) on the day of discharge from hospital. A significant correlation was found between results obtained using the GCS and results on the FIR, on both the day of admission [R t(n-2) =7.612=0.530; P=0.00] and the day of discharge [R t(n-2) =8.998=0.595; P=0.00]. Further, a high correlation was found between the FCS and the FIR (rs= −0.854 on day of admission and rs= −0.840 on day of discharge). Conclusion The majority of examined patients had mild impairment of consciousness. A moderate correlation was found between the GCS and the scales assessing activities of daily living. A high correlation was found between FCS and FIR, which may result from the similarities between the analyzed tools in the scope of their construction and application. PMID:26170636

  13. 32 CFR 516.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Glossary contains explanations of abbreviations and terms. (b) The masculine gender has been used throughout this regulation for simplicity and consistency. Any reference to the masculine gender is...

  14. 32 CFR 516.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Glossary contains explanations of abbreviations and terms. (b) The masculine gender has been used throughout this regulation for simplicity and consistency. Any reference to the masculine gender is...

  15. 32 CFR 516.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Glossary contains explanations of abbreviations and terms. (b) The masculine gender has been used throughout this regulation for simplicity and consistency. Any reference to the masculine gender is...

  16. 32 CFR 516.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Glossary contains explanations of abbreviations and terms. (b) The masculine gender has been used throughout this regulation for simplicity and consistency. Any reference to the masculine gender is...

  17. 32 CFR 516.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Glossary contains explanations of abbreviations and terms. (b) The masculine gender has been used throughout this regulation for simplicity and consistency. Any reference to the masculine gender is...

  18. The CRASH trial: the first large-scale, randomised, controlled trial in head injury

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ian

    2001-01-01

    The global epidemic of head injuries is just beginning. Many are caused by road traffic crashes. It is estimated that, by 2020, road traffic crashes will have moved from its present position of ninth to third in the world disease burden ranking, as measured in disability adjusted life years. In developing countries, it will have moved to second. The Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) trial is a large-scale, randomised, controlled trial, among adults with head injury and impaired consciousness, of the effects of a short-term infusion of corticosteroids on death and on neurological disability. Following a successful pilot phase, which included over 1000 randomised participants, the main phase of the trial is now underway. Over the next 5 years, the trial aims to recruit a total of 20,000 patients. Such large numbers will only be possible if hundreds of doctors and nurses can collaborate in emergency departments all over the world. The trial is currently recruiting, and new collaborators are welcome to join the trial (see ). PMID:11737908

  19. Injury Risk Factors in a Small-Scale Gold Mining Community in Ghana’s Upper East Region

    PubMed Central

    Long, Rachel N.; Sun, Kan; Neitzel, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational injury is one of many health concerns related to small-scale gold mining (ASGM), but few data exist on the subject, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In 2011 and 2013, we examined accidents, injuries, and potential risk factors in a Ghanaian ASGM community. In 2011, 173 participants were surveyed on occupational history and health, and 22 of these were surveyed again in 2013. Injury rates were estimated at 45.5 and 38.5 injuries per 100 person-years in 2011 and in 2013, respectively; these rates far surpass those of industrialized mines in the U.S. and South Africa. Demographic and job characteristics generally were not predictive of injury risk, though there was a significant positive association with injury risk for males and smokers. Legs and knees were the most common body parts injured, and falling was the most common cause of injury. The most common type of injuries were cuts or lacerations, burns and scalds, and contusions and abrasions. Only two miners had ever received any occupational safety training, and PPE use was low. Our results suggest that injuries should be a priority area for occupational health research in ASGM. PMID:26213958

  20. Reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale in the Assessment of Plantarflexor Muscle Spasticity in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, S. C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This attempt to determine the reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale for assessing the severity of muscle spasticity for ankle plantarflexors in 30 patients with traumatic brain injury concluded that the reliability was minimally adequate to support the scale's continued use. Interrater reliability was less than that previously reported for…

  1. Abbreviations used in publications of the United States Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1953-01-01

    The use of abbreviations in publications of the Geological Survey is determined by several forces working in different directions. Pulling in the direction of greater condensation and the freer use of abbreviations and symbols is the desire to achieve greater economy in publications. Working in the opposite direction is the desire to have the publications used more conveniently by an increasingly heterogeneous public.

  2. 16 CFR 301.4 - Abbreviations or ditto marks prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Abbreviations or ditto marks prohibited. 301.4 Section 301.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.4 Abbreviations or...

  3. 16 CFR 301.4 - Abbreviations or ditto marks prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Abbreviations or ditto marks prohibited. 301.4 Section 301.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.4 Abbreviations or...

  4. 16 CFR 301.4 - Abbreviations or ditto marks prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Abbreviations or ditto marks prohibited. 301.4 Section 301.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.4 Abbreviations or...

  5. 16 CFR 301.4 - Abbreviations or ditto marks prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Abbreviations or ditto marks prohibited. 301.4 Section 301.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.4 Abbreviations or...

  6. 16 CFR 301.4 - Abbreviations or ditto marks prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Abbreviations or ditto marks prohibited. 301.4 Section 301.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.4 Abbreviations or...

  7. 40 CFR 89.3 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... kW Kilowatt NIST National Institute for Standards and Testing NMHC Nonmethane hydrocarbon NTIS...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES General § 89.3 Acronyms and abbreviations. The following acronyms and abbreviations apply to part 89. AECD Auxiliary emission control...

  8. 40 CFR 90.5 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS General § 90.5 Acronyms and abbreviations. The following acronyms and abbreviations apply to part 90. AECD—Auxiliary emission... Materials CAA—Clean Air Act CAAA—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CLD—chemiluminescent detector...

  9. 40 CFR 89.3 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... kW Kilowatt NIST National Institute for Standards and Testing NMHC Nonmethane hydrocarbon NTIS...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES General § 89.3 Acronyms and abbreviations. The following acronyms and abbreviations apply to part 89. AECD Auxiliary emission control...

  10. 40 CFR 89.3 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... kW Kilowatt NIST National Institute for Standards and Testing NMHC Nonmethane hydrocarbon NTIS...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES General § 89.3 Acronyms and abbreviations. The following acronyms and abbreviations apply to part 89. AECD Auxiliary emission control...

  11. 7 CFR 1951.852 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions and abbreviations. 1951.852 Section 1951....852 Definitions and abbreviations. (a) General definitions. The following definitions are applicable...) Low-income. The level of income of a person or family which is at or below the Poverty Guidelines...

  12. 40 CFR 97.203 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 97.203 Section 97.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Trading Program General Provisions § 97.203 Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms....

  13. 40 CFR 96.203 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 96.203 Section 96.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR SO 2 Trading Program General Provisions § 96.203 Measurements, abbreviations,...

  14. 40 CFR 97.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 97.3 Section 97.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Trading Program General Provisions § 97.3 Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms....

  15. 40 CFR 97.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 97.3 Section 97.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Trading Program General Provisions § 97.3 Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms....

  16. 40 CFR 97.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 97.3 Section 97.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Trading Program General Provisions § 97.3 Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms....

  17. Features of Word Omission and Abbreviation in Telexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zak, Helena; Dudley-Evans, Tony

    1986-01-01

    Features of telexes used for business correspondence are discussed, including omission of parts of verbs, definite and indefinite articles, pronouns, and prepositions, and also word abbreviations. The telex is different from other abbreviated texts (such as telegrams), and Business English courses should include instruction in telex writing.…

  18. Injuries sustained during snow removal from roofs resulting in hospital care.

    PubMed

    Bylund, Per-Olof; Johansson, Jim; Albertsson, Pontus

    2016-01-01

    Clearing snow from roofs causes serious injuries annually. The aim of this study was to describe injury mechanisms, injury panorama, and injury incidence in connection to this activity. A specific aim was to study the association between snow depth and injury incidence. A total of 95 people were injured during four study periods. The risk of injury is strongly associated with snow depth, and the incidence varied up to 10-fold between the studied winter seasons. The majority of injuries (91; 96%) occurred during leisure time and only four people were injured in the occupational setting. The most common injury mechanism was falling off roofs or ladders of residential homes. Nearly 60% sustained moderate or serious injuries (Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale [MAIS] 2-3), and fractures accounted for almost half of all injuries. Because roofs of single-family homes in Sweden usually do not require snow removal for heavy snow loads, these injuries may have been both unnecessary and avoidable. Further education is required to advise the public on the risks associated with snow removal from roofs.

  19. Abbreviated laparotomy or damage control laparotomy: Why, when and how to do it?

    PubMed

    Voiglio, E J; Dubuisson, V; Massalou, D; Baudoin, Y; Caillot, J L; Létoublon, C; Arvieux, C

    2016-08-01

    The goal of abbreviated laparotomy is to treat severely injured patients whose condition requires an immediate surgical operation but for whom a prolonged procedure would worsen physiological impairment and metabolic failure. Indeed, in severely injured patients, blood loss and tissue injuries enhance the onset of the "bloody vicious circle", triggered by the triad of acidosis-hypothermia-coagulopathy. Abbreviated laparotomy is a surgical strategy that forgoes the completeness of operation in favor of a physiological approach, the overriding preference going to rapidity and limiting the procedure to control the injuries. Management is based on sequential association of the shortest possible preoperative resuscitation with surgery limited to essential steps to control injury (stop the bleeding and contamination), without definitive repair. The latter will be ensured during a scheduled re-operation after a period of resuscitation aiming to correct physiological abnormalities induced by the trauma and its treatment. This strategy necessitates a pre-defined plan and involvement of the entire medical and nursing staff to reduce time loss to a strict minimum. PMID:27542655

  20. Effects of Glasgow Outcome Scale Misclassification on Traumatic Brain Injury Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Juan; Murray, Gordon D.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Butcher, Isabella; Mchugh, Gillian S.; Lingsma, Hester; Mushkudiani, Nino; Choi, Sung; Maas, Andrew I.R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) is the primary endpoint for efficacy analysis of clinical trials in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Accurate and consistent assessment of outcome after TBI is essential to the evaluation of treatment results, particularly in the context of multicenter studies and trials. The inconsistent measurement or interobserver variation on GOS outcome, or for that matter, on any outcome scales, may adversely affect the sensitivity to detect treatment effects in clinical trial. The objective of this study is to examine effects of nondifferential misclassification of the widely used five-category GOS outcome scale and in particular to assess the impact of this misclassification on detecting a treatment effect and statistical power. We followed two approaches. First, outcome differences were analyzed before and after correction for misclassification using a dataset of 860 patients with severe brain injury randomly sampled from two TBI trials with known differences in outcome. Second, the effects of misclassification on outcome distribution and statistical power were analyzed in simulation studies on a hypothetical 800-patient dataset. Three potential patterns of nondifferential misclassification (random, upward and downward) on the dichotomous GOS outcome were analyzed, and the power of finding treatments differences was investigated in detail. All three patterns of misclassification reduce the power of detecting the true treatment effect and therefore lead to a reduced estimation of the true efficacy. The magnitude of such influence not only depends on the size of the misclassification, but also on the magnitude of the treatment effect. In conclusion, nondifferential misclassification directly reduces the power of finding the true treatment effect. An awareness of this procedural error and methods to reduce misclassification should be incorporated in TBI clinical trials. PMID:18578634

  1. Injury Rehabilitation Overadherence: Preliminary Scale Validation and Relationships With Athletic Identity and Self-Presentation Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Podlog, Leslie; Gao, Zan; Kenow, Laura; Kleinert, Jens; Granquist, Megan; Newton, Maria; Hannon, James

    2013-01-01

    Context: Evidence suggests that nonadherence to rehabilitation protocols may be associated with worse clinical and functional rehabilitation outcomes. Recently, it has been recognized that nonadherence may not only reflect a lack of rehabilitation engagement but that some athletes may “overadhere” to their injury-rehabilitation regimen or risk a premature return to sport. Presently, no measure of overadherence exists, and correlates of overadherence and risking a premature return to sport remain uncertain. Objective: To provide initial validation of a novel injury-rehabilitation overadherence measure (study 1) and to examine correlates of overadherence and risking a premature return to sport (study 2). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: High school athletes (study 1) and collegiate athletes (study 2). Patients or Other Participants: In study 1, 118 currently injured US adolescent athletes competing in a range of high school sports participated. In study 2, 105 currently injured collegiate athletes (National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I–III) volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s): The Rehabilitation Overadherence Questionnaire was a novel instrument developed to assess injured athletes' tendency toward overadherence behaviors and beliefs. We used an adapted version of the Injury Psychological Readiness to Return to Sport Scale to assess the tendency to risk a premature return to sport. Results: In study 1, the construct validity of the overadherence measure was supported using principal axis factoring. Moreover, bivariate correlation and regression analyses indicated that self-presentation concerns and athletic identity were positive predictors of adolescent rehabilitation overadherence and a premature return to sport. Study 2 provided support for the 2-factor structure of the overadherence measure found in study 1 via confirmatory factor analysis. Further support for the relationship among self-presentation concerns, athletic identity, and

  2. Rasch Analysis of the General Self-Efficacy Scale in Workers with Traumatic Limb Injuries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Yi; Yu, Wan-Hui; Huang, Chien-Yu; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to apply Rasch analysis to examine the unidimensionality and reliability of the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) in workers with traumatic limb injuries. Furthermore, if the items of the GSE fitted the Rasch model's assumptions, we transformed the raw sum ordinal scores of the GSE into Rasch interval scores. Methods A total of 1076 participants completed the GSE at 1 month post injury. Rasch analysis was used to examine the unidimensionality and person reliability of the GSE. The unidimensionality of the GSE was verified by determining whether the items fit the Rasch model's assumptions: (1) item fit indices: infit and outfit mean square (MNSQ) ranged from 0.6 to 1.4; and (2) the eigenvalue of the first factor extracted from principal component analysis (PCA) for residuals was <2. Person reliability was calculated. Results The unidimensionality of the 10-item GSE was supported in terms of good item fit statistics (infit and outfit MNSQ ranging from 0.92 to 1.32) and acceptable eigenvalues (1.6) of the first factor of the PCA, with person reliability = 0.89. Consequently, the raw sum scores of the GSE were transformed into Rasch scores. Conclusions The results indicated that the items of GSE are unidimensional and have acceptable person reliability in workers with traumatic limb injuries. Additionally, the raw sum scores of the GSE can be transformed into Rasch interval scores for prospective users to quantify workers' levels of self-efficacy and to conduct further statistical analyses.

  3. Drug and herb induced liver injury: Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences scale for causality assessment.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Rolf; Wolff, Albrecht; Frenzel, Christian; Schwarzenboeck, Alexander; Schulze, Johannes; Eickhoff, Axel

    2014-01-27

    Causality assessment of suspected drug induced liver injury (DILI) and herb induced liver injury (HILI) is hampered by the lack of a standardized approach to be used by attending physicians and at various subsequent evaluating levels. The aim of this review was to analyze the suitability of the liver specific Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) scale as a standard tool for causality assessment in DILI and HILI cases. PubMed database was searched for the following terms: drug induced liver injury; herb induced liver injury; DILI causality assessment; and HILI causality assessment. The strength of the CIOMS lies in its potential as a standardized scale for DILI and HILI causality assessment. Other advantages include its liver specificity and its validation for hepatotoxicity with excellent sensitivity, specificity and predictive validity, based on cases with a positive reexposure test. This scale allows prospective collection of all relevant data required for a valid causality assessment. It does not require expert knowledge in hepatotoxicity and its results may subsequently be refined. Weaknesses of the CIOMS scale include the limited exclusion of alternative causes and qualitatively graded risk factors. In conclusion, CIOMS appears to be suitable as a standard scale for attending physicians, regulatory agencies, expert panels and other scientists to provide a standardized, reproducible causality assessment in suspected DILI and HILI cases, applicable primarily at all assessing levels involved.

  4. The Louisville Swim Scale: A Novel Assessment of Hindlimb Function following Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Burke, Darlene A.; Baldini, Angela D.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Baltzley, Ryan; Bunger, Michelle; Magnuson, David S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of animal studies examining the recovery of function following spinal cord injury use the BBB Open-Field Locomotor Scale as a primary outcome measure. However, it is now well known that rehabilitation strategies can bring about significant improvements in hindlimb function in some animal models. Thus, improvements in walking following spinal cord injury in rats may be influenced by differences in activity levels and housing conditions during the first few weeks post-injury. Swimming is a natural form of locomotion that animals are not normally exposed to in the laboratory setting. We hypothesized that deficits in, and functional recovery of, swimming would accurately represent the locomotor capability of the nervous system in the absence of any retraining effects. To test this hypothesis, we have compared the recovery of walking and swimming in rats following a range of standardized spinal cord injuries and two different retraining strategies. In order to assess swimming, we developed a rating system we call the Louisville Swimming Scale (LSS) that evaluates three characteristics of swimming that are highly altered by spinal cord injury— namely, hindlimb movement, forelimb dependency, and body position. The data indicate that the LSS is a sensitive and reliable method of determining swimming ability and the improvement in hindlimb function after standardized contusion injury of the thoracic spinal cord. Furthermore, the data suggests that when used in conjunction with the BBB Open-field Locomotor Scale, the LSS assesses locomotor capabilities that are not influenced by a retraining effect. PMID:17115911

  5. Thoracic injuries sustained by severely injured front-seat passengers and drivers: injury patterns and their relationship to crash characteristics.

    PubMed

    Stübig, Timo; Brand, Stephan; Zeckey, Christian; Beltran, Michael J; Otte, Dietmar; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic injuries are common in vehicle crashes, but only a few studies thus far have analysed the relationship between injury characteristics and collision details and discussed the possible implications for future vehicle design and prevention. In this study, the crash details were prospectively collected at the scene of injury between 2004 and 2009 for severely injured patients. The collected data included the type of collision, angle of impact and change of velocity on impact as well as injury characteristics and patient demographics, including abbreviated injury scale (AIS) and injury severity score (ISS).There were 5998 accidents involving 8830 patients over this five-year period; 31 met the inclusion criteria (23 males and eight females). The mean ISS was 37 ± 12.68, the mean AIS Thorax was 4.0. Lung contusions were found in 90% of the patients, pneumothoraces in 58% and rib fractures in 81%. There was a significant relationship between accident deceleration speed (ΔV), AIS Thorax (p = 0.02) and the incidence of pneumothoraces (p = 0.046). The analysis showed a high overall incidence of thoracic injuries in car passengers. Future improvements in automobile safety and design should seek to reduce the incidence of thoracic injuries by uniform vehicle deformation and further implementation of side airbags. PMID:23035651

  6. 40 CFR 87.2 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Definitions. § 87.2 Acronyms and abbreviations. Link to an amendment published at 77 FR 36381, June 18, 2012... pressure ratio sec.Seconds SPShaft power SNSmoke number TTemperature, degrees Kelvin TIMTime in mode...

  7. 7 CFR 1980.302 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... abbreviations are applicable to this subpart: Fannie Mae— Federal National Mortgage Association. FCS— Farm.... Ginnie Mae— Government National Mortgage Association. HUD— Department of Housing and Urban...

  8. 40 CFR 96.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS NOX Budget Trading Program General Provisions § 96.3 Measurements, abbreviations,...

  9. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III and Malingering in Traumatic Brain Injury: Classification Accuracy in Known Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Kelly L.; Greve, Kevin W.; Bianchini, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    A known-groups design was used to determine the classification accuracy of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) variables in detecting malingered neurocognitive dysfunction (MND) in traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI patients were classified into the following groups: (a) mild TBI not-MND (n = 26), (b) mild TBI MND (n = 31), and (c)…

  10. The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale as a Positive Psychology Measure for People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujikawa, Mayu; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Chan, Fong; Catalano, Denise; Hunter, Celeste; Bengtson, Kevin; Rahimi, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to evaluate the measurement structure of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) as a positive psychology measure for people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) using confirmatory factor analysis. The participants consisted of 274 Canadians with SCI living in the community. The result indicated that the…

  11. Parafoveal and Foveal Processing of Abbreviations during Eye Fixations in Reading: Making a Case for Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slattery, Timothy J.; Schotter, Elizabeth R.; Berry, Raymond W.; Rayner, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The processing of abbreviations in reading was examined with an eye movement experiment. Abbreviations were of 2 distinct types: acronyms (abbreviations that can be read with the normal grapheme-phoneme correspondence [GPC] rules, such as NASA) and initialisms (abbreviations in which the GPCs are letter names, such as NCAA). Parafoveal and foveal…

  12. Proteomic changes associated with freeze-thaw injury and post-thaw recovery in onion (Allium cepa L.) scales.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keting; Renaut, Jenny; Sergeant, Kjell; Wei, Hui; Arora, Rajeev

    2013-04-01

    The ability of plants to recover from freeze-thaw injury is a critical component of freeze-thaw stress tolerance. To investigate the molecular basis of freeze-thaw recovery, here we compared the proteomes of onion scales from unfrozen control (UFC), freeze-thaw injured (INJ), and post-thaw recovered (REC) treatments. Injury-related proteins (IRPs) and recovery-related proteins (RRPs) were differentiated according to their accumulation patterns. Many IRPs decreased right after thaw without any significant re-accumulation during post-thaw recovery, while others were exclusively induced in INJ tissues. Most IRPs are antioxidants, stress proteins, molecular chaperones, those induced by physical injury or proteins involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, these observations suggest that while freeze-thaw compromises the constitutive stress protection and energy supply in onion scales, it might also recruit 'first-responders' (IRPs that were induced) to mitigate such injury. RRPs, on the other hand, are involved in the injury-repair program during post-thaw environment conducive for recovery. Some RRPs were restored in REC tissues after their first reduction right after thaw, while others exhibit higher abundance than their 'constitutive' levels. RRPs might facilitate new cellular homeostasis, potentially by re-establishing ion homeostasis and proteostasis, cell-wall remodelling, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging, defence against possible post-thaw infection, and regulating the energy budget to sustain these processes.

  13. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition profiles and their relationship to self-reported outcome following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Harman-Smith, Yasmin E; Mathias, Jane L; Bowden, Stephen C; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Bigler, Erin D

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychological assessments of outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are often unrelated to self-reported problems after TBI. The current study cluster-analyzed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) subtest scores from mild, moderate, and severe TBI (n=220) and orthopedic injury control (n=95) groups, to determine whether specific cognitive profiles are related to people's perceived outcomes after TBI. A two-stage cluster analysis produced 4- and 6-cluster solutions, with the 6-cluster solution better capturing subtle variations in cognitive functioning. The 6 clusters differed in the levels and profiles of cognitive performance, self-reported recovery, and education and injury severity. The findings suggest that subtle cognitive impairments after TBI should be interpreted in conjunction with patient's self-reported problems.

  14. Detection of sentence boundaries and abbreviations in clinical narratives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background In Western languages the period character is highly ambiguous, due to its double role as sentence delimiter and abbreviation marker. This is particularly relevant in clinical free-texts characterized by numerous anomalies in spelling, punctuation, vocabulary and with a high frequency of short forms. Methods The problem is addressed by two binary classifiers for abbreviation and sentence detection. A support vector machine exploiting a linear kernel is trained on different combinations of feature sets for each classification task. Feature relevance ranking is applied to investigate which features are important for the particular task. The methods are applied to German language texts from a medical record system, authored by specialized physicians. Results Two collections of 3,024 text snippets were annotated regarding the role of period characters for training and testing. Cohen's kappa resulted in 0.98. For abbreviation and sentence boundary detection we can report an unweighted micro-averaged F-measure using a 10-fold cross validation of 0.97 for the training set. For test set based evaluation we obtained an unweighted micro-averaged F-measure of 0.95 for abbreviation detection and 0.94 for sentence delineation. Language-dependent resources and rules were found to have less impact on abbreviation detection than on sentence delineation. Conclusions Sentence detection is an important task, which should be performed at the beginning of a text processing pipeline. For the text genre under scrutiny we showed that support vector machines exploiting a linear kernel produce state of the art results for sentence boundary detection. The results are comparable with other sentence boundary detection methods applied to English clinical texts. We identified abbreviation detection as a supportive task for sentence delineation. PMID:26099994

  15. Epidemiology of fatal and nonfatal injuries in the Avianca plane crash: Avianca Flight 052, January 25, 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Kahn, C.J.; Greensher, J.; Schechter, S.

    1992-11-01

    On January 25, 1990 Avianca Flight 052 crashed without a conflagration after running out of fuel; 73 persons died, 85 survived. Epidemiological, biostatistical, and related analytical methods were used for the analysis of decedent and survivor injury patterns and for the purpose of examining selected EMS and hospital issues-relative to disaster planning and incident management and response. Medical examiner and hospital records for all decedents and survivors were identified, abstracted, and coded using the International Classification of Diseases with Clinical Modifications, 9th Edition (ICD 9-CM) to determine the nature of injuries and comorbid conditions. Injury severity values were determined using the 1985 Abbreviated Injury Scale with Epidemiologic Modifications (AIS 85-EM).

  16. A new classification of ophthalmic disorders with standardized ophthalmic abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Spencer, L M; Spencer, G R

    1990-03-01

    A classification of ocular disorders has been developed that is both comprehensive and easy to use. Each disorder was assigned a unique abbreviation and cross referenced to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition (ICD-9). Ophthalmic procedures, medications, and other terms were similarly standardized and abbreviated. The result is a system of ophthalmic terminology that improves the quality of the medical record, facilitates ICD-9 coding, and makes computer data entry faster and more accurate. The system is published as a standard text with companion handbook. A computer program that uses the system also has been developed. PMID:2336279

  17. Sport injuries in enduro riders: a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Anil; Bagouri, Elmunzar O.; Gougoulias, Nikolaos; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction enduro is an off road motorcycling event. It is a fast, exciting adventure sport with increasing numbers of participants and competitions. Materials and methods we performed search of PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, and Embase databases using the following keywords ‘Enduro injuries’, ‘off-road motorcycle injuries’ and ‘Enduro sport’. We identified four studies which described the physiological characteristic of enduro riders and the injury pattern sustained by these athletes. Results hands, wrists and forearms are the predominant areas of overuse in enduro riders. The extremities are the most injured parts in enduro. However, 98% of these injuries are mild to moderate with abbreviated injury scale grades 1 and 2. Conclusion there is paucity of published data on enduro injuries. In depth understanding of the physiological aspect of enduro riders with close monitoring of injuries is needed to promote safety measures in enduro and to reduce risk factors of injury which in turn can help to make enduro a safe alternative to the other dangerous motorcycling sports. PMID:26605195

  18. Vulnerability Scale scores in female inpatients diagnosed with self-injurious behaviour, dissociative identity disorder, and major depression.

    PubMed

    Glover, H; Lader, W; Walker-O'Keefe, J

    1995-12-01

    For three groups of predominantly female inpatients scores on the Glover Vulnerability Scale were compared with each other and with those of a control sample. The four groups included individuals who were diagnosed with self-injurious behavior, females diagnosed with Dissociative Identity Disorder, females whose predominant diagnosis was Major Depressive Disorder, and female controls. Females with a trauma-related diagnosis (Groups 1 and 2) scored higher on the Glover Vulnerability Scale than Group 3. History of exposure to trauma or childhood abuse most clearly discriminated higher scores within the control sample. The findings highlighted the close relationship between histories of exposure to trauma and high scores on this scale. Additional analysis of these scores and those on the Glover Numbing Scale showed a close association between feelings of vulnerability and the numbing response.

  19. Correlation Between Euro NCAP Pedestrian Test Results and Injury Severity in Injury Crashes with Pedestrians and Bicyclists in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Strandroth, Johan; Sternlund, Simon; Lie, Anders; Tingvall, Claes; Rizzi, Matteo; Kullgren, Anders; Ohlin, Maria; Fredriksson, Rikard

    2014-11-01

    Pedestrians and bicyclists account for a significant share of deaths and serious injuries in the road transport system. The protection of pedestrians in car-to-pedestrian crashes has therefore been addressed by friendlier car fronts and since 1997, the European New Car Assessment Program (Euro NCAP) has assessed the level of protection for most car models available in Europe. In the current study, Euro NCAP pedestrian scoring was compared with real-life injury outcomes in car-to-pedestrian and car-tobicyclist crashes occurring in Sweden. Approximately 1200 injured pedestrians and 2000 injured bicyclists were included in the study. Groups of cars with low, medium and high pedestrian scores were compared with respect to pedestrian injury severity on the Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (MAIS)-level and risk of permanent medical impairment (RPMI). Significant injury reductions to both pedestrians and bicyclists were found between low and high performing cars. For pedestrians, the reduction of MAIS2+, MAIS3+, RPMI1+ and RPMI10+ ranged from 20-56% and was significant on all levels except for MAIS3+ injuries. Pedestrian head injuries had the highest reduction, 80-90% depending on level of medical impairment. For bicyclist, an injury reduction was only observed between medium and high performing cars. Significant injury reductions were found for all body regions. It was also found that cars fitted with autonomous emergency braking including pedestrian detection might have a 60-70% lower crash involvement than expected. Based on these results, it was recommended that pedestrian protection are implemented on a global scale to provide protection for vulnerable road users worldwide.

  20. Correlation Between Euro NCAP Pedestrian Test Results and Injury Severity in Injury Crashes with Pedestrians and Bicyclists in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Strandroth, Johan; Sternlund, Simon; Lie, Anders; Tingvall, Claes; Rizzi, Matteo; Kullgren, Anders; Ohlin, Maria; Fredriksson, Rikard

    2014-11-01

    Pedestrians and bicyclists account for a significant share of deaths and serious injuries in the road transport system. The protection of pedestrians in car-to-pedestrian crashes has therefore been addressed by friendlier car fronts and since 1997, the European New Car Assessment Program (Euro NCAP) has assessed the level of protection for most car models available in Europe. In the current study, Euro NCAP pedestrian scoring was compared with real-life injury outcomes in car-to-pedestrian and car-tobicyclist crashes occurring in Sweden. Approximately 1200 injured pedestrians and 2000 injured bicyclists were included in the study. Groups of cars with low, medium and high pedestrian scores were compared with respect to pedestrian injury severity on the Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (MAIS)-level and risk of permanent medical impairment (RPMI). Significant injury reductions to both pedestrians and bicyclists were found between low and high performing cars. For pedestrians, the reduction of MAIS2+, MAIS3+, RPMI1+ and RPMI10+ ranged from 20-56% and was significant on all levels except for MAIS3+ injuries. Pedestrian head injuries had the highest reduction, 80-90% depending on level of medical impairment. For bicyclist, an injury reduction was only observed between medium and high performing cars. Significant injury reductions were found for all body regions. It was also found that cars fitted with autonomous emergency braking including pedestrian detection might have a 60-70% lower crash involvement than expected. Based on these results, it was recommended that pedestrian protection are implemented on a global scale to provide protection for vulnerable road users worldwide. PMID:26192956

  1. Permanent sequelae in sports injuries: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, A.; Di, B; Messi, G.; Gazzola, G.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To identify permanent sequelae after sports injuries in children and adolescents.
METHODS—In 1985, a prospective register was drawn up of all sports related injuries reported that year by the residents of Trieste, Italy aged 6-15 years. Moderate to severe injuries (scoring ⩾ 2 on the abbreviated injury scale (AIS)) were the object of a longitudinal clinical study. In 1988, 30.9% of the 220 subjects enrolled had sequelae. A further follow up was undertaken in 1997.
RESULTS—The follow up in 1997 involved 54 subjects (26 girls; average age 24.5 years). Subjective and objective sequelae, by now considered to be permanent, were found in 61.1%, corresponding to 15% of the AIS ⩾ 2 injuries recorded in 1985. The prevalence of sequelae was similar in the two sexes, in relation to the child's age at time of injury, and in the different sports practised. It was higher in relation to the severity of the lesion (89% of AIS 3injuries examined, 56% of AIS 2 injuries) and to the type of lesion and its location. With regard to AIS ⩾ 2 injuries, permanent sequelae were found in 50% of ankle fractures, 43% of elbow fractures, 33% of leg/foot fractures, 25% of knee sprains, and 23% of ankle sprains.
CONCLUSIONS—The frequency of sequelae in sports injuries in children and adolescents is high. The risk appears to be connected to certain anatomical and functional age characteristics. Prevention strategies should include specific assessment of physical fitness and adequate follow up after the accident, particularly rehabilitation.

 PMID:10490437

  2. 40 CFR 87.2 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acronyms and abbreviations. 87.2 Section 87.2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES General Provisions § 87.2 Acronyms...

  3. Children's Text Messaging: Abbreviations, Input Methods and Links with Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, N.; Bushnell, C.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of mobile phone text-messaging method (predictive and multi-press) and experience (in texters and non-texters) on children's textism use and understanding. It also examined popular claims that the use of text-message abbreviations, or "textese" spelling, is associated with poor literacy skills. A sample of 86…

  4. 40 CFR 1037.805 - Symbols, acronyms, and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Symbols, acronyms, and abbreviations. 1037.805 Section 1037.805 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Definitions and Other Reference Information § 1037.805 Symbols,...

  5. Is It Necessary To Create Abbreviations of Signed Languages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Yerker

    2001-01-01

    Suggests considering the following before creating abbreviations of sign languages: the recognition of signed languages as official languages; the standardization of signed languages; the existence of different signed languages using the same spoken language as a substitute language; whether attention should be given to countries whose names share…

  6. 40 CFR 86.1804-01 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1804-01 Acronyms and abbreviations. The following... per hour. mV—Millivolt N2—Nitrogen. NDIR—Nondispersive infrared. NLEV—Refers to the National Low... oxide. No.—Number. O2—Oxygen. OEM—Original equipment manufacturer. NO2—Nitrogen dioxide. NOX—Oxides...

  7. Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Planning Template for Primary Care Offices

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Plan Template for Primary Care Provider Offices is intended to assist primary care providers and office managers with preparing their offices for quickly putting a plan in place to handle an increase in patient calls and visits, whether during the 2009-2010 influenza season or future influenza seasons.

  8. 40 CFR 205.155 - Motorcycle class and manufacturer abbreviation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Motorcycle class and manufacturer abbreviation. 205.155 Section 205.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles §...

  9. 40 CFR 205.155 - Motorcycle class and manufacturer abbreviation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motorcycle class and manufacturer abbreviation. 205.155 Section 205.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles §...

  10. 40 CFR 205.155 - Motorcycle class and manufacturer abbreviation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motorcycle class and manufacturer abbreviation. 205.155 Section 205.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles §...

  11. 40 CFR 205.155 - Motorcycle class and manufacturer abbreviation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motorcycle class and manufacturer abbreviation. 205.155 Section 205.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles §...

  12. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  13. 40 CFR 96.203 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR SO2 Trading Program General Provisions § 96.203 Measurements, abbreviations, and...—nitrogen oxides O2—oxygen ppm—parts per million scfh—standard cubic feet per hour SO2—sulfur dioxide...

  14. 40 CFR 96.203 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR SO2 Trading Program General Provisions § 96.203 Measurements, abbreviations, and...—nitrogen oxides O2—oxygen ppm—parts per million scfh—standard cubic feet per hour SO2—sulfur dioxide...

  15. 40 CFR 96.203 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR STATE IMPLEMENTATION PLANS CAIR SO2 Trading Program General Provisions § 96.203 Measurements, abbreviations, and...—nitrogen oxides O2—oxygen ppm—parts per million scfh—standard cubic feet per hour SO2—sulfur dioxide...

  16. 40 CFR 86.1804-01 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1804-01 Acronyms and abbreviations. The following...—Gross vehicle weight rating. H2O—Water. HC—Hydrocarbon(s). HCHO—Formaldehyde. HDV—Heavy-duty vehicle...). SAE—Society of Automotive Engineers. SBC—Standard Bench Cycle SFTP—Supplemental Federal Test...

  17. 7 CFR 772.2 - Abbreviations and Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Abbreviations. AMPAssociation-Type Minor Program loan; CFRCode of Federal Regulations; FOFarm Ownership Loan; FSAFarm Service Agency; IMPIndividual-Type Minor Program loan; OLOperating Loan; USDAUnited States Department of Agriculture. (b) Definitions. Association-Type Minor Program loans (AMP): Loans to...

  18. 24 CFR 91.235 - Special case; abbreviated consolidated plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... that submit an abbreviated consolidated plan pursuant to 24 CFR 570.440. For the CDBG program, an... 24 CFR part 570, subpart D, and is not expected to be a participating jurisdiction in the HOME program under 24 CFR part 92, as well as an Insular Area that is a HOME or CDBG grantee, may submit...

  19. 24 CFR 91.235 - Special case; abbreviated consolidated plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... that submit an abbreviated consolidated plan pursuant to 24 CFR 570.440. For the CDBG program, an... 24 CFR part 570, subpart D, and is not expected to be a participating jurisdiction in the HOME program under 24 CFR part 92, as well as an Insular Area that is a HOME or CDBG grantee, may submit...

  20. 40 CFR 72.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 72.3 Section 72.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Program General Provisions § 72.3...

  1. 40 CFR 72.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 72.3 Section 72.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Program General Provisions § 72.3...

  2. 40 CFR 72.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 72.3 Section 72.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Program General Provisions § 72.3...

  3. 40 CFR 72.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 72.3 Section 72.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Program General Provisions § 72.3...

  4. 40 CFR 72.3 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 72.3 Section 72.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Program General Provisions § 72.3...

  5. 38 CFR 21.8010 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth... abbreviations. For the purposes of this subpart: Covered birth defect means the same as defined at § 3.815(c)(3... title who has a covered birth defect other than a birth defect described in § 3.815(a)(2)....

  6. 38 CFR 21.8010 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth... abbreviations. For the purposes of this subpart: Covered birth defect means the same as defined at § 3.815(c)(3... title who has a covered birth defect other than a birth defect described in § 3.815(a)(2)....

  7. 38 CFR 21.8010 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth... abbreviations. For the purposes of this subpart: Covered birth defect means the same as defined at § 3.815(c)(3... title who has a covered birth defect other than a birth defect described in § 3.815(a)(2)....

  8. 38 CFR 21.8010 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth... abbreviations. For the purposes of this subpart: Covered birth defect means the same as defined at § 3.815(c)(3... title who has a covered birth defect other than a birth defect described in § 3.815(a)(2)....

  9. 7 CFR 1755.900 - Abbreviations and Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to §§ 1755.901 and 1755.902: (a) Abbreviations. (1) ADSSAll dielectric self-supporting; (2...) Dielectric cable means a cable which has neither metallic members nor other electrically conductive materials... dielectric material that guides light. (24) Optical point discontinuities means the localized deviations...

  10. 7 CFR 1755.900 - Abbreviations and Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to §§ 1755.901 and 1755.902: (a) Abbreviations. (1) ADSSAll dielectric self-supporting; (2...) Dielectric cable means a cable which has neither metallic members nor other electrically conductive materials... dielectric material that guides light. (24) Optical point discontinuities means the localized deviations...

  11. 7 CFR 1755.900 - Abbreviations and Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to §§ 1755.901 and 1755.902: (a) Abbreviations. (1) ADSSAll dielectric self-supporting; (2...) Dielectric cable means a cable which has neither metallic members nor other electrically conductive materials... dielectric material that guides light. (24) Optical point discontinuities means the localized deviations...

  12. 7 CFR 1755.900 - Abbreviations and Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to §§ 1755.901 and 1755.902: (a) Abbreviations. (1) ADSSAll dielectric self-supporting; (2...) Dielectric cable means a cable which has neither metallic members nor other electrically conductive materials... dielectric material that guides light. (24) Optical point discontinuities means the localized deviations...

  13. 7 CFR 4280.302 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions and abbreviations. 4280.302 Section 4280.302 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS AND GRANTS Rural...

  14. 7 CFR 4280.302 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions and abbreviations. 4280.302 Section 4280.302 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS AND GRANTS Rural...

  15. 7 CFR 4280.302 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions and abbreviations. 4280.302 Section 4280.302 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS AND GRANTS Rural...

  16. 7 CFR 4280.302 - Definitions and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definitions and abbreviations. 4280.302 Section 4280.302 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS AND GRANTS Rural...

  17. 40 CFR 96.103 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 96.103 Section 96.103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS FOR...

  18. 40 CFR 97.603 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 97.603 Section 97.603 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2...

  19. 40 CFR 97.503 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 97.503 Section 97.503 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX...

  20. 40 CFR 97.403 - Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Measurements, abbreviations, and acronyms. 97.403 Section 97.403 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX...

  1. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 806 - Abbreviations and Acronyms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 806 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM Pt. 806, App. B Appendix B to Part 806—Abbreviations and Acronyms AFCA—Air Force Communications Agency AFCIC—Air Force Communications and Information Center...

  2. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 806 - Abbreviations and Acronyms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 806 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM Pt. 806, App. B Appendix B to Part 806—Abbreviations and Acronyms AFCA—Air Force Communications Agency AFCIC—Air Force Communications and Information Center...

  3. 32 CFR 507.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Explanation of abbreviations and terms. 507.3 Section 507.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL... times actual size, showing placement of stitches, color and size of yarn and number of stitches....

  4. 32 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Abbreviations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Abbreviations F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS..., Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville Pt. 552, Subpt. M, App. F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part...

  5. 32 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Abbreviations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Abbreviations F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS..., Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville Pt. 552, Subpt. M, App. F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part...

  6. 32 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Abbreviations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Abbreviations F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS..., Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville Pt. 552, Subpt. M, App. F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part...

  7. 32 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Abbreviations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Abbreviations F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Land Use Policy for Fort...

  8. 32 CFR 634.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Explanation of abbreviations and terms. 634.3 Section 634.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Introduction § 634.3 Explanation...

  9. 27 CFR 19.726 - Authorized abbreviations to identify spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... records: Kinds of spirits Abbreviations Alcohol A Brandy BR Bourbon Whisky BW Canadian Whisky CNW Completely Denatured Alcohol CDA Corn Whisky CW Grain Spirits GS Irish Whisky IW Light Whisky LW Malt Whisky MW Neutral Spirits NS Neutral Spirits Grain NSG Rye Whisky RW Scotch Whisky SW Specially...

  10. 32 CFR Appendix F to Subpart M of... - Abbreviations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Abbreviations F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS..., Yakima Training Center, and Camp Bonneville Pt. 552, Subpt. M, App. F Appendix F to Subpart M of Part...

  11. 32 CFR 651.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Explanation of abbreviations and terms. 651.3 Section 651.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.3 Explanation...

  12. 32 CFR 651.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Explanation of abbreviations and terms. 651.3 Section 651.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.3 Explanation...

  13. 32 CFR 651.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Explanation of abbreviations and terms. 651.3 Section 651.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.3 Explanation...

  14. 32 CFR 651.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Explanation of abbreviations and terms. 651.3 Section 651.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.3 Explanation...

  15. 32 CFR 651.3 - Explanation of abbreviations and terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Explanation of abbreviations and terms. 651.3 Section 651.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.3 Explanation...

  16. 76 FR 26307 - Guidance for Industry on the Submission of Summary Bioequivalence Data for Abbreviated New Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... Bioequivalence Data for Abbreviated New Drug Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Submission of Summary Bioequivalence Data for Abbreviated New Drug Applications.'' The guidance is intended to assist abbreviated new drug application (ANDA) applicants...

  17. 78 FR 12048 - Gulf Shore Energy Partners, LP; Notice of Abbreviated Application for Limited Amendment to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Gulf Shore Energy Partners, LP; Notice of Abbreviated Application for Limited Amendment to Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity On February 11, 2013, Gulf Shore Energy Partners, LP (``Gulf Shore''), filed an abbreviated application for limited amendment...

  18. 76 FR 13880 - Investigational New Drug Applications and Abbreviated New Drug Applications; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 312 and 314 Investigational New Drug Applications and Abbreviated New Drug Applications; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... amending its investigational new drug application (IND) regulations and abbreviated new drug...

  19. Patterns in deer-related traffic injuries over a decade: the Mayo clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Our American College of Surgeons Level 1 Trauma Center serves a rural population. As a result, there is a unique set of accidents that are not present in an urban environment such as deer related motor vehicle crashes (dMVC). We characterized injury patterns between motorcycle/all-terrain vehicles (MCC) and automobile (MVC) crashes related to dMVC (deer motor vehicle crash) with the hypotheses that MCC will present with higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) and that it would be related to whether the driver struck the deer or swerved. Methods The records of 157 consecutive patients evaluated at our institution for injury related to dMVC from January 1st, 1997 to December 31st, 2006 were reviewed from our prospectively collected trauma database. Demographic, clinical, and crash specific parameters were abstracted. Injury severity was analyzed by the Abbreviated Injury Scale score for each body region as well as the overall Injury Severity Score (ISS). Results Motorcycle crashes presented with a higher median ISS than MVCs (14 vs 5, p < 0.001). Median Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS) of the spine for MCC riders was higher (3 vs 0, p < 0.001) if they swerved rather than collided. Seventy-seven percent of riders were not wearing a helmet which did not result in a statistically significant increase in median ISS (16 vs 10), head AIS (2 vs 0) or spine AIS (0 vs 0). Within the MVC group, there was no difference between swerving and hitting the deer in any AIS group. Forty-seven percent of drivers were not wearing seat belts which resulted in similar median ISS (6 vs 5) and AIS of all body regions. Conclusions Motorcycle operators suffered higher ISS. There were no significant differences in median ISS if a driver involved in a deer-related motor vehicle crash swerved rather than collided, was helmeted, or restrained. PMID:20716341

  20. Has the pendulum swung too far? The impact of missed abdominal injuries in the era of nonoperative management.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Lindsay M; Christmas, A Britton; Deaugustinis, Matthew; Gordon, Latiffany; Head, Karen; Jacobs, David G; Sing, Ronald F

    2009-07-01

    Nonoperative management for traumatic injuries has significantly influenced trauma care during the last decade. We undertook this study to assess the impact of nontherapeutic laparotomies for suspected abdominal injuries compared with delayed laparotomies for questionable abdominal injuries for patients with abdominal trauma. The records of patients admitted to the trauma service between 2002 and 2007 who underwent laparotomies deemed nontherapeutic or delayed were retrospectively reviewed. Demographics, severity of injury, management scheme, and outcome data were analyzed. Sixteen patients underwent delayed laparotomies, whereas 26 patients incurred nontherapeutic laparotomies. Injury severity scores, Glasgow coma scale scores, abdominal abbreviated injury scale score (AIS), and age were similar for both populations. Delayed laparotomies occurred an average of 7 +/- 9 days postinjury. Intensive care unit length of stay (26 +/- 24 vs 10 +/- 6 days), hospital length of stay (40 +/- 37 vs 11 +/- 10 days), ventilator days (31 +/- 29 vs 11 +/- 10), and number of abdominal operative procedures (1.9 +/- 1.5 vs 1 +/- 0) were significantly higher in the delayed laparotomies group versus the nontherapeutic laparotomies group, respectively. Delayed diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries yielded a significantly increased morbidity and mortality. During the evolving era of technological imaging for traumatic injuries, we must not allow the nonoperative pendulum to swing too far.

  1. 49 CFR 1500.3 - Terms and abbreviations used in this chapter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Terms and abbreviations used in this chapter. 1500... APPLICABILITY, TERMS, AND ABBREVIATIONS § 1500.3 Terms and abbreviations used in this chapter. As used in this chapter: Administrator means the Under Secretary of Transportation for Security identified in 49...

  2. Medical Efforts and Injury Patterns of Military Hospital Patients Following the 2013 Lushan Earthquake in China: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Peng; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Yipeng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate medical efforts and injury profiles of victims of the Lushan earthquake admitted to three military hospitals. This study retrospectively investigated the clinical records of 266 admitted patients evacuated from the Lushan earthquake area. The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS-2005) was used to identify the severity of each injury. Patient demographic data, complaints, diagnoses, injury types, prognosis, means of transportation, and cause of injury were all reviewed individually. The statistical analysis of the study was conducted primarily using descriptive statistics. Of the 266 patients, 213 (80.1%) were admitted in the first two days. A total of 521 injury diagnoses were recorded in 266 patients. Earthquake-related injuries were primarily caused by buildings collapsing (38.4%) and victims being struck by objects (33.8%); the most frequently injured anatomic sites were the lower extremities and pelvis (34.2%) and surface area of the body (17.9%). Fracture (41.5%) was the most frequent injury, followed by soft tissue injury (27.5%), but crush syndrome was relatively low (1.2%) due to the special housing structures in the Lushan area. The most commonly used procedure was suture and dressings (33.7%), followed by open reduction and internal fixation (21.9%).The results of this study help formulate recommendations to improve future disaster relief and emergency planning in remote, isolated, and rural regions of developing countries. PMID:26334286

  3. Medical Efforts and Injury Patterns of Military Hospital Patients Following the 2013 Lushan Earthquake in China: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Peng; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Yipeng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-08-31

    The aim of this paper is to investigate medical efforts and injury profiles of victims of the Lushan earthquake admitted to three military hospitals. This study retrospectively investigated the clinical records of 266 admitted patients evacuated from the Lushan earthquake area. The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS-2005) was used to identify the severity of each injury. Patient demographic data, complaints, diagnoses, injury types, prognosis, means of transportation, and cause of injury were all reviewed individually. The statistical analysis of the study was conducted primarily using descriptive statistics. Of the 266 patients, 213 (80.1%) were admitted in the first two days. A total of 521 injury diagnoses were recorded in 266 patients. Earthquake-related injuries were primarily caused by buildings collapsing (38.4%) and victims being struck by objects (33.8%); the most frequently injured anatomic sites were the lower extremities and pelvis (34.2%) and surface area of the body (17.9%). Fracture (41.5%) was the most frequent injury, followed by soft tissue injury (27.5%), but crush syndrome was relatively low (1.2%) due to the special housing structures in the Lushan area. The most commonly used procedure was suture and dressings (33.7%), followed by open reduction and internal fixation (21.9%).The results of this study help formulate recommendations to improve future disaster relief and emergency planning in remote, isolated, and rural regions of developing countries.

  4. Numbing scale scores in female psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with self-injurious behavior, dissociative identity disorder, and major depression.

    PubMed

    Glover, H; Lader, W; Walker-O'Keefe, J; Goodnick, P

    1997-05-01

    Female inpatients engaged in self-injurious behavior (SIB) and females diagnosed with Dissociative Identify Disorder (DID) scored higher on the Glover Numbing Scale (GNS) than female inpatients diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The DID sample showed a multi-modal distribution of scores, and the MDD sample showed a bimodal distribution with a significant difference between the means of the two subgroups. An additional subsample of outpatient males diagnosed with MDD also evidenced a bimodal distribution of scores with a similar spread between the two means. Scores on the Beck Depression Inventory did not discriminate the latter two subgroups.

  5. Synonym extraction and abbreviation expansion with ensembles of semantic spaces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Terminologies that account for variation in language use by linking synonyms and abbreviations to their corresponding concept are important enablers of high-quality information extraction from medical texts. Due to the use of specialized sub-languages in the medical domain, manual construction of semantic resources that accurately reflect language use is both costly and challenging, often resulting in low coverage. Although models of distributional semantics applied to large corpora provide a potential means of supporting development of such resources, their ability to isolate synonymy from other semantic relations is limited. Their application in the clinical domain has also only recently begun to be explored. Combining distributional models and applying them to different types of corpora may lead to enhanced performance on the tasks of automatically extracting synonyms and abbreviation-expansion pairs. Results A combination of two distributional models – Random Indexing and Random Permutation – employed in conjunction with a single corpus outperforms using either of the models in isolation. Furthermore, combining semantic spaces induced from different types of corpora – a corpus of clinical text and a corpus of medical journal articles – further improves results, outperforming a combination of semantic spaces induced from a single source, as well as a single semantic space induced from the conjoint corpus. A combination strategy that simply sums the cosine similarity scores of candidate terms is generally the most profitable out of the ones explored. Finally, applying simple post-processing filtering rules yields substantial performance gains on the tasks of extracting abbreviation-expansion pairs, but not synonyms. The best results, measured as recall in a list of ten candidate terms, for the three tasks are: 0.39 for abbreviations to long forms, 0.33 for long forms to abbreviations, and 0.47 for synonyms. Conclusions This study demonstrates

  6. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories.

  7. 40 CFR 86.1804-01 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1804-01 Acronyms and abbreviations. The following... per hour. mV—Millivolt N2—Nitrogen. NDIR—Nondispersive infrared. NLEV—Refers to the National Low... oxide. No.—Number. O2—Oxygen. OEM—Original equipment manufacturer. NO2—Nitrogen dioxide. NOX—Oxides...

  8. 40 CFR 86.1804-01 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1804-01 Acronyms and abbreviations. The following... per hour. mV—Millivolt N2—Nitrogen. NDIR—Nondispersive infrared. NLEV—Refers to the National Low... oxide. No.—Number. O2—Oxygen. OEM—Original equipment manufacturer. NO2—Nitrogen dioxide. NOX—Oxides...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1804-01 - Acronyms and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1804-01 Acronyms and abbreviations. The following... per hour. mV—Millivolt N2—Nitrogen. NDIR—Nondispersive infrared. NLEV—Refers to the National Low... oxide. No.—Number. O2—Oxygen. OEM—Original equipment manufacturer. NO2—Nitrogen dioxide. NOX—Oxides...

  10. Space transportation system and associated payloads: Glossary, acronyms, and abbreviations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A collection of some of the acronyms and abbreviations now in everyday use in the shuttle world is presented. It is a combination of lists that were prepared at Marshall Space Flight Center and Kennedy and Johnson Space Centers, places where intensive shuttle activities are being carried out. This list is intended as a guide or reference and should not be considered to have the status and sanction of a dictionary.

  11. 40 CFR 60.3 - Units and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.3 Units and abbreviations. Used... feet at standard conditions dscm—dry cubic meter at standard conditions eq—equivalent °F—degree Fahrenheit ft—feet gal—gallon gr—grain g-eq—gram equivalent hr—hour in—inch k—1,000 l—liter lpm—liter...

  12. 40 CFR 60.3 - Units and abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.3 Units and abbreviations. Used... feet at standard conditions dscm—dry cubic meter at standard conditions eq—equivalent °F—degree Fahrenheit ft—feet gal—gallon gr—grain g-eq—gram equivalent hr—hour in—inch k—1,000 l—liter lpm—liter...

  13. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  14. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bjugstad, Kimberly B; Rael, Leonard T; Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta S; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  15. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  16. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bjugstad, Kimberly B; Rael, Leonard T; Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta S; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  17. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Injury-Psychological Readiness to Return to Sport scale to Persian language.

    PubMed

    Naghdi, Soofia; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Farhadi, Yasaman; Ebadi, Safoora; Entezary, Ebrahim; Glazer, Douglas

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and provide validation statistics for the Persian Injury-Psychological Readiness to Return to Sport scale (I-PRRS) following a cross-sectional and prospective cohort study design. The I-PRRS was forward/back-translated and culturally adapted into Persian language. The Persian I-PRRS was administered to 100 injured athletes (93 male; age 26.0 ± 5.6 years; time since injury 4.84 ± 6.4 months) and 50 healthy athletes (36 male; mean age 25.7 ± 6.0 years). The Persian I-PRRS was re-administered to 50 injured athletes at 1 week to examine test-retest reliability. There were no floor or ceiling effects confirming the content validity of Persian I-PRRS. The internal consistency reliability was good. Excellent test-retest reliability and agreement were demonstrated. The statistically significant difference in Persian I-PRRS total scores between the injured athletes and healthy athletes provides an evidence of discriminative validity. The Persian I-PRRS total scores were positively correlated with the Farsi Mood Scale (FARMS) total scores, showing construct validity. The principal component analysis indicated a two-factor solution consisting of "Confidence to play" and "Confidence in the injured body part and skill level". The Persian I-PRRS showed excellent reliability and validity and can be used to assess injured athletes' psychological readiness to return to sport among Persian-speaking populations. PMID:27618418

  18. A simple post hoc transformation that improves the metric properties of the BBB scale for rats with moderate to severe spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Adam R; Hook, Michelle A; Garcia, Guadalupe; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Beattie, Michael S; Grau, James W

    2004-11-01

    The Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) open field locomotor scale is a popular measure of functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). To examine the metric properties of the scale, we performed detailed analyses of BBB scores from 643 rats with moderate and severe SCI (12.5, 25, or 50 mm MASCIS) from two different laboratories. The analyses revealed that the BBB scale is ordinal in the most frequently used portion of the scale. Higher scores (14 and greater) were not frequently assigned in the dataset as animals with mild injuries were not sampled, making the ordinal nature of the upper end of the scale difficult to assess. The rare scores assigned in this range disproportionately increased variance. Under these conditions collapsing scores above 14 into one category increased effect size. Analysis of the lower region of the scale revealed that some scores (2 and 3) were rarely assigned, implying a discontinuity in the scale. The discontinuous nature of the lower portion of the scale presents a problem for both parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses. Pooling scores 2/3/4 eliminated the gap, enhancing the metric properties of the scale. Under the injury conditions evaluated, the transformation helped assure that the data were continuous and ordered. Further, interval durations were comparable across the entire range of the transformed scale, allowing application of parametric statistical techniques. The transformation should be applied in a post hoc fashion to reduce variability and increase power in cases where few scores fall in upper portion of the scale. PMID:15684652

  19. Word Sense Disambiguation of clinical abbreviations with hyperdimensional computing.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sungrim; Berster, Bjoern-Toby; Xu, Hua; Cohen, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Automated Word Sense Disambiguation in clinical documents is a prerequisite to accurate extraction of medical information. Emerging methods utilizing hyperdimensional computing present new approaches to this problem. In this paper, we evaluate one such approach, the Binary Spatter Code Word Sense Disambiguation algorithm, on 50 ambiguous abbreviation sets derived from clinical notes. This algorithm uses reversible vector transformations to encode ambiguous terms and their context-specific senses into vectors representing surrounding terms. The sense for a new context is then inferred from vectors representing the terms it contains. One-to-one BSC-WSD achieves average accuracy of 94.55% when considering the orientation and distance of neighboring terms relative to the target abbreviation, outperforming Support Vector Machine and Naïve Bayes classifiers. Furthermore, it is practical to deal with all 50 abbreviations in an identical manner using a single one-to-many BSC-WSD model with average accuracy of 93.91%, which is not possible with common machine learning algorithms.

  20. Development of an Abbreviated Form of the Penn Line Orientation Test Using Large Samples and Computerized Adaptive Test Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler M.; Scott, J. Cobb; Reise, Steven P.; Port, Allison M.; Jackson, Chad T.; Ruparel, Kosha; Savitt, Adam P.; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2015-01-01

    Visuospatial processing is a commonly assessed neurocognitive domain, with deficits linked to dysfunction in right posterior regions of the brain. With the growth of large-scale clinical research studies there is an increased need for efficient and scalable assessments of neurocognition, including visuospatial processing. The purpose of the current study was to use a novel method that combines item response theory (IRT) and computerized adaptive testing (CAT) approaches to create an abbreviated form of the computerized Penn Line Orientation Test (PLOT). The 24-item PLOT was administered to 8,498 youths (aged 8 to 21) as part of the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort study and, by web-based data collection, in an independent sample of 4,593 adults from Great Britain as part of a television documentary. IRT-based CAT simulations were used to select the best PLOT items for an abbreviated form by performing separate simulations in each group and choosing only items that were selected as useful (i.e., high item discrimination and in the appropriate difficulty range) in at least one of the simulations. Fifteen items were chosen for the final, short form of the PLOT, indicating substantial agreement among the models in how they evaluated each item's usefulness. Moreover, this abbreviated version performed comparably to the full version in tests of sensitivity to age and sex effects. This abbreviated version of the PLOT cuts administration time by 50% without detectable loss of information, which points to its feasibility for large-scale clinical and genomic studies. PMID:25822834

  1. Crash Injury Prediction and Vehicle Damage Reporting by Paramedics

    PubMed Central

    Vaca, Federico E.; Anderson, Craig L.; Herrera, Harold; Patel, Chirag; Silman, Eric F.; DeGuzman, Rhian; Lahham, Shadi; Kohl, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The accuracy of pre-hospital crash scene details and crash victim assessment has important implications for initial trauma care assessment and management. Similarly, it is known to influence physician perception of crash victim injury severity. The goal of this feasibility study was to examine paramedic accuracy in predicting crash victim injury profile, disability outcome at hospital discharge, and reporting vehicle damage with other crash variables. Methods: This prospective case series study was undertaken at a Southern California, Level I trauma center certified by the American College of Surgeons. Paramedics transporting crash injured motor vehicle occupants to our emergency department (ED)/trauma center were surveyed. We abstracted ED and in-patient records of injured vehicle occupants. Vehicle and crash scene data were obtained from a professional crash reconstruction, which included the assessment of deformation, crash forces, change in velocity, and the source of each injury. Results: We used survey, injury, and crash reconstruction data from 22 collision cases in the final analysis. The median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was five (range 1–24). No enrolled patients died, and none were severely disabled at the time of discharge from the hospital. The paramedic crash injury severity predictions were sensitive for an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) of 2–4. Paramedics often agreed with the crash reconstruction on restraint use, ejection, and other fatalities at the scene, and had lower levels of agreement for front airbag deployment, steering wheel damage, and window/windshield impact. Paramedics had 80% accuracy in predicting any disability at the time of hospital discharge. Conclusion: Paramedic prediction of injury profile was sensitive, and prediction of disability outcome at discharge was accurate when compared to discharge diagnosis. Their reporting of vehicle specific crash variables was less accurate. Further study should be undertaken to

  2. Intervention to reduce the use of unsafe abbreviations in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Alshaikh, Mashael; Mayet, Ahmed; Adam, Mansour; Ahmed, Yusuf; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effectiveness of a two-phase intervention designed to reduce the use of unsafe abbreviations. Methods An observational prospective study was conducted at the King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during May–September 2009. A list of unsafe abbreviations was formulated based on the recommendations of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. The first 7000 medication orders written at the beginning of each period were collected. Phase one of the intervention involved educating health care professionals about the dangers of using unsafe abbreviations. In the second phase of the intervention, a policy was approved that prohibited the use of unsafe abbreviations hospital-wide. Then, another educational campaign targeted toward prescribers was organized. Descriptive statistics are used in this paper to present the results. Results At baseline, we identified 1980 medication abbreviations used in 7000 medication orders (28.3%). Three months after phase one of the intervention, the number of abbreviations found in 7000 medication orders had decreased to 1489 (21.3%). Six months later, after phase two of the intervention, the number of abbreviations used had decreased to 710 (10%). During this phase, the use of all abbreviations had declined relative to the baseline and phase one use levels. The decrease in the use of abbreviations was statistically significant in all three periods (P < 0.001). Conclusion The implementation of a complex intervention program reduced the use of unsafe abbreviations by 65%. PMID:23960844

  3. A review of injury epidemiology in the UK and Europe: some methodological considerations in constructing rates

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Roxana; O'Brien, Sarah J; Lecky, Fiona E

    2009-01-01

    deal with the study design inconsistencies and the knowledge gaps identified across this review. Trauma registries contain injury data from hospitals within larger regions and code injury by Abbreviated Injury Scale enabling information on severity; these may be reliable data sources to improve understanding of injury epidemiology. PMID:19591670

  4. Criteria for level 1 and level 2 trauma codes: Are pelvic ring injuries undertriaged?

    PubMed Central

    Haws, Brittany E; Wuertzer, Scott; Raffield, Laura; Lenchik, Leon; Miller, Anna N

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association of unstable pelvic ring injuries with trauma code status. METHODS A retrospective review of all pelvic ring injuries at a single academic center from July 2010 to June 2013 was performed. The trauma registry was used to identify level 1 and level 2 trauma codes for each injury. The computed tomography scans in all patients were classified as stable or unstable using the Abbreviated Injury Scale. Pelvic injury classifications in level 1 and level 2 groups were compared. Patient disposition at discharge in level 1 and level 2 groups were also compared. RESULTS There were 108 level 1 and 130 level 2 blunt trauma admissions. In the level 1 group, 67% of pelvic injuries were classified as stable fracture patterns and 33% were classified as unstable. In the level 2 group, 62% of pelvic injuries were classified as stable fracture patterns and 38% were classified as unstable. level 1 trauma code was not associated with odds of having an unstable fracture pattern (OR = 0.83, 95%CI: 0.48-1.41, P = 0.485). In the level 1 group with unstable pelvic injuries, 33% were discharged to home, 36% to a rehabilitation facility, and 32% died. In the level 2 group with unstable pelvic injuries, 65% were discharged to home, 31% to a rehabilitation facility, and 4% died. For those with unstable pelvic fractures (n = 85), assignment of a level 2 trauma code was associated with reduced odds of death (OR = 0.07, 95%CI: 0.01-0.35, P = 0.001) as compared to being discharged to home. CONCLUSION Trauma code level assignment is not correlated with severity of pelvic injury. Because an unstable pelvis can lead to hemodynamic instability, these injuries may be undertriaged.

  5. Criteria for level 1 and level 2 trauma codes: Are pelvic ring injuries undertriaged?

    PubMed Central

    Haws, Brittany E; Wuertzer, Scott; Raffield, Laura; Lenchik, Leon; Miller, Anna N

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association of unstable pelvic ring injuries with trauma code status. METHODS A retrospective review of all pelvic ring injuries at a single academic center from July 2010 to June 2013 was performed. The trauma registry was used to identify level 1 and level 2 trauma codes for each injury. The computed tomography scans in all patients were classified as stable or unstable using the Abbreviated Injury Scale. Pelvic injury classifications in level 1 and level 2 groups were compared. Patient disposition at discharge in level 1 and level 2 groups were also compared. RESULTS There were 108 level 1 and 130 level 2 blunt trauma admissions. In the level 1 group, 67% of pelvic injuries were classified as stable fracture patterns and 33% were classified as unstable. In the level 2 group, 62% of pelvic injuries were classified as stable fracture patterns and 38% were classified as unstable. level 1 trauma code was not associated with odds of having an unstable fracture pattern (OR = 0.83, 95%CI: 0.48-1.41, P = 0.485). In the level 1 group with unstable pelvic injuries, 33% were discharged to home, 36% to a rehabilitation facility, and 32% died. In the level 2 group with unstable pelvic injuries, 65% were discharged to home, 31% to a rehabilitation facility, and 4% died. For those with unstable pelvic fractures (n = 85), assignment of a level 2 trauma code was associated with reduced odds of death (OR = 0.07, 95%CI: 0.01-0.35, P = 0.001) as compared to being discharged to home. CONCLUSION Trauma code level assignment is not correlated with severity of pelvic injury. Because an unstable pelvis can lead to hemodynamic instability, these injuries may be undertriaged. PMID:27622148

  6. The Effect of Nano-Scale Topography on Keratinocyte Phenotype and Wound Healing Following Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Suzanne M.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Wood, Fiona M.; Fear, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic modulation of tissue response is an important consideration in the design and manufacture of a biomaterial. In developing new tissue therapies for skin, all levels of architecture, including the nanoscale need to be considered. Here we show that keratinocyte phenotype is affected by nanoscale changes in topography with cell morphology, proliferation, and migration influenced by the pore size in anodic aluminum oxide membranes. A membrane with a pore size of 300 nm, which enhanced cell phenotype in vitro, was used as a dressing to cover a partial thickness burn injury in the pig. Wounds dressed with the membrane showed evidence of advanced healing with significantly less organizing granulation tissue and more mature epidermal layers than control wounds dressed with a standard burns dressing. The results demonstrate the importance of nanoscale topography in modulating keratinocyte phenotype and skin wound healing. PMID:21988618

  7. Motor Vehicle Crash–Related Injury Causation Scenarios for Spinal Injuries in Restrained Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    ZONFRILLO, MARK R.; LOCEY, CAITLIN M.; SCARFONE, STEVEN R.; ARBOGAST, KRISTY B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Motor vehicle crash (MVC)-related spinal injuries result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. The objective was to identify MVC-related injury causation scenarios for spinal injuries in restrained children. Methods This was a case series of occupants in MVCs from the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) data set. Occupants aged 0–17 years old with at least one Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 2+ severity spinal injury in vehicles model year 1990+ that did not experience a rollover were included. Unrestrained occupants, those not using the shoulder portion of the belt restraint, and those with child restraint gross misuse were excluded. Occupants with preexisting comorbidities contributing to spinal injury and occupants with limited injury information were also excluded. A multidisciplinary team retrospectively reviewed each case to determine injury causation scenarios (ICSs). Crash conditions, occupant and restraint characteristics, and injuries were qualitatively summarized. Results Fifty-nine cases met the study inclusion criteria and 17 were excluded. The 42 occupants included sustained 97 distinct AIS 2+ spinal injuries (27 cervical, 22 thoracic, and 48 lumbar; 80 AIS-2, 15 AIS-3, 1 AIS-5, and 1 AIS-6), with fracture as the most common injury type (80%). Spinal-injured occupants were most frequently in passenger cars (64%), and crash direction was most often frontal (62%). Mean delta-V was 51.3 km/h ± 19.4 km/h. The average occupant age was 12.4 ± 5.3 years old, and 48% were 16- to 17-year-olds. Thirty-six percent were right front passengers and 26% were drivers. Most occupants were lap and shoulder belt restrained (88%). Non-spinal AIS 2+ injuries included those of the lower extremity and pelvis (n = 56), head (n = 43), abdomen (n = 39), and thorax (n = 36). Spinal injury causation was typically due to flexion or lateral bending over the lap and or shoulder belt or child restraint harness, compression by occupant

  8. Parafoveal and foveal processing of abbreviations during eye fixations in reading: Making a case for case

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Timothy J.; Schotter, Elizabeth R.; Berry, Raymond W.; Rayner, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The processing of abbreviations in reading was examined with an eye movement experiment. Abbreviations were of two distinct types: Acronyms (abbreviations that can be read with the normal grapheme-phoneme correspondence rules, such as NASA) and initialisms (abbreviations in which the grapheme-phoneme correspondences are letter names, such as NCAA). Parafoveal and foveal processing of these abbreviations was assessed with the use of the boundary change paradigm (Rayner, 1975). Using this paradigm, previews of the abbreviations were either identical to the abbreviation (NASA or NCAA), orthographically legal (NUSO or NOBA), or illegal (NRSB or NRBA). The abbreviations were presented as capital letter strings within normal, predominantly lowercase sentences and also sentences in all capital letters such that the abbreviations would not be visually distinct. The results indicate that acronyms and initialisms undergo different processing during reading, and that readers can modulate their processing based on low-level visual cues (distinct capitalization) in parafoveal vision. In particular, readers may be biased to process capitalized letter strings as initialisms in parafoveal vision when the rest of the sentence is normal, lower case letters. PMID:21480754

  9. Assessing injury severity in bicyclists involved in traffic accidents to more effectively prevent fatal bicycle injuries in Japan.

    PubMed

    Gomei, Sayaka; Hitosugi, Masahito; Ikegami, Keiichi; Tokudome, Shogo

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between injury severity in bicyclists involved in traffic accidents and patient outcome or type of vehicle involved in order to propose effective measures to prevent fatal bicycle injuries. Hospital records were reviewed for all patients from 2007 to 2010 who had been involved in a traffic accident while riding a bicycle and were subsequently transferred to the Shock Trauma Center of Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital. Patient outcomes and type of vehicle that caused the injury were examined. The mechanism of injury, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score, and Injury Severity Score (ISS) of the patient were determined. A total of 115 patients' records were reviewed. The mean patient age was 47.1 ± 27.4 years. The average ISS was 23.9, with an average maximum AIS (MAIS) score of 3.7. The ISS, MAIS score, head AIS score, and chest AIS score were well correlated with patient outcome. The head AIS score was significantly higher in patients who had died (mean of 4.4); however, the ISS, MAIS score, and head AIS score did not differ significantly according to the type of vehicle involved in the accident. The mean head AIS scores were as high as 2.4 or more for accidents involving any type of vehicle. This study provides useful information for forensic pathologists who suspect head injuries in bicyclists involved in traffic accidents. To effectively reduce bicyclist fatalities from traffic accidents, helmet use should be required for all bicyclists.

  10. The Preventive Effect of Head Injury by Helmet Type in Motorcycle Crashes: A Rural Korean Single-Center Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kang-Min; Noble, Jennifer; Kim, Sang-Chul; Jeon, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Jin-Yong; Do, Han-Ho; Park, Sang-O; Lee, Kyeong-Ryong; Baek, Kwang-Je

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The goal of this study was to determine the preventive effect on head injury by helmet type: full face helmet (FFH), open face helmet (OFH), and half-coverage helmet (HCH). Methods. This is a retrospective observational study of motorcycle crash victims between June 2012 and May 2015 in a rural town in Korea. We performed multiple linear regression to predict the effect of each type of helmet compared to unhelmeted status in preventing head injury using dependent variables based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and applied logistic regression modeling to compare the incidence of head injury. Results. Of the 738 patients, the number of FFH patients was 33.5%, followed by unhelmeted (27.8%), OFH (17.6%), and HCH (13.0%) patients. The FFH and OFH group had a lower head maximum AIS than unhelmeted group (coefficient: −0.368, 95% CI: −0.559 to −0.177 and coefficient: −0.235, 95% CI: −0.459 to −0.010, resp.) and only FFHs experienced a reduction effect of severe and minor head injury (OR: 0.206, 95% CI: 0.080 to 0.533 and OR: 0.589, 95% CI: 0.377 to 0.920, resp.). Conclusions. FFHs and OFHs reduce the risk of head injury, and FFHs have a more preventive effect on head injury in motorcycle crashes. PMID:27340652

  11. The Preventive Effect of Head Injury by Helmet Type in Motorcycle Crashes: A Rural Korean Single-Center Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kang-Min; Noble, Jennifer; Kim, Sang-Chul; Jeon, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Jin-Yong; Do, Han-Ho; Park, Sang-O; Lee, Kyeong-Ryong; Baek, Kwang-Je

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The goal of this study was to determine the preventive effect on head injury by helmet type: full face helmet (FFH), open face helmet (OFH), and half-coverage helmet (HCH). Methods. This is a retrospective observational study of motorcycle crash victims between June 2012 and May 2015 in a rural town in Korea. We performed multiple linear regression to predict the effect of each type of helmet compared to unhelmeted status in preventing head injury using dependent variables based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and applied logistic regression modeling to compare the incidence of head injury. Results. Of the 738 patients, the number of FFH patients was 33.5%, followed by unhelmeted (27.8%), OFH (17.6%), and HCH (13.0%) patients. The FFH and OFH group had a lower head maximum AIS than unhelmeted group (coefficient: -0.368, 95% CI: -0.559 to -0.177 and coefficient: -0.235, 95% CI: -0.459 to -0.010, resp.) and only FFHs experienced a reduction effect of severe and minor head injury (OR: 0.206, 95% CI: 0.080 to 0.533 and OR: 0.589, 95% CI: 0.377 to 0.920, resp.). Conclusions. FFHs and OFHs reduce the risk of head injury, and FFHs have a more preventive effect on head injury in motorcycle crashes. PMID:27340652

  12. Cutoff score on the apathy evaluation scale in subjects with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Mel B; Burke, David T; O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese; Goldstein, Richard; Jacob, Loyal; Kettell, Jennifer

    2002-06-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to determine a cutoff score on the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) that predicts a clinician's designation of a subject with TBI as apathetic or not. Forty-five outpatients with TBI completed the AES-S, and 37 family members, friends, or significant others filled out the AES-I. Three clinicians prospectively gave their impressions of the presence or absence of apathy and retrospectively chose the degree of apathy on a 7-point subjective rating scale. The data was analysed by logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. No cutoff score on the AES-S or AES-I was found to have reasonable sensitivity and specificity with respect to the ability to predict the clinician's designation of a subject as apathetic. The AES requires further study if it is to be used to measure apathy following TBI.

  13. Home and other nontraffic injuries among children and youth in a high-income Middle Eastern country: a trauma registry study.

    PubMed

    Grivna, Michal; Barss, Peter; Stanculescu, Cristina; Eid, Hani O; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2015-03-01

    A trauma registry in the United Arab Emirates was used to ascertain nontraffic injuries of 0- to 19-year-olds. The registry's value for prevention was assessed. A total of 292 children and youth with nontraffic injuries were admitted for >24 hours at surgical wards of the main trauma hospital in Al Ain region during 36 months in 2003-2006. Injuries were analyzed by external cause, location, body part, and severity. Nontraffic represented 60% (n = 292) of child and youth injuries. Incidence/100 000 person-years was 91 for males, 43 for females. Unintentional included falls 65% (n = 191), burns 17% (n = 49), animal-related (mainly camel) 3% (n = 10), and others 10% (n = 29). Intentional accounted for 4% (n = 13). Falls affected all ages, burns mainly 1- to 4-year-olds. Of the injuries, 70% occurred at home. Most frequent and severe injuries measured by the Injury Severity Score and Abbreviated Injury Scale involved extremities. Prevention of home falls for all ages and burns of 1- to 4-year-olds are priorities. Registries should cover pediatric wards and include data on fall locations and hazardous products.

  14. 78 FR 25279 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Abbreviated New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Abbreviated New Animal Drug Applications AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... solicits comments on the paperwork associated with abbreviated new animal drug applications submitted to the Center for Veterinary Medicine, FDA. DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on...

  15. 21 CFR 314.105 - Approval of an application and an abbreviated application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Approval of an application and an abbreviated application. 314.105 Section 314.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... abbreviated application. (a) The Food and Drug Administration will approve an application and send...

  16. 21 CFR 314.105 - Approval of an application and an abbreviated application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Approval of an application and an abbreviated application. 314.105 Section 314.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... abbreviated application. (a) The Food and Drug Administration will approve an application and send...

  17. 21 CFR 314.105 - Approval of an application and an abbreviated application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Approval of an application and an abbreviated application. 314.105 Section 314.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... abbreviated application. (a) The Food and Drug Administration will approve an application and send...

  18. 21 CFR 314.105 - Approval of an application and an abbreviated application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Approval of an application and an abbreviated application. 314.105 Section 314.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... abbreviated application. (a) The Food and Drug Administration will approve an application and send...

  19. 21 CFR 314.105 - Approval of an application and an abbreviated application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Approval of an application and an abbreviated application. 314.105 Section 314.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... abbreviated application. (a) The Food and Drug Administration will approve an application and send...

  20. 78 FR 26785 - Guidance for Industry: Implementation of an Acceptable Abbreviated Donor History Questionnaire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ...DHQ documents under 21 CFR 601.12. In the Federal Register of October 24, 2011 (76 FR 65735), FDA... Abbreviated Donor History Questionnaire and Accompanying Materials for Use in Screening Frequent Donors of... ``Guidance for Industry: Implementation of an Acceptable Abbreviated Donor History Questionnaire...

  1. 21 CFR 314.101 - Filing an application and receiving an abbreviated new drug application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.101 Filing an application and receiving an abbreviated new drug application. (a)(1) Within 60 days after FDA receives...

  2. 21 CFR 314.153 - Suspension of approval of an abbreviated new drug application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension of approval of an abbreviated new drug... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA... new drug application. (a) Suspension of approval. The approval of an abbreviated new drug...

  3. 21 CFR 314.101 - Filing an application and receiving an abbreviated new drug application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... new drug application. 314.101 Section 314.101 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.101 Filing an application and receiving an abbreviated new drug application. (a)(1) Within 60 days after FDA receives...

  4. 77 FR 50702 - Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited; Withdrawal of Approval of 27 Abbreviated New Drug Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Abbreviated New Drug Applications AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. ] SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is withdrawing approval of 27 abbreviated new drug applications... introduction into interstate commerce of products without approved new drug applications violates section...

  5. 75 FR 37295 - Change of Address; Abbreviated New Drug Applications; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 312 and 314 Change of Address; Abbreviated New... the address for applicants to submit abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) and ANDA amendments... new drug applications (INDs) for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies in humans that...

  6. Automatic Word Sense Disambiguation of Acronyms and Abbreviations in Clinical Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Sungrim

    2012-01-01

    The use of acronyms and abbreviations is increasing profoundly in the clinical domain in large part due to the greater adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems and increased electronic documentation within healthcare. A single acronym or abbreviation may have multiple different meanings or senses. Comprehending the proper meaning of an…

  7. Effectiveness of Booster Seats Compared With No Restraint or Seat Belt Alone for Crash Injury Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoguang; Griffin, Russell; McGwin, Gerald; Allison, David B.; Heymsfield, Steven B.; He, Wei; Zhu, Shankuan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of belt-positioning booster seats, compared with no restraint use and with seat belt use only, during motor vehicle crashes among U.S. children. Methods This was a retrospective matched cohort study with data from the 1998 through 2009 National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) Crashworthiness Data System (CDS). The study sample consisted of children aged 0 to 10 years who were not seated in the front seat of the vehicle. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the risk of overall, fatal, and regional body injury. Results Children using seat belts in belt-positioning booster seats experienced less overall injury (Injury Severity Score [ISS] > 0, adjusted risk ratio [RR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.55 to 0.96; Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score of 2 or higher, adjusted RR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.16 to 0.58; ISS > 8, adjusted RR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.06 to 0.56), and less injury in most body regions except the neck (adjusted RR = 4.79, 95% CI = 1.43 to 16.00) than did children with no restraint use. Children using seat belts in belt-positioning booster seats had an equal risk of injury but higher risks of neck (adjusted RR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.02 to 3.40) and thorax (adjusted RR = 2.86, 95% CI = 1.33 to 6.15) injury than did children restrained by seat belts only. Conclusions Children using belt-positioning booster seats appear to experience a higher risk of AIS > 0 injury to the neck and thorax than do children using seat belts only. Future research should examine whether the observed increase in neck and thorax injuries can be attributed to improper use of booster seats. PMID:24050794

  8. Allie: a database and a search service of abbreviations and long forms.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Bono, Hidemasa; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2011-01-01

    Many abbreviations are used in the literature especially in the life sciences, and polysemous abbreviations appear frequently, making it difficult to read and understand scientific papers that are outside of a reader's expertise. Thus, we have developed Allie, a database and a search service of abbreviations and their long forms (a.k.a. full forms or definitions). Allie searches for abbreviations and their corresponding long forms in a database that we have generated based on all titles and abstracts in MEDLINE. When a user query matches an abbreviation, Allie returns all potential long forms of the query along with their bibliographic data (i.e. title and publication year). In addition, for each candidate, co-occurring abbreviations and a research field in which it frequently appears in the MEDLINE data are displayed. This function helps users learn about the context in which an abbreviation appears. To deal with synonymous long forms, we use a dictionary called GENA that contains domain-specific terms such as gene, protein or disease names along with their synonymic information. Conceptually identical domain-specific terms are regarded as one term, and then conceptually identical abbreviation-long form pairs are grouped taking into account their appearance in MEDLINE. To keep up with new abbreviations that are continuously introduced, Allie has an automatic update system. In addition, the database of abbreviations and their long forms with their corresponding PubMed IDs is constructed and updated weekly. Database URL: The Allie service is available at http://allie.dbcls.jp/. PMID:21498548

  9. Allie: a database and a search service of abbreviations and long forms.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Bono, Hidemasa; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2011-01-01

    Many abbreviations are used in the literature especially in the life sciences, and polysemous abbreviations appear frequently, making it difficult to read and understand scientific papers that are outside of a reader's expertise. Thus, we have developed Allie, a database and a search service of abbreviations and their long forms (a.k.a. full forms or definitions). Allie searches for abbreviations and their corresponding long forms in a database that we have generated based on all titles and abstracts in MEDLINE. When a user query matches an abbreviation, Allie returns all potential long forms of the query along with their bibliographic data (i.e. title and publication year). In addition, for each candidate, co-occurring abbreviations and a research field in which it frequently appears in the MEDLINE data are displayed. This function helps users learn about the context in which an abbreviation appears. To deal with synonymous long forms, we use a dictionary called GENA that contains domain-specific terms such as gene, protein or disease names along with their synonymic information. Conceptually identical domain-specific terms are regarded as one term, and then conceptually identical abbreviation-long form pairs are grouped taking into account their appearance in MEDLINE. To keep up with new abbreviations that are continuously introduced, Allie has an automatic update system. In addition, the database of abbreviations and their long forms with their corresponding PubMed IDs is constructed and updated weekly. Database URL: The Allie service is available at http://allie.dbcls.jp/.

  10. Allie: a database and a search service of abbreviations and long forms

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Bono, Hidemasa; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2011-01-01

    Many abbreviations are used in the literature especially in the life sciences, and polysemous abbreviations appear frequently, making it difficult to read and understand scientific papers that are outside of a reader’s expertise. Thus, we have developed Allie, a database and a search service of abbreviations and their long forms (a.k.a. full forms or definitions). Allie searches for abbreviations and their corresponding long forms in a database that we have generated based on all titles and abstracts in MEDLINE. When a user query matches an abbreviation, Allie returns all potential long forms of the query along with their bibliographic data (i.e. title and publication year). In addition, for each candidate, co-occurring abbreviations and a research field in which it frequently appears in the MEDLINE data are displayed. This function helps users learn about the context in which an abbreviation appears. To deal with synonymous long forms, we use a dictionary called GENA that contains domain-specific terms such as gene, protein or disease names along with their synonymic information. Conceptually identical domain-specific terms are regarded as one term, and then conceptually identical abbreviation-long form pairs are grouped taking into account their appearance in MEDLINE. To keep up with new abbreviations that are continuously introduced, Allie has an automatic update system. In addition, the database of abbreviations and their long forms with their corresponding PubMed IDs is constructed and updated weekly. Database URL: The Allie service is available at http://allie.dbcls.jp/. PMID:21498548

  11. Ozone risk and foliar injury on Viburnum lantana L.: a meso-scale epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Gottardini, Elena; Cristofolini, Fabiana; Cristofori, Antonella; Ferretti, Marco

    2014-09-15

    A stratified random sampling design was adopted to contrast sites with different ozone exposure levels (≤ 18,000 and >18,000 μg m(-3) h) in order to define whether and to what extent a relationship exists between potential risk (estimated by exposure to ozone) and the response of Viburnum lantana L. in terms of foliar symptoms. The study was designed over a meso-scale (6200 km(2)), carried out in 2010 and repeated in 2012 on a subset of sites. No difference was found between the occurrences of symptoms in relation to soil moisture or plant size. Although no direct significant exposure-response function could be identified, when data were aggregated according to ozone exposure levels the symptoms (in terms of number of symptomatic plants and symptomatic leaves per plant) were found to be significantly more frequent at sites with higher exposure (AOT40>18,000 μg m(-3) h), especially at high elevations (>700 ma.s.l.). The 2012 results confirmed the 2010 findings. Although ozone levels in the region were almost similar between 2010 and 2012, symptoms were significantly less frequent in 2012. This was likely due to drier conditions in 2012 (+1.1 °C; -23% precipitation), a situation that may have prevented in part ozone uptake and therefore the expression of symptoms. These results are useful in several respects: (i) for identifying areas where ozone is likely to impact vegetation; (ii) for testing the appropriateness of EU standards to protect vegetation from ozone; and (iii) for designing biomonitoring surveys. We suggest that V. lantana is a suitable indicator for assessing qualitatively (but not quantitatively) the potential risk of ozone damage to vegetation over remote, large areas.

  12. A comparison of fatal with non-fatal knife injuries in Edinburgh.

    PubMed

    Webb, E; Wyatt, J P; Henry, J; Busuttil, A

    1999-01-25

    Assault using a knife is a common problem in the United Kingdom. Between February 1992 and December 1996, 120 individuals died or received hospital treatment in Edinburgh after being assaulted with a knife. Twenty individuals (17%) died as a result of their injuries. Comparison of the survivors with non-survivors revealed both groups to have similar age and sex distributions, but those who died had significantly more severe injuries when scored according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale. Eight individuals died of unsurvivable chest injuries at the scene of the attack and of the remainder, only five reached hospital with signs of life. Analysis of hospital treatment using TRISS methodology revealed there to be two unexpected survivors and no unexpected deaths. The risk of death appears to depend mostly upon injuries sustained and also to a lesser extent upon other factors such as alcohol consumption and the presence of a bystander capable and willing to request emergency medical assistance. There does not appear to be much potential to save lives by improving hospital treatment for those assaulted with a knife in Edinburgh. Instead, greater focus needs to be placed upon rapid transfer to hospital and upon restricting the possession and use of knives.

  13. Patient and Community-Level Socio-Demographic Characteristics Associated with Emergency Department Visits for Childhood Injury; A Retrospective Analysis of Data from the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) Core Data Project 2004–2008

    PubMed Central

    Macy, Michelle L.; Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Cook, Lawrence J.; Funai, Tomohiko; Goldstick, Jason; Stanley, Rachel M.; Chamberlain, James M.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Lipton, Robert; Alpern, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine pediatric emergency department (ED) visits over 5 years, trends in injury severity, and associations between injury-related ED visit outcome and patient and community-level socio-demographic characteristics. Study design Retrospective analysis of administrative data provided to the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Core Data Project, 2004–2008. Home addresses were geocoded to determine census block group and associated socio-demographic characteristics. Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale severity and Severity Classification System scores were calculated. Generalized estimating equations were used to test for associations between socio-demographic characteristics and admission or transfer among injury-related ED visits. Results Overall ED visits and injury-related visits increased from 2004 to 2008 at study sites. Of 2,833,676 successfully geocoded visits, 700,821 (24.7%) were injury-related. The proportion of higher severity injury-related visits remained consistent. Nearly 10% of injury-related visits resulted in admission or transfer each year. After adjusting for age, sex, payer, and injury severity, odds of admission or transfer were lower among minority children and children from areas with moderate and high prevalence of poverty. Conclusions Pediatric injury-related ED visits to included sites increased over the study period while injury severity, anticipated resource utilization, and visit outcomes remained stable, with low rates of admission or transfer. Socio-demographic differences in injury-related visits and ED disposition were apparent. ED-based injury surveillance is essential to understand disparities, inform targets for prevention programs, and reduce the overall burden of childhood injuries. PMID:26141551

  14. [SURGICAL TREATMENT MANAGEMENT OF ABDOMEN GUNSHOT INJURIES].

    PubMed

    Linyov, K A

    2015-07-01

    The medical records of 100 patients with gunshot abdomen injuries were analysed. The damaging nature of the projectile, the nature of the damage and the combination with damage to other body parts were studied. The anesthesiologist--resuscitator and surgeon actions after hospitalisation of injured persons were postulated. The emergency victim examination was reduced to ultrasound and SCT. The indications for laparotomy in abdominal gunshot injuries were defined. Three most common variants of gunshot abdomen injuries were found. In surgical treatment we applied "damage control" strategy included the initial (abbreviated) operation, resuscitative therapy and final operation. The postoperative complications, couse of deaths was investigated.

  15. 21 CFR 314.152 - Notice of withdrawal of approval of an application or abbreviated application for a new drug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or abbreviated application for a new drug. 314.152 Section 314.152 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications § 314.152 Notice of withdrawal of approval of an application or abbreviated application for a new drug. If the Food and...

  16. Badminton injuries--a prospective epidemiological and socioeconomic study.

    PubMed Central

    Høy, K; Lindblad, B E; Terkelsen, C J; Helleland, H E; Terkelsen, C J

    1994-01-01

    During a 1-year period 100 badminton players were registered and treated in the casualty ward of Randers City Hospital, Denmark. The injuries to the badminton players constituted 5% of all sports injuries registered during the same period in the casualty ward. At follow-up questionnaires were sent to all participants. Replies were received from 89 patients. Over the same period all sports participants in the hospital catchment area (30,254) were registered according to their sport affiliation (2620 badminton players-1650 men and 970 women). Of those injured 58% were men (mean age 31 years) and 42% were women (mean age 25 years). Of the injuries 55% occurred in club players, the remainder occurring during company and school sports activities. The active players were classified into three groups according to age: Group 1 under 18 years (31%); Group 2 18-25 years (16%); Group 3 more than 25 years (53%). According to the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 17% of the injuries were classified as minor, 56% as moderate, and 27% as severe, respectively. Of the severe injuries (AIS = 3) 56% were found in the oldest age group. AIS correlated with time absent from sport (P < 0.001). Nine players (9%) reported that earlier injuries had influenced the actual accident. Most players (96%) trained one to three times a week. Sprains were the injury most commonly diagnosed (56%), fractures accounted for 5%, torn ankle ligaments were found in 10%, and 13% had ruptures to the Achilles tendon. Overall, 21% were admitted to hospital. None of the patients treated as inpatients was kept in hospital for more than 7 days. The injury caused 56% of players to be absent from work of whom 23% were absent for more than 3 weeks. After the injury 12% of the players gave up their sport, and only 4% restarted their training/sport within 1 week. As many as 28% had to avoid training and playing in matches for 8 weeks or more. PMID:7894961

  17. A challenge for diagnosing acute liver injury with concomitant/sequential exposure to multiple drugs: can causality assessment scales be utilized to identify the offending drug?

    PubMed

    Lim, Roxanne; Choudry, Hassan; Conner, Kim; Karnsakul, Wikrom

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity most commonly manifests as an acute hepatitis syndrome and remains the leading cause of drug-induced death/mortality and the primary reason for withdrawal of drugs from the pharmaceutical market. We report a case of acute liver injury in a 12-year-old Hispanic boy, who received a series of five antibiotics (amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, ampicillin/sulbactam, and clindamycin) for cervical lymphadenitis/retropharyngeal cellulitis. Histopathology of the liver biopsy specimen revealed acute cholestatic hepatitis. All known causes of acute liver injury were appropriately excluded and (only) drug-induced liver injury was left as a cause of his cholestasis. Liver-specific causality assessment scales such as Council for the International Organization of Medical Sciences/Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method scoring system (CIOMS/RUCAM), Maria and Victorino scale, and Digestive Disease Week-Japan were applied to seek the most likely offending drug. Although clindamycin is the most likely cause by clinical diagnosis, none of causality assessment scales aid in the diagnosis.

  18. Effects of long work hours and poor sleep characteristics on workplace injury among full-time male employees of small- and medium-scale businesses.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Akinori

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long work hours and poor sleep characteristics on workplace injury. A total of 1891 male employees, aged 18-79 years (mean 45 years), in 296 small- and medium-scale businesses in a suburb of Tokyo were surveyed by means of a self-administered questionnaire during August-December 2002. Work hours and sleep characteristics, including daily sleep hours, subjective sleep sufficiency, sleep quality and easiness to wake up in the morning, were evaluated. Information on workplace injury in the past 1-year period was self-reported. The risk of workplace injury associated with work hours and poor sleep was estimated using multivariate logistic regression with odds ratio (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals as measures of associations. Compared with those working 6-8 h day(-1) with good sleep characteristics, positive interactive effects for workplace injury were found between long work hours (>8-10 h day(-1) or >10 h day(-1) ) and short sleep duration (<6 h) [adjusted OR (aOR), 1.27-1.54], subjective insufficient sleep (aOR, 1.94-1.99), sleep poorly at night (aOR, 2.23-2.49) and difficulty waking up in the morning (aOR, 1.56-1.59). Long work hours (aOR, 1.31-1.48), subjective insufficient sleep (aOR, 1.49) and sleeping poorly at night (aOR, 1.72) were also independently associated with workplace injury. This study suggests that long work hours coupled with poor sleep characteristics are synergistically associated with increased risk of workplace injury. Greater attention should be paid to manage/treat poor sleep and reduce excessive work hours to improve safety at the workplace.

  19. Large-Scale Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan Digestion with Chondroitinase Gene Therapy Leads to Reduced Pathology and Modulates Macrophage Phenotype following Spinal Cord Contusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bartus, Katalin; James, Nicholas D.; Didangelos, Athanasios; Bosch, Karen D.; Verhaagen, Joost; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J.; Rogers, John H.; Schneider, Bernard L.; Muir, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) inhibit repair following spinal cord injury. Here we use mammalian-compatible engineered chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) delivered via lentiviral vector (LV-ChABC) to explore the consequences of large-scale CSPG digestion for spinal cord repair. We demonstrate significantly reduced secondary injury pathology in adult rats following spinal contusion injury and LV-ChABC treatment, with reduced cavitation and enhanced preservation of spinal neurons and axons at 12 weeks postinjury, compared with control (LV-GFP)-treated animals. To understand these neuroprotective effects, we investigated early inflammatory changes following LV-ChABC treatment. Increased expression of the phagocytic macrophage marker CD68 at 3 d postinjury was followed by increased CD206 expression at 2 weeks, indicating that large-scale CSPG digestion can alter macrophage phenotype to favor alternatively activated M2 macrophages. Accordingly, ChABC treatment in vitro induced a significant increase in CD206 expression in unpolarized monocytes stimulated with conditioned medium from spinal-injured tissue explants. LV-ChABC also promoted the remodelling of specific CSPGs as well as enhanced vascularity, which was closely associated with CD206-positive macrophages. Neuroprotective effects of LV-ChABC corresponded with improved sensorimotor function, evident as early as 1 week postinjury, a time point when increased neuronal survival correlated with reduced apoptosis. Improved function was maintained into chronic injury stages, where improved axonal conduction and increased serotonergic innervation were also observed. Thus, we demonstrate that ChABC gene therapy can modulate secondary injury processes, with neuroprotective effects that lead to long-term improved functional outcome and reveal novel mechanistic evidence that modulation of macrophage phenotype may underlie these effects. PMID:24695702

  20. Psychometrically Improved, Abbreviated Versions of Three Classic Measures of Impulsivity and Self-Control

    PubMed Central

    Morean, Meghan E.; DeMartini, Kelly S.; Leeman, Robert F.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Anticevic, Alan; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Krystal, John H.; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2014-01-01

    Self-reported impulsivity confers risk factor for substance abuse. However, the psychometric properties of many self-report impulsivity measures have been questioned, thereby undermining the interpretability of study findings using these measures. To better understand these measurement limitations and to suggest a path to assessing self-reported impulsivity with greater psychometric stability, we conducted a comprehensive psychometric evaluation of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11), the Behavioral Inhibition and Activation Scales (BIS/BAS), and the Brief Self Control Scale (BSCS) using data from 1,449 individuals who participated in substance use research. For each measure, we evaluated: 1) latent factor structure, 2) measurement invariance, 3) test-criterion relationships between the measures, and 4) test-criterion relations with drinking and smoking outcomes. Notably, we could not replicate the originally published latent structure for the BIS, BIS/BAS, or BSCS or any previously published alternative factor structures (English language). Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, we identified psychometrically improved, abbreviated versions of each measure (i.e., 8-item, 2 factor BIS-11 [RMSEA = .06, CFI = .95]; 13-item, 4 factor BIS/BAS [RMSEA = .04, CFI = .96]; 7-item, 2 factor BSCS [RMSEA = .05, CFI = .96]). These versions evidenced: 1) stable, replicable factor structures, 2) scalar measurement invariance, ensuring our ability to make statistically interpretable comparisons across subgroups of interest (e.g., sex, race, drinking/smoking status), and 3) test-criterion relationships with each other and with drinking/smoking. This study provides strong support for using these psychometrically improved impulsivity measures, which improve data quality directly through better scale properties and indirectly through reducing response burden. PMID:24885848

  1. 76 FR 44013 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Implementation of Acceptable Full-Length and Abbreviated Donor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Implementation of Acceptable Full- Length and Abbreviated Donor History Questionnaires and Accompanying Materials for Use in Screening Donors of Source Plasma; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  2. Pedestrian Injury Patterns and Risk in Minibus Collisions in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kui; Fan, Xiaoxiang; Yin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Background The minibus, with a nearly flat front, is widely used in China, especially in the underdeveloped regions, and results in large numbers of pedestrian injuries and deaths. The purpose of this study was to determine the injury patterns and risk for pedestrians involved in these crashes. Material/Methods We conducted an in-depth investigation of minibus/pedestrian accidents in Chongqing, China, occurring between September 2000 and April 2014. The enrolled pedestrians was classified into 3 groups: young (aged 14–44 years), middle-aged (aged 45–59 years), and elderly (aged over 60 years). Pedestrian injuries were coded according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Results A total of 109 pedestrians, with an average age of 55.7±16.2 years, were injured or killed – 30.3% were young, 23.9% were middle-aged, and 45.9% were elderly. Pedestrians hit by a minibus had a high proportion of head, chest, and extremity injuries – 84.4%, 50.5%, and 52.3%, respectively. In addition, impact speeds in excess of 75 km/h all ultimately resulted in fatalities. At an impact speed of 30 km/h, the risk of pedestrian fatality and AIS3+ injury are approximately 12.0% and 37.2%, respectively. At 50 km/h the risks are 65.2% and 96.9%, respectively, and at 70 km/h the risks are 96.3% and 99.9%, respectively. Conclusions A higher likelihood of chest injury was associated with being older and impact speed of over 40 km/h in minibus/pedestrian collision. Our data suggest that the injury patterns of pedestrians in minibus collisions differ from that in other vehicle/pedestrian collisions. These findings could contribute to better understanding of the injury patterns and risk of pedestrian in minibus collisions in China, which may play an important role in developing measures to improve traffic safety. PMID:25754962

  3. Advantages of using an abbreviated dossier for drug master file applications in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Sun, I-Chen

    2016-10-01

    In Taiwan, the quality of active pharmaceutical ingredients is recorded in a drug master file (DMF), the applications for which can be submitted in two dossier types, either full (complete technical information) or abbreviated (partially complete technical information with an approved document issued by developed countries). However, the advantages of the abbreviated approach remain unknown. This study compared full and abbreviated dossier profiles and reviewed their outcomes in acceptance rates and deficiencies leading to rejection. Data were collected from new submissions of both dossier types that were completed in 2014 by the Center for Drug Evaluation, Taiwan. The results revealed that the abbreviated applications took shorter review time and had a higher acceptance rate. Among the eligible types of document for abbreviated applications, Certification of Suitability to the Monographs of the European Pharmacopeia (CEP) was the most frequently used. For categorical deficiencies, both dossier types presented the deficiencies in similar sections leading to rejection, namely Manufacture (3.2.S.2), Control of drug substance (3.2.S.4), and Stability (3.2.S.7). In summary, CEP serves a favorable document for the abbreviated DMF application in which it shortens the review time, increases the acceptance rate, and its deficiencies are similar to those of the full DMF application.

  4. Advantages of using an abbreviated dossier for drug master file applications in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Sun, I-Chen

    2016-10-01

    In Taiwan, the quality of active pharmaceutical ingredients is recorded in a drug master file (DMF), the applications for which can be submitted in two dossier types, either full (complete technical information) or abbreviated (partially complete technical information with an approved document issued by developed countries). However, the advantages of the abbreviated approach remain unknown. This study compared full and abbreviated dossier profiles and reviewed their outcomes in acceptance rates and deficiencies leading to rejection. Data were collected from new submissions of both dossier types that were completed in 2014 by the Center for Drug Evaluation, Taiwan. The results revealed that the abbreviated applications took shorter review time and had a higher acceptance rate. Among the eligible types of document for abbreviated applications, Certification of Suitability to the Monographs of the European Pharmacopeia (CEP) was the most frequently used. For categorical deficiencies, both dossier types presented the deficiencies in similar sections leading to rejection, namely Manufacture (3.2.S.2), Control of drug substance (3.2.S.4), and Stability (3.2.S.7). In summary, CEP serves a favorable document for the abbreviated DMF application in which it shortens the review time, increases the acceptance rate, and its deficiencies are similar to those of the full DMF application. PMID:27237380

  5. Utility of an abbreviated questionnaire to identify individuals with ADHD at risk for functional impairments

    PubMed Central

    Biederman, Joseph; Petty, Carter R.; Fried, Ronna; Doyle, Alysa E.; Mick, Eric; Aleardi, Megan; Monuteaux, Michael C.; Seidman, Larry J.; Spencer, Thomas; Faneuil, Alicia R.; Holmes, Lauren; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To discern whether a subset of items from the 99-item Current Behavior Scale (CBS) of behaviorally defined executive function deficits (EFDs) in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can identify a group at risk for poor outcome. Methods Subjects were 200 adults with ADHD participating in a family study of ADHD in adults. Factor analysis was used to reduce the number of items in the 99-item CBS. Results The one factor solution provided 8 items with factor loadings above 0.70. This abbreviated set of items was highly correlated with the 99-item CBS (0.91) and was similarly related to functional outcomes compared to the 99-item CBS (average correlation of 0.30 versus 0.32). Conclusion For adults with ADHD, a set of 8 empirically derived from the CBS similarly correlated with negative outcomes compared to the 99-item CBS, raising the possibility of utilization as a mechanism for identification of EFDs in adults with ADHD. PMID:17335849

  6. A 10-year population survey of spinal trauma and spinal cord injuries after road accidents in the Rhône area.

    PubMed

    Lieutaud, Thomas; Ndiaye, Amina; Frost, Fanny; Chiron, Mireille

    2010-06-01

    Fatalities or injuries following motorized and non-motorized vehicle accidents (MNMVA) are reported by police or health care systems. However, limited data exist for spinal injuries. Using an epidemiological database of road accidents occurring in a defined geographic area, we measured the incidence of major spinal trauma (MST, Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score 2 or more), spinal cord injury (SCI, AIS score 4 or more), and associated lesions over a 10-year period (1997-2006). Among the 97,341 victims included, 21,623 (22.2%) suffered spinal trauma, but only 1523 (1.6%) and 144 (0.2%) sustained an MST or SCI, respectively, and among those 10% and 43% died, respectively, before reaching hospital facilities. Men were more likely to have SCI and die. Cervical injuries were more frequently observed for SCI (58%) than for MST (39%; p < 0.001). Motorcyclists were overrepresented in SCI (33%) compared to MST (21%; p < 0.001), and were at significant risk for fatality. Non-restrained car occupants were at risk of MST and SCI, whereas motorcyclists wearing helmets were not. The chest was the most frequently-injured body region. Nearly half of MNMVA victims suffering SCI die quickly after the crash. Young age, male gender, a motorcyclist, and non-restrained car occupant were risk factors for serious injury. These groups should be targeted in specific programs to decrease fatalities, spinal trauma, and SCI after MNMVA.

  7. Burn injuries from small airplane crashes.

    PubMed

    Moye, S J; Cruse, C W; Watkins, G M

    1991-11-01

    Because a large amount of general aviation activity occurs in Central Florida, we reviewed our admissions for victims of small airplane crashes. We identified 13 burn victims of small aircraft accidents over a 7-year period. Of the 13, 12 survived their burn injuries, an overall survival rate of 92%. The extent of burn injury, Abbreviated Burn Severity Index (ABSI), complications, other injuries and rehabilitation potential are reviewed. Burn injury resulting from small airplane crashes is usually survivable if the patient arrives at the Burn Center alive. These burn victims generally are highly motivated individuals, are easily rehabilitated, and continue productive lives. Small airports and local hospitals should be aware of burn center availability because of the usual major extent of the burn injury.

  8. Is Traumatic Brain Injury Associated with Reduced Inter-Hemispheric Functional Connectivity? A Study of Large-Scale Resting State Networks following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rigon, Arianna; Duff, Melissa C; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F; Voss, Michelle W

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often has long-term debilitating sequelae in cognitive and behavioral domains. Understanding how TBI impacts functional integrity of brain networks that underlie these domains is key to guiding future approaches to TBI rehabilitation. In the current study, we investigated the differences in inter-hemispheric functional connectivity (FC) of resting state networks (RSNs) between chronic mild-to-severe TBI patients and normal comparisons (NC), focusing on two externally oriented networks (i.e., the fronto-parietal network [FPN] and the executive control network [ECN]), one internally oriented network (i.e., the default mode network [DMN]), and one somato-motor network (SMN). Seed voxel correlation analysis revealed that TBI patients displayed significantly less FC between lateralized seeds and both homologous and non-homologous regions in the opposite hemisphere for externally oriented networks but not for DMN or SMN; conversely, TBI patients showed increased FC within regions of the DMN, especially precuneus and parahippocampal gyrus. Region of interest correlation analyses confirmed the presence of significantly higher inter-hemispheric FC in NC for the FPN (p < 0.01), and ECN (p < 0.05), but not for the DMN (p > 0.05) or SMN (p > 0.05). Further analysis revealed that performance on a neuropsychological test measuring organizational skills and visuo-spatial abilities administered to the TBI group, the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, positively correlated with FC between the right FPN and homologous regions. Our findings suggest that distinct RSNs display specific patterns of aberrant FC following TBI; this represents a step forward in the search for biomarkers useful for early diagnosis and treatment of TBI-related cognitive impairment.

  9. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  10. Psychometric support for an abbreviated version of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) Parent Form.

    PubMed

    LeJeune, Brenna; Beebe, Dean; Noll, Jennie; Kenealy, Laura; Isquith, Peter; Gioia, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to systematically develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of an abbreviated version of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) Parent Report; a questionnaire widely used by pediatric neuropsychologists. A total of 24 items from the original BRIEF Parent Form were selected for the short-form, which was then evaluated in three complementary samples, according to six a priori psychometric criteria. The short-form generally demonstrated appropriate psychometric qualities, with convincing evidence for the reliability and validity of the three composite indices: Behavioral Regulation, Metacognition, and the Global Executive Composite. Potential clinical applications include screening at-risk children in medical clinics to facilitate appropriate referrals for further psychological consultation. In research settings, the short-form can be easily integrated into studies involving mass collection of data (e.g., large-scale epidemiological research), facilitating advancements in the scientific understanding of neuropsychological morbidity in medically involved populations.

  11. Hospital Qualities Related to Return to Work from Occupational Injury after Controlling for Injury Severity as Well as Occupational Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We examined associations between hospital quality in the workers’ compensation system and injured patients’ return to work after controlling for injury severity, occupational factors, and demographic factors. Return to work data of injured workers were constructed from 2 datasets: 23,392 patients injured in 2009–2011 from the Korea Workers’ Compensation & Welfare Service and return to work data from Korea Employment Information Services. After de-identifying the data, quality scores were matched for each hospital that cared for injured patients. Injury severity was measured by Abbreviated Injury Scales. Relative risk and 95% confidence interval were calculated using log binomial regression models. After adjusting for age, sex, injury severity, occupation, factory size, city, and hospital type, the relative risk (95% confidence interval) for the total score was 1.04 (1.02–1.06), 1.06 (1.04–1.09), and 1.07 (1.05–1.10) in the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles, respectively, compared to the 1st quartile. The RR (95% CI) in the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles was 1.05 (1.02–1.07), 1.05 (1.02–1.08), and 1.06 (1.04–1.09) for the process score; and 1.02 (1.01–1.04), 1.05 (1.03–1.07), and 1.06 (1.04–1.09) for the outcome score compared to the 1st quartile score, respectively. In conclusion, our study design with blinded merge methods shows that total, process, and outcome qualities are related to the return to work of injured workers after controlling for other factors. PMID:27134489

  12. Hospital Qualities Related to Return to Work from Occupational Injury after Controlling for Injury Severity as Well as Occupational Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong-Uk; Seok, Hongdeok; Rhie, Jeongbae; Yoon, Jin-Ha

    2016-05-01

    We examined associations between hospital quality in the workers' compensation system and injured patients' return to work after controlling for injury severity, occupational factors, and demographic factors. Return to work data of injured workers were constructed from 2 datasets: 23,392 patients injured in 2009-2011 from the Korea Workers' Compensation & Welfare Service and return to work data from Korea Employment Information Services. After de-identifying the data, quality scores were matched for each hospital that cared for injured patients. Injury severity was measured by Abbreviated Injury Scales. Relative risk and 95% confidence interval were calculated using log binomial regression models. After adjusting for age, sex, injury severity, occupation, factory size, city, and hospital type, the relative risk (95% confidence interval) for the total score was 1.04 (1.02-1.06), 1.06 (1.04-1.09), and 1.07 (1.05-1.10) in the 2(nd), 3(rd), and 4(th) quartiles, respectively, compared to the 1(st) quartile. The RR (95% CI) in the 2(nd), 3(rd), and 4(th) quartiles was 1.05 (1.02-1.07), 1.05 (1.02-1.08), and 1.06 (1.04-1.09) for the process score; and 1.02 (1.01-1.04), 1.05 (1.03-1.07), and 1.06 (1.04-1.09) for the outcome score compared to the 1(st) quartile score, respectively. In conclusion, our study design with blinded merge methods shows that total, process, and outcome qualities are related to the return to work of injured workers after controlling for other factors. PMID:27134489

  13. Hospital Qualities Related to Return to Work from Occupational Injury after Controlling for Injury Severity as Well as Occupational Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong-Uk; Seok, Hongdeok; Rhie, Jeongbae; Yoon, Jin-Ha

    2016-05-01

    We examined associations between hospital quality in the workers' compensation system and injured patients' return to work after controlling for injury severity, occupational factors, and demographic factors. Return to work data of injured workers were constructed from 2 datasets: 23,392 patients injured in 2009-2011 from the Korea Workers' Compensation & Welfare Service and return to work data from Korea Employment Information Services. After de-identifying the data, quality scores were matched for each hospital that cared for injured patients. Injury severity was measured by Abbreviated Injury Scales. Relative risk and 95% confidence interval were calculated using log binomial regression models. After adjusting for age, sex, injury severity, occupation, factory size, city, and hospital type, the relative risk (95% confidence interval) for the total score was 1.04 (1.02-1.06), 1.06 (1.04-1.09), and 1.07 (1.05-1.10) in the 2(nd), 3(rd), and 4(th) quartiles, respectively, compared to the 1(st) quartile. The RR (95% CI) in the 2(nd), 3(rd), and 4(th) quartiles was 1.05 (1.02-1.07), 1.05 (1.02-1.08), and 1.06 (1.04-1.09) for the process score; and 1.02 (1.01-1.04), 1.05 (1.03-1.07), and 1.06 (1.04-1.09) for the outcome score compared to the 1(st) quartile score, respectively. In conclusion, our study design with blinded merge methods shows that total, process, and outcome qualities are related to the return to work of injured workers after controlling for other factors.

  14. Using Genetic Algorithms in a Large Nationally Representative American Sample to Abbreviate the Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Sahdra, Baljinder K.; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Parker, Philip; Scrucca, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) are robust machine learning approaches for abbreviating a large set of variables into a shorter subset that maximally captures the variance in the original data. We employed a GA-based method to shorten the 62-item Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire (MEAQ) by half without much loss of information. Experiential avoidance or the tendency to avoid negative internal experiences is a key target of many psychological interventions and its measurement is an important issue in psychology. The 62-item MEAQ has been shown to have good psychometric properties, but its length may limit its use in most practical settings. The recently validated 15-item brief version (BEAQ) is one short alternative, but it reduces the multidimensional scale to a single dimension. We sought to shorten the 62-item MEAQ by half while maintaining fidelity to its six dimensions. In a large nationally representative sample of Americans (N = 7884; 52% female; Age: M = 47.9, SD = 16), we employed a GA method of scale abbreviation implemented in the R package, GAabbreviate. The GA-derived short form, MEAQ-30 with five items per subscale, performed virtually identically to the original 62-item MEAQ in terms of inter-subscales correlations, factor structure, factor correlations, and zero-order correlations and unique latent associations of the six subscales with other measures of mental distress, wellbeing and personal strivings. The two measures also showed similar distributions of means across American census regions. The MEAQ-30 provides a multidimensional assessment of experiential avoidance whilst minimizing participant burden. The study adds to the emerging literature on the utility of machine learning methods in psychometrics. PMID:26941672

  15. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  16. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  17. 78 FR 60292 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Abbreviated New Drug Application Submissions-Refuse-to-Receive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Abbreviated New Drug... to assist applicants preparing to submit to FDA abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) and related... ANDAs and PASs to ANDAs for which the applicant is seeking approval of a new strength of the...

  18. 76 FR 64951 - Apothecon et al.; Withdrawal of Approval of 103 New Drug Applications and 35 Abbreviated New Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Apothecon et al.; Withdrawal of Approval of 103 New Drug Applications and 35 Abbreviated New Drug Applications; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... new drug applications (NDAs) and 35 abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) from multiple...

  19. 77 FR 51816 - Notice of Opportunity To Withdraw Abbreviated New Drug Applications To Avoid Backlog Fee Obligations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Notice of Opportunity To Withdraw Abbreviated New Drug Applications To Avoid Backlog Fee Obligations AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... longer seeking approval of their pending original abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) with...

  20. 77 FR 65198 - Generic Drug User Fee-Abbreviated New Drug Application, Prior Approval Supplement, and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee--Abbreviated New Drug Application, Prior Approval Supplement, and Drug Master File Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2013 AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA), Prior Approval Supplement (PAS), and Drug Master...

  1. Memory functioning in individuals with traumatic brain injury: an examination of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV).

    PubMed

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Grech, Julie; Tulsky, David S

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the construct validity of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV) in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). One hundred individuals with TBI (n = 35 complicated mild/moderate TBI; n = 65 severe TBI) and 100 matched controls from the WMS-IV normative dataset completed the WMS-IV. Multivariate analyses indicated that severe TBI participants had poorer performance than matched controls on all index scores and subtests. Individuals with complicated mild/moderate TBI performed more poorly than controls on all index scores, as well as on tests of visual memory (Designs I and II; Visual Reproduction I and II) and visual working memory (Spatial Addition; Symbol Span), but not on auditory verbal memory tests (Logical Memory I and II; Verbal Paired Associates I and II). After controlling for time since injury, severe TBI participants had significantly lower scores than the complicated mild/moderate TBI on 4 of the 5 WMS-IV index scores (Auditory Memory, Visual Memory, Immediate Memory, Delayed Memory) and 4 of the 10 WMS-IV subtests (Designs I and II, Verbal Pairs II, Logical Memory II). Effect sizes for index and subtest scores were generally moderate for the complicated mild/moderate group and moderate-to-large for the severe TBI group. Findings provide support for the construct validity of the WMS-IV in individuals with TBI.

  2. Validation of the Child Premorbid Intelligence Estimate Method to Predict Premorbid Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition Full Scale IQ among Children with Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenberg, Mike R.; Lange, Rael T.; Saklofske, Donald H.; Suarez, Mariann; Brickell, Tracey A.

    2008-01-01

    Determination of neuropsychological impairment involves contrasting obtained performances with a comparison standard, which is often an estimate of premorbid IQ. M. R. Schoenberg, R. T. Lange, T. A. Brickell, and D. H. Saklofske (2007) proposed the Child Premorbid Intelligence Estimate (CPIE) to predict premorbid Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) using the…

  3. Comparison of the Abbreviated and Original Versions of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Personality Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiden, Lisa I.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The responses of two classes of medical students on both the original and abbreviated versions of the Myer-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) are examined. The purpose was to identify the extent to which MBTI numerical scores and the MBTI personality types represented by the numerical scores are congruent between the forms.

  4. Text-Message Abbreviations and Language Skills in High School and University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jonge, Sarah; Kemp, Nenagh

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the use of text-message abbreviations (textisms) in Australian adolescents and young adults, and relations between textism use and literacy abilities. Fifty-two high school students aged 13-15 years, and 53 undergraduates aged 18-24 years, all users of predictive texting, translated conventional English sentences into…

  5. Relax and Try This Instead: Abbreviated Habit Reversal for Maladaptive Self-Biting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kevin M.; Swearer, Susan M.; Friman, Patrick C.

    1997-01-01

    A study evaluated the effectiveness of an abbreviated habit reversal procedure to reduce maladaptive oral self-biting in an adolescent boy in residential care. Treatment involved a combination of relaxation and two competing responses (gum chewing and tongue-lip rubbing). The intervention eliminated the biting and the tissue damage it caused.…

  6. Relationship between Acceptable Noise Level and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyaldenhoven, Melinda C.; Nabelek, Anna K.; Tampas, Joanna W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between acceptable noise levels (ANLs) and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB; R. M. Cox & G. C. Alexander, 1995). This study further examined the APHAB's ability to predict hearing aid use. Method: ANL and APHAB data were collected for 191 listeners with impaired hearing,…

  7. 21 CFR 314.94 - Content and format of an abbreviated application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... bioequivalence study contained in the abbreviated new drug application, a description of the analytical and... balanced salt solution as a diluent as opposed to an isotonic saline solution, or by making a significant... topical use, solutions for aerosolization or nebulization, and nasal solutions shall contain the...

  8. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of an Abbreviated Social Support Instrument: The MOS-SSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjesfjeld, Christopher D.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Kim, Kevin H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Confirm the factor structure of the original 18-item Medical Outcome Study Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS) as well as two abbreviated versions in a sample of mothers with a child in mental health treatment. Method: The factor structure, internal consistency, and concurrent validity of the MOS-SSS were assessed using a convenience sample…

  9. 14 CFR 221.200 - Content and explanation of abbreviations, reference marks and symbols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Content and explanation of abbreviations, reference marks and symbols. 221.200 Section 221.200 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... Matter X—Canceled Matter C—Change in Footnotes, Routings, Rules or Zones E—Denotes change in...

  10. 77 FR 12877 - Record of Decision for the General Management Plan/Abbreviated Final Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... National Park Service Record of Decision for the General Management Plan/Abbreviated Final Environmental... Management Plan for New River Gorge National River, West Virginia. The Record of Decision selects the approved general management plan for New River Gorge National River for the next 15 to 20 years....

  11. 32 CFR Attachment 1 to Part 855 - Glossary of References, Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Terms

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Permits AFI 13-201, Air Force Airspace Management AFI 32-7061(32 CFR part 989), Environmental Impact..., and Terms 1 Attachment 1 to Part 855 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF... Attachment 1 to Part 855—Glossary of References, Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Terms Section A—References...

  12. 21 CFR 314.150 - Withdrawal of approval of an application or abbreviated application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW... products as defined in §§ 310.6 and 314.151(a) of this chapter and for a new drug afford an opportunity for a hearing on a proposal to withdraw approval of the application or abbreviated new drug...

  13. 21 CFR 314.150 - Withdrawal of approval of an application or abbreviated application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW... products as defined in §§ 310.6 and 314.151(a) of this chapter and for a new drug afford an opportunity for a hearing on a proposal to withdraw approval of the application or abbreviated new drug...

  14. 21 CFR 314.94 - Content and format of an abbreviated application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bioequivalence study contained in the abbreviated new drug application, a description of the analytical and... exclusivity under section 505(j)(4)(D) of the act. (9) Chemistry, manufacturing, and controls. (i) The... the act and one copy of the analytical procedures and descriptive information needed by...

  15. 21 CFR 314.94 - Content and format of an abbreviated application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... bioequivalence study contained in the abbreviated new drug application, a description of the analytical and... exclusivity under section 505(j)(5)(F) of the act. (9) Chemistry, manufacturing, and controls. (i) The... the act and one copy of the analytical procedures and descriptive information needed by...

  16. Psychometric Properties of the Abbreviated Perceived Motivational Climate in Exercise Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, E. Whitney G.; Brown, Theresa C.; Fry, Mary D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an abbreviated version of the Perceived Motivational Climate in Exercise Questionnaire (PMCEQ-A) to provide a more practical instrument for use in applied exercise settings. In the calibration step, two shortened versions' measurement and latent model values were compared to each other and the original…

  17. Automated Disambiguation of Acronyms and Abbreviations in Clinical Texts: Window and Training Size Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sungrim; Pakhomov, Serguei; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2012-01-01

    Acronyms and abbreviations within electronic clinical texts are widespread and often associated with multiple senses. Automated acronym sense disambiguation (WSD), a task of assigning the context-appropriate sense to ambiguous clinical acronyms and abbreviations, represents an active problem for medical natural language processing (NLP) systems. In this paper, fifty clinical acronyms and abbreviations with 500 samples each were studied using supervised machine-learning techniques (Support Vector Machines (SVM), Naïve Bayes (NB), and Decision Trees (DT)) to optimize the window size and orientation and determine the minimum training sample size needed for optimal performance. Our analysis of window size and orientation showed best performance using a larger left-sided and smaller right-sided window. To achieve an accuracy of over 90%, the minimum required training sample size was approximately 125 samples for SVM classifiers with inverted cross-validation. These findings support future work in clinical acronym and abbreviation WSD and require validation with other clinical texts. PMID:23304410

  18. 76 FR 71601 - Record of Decision, Long Walk National Historic Trail Feasibility Study/Abbreviated Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... National Park Service Record of Decision, Long Walk National Historic Trail Feasibility Study/Abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement, National Trails Intermountain Region, NM AGENCY: National Park... the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332(2)(C), the National Park...

  19. 75 FR 73108 - Guidance for Industry on Abbreviated New Drug Applications: Impurities in Drug Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Abbreviated New Drug Applications...) guidance for industry ``Q3B(R) Impurities in New Drug Products,'' which was announced in August 2006. DATES... and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New ] Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 2201,...

  20. 75 FR 44977 - General Management Plan/Abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement, Roosevelt-Vanderbilt...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... National Park Service General Management Plan/Abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement, Roosevelt... Management Plan, Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historic Sites, Hyde Park, NY. SUMMARY: Pursuant to National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332 (2) (C), the National Park Service (NPS) announces...

  1. 21 CFR 314.440 - Addresses for applications and abbreviated applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Director for Policy (HFD-5). (4) The field copy of an application, an abbreviated application, amendments... applicant shall send the field copy to the appropriate address identified in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of... containers intended for the collection, processing, or storage of blood and blood components; (2)...

  2. Symbolic Capital in a Virtual Heterosexual Market: Abbreviation and Insertion in Italian iTV SMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Susan C.; Zelenkauskaite, Asta

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes gender variation in nonstandard typography--specifically, abbreviations and insertions--in mobile phone text messages (SMS) posted to a public Italian interactive television (iTV) program. All broadcast SMS were collected for a period of 2 days from the Web archive for the iTV program, and the frequency and distribution of…

  3. Exploring the Relationship between Children's Knowledge of Text Message Abbreviations and School Literacy Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plester, Beverly; Wood, Clare; Joshi, Puja

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study of 88 British 10-12-year-old children's knowledge of text message (SMS) abbreviations ("textisms") and how it relates to their school literacy attainment. As a measure of textism knowledge, the children were asked to compose text messages they might write if they were in each of a set of scenarios. Their text messages…

  4. 14 CFR 221.200 - Content and explanation of abbreviations, reference marks and symbols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Content and explanation of abbreviations, reference marks and symbols. 221.200 Section 221.200 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... Matter X—Canceled Matter C—Change in Footnotes, Routings, Rules or Zones E—Denotes change in...

  5. 76 FR 62089 - General Management Plan/Abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement, New River Gorge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... Abbreviated Final Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan (GMP/EIS) for New River Gorge... GMP/EIS includes an analysis of agency and public comments received on the Draft GMP/EIS with NPS responses, errata sheets detailing editorial corrections to the Draft GMP/EIS, and copies of agency...

  6. 40 CFR Table B-5 to Subpart B of... - Symbols and Abbreviations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-5 to Subpart B of Part 53—Symbols and Abbreviations B L—Analyzer reading at the specified LDL test concentration for the LDL test. B Z—analyzer reading at 0 concentration for the LDL test. DM—Digital meter. C max—Maximum analyzer reading during the 12ZD test period. C min—Minimum analyzer reading during...

  7. 40 CFR Table B-5 to Subpart B of... - Symbols and Abbreviations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-5 to Subpart B of Part 53—Symbols and Abbreviations B L—Analyzer reading at the specified LDL test concentration for the LDL test. B Z—analyzer reading at 0 concentration for the LDL test. DM—Digital meter. C max—Maximum analyzer reading during the 12ZD test period. C min—Minimum analyzer reading during...

  8. Evaluating an Abbreviated Version of the Hispanic Stress Inventory for Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A.; Zayas, Luis H.; Walker, Mark S.; Fisher, Edwin B.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates an abbreviated version of the Hispanic Stress Inventory-Immigrant version (HSI-I) with a nonclinical sample of 143 adult Hispanic immigrants residing in a large midwestern city. The HSI-I consists of 73 items and 5 distinct subscales that assess psychosocial experiences on five dimensions, namely, occupational/economic,…

  9. 21 CFR 314.440 - Addresses for applications and abbreviated applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Addresses for applications and abbreviated applications. 314.440 Section 314.440 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...-600), Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Metro Park North...

  10. 40 CFR Table B-5 to Subpart B of... - Symbols and Abbreviations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Symbols and Abbreviations B Table B-5 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Performance Characteristics of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Table B-5 Table...

  11. 7 CFR 1755.900 - Abbreviations and Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... dielectric material that guides light. (24) Optical point discontinuities means the localized deviations of..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD...) ASTMAmerican Society for Testing and Materials; (3) °CCentigrade temperature scale; (4) dBDecibel;...

  12. Analysis of blood trace elements and biochemical indexes levels in severe craniocerebral trauma adults with Glasgow Coma Scale and injury severity score.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangtao; Hu, Bo; Chen, Guiqian; Yu, Xiaojun; Luo, Jianming; Lv, Junyao; Gu, Jiang

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the correlation between the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), the injury severity score (ISS) and serum levels of trace elements (TE) in severe trauma patients to analyze alteration of the levels of trace elements and serum biochemical indexes in the period of admission from 126 adult cases of severe brain trauma with traffic accidents. Multi-trace elements for patients in the trauma-TE groups were used. The results indicated that all patients presented an acute trace elements deficiency syndrome (ATEDs) after severe trauma, and the correlation between ISS and serum levels of Fe, Zn, and Mg was significant. Compared to the normal control group, levels of the trace elements in serum were significantly decreased after trauma, suggesting that enhancement of immunity to infection and multiple organ failure (MOF) via the monitoring and supplement of trace elements will be a good strategy to severe traumatic patients in clinics.

  13. Challenges and Practical Approaches with Word Sense Disambiguation of Acronyms and Abbreviations in the Clinical Domain

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, Bridget; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although acronyms and abbreviations in clinical text are used widely on a daily basis, relatively little research has focused upon word sense disambiguation (WSD) of acronyms and abbreviations in the healthcare domain. Since clinical notes have distinctive characteristics, it is unclear whether techniques effective for acronym and abbreviation WSD from biomedical literature are sufficient. Methods The authors discuss feature selection for automated techniques and challenges with WSD of acronyms and abbreviations in the clinical domain. Results There are significant challenges associated with the informal nature of clinical text, such as typographical errors and incomplete sentences; difficulty with insufficient clinical resources, such as clinical sense inventories; and obstacles with privacy and security for conducting research with clinical text. Although we anticipated that using sophisticated techniques, such as biomedical terminologies, semantic types, part-of-speech, and language modeling, would be needed for feature selection with automated machine learning approaches, we found instead that simple techniques, such as bag-of-words, were quite effective in many cases. Factors, such as majority sense prevalence and the degree of separateness between sense meanings, were also important considerations. Conclusions The first lesson is that a comprehensive understanding of the unique characteristics of clinical text is important for automatic acronym and abbreviation WSD. The second lesson learned is that investigators may find that using simple approaches is an effective starting point for these tasks. Finally, similar to other WSD tasks, an understanding of baseline majority sense rates and separateness between senses is important. Further studies and practical solutions are needed to better address these issues. PMID:25705556

  14. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  15. Neurological outcome scale for traumatic brain injury: III. Criterion-related validity and sensitivity to change in the NABIS hypothermia-II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Stephen R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Moretti, Paolo; Macleod, Marianne C; Pedroza, Claudia; Drever, Pamala; Fourwinds, Sierra; Frisby, Melisa L; Beers, Sue R; Scott, James N; Hunter, Jill V; Traipe, Elfrides; Valadka, Alex B; Okonkwo, David O; Zygun, David A; Puccio, Ava M; Clifton, Guy L

    2013-09-01

    The neurological outcome scale for traumatic brain injury (NOS-TBI) is a measure assessing neurological functioning in patients with TBI. We hypothesized that the NOS-TBI would exhibit adequate concurrent and predictive validity and demonstrate more sensitivity to change, compared with other well-established outcome measures. We analyzed data from the National Acute Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia-II clinical trial. Participants were 16-45 years of age with severe TBI assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. For analysis of criterion-related validity (concurrent and predictive), Spearman's rank-order correlations were calculated between the NOS-TBI and the glasgow outcome scale (GOS), GOS-extended (GOS-E), disability rating scale (DRS), and neurobehavioral rating scale-revised (NRS-R). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through significant correlations between the NOS-TBI and GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R measured contemporaneously at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury (all p<0.0013). For prediction analyses, the multiplicity-adjusted p value using the false discovery rate was <0.015. The 1-month NOS-TBI score was a significant predictor of outcome in the GOS, GOS-E, and DRS at 3 and 6 months postinjury (all p<0.015). The 3-month NOS-TBI significantly predicted GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R outcomes at 6 and 12 months postinjury (all p<0.0015). Sensitivity to change was analyzed using Wilcoxon's signed rank-sum test of subsamples demonstrating no change in the GOS or GOS-E between 3 and 6 months. The NOS-TBI demonstrated higher sensitivity to change, compared with the GOS (p<0.038) and GOS-E (p<0.016). In summary, the NOS-TBI demonstrated adequate concurrent and predictive validity as well as sensitivity to change, compared with gold-standard outcome measures. The NOS-TBI may enhance prediction of outcome in clinical practice and measurement of outcome in TBI research.

  16. Prehospital risk factors of mortality and impaired consciousness after severe traumatic brain injury: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health concern and a major burden for society. The period between trauma event and hospital admission in an emergency department (ED) could be a determinant for secondary brain injury and early survival. The aim was to investigate the relationship between prehospital factors associated with secondary brain injury (arterial hypotension, hypoxemia, hypothermia) and the outcomes of mortality and impaired consciousness of survivors at 14 days. Methods A multicenter, prospective cohort study was performed in dedicated trauma centres of Switzerland. Adults with severe TBI (Abbreviated Injury Scale score of head region (HAIS) >3) were included. Main outcome measures were death and impaired consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤13) at 14 days. The associations between risk factors and outcome were assessed with univariate and multivariate regression models. Results 589 patients were included, median age was 55 years (IQR 33, 70). The median GCS in ED was 4 (IQR 3-14), with abnormal pupil reaction in 167 patients (29.2%). Median ISS was 25 (IQR 21, 34). Three hundred seven patients sustained their TBI from falls (52.1%) and 190 from a road traffic accidents (32.3%). Median time from Out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service (OHEMS) departure on scene to arrival in ED was 50 minutes (IQR 37-72); 451 patients had a direct admission (76.6%). Prehospital hypotension was observed in 24 (4.1%) patients, hypoxemia in 73 (12.6%) patients and hypothermia in 146 (24.8%). Prehospital hypotension and hypothermia (apart of age and trauma severity) was associated with mortality. Prehospital hypoxemia (apart of trauma severity) was associated with impaired consciousness; indirect admission was a protective factor. Conclusion Mortality and impaired consciousness at 14 days do not have the same prehospital risk factors; prehospital hypotension and hypothermia is associated with mortality, and prehospital hypoxemia with

  17. Psychometric Validation of the Brief Adaptation to Disability Scale-Revised for Persons with Spinal Cord Injury in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chen-Ping; Wang, Chia-Chiang; Fujikawa, Mayu; Brooks, Jessica; Eastvold-Walton, Lissa; Maxwell, Kristin; Chan, Fong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the measurement structure of the Brief Adaptation to Disability Scale-Revised (B-ADS-R). Measure: A 12-item measure of disability acceptance based on the four value changes (enlarging the scope of values, containing the effects of the disability, subordinating the physique, and transforming comparative-status values to asset…

  18. Trauma-induced coagulopathy: standard coagulation tests, biomarkers of coagulopathy, and endothelial damage in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Johansson, Pär Ingemar; Meyer, Martin Abild Stengaard; Sølbeck, Sacha; Sørensen, Anne Marie; Larsen, Claus Falck; Welling, Karen Lise; Windeløv, Nis Agerlin; Rasmussen, Lars S; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye

    2013-02-15

    It remains to be debated whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a different coagulopathy than does non-TBI. This study investigated traditional coagulation tests, biomarkers of coagulopathy, and endothelial damage in trauma patients with and without TBI. Blood from 80 adult trauma patients was sampled (median of 68 min [IQR 48-88] post-injury) upon admission to our trauma center. Plasma/serum were retrospectively analyzed for biomarkers reflecting sympathoadrenal activation (adrenaline, noradrenaline), coagulation activation/inhibition and fibrinolysis (protein C, activated protein C, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, antithrombin, prothrombin fragment 1+2, thrombin/antithrombin complex, von Willebrand factor, factor XIII, d-dimer, tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1), immunology (interleukin [IL]6), endothelial cell/glycocalyx damage (soluble thrombomodulin, syndecan-1), and vasculogenesis (angiopoietin-1, -2). Patients were stratified according to: (1) isolated severe head/neck injuries (Abbreviated injury score [AIS]-head/neck ≥ 3, AIS-other<3) (isoTBI); (2) severe head/neck and extracranial injuries (AIS-head/neck ≥ 3, AIS-other>3) (sTBI+other); and (3) injuries without significant head/neck injuries (AIS-head/neck<3, including all AIS-other scores) (non-TBI). Twenty-three patients presented with isoTBI, 15 with sTBI+other and 42 with non-TBI. Acute coagulopathy of trauma shock, defined as activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and/or international normalized ratio (INR)>35 sec and>1.2, was found in 13%, 47%, and 5%, respectively (p=0.000). sTBI+other had significantly higher plasma levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, annexin V, d-dimer, IL-6, syndecan-1, soluble thrombomodulin, and reduced protein C and factor XIII levels (all p<0.05). No significant biomarker differences were found between isoTBI and non-TBI patients. Injury severity scale (ISS) rather than the presence or absence of head/neck injuries

  19. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  20. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  1. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  2. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  3. Blast Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical Providers Blast Injuries U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Gustavo Olgiati How ... tertiary injury Does a blast cause different brain injuries than blunt trauma? There currently is no evidence ...

  4. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  5. Hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Ropiak, Christopher R; Bosco, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Hamstring injuries are a frequent injury in athletes. Proximal injuries are common, ranging from strain to complete tear. Strains are managed nonoperatively, with rest followed by progressive stretching and strengthening. Reinjury is a concern. High grade complete tears are better managed surgically, with reattachment to the injured tendon or ischial tuberosity. Distal hamstring injury is usually associated with other knee injuries, and isolated injury is rare.

  6. Modern abbreviated computer navigation of the femur reduces blood loss in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Licini, David J; Meneghini, R Michael

    2015-10-01

    Computer assisted surgery (CAS) optimizes component position in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), yet effects specifically on blood loss are less known. This study purpose was to determine whether a modern abbreviated CAS protocol would reduce blood loss in TKA compared to conventional instrumentation. One hundred consecutive TKAs were retrospectively reviewed comparing abbreviated CAS versus conventional IM instrumentation. Blood loss was determined using drain output, change in hemoglobin, and calculated blood loss. The CAS group demonstrated less hourly drain output (P=0.02), hemoglobin change (P=0.001), and estimated blood loss (P=0.001) versus conventional instrumentation. With proven advantages of accurate component placement and improved functional outcome after TKA, CAS provides additional value by reducing blood loss in TKA.

  7. The Abbreviated Character Strengths Test (ACST): A Preliminary Assessment of Test Validity.

    PubMed

    Vanhove, Adam J; Harms, P D; DeSimone, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    The 24-item Abbreviated Character Strengths Test (ACST) was developed to efficiently measure character strengths (Peterson, Park, & Castro, 2011 ). However, its validity for this purpose has not yet been sufficiently established. Using confirmatory factor analysis to test a series of structural models, only a modified bifactor model showed reasonably acceptable fit. Further analyses of this model failed to demonstrate measurement invariance between male and female respondents. Relationships between ACST dimension and Big Five personality trait scores were generally weak-to-moderate, and support for hypotheses regarding each ACST virtue's expected correspondence with specific Big Five dimensions was mixed. Finally, scores on ACST dimensions accounted for a combined 12% of the variance in satisfaction with life scores, after controlling for socially desirability. Although an abbreviated measure of character strengths represents a practical need, considerable improvements to the ACST are needed for it to adequately meet this purpose. PMID:26983465

  8. Evaluation of an abbreviated impactor for fine particle fraction (FPF) determination of metered dose inhalers (MDI).

    PubMed

    Guo, Changning; Ngo, Diem; Ahadi, Shafiq; Doub, William H

    2013-09-01

    Abbreviated impactors have been developed recently to allow more rapid evaluation of inhalation products as alternates to the eight-stage Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) which has been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for assessing aerodynamic particle size distribution. In this paper, a two-stage abbreviated impactor, Westech Fine Particle Dose Impactor (WFPD), was used to characterize the aerodynamic particle size of metered dose inhaler (MDI) products, and the results were compared with those obtained using the standard eight-stage ACI. Seven commercial MDI products, with different propellants (chlorofluorocarbon/hydrofluoroalkane) and formulation types (suspension/solution, dry/normal/wet), were tested in this study by both WFPD and ACI. Substantially equivalent measures of fine particle fraction were obtained for most of the tested MDI products, but larger coarse particle fraction and extra-fine particle fraction values were measured from WFPD relative to those measured using the ACI. Use of the WFPD also produced more wall loss than the ACI. Therefore, it is recommended that the system suitability be evaluated on a product-by-product basis to establish substantial equivalency before implementing an abbreviated impactor measurement methodology for routine use in inhaler product characterization. PMID:23780781

  9. Abbreviated epitaxial growth mode (AGM) method for reducing cost and improving quality of LEDs and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Tansu, Nelson; Chan, Helen M; Vinci, Richard P; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Biser, Jeffrey

    2013-09-24

    The use of an abbreviated GaN growth mode on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire substrates, which utilizes a process of using 15 nm low temperature GaN buffer and bypassing etch-back and recovery processes during epitaxy, enables the growth of high-quality GaN template on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire. The GaN template grown on nano-patterned AGOG sapphire by employing abbreviated growth mode has two orders of magnitude lower threading dislocation density than that of conventional GaN template grown on planar sapphire. The use of abbreviated growth mode also leads to significant reduction in cost of the epitaxy. The growths and characteristics of InGaN quantum wells (QWs) light emitting diodes (LEDs) on both templates were compared. The InGaN QWs LEDs grown on the nano-patterned AGOG sapphire demonstrated at least a 24% enhancement of output power enhancement over that of LEDs grown on conventional GaN templates.

  10. Evaluation of an abbreviated impactor for fine particle fraction (FPF) determination of metered dose inhalers (MDI).

    PubMed

    Guo, Changning; Ngo, Diem; Ahadi, Shafiq; Doub, William H

    2013-09-01

    Abbreviated impactors have been developed recently to allow more rapid evaluation of inhalation products as alternates to the eight-stage Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) which has been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for assessing aerodynamic particle size distribution. In this paper, a two-stage abbreviated impactor, Westech Fine Particle Dose Impactor (WFPD), was used to characterize the aerodynamic particle size of metered dose inhaler (MDI) products, and the results were compared with those obtained using the standard eight-stage ACI. Seven commercial MDI products, with different propellants (chlorofluorocarbon/hydrofluoroalkane) and formulation types (suspension/solution, dry/normal/wet), were tested in this study by both WFPD and ACI. Substantially equivalent measures of fine particle fraction were obtained for most of the tested MDI products, but larger coarse particle fraction and extra-fine particle fraction values were measured from WFPD relative to those measured using the ACI. Use of the WFPD also produced more wall loss than the ACI. Therefore, it is recommended that the system suitability be evaluated on a product-by-product basis to establish substantial equivalency before implementing an abbreviated impactor measurement methodology for routine use in inhaler product characterization.

  11. The injury epidemiology of cyclists based on a road trauma registry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bicycle use has increased in some of France's major cities, mainly as a means of transport. Bicycle crashes need to be studied, preferably by type of cycling. Here we conduct a descriptive analysis. Method A road trauma registry has been in use in France since 1996, in a large county around Lyon (the Rhône, population 1.6 million). It covers outpatients, inpatients and fatalities. All injuries are coded using the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Proxies were used to identify three types of cycling: learning = children (0-10 years old); sports cycling = teenagers and adults injured outside towns; cycling as means of transport = teenagers and adults injured in towns. The study is based on 13,684 cyclist casualties (1996-2008). Results The percentage of cyclists injured in a collision with a motor vehicle was 8% among children, 17% among teenagers and adults injured outside towns, and 31% among those injured in towns. The percentage of serious casualties (MAIS 3+) was 4.5% among children, 10.9% among adults injured outside towns and 7.2% among those injured in towns. Collisions with motor-vehicles lead to more internal injuries than bicycle-only crashes. Conclusion The description indicates that cyclist type is associated with different crash and injury patterns. In particular, cyclists injured in towns (where cycling is increasing) are generally less severely injured than those injured outside towns for both types of crash (bicycle-only crashes and collisions with a motor vehicle). This is probably due to lower speeds in towns, for both cyclists and motor vehicles. PMID:21849071

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury among Older Adults at Level I and II Trauma Centers

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Jeffrey P.; Whyte, John; Corrigan, John D.; Faul, Mark; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Individuals 65 years of age and over have the highest rates of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related hospitalizations and deaths, and older adults (defined variably across studies) have particularly poor outcomes after TBI. The factors predicting these outcomes remain poorly understood, and age-specific care guidelines for TBI do not exist. This study provides an overview of TBI in older adults using data from the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) gathered between 2007 and 2010, evaluates age group-specific trends in rates of TBI over time using U.S. Census data, and examines whether routinely collected information is able to predict hospital discharge status among older adults with TBI in the NTDB. Results showed a 20–25% increase in trauma center admissions for TBI among the oldest age groups (those >=75 years), relative to the general population, between 2007 and 2010. Older adults (>=65 years) with TBI tended to be white females who have incurred an injury from a fall resulting in a “severe” Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of the head. Older adults had more in-hospital procedures, such as neuroimaging and neurosurgery, tended to experience longer hospital stays, and were more likely to require continued medical care than younger adults. Older age, injury severity, and hypotension increased the odds of in-hospital death. The public health burden of TBI among older adults will likely increase as the Baby Boom generation ages. Improved primary and secondary prevention of TBI in this cohort is needed. PMID:23962046

  13. Triage of Children with Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury to Trauma Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kernic, Mary A.; Rivara, Frederick P.; Zatzick, Douglas F.; Bell, Michael J.; Wainwright, Mark S.; Groner, Jonathan I.; Giza, Christopher C.; Mink, Richard B.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Boyle, Linda; Mitchell, Pamela H.; Kannan, Nithya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Outcomes after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) are related to pre-treatment factors including age, injury severity, and mechanism of injury, and may be positively affected by treatment at trauma centers relative to non-trauma centers. This study estimated the proportion of children with moderate to severe TBI who receive care at trauma centers, and examined factors associated with receipt of care at adult (ATC), pediatric (PTC), and adult/pediatric trauma centers (APTC), compared with care at non-trauma centers (NTC) using a nationally representative database. The Kids' Inpatient Database was used to identify hospitalizations for moderate to severe pediatric TBI. Pediatric inpatients ages 0 to 17 years with at least one diagnosis of TBI and a maximum head Abbreviated Injury Scale score of ≥3 were studied. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to examine factors predictive of the level and type of facility where care was received. A total of 16.7% of patients were hospitalized at NTC, 44.2% at Level I or II ATC, 17.9% at Level I or II PTC, and 21.2% at Level I or II APTC. Multiple regression analyses showed receipt of care at a trauma center was associated with age and polytrauma. We concluded that almost 84% of children with moderate to severe TBI currently receive care at a Level I or Level II trauma center. Children with trauma to multiple body regions in addition to more severe TBI are more likely to receive care a trauma center relative to a NTC. PMID:23343131

  14. Effects of signal salience and noise on performance and stress in an abbreviated vigil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helton, William Stokely

    Vigilance or sustained attention tasks traditionally require observers to detect predetermined signals that occur unpredictably over periods of 30 min to several hours (Warm, 1984). These tasks are taxing and have been useful in revealing the effects of stress agents, such as infectious disease and drugs, on human performance (Alluisi, 1969; Damos & Parker, 1994; Warm, 1993). However, their long duration has been an inconvenience. Recently, Temple and his associates (Temple et al., 2000) developed an abbreviated 12-min vigilance task that duplicates many of the findings with longer duration vigils. The present study was designed to explore further the similarity of the abbreviated task to long-duration vigils by investigating the effects of signal salience and jet-aircraft engine noise on performance, operator stress, and coping strategies. Forty-eight observers (24 males and 24 females) were assigned at random to each of four conditions resulting from the factorial combination of signal salience (high and low contrast signals) and background noise (quiet and jet-aircraft noise). As is the case with long-duration vigils (Warm, 1993), signal detection in the abbreviated task was poorer for low salience than for high salience signals. In addition, stress scores, as indexed by the Dundee Stress State Questionnaire (Matthews, Joiner, Gilliland, Campbell, & Falconer, 1999), were elevated in the low as compared to the high salience condition. Unlike longer vigils, however, (Becker, Warm, Dember, & Hancock, 1996), signal detection in the abbreviated task was superior in the presence of aircraft noise than in quiet. Noise also attenuated the stress of the vigil, a result that is counter to previous findings regarding the effects of noise in a variety of other scenarios (Clark, 1984). Examination of observers' coping responses, as assessed by the Coping Inventory for Task Situations (Matthews & Campbell, 1998), indicated that problem-focused coping was the overwhelming

  15. Baseball bat assault injuries.

    PubMed

    Groleau, G A; Tso, E L; Olshaker, J S; Barish, R A; Lyston, D J

    1993-03-01

    The baseball bat, according to Baltimore City police crime statistics, is a commonly used weapon. To assess the severity of injuries inflicted by this modern-day club, we retrospectively reviewed 75 charts of patients treated at the University of Maryland Medical Systems Hospital for baseball bat injuries from January 1990 through July 1991. Multisystem trauma was documented, with craniocerebral injury being the most frequent and the most frequent cause of death. Of the victims struck on the head, 26% sustained an intracranial hemorrhage. In our series, the history of loss of consciousness and the Glasgow Coma Scale score failed to reliably identify the patients with serious injuries. Seventeen percent of our patients with intracranial hemorrhages had both a negative or uncertain history of loss of consciousness and a normal Glasgow Coma Scale score on arrival.

  16. Injuries caused by antipersonnel mines in Croatian Army soldiers on the East Slavonia front during the 1991-1992 war in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Soldo, S; Puntarić, D; Petrovicki, Z; Prgomet, D

    1999-02-01

    During the war in Croatia, antipersonnel mines were mostly laid without plan by both sides, with no minefield layout, especially on the East Slavonia front. A group of Croatian disabled war veterans wounded by antipersonnel mines at the East Slavonia front from June 1, 1991, to September 1, 1992, were analyzed. The front line between the Croatian Army units and Serbian paramilitary units mostly ran along a lowland, partially swampy and wooded ground, convenient for large-scale laying of antipersonnel mines, especially so-called surprise mines. Fifty-seven soldiers suffered injuries caused by antipersonnel mines, 27 (47.4%) of them by pressure-activated mines and 30 (52.6%) by pull-action mines. The severity of wounds was assessed according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). In the group of patients with wounds inflicted by pressure-activated mines, the mean AIS score was 4.0 +/- 0.7, with injuries to the lower extremities (mostly feet) ranging from foot-mutilating defects to partial lower-leg amputation. In the group of patients with injuries caused by pull-action mines, the mean AIS score was 3.0 +/- 0.9, indicating relatively minor injuries of different types according to the mechanism of wounding and localization. A failure to comply with minelaying regulations made protection impossible and resulted in a relatively high proportion of the wounded. The same problems are now encountered on mine removal. According to estimates, at least 10 years of intensive work of 2,000 to 3,000 trained experts will be required to clear some 2 million mines laid all over the area.

  17. Brief report: data on the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales (5th ed.) in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Coolican, Jamesie; Bryson, Susan E; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie

    2008-01-01

    The Fifth Edition of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales (SB5; Roid, G. H. (2003). Stanford Binet intelligence scales (5th ed.). Itasca, IL: Riverside Publishing) is relatively new, with minimal published research on general populations and none with special populations. The present study provides information on the cognitive profiles of children with ASD (N=63) and on the whether the abbreviated battery is representative of the full scale. A high percentage of the children had significantly stronger nonverbal (vs. verbal) skills. This pattern was not related to Full Scale IQ, age or diagnostic subgroup. IQs derived from the abbreviated battery accounted for a large proportion of the variance in FSIQ relative to comparable abbreviated batteries. However, caution is warranted when using the abbreviated battery, as it misrepresents actual ability in a small percentage of cases.

  18. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  19. Snowboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Pino, E C; Colville, M R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 267 snowboarders was undertaken to determine the population at risk and types and mechanisms of injuries sustained in this sport. Snowboarders are young (average age, 21 years), male (greater than 90%), view themselves in average or above average physical condition (96%), and have varied sports interests. One hundred ten injuries that resulted in a physician visit were reported. Ligament sprains, fractures, and contusions were the most frequent types of injury. Fifty percent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities, with ankle injuries being the most common. Snowboard riders using equipment with increased ankle support seem to be more protected from lower extremity injuries. The lower extremity injuries were concentrated in the forward limb of the snowboarder, where the rider's weight is disproportionately distributed. Differences in the mechanism and spectrum of injury between snowboarding and skiing injuries were noted, including: impact rather than torsion as the major mechanism of injury, a significant lack of thumb injuries, comparative increase in ankle injuries, a decrease in knee injuries, and a higher percentage of upper extremity injuries.

  20. Basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joel S; Newberg, Arthur H

    2010-11-01

    Basketball injuries are most prevalent in the lower extremity, especially at the ankle and knee. Most basketball injuries are orthopedic in nature and commonly include ligament sprains, musculotendinous strains, and overuse injuries including stress fractures. By virtue of its excellent contrast resolution and depiction of the soft tissues and trabecular bone, magnetic resonance imaging has become the principal modality for evaluating many basketball injuries. In this article, commonly encountered basketball injuries and their imaging appearances are described. The epidemiology of basketball injuries across various age groups and levels of competition and between genders are reviewed.

  1. Abbreviations, acronyms, and initialisms frequently used by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.T.

    1994-09-01

    Guidelines are given for using abbreviations, acronyms, and initialisms (AAIs) in documents prepared by US Department of Energy facilities managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The more than 10,000 AAIs listed represent only a small portion of those found in recent documents prepared by contributing editors of the Information Management Services organization of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document expands on AAIs listed in the Document Preparation Guide and is intended as a companion document

  2. ED disposition of the Glasgow Coma Scale 13 to 15 traumatic brain injury patient: analysis of the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in TBI study☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Opeolu; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Hart, Kimberly W.; Pancioli, Arthur; McMullan, Jason T.; Yue, John K.; Nishijima, Daniel K.; Gordon, Wayne A.; Valadka, Alex B.; Okonkwo, David O.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Maas, Andrew I.R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients are frequently admitted to high levels of care despite limited evidence suggesting benefit. Such decisions may contribute to the significant cost of caring for mTBI patients. Understanding the factors that drive disposition decision making and how disposition is associated with outcomes is necessary for developing an evidence-base supporting disposition decisions. We evaluated factors associated with emergency department triage of mTBI patients to 1 of 3 levels of care: home, inpatient floor, or intensive care unit (ICU). Methods This multicenter, prospective, cohort study included patients with isolated head trauma, a cranial computed tomography as part of routine care, and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 13 to 15. Data analysis was performed using multinomial logistic regression. Results Of the 304 patients included, 167 (55%) were discharged home, 76 (25%) were admitted to the inpatient floor, and 61 (20%) were admitted to the ICU. In the multivariable model, admission to the ICU, compared with floor admission, varied by study site, odds ratio (OR) 0.18 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.06–0.57); antiplatelet/anticoagulation therapy, OR 7.46 (95% CI, 1.79–31.13); skull fracture, OR 7.60 (95% CI, 2.44–23.73); and lower GCS, OR 2.36 (95% CI, 1.05–5.30). No difference in outcome was observed between the 3 levels of care. Conclusion Clinical characteristics and local practice patterns contribute to mTBI disposition decisions. Level of care was not associated with outcomes. Intracranial hemorrhage, GCS 13 to 14, skull fracture, and current antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy influenced disposition decisions. PMID:24857248

  3. Skateboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Cass, D T; Ross, F

    1990-08-01

    The recent increase in skateboard injuries is causing concern. Over a 30-month period there were 80 admissions (69 children) to Westmead Hospital because of skateboard injuries. Among children most injuries were minor, involving fractures to the upper limbs (47) or minor head injuries (8). The only serious injuries were a ruptured urethra and a closed head injury. Over the same time period skateboard riding caused five deaths in New South Wales. These all involved head injuries and in four instances collisions with cars. The data strongly support other studies that show skateboard riding is particularly dangerous near traffic and should be proscribed. However, in parkland and around the home the skateboard is an enjoyable toy with an acceptable risk of minor injury. Helmets should be worn and would have prevented all the head injury admissions in this series. Children under 10 have a higher risk of fractures and head injuries due to insufficient motor development to control the boards and the resultant falls. Skateboard injuries are an example of injuries caused by a "fad epidemic". To cope with these types of periodic events up-to-date data collection is needed, followed rapidly by an intervention programme so that serious injuries can be kept to a minimum.

  4. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  5. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  6. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  7. Epidemiology of injuries in English professional rugby union: part 1 match injuries

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, J; Fuller, C; Kemp, S; Reddin, D

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To undertake a detailed, large scale epidemiological study of match injuries sustained by professional rugby union players in order to define their incidence, nature, severity, and causes. Methods: A two season prospective design was used to study match injuries associated with 546 rugby union players at 12 English Premiership clubs. Team clinicians reported all match injuries on a weekly basis and provided details of the location, diagnosis, severity, and mechanism of each injury. Match exposures for individual players were recorded on a weekly basis. Loss of time from training and match play was used as the definition of an injury. Results: The overall incidence of injury was 91 injuries/1000 player-hours, and each injury resulted on average in 18 days lost time. Recurrences, which accounted for 18% of injuries, were significantly more severe (27 days) than new injuries (16 days). Thigh haematomas were the most common injury for forwards and backs, but anterior cruciate ligament injuries for forwards and hamstring injuries for backs caused the greatest number of days absence. Contact mechanisms accounted for 72% of injuries, but foul play was only implicated in 6% of injuries. The ruck and maul elements of the game caused most injuries to forwards, and being tackled caused most injuries to backs. The hooker and outside centre were the playing positions at greatest risk of injury. Conclusions: On average, a club will have 18% of their players unavailable for selection as a consequence of match injuries. PMID:16183774

  8. Exploring the relationship between children's knowledge of text message abbreviations and school literacy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Plester, Beverly; Wood, Clare; Joshi, Puja

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a study of 88 British 10-12-year-old children's knowledge of text message (SMS) abbreviations ('textisms') and how it relates to their school literacy attainment. As a measure of textism knowledge, the children were asked to compose text messages they might write if they were in each of a set of scenarios. Their text messages were coded for types of text abbreviations (textisms) used, and the ratio of textisms to total words was calculated to indicate density of textism use. The children also completed a short questionnaire about their mobile phone use. The ratio of textisms to total words used was positively associated with word reading, vocabulary, and phonological awareness measures. Moreover, the children's textism use predicted word reading ability after controlling for individual differences in age, short-term memory, vocabulary, phonological awareness and how long they had owned a mobile phone. The nature of the contribution that textism knowledge makes to children's word reading attainment is discussed in terms of the notion of increased exposure to print, and Crystal's (2006a) notion of ludic language use.

  9. Ectopic expression of KCNE3 accelerates cardiac repolarization and abbreviates the QT interval

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Reza; Nuss, H. Bradley; Armoundas, Antonis A.; Winslow, Raimond L.; Marbán, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory subunit KCNE3 (E3) interacts with KCNQ1 (Q1) in epithelia, regulating its activation kinetics and augmenting current density. Since E3 is expressed weakly in the heart, we hypothesized that ectopic expression of E3 in cardiac myocytes might abbreviate action potential duration (APD) by interacting with Q1 and augmenting the delayed rectifier current (IK). Thus, we transiently coexpressed E3 with Q1 and KCNE1 (E1) in Chinese hamster ovary cells and found that E3 coexpression increased outward current at potentials by ≥ –80 mV and accelerated activation. We then examined the changes in cardiac electrophysiology following injection of adenovirus-expressed E3 into the left ventricular cavity of guinea pigs. After 72 hours, the corrected QT interval of the electrocardiogram was reduced by ∼10%. APD was reduced by >3-fold in E3-transduced cells relative to controls, while E-4031–insensitive IK and activation kinetics were significantly augmented. Based on quantitative modeling of a transmural cardiac segment, we demonstrate that the degree of QT interval abbreviation observed results from electrotonic interactions in the face of limited transduction efficiency and that heterogeneous transduction of E3 may actually potentiate arrhythmias. Provided that fairly homogeneous ectopic ventricular expression of regulatory subunits can be achieved, this approach may be useful in enhancing repolarization and in treating long QT syndrome. PMID:11956246

  10. Elevated depressive symptoms and adolescent injury: examining associations by injury frequency, injury type, and gender

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Key risk factors for adolescent injury have been well documented, and include structural, behavioural, and psychosocial indicators. While psychiatric distress has been associated with suicidal behaviour and related self-harm, very little research has examined the role of depression in shaping adolescent injury. This study examines the association of elevated depressive symptoms with injury, including total number of injuries and injury type. Gender differences are also considered. Methods Data were drawn in 2010–11 from a representative sample of 2,989 high school students (14 to18 years of age) from Nova Scotia, Canada. Self-reported injury outcomes were examined using the 17-item Adolescent Injury Checklist, which captures past six-month injuries. Elevated depressive symptoms were assessed using the Centers for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Associations of elevated depressive symptoms with total number of injuries were estimated with negative binomial regression, while associations with specific injury types were estimated with logistic regression. Analyses were conducted in 2012. Results Adolescents with elevated depressive symptoms experienced a 40% increase in the total number of injury events occurring in the past six months. The association of elevated depressive symptoms with injury was consistent across injury type; violence-related (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.61 to 3.03), transport-related (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.13), and unintentional injuries (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.20 to 2.27). Gender differences were also observed. Conclusion Elevated depressive symptoms play a role in shaping adolescent injury. Interventions aimed at reducing adolescent injury should look to minimize psychosocial antecedents, such as poor mental health, that put adolescents at an elevated risk. PMID:24555802

  11. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  12. Bicycling injuries.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Bicycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, and overuse injuries. Despite the popularity of cycling, there are few scientific studies regarding injuries. Epidemiological studies are difficult to compare due to different methodologies and the diverse population of cyclists studied. There are only three studies conducted on top level professionals. Ninety-four percent of professionals in 1 year have experienced at least one overuse injury. Most overuse injuries are mild with limited time off the bike. The most common site of overuse injury is the knee, and the most common site of traumatic injury is the shoulder, with the clavicle having the most common fracture. Many overuse and bicycle contact ailments are relieved with simple bike adjustments.

  13. 21 CFR 314.107 - Effective date of approval of a 505(b)(2) application or abbreviated new drug application under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) application or abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j) of the act. 314.107 Section 314.107 Food... application under section 505(j) of the act. (a) General. A drug product may be introduced or delivered for... abbreviated new drug application submitted under section 505(j) of the act or of a 505(b)(2) application...

  14. 21 CFR 314.122 - Submitting an abbreviated application for, or a 505(j)(2)(C) petition that relies on, a listed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 505(j)(2)(C) petition that relies on, a listed drug that is no longer marketed. 314.122 Section 314... Abbreviated Applications § 314.122 Submitting an abbreviated application for, or a 505(j)(2)(C) petition that... to, or a petition under section 505(j)(2)(C) of the act and § 314.93 that relies on, a listed...

  15. 21 CFR 314.122 - Submitting an abbreviated application for, or a 505(j)(2)(C) petition that relies on, a listed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 505(j)(2)(C) petition that relies on, a listed drug that is no longer marketed. 314.122 Section 314... Abbreviated Applications § 314.122 Submitting an abbreviated application for, or a 505(j)(2)(C) petition that... to, or a petition under section 505(j)(2)(C) of the act and § 314.93 that relies on, a listed...

  16. 21 CFR 314.107 - Effective date of approval of a 505(b)(2) application or abbreviated new drug application under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) application or abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j) of the act. 314.107 Section 314.107 Food... application under section 505(j) of the act. (a) General. A drug product may be introduced or delivered for... abbreviated new drug application submitted under section 505(j) of the act or of a 505(b)(2) application...

  17. Delayed and disorganised brain activation detected with magnetoencephalography after mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Leodante; Robertson, Amanda; Bethune, Allison; MacDonald, Matt J; Shek, Pang N; Taylor, Margot J; Pang, Elizabeth W

    2015-01-01

    Background Awareness to neurocognitive issues after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is increasing, but currently no imaging markers are available for mTBI. Advanced structural imaging recently showed microstructural tissue changes and axonal injury, mild but likely sufficient to lead to functional deficits. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has high temporal and spatial resolution, combining structural and electrophysiological information, and can be used to examine brain activation patterns of regions involved with specific tasks. Methods 16 adults with mTBI and 16 matched controls were submitted to neuropsychological testing (Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI); Conners; Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT); Generalised Anxiety Disorder Seven-item Scale (GAD-7); Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9); Symptom Checklist and Symptom Severity Score (SCAT2)) and MEG while tested for mental flexibility (Intra-Extra Dimensional set-shifting tasks). Three-dimensional maps were generated using synthetic aperture magnetometry beamforming analyses to identify differences in regional activation and activation times. Reaction times and accuracy between groups were compared using 2×2 mixed analysis of variance. Findings While accuracy was similar, patients with mTBI reaction time was delayed and sequence of activation of brain regions disorganised, with involvement of extra regions such as the occipital lobes, not used by controls. Examination of activation time showed significant delays in the right insula and left posterior parietal cortex in patients with mTBI. Conclusions Patients with mTBI showed significant delays in the activation of important areas involved in executive function. Also, more regions of the brain are involved in an apparent compensatory effort. Our study suggests that MEG can detect subtle neural changes associated with cognitive dysfunction and thus, may eventually be useful for capturing and tracking the onset and course of

  18. Abbreviated bibliography on energy development—A focus on the Rocky Mountain Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montag, Jessica M.; Willis, Carolyn J.; Glavin, Levi W.

    2011-01-01

    Energy development of all types continues to grow in the Rocky Mountain Region of the western United States. Federal resource managers increasingly need to balance energy demands, effects on the natural landscape and public perceptions towards these issues. To assist in efficient access to valuable information, this abbreviated bibliography provides citations to relevant information for myriad of issues for which resource managers must contend. The bibliography is organized by seven large topics with various sup-topics: broad energy topics (energy crisis, conservation, supply and demand, etc.); energy sources (fossil fuel, nuclear, renewable, etc.); natural landscape effects (climate change, ecosystem, mitigation, restoration, and reclamation, wildlife, water, etc.); human landscape effects (attitudes and perceptions, economics, community effects, health, Native Americans, etc.); research and technology; international research; and, methods and modeling. A large emphasis is placed on the natural and human landscape effects.

  19. Skiing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    In the broad spectrum of orthopedic skiing injuries, ‘second aid’ on the mountain and at the base by the physician is very important. All skiing physicians should carry minimal medical supplies, including narcotic medication. Diagnosis and treatment of injuries at the hospital are outlined. Most ski fractures of the tibia can be treated by conservative methods. A more aggressive approach to diagnosis and treatment of ligamentous injuries of the knee is recommended. PMID:20469236

  20. Diving injuries.

    PubMed

    Dickey, L S

    1984-01-01

    This is a collective review about the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of SCUBA and diving injuries by the emergency physician. These injuries can be classified into those resulting from the toxic effects of the inhaled gas, from the pressure changes in the water and gas mixture while diving, and from decompression sickness. With the increasing popularity of SCUBA diving, it is hoped that this discussion will enable a recognition of these injuries and therefore minimize the morbidity and mortality from them.

  1. Txt Msg N School Literacy: Does Texting and Knowledge of Text Abbreviations Adversely Affect Children's Literacy Attainment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plester, Beverly; Wood, Clare; Bell, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on two studies which investigated the relationship between children's texting behaviour, their knowledge of text abbreviations and their school attainment in written language skills. In Study One, 11-12-year-old children provided information on their texting behaviour. They were also asked to translate a standard English…

  2. 9 CFR 317.3 - Approval of abbreviations of marks of inspection; preparation of marking devices bearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... other (nonhorse) equine meat food products), or any abbreviations, copy or representation thereof. (c... horse carcasses and parts of horse carcasses), § 312.3(b) (only the legend appropriate for other equine (nonhorse) carcasses and parts of other (nonhorse) equine carcasses) or § 312.7(a). (1) The certificate is...

  3. 9 CFR 317.3 - Approval of abbreviations of marks of inspection; preparation of marking devices bearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... other (nonhorse) equine meat food products), or any abbreviations, copy or representation thereof. (c... horse carcasses and parts of horse carcasses), § 312.3(b) (only the legend appropriate for other equine (nonhorse) carcasses and parts of other (nonhorse) equine carcasses) or § 312.7(a). (1) The certificate is...

  4. 9 CFR 317.3 - Approval of abbreviations of marks of inspection; preparation of marking devices bearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... other (nonhorse) equine meat food products), or any abbreviations, copy or representation thereof. (c... horse carcasses and parts of horse carcasses), § 312.3(b) (only the legend appropriate for other equine (nonhorse) carcasses and parts of other (nonhorse) equine carcasses) or § 312.7(a). (1) The certificate is...

  5. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: An abbreviated regulatory guide to the clinical requirements for development of therapeutics in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Simon, L S

    2015-05-01

    In this brief abbreviated review of regulatory issues regarding the development of drugs and or devices for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA), the steps that are expected by both the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) are discussed.

  6. Matching Element Symbols with State Abbreviations: A Fun Activity for Browsing the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woelk, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    A classroom activity is presented in which students are challenged to find matches between the United States two-letter postal abbreviations for states and chemical element symbols. The activity aims to lessen negative apprehensions students might have when the periodic table of the elements with its more than 100 combinations of letters is first…

  7. Development of an Abbreviated Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) Using Item Response Theory: The SPAI-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Strong, David R.; Nay, William T.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Turner, Samuel M.

    2007-01-01

    An abbreviated version of the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory (SPAI) was developed using methods based in nonparametric item response theory. Participants included a nonclinical sample of 1,482 undergraduates (52% female, mean age = 19.4 years) as well as a clinical sample of 105 individuals (56% female, mean age = 36.4 years) diagnosed with…

  8. Patient and Trauma Center Characteristics Associated with Helicopter Emergency Medical Services Transport for Patients with Minor Injuries in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Brian H.; Delgado, M. Kit; Staudenmayer, Kristan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Helicopter emergency medical services (EMS) transport is expensive, and previous work has shown that cost-effective use of this resource is dependent on the proportion of minor injuries flown. To understand how over-triage to helicopter EMS versus ground EMS can be reduced, it is important to understand factors associated with helicopter transport of patients with minor injuries. Objectives The aim was to characterize patient and hospital characteristics associated with helicopter transport of patients with minor injuries. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of adults ≥18 years who were transported by helicopter to Level I/II trauma centers from 2009 through 2010 as identified in the National Trauma Data Bank. Minor injuries were defined as all injuries scored at an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) < 3. Patient and hospital characteristics associated of being flown with only minor injuries were compared in an unadjusted and adjusted fashion. Hierarchical, multivariate logistic regression was used to adjust for patient demographics, mechanism of injury, presenting physiology, injury severity, urban-rural location of injury, total EMS time, hospital characteristics, and region. Results A total of 24,812 records were identified, corresponding to 76,090 helicopter transports. The proportion of helicopter transports with only minor injuries was 36% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 34% to 39%). Patient characteristics associated with being flown with minor injuries included being uninsured (odds ratio [OR] 1.36, 95% CI = 1.26 to 1.47), injury by a fall (OR 1.32, 95% CI = 1.20 to 1.45), or other penetrating trauma (OR 2.52, 95% CI = 2.12 to 3.00). Being flown with minor injuries was more likely if the patient was transported to a trauma center that also received a high proportion of patients with minor injuries by ground EMS (OR 1.89, 95% CI = 1.58 to 2.26) or a high proportion of EMS traffic by helicopter (OR 1.35, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.78). No significant

  9. Injury Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Injuries are now the cause of more deaths to children than the next six most frequent causes combined. Reviews the research evidence on the effectiveness of approaches to injury control such as legislation, health education, and behavioral strategies. Suggests avenues of further research. (Author/BJV)

  10. Rowing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hosea, Timothy M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Rowing is one of the original modern Olympic sports and was one of the most popular spectator sports in the United States. Its popularity has been increasing since the enactment of Title IX. The injury patterns in this sport are unique because of the stress applied during the rowing stroke. Evidence Acquisition: This review summarizes the existing literature describing the biomechanics of the rowing stroke and rowing-related injury patterns. Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December, 2011) as well as from textbook chapters and rowing coaching manuals. Results: Rowing injuries are primarily overuse related. The knee, lumbar spine, and ribs are most commonly affected. The injury incidence is directly related to the volume of training and technique. Conclusion: Familiarity of the injury patterns and the biomechanical forces affecting the rowing athlete will aid in prompt diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23016093

  11. Hospital Acquired Pneumonia is an Independent Predictor of Poor Global Outcome in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury up to 5 Years after Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Kesinger, Matthew R.; Kumar, Raj G.; Wagner, Amy K.; Puyana, Juan C.; Peitzman, Andrew P.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Sperry, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Long-term outcomes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) correlate with initial head injury severity and other acute factors. Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is a common complication in TBI. Little information exists regarding the significance of infectious complications on long-term outcomes post-TBI. We sought to characterize risks associated with HAP on outcomes 5 years post-TBI. Methods Ddata from the merger of an institutional trauma registry and the TBI Model Systems outcome data. Individuals with severe head injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale≥4), who survived to rehabilitation were analyzed. Primary outcome was Glasgow Outcome Scaled-Extended (GOSE) at 1, 2, and 5 years. GOSE was dichotomized into LOW (GOSE<6) and HIGH (GOSE≥6). Logistic regression was utilized to determine adjusted odds of LOW-GOSE associated with HAP after controlling for age, sex, head and overall injury severity, cranial surgery, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), ventilation days, and other important confounders. A general estimating equation (GEE) model was used to analyze all outcome observations simultaneously while controlling for within-patient correlation. Results A total of 141 individuals met inclusion criteria, with a 30% incidence of HAP. Individuals with and without HAP had similar demographic profiles, presenting vitals, head injury severity, and prevalence of cranial surgery. Individuals with HAP had lower presenting GCS. Logistic regression demonstrated that HAP was independently associated with LOW-GOSE scores at follow-up (1year: OR=6.39, 95%CI: 1.76-23.14, p=0.005; 2-years: OR=7.30, 95%CI 1.87-27.89, p=0.004; 5-years: OR=6.89, 95%CI: 1.42-33.39, p=0.017). Stratifying by GCS≤8 and early intubation, HAP remained a significant independent predictor of LOW-GOSE in all strata. In the GEE model, HAP continued to be an independent predictor of LOW-GOSE (OR: 4.59; 95%CI: 1.82-11.60′ p=0.001). Conclusion HAP is independently associated with poor outcomes in severe

  12. COMT Val 158 Met polymorphism is associated with nonverbal cognition following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; McAllister, Thomas W; Temkin, Nancy R; Oh, Sam S; Burchard, Esteban G; Hu, Donglei; Ferguson, Adam R; Lingsma, Hester F; Burke, John F; Sorani, Marco D; Rosand, Jonathan; Yuh, Esther L; Barber, Jason; Tarapore, Phiroz E; Gardner, Raquel C; Sharma, Sourabh; Satris, Gabriela G; Eng, Celeste; Puccio, Ava M; Wang, Kevin K W; Mukherjee, Pratik; Valadka, Alex B; Okonkwo, David O; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) results in variable clinical outcomes, which may be influenced by genetic variation. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme which degrades catecholamine neurotransmitters, may influence cognitive deficits following moderate and/or severe head trauma. However, this has been disputed, and its role in mTBI has not been studied. Here, we utilize the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot (TRACK-TBI Pilot) study to investigate whether the COMT Val (158) Met polymorphism influences outcome on a cognitive battery 6 months following mTBI--Wechsler Adult Intelligence Test Processing Speed Index Composite Score (WAIS-PSI), Trail Making Test (TMT) Trail B minus Trail A time, and California Verbal Learning Test, Second Edition Trial 1-5 Standard Score (CVLT-II). All patients had an emergency department Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 13-15, no acute intracranial pathology on head CT, and no polytrauma as defined by an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of ≥3 in any extracranial region. Results in 100 subjects aged 40.9 (SD 15.2) years (COMT Met (158) /Met (158) 29 %, Met (158) /Val (158) 47 %, Val (158) /Val (158) 24 %) show that the COMT Met (158) allele (mean 101.6 ± SE 2.1) associates with higher nonverbal processing speed on the WAIS-PSI when compared to Val (158) /Val (158) homozygotes (93.8 ± SE 3.0) after controlling for demographics and injury severity (mean increase 7.9 points, 95 % CI [1.4 to 14.3], p = 0.017). The COMT Val (158) Met polymorphism did not associate with mental flexibility on the TMT or with verbal learning on the CVLT-II. Hence, COMT Val (158) Met may preferentially modulate nonverbal cognition following uncomplicated mTBI.Registry: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01565551. PMID:26576546

  13. The Impact of Pre-Hospital Administration of Lactated Ringer's Solution versus Normal Saline in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rowell, Susan E; Fair, Kelly A; Barbosa, Ronald R; Watters, Jennifer M; Bulger, Eileen M; Holcomb, John B; Cohen, Mitchell J; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Fox, Erin E; Schreiber, Martin A

    2016-06-01

    Lactated Ringer's (LR) and normal saline (NS) are both used for resuscitation of injured patients. NS has been associated with increased resuscitation volume, blood loss, acidosis, and coagulopathy compared with LR. We sought to determine if pre-hospital LR is associated with improved outcome compared with NS in patients with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI). We included patients receiving pre-hospital LR or NS from the PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study. Patients with TBI (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] head ≥3) and without TBI (AIS head ≤2) were compared. Cox proportional hazards models including Injury Severity Score (ISS), AIS head, AIS extremity, age, fluids, intubation status, and hospital site were generated for prediction of mortality. Linear regression models were generated for prediction of red blood cell (RBC) and crystalloid requirement, and admission biochemical/physiological parameters. Seven hundred ninety-one patients received either LR (n = 117) or NS (n = 674). Median ISS, AIS head, AIS extremity, and pre-hospital fluid volume were higher in TBI and non-TBI patients receiving LR compared with NS (p < 0.01). In patients with TBI (n = 308), LR was associated with higher adjusted mortality compared with NS (hazard rate [HR] = 1.78, confidence interval [CI] 1.04-3.04, p = 0.035). In patients without TBI (n = 483), no difference in mortality was demonstrated (HR = 1.49, CI 0.757-2.95, p = 0.247). Fluid type had no effect on admission biochemical or physiological parameters, 6-hour RBC, or crystalloid requirement in either group. LR was associated with increased mortality compared with NS in patients with TBI. These results underscore the need for a prospective randomized trial comparing pre-hospital LR with NS in patients with TBI.

  14. Badminton injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Krøner, K; Schmidt, S A; Nielsen, A B; Yde, J; Jakobsen, B W; Møller-Madsen, B; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    In a one year period, from 1 January 1986 to 31 December 1986, 4303 patients with sports injuries were treated at Aarhus Amtssygehus and Aarhus Kommunehospital. The mean age was 21.6 years (range 7-72 years) and 2830 were men. Two hundred and seventeen badminton injuries occurred in 208 patients (136 men) with a mean age of 29.6 years (range 7-57 years), constituting 4.1 percent of all sport injuries in Aarhus. Joints and ligaments were injured in 58.5 percent of the patients, most frequently located in the lower limb and significantly more often among patients younger than 30 years of age. Muscle injury occurred in 19.8 percent of the patients. This type of injury was significantly more frequent among patients older than 30 years of age. Most injuries were minor. However, 6.8 percent of the patients were hospitalized and 30.9 percent received additional treatment by a physician. As the risk of injury varies with age, attempts to plan training individually and to institute prophylactic measures should be made. PMID:2078802

  15. Identification of a Neurologic Scale that Optimizes EMS Detection of Older Adult Traumatic Brain Injury Patients who Require Transport to a Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Erin B; Shah, Manish N; Jones, Courtney MC; Cushman, Jeremy T; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Gillespie, Suzanne M; Cheng, Julius D; Dozier, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to identify a scale or components of a scale that optimize detection of older adult TBI patients who require transport to a trauma center, regardless of mechanism. Methods We assembled a consensus panel consisting of nine experts in geriatric emergency medicine, prehospital medicine, trauma surgery, geriatric medicine, and TBI, as well as prehospital providers, to evaluate the existing scales used to identify TBI. We reviewed the relevant literature and solicited group feedback to create a list of candidate scales and criteria for evaluation. Using the nominal group technique, scales were evaluated by the expert panel through an iterative process until consensus was achieved. Results We identified 15 scales for evaluation. The panel’s criteria for rating the scales included: ease of administration, prehospital familiarity with scale components, feasibility of use with older adults, time to administer, and strength of evidence for their performance in the prehospital setting. After review and discussion of aggregated ratings, the panel identified the Simplified Motor Scale, GCS–Motor Component, and AVPU (alert, voice, pain, unresponsive) as the strongest scales but determined that none meet all EMS provider and patient needs due to poor usability and lack of supportive evidence. The panel proposed that a dichotomized decision scheme that includes domains of the top-rated scales — level of alertness (alert vs. not alert) and motor function (obeys commands vs. does not obey) — may be more effective in identifying older adult TBI patients who require transport to a trauma center in the prehospital setting. Conclusions Existing scales to identify TBI are inadequate to detect older adult TBI patients who require transport to a trauma center. A new algorithm, derived from elements of previously established scales, has potential to guide prehospital providers in improving the triage of older adult TBI patients, but needs further evaluation prior

  16. Propeller injuries.

    PubMed

    Mann, R J

    1976-05-01

    Water skiing, boat racing, skin and scuba diving, and pleasure boat cruising are increasing in popularity. As a result the incidence of injuries secondary to motor propellers is becoming more frequent. In a ten-year period from 1963 to 1973, I collected a total of nine cases. In some amputations were necessary, and in other cases amputations occurred at the time of injury. Problems with bacterial flora occurring in open sea water versus salt water enclosed near docks and fresh lake water are discussed. A review of the orthopedic literature revealed sparse information regarding propeller injuries.

  17. Actual data on epidemiological evolution and prevention endeavours regarding traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, C; Anghelescu, A; Daia, C; Onose, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the epidemiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is required both to prevent this disorder and to develop effective care and rehabilitation approaches for patients. Objective: The aim of this article is to find solutions to decrease the incidence of TBI and offer recommendations for their prevention. Material and methods: We analyzed epidemiological studies on TBI by performing a systematic review of literature, using information reported by different centers, collecting data on demographics, showing characteristics of TBI including incidence, identification of risk groups on differences in age, gender, geographical variation, severity and mortality. Results: Studies suggest that the incidence of TBI is between 18 and 250 per 100,000 persons per year. Men and people living in social and economical deprived areas, usually young adults and the elderly are high-risk groups for TBI. Discussion: Prevention remains the “key point” in medicine and especially for TBI, saving the patient from unnecessary often-harsh sufferance. Conclusions: Most public epidemiological data showed that TBI is a major cause of mortality and disability. The effort to understand TBI and the available strategies to treat this lesion, in order to improve clinical outcomes after TBI, may be based on an increase in research on the epidemiology of TBI. A coordinated strategy to evaluate this public health problem in Romania would first of all rely on a related advanced monitoring system, to provide precise information about the epidemiology, clinical and paraclinical data, but concerning the social and economic connected consequences, too. Abbreviations: CNS = central nervous system, ED = emergency department, EU = European Union, FTE = Full Time Employees, GCS = Glasgow Coma Scale, TBI = traumatic brain injury, US = United States, WHO = World Health Organization. PMID:26351526

  18. Severe traumatic brain injury in a high-income country: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Walder, Bernhard; Haller, Guy; Rebetez, Marie My Lien; Delhumeau, Cecile; Bottequin, Ezra; Schoettker, Patrick; Ravussin, Patrick; Brodmann Maeder, Monika; Stover, John F; Zürcher, Mathias; Haller, Alois; Wäckelin, Adrian; Haberthür, Christoph; Fandino, Javier; Haller, Chiara Simone; Osterwalder, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    This adult cohort determined the incidence and patients' short-term outcomes of severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) in Switzerland and age-related differences. A prospective cohort study with a follow-up at 14 days was performed. Patients ≥16 years of age sustaining sTBI and admitted to 1 of 11 trauma centers were included. sTBI was defined by an Abbreviated Injury Scale of the head (HAIS) score >3. The centers participated from 6 months to 3 years. The results are presented as percentages, medians, and interquartile ranges (IQRs). Subgroup analyses were performed for patients ≤65 years (younger) and >65 (elderly). sTBI was observed in 921 patients (median age, 55 years; IQR, 33-71); 683 (74.2%) were male. Females were older (median age, 67 years; IQR, 42-80) than males (52; IQR, 31-67; p<0.00001). The estimated incidence was 10.58 per 100,000 inhabitants per year. Blunt trauma was observed in 879 patients (95.4%) and multiple trauma in 283 (30.7%). Median Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) on the scene was 9 (IQR 4-14; 8 in younger, 12 in elderly) and in emergency departments 5 (IQR, 3-14; 3 in younger, 8 in elderly). Trauma mechanisms included the following: 484 patients with falls (52.6%; younger, 242 patients [50.0%]; elderly, 242 [50.0%]), 291 with road traffic accidents (31.6%; younger, 237 patients [81.4%]; elderly, 54 [18.6%]), and 146 with others (15.8%). Mortality was 30.2% (24.5% in younger, 40.9% in elderly). Median GCS at 14 days was 15 (IQR, 14-15) without differences among subgroups. Estimated incidence of sTBI in Switzerland was low, age was high, and mortality considerable. The elderly had higher initial GCS and a higher death rate, but high GCS at 14 days.

  19. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, to help decrease swelling. The Body’s Healing Process From the moment a bone breaks or a ... what happens at each stage of the healing process: At the moment of injury: Chemicals are released ...

  20. Defining constants, equations, and abbreviated tables of the 1975 US Standard Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzner, R. A.; Reber, C. A.; Jacchia, L. G.; Huang, F. T.; Cole, A. E.; Kantor, A. J.; Keneshea, T. J.; Zimmerman, S. P.; Forbes, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1975 (COESA, 1975) is an idealized, steady-state representation of the earth's atmosphere from the surface of the earth to 1000-km altitude, as it is assumed to exist in a period of moderate solar activity. From 0 to 86 km, the atmospheric model is specified in terms of the hydrostatic equilibrium of a perfect gas, with that portion of the model from 0 to 51 geopotential kilometers being identical with that of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1962 (COESA, 1962). Between 51 and 86 km, the defining temperature-height profile has been modified from that of the 1962 Standard to lower temperatures between 51 and 69.33 km, and to greater values between 69.33 and 86 km. Above 86 km, the model is defined in terms of quasi-dynamic considerations involving the vertical component of the flux of molecules of individual gas species. These conditions lead to the generation of independent number-density distributions of the major species, N2, O2, O, Ar, Ne, and H, consistent with observations. The detailed definitions of the model are presented along with graphs and abbreviated tables of the atmospheric properties of the 1975 Standard.

  1. [Magnetic resonance imaging. Sequence acronyms and other abbreviations in MR imaging].

    PubMed

    Nitz, W R

    2003-09-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging in clinical routine is still increasing. The large number of possible MR acquisition schemes reflects the variety of tissue-dependent parameters that may influence the contrast within the image. Those schemes can be categorized into gradient echo and spin echo techniques. Within these groups, further sorting can be done to differentiate between single-echo, multi-echo, and single-shot techniques. Each of these techniques can be combined with preparation schemes for modifying the longitudinal magnetization. Hybrids are found between the groups, which are those techniques that utilize spin echoes as well as gradient echoes. Academic groups as well as vendors often have different sequence acronyms for the same acquisition scheme. This contribution will sort these sequence acronyms into the previously mentioned scheme. The basic principle of the data acquisition is elaborated on and hints are given for potential clinical applications. Besides the sequence-specific acronyms, new abbreviations have surfaced recently in conjunction with parallel acquisition techniques." The latter means the utilization of multiple surface coils where the position and the sensitivity profile of the coils provide additional spatial information, allowing the application of reduced matrixes leading to a shorter measurement time.

  2. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  3. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries.

  4. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries. PMID:10645833

  5. Validation of a Measure of Subjective Well-Being: An Abbreviated Version of the Day Reconstruction Method

    PubMed Central

    Miret, Marta; Caballero, Francisco Félix; Mathur, Arvind; Naidoo, Nirmala; Kowal, Paul; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis; Chatterji, Somnath

    2012-01-01

    Background The study of well-being is becoming a priority in social sciences. The Day Reconstruction Method (DRM) was developed to assess affective states. The aim of the present study was to validate an abbreviated version of the DRM designed for administration in population studies, and to assess its test-retest properties. Principal Findings 1560 adults from Jodhpur (India) were interviewed using an abbreviated version of the DRM, and a week later they were re-interviewed using the original long version of the DRM, after which the abbreviated version of the DRM was compared with the original version. A regression model considering interaction terms was employed to analyse the impact of sociodemographic characteristics on net affect. Test-retest reliability was assessed, and found to be moderate. Positive affect showed more test-retest reliability than negative affect, while net affect had more temporal stability than U-index. The affect of sets A, B, and C, taken together, had a moderate predictive ability compared with the affect obtained using the full version of the DRM: AUC = 0.67 for positive affect; 0.66 for net affect; 0.61 for negative affect; and 0.60 for the U-index. Household income, gender, and setting all had a significant impact on net affect. Conclusions Net affect and positive affect showed moderate temporal stability, whereas negative affect and the U-index showed fair temporal stability. Evaluating the affective state using the abbreviated version of the DRM provides a profile of the population similar to that of the full version. The results provide considerable support for using the short version of the DRM as an instrument to measure subjective well-being in large population surveys. PMID:22952801

  6. Accelerated/abbreviated test methods of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Study 4, task 3: Encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolyer, J. M.; Mann, N. R.

    1977-01-01

    Methods of accelerated and abbreviated testing were developed and applied to solar cell encapsulants. These encapsulants must provide protection for as long as 20 years outdoors at different locations within the United States. Consequently, encapsulants were exposed for increasing periods of time to the inherent climatic variables of temperature, humidity, and solar flux. Property changes in the encapsulants were observed. The goal was to predict long term behavior of encapsulants based upon experimental data obtained over relatively short test periods.

  7. Associations between performance on an abbreviated CogState battery, other measures of cognitive function, and biomarkers in people at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Annie M.; Clark, Lindsay R.; Berman, Sara E.; Koscik, Rebecca L.; Mueller, Kimberly D.; Norton, Derek; Nicholas, Christopher R.; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Jedynak, Bruno; Bilgel, Murat; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Christian, Bradley T.; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C.

    2016-01-01

    It is not known whether computerized cognitive assessments, like the CogState battery, are sensitive to preclinical cognitive changes or pathology in people at risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In 469 late middle-aged participants from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention (mean age 63.8±7 years at testing; 67% female; 39% APOE4+), we examined relationships between a CogState abbreviated battery (CAB) of seven tests and demographic characteristics, traditional paper-based neuropsychological tests as well as a composite cognitive impairment index, cognitive impairment status (determined by consensus review); and biomarkers for amyloid and tau (CSF phosphorylated-tau/Aβ42 and global PET-PiB burden) and neural injury (CSF neurofilament light protein). CSF and PET-PiB were collected in n=71 and n=91 participants, respectively, approximately four years prior to CAB testing. For comparison, we examined three traditional tests of delayed memory in parallel. Similar to studies in older samples, the CAB was less influenced by demographic factors than traditional tests. CAB tests were generally correlated with most paper-based cognitive tests examined and mapped onto the same cognitive domains. Greater composite cognitive impairment index was associated with worse performance on all CAB tests. Cognitively impaired participants performed significantly worse compared to normal controls on all but one CAB test. Poorer One Card Learning test performance was associated with higher levels of CSF phosphorylated-tau/Aβ42. These results support the use of the CogState battery as measures of early cognitive impairment in studies of people at risk for AD. PMID:27589532

  8. Self efficacy for fruit, vegetable and water intakes: expanded and abbreviated scales from item response modeling analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to improve an existing measure of fruit and vegetable intake self efficacy, by including items that varied on levels of difficulty, and testing a corresponding measure of water intake self efficacy. A cross sectional assessment was used. Items were modified to have easy, moderate, ...

  9. A field evaluation of real-life motor vehicle accidents: presence of unrestrained objects and their association with distribution and severity of patient injuries.

    PubMed

    Staff, Trine; Eken, Torsten; Hansen, Trond Boye; Steen, Petter Andreas; Søvik, Signe

    2012-03-01

    Moving objects may pose an added threat to car occupants in motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). However, to our knowledge, there have only been two case studies published on the subject. For the present study, accident reports and photo documentation from MVAs were collected on-scene by dedicated paramedics. Emergency medical service personnel on-scene were interviewed as necessary. Potentially harmful unrestrained objects in the involved motor vehicles (MVs) were identified and categorised by type, weight and hardness. Seatback offset by unrestrained objects was noted. The patient injury distribution (Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) body regions) and severity (AIS severity scores and New Injury Severity Score (NISS) scores) were retrospectively determined from hospital and autopsy records, and their potential relationship to unrestrained objects was explored. A total of 190 accidents involving 338 MVs and 618 individuals were included. In total, 327 individuals (53%) were injured, and 61 (10%) died. 37 of 61 were not autopsied. The mean NISS was 17 (median 8, interquartile range (IQR) 1-27). Unrestrained objects were reported for 133 motor vehicles (39%) involving 293 individuals. 35% of the unrestrained objects found in the passenger compartment weighed >2 kg. In the boot, 32% of objects weighed >20 kg. Seatback offset associated with unrestrained objects was found for 45 individuals (15%). Unrestrained objects originally located in the boot (heavy luggage, groceries and tyres were the most frequently reported) had moved into the passenger compartment on impact in 27 cases, 24 of which were associated with seatback offset. An in-depth analysis was performed on 24 patients whose injuries were highly likely to be associated with unrestrained objects, as indicated by accident reports and medical documentation. Nineteen (79%) were involved in frontal collisions, and 12 (50%) died on-scene. The mean NISS was 51.7 (median 51, IQR 27-75) in the 17 (71%) patients with

  10. Comparative Assessment of the Prognostic Value of Biomarkers in Traumatic Brain Injury Reveals an Independent Role for Serum Levels of Neurofilament Light

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Harriet; Dring, Ann M.; Svenningsson, Anders; Piehl, Fredrik; Nelson, David W.; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of death and disability, worldwide. Early determination of injury severity is essential to improve care. Neurofilament light (NF-L) has been introduced as a marker of neuroaxonal injury in neuroinflammatory/-degenerative diseases. In this study we determined the predictive power of serum (s-) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-) NF-L levels towards outcome, and explored their potential correlation to diffuse axonal injury (DAI). A total of 182 patients suffering from TBI admitted to the neurointensive care unit at a level 1 trauma center were included. S-NF-L levels were acquired, together with S100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE). CSF-NF-L was measured in a subcohort (n = 84) with ventriculostomies. Clinical and neuro-radiological parameters, including computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, were included in the analyses. Outcome was assessed 6 to 12 months after injury using the Glasgow Outcome Score (1-5). In univariate proportional odds analyses mean s-NF-L, -S100B and -NSE levels presented a pseudo-R2 Nagelkerke of 0.062, 0.214 and 0.074 in correlation to outcome, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, in addition to a model including core parameters (pseudo-R2 0.33 towards outcome; Age, Glasgow Coma Scale, pupil response, Stockholm CT score, abbreviated injury severity score, S100B), S-NF-L yielded an extra 0.023 pseudo-R2 and a significantly better model (p = 0.006) No correlation between DAI or CT assessed-intracranial damage and NF-L was found. Our study thus demonstrates that S-NF-L correlates to TBI outcome, even if used in models with S100B, indicating an independent contribution to the prediction, perhaps by reflecting different pathophysiological processes, not possible to monitor using conventional neuroradiology. Although we did not find a predictive value of NF-L for DAI, this cannot be completely excluded. We suggest further studies, with volume quantification of axonal injury

  11. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  12. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  13. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured – A Retrospective Multicentre Study

    PubMed Central

    Hanschen, Marc; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Khalil, Philipe N.; Wierer, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients. Methods In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009), characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6), the revised injury severity score (RISC) allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6) (2.3% of patients). Results Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%). The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1) and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6) are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6) is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively) as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49) of the study collective. Conclusion Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients’ outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury. PMID:26136126

  14. Hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guanche, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a continuum of hamstring injuries that can range from musculotendinous strains to avulsion injuries. Although the proximal hamstring complex has a strong bony attachment on the ischial tuberosity, hamstring injuries are common in athletic population and can affect all levels of athletes. Nonoperative treatment is mostly recommended in the setting of low-grade partial tears and insertional tendinosis. However, failure of nonoperative treatment of partial tears may benefit from surgical debridement and repair. The technique presented on this article allows for the endoscopic management of proximal hamstring tears and chronic ischial bursitis, which until now has been managed exclusively with much larger open approaches. The procedure allows for complete exposure of the posterior aspect of the hip in a safe, minimally invasive fashion. PMID:27011828

  15. Fingertip injuries

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Sanjay; Tiwari, VK

    2007-01-01

    Background: Fingertip injuries are extremely common. Out of the various available reconstructive options, one needs to select an option which achieves a painless fingertip with durable and sensate skin cover. The present analysis was conducted to evaluate the management and outcome of fingertip injuries. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 150 cases of fingertip Injuries of patients aged six to 65 years managed over a period of two years. Various reconstructive options were considered for the fingertip lesions greater than or equal to 1 cm2. The total duration of treatment varied from two to six weeks with follow-up from two months to one year. Results: The results showed preservation of finger length and contour, retention of sensation and healing without significant complication. Conclusion: The treatment needs to be individualized and all possible techniques of reconstruction must be known to achieve optimal recovery. PMID:21139772

  16. Wrestling injuries.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Laurel

    2008-01-01

    The sport of wrestling has a history dating back to ancient times as one of the original Olympic sports. It particularly appeals to adolescents as equally matched opponents engage in competition. There can be no argument that participation in sports helps promote a physically active lifestyle. However, despite the documented health benefits of increased physical activity, those who participate in athletics are at risk for sports-related injuries. This article will discuss wrestling injuries and recommend prevention strategies to keep athletes safe. PMID:18521035

  17. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  19. Nonoperative treatment of blunt splenic injury.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J

    2001-11-01

    A spleen-preserving program was implemented at the author's institution during the mid-1980s using a five-part injury-grading scale that is similar and comparable to the AAST classification. Since that time, all patients with splenic injuries admitted to the Department of Surgery at the Karl-Franzens University Hospital in Graz, a level I trauma center, have been prospectively evaluated with respect to splenic preservation. Analysis of the relation of the severity of organ injury to the use of nonoperative management showed that degree I or II injuries were treated nonoperatively, whereas degree III and IV injuries were usually treated with adhesives, partial resection, or mesh splenorrhaphy; only degree V injuries almost always required splenectomy. With increasing experience in nonoperative management of splenic injuries the initial criteria have become less rigid, and there is now a tendency to attempt it in patients who formerly would have undergone surgery. PMID:11760743

  20. Nonoperative treatment of blunt splenic injury.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J

    2001-11-01

    A spleen-preserving program was implemented at the author's institution during the mid-1980s using a five-part injury-grading scale that is similar and comparable to the AAST classification. Since that time, all patients with splenic injuries admitted to the Department of Surgery at the Karl-Franzens University Hospital in Graz, a level I trauma center, have been prospectively evaluated with respect to splenic preservation. Analysis of the relation of the severity of organ injury to the use of nonoperative management showed that degree I or II injuries were treated nonoperatively, whereas degree III and IV injuries were usually treated with adhesives, partial resection, or mesh splenorrhaphy; only degree V injuries almost always required splenectomy. With increasing experience in nonoperative management of splenic injuries the initial criteria have become less rigid, and there is now a tendency to attempt it in patients who formerly would have undergone surgery.

  1. Reliability and Validity of a German Version of the "Questions about Behavioral Function" (QABF) Scale for Self-Injurious Behavior in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienstein, Pia; Nussbeck, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a German version of the Questions About Behavioral Function Scale (QABF) (Matson & Vollmer, 1995) were examined in a sample of 522 individuals with intellectual disabilities residing in large facilities participated. The factor structure was first examined by exploratory factor analysis, yielding a…

  2. Electrical Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your injuries are depends on how strong the electric current was, what type of current it was, how it moved through your body, and how long you were exposed. Other factors include how ... you should see a doctor. You may have internal damage and not realize it.

  3. Patient Injuries?

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    An injured patient may be the last thing dentists want to think about. However, in reality, patients can be injured during dental treatment or as the result of an incident such as a slip and fall in the office. Treatment-related injuries can run the gamut and include burns, lacerations, swallowed objects and allergic reactions, according to The Dentists Insurance Company.

  4. Injuries in male versus female soccer players: epidemiology of a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Mufty, S; Bollars, P; Vanlommel, L; Van Crombrugge, K; Corten, K; Bellemans, J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse soccer injuries on a national scale over one decade and to compare injury rates by gender. Detailed injury data obtained from the Royal Belgian Football Association from seasons 1999-2000 and 2009-2010 were recorded and gender differences in incidences of injuries, type of injury, affected body part and timing of injury were compared. A significant decrease in injuries from 7.56 to 5.96 injuries per 100 players was seen (p<0.0001). Overall male players sustained more cont usions, fractures, joint dislocations and musculotendinous injuries than female players. Proportionally, females sustained more severe injuries than men (p<0.0001). Significantly more injuries where sustained during competition in both males and females. The number of injuries in male and female soccer players has decreased over the past decade. A higher injury rate was seen in men but proportionally, females sustained more severe injuries. PMID:26280969

  5. Injuries in male versus female soccer players: epidemiology of a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Mufty, S; Bollars, P; Vanlommel, L; Van Crombrugge, K; Corten, K; Bellemans, J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse soccer injuries on a national scale over one decade and to compare injury rates by gender. Detailed injury data obtained from the Royal Belgian Football Association from seasons 1999-2000 and 2009-2010 were recorded and gender differences in incidences of injuries, type of injury, affected body part and timing of injury were compared. A significant decrease in injuries from 7.56 to 5.96 injuries per 100 players was seen (p<0.0001). Overall male players sustained more cont usions, fractures, joint dislocations and musculotendinous injuries than female players. Proportionally, females sustained more severe injuries than men (p<0.0001). Significantly more injuries where sustained during competition in both males and females. The number of injuries in male and female soccer players has decreased over the past decade. A higher injury rate was seen in men but proportionally, females sustained more severe injuries.

  6. Does a booster intervention augment the preventive effects of an abbreviated version of the coping power program for aggressive children?

    PubMed

    Lochman, John E; Baden, Rachel E; Boxmeyer, Caroline L; Powell, Nicole P; Qu, Lixin; Salekin, Karen L; Windle, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Booster interventions have been presumed to be important methods for maintaining the effects of evidence-based programs for children with behavioral problems, but there has been remarkably little empirical attention to this assumption. The present study examines the effect of a child-oriented booster preventive intervention with children who had previously received an abbreviated version (24 child sessions, 10 parent sessions) of the Coping Power targeted prevention program. Two hundred and forty-one children (152 boys, 89 girls) were screened as having moderate to high levels of aggressive behavior in 4th grade, then half were randomly assigned to receive the abbreviated Coping Power program in 5th grade, and half of the preventive intervention children were then randomly assigned to a Booster condition in 6th grade. The Booster sessions consisted of brief monthly individual contacts, and were primarily with the children. Five assessments across 4 years were collected from teachers, providing a three-year follow-up for all children who participated in the project. Results indicated that the abbreviated Coping Power program (one-third shorter than the full intervention) had long-term effects in reducing children's externalizing problem behaviors, proactive and reactive aggression, impulsivity traits and callous-unemotional traits. The Booster intervention did not augment these prevention effects. These findings indicate that a briefer and more readily disseminated form of an evidence-based targeted preventive intervention was effective. The findings have potential implications for policy and guidelines about possible intervention length and booster interventions.

  7. Clinimetric measurement in traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Opara, J A; Małecka, E; Szczygiel, J

    2014-06-15

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Every year, about 1.5 million affected people die and several millions receive emergency treatment. Most of the burden (90%) is in low and middle-income countries. The costs of care depend on the level of disability. The burden of care after traumatic brain injury is caused by disability as well as by psychosocial and emotional sequelae of injury. The final consequence of brain injury is the reduction of quality of life. It is very difficult to predict the outcome after traumatic brain injury. The basic clinical model included four predictors: age, score in Glasgow coma scale, pupil reactivity, and the presence of major extracranial injury. These are the neuroradiological markers of recovery after TBI (CT, MRI and PET) and biomarkers: genetic markers of ApoE Gene, ectoenzyme CD 38 (cluster of differentiation 38), serum S100B, myelin basic protein (MBP), neuron specific endolase (NSE), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GPAP). These are many clinimetric scales which are helpful in prognosing after head injury. In this review paper, the most commonly used scales evaluating the level of consciousness after traumatic brain injury have been presented.

  8. Coelomogenesis during the abbreviated development of the echinoid Heliocidaris erythrogramma and the developmental origin of the echinoderm pentameral body plan.

    PubMed

    Morris, Valerie B

    2011-01-01

    The development of the coeloms is described in an echinoid with an abbreviated larval development and shows the early morphogenesis of the coeloms of the adult stage. The development is described from images obtained by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The development in Heliocidaris erythrogramma is asymmetric with a larger left coelom forming on the larval-left side and a smaller right coelom forming on the larval-right side. The right coelom forms after the development of the left coelom is well advanced. The hydrocoele forms from the anterior part of the left coelom. The five lobes of the hydrocoele from which the pentamery of the adult derives take shape on the outer, distal wall of the anterior part of the left coelom. The hydrocoele separates from the more posterior part of the left coelom, which becomes the left posterior coelom. The lobes of the hydrocoele are named, based on the site of the connexion of the stone canal to the hydrocoele. The mouth is assumed to form by penetration through only the outer, distal wall of the hydrocoele and the ectoderm. Both larval and adult polarities are evident in this larva. A comparison with coelomogenesis in the asteroid Parvulastra exigua, which also has an abbreviated development, leads to predictions of homology between the echinoderm and chordate phyla that do not require the hypothesis of a dorsoventral inversion event in chordates.

  9. The Abbreviated Dimensions of Temperament Survey: Factor Structure and Construct Validity Across Three Racial/Ethnic Groups.

    PubMed

    Windle, Michael; Wiesner, Margit; Elliott, Marc N; Wallander, Jan L; Kanouse, David E; Schuster, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The factor structure, reliability, and construct validity of an abbreviated version of the Revised Dimensions of Temperament Survey (DOTS-R) were evaluated across Black, Hispanic, and White early adolescents. Primary caregivers reported on 5 dimensions of temperament for 4,701 children. Five temperament dimensions were identified via maximum likelihood exploratory factor analysis and were labeled flexibility, general activity level, positive mood, task orientation, and sleep rhythmicity. Multigroup mean and covariance structures analysis provided partial support for strong factorial invariance across these racial/ethnic groups. Mean level comparisons indicated that relative to Hispanics and Blacks, Whites had higher flexibility, greater sleep regularity, and lower activity. They also reported higher positive mood than Blacks. Blacks, relative to Hispanics, had higher flexibility and lower sleep regularity. Construct validity was supported as the 5 temperament dimensions were significantly correlated with externalizing problems and socioemotional competence. This abbreviated version of the DOTS-R could be used across racial/ethnic groups of early adolescents to assess significant dimensions of temperament risk that are associated with mental health and competent (healthy) functioning.

  10. The Abbreviated Dimensions of Temperament Survey: Factor Structure and Construct Validity Across Three Racial/Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Windle, Michael; Wiesner, Margit; Elliott, Marc N.; Wallander, Jan L.; Kanouse, David E.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The factor structure, reliability, and construct validity of an abbreviated version of the Revised Dimensions of Temperament Survey (DOTS–R) were evaluated across Black, Hispanic, and White early adolescents. Primary caregivers reported on 5 dimensions of temperament for 4,701 children. Five temperament dimensions were identified via maximum likelihood exploratory factor analysis and were labeled flexibility, general activity level, positive mood, task orientation, and sleep rhythmicity. Multigroup mean and covariance structures analysis provided partial support for strong factorial invariance across these racial/ethnic groups. Mean level comparisons indicated that relative to Hispanics and Blacks, Whites had higher flexibility, greater sleep regularity, and lower activity. They also reported higher positive mood than Blacks. Blacks, relative to Hispanics, had higher flexibility and lower sleep regularity. Construct validity was supported as the 5 temperament dimensions were significantly correlated with externalizing problems and socioemotional competence. This abbreviated version of the DOTS–R could be used across racial/ethnic groups of early adolescents to assess significant dimensions of temperament risk that are associated with mental health and competent (healthy) functioning. PMID:25932505

  11. [Spanish validation of the Iowa Rating Scale for Personality Change (IRSPC) for the appraisal of changes in personality in patients with acquired brain injury].

    PubMed

    Guallart-Balet, María; Jiménez-Cortés, Marta P; Tuquet-Calvo, Helena; Pelegrín-Valero, Carmelo; Olivera-Pueyo, Javier; Benabarre-Ciria, Sergio; Tirapu-Ustárroz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Introduccion. La Iowa Rating Scale for Personality Change (IRSPC) presenta una serie de caracteristicas (enfasis en las funciones motivacionales y emocionales, evaluacion de las funciones ejecutivas 'cognitivas' en la vida cotidiana, estimacion de la personalidad premorbida, valoracion de la fiabilidad del informador) que hacen muy interesante su utilizacion tanto en la clinica como en la investigacion. Objetivo. Validar en castellano la IRSPC para la evaluacion de los 'cambios de personalidad' secundarios a las lesiones cerebrales de la corteza prefrontal en general y del area ventromedial en particular. Pacientes y metodos. Tras el proceso de traduccion y adaptacion de la guia de la escala al castellano, se realizo un estudio de validacion con 31 pacientes con daño cerebral traumatico y se obtuvieron unos resultados de fiabilidad muy adecuados. Resultados. Los resultados obtenidos al medir la consistencia interna de la IRSPC y los coeficientes de fiabilidad interobservadores y test-retest apoyan dicha afirmacion. La validez del instrumento es confirmada por la validez concurrente (comparandolo con el inventario neuropsiquiatrico) y la validez de constructo (comparando las puntuaciones de los pacientes antes y despues del traumatismo). Conclusiones. La IRSPC es un instrumento fiable y valido para la exploracion clinica, en el contexto de una evaluacion integral de los sintomas derivados de las enfermedades neurologicas en general, y en particular de aquellas en las que se encuentra involucrada la corteza prefrontal ventromedial.

  12. A new tool for coding and interpreting injuries in fatal airplane crashes: the crash injury pattern assessment tool application to the Air France Flight AF447 disaster (Rio de Janeiro-Paris), 1st of June 2009.

    PubMed

    Schuliar, Yves; Chapenoire, Stéphane; Miras, Alain; Contrand, Benjamin; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2014-09-01

    For investigation of air disasters, crash reconstruction is obtained using data from flight recorders, physical evidence from the site, and injuries patterns of the victims. This article describes a new software, Crash Injury Pattern Assessment Tool (CIPAT), to code and analyze injuries. The coding system was derived from the Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS). Scores were created corresponding to the amount of energy required causing the trauma (ER), and the software was developed to compute summary variables related to the position (assigned seat) of victims. A dataset was built from the postmortem examination of 154/228 victims of the Air France disaster (June 2009), recovered from the Atlantic Ocean after a complex and difficult task at a depth of 12790 ft. The use of CIPAT allowed to precise cause and circumstances of deaths and confirmed major dynamics parameters of the crash event established by the French Civil Aviation Safety Investigation Authority.

  13. Unintentional injuries in child care centers in the United States: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Andrew N; Newton, Manya F; Cunningham, Rebecca M; Stevens, Martha W

    2015-03-01

    The study systematically reviewed all types of unintentional injury and injury prevention research studies occurring within child care centers in the United States. A total of 2 reviewers searched 11 electronic databases to identify 53 articles meeting inclusion criteria. No studies used trauma registries or randomized control trials. Data were not pooled for further analysis because studies lacked standardized definitions for injury, rates, severity, exposure, and demographics. The following child care center injury rates were reported: (0.25-5.31 injuries per 100,000 child-hours); (11.3-18 injuries per 100 children per year); (6-49 injuries per 1000 child-years); (2.5-8.29 injuries per child-year); (2.6-3.3 injuries per child); (3.3-6.3 injuries per 100 observations); (635-835 medically attended injuries per year per 100,000 children and 271-364 child care center playground injuries per year per 100,000 children); and (3.8 injuries per child per 2000 exposure hours). Child care center injury rates were comparable to injury rates published for schools, playground, and summer camp. Most injuries were minor, while most severe injuries (fractures and concussions) were falls from playground structures. Future studies need to use standardized injury definitions and injury severity scales, focus efforts on preventing severe playground injuries in child care centers, and report child care parameters for inclusion in national injury databases.

  14. Psychometric Properties of a Proposed Short Form of the BASC Teacher Rating Scale--Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanosky, Daniel J.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.; Kamphaus, Randy W.

    2013-01-01

    A 25 item short form of the Behavioral Assessment System for Children (BASC) Teacher Rating Scale--Preschool (TRS-P) was developed by the BASC authors to serve as an emotional/behavioral indicator for an academic intervention study targeting preschool-aged students. The BASC screener is thought to fulfill a need for an abbreviated behavior rating…

  15. Cognitive reserve as a moderator of responsiveness to an online problem-solving intervention for adolescents with complicated mild-to-severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Karver, Christine L; Wade, Shari L; Cassedy, Amy; Taylor, H Gerry; Brown, Tanya M; Kirkwood, Michael W; Stancin, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often experience behavior difficulties that may arise from problem-solving deficits and impaired self-regulation. However, little is known about the relationship of neurocognitive ability to post-TBI behavioral recovery. To address this question, we examined whether verbal intelligence, as estimated by Vocabulary scores from the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, predicted improvements in behavior and executive functioning following a problem-solving intervention for adolescents with TBI. One hundred and thirty-two adolescents with complicated mild-to-severe TBI were randomly assigned to a six-month Web-based problem-solving intervention (CAPS; n = 65) or to an Internet resource comparison (IRC; n = 67) group. Vocabulary moderated the association between treatment group and improvements in metacognitive abilities. Examination of the mean estimates indicated that for those with lower Vocabulary scores, pre-intervention Metacognition Index scores from the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) did not differ between the groups, but post-intervention scores were significantly lower (more improved) for those in the CAPS group. These findings suggest that low verbal intelligence was associated with greater improvements in executive functioning following the CAPS intervention and that verbal intelligence may have an important role in response to intervention for TBI. Understanding predictors of responsiveness to interventions allows clinicians to tailor treatments to individuals, thus improving efficacy.

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center PTACs Workspaces Log-in Search for: Traumatic Brain Injury A legacy resource from NICHCY Disability Fact ... in her. Back to top What is Traumatic Brain Injury? A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an ...

  18. Eye Injuries at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 20,000 workplace eye injuries happen each year. Injuries on the job often ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports that workplace eye injuries cost an estimated $300 million a year in ...

  19. Wounds and Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, ... millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can ...

  20. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  1. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  2. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  3. Hangman's fracture in head injury.

    PubMed

    Umebese, P F; Orhewere, F A

    1989-09-01

    Five patients with fracture of pedicle of axis vertebra as a complication of head injury are reported. The ages of the patients ranged from 16-25 years and all of them were victims of road traffic accidents. The head injuries were moderately severe requiring admission. The average Glasgow Coma Scale sum on admission was 11. Simple non-operative management in a well padded stiff collar with sand bags supporting the head in a neutral position in bed resulted in full recovery without complication after an average of 4 weeks recumbency.

  4. Proposal for a revised taxonomy of the family Filoviridae: classification, names of taxa and viruses, and virus abbreviations

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Jens H.; Becker, Stephan; Ebihara, Hideki; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Johnson, Karl M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Lipkin, W. Ian; Negredo, Ana I.; Netesov, Sergey V.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Palacios, Gustavo; Peters, Clarence J.; Tenorio, Antonio; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The taxonomy of the family Filoviridae (marburgviruses and ebolaviruses) has changed several times since the discovery of its members, resulting in a plethora of species and virus names and abbreviations. The current taxonomy has only been partially accepted by most laboratory virologists. Confusion likely arose for several reasons: species names that consist of several words or which (should) contain diacritical marks, the current orthographic identity of species and virus names, and the similar pronunciation of several virus abbreviations in the absence of guidance for the correct use of vernacular names. To rectify this problem, we suggest (1) to retain the current species names Reston ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus, and Zaire ebolavirus, but to replace the name Cote d'Ivoire ebolavirus [sic] with Taï Forest ebolavirus and Lake Victoria marburgvirus with Marburg marburgvirus; (2) to revert the virus names of the type marburgviruses and ebolaviruses to those used for decades in the field (Marburg virus instead of Lake Victoria marburgvirus and Ebola virus instead of Zaire ebolavirus); (3) to introduce names for the remaining viruses reminiscent of jargon used by laboratory virologists but nevertheless different from species names (Reston virus, Sudan virus, Taï Forest virus), and (4) to introduce distinct abbreviations for the individual viruses (RESTV for Reston virus, SUDV for Sudan virus, and TAFV for Taï Forest virus), while retaining that for Marburg virus (MARV) and reintroducing that used over decades for Ebola virus (EBOV). Paying tribute to developments in the field, we propose (a) to create a new ebolavirus species (Bundibugyo ebolavirus) for one member virus (Bundibugyo virus, BDBV); (b) to assign a second virus to the species Marburg marburgvirus (Ravn virus, RAVV) for better reflection of now available high-resolution phylogeny; and (c) to create a new tentative genus (Cuevavirus) with one tentative species (Lloviu cuevavirus) for the recently

  5. Basketball Injuries: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple Jr., David F.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses reasons for the increase in basketball-related injuries, describes common injuries, outlines steps for diagnosis and treatment, and offers recovery and prevention strategies. (IAH)

  6. Baseball and softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quincy

    2006-05-01

    Baseball and softball injuries can be a result of both acute and overuse injuries. Soft tissue injuries include contusions, abrasions, and lacerations. Return to play is allowed when risk of further injury is minimized. Common shoulder injuries include those to the rotator cuff, biceps tendon, and glenoid labrum. Elbow injuries are common in baseball and softball and include medial epicondylitis, ulnar collateral ligament injury, and osteochondritis dissecans. Typically conservative treatment with relative rest, medication, and a rehabilitation program will allow return to play. Surgical intervention may be needed for certain injuries or conservative treatment failure.

  7. Sports injuries of the ear.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G A

    1972-07-01

    The author describes common sports injuries involving the ear. Such injuries include hematoma, lacerations, foreign bodies (tattoo), and thermal injuries. Ear canal injuries include swimmer's ear and penetrating injuries. Tympanum injuries include tympanic membrane perforations, ossicular discontinuity, eustachian tube dysfunction, temporal bone fractures and traumatic facial nerve palsy. Inner ear injuries include traumatic sensorineural deafness. The author emphasizes the management of these injuries.

  8. Assessment of an abbreviated odorant identification task for children: a rapid screening device for schools and clinics.

    PubMed

    Richman, R A; Wallace, K; Sheehe, P R

    1995-04-01

    To validate the level of olfactory performance of children, we tested 825 volunteers, aged 4-17 years, with an abbreviated form of our pediatric odorant identification task. The test consisted of sniffing and identifying five odorants (baby powder, bubble gum, candy cane, licorice and peach). Mean olfactory scores increased as a function of age, reaching a plateau of about 94-95% correct at 8 years of age. In general, girls out-performed boys. Physicians require a test instrument such as the one we have devised to allow them to diagnose olfactory dysfunction in children. The present task is particularly applicable in screening large numbers of children in clinics or schools because it can be administered easily and rapidly. Adult subjects with olfactory dysfunction also performed poorly on this odorant identification task designed for children. Therefore, we expect that our odorant identification task will also detect children with severe olfactory dysfunction. PMID:7795355

  9. Impact of Abbreviated Lecture with Interactive Mini-cases vs Traditional Lecture on Student Performance in the Large Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Nykamp, Diane L.; Momary, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To compare the impact of 2 different teaching and learning methods on student mastery of learning objectives in a pharmacotherapy module in the large classroom setting. Design. Two teaching and learning methods were implemented and compared in a required pharmacotherapy module for 2 years. The first year, multiple interactive mini-cases with inclass individual assessment and an abbreviated lecture were used to teach osteoarthritis; a traditional lecture with 1 inclass case discussion was used to teach gout. In the second year, the same topics were used but the methods were flipped. Student performance on pre/post individual readiness assessment tests (iRATs), case questions, and subsequent examinations were compared each year by the teaching and learning method and then between years by topic for each method. Students also voluntarily completed a 20-item evaluation of the teaching and learning methods. Assessment. Postpresentation iRATs were significantly higher than prepresentation iRATs for each topic each year with the interactive mini-cases; there was no significant difference in iRATs before and after traditional lecture. For osteoarthritis, postpresentation iRATs after interactive mini-cases in year 1 were significantly higher than postpresentation iRATs after traditional lecture in year 2; the difference in iRATs for gout per learning method was not significant. The difference between examination performance for osteoarthritis and gout was not significant when the teaching and learning methods were compared. On the student evaluations, 2 items were significant both years when answers were compared by teaching and learning method. Each year, students ranked their class participation higher with interactive cases than with traditional lecture, but both years they reported enjoying the traditional lecture format more. Conclusion. Multiple interactive mini-cases with an abbreviated lecture improved immediate mastery of learning objectives compared to

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of an abbreviated 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test for measurement of pancreatic exocrine function

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Viola; Wolfram, Kristina U; Rosien, Ulrich; Layer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background A modified 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test (13C -MTGT) detects moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency noninvasively and reliably, but it requires prolonged breath sampling (6 hours (hr)). Objective We aimed to investigate whether 13C -MTGT can be abbreviated, to optimize clinical usability. Methods We analyzed the 13C-MTGT of 200 consecutive patients, retrospectively. Cumulative 1–5 hr 13C-exhalation values were compared with the standard parameter (6-hr cumulative 13C-exhalation). We determined the sensitivity and specificity of shortened breath sampling periods, by comparison with the normal values from 10 healthy volunteers, whom also underwent a secretin test to quantitate pancreatic secretion. Moreover, we evaluated the influence of gastric emptying (GE), using a 13C-octanoic acid breath test in a subset (N = 117). Results The 1–5 hr cumulative 13C-exhalation tests correlated highly and significantly with the standard parameter (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for detection of impaired lipolysis was high (≥77%), but the specificity was low (≥38%) for the early measurements. Both parameters were high after 4 hrs (88% and 94%, respectively) and 5 hrs (98% and 91%, respectively). Multivariate linear correlation analysis confirmed that GE strongly influenced early postprandial 13C-exhalation during the 13C-MTGT. Conclusion Shortening of the 13C -MTGT from 6 to 4 hrs of duration was associated with similar diagnostic accuracy, yet increased clinical usability. The influence of GE on early postprandial results of the 13C-MTGT precluded further abbreviation of the test. PMID:25083286

  11. 21 CFR 314.151 - Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. 314.151 Section 314.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. (a) Approval... with § 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed...

  12. 21 CFR 314.151 - Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. 314.151 Section 314.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. (a) Approval... with § 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed...

  13. 21 CFR 314.151 - Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. 314.151 Section 314.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. (a) Approval... with § 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed...

  14. 21 CFR 314.151 - Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. 314.151 Section 314.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. (a) Approval... with § 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed...

  15. 21 CFR 314.151 - Withdrawal of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. 314.151 Section 314.151 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of approval of an abbreviated new drug application under section 505(j)(5) of the act. (a) Approval... with § 10.20(j) of this chapter. Documents available for examination or copying will be placed...

  16. Type A personality as psychopathology: personality correlates and an abbreviated scoring system.

    PubMed

    Irvine, J; Lyle, R C; Allon, R

    1982-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the Jenkins Activity Survey, a questionnaire developed to measure the Type A 'coronary-prone' personality described by Friedman and Rosenman, and other personality measures, comprising the Eysenck Personality Inventory, the Personal Deviance Scale, and a measure of Achievement Need. Significant correlations were obtained between Neuroticism and both the Type A scale, and the Speed and Impatience subscale of the J.A.S. The Type A scale was also found to correlate with Dominance and Extrapunitiveness, and the Speed and Impatience subscale correlated with Extrapunitiveness. No correlation was found between any J.A.S. scale and the measure of Achievement Need. When subjects were divided into Types A and B using the group mean as division point, significant differences in certain questionnaire variables, most noticeably in Neuroticism were apparent, with the Type A group being found significantly more Neurotic. Theoretical implications of this for susceptibility to stress-related disease were discussed. Additionally, the paper explored a briefer alternative to the complex, computerised scoring system for the J.A.S., and found this to correlate well with the weighted scoring system.

  17. Injury surveillance in construction: eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Welch, L S; Hunting, K L; Mawudeku, A

    2001-07-01

    Occupational eye injuries are both common and preventable. About 20% of occupational eye injuries occur in construction. To investigate the nature of eye injuries among construction workers, we analyzed a large data set of construction worker injuries. In addition, we interviewed 62 workers with eye injuries to further explore circumstances of eye injury and workers' attitudes and behavior toward the use of eye protection. Eleven percent (363 cases) of the 3,390 construction workers in our data set were treated for eye injuries. Welders, plumbers, insulators, painters/glaziers, supervisors, and electricians had a higher proportion of all injuries due to eye injuries than other trades. Nearly half of the diagnoses were abrasions (46%) followed by foreign objects or splash in the eye (29%), conjunctivitis (10%), and burns (5%). In the interviews with 62 workers, we found that employers very frequently required eye protection for all tasks or for high-risk tasks, and workers report wearing eye protection regularly. However, most did not wear eye protection with top and side shields; if we believe the injuries occurred because a particle or liquid passed between the glasses and the workers' faces, increased use of goggles or full shields would have prevented two-thirds of this group of injuries.

  18. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  19. Sports-specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Plancher, K D; Minnich, J M

    1996-04-01

    Injuries to the upper extremities can happen in any sport. Injury patterns are common to specific sports. Understanding which injuries occur with these sports allows the examiner to diagnose and treat the athlete easily. This article reviews some of the injuries common in sports such as bicycling, golf, gymnastics, martial arts, racquet sports, and weightlifting.

  20. An overview of some definitional issues for sports injury surveillance.

    PubMed

    Finch, C F

    1997-09-01

    Injury surveillance is the ongoing collection of data describing the occurrence of, and factors associated with, injury. The success of any sports injury surveillance system and its wide scale applicability is dependent upon valid and reliable definitions of sports injury, injury severity and sports participation. Published sports injury reports are often difficult to interpret and compare with other published data because of different data collection and/or analysis methods. Standardised data collection methodologies including definitions are crucial for improving the comparability and interpretation of published data. Attention needs to be directed towards the definition of both risk and exposure factors since the validity and usefulness of the outcomes of research activities, data collection and surveillance systems rely on these. International consensus on appropriate definitions would greatly assist the collection of comparable and reliable sports injury data. Standardised definitions are also needed to answer questions such as: 'what is a sport? When should an activity be considered to be recreational rather than sport? Who is a sports participant? How should sports participation be measured? What is a meaningful measure of exposure to injury risk? What is a sports injury? How should sports injury severity be measured? How severe must an injury be before it should be considered to be a sports injury for surveillance purposes?' Agreed definitions and answers to these questions are essential before injury surveillance is established. Sports injury data is needed to guide injury prevention activities, to set and monitor sports safety policies and interventions, and as the basis of sports injury prevention research. All sports injury surveillance systems should therefore collect information about the epidemiology of sports injuries and their outcomes in a form that is of relevance across a broad range of potential users of the data. PMID:9327529

  1. Investigation of nerve injury through microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Rezina; Thakor, Nitish

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injuries, both in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS), can potentially lead to irreversible damage resulting in permanent loss of function. Investigating the complex dynamics involved in these processes may elucidate the biological mechanisms of both nerve degeneration and regeneration, and may potentially lead to the development of new therapies for recovery. A scientific overview on the biological foundations of nerve injury is presented. Differences between nerve regeneration in the central and PNS are discussed. Advances in microtechnology over the past several years have led to the development of invaluable tools that now facilitate investigation of neurobiology at the cellular scale. Microfluidic devices are explored as a means to study nerve injury at the necessary simplification of the cellular level, including those devices aimed at both chemical and physical injury, as well as those that recreate the post-injury environment. PMID:24227311

  2. Eye injuries in childhood.

    PubMed

    Grin, T R; Nelson, L B; Jeffers, J B

    1987-07-01

    A 3-year survey was conducted of all children with eye injuries admitted to Wills Eye Hospital to determine demographic, etiologic, and prophylactic factors. There were 278 cases, representing 22% of all ocular injuries in children requiring admission. The frequency of childhood ocular injuries is high, often resulting in serious visual impairment. Many of these injuries are preventable. The causes of pediatric eye injuries and preventive measures are discussed.

  3. Pediatric Hand Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew A; Cogan, Charles J; Adkinson, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric hand injuries are extremely common. Although many hand injuries are adequately managed in the emergency department, some may need evaluation and treatment by a pediatric hand surgeon to ensure a good functional outcome. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of the most common pediatric hand maladies: fingertip injuries/amputation, tendon injuries, and phalangeal and metacarpal fractures. The plastic surgery nurse should be familiar with hand injuries that require intervention to facilitate efficient management and optimal postoperative care. PMID:27606586

  4. The prognostic value of injury severity, location of event, and age at injury in pediatric traumatic head injuries

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsson, Jonas G; Flekkoy, Kjell M; Arnkelsson, Gudmundur B; Tomasson, Kristinn; Gudmundsson, Kristinn R; Arnarson, Eirikur Orn

    2008-01-01

    Aims To estimate the prognostic value of injury severity, location of event, and demographic parameters, for symptoms of pediatric traumatic head injury (THI) 4 years later. Methods Data were collected prospectively from Reykjavik City Hospital on all patients age 0–19 years, diagnosed with THI (n = 408) during one year. Information was collected on patient demographics, location of traumatic event, cause of injury, injury severity, and ICD-9 diagnosis. Injury severity was estimated according to the Head Injury Severity Scale (HISS). Four years post-injury, a questionnaire on late symptoms attributed to the THI was sent. Results Symptoms reported were more common among patients with moderate/severe THI than among others (p < 0.001). The event location had prognostic value (p < 0.05). Overall, 72% of patients with moderate/severe motor vehicle-related THI reported symptoms. There was a curvilinear age effect (p < 0.05). Symptoms were least frequent in the youngest age group, 0–4 years, and most frequent in the age group 5–14 years. Gender and urban/rural residence were not significantly related to symptoms. Conclusions Motor vehicle related moderate/severe THI resulted in a high rate of late symptoms. Location had a prognostic value. Patients with motor vehicle-related THI need special consideration regardless of injury severity. PMID:18728737

  5. Development and Validation of a Brief Version of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale With a Nonparametric Item Analysis Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabourin, Stephane; Valois, Pierre; Lussier, Yvan

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of the current research was to develop an abbreviated form of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) with nonparametric item response theory. The authors conducted 5 studies, with a total participation of 8,256 married or cohabiting individuals. Results showed that the item characteristic curves behaved in a monotonically increasing…

  6. Moderate elevations in international normalized ratio should not lead to delays in neurosurgical intervention in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Rowell, Susan E.; Barbosa, Ronald R.; Lennox, Tori C.; Fair, Kelly A.; Rao, Abigail J.; Underwood, Samantha J.; Schreiber, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The management of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently involves invasive intracranial monitoring or cranial surgery. In our institution, intracranial procedures are often deferred until an international normalized ratio (INR) of less than 1.4 is achieved. There is no evidence that a moderately elevated INR is associated with increased risk of bleeding in patients undergoing neurosurgical intervention (NI). Thrombelastography (TEG) provides a functional assessment of clotting and has been shown to better predict clinically relevant coagulopathy compared with INR. We hypothesized that in patients with TBI, an elevated INR would result in increased time to NI and would not be associated with coagulation abnormalities based on TEG. METHODS A secondary analysis of prospectively collected data was performed in trauma patients with intracranial hemorrhage that underwent NI (defined as cranial surgery or intracranial pressure monitoring) within 24 hours of arrival. Time from admission to NI was recorded. TEG and routine coagulation assays were obtained at admission. Patients were considered hypocoagulable based on INR if their admission INR was greater than 1.4 (high INR). Manufacturer-specified values were used to determine hypocoagulability for each TEG variable. RESULTS Sixty-one patients (median head Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score, 5) met entry criteria, of whom 16% had high INR. Demographic, physiologic, and injury scoring data were similar between groups. The median time to NI was longer in patients with high INR (358 minutes vs. 184 minutes, p = 0.027). High-INR patients were transfused more plasma than patients with an INR of 1.4 or less (2 U vs. 0 U, p = 0.01). There was no association between an elevated INR and hypocoagulability based on TEG. CONCLUSION TBI patients with an admission INR of greater than 1.4 had a longer time to NI. The use of plasma transfusion to decrease the INR may have contributed to this delay. A moderately

  7. Management of penetrating brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kazim, Syed Faraz; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad; Tahir, Muhammad Zubair; Enam, Syed Ather; Waheed, Shahan

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating brain injury (PBI), though less prevalent than closed head trauma, carries a worse prognosis. The publication of Guidelines for the Management of Penetrating Brain Injury in 2001, attempted to standardize the management of PBI. This paper provides a precise and updated account of the medical and surgical management of these unique injuries which still present a significant challenge to practicing neurosurgeons worldwide. The management algorithms presented in this document are based on Guidelines for the Management of Penetrating Brain Injury and the recommendations are from literature published after 2001. Optimum management of PBI requires adequate comprehension of mechanism and pathophysiology of injury. Based on current evidence, we recommend computed tomography scanning as the neuroradiologic modality of choice for PBI patients. Cerebral angiography is recommended in patients with PBI, where there is a high suspicion of vascular injury. It is still debatable whether craniectomy or craniotomy is the best approach in PBI patients. The recent trend is toward a less aggressive debridement of deep-seated bone and missile fragments and a more aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis in an effort to improve outcomes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are common in PBI patients and surgical correction is recommended for those which do not close spontaneously or are refractory to CSF diversion through a ventricular or lumbar drain. The risk of post-traumatic epilepsy after PBI is high, and therefore, the use of prophylactic anticonvulsants is recommended. Advanced age, suicide attempts, associated coagulopathy, Glasgow coma scale score of 3 with bilaterally fixed and dilated pupils, and high initial intracranial pressure have been correlated with worse outcomes in PBI patients. PMID:21887033

  8. Bodygraphic Injury Surveillance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Toshiki; Kitamura, Koji; Nishida, Yoshihumi; Motomura, Yoichi; Takano, Tachio; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes a new technology,``a bodygraphic injury surveillance system (BISS)'' that not only accumulates accident situation data but also represents injury data based on a human body coordinate system in a standardized and multilayered way. Standardized and multilayered representation of injury enables accumulation, retrieval, sharing, statistical analysis, and modeling causalities of injury across different fields such as medicine, engineering, and industry. To confirm the effectiveness of the developed system, the authors collected 3,685 children's injury data in cooperation with a hospital. As new analyses based on the developed BISS, this paper shows bodygraphically statistical analysis and childhood injury modeling using the developed BISS and Bayesian network technology.

  9. Upper extremity golf injuries.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Michael A; Lee, Steven K; Strauss, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Golf is a global sport enjoyed by an estimated 60 million people around the world. Despite the common misconception that the risk of injury during the play of golf is minimal, golfers are subject to a myriad of potential pathologies. While the majority of injuries in golf are attributable to overuse, acute traumatic injuries can also occur. As the body's direct link to the golf club, the upper extremities are especially prone to injury. A thorough appreciation of the risk factors and patterns of injury will afford accurate diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of further injury.

  10. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  11. Rehabilitation of basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Chimes, Gary P

    2006-08-01

    Basketball is one of the most popular sports in the United States and throughout the world, and therefore represents one of the most common sources of sports-related injuries. Basketball injuries should be managed by the same general rehabilitation principles as other sports injuries. Additionally, the clinician should be aware not only of general sports injuries but of those injuries most commonly seen in basketball players. By maintaining knowledge of the most common basketball injuries as well as their diagnosis and treatment, the clinician can help to optimize the athlete's return to play and enjoyment of the sport.

  12. Selecting an optimal abbreviated ICF set for clinical practice among rehabilitants with subacute stroke: retrospective analysis of patient records.

    PubMed

    Saltychev, Mikhail; Tarvonen-Schröder, Sinikka; Eskola, Merja; Laimi, Katri

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the adequacy of abbreviated versions of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) (the WHO ICF Checklist and the ICF Comprehensive Core Set for Stroke) with respect to the specific clinical needs of a stroke rehabilitation unit before their implementation at a practical level. Common descriptions of functional limitations were identified from patient records of 10 subsequent subacute stroke patients referred to an inpatient multiprofessional rehabilitation unit of a university hospital. These descriptions were then converted into ICF categories, and the list was compared with the ICF Checklist of the WHO and the ICF Comprehensive and Brief Core Sets for Stroke developed by the ICF Research Branch. From the study population (50% women), 71 different, second-level ICF categories were identified, averaging 36.4 categories/patient (SD 5.8, range 28-46). Except for one category, all of the categories identified were also found in the ICF Comprehensive Core Set for Stroke. Of the categories identified, 49 (69%) were found in the WHO ICF Checklist. All except one category included in the ICF Brief Core Set for Stroke were also in our list. The Comprehensive Core Set for Stroke was found to be a good potential starting point for the practical implementation of the ICF in a stroke rehabilitation unit.

  13. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brachial Plexus Injuries Information Page Synonym(s): Erb's Palsy Table of Contents ( ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Brachial Plexus Injuries? The brachial plexus is a network of nerves ...

  14. Teeth Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Teeth Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Teeth Injuries ... or young child injures the gums or baby teeth: Apply pressure to the area (if it's bleeding) ...

  15. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  16. What Are Sports Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 06:02 Size: 11.7 MB November 2014 What Are Sports Injuries? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Research Is Being Done on Treating Sports Injuries? What’s the Difference Between an Acute and a Chronic ...

  17. Football injuries: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Olson, David E; Sikka, Robby Singh; Hamilton, Abigail; Krohn, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Football is one of the most popular sports in the United States and is the leading cause of sports-related injury. A large focus in recent years has been on concussions, sudden cardiac death, and heat illness, all thought to be largely preventable health issues in the young athlete. Injury prevention through better understanding of injury mechanisms, education, proper equipment, and practice techniques and preseason screening may aid in reducing the number of injuries. Proper management of on-field injuries and health emergencies can reduce the morbidity associated with these injuries and may lead to faster return to play and reduced risk of future injury. This article reviews current concepts surrounding frequently seen football-related injuries.

  18. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, ... your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For ...

  19. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  20. Arm Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of muscles, joints, tendons and other connective tissue. Injuries to any of these parts of the arm ... a fall or an accident. Types of arm injuries include Tendinitis and bursitis Sprains Dislocations Broken bones ...

  1. Hand Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrist, often making your fingers feel numb Injuries that result in fractures, ruptured ligaments and dislocations ... deformity Tendinitis - irritation of the tendons Disorders and injuries of your fingers and thumb

  2. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  3. Recreational softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Shesser, R; Smith, M; Ellis, P; Brett, S; Ott, J E

    1985-05-01

    Every patient who presented to an urban teaching hospital's emergency department during one season complaining of an injury sustained while playing softball was interviewed to determine the parameters of play associated with the injury. Trends were noticed toward increased frequency of injury to experienced players late in the season. A fall was the most common mechanism of injury, and player location at the time of injury was equally divided between the basepath and defense. Very few players were injured at bat. No conclusion could be drawn about the protection afforded a player from the use of a mitt or cleats. The relative rate of injury was estimated to be 2.26 injuries per 1,000 players per day, making the risk of injury for softball participants about 50% of that for recreational skiers.

  4. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  5. Eye Injuries in Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... these injuries can be prevented. Overall, basketball and baseball cause the most eye injuries, followed by water ... involve body contact. Some high-risk sports are baseball, basketball, hockey, football, lacrosse, tennis and other racquet ...

  6. Human Injury Criteria for Underwater Blasts.

    PubMed

    Lance, Rachel M; Capehart, Bruce; Kadro, Omar; Bass, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Underwater blasts propagate further and injure more readily than equivalent air blasts. Development of effective personal protection and countermeasures, however, requires knowledge of the currently unknown human tolerance to underwater blast. Current guidelines for prevention of underwater blast injury are not based on any organized injury risk assessment, human data or experimental data. The goal of this study was to derive injury risk assessments for underwater blast using well-characterized human underwater blast exposures in the open literature. The human injury dataset was compiled using 34 case reports on underwater blast exposure to 475 personnel, dating as early as 1916. Using severity ratings, computational reconstructions of the blasts, and survival information from a final set of 262 human exposures, injury risk models were developed for both injury severity and risk of fatality as functions of blast impulse and blast peak overpressure. Based on these human data, we found that the 50% risk of fatality from underwater blast occurred at 302±16 kPa-ms impulse. Conservatively, there is a 20% risk of pulmonary injury at a kilometer from a 20 kg charge. From a clinical point of view, this new injury risk model emphasizes the large distances possible for potential pulmonary and gut injuries in water compared with air. This risk value is the first impulse-based fatality risk calculated from human data. The large-scale inconsistency between the blast exposures in the case reports and the guidelines available in the literature prior to this study further underscored the need for this new guideline derived from the unique dataset of actual injuries in this study.

  7. Human Injury Criteria for Underwater Blasts

    PubMed Central

    Lance, Rachel M.; Capehart, Bruce; Kadro, Omar; Bass, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    Underwater blasts propagate further and injure more readily than equivalent air blasts. Development of effective personal protection and countermeasures, however, requires knowledge of the currently unknown human tolerance to underwater blast. Current guidelines for prevention of underwater blast injury are not based on any organized injury risk assessment, human data or experimental data. The goal of this study was to derive injury risk assessments for underwater blast using well-characterized human underwater blast exposures in the open literature. The human injury dataset was compiled using 34 case reports on underwater blast exposure to 475 personnel, dating as early as 1916. Using severity ratings, computational reconstructions of the blasts, and survival information from a final set of 262 human exposures, injury risk models were developed for both injury severity and risk of fatality as functions of blast impulse and blast peak overpressure. Based on these human data, we found that the 50% risk of fatality from underwater blast occurred at 302±16 kPa-ms impulse. Conservatively, there is a 20% risk of pulmonary injury at a kilometer from a 20 kg charge. From a clinical point of view, this new injury risk model emphasizes the large distances possible for potential pulmonary and gut injuries in water compared with air. This risk value is the first impulse-based fatality risk calculated from human data. The large-scale inconsistency between the blast exposures in the case reports and the guidelines available in the literature prior to this study further underscored the need for this new guideline derived from the unique dataset of actual injuries in this study. PMID:26606655

  8. Human Injury Criteria for Underwater Blasts.

    PubMed

    Lance, Rachel M; Capehart, Bruce; Kadro, Omar; Bass, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Underwater blasts propagate further and injure more readily than equivalent air blasts. Development of effective personal protection and countermeasures, however, requires knowledge of the currently unknown human tolerance to underwater blast. Current guidelines for prevention of underwater blast injury are not based on any organized injury risk assessment, human data or experimental data. The goal of this study was to derive injury risk assessments for underwater blast using well-characterized human underwater blast exposures in the open literature. The human injury dataset was compiled using 34 case reports on underwater blast exposure to 475 personnel, dating as early as 1916. Using severity ratings, computational reconstructions of the blasts, and survival information from a final set of 262 human exposures, injury risk models were developed for both injury severity and risk of fatality as functions of blast impulse and blast peak overpressure. Based on these human data, we found that the 50% risk of fatality from underwater blast occurred at 302±16 kPa-ms impulse. Conservatively, there is a 20% risk of pulmonary injury at a kilometer from a 20 kg charge. From a clinical point of view, this new injury risk model emphasizes the large distances possible for potential pulmonary and gut injuries in water compared with air. This risk value is the first impulse-based fatality risk calculated from human data. The large-scale inconsistency between the blast exposures in the case reports and the guidelines available in the literature prior to this study further underscored the need for this new guideline derived from the unique dataset of actual injuries in this study. PMID:26606655

  9. Softball Pitching and Injury.

    PubMed

    Lear, Aaron; Patel, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    The windmill softball pitch generates considerable forces about the athlete's shoulder and elbow. The injury pattern of softball pitchers seems to be primarily overuse injury, and they seem not to suffer the same volume of injury that baseball pitchers do. This article will explore softball pitching techniques, kinetics and kinematics of the windmill pitch, epidemiology of softball pitchers, and discuss possible etiologies of softball pitching injuries.

  10. Baseball/lacrosse injuries.

    PubMed

    Casazza, B A; Rossner, K

    1999-02-01

    With the expansion of baseball into all age groups, the game is becoming as much a recreational sport as a youth sport. Throwing arm injuries eventually limit the participation of most players. Analysis is made of these injuries with the goal of complete rehabilitation for the baseball player. Lacrosse has also seen an increase in popularity as a recreational sport. Analysis of lacrosse injuries and rehabilitation of the most common injuries is reviewed.

  11. Softball Pitching and Injury.

    PubMed

    Lear, Aaron; Patel, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    The windmill softball pitch generates considerable forces about the athlete's shoulder and elbow. The injury pattern of softball pitchers seems to be primarily overuse injury, and they seem not to suffer the same volume of injury that baseball pitchers do. This article will explore softball pitching techniques, kinetics and kinematics of the windmill pitch, epidemiology of softball pitchers, and discuss possible etiologies of softball pitching injuries. PMID:27618243

  12. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  13. Prevention of Football Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kirkendall, Donald T; Junge, Astrid; Dvorak, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Every sport has a unique profile of injury and risk of injury. In recent years, there have been numerous attempts at conducting injury prevention trials for specific injuries or for injuries within specific sports to provide evidence useful to the sports medicine and sport community. Football has been a focus of a number of randomized injury prevention trials. Methods MEDLINE was searched with the first order keywords of “injury prevention” and “sport”. This list was restricted to “clinical trial” or “randomized controlled trial” which had been conducted on children and adults whose goal was preventing common football injuries. Our objective was to find studies with an exercise-based training program, thus projects that used mechanical interventions were excluded. Results A structured, generalized warm-up has been shown to be effective at preventing common injuries in football, reducing injuries by about one-third. Conclusion The huge participation numbers in the worldwide family of football would suggest that any reduction in injury should have a public health impact. Professionals in sports medicine need to promote injury prevention programs that have been shown to be effective. PMID:22375195

  14. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  15. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  16. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that happen when too much stress is placed on a part of the body, resulting in inflammation (pain and swelling), muscle strain, or tissue damage. This stress generally occurs from ...

  17. Treatment of osteochondral injuries with platelet gel

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, Marcus Vinicius; da Rosa Pereira, Hamilton; de Sá Carneiro, Carlos Augusto; Felisbino, Sérgio Luiz; Deffune, Elenice

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Treatments for injured articular cartilage have not advanced to the point that efficient regeneration is possible. However, there has been an increase in the use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of several orthopedic disorders, including chondral injuries. Our hypothesis is that the treatment of chondral injuries with platelet gel results in higher-quality repair tissue after 180 days compared with chondral injuries not treated with gel. METHODS: A controlled experimental laboratory study was performed on 30 male rabbits to evaluate osteochondral injury repair after treatment with or without platelet gel. Osteochondral injuries were surgically induced in both knees of each rabbit at the medial femoral condyle. The left knee injury was filled with the platelet gel, and the right knee was not treated. Microscopic analysis of both knee samples was performed after 180 days using a histological grading scale. RESULTS: The only histological evaluation criterion that was not significantly different between treatments was metachromasia. The group that was treated with platelet gel exhibited superior results in all other criteria (cell morphology, surface regularity, chondral thickness and repair tissue integration) and in the total score. CONCLUSION: The repair tissue was histologically superior after 180 days in the study group treated with platelet gel compared with the group of untreated injuries. PMID:25518022

  18. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and…

  19. [Trampoline injuries in children].

    PubMed

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Antila, Eeva; Korhonen, Jussi; Rättyä, Johanna; Serlo, Willy

    2012-01-01

    Trampolines for home use have become common in Finland during the past ten years, being especially favored by children. Trampoline jumping is beneficial and constructive physical exercise, but poses a significant risk for injuries. The most common injuries include sprains and strains. During summertime, trampoline injuries account for as many as 13% of children's accidents requiring hospital care. Fractures are by far the most common trampoline injuries requiring hospital care. Injuries can be prevented by using safety nets. Only one child at a time is allowed to jump on the trampoline.

  20. Indoor racquet sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Silko, G J; Cullen, P T

    1994-08-01

    Family physicians can care for most patients injured while participating in indoor racquet sports. However, patients with injuries to the eye usually require ophthalmologic referral. The most common injuries that occur in persons participating in indoor racquet sports include contusions, sprains and strains, lacerations, eye injuries, bursitis and tendinitis. Musculoskeletal injuries that merit special consideration include lateral epicondylitis, DeQuervain's tenosynovitis, wrist intersection syndrome, patellar pain syndrome, meniscal injuries, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis. The family physician plays a critical role in providing patients with information about preventive measures.