Science.gov

Sample records for abc efflux pumps

  1. Physico-chemical factors affect chloramphenicol efflux and EmhABC efflux pump expression in Pseudomonas fluorescens cLP6a.

    PubMed

    Adebusuyi, Abigail; Foght, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Protein synthesis inhibitors such as chloramphenicol and tetracycline may be inducers of efflux pumps such as MexY in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, complicating their use for the treatment of bacterial infections. We previously determined that chloramphenicol, a substrate of the EmhABC efflux pump in Pseudomonas fluorescens cLP6a, did not induce emhABC expression. In this study, we determined the effect of physico-chemical factors on chloramphenicol efflux by EmhABC, and the expression of emhABC. Efflux assays measuring accumulation of (14)C-chloramphenicol in cell pellets showed that chloramphenicol efflux is dependent on growth temperature, pH and concentration of Mg(2+). These physico-chemical factors modulated the efflux of chloramphenicol by 26 to >50%. All conditions tested that decreased the efflux of chloramphenicol unexpectedly induced transcription of emhABC efflux genes. EmhABC activity also effectively suppressed the deleterious effect of chloramphenicol on the cell membrane of strain cLP6a, which may explain why chloramphenicol is not an inducer of emhABC. Our results suggest that the detrimental effect of an antibiotic on cell membrane integrity and fatty acid composition may be the signal that induces emhABC expression, and that inducers of other bacterial efflux pumps may include environmental factors rather than their substrates per se.

  2. The EmhABC efflux pump decreases the efficiency of phenanthrene biodegradation by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain LP6a.

    PubMed

    Adebusuyi, Abigail A; Smith, Angela Y; Gray, Murray R; Foght, Julia M

    2012-08-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain LP6a, designated here as strain WEN (wild-type PAH catabolism, efflux positive), utilizes the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene as a carbon source but also extrudes it into the extracellular medium using the efflux pump EmhABC. Because phenanthrene is considered a nontoxic carbon source for P. fluorescens WEP, its energy-dependent efflux seems counter-productive. We hypothesized that the efflux of phenanthrene would decrease the efficiency of its biodegradation. Indeed, an emhB disruptant strain, wild-type PAH catabolism, efflux negative (WEN), biodegraded 44% more phenanthrene than its parent strain WEP during a 6-day incubation. To determine whether efflux affected the degree of oxidation of phenanthrene, we quantified the conversion of ¹⁴C-phenanthrene to radiolabeled polar metabolites and ¹⁴CO₂. The emhB⁻ WEN strain produced approximately twice as much ¹⁴CO₂ and radiolabeled water-soluble metabolites as the WEP strain. In contrast, the mineralization of ¹⁴C-glucose, which is not a known EmhB efflux substrate, was equivalent in both strains. An early open-ring metabolite of phenanthrene, trans-4-(1-hydroxynaphth-2-yl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid, also was found to be a substrate of the EmhABC pump and accumulated in the supernatant of WEP but not WEN cultures. The analogous open-ring metabolite of dibenzothiophene, a heterocyclic analog of phenanthrene, was extruded by EmhABC plus a putative alternative efflux pump, whereas the end product 3-hydroxy-2-formylbenzothiophene was not actively extruded from either WEP or WEN cells. These results indicate that the active efflux of phenanthrene and its early metabolite(s) decreases the efficiency of phenanthrene degradation by the WEP strain. This activity has implications for the bioremediation and biocatalytic transformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocycles.

  3. The eefABC multidrug efflux pump operon is repressed by H-NS in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Masi, Muriel; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Villard, Claude; Pradel, Elizabeth

    2005-06-01

    The Enterobacter aerogenes eefABC locus, which encodes a tripartite efflux pump, was cloned by complementation of an Escherichia coli tolC mutant. E. aerogenes deltaacrA expressing EefABC became less susceptible to a wide range of antibiotics. Data from eef::lacZ fusions showed that eefABC was not transcribed in the various laboratory conditions tested. However, increased transcription from Peef was observed in an E. coli hns mutant. In addition, EefA was detected in E. aerogenes expressing a dominant negative E. coli hns allele.

  4. Growth Hormone Receptor Knockdown Sensitizes Human Melanoma Cells to Chemotherapy by Attenuating Expression of ABC Drug Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Basu, Reetobrata; Baumgaertel, Nicholas; Wu, Shiyong; Kopchick, John J

    2017-03-14

    Melanoma remains one of the most therapy-resistant forms of human cancer despite recent introductions of highly efficacious targeted therapies. The intrinsic therapy resistance of human melanoma is largely due to abundant expression of a repertoire of xenobiotic efflux pumps of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Here, we report that GH action is a key mediator of chemotherapeutic resistance in human melanoma cells. We investigated multiple ABC efflux pumps (ABCB1, ABCB5, ABCB8, ABCC1, ABCC2, ABCG1, and ABCG2) reportedly associated with melanoma drug resistance in different human melanoma cells and tested the efficacy of five different anti-cancer compounds (cisplatin, doxorubicin, oridonin, paclitaxel, vemurafenib) with decreased GH action. We found that GH treatment of human melanoma cells upregulates expression of multiple ABC transporters and increases the EC50 of melanoma drug vemurafenib. Also, vemurafenib-resistant melanoma cells had upregulated levels of GH receptor (GHR) expression as well as ABC efflux pumps. GHR knockdown (KD) using siRNA in human melanoma cells treated with sub-EC50 doses of anti-tumor compounds resulted in significantly increased drug retention, decreased cell proliferation and increased drug efficacy, compared to mock-transfected controls. Our set of findings identify an unknown mechanism of GH regulation in mediating melanoma drug resistance and validates GHR as a unique therapeutic target for sensitizing highly therapy-resistant human melanoma cells to lower doses of anti-cancer drugs.

  5. Antibiotic-dependent induction of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E TtgABC efflux pump is mediated by the drug binding repressor TtgR.

    PubMed

    Terán, Wilson; Felipe, Antonia; Segura, Ana; Rojas, Antonia; Ramos, Juan-Luis; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2003-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida is well known for its metabolic capabilities, but recently, it has been shown to exhibit resistance to a wide range of antibiotics. In P. putida DOT-T1E, the TtgABC efflux pump, which has a broad substrate specificity, extrudes antibiotics such as ampicillin, carbenicillin, tetracycline, nalidixic acid, and chloramphenicol. We have analyzed the expression of the ttgABC efflux pump operon and its regulatory gene, ttgR, in response to several structurally unrelated antibiotics at the transcriptional level and investigated the role of the TtgR protein in this process. ttgABC and ttgR are expressed in vivo at a moderate basal level, which increases in the presence of hydrophobic antibiotics like chloramphenicol and tetracycline. In vitro experiments show that, in the absence of inducers, TtgR binds to a palindromic operator site which overlaps both ttgABC and ttgR promoters and dissociates from it in the presence of chloramphenicol and tetracycline. These results suggest that the TtgR repressor is able to bind to structurally different antibiotics, which allows induction of TtgABC multidrug efflux pump expression in response to these antimicrobial agents. This is the first case in which the expression of a drug transporter of the resistance-nodulation-division family has been shown to be regulated directly by antibiotics.

  6. RND-type efflux pumps in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii: major role for AdeABC overexpression and AdeRS mutations.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance (MDR) of Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the relative contributions of the three most prevalent pumps, AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK, have not been evaluated in clinical settings. We have screened 14 MDR clinical isolates shown to be distinct on the basis of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for the presence and overexpression of the three Ade efflux systems and analyzed the sequences of the regulators AdeRS, a two-component system, for AdeABC and AdeL, a LysR-type regulator, for AdeFGH. Gene adeB was detected in 13 of 14 isolates, and adeG and the intrinsic adeJ gene were detected in all strains. Significant overexpression of adeB was observed in 10 strains, whereas only 7 had moderately increased levels of expression of AdeFGH, and none overexpressed AdeIJK. Thirteen strains had reduced susceptibility to tigecycline, but there was no correlation between tigecycline MICs and the levels of AdeABC expression, suggesting the presence of other mechanisms for tigecycline resistance. No mutations were found in the highly conserved LysR regulator of the nine strains expressing AdeFGH. In contrast, functional mutations were found in conserved domains of AdeRS in all the strains that overexpressed AdeABC with two mutational hot spots, one in AdeS near histidine 149 suggesting convergent evolution and the other in the DNA binding domain of AdeR compatible with horizontal gene transfer. This report outlines the high incidence of AdeABC efflux pump overexpression in MDR A. baumannii as a result of a variety of single mutations in the corresponding two-component regulatory system.

  7. Effect of iron on expression of efflux pump (adeABC) and quorum sensing (luxI, luxR) genes in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Modarresi, Farzan; Azizi, Omid; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Valibeigi, Behnaz; Mansouri, Shahla

    2015-11-01

    Resistance-nodulation-division efflux system (RND) adeABC contributes to intrinsic resistance to various drug classes in Acinetobacter baumannii. Similarly, quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in the biofilm formation and pathogenicity of this bacterium. The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of iron limitation on the expression of efflux pump (adeABC) genes and QS (luxI, luxR) system by relative quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In addition, DNA sequence and phylogenetic relatedness of biofilm-associated protein (Bap) gene was also investigated. Sixty-five multidrug-resistant isolates of A. baumannii were recovered from ICU patients of three hospitals in Kerman, Iran. The isolates were highly resistant to at least 11 antibiotics (MIC ≥64 μg/mL); however, 87% and 89% were susceptible to colistin and tigecycline, respectively (MIC 0.05 μg/mL) (p ≤ 0.05). We detected the presence of RND efflux pump, QS, and bap genes with the frequencies of 92% (adeA), 61.5% (adeB), 84.6% (adeC), 80% (luxI), 61% (luxR), and 66% (bap), respectively. qRT-PCR analysis showed that in some isolates, expression of both adeABC and luxI/R was increased more than fourfold in the presence of low iron (20 μm), suggesting the additional regulatory role of iron on both efflux pump and QS system. Alignment and phylogenetic analysis on the strong biofilm forming isolates confirmed that the fragments amplified were indeed part of bap gene and deduced sequence was similar to A. baumannii K9B410.

  8. The Efflux Pump Inhibitor Reserpine Selects Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains That Overexpress the ABC Transporters PatA and PatB▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Mark I.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2008-01-01

    One way to combat multidrug-resistant microorganisms is the use of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Spontaneous mutants resistant to the EPI reserpine selected from Streptococcus pneumoniae NCTC 7465 and R6 at a frequency suggestive of a single mutational event were also multidrug resistant. No mutations in pmrA (which encodes the efflux protein PmrA) were detected, and the expression of pmrA was unaltered in all mutants. In the reserpine-resistant multidrug-resistant mutants, the overexpression of both patA and patB, which encode ABC transporters, was associated with accumulation of low concentrations of antibiotics and dyes. The addition of sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of ABC efflux pumps, or the insertional inactivation of either gene restored wild-type antibiotic susceptibility and wild-type levels of accumulation. Only when patA was insertionally inactivated were both multidrug resistance and reserpine resistance lost. Strains in which patA was insertionally inactivated grew significantly more slowly than the wild type. These data indicate that the overexpression of both patA and patB confers multidrug resistance in S. pneumoniae but that only patA is involved in reserpine resistance. The selection of reserpine-resistant multidrug-resistant pneumococci has implications for analogous systems in other bacteria or in cancer. PMID:18362193

  9. Isolation of a point mutation associated with altered expression of the CmeABC efflux pump in a multidrug-resistant Campylobacter jejuni population of poultry origin.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Boto, David; Acebo, Paloma; García-Peña, Francisco Javier; Abad, Juan Carlos; Echeita, María Aurora; Amblar, Mónica

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antibiotic resistance phenotype of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from a poultry flock of broiler production in Spain. Isolates were characterised by RFLP-PCR of the flaA gene and multilocus sequence typing. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of quinolones, aminoglycosides, β-lactams, tetracyclines, phenicols, macrolides and lincosamides were determined by Etest. Determinants of resistance and the regulatory region of the cmeABC operon were investigated in all isolates by PCR detection and sequencing. Expression of the CmeABC efflux pump was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR and accumulation assay. Based on their molecular markers, two different populations of C. jejuni were identified: one resistant to quinolones, β-lactams and tetracyclines, considered multidrug-resistant (MDR); and another resistant only to tetracyclines. Both populations possessed the tetO gene, previously associated with tetracycline resistance. The blaOXA-61 gene was also present in both populations, although only the MDR population showed β-lactamase activity. In addition, MDR isolates possessed the Thr86Ile mutation in the gyrA gene responsible for quinolone resistance. Moreover, sequencing of the regulatory region of the cmeABC operon revealed the presence of the C-32→T mutation in the MDR isolates, which was accompanied by an increase in cmeA mRNA levels compared with the non-mutant population. In conclusion, this is the first report of the mutation C-32→T in the cmeABC operon in C. jejuni isolates of veterinary origin. This mutation is associated with overexpression of the CmeABC efflux pump in a MDR population and is possibly related to enhanced tolerance to antimicrobials that favours the development of resistance.

  10. Genome Sequence of a Clinical Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii Belonging to the ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 Clone Lacking the AdeABC (Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type) Efflux Pump

    PubMed Central

    López, M.; Álvarez-Fraga, L.; Gato, E.; Blasco, L.; Poza, M.; Fernández-García, L.; Bou, G.

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii. Little is known about the genetic characteristics of clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii lacking the AdeABC pump. In this study, we sequenced the genome of clinical strain Ab421 GEIH-2010 (belonging to clone ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 from the GEIH-REIPI Ab. 2010 project) which lacks this efflux pump. PMID:27609928

  11. Genome Sequence of a Clinical Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii Belonging to the ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 Clone Lacking the AdeABC (Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type) Efflux Pump.

    PubMed

    López, M; Álvarez-Fraga, L; Gato, E; Blasco, L; Poza, M; Fernández-García, L; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2016-09-08

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii Little is known about the genetic characteristics of clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii lacking the AdeABC pump. In this study, we sequenced the genome of clinical strain Ab421 GEIH-2010 (belonging to clone ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 from the GEIH-REIPI Ab. 2010 project) which lacks this efflux pump.

  12. Microbicides Alter the Expression and Function of RND-Type Efflux Pump AdeABC in Biofilm-Associated Cells of Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Suvarna; Shah, Bhavikkumar P.; Lee, Hiu Ham

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes nosocomial infections worldwide. This microbe's propensity to form biofilms allows it to persist and to survive on clinical abiotic surfaces for long periods. In fact, A. baumannii biofilm formation and its multidrug-resistant nature severely compromise our capacity to care for patients in hospital environments. In contrast, microbicides such as cetrimide (CT) and chlorhexidine (CHX) play important roles in the prevention and treatment of infections. We assessed the efficacy of CT and CHX, either alone or in combination, in eradicating A. baumannii biofilms formed by clinical isolates, by using stainless steel washers to mimic hard abiotic surfaces found in hospital settings. We demonstrated that increasing amounts of each microbicide, alone or in combination, were able to damage and to reduce the viability of A. baumannii biofilms efficaciously. Interestingly, the adeB gene of the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family is predominantly associated with acquired resistance to antimicrobials in A. baumannii. We showed that CT and CHX adversely modified the expression and function of the RND-type efflux pump AdeABC in biofilm-associated A. baumannii cells. Furthermore, we established that these microbicides decreased the negative charges on A. baumannii cell membranes, causing dysregulation of the efflux pump and leading to cell death. Our findings suggest that CT and CHX, alone or in combination, can be used efficaciously for eradication of A. baumannii from hospital surfaces, in order to reduce infections caused by this nosocomial agent. PMID:26459900

  13. Microbicides Alter the Expression and Function of RND-Type Efflux Pump AdeABC in Biofilm-Associated Cells of Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Suvarna; Shah, Bhavikkumar P; Lee, Hiu Ham; Martinez, Luis R

    2015-10-12

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes nosocomial infections worldwide. This microbe's propensity to form biofilms allows it to persist and to survive on clinical abiotic surfaces for long periods. In fact, A. baumannii biofilm formation and its multidrug-resistant nature severely compromise our capacity to care for patients in hospital environments. In contrast, microbicides such as cetrimide (CT) and chlorhexidine (CHX) play important roles in the prevention and treatment of infections. We assessed the efficacy of CT and CHX, either alone or in combination, in eradicating A. baumannii biofilms formed by clinical isolates, by using stainless steel washers to mimic hard abiotic surfaces found in hospital settings. We demonstrated that increasing amounts of each microbicide, alone or in combination, were able to damage and to reduce the viability of A. baumannii biofilms efficaciously. Interestingly, the adeB gene of the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family is predominantly associated with acquired resistance to antimicrobials in A. baumannii. We showed that CT and CHX adversely modified the expression and function of the RND-type efflux pump AdeABC in biofilm-associated A. baumannii cells. Furthermore, we established that these microbicides decreased the negative charges on A. baumannii cell membranes, causing dysregulation of the efflux pump and leading to cell death. Our findings suggest that CT and CHX, alone or in combination, can be used efficaciously for eradication of A. baumannii from hospital surfaces, in order to reduce infections caused by this nosocomial agent.

  14. Prevalence of Genes of OXA-23 Carbapenemase and AdeABC Efflux Pump Associated with Multidrug Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates in the ICU of a Comprehensive Hospital of Northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wei; Li, Caiyun; Zhang, Haiyun; Li, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Wei, Jun

    2015-08-21

    The objective of this study was to explore the molecular epidemiology and the genetic support of clinical multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) isolates in an ICU ward of a comprehensive hospital. A total of 102 non-duplicate drug-resistant A. baumannii isolates were identified and 93 (91.1%) of them were MDR strains. Molecular analysis demonstrated that carbapenemase genes blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 were presented in all 93 MDR isolates (100%), but other carbapenemase genes, including blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaIMP-1, blaIMP-4, blaSIM, and blaVIM genes were completely absent in all isolates. In addition, genes of AdeABC efflux system were detected in 88.2% (90/102) isolates. Interestingly, an addition to efflux pump inhibitor, reserpine could significantly enhance the susceptibility of MDR isolates to moxifloxacin, cefotaxime, and imipenem (p < 0.01). Clonal relationship analysis further grouped these clinical drug-resistant isolates into nine clusters, and the MDR strains were mainly in clusters A, B, C, and D, which include 16, 13, 25, and 15 isolates, respectively. This study demonstrated that clinical isolates carrying carbapenemase-encoding genes blaOXA-23 and AdeABC efflux pump genes are the main prevalent MDR A. baumannii, and the co-expression of oxacillinase and efflux pump proteins are thus considered to be the important reason for the prevalence of this organism in the ICU of this hospital.

  15. Effluxing ABC Transporters in Human Corneal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Mannermaa, Eliisa; Turner, Helen; Häkli, Marika; Wolosin, J. Mario; Tervo, Timo; Honkakoski, Paavo; Urtti, Arto

    2010-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are able to efflux their substrate drugs from the cells. We compared expression of efflux proteins in normal human corneal epithelial tissue, primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCEpiC), and corneal epithelial cell culture model (HCE model) based on human immortal cell line. Expression of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1–6 (MRP1–6) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) was studied using quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Only MRP1, MRP5, and BCRP were expressed in the freshly excised human corneal epithelial tissue. Expression of MRP1 and MRP5 was localized predominantly in the basal cells of the central cornea and limbus. Functional efflux activity was shown in the cell models, but they showed over-expression of most efflux transporters compared to that of normal corneal epithelium. In conclusion, MRP1, MRP5, and BCRP are expressed in the corneal epithelium, but MDR1, MRP2, MRP3, MRP4, and MRP6 are not significantly expressed. HCE cell model and commercially available primary cells deviate from this expression profile. PMID:19623615

  16. Efflux Pump Control Alters Synthetic Gene Circuit Function.

    PubMed

    Diao, Junchen; Charlebois, Daniel A; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Bódi, Zoltán; Pál, Csaba; Balázsi, Gábor

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic biology aims to design new biological systems for predefined purposes, such as the controlled secretion of biofuels, pharmaceuticals, or other chemicals. Synthetic gene circuits regulating an efflux pump from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family could achieve this. However, ABC efflux pumps can also drive out intracellular inducer molecules that control the gene circuits. This will introduce an implicit feedback that could alter gene circuit function in ways that are poorly understood. Here, we used two synthetic gene circuits inducible by tetracycline family molecules to regulate the expression of a yeast ABC pump (Pdr5p) that pumps out the inducer. Pdr5p altered the dose-responses of the original gene circuits substantially in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While one aspect of the change could be attributed to the efflux pumping function of Pdr5p, another aspect remained unexplained. Quantitative modeling indicated that reduced regulator gene expression in addition to efflux pump function could fully explain the altered dose-responses. These predictions were validated experimentally. Overall, we highlight how efflux pumps can alter gene circuit dynamics and demonstrate the utility of mathematical modeling in understanding synthetic gene circuit function in new circumstances.

  17. CmeR-dependent gene Cj0561c is induced more effectively by bile salts than the CmeABC efflux pump in both human and poultry Campylobacter jejuni strains.

    PubMed

    Dzieciol, Monika; Wagner, Martin; Hein, Ingeborg

    2011-12-01

    The multidrug efflux pump CmeABC described in the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni was shown to be an important element of bile resistance and significant for successful colonization of chicken intestines. Recently, another gene (Cj0561c) strongly suppressed by the same repressor (CmeR) that regulates expression of CmeABC was identified in C. jejuni NCTC 11168. Initial data suggested that, similarly to cmeABC, Cj0561c could be induced by bile salts. In the present study, the occurrence of the Cj0561c gene and bile-salt-dependent induction was investigated in ten poultry and eight human C. jejuni strains. The Cj0561c gene was present in all strains. When cultured without addition of bile salts, the transcription level of that gene was about tenfold higher than that of cmeABC. Bile salts cholate and taurocholate induced transcription of cmeABC 1.66-fold and 2.71-fold and that of Cj0561c 3.71-fold and 10.99-fold, respectively. Thus Cj0561c was more effectively induced by bile salts than cmeABC and taurocholate was superior to cholate as an inducer of transcription. More efficient induction of both cmeABC and Cj0561c by taurocholate might be the reason for the higher minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) observed with taurocholate than with cholate (100 mg/ml vs. 10 mg/ml). There was no significant difference between poultry and human C. jejuni strains concerning the transcription levels of cmeABC and Cj0561c in cultures without bile salts and concerning bile-salt-induced changes in transcription of cmeABC and Cj0561c. Thus, higher MIC values observed for taurocholate in human strains than in poultry strains (200 mg/ml vs. 75 mg/ml) could not be explained by different responses of cmeABC and Cj0561c to bile salts. Therefore, they must be due to another mechanism.

  18. Distribution of AdeABC efflux system genes in genotypically diverse strains of clinical Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Piotr; Sacha, Paweł; Czaban, Sławomir; Hauschild, Tomasz; Ojdana, Dominika; Kowalczuk, Oksana; Milewski, Robert; Poniatowski, Bogusław; Nikliński, Jacek; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly problematic hospital-associated pathogen. Different mechanisms contribute to the formation of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii, including the AdeABC efflux system. Distribution of the structural and regulatory genes encoding the AdeABC efflux system among genetically diverse clinical A. baumannii strains was achieved by using PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques. The distribution of adeABRS genes is extremely high among our A. baumannii strains, except the adeC gene. We have observed a large proportion of strains presenting multidrug-resistance phenotype for several years. The efflux pump could be an important mechanism in these strains in resistance to antibiotics.

  19. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Lea M.; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis. In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis. Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  20. Plasmid borne Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Class D β-Lactamases (CHDLs) and AdeABC efflux pump conferring carbapenem-tigecycline resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii isolates harboring TnAbaRs.

    PubMed

    Savari, Mohammad; Ekrami, Alireza; Shoja, Saeed; Bahador, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    Here we studied the prevalence and mechanisms of simultaneous resistance to carbapenem and tigecycline and accumulation of resistance determinants reservoirs in genome of Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) clinical isolates. Susceptibility of the isolates were measured to 18 antimicrobial agents. Genetic diversity of the microbial population was determined using the International Clonal lineage typing (IC typing), multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) and plasmid profiling methods. To detect the AbaRs, Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Class D β-Lactamases (CHDLs) genes, AdeABC efflux pump genes and resistance determinants, PCR was used. Filter mating experiments were used to prove that if carbapenem resistance genes are located on conjugative plasmids or not. Among the A. baumannii clinical isolates, 40.8% were carbapenem-tigecycline resistant and in this population, 46.9% were belonging to IC I, IC II or IC III and 53.1% were IC variants. These isolates had fallen in 40 MLVA types and were harboring plasmids in multiple numbers and sizes. In this study, blaOXA-23-like was the most prevalent CHDL and conjugation analysis proved that the carbapenem resistance genes are located on conjugative plasmids. All efflux pump genes, except for adeC, were detected in all carbapenem-tigecycline resistant A. baumannii (CTRAb) isolates. Resistance determinants were distributed in both TnAbaRs and R plasmids with a shift toward the R plasmids. Emerging of carbapenem resistant A. baumannii (CRAB) with simultaneous resistance to the last line therapy including tigecycline represent emerging of extensively drug resistance (XDR) and pandrug resistance (PDR) phenotypes that would be a great threat to our public health system.

  1. Efflux pumps of Mycobacterium tuberculosis play a significant role in antituberculosis activity of potential drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Balganesh, Meenakshi; Dinesh, Neela; Sharma, Sreevalli; Kuruppath, Sanjana; Nair, Anju V; Sharma, Umender

    2012-05-01

    Active efflux of drugs mediated by efflux pumps that confer drug resistance is one of the mechanisms developed by bacteria to counter the adverse effects of antibiotics and chemicals. To understand these efflux mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we generated knockout (KO) mutants of four efflux pumps of the pathogen belonging to different classes. We measured the MICs and kill values of two different compound classes on the wild type (WT) and the efflux pump (EP) KO mutants in the presence and absence of the efflux inhibitors verapamil and l-phenylalanyl-l-arginyl-β-naphthylamide (PAβN). Among the pumps studied, the efflux pumps belonging to the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) class, encoded by Rv1218c, and the SMR (small multidrug resistance) class, encoded by Rv3065, appear to play important roles in mediating the efflux of different chemical classes and antibiotics. Efflux pumps encoded by Rv0849 and Rv1258c also mediate the efflux of these compounds, but to a lesser extent. Increased killing is observed in WT M. tuberculosis cells by these compounds in the presence of either verapamil or PAβN. The efflux pump KO mutants were more susceptible to these compounds in the presence of efflux inhibitors. We have shown that these four efflux pumps of M. tuberculosis play a vital role in mediating efflux of different chemical scaffolds. Inhibitors of one or several of these efflux pumps could have a significant impact in the treatment of tuberculosis. The identification and characterization of Rv0849, a new efflux pump belonging to the MFS (major facilitator superfamily) class, are reported.

  2. Efflux pump-mediated benzalkonium chloride resistance in Listeria monocytogenes isolated from retail food.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaobing; Yu, Tao; Liang, Yu; Ji, Shengdong; Guo, Xiaowei; Ma, Jianmin; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-01-18

    In this study, efflux pump-mediated benzalkonium chloride (BC) resistance, including plasmid-encoded (Qac protein family and BcrABC) and chromosome-borne efflux pumps, was investigated in Listeria monocytogenes from retail food in China. Among the 59 L. monocytogenes strains, 13 (22.0%) strains were resistant to BC. The PCR results showed that bcrABC was harbored by 2 of 13 BC resistant strains. However, none of the qac genes were detected among the 59 strains. The bcrABC was absent in both of the plasmid cured strains, indicating that this BC resistance determinant was plasmid-encoded in the two bcrABC-positive strains. In the presence of reserpine, most of the bcrABC-negative strains had decreases in the MICs of BC, suggesting the existence of other efflux pumps and their role in BC resistance. After exposed to reserpine, the reduction in BC MICs was observed in the two cured strains, indicating that efflux pumps located on chromosome was also involved in BC resistance. Our findings suggest that food products may act as reservoirs for BC resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes and plasmid- and chromosome-encoded efflux pumps could mediate the BC resistance of L. monocytogenes, which is especially relevant to the adaption of this organism in food-related environments with frequent BC use.

  3. Modified host cells with efflux pumps

    DOEpatents

    Dunlop, Mary J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2016-08-30

    The present invention provides for a modified host cell comprising a heterologous expression of an efflux pump capable of transporting an organic molecule out of the host cell wherein the organic molecule at a sufficiently high concentration reduces the growth rate of or is lethal to the host cell.

  4. An overview of bacterial efflux pumps and computational approaches to study efflux pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Shirin; Sutton, J Mark; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2016-01-01

    Micro-organisms express a wide range of transmembrane pumps known as multidrug efflux pumps that improve the micro-organism's ability to survive in severe environments and contribute to resistance against antibiotic and antimicrobial agents. There is significant interest in developing efflux inhibitors as an adjunct to treatment with current and next generation of antibiotics. A greater understanding of drug recognition and transport by multidrug efflux pumps is needed to develop clinically useful inhibitors, given the breadth of molecules that can be effluxed by these systems. We summarize some structural and functional data that could provide insights into the inhibition of transport mechanisms of these intricate molecular nanomachines with a focus on the advances in computational approaches.

  5. Properties of AdeABC and AdeIJK Efflux Systems of Acinetobacter baumannii Compared with Those of the AcrAB-TolC System of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Etsuko

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii contains RND-family efflux systems AdeABC and AdeIJK, which pump out a wide range of antimicrobial compounds, as judged from the MIC changes occurring upon deletion of the responsible genes. However, these studies may miss changes because of the high backgrounds generated by the remaining pumps and by β-lactamases, and it is unclear how the activities of these pumps compare quantitatively with those of the well-studied AcrAB-TolC system of Escherichia coli. We expressed adeABC and adeIJK of A. baumannii, as well as E. coli acrAB, in an E. coli host from which acrAB was deleted. The A. baumannii pumps were functional in E. coli, and the MIC changes that were observed largely confirmed the substrate range already reported, with important differences. Thus, the AdeABC system pumped out all β-lactams, an activity that was often missed in deletion studies. When the expression level of the pump genes was adjusted to a similar level for a comparison with AcrAB-TolC, we found that both A. baumannii efflux systems pumped out a wide range of compounds, but AdeABC was less effective than AcrAB-TolC in the extrusion of lipophilic β-lactams, novobiocin, and ethidium bromide, although it was more effective at tetracycline efflux. AdeIJK was remarkably more effective than a similar level of AcrAB-TolC in the efflux of β-lactams, novobiocin, and ethidium bromide, although it was less so in the efflux of erythromycin. These results thus allow us to compare these efflux systems on a quantitative basis, if we can assume that the heterologous systems are fully functional in the E. coli host. PMID:25246403

  6. Targeting efflux pumps to overcome antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann R; Cardno, Tony S; Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Keniya, Mikhail V; Lackovic, Kurt; Monk, Brian C; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antifungal drugs is an increasingly significant clinical problem. The most common antifungal resistance encountered is efflux pump-mediated resistance of Candida species to azole drugs. One approach to overcome this resistance is to inhibit the pumps and chemosensitize resistant strains to azole drugs. Drug discovery targeting fungal efflux pumps could thus result in the development of azole-enhancing combination therapy. Heterologous expression of fungal efflux pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a versatile system for screening for pump inhibitors. Fungal efflux pumps transport a range of xenobiotics including fluorescent compounds. This enables the use of fluorescence-based detection, as well as growth inhibition assays, in screens to discover compounds targeting efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance. A variety of medium- and high-throughput screens have been used to identify a number of chemical entities that inhibit fungal efflux pumps.

  7. An ATP-driven efflux pump is a novel pathogenicity factor in rice blast disease.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, M; Bhargava, T; Hamer, J E

    1999-01-01

    Cells tolerate exposure to cytotoxic compounds through the action of ATP-driven efflux pumps belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of membrane transporters. Phytopathogenic fungi encounter toxic environments during plant invasion as a result of the plant defense response. Here we demonstrate the requirement for an ABC transporter during host infection by the fungal plant pathogen Magnaporthe grisea. The ABC1 gene was identified in an insertional mutagenesis screen for pathogenicity mutants. The ABC1 insertional mutant and a gene-replacement mutant arrest growth and die shortly after penetrating either rice or barley epidermal cells. The ABC1-encoded protein is similar to yeast ABC transporters implicated in multidrug resistance, and ABC1 gene transcripts are inducible by toxic drugs and a rice phytoalexin. However, abc1 mutants are not hypersensitive to antifungal compounds. The non-pathogenic, insertional mutation in ABC1 occurs in the promoter region and dramatically reduces transcript induction by metabolic poisons. These data strongly suggest that M.grisea requires the up-regulation of specific ABC transporters for pathogenesis; most likely to protect itself against plant defense mechanisms. PMID:9927411

  8. Identification of a multidrug efflux pump in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ankita; Mallik, Dhriti; Kar, Debasish; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2016-07-01

    Cell wall impermeability and active efflux of drugs are among the primary reasons for drug resistance in mycobacteria. Efflux pumps are tripartite membrane localized transport proteins that expel drug molecules outside the cells. Several of such efflux pumps are annotated in mycobacteria, but few have been characterized, like MSMEG_2991, a putative efflux pump permease of Mycobacterium smegmatis To substantiate this, we overexpressed MSMEG_2991 protein in Escherichia coli 2443. Expression of MSMEG_2991 elevated the resistance towards structurally unrelated groups of antibiotics. An active antibiotic efflux pump nature of MSMEG_2991 was revealed by assessing the acquisition of ciprofloxacin in the absence and presence of the efflux pump inhibitor, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone, indicating the involvement of proton-motive force (pmf) during the efflux activity. MSMEG_2991 expression elevated biofilm formation in E. coli by 4-fold, keeping parity to some of the earlier reported efflux pumps. In silico analysis suggested the presence of 12 transmembrane helices in MSMEG_2991 resembling EmrD efflux pump of E. coli Based on in vivo and in silico analyses, MSMEG_2991 may be designated as a pmf-mediated multidrug efflux pump protein that expels diverse groups of antibiotics and might as well be involved in the biofilm enhancement.

  9. Role of Efflux Pumps and Topoisomerase Mutations in Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Beilei; McDermott, Patrick F.; White, David G.; Meng, Jianghong

    2005-01-01

    Point mutations in the topoisomerase (DNA gyrase A) gene are known to be associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter. Recent studies have shown that an efflux pump encoded by cmeABC is also involved in decreased susceptibilities to fluoroquinolones, as well as other antimicrobials. Genome analysis suggests that Campylobacter jejuni contains at least nine other putative efflux pumps. Using insertional inactivation and site-directed mutagenesis, we investigated the potential contributions of these pumps to susceptibilities to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and tetracycline in C. jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Insertional inactivation of cmeB resulted in 4- to 256-fold decreases in the MICs of chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and tetracycline, with erythromycin being the most significantly affected. In contrast, inactivation of all other putative efflux pumps had no effect on susceptibility to any of the four antimicrobials tested. Mutation of gyrA at codon 86 (Thr-Ile) caused 128- and 64-fold increases in the MICs of ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid, respectively. The replacement of the mutated gyrA with a wild-type gyrA allele resulted in a 32-fold decrease in the ciprofloxacin MIC and no change in the nalidixic acid MIC. Our findings indicate that CmeABC is the only efflux pump among those tested that influences antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter and that a point mutation (Thr-86-Ile) in gyrA directly causes fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter. These two mechanisms work synergistically in acquiring and maintaining fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter species. PMID:16048946

  10. Natural and Synthetic Polymers as Inhibitors of Drug Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of efflux pumps is an emerging approach in cancer therapy and drug delivery. Since it has been discovered that polymeric pharmaceutical excipients such as Tweens® or Pluronics® can inhibit efflux pumps, various other polymers have been investigated regarding their potential efflux pump inhibitory activity. Among them are polysaccharides, polyethylene glycols and derivatives, amphiphilic block copolymers, dendrimers and thiolated polymers. In the current review article, natural and synthetic polymers that are capable of inhibiting efflux pumps as well as their application in cancer therapy and drug delivery are discussed. PMID:17896100

  11. RND efflux pump and its interrelationship with quorum sensing system.

    PubMed

    Zhibin, Liang; Yumei, Chen; Yufan, Chen; Yingying, Cheng; Lianhui, Zhang

    2016-10-20

    Antibiotic resistance has become a serious concern in treatment of bacterial infections. Overexpression of efflux pump is one of the important mechanisms in antibiotic resistance. In Gram negative bacteria, RND (Resistance-nodulation-cell division) superfamily efflux pump plays a vital important role in antibiotics resistance. Recent research progress unveils an intriguing interrelationship between RND efflux pump and the bacterial quorum sensing system, whose regulation is dependent on small signal molecules. This article reviews the latest findings on the structure and transport mechanism of RND efflux pump, as well as the general features and regulatory mechanisms of quorum sensing, with a special focus on the role and mechanism of quorum sensing system in regulation of RND efflux pump, and the influence of efflux pump on quorum sensing signal transportation. Further investigation of the interrelationship between RND efflux pumps and the bacterial quorum sensing systems is critical for elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms that govern the expression of the RND efflux pumps genes, and may also provide useful clues to overcome the efflux pump mediated antibiotic resistance.

  12. Multidrug efflux pumps in Staphylococcus aureus and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Jang, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is rapidly spreading among bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes a variety of diseases in humans. For the last two decades, bacterial multidrug efflux pumps have drawn attention due to their potential association with clinical multidrug resistance. Numerous researchers have demonstrated efflux-mediated resistance in vitro and in vivo and found novel multidrug transporters using advanced genomic information about bacteria. This article aims to provide a concise summary of multidrug efflux pumps and their important clinical implications, focusing on recent findings concerning S. aureus efflux pumps.

  13. Interspecies signalling: Pseudomonas putida efflux pump TtgGHI is activated by indole to increase antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Fillet, Sandy; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-05-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug efflux pumps are responsible for the extrusion of chemicals that are deleterious for growth. Some of these efflux pumps are induced by endogenously produced effectors, while abiotic or biotic signals induce the expression of other efflux pumps. In Pseudomonas putida, the TtgABC efflux pump is the main antibiotic extrusion system that respond to exogenous antibiotics through the modulation of the expression of this operon mediated by TtgR. The plasmid-encoded TtgGHI efflux pump in P. putida plays a minor role in antibiotic resistance in the parental strain; however, its role is critical in isogenic backgrounds deficient in TtgABC. Expression of ttgGHI is repressed by the TtgV regulator that recognizes indole as an effector, although P. putida does not produce indole itself. Because indole is not produced by Pseudomonas, the indole-dependent antibiotic resistance seems to be part of an antibiotic resistance programme at the community level. Pseudomonas putida recognizes indole added to the medium or produced by Escherichia coli in mixed microbial communities. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that the indole-specific response involves activation of 43 genes and repression of 23 genes. Indole enhances not only the expression of the TtgGHI pump but also a set of genes involved in iron homeostasis, as well as genes for amino acid catabolism. In a ttgABC-deficient P. putida, background ampicillin and other bactericidal compounds lead to cell death. Co-culture of E. coli and P. putida ΔttgABC allowed growth of the P. putida mutant in the presence of ampicillin because of induction of the indole-dependent efflux pump.

  14. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  15. Physiological characterisation of the efflux pump system of antibiotic-susceptible and multidrug-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Martins, A; Spengler, G; Martins, M; Rodrigues, L; Viveiros, M; Davin-Regli, A; Chevalier, J; Couto, I; Pagès, J M; Amaral, L

    2010-10-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes predominates amongst Enterobacteriaceae species that are increasingly reported as producers of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases. Although this mechanism of resistance to beta-lactams is important, other mechanisms bestowing a multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype in this species are now well documented. Amongst these mechanisms is the overexpression of efflux pumps that extrude structurally unrelated antibiotics prior to their reaching their targets. Interestingly, although knowledge of the genetic background behind efflux pumps is rapidly advancing, few studies assess the physiological nature of the overall efflux pump system of this, or for that matter any other, bacterium. The study reported here evaluates physiologically the efflux pump system of an E. aerogenes ATCC reference as well as two strains whose MDR phenotypes are mediated by overexpressed efflux pumps. The activities of the efflux pumps in these strains are modulated by pH and glucose, although the effects of the latter are essentially restricted to pH 8, suggesting the presence of two general efflux pump systems, i.e. proton-motive force-dependent and ABC transporter types, respectively.

  16. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics. PMID:27681908

  17. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Much More Than Antibiotic Resistance Determinants.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Paula; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Reales-Calderon, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Lira, Felipe; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Bernardini, Alejandra; Sanchez, Maria Blanca; Martinez, Jose Luis

    2016-02-16

    Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are antibiotic resistance determinants present in all microorganisms. With few exceptions, they are chromosomally encoded and present a conserved organization both at the genetic and at the protein levels. In addition, most, if not all, strains of a given bacterial species present the same chromosomally-encoded efflux pumps. Altogether this indicates that multidrug efflux pumps are ancient elements encoded in bacterial genomes long before the recent use of antibiotics for human and animal therapy. In this regard, it is worth mentioning that efflux pumps can extrude a wide range of substrates that include, besides antibiotics, heavy metals, organic pollutants, plant-produced compounds, quorum sensing signals or bacterial metabolites, among others. In the current review, we present information on the different functions that multidrug efflux pumps may have for the bacterial behaviour in different habitats as well as on their regulation by specific signals. Since, in addition to their function in non-clinical ecosystems, multidrug efflux pumps contribute to intrinsic, acquired, and phenotypic resistance of bacterial pathogens, the review also presents information on the search for inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps, which are currently under development, in the aim of increasing the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics.

  18. Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps: mechanisms, physiology and pharmacological exploitations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingjing; Deng, Ziqing; Yan, Aixin

    2014-10-17

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) refers to the capability of bacterial pathogens to withstand lethal doses of structurally diverse drugs which are capable of eradicating non-resistant strains. MDR has been identified as a major threat to the public health of human being by the World Health Organization (WHO). Among the four general mechanisms that cause antibiotic resistance including target alteration, drug inactivation, decreased permeability and increased efflux, drug extrusion by the multidrug efflux pumps serves as an important mechanism of MDR. Efflux pumps not only can expel a broad range of antibiotics owing to their poly-substrate specificity, but also drive the acquisition of additional resistance mechanisms by lowering intracellular antibiotic concentration and promoting mutation accumulation. Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps have been increasingly found to be associated with clinically relevant drug resistance. On the other hand, accumulating evidence has suggested that efflux pumps also have physiological functions in bacteria and their expression is subject tight regulation in response to various of environmental and physiological signals. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of drug extrusion, and regulation and physiological functions of efflux pumps is essential for the development of anti-resistance interventions. In this review, we summarize the development of these research areas in the recent decades and present the pharmacological exploitation of efflux pump inhibitors as a promising anti-drug resistance intervention.

  19. [The role of cell wall organization and active efflux pump systems in multidrug resistance of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Hasdemir, Ufuk

    2007-04-01

    Multiple antibiotic resistance of clinically important bacteria are of major concern worldwide. Alterations of drug targets or enzymatic inactivation of antimicrobial agents are the well known mechanisms of antimicrobial drug resistance. Besides these well known mechanisms, recent studies have shown that a further resistance mechanism, active drug efflux, has become increasingly important in the current threat of multidrug resistance. It involves certain bacterial transport proteins which pump out toxic antimicrobial compounds from the cell. Drug efflux pump proteins in bacteria fall into five distinct protein super families [ATP binding cassette super family (ABC), Major facilitator super family (MFS), Small multidrug resistance super family (SMR), Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) super family, Resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) super family] and are mostly encoded by chromosomal genes. Among them, the members of RND protein super family are widely distrubuted in Gram negative bacteria and play siginificant role in both, intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance of these bacteria with very wide substrate specificity. RND type multidrug efflux proteins usually function together with an outer membrane canal protein (OMP) and a membrane fusion protein (MFP) to pump out drugs. AcrAB-TolC of Escherichia coli and MexAB-OprM of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the typical examples of these tripartite systems. They are constitutively expressed in wild type cells and play significant role in intrinsic resistance of these bacteria. However, multidrug resistance which is of major clinical significance, rises as a result of overexpression of these pump systems due to mutations and elevated levels of resistance are recorded to structurally unrelated antimicrobial drugs such as fluoroquinolones, beta-lactams, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, aminoglycosides and toxic compunds. Synthesis of RND type pump proteins are regulated by complex genetic

  20. Regulation of ABC Efflux Transporters at Blood-Brain Barrier in Health and Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Qosa, Hisham; Miller, David S.; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2015-01-01

    The strength of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in providing protection to the central nervous system from exposure to circulating chemicals is maintained by tight junctions between endothelial cells and by a broad range of transporter proteins that regulate exchange between CNS and blood. The most important transporters that restrict the permeability of large number of toxins as well as therapeutic agents are the ABC transporters. Among them, P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 are the utmost studied. These efflux transporters are neuroprotective, limiting the brain entry of neurotoxins; however, they could also restrict the entry of many therapeutics and contribute to CNS pharmacoresistance. Characterization of several regulatory pathways that govern expression and activity of ABC efflux transporters in the endothelium of brain capillaries have led to an emerging consensus that these processes are complex and contain several cellular and molecular elements. Alterations in ABC efflux transporters expression and/or activity occur in several neurological diseases. Here, we review the signaling pathways that regulate expression and transport activity of P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 as well as how their expression/activity changes in neurological diseases. PMID:26187753

  1. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sofia Santos; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of infections caused by multi- or pan-resistant bacteria in the hospital or in the community settings is an increasing health concern. Albeit there is no single resistance mechanism behind multiresistance, multidrug efflux pumps, proteins that cells use to detoxify from noxious compounds, seem to play a key role in the emergence of these multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. During the last decades, experimental data has established their contribution to low level resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria and their potential role in the appearance of MDR phenotypes, by the extrusion of multiple, unrelated compounds. Recent studies suggest that efflux pumps may be used by the cell as a first-line defense mechanism, avoiding the drug to reach lethal concentrations, until a stable, more efficient alteration occurs, that allows survival in the presence of that agent. In this paper we review the current knowledge on MDR efflux pumps and their intricate regulatory network in Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen, responsible from mild to life-threatening infections. Particular emphasis will be given to the potential role that S. aureus MDR efflux pumps, either chromosomal or plasmid-encoded, have on resistance towards different antimicrobial agents and on the selection of drug - resistant strains. We will also discuss the many questions that still remain on the role of each specific efflux pump and the need to establish appropriate methodological approaches to address all these questions. PMID:23569469

  2. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus: an Update.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sofia Santos; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of infections caused by multi- or pan-resistant bacteria in the hospital or in the community settings is an increasing health concern. Albeit there is no single resistance mechanism behind multiresistance, multidrug efflux pumps, proteins that cells use to detoxify from noxious compounds, seem to play a key role in the emergence of these multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. During the last decades, experimental data has established their contribution to low level resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria and their potential role in the appearance of MDR phenotypes, by the extrusion of multiple, unrelated compounds. Recent studies suggest that efflux pumps may be used by the cell as a first-line defense mechanism, avoiding the drug to reach lethal concentrations, until a stable, more efficient alteration occurs, that allows survival in the presence of that agent. In this paper we review the current knowledge on MDR efflux pumps and their intricate regulatory network in Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen, responsible from mild to life-threatening infections. Particular emphasis will be given to the potential role that S. aureus MDR efflux pumps, either chromosomal or plasmid-encoded, have on resistance towards different antimicrobial agents and on the selection of drug - resistant strains. We will also discuss the many questions that still remain on the role of each specific efflux pump and the need to establish appropriate methodological approaches to address all these questions.

  3. Effect of putative efflux pump inhibitors and inducers on the antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Hannula, Minna; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2008-07-01

    The CmeABC efflux pump plays an important role in the antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. The aim of this investigation was to study the effect of putative efflux pump inhibitors, phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamide (PAbetaN) and 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP), as well as the effect of putative efflux pump inducers, sodium salicylate and sodium deoxycholate, on the MIC levels of erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, tetracycline and rifampicin for C. jejuni and C. coli. Our results indicated that susceptibility to erythromycin and rifampicin increased, respectively, 8- to 32- and 8- to 64-fold in the presence of PAbetaN and to a lesser extent in the presence of NMP. Salicylate produced a 2- to 4-fold increase in ciprofloxacin MIC values, whereas little effect was observed in the presence of deoxycholate.

  4. RND multidrug efflux pumps: what are they good for?

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Olivares, Jorge; Martínez, José L

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps are chromosomally encoded genetic elements capable of mediating resistance to toxic compounds in several life forms. In bacteria, these elements are involved in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibiotics. Unlike other well-known horizontally acquired antibiotic resistance determinants, genes encoding for multidrug efflux pumps belong to the core of bacterial genomes and thus have evolved over millions of years. The selective pressure stemming from the use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections is relatively recent in evolutionary terms. Therefore, it is unlikely that these elements have evolved in response to antibiotics. In the last years, several studies have identified numerous functions for efflux pumps that go beyond antibiotic extrusion. In this review we present some examples of these functions that range from bacterial interactions with plant or animal hosts, to the detoxification of metabolic intermediates or the maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  5. RND multidrug efflux pumps: what are they good for?

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Olivares, Jorge; Martínez, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps are chromosomally encoded genetic elements capable of mediating resistance to toxic compounds in several life forms. In bacteria, these elements are involved in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibiotics. Unlike other well-known horizontally acquired antibiotic resistance determinants, genes encoding for multidrug efflux pumps belong to the core of bacterial genomes and thus have evolved over millions of years. The selective pressure stemming from the use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections is relatively recent in evolutionary terms. Therefore, it is unlikely that these elements have evolved in response to antibiotics. In the last years, several studies have identified numerous functions for efflux pumps that go beyond antibiotic extrusion. In this review we present some examples of these functions that range from bacterial interactions with plant or animal hosts, to the detoxification of metabolic intermediates or the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. PMID:23386844

  6. Recent advances toward a molecular mechanism of efflux pump inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Opperman, Timothy J.; Nguyen, Son T.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in Gram-negative pathogens, such as the Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, poses a significant threat to our ability to effectively treat infections caused by these organisms. A major component in the development of the MDR phenotype in Gram-negative bacteria is overexpression of Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND)-type efflux pumps, which actively pump antibacterial agents and biocides from the periplasm to the outside of the cell. Consequently, bacterial efflux pumps are an important target for developing novel antibacterial treatments. Potent efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) could be used as adjunctive therapies that would increase the potency of existing antibiotics and decrease the emergence of MDR bacteria. Several potent inhibitors of RND-type efflux pump have been reported in the literature, and at least three of these EPI series were optimized in a pre-clinical development program. However, none of these compounds have been tested in the clinic. One of the major hurdles to the development of EPIs has been the lack of biochemical, computational, and structural methods that could be used to guide rational drug design. Here, we review recent reports that have advanced our understanding of the mechanism of action of several potent EPIs against RND-type pumps. PMID:25999939

  7. Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulations of Multidrug RND Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V; Collu, Francesca; Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps of the Resistance Nodulation Division (RND) protein super family counts among the main causes for microbial resistance against pharmaceuticals. Understanding the molecular basis of this process is one of the major challenges of modern biomedical research, involving a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review the current state of RND transporter investigation employing molecular dynamics simulations providing conformational samples of transporter components to obtain insights into the functional mechanism underlying efflux pump-mediated antibiotics resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulations of Multidrug RND Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V.; Collu, Francesca; Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps of the Resistance Nodulation Division (RND) protein super family counts among the main causes for microbial resistance against pharmaceuticals. Understanding the molecular basis of this process is one of the major challenges of modern biomedical research, involving a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review the current state of RND transporter investigation employing molecular dynamics simulations providing conformational samples of transporter components to obtain insights into the functional mechanism underlying efflux pump-mediated antibiotics resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24688701

  9. Multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria and their role in antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Richmond, Grace E; Piddock, Laura J V

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria express a plethora of efflux pumps that are capable of transporting structurally varied molecules, including antibiotics, out of the bacterial cell. This efflux lowers the intracellular antibiotic concentration, allowing bacteria to survive at higher antibiotic concentrations. Overexpression of some efflux pumps can cause clinically relevant levels of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative pathogens. This review discusses the role of efflux in resistance of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, the regulatory mechanisms that control efflux pump expression, the recent advances in our understanding of efflux pump structure and how inhibition of efflux is a promising future strategy for tackling multidrug resistance in Gram-negative pathogens.

  10. Structure and function of efflux pumps that confer resistance to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Borges-Walmsley, M Ines; McKeegan, Kenneth S; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutic drugs encompasses a diverse range of biological systems, which all have a human impact. From the relative simplicity of bacterial cells, fungi and protozoa to the complexity of human cancer cells, resistance has become problematic. Stated in its simplest terms, drug resistance decreases the chance of providing successful treatment against a plethora of diseases. Worryingly, it is a problem that is increasing, and consequently there is a pressing need to develop new and effective classes of drugs. This has provided a powerful stimulus in promoting research on drug resistance and, ultimately, it is hoped that this research will provide novel approaches that will allow the deliberate circumvention of well understood resistance mechanisms. A major mechanism of resistance in both microbes and cancer cells is the membrane protein-catalysed extrusion of drugs from the cell. Resistant cells exploit proton-driven antiporters and/or ATP-driven ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters to extrude cytotoxic drugs that usually enter the cell by passive diffusion. Although some of these drug efflux pumps transport specific substrates, many are transporters of multiple substrates. These multidrug pumps can often transport a variety of structurally unrelated hydrophobic compounds, ranging from dyes to lipids. If we are to nullify the effects of efflux-mediated drug resistance, we must first of all understand how these efflux pumps can accommodate a diverse range of compounds and, secondly, how conformational changes in these proteins are coupled to substrate translocation. These are key questions that must be addressed. In this review we report on the advances that have been made in understanding the structure and function of drug efflux pumps. PMID:13678421

  11. Tripartite assembly of RND multidrug efflux pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daury, Laetitia; Orange, François; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Verchère, Alice; Monlezun, Laura; Gounou, Céline; Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle; Pos, Klaas M.; Lambert, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Tripartite multidrug efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria are composed of an inner membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and a periplasmic adaptor protein. They are assumed to form ducts inside the periplasm facilitating drug exit across the outer membrane. Here we present the reconstitution of native Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM and Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC tripartite Resistance Nodulation and cell Division (RND) efflux systems in a lipid nanodisc system. Single-particle analysis by electron microscopy reveals the inner and outer membrane protein components linked together via the periplasmic adaptor protein. This intrinsic ability of the native components to self-assemble also leads to the formation of a stable interspecies AcrA-MexB-TolC complex suggesting a common mechanism of tripartite assembly. Projection structures of all three complexes emphasize the role of the periplasmic adaptor protein as part of the exit duct with no physical interaction between the inner and outer membrane components.

  12. Contribution of efflux pumps, porins, and β-lactamases to multidrug resistance in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Rumbo, C; Gato, E; López, M; Ruiz de Alegría, C; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Martínez-Martínez, L; Vila, J; Pachón, J; Cisneros, J M; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Pascual, A; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGE-ROC-1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58 β-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24 β-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems). We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobial resistance (MICs) with expression of genes encoding chromosomal β-lactamases (AmpC and OXA-51), porins (OmpA, CarO, Omp33, Dcap-like, OprB, Omp25, OprC, OprD, and OmpW), and proteins integral to six efflux systems (AdeABC, AdeIJK, AdeFGH, CraA, AbeM, and AmvA). Overexpression of the AdeABC system (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 30- to 45-fold) was significantly associated with resistance to tigecycline, minocycline, and gentamicin and other biological functions. However, hyperexpression of the AdeIJK efflux pump (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 8- to 10-fold) was significantly associated only with resistance to tigecycline and minocycline (to which the TetB efflux system also contributed). TetB and TetA(39) efflux pumps were detected in clinical strains and were associated with resistance to tetracyclines and doxycycline. The absence of the AdeABC system and the lack of expression of other mechanisms suggest that tigecycline-resistant strains of the PFGE-HUI-1 clone may be associated with a novel resistance-nodulation-cell efflux pump (decreased MICs in the presence of the inhibitor Phe-Arg β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride) and the TetA(39) system.

  13. Contribution of Efflux Pumps, Porins, and β-Lactamases to Multidrug Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Rumbo, C.; Gato, E.; López, M.; Ruiz de Alegría, C.; Fernández-Cuenca, F.; Martínez-Martínez, L.; Vila, J.; Pachón, J.; Cisneros, J. M.; Rodríguez-Baño, J.; Pascual, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGE-ROC-1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58 β-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24 β-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems). We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobial resistance (MICs) with expression of genes encoding chromosomal β-lactamases (AmpC and OXA-51), porins (OmpA, CarO, Omp33, Dcap-like, OprB, Omp25, OprC, OprD, and OmpW), and proteins integral to six efflux systems (AdeABC, AdeIJK, AdeFGH, CraA, AbeM, and AmvA). Overexpression of the AdeABC system (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 30- to 45-fold) was significantly associated with resistance to tigecycline, minocycline, and gentamicin and other biological functions. However, hyperexpression of the AdeIJK efflux pump (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 8- to 10-fold) was significantly associated only with resistance to tigecycline and minocycline (to which the TetB efflux system also contributed). TetB and TetA(39) efflux pumps were detected in clinical strains and were associated with resistance to tetracyclines and doxycycline. The absence of the AdeABC system and the lack of expression of other mechanisms suggest that tigecycline-resistant strains of the PFGE-HUI-1 clone may be associated with a novel resistance-nodulation-cell efflux pump (decreased MICs in the presence of the inhibitor Phe-Arg β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride) and the TetA(39) system. PMID:23939894

  14. Engineering microbial biofuel tolerance and export using efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Mary J; Dossani, Zain Y; Szmidt, Heather L; Chu, Hou Cheng; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D; Hadi, Masood Z; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2011-01-01

    Many compounds being considered as candidates for advanced biofuels are toxic to microorganisms. This introduces an undesirable trade-off when engineering metabolic pathways for biofuel production because the engineered microbes must balance production against survival. Cellular export systems, such as efflux pumps, provide a direct mechanism for reducing biofuel toxicity. To identify novel biofuel pumps, we used bioinformatics to generate a list of all efflux pumps from sequenced bacterial genomes and prioritized a subset of targets for cloning. The resulting library of 43 pumps was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, where we tested it against seven representative biofuels. By using a competitive growth assay, we efficiently distinguished pumps that improved survival. For two of the fuels (n-butanol and isopentanol), none of the pumps improved tolerance. For all other fuels, we identified pumps that restored growth in the presence of biofuel. We then tested a beneficial pump directly in a production strain and demonstrated that it improved biofuel yields. Our findings introduce new tools for engineering production strains and utilize the increasingly large database of sequenced genomes. PMID:21556065

  15. Engineering microbial biofuel tolerance and export using efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Mary J; Dossani, Zain Y; Szmidt, Heather L; Chu, Hou Cheng; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D; Hadi, Masood Z; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2011-05-10

    Many compounds being considered as candidates for advanced biofuels are toxic to microorganisms. This introduces an undesirable trade-off when engineering metabolic pathways for biofuel production because the engineered microbes must balance production against survival. Cellular export systems, such as efflux pumps, provide a direct mechanism for reducing biofuel toxicity. To identify novel biofuel pumps, we used bioinformatics to generate a list of all efflux pumps from sequenced bacterial genomes and prioritized a subset of targets for cloning. The resulting library of 43 pumps was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, where we tested it against seven representative biofuels. By using a competitive growth assay, we efficiently distinguished pumps that improved survival. For two of the fuels (n-butanol and isopentanol), none of the pumps improved tolerance. For all other fuels, we identified pumps that restored growth in the presence of biofuel. We then tested a beneficial pump directly in a production strain and demonstrated that it improved biofuel yields. Our findings introduce new tools for engineering production strains and utilize the increasingly large database of sequenced genomes.

  16. First evidence for the presence of efflux pump in the earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Hackenberger, Branimir K; Velki, Mirna; Stepić, Sandra; Hackenberger, Davorka K

    2012-01-01

    Efflux pumps are transport proteins involved in the extrusion of toxic substrates from cells to the external environment. Activities of efflux pumps have been found in many organisms, however such activity has not been evidenced in earthworms. Adult Eisenia andrei earthworms were exposed to efflux modulators - verapamil (a known inhibitor of efflux pump protein) and dexamethasone (a known inducer of efflux activity) - and the amount of absorbed fluorescent dye rhodamine B was measured. The results showed that verapamil inhibited efflux activity and decreased removal of rhodamine B, whereas dexamethasone induced efflux activity and increased removal of rhodamine B. This is the first evidence of the presence of efflux pump in earthworm Eisenia andrei. Since earthworms are often used as test organisms due to their sensitive reactions towards environmental influences, the discovery of efflux pump activity can contribute to the better understanding of toxicity of certain pollutants.

  17. AdeIJK, a Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Pump Effluxing Multiple Antibiotics in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Damier-Piolle, Laurence; Magnet, Sophie; Brémont, Sylvie; Lambert, Thierry; Courvalin, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We have identified a second resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux pump, AdeIJK, in clinical isolate Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454. The adeI, adeJ, and adeK genes encode, respectively, the membrane fusion, RND, and outer membrane components of the pump. AdeJ belongs to the AcrB protein family (57% identity with AcrB from Escherichia coli). mRNA analysis by Northern blotting and reverse transcription-PCR indicated that the genes were cotranscribed. Overexpression of the cloned adeIJK operon was toxic in both E. coli and Acinetobacter. The adeIJK genes were detected in all of the 60 strains of A. baumannii tested. The two latter observations suggest that the AdeIJK complex might contribute to intrinsic but not to acquired antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter. To characterize the substrate specificity of the pump, we have constructed derivatives of BM4454 in which adeIJK (strain BM4579), adeABC (strain BM4561), or both groups of genes (strain BM4652) were inactivated by deletion-insertion. Determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of these strains and of BM4652 and BM4579, in which the adeIJK operon was provided in trans, indicated that the AdeIJK pump contributes to resistance to β-lactams, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, erythromycin, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, fusidic acid, novobiocin, rifampin, trimethoprim, acridine, safranin, pyronine, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical structure of these molecules suggests that amphiphilic compounds are the preferred substrates. The AdeABC and AdeIJK efflux systems contributed in a more than additive fashion to tigecycline resistance. PMID:18086852

  18. Multidrug Efflux Pumps Attenuate the Effect of MGMT Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tomaszowski, Karl-Heinz; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Kaina, Bernd

    2015-11-02

    Various mechanisms of drug resistance attenuate the effectiveness of cancer therapeutics, including drug transport and DNA repair. The DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a key factor determining the resistance against alkylating anticancer drugs inducing the genotoxic DNA lesions O(6)-methylguanine and O(6)-chloroethylguanine, and MGMT inactivation or depletion renders cells more susceptible to treatment with methylating and chloroethylating agents. Highly specific and efficient inhibitors of the repair protein MGMT were designed, including O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)BG) and O(6)-(4-bromothenyl)guanine (O(6)BTG) that are nontoxic on their own. Unfortunately, these inhibitors do not select between MGMT in normal and cancer cells, causing nontarget effects in the healthy tissue. Therefore, a targeting strategy for MGMT inhibitors is required. Here, we used O(6)BG and O(6)BTG conjugated to β-d-glucose (O(6)BG-Glu and O(6)BTG-Glu, respectively) in order to selectively inhibit MGMT in tumors, harnessing their high demand for glucose. Both glucose conjugates efficiently inhibited MGMT in several cancer cell lines, but with different extents of sensitization to DNA alkylating agents, with lomustine being more effective than temozolomide. We further show that the glucose conjugates are subject to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated efflux, involving P-glycoprotein, MRP1, and BCRP, which impacts the efficiency of MGMT inhibition. Surprisingly, also O(6)BG and O(6)BTG were subject to an active transport out of the cell. We also show that pharmacological inhibition of efflux transporters increases the induction of cell death following treatment with these MGMT inhibitors and temozolomide. We conclude that strategies of attenuating the efflux by ABC transporters are required for achieving successful MGMT targeting.

  19. Complexity in efflux pump control: cross-regulation by the paralogues TtgV and TtgT.

    PubMed

    Terán, Wilson; Felipe, Antonia; Fillet, Sandy; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Krell, Tino; Ruiz, Raquel; Ramos, Juan L; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2007-12-01

    Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E, known for its high tolerance to solvents, possesses three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-type (RND) efflux pumps, namely TtgABC, TtgDEF and TtgGHI, which are involved in the active extrusion of solvents. Expression of the ttgABC and ttgGHI operons was previously shown to be regulated by the adjacently encoded repressors, TtgR and TtgV, respectively. Upstream of the third RND operon, ttgDEF, is located a putative regulator gene, ttgT. In this study, TtgT is shown to bind to the promoter region of the ttgDEF operon, and to be released from DNA in the presence of organic solvents. In vitro studies revealed that TtgV and TtgT bind the same operator sites in both the ttgDEF and the ttgGHI promoters. However, the affinity of TtgV for the ttgDEF operator was higher than that of TtgT, which, together with the fact that the ttgV promoter seems to be almost twice stronger than the ttgT promoter, explains why TtgV takes over in the regulation of the two efflux pump operons. The functional replacement of the cognate, chromosomally encoded TtgT by the plasmid-encoded paralogue TtgV illustrates a new mode of efflux pump regulation of which the physiological relevance is discussed.

  20. [Bacterial efflux pumps - their role in antibiotic resistance and potential inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hricová, Kristýna; Kolář, Milan

    2014-12-01

    Efflux pumps capable of actively draining antibiotic agents from bacterial cells may be considered one of potential mechanisms of the development of antimicrobial resistance. The most important group of efflux pumps capable of removing several types of antibiotics include RND (resistance - nodulation - division) pumps. These are three proteins that cross the bacterial cell wall, allowing direct expulsion of the agent out from the bacterial cell. The most investigated efflux pumps are the AcrAB-TolC system in Escherichia coli and the MexAB-OprM system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, efflux pumps are able to export other than antibacterial agents such as disinfectants, thus decreasing their effectiveness. One potential approach to inactivation of an efflux pump is to use the so-called efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Potential inhibitors tested in vitro involve, for example, phenylalanyl-arginyl-b-naphthylamide (PAbN), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or agents of the phenothiazine class.

  1. The ABC transporter ATR1 is necessary for efflux of the toxin cercosporin in the fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Daub, Margaret E

    2009-02-01

    The Cercospora nicotianae mutant deficient for the CRG1 transcription factor has marked reductions in both resistance and biosynthesis of the toxin cercosporin. We cloned and sequenced full-length copies of two genes, ATR1 and CnCFP, previously identified from a subtractive library between the wild type (WT) and a crg1 mutant. ATR1 is an ABC transporter gene and has an open reading frame (ORF) of 4368bp with one intron. CnCFP encodes a MFS transporter with homology to Cercospora kikuchii CFP, previously implicated in cercosporin export, and has an ORF of 1975bp with three introns. Disruption of ATR1 indicated atr1-null mutants had dramatic reductions in cercosporin production (25% and 20% of WT levels) in solid and liquid cultures, respectively. The ATR1 disruptants also showed moderately higher sensitivity to cercosporin. Constitutive expression of ATR1 in the crg1 mutant restored cercosporin biosynthesis and moderately increased resistance. In contrast, CnCFP overexpression in the mutant did not restore toxin production, however, it moderately enhanced toxin resistance. The results together indicate ATR1 acts as a cercosporin efflux pump in this fungus and plays a partial role in resistance.

  2. Recent Advances in Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) Efflux Pump Inhibitors of Gram-Positive Bacteria S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Handzlik, Jadwiga; Matys, Anna; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on recent achievements in the search for new chemical compounds able to inhibit multidrug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in Gram-positive pathogens. An analysis of the results of the search for new efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) for Gram-positive bacteria, which have been performed over the last decade, indicates that almost all efforts are focused on the NorA (MFS) efflux pump in S. aureus. Considering the chemical structures of the NorA EPIs that have been identified, it can be observed that the most active agents belong to the families of compounds possessing conjugated double bonds, e.g., chalcones, piperine-like compounds, N-cinnamoylphenalkylamides or citral amide derivatives. Indole-, dihydronaphthyl-, 2-chloro-5-bromo-phenyl- or piperidine moieties seem to be profitable for the EPI properties, as well. These results, together with an increasing knowledge about a variety of efflux pumps that are involved in MDR of Gram-positive pathogens underline that further search for new EPIs should pay more attention to develop MDR efflux protein targets, including SMR, MATE, ABC or other members of the MFS family. PMID:27029290

  3. Recent Advances in Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) Efflux Pump Inhibitors of Gram-Positive Bacteria S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Handzlik, Jadwiga; Matys, Anna; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2013-02-05

    The paper focuses on recent achievements in the search for new chemical compounds able to inhibit multidrug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in Gram-positive pathogens. An analysis of the results of the search for new efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) for Gram-positive bacteria, which have been performed over the last decade, indicates that almost all efforts are focused on the NorA (MFS) efflux pump in S. aureus. Considering the chemical structures of the NorA EPIs that have been identified, it can be observed that the most active agents belong to the families of compounds possessing conjugated double bonds, e.g., chalcones, piperine-like compounds, N-cinnamoylphenalkylamides or citral amide derivatives. Indole-, dihydronaphthyl-, 2-chloro-5-bromo-phenyl- or piperidine moieties seem to be profitable for the EPI properties, as well. These results, together with an increasing knowledge about a variety of efflux pumps that are involved in MDR of Gram-positive pathogens underline that further search for new EPIs should pay more attention to develop MDR efflux protein targets, including SMR, MATE, ABC or other members of the MFS family.

  4. Channel-tunnels: outer membrane components of type I secretion systems and multidrug efflux pumps of Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andersen, C

    2003-01-01

    For translocation across the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria, substances have to overcome two permeability barriers, the inner and outer membrane. Channel-tunnels are outer membrane proteins, which are central to two distinct export systems: the type I secretion system exporting proteins such as toxins or proteases, and efflux pumps discharging antibiotics, dyes, or heavy metals and thus mediating drug resistance. Protein secretion is driven by an inner membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter while drug efflux occurs via an inner membrane proton antiporter. Both inner membrane transporters are associated with a periplasmic accessory protein that recruits an outer membrane channel-tunnel to form a functional export complex. Prototypes of these export systems are the hemolysin secretion system and the AcrAB/TolC drug efflux pump of Escherichia coli, which both employ TolC as an outer membrane component. Its remarkable conduit-like structure, protruding 100 A into the periplasmic space, reveals how both systems are capable of transporting substrates across both membranes directly from the cytosol into the external environment. Proteins of the channel-tunnel family are widespread within Gram-negative bacteria. Their involvement in drug resistance and in secretion of pathogenic factors makes them an interesting system for further studies. Understanding the mechanism of the different export apparatus could help to develop new drugs, which block the efflux pumps or the secretion system.

  5. Contribution of the Ade Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type Efflux Pumps to Fitness and Pathogenesis of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Balloy, Viviane; Fiette, Laurence; Chignard, Michel; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Overexpression of chromosomal resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems with broad substrate specificity contributes to multidrug resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii. We have shown that modulation of expression of the structural genes for the efflux systems AdeABC and AdeIJK confers MDR and results in numerous alterations of membrane-associated cellular functions, in particular biofilm formation. However, the contribution of these RND pumps to cell fitness and virulence has not yet been studied. The biological cost of an antibiotic resistance mechanism is a key parameter in determining its stability and dissemination. From an entirely sequenced susceptible clinical isolate, we have generated a set of isogenic derivatives having single point mutations resulting in overexpression of each efflux system or with every pump deleted by allelic replacement. We found that overproduction of the pumps results in a significant decrease in fitness of the bacterial host when measured by competition experiments in vitro. Fitness and virulence were also evaluated in vivo both in systemic and pulmonary infection models in immunocompetent mice. A diminished competitiveness of the AdeABC-overexpressing mutant was observed only after intraperitoneal inoculation, but not after intranasal inoculation, the latter mimicking the most frequent type of human A. baumannii infection. However, in mice infected intranasally, this mutant was more virulent and stimulated an enhanced neutrophil activation in the lungs. Altogether, these data account for the observation that adeABC overexpression is common in MDR A. baumannii frequently found in ventilator-associated pneumonia. PMID:27247231

  6. Role of the Mmr Efflux Pump in Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Liliana; Villellas, Cristina; Bailo, Rebeca; Viveiros, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Efflux pumps are membrane proteins capable of actively transporting a broad range of substrates from the cytoplasm to the exterior of the cell. Increased efflux activity in response to drug treatment may be the first step in the development of bacterial drug resistance. Previous studies showed that the efflux pump Mmr was significantly overexpressed in strains exposed to isoniazid. In the work to be described, we constructed mutants lacking or overexpressing Mmr in order to clarify the role of this efflux pump in the development of resistance to isoniazid and other drugs in M. tuberculosis. The mmr knockout mutant showed an increased susceptibility to ethidium bromide, tetraphenylphosphonium, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Overexpression of mmr caused a decreased susceptibility to ethidium bromide, acriflavine, and safranin O that was obliterated in the presence of the efflux inhibitors verapamil and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Isoniazid susceptibility was not affected by the absence or overexpression of mmr. The fluorometric method allowed the detection of a decreased efflux of ethidium bromide in the knockout mutant, whereas the overexpressed strain showed increased efflux of this dye. This increased efflux activity was inhibited in the presence of efflux inhibitors. Under our experimental conditions, we have found that efflux pump Mmr is mainly involved in the susceptibility to quaternary compounds such as ethidium bromide and disinfectants such as CTAB. The contribution of this efflux pump to isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis still needs to be further elucidated. PMID:23165464

  7. Non-equivalent roles of two periplasmic subunits in the function and assembly of triclosan pump TriABC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Jon W; Nickels, Logan M; Ntreh, Abigail T; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2015-10-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug efflux transporters function in complexes with periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) that enable antibiotic efflux across the outer membrane. In this study, we analyzed the function, composition and assembly of the triclosan efflux transporter TriABC-OpmH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We report that this transporter possesses a surprising substrate specificity that encompasses not only triclosan but the detergent SDS, which are often used together in antibacterial soaps. These two compounds interact antagonistically in a TriABC-dependent manner and negate antibacterial properties of each other. Unlike other efflux pumps that rely on a single MFP for their activities, two different MFPs, TriA and TriB, are required for triclosan/SDS resistance mediated by TriABC-OpmH. We found that analogous mutations in the α-helical hairpin and membrane proximal domains of TriA and TriB differentially affect triclosan efflux and assembly of the complex. Furthermore, our results show that TriA and TriB function as a dimer, in which TriA is primarily responsible for stabilizing interactions with the outer membrane channel, whereas TriB is important for the stimulation of the transporter. We conclude that MFPs are engaged into complexes as asymmetric dimers, in which each protomer plays a specific role.

  8. Multidrug Efflux Pumps at the Crossroad between Antibiotic Resistance and Bacterial Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Martínez, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps can be involved in bacterial resistance to antibiotics at different levels. Some efflux pumps are constitutively expressed at low levels and contribute to intrinsic resistance. In addition, their overexpression may allow higher levels of resistance. This overexpression can be transient, in the presence of an effector (phenotypic resistance), or constitutive when mutants in the regulatory elements of the expression of efflux pumps are selected (acquired resistance). Efflux pumps are present in all cells, from human to bacteria and are highly conserved, which indicates that they are ancient elements in the evolution of different organisms. Consequently, it has been suggested that, besides antibiotic resistance, bacterial multidrug efflux pumps would likely contribute to other relevant processes of the microbial physiology. In the current article, we discuss some specific examples of the role that efflux pumps may have in the bacterial virulence of animals’ and plants’ pathogens, including the processes of intercellular communication. Based in these evidences, we propose that efflux pumps are at the crossroad between resistance and virulence of bacterial pathogens. Consequently, the comprehensive study of multidrug efflux pumps requires addressing these functions, which are of relevance for the bacterial–host interactions during infection. PMID:27708632

  9. Multidrug Efflux Pumps at the Crossroad between Antibiotic Resistance and Bacterial Virulence.

    PubMed

    Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Martínez, José L

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps can be involved in bacterial resistance to antibiotics at different levels. Some efflux pumps are constitutively expressed at low levels and contribute to intrinsic resistance. In addition, their overexpression may allow higher levels of resistance. This overexpression can be transient, in the presence of an effector (phenotypic resistance), or constitutive when mutants in the regulatory elements of the expression of efflux pumps are selected (acquired resistance). Efflux pumps are present in all cells, from human to bacteria and are highly conserved, which indicates that they are ancient elements in the evolution of different organisms. Consequently, it has been suggested that, besides antibiotic resistance, bacterial multidrug efflux pumps would likely contribute to other relevant processes of the microbial physiology. In the current article, we discuss some specific examples of the role that efflux pumps may have in the bacterial virulence of animals' and plants' pathogens, including the processes of intercellular communication. Based in these evidences, we propose that efflux pumps are at the crossroad between resistance and virulence of bacterial pathogens. Consequently, the comprehensive study of multidrug efflux pumps requires addressing these functions, which are of relevance for the bacterial-host interactions during infection.

  10. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily as Targets for Modulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanath; He, Guixin; Kakarla, Prathusha; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranjana, K C; Ranaweera, Indrika; Willmon, T Mark; Barr, Sharla R; Hernandez, Alberto J; Varela, Manuel F

    2016-01-01

    Causative agents of infectious disease that are multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens represent a serious public health concern due to the increasingly difficult nature of achieving efficacious clinical treatments. Of the various acquired and intrinsic antimicrobial agent resistance determinants, integral-membrane multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily constitute a major mechanism of bacterial resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) encompasses thousands of known related secondary active and passive solute transporters, including multidrug efflux pumps, from bacteria to humans. This review article addresses recent developments involving the targeting by various modulators of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps from the major facilitator superfamily. It is currently of tremendous interest to modulate bacterial multidrug efflux pumps in order to eventually restore the clinical efficacy of therapeutic agents against recalcitrant bacterial infections. Such MFS multidrug efflux pumps are good targets for modulation.

  11. Interplay between Three RND Efflux Pumps in Doxycycline-Selected Strains of Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    Biot, Fabrice Vincent; Lopez, Mélanie Monique; Poyot, Thomas; Neulat-Ripoll, Fabienne; Lignon, Sabrina; Caclard, Arnaud; Thibault, François Michel; Peinnequin, Andre; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Valade, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background Efflux systems are involved in multidrug resistance in most Gram-negative non-fermentative bacteria. We have chosen Burkholderia thailandensis to dissect the development of multidrug resistance phenotypes under antibiotic pressure. Methodology/Principal Findings We used doxycycline selection to obtain several resistant B. thailandensis variants. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of a large panel of structurally unrelated antibiotics were determined ± the efflux pump inhibitor phenylalanine-arginine ß-naphthylamide (PAßN). Membrane proteins were identified by proteomic method and the expressions of major efflux pumps in the doxycycline selected variants were compared to those of the parental strains by a quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Doxycycline selected variants showed a multidrug resistance in two major levels corresponding to the overproduction of two efflux pumps depending on its concentration: AmrAB-OprA and BpeEF-OprC. The study of two mutants, each lacking one of these pumps, indicated that a third pump, BpeAB-OprB, could substitute for the defective pump. Surprisingly, we observed antagonistic effects between PAßN and aminoglycosides or some ß-lactams. PAßN induced the overexpression of AmrAB-OprA and BpeAB-OprB pump genes, generating this unexpected effect. Conclusions/Significance These results may account for the weak activity of PAßN in some Gram-negative species. We clearly demonstrated two antagonistic effects of this molecule on bacterial cells: the blocking of antibiotic efflux and an increase in efflux pump gene expression. Thus, doxycycline is a very efficient RND efflux pump inducer and PAßN may promote the production of some efflux pumps. These results should be taken into account when considering antibiotic treatments and in future studies on efflux pump inhibitors. PMID:24386333

  12. Incubation temperature, osmolarity, and salicylate affect the expression of resistance-nodulation-division efflux pumps and outer membrane porins in Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC19606T.

    PubMed

    Bazyleu, Andrei; Kumar, Ayush

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of various environmental conditions on the expression of resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux pumps and outer membrane (OM) porins, two key determinants of Acinetobacter baumannii's intrinsic resistance, an organism known to cause various multidrug resistant infections in immunocompromised individuals. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to analyze the expression of adeB, adeG, and adeJ (genes encoding RND pumps) and 33 kDa, carO, and oprD (genes encoding OM porins) of A. baumannii ATCC19606(T) under different incubation temperatures (30, 37, and 42 °C) and in the presence of high osmolarity and salicylate. Downregulation of all three RND pumps was observed at 30 °C, while downregulation of all three porins tested was observed at increased osmolarity. Downregulation of RND efflux pumps, particularly AdeABC, was consistent with increased susceptibility to antibiotics that are substrates of this pump. Expression of the adeR response regulator gene of the AdeRS system, the activator of the AdeABC pump, was also analyzed. Our work shows that various environmental stress conditions can influence the expression of RND pumps and porins in A. baumannii ATCC19606(T) and thus may play a role in the modulation of its antibiotic resistance.

  13. Antibiotic resistance and multidrug-resistant efflux pumps expression in lactic acid bacteria isolated from pozol, a nonalcoholic Mayan maize fermented beverage.

    PubMed

    Wacher-Rodarte, Maria Del Carmen; Trejo-Muñúzuri, Tanya Paulina; Montiel-Aguirre, Jesús Fernando; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa; Gutiérrez-Lucas, Raúl L; Castañeda-Sánchez, Jorge Ismael; Sainz-Espuñes, Teresita

    2016-05-01

    Pozol is a handcrafted nonalcoholic Mayan beverage produced by the spontaneous fermentation of maize dough by lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are carriers of chromosomal encoded multidrug-resistant efflux pumps genes that can be transferred to pathogens and/or confer resistance to compounds released during the fermentation process causing food spoiling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic sensibility and the transcriptional expression of ABC-type efflux pumps in LAB isolated from pozol that contributes to multidrug resistance. Analysis of LAB and Staphylococcus (S.) aureus ATCC 29213 and ATCC 6538 control strains to antibiotic susceptibility, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) to ethidium bromide were based in "standard methods" whereas the ethidium bromide efflux assay was done by fluorometric assay. Transcriptional expression of efflux pumps was analyzed by RT-PCR. LAB showed antibiotic multiresistance profiles, moreover, Lactococcus (L.) lactis and Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum displayed higher ethidium bromide efflux phenotype than S. aureus control strains. Ethidium bromide resistance and ethidium bromide efflux phenotypes were unrelated with the overexpression of lmrD in L. lactics, or the underexpression of lmrA in L. plantarum and norA in S. aureus. These findings suggest that, moreover, the analyzed efflux pumps genes, other unknown redundant mechanisms may underlie the antibiotic resistance and the ethidium bromide efflux phenotype in L. lactis and L. plantarum. Phenotypic and molecular drug multiresistance assessment in LAB may improve a better selection of the fermentation starter cultures used in pozol, and to control the antibiotic resistance widespread and food spoiling for health safety.

  14. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of efflux pump in Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Gressler, Letícia Trevisan; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Pötter, Luciana; da Silveira, Bibiana Petri; Sangioni, Luis Antônio; de Avila Botton, Sônia

    2014-01-01

    The req_39680 gene, associated to a putative efflux system, was detected in 60% (54/90) of R. equi isolates by PCR. The phenotypic expression of efflux mechanism was verified in 20% of the isolates using ethidium bromide. For the first time, the expression of efflux mechanism was demonstrated in R. equi. PMID:25242956

  15. Chloroquinolines block antibiotic efflux pumps in antibiotic-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes isolates.

    PubMed

    Ghisalberti, Didier; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Baitiche, Milad; Martino, Michèle; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Barbe, Jacques

    2006-06-01

    Efflux mechanisms protect bacterial cells by pumping out toxic compounds and actively contribute to bacterial multidrug resistance. Agents inhibiting efflux pumps are of interest for the control of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Herein we report the effects of new chloroquinoline derivatives that render resistant Enterobacter aerogenes isolates noticeably more susceptible to structurally unrelated antibiotics. In addition, some of these chloroquinolines increase the intracellular concentration of chloramphenicol. Some of the molecules tested in this work are able to inhibit the main efflux pump (AcrAB-TolC), which is involved in E. aerogenes antibiotic resistance.

  16. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS. PMID:25750934

  17. Impact of anatase and rutile titanium dioxide nanoparticles on uptake carriers and efflux pumps in Caco-2 gut epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorier, M.; Brun, E.; Veronesi, G.; Barreau, F.; Pernet-Gallay, K.; Desvergne, C.; Rabilloud, T.; Carapito, C.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Carrière, M.

    2015-04-01

    TiO2 microparticles are widely used in food products, where they are added as a white food colouring agent. This food additive contains a significant amount of nanoscale particles; still the impact of TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) on gut cells is poorly documented. Our study aimed at evaluating the impact of rutile and anatase TiO2-NPs on the main functions of enterocytes, i.e. nutrient absorption driven by solute-liquid carriers (SLC transporters) and protection against other xenobiotics driven by efflux pumps from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family. We show that acute exposure of Caco-2 cells to both anatase (12 nm) and rutile (20 nm) TiO2-NPs induce early upregulation of a battery of efflux pumps and nutrient transporters. In addition they cause overproduction of reactive oxygen species and misbalance redox repair systems, without inducing cell mortality or DNA damage. Taken together, these data suggest that TiO2-NPs may increase the functionality of gut epithelial cells, particularly their property to form a protective barrier against exogenous toxicants and to absorb nutrients.TiO2 microparticles are widely used in food products, where they are added as a white food colouring agent. This food additive contains a significant amount of nanoscale particles; still the impact of TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) on gut cells is poorly documented. Our study aimed at evaluating the impact of rutile and anatase TiO2-NPs on the main functions of enterocytes, i.e. nutrient absorption driven by solute-liquid carriers (SLC transporters) and protection against other xenobiotics driven by efflux pumps from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family. We show that acute exposure of Caco-2 cells to both anatase (12 nm) and rutile (20 nm) TiO2-NPs induce early upregulation of a battery of efflux pumps and nutrient transporters. In addition they cause overproduction of reactive oxygen species and misbalance redox repair systems, without inducing cell mortality or DNA damage. Taken

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of a multidrug efflux pump, SmfY, from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Minato, Yusuke; Chen, Jing; Mizushima, Tohru; Ogawa, Wakano; Kuroda, Teruo; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2007-04-01

    We cloned a gene smfY for multidrug efflux pump from chromosomal DNA of Serratia marcescens using drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli KAM32 as the host, and characterized the pump. E. coli KAM32/pESM42 carrying the smfY showed significantly increased MICs of various drugs including DAPI, norfloxacin, benzalkonium chloride, acriflavine and ethidium bromide, compared with the control. We also detected energy-dependent ethidium and acriflavine efflux due to the SmfY. Sequence analysis revealed that the SmfY was a multidrug efflux pump of the MF (Major Facilitator) superfamily transporters. This is the first report of a multidrug efflux pump belonging to the MF superfamily in S. marcescens.

  19. [Significance of efflux pumps in multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wiercińska, Olga; Chojecka, Agnieszka; Kanclerski, Krzysztof; Rőhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Jakimiak, Bożenna

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug. resistance of bacteria is a serious problem of modern medicine. This resistance largely is a consequence of abuse and improper use of antibacterial substances, especially antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in hospital settings. Multidrug resistance is caused by a number of interacting mechanisms of resistance. Recent studies have indicated that efflux pumps and systems of efflux pumps are an important determinant of this phenomenon. Contribute to this particular RND efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria, which possess a wide range of substrates such as antibiotics, dyes, detergents, toxins and active substances of disinfectants and antiseptics. These transporters are usually encoded on bacterial chromosomes. Genes encoding efflux pumps' proteins may also be carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Such pumps are usually specific to a small group of substrates, but as an additional mechanism of resistance may contribute to the multidrug resistance.

  20. The role played by drug efflux pumps in bacterial multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Chitsaz, Mohsen; Brown, Melissa H

    2017-02-28

    Antimicrobial resistance is a current major challenge in chemotherapy and infection control. The ability of bacterial and eukaryotic cells to recognize and pump toxic compounds from within the cell to the environment before they reach their targets is one of the important mechanisms contributing to this phenomenon. Drug efflux pumps are membrane transport proteins that require energy to export substrates and can be selective for a specific drug or poly-specific that can export multiple structurally diverse drug compounds. These proteins can be classified into seven groups based on protein sequence homology, energy source and overall structure. Extensive studies on efflux proteins have resulted in a wealth of knowledge that has made possible in-depth understanding of the structures and mechanisms of action, substrate profiles, regulation and possible inhibition of many clinically important efflux pumps. This review focuses on describing known families of drug efflux pumps using examples that are well characterized structurally and/or biochemically.

  1. Efflux pump-deficient mutants as a platform to search for microbes that produce antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Udaondo, Zulema; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Roca, Amalia; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Reyes, Fernando; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2015-07-01

    Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E-18 is a strain deficient in the major antibiotic efflux pump (TtgABC) that exhibits an overall increased susceptibility to a wide range of drugs when compared with the wild-type strain. We used this strain as a platform to search for microbes able to produce antibiotics that inhibit growth. A collection of 2400 isolates from soil, sediments and water was generated and a drop assay developed to identify, via growth inhibition halos, strains that prevent the growth of DOT-T1E-18 on solid Luria-Bertani plates. In this study, 35 different isolates that produced known and unknown antibiotics were identified. The most potent inhibitor of DOT-T1E-18 growth was an isolate named 250J that, through multi-locus sequence analysis, was identified as a Pseudomonas sp. strain. Culture supernatants of 250J contain four different xantholysins that prevent growth of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative and fungi. Two of the xantholysins were produced in higher concentrations and purified. Xantholysin A was effective against Bacillus, Lysinibacillus and Rhodococcus strains, and the effect against these microbes was enhanced when used in combination with other antibiotics such as ampicillin, gentamicin and kanamycin. Xantholysin C was also efficient against Gram-positive bacteria and showed an interesting antimicrobial effect against Pseudomonas strains, and a synergistic inhibitory effect with ampicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin.

  2. Efflux pump-deficient mutants as a platform to search for microbes that produce antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Udaondo, Zulema; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Roca, Amalia; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Reyes, Fernando; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E-18 is a strain deficient in the major antibiotic efflux pump (TtgABC) that exhibits an overall increased susceptibility to a wide range of drugs when compared with the wild-type strain. We used this strain as a platform to search for microbes able to produce antibiotics that inhibit growth. A collection of 2400 isolates from soil, sediments and water was generated and a drop assay developed to identify, via growth inhibition halos, strains that prevent the growth of DOT-T1E-18 on solid Luria–Bertani plates. In this study, 35 different isolates that produced known and unknown antibiotics were identified. The most potent inhibitor of DOT-T1E-18 growth was an isolate named 250J that, through multi-locus sequence analysis, was identified as a Pseudomonas sp. strain. Culture supernatants of 250J contain four different xantholysins that prevent growth of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative and fungi. Two of the xantholysins were produced in higher concentrations and purified. Xantholysin A was effective against Bacillus, Lysinibacillus and Rhodococcus strains, and the effect against these microbes was enhanced when used in combination with other antibiotics such as ampicillin, gentamicin and kanamycin. Xantholysin C was also efficient against Gram-positive bacteria and showed an interesting antimicrobial effect against Pseudomonas strains, and a synergistic inhibitory effect with ampicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. PMID:26059350

  3. Evaluation of efflux pumps gene expression in resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in an Iranian referral hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pourakbari, Babak; Yaslianifard, Sahar; Yaslianifard, Somaye; Mahmoudi, Shima; Keshavarz-Valian, Sepideh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections and has an intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Among all the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) pumps of P. aeruginosa, MexAB-OprM is the first efflux pump found to target multiple classes of antibiotics. This study was aimed to evaluate the expression level of genes expressing MexAB-OprM in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: In this study, 45 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from patients admitted to Children’s Medical Center Hospital, an Iranian referral hospital. Disk diffusion and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) methods were used for determination of the patterns of resistance to antibiotics. Real-time PCR was used to investigate the expression level of genes of MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Results: Among 45 resistant PA isolates, the frequency of genes overexpression was as follows: MexA (n=25, 55.5%), MexB (n=24, 53.3%) and OprM (n=16, 35.5%). In addition, in 28 strains (62%) overexpression was observed in one of the studied three genes of MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Conclusion: In our study 28 isolates (62%) had increased expression level of efflux pumps genes, MexAB-OprM. Although the efflux pumps play important roles in increasing the resistance towards different antibiotics but the role of other agents and mechanisms in evolution of resistance should not be ignored. Since the concomitant overproduction of other Mex efflux systems might have additive effects on antibiotic resistance, the co-expressing of a multicomponent efflux pump is recommended. On the other hand, the concomitant overproduction of two Mex pumps might have additive effects on resistance to antibiotic. Therefore co-expressing of Mex efflux systems is recommended. PMID:28210464

  4. Salicylate functions as an efflux pump inducer and promotes the emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni mutants.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhangqi; Pu, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Qijing

    2011-10-01

    Salicylate, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compound, has been shown to increase the resistance of Campylobacter to antimicrobials. However, the molecular mechanism underlying salicylate-induced resistance has not yet been established. In this study, we determined how salicylate increases antibiotic resistance and evaluated its impact on the development of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter mutants. Transcriptional fusion assays, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and immunoblotting assays consistently demonstrated the induction of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump by salicylate. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays further showed that salicylate inhibits the binding of CmeR (a transcriptional repressor of the TetR family) to the promoter DNA of cmeABC, suggesting that salicylate inhibits the function of CmeR. The presence of salicylate in the culture medium not only decreased the susceptibility of Campylobacter to ciprofloxacin but also resulted in an approximately 70-fold increase in the observed frequency of emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants under selection with ciprofloxacin. Together, these results indicate that in Campylobacter, salicylate inhibits the binding of CmeR to the promoter DNA and induces expression of cmeABC, resulting in decreased susceptibility to antibiotics and in increased emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants under selection pressure.

  5. Downregulation of mdr1 and abcg2 genes is a mechanism of inhibition of efflux pumps mediated by polymeric amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Castillo, Amalia I; Sosnik, Alejandro; Mathet, Verónica L

    2012-11-01

    The ability of cells to acquire resistance to multiple pharmaceuticals, namely multidrug resistance (MDR), is often mediated by the over-expression of efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily; for example P-glycoprotein (P-gp or MDR1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP or ABCG2), and multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1. ABCs pump drug molecules out of cells against a concentration gradient, reducing their intracellular concentration. The ability of polymeric amphiphiles to inhibit ABCs as well as the cellular pathways involved in the inhibition has been extensively investigated. This work investigated for the first time the effect of branched poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers (poloxamines) on the levels of mRNA encoding for MDR1, BCRP and MRP1, in a human hepatoma cell line (Huh7). Copolymers with a broad range of molecular weights and hydrophilic-lipophilic balances were assayed. Results confirmed the down-regulation of mdr1 and abcg2 genes. Conversely, the mrp1 gene was not affected. These findings further support the versatility of these temperature- and pH-responsive copolymers to overcome drug resistance in cancer and infectious diseases.

  6. Role of Efflux Pumps in Adaptation and Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes to Benzalkonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Romanova, N. A.; Wolffs, P. F. G.; Brovko, L. Y.; Griffiths, M. W.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, potential mechanisms underlying resistance and adaptation to benzalkonium chloride (BC) in Listeria monocytogenes were investigated. Two groups of strains were studied. The first group consisted of strains naturally sensitive to BC which could be adapted to BC. The second group consisted of naturally resistant strains. For all adapted isolates, there was a correlation between the resistance to BC and ethidium bromide, but this was not the case for the naturally resistant isolates. To investigate the role of efflux pumps in adaptation or resistance, reserpine, an efflux pump inhibitor, was added to the strains. Addition of reserpine to the sensitive and adapted strains resulted in a decrease in the MIC for BC, whereas no such decrease was observed for the resistant strains, indicating that efflux pumps played no role in the innate resistance of certain strains of L. monocytogenes to this compound. Two efflux pumps (MdrL and Lde) have been described in L. monocytogenes. Studies showed low and intermediate levels of expression of the genes encoding the efflux pumps for two selected resistant strains, H7764 and H7962, respectively. Adaptation to BC of sensitive isolates of L. monocytogenes resulted in significant increases in expression of mdrl (P < 0.05), but no such increase was observed for lde for two adapted strains of L. monocytogenes, LJH 381 (P = 0.91) and C719 (P = 0.11). This indicates that the efflux pump Mdrl is at least partly responsible for the adaptation to BC. PMID:16672496

  7. Multidrug efflux pumps as main players in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Corona, Fernando; Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Sánchez, María B; Martínez, José L

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps constitute a group of transporters that are ubiquitously found in any organism. In addition to other functions with relevance for the cell physiology, efflux pumps contribute to the resistance to compounds used for treating different diseases, including resistance to anticancer drugs, antibiotics or antifungal compounds. In the case of antimicrobials, efflux pumps are major players in both intrinsic and acquired resistance to drugs currently in use for the treatment of infectious diseases. One important aspect not fully explored of efflux pumps consists on the identification of effectors able to induce their expression. Indeed, whereas the analysis of clinical isolates have shown that mutants overexpressing these resistance elements are frequently found, less is known on the conditions that may trigger expression of efflux pumps, hence leading to transient induction of resistance in vivo, a situation that is barely detectable using classical susceptibility tests. In the current article we review the structure and mechanisms of regulation of the expression of bacterial and fungal efflux pumps, with a particular focus in those for which a role in clinically relevant resistance has been reported.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of inhibitors of bacterial drug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily.

    PubMed

    Okandeji, Babajide O; Greenwald, Daniel M; Wroten, Jessica; Sello, Jason K

    2011-12-15

    Inhibitors of drug efflux pumps have great potential as pharmacological agents that restore the drug susceptibility of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens. Most attention has been focused on the discovery of small molecules that inhibit the resistance nodulation division (RND) family drug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. The prototypical inhibitor of RND-family efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria is MC-207,110 (Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide), a C-capped dipeptide. Here, we report that C-capped dipeptides inhibit two chloramphenicol-specific efflux pumps in Streptomyces coelicolor, a Gram-positive bacterium that is a relative of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Diversity-oriented synthesis of a library of structurally related C-capped dipeptides via an Ugi four component reaction and screening of the resulting compounds resulted in the discovery of a compound that is threefold more potent as a suppressor of chloramphenicol resistance in S. coelicolor than MC-207,110. Since chloramphenicol resistance in S. coelicolor is mediated by major facilitator superfamily drug efflux pumps, our findings provide the first evidence that C-capped dipeptides can inhibit drug efflux pumps outside of the RND superfamily.

  9. Broad Specificity Efflux pumps and Their Role in Multidrug Resistance of Gram Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance mechanisms reported in Gram-negative bacteria are producing a worldwide health problem. The continuous dissemination of «multi-drug resistant» (MDR) bacteria drastically reduces the efficacy of our antibiotic “arsenal” and consequently increases the frequency of therapeutic failure. In MDR bacteria, the over-expression of efflux pumps that expel structurally-unrelated drugs contributes to the reduced susceptibility by decreasing the intracellular concentration of antibiotics. During the last decade, several clinical data indicate an increasing involvement of efflux pumps in the emergence and dissemination of resistant Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to clearly define the molecular, functional and genetic bases of the efflux pump in order to understand the translocation of antibiotic molecules through the efflux transporter. The recent investigation on the efflux pump AcrB at its structural and physiological level, including the identification of drug affinity sites and kinetic parameters for various antibiotics, may open the way to rationally develop an improved new generation of antibacterial agents as well as efflux inhibitors in order to efficiently combat efflux-based resistance mechanisms. PMID:21707670

  10. Broad-specificity efflux pumps and their role in multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Hiroshi; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2012-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance mechanisms reported in Gram-negative bacteria are causing a worldwide health problem. The continuous dissemination of 'multidrug-resistant' (MDR) bacteria drastically reduces the efficacy of our antibiotic 'arsenal' and consequently increases the frequency of therapeutic failure. In MDR bacteria, the overexpression of efflux pumps that expel structurally unrelated drugs contributes to the reduced susceptibility by decreasing the intracellular concentration of antibiotics. During the last decade, several clinical data have indicated an increasing involvement of efflux pumps in the emergence and dissemination of resistant Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to clearly define the molecular, functional and genetic bases of the efflux pump in order to understand the translocation of antibiotic molecules through the efflux transporter. The recent investigation on the efflux pump AcrB at its structural and physiological levels, including the identification of drug affinity sites and kinetic parameters for various antibiotics, may pave the way towards the rational development of an improved new generation of antibacterial agents as well as efflux inhibitors in order to efficiently combat efflux-based resistance mechanisms.

  11. Identification and functional characterization of Penicillium marneffei pleiotropic drug resistance transporters ABC1 and ABC2.

    PubMed

    Panapruksachat, Siribun; Iwatani, Shun; Oura, Takahiro; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Chindamporn, Ariya; Niimi, Kyoko; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Cannon, Richard D; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    Penicilliosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei is an endemic, AIDS-defining illness and, after tuberculosis and cryptococcosis, the third most common opportunistic infection of AIDS patients in tropical Southeast Asia. Untreated, patients have poor prognosis; however, primary amphotericin B treatment followed by prolonged itraconazole prophylaxis is effective. To identify ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that may play a role in potential multidrug resistance of P. marneffei, we identified and classified all 46 P. marneffei ABC transporters from the genome sequence. PmABC1 and PmABC2 were most similar to the archetype Candida albicans multidrug efflux pump gene CDR1. P. marneffei Abc1p (PmAbc1p) was functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, although at rather low levels, and correctly localized to the plasma membrane, causing cells to be fourfold to eightfold more resistant to azoles and many other xenobiotics than untransformed cells. P. marneffei Abc2p (PmAbc2p) was expressed at similarly low levels, but it had no efflux activity and did not properly localize to the plasma membrane. Interestingly, PmAbc1p mislocalized and lost its transport activity when cells were shifted to 37 °C. We conclude that expression of PmAbc1p in S. cerevisiae confers resistance to several xenobiotics indicating that PmAbc1p may be a multidrug efflux pump.

  12. Cholesterol and ergosterol affect the activity of Staphylococcus aureus antibiotic efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Tintino, S R; Oliveira-Tintino, C D M; Campina, F F; Costa, M S; Cruz, R P; Pereira, R L S; Andrade, J C; Sousa, E O; Siqueira-Junior, J P; Coutinho, H D M; Leal-Balbino, T C; Balbino, V Q

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of ergosterol on steroids and cholesterol efflux pumps in multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. Were used RN4220 harboring plasmid pUL5054, which carries the gene encoding the MsrA macrolide efflux protein; and IS-58, which possesses the TetK tetracycline efflux protein; 1199B resists hydrophilic fluoroquinolones via a NorA-mediated mechanism and wild strain 1199B. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined and the evaluation of possible inhibition of efflux pumps by reduction of MIC. Some of the detrimental effects on bacterial cells can be attributed to the detergent properties of cholesterol and ergosterol on account of their amphipathic structure. Besides the cholesterol did not affect directly the pump structure, a synergism was observed, maybe due the interaction with the cell membrane and interference in the lipid bilayer.

  13. Antibiotic resistance, efflux pump genes and virulence determinants in Enterococcus spp. from surface water systems.

    PubMed

    Molale, L G; Bezuidenhout, Cornelius Carlos

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to report on antibiotic susceptibility patterns as well as highlight the presence of efflux pump genes and virulence genetic determinants in Enterococcus spp. isolated from South African surface water systems. One hundred and twenty-four Enterococcus isolates consisting of seven species were identified. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed a high percentage of isolates was resistant to β-lactams and vancomycin. Many were also resistant to other antibiotic groups. These isolates were screened by PCR, for the presence of four efflux pump genes (mefA, tetK, tetL and msrC). Efflux genes mefA and tetK were not detected in any of the Enterococcus spp. However, tetL and msrC were detected in 17 % of the Enterococcus spp. The presence of virulence factors in the Enterococcus spp. harbouring efflux pump genes was determined. Virulence determinants were detected in 86 % of the Enterococcus spp. harbouring efflux pump genes. Four (asa1, cylA, gel and hyl) of the five virulence factors were detected. The findings of this study have demonstrated that Enterococcus from South African surface water systems are resistant to multiple antibiotics, some of which are frequently used for therapy. Furthermore, these isolates harbour efflux pump genes coding for resistance to antibiotics and virulence factors which enhance their pathogenic potential.

  14. Phytochemicals increase the antibacterial activity of antibiotics by acting on a drug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Ohene-Agyei, Thelma; Mowla, Rumana; Rahman, Taufiq; Venter, Henrietta

    2014-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps confer resistance upon bacteria to a wide range of antibiotics from various classes. The expression of efflux pumps are also implicated in virulence and biofilm formation. Moreover, organisms can only acquire resistance in the presence of active drug efflux pumps. Therefore, efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) are attractive compounds to reverse multidrug resistance and to prevent the development of resistance in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. We investigated the potential of pure compounds isolated from plants to act as EPIs. In silico screening was used to predict the bioactivity of plant compounds and to compare that with the known EPI, phe-arg-β-naphthylamide (PAβN). Subsequently, promising products have been tested for their ability to inhibit efflux. Plumbagin nordihydroguaretic acid (NDGA) and to a lesser degree shikonin, acted as sensitizers of drug-resistant bacteria to currently used antibiotics and were able to inhibit the efflux pump-mediated removal of substrate from cells. We demonstrated the feasibility of in silico screening to identify compounds that potentiate the action of antibiotics against drug-resistant strains and which might be potentially useful lead compounds for an EPI discovery program. PMID:25224951

  15. Overexpression of MexAB-OprM efflux pump in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ya-Ping; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Zhong-Xin; Fang, Ya-Ping; Shen, Ji-Lu

    2016-08-01

    Efflux pump systems are one of the most important mechanisms conferring multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MexAB-OprM efflux pump is one of the largest multi-drug resistant efflux pumps with high-level expression, which is controlled by regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD. This study investigated the role of efflux pump MexAB-OprM in 75 strains of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and evaluated the influence of point mutation of the regulatory genes. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of imipenem and meropenem, with or without MC207110, an efflux pump inhibitor, were determined by agar dilution method to select the positive strains for an overexpressed active efflux pump. Carba NP test and EDTA-disk synergy test were used for the detection of carbapenemase and metallo-β-lactamases, respectively. The gene mexA, responsible for the fusion protein structure, and the reference gene rpoD of the MexAB-OprM pump were amplified by real-time PCR. The quantity of relative mRNA expression was determined simultaneously. By PCR method, the efflux regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD and outer membrane protein OprD2 were amplified for the strains showing overexpression of MexAB-OprM and subsequently analyzed by BLAST. Among the 75 P. aeruginosa strains, the prevalence of efflux pump-positive phenotype was 17.3 % (13/75). Carba NP test and EDTA-disk synergy test were all negative in the 13 strains. PCR assay results showed that ten strains overexpressed the MexAB-OprM efflux pump and were all positive for the regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD. Sequence analysis indicated that of the ten isolates, nine had a mutation (Gly → Glu) at 71st amino acid position in NalC, and eight also had a mutation (Ser → Arg) at 209th position in NalC. Only one strain had a mutation (Thr → Ile) at the 158th amino acid position in NalD, whereas eight isolates had mutations in MexR. In conclusion, overexpression of efflux pump MexAB-OprM plays an important role in

  16. Reviving Antibiotics: Efflux Pump Inhibitors That Interact with AcrA, a Membrane Fusion Protein of the AcrAB-TolC Multidrug Efflux Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Abdali, Narges; Parks, Jerry M.; Haynes, Keith M.; Chaney, Julie L.; Green, Adam T.; Wolloscheck, David; Walker, John K.; Rybenkov, Valentin V.; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C.; Zgurskaya, Helen I.

    2016-10-21

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to human welfare. Inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps (EPIs) are promising alternative therapeutics that could revive activities of antibiotics and reduce bacterial virulence. Identification of new druggable sites for inhibition is critical for developing effective EPIs, especially in light of constantly emerging resistance. We describe new EPIs that interact with and possibly inhibit the function of periplasmic membrane fusion proteins, critical components of efflux pumps that are responsible for the activation of the transporter and the recruitment of the outer-membrane channel. The discovered EPIs bind to AcrA, a component of the prototypical AcrAB-TolC pump, change its structure in vivo, inhibit efflux of fluorescent probes and potentiate the activities of antibiotics in Escherichia coli cells. These findings expand the chemical and mechanistic diversity of EPIs, suggest the mechanism for regulation of the efflux pump assembly and activity, and provide a promising path for reviving the activities of antibiotics in resistant bacteria.

  17. Reviving Antibiotics: Efflux Pump Inhibitors That Interact with AcrA, a Membrane Fusion Protein of the AcrAB-TolC Multidrug Efflux Pump

    DOE PAGES

    Abdali, Narges; Parks, Jerry M.; Haynes, Keith M.; ...

    2016-10-21

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to human welfare. Inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps (EPIs) are promising alternative therapeutics that could revive activities of antibiotics and reduce bacterial virulence. Identification of new druggable sites for inhibition is critical for developing effective EPIs, especially in light of constantly emerging resistance. We describe new EPIs that interact with and possibly inhibit the function of periplasmic membrane fusion proteins, critical components of efflux pumps that are responsible for the activation of the transporter and the recruitment of the outer-membrane channel. The discovered EPIs bind to AcrA, a component of the prototypical AcrAB-TolC pump,more » change its structure in vivo, inhibit efflux of fluorescent probes and potentiate the activities of antibiotics in Escherichia coli cells. These findings expand the chemical and mechanistic diversity of EPIs, suggest the mechanism for regulation of the efflux pump assembly and activity, and provide a promising path for reviving the activities of antibiotics in resistant bacteria.« less

  18. The ABCs of pump selection for mine dewatering

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, S.E.

    2008-10-15

    Choosing the right type of pump for removing water from mine operations can provide significant benefits in overall performance and cost of operation. The article describes the types of pump most commonly used: vertical turbine pumps, electric and hydraulic submersible pumps, horizontal multistage centrifugal pumps and horizontal single-stage centrifugal pumps. It gives points to consider when selecting a suitable pump, including solids handling capacity and acid content, portability, automatic operation, easy maintenance and parts availability. 1 photo.

  19. Efflux Pump Inhibitor Phenylalanine-Arginine Β-Naphthylamide Effect on the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated From Hospitalized Patients in Shahid Motahari Burn Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Ali; Hakemi-Vala, Mojdeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Hallajzadeh, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly troublesome pathogen and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among hospitalized burn patients. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of the AdeABC genes and the role of the efflux pump (s) in the imipenem resistance of A. baumannii strains isolated from burn patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 60 A. baumannii isolates collected from 240 wound samples of burn patients admitted to the Burn Unit of Shahid Motahari Burn hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and broth microdilution according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. The activity of the efflux pump was evaluated using the efflux pump inhibitor, the phenylalanine-arginine Β-naphthylamide (PAΒN). The AdeABC genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Results: In this study, 100% of the isolates were resistant to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, piperacillin, meropenem, co-trimoxazole, and piperacillin/tazobactam; 56 (94%) to gentamicin; 50 (81%) to amikacin; 58 (97%) to imipenem; and 45 (76%) to tetracycline. Additionally,all the isolates were susceptible to colistin. The susceptibility of the strains to imipenem was highly increased in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor such that for 58 (96.6%) of the isolates, the PAΒN reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) by 4- to 64-fold. The adeA and adeB genes were detected in 60 (100%) of the isolates, and the adeC gene was present in 51 (85%). Conclusions: The efflux pump may play a role in antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii isolates. The ability of A. baumannii isolates to acquire drug resistance by the efflux pump mechanism is a concern. Thus, new strategies are required in order to eliminate the efflux transport activity from resistant A. baumannii isolates causing

  20. Calcium induces tobramycin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by regulating RND efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Sharmily; Guragain, Manita; Lenaburg, Dirk L; Kubat, Ryan; Patrauchan, Marianna A

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic multidrug resistant pathogen causing severe chronic infections. Our previous studies showed that elevated calcium (Ca(2+)) enhances production of several virulence factors and plant infectivity of the pathogen. Here we show that Ca(2+) increases resistance of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to tobramycin, antibiotic commonly used to treat Pseudomonas infections. LC-MS/MS-based comparative analysis of the membrane proteomes of P aeruginosa grown at elevated versus not added Ca(2+), determined that the abundances of two RND (resistance-nodulation-cell division) efflux pumps, MexAB-OprM and MexVW-OprM, were increased in the presence of elevated Ca(2+). Analysis of twelve transposon mutants with disrupted RND efflux pumps showed that six of them (mexB, muxC, mexY, mexJ, czcB, and mexE) contribute to Ca(2+)-induced tobramycin resistance. Transcriptional analyses by promoter activity and RT-qPCR showed that the expression of mexAB, muxABC, mexXY, mexJK, czcCBA, and mexVW is increased by elevated Ca(2+). Disruption of mexJ, mexC, mexI, and triA significantly decreased Ca(2+)-induced plant infectivity of the pathogen. Earlier, our group showed that PAO1 maintains intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)in) homeostasis, which mediates Ca(2+) regulation of P. aeruginosa virulence, and identified four putative Ca(2+) transporters involved in this process (Guragain et al., 2013). Here we show that three of these transporters (PA2435, PA2092, PA4614) play role in Ca(2+)-induced tobramycin resistance and one of them (PA2435) contributes to Ca(2+) regulation of mexAB-oprM promoter activity. Furthermore, mexJ, czcB, and mexE contribute to the maintenance of Ca(2+)in homeostasis. This provides the first evidence that Ca(2+)in homeostasis mediates Ca(2+) regulation of RND transport systems, which contribute to Ca(2+)-enhanced tobramycin resistance and plant infectivity in P. aeruginosa.

  1. Anion-coupled Na efflux mediated by the human red blood cell Na/K pump

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The red cell Na/K pump is known to continue to extrude Na when both Na and K are removed from the external medium. Because this ouabain- sensitive flux occurs in the absence of an exchangeable cation, it is referred to as uncoupled Na efflux. This flux is also known to be inhibited by 5 mM Nao but to a lesser extent than that inhibitable by ouabain. Uncoupled Na efflux via the Na/K pump therefore can be divided into a Nao-sensitive and Nao-insensitive component. We used DIDS- treated, SO4-equilibrated human red blood cells suspended in HEPES- buffered (pHo 7.4) MgSO4 or (Tris)2SO4, in which we measured 22Na efflux, 35SO4 efflux, and changes in the membrane potential with the fluorescent dye, diS-C3 (5). A principal finding is that uncoupled Na efflux occurs electroneurally, in contrast to the pump's normal electrogenic operation when exchanging Nai for Ko. This electroneutral uncoupled efflux of Na was found to be balanced by an efflux of cellular anions. (We were unable to detect any ouabain-sensitive uptake of protons, measured in an unbuffered medium at pH 7.4 with a Radiometer pH-STAT.) The Nao-sensitive efflux of Nai was found to be 1.95 +/- 0.10 times the Nao-sensitive efflux of (SO4)i, indicating that the stoichiometry of this cotransport is two Na+ per SO4=, accounting for 60-80% of the electroneutral Na efflux. The remainder portion, that is, the ouabain-sensitive Nao-insensitive component, has been identified as PO4-coupled Na transport and is the subject of a separate paper. That uncoupled Na efflux occurs as a cotransport with anions is supported by the result, obtained with resealed ghosts, that when internal and external SO4 was substituted by the impermeant anion, tartrate i,o, the efflux of Na was inhibited 60-80%. This inhibition could be relieved by the inclusion, before DIDS treatment, of 5 mM Cli,o. Addition of 10 mM Ko to tartrate i,o ghosts, with or without Cli,o, resulted in full activation of Na/K exchange and the pump's electrogenicity

  2. Characterization of the RND family of multidrug efflux pumps: in silico to in vivo confirmation of four functionally distinct subgroups.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Patricia; Molina-Henares, Antonio J; de la Torre, Jesús; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a generalized profile that identifies members of the root-nodulation-cell-division (RND) family of efflux pumps and classifies them into four functional subfamilies. According to Z-score values, efflux pumps can be grouped by their metabolic function, thus making it possible to distinguish pumps involved in antibiotic resistance (group 1) from those involved in metal resistance (group 3). In silico data regarding efflux pumps in group 1 were validated after identification of RND efflux pumps in a number of environmental microbes that were isolated as resistant to ethidium bromide. Analysis of the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 genome identified efflux pumps in all groups. A collection of mutants in efflux pumps and a screening platform consisting of 50 drugs were created to assign a function to the efflux pumps. We validated in silico data regarding efflux pumps in groups 1 and 3 using 9 different mutants. Four mutants belonging to group 2 were found to be more sensitive than the wild-type to oxidative stress-inducing agents such as bipyridyl and methyl viologen. The two remaining mutants belonging to group 4 were found to be more sensitive than the parental to tetracycline and one of them was particularly sensitive to rubidium and chromate. By effectively combining in vivo data with generalized profiles and gene annotation data, this approach allowed the assignment, according to metabolic function, of both known and uncharacterized RND efflux pumps into subgroups, thereby providing important new insight into the functions of proteins within this family.

  3. Abc3-Mediated Efflux of an Endogenous Digoxin-like Steroidal Glycoside by Magnaporthe oryzae Is Necessary for Host Invasion during Blast Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patkar, Rajesh N.; Xue, Yang Kui; Shui, Guanghou; Wenk, Markus R.; Naqvi, Naweed I.

    2012-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae, which causes the devastating rice-blast disease, invades its host plants via a specialized infection structure called the appressorium. Previously, we showed that the ATP-Binding Cassette 3 transporter is necessary for appressorial function (host penetration) in M. oryzae. However, thus far, the molecular basis underlying impaired appressorial function in the abc3Δ remains elusive. We hypothesized that the abc3Δ appressoria accumulate excessive amounts of specific efflux substrate(s) of the Abc3 transporter in M. oryzae. We devised an innovative yeast-based strategy and identified Abc3 Transporter efflux Substrate (ATS) to be a digoxin-like endogenous steroidal glycoside that accumulates to inhibitory levels in M. oryzae abc3Δ appressoria. Exogenous ATS altered cell wall biogenesis and viability in wild-type Schizosaccharomyces pombe, but not in S. pombe expressing M. oryzae Abc3. We show that ATS associates with the Translation Elongation factor Tef2 in M. oryzae, and propose that ATS regulates ion homeostasis during pathogenesis. Excessive ATS accumulation, either intracellularly due to impaired efflux in the abc3Δ or when added exogenously to the wild type, renders M. oryzae nonpathogenic. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the host penetration defects in the abc3Δ are due to aberrant F-actin dynamics as a result of altered Tef2 function and/or ion homeostasis defects caused by excess accumulation of ATS therein. Rather surprisingly, excessive exogenous ATS or digoxin elicited the hypersensitive response in rice, even in the absence of the blast fungus. Lastly, reduced disease symptoms in the inoculated host plants in the presence of excessive digoxin suggest a potential use for such related steroidal glycosides in controlling rice-blast disease. PMID:22927822

  4. BpeAB-OprB, a multidrug efflux pump in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y Y; Tan, T M C; Ong, Y M; Chua, K L

    2004-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial agents, including beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides, and polymyxins. An operon, bpeR-bpeA-bpeB-oprB, which encodes a putative repressor, a membrane fusion protein, an inner membrane protein, and an outer membrane protein, respectively, of a multidrug efflux pump of the resistance-nodulation-division family was identified in B. pseudomallei. The divergently transcribed bpeR gene encodes a putative repressor protein of the TetR family which probably regulates the expression of the bpeAB-oprB gene cluster. Comparison of the MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations of antimicrobials for bpeAB deletion mutant KHW Delta bpeAB and its isogenic wild-type parent, KHW, showed that the B. pseudomallei BpeAB-OprB pump is responsible for the efflux of the aminoglycosides gentamicin and streptomycin, the macrolide erythromycin, and the dye acriflavine. Antibiotic efflux by the BpeAB-OprB pump was dependent on a proton gradient and differs from that by the AmrAB-OprA pump in that it did not efflux the aminoglycoside spectinomycin or the macrolide clarithromycin. The broad-spectrum efflux pump inhibitor MC-207,110 did not potentiate the effectiveness of the antimicrobials erythromycin and streptomycin in B. pseudomallei.

  5. BpeAB-OprB, a Multidrug Efflux Pump in Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Y. Y.; Tan, T. M. C.; Ong, Y. M.; Chua, K. L.

    2004-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to a wide range of antimicrobial agents, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides, and polymyxins. An operon, bpeR-bpeA-bpeB-oprB, which encodes a putative repressor, a membrane fusion protein, an inner membrane protein, and an outer membrane protein, respectively, of a multidrug efflux pump of the resistance-nodulation-division family was identified in B. pseudomallei. The divergently transcribed bpeR gene encodes a putative repressor protein of the TetR family which probably regulates the expression of the bpeAB-oprB gene cluster. Comparison of the MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations of antimicrobials for bpeAB deletion mutant KHWΔbpeAB and its isogenic wild-type parent, KHW, showed that the B. pseudomallei BpeAB-OprB pump is responsible for the efflux of the aminoglycosides gentamicin and streptomycin, the macrolide erythromycin, and the dye acriflavine. Antibiotic efflux by the BpeAB-OprB pump was dependent on a proton gradient and differs from that by the AmrAB-OprA pump in that it did not efflux the aminoglycoside spectinomycin or the macrolide clarithromycin. The broad-spectrum efflux pump inhibitor MC-207,110 did not potentiate the effectiveness of the antimicrobials erythromycin and streptomycin in B. pseudomallei. PMID:15047512

  6. A Combination Fluorescence Assay Demonstrates Increased Efflux Pump Activity as a Resistance Mechanism in Azole-Resistant Vaginal Candida albicans Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Somanon; Sobel, Jack D.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic fungus causing vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). Azole drugs, such as fluconazole, are the most common treatment for these infections. Recently, azole-resistant vaginal C. albicans isolates have been detected in patients with recurring and refractory vaginal infections. However, the mechanisms of resistance in vaginal C. albicans isolates have not been studied in detail. In oral and systemic resistant isolates, overexpression of the ABC transporters Cdr1p and Cdr2p and the major facilitator transporter Mdr1p is associated with resistance. Sixteen fluconazole-susceptible and 22 fluconazole-resistant vaginal C. albicans isolates were obtained, including six matched sets containing a susceptible and a resistant isolate, from individual patients. Using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), 16 of 22 resistant isolates showed overexpression of at least one efflux pump gene, while only 1 of 16 susceptible isolates showed such overexpression. To evaluate the pump activity associated with overexpression, an assay that combined data from two separate fluorescent assays using rhodamine 6G and alanine β-naphthylamide was developed. The qRT-PCR results and activity assay results were in good agreement. This combination of two fluorescent assays can be used to study efflux pumps as resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates. These results demonstrate that efflux pumps are a significant resistance mechanism in vaginal C. albicans isolates. PMID:27431223

  7. Trade-Offs in Improving Biofuel Tolerance Using Combinations of Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Turner, William J; Dunlop, Mary J

    2015-10-16

    Microbes can be engineered to produce next-generation biofuels; however, the accumulation of toxic biofuels can limit yields. Previous studies have shown that efflux pumps can increase biofuel tolerance and improve production. Here, we asked whether expressing multiple pumps in combination could further increase biofuel tolerance. Pump overexpression inhibits cell growth, suggesting a trade-off between biofuel and pump toxicity. With multiple pumps, it is unclear how the fitness landscape is impacted. To address this, we measured tolerance of Escherichia coli to the biojet fuel precursor α-pinene in one-pump and two-pump strains. To support our experiments, we developed a mathematical model describing toxicity due to biofuel and overexpression of pumps. We found that data from one-pump strains can accurately predict the performance of two-pump strains. This result suggests that it may be possible to dramatically reduce the number of experiments required for characterizing the effects of combined biofuel tolerance mechanisms.

  8. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii serum-associated antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn; Dunman, Paul M

    2014-11-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca(2+) channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections.

  9. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii Serum-Associated Antibiotic Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca2+ channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:25114126

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei resistance to antibiotics in biofilm-induced conditions is related to efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Sirijant, Nopphasul; Sermswan, Rasana W; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi

    2016-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, has been found to increase its resistance to antibiotics when growing as a biofilm. The resistance is related to several mechanisms. One of the possible mechanisms is the efflux pump. Using bioinformatics analysis, it was found that BPSL1661, BPSL1664 and BPSL1665 were orthologous genes of the efflux transporter encoding genes for biofilm-related antibiotic resistance, PA1874-PA1877 genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1. Expression of selected encoding genes for the efflux transporter system during biofilm formation were investigated. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR expression of amrB, cytoplasmic membrane protein of AmrAB-OprA efflux transporter encoding gene, was slightly increased, while BPSL1665 was significantly increased during growth of bacteria in biofilm formation. Minimum biofilm inhibition concentration and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) of ceftazidime (CTZ), doxycycline (DOX) and imipenem were found to be 2- to 1024-times increased when compared to their MICs for of planktonic cells. Inhibition of the efflux transporter by adding phenylalanine arginine β-napthylamide (PAβN), a universal efflux inhibitor, decreased 2 to 16 times as much as MBEC in B. pseudomallei biofilms with CTZ and DOX. When the intracellular accumulation of antibiotics was tested to reveal the pump inhibition, only the concentrations of CTZ and DOX increased in PAβN treated biofilm. Taken together, these results indicated that BPSL1665, a putative precursor of the efflux pump gene, might be related to the adaptation of B. pseudomallei in biofilm conditions. Inhibition of efflux pumps may lead to a decrease of resistance to CTZ and DOX in biofilm cells.

  11. The antibiotic resistance arrow of time: efflux pump induction is a general first step in the evolution of mycobacterial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Schmalstieg, Aurelia M; Srivastava, Shashikant; Belkaya, Serkan; Deshpande, Devyani; Meek, Claudia; Leff, Richard; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2012-09-01

    We hypothesize that low-level efflux pump expression is the first step in the development of high-level drug resistance in mycobacteria. We performed 28-day azithromycin dose-effect and dose-scheduling studies in our hollow-fiber model of disseminated Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex. Both microbial kill and resistance emergence were most closely linked to the within-macrophage area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)/MIC ratio. Quantitative PCR revealed that subtherapeutic azithromycin exposures over 3 days led to a 56-fold increase in expression of MAV_3306, which encodes a putative ABC transporter, and MAV_1406, which encodes a putative major facilitator superfamily pump, in M. avium. By day 7, a subpopulation of M. avium with low-level resistance was encountered and exhibited the classic inverted U curve versus AUC/MIC ratios. The resistance was abolished by an efflux pump inhibitor. While the maximal microbial kill started to decrease after day 7, a population with high-level azithromycin resistance appeared at day 28. This resistance could not be reversed by efflux pump inhibitors. Orthologs of pumps encoded by MAV_3306 and MAV_1406 were identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium abscessus, and Mycobacterium ulcerans. All had highly conserved protein secondary structures. We propose that induction of several efflux pumps is the first step in a general pathway to drug resistance that eventually leads to high-level chromosomal-mutation-related resistance in mycobacteria as ordered events in an "antibiotic resistance arrow of time."

  12. Chloramphenicol and expression of multidrug efflux pump in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Ghisalberti, Didier; Masi, Muriel; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Chevalier, Jacqueline

    2005-03-25

    Chloramphenicol has been reported to act as an inducer of the multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli. A resistant variant able to grow on plates containing 64 microg/ml chloramphenicol was obtained from the Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048-type strain. Chloramphenicol resistance was due to an active efflux of this antibiotic and it was associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones and tetracycline, but not to aminoglycoside or beta-lactam antibiotics. MDR in the chloramphenicol-resistant variant is linked to the overexpression of the major AcrAB-TolC efflux system. This overexpression seems unrelated to the global Mar and the local AcrR regulatory pathways.

  13. [Investigation of mutations in transcription factors of efflux pump genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans strains overexpressing the efflux pumps].

    PubMed

    Kalkandelen, Kemal Turan; Doluca Dereli, Mine

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, a significant rise in the number of immunocompromised patients have been observed due to cancer chemotherapy, organ transplantation and HIV infection. As a result of this, the frequency of Candida albicans infections in the clinics have been increased. Fluconazole, as being a well tolerated, easy to use drug with minor side effects, is often the first choice antifungal agent for this patient group, both for therapy and prophylaxis. Especially the long-term use of this drug, causes the selection of resistant strains and leads to the development of fluconazole resistance. The most frequently observed resistance mechanism against fluconazole in C.albicans strains is the transportation of the drug out of the cell via efflux pumps. The efflux pumps mainly involved are Cdr1, Cdr2 ve Mdr1 encoded by CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 genes. It has been shown that, the overexpression of these efflux pump genes was caused by functional mutations in TAC1 and MRR1 genes which encode the transcription factors Tac1p and Mrr1p. This study was aimed to analyze TAC1 and MRR1 genes of 15 C.albicans strains which consist of six fluconazole-susceptible, four susceptible with trailing effect and five fluconazole-resistant isolates plus one resistant strain (DSY292), known to overexpress Mdr1 efflux pump due to P683H mutation in MRR1 gene and one fluconazole-sensitive ATCC 14053 C.albicans strain in terms of mutations with polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. Two of the fluconazole-resistant isolates which had overexpression of Cdr1 and Cdr2 pumps known to have overexpression of TAC1 gene, revealed R673Q and A736V mutations. A P683H point mutation, that overexpressed the Mdr1 pump was detected in a fluconazole-resistant strain, which was known to cause MRR1 overexpression. In conclusion, mutations in the transcription factors of the efflux pump genes may play an important role in the resistance against fluconazole among our selected C.albicans strains.

  14. Functional and Genetic Characterization of the Tap Efflux Pump in Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Virginie; Dainese, Elisa; Martín, Carlos; Thompson, Charles J.; De Rossi, Edda; Manganelli, Riccardo; Aínsa, José A.

    2012-01-01

    Efflux pumps extrude a wide variety of chemically unrelated compounds conferring multidrug resistance and participating in numerous physiological processes. Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses many efflux pumps, and their roles in drug resistance and physiology are actively investigated. In this work we found that tap mutant cells showed changes in morphology and a progressive loss of viability upon subcultivation in liquid medium. Transcriptome analysis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG revealed that disruption of the Rv1258c gene, encoding the Tap efflux pump, led to an extensive change in gene expression patterns during stationary phase, with no changes during exponential growth. In stationary phase, Tap inactivation triggered a general stress response and led to a general repression of genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis, in particular the formation of the peptidoglycan; this suggested the accumulation of an unknown Tap substrate that reaches toxic concentrations during stationary phase. We also found that both disruption and overexpression of tap altered susceptibility to many clinically approved antibiotics in M. bovis BCG. Acriflavine and tetracycline accumulation assays and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) potentiation experiments demonstrated that this phenotype was due to an active efflux mechanism. These findings emphasize the important role of the Tap efflux pump in bacterial physiology and intrinsic drug resistance. PMID:22232275

  15. Efflux Pump Gene Expression in Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi; Wei, Jianhao; Zhao, Li-li; Zhao, Xiuqin; Lu, Jianxin; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) are the two most effective drugs in tuberculosis therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance to these two drugs is essential to quickly diagnose multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis. Nine clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates resistant to only INH and RIF and 10 clinical pan-sensitive isolates were included to evaluate the expression of 20 putative drug efflux pump genes and sequence mutations in rpoB (RIF), katG (INH), the inhA promoter (INH), and oxyR-ahpC (INH). Nine and three MDR isolates were induced to overexpress efflux pump genes by INH and RIF, respectively. Eight and two efflux pump genes were induced to overexpress by INH and RIF in MDR isolates, respectively. drrA, drrB, efpA, jefA (Rv2459), mmr, Rv0849, Rv1634, and Rv1250 were overexpressed under INH or RIF stress. Most efflux pump genes were overexpressed under INH stress in a MDR isolates that carried the wild-type katG, inhA, and oxyR-ahpC associated with INH resistance than in those that carried mutations. The expression levels of 11 genes (efpA, Rv0849, Rv1250, P55 (Rv1410c), Rv1634, Rv2994, stp, Rv2459, pstB, drrA, and drrB) without drug inducement were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in nine MDR isolates than in 10 pan-sensitive isolates. In conclusion, efflux pumps may play an important role in INH acquired resistance in MDR M. tuberculosis, especially in those strains having no mutations in genes associated with INH resistance; basal expression levels of some efflux pump genes are higher in MDR isolates than in pan-sensitive isolates and the basal expressional differences may be helpful to diagnose and treat resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25695504

  16. Efflux pump gene expression in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Li, Guilian; Zhang, Jingrui; Guo, Qian; Jiang, Yi; Wei, Jianhao; Zhao, Li-li; Zhao, Xiuqin; Lu, Jianxin; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) are the two most effective drugs in tuberculosis therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance to these two drugs is essential to quickly diagnose multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis. Nine clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates resistant to only INH and RIF and 10 clinical pan-sensitive isolates were included to evaluate the expression of 20 putative drug efflux pump genes and sequence mutations in rpoB (RIF), katG (INH), the inhA promoter (INH), and oxyR-ahpC (INH). Nine and three MDR isolates were induced to overexpress efflux pump genes by INH and RIF, respectively. Eight and two efflux pump genes were induced to overexpress by INH and RIF in MDR isolates, respectively. drrA, drrB, efpA, jefA (Rv2459), mmr, Rv0849, Rv1634, and Rv1250 were overexpressed under INH or RIF stress. Most efflux pump genes were overexpressed under INH stress in a MDR isolates that carried the wild-type katG, inhA, and oxyR-ahpC associated with INH resistance than in those that carried mutations. The expression levels of 11 genes (efpA, Rv0849, Rv1250, P55 (Rv1410c), Rv1634, Rv2994, stp, Rv2459, pstB, drrA, and drrB) without drug inducement were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in nine MDR isolates than in 10 pan-sensitive isolates. In conclusion, efflux pumps may play an important role in INH acquired resistance in MDR M. tuberculosis, especially in those strains having no mutations in genes associated with INH resistance; basal expression levels of some efflux pump genes are higher in MDR isolates than in pan-sensitive isolates and the basal expressional differences may be helpful to diagnose and treat resistant tuberculosis.

  17. Resistance-Nodulation-Division Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Gram-Negative Bacteria: Role in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Dinesh M; Kumar, Ayush

    2013-03-18

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) efflux pumps are one of the most important determinants of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Gram-negative bacteria. With an ever increasing number of Gram-negative clinical isolates exhibiting MDR phenotypes as a result of the activity of RND pumps, it is clear that the design of novel effective clinical strategies against such pathogens must be grounded in a better understanding of these pumps, including their physiological roles. To this end, recent evidence suggests that RND pumps play an important role in the virulence of Gram-negative pathogens. In this review, we discuss the important role RND efflux pumps play in different facets of virulence including colonization, evasion of host defense mechanisms, and biofilm formation. These studies provide key insights that may ultimately be applied towards strategies used in the design of effective therapeutics against MDR Gram negative bacterial pathogens.

  18. Indole-Induced Activities of β-Lactamase and Efflux Pump Confer Ampicillin Resistance in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jisun; Shin, Bora; Park, Chulwoo; Park, Woojun

    2017-01-01

    Indole, which is widespread in microbial communities, has received attention because of its effects on bacterial physiology. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can acquire ampicillin (Amp) resistance during growth on indole-Amp agar. Transcriptome, mutant, and inhibitor studies have suggested that Amp resistance induced by indole can be attributed to increased gene expression of ttgAB encoding two genes of RND-type multidrug efflux operons and an ampC encoding β-lactamase. Expression, enzyme activities, and mutational analyses indicated that AmpC β-lactamase is important for acquiring Amp resistance of P. putida in the presence of indole. Here, we show, for the first time, that volatile indole increased Amp-resistant cells. Consistent with results of the volatile indole assay, a low concentration of indole in liquid culture promoted growth initially, but led to mutagenesis after indole was depleted, which could not be observed at high indole concentrations. Interestingly, ttgAB and ampC gene expression levels correlate with the concentration of indole, which might explain the low number of Amp-mutated cells in high indole concentrations. The expression levels of genes involved in mutagenesis, namely rpoS, recA, and mutS, were also modulated by indole. Our data indicates that indole reduces Amp-induced heterogeneity by promoting expression of TtgABC or MexAB-OprM efflux pumps and the indole-induced β-lactamase in P. putida and P. aeruginosa. PMID:28352264

  19. Anion-coupled Na efflux mediated by the human red blood cell Na/K pump

    SciTech Connect

    Dissing, S.; Hoffman, J.F. )

    1990-07-01

    The red cell Na/K pump is known to continue to extrude Na when both Na and K are removed from the external medium. Because this ouabain-sensitive flux occurs in the absence of an exchangeable cation, it is referred to as uncoupled Na efflux. This flux is also known to be inhibited by 5 mM Nao but to a lesser extent than that inhibitable by ouabain. Uncoupled Na efflux via the Na/K pump therefore can be divided into a Nao-sensitive and Nao-insensitive component. We used DIDS-treated, SO4-equilibrated human red blood cells suspended in HEPES-buffered (pHo 7.4) MgSO4 or (Tris)2SO4, in which we measured 22Na efflux, 35SO4 efflux, and changes in the membrane potential with the fluorescent dye, diS-C3 (5). A principal finding is that uncoupled Na efflux occurs electroneurally, in contrast to the pump's normal electrogenic operation when exchanging Nai for Ko. This electroneutral uncoupled efflux of Na was found to be balanced by an efflux of cellular anions. (We were unable to detect any ouabain-sensitive uptake of protons, measured in an unbuffered medium at pH 7.4 with a Radiometer pH-STAT.) The Nao-sensitive efflux of Nai was found to be 1.95 +/- 0.10 times the Nao-sensitive efflux of (SO4)i, indicating that the stoichiometry of this cotransport is two Na+ per SO4=, accounting for 60-80% of the electroneutral Na efflux. The remainder portion, that is, the ouabain-sensitive Nao-insensitive component, has been identified as PO4-coupled Na transport and is the subject of a separate paper. That uncoupled Na efflux occurs as a cotransport with anions is supported by the result, obtained with resealed ghosts, that when internal and external SO4 was substituted by the impermeant anion, tartrate i,o, the efflux of Na was inhibited 60-80%. This inhibition could be relieved by the inclusion, before DIDS treatment, of 5 mM Cli,o.

  20. A Simple Method for Assessment of MDR Bacteria for Over-Expressed Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P; Viveiros, Miguel; Couto, Isabel; Fanning, Séamus; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Amaral, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    It is known that bacteria showing a multi-drug resistance phenotype use several mechanisms to overcome the action of antibiotics. As a result, this phenotype can be a result of several mechanisms or a combination of thereof. The main mechanisms of antibiotic resistance are: mutations in target genes (such as DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV); over-expression of efflux pumps; changes in the cell envelope; down regulation of membrane porins, and modified lipopolysaccharide component of the outer cell membrane (in the case of Gram-negative bacteria). In addition, adaptation to the environment, such as quorum sensing and biofilm formation can also contribute to bacterial persistence. Due to the rapid emergence and spread of bacterial isolates showing resistance to several classes of antibiotics, methods that can rapidly and efficiently identify isolates whose resistance is due to active efflux have been developed. However, there is still a need for faster and more accurate methodologies. Conventional methods that evaluate bacterial efflux pump activity in liquid systems are available. However, these methods usually use common efflux pump substrates, such as ethidium bromide or radioactive antibiotics and therefore, require specialized instrumentation, which is not available in all laboratories. In this review, we will report the results obtained with the Ethidium Bromide-agar Cartwheel method. This is an easy, instrument-free, agar based method that has been modified to afford the simultaneous evaluation of as many as twelve bacterial strains. Due to its simplicity it can be applied to large collections of bacteria to rapidly screen for multi-drug resistant isolates that show an over-expression of their efflux systems. The principle of the method is simple and relies on the ability of the bacteria to expel a fluorescent molecule that is substrate for most efflux pumps, ethidium bromide. In this approach, the higher the concentration of ethidium bromide required to

  1. Enhancing isoprenoid production through systematically assembling and modulating efflux pumps in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Feng; Xiong, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Yong

    2013-09-01

    Enhancement of the cellular exportation of heterologous compounds is an important aspect to improve the product yield in microbial cell factory. Efflux pumps can expel various intra- or extra-cellular substances out of microbial hosts and increase the cellular tolerance. Thus in this study, by using the hydrophobic sesquiterpene (amorphadiene) and diterpene (kaurene) as two model compounds, we attempted to improve isoprenoid production through systematically engineering the efflux pumps in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The pleiotropic resistant pumps, AcrAB-TolC, MdtEF-TolC from E. coli and heterologous MexAB-OprM pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were overexpressed, assembled, and finely modulated. We found that overexpression of AcrB and TolC components can effectively enhance the specific yield of amorphadiene and kaurene, e.g., 31 and 37 % improvement for amorphadiene compared with control, respectively. The heterologous MexB component can enhance kaurene production with 70 % improvement which is more effective than TolC and AcrB. The results suggest that the three components of tripartite efflux pumps play varied effect to enhance isoprenoid production. Considering the highly organized structure of efflux pumps and importance of components interaction, various component combinations were constructed and the copy number of key components AcrB and TolC was finely modulated as well. The results exhibit that the combination TolC and TolC and AcrB improved the specific yield of amorphadiene with 118 %, and AcrA and TolC and AcrB improved that of kaurene with 104 %. This study indicates that assembling and finely modulating efflux pumps is an effective strategy to improve the production of heterologous compounds in E. coli.

  2. Action of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol on Staphylococcus aureus efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Tintino, Saulo R.; Morais-Tintino, Cícera D.; Campina, Fábia F.; Pereira, Raimundo L.; Costa, Maria do S.; Braga, Maria Flaviana B.M.; Limaverde, Paulo W.; Andrade, Jacqueline C.; Siqueira-Junior, José P.; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Balbino, Valdir Q.; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C.; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol is one the most abundant and biologically active isoforms of vitamin E. This compound is a potent antioxidant and one of most studied isoforms of vitamin E. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is an important nutrient for calcium homeostasis and bone health, that has also been recognized as a potent modulator of the immune response. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most important causative agent of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of alpha-tocopherol and cholecalciferol on both S. aureus and multidrug resistant S. aureus efflux pumps. The RN4220 strain has the plasmid pUL5054 that is the carrier of gene that encodes the macrolide resistance protein (an efflux pump) MsrA; the IS-58 strain possesses the TetK tetracycline efflux protein in its genome and the 1199B strain resists to hydrophilic fluoroquinolones via a NorA-mediated mechanism. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and a possible inhibition of efflux pumps was associated to a reduction of the MIC. In this work we observed that in the presence of the treatments there was a decrease in the MIC for the RN4220 and IS-58 strains, suggesting that the substances presented an inhibitory effect on the efflux pumps of these strains. Significant efforts have been done to identify efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) from natural sources and, therefore, the antibacterial properties of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol might be attributed to a direct effect on the bacterial cell depending on their amphipathic structure. PMID:27298617

  3. Action of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol on Staphylococcus aureus efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Tintino, Saulo R; Morais-Tintino, Cícera D; Campina, Fábia F; Pereira, Raimundo L; Costa, Maria do S; Braga, Maria Flaviana B M; Limaverde, Paulo W; Andrade, Jacqueline C; Siqueira-Junior, José P; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Balbino, Valdir Q; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol is one the most abundant and biologically active isoforms of vitamin E. This compound is a potent antioxidant and one of most studied isoforms of vitamin E. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is an important nutrient for calcium homeostasis and bone health, that has also been recognized as a potent modulator of the immune response. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most important causative agent of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of alpha-tocopherol and cholecalciferol on both S. aureus and multidrug resistant S. aureus efflux pumps. The RN4220 strain has the plasmid pUL5054 that is the carrier of gene that encodes the macrolide resistance protein (an efflux pump) MsrA; the IS-58 strain possesses the TetK tetracycline efflux protein in its genome and the 1199B strain resists to hydrophilic fluoroquinolones via a NorA-mediated mechanism. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and a possible inhibition of efflux pumps was associated to a reduction of the MIC. In this work we observed that in the presence of the treatments there was a decrease in the MIC for the RN4220 and IS-58 strains, suggesting that the substances presented an inhibitory effect on the efflux pumps of these strains. Significant efforts have been done to identify efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) from natural sources and, therefore, the antibacterial properties of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol might be attributed to a direct effect on the bacterial cell depending on their amphipathic structure.

  4. Rethinking Drug Treatment Approaches in ALS by Targeting ABC Efflux Transporters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    disease  progression,  and  found  that   chronic  treatment  with  either   the...down   disease  progression  as  reported.     In  addition  to  evaluating  the  toxicity  of   chronic  Elacridar...far underestimated issue of disease -driven pharmacoresistance mediated by the multi-drug resistance (mdr) efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein

  5. Use and engineering of efflux pumps for the export of olefins in microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2016-07-14

    The scope of the project is to investigate efflux pump systems in engineered host microorganisms, such as E. coli, and develop a pump engineered to export a target compound. To initiate the project in coordination with other TOTAL driven projects, the first target compound to be studied was 1-hexene. However, we were investigating other chemicals as Styrene. The main goal of the project was to generate a set of optimized efflux pump systems for microorganisms (E. coli and Streptomyces or other host) engineered to contain biosynthetic pathways to export large titers of target compounds that are toxic (or accumulate and push back biosynthesis) to the host cell. An optimized microbial host will utilize specific and efficient cell wall located pumps to extrude harmful target compounds and enable greater production of these compounds.

  6. Efflux pump-mediated antibiotics resistance: insights from computational structural biology.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nadine; Raunest, Martin; Schmidt, Thomas H; Koch, Dennis C; Kandt, Christian

    2014-03-01

    The continuous rise of bacterial resistance against formerly effective pharmaceuticals is a major challenge for biomedical research. Since the first computational studies published seven years ago the simulation-based investigation of antibiotics resistance mediated by multidrug efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division (RND) protein super family has grown into a vivid field of research. Here we review the employment of molecular dynamics computer simulations to investigate RND efflux pumps focusing on our group's recent contributions to this field studying questions of energy conversion and substrate transport in the inner membrane antiporter AcrB in Escherichia coli as well as access regulation and gating mechanism in the outer membrane efflux ducts TolC and OprM in E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  7. The Contribution of Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms in Clinical Burkholderia cepacia Complex Isolates: An Emphasis on Efflux Pump Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Sung-Pin; Tsai, Wan-Chi; Liang, Chih-Yuan; Lin, Yin-Shiou; Huang, Jun-Wei; Chang, Chung-Yu; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Lu, Po-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Due to the limited information of the contribution of various antibiotic resistance mechanisms in clinical Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates, Antibiotic resistance mechanisms, including integron analysis, identification of quinolone resistance-determining region mutations, measurement of efflux pump activity, and sequence analysis of efflux pump regulators, were investigated in 66 clinical B. cepacia complex isolates. Species were identified via recA-RFLP and MALDI-TOF. Four genomovars were identified by recA-RFLP. B. cenocepacia (genomovar III) was the most prevalent genomovar (90.1%). Most isolates (60/66, 90.9%) were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF analysis. Clonal relatedness determined by PFGE analysis revealed 30 pulsotypes, including two major pulsotypes that comprised 22.7% and 18.2% of the isolates, respectively. Seventeen (25.8%) isolates harboured class 1 integron with various combinations of resistance genes. Among six levofloxacin-resistant isolates, five had single-base substitutions in the gyrA gene and three demonstrated efflux pump activities. Among the 42 isolates exhibiting resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent, 94.4% ceftazidime-resistant isolates (17/18) and 72.7% chloramphenicol-resistant isolates (16/22) demonstrated efflux pump activity. Quantitation of efflux pump RNA level and sequence analysis revealed that over-expression of the RND-3 efflux pump was attributable to specific mutations in the RND-3 efflux pump regulator gene. In conclusion, high-level expression of efflux pumps is prevalent in B. cepacia complex isolates. Mutations in the RND-3 efflux pump regulator gene are the major cause of efflux pump activity, resulting in the resistance to antibiotics in clinical B. cepacia complex isolates. PMID:25153194

  8. The contribution of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in clinical Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates: an emphasis on efflux pump activity.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Sung-Pin; Tsai, Wan-Chi; Liang, Chih-Yuan; Lin, Yin-Shiou; Huang, Jun-Wei; Chang, Chung-Yu; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Lu, Po-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Due to the limited information of the contribution of various antibiotic resistance mechanisms in clinical Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates, Antibiotic resistance mechanisms, including integron analysis, identification of quinolone resistance-determining region mutations, measurement of efflux pump activity, and sequence analysis of efflux pump regulators, were investigated in 66 clinical B. cepacia complex isolates. Species were identified via recA-RFLP and MALDI-TOF. Four genomovars were identified by recA-RFLP. B. cenocepacia (genomovar III) was the most prevalent genomovar (90.1%). Most isolates (60/66, 90.9%) were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF analysis. Clonal relatedness determined by PFGE analysis revealed 30 pulsotypes, including two major pulsotypes that comprised 22.7% and 18.2% of the isolates, respectively. Seventeen (25.8%) isolates harboured class 1 integron with various combinations of resistance genes. Among six levofloxacin-resistant isolates, five had single-base substitutions in the gyrA gene and three demonstrated efflux pump activities. Among the 42 isolates exhibiting resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent, 94.4% ceftazidime-resistant isolates (17/18) and 72.7% chloramphenicol-resistant isolates (16/22) demonstrated efflux pump activity. Quantitation of efflux pump RNA level and sequence analysis revealed that over-expression of the RND-3 efflux pump was attributable to specific mutations in the RND-3 efflux pump regulator gene. In conclusion, high-level expression of efflux pumps is prevalent in B. cepacia complex isolates. Mutations in the RND-3 efflux pump regulator gene are the major cause of efflux pump activity, resulting in the resistance to antibiotics in clinical B. cepacia complex isolates.

  9. Involvement of the Efflux Pumps in Chloramphenicol Selected Strains of Burkholderia thailandensis: Proteomic and Mechanistic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Biot, Fabrice V.; Valade, Eric; Garnotel, Eric; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Villard, Claude; Thibault, François M.; Vidal, Dominique R.; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia is a bacterial genus comprising several pathogenic species, including two species highly pathogenic for humans, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. B. thailandensis is a weakly pathogenic species closely related to both B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. It is used as a study model. These bacteria are able to exhibit multiple resistance mechanisms towards various families of antibiotics. By sequentially plating B. thailandensis wild type strains on chloramphenicol we obtained several resistant variants. This chloramphenicol-induced resistance was associated with resistance against structurally unrelated antibiotics including quinolones and tetracyclines. We functionally and proteomically demonstrate that this multidrug resistance phenotype, identified in chloramphenicol-resistant variants, is associated with the overexpression of two different efflux pumps. These efflux pumps are able to expel antibiotics from several families, including chloramphenicol, quinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim and some β-lactams, and present a partial susceptibility to efflux pump inhibitors. It is thus possible that Burkholderia species can develop such adaptive resistance mechanisms in response to antibiotic pressure resulting in emergence of multidrug resistant strains. Antibiotics known to easily induce overexpression of these efflux pumps should be used with discernment in the treatment of Burkholderia infections. PMID:21347382

  10. Adaptive Resistance in Bacteria Requires Epigenetic Inheritance, Genetic Noise, and Cost of Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Santiago Sandoval; Cluzel, Philippe; Aldana, Maximino

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive resistance emerges when populations of bacteria are subjected to gradual increases of antibiotics. It is characterized by a rapid emergence of resistance and fast reversibility to the non-resistant phenotype when the antibiotic is removed from the medium. Recent work shows that adaptive resistance requires epigenetic inheritance and heterogeneity of gene expression patterns that are, in particular, associated with the production of porins and efflux pumps. However, the precise mechanisms by which inheritance and variability govern adaptive resistance, and what processes cause its reversibility remain unclear. Here, using an efflux pump regulatory network (EPRN) model, we show that the following three mechanisms are essential to obtain adaptive resistance in a bacterial population: 1) intrinsic variability in the expression of the EPRN transcription factors; 2) epigenetic inheritance of the transcription rate of EPRN associated genes; and 3) energetic cost of the efflux pumps activity that slows down cell growth. While the first two mechanisms acting together are responsible for the emergence and gradual increase of the resistance, the third one accounts for its reversibility. In contrast with the standard assumption, our model predicts that adaptive resistance cannot be explained by increased mutation rates. Our results identify the molecular mechanism of epigenetic inheritance as the main target for therapeutic treatments against the emergence of adaptive resistance. Finally, our theoretical framework unifies known and newly identified determinants such as the burden of efflux pumps that underlie bacterial adaptive resistance to antibiotics. PMID:25781931

  11. Adaptive resistance in bacteria requires epigenetic inheritance, genetic noise, and cost of efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Motta, Santiago Sandoval; Cluzel, Philippe; Aldana, Maximino

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive resistance emerges when populations of bacteria are subjected to gradual increases of antibiotics. It is characterized by a rapid emergence of resistance and fast reversibility to the non-resistant phenotype when the antibiotic is removed from the medium. Recent work shows that adaptive resistance requires epigenetic inheritance and heterogeneity of gene expression patterns that are, in particular, associated with the production of porins and efflux pumps. However, the precise mechanisms by which inheritance and variability govern adaptive resistance, and what processes cause its reversibility remain unclear. Here, using an efflux pump regulatory network (EPRN) model, we show that the following three mechanisms are essential to obtain adaptive resistance in a bacterial population: 1) intrinsic variability in the expression of the EPRN transcription factors; 2) epigenetic inheritance of the transcription rate of EPRN associated genes; and 3) energetic cost of the efflux pumps activity that slows down cell growth. While the first two mechanisms acting together are responsible for the emergence and gradual increase of the resistance, the third one accounts for its reversibility. In contrast with the standard assumption, our model predicts that adaptive resistance cannot be explained by increased mutation rates. Our results identify the molecular mechanism of epigenetic inheritance as the main target for therapeutic treatments against the emergence of adaptive resistance. Finally, our theoretical framework unifies known and newly identified determinants such as the burden of efflux pumps that underlie bacterial adaptive resistance to antibiotics.

  12. Drug efflux pump deficiency and drug target resistance masking in growing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fange, David; Nilsson, Karin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that drug efflux pump deficiency not only increases the susceptibility of pathogens to antibiotics, but also seems to “mask” the effects of mutations, that decrease the affinities of drugs to their intracellular targets, on the growth rates of drug-exposed bacteria. That is, in the presence of drugs, the growth rates of drug-exposed WT and target mutated strains are the same in a drug efflux pump deficient background, but the mutants grow faster than WT in a drug efflux pump proficient background. Here, we explain the mechanism of target resistance masking and show that it occurs in response to drug efflux pump inhibition among pathogens with high-affinity drug binding targets, low cell-membrane drug-permeability and insignificant intracellular drug degradation. We demonstrate that target resistance masking is fundamentally linked to growth-bistability, i.e., the existence of 2 different steady state growth rates for one and the same drug concentration in the growth medium. We speculate that target resistance masking provides a hitherto unknown mechanism for slowing down the evolution of target resistance among pathogens. PMID:19416855

  13. Role of the cell envelope stress regulators BaeR and CpxR in control of RND-type multidrug efflux pumps and transcriptional cross talk with exopolysaccharide synthesis in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Daniel; Stahl, Antje; Oja, Anna Elisabeth; Weingart, Helge

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the role of the cell envelope stress-sensing systems BaeSR and CpxARP in regulation of multidrug efflux and exopolysaccharide synthesis in Erwinia amylovora. We have previously reported that BaeR activates transcription of the RND-type efflux pumps AcrD and MdtABC. In this study, we found that a cpxR-deficient mutant was highly susceptible to β-lactams, aminoglycosides and lincomycin, whereas a baeR mutant showed no change in antimicrobial sensitivity. However, overexpression of BaeR in a mutant lacking the major RND pump AcrB increased resistance of E. amylovora to several compounds that are not substrates of AcrD or MdtABC. Furthermore, we observed that overexpression of BaeR significantly increased amylovoran production. Moreover, the expression of RND-type efflux pumps was changed in regulatory mutants of exopolysaccharide production. Our data suggest that BaeSR and CpxARP regulate additional mechanisms, beside efflux, which are responsible for antimicrobial resistance of E. amylovora.

  14. Getting pumped: membrane efflux transporters for enhanced biomolecule production.

    PubMed

    Boyarskiy, Sergey; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-10-01

    Small molecule production in microbial hosts is limited by the accumulation of the product inside the cell. Efflux transporters show promise as a solution to removal of the often-toxic products. Recent advances in transporter identification through expression profiling, heterologous expression, and knockout studies have identified transporters capable of secreting compounds of biotechnological interest. In addition, engineering of well-studied transporters has shown that substrate specificity in these transporters is malleable. Future work in identification, engineering, and expression of small molecule exporters can be instrumental in expanding the biocatalysis portfolio.

  15. Engineering bacterial efflux pumps for solar-powered bioremediation of surface waters.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vikram; Wendell, David

    2013-05-08

    Antibiotics are difficult to selectively remove from surface waters by present treatment methods. Bacterial efflux pumps have evolved the ability to discriminately expel antibiotics and other noxious agents via proton and ATP driven pathways. Here, we describe light-dependent removal of antibiotics by engineering the bacterial efflux pump AcrB into a proteovesicle system. We have created a chimeric protein with the requisite proton motive force by coupling AcrB to the light-driven proton pump Delta-rhodopsin (dR) via a glycophorin A transmembrane domain. This creates a solar powered protein material capable of selectively capturing antibiotics from bulk solutions. Using environmental water and direct sunlight, our AcrB-dR vesicles removed almost twice as much antibiotic as the treatment standard, activated carbon. Altogether, the AcrB-dR system provides an effective means of extracting antibiotics from surface waters as well as potential antibiotic recovery through vesicle solubilization.

  16. The Role of Efflux Pumps in Schistosoma mansoni Praziquantel Resistant Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Armada, Ana; Belo, Silvana; Carrilho, Emanuel; Viveiros, Miguel; Afonso, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a neglected disease caused by a trematode of the genus Schistosoma that is second only to malaria in public health significance in Africa, South America, and Asia. Praziquantel (PZQ) is the drug of choice to treat this disease due to its high cure rates and no significant side effects. However, in the last years increasingly cases of tolerance to PZQ have been reported, which has caused growing concerns regarding the emergency of resistance to this drug. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the selection of a parasitic strain that has a stable resistance phenotype to PZQ. It has been reported that drug resistance in helminths might involve efflux pumps such as members of ATP-binding cassette transport proteins, including P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein families. Here we evaluate the role of efflux pumps in Schistosoma mansoni resistance to PZQ, by comparing the efflux pumps activity in susceptible and resistant strains. The evaluation of the efflux activity was performed by an ethidium bromide accumulation assay in presence and absence of Verapamil. The role of efflux pumps in resistance to PZQ was further investigated comparing the response of susceptible and resistant parasites in the absence and presence of different doses of Verapamil, in an ex vivo assay, and these results were further reinforced through the comparison of the expression levels of SmMDR2 RNA by RT-PCR. Conclusions/Significance This work strongly suggests the involvement of Pgp-like transporters SMDR2 in Praziquantel drug resistance in S. mansoni. Low doses of Verapamil successfully reverted drug resistance. Our results might give an indication that a combination therapy with PZQ and natural or synthetic Pgp modulators can be an effective strategy for the treatment of confirmed cases of resistance to PZQ in S. mansoni. PMID:26445012

  17. Beyond Antimicrobial Resistance: Evidence for a Distinct Role of the AcrD Efflux Pump in Salmonella Biology

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Michelle M. C.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Newcombe, Jane; Dwyer, Daniel J.; Ivens, Alasdair

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For over 20 years, bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps have been studied because of their impact on resistance to antimicrobials. However, critical questions remain, including why produce efflux pumps under non-antimicrobial treatment conditions, and why have multiple pumps if their only purpose is antimicrobial efflux? Salmonella spp. possess five efflux pump families, including the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux pumps. Notably, the RND efflux pump AcrD has a unique substrate profile, distinct from other Salmonella efflux pumps. Here we show that inactivation of acrD results in a profoundly altered transcriptome and modulation of pathways integral to Salmonella biology. The most significant transcriptome changes were central metabolism related, with additional changes observed in pathogenicity, environmental sensing, and stress response pathway expression. The extent of tricarboxylic acid cycle and fumarate metabolism expression changes led us to hypothesize that acrD inactivation may result in motility defects due to perturbation of metabolite concentrations, such as fumarate, for which a role in motility has been established. Despite minimal detectable changes in flagellar gene expression, we found that an acrD mutant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolate was significantly impaired for swarming motility, which was restored by addition of fumarate. The acrD mutant outcompeted the wild type in fitness experiments. The results of these diverse experiments provide strong evidence that the AcrD efflux pump is not simply a redundant system providing response resilience, but also has distinct physiological functions. Together, these data indicate that the AcrD efflux pump has a significant and previously underappreciated impact on bacterial biology, despite only minor perturbations of antibiotic resistance profiles. PMID:27879336

  18. Beyond Antimicrobial Resistance: Evidence for a Distinct Role of the AcrD Efflux Pump in Salmonella Biology.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Michelle M C; Blair, Jessica M A; La Ragione, Roberto M; Newcombe, Jane; Dwyer, Daniel J; Ivens, Alasdair; Piddock, Laura J V

    2016-11-22

    For over 20 years, bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps have been studied because of their impact on resistance to antimicrobials. However, critical questions remain, including why produce efflux pumps under non-antimicrobial treatment conditions, and why have multiple pumps if their only purpose is antimicrobial efflux? Salmonella spp. possess five efflux pump families, including the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux pumps. Notably, the RND efflux pump AcrD has a unique substrate profile, distinct from other Salmonella efflux pumps. Here we show that inactivation of acrD results in a profoundly altered transcriptome and modulation of pathways integral to Salmonella biology. The most significant transcriptome changes were central metabolism related, with additional changes observed in pathogenicity, environmental sensing, and stress response pathway expression. The extent of tricarboxylic acid cycle and fumarate metabolism expression changes led us to hypothesize that acrD inactivation may result in motility defects due to perturbation of metabolite concentrations, such as fumarate, for which a role in motility has been established. Despite minimal detectable changes in flagellar gene expression, we found that an acrD mutant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolate was significantly impaired for swarming motility, which was restored by addition of fumarate. The acrD mutant outcompeted the wild type in fitness experiments. The results of these diverse experiments provide strong evidence that the AcrD efflux pump is not simply a redundant system providing response resilience, but also has distinct physiological functions. Together, these data indicate that the AcrD efflux pump has a significant and previously underappreciated impact on bacterial biology, despite only minor perturbations of antibiotic resistance profiles.

  19. Macrolide Efflux in Streptococcus pneumoniae Is Mediated by a Dual Efflux Pump (mel and mef) and Is Erythromycin Inducible

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Karita D.; Nisbet, Rebecca; Stephens, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae due to efflux has emerged as an important worldwide clinical problem over the past decade. Efflux is mediated by the genes of the genetic element mega (macrolide efflux genetic assembly) and related elements, such as Tn1207.1. These elements contain two adjacent genes, mef (mefE or mefA) and the closely related mel gene (msrA homolog), encoding a proton motive force pump and a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter homolog, and are transcribed as an operon (M. Del Grosso et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 40:774-778, 2004; K. Gay and D. S. Stephens, J. Infect. Dis. 184:56-65, 2001; and M. Santagati et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44:2585-2587, 2000). Previous studies have shown that Mef is required for macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; however, the contribution of Mel has not been fully determined. Independent deletions were constructed in mefE and mel in the serotype 14 macrolide-resistant strains GA16638 (erythromycin [Em] MIC, 8 to 16 μg/ml) and GA17719 (Em MIC, 2 to 4 μg/ml), which contain allelic variations in the mega element. The MICs to erythromycin were significantly reduced for the independent deletion mutants of both mefE and mel compared to those of the parent strains and further reduced threefold to fourfold to Em MICs of <0.15 μg/ml with mefE mel double mutants. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, the expression of mefE in the mel deletion mutants was increased more than 10-fold. However, in the mefE deletion mutants, the expression of mel did not differ significantly from the parent strains. The expression of both mefE and mel was inducible by erythromycin. These data indicate a requirement for both Mef and Mel in the novel efflux-mediated macrolide resistance system in S. pneumoniae and other gram-positive bacteria and that the system is inducible by macrolides. PMID:16189099

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resistance to Zinc pyrithione: phenotypic changes suggest the involvement of efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Abdel Malek, Suzanne M; Al-Adham, Ibrahim S; Matalka, Khalid Z; Collier, Philip J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of an efflux pump in the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistance to zinc pyrithione (ZnPT). In the presence of efflux inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP), the minimum inhibitory concentration of ZnPT for P. aeruginosa resistant cells is reduced significantly (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of ZnPT excluded by the resistant bacteria was reduced significantly (p < 0.01). However, the above reductions did not reach the levels measured for P. aeruginosa PAO1 sensitive strain. Furthermore, such changes in P. aeruginosa resistant cells were correlated with the overexpression of outer membrane proteins, reduced sensitivity toward imipenem (p < 0.01) and increased sensitivity toward sulphatriad and chloramphenicol (p < 0.05). In a continuation to a previous study, we conclude that P. aeruginosa resistance to ZnPT is multifactorial and involves induced efflux systems.

  1. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.

  2. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    DOE PAGES

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; ...

    2015-08-06

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystalmore » structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.« less

  3. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-08-06

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.

  4. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P.; Paterson, Neil G.; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-01-01

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  5. AcrB, AcrD, and MdtABC multidrug efflux systems are involved in enterobactin export in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Horiyama, Tsukasa; Nishino, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli produces the iron-chelating compound enterobactin to enable growth under iron-limiting conditions. After biosynthesis, enterobactin is released from the cell. However, the enterobactin export system is not fully understood. Previous studies have suggested that the outer membrane channel TolC is involved in enterobactin export. There are several multidrug efflux transporters belonging to resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family that require interaction with TolC to function. Therefore, several RND transporters may be responsible for enterobactin export. In this study, we investigated whether RND transporters are involved in enterobactin export using deletion mutants of multidrug transporters in E. coli. Single deletions of acrB, acrD, mdtABC, acrEF, or mdtEF did not affect the ability of E. coli to excrete enterobactin, whereas deletion of tolC did affect enterobactin export. We found that multiple deletion of acrB, acrD, and mdtABC resulted in a significant decrease in enterobactin export and that plasmids carrying the acrAB, acrD, or mdtABC genes restored the decrease in enterobactin export exhibited by the ΔacrB acrD mdtABC mutant. These results indicate that AcrB, AcrD, and MdtABC are required for the secretion of enterobactin.

  6. Efflux pump induction by quaternary ammonium compounds and fluoroquinolone resistance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Buffet-Bataillon, Sylvie; Tattevin, Pierre; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Biocides, primarily those containing quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC), are heavily used in hospital environments and various industries (e.g., food, water, cosmetic). To date, little attention has been paid to potential implications of QAC use in the emergence of antibiotic resistance, especially fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in patients and in the environment. QAC-induced overexpression of efflux pumps can lead to: cross resistance with fluoroquinolones mediated by multidrug efflux pumps; stress response facilitating mutation in the Quinolone Resistance Determining Region; and biofilm formation increasing the risk of transfer of mobile genetic elements carrying fluoroquinolone or QAC resistance determinants. By following the European Biocidal Product Regulation, manufacturers of QAC are required to ensure that their QAC-based biocidal products are safe and will not contribute to emerging bacterial resistance.

  7. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals the Participation of Efflux Pumps and Ornithine in the Response of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E Cells to Challenge with Propranolol

    PubMed Central

    Sayqal, Ali; Xu, Yun; Trivedi, Drupad K.; AlMasoud, Najla; Ellis, David I.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-01-01

    Efflux pumps are critically important membrane components that play a crucial role in strain tolerance in Pseudomonas putida to antibiotics and aromatic hydrocarbons that result in these toxicants being expelled from the bacteria. Here, the effect of propranolol on P. putida was examined by sudden addition of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg mL-1 of this β-blocker to several strains of P. putida, including the wild type DOT-T1E and the efflux pump knockout mutants DOT-T1E-PS28 and DOT-T1E-18. Bacterial viability measurements reveal that the efflux pump TtgABC plays a more important role than the TtgGHI pump in strain tolerance to propranolol. Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy was then used as a rapid, high-throughput screening tool to investigate any phenotypic changes resulting from exposure to varying levels of propranolol. Multivariate statistical analysis of these MIR data revealed gradient trends in resultant ordination scores plots, which were related to the concentration of propranolol. MIR illustrated phenotypic changes associated with the presence of this drug within the cell that could be assigned to significant changes that occurred within the bacterial protein components. To complement this phenotypic fingerprinting approach metabolic profiling was performed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify metabolites of interest during the growth of bacteria following toxic perturbation with the same concentration levels of propranolol. Metabolic profiling revealed that ornithine, which was only produced by P. putida cells in the presence of propranolol, presents itself as a major metabolic feature that has important functions in propranolol stress tolerance mechanisms within this highly significant and environmentally relevant species of bacteria. PMID:27331395

  8. CraA, a Major Facilitator Superfamily Efflux Pump Associated with Chloramphenicol Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Roca, I.; Marti, S.; Espinal, P.; Martínez, P.; Gibert, I.; Vila, J.

    2009-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has been increasingly associated with hospital-acquired infections, and the presence of multidrug resistance strains is of great concern to clinicians. A. baumannii is thought to possess a great deal of intrinsic resistance to several antimicrobial agents, including chloramphenicol, although the mechanisms involved in such resistance are not well understood. In this work, we have identified a major facilitator superfamily efflux pump present in most A. baumannii strains, displaying strong substrate specificity toward chloramphenicol. PMID:19581458

  9. Expression of the CDR1 efflux pump in clinical Candida albicans isolates is controlled by a negative regulatory element

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Naseem Akhtar; Manoharlal, Raman; Saini, Preeti; Prasad, Tulika; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Hoefer, Milan; Morschhaeuser, Joachim; Prasad, Rajendra . E-mail: rp47@hotmail.com

    2005-06-24

    Resistance to azole antifungal drugs in clinical isolates of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is often caused by constitutive overexpression of the CDR1 gene, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump of the ABC transporter superfamily. To understand the relevance of a recently identified negative regulatory element (NRE) in the CDR1 promoter for the control of CDR1 expression in the clinical scenario, we investigated the effect of mutation or deletion of the NRE on CDR1 expression in two matched pairs of azole-sensitive and resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Expression of GFP or lacZ reporter genes from the wild type CDR1 promoter was much higher in the azole-resistant C. albicans isolates than in the azole-susceptible isolates, reflecting the known differences in CDR1 expression in these strains. Deletion or mutation of the NRE resulted in enhanced reporter gene expression in azole-sensitive strains, but did not further increase the already high CDR1 promoter activity in the azole-resistant strains. In agreement with these findings, electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed a reduced binding to the NRE of nuclear extracts from the resistant C. albicans isolates as compared with extracts from the sensitive isolates. These results demonstrate that the NRE is involved in maintaining CDR1 expression at basal levels and that this repression is overcome in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates, resulting in constitutive CDR1 overexpression and concomitant drug resistance.

  10. Multidrug Efflux Pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus Bacterial Food Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jody L.; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; KC, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations. PMID:25635914

  11. Multidrug efflux pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial food pathogens.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jody L; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; K C, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F

    2015-01-28

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations.

  12. The role of drug efflux pumps in Malassezia pachydermatis and Malassezia furfur defence against azoles.

    PubMed

    Iatta, Roberta; Puttilli, Maria Rita; Immediato, Davide; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of efflux pump modulators (EPMs) on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of fluconazole (FLZ) and voriconazole (VOR) in Malassezia furfur and Malassezia pachydermatis. The in vitro efficacy of azoles, in combination with EPMs (ie haloperidol-HAL, promethazine-PTZ and cyclosporine A-CYS), against 21 M. furfur from bloodstream infection patients and 14 M. pachydermatis from the skin of dogs with dermatitis, was assessed using a broth microdilution chequerboard analysis. Data were analysed using the model-fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) method. The MIC of FLZ and VOR of Malassezia spp. decreased in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of HAL and/or PTZ. The synergic effect was observed only in strains with FLZ MIC≥128 μg/mL for M. furfur, FLZ MIC≥64 μg/mL for M. pachydermatis and VOR MIC≥4 μg/mL in both Malassezia spp. These results suggest that the drug efflux pumps are involved as defence mechanisms to azole drugs in Malassezia yeast. The synergism might be related to an increased expression of efflux pump genes, eventually resulting in azole resistance phenomena. Finally, the above FLZ and VOR MIC values might be considered the cut-off to discriminate susceptible and resistant strains.

  13. Crystal structures of the CusA efflux pump suggest methionine-mediated metal transport

    PubMed Central

    Long, Feng; Su, Chih-Chia; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Boyken, Scott E.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Yu, Edward W.

    2010-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently utilize tripartite efflux complexes in the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family to expel diverse toxic compounds from the cell.1,2 The efflux system CusCBA is responsible for extruding biocidal Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions.3,4 No prior structural information was available for the heavy-metal efflux (HME) subfamily of the RND efflux pumps. Here we describe the crystal structures of the inner membrane transporter CusA in the absence and presence of bound Cu(I) or Ag(I). These CusA structures provide important new structural information about the HME sub-family of RND efflux pumps. The structures suggest that the metal binding sites, formed by a three-methionine cluster, are located within the cleft region of the periplasmic domain. Intriguingly, this cleft is closed in the apo-CusA form but open in the CusA-Cu(I) and CusA-Ag(I) structures, which directly suggests a plausible pathway for ion export. Binding of Cu(I) and Ag(I) triggers significant conformational changes in both the periplasmic and transmembrane domains. The crystal structure indicates that CusA has, in addition to the three-methionine metal binding site, four methionine pairs - three located in the transmembrane region and one in the periplasmic domain. Genetic analysis and transport assays suggest that CusA is capable of actively picking up metal ions from the cytosol, utilizing these methionine pairs/clusters to bind and export metal ions. These structures suggest a stepwise shuttle mechanism for transport between these sites. PMID:20865003

  14. Crystal structures of the CusA efflux pump suggest methionine-mediated metal transport

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Feng; Su, Chih-Chia; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Boyken, Scott E.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Yu, Edward W.

    2010-09-23

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently use tripartite efflux complexes in the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family to expel various toxic compounds from the cell. The efflux system CusCBA is responsible for extruding biocidal Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions. No previous structural information was available for the heavy-metal efflux (HME) subfamily of the RND efflux pumps. Here we describe the crystal structures of the inner-membrane transporter CusA in the absence and presence of bound Cu(I) or Ag(I). These CusA structures provide new structural information about the HME subfamily of RND efflux pumps. The structures suggest that the metal-binding sites, formed by a three-methionine cluster, are located within the cleft region of the periplasmic domain. This cleft is closed in the apo-CusA form but open in the CusA-Cu(I) and CusA-Ag(I) structures, which directly suggests a plausible pathway for ion export. Binding of Cu(I) and Ag(I) triggers significant conformational changes in both the periplasmic and transmembrane domains. The crystal structure indicates that CusA has, in addition to the three-methionine metal-binding site, four methionine pairs - three located in the transmembrane region and one in the periplasmic domain. Genetic analysis and transport assays suggest that CusA is capable of actively picking up metal ions from the cytosol, using these methionine pairs or clusters to bind and export metal ions. These structures suggest a stepwise shuttle mechanism for transport between these sites.

  15. RND efflux pump mediated antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a major issue worldwide.

    PubMed

    Puzari, Minakshi; Chetia, Pankaj

    2017-02-01

    Therapeutic failures against diseases due to resistant Gram-negative bacteria have become a major threat nowadays as confirmed by surveillance reports across the world. One of the methods of development of multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is by means of RND efflux pumps. Inhibition of these pumps might help to combat the antibiotic resistance problem, for which the structure and regulation of the pumps have to be known. Moreover, judicious antibiotic use is needed to control the situation. This paper focuses on the issue of antibiotic resistance as well as the structure, regulation and inhibition of the efflux pumps present in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  16. Marinobacter adhaerens HP15 harbors two CzcCBA efflux pumps involved in zinc detoxification.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Antje; Pletzer, Daniel; Mehmood, Amna; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2015-09-01

    Several members of the ubiquitously found γ-proteobacterial genus Marinobacter were described or assumed to inhabit marine environments naturally enriched in heavy metals. However, direct studies that describe the ability of this genus to occupy such environments have not been conducted. To cope with heavy metal stress, bacteria possess specific efflux pumps as tools for detoxification, among which the CzcCBA type efflux system is one representative. Previous studies showed that this system plays an important role in resistance towards cadmium, zinc, and cobalt. Up to now, no study had focused on characterization of Czc pumps in Marinobacter sp. or other marine prokaryotes. Herein, we elucidated the function of two CzcCBA pumps encoded by Marinobacter adhaerens HP15's genome during exposure to cadmium, zinc, and cobalt. Single and double knock-out mutants lacking the corresponding two czcCBA operons were generated and analyzed in terms of their resistance profiles. Both operons appeared to be important for zinc resistance but had no role in tolerance towards cadmium or cobalt. One of the mutations was genetically complemented thereby restoring the wild type phenotype. In accordance with the resistance pattern, expression of the genes coding for both CzcCBA pumps was induced by zinc but neither by cadmium nor cobalt.

  17. Evaluation of the tannic acid inhibitory effect against the NorA efflux pump of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tintino, Saulo R; Oliveira-Tintino, Cícera D M; Campina, Fábia F; Silva, Raimundo L P; Costa, Maria do S; Menezes, Irwin R A; Calixto-Júnior, João T; Siqueira-Junior, José P; Coutinho, Henrique D M; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C; Balbino, Valdir Q

    2016-08-01

    During the early periods of antibiotic usage, bacterial infections were considered tamed. However, widespread antibiotic use has promoted the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, including multidrug resistant strains. Active efflux is a mechanism for bacterial resistance to inhibitory substances, known simply as drug efflux pumps. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogenic bacterium responsible for an array of infections. The NorA efflux pump has been shown to be responsible for moderate fluoroquinolone resistance of S. aureus. The inhibition of the efflux pump was assayed using a sub-inhibitory concentration of standard efflux pump inhibitors and tannic acid (MIC/8), where its capacity to decrease the MIC of Ethidium bromide (EtBr) and antibiotics due to the possible inhibitory effect of these substances was observed. The MICs of EtBr and antibiotics were significantly reduced in the presence of tannic acid, indicating the inhibitory effect of this agent against the efflux pumps of both strains causing a three-fold reduction of the MIC when compared with the control. These results indicate the possible usage of tannic acid as an adjuvant in antibiotic therapy against multidrug resistant bacteria (MDR).

  18. Differential roles of RND efflux pumps in antimicrobial drug resistance of sessile and planktonic Burkholderia cenocepacia cells.

    PubMed

    Buroni, Silvia; Matthijs, Nele; Spadaro, Francesca; Van Acker, Heleen; Scoffone, Viola C; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Coenye, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is notorious for causing respiratory tract infections in people with cystic fibrosis. Infections with this organism are particularly difficult to treat due to its high level of intrinsic resistance to most antibiotics. Multidrug resistance in B. cenocepacia can be ascribed to different mechanisms, including the activity of efflux pumps and biofilm formation. In the present study, the effects of deletion of the 16 operons encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia strain J2315 were investigated by determining the MICs of various antibiotics and by investigating the antibiofilm effect of these antibiotics. Finally, the expression levels of selected RND genes in treated and untreated cultures were investigated using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Our data indicate that the RND-3 and RND-4 efflux pumps are important for resistance to various antimicrobial drugs (including tobramycin and ciprofloxacin) in planktonic B. cenocepacia J2315 populations, while the RND-3, RND-8, and RND-9 efflux systems protect biofilm-grown cells against tobramycin. The RND-8 and RND-9 efflux pumps are not involved in ciprofloxacin resistance. Results from the RT-qPCR experiments on the wild-type strain B. cenocepacia J2315 suggest that there is little regulation at the level of mRNA expression for these efflux pumps under the conditions tested.

  19. Adaptive and mutational resistance: role of porins and efflux pumps in drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía; Hancock, Robert E W

    2012-10-01

    The substantial use of antibiotics in the clinic, combined with a dearth of new antibiotic classes, has led to a gradual increase in the resistance of bacterial pathogens to these compounds. Among the various mechanisms by which bacteria endure the action of antibiotics, those affecting influx and efflux are of particular importance, as they limit the interaction of the drug with its intracellular targets and, consequently, its deleterious effects on the cell. This review evaluates the impact of porins and efflux pumps on two major types of resistance, namely, mutational and adaptive types of resistance, both of which are regarded as key phenomena in the global rise of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. In particular, we explain how adaptive and mutational events can dramatically influence the outcome of antibiotic therapy by altering the mechanisms of influx and efflux of antibiotics. The identification of porins and pumps as major resistance markers has opened new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies directed specifically against these mechanisms.

  20. Structural comparison of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranjana, K.C.; Kakarla, Prathusha; Willmon, T. Mark; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Barr, Sharla R.; Varela, Manuel F.

    2016-01-01

    The biological membrane is an efficient barrier against water-soluble substances. Solute transporters circumvent this membrane barrier by transporting water-soluble solutes across the membrane to the other sides. These transport proteins are thus required for all living organisms. Microorganisms, such as bacteria, effectively exploit solute transporters to acquire useful nutrients for growth or to expel substances that are inhibitory to their growth. Overall, there are distinct types of related solute transporters that are grouped into families or superfamilies. Of these various transporters, the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) represents a very large and constantly growing group and are driven by solute- and ion-gradients, making them passive and secondary active transporters, respectively. Members of the major facilitator superfamily transport an extreme variety of structurally different substrates such as antimicrobial agents, amino acids, sugars, intermediary metabolites, ions, and other small molecules. Importantly, bacteria, especially pathogenic ones, have evolved multidrug efflux pumps which belong to the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, members of this important superfamily share similar primary sequences in the form of highly conserved sequence motifs that confer useful functional properties during transport. The transporters of the superfamily also share similarities in secondary structures, such as possessing 12- or 14-membrane spanning α-helices and the more recently described 3-helix structure repeat element, known as the MFS fold. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps have been determined for only a few members of the superfamily, all drug pumps of which are surprisingly from Escherichia coli. This review briefly summarizes the structural properties of the bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily in a comparative manner and provides future directions for study. PMID:27065631

  1. Landscape of Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND)-Type Efflux Pumps in Enterobacter cloacae Complex.

    PubMed

    Guérin, François; Lallement, Claire; Isnard, Christophe; Dhalluin, Anne; Cattoir, Vincent; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2016-04-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the active efflux is an important mechanism of antimicrobial resistance, but little is known about theEnterobacter cloacaecomplex (ECC). It is mediated primarily by pumps belonging to the RND (resistance-nodulation-cell division) family, and only AcrB, part of the AcrAB-TolC tripartite system, was characterized in ECC. However, detailed genome sequence analysis of the strainE. cloacaesubsp.cloacaeATCC 13047 revealed to us that 10 other genes putatively coded for RND-type transporters. We then characterized the role of all of these candidates by construction of corresponding deletion mutants, which were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility to 36 compounds, their virulence in the invertebrateGalleria mellonellamodel of infection, and their ability to form biofilm. Only the ΔacrBmutant displayed significantly different phenotypes compared to that of the wild-type strain: 4- to 32-fold decrease of MICs of several antibiotics, antiseptics, and dyes, increased production of biofilm, and attenuated virulence inG. mellonella In order to identify specific substrates of each pump, we individually expressed intransall operons containing an RND pump-encoding gene into the ΔacrBhypersusceptible strain. We showed that three other RND-type efflux systems (ECL_00053-00055, ECL_01758-01759, and ECL_02124-02125) were able to partially restore the wild-type phenotype and to superadd to and even enlarge the broad range of antimicrobial resistance. This is the first global study assessing the role of all RND efflux pumps chromosomally encoded by the ECC, which confirms the major role of AcrB in both pathogenicity and resistance and the potential involvement of other RND-type members in acquired resistance.

  2. Landscape of Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND)-Type Efflux Pumps in Enterobacter cloacae Complex

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, François; Lallement, Claire; Isnard, Christophe; Dhalluin, Anne; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the active efflux is an important mechanism of antimicrobial resistance, but little is known about the Enterobacter cloacae complex (ECC). It is mediated primarily by pumps belonging to the RND (resistance-nodulation-cell division) family, and only AcrB, part of the AcrAB-TolC tripartite system, was characterized in ECC. However, detailed genome sequence analysis of the strain E. cloacae subsp. cloacae ATCC 13047 revealed to us that 10 other genes putatively coded for RND-type transporters. We then characterized the role of all of these candidates by construction of corresponding deletion mutants, which were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility to 36 compounds, their virulence in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella model of infection, and their ability to form biofilm. Only the ΔacrB mutant displayed significantly different phenotypes compared to that of the wild-type strain: 4- to 32-fold decrease of MICs of several antibiotics, antiseptics, and dyes, increased production of biofilm, and attenuated virulence in G. mellonella. In order to identify specific substrates of each pump, we individually expressed in trans all operons containing an RND pump-encoding gene into the ΔacrB hypersusceptible strain. We showed that three other RND-type efflux systems (ECL_00053-00055, ECL_01758-01759, and ECL_02124-02125) were able to partially restore the wild-type phenotype and to superadd to and even enlarge the broad range of antimicrobial resistance. This is the first global study assessing the role of all RND efflux pumps chromosomally encoded by the ECC, which confirms the major role of AcrB in both pathogenicity and resistance and the potential involvement of other RND-type members in acquired resistance. PMID:26856831

  3. Structural comparison of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily.

    PubMed

    Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranjana, K C; Kakarla, Prathusha; Willmon, T Mark; Hernandez, Alberto J; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Barr, Sharla R; Varela, Manuel F

    The biological membrane is an efficient barrier against water-soluble substances. Solute transporters circumvent this membrane barrier by transporting water-soluble solutes across the membrane to the other sides. These transport proteins are thus required for all living organisms. Microorganisms, such as bacteria, effectively exploit solute transporters to acquire useful nutrients for growth or to expel substances that are inhibitory to their growth. Overall, there are distinct types of related solute transporters that are grouped into families or superfamilies. Of these various transporters, the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) represents a very large and constantly growing group and are driven by solute- and ion-gradients, making them passive and secondary active transporters, respectively. Members of the major facilitator superfamily transport an extreme variety of structurally different substrates such as antimicrobial agents, amino acids, sugars, intermediary metabolites, ions, and other small molecules. Importantly, bacteria, especially pathogenic ones, have evolved multidrug efflux pumps which belong to the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, members of this important superfamily share similar primary sequences in the form of highly conserved sequence motifs that confer useful functional properties during transport. The transporters of the superfamily also share similarities in secondary structures, such as possessing 12- or 14-membrane spanning α-helices and the more recently described 3-helix structure repeat element, known as the MFS fold. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps have been determined for only a few members of the superfamily, all drug pumps of which are surprisingly from Escherichia coli. This review briefly summarizes the structural properties of the bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily in a comparative manner and provides future directions for study.

  4. Fmt bypass in Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes induction of MexXY efflux pump expression.

    PubMed

    Caughlan, Ruth E; Sriram, Shubha; Daigle, Denis M; Woods, Angela L; Buco, Jennifer; Peterson, Ron L; Dzink-Fox, Joann; Walker, Susan; Dean, Charles R

    2009-12-01

    The intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to the peptide deformylase inhibitor (PDF-I) LBM415 was mediated by the MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux pumps, the latter of which was strongly induced by LBM415. Single-step exposure of PAO1 deleted for mexAB-oprM (therefore lacking both MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM functions) to PDF-Is selected for nfxB mutants, which express the MexCD-OprJ efflux pump, indicating that these compounds are also substrates for this pump. Selection of resistant mutants by use of levels of LBM415 greater than that accommodated by efflux yielded two additional groups of mutations, in the methionyl-tRNA(fmet) formyltransferase (fmt) and folD genes. Both mechanisms are known to impose an in vitro growth deficit (also observed here), presumably due to impairment of protein synthesis. We surmised that this inherent impairment of protein synthesis would upregulate expression of mexXY in a fashion similar to upregulation by LBM415 or by ribosome inhibitory compounds. Transcriptional profiling and/or mexX::lux promoter fusion analysis revealed that fmt and folD mutants were strongly upregulated for mexXY and another gene known to be required for upregulation of the pump, PA5471. Complementation of the fmt mutation in trans reversed this constitutive expression. This supports the notion that MexXY has a natural physiological function responding to impairment of ribosome function or protein synthesis and that fmt mutation (Fmt bypass) and folD mutation generate the intracellular mexXY-inducing signal.

  5. Modulation of P-glycoprotein efflux pump: induction and activation as a therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata; Vilas-Boas, Vânia; Carmo, Helena; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Carvalho, Félix; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Remião, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-dependent efflux pump encoded by the MDR1 gene in humans, known to mediate multidrug resistance of neoplastic cells to cancer therapy. For several decades, P-gp inhibition has drawn many significant research efforts in an attempt to overcome this phenomenon. However, P-gp is also constitutively expressed in normal human epithelial tissues and, due to its broad substrate specificity, to its cellular polarized expression in many excretory and barrier tissues, and to its great efflux capacity, it can play a crucial role in limiting the absorption and distribution of harmful xenobiotics, by decreasing their intracellular accumulation. Such a defense mechanism can be of particular relevance at the intestinal level, by significantly reducing the intestinal absorption of the xenobiotic and, consequently, avoiding its access to the target organs. In this review, the current knowledge on this important efflux pump is summarized, and a new focus is brought on the therapeutic interest of inducing and/or activating P-gp for limiting the toxicity caused by its substrates. Several in vivo and in vitro studies validating the use of such a therapeutic strategy are discussed. An extensive literature search for reported P-gp inducers/activators and for the experimental models used in their characterization was conducted. Those studies demonstrate that effective antidotal pathways can be achieved by efficiently promoting the P-gp-mediated efflux of deleterious xenobiotics, resulting in a significant reduction in their intracellular levels and, consequently, in a significant reduction of their toxicity.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Inhibitors of Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Novel Agents for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lomovskaya, Olga; Warren, Mark S.; Lee, Angela; Galazzo, Jorge; Fronko, Richard; Lee, May; Blais, Johanne; Cho, Deidre; Chamberland, Suzanne; Renau, Tom; Leger, Roger; Hecker, Scott; Watkins, Will; Hoshino, Kazuki; Ishida, Hiroko; Lee, Ving J.

    2001-01-01

    Whole-cell assays were implemented to search for efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) of the three multidrug resistance efflux pumps (MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN) that contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Secondary assays were developed to identify lead compounds with exquisite activities as inhibitors. A broad-spectrum EPI which is active against all three known Mex efflux pumps from P. aeruginosa and their close Escherichia coli efflux pump homolog (AcrAB-TolC) was discovered. When this compound, MC-207,110, was used, the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to fluoroquinolones was decreased significantly (eightfold for levofloxacin). Acquired resistance due to the overexpression of efflux pumps was also decreased (32- to 64-fold reduction in the MIC of levofloxacin). Similarly, 32- to 64-fold reductions in MICs in the presence of MC-207,110 were observed for strains with overexpressed efflux pumps and various target mutations that confer resistance to levofloxacin (e.g., gyrA and parC). We also compared the frequencies of emergence of levofloxacin-resistant variants in the wild-type strain at four times the MIC of levofloxacin (1 μg/ml) when it was used either alone or in combination with EPI. In the case of levofloxacin alone, the frequency was ∼10−7 CFU/ml. In contrast, with an EPI, the frequency was below the level of detection (<10−11). In summary, we have demonstrated that inhibition of efflux pumps (i) decreased the level of intrinsic resistance significantly, (ii) reversed acquired resistance, and (iii) resulted in a decreased frequency of emergence of P. aeruginosa strains that are highly resistant to fluoroquinolones. PMID:11120952

  7. Moving out: from sterol transport to drug resistance - the ABCG subfamily of efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Moitra, Karobi; Silverton, Latoya; Limpert, Katy; Im, Kate; Dean, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins are typically ATP-driven transmembrane pumps that have been evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to humans. In humans these transporters are subdivided into seven subfamilies, ranging from A to G. The ABCG subfamily of transporters is the primary focus of this review. This subfamily of proteins has been conserved throughout evolution and plays a central role in several cellular processes, such as sterol homeostasis and multidrug resistance. Functional polymorphisms/mutations in some of these G-subfamily transporters have clinical consequences in humans.

  8. SatR Is a Repressor of Fluoroquinolone Efflux Pump SatAB

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Jose Antonio; San Millan, Alvaro; Montero, Natalia; Gutierrez, Belen; Ovejero, Cristina Martinez; Carrilero, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an emerging zoonotic agent responsible for high-mortality outbreaks among the human population in China. In this species, the ABC transporter SatAB mediates fluoroquinolone resistance when overexpressed. Here, we describe and characterize satR, an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a MarR superfamily regulator that acts as a repressor of satAB. satR is cotranscribed with satAB, and its interruption entails the overexpression of the pump, leading to a clinically relevant increase in resistance to fluoroquinolones. PMID:23650171

  9. Erythromycin resistance by L4/L22 mutations and resistance masking by drug efflux pump deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lovmar, Martin; Nilsson, Karin; Lukk, Eliisa; Vimberg, Vladimir; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    We characterized the effects of classical erythromycin resistance mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 of the large ribosomal subunit on the kinetics of erythromycin binding. Our data are consistent with a mechanism in which the macrolide erythromycin enters and exits the ribosome through the nascent peptide exit tunnel, and suggest that these mutations both impair passive transport through the tunnel and distort the erythromycin-binding site. The growth-inhibitory action of erythromycin was characterized for bacterial populations with wild-type and L22-mutated ribosomes in drug efflux pump deficient and proficient backgrounds. The L22 mutation conferred reduced erythromycin susceptibility in the drug efflux pump proficient, but not deficient, background. This ‘masking' of drug resistance by pump deficiency was reproduced by modelling with input data from our biochemical experiments. We discuss the general principles behind the phenomenon of drug resistance ‘masking', and highlight its potential importance for slowing down the evolution of drug resistance among pathogens. PMID:19197244

  10. Influence of efflux pump inhibitors on the multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhan; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Tang, Fu-Ai; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) on multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS: H. pylori strains were isolated and cultured on Brucella agar plates with 10% sheep’s blood. The multidrug resistant (MDR) H. pylori were obtained with the inducer chloramphenicol by repeated doubling of the concentration until no colony was seen, then the susceptibilities of the MDR strains and their parents to 9 antibiotics were assessed with agar dilution tests. The present study included periods before and after the advent of the EPIs, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), reserpine and pantoprazole), and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined accordingly. In the same way, the effects of 5 proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), used in treatment of H. pylori infection, on MICs of antibiotics were evaluated. RESULTS: Four strains of MDR H. pylori were induced successfully, and the antibiotic susceptibilities of MDR strains were partly restored by CCCP and pantoprazole, but there was little effect of reserpine. Rabeprazole was the most effective of the 5 PPIs which could decrease the MICs of antibiotics for MDR H. pylori significantly. CONCLUSION: In vitro, some EPIs can strengthen the activities of different antibiotics which are the putative substrates of the efflux pump system in H. pylori. PMID:20222174

  11. Efflux Pump Overexpression Contributes to Tigecycline Heteroresistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Hu, Daxing; Zhang, Qijing; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial heteroresistance has been identified in several combinations of bacteria and antibiotics, and it complicated the therapeutic strategies. Tigecycline is being used as one of the optimal options for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella. This study investigated whether heterorresistance to tigecycline exists in a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain harboring the oqxAB-bearing IncHI2 plasmid pHXY0908. MIC and population analyses were performed to evaluate population-wide susceptibility to tigecycline. The effects of efflux pumps on MIC levels were assessed using the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide, measuring intracellular tigecycline accumulation as well as mRNA levels of regulatory and efflux pump genes. DNA sequencing of regulatory regions were performed and plasmid curing from a resistant strain provided an appropriate control. Results showed that MICs of a parental strain with and without pHXY0908 as well as a plasmid-cured strain 14028/Δp52 were 0.5, 1, and 1 μg/mL, respectively. Population analysis profiling (PAP) illustrated that only the pHXY0908-containg strain was heteroresistant to tigecycline. A fraction of colonies exhibited stable profiles with 4- to 8-fold increases in MIC. The frequencies of emergence of these isolates were higher in the plasmid-containing strain pHXY0908 than either the parental or the 14028/Δp52 strain. Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide addition restored tigecycline susceptibility of these isolates and intracellular tigecycline accumulation was reduced. Heteroresistant isolates of the strain containing pHXY0908 also had elevated expression of acrB, ramA, and oqxB. DNA sequencing identified numerous mutations in RamR that have been shown to lead to ramA overexpression. In conclusions, heteroresistance to tigecycline in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was manifested in a plasmid-bearing strain. Our results suggest that this phenotype was associated with overexpression

  12. Efflux Pump Overexpression Contributes to Tigecycline Heteroresistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Hu, Daxing; Zhang, Qijing; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial heteroresistance has been identified in several combinations of bacteria and antibiotics, and it complicated the therapeutic strategies. Tigecycline is being used as one of the optimal options for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella. This study investigated whether heterorresistance to tigecycline exists in a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain harboring the oqxAB-bearing IncHI2 plasmid pHXY0908. MIC and population analyses were performed to evaluate population-wide susceptibility to tigecycline. The effects of efflux pumps on MIC levels were assessed using the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide, measuring intracellular tigecycline accumulation as well as mRNA levels of regulatory and efflux pump genes. DNA sequencing of regulatory regions were performed and plasmid curing from a resistant strain provided an appropriate control. Results showed that MICs of a parental strain with and without pHXY0908 as well as a plasmid-cured strain 14028/Δp52 were 0.5, 1, and 1 μg/mL, respectively. Population analysis profiling (PAP) illustrated that only the pHXY0908-containg strain was heteroresistant to tigecycline. A fraction of colonies exhibited stable profiles with 4- to 8-fold increases in MIC. The frequencies of emergence of these isolates were higher in the plasmid-containing strain pHXY0908 than either the parental or the 14028/Δp52 strain. Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide addition restored tigecycline susceptibility of these isolates and intracellular tigecycline accumulation was reduced. Heteroresistant isolates of the strain containing pHXY0908 also had elevated expression of acrB, ramA, and oqxB. DNA sequencing identified numerous mutations in RamR that have been shown to lead to ramA overexpression. In conclusions, heteroresistance to tigecycline in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was manifested in a plasmid-bearing strain. Our results suggest that this phenotype was associated with overexpression

  13. Inhibition of the multidrug efflux pump LmrS from Staphylococcus aureus by cumin spice Cuminum cyminum.

    PubMed

    Kakarla, Prathusha; Floyd, Jared; Mukherjee, MunMun; Devireddy, Amith R; Inupakutika, Madhuri A; Ranweera, Indrika; Kc, Ranjana; 'Shrestha, Ugina; Cheeti, Upender Rao; Willmon, Thomas Mark; Adams, Jaclyn; Bruns, Merissa; Gunda, Shravan Kumar; Varela, Manuel F

    2017-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious causative agent of infectious disease. Multidrug-resistant strains like methicillin-resistant S. aureus compromise treatment efficacy, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Active efflux represents a major antimicrobial resistance mechanism. The proton-driven multidrug efflux pump, LmrS, actively exports structurally distinct antimicrobials. To circumvent resistance and restore clinical efficacy of antibiotics, efflux pump inhibitors are necessary, and natural edible spices like cumin are potential candidates. The mode of cumin antibacterial action and underlying mechanisms behind drug resistance inhibition, however, are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that cumin inhibits LmrS drug transport. We found that cumin inhibited bacterial growth and LmrS ethidium transport in a dosage-dependent manner. We demonstrate that cumin is antibacterial toward a multidrug-resistant host and that resistance modulation involves multidrug efflux inhibition.

  14. Efflux pump gene hefA of Helicobacter pylori plays an important role in multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether efflux systems contribute to multidrug resistance of H pylori. METHODS: A chloramphenicol-induced multidrug resistance model of six susceptible H pylori strains (5 isolates and H pylori NCTC11637) was developed. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains were selected and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of erythromycin, metronidazole, penicillin G, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin in multidrug resistant strains and their parent strains was determined by agar dilution tests. The level of mRNA expression of hefA was assessed by fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR. A H pylori LZ1026 knockout mutant (ΔH pylori LZ1026) for (putative) efflux protein was constructed by inserting the kanamycin resistance cassette from pEGFP-N2 into hefA, and its susceptibility profiles to 10 antibiotics were evaluated. RESULTS: The MIC of six multidrug-resistant strains (including 5 clinical isolates and H pylori NCTC11637) increased significantly (≥ 4-fold) compared with their parent strains. The expression level of hefA gene was significantly higher in the MDR strains than in their parent strains (P = 0.033). A H pylori LZ1026 mutant was successfully constructed and the ΔH pylori LZ1026 was more susceptible to four of the 10 antibiotics. All the 20 strains displayed transcripts for hefA that confirmed the in vitro expression of these genes. CONCLUSION: The efflux pump gene hefA plays an important role in multidrug resistance of H pylori. PMID:18777600

  15. Inhibition of the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and BCRP by the BDE-47 Hydroxylated Metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47: Considerations for Human Exposure.

    PubMed

    Marchitti, Satori A; Mazur, Christopher S; Dillingham, Caleb M; Rawat, Swati; Sharma, Anshika; Zastre, Jason; Kenneke, John F

    2017-01-01

    High body burdens of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in infants and young children have led to increased concern over their potential impact on human development. PBDE exposure can alter the expression of genes involved in thyroid homeostasis, including those of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which mediate cellular xenobiotic efflux. However, little information exists on how PBDEs interact with ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the interactions of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and its hydroxylated metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with P-gp and BCRP, using human MDR1- and BCRP-expressing membrane vesicles and stably transfected NIH-3T3-MDR1 and MDCK-BCRP cells. In P-gp membranes, BDE-47 did not affect P-gp activity; however, 6-OH-BDE-47 inhibited P-gp activity at low µM concentrations (IC50 = 11.7 µM). In BCRP membranes, BDE-47 inhibited BCRP activity; however, 6-OH-BDE-47 was a stronger inhibitor [IC50 = 45.9 µM (BDE-47) vs. IC50 = 9.4 µM (6-OH-BDE-47)]. Intracellular concentrations of known P-gp and BCRP substrates [((3)H)-paclitaxel and ((3)H)-prazosin, respectively] were significantly higher (indicating less efflux) in NIH-3T3-MDR1 and MDCK-BCRP cells in the presence of 6-OH-BDE-47, but not BDE-47. Collectively, our results indicate that the BDE-47 metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 is an inhibitor of both P-gp and BCRP efflux activity. These findings suggest that some effects previously attributed to BDE-47 in biological systems may actually be due to 6-OH-BDE-47. Considerations for human exposure are discussed.

  16. Evaluation of a series of 2-napthamide derivatives as inhibitors of the drug efflux pump AcrB for the reversal of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinhu; Mowla, Rumana; Guo, Liwei; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Rahman, Taufiq; De Barros Lopes, Miguel A; Ma, Shutao; Venter, Henrietta

    2017-02-15

    Drug efflux pumps confer multidrug resistance to dangerous pathogens which makes these pumps important drug targets. We have synthesised a novel series of compounds based on a 2-naphthamide pharmacore aimed at inhibiting the efflux pumps from Gram-negative bacteria. The archeatypical transporter AcrB from Escherichia coli was used as model efflux pump as AcrB is widely conserved throughout Gram-negative organisms. The compounds were tested for their antibacterial action, ability to potentiate the action of antibiotics and for their ability to inhibit Nile Red efflux by AcrB. None of the compounds were antimicrobial against E. coli wild type cells. Most of the compounds were able to inhibit Nile Red efflux indicating that they are substrates of the AcrB efflux pump. Three compounds were able to synergise with antibiotics and reverse resistance in the resistant phenotype. Compound A3, 4-(isopentyloxy)-2-naphthamide, reduced the MICs of erythromycin and chloramphenicol to the MIC levels of the drug sensitive strain that lacks an efflux pump. A3 had no effect on the MIC of the non-substrate rifampicin indicating that this compound acts specifically through the AcrB efflux pump. A3 also does not act through non-specific mechanisms such as outer membrane or inner membrane permeabilisation and is not cytotoxic against mammalian cell lines. Therefore, we have designed and synthesised a novel chemical compound with great potential to further optimisation as inhibitor of drug efflux pumps.

  17. Two Distinct Major Facilitator Superfamily Drug Efflux Pumps Mediate Chloramphenicol Resistance in Streptomyces coelicolor▿

    PubMed Central

    Vecchione, James J.; Alexander, Blair; Sello, Jason K.

    2009-01-01

    Chloramphenicol, florfenicol, and thiamphenicol are used as antibacterial drugs in clinical and veterinary medicine. Two efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily encoded by the cmlR1 and cmlR2 genes mediate resistance to these antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor, a close relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The transcription of both genes was observed by reverse transcription-PCR. Disruption of cmlR1 decreased the chloramphenicol MIC 1.6-fold, while disruption of cmlR2 lowered the MIC 16-fold. The chloramphenicol MIC of wild-type S. coelicolor decreased fourfold and eightfold in the presence of reserpine and Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide, respectively. These compounds are known to potentiate the activity of some antibacterial drugs via efflux pump inhibition. While reserpine is known to potentiate drug activity against gram-positive bacteria, this is the first time that Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide has been shown to potentiate drug activity against a gram-positive bacterium. PMID:19687245

  18. Virtual screening for novel Staphylococcus Aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors from natural products.

    PubMed

    Thai, Khac-Minh; Ngo, Trieu-Du; Phan, Thien-Vy; Tran, Thanh-Dao; Nguyen, Ngoc-Vinh; Nguyen, Thien-Hai; Le, Minh-Tri

    2015-01-01

    NorA is a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) drug efflux pumps that have been shown to mediate antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus (SA). In this study, QSAR analysis, virtual screening and molecular docking were implemented in an effort to discover novel SA NorA efflux pump inhibitors. Originally, a set of 47 structurally diverse compounds compiled from the literature was used to develop linear QSAR models and another set of 15 different compounds were chosen for extra validation. The final model which was estimated by statistical values for the full data set (n = 45, Q(2) = 0.80, RMSE = 0.20) and for the external test set (n = 15, R(2) = 0.60, |res|max = 0.75, |res|min = 0.02) was applied on the collection of 182 flavonoides and the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database to screen for novel NorA inhibitors. Finally, 33 lead compounds that met the Lipinski's rules of five/three and had good predicted pIC50 values from in silico screening process were employed to analyze the binding ability by docking studies on NorA homology model in place of its unavailable crystal structures at two active sites, the central channel and the Walker B.

  19. Elimination of plasmids by SILA compounds that inhibit efflux pumps of bacteria and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schelz, Zsuzsanna; Martins, Marta; Martins, Ana; Viveiros, Miguel; Molnar, Joseph; Amaral, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    Patented SILA compounds 409 and 421, previously shown to inhibit the efflux pumps of bacteria and cancer cells, have been studied for their ability to reduce or eliminate the presence of plasmids from Escherichia coli strains that have been induced to high level resistance to tetracycline by gradual exposure to increasing concentrations of the antibiotic. The results demonstrate that SILA compound 421, which has greater efflux pump inhibitory activity than its parent SILA compound 409, can reduce plasmid loads by 5 logs, over that present in the absence of the drug. The ability of the SILA compound to eliminate much larger plasmids is substantially lower. Because in vivo studies have shown that these compounds are not toxic to the mouse, the results obtained in our study suggest a potential role for SILA compound 421 as an adjunct for the therapy of antibiotic-resistant E. coli infections whose resistance is plasmid-mediated. In addition, because plasmid-mediated resistance is often found in tetracycline-treated cattle, SILA compound 421 may have potential as an adjunct during the time that the cattle are maintained on tetracycline prior to slaughter.

  20. Efflux Pump Blockers in Gram-Negative Bacteria: The New Generation of Hydantoin Based-Modulators to Improve Antibiotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otręebska-Machaj, Ewa; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Szymańska, Ewa; Schabikowski, Jakub; Boyer, Gérard; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Alibert, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are an increasing health problem with the shortage of new active antibiotic agents. Among effective mechanisms that contribute to the spread of MDR Gram-negative bacteria are drug efflux pumps that expel clinically important antibiotic classes out of the cell. Drug pumps are attractive targets to restore the susceptibility toward the expelled antibiotics by impairing their efflux activity. Arylhydantoin derivatives were investigated for their potentiation of activities of selected antibiotics described as efflux substrates in Enterobacter aerogenes expressing or not AcrAB pump. Several compounds increased the bacterial susceptibility toward nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol and sparfloxacin and were further pharmacomodulated to obtain a better activity against the AcrAB producing bacteria. PMID:27199950

  1. Interaction of BDE-47 and its Hydroxylated Metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and BCRP: Considerations for Human Exposure and Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp; also known as MDR1, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; also known as ABCG2), are membrane-bound proteins that mediate the cellular efflux of xenobiotics as an important defense against chemic...

  2. Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli CusC the Outer Membrane Component of a Heavy Metal Efflux Pump

    SciTech Connect

    R Kulathila; R Kulathila; M Indic; B van den Berg

    2011-12-31

    While copper has essential functions as an enzymatic co-factor, excess copper ions are toxic for cells, necessitating mechanisms for regulating its levels. The cusCBFA operon of E. coli encodes a four-component efflux pump dedicated to the extrusion of Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions. We have solved the X-ray crystal structure of CusC, the outer membrane component of the Cus heavy metal efflux pump, to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The structure has the largest extracellular opening of any outer membrane factor (OMF) protein and suggests, for the first time, the presence of a tri-acylated N-terminal lipid anchor. The CusC protein does not have any obvious features that would make it specific for metal ions, suggesting that the narrow substrate specificity of the pump is provided by other components of the pump, most likely by the inner membrane component CusA.

  3. Human and Rat ABC Transporter Efflux of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol A Glucuronide: Interspecies Comparison and Implications for Pharmacokinetic Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant interspecies differences exist between human and rodent with respect to absorption, distribution, and excretion of bisphenol A (BPA) and its primary metabolite, BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G). ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter enzymes play important roles in these physi...

  4. Contribution of EmrAB efflux pumps to colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Feng; Lin, Yun-You; Lan, Chung-Yu

    2017-02-01

    Efflux pumps play an important role in antimicrobial resistance for Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the function of the Emr pump system and the relationship between Emr and drug resistance has not been characterized in A. baumannii. In this study, four possible groups of emr-like genes were found by searching a genome database. Among them, A1S_1772 (emrB) and A1S_1773 (emrA) were demonstrated to be co-transcribed as a single operon. Moreover, during osmotic stress, A1S_1772 showed the largest change in gene expression compared to the other emrB-like genes, and deletion of A1S_1772 (AB ΔemrB) significantly slowed cell growth in 20% sucrose. Using a phenotypic microarray analysis, the AB ΔemrB mutant was more susceptible to colistin and nafcillin, paromomycin, spiramycin, and D,L-serine hydroxmate than the wild type. The spot assay, time kill assay and minimal inhibition concentration determination also indicated that the wild type could tolerate colistin better than the AB ΔemrB mutant. Finally, the increased expression levels of all emrB-like genes, including A1S_0775, A1S_0909, A1S_1772, and A1S_1799, in colistin resistance-induced A. baumannii further supported the possible involvement of the emrB genes in A. baumannii colistin resistance. Together, the Emr pump systems in A. baumannii contribute to adaptation to osmotic stress and resistance to colistin.

  5. Keratin degradation by dermatophytes relies on cysteine dioxygenase and a sulfite efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Grumbt, Maria; Monod, Michel; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Hertweck, Christian; Kunert, Jiri; Staib, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Millions of people suffer from superficial infections caused by dermatophytes. Intriguingly, these filamentous fungi exclusively infect keratin-rich host structures such as hair, nails, and skin. Keratin is a hard, compact protein, and its utilization by dermatophytes for growth has long been discussed as a major virulence attribute. Here, we provide strong support for the hypothesis that keratin degradation is facilitated by the secretion of the reducing agent sulfite, which can cleave keratin-stabilizing cystine bonds. We discovered that sulfite is produced by dermatophytes from environmental cysteine, which at elevated concentrations is toxic for microbes and humans. We found that sulfite formation from cysteine relies on the key enzyme cysteine dioxygenase Cdo1. Sulfite secretion is supported by the sulfite efflux pump Ssu1. Targeted mutagenesis proved that dermatophyte mutants in either Cdo1 or Ssu1 were highly growth-sensitive to cysteine, and mutants in Ssu1 were specifically sensitive to sulfite. Most notably, dermatophyte mutants in Cdo1 and Ssu1 were specifically growth-defective on hair and nails. As keratin is rich in cysteine, our identified mechanism of cysteine conversion and sulfite efflux supports both cysteine and sulfite tolerance per se and progression of keratin degradation. These in vitro findings have implications for dermatophyte infection pathogenesis.

  6. Dipeptide Prodrug Approach to Evade Efflux Pumps and CYP3A4 Metabolism of Lopinavir

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Sheng, Ye; Mandava, Nanda K.; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Oral absorption of lopinavir (LPV) is limited due to P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein2 (MRP2) mediated efflux by intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, LPV is extensively metabolized by CYP3A4 enzymes. In the present study, dipeptide prodrug approach was employed to circumvent efflux pumps (P-gp and MRP2) and CYP3A4 mediated metabolism of LPV. Valine-isoleucine-LPV (Val-Ile-LPV) was synthesized and identified by LCMS and NMR techniques. The extent of LPV and Val-Ile-LPV interactions with P-gp and MRP2 was studied by uptake and transport studies across MDCK-MDR1 and MDCK-MRP2 cells. To determine the metabolic stability, time and concentration dependent degradation study was performed in liver microsomes. Val-Ile-LPV exhibited significantly higher aqueous solubility relative to LPV. This prodrug generated higher stability under acidic pH. Val-Ile-LPV demonstrated significantly lower affinity towards P-gp and MRP2 relative to LPV. Transepithelial transport of Val-Ile-LPV was significantly higher in the absorptive direction (apical to basolateral) relative to LPV. Importantly, Val-Ile-LPV was recognized as an excellent substrate by peptide transporter. Moreover, Val-Ile-LPV displayed significantly higher metabolic stability relative to LPV. Results obtained from this study suggested that dipeptide prodrug approach is a viable option to elevate systemic levels of LPV following oral administration PMID:25261710

  7. MexEF-OprN efflux pump exports the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) precursor HHQ (4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline).

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Martin G; Déziel, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cells have evolved the capacity to communicate between each other via small diffusible chemical signals termed autoinducers. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen involved, among others, in cystic fibrosis complications. Virulence of P. aeruginosa relies on its ability to produce a number of autoinducers, including 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQ). In a cell density-dependent manner, accumulated signals induce the expression of multiple targets, especially virulence factors. This phenomenon, called quorum sensing, promotes bacterial capacity to cause disease. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa possesses many multidrug efflux pumps conferring adaptive resistance to antibiotics. Activity of some of these efflux pumps also influences quorum sensing. The present study demonstrates that the MexEF-OprN efflux pump modulates quorum sensing through secretion of a signalling molecule belonging to the HAQ family. Moreover, activation of MexEF-OprN reduces virulence factor expression and swarming motility. Since MexEF-OprN can be activated in infected hosts even in the absence of antibiotic selective pressure, it could promote establishment of chronic infections in the lungs of people suffering from cystic fibrosis, thus diminishing the immune response to virulence factors. Therapeutic drugs that affect multidrug efflux pumps and HAQ-mediated quorum sensing would be valuable tools to shut down bacterial virulence.

  8. Prediction and Early Evaluation of Anticancer Therapy Response: From Imaging of Drug Efflux Pumps to Targeted Therapy Response.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingqing; Li, Zheng; Li, Shaoshun

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) describes the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapy and has been ascribed to the overexpression of drug efflux pumps. Molecular imaging of drug efflux pumps is helpful to identify the patients who may be resistant to the chemotherapy and thus will avoid the unnecessary treatment and increase the therapeutic effectiveness. Imaging probes targeting drug efflux pumps can non-invasively evaluate the Pgp function and play an important role in identification of MDR, prediction of response, and monitoring MDR modulation. On the other hand, new anticancer agents based on molecular targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and angiogenic factor receptor may potentially be combined with chemotherapeutic drugs to overcome the MDR. Imaging of molecular targets visualize treatment response of patients at molecular level vividly and help to select right patients for certain targeted anticancer therapy. Among all the imaging modalities, nuclear imaging including positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has the greatest promise for rapid translation to the clinic and can realize quantitative visualization of biochemical processes in vivo. In this review, we will summarize the nuclear imaging probes utilized for predicting and evaluating the early anticancer therapy response.99mTc labeled agents and PET based radiopharmaceuticals like 18F-Paclitaxel, 11C-Verapamil for drug efflux pumps imaging will be discussed here. Moreover, molecular imaging probes used for targeted therapy response evaluation like 18F-Tamoxifen,89Zr-Trastuzumab will also be introduced in this review.

  9. PatA and PatB form a functional heterodimeric ABC multidrug efflux transporter responsible for the resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Boncoeur, Emilie; Durmort, Claire; Bernay, Benoît; Ebel, Christine; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Croizé, Jacques; Vernet, Thierry; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2012-10-02

    All bacterial multidrug ABC transporters have been shown to work as either homodimers or heterodimers. Two possibly linked genes, patA and patB from Streptococcus pneumococcus, that encode half-ABC transporters have been shown previously to be involved in fluoroquinolone resistance. We showed that the ΔpatA, ΔpatB, or ΔpatA/ΔpatB mutant strains were more sensitive to unstructurally related compounds, i.e., ethidium bromide or fluoroquinolones, than the wild-type R6 strain. Inside-out vesicles prepared from Escherichia coli expressing PatA and/or PatB transported Hoechst 33342, a classical substrate of multidrug transporters, only when both PatA and PatB were coexpressed. This transport was inhibited either by orthovanadate or by reserpine, and mutation of the conserved Walker A lysine residue of either PatA or PatB fully abrogated Hoechst 33342 transport. PatA, PatB, and the PatA/PatB heterodimer were purified from detergent-solubilized E. coli membrane preparations. Protein dimers were identified in all cases, albeit in different proportions. In contrast to the PatA/PatB heterodimers, homodimers of PatA or PatB failed to show a vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity. Thus, PatA and PatB need to interact together to make a functional drug efflux transporter, and they work only as heterodimers.

  10. Hyper Accumulation of Arsenic in Mutants of Ochrobactrum tritici Silenced for Arsenite Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Piedade, Ana Paula; Morais, Paula V.

    2015-01-01

    Ochrobactrum tritici SCII24T is a highly As-resistant bacterium, with two previously described arsenic resistance operons, ars1 and ars2. Among a large number of genes, these operons contain the arsB and Acr3 genes that encode the arsenite efflux pumps responsible for arsenic resistance. Exploring the genome of O. tritici SCII24T, an additional putative operon (ars3) was identified and revealed the presence of the Acr3_2 gene that encodes for an arsenite efflux protein but which came to prove to not be required for full As resistance. The genes encoding for arsenite efflux pumps, identified in this strain, were inactivated to develop microbial accumulators of arsenic as new tools for bioremediation. Six different mutants were produced, studied and three were more useful as biotools. O. tritici wild type and the Acr3-mutants showed the highest resistance to As(III), being able to grow up to 50 mM of arsenite. On the other hand, arsB-mutants were not able to grow at concentrations higher than 1 mM As(III), and were the most As(III) sensitive mutants. In the presence of 1 mM As(III), the strain with arsB and Acr3_1 mutated showed the highest intracellular arsenic concentration (up to 17 ng(As)/mg protein), while in assays with 5 mM As(III), the single arsB-mutant was able to accumulate the highest concentration of arsenic (up to 10 ng(As)/mg protein). Therefore, arsB is the main gene responsible for arsenite resistance in O. tritici. However, both genes arsB and Acr3_1 play a crucial role in the resistance mechanism, depending on the arsenite concentration in the medium. In conclusion, at moderate arsenite concentrations, the double arsB- and Acr3_1-mutant exhibited a great ability to accumulate arsenite and can be seen as a promising bioremediation tool for environmental arsenic detoxification. PMID:26132104

  11. Molecular Mechanism of MBX2319 Inhibition of Escherichia coli AcrB Multidrug Efflux Pump and Comparison with Other Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Vargiu, Attilio V.; Ruggerone, Paolo; Opperman, Timothy J.; Nguyen, Son T.

    2014-01-01

    Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division (RND) superfamily, such as AcrB, make a major contribution to multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. The development of inhibitors of the RND pumps would improve the efficacy of current and next-generation antibiotics. To date, however, only one inhibitor has been cocrystallized with AcrB. Thus, in silico structure-based analysis is essential for elucidating the interaction between other inhibitors and the efflux pumps. In this work, we used computer docking and molecular dynamics simulations to study the interaction between AcrB and the compound MBX2319, a novel pyranopyridine efflux pump inhibitor with potent activity against RND efflux pumps of Enterobacteriaceae species, as well as other known inhibitors (D13-9001, 1-[1-naphthylmethyl]-piperazine, and phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide) and the binding of doxorubicin to the efflux-defective F610A variant of AcrB. We also analyzed the binding of a substrate, minocycline, for comparison. Our results show that MBX2319 binds very tightly to the lower part of the distal pocket in the B protomer of AcrB, strongly interacting with the phenylalanines lining the hydrophobic trap, where the hydrophobic portion of D13-9001 was found to bind by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, MBX2319 binds to AcrB in a manner that is similar to the way in which doxorubicin binds to the F610A variant of AcrB. In contrast, 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine and phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide appear to bind to somewhat different areas of the distal pocket in the B protomer of AcrB than does MBX2319. However, all inhibitors (except D13-9001) appear to distort the structure of the distal pocket, impairing the proper binding of substrates. PMID:25114133

  12. Tigecycline Susceptibility and the Role of Efflux Pumps in Tigecycline Resistance in KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiong; Ruan, Zhi; Hua, Xiaoting; Zhou, Hua; Yu, Yunsong

    2015-01-01

    KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates have emerged as important pathogens of nosocomial infections, and tigecycline is one of the antibiotics recommended for severe infections caused by KPC-producing K. pneumoniae. To identify the susceptibility profile of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae to tigecycline and investigate the role of efflux pumps in tigecycline resistance, a total of 215 KPC-producing K. pneumoniae isolates were collected. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of tigecycline was determined by standard broth microdilution tests. Isolates showing resistance to tigecycline underwent susceptibility test with efflux pump inhibitors. Expression levels of efflux pump genes (acrB and oqxB) and their regulators (ramA, marA, soxS and rarA) were examined by real-time PCR, and the correlation between tigecycline MICs and gene expression levels were analysed. Our results show that the tigecycline resistance rate in these isolates was 11.2%. Exposure of the tigecycline-resistant isolates to the efflux pump inhibitor NMP resulted in an obvious decrease in MICs and restored susceptibility to tigecycline in 91.7% of the isolates. A statistically significant association between acrB expression and tigecycline MICs was observed, and overexpression of ramA was found in three tigecycline-resistant isolates, further analysis confirmed ramR mutations existed in these isolates. Transformation of one mutant with wild-type ramR restored susceptibility to tigecycline and repressed overexpression of ramA and acrB. These data indicate that efflux pump AcrAB, which can be up-regulated by ramR mutations and subsequent ramA activation, contributed to tigecycline resistance in K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. PMID:25734903

  13. Tigecycline susceptibility and the role of efflux pumps in tigecycline resistance in KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Fu, Ying; Chen, Qiong; Ruan, Zhi; Hua, Xiaoting; Zhou, Hua; Yu, Yunsong

    2015-01-01

    KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates have emerged as important pathogens of nosocomial infections, and tigecycline is one of the antibiotics recommended for severe infections caused by KPC-producing K. pneumoniae. To identify the susceptibility profile of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae to tigecycline and investigate the role of efflux pumps in tigecycline resistance, a total of 215 KPC-producing K. pneumoniae isolates were collected. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of tigecycline was determined by standard broth microdilution tests. Isolates showing resistance to tigecycline underwent susceptibility test with efflux pump inhibitors. Expression levels of efflux pump genes (acrB and oqxB) and their regulators (ramA, marA, soxS and rarA) were examined by real-time PCR, and the correlation between tigecycline MICs and gene expression levels were analysed. Our results show that the tigecycline resistance rate in these isolates was 11.2%. Exposure of the tigecycline-resistant isolates to the efflux pump inhibitor NMP resulted in an obvious decrease in MICs and restored susceptibility to tigecycline in 91.7% of the isolates. A statistically significant association between acrB expression and tigecycline MICs was observed, and overexpression of ramA was found in three tigecycline-resistant isolates, further analysis confirmed ramR mutations existed in these isolates. Transformation of one mutant with wild-type ramR restored susceptibility to tigecycline and repressed overexpression of ramA and acrB. These data indicate that efflux pump AcrAB, which can be up-regulated by ramR mutations and subsequent ramA activation, contributed to tigecycline resistance in K. pneumoniae clinical isolates.

  14. The AcrAB-TolC pump is involved in macrolide resistance but not in telithromycin efflux in Enterobacter aerogenes and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Renaud; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Bryskier, André; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2004-09-01

    The role of the AcrAB-TolC pump in macrolide and ketolide susceptibility in Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes was studied. Efflux pump inhibitor restored erythromycin, clarithromycin, and telithromycin susceptibilities to multidrug-resistant isolates. No modification of telithromycin accumulation was detected in E. aerogenes acrAB or tolC derivatives compared to that in the parental strain. Two independent efflux pumps, inhibited by phenylalanine arginine beta-naphthylamide, expel macrolides and telithromycin in E. aerogenes.

  15. The multidrug efflux pump MdtEF protects against nitrosative damage during the anaerobic respiration in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiliang; Xiao, Minfeng; Horiyama, Tsukasa; Zhang, Yinfeng; Li, Xuechen; Nishino, Kunihiko; Yan, Aixin

    2011-07-29

    Drug efflux represents an important protection mechanism in bacteria to withstand antibiotics and environmental toxic substances. Efflux genes constitute 6-18% of all transporters in bacterial genomes, yet the expression and functions of only a handful of them have been studied. Among the 20 efflux genes encoded in the Escherichia coli K-12 genome, only the AcrAB-TolC system is constitutively expressed. The expression, activities, and physiological functions of the remaining efflux genes are poorly understood. In this study we identified a dramatic up-regulation of an additional efflux pump, MdtEF, under the anaerobic growth condition of E. coli, which is independent of antibiotic exposure. We found that expression of MdtEF is up-regulated more than 20-fold under anaerobic conditions by the global transcription factor ArcA, resulting in increased efflux activity and enhanced drug tolerance in anaerobically grown E. coli. Cells lacking mdtEF display a significantly decreased survival rate under the condition of anaerobic respiration of nitrate. Deletion of the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of indole, tnaAB, or replacing nitrate with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor during the anaerobic respiration restores the decreased survival of ΔmdtEF cells. Moreover, ΔmdtEF cells are susceptible to indole nitrosative derivatives, a class of toxic byproducts formed and accumulated within E. coli when the bacterium respires nitrate under anaerobic conditions. Taken together, we conclude that the multidrug efflux pump MdtEF is up-regulated during the anaerobic physiology of E. coli to protect the bacterium from nitrosative damage through expelling the nitrosyl indole derivatives out of the cells.

  16. Multidrug binding properties of the AcrB efflux pump characterized by molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Vargiu, Attilio V.; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, to which multidrug efflux pumps such as the AcrB transporter makes a major contribution, is becoming a major public health problem. Unfortunately only a few compounds have been cocrystallized with AcrB, and thus computational approaches are essential in elucidating the interaction between diverse ligands and the pump protein. We used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the binding of nine substrates, two inhibitors, and two nonsubstrates to the distal binding pocket of AcrB, identified earlier by X-ray crystallography. This approach gave us more realistic views of the binding than the previously used docking approach, as the explicit water molecules contributed to the process and the flexible binding site was often seen to undergo large structural changes. We analyzed the interaction in detail in terms of the binding energy, hydrophobic surface-matching, and the residues involved in the process. We found that all substrates tested bound to the pocket, whereas the binding to this site was not preferred for the nonsubstrates. Interestingly, both inhibitors [Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide and 1-(1-naphtylmethyl)-piperazine] tended to move out of the pocket at least partially, getting into contact with a glycine-rich loop that separates the distal pocket from the more proximal region of the protein and is thought to control the access of substrates to the distal pocket. PMID:23175790

  17. NorB, an efflux pump in Staphylococcus aureus strain MW2, contributes to bacterial fitness in abscesses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanpeng; Onodera, Yoshikuni; Lee, Jean C; Hooper, David C

    2008-11-01

    While remaining a major problem in hospitals, Staphylococcus aureus is now spreading in communities. Strain MW2 (USA400 lineage) and other community methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains most commonly cause skin infections with abscess formation. Multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps contribute to antimicrobial resistance but may also contribute to bacterial survival by removal of environmental toxins. In S. aureus, NorA, NorB, NorC, and Tet38 are chromosomally encoded efflux pumps whose overexpression can confer MDR to quinolones and other compounds (Nor pumps) or tetracyclines alone (Tet38), but the natural substrates of these pumps are not known. To determine the role of these efflux pumps in a natural environment in the absence of antibiotics, we used strain MW2 in a mouse subcutaneous abscess model and compared pump gene expression as determined by reverse transcription-PCR in the abscesses and in vitro. norB and tet38 were selectively upregulated in vivo more than 171- and 24-fold, respectively, whereas norA and norC were downregulated. These changes were associated with an increase in expression of mgrA, which encodes a transcriptional regulator known to affect pump gene expression. In competition experiments using equal inocula of a norB or tet38 mutant and parent strain MW2, each mutant exhibited growth defects of about two- to threefold in vivo. In complementation experiments, a single-copy insertion of norB (but not a single-copy insertion of tet38) in the attB site within geh restored the growth fitness of the norB mutant in vivo. Our findings indicate that some MDR pumps, like NorB, can facilitate bacterial survival when they are overexpressed in a staphylococcal abscess and may contribute to the relative resistance of abscesses to antimicrobial therapy, thus linking bacterial fitness and resistance in vivo.

  18. Substrate Competition Studies Using Whole-Cell Accumulation Assays with the Major Tripartite Multidrug Efflux Pumps of Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Christopher A.; Mullis, Lisa B.

    2007-01-01

    AcrAB-TolC is the major, constitutively expressed tripartite multidrug efflux system in Escherichia coli that recognizes various structurally unrelated molecules, including many antibiotics, dyes, and steroids. The AcrB inner membrane pump portion of the efflux system has been shown in recent structural studies to bind substrates at multiple sites, suggesting that particular substrate “sets” may compete for efflux by interfering with a certain binding site(s). However, our data indicate that the general structural class does not appear to dictate a particular substrate binding site that can be competitively inhibited in whole cells. In our study, substrate competition failed to increase cell-associated levels of steroids or dyes to levels characteristic of AcrB- or AcrB/EmrAB-deficient genomic mutants or achieved with the pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. In addition, this general observation was sustained even with (i) a cocktail containing seven-pump substrates supplied slightly below their respective wild-type MIC levels, (ii) competing drug substrates of the same structural class (steroids or macrolides), and (iii) hyper-MIC levels of the exogenously supplied agents. Thus, this pump system (and possibly EmrAB-TolC) may have an extraordinary capacity to simultaneously handle multiple-drug substrates that is not necessarily reflected in MIC analyses. In addition, our study has extended the range of substrates recognized by the AcrAB- and EmrAB-TolC systems. PMID:17210767

  19. Growth-related changes in intracellular spermidine and its effect on efflux pump expression and quorum sensing in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ying Ying; Chua, Kim Lee

    2010-04-01

    The Burkholderia pseudomallei BpeAB-OprB resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family pump effluxes aminoglycoside and macrolide antibiotics as well as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) involved in quorum sensing. Expression of bpeA-lacZ was cell density-dependent and was inducible in the presence of these compounds. Intracellular levels of spermidine and N-acetylspermidine increased with cell density in wild-type B. pseudomallei KHW, but were always lower in the bpeAB pump mutant at all growth phases. The significance of changes in intracellular spermidine on efflux pump expression was demonstrated by the disruption of the binding of the BpeR repressor protein to the bpeABoprB regulatory region in vitro in the presence of increasing spermidine concentrations. This was supported by dose-dependent activation of bpeA-lacZ transcription in vivo in the presence of exogenous spermidine and N-acetylspermidine, thus implicating the involvement of the BpeAB-OprB pump in spermidine homeostasis in B. pseudomallei. Consequently, inhibition of intracellular spermidine synthesis reduced the efflux of AHLs by BpeAB-OprB. Other potential therapeutic applications of spermidine synthase inhibitors include the reduction of swimming motility and biofilm formation by B. pseudomallei.

  20. Antimicrobial and Efflux Pump Inhibitory Activity of Caffeoylquinic Acids from Artemisia absinthium against Gram-Positive Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fiamegos, Yiannis C.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Han, Haley; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Vervoort, Jacques; Lewis, Kim; Hamblin, Michael R.; Tegos, George P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Traditional antibiotics are increasingly suffering from the emergence of multidrug resistance amongst pathogenic bacteria leading to a range of novel approaches to control microbial infections being investigated as potential alternative treatments. One plausible antimicrobial alternative could be the combination of conventional antimicrobial agents/antibiotics with small molecules which block multidrug efflux systems known as efflux pump inhibitors. Bioassay-driven purification and structural determination of compounds from plant sources have yielded a number of pump inhibitors which acted against gram positive bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we report the identification and characterization of 4′,5′-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4′,5′-ODCQA) from Artemisia absinthium as a pump inhibitor with a potential of targeting efflux systems in a wide panel of Gram-positive human pathogenic bacteria. Separation and identification of phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, 3′,5′-ODCQA, 4′,5′-ODCQA) was based on hyphenated chromatographic techniques such as liquid chromatography with post column solid-phase extraction coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. Microbial susceptibility testing and potentiation of well know pump substrates revealed at least two active compounds; chlorogenic acid with weak antimicrobial activity and 4′,5′-ODCQA with pump inhibitory activity whereas 3′,5′-ODCQA was ineffective. These intitial findings were further validated with checkerboard, berberine accumulation efflux assays using efflux-related phenotypes and clinical isolates as well as molecular modeling methodology. Conclusions/Significance These techniques facilitated the direct analysis of the active components from plant extracts, as well as dramatically reduced the time needed to analyze the compounds, without the need for prior isolation. The calculated energetics of the docking poses supported the

  1. Structure of reconstituted bacterial membrane efflux pump by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Trépout, Sylvain; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Granier, Thierry; Ducruix, Arnaud; Frangakis, Achilleas S; Lambert, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Complexes of OprM and MexA, two proteins of the MexA-MexB-OprM multidrug efflux pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium, were reconstituted into proteoliposomes by detergent removal. Stacks of protein layers with a constant height of 21nm, separated by lipid bilayers, were obtained at stoichiometry of 1:1 (w/w). Using cryo-electron microscopy and tomography, we showed that these protein layers were composed of MexA-OprM complexes self-assembled into regular arrays. Image processing of extracted sub-tomograms depicted the architecture of the bipartite complex sandwiched between two lipid bilayers, representing an environment close to that of the native whole pump (i.e. anchored between outer and inner membranes of P. aeruginosa). The MexA-OprM complex appeared as a cylindrical structure in which we were able to identify the OprM molecule and the MexA moiety. MexA molecules have a cylindrical shape prolonging the periplasmic helices of OprM, and widening near the lipid bilayer. The flared part is likely composed of two MexA domains adjacent to the lipid bilayer, although their precise organization was not reachable mainly due to their flexibility. Moreover, the intermembrane distance of 21nm indicated that the height of the bipartite complex is larger than that of the tripartite AcrA-AcrB-TolC built-up model in which TolC and AcrB are docked into contact. We proposed a model of MexA-OprM taking into account features of previous models based on AcrA-AcrB-TolC and our structural results providing clues to a possible mechanism of tripartite system assembly.

  2. Vulvovaginal candidiasis: species distribution, fluconazole resistance and drug efflux pump gene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie-Yu; Liu, Jin-Hui; Liu, Fa-Di; Xia, Yan-Hua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Zhi-Qin; Zhu, Na; Yan-Yan; Ying, Ying; Huang, Xiao-Tian

    2014-10-01

    The increasing incidence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and the emergence of fluconazole resistance are an indisputable fact. However, little information is available regarding the correlation between fluconazole resistance in vaginal Candida albicans and the expression of drug efflux pump genes. In this study, we investigated the species distribution, fluconazole susceptibility profiles and the mechanisms of fluconazole resistance in Candida strains. In total, 785 clinical Candida isolates were collected from patients with VVC. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species(n = 529) followed by C. glabrata (n = 164) and C. krusei (n = 57). Of all Candida isolates, 4.7% were resistant to fluconazole. We randomly selected 18 fluconazole resistant isolates of C. albicans to evaluate the expression of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1 and FLU1 genes. Compared with fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans isolates, CDR1 gene expression displayed 3.16-fold relative increase, which was statistically significant. CDR2, MDR1 and FLU1 overexpression was observed in several fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates, but statistical significance was not achieved. These results demonstrate a high frequency of non-albicans species (32.6%); however, C. albicans is the most common Candida species implicated in vaginitis, and this strain displays considerable fluconazole resistance. Meanwhile, our study further indicates that fluconazole resistance in C. albicans may correlate with CDR1 gene overexpression.

  3. Sorafenib overcomes irinotecan resistance in colorectal cancer by inhibiting the ABCG2 drug-efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Mazard, Thibault; Causse, Annick; Simony, Joelle; Leconet, Wilhem; Vezzio-Vie, Nadia; Torro, Adeline; Jarlier, Marta; Evrard, Alexandre; Del Rio, Maguy; Assenat, Eric; Martineau, Pierre; Ychou, Marc; Robert, Bruno; Gongora, Celine

    2013-10-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC), tumor resistance is a frequent cause of chemotherapy failure. Therefore, new treatment options are needed to improve survival of patients with irinotecan-refractory CRCs, particularly those bearing KRAS mutations that preclude the use of anti-EGFR therapies. In this study, we investigated whether sorafenib could reverse irinotecan resistance, thereby enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of routinely used irinotecan-based chemotherapy. We used both in vitro (the HCT116, SW48, SW620, and HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cell lines and four SN-38-resistant HCT-116 and SW48 clones) and in vivo models (nude mice xenografted with SN-38-resistant HCT116 cells) to test the efficacy of sorafenib alone or in combination with irinotecan or its active metabolite, SN-38. We have shown that sorafenib improved the antitumoral activity of irinotecan in vitro, in both parental and SN-38-resistant colon adenocarcinoma cell lines independently of their KRAS status, as well as in vivo, in xenografted mice. By inhibiting the drug-efflux pump ABCG2, sorafenib favors irinotecan intracellular accumulation and enhances its toxicity. Moreover, we found that sorafenib improved the efficacy of irinotecan by inhibiting the irinotecan-mediated p38 and ERK activation. In conclusion, our results show that sorafenib can suppress resistance to irinotecan and suggest that sorafenib could be used to overcome resistance to irinotecan-based chemotherapies in CRC, particularly in KRAS-mutated tumors.

  4. Plasmid-Encoded Tetracycline Efflux Pump Protein Alters Bacterial Stress Responses and Ecological Fitness of Acinetobacter oleivorans

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyerim; Jung, Jaejoon; Park, Woojun

    2014-01-01

    Acquisition of the extracellular tetracycline (TC) resistance plasmid pAST2 affected host gene expression and phenotype in the oil-degrading soil bacterium, Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1. Whole-transcriptome profiling of DR1 cells harboring pAST2 revealed that all the plasmid genes were highly expressed under TC conditions, and the expression levels of many host chromosomal genes were modulated by the presence of pAST2. The host energy burden imposed by replication of pAST2 led to (i) lowered ATP concentrations, (ii) downregulated expression of many genes involved in cellular growth, and (iii) reduced growth rate. Interestingly, some phenotypes were restored by deleting the plasmid-encoded efflux pump gene tetH, suggesting that the membrane integrity changes resulting from the incorporation of efflux pump proteins also resulted in altered host response under the tested conditions. Alteration of membrane integrity by tetH deletion was shown by measuring permeability of fluorescent probe and membrane hydrophobicity. The presence of the plasmid conferred peroxide and superoxide resistance to cells, but only peroxide resistance was diminished by tetH gene deletion, suggesting that the plasmid-encoded membrane-bound efflux pump protein provided peroxide resistance. The downregulation of fimbriae-related genes presumably led to reduced swimming motility, but this phenotype was recovered by tetH gene deletion. Our data suggest that not only the plasmid replication burden, but also its encoded efflux pump protein altered host chromosomal gene expression and phenotype, which also alters the ecological fitness of the host in the environment. PMID:25229538

  5. Improved Potency of Indole-Based NorA Efflux Pump Inhibitors: From Serendipity toward Rational Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Buonerba, Federica; Lepri, Susan; Goracci, Laura; Schindler, Bryan D; Seo, Susan M; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cruciani, Gabriele

    2017-01-12

    The NorA efflux pump is a potential drug target for reversal of resistance to selected antibacterial agents, and recently we described indole-based inhibitor candidates. Herein we report a second class of inhibitors derived from them but with significant differences in shape and size. In particular, compounds 13 and 14 are very potent inhibitors in that they demonstrated the lowest IC50 values (2 μM) ever observed among all indole-based compounds we have evaluated.

  6. Tracking metal ions through a Cu/Ag efflux pump assigns the functional roles of the periplasmic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mealman, Tiffany D.; McEvoy, Megan M.; Blackburn, Ninian J.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential nutrient for all aerobic organisms but is toxic in excess. At the host–pathogen interface, macrophages respond to bacterial infection by copper-dependent killing mechanisms, whereas the invading bacteria are thought to counter with an up-regulation of copper transporters and efflux pumps. The tripartite efflux pump CusCBA and its metallochaperone CusF are vital to the detoxification of copper and silver ions in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. However, the mechanism of efflux by this complex, which requires the activation of the inner membrane pump CusA, is poorly understood. Here, we use selenomethionine (SeM) active site labels in a series of biological X-ray absorption studies at the selenium, copper, and silver edges to establish a “switch” role for the membrane fusion protein CusB. We determine that metal-bound CusB is required for activation of cuprous ion transfer from CusF directly to a site in the CusA antiporter, showing for the first time (to our knowledge) the in vitro activation of the Cus efflux pump. This metal-binding site of CusA is unlike that observed in the crystal structures of the CusA protein and is composed of one oxygen and two sulfur ligands. Our results suggest that metal transfer occurs between CusF and apo-CusB, and that, when metal-loaded, CusB plays a role in the regulation of metal ion transfer from CusF to CusA in the periplasm. PMID:25313055

  7. Homology modeling, molecular dynamics, and virtual screening of NorA efflux pump inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Baki Vijaya; Babu, Tirumalasetty Muni Chandra; Reddy, Netala Vasudeva; Rajendra, Wudayagiri

    2016-01-01

    Emerging drug resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus might be implicated to the overexpression of NorA efflux pump which is capable of extruding numerous structurally diverse compounds. However, NorA efflux pump is considered as a potential drug target for the development of efflux pump inhibitors. In the present study, NorA model was constructed based on the crystal structure of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (PDBID: 1PW4). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed using NAMD2.7 for NorA which is embedded in the hydrated lipid bilayer. Structural design of NorA unveils amino (N)- and carboxyl (C)-terminal domains which are connected by long cytoplasmic loop. N and C domains are composed of six transmembrane α-helices (TM) which exhibits pseudo-twofold symmetry and possess voluminous substrate binding cavity between TM helices. Molecular docking of reserpine, totarol, ferruginol, salvin, thioxanthene, phenothiazine, omeprazole, verapamil, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and acridine to NorA found that all the molecules were bound at the large hydrophobic cleft and indicated significant interactions with the key residues. In addition, structure-based virtual screening was employed which indicates that 14 potent novel lead molecules such as CID58685302, CID58685367, CID5799283, CID5578487, CID60028372, ZINC12196383, ZINC72140751, ZINC72137843, ZINC39227983, ZINC43742707, ZINC12196375, ZINC66166948, ZINC39228014, and ZINC14616160 have highest binding affinity for NorA. These lead molecules displayed considerable pharmacological properties as evidenced by Lipinski rule of five and prophecy of toxicity risk assessment. Thus, the present study will be helpful in designing and synthesis of a novel class of NorA efflux pump inhibitors that restore the susceptibilities of drug compounds. PMID:27757014

  8. Tracking metal ions through a Cu/Ag efflux pump assigns the functional roles of the periplasmic proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Chacon, Kelly N.; Mealman, Tiffany D.; McEvoy, Megan M.; ...

    2014-10-13

    Copper is an essential nutrient for all aerobic organisms but is toxic in excess. At the host–pathogen interface, macrophages respond to bacterial infection by copper-dependent killing mechanisms, whereas the invading bacteria are thought to counter with an up-regulation of copper transporters and efflux pumps. The tripartite efflux pump CusCBA and its metallochaperone CusF are vital to the detoxification of copper and silver ions in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. However, the mechanism of efflux by this complex, which requires the activation of the inner membrane pump CusA, is poorly understood. In this paper, we use selenomethionine (SeM) active site labelsmore » in a series of biological X-ray absorption studies at the selenium, copper, and silver edges to establish a “switch” role for the membrane fusion protein CusB. We determine that metal-bound CusB is required for activation of cuprous ion transfer from CusF directly to a site in the CusA antiporter, showing for the first time (to our knowledge) the in vitro activation of the Cus efflux pump. This metal-binding site of CusA is unlike that observed in the crystal structures of the CusA protein and is composed of one oxygen and two sulfur ligands. Finally, our results suggest that metal transfer occurs between CusF and apo-CusB, and that, when metal-loaded, CusB plays a role in the regulation of metal ion transfer from CusF to CusA in the periplasm.« less

  9. Tracking metal ions through a Cu/Ag efflux pump assigns the functional roles of the periplasmic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, Kelly N.; Mealman, Tiffany D.; McEvoy, Megan M.; Blackburn, Ninian J.

    2014-10-13

    Copper is an essential nutrient for all aerobic organisms but is toxic in excess. At the host–pathogen interface, macrophages respond to bacterial infection by copper-dependent killing mechanisms, whereas the invading bacteria are thought to counter with an up-regulation of copper transporters and efflux pumps. The tripartite efflux pump CusCBA and its metallochaperone CusF are vital to the detoxification of copper and silver ions in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. However, the mechanism of efflux by this complex, which requires the activation of the inner membrane pump CusA, is poorly understood. In this paper, we use selenomethionine (SeM) active site labels in a series of biological X-ray absorption studies at the selenium, copper, and silver edges to establish a “switch” role for the membrane fusion protein CusB. We determine that metal-bound CusB is required for activation of cuprous ion transfer from CusF directly to a site in the CusA antiporter, showing for the first time (to our knowledge) the in vitro activation of the Cus efflux pump. This metal-binding site of CusA is unlike that observed in the crystal structures of the CusA protein and is composed of one oxygen and two sulfur ligands. Finally, our results suggest that metal transfer occurs between CusF and apo-CusB, and that, when metal-loaded, CusB plays a role in the regulation of metal ion transfer from CusF to CusA in the periplasm.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus NorD, a putative efflux pump coregulated with the Opp1 oligopeptide permease, contributes selectively to fitness in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanpeng; Fu, Yingmei; Lee, Jean C; Hooper, David C

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus readily infects humans, causing infections from mild superficial skin infections to lethal bacteremia and endocarditis. Transporters produced by S. aureus allow the pathogen to adapt to a variety of settings, including survival at sites of infection and in the presence of antibiotics. The native functions of many transporters are unknown, but their potential dual contribution to fitness and antimicrobial resistance highlights their importance in staphylococcal infections. Here, we show that S. aureus NorD, a newly recognized efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily, contributes to fitness in a murine subcutaneous abscess model. In community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain MW2, norD was selectively upregulated 36-fold at the infection site relative to growth in vitro, and the norD mutant demonstrated significant fitness impairment in abscesses, with fitness 20- to 40-fold lower than that of the parent MW2 strain. Plasmid-encoded NorD could complement the fitness defect of the MW2 norD mutant. Chromosomal norD expression is polycistronic with the upstream oligopeptide permease genes (opp1ABCDF), which encode an ABC oligopeptide transporter. Both norD and opp1 were upregulated in abscesses and iron-restricted culture medium and negatively regulated by Fur, but only NorD contributed to fitness in the murine abscess model.

  11. In vitro transport activity of the fully assembled MexAB-OprM efflux pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verchère, Alice; Dezi, Manuela; Adrien, Vladimir; Broutin, Isabelle; Picard, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and many bacteria responsible for human infections have now developed a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms. For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a disease-causing Gram-negative bacteria, is now resistant to almost every class of antibiotics. Much of this resistance is attributable to multidrug efflux pumps, which are tripartite membrane protein complexes that span both membranes and actively expel antibiotics. Here we report an in vitro procedure to monitor transport by the tripartite MexAB-OprM pump. By combining proteoliposomes containing the MexAB and OprM portions of the complex, we are able to assay energy-dependent substrate translocation in a system that mimics the dual-membrane architecture of Gram-negative bacteria. This assay facilitates the study of pump transport dynamics and could be used to screen pump inhibitors with potential clinical use in restoring therapeutic activity of old antibiotics.

  12. Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli CusC, the Outer Membrane Component of a Heavy Metal Efflux Pump

    PubMed Central

    Indic, Mridhu; van den Berg, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Background While copper has essential functions as an enzymatic co-factor, excess copper ions are toxic for cells, necessitating mechanisms for regulating its levels. The cusCBFA operon of E. coli encodes a four-component efflux pump dedicated to the extrusion of Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions. Methodology/Principal Findings We have solved the X-ray crystal structure of CusC, the outer membrane component of the Cus heavy metal efflux pump, to 2.3 Å resolution. The structure has the largest extracellular opening of any outer membrane factor (OMF) protein and suggests, for the first time, the presence of a tri-acylated N-terminal lipid anchor. Conclusions/Significance The CusC protein does not have any obvious features that would make it specific for metal ions, suggesting that the narrow substrate specificity of the pump is provided by other components of the pump, most likely by the inner membrane component CusA. PMID:21249122

  13. A phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide sensitive multidrug efflux pump involved in intrinsic and acquired resistance of Campylobacter to macrolides.

    PubMed

    Mamelli, Laurent; Amoros, Jean-Pierre; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Bolla, Jean-Michel

    2003-09-01

    The macrolide erythromycin is the antibiotic of choice in the management of Campylobacter infections. Although mutation has been reported to account for resistance to the antibiotic, resistance may also be due to an efflux pump that extrudes the drug prior to reaching its target. Moreover, the efflux pump may be one that accommodates resistance to other related or unrelated drugs (multidrug resistance). We examined the possibility that resistance to erythromycin may involve an efflux pump whose presence may be identified by the use of the unique commercial inhibitor of the previously described efflux pumps phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphtylamide (PAbetaN). We showed that PAbetaN is able to significantly increase the susceptibility of the reference strain NCTC 11168 to erythromycin, suggesting that an efflux pump functions at a basal level in the reference wild type strain. Erythromycin-resistant isolates were tested for their response to PAbetaN treatment. Among the strains tested, resistance of three isolates to erythromycin was reduced to a level comparable to that of the susceptible strain when the strains were grown in the presence of this inhibitor. To conclude, besides mutations, erythromycin resistance in Campylobacter may also be due to an efflux mechanism sensitive to PAbetaN.

  14. Resistance-nodulation-division efflux pump acrAB is modulated by florfenicol and contributes to drug resistance in the fish pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Rodrigo; Oliver, Cristian; Valdivia, Sharin; Valenzuela, Karla; Haro, Ronie E; Sánchez, Patricio; Olavarría, Víctor H; Valenzuela, Paulina; Avendaño-Herrera, Rubén; Romero, Alex; Cárcamo, Juan G; Figueroa, Jaime E; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-06-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is a fastidious intracellular pathogen responsible for high mortality rates in farmed salmonids, with serious economic consequences for the Chilean aquaculture industry. Oxytetracycline and florfenicol are the most frequently used antibiotics against P. salmonis, but routine use could contribute to drug resistance. This study identified differentiated florfenicol susceptibilities in two P. salmonis strains, LF-89 and AUSTRAL-005. The less susceptible isolate, AUSTRAL-005, also showed a high ethidium bromide efflux rate, indicating a higher activity of general efflux pump genes than LF-89. The P. salmonis genome presented resistance nodulation division (RND) family members, a family containing typical multidrug resistance-related efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. Additionally, efflux pump acrAB genes were overexpressed in AUSTRAL-005 following exposure to the tolerated maximal concentration of florfenicol, in contrast to LF-89. These results indicate that tolerated maximum concentrations of florfenicol can modulate RND gene expression and increase efflux pump activity. We propose that the acrAB efflux pump is essential for P. salmonis survival at critical florfenicol concentrations and for the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains.

  15. Structure-Activity Relationships of a Novel Pyranopyridine Series of Gram-negative Bacterial Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Son T.; Kwasny, Steven M.; Ding, Xiaoyuan; Cardinale, Steven C.; McCarthy, Courtney T.; Kim, Hong-Suk; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Peet, Norton P.; Williams, John D.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Opperman, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we described a novel pyranopyridine inhibitor (MBX2319) of RND-type efflux pumps of the Enterobacteriaceae. MBX2319 (3,3-dimethyl-5-cyano-8-morpholino-6-(phenethylthio)-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrano[3,4-c]pyridine) is structurally distinct from other known Gram-negative efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), such as 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP), phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide (PAβN), D13-9001, and the pyridopyrimidine derivatives. Here, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 60 new analogs of MBX2319 that were designed to probe the structure activity relationships (SARs) of the pyranopyridine scaffold. The results of these studies produced a molecular activity map of the scaffold, which identifies regions that are critical to efflux inhibitory activities and those that can be modified to improve potency, metabolic stability and solubility. Several compounds, such as 22d–f, 22i and 22k, are significantly more effective than MBX2319 at potentiating the antibacterial activity of levofloxacin and piperacillin against Escherichia coli. PMID:25818767

  16. The Influence of Efflux Pump Inhibitors on the Activity of Non-Antibiotic NSAIDS against Gram-Negative Rods

    PubMed Central

    Laudy, Agnieszka E.; Mrowka, Agnieszka; Krajewska, Joanna; Tyski, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Most patients with bacterial infections suffer from fever and various pains that require complex treatments with antibiotics, antipyretics, and analgaesics. The most common drugs used to relieve these symptoms are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are not typically considered antibiotics. Here, we investigate the effects of NSAIDs on bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics and the modulation of bacterial efflux pumps. Methodology The activity of 12 NSAID active substances, paracetamol (acetaminophen), and eight relevant medicinal products was analyzed with or without pump inhibitors against 89 strains of Gram-negative rods by determining the MICs. Furthermore, the effects of NSAIDs on the susceptibility of clinical strains to antimicrobial agents with or without PAβN (Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide) were measured. Results The MICs of diclofenac, mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, in the presence of PAβN, were significantly (≥4-fold) reduced, decreasing to 25–1600 mg/L, against the majority of the studied strains. In the case of acetylsalicylic acid only for 5 and 7 out of 12 strains of P. mirabilis and E. coli, respectively, a 4-fold increase in susceptibility in the presence of PAβN was observed. The presence of Aspirin resulted in a 4-fold increase in the MIC of ofloxacin against only two strains of E. coli among 48 tested clinical strains, which included species such as E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, and S. maltophilia. Besides, the medicinal products containing the following NSAIDs, diclofenac, mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, did not cause the decrease of clinical strains’ susceptibility to antibiotics. Conclusions The effects of PAβN on the susceptibility of bacteria to NSAIDs indicate that some NSAIDs are substrates for efflux pumps in Gram-negative rods. Morever, Aspirin probably induced efflux-mediated resistance to fluoroquinolones in a few E. coli strains. PMID:26771525

  17. Involvement of the AcrAB-TolC Efflux Pump in the Resistance, Fitness, and Virulence of Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Astrid; Poza, Margarita; Fernández, Ana; del Carmen Fernández, Maria; Mallo, Susana; Merino, María; Rumbo-Feal, Soraya; Cabral, María P.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps have emerged as important mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial pathogens. In order to cause infection, pathogenic bacteria require mechanisms to avoid the effects of host-produced compounds, and express efflux pumps may accomplish this task. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the inactivation of AcrAB-TolC on antimicrobial resistance, fitness, and virulence in Enterobacter cloacae, an opportunistic pathogen usually involved in nosocomial infections. Two different clinical isolates of E. cloacae were used, EcDC64 (multidrug resistance overexpressing the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump) and Jc194 (basal AcrAB-TolC expression). The acrA and tolC genes were deleted in strains EcDC64 and Jc194 to produce, respectively, EcΔacrA and EcΔtolC and JcΔacrA and JcΔtolC knockout (KO) derivatives. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed with all isolates, and we discovered that these mechanisms are involved in the resistance of E. cloacae to several antibiotics. Competition experiments were also performed with wild-type and isogenic KO strains. The competition index (CI), defined as the mutant/wild-type ratio, revealed that the acrA and tolC genes both affect the fitness of E. cloacae, as fitness was clearly reduced in the acrA and tolC KO strains. The median CI values obtained in vitro and in vivo were, respectively, 0.42 and 0.3 for EcDC64/EcΔacrA, 0.24 and 0.38 for EcDC64/EcΔtolC, 0.15 and 0.11 for Jc194/JcΔacrA, and 0.38 and 0.39 for Jc194/JcΔtolC. Use of an intraperitoneal mouse model of systemic infection revealed reduced virulence in both E. cloacae clinical strains when either the acrA or tolC gene was inactivated. In conclusion, the structural components of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump appear to play a role in antibiotic resistance as well as environmental adaptation and host virulence in clinical isolates of E. cloacae. PMID:22290971

  18. Involvement of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump in the resistance, fitness, and virulence of Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Astrid; Poza, Margarita; Fernández, Ana; Fernández, Maria del Carmen; Mallo, Susana; Merino, María; Rumbo-Feal, Soraya; Cabral, María P; Bou, Germán

    2012-04-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps have emerged as important mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial pathogens. In order to cause infection, pathogenic bacteria require mechanisms to avoid the effects of host-produced compounds, and express efflux pumps may accomplish this task. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the inactivation of AcrAB-TolC on antimicrobial resistance, fitness, and virulence in Enterobacter cloacae, an opportunistic pathogen usually involved in nosocomial infections. Two different clinical isolates of E. cloacae were used, EcDC64 (multidrug resistance overexpressing the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump) and Jc194 (basal AcrAB-TolC expression). The acrA and tolC genes were deleted in strains EcDC64 and Jc194 to produce, respectively, EcΔacrA and EcΔtolC and JcΔacrA and JcΔtolC knockout (KO) derivatives. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed with all isolates, and we discovered that these mechanisms are involved in the resistance of E. cloacae to several antibiotics. Competition experiments were also performed with wild-type and isogenic KO strains. The competition index (CI), defined as the mutant/wild-type ratio, revealed that the acrA and tolC genes both affect the fitness of E. cloacae, as fitness was clearly reduced in the acrA and tolC KO strains. The median CI values obtained in vitro and in vivo were, respectively, 0.42 and 0.3 for EcDC64/EcΔacrA, 0.24 and 0.38 for EcDC64/EcΔtolC, 0.15 and 0.11 for Jc194/JcΔacrA, and 0.38 and 0.39 for Jc194/JcΔtolC. Use of an intraperitoneal mouse model of systemic infection revealed reduced virulence in both E. cloacae clinical strains when either the acrA or tolC gene was inactivated. In conclusion, the structural components of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump appear to play a role in antibiotic resistance as well as environmental adaptation and host virulence in clinical isolates of E. cloacae.

  19. Role of EfrAB efflux pump in biocide tolerance and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from traditional fermented foods and the effect of EDTA as EfrAB inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Valenzuela, Antonio Sánchez; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-12-01

    Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from various traditional fermented foods of both animal and vegetable origins have shown multidrug resistance to several antibiotics and tolerance to biocides. Reduced susceptibility was intra and inter-species dependent and was due to specific and unspecific mechanisms such as efflux pumps. EfrAB, a heterodimeric ABC transporter efflux pump, was detected in 100% of multidrug resistant (MDR) E. faecalis strains and only in 12% of MDR E. faecium strains. EfrAB expression was induced by half of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of gentamicin, streptomycin and chloramphenicol. However, expression of efrA and efrB genes was highly dependent on the strain tested and on the antimicrobial used. Our results indicated that 3 mM EDTA highly reduced the MICs of almost all drugs tested. Nevertheless, the higher reductions (>8 folds) were obtained with gentamicin, streptomycin, chlorhexidine and triclosan. Reductions of MICs were correlated with down-regulation of EfrAB expression (10-140 folds) in all three MDR enterococci strains. This is the first report describing the role of EfrAB in the efflux of antibiotics and biocides which reflect also the importance of EfrAB in multidrug resistance in enterococci. EDTA used at low concentration as food preservative could be one of the best choices to prevent spread of multidrug resistant enterococci throughout food chain by decreasing EfrAB expression. EfrAB could be an attractive target not only in enterococci present in food matrix but also those causing infections as well by using EDTA as therapeutic agent in combination with low doses of antibiotics.

  20. Functional cloning and expression of emeA, and characterization of EmeA, a multidrug efflux pump from Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Woo; Chen, Jing; Huda, Md Nazmul; Kuroda, Teruo; Mizushima, Tohru; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2003-02-01

    A fragment of chromosomal DNA from Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was cloned using Escherichia coli KAM32 host cells lacking major multidrug efflux pumps. E. coli KAM32 cells were sensitive to many antimicrobial agents, and the transformed cells harboring a recombinant plasmid became resistant to several structurally unrelated antimicrobial agents such as tetraphenylphosphonium chloride, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), Hoechst 33342, acriflavine, benzalkonium chloride, norfloxacin and ethidium bromide. This suggests that the cloned DNA fragment carries a gene(s) encoding a multidrug efflux pump. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the cloned DNA revealed a gene designated as emeA. The transformed E. coli cells showed efflux activity of several antimicrobial agents such as DAPI, Hoechst 33342 and acriflavine. Efflux of DAPI via EmeA was strongly inhibited by reserpine.

  1. Synthetic interaction between the TipN polarity factor and an AcrAB-family efflux pump implicates cell polarity in bacterial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Viollier, Patrick H

    2014-05-22

    Quinolone antibiotics are clinically important drugs that target bacterial DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Although the AcrAB-family efflux pumps generally protect bacteria from such drugs, the physiological role of these efflux systems and their interplay with other cellular events are poorly explored. Here, we report an intricate relationship between antibiotic resistance and cell polarity in the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We show that a polarity landmark protein, TipN, identified by virtue of its ability to direct flagellum placement to the new cell pole, protects cells from toxic misregulation of an AcrAB efflux pump through a cis-encoded nalidixic acid-responsive transcriptional repressor. Alongside the importance of polarity in promoting the inheritance and activity of virulence functions including motility, we can now ascribe to it an additional role in drug resistance that is distinct from classical efflux mechanisms.

  2. Molecular Expression and Functional Evidence of a Drug Efflux Pump (BCRP) in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karla, Pradeep K.; Earla, Ravinder; Boddu, Sagar H.; Johnston, Thomas P.; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) belongs to the family of efflux transporters involved in drug efflux leading to drug resistance. The objective of this study was to explore physical barriers for ocular drug absorption and to verify the presence and possible role of BCRP as a bar-rier for ocular drug resistance. Methods Transfected human corneal epithelial cells (SV40-HCEC) were selected as an in vitro model for corneal epithelium with MDCKII-BCRP as positive control. [3H]-Mitoxantrone ([3H]-MTX), which is a proven substrate for organic anion transporter like BCRP, was selected as a model drug for functional expression studies. Fumetremorgin C (FTC), a known specific inhibitor for BCRP and GF120918, an inhibitor for BCRP and P-gp, were added to inhibit BCRP-mediated efflux. PGP-4008, a specific inhibitor of P-gp was used to delineate the contribution of P-gp. The mRNA extracted from cells was used for RT-PCR analysis and gene expression. Membrane fractions of SV40-HCEC and MDCKII-BCRP were used for immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis. Results Efflux was inhibited significantly in the presence of FTC and GF120918. Dose-dependent inhibition of efflux by BCRP was noticed in SV40-HCEC and MDCKII-BCRP in the presence of FTC and GF120918, and the efflux was ATP-dependent. The metabolic inhibitor, 2,4-DNP, significantly inhibited efflux. No pH-dependent efflux was noticed except at pH 5.5. RT-PCR analysis indicated a unique and distinct band at ~429 bp, corresponding to BCRP in SV40-HCEC and MDCKII-BCRP cells. Western Blot analysis indicated a specific band at ~70 kDa in the membrane fraction of SV40-HCEC and MDCKII-BCRP cells. Conclusions We have demonstrated the expression of BCRP in human corneal epithelial cells and, for the first time, demonstrated its functional activity leading to drug efflux. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis further confirmed this finding. PMID:19172464

  3. Regulation of ABC Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Miller, David S.

    2015-01-01

    ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters at the blood-brain barrier function as ATP-driven xenobiotic efflux pumps and limit delivery of small molecule drugs to the brain. Here I review recent progress in understanding the regulation of the expression and transport activity of these transporters and comment on how this new information might aid in improving drug delivery to the brain. PMID:25670036

  4. Morphological changes and differentially expressed efflux pump genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposed to a rifampicin and verapamil combination.

    PubMed

    Caleffi-Ferracioli, Katiany R; Amaral, Renata Claro R; Demitto, Fernanda O; Maltempe, Flaviane G; Canezin, Pedro Henrique; Scodro, Regiane B L; Nakamura, Celso V; Leite, Clarice Queico F; Siqueira, Vera Lúcia D; Cardoso, Rosilene F

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to (i) evaluate the in vitro action of rifampicin (RIF), ethambutol or isoniazid with efflux pumps inhibitors (EPIs) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv and (ii) evaluate the morphological and efflux pumps (EPs) transcriptional changes by the action of rifampicin + verapamil combination (RIF + VP). The minimal inhibitory concentration and synergic effect of drug combinations were determined by Resazurin Microtiter Plate Assay and Resazurin Drugs Combination Microtiter Assay, respectively. VP showed greater capacity of ethidium bromide accumulation and RIF + VP had the lower fractional inhibitory concentration index. The RIF + VP exerted a similar reduction of viable cell counts to RIF by time-kill curve, but decreases in the expression of EPs genes were observed by Real time PCR at 72 h of RIF + VP exposure. Accumulative morphological changes (wrinkled and rounding) caused by each drug were observed by scanning electron microscopy after RIF + VP exposure. The downexpression of EPs related genes exposed to RIF + VP, suggest an effective inhibitory activity of VP in Mtb H37Rv. The role of EPs and the use of EPIs open up a powerful approach and the RIF + VP combination should be studied in Mtb more thoroughly.

  5. The BpeAB-OprB Efflux Pump of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b Does Not Play a Role in Quorum Sensing, Virulence Factor Production, or Extrusion of Aminoglycosides but Is a Broad-Spectrum Drug Efflux System ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Takehiko; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2010-01-01

    Most Burkholderia pseudomallei strains are intrinsically aminoglycoside resistant, mainly due to AmrAB-OprA-mediated efflux. Rare naturally occurring or genetically engineered mutants lacking this pump are aminoglycoside susceptible despite the fact that they also encode and express BpeAB-OprB, which was reported to mediate efflux of aminoglycosides in the Singapore strain KHW. To reassess the role of BpeAB-OprB in B. pseudomallei aminoglycoside resistance, we used mutants overexpressing or lacking this pump in either AmrAB-OprA-proficient or -deficient strain 1026b backgrounds. Our data show that BpeAB-OprB does not mediate efflux of aminoglycosides but is a multidrug efflux system which extrudes macrolides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, acriflavine, and, to a lesser extent, chloramphenicol. Phylogenetically, BpeAB-OprB is closely related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM, which has a similar substrate spectrum. AmrAB-OprA is most closely related to MexXY, the only P. aeruginosa efflux pump known to extrude aminoglycosides. Since BpeAB-OprB in strain KHW was also implicated in playing a major role in export of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules and in expression of diverse virulence factors, we explored whether this was also true in the strain 1026b background. The results showed that BpeAB-OprB was not required for AHL export, and mutants lacking this efflux system exhibited normal swimming motility and siderophore production, which were severely impaired in KHW bpeAB-oprB mutants. Biofilm formation was impaired in 1026b Δ(amrRAB-oprA) and Δ(amrRAB-oprA) Δ(bpeAB-oprB) mutants. At present, we do not know why our BpeAB-OprB susceptibility and virulence factor expression results with 1026b and its derivatives are different from those previously published for Singapore strain KHW. PMID:20498323

  6. The BpeAB-OprB efflux pump of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b does not play a role in quorum sensing, virulence factor production, or extrusion of aminoglycosides but is a broad-spectrum drug efflux system.

    PubMed

    Mima, Takehiko; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2010-08-01

    Most Burkholderia pseudomallei strains are intrinsically aminoglycoside resistant, mainly due to AmrAB-OprA-mediated efflux. Rare naturally occurring or genetically engineered mutants lacking this pump are aminoglycoside susceptible despite the fact that they also encode and express BpeAB-OprB, which was reported to mediate efflux of aminoglycosides in the Singapore strain KHW. To reassess the role of BpeAB-OprB in B. pseudomallei aminoglycoside resistance, we used mutants overexpressing or lacking this pump in either AmrAB-OprA-proficient or -deficient strain 1026b backgrounds. Our data show that BpeAB-OprB does not mediate efflux of aminoglycosides but is a multidrug efflux system which extrudes macrolides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, acriflavine, and, to a lesser extent, chloramphenicol. Phylogenetically, BpeAB-OprB is closely related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM, which has a similar substrate spectrum. AmrAB-OprA is most closely related to MexXY, the only P. aeruginosa efflux pump known to extrude aminoglycosides. Since BpeAB-OprB in strain KHW was also implicated in playing a major role in export of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules and in expression of diverse virulence factors, we explored whether this was also true in the strain 1026b background. The results showed that BpeAB-OprB was not required for AHL export, and mutants lacking this efflux system exhibited normal swimming motility and siderophore production, which were severely impaired in KHW bpeAB-oprB mutants. Biofilm formation was impaired in 1026b Delta(amrRAB-oprA) and Delta(amrRAB-oprA) Delta(bpeAB-oprB) mutants. At present, we do not know why our BpeAB-OprB susceptibility and virulence factor expression results with 1026b and its derivatives are different from those previously published for Singapore strain KHW.

  7. Interaction of Ocular Hypotensive Agents (PGF2α Analogs—Bimatoprost, Latanoprost, and Travoprost) With MDR Efflux Pumps on the Rabbit Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Ashim K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this work were (i) to screen ocular hypotensive prostaglandin (PGF2α) analogs—bimatoprost, latanoprost, and travoprost as well as their free acid forms—for interaction with efflux pumps on the cornea and (ii) to assess the modulation of efflux upon co-administration of these prostaglandin analogs. Methods: Cultured rabbit primary corneal epithelial cells (rPCEC) were employed as an in vitro model for rabbit cornea. Transporter-specific interaction studies were carried out using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells overexpressing MDR1, MRP1, MRP2, MRP5, and BCRP. Freshly excised rabbit cornea was used as an ex vivo model to determine transcorneal permeability. Results: Cellular accumulation studies clearly showed that all prostaglandin analogs and their free acid forms are substrates of MRP1, MRP2, and MRP5. Bimatoprost was the only prostaglandin analog in this study to interact with P-gp. In addition, none of these molecules showed any affinity for BCRP. Ki values of these prostaglandin analogs obtained from dose-dependent inhibition of erythromycin efflux in rPCEC showed bimatoprost (82.54 μM) and travoprost (94.77 μM) to have similar but higher affinity to efflux pumps than latanoprost (163.20 μM). Ex vivo studies showed that the permeation of these molecules across cornea was significantly elevated in the presence of specific efflux modulators. Finally, both in vitro and ex vivo experiments demonstrated that the efflux of these prostaglandin analogs could be modulated by co-administering them together. Conclusion: Bimatoprost, latanoprost, travoprost, and their free acid forms are substrates of multiple drug efflux pumps on the cornea. Co-administration of these molecules together is a viable strategy to overcome efflux, which could simultaneously elicit a synergistic pharmacological effect, since these molecules have been shown to activate different receptor population for the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP). PMID

  8. Distribution and expression of the Ade multidrug efflux systems in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Pagdepanichkit, Sirawit; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Chuanchuen, Rungtip

    2016-09-01

    One hundred Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates were examined for inhibitory effect of reserpine and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) on the antimicrobial susceptibility and expression of 4 resistant-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type multidrug efflux systems, including AdeABC, AdeDE, AdeIJK, and AdeFGH, using RT-PCR. Ten A. baumannii isolates expressing AdeABC, AdeIJK, or AdeFGH were randomly selected for determination of transcription level and regulatory mutations. While all the isolates were resistant to multiple drugs, the reserpine and CCCP experiment showed that the multidrug resistance phenotype in most A. baumannii isolates was associated with efflux pumps. Most isolates expressed at least one of the RND-type efflux pumps tested (97%). AdeIJK expression was most common (97%), but none of the isolates produced AdeDE. Fifty-two percent of the A. baumannii isolates simultaneously produced up to 3 RND-type efflux systems (i.e., AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK). No good correlation between the expression of RND-type efflux pumps and the type of antimicrobial resistance was observed. Overexpression of AdeABC, AdeIJK, and AdeFGH was not always related to the presence of mutations in their corresponding regulatory genes. This study highlights (i) the universal presence of the RND-type efflux pumps with variable levels of expression level among the A. baumannii in this collection and (ii) the complexity of their regulation of expression.

  9. Reversal of the Drug Binding Pocket Defects of the AcrB Multidrug Efflux Pump Protein of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Soparkar, Ketaki; Kinana, Alfred D.; Weeks, Jon W.; Morrison, Keith D.; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The AcrB protein of Escherichia coli, together with TolC and AcrA, forms a contiguous envelope conduit for the capture and extrusion of diverse antibiotics and cellular metabolites. In this study, we sought to expand our knowledge of AcrB by conducting genetic and functional analyses. We began with an AcrB mutant bearing an F610A substitution in the drug binding pocket and obtained second-site substitutions that overcame the antibiotic hypersusceptibility phenotype conferred by the F610A mutation. Five of the seven unique single amino acid substitutions—Y49S, V127A, V127G, D153E, and G288C—mapped in the periplasmic porter domain of AcrB, with the D153E and G288C mutations mapping near and at the distal drug binding pocket, respectively. The other two substitutions—F453C and L486W—were mapped to transmembrane (TM) helices 5 and 6, respectively. The nitrocefin efflux kinetics data suggested that all periplasmic suppressors significantly restored nitrocefin binding affinity impaired by the F610A mutation. Surprisingly, despite increasing MICs of tested antibiotics and the efflux of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine, the TM suppressors did not improve the nitrocefin efflux kinetics. These data suggest that the periplasmic substitutions act by influencing drug binding affinities for the distal binding pocket, whereas the TM substitutions may indirectly affect the conformational dynamics of the drug binding domain. IMPORTANCE The AcrB protein and its homologues confer multidrug resistance in many important human bacterial pathogens. A greater understanding of how these efflux pump proteins function will lead to the development of effective inhibitors against them. The research presented in this paper investigates drug binding pocket mutants of AcrB through the isolation and characterization of intragenic suppressor mutations that overcome the drug susceptibility phenotype of mutations affecting the drug binding pocket. The data reveal a remarkable structure

  10. Identification of Important Compounds Isolated from Natural Sources that Have Activity Against Multidrug-resistant Cancer Cell Lines: Effects on Proliferation, Apoptotic Mechanism and the Efflux Pump Responsible for Multi-resistance Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Leonard; Spengler, Gabriella; Molnar, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this mini-review is to identify non-toxic compounds isolated from natural sources (plants) that exhibit specific activity against efflux pumps of specific multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cell lines, inhibit proliferation of the MDR cancer cell lines and inhibit the activity of overexpressed efflux pumps of the MDR cancer cell line.

  11. Microarray analysis of efflux pump genes in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis during stress induced by common anti-tuberculous drugs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anuj Kumar; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Sharma, Rahul; Singh, Mradula; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Sharma, Vishnu Dutt

    2010-03-01

    Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has become one of the major problems in public health. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance has been central to tuberculosis research in recent times. DNA microarray technology provides the platform to study the genomic variations related to these mechanisms on a comprehensive level. To investigate the role of efflux pumps in drug resistance, we have constructed a custom DNA microarray containing 25 drug efflux pump genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Indian Patent file no. 2071/DEL/2007) and monitored changes in the expression of these genes on exposure of common anti-tuberculous drugs. Expression profiling of efflux pump genes in multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates showed overexpression of 10 genes following exposure to various anti-tuberculous drugs. Although two of these genes (Rv3065 and Rv2938) have already been reported to be active drug efflux pumps in M. tuberculosis in earlier studies, the increased activities of other eight efflux pump genes (Rv1819, Rv2209, Rv2459, Rv2477c, Rv2688, Rv2846, Rv2994, and Rv3728) have been demonstrated in multidrug-resistant isolates by us for the first time. After confirmation of differential expressions of these genes by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, it was observed that a simultaneous overexpression of efflux pump genes Rv2459, Rv3728, and Rv3065 was associated with resistance to the combination of isoniazid and ethambutol, and these drugs, along with streptomycin, were identified to group together, where efflux-mediated drug resistance appears to be important in M. tuberculosis and follows a constant pattern of induction in multidrug-resistant isolates. Isoniazid and ethambutol combination was also found to be affected in 10% (6/60) of the clinical isolates in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chloro phenylhydrazone in resazurin microtitre plate assay, supporting the role of efflux pumps in the resistance to these

  12. Mass spectrometry reveals synergistic effects of nucleotides, lipids, and drugs binding to a multidrug resistance efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Julien; Wang, Sheila C; Politis, Argyris; Reading, Eamonn; Ma, Jerome; Biggin, Philip C; Zhou, Min; Tao, Houchao; Zhang, Qinghai; Chang, Geoffrey; Morgner, Nina; Robinson, Carol V

    2013-06-11

    Multidrug resistance is a serious barrier to successful treatment of many human diseases, including cancer, wherein chemotherapeutics are exported from target cells by membrane-embedded pumps. The most prevalent of these pumps, the ATP-Binding Cassette transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), consists of two homologous halves each comprising one nucleotide-binding domain and six transmembrane helices. The transmembrane region encapsulates a hydrophobic cavity, accessed by portals in the membrane, that binds cytotoxic compounds as well as lipids and peptides. Here we use mass spectrometry (MS) to probe the intact P-gp small molecule-bound complex in a detergent micelle. Activation in the gas phase leads to formation of ions, largely devoid of detergent, yet retaining drug molecules as well as charged or zwitterionic lipids. Measuring the rates of lipid binding and calculating apparent KD values shows that up to six negatively charged diacylglycerides bind more favorably than zwitterionic lipids. Similar experiments confirm binding of cardiolipins and show that prior binding of the immunosuppressant and antifungal antibiotic cyclosporin A enhances subsequent binding of cardiolipin. Ion mobility MS reveals that P-gp exists in an equilibrium between different states, readily interconverted by ligand binding. Overall these MS results show how concerted small molecule binding leads to synergistic effects on binding affinities and conformations of a multidrug efflux pump.

  13. Gallic acid-based indanone derivative interacts synergistically with tetracycline by inhibiting efflux pump in multidrug resistant E. coli.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Gaurav Raj; Tiwari, Nimisha; Singh, Aastha; Kumar, Akhil; Roy, Sudeep; Negi, Arvind Singh; Pal, Anirban; Chanda, Debabrata; Sharma, Ashok; Darokar, Mahendra P

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to study the synergy potential of gallic acid-based derivatives in combination with conventional antibiotics using multidrug resistant cultures of Escherichia coli. Gallic acid-based derivatives significantly reduced the MIC of tetracycline against multidrug resistant clinical isolate of E. coli. The best representative, 3-(3',4,'5'-trimethoxyphenyl)-4,5,6-trimethoxyindanone-1, an indanone derivative of gallic acid, was observed to inhibit ethidium bromide efflux and ATPase which was also supported by in silico docking. This derivative extended the post-antibiotic effect and decreased the mutation prevention concentration of tetracycline. This derivative in combination with TET was able to reduce the concentration of TNFα up to 18-fold in Swiss albino mice. This derivative was nontoxic and well tolerated up to 300 mg/kg dose in subacute oral toxicity study in mice. This is the first report of gallic acid-based indanone derivative as drug resistance reversal agent acting through ATP-dependent efflux pump inhibition.

  14. Effects of chlorophyll-derived efflux pump inhibitor pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a on erythromycin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to validate the hypothesis that pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a reduce erythromycin resistance of reference strains of facultative anaerobic bacteria with multidrug or macrolide efflux pumps, as indicative of their effect on bacteria indigenous to anaerobic swine ...

  15. First report of plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone efflux pump QepA in Escherichia coli clinical isolate ST68, in South America.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Giovanna; Radice, Marcela; Giovanakis, Marta; Di Conza, Jose A; Gutkind, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    This is the first report of the presence of qepA1 efflux pump gene in Escherichia coli clinical isolate from Argentina, which was associated to other plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants, such as aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrB10 and also quinolone resistance determining regions mutations.

  16. Crystal structures of OprN and OprJ, outer membrane factors of multidrug tripartite efflux pumps of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Ryo; Yamashita, Eiki; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    The genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes tripartite efflux pumps that extrude functionally and structurally dissimilar antibiotics from the bacterial cell. MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and MexXY-OprM are the main tripartite efflux pumps responsible for multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. The outer membrane factors OprN, OprJ, and OprM are essential components of functional tripartite efflux pumps. To elucidate the structural basis of multidrug resistance, we determined the crystal structures of OprN and OprJ. These structures revealed several features, including tri-acylation of the N-terminal cysteine, a small pore in the β-barrel domain, and a tightly sealed gate in the α-barrel domain. Despite the overall similarity of OprN, OprJ, and OprM, a comparison of their structures and electrostatic distributions revealed subtle differences at the periplasmic end of the α-barrel domain. These results suggested that the overall structures of these outer membrane factors are specifically optimized for particular tripartite efflux pumps. Proteins 2016; 84:759-769. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of chlorophyll-derived efflux pump inhibitor pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a on growth and macrolide antibiotic resistance of indicator and anaerobic swine manure bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural plant compounds, such as the chlorophyll a catabolites pheophorbide a (php) and pyropheophorbide a (pyp), are potentially active in the gastrointestinal tracts and wastes of livestock as antimicrobial resistance-modifying agents through inhibition of bacterial efflux pumps. To investigate w...

  18. Antibiotic-potentiation activities of four Cameroonian dietary plants against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria expressing efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The continuous spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, partially due to efflux pumps drastically reduced the efficacy of the antibiotic armory, increasing the frequency of therapeutic failure. The search for new compounds to potentiate the efficacy of commonly used antibiotics is therefore important. The present study was designed to evaluate the ability of the methanol extracts of four Cameroonian dietary plants (Capsicum frutescens L. var. facilulatum, Brassica oleacera L. var. italica, Brassica oleacera L. var. butyris and Basilicum polystachyon (L.) Moench.) to improve the activity of commonly used antibiotics against MDR Gram-negative bacteria expressing active efflux pumps. Methods The qualitative phytochemical screening of the plant extracts was performed using standard methods whilst the antibacterial activity was performed by broth micro-dilution method. Results All the studied plant extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, phenols, flavonoids, triterpenes and sterols. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the studied extracts ranged from 256-1024 μg/mL. Capsicum frutescens var. facilulatum extract displayed the largest spectrum of activity (73%) against the tested bacterial strains whilst the lower MIC value (256 μg/mL) was recorded with Basilicum polystachyon against E. aerogenes ATCC 13048 and P. stuartii ATCC 29916. In the presence of PAβN, the spectrum of activity of Brassica oleacera var. italica extract against bacteria strains increased (75%). The extracts from Brassica oleacera var. butyris, Brassica oleacera var. italica, Capsicum frutescens var. facilulatum and Basilicum polystachyon showed synergistic effects (FIC ≤ 0.5) against the studied bacteria, with an average of 75.3% of the tested antibiotics. Conclusion These results provide promising information for the potential use of the tested plants alone or in combination with some commonly used antibiotics in the fight against MDR Gram-negative bacteria

  19. Structural and Functional Analysis of SmeT, the Repressor of the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Multidrug Efflux Pump SmeDEF*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Alvaro; Maté, María J.; Sánchez-Díaz, Patricia C.; Romero, Antonio; Rojo, Fernando; Martínez, José L.

    2009-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an opportunistic pathogen characterized for its intrinsic low susceptibility to several antibiotics. Part of this low susceptibility relies on the expression of chromosomally encoded multidrug efflux pumps, with SmeDEF being the most relevant antibiotic resistance efflux pump so far studied in this bacterial species. Expression of smeDEF is down-regulated by the SmeT repressor, encoded upstream smeDEF, in its complementary DNA strand. In the present article we present the crystal structure of SmeT and analyze its interactions with its cognate operator. Like other members of the TetR family of transcriptional repressors, SmeT behaves as a dimer and presents some common structural features with other TetR proteins like TtgR, QacR, and TetR. Differing from other TetR proteins for which the structure is available, SmeT turned out to have two extensions at the N and C termini that might be relevant for its function. Besides, SmeT presents the smallest binding pocket so far described in the TetR family of transcriptional repressors, which may correlate with a specific type and range of effectors. In vitro studies revealed that SmeT binds to a 28-bp pseudopalindromic region, forming two complexes. This operator region was found to overlap the promoters of smeT and smeDEF. This finding is consistent with a role for SmeT simultaneously down-regulating smeT and smeDEF transcription, likely by steric hindrance on RNA polymerase binding to DNA. PMID:19324881

  20. The Burkholderia pseudomallei BpeAB-OprB Efflux Pump: Expression and Impact on Quorum Sensing and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ying Ying; Chua, Kim Lee

    2005-01-01

    BpeAB-OprB is a multidrug efflux pump of the bacterial pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei and is responsible for conferring antimicrobial resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides. Expression of bpeAB-oprB is inducible by its substrate erythromycin and upon entry into stationary phase. BpeR, a member of the TetR family, functions as a repressor of the bpeAB-oprB operon. bpeR expression was similarly induced at stationary phase but lagged behind the induction of bpeAB-oprB expression. The induction of bpeAB-oprB expression could be advanced to the early exponential phase by exogenous addition of the B. pseudomallei autoinducers N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8HSL) and N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C10HSL), suggesting that the bpeAB-oprB operon may be quorum regulated. On the other hand, acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) production was undetectable in the bpeAB-null mutant and strains which overexpress bpeR. The failure of these strains to produce acyl-HSLs seemed to be at the level of synthesis of acyl-HSLs, as growth-phase-dependent expression of the autoinducer synthase BpsI was abolished in the bpeAB-null mutant. bpsI expression remained growth phase dependent in the bpeR mutant which had functional BpeAB-OprB. BpeAB-OprB function is likewise necessary for optimal production of quorum-sensing-controlled virulence factors such as siderophore and phospholipase C and for biofilm formation. Cell invasion and cytotoxicity towards human lung epithelial (A549) and human macrophage (THP-1) cells were also significantly attenuated in both the bpeAB mutant and bpeR-overexpressing strains, thus suggesting the possibility of attenuating B. pseudomallei virulence using inhibitors of the BpeAB-OprB efflux pump. PMID:15995185

  1. The Burkholderia pseudomallei BpeAB-OprB efflux pump: expression and impact on quorum sensing and virulence.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ying Ying; Chua, Kim Lee

    2005-07-01

    BpeAB-OprB is a multidrug efflux pump of the bacterial pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei and is responsible for conferring antimicrobial resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides. Expression of bpeAB-oprB is inducible by its substrate erythromycin and upon entry into stationary phase. BpeR, a member of the TetR family, functions as a repressor of the bpeAB-oprB operon. bpeR expression was similarly induced at stationary phase but lagged behind the induction of bpeAB-oprB expression. The induction of bpeAB-oprB expression could be advanced to the early exponential phase by exogenous addition of the B. pseudomallei autoinducers N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8HSL) and N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C10HSL), suggesting that the bpeAB-oprB operon may be quorum regulated. On the other hand, acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) production was undetectable in the bpeAB-null mutant and strains which overexpress bpeR. The failure of these strains to produce acyl-HSLs seemed to be at the level of synthesis of acyl-HSLs, as growth-phase-dependent expression of the autoinducer synthase BpsI was abolished in the bpeAB-null mutant. bpsI expression remained growth phase dependent in the bpeR mutant which had functional BpeAB-OprB. BpeAB-OprB function is likewise necessary for optimal production of quorum-sensing-controlled virulence factors such as siderophore and phospholipase C and for biofilm formation. Cell invasion and cytotoxicity towards human lung epithelial (A549) and human macrophage (THP-1) cells were also significantly attenuated in both the bpeAB mutant and bpeR-overexpressing strains, thus suggesting the possibility of attenuating B. pseudomallei virulence using inhibitors of the BpeAB-OprB efflux pump.

  2. Biofilm Formation Caused by Clinical Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates Is Associated with Overexpression of the AdeFGH Efflux Pump.

    PubMed

    He, Xinlong; Lu, Feng; Yuan, Fenglai; Jiang, Donglin; Zhao, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Cheng, Huali; Cao, Jun; Lu, Guozhong

    2015-08-01

    Chronic wound infections are associated with biofilm formation, which in turn has been correlated with drug resistance. However, the mechanism by which bacteria form biofilms in clinical environments is not clearly understood. This study was designed to investigate the biofilm formation potency of Acinetobacter baumannii and the potential association of biofilm formation with genes encoding efflux pumps, quorum-sensing regulators, and outer membrane proteins. A total of 48 clinically isolated A. baumannii strains, identified by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR as types A-II, A-III, and A-IV, were analyzed. Three representative strains, which were designated A. baumannii ABR2, ABR11, and ABS17, were used to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm inducibility, and gene transcription (abaI, adeB, adeG, adeJ, carO, and ompA). A significant increase in the MICs of different classes of antibiotics was observed in the biofilm cells. The formation of a biofilm was significantly induced in all the representative strains exposed to levofloxacin. The levels of gene transcription varied between bacterial genotypes, antibiotics, and antibiotic concentrations. The upregulation of adeG correlated with biofilm induction. The consistent upregulation of adeG and abaI was detected in A-III-type A. baumannii in response to levofloxacin and meropenem (1/8 to 1/2× the MIC), conditions which resulted in the greatest extent of biofilm induction. This study demonstrates a potential role of the AdeFGH efflux pump in the synthesis and transport of autoinducer molecules during biofilm formation, suggesting a link between low-dose antimicrobial therapy and a high risk of biofilm infections caused by A. baumannii. This study provides useful information for the development of antibiofilm strategies.

  3. The MerR-like regulator BrlR confers biofilm tolerance by activating multidrug efflux pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Liao, Julie; Schurr, Michael J; Sauer, Karin

    2013-08-01

    A defining characteristic of biofilms is antibiotic tolerance that can be up to 1,000-fold greater than that of planktonic cells. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm tolerance to antimicrobial agents requires the biofilm-specific MerR-type transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm tolerance has not been elucidated. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling indicated that brlR was required for maximal expression of genes associated with antibiotic resistance, in particular those encoding the multidrug efflux pumps MexAB-OprM and MexEF-OprN. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed a direct regulation of these genes by BrlR, with DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter regions of the mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN operons. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis further indicated BrlR to be an activator of mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN gene expression. Moreover, immunoblot analysis confirmed increased MexA abundance in cells overexpressing brlR. Inactivation of both efflux pumps rendered biofilms significantly more susceptible to five different classes of antibiotics by affecting MIC but not the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by bactericidal agents. Overexpression of either efflux pump in a ΔbrlR strain partly restored tolerance of ΔbrlR biofilms to antibiotics. Expression of brlR in mutant biofilms lacking both efflux pumps partly restored antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms to wild-type levels. Our results indicate that BrlR acts as an activator of multidrug efflux pumps to confer tolerance to P. aeruginosa biofilms and to resist the action of antimicrobial agents.

  4. The MerR-Like Regulator BrlR Confers Biofilm Tolerance by Activating Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Julie; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A defining characteristic of biofilms is antibiotic tolerance that can be up to 1,000-fold greater than that of planktonic cells. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm tolerance to antimicrobial agents requires the biofilm-specific MerR-type transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm tolerance has not been elucidated. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling indicated that brlR was required for maximal expression of genes associated with antibiotic resistance, in particular those encoding the multidrug efflux pumps MexAB-OprM and MexEF-OprN. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed a direct regulation of these genes by BrlR, with DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter regions of the mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN operons. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis further indicated BrlR to be an activator of mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN gene expression. Moreover, immunoblot analysis confirmed increased MexA abundance in cells overexpressing brlR. Inactivation of both efflux pumps rendered biofilms significantly more susceptible to five different classes of antibiotics by affecting MIC but not the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by bactericidal agents. Overexpression of either efflux pump in a ΔbrlR strain partly restored tolerance of ΔbrlR biofilms to antibiotics. Expression of brlR in mutant biofilms lacking both efflux pumps partly restored antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms to wild-type levels. Our results indicate that BrlR acts as an activator of multidrug efflux pumps to confer tolerance to P. aeruginosa biofilms and to resist the action of antimicrobial agents. PMID:23687276

  5. The PerR-regulated P1B-4 type ATPase (PmtA) acts as a ferrous iron efflux pump in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew G; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y; Djoko, Karrera Y; West, Nicholas P; Davies, Mark R; McEwan, Alastair G; Walker, Mark J

    2017-04-03

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is an obligate human pathogen responsible for a broad spectrum of human disease. GAS has a requirement for metal homeostasis within the human host and as such, tightly modulates metal uptake and efflux during infection. Metal acquisition systems are required to combat metal sequestration by the host, while metal efflux systems are essential to protect against metal overload poisoning. Here, we investigated the function of PmtA (PerR-regulated metal transporter A), a P1B-4 type ATPase efflux pump, in the invasive GAS M1T1 strain 5448. We reveal that PmtA functions as a ferrous iron [Fe(II)] efflux system. In the presence of high Fe(II) concentrations, the 5448ΔpmtA deletion mutant exhibited diminished growth and accumulated 5-fold higher intracellular Fe(II) compared to the wild-type and complemented mutant. The 5448ΔpmtA deletion mutant also showed enhanced susceptibility to killing by the Fe-dependent antibiotic, streptonigrin, as well as increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and superoxide. We suggest that the PerR-mediated control of Fe(II) efflux by PmtA is important for bacterial defense against oxidative stress. PmtA represents an exemplar for a Fe(II) efflux system in a host-adapted Gram-positive bacterial pathogen.

  6. A linkage between SmeIJK efflux pump, cell envelope integrity, and σE-mediated envelope stress response in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Wei; Liou, Rung-Shiuan; Lin, Yi-Tsung; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Resistance nodulation division (RND) efflux pumps, such as the SmeIJK pump of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, are known to contribute to the multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. However, some RND pumps are constitutively expressed even though no antimicrobial stresses occur, implying that there should be some physical implications for these RND pumps. In this study, the role of SmeIJK in antimicrobials resistance, envelope integrity, and σE-mediated envelope stress response (ESR) of S. maltophilia was assessed. SmeIJK was involved in the intrinsic resistance of S. maltophilia KJ to aminoglycosides and leucomycin. Compared with the wild-type KJ, the smeIJK deletion mutant exhibited growth retardation in the MH medium, an increased sensitivity to membrane-damaging agents (MDAs), as well as activation of an σE-mediated ESR. Moreover, the expression of smeIJK was further induced by sub-lethal concentrations of MDAs or surfactants in an σE-dependent manner. These data collectively suggested an alternative physiological role of smeIJK in cell envelope integrity maintenance and σE-mediated ESR beyond the efflux of antibiotics. Because of the necessity of the physiological role of SmeIJK in protecting S. maltophilia from the envelope stress, smeIJK is constitutively expressed, which, in turn, contributes the intrinsic resistance to aminoglycoside and leucomycin. This is the first demonstration of the linkage among RND-type efflux pump, cell envelope integrity, and σE-mediated ESR in S. maltophilia.

  7. Functional analysis of Vibrio vulnificus RND efflux pumps homologous to Vibrio cholerae VexAB and VexCD, and to Escherichia coli AcrAB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghwa; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Seo, Sojin; Lee, Minho; Kim, Sarang; Bae, Jeehyeon; Lee, Kangseok; Hwang, Jihwan

    2015-04-01

    Resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux pumps are associated with multidrug resistance in many gram-negative pathogens. The genome of Vibrio vulnificus encodes 11 putative RND pumps homologous to those of Vibrio cholerae and Escherichia coli. In this study, we analyzed three putative RND efflux pumps, showing homology to V. cholerae VexAB and VexCD and to E. coli AcrAB, for their functional roles in multidrug resistance of V. vulnificus. Deletion of the vexAB homolog resulted in increased susceptibility of V. vulnificus to bile acid, acriflavine, ethidium bromide, and erythromycin, whereas deletion of acrAB homologs rendered V. vulnificus more susceptible to acriflavine only. Deletion of vexCD had no effect on susceptibility of V. vulnificus to these chemicals. Upon exposure to these antibacterial chemicals, expression of tolCV1 and tolCV2, which are putative outer membrane factors of RND efflux pumps, was induced, whereas expression levels of vexAB, vexCD, and acrAB homologs were not significantly changed. Our results show that the V. vulnificus homologs of VexAB largely contributed to in vitro antimicrobial resistance with a broad substrate specificity that was partially redundant with the AcrAB pump homologs.

  8. Two-component regulatory systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an intricate network mediating fimbrial and efflux pump gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Sivaneson, Melissa; Mikkelsen, Helga; Ventre, Isabelle; Bordi, Christophe; Filloux, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for chronic and acute infections in humans. Chronic infections are associated with production of fimbriae and the formation of a biofilm. The two-component system Roc1 is named after its role in the regulation of cup genes, which encode components of a machinery allowing assembly of fimbriae. A non-characterized gene cluster, roc2, encodes components homologous to the Roc1 system. We show that cross-regulation occurs between the Roc1 and Roc2 signalling pathways. We demonstrate that the sensors RocS2 and RocS1 converge on the response regulator RocA1 to control cupC gene expression. This control is independent of the response regulator RocA2. Instead, we show that these sensors act via the RocA2 response regulator to repress the mexAB-oprM genes. These genes encode a multidrug efflux pump and are upregulated in the rocA2 mutant, which is less susceptible to antibiotics. It has been reported that in cystic fibrosis lungs, in which P. aeruginosa adopts the biofilm lifestyle, most isolates have an inactive MexAB-OprM pump. The concomitant RocS2-dependent upregulation of cupC genes (biofilm formation) and downregulation of mexAB-oprM genes (antibiotic resistance) is in agreement with this observation. It suggests that the Roc systems may sense the environment in the cystic fibrosis lung. PMID:21205015

  9. Consecutive salinomycin treatment reduces doxorubicin resistance of breast tumor cells by diminishing drug efflux pump expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Hermawan, Adam; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Chemoresistance is a major challenge for the successful therapy of breast cancer. The discovery of salinomycin as an anticancer stem cell drug provides progress in overcoming chemoresistance. However, it remains to be elucidated whether salinomycin treatment is able to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. In the present study, we consecutively treated epithelial MCF-7 and BT-474 breast cancer cells as well as mesenchymal MDA-MB 231 and MDA-MB 436 cells with salinomycin, and analyzed the gene expression of the two prominent multiple drug resistance (MDR) genes, MDR1 and BCRP1. We found that repeated treatment with salinomycin generated resistance against this drug in all cell lines and increased the chemosensitivity towards doxorubicin. Drug efflux pump gene expression and pump activity of MDR1 and BCRP1 were downregulated in almost all cell lines, except for MDR1 in the MDA-MB 231 cells. Consequently, the intracellular doxorubicin accumulation was increased compared to the respective parental cells. Our findings suggest a novel treatment option for MDR tumors by sensitizing these tumors via salinomycin pretreatment.

  10. A D-octapeptide drug efflux pump inhibitor acts synergistically with azoles in a murine oral candidiasis infection model.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Ishijima, Sanae A; Niimi, Kyoko; Tansho, Shigeru; Ono, Yasuo; Monk, Brian C; Holmes, Ann R; Harding, David R K; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Clinical management of patients undergoing treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis with azole antifungals can be impaired by azole resistance. High-level azole resistance is often caused by the overexpression of Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p. Inhibition of this pump therefore represents a target for combination therapies that reverse azole resistance. We assessed the therapeutic potential of the D-octapeptide derivative RC21v3, a Cdr1p inhibitor, in the treatment of murine oral candidiasis caused by either the azole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate MML611 or its azole-susceptible parental strain MML610. RC21v3, fluconazole (FLC), or a combination of both drugs were administered orally to immunosuppressed ICR mice at 3, 24, and 27 h after oral inoculation with C. albicans. FLC protected the mice inoculated with MML610 from oral candidiasis, but was only partially effective in MML611-infected mice. The co-application of RC21v3 (0.02 μmol per dose) potentiated the therapeutic performance of FLC for mice infected with either strain. It caused a statistically significant decrease in C. albicans cfu isolated from the oral cavity of the infected mice and reduced oral lesions. RC21v3 also enhanced the therapeutic activity of itraconazole against MML611 infection. These results indicate that RC21v3 in combination with azoles has potential as a therapy against azole-resistant oral candidiasis.

  11. Dual Repression of the Multidrug Efflux Pump CmeABC by CosR and CmeR in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Grinnage-Pulley, Tara; Mu, Yang; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-01-01

    During transmission and intestinal colonization, Campylobacter jejuni, a major foodborne human pathogen, experiences oxidative stress. CosR, a response regulator in C. jejuni, modulates the oxidative stress response and represses expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. CmeABC, a key component in resistance to toxic compounds including antimicrobials and bile salts, is also under negative regulation by CmeR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator. How CosR and CmeR interact in binding to the cmeABC promoter and how CosR senses oxidative stress are still unknown. To answer these questions, we conducted various experiments utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusion assays. CosR and CmeR bound independently to two separate sites of the cmeABC promoter, simultaneously repressing cmeABC expression. This dual binding of CosR and CmeR is optimal with a 17 base pair space between the two binding sites as mutations that shortened the distance between the binding sites decreased binding by CmeR and enhanced cmeABC expression. Additionally, the single cysteine residue (C218) of CosR was sensitive to oxidation, which altered the DNA-binding activity of CosR and dissociated CosR from the cmeABC promoter as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Replacement of C218 with serine rendered CosR insensitive to oxidation, suggesting a potential role of C218 in sensing oxidative stress and providing a possible mechanism for CosR-mediated response to oxidative stress. These findings reveal a dual regulatory role of CosR and CmeR in modulating cmeABC expression and suggest a potential mechanism that may explain overexpression of cmeABC in response to oxidative stress. Differential expression of cmeABC mediated by CmeR and CosR in response to different signals may facilitate adaptation of Campylobacter to various environmental conditions. PMID:27468281

  12. RNA expression analysis of efflux pump genes in clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae Sang; Kim, Young Jin; Kang, Hee Yoon; Kim, Chang-Ki; Cho, Sun Young; Lee, Hee Joo

    2017-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an important communicable disease. Various mechanisms of resistance to antituberculosis drugs have been reported; these are principally mutations in target genes. However, not all M. tuberculosis resistance can be explained by mutations in such genes. Other resistance mechanisms associated with drug transport, such as efflux pumps, have also been reported. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of three putative efflux pumps and mutations in target genes associated with injectable agents and fluoroquinolones with clinical MDR and XDR-TB isolates. Thirty clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis that had been phenotypically characterized were obtained from the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis. Of these, 14 were MDR-TB isolates resistant to at least one injectable aminoglycoside (amikacin; AMK, kanamycin; KAN, and/or capreomycin; CPM) and 16 were XDR-TB isolates. M. tuberculosis H37Rv (ATCC 27249) was used as a reference strain. Five putative genes (Rv1258c, Rv2686c, Rv2687c, Rv2688c and pstB) were selected for analysis in this study. Sequencing was performed to detect mutations in rrs and eis genes. qRT-PCR was performed to investigate expression levels of five efflux pump genes. Of the 30 isolates, 25 strains had mutations in rrs associated with resistance to KAN, CPM and AMK and two strains had eis mutations, as well as mutations in rrs. pstB (Rv0933) exhibited increased expression and Rv2687c and Rv2688c exhibited decreased expression compared to the reference strain. Increased expression of pstB in clinical drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates may contribute to drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. In our case, overexpression of Rv1258c may have been associated with resistance to kanamycin. No correlation was evident between Rv2686c, Rv2687c or Rv2688c expression and fluoroquinolone resistance. To explore the details of efflux pump drug-resistance mechanisms, further studies on

  13. Involvement of the SmeAB Multidrug Efflux Pump in Resistance to Plant Antimicrobials and Contribution to Nodulation Competitiveness in Sinorhizobium meliloti▿†

    PubMed Central

    Eda, Shima; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of multicomponent-type multidrug efflux pumps to antimicrobial resistance and nodulation ability in Sinorhizobium meliloti were comprehensively analyzed. Computational searches identified genes in the S. meliloti strain 1021 genome encoding 1 pump from the ATP-binding cassette family, 3 pumps from the major facilitator superfamily, and 10 pumps from the resistance-nodulation-cell division family, and subsequently, these genes were deleted either individually or simultaneously. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests demonstrated that deletion of the smeAB pump genes resulted in increased susceptibility to a range of antibiotics, dyes, detergents, and plant-derived compounds and, further, that specific deletion of the smeCD or smeEF genes in a ΔsmeAB background caused a further increase in susceptibility to certain antibiotics. Competitive nodulation experiments revealed that the smeAB mutant was defective in competing with the wild-type strain for nodulation. The introduction of a plasmid carrying smeAB into the smeAB mutant restored antimicrobial resistance and nodulation competitiveness. These findings suggest that the SmeAB pump, which is a major multidrug efflux system of S. meliloti, plays an important role in nodulation competitiveness by mediating resistance toward antimicrobial compounds produced by the host plant. PMID:21398477

  14. Transcriptional Analysis of MexAB-OprM Efflux Pumps System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Role in Carbapenem Resistance in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Debarati; Das Talukdar, Anupam; Dutta Choudhury, Manabendra; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Paul, Deepjyoti; Dhar Chanda, Debadatta; Chakravorty, Atanu; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance presents severe threat to the treatment of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The study was undertaken to investigate the role of efflux pumps in conferring meropenem resistance and effect of single dose exposure of meropenem on transcription level of mexA gene in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of India. Further, in this investigation an effort was made to assess whether different components of MexAB-OprM operon expresses in the same manner and the extent of contributions of those components in meropenem resistance in its natural host (P. aeruginosa) and in a heterologous host (E. coli). Out of 83 meropenem nonsusceptible isolates, 22 isolates were found to possess efflux pump activity phenotypically. Modified hodge test and multiplex PCR confirmed the absence of carbapenemase genes in those isolates. All of them were of multidrug resistant phenotype and were resistant to all the carbepenem drug tested. MexAB-OprM efflux pump was found to be overexpressed in all the study isolates. It could be observed that single dose exposure meropenem could give rise to trivial increase in transcription of mexA gene. Different constructs of MexAB-OprM (mexR-mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB) could be expressed in both its natural (P. aeruginosa PAO1) and heterologous host (E. coli JM107) but transcription level of mexA gene varied in both the hosts before and after single dose exposure of meropenem. Different components of the operon failed to enhance meropenem resistance in E. coli JM107 and P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study could prove that MexAB-OprM efflux pump can significantly contribute to meropenem resistance in hospital isolates of P. aeruginosa where an acquired resistant mechanism is absent. Thus, equal importance should be given for diagnosis of intrinsic resistance mechanism so as to minimize treatment failure. As meropenem could not enhance mexA transcriptions significantly, there

  15. Characterization of a novel domain ‘GATE’ in the ABC protein DrrA and its role in drug efflux by the DrrAB complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Rahman, Sadia; Li, Wen; Fu, Guoxing; Kaur, Parjit

    2015-03-27

    A novel domain, GATE (Glycine-loop And Transducer Element), is identified in the ABC protein DrrA. This domain shows sequence and structural conservation among close homologs of DrrA as well as distantly-related ABC proteins. Among the highly conserved residues in this domain are three glycines, G215, G221 and G231, of which G215 was found to be critical for stable expression of the DrrAB complex. Other conserved residues, including E201, G221, K227 and G231, were found to be critical for the catalytic and transport functions of the DrrAB transporter. Structural analysis of both the previously published crystal structure of the DrrA homolog MalK and the modeled structure of DrrA showed that G215 makes close contacts with residues in and around the Walker A motif, suggesting that these interactions may be critical for maintaining the integrity of the ATP binding pocket as well as the complex. It is also shown that G215A or K227R mutation diminishes some of the atomic interactions essential for ATP catalysis and overall transport function. Therefore, based on both the biochemical and structural analyses, it is proposed that the GATE domain, located outside of the previously identified ATP binding and hydrolysis motifs, is an additional element involved in ATP catalysis. - Highlights: • A novel domain ‘GATE’ is identified in the ABC protein DrrA. • GATE shows high sequence and structural conservation among diverse ABC proteins. • GATE is located outside of the previously studied ATP binding and hydrolysis motifs. • Conserved GATE residues are critical for stability of DrrAB and for ATP catalysis.

  16. Carpobrotus edulis methanol extract inhibits the MDR efflux pumps, enhances killing of phagocytosed S. aureus and promotes immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane; Hohmann, Judit; Viveiros, Miguel; Viveiros, Antonio; Molnar, Joseph; Leandro, Clara; Arroz, Maria Jorge; Gracio, Maria Amelia; Amaral, Leonard

    2003-05-01

    Although alkaloids from the family Aizoaceae have anticancer activity, species of this family have received little attention. Because these alkaloids also exhibit properties normally associated with compounds that have activity at the level of the plasma membrane, a methanol extract of Carpobrotus edulis, a common plant found along the Portuguese coast, was studied for properties normally associated with plasma membrane active compounds. The results of this study show that the extract is non-toxic at concentrations that inhibit a verapamil sensitive efflux pump of L5178 mouse T cell lymphoma cell line thereby rendering these multi-drug resistant cells susceptible to anticancer drugs. These non-toxic concentrations also prime THP-1 human monocyte-derived macrophages to kill ingested Staphylococcus aureus and to promote the release of lymphokines associated with cellular immune functions. The extract also induces the proliferation of THP-1 cells within 1 day of exposure to quantities normally associated with phytohaemagglutinin. The potential role of the compound(s) isolated from this plant in cancer biology is intriguing and is currently under investigation. It is supposed that the resistance modifier and immunomodulatory effect of this plant extract can be exploited in the experimental chemotherapy of cancer and bacterial or viral infections.

  17. The prevalence of the OqxAB multidrug efflux pump amongst olaquindox-resistant Escherichia coli in pigs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren J; Jørgensen, Helle S; Jensen, Lars B

    2005-01-01

    The quinoxaline olaquindox has been used extensively as a growth promoter for pigs. Recently, we isolated a plasmid (pOLA52) conferring resistance to olaquindox from swine manure. On this plasmid, the oqxA and oqxB genes encode an RND-family multidrug efflux pump, OqxAB. It facilitates resistance to olaquindox as well as resistance to other antimicrobials like chloramphenicol. In this study, 10 of the 556 (1.8%) previously isolated Escherichia coli strains were shown to have an MIC >or= 64 microg/ml olaquindox. In nine of the ten strains, the oqxA gene was detected. Sequencing of an internal fragment of oqxA from the oqxA-positive strains showed no variation, indicating highly conserved oqxA genes. All of the oqxA-positive strains contain plasmids with replicons similar to that of pOLA52. It was verified by Southern hybridization that the oqxAB operon was situated on plasmids in most, if not all, resistant strains. Furthermore, horizontal transfer of olaquindox resistance from three olaquindox-resistant isolates was achieved using an olaquindox-sensitive E. coli as recipient.

  18. Inhibition of the TetK efflux-pump by the essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. and α-terpinene against Staphylococcus aureus IS-58.

    PubMed

    Limaverde, Paulo W; Campina, Fábia F; da Cunha, Francisco A B; Crispim, Francidalva D; Figueredo, Fernando G; Lima, Luciene F; Datiane de M Oliveira-Tintino, Cícera; de Matos, Yedda M L S; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana B; Menezes, Irwin R A; Balbino, Valdir Q; Coutinho, Henrique D M; Siqueira-Júnior, José P; Almeida, Jackson R G S; Tintino, Saulo R

    2017-02-23

    The use of natural products is crucial to suppress the development of these micro-organisms and to reduce the concentration necessary to inhibit these microrganisms, reducing the toxicity risks also. In this study, the essential oil from Chenopodium ambrosioides Leaves and its main constituent α-Terpinene were used in the antibacterial and potentiating activity of antibiotics and ethidium bromide assays, against the bacterial strains Staphylococcus aureus IS-58, carriers of efflux pumps. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined using a microdilution method. The capacity of the aforementioned was also tested in combination with tetracycline and ethidium bromide, with the aim of improving the activity of the antibacterials. The MIC of the C. ambrosioides L. essential oil and of α-Terpinene were above 1024 μg/mL, comprising a clinically irrelevant value. However, when associated with the antibiotics, the C. ambrosioides L. essential oil, significantly decreased the MIC of tetracycline and ethidium bromide. The efflux pump is the only mechanism the bacteria possesses to reduce the toxicity of ethidium bromide, and thus this reduction in the MIC demonstrates that the C. ambrosioides L. essential oil is an effective option in the inhibition of the efflux pump present in these micro-organisms.

  19. Involvement of a novel genistein-inducible multidrug efflux pump of Bradyrhizobium japonicum early in the interaction with Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Keisuke; Hidaka, Tatsuo; Wei, Min; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Itakura, Manabu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Saeki, Kazuhiko; Oomori, Hirofumi; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Uchiumi, Toshiki; Abe, Mikiko; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Ohwada, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    The early molecular dialogue between soybean and the bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum is crucial for triggering their symbiotic interaction. Here we found a single large genomic locus that is widely separated from the symbiosis island and was conspicuously induced within minutes after the addition of genistein. This locus (named BjG30) contains genes for the multidrug efflux pump, TetR family transcriptional regulator, and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism. The induction of BjG30 by genistein was competitively inhibited by daidzein, although both genistein and daidzein are soybean-derived inducers of nodulation (nod) genes. Such a differential expression pattern is also observed in some legume-derived flavonoids, which structurally differ in the hydroxy/deoxy group at the 5-position. In addition, not only did the induction start far in advance of nodW and nodD1 after the addition of genistein, but the levels showed distinct concentration dependence, indicating that the induction pattern of BjG30 is completely different from that of nod genes. The deletion of genes encoding either the multidrug efflux pump or PHB metabolism, especially the former, resulted in defective nodulation performance and nitrogen-fixing capability. Taken together, these results indicate that BjG30, and especially its multidrug efflux pump, may play a key role in the early stage of symbiosis by balancing the dual functions of genistein as both a nod gene inducer and toxicant.

  20. FarR regulates the farAB-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae via an MtrR regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, E-H; Rouquette-Loughlin, C; Folster, J P; Shafer, W M

    2003-12-01

    The farAB operon of Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes an efflux pump which mediates gonococcal resistance to antibacterial fatty acids. It was previously observed that expression of the farAB operon was positively regulated by MtrR, which is a repressor of the mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump system (E.-H. Lee and W. M. Shafer, Mol. Microbiol. 33:839-845, 1999). This regulation was believed to be indirect since MtrR did not bind to the farAB promoter. In this study, computer analysis of the gonococcal genome sequence database, lacZ reporter fusions, and gel mobility shift assays were used to elucidate the regulatory mechanism by which expression of the farAB operon is modulated by MtrR in gonococci. We identified a regulatory protein belonging to the MarR family of transcriptional repressors and found that it negatively controls expression of farAB by directly binding to the farAB promoter. We designated this regulator FarR to signify its role in regulating the farAB operon. We found that MtrR binds to the farR promoter, thereby repressing farR expression. Hence, MtrR regulates farAB in a positive fashion by modulating farR expression. This MtrR regulatory cascade seems to play an important role in adjusting levels of the FarAB and MtrCDE efflux pumps to prevent their excess expression in gonococci.

  1. Azole resistance in Candida spp. isolated from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil: an efflux-pump-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Brilhante, Raimunda S.N.; Paiva, Manoel A.N.; Sampaio, Célia M.S.; Castelo-Branco, Débora S.C.M.; Teixeira, Carlos E.C.; de Alencar, Lucas P.; Bandeira, Tereza J.P.G.; Monteiro, André J.; Cordeiro, Rossana A.; Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro A.; Sidrim, José J.C.; Moreira, José L.B.; Rocha, Marcos F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Since, there is no study reporting the mechanism of azole resistance among yeasts isolated from aquatic environments; the present study aims to investigate the occurrence of antifungal resistance among yeasts isolated from an aquatic environment, and assess the efflux-pump activity of the azole-resistant strains to better understand the mechanism of resistance for this group of drugs. For this purpose, monthly water and sediment samples were collected from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil, from March 2011 to February 2012. The obtained yeasts were identified based on morphological and biochemical characteristics. Of the 46 isolates, 37 were Candida spp., 4 were Trichosporon asahii, 3 were Cryptococcus laurentii, 1 Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and 1 was Kodamaea ohmeri. These isolates were subjected to broth microdilution assay with amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole, according to the methodology standardized by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole were 0.03125–2 μg/mL, 0.0625 to ≥16 μg/mL, and 0.5 to ≥64 μg/mL, respectively, and 13 resistant azole-resistant Candida isolates were detected. A reduction in the azole MICs leading to the phenotypical reversal of the azole resistance was observed upon addition of efflux-pump inhibitors. These findings suggest that the azole resistance among environmental Candida spp. is most likely associated with the overexpression of efflux-pumps. PMID:26887224

  2. SmeOP-TolCSm Efflux Pump Contributes to the Multidrug Resistance of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Wen; Huang, Yi-Wei; Hu, Rouh-Mei

    2014-01-01

    A five-gene cluster, tolCSm-pcm-smeRo-smeO-smeP, of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was characterized. The presence of smeOP and smeRo-pcm-tolCSm operons was verified by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Both operons were negatively regulated by the TetR-type transcriptional regulator SmeRo, as demonstrated by quantitative RT-PCR and a promoter-fusion assay. SmeO and SmeP were associated with TolCSm (the TolC protein of S. maltophilia) for the assembly of a resistance-nodulation-cell-division (RND)-type pump. The compounds extruded by SmeOP-TolCSm mainly included nalidixic acid, doxycycline, amikacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, leucomycin, carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone, crystal violet, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and tetrachlorosalicylanilide. PMID:24395237

  3. Fluorescence-Based Flow Sorting in Parallel with Transposon Insertion Site Sequencing Identifies Multidrug Efflux Systems in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Amy K.; Huang, TaoTao; Liu, Qi; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Boinett, Christine J.; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Li, Liping; Ostrowski, Martin; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Baker, Stephen; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug efflux pumps provide clinically significant levels of drug resistance in a number of Gram-negative hospital-acquired pathogens. These pathogens frequently carry dozens of genes encoding putative multidrug efflux pumps. However, it can be difficult to determine how many of these pumps actually mediate antimicrobial efflux, and it can be even more challenging to identify the regulatory proteins that control expression of these pumps. In this study, we developed an innovative high-throughput screening method, combining transposon insertion sequencing and cell sorting methods (TraDISort), to identify the genes encoding major multidrug efflux pumps, regulators, and other factors that may affect the permeation of antimicrobials, using the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. A dense library of more than 100,000 unique transposon insertion mutants was treated with ethidium bromide, a common substrate of multidrug efflux pumps that is differentially fluorescent inside and outside the bacterial cytoplasm. Populations of cells displaying aberrant accumulations of ethidium were physically enriched using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the genomic locations of transposon insertions within these strains were determined using transposon-directed insertion sequencing. The relative abundance of mutants in the input pool compared to the selected mutant pools indicated that the AdeABC, AdeIJK, and AmvA efflux pumps are the major ethidium efflux systems in A. baumannii. Furthermore, the method identified a new transcriptional regulator that controls expression of amvA. In addition to the identification of efflux pumps and their regulators, TraDISort identified genes that are likely to control cell division, cell morphology, or aggregation in A. baumannii. PMID:27601573

  4. Tripartite efflux pumps: energy is required for dissociation, but not assembly or opening of the outer membrane channel of the pump.

    PubMed

    Janganan, Thamarai K; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Zhang, Li; Borges-Walmsley, Maria Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2013-05-01

    The MtrCDE multidrug pump, from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, is assembled from the inner and outer membrane proteins MtrD and MtrE, which are connected by the periplasmic membrane fusion protein MtrC. Although it is clear that MtrD delivers drugs to the channel of MtrE, it remains unclear how drug delivery and channel opening are connected. We used a vancomycin sensitivity assay to test for opening of the MtrE channel. Cells expressing MtrE or MtrE-E434K were insensitive to vancomycin; but became moderately and highly sensitive to vancomycin respectively, when coexpressed with MtrC, suggesting that the MtrE channel opening requires MtrC binding and is energy-independent. Cells expressing wild-type MtrD, in an MtrCE background, were vancomycin-insensitive, but moderately sensitive in an MtrCE-E434K background. The mutation of residues involved in proton translocation inactivated MtrD and abolished drug efflux, rendered both MtrE and MtrE-E434K vancomycin-insensitive; imply that the pump-component interactions are preserved, and that the complex is stable in the absence of proton flux, thus sealing the open end of MtrE. Following the energy-dependent dissociation of the tripartite complex, the MtrE channel is able to reseal, while MtrE-E434K is unable to do so, resulting in the vancomycin-sensitive phenotype. Thus, our findings suggest that opening of the OMP via interaction with the MFP is energy-independent, while both drug export and complex dissociation require active proton flux.

  5. Overexpression of the Novel MATE Fluoroquinolone Efflux Pump FepA in Listeria monocytogenes Is Driven by Inactivation of Its Local Repressor FepR

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, François; Galimand, Marc; Tuambilangana, Fabrice; Courvalin, Patrice; Cattoir, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Whereas fluoroquinolone resistance mainly results from target modifications in gram-positive bacteria, it is primarily due to active efflux in Listeria monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to dissect a novel molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in this important human pathogen. Isogenic L. monocytogenes clinical isolates BM4715 and BM4716, respectively susceptible and resistant to fluoroquinolones, were studied. MICs of norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin were determined in the presence or in the absence of reserpine (10 mg/L). Strain BM4715 was susceptible to norfloxacin (MIC, 4 mg/L) and ciprofloxacin (MIC, 0.5 mg/L) whereas BM4716 was highly resistant to both drugs (MICs 128 and 32 mg/L, respectively). Reserpine was responsible for a 16-fold decrease in both norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin MICs against BM4716 suggesting efflux associated resistance. Whole-genome sequencing of the strains followed by comparative genomic analysis revealed a single point mutation in the gene for a transcriptional regulator, designated fepR (for fluoroquinolone efflux protein regulator) belonging to the TetR family. The frame-shift mutation was responsible for the introduction of a premature stop codon resulting in an inactive truncated protein. Just downstream from fepR, the structural gene for an efflux pump of the MATE family (named FepA) was identified. Gene expression was quantified by qRT-PCR and demonstrated that fepA expression was more than 64-fold higher in BM4716 than in BM4715. The clean deletion of the fepR gene from BM4715 was responsible for an overexpression of fepA with resistance to norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin, confirming the role of FepR as a local repressor of fepA. In conclusion, we demonstrated that overexpression of the new MATE efflux pump FepA is responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance in L. monocytogenes and secondary to inactivation of the FepR repressor. PMID:25188450

  6. Functional Cloning and Characterization of the Multidrug Efflux Pumps NorM from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and YdhE from Escherichia coli▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Long, Feng; Rouquette-Loughlin, Corinne; Shafer, William M.; Yu, Edward W.

    2008-01-01

    Active efflux of antimicrobial agents is one of the most important adapted strategies that bacteria use to defend against antimicrobial factors that are present in their environment. The NorM protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the YdhE protein of Escherichia coli have been proposed to be multidrug efflux pumps that belong to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family. In order to determine their antimicrobial export capabilities, we cloned, expressed, and purified these two efflux proteins and characterized their functions both in vivo and in vitro. E. coli strains expressing norM or ydhE showed elevated (twofold or greater) resistance to several antimicrobial agents, including fluoroquinolones, ethidium bromide, rhodamine 6G, acriflavine, crystal violet, berberine, doxorubicin, novobiocin, enoxacin, and tetraphenylphosphonium chloride. When they were expressed in E. coli, both transporters reduced the levels of ethidium bromide and norfloxacin accumulation through a mechanism requiring the proton motive force, and direct measurements of efflux confirmed that NorM behaves as an Na+-dependent transporter. The capacities of NorM and YdhE to recognize structurally divergent compounds were confirmed by steady-state fluorescence polarization assays, and the results revealed that these transporters bind to antimicrobials with dissociation constants in the micromolar region. PMID:18591276

  7. Distribution of genes encoding erythromycin ribosomal methylases and an erythromycin efflux pump in epidemiologically distinct groups of staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Eady, E A; Ross, J I; Tipper, J L; Walters, C E; Cove, J H; Noble, W C

    1993-02-01

    Erythromycin-resistant staphylococci can be divided into two phenotypic classes based on their pattern of cross-resistance to other macrolides, lincosamides and type B streptogramins. Strains inducibly or constitutively resistant to all MLS antibiotics possess erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm) genes, whereas strains inducibly resistant to only 14 and 15-membered ring macrolides and type B streptogramins harbour msrA, which encodes an ATP-dependent efflux pump. Dot-blot hybridization was used to study the distribution of ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA in five epidemiologically distinct groups of staphylococci. The most widely-distributed resistance determinant was ermC, which was detected in 112 (50.6%) of 221 isolates, alone in 106 isolates and in combination with a second erythromycin resistance determinant in six strains. MsrA was detected in 73 (33%) of isolates, alone in 65 and in combination with a methylase gene in eight strains. This determinant was responsible for erythromycin resistance in over one-third (36.4%) of clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci. ErmA and ermB were present in only a minority of isolates (5.9 and 7.2% of strains, respectively). The resistance determinants present in ten strains did not hybridize to any of the four probes although, in all cases, their resistance phenotype was consistent with the possession of a methylase gene. Interestingly, ermB was found exclusively in animal isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus hyicus, but not in coagulase-negative staphylococci of human origin. This determinant has previously only been found in a small number of epidemiologically related strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

  8. HEC-cysteamine conjugates: influence of degree of thiolation on efflux pump inhibitory and permeation enhancing properties.

    PubMed

    Rahmat, Deni; Sakloetsakun, Duangkamon; Shahnaz, Gul; Sarti, Federica; Laffleur, Flavia; Schnürch, Andreas Bernkop

    2012-01-17

    Within the present study hydroxyethyl cellulose-cysteamine conjugates are investigated regarding biocompatibility, in situ gelling, permeation enhancing and efflux pump inhibitory properties. For this purpose, a series of concentrations of sodium periodate was prepared to oxidize HEC leading to ring opening of glucose subunits. The resulting polymers showing varying degrees of oxidation (DO) were then conjugated with cysteamine stabilized via reductive amination. Consequently, HEC-cysteamine conjugates with increasing degree in thiolation were obtained. Since the conjugates are positively charged, potency of cytotoxicity was tested by resazurin assay. In situ gelling properties of the conjugates were studied to investigate change of their viscosity due to inter- and/or intramolecular crosslinking via disulfide bonds. The influence of the presence of the conjugates on transport of rhodamine 123 and fluoresceinisothiocyanate-dextran 4 (FD4) representing model compounds for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibition and permeation enhancing studies, respectively, across Caco-2 cell monolayers was determined. The conjugates showed a degree of thiolation in the range of 316-2158 μmol/g. Within 30 min, dynamic viscosity of the conjugate with the lowest degree of thiolation 0.5% (m/v) increased up to 300-fold. The conjugates showed a degree of thiolation-dependent increase in cytotoxicity but they all were found comparatively low cytotoxic. The addition of the conjugate with thiol group content of 1670 μmol/g resulted in the highest improvement in the transport of both rhodamine 123 and FD4 as compared to buffer control. Accordingly, the degree of thiolation strongly influences the properties of the conjugates and the modulation of the degree of thiolation could be exploited for development of various drug delivery systems.

  9. Regulation of the AcrAB multidrug efflux pump in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in response to indole and paraquat.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Eiji; Shirosaka, Ikue; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Nishino, Kunihiko

    2011-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has at least nine multidrug efflux pumps. Among these, AcrAB is constitutively expressed and is the most efficient, playing a role in both drug resistance and virulence. The acrAB locus is induced by indole, Escherichia coli-conditioned medium, and bile salts. This induction is dependent on RamA through the binding sequence in the upstream region of acrA that binds RamA. In the present study, we made a detailed investigation of the ramA and acrAB induction mechanisms in Salmonella in response to indole, a biological oxidant for bacteria. We found that acrAB and ramA induction in response to indole is dependent on RamR. However, the cysteine residues of RamR do not play a role in the induction of ramA in response to indole, and the oxidative effect of indole is therefore not related to ramA induction via RamR. Furthermore, we showed that paraquat, a superoxide generator, induces acrAB but not ramA. We further discovered that the mechanism of acrAB induction in response to paraquat is dependent on SoxS. The data indicate that there are at least two independent induction pathways for acrAB in response to extracellular signals such as indole and paraquat. We propose that Salmonella utilizes these regulators for acrAB induction in response to extracellular signals in order to adapt itself to environmental conditions.

  10. Hoechst 33342 Is a Hidden “Janus” amongst Substrates for the Multidrug Efflux Pump LmrP

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, Arthur; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug transporters mediate the active extrusion of antibiotics and toxic ions from the cell. This reaction is thought to be based on a switch of the transporter between two conformational states, one in which the interior substrate binding cavity is available for substrate binding at the inside of the cell, and another in which the cavity is exposed to the outside of the cell to enable substrate release. Consistent with this model, cysteine cross-linking studies with the Major Facilitator Superfamily drug/proton antiporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis demonstrated binding of transported benzalkonium to LmrP in its inward-facing state. The fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342 is a substrate for many multidrug transporters and is extruded by efflux pumps in microbial and mammalian cells. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other multidrug transporters, LmrP was found to actively accumulate, rather than extrude, Hoechst 33342 in lactococcal cells. Consistent with this observation, LmrP expression was associated with cellular sensitivity, rather than resistance to Hoechst 33342. Thus, we discovered a hidden “Janus” amongst LmrP substrates that is translocated in reverse direction across the membrane by binding to outward-facing LmrP followed by release from inward-facing LmrP. These findings are in agreement with distance measurements by electron paramagnetic resonance in which Hoechst 33342 binding was found to stabilize LmrP in its outward-facing conformation. Our data have important implications for the use of multidrug exporters in selective targeting of “Hoechst 33342-like” drugs to cells and tissues in which these transporters are expressed. PMID:26540112

  11. The Effects of Berberine and Palmatine on Efflux Pumps Inhibition with Different Gene Patterns in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Infections

    PubMed Central

    Aghayan, Seyed Sajjad; Kalalian Mogadam, Hamidreza; Fazli, Mozhgan; Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood; Khoramrooz, Seyed Sajjad; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Yaslianifard, Somayeh; Mirzaii, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Related Multidrug Resistance (MDR) to efflux pumps is a significant problem in treating infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). Plant compounds have been identified as Pump Inhibitors (EPIs). In the current study, the potential effect of Berberine and Palmatine as EPIs were investigated on efflux pump inhibition through focusing on different gene patterns in P. aeruginosa isolated from burn infections. Methods: All isolates were collected and identified using the standard biochemical tests. Antimicrobial sensitivity was performed based on disk agar diffusion method for 12 antibiotics. MIC-MBC tests were also performed based on the broth microdilution method to detect synergistic relationship between ciprofloxacin, Berberine and Palmatine. Detection of mexA, mexB, mexC, mexD, mexE, mexF and mexX was conducted by PCR assay. Fisher’s Exact test and Logistic Regression were used as statistical tools. Results: A total of 60 P. aeruginosa isolates were collected. The highest and lowest levels of resistance were found to be respectively against clindamycin and tigecycline. Comparing the MIC with MBC distribution, it was found that Berberine and Palmatine lower the MIC-MBC level of ciprofloxacin. The PCR results indicated that the highest frequency is about MexAB-OprM operon. The statistical analysis among different gene patterns of efflux pumps showed that there were no significant relationships between the effectiveness of Berberine and Palmatine (p>0.05). Conclusion: It can be speculated that Berberine and Palmatine both act as EPIs and can be used as auxiliary treatments with the purpose of increasing the effect of available antibiotics as well as decreasing the emergence of MDR bacteria. The efficiency of these combinations should be studied further under in vivo conditions to have a more comprehensive conclusion regarding this issue. PMID:28090273

  12. Efflux pumps expression and its association with porin down-regulation and β-lactamase production among Pseudomonas aeruginosa causing bloodstream infections in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multi-drug efflux pumps have been increasingly recognized as a major component of resistance in P. aeruginosa. We have investigated the expression level of efflux systems among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, regardless of their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Results Aztreonam exhibited the highest in vitro activity against the P. aeruginosa isolates studied (64.4% susceptibility), whereas susceptibility rates of imipenem and meropenem were both 47.5%. The MexXY-OprM and MexAB-OprM efflux systems were overexpressed in 50.8% and 27.1% of isolates studied, respectively. Overexpression of the MexEF-OprN and MexCD-OprJ systems was not observed. AmpC β-lactamase was overexpressed in 11.9% of P. aeruginosa isolates. In addition, decreased oprD expression was also observed in 69.5% of the whole collection, and in 87.1% of the imipenem non-susceptible P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. The MBL-encoding genes blaSPM-1 and blaIMP-1 were detected in 23.7% and 1.7% P. aeruginosa isolates, respectively. The blaGES-1 was detected in 5.1% of the isolates, while blaGES-5 and blaCTX-M-2 were observed in 1.7% of the isolates evaluated. In the present study, we have observed that efflux systems represent an adjuvant mechanism for antimicrobial resistance. Conclusions Efflux systems in association of distinct mechanisms such as the porin down-regulation, AmpC overproduction and secondary β-lactamases play also an important role in the multi-drug resistance phenotype among P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:20704733

  13. Analysis of the inhibition potential of zosuquidar derivatives on selected bacterial and fungal ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Infed, Nacera; Smits, Sander H J; Dittrich, Torsten; Braun, Manfred; Driessen, Arnold J M; Hanekop, Nils; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-03-01

    The increasing number of multidrug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms is a serious public health issue. Among the multitude of mechanisms that lead to multidrug resistance, the active extrusion of toxic compounds, mediated by MDR efflux pumps, plays an important role. In our study we analyzed the inhibitory capability of 26 synthesized zosuquidar derivatives on three ABC-type MDR efflux pumps, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr5 as well as Lactococcus lactis LmrA and LmrCD. For Pdr5, five compounds could be identified that inhibited rhodamine 6G transport more efficiently than zosuquidar. One of these is a compound with a new catechol acetal structure that might represent a new lead compound. Furthermore, the determination of IC(50) values for rhodamine 6G transport of Pdr5 with representative compounds reveals values between 0.3 and 0.9 μM. Thus the identified compounds are among the most potent inhibitors known for Pdr5. For the ABC-type efflux pumps LmrA and LmrCD from L. lactis, seven and three compounds, which inhibit the transport activity more than the lead compound zosuquidar, were found. Interestingly, transport inhibition for LmrCD was very specific, with a drastic reduction by one compound while its diastereomers showed hardly an effect. Thus, the present study reveals new potent inhibitors for the ABC-type MDR efflux pumps studied with the inhibitors of Pdr5 and LmrCD being of particular interest as these proteins are well known model systems for their homologs in pathogenic fungi and Gram-positive bacteria.

  14. Research Progress on the Role of ABC Transporters in the Drug Resistance Mechanism of Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Mao, Ding-an; Liu, Li-qun

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy is not fully clear. In recent years, both animal and clinical trials have shown that the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is increased in patients with intractable epilepsy; additionally, epileptic seizures can lead to an increase in the number of sites that express ABC transporters. These findings suggest that ABC transporters play an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of epilepsy. ABC transporters can perform the funcions of a drug efflux pump, which can reduce the effective drug concentration at epilepsy lesions by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier to antiepileptic drugs, thus causing resistance to antiepileptic drugs. Given the important role of ABC transporters in refractory epilepsy drug resistance, antiepileptic drugs that are not substrates of ABC transporters were used to obtain ABC transporter inhibitors with strong specificity, high safety, and few side effects, making them suitable for long-term use; therefore, these drugs can be used for future clinical treatment of intractable epilepsy. PMID:26491660

  15. Extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity or lipid raft localization and efflux function of the ABC transporter MRP1

    PubMed Central

    Klappe, Karin; Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Hummel, Ina; vanDam, Annie; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Myers, David S.; Brown, H. Alex; Permentier, Hjalmar; Kok, Jan W.

    2013-01-01

    We show that highly efficient depletion of sphingolipids in two different cell lines does not abrogate the ability to isolate Lubrol-based DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) or detergent-free lipid rafts from these cells. Compared with control, DRM/detergent-free lipid raft fractions contain equal amounts of protein, cholesterol and phospholipid, whereas the classical DRM/lipid raft markers Src, caveolin-1 and flotillin display the same gradient distribution. DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts themselves are severely depleted of sphingolipids. The fatty acid profile of the remaining sphingolipids as well as that of the glycerophospholipids shows several differences compared with control, most prominently an increase in highly saturated C16 species. The glycerophospholipid headgroup composition is unchanged in sphingolipid-depleted cells and cell-derived detergent-free lipid rafts. Sphingolipid depletion does not alter the localization of MRP1 (multidrug-resistance-related protein 1) in DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts or MRP1-mediated efflux of carboxyfluorescein. We conclude that extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity in two cell lines and does not affect the function of the lipid-raft-associated protein MRP1. PMID:20604746

  16. Overexpression and functional characterization of an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter encoded by the genes drrA and drrB of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Choudhuri, Baisakhee Saha; Bhakta, Sanjib; Barik, Rajib; Basu, Joyoti; Kundu, Manikuntala; Chakrabarti, Parul

    2002-01-01

    The genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters occupy 2.5% of the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, none of these putative ABC transporters has been characterized so far. We describe the development of expression systems for simultaneous expression of the ATP-binding protein DrrA and the membrane integral protein DrrB which together behave as a functional doxorubicin efflux pump. Doxorubicin uptake in Escherichia coli or Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing DrrAB was inhibited by reserpine, an inhibitor of ABC transporters. The localization of DrrA to the membrane depended on the simultaneous expression of DrrB. ATP binding was positively regulated by doxorubicin and daunorubicin. At the same time, DrrB appeared to be sensitive to proteolysis when expressed alone in the absence of DrrA. Simultaneous expression of the two polypeptides was essential to obtain a functional doxorubicin efflux pump. Expression of DrrAB in E. coli conferred 8-fold increased resistance to ethidium bromide, a cationic compound. 2',7'-bis-(2-Carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), a neutral compound, also behaved as a substrate of the reconstituted efflux pump. When expressed in M. smegmatis, DrrAB conferred resistance to a number of clinically relevant, structurally unrelated antibiotics. The resistant phenotype could be reversed by verapamil and reserpine, two potent inhibitors of ABC transporters. PMID:12057006

  17. Ligand-regulated transport of the Menkes copper P-type ATPase efflux pump from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane: a novel mechanism of regulated trafficking.

    PubMed

    Petris, M J; Mercer, J F; Culvenor, J G; Lockhart, P; Gleeson, P A; Camakaris, J

    1996-11-15

    The Menkes P-type ATPase (MNK), encoded by the Menkes gene (MNK; ATP7A), is a transmembrane copper-translocating pump which is defective in the human disorder of copper metabolism, Menkes disease. Recent evidence that the MNK P-type ATPase has a role in copper efflux has come from studies using copper-resistant variants of cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. These variants have MNK gene amplification and consequently overexpress MNK, the extents of which correlate with the degree of elevated copper efflux. Here, we report on the localization of MNK in these copper-resistant CHO cells when cultured in different levels of copper. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that MNK is predominantly localized to the Golgi apparatus of cells in basal medium. In elevated copper conditions there was a rapid trafficking of MNK from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. This shift in steady-state distribution of MNK was reversible and not dependent on new protein synthesis. In media containing basal copper, MNK accumulated in cytoplasmic vesicles after treatment of cells with a variety of agents that inhibit endosomal recycling. We suggest that MNK continuously recycles between the Golgi and the plasma membrane and elevated copper shifts the steady-state distribution from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. These data reveal a novel system of regulated protein trafficking which ultimately leads to the efflux of an essential yet potentially toxic ligand, where the ligand itself appears directly and specifically to stimulate the trafficking of its own transporter.

  18. Role of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in tolerance to tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil and its monoterpene components terpinen-4-ol, 1,8-cineole, and alpha-terpineol.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Chelsea J; Carson, Christine F; Chang, Barbara J; Riley, Thomas V

    2008-03-01

    Using a series of efflux mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the MexAB-OprM pump was identified as contributing to this organism's tolerance to the antimicrobial agent tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil and its monoterpene components terpinen-4-ol, 1,8-cineole, and alpha-terpineol. These data show that a multidrug efflux system of P. aeruginosa can extrude monoterpenes and related alcohols.

  19. Verapamil, and its metabolite norverapamil, inhibit macrophage-induced, bacterial efflux pump-mediated tolerance to multiple anti-tubercular drugs.

    PubMed

    Adams, Kristin N; Szumowski, John D; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2014-08-01

    Drug tolerance likely represents an important barrier to tuberculosis treatment shortening. We previously implicated the Mycobacterium tuberculosis efflux pump Rv1258c as mediating macrophage-induced tolerance to rifampicin and intracellular growth. In this study, we infected the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 with drug-sensitive and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains and found that tolerance developed to most antituberculosis drugs, including the newer agents moxifloxacin, PA-824, linezolid, and bedaquiline. Multiple efflux pump inhibitors in clinical use for other indications reversed tolerance to isoniazid and rifampicin and slowed intracellular growth. Moreover, verapamil reduced tolerance to bedaquiline and moxifloxacin. Verapamil's R isomer and its metabolite norverapamil have substantially less calcium channel blocking activity yet were similarly active as verapamil at inhibiting macrophage-induced drug tolerance. Our finding that verapamil inhibits intracellular M. tuberculosis growth and tolerance suggests its potential for treatment shortening. Norverapamil, R-verapamil, and potentially other derivatives present attractive alternatives that may have improved tolerability.

  20. Chlorinated phenols control the expression of the multi-drug resistance efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by activating NalC

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Cremers, Claudia M.; Jakob, Ursula; Love, Nancy G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary NalC is a TetR type regulator that represses the multidrug efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we explain the mechanism of NalC mediated regulation of MexAB-OprM. We show that NalC non-covalently binds chlorinated phenols and chemicals containing chlorophenol sidechains such as triclosan. NalC-chlorinated phenol binding results in its dissociation from promoter DNA and up-regulation of NalC’s downstream targets, including the MexR antirepressor ArmR. ArmR up-regulation and MexR-ArmR complex formation have previously been shown to upregulate MexAB-OprM. In vivo mexB and armR expression analyses were used to corroborate in vitro NalC chlorinated phenol binding. We also show that the interaction between chlorinated phenols and NalC is reversible, such that removal of these chemicals restored NalC promoter DNA binding. Thus, the NalC-chlorinated phenol interaction is likely a pertinent physiological mechanism that P. aeruginosa uses to control expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. PMID:21231970

  1. Induction of the MexXY efflux pump in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is dependent on drug-ribosome interaction.

    PubMed

    Jeannot, Katy; Sobel, Mara L; El Garch, Farid; Poole, Keith; Plésiat, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    MexXY is an inducible efflux system that contributes to the natural resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics. Experiments involving real-time PCR after reverse transcription in reference strain PAO1 showed concentration-dependent induction of gene mexY by various ribosome inhibitors (e.g., chloramphenicol, tetracycline, macrolides, and aminoglycosides) but not by antibiotics acting on other cellular targets (e.g., beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones). Confirming a functional link between the efflux system and the translational machinery, ribosome protection by plasmid-encoded proteins TetO and ErmBP increased the resistance of a DeltamexAB-oprM mutant of PAO1 to tetracycline and erythromycin, respectively, as well as the concentrations of both drugs required to induce mexY. Furthermore, spontaneous mutations resulting in specific resistance to dihydrostreptomycin or spectinomycin also raised the minimal drug concentration for mexXY induction in strain PAO1. While strongly upregulated in a PAO1 mutant defective in gene mexZ (which codes for a putative repressor of operon mexXY), gene mexY remained inducible by agents such as tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and spectinomycin, suggesting additional regulatory loci for mexXY. Altogether, these data demonstrate physiological interplays between MexXY and the ribosome and are suggestive of an alternative function for MexXY beyond antibiotic efflux.

  2. Regulation of ABC transporters blood-brain barrier: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Miller, David S

    2015-01-01

    The brain capillary endothelial cells that constitute the blood-brain barrier express multiple ABC transport proteins on the luminal, blood-facing, plasma membrane. These transporters function as ATP-driven efflux pumps for xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites. High expression of these ABC transporters at the barrier is a major obstacle to the delivery of therapeutics, including chemotherapeutics, to the CNS. Here, I review the signals that alter ABC transporter expression and transport function with an emphasis on P-glycoprotein, Mrp2, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), the efflux transporters for which we have the most detailed picture of regulation. Recent work shows that transporter protein expression can be upregulated in response to inflammatory and oxidative stress, therapeutic drugs, diet, and persistent environmental pollutants; as a consequence, drug delivery to the brain is reduced (potentially bad and ugly). In contrast, basal transport activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP can be reduced through complex signaling pathways that involve events in and on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Targeting these signaling events provides opportunities to rapidly and reversibly increase brain accumulation of drugs that are substrates for the transporters (potentially good). The clinical usefulness of targeting signaling to reduce efflux transporter activity and improve drug delivery to the CNS remains to be established.

  3. Effect of Transcriptional Activators SoxS, RobA, and RamA on Expression of Multidrug Efflux Pump AcrAB-TolC in Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Astrid; Poza, Margarita; Aranda, Jesús; Latasa, Cristina; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Tomás, María; Romero, Antonio; Lasa, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    Control of membrane permeability is a key step in regulating the intracellular concentration of antibiotics. Efflux pumps confer innate resistance to a wide range of toxic compounds such as antibiotics, dyes, detergents, and disinfectants in members of the Enterobacteriaceae. The AcrAB-TolC efflux pump is involved in multidrug resistance in Enterobacter cloacae. However, the underlying mechanism that regulates the system in this microorganism remains unknown. In Escherichia coli, the transcription of acrAB is upregulated under global stress conditions by proteins such as MarA, SoxS, and Rob. In the present study, two clinical isolates of E. cloacae, EcDC64 (a multidrug-resistant strain overexpressing the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump) and Jc194 (a strain with a basal AcrAB-TolC expression level), were used to determine whether similar global stress responses operate in E. cloacae and also to establish the molecular mechanisms underlying this response. A decrease in susceptibility to erythromycin, tetracycline, telithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol was observed in clinical isolate Jc194 and, to a lesser extent in EcDC64, in the presence of salicylate, decanoate, tetracycline, and paraquat. Increased expression of the acrAB promoter in the presence of the above-described conditions was observed by flow cytometry and reverse transcription-PCR, by using a reporter fusion protein (green fluorescent protein). The expression level of the AcrAB promoter decreased in E. cloacae EcDC64 derivates deficient in SoxS, RobA, and RamA. Accordingly, the expression level of the AcrAB promoter was higher in E. cloacae Jc194 strains overproducing SoxS, RobA, and RamA. Overall, the data showed that SoxS, RobA, and RamA regulators were associated with the upregulation of acrAB, thus conferring antimicrobial resistance as well as a stress response in E. cloacae. In summary, the regulatory proteins SoxS, RobA, and RamA were cloned and sequenced for the first time in this species. The

  4. The Deviant ATP-binding Site of the Multidrug Efflux Pump Pdr5 Plays an Active Role in the Transport Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Christopher; Mehla, Jitender; Ananthaswamy, Neeti; Arya, Nidhi; Kulesh, Bridget; Kovach, Ildiko; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Golin, John

    2013-01-01

    Pdr5 is the founding member of a large subfamily of evolutionarily distinct, clinically important fungal ABC transporters containing a characteristic, deviant ATP-binding site with altered Walker A, Walker B, Signature (C-loop), and Q-loop residues. In contrast to these motifs, the D-loops of the two ATP-binding sites have similar sequences, including a completely conserved aspartate residue. Alanine substitution mutants in the deviant Walker A and Signature motifs retain significant, albeit reduced, ATPase activity and drug resistance. The D-loop residue mutants D340A and D1042A showed a striking reduction in plasma membrane transporter levels. The D1042N mutation localized properly had nearly WT ATPase activity but was defective in transport and was profoundly hypersensitive to Pdr5 substrates. Therefore, there was a strong uncoupling of ATPase activity and drug efflux. Taken together, the properties of the mutants suggest an additional, critical intradomain signaling role for deviant ATP-binding sites. PMID:24019526

  5. From mixed sigma-2 receptor/P-glycoprotein targeting agents to selective P-glycoprotein modulators: small structural changes address the mechanism of interaction at the efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Abate, Carmen; Pati, Maria Laura; Contino, Marialessandra; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Perrone, Roberto; Niso, Mauro; Berardi, Francesco

    2015-01-07

    Generations of modulators of the efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) have been produced as tools to counteract the Multidrug Resistance (MDR) phenomenon in tumor therapy, but clinical trials were not successful so far. With the aim of contributing to the development of novel P-gp modulators, we started from recently studied high-affinity sigma-2 (σ2) receptor ligands that showed also potent interaction with P-gp. For σ2 receptors high-affinity binding, a basic N-atom is a strict requirement. Therefore, we reduced the basic character of the N-atom present in these ligands, and we obtained potent P-gp modulators with poor or null σ2 receptor affinity. We also evaluated whether modulation of P-gp by these novel compounds involved consumption of ATP (as P-gp substrates do), as a source of energy to support the efflux. Surprisingly, even small structural changes resulted in opposite behavior, with amide 13 depleting ATP, in contrast to its isomer 18. Two compounds, 15 and 25, emerged for their potent activity at P-gp, and deserve further investigations as tools for P-gp modulation.

  6. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD transports a natural phenazine that controls gene expression and biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Sakhtah, Hassan; Koyama, Leslie; Zhang, Yihan; Morales, Diana K.; Fields, Blanche L.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Hogan, Deborah A.; Shepard, Kenneth; Dietrich, Lars E. P.

    2016-01-01

    Redox-cycling compounds, including endogenously produced phenazine antibiotics, induce expression of the efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Previous studies of P. aeruginosa virulence, physiology, and biofilm development have focused on the blue phenazine pyocyanin and the yellow phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). In P. aeruginosa phenazine biosynthesis, conversion of PCA to pyocyanin is presumed to proceed through the intermediate 5-methylphenazine-1-carboxylate (5-Me-PCA), a reactive compound that has eluded detection in most laboratory samples. Here, we apply electrochemical methods to directly detect 5-Me-PCA and find that it is transported by MexGHI-OpmD in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 planktonic and biofilm cells. We also show that 5-Me-PCA is sufficient to fully induce MexGHI-OpmD expression and that it is required for wild-type colony biofilm morphogenesis. These physiological effects are consistent with the high redox potential of 5-Me-PCA, which distinguishes it from other well-studied P. aeruginosa phenazines. Our observations highlight the importance of this compound, which was previously overlooked due to the challenges associated with its detection, in the context of P. aeruginosa gene expression and multicellular behavior. This study constitutes a unique demonstration of efflux-based self-resistance, controlled by a simple circuit, in a Gram-negative pathogen. PMID:27274079

  7. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD transports a natural phenazine that controls gene expression and biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Sakhtah, Hassan; Koyama, Leslie; Zhang, Yihan; Morales, Diana K; Fields, Blanche L; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Hogan, Deborah A; Shepard, Kenneth; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2016-06-21

    Redox-cycling compounds, including endogenously produced phenazine antibiotics, induce expression of the efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa Previous studies of P. aeruginosa virulence, physiology, and biofilm development have focused on the blue phenazine pyocyanin and the yellow phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). In P. aeruginosa phenazine biosynthesis, conversion of PCA to pyocyanin is presumed to proceed through the intermediate 5-methylphenazine-1-carboxylate (5-Me-PCA), a reactive compound that has eluded detection in most laboratory samples. Here, we apply electrochemical methods to directly detect 5-Me-PCA and find that it is transported by MexGHI-OpmD in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 planktonic and biofilm cells. We also show that 5-Me-PCA is sufficient to fully induce MexGHI-OpmD expression and that it is required for wild-type colony biofilm morphogenesis. These physiological effects are consistent with the high redox potential of 5-Me-PCA, which distinguishes it from other well-studied P. aeruginosa phenazines. Our observations highlight the importance of this compound, which was previously overlooked due to the challenges associated with its detection, in the context of P. aeruginosa gene expression and multicellular behavior. This study constitutes a unique demonstration of efflux-based self-resistance, controlled by a simple circuit, in a Gram-negative pathogen.

  8. Discovery of 4-acetyl-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(p-tolyl)-5-methylpyrrole as a dual inhibitor of human P-glycoprotein and Staphylococcus aureus Nor A efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Jaideep B; Singh, Samsher; Wani, Abubakar; Sharma, Sadhana; Joshi, Prashant; Khan, Inshad A; Kumar, Ajay; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Bharate, Sandip B

    2015-05-21

    Polysubstituted pyrrole natural products, lamellarins, are known to overcome multi-drug resistance in cancer via the inhibition of p-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) efflux pumps. Herein, a series of simplified polysubstituted pyrroles, prepared via a one-pot domino protocol, were screened for P-gp inhibition in P-gp overexpressing human adenocarcinoma LS-180 cells using a rhodamine 123 efflux assay. Several compounds showed the significant inhibition of P-gp at 50 μM, as indicated by increase in the intracellular accumulation of Rh123 in LS-180 cells. Furthermore, pyrrole 5i decreased the efflux of digoxin, a FDA approved P-gp substrate in MDCK-MDR1 cells with an IC50 of 11.2 μM. In in vivo studies, following the oral administration of a P-gp substrate drug, rifampicin, along with compound , the Cmax and AUC0-∞ of rifampicin was enhanced by 31% and 46%, respectively. All the compounds were then screened for their ability to potentiate ciprofloxacin activity via the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Nor A efflux pump. Pyrrole showed the significant inhibition of S. aureus Nor A efflux pump with 8- and 4-fold reductions in the MIC of ciprofloxacin at 50 and 6.25 μM, respectively. The molecular docking studies of compound with the human P-gp and S. aureus Nor A efflux pump identified its plausible binding site and key interactions. Thus, the results presented herein strongly indicate the potential of this scaffold for its use as multi-drug resistance reversal agent or bioavailability enhancer.

  9. Differential requirement of the transcription factor Mcm1 for activation of the Candida albicans multidrug efflux pump MDR1 by its regulators Mrr1 and Cap1.

    PubMed

    Mogavero, Selene; Tavanti, Arianna; Senesi, Sonia; Rogers, P David; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2011-05-01

    Overexpression of the multidrug efflux pump Mdr1 causes increased fluconazole resistance in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. The transcription factors Mrr1 and Cap1 mediate MDR1 upregulation in response to inducing stimuli, and gain-of-function mutations in Mrr1 or Cap1, which render the transcription factors hyperactive, result in constitutive MDR1 overexpression. The essential MADS box transcription factor Mcm1 also binds to the MDR1 promoter, but its role in inducible or constitutive MDR1 upregulation is unknown. Using a conditional mutant in which Mcm1 can be depleted from the cells, we investigated the importance of Mcm1 for MDR1 expression. We found that Mcm1 was dispensable for MDR1 upregulation by H2O2 but was required for full MDR1 induction by benomyl. A C-terminally truncated, hyperactive Cap1 could upregulate MDR1 expression both in the presence and in the absence of Mcm1. In contrast, a hyperactive Mrr1 containing a gain-of-function mutation depended on Mcm1 to cause MDR1 overexpression. These results demonstrate a differential requirement for the coregulator Mcm1 for Cap1- and Mrr1-mediated MDR1 upregulation. When activated by oxidative stress or a gain-of-function mutation, Cap1 can induce MDR1 expression independently of Mcm1, whereas Mrr1 requires either Mcm1 or an active Cap1 to cause overexpression of the MDR1 efflux pump. Our findings provide more detailed insight into the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance in this important human fungal pathogen.

  10. Reduced aeration affects the expression of the NorB efflux pump of Staphylococcus aureus by posttranslational modification of MgrA.

    PubMed

    Truong-Bolduc, Que Chi; Hsing, Liao Chun; Villet, Regis; Bolduc, Gilles R; Estabrooks, Zoe; Taguezem, G Florent; Hooper, David C

    2012-04-01

    We previously showed that at acid pH, the transcription of norB, encoding the NorB efflux pump, increases due to a reduction in the phosphorylation level of MgrA, which in turn leads to a reduction in bacterial killing by moxifloxacin, a substrate of the NorB efflux pump. In this study, we demonstrated that reduced oxygen levels did not affect the transcript levels of mgrA but modified the dimerization of the MgrA protein, which remained mostly in its monomeric form. Under reduced aeration, we also observed a 21.7-fold increase in the norB transcript levels after 60 min of growth that contributed to a 4-fold increase in the MICs of moxifloxacin and sparfloxacin for Staphylococcus aureus RN6390. The relative proportions of MgrA in monomeric and dimeric forms were altered by treatment with H(2)O(2), but incubation of purified MgrA with extracts of cells grown under reduced but not normal aeration prevented MgrA from being converted to its dimeric DNA-binding form. This modification was associated with cleavage of a fragment of the dimerization domain of MgrA without change in MgrA phosphorylation and an increase in transcript levels of genes encoding serine proteases in cells incubated at reduced aeration. Taken together, these data suggest that modification of MgrA by proteases underlies the reversal of its repression of norB and increased resistance to NorB substrates in response to reduced-aeration conditions, illustrating a third mechanism of posttranslational modification, in addition to oxidation and phosphorylation, that modulates the regulatory activities of MgrA.

  11. Synergistic effect of fluconazole and doxycycline against Candida albicans biofilms resulting from calcium fluctuation and downregulation of fluconazole-inducible efflux pump gene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Li, Hui; Liu, Shuyuan; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Shujuan

    2014-07-01

    Candida albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to antimicrobial agents. Previous work demonstrated that the antifungal activity of fluconazole against C. albicans biofilms is notably enhanced by doxycycline. In order to explore the synergistic mechanism of fluconazole and doxycycline, we investigated the changes of efflux pump gene expression, intracellular calcium concentration and cell cycle distribution after drug intervention in this study. The expression levels of CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 were determined by real-time PCR, and the results showed that fluconazole alone could stimulate the high expression of CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1, and the combination of doxycycline and fluconazole downregulated the gene overexpression induced by fluconazole. Intracellular calcium concentration was determined using Fluo-3/AM by observing the fluorescence with flow cytometry. A calcium fluctuation, which started 4 h and peaked 8 h after the treatment with fluconazole, was observed. The combined drugs also initiated a calcium fluctuation after 4 h treatment and showed a peak at 16 h, and the peak was higher than that stimulated by fluconazole alone. The cell cycle was measured using flow cytometry. Fluconazole alone and the combined drugs both induced a reduction in the percentages of S-phase cells and an elevation in the percentages of cells in the G2/M phase. The results of this research showed that the synergism of fluconazole and doxycycline against C. albicans biofilms is associated with blockade of the efflux pump genes CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1, and stimulation of high intracellular calcium concentration. The findings of this study are of great significance in the search for new antifungal mechanisms.

  12. Characterization of AcrD, a Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-type multidrug efflux pump from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug efflux pumps are membrane translocases that have the ability to extrude a variety of structurally unrelated compounds from the cell. AcrD, a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) transporter, was shown to be involved in efflux of highly hydrophilic aminoglycosides and a limited number of amphiphilic compounds in E. coli. Here, a homologue of AcrD in the plant pathogen and causal agent of fire blight disease Erwinia amylovora was identified. Results The substrate specificity of AcrD was studied by overexpression of the corresponding gene from a high-copy plasmid in E. amylovora Ea1189-3, which is hypersensitive to many drugs due to a deficiency of the major multidrug pump AcrB. AcrD mediated resistance to several amphiphilic compounds including clotrimazole and luteolin, two compounds hitherto not described as substrates of AcrD in enterobacteria. However, AcrD was not able to expel aminoglycosides. An acrD mutant exhibited full virulence on apple rootstock and immature pear fruits. RT-PCR analysis revealed an induction of acrD expression in infected apple tissue but not on pear fruits. Moreover, a direct binding of BaeR, the response regulator of the two-component regulatory system BaeSR, to the acrD promoter was observed as has already been shown in other enterobacteria. Conclusions AcrD from E. amylovora is involved in resistance to a limited number of amphiphilic compounds, but in contrast to AcrD of E. coli, it is not involved in resistance to aminoglycosides. The expression of acrD was up-regulated by addition of the substrates deoxycholate, naringenin, tetracycline and zinc. AcrD appears to be regulated by the BaeSR two-component system, an envelope stress signal transduction pathway. PMID:24443882

  13. Control of gdhR Expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae via Autoregulation and a Master Repressor (MtrR) of a Drug Efflux Pump Operon

    PubMed Central

    Rouquette-Loughlin, Corinne E.; Zalucki, Yaramah M.; Dhulipala, Vijaya L.; Balthazar, Jacqueline T.; Doyle, Raúl G.; Nicholas, Robert A.; Begum, Afrin A.; Raterman, Erica L.; Jerse, Ann E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The MtrCDE efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae contributes to gonococcal resistance to a number of antibiotics used previously or currently in treatment of gonorrhea, as well as to host-derived antimicrobials that participate in innate defense. Overexpression of the MtrCDE efflux pump increases gonococcal survival and fitness during experimental lower genital tract infection of female mice. Transcription of mtrCDE can be repressed by the DNA-binding protein MtrR, which also acts as a global regulator of genes involved in important metabolic, physiologic, or regulatory processes. Here, we investigated whether a gene downstream of mtrCDE, previously annotated gdhR in Neisseria meningitidis, is a target for regulation by MtrR. In meningococci, GdhR serves as a regulator of genes involved in glucose catabolism, amino acid transport, and biosynthesis, including gdhA, which encodes an l-glutamate dehydrogenase and is located next to gdhR but is transcriptionally divergent. We report here that in N. gonorrhoeae, expression of gdhR is subject to autoregulation by GdhR and direct repression by MtrR. Importantly, loss of GdhR significantly increased gonococcal fitness compared to a complemented mutant strain during experimental murine infection. Interestingly, loss of GdhR did not influence expression of gdhA, as reported for meningococci. This variance is most likely due to differences in promoter localization and utilization between gonococci and meningococci. We propose that transcriptional control of gonococcal genes through the action of MtrR and GdhR contributes to fitness of N. gonorrhoeae during infection.

  14. The MexGHI-OpmD multidrug efflux pump controls growth, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa via 4-quinolone-dependent cell-to-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Aendekerk, Séverine; Diggle, Stephen P; Song, Zhijun; Høiby, Niels; Cornelis, Pierre; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel

    2005-04-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the production of multiple virulence factors depends on cell-to-cell communication through the integration of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)- and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS)- dependent signalling. Mutation of genes encoding the efflux protein MexI and the porin OpmD from the MexGHI-OpmD pump resulted in the inability to produce N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-c12-hsl) and pqs and a marked reduction in n-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone levels. Both pump mutants were impaired in growth and exhibited enhanced rather than reduced antibiotic resistance. Provision of exogenous PQS improved growth and restored AHL and virulence factor production as well as antibiotic susceptibility, indicating that the pump mutants retained their capacity to respond to PQS. RT-PCR analysis indicated that expression of the PQS biosynthetic genes, phnA and pqsA, was inhibited when the mutants reached stationary phase, suggesting that the pleiotropic phenotype observed may be due to intracellular accumulation of a toxic PQS precursor. To explore this hypothesis, double mexI phnA (unable to produce anthranilate, the precursor of PQS) and mexI pqsA mutants were constructed; the improved growth of the former suggested that the toxic compound is likely to be anthranilate or a metabolite of it. Mutations in mexI and opmD also resulted in the attenuation of virulence in rat and plant infection models. In plants, addition of PQS restored the virulence of mexI and opmD mutants. Collectively, these results demonstrate an essential function for the MexGHI-OpmD pump in facilitating cell-to-cell communication, antibiotic susceptibility and promoting virulence and growth in P. aeruginosa.

  15. Cloning, Nucleotide Sequencing, and Analysis of the AcrAB-TolC Efflux Pump of Enterobacter cloacae and Determination of Its Involvement in Antibiotic Resistance in a Clinical Isolate▿

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Astrid; Canle, Delia; Latasa, Cristina; Poza, Margarita; Beceiro, Alejandro; del Mar Tomás, María; Fernández, Ana; Mallo, Susana; Pérez, Sonia; Molina, Francisca; Villanueva, Rosa; Lasa, Iñigo; Bou, Germán

    2007-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae is an emerging clinical pathogen that may be responsible for nosocomial infections. Management of these infections is often difficult, owing to the high frequency of strains that are resistant to disinfectants and antimicrobial agents in the clinical setting. Multidrug efflux pumps, especially those belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division family, play a major role as a mechanism of antimicrobial resistance in gram-negative pathogens. In the present study, we cloned and sequenced the genes encoding an AcrAcB-TolC-like efflux pump from an E. cloacae clinical isolate (isolate EcDC64) showing a broad antibiotic resistance profile. Sequence analysis showed that the acrR, acrA, acrB, and tolC genes encode proteins that display 79.8%, 84%, 88%, and 82% amino acid identities with the respective homologues of Enterobacter aerogenes and are arranged in a similar pattern. Deletion of the acrA gene to yield an AcrA-deficient EcDC64 mutant (EcΔacrA) showed the involvement of AcrAB-TolC in multidrug resistance in E. cloacae. However, experiments with an efflux pump inhibitor suggested that additional efflux systems also play a role in antibiotic resistance. Investigation of several unrelated isolates of E. cloacae by PCR analysis revealed that the AcrAB system is apparently ubiquitous in this species. PMID:17638702

  16. Characterization of macrolide efflux pump mef subclasses detected in clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes isolated between 1999 and 2005.

    PubMed

    Blackman Northwood, J; Del Grosso, M; Cossins, L R; Coley, M D; Creti, R; Pantosti, A; Farrell, D J

    2009-05-01

    The macrolide efflux mechanism of resistance, mef, was characterized in community-acquired respiratory tract infections with Streptococcus pyogenes. Fifty-four (4.6%) M phenotype isolates were screen tested as negative for mef(A). Of these 54 isolates, 5 (0.4%), 27 (2.3%), and 1 (0.1%) were considered to be mef(I) positive, a novel mosaic variant of mef, or a novel subclass of mef, respectively. This study shows (i) the definitive presence of mef(E) in S. pyogenes and its global distribution, (ii) the presence of a mosaic variant of mef composed of mef(A) and mef(E), (iii) the previously undescribed presence of mef(I) in S. pyogenes, and (iv) the presence of a novel subclass of mef in S. pyogenes.

  17. Inactivation of SmeSyRy Two-Component Regulatory System Inversely Regulates the Expression of SmeYZ and SmeDEF Efflux Pumps in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Ning, Hsiao-Chen; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2016-01-01

    SmeYZ efflux pump is a critical pump responsible for aminoglycosides resistance, virulence-related characteristics (oxidative stress susceptibility, motility, and secreted protease activity), and virulence in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. However, the regulatory circuit involved in SmeYZ expression is little known. A two-component regulatory system (TCS), smeRySy, transcribed divergently from the smeYZ operon is the first candidate to be considered. To assess the role of SmeRySy in smeYZ expression, the smeRySy isogenic deletion mutant, KJΔRSy, was constructed by gene replacement strategy. Inactivation of smeSyRy correlated with a higher susceptibility to aminoglycosides concomitant with an increased resistance to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and macrolides. To elucidate the underlying mechanism responsible for the antimicrobials susceptibility profiles, the SmeRySy regulon was firstly revealed by transcriptome analysis and further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and promoter transcription fusion constructs assay. The results demonstrate that inactivation of smeRySy decreased the expression of SmeYZ pump and increased the expression of SmeDEF pump, which underlies the ΔsmeSyRy-mediated antimicrobials susceptibility profile. To elucidate the cognate relationship between SmeSy and SmeRy, a single mutant, KJΔRy, was constructed and the complementation assay of KJΔRSy with smeRy were performed. The results support that SmeSy-SmeRy TCS is responsible for the regulation of smeYZ operon; whereas SmeSy may be cognate with another unidentified response regulator for the regulation of smeDEF operon. The impact of inverse expression of SmeYZ and SmeDEF pumps on physiological functions was evaluated by mutants construction, H2O2 susceptibility test, swimming, and secreted protease activity assay. The increased expression of SmeDEF pump in KJΔRSy may compensate, to some extents, the SmeYZ downexpression

  18. Contribution of Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Efflux Systems to Antibiotic Resistance and Biofilm Formation in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Nait Chabane, Yassine; Goussard, Sylvie; Snesrud, Erik; Courvalin, Patrice; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen of increasing importance due to its multiple resistance to antibiotics and ability to survive in the hospital environment linked to its capacity to form biofilms. To fully characterize the contribution of AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems to acquired and intrinsic resistance, we constructed, from an entirely sequenced susceptible A. baumannii strain, a set of isogenic mutants overexpressing each system following introduction of a point mutation in their cognate regulator or a deletion for the pump by allelic replacement. Pairwise comparison of every derivative with the parental strain indicated that AdeABC and AdeFGH are tightly regulated and contribute to acquisition of antibiotic resistance when overproduced. AdeABC had a broad substrate range, including β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines-tigecycline, macrolides-lincosamides, and chloramphenicol, and conferred clinical resistance to aminoglycosides. Importantly, when combined with enzymatic resistance to carbapenems and aminoglycosides, this pump contributed in a synergistic fashion to the level of resistance of the host. In contrast, AdeIJK was expressed constitutively and was responsible for intrinsic resistance to the same major drug classes as AdeABC as well as antifolates and fusidic acid. Surprisingly, overproduction of AdeABC and AdeIJK altered bacterial membrane composition, resulting in decreased biofilm formation but not motility. Natural transformation and plasmid transfer were diminished in recipients overproducing AdeABC. It thus appears that alteration in the expression of efflux systems leads to multiple changes in the relationship between the host and its environment, in addition to antibiotic resistance. PMID:25805730

  19. Differential Contributions of Five ABC Transporters to Mutidrug Resistance, Antioxidion and Virulence of Beauveria bassiana, an Entomopathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) confers agrochemical compatibility to fungal cells-based mycoinsecticdes but mechanisms involved in MDR remain poorly understood for entomopathogenic fungi, which have been widely applied as biocontrol agents against arthropod pests. Here we characterized the functions of five ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which were classified to the subfamilies ABC-B (Mdr1), ABC-C (Mrp1) and ABC-G (Pdr1, Pdr2 and Pdr5) and selected from 54 full-size ABC proteins of Beauveria bassiana based on their main domain architecture, membrane topology and transcriptional responses to three antifungal inducers. Disruption of each transporter gene resulted in significant reduction in resistance to four to six of eight fungicides or antifungal drugs tested due to their differences in structure and function. Compared with wild-type and complemented (control) strains, disruption mutants of all the five transporter genes became significantly less tolerant to the oxidants menadione and H2O2 based on 22−41% and 10−31% reductions of their effective concentrations required for the suppression of 50% colony growth at 25°C. Under a standardized spray, the killing actions of ΔPdr5 and ΔMrp1 mutants against Spodoptera litura second-instar larvae were delayed by 59% and 33% respectively. However, no significant virulence change was observed in three other delta mutants. Taken together, the examined five ABC transporters contribute differentially to not only the fungal MDR but antioxidant capability, a phenotype rarely associated with ABC efflux pumps in previous reports; at least some of them are required for the full virulence of B. bassiana, thereby affecting the fungal biocontrol potential. Our results indicate that ABC pump-dependent MDR mechanisms exist in entomopathogenic fungi as do in yeasts and human and plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:23596534

  20. Evidence of a Substrate-Discriminating Entrance Channel in the Lower Porter Domain of the Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pump AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Vavra, Martina; Kern, Winfried V.

    2016-01-01

    Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) transporter family, such as AcrB of Escherichia coli, play an important role in the development of multidrug resistance, but the molecular basis for their substrate promiscuity is not yet completely understood. From a collection of highly clarithromycin-resistant AcrB periplasmic domain mutants derived from in vitro random mutagenesis, we identified variants with an unusually altered drug resistance pattern characterized by increased susceptibility to many drugs of lower molecular weight, including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, and oxazolidinones, but unchanged or increased resistance to drugs of higher molecular weight, including macrolides. Sequencing of 14 such “divergent resistance” phenotype mutants and 15 control mutants showed that this unusual phenotype was associated with mutations at residues I38 and I671 predominantly to phenylalanine and threonine, respectively, both conferring a similar susceptibility pattern. Reconstructed I38F and I671T single mutants as well as an engineered I38F I671T double mutant with proved efflux competence revealed an equivalent phenotype with enhanced or unchanged resistance to many large AcrB substrates but increased susceptibility to several lower-molecular-weight drugs known to bind within the distal binding pocket. The two isoleucines located in close vicinity to each other in the lower porter domain of AcrB beneath the bottom of the proximal binding pocket may be part of a preferential small-drug entrance pathway that is compromised by the mutations. This finding supports recent indications of distinct entrance channels used by compounds with different physicochemical properties, of which molecular size appears to play a prominent role. PMID:27161641

  1. Tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes to Quaternary Ammonium Sanitizers Is Mediated by a Novel Efflux Pump Encoded by emrE.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Jovana; Ziegler, Jennifer; Wałecka-Zacharska, Ewa; Reimer, Aleisha; Kitts, David D; Gilmour, Matthew W

    2015-11-20

    A novel genomic island (LGI1) was discovered in Listeria monocytogenes isolates responsible for the deadliest listeriosis outbreak in Canada, in 2008. To investigate the functional role of LGI1, the outbreak strain 08-5578 was exposed to food chain-relevant stresses, and the expression of 16 LGI1 genes was measured. LGI1 genes with putative efflux (L. monocytogenes emrE [emrELm]), regulatory (lmo1851), and adhesion (sel1) functions were deleted, and the mutants were exposed to acid (HCl), cold (4°C), salt (10 to 20% NaCl), and quaternary ammonium-based sanitizers (QACs). Deletion of lmo1851 had no effect on the L. monocytogenes stress response, and deletion of sel1 did not influence Caco-2 and HeLa cell adherence/invasion, whereas deletion of emrE resulted in increased susceptibility to QACs (P < 0.05) but had no effect on the MICs of gentamicin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tetracycline, acriflavine, and triclosan. In the presence of the QAC benzalkonium chloride (BAC; 5 μg/ml), 14/16 LGI1 genes were induced, and lmo1861 (putative repressor gene) was constitutively expressed at 4 °C, 37 °C, and 52 °C and in the presence of UV exposure (0 to 30 min). Following 1 h of exposure to BAC (10 μg/ml), upregulation of emrE (49.6-fold), lmo1851 (2.3-fold), lmo1861 (82.4-fold), and sigB (4.1-fold) occurred. Reserpine visibly suppressed the growth of the ΔemrELm strain, indicating that QAC tolerance is due at least partially to efflux activity. These data suggest that a minimal function of LGI1 is to increase the tolerance of L. monocytogenes to QACs via emrELm. Since QACs are commonly used in the food industry, there is a concern that L. monocytogenes strains possessing emrE will have an increased ability to survive this stress and thus to persist in food processing environments.

  2. Tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes to Quaternary Ammonium Sanitizers Is Mediated by a Novel Efflux Pump Encoded by emrE

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Jennifer; Wałecka-Zacharska, Ewa; Reimer, Aleisha; Kitts, David D.; Gilmour, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    A novel genomic island (LGI1) was discovered in Listeria monocytogenes isolates responsible for the deadliest listeriosis outbreak in Canada, in 2008. To investigate the functional role of LGI1, the outbreak strain 08-5578 was exposed to food chain-relevant stresses, and the expression of 16 LGI1 genes was measured. LGI1 genes with putative efflux (L. monocytogenes emrE [emrELm]), regulatory (lmo1851), and adhesion (sel1) functions were deleted, and the mutants were exposed to acid (HCl), cold (4°C), salt (10 to 20% NaCl), and quaternary ammonium-based sanitizers (QACs). Deletion of lmo1851 had no effect on the L. monocytogenes stress response, and deletion of sel1 did not influence Caco-2 and HeLa cell adherence/invasion, whereas deletion of emrE resulted in increased susceptibility to QACs (P < 0.05) but had no effect on the MICs of gentamicin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tetracycline, acriflavine, and triclosan. In the presence of the QAC benzalkonium chloride (BAC; 5 μg/ml), 14/16 LGI1 genes were induced, and lmo1861 (putative repressor gene) was constitutively expressed at 4°C, 37°C, and 52°C and in the presence of UV exposure (0 to 30 min). Following 1 h of exposure to BAC (10 μg/ml), upregulation of emrE (49.6-fold), lmo1851 (2.3-fold), lmo1861 (82.4-fold), and sigB (4.1-fold) occurred. Reserpine visibly suppressed the growth of the ΔemrELm strain, indicating that QAC tolerance is due at least partially to efflux activity. These data suggest that a minimal function of LGI1 is to increase the tolerance of L. monocytogenes to QACs via emrELm. Since QACs are commonly used in the food industry, there is a concern that L. monocytogenes strains possessing emrE will have an increased ability to survive this stress and thus to persist in food processing environments. PMID:26590290

  3. Overexpression of AmpC and Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Bloodstream Infections: Prevalence and Impact on Resistance in a Spanish Multicenter Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Tubau, Fe; Macia, María D.; Rodríguez, Cristina; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Suárez, Cristina; Peña, Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Oliver, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and impact of the overexpression of AmpC and efflux pumps were evaluated with a collection of 190 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from bloodstream infections in a 2008 multicenter study (10 hospitals) in Spain. The MICs of a panel of 13 antipseudomonal agents were determined by microdilution, and the expressions of ampC, mexB, mexY, mexD, and mexF were determined by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Up to 39% of the isolates overexpressed at least one of the mechanisms. ampC overexpression (24.2%) was the most prevalent mechanism, followed by mexY (13.2%), mexB (12.6%), mexF (4.2%), and mexD (2.2%). The overexpression of mexB plus mexY, documented for 5.3% of the isolates, was the only combination showing a significantly (P = 0.02) higher prevalence than expected from the frequencies of the individual mechanisms (1.6%). Additionally, all imipenem-resistant isolates studied (25 representative isolates) showed inactivating mutations in oprD. Most of the isolates nonsusceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam (96%) and ceftazidime (84%) overexpressed ampC, while mexB (25%) and mexY (29%) overexpressions gained relevance among cefepime-nonsusceptible isolates. Nevertheless, the prevalence of mexY overexpression was highest among tobramycin-nonsusceptible isolates (37%), and that of mexB was highest among meropenem-nonsusceptible isolates (33%). Regarding ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, besides the expected increased prevalence of efflux pump overexpression, a highly significant link to ampC overexpression was documented for the first time: up to 52% of ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible isolates overexpressed ampC, sharply contrasting with the 24% documented for the complete collection (P < 0.001). In summary, mutation-driven resistance was frequent in P. aeruginosa isolates from bloodstream infections, whereas metallo-β-lactamases, detected in 2 isolates (1%) producing VIM-2, although with increasing prevalences, were still uncommon. PMID

  4. The TetR-Type MfsR Protein of the Integrative and Conjugative Element (ICE) ICEclc Controls both a Putative Efflux System and Initiation of ICE Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Pradervand, Nicolas; Delavat, François; Sulser, Sandra; Miyazaki, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Integrative and conjugating elements (ICE) are self-transferable DNAs widely present in bacterial genomes, which often carry a variety of auxiliary genes of potential adaptive benefit. One of the model ICE is ICEclc, an element originally found in Pseudomonas knackmussii B13 and known for its propensity to provide its host with the capacity to metabolize chlorocatechols and 2-aminophenol. In this work, we studied the mechanism and target of regulation of MfsR, a TetR-type repressor previously found to exert global control on ICEclc horizontal transfer. By using a combination of ICEclc mutant and transcriptome analysis, gene reporter fusions, and DNA binding assays, we found that MfsR is a repressor of both its own expression and that of a gene cluster putatively coding for a major facilitator superfamily efflux system on ICEclc (named mfsABC). Phylogenetic analysis suggests that mfsR was originally located immediately adjacent to the efflux pump genes but became displaced from its original cis target DNA by a gene insertion. This resulted in divergence of the original bidirectional promoters into two separated individual regulatory units. Deletion of mfsABC did not result in a strong phenotype, and despite screening a large number of compounds and conditions, we were unable to define the precise current function or target of the putative efflux pump. Our data reconstruct how the separation of an ancestor mfsR-mfsABC system led to global control of ICEclc transfer by MfsR. PMID:25182498

  5. Novel Piperazine Arylideneimidazolones Inhibit the AcrAB-TolC Pump in Escherichia coli and Simultaneously Act as Fluorescent Membrane Probes in a Combined Real-Time Influx and Efflux Assay

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Sabine; Kern, Winfried V.; Karcz, Tadeusz; Olejarz, Agnieszka; Kaczor, Aneta; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we tested five compounds belonging to a novel series of piperazine arylideneimidazolones for the ability to inhibit the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump. The biphenylmethylene derivative (BM-19) and the fluorenylmethylene derivative (BM-38) were found to possess the strongest efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) activities in the AcrAB-TolC-overproducing Escherichia coli strain 3-AG100, whereas BM-9, BM-27, and BM-36 had no activity at concentrations of up to 50 μM in a Nile red efflux assay. MIC microdilution assays demonstrated that BM-19 at 1/4 MIC (intrinsic MIC, 200 μM) was able to reduce the MICs of levofloxacin, oxacillin, linezolid, and clarithromycin 8-fold. BM-38 at 1/4 MIC (intrinsic MIC, 100 μM) was able to reduce only the MICs of oxacillin and linezolid (2-fold). Both compounds markedly reduced the MIC of rifampin (BM-19, 32-fold; and BM-38, 4-fold), which is suggestive of permeabilization of the outer membrane as an additional mechanism of action. Nitrocefin hydrolysis assays demonstrated that in addition to their EPI activity, both compounds were in fact weak permeabilizers of the outer membrane. Moreover, it was found that BM-19, BM-27, BM-36, and BM-38 acted as near-infrared-emitting fluorescent membrane probes, which allowed for their use in a combined influx and efflux assay and thus for tracking of the transport of an EPI across the outer membrane by an efflux pump in real time. The EPIs BM-38 and BM-19 displayed the most rapid influx of all compounds, whereas BM-27, which did not act as an EPI, showed the slowest influx. PMID:26824939

  6. Novel Piperazine Arylideneimidazolones Inhibit the AcrAB-TolC Pump in Escherichia coli and Simultaneously Act as Fluorescent Membrane Probes in a Combined Real-Time Influx and Efflux Assay.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Jürgen A; Schuster, Sabine; Kern, Winfried V; Karcz, Tadeusz; Olejarz, Agnieszka; Kaczor, Aneta; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested five compounds belonging to a novel series of piperazine arylideneimidazolones for the ability to inhibit the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump. The biphenylmethylene derivative (BM-19) and the fluorenylmethylene derivative (BM-38) were found to possess the strongest efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) activities in the AcrAB-TolC-overproducingEscherichia colistrain 3-AG100, whereas BM-9, BM-27, and BM-36 had no activity at concentrations of up to 50 μM in a Nile red efflux assay. MIC microdilution assays demonstrated that BM-19 at 1/4 MIC (intrinsic MIC, 200 μM) was able to reduce the MICs of levofloxacin, oxacillin, linezolid, and clarithromycin 8-fold. BM-38 at 1/4 MIC (intrinsic MIC, 100 μM) was able to reduce only the MICs of oxacillin and linezolid (2-fold). Both compounds markedly reduced the MIC of rifampin (BM-19, 32-fold; and BM-38, 4-fold), which is suggestive of permeabilization of the outer membrane as an additional mechanism of action. Nitrocefin hydrolysis assays demonstrated that in addition to their EPI activity, both compounds were in fact weak permeabilizers of the outer membrane. Moreover, it was found that BM-19, BM-27, BM-36, and BM-38 acted as near-infrared-emitting fluorescent membrane probes, which allowed for their use in a combined influx and efflux assay and thus for tracking of the transport of an EPI across the outer membrane by an efflux pump in real time. The EPIs BM-38 and BM-19 displayed the most rapid influx of all compounds, whereas BM-27, which did not act as an EPI, showed the slowest influx.

  7. Functional induction of P-glycoprotein efflux pump by phenyl benzenesulfonamides: Synthesis and biological evaluation of T0901317 analogs.

    PubMed

    Padala, Anil K; Wani, Abubakar; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Kumar, Ajay; Bharate, Sandip B

    2016-10-21

    N-(2,2,2-Trifluoroethyl)-N-[4-[2,2,2-trifluoro-1-hydroxy-1-(trifluoromethyl)ethyl]phenyl]-benzenesulfonamide (T0901317, 6) is a potent activator of pregnane-X-receptor (PXR), which is a nuclear receptor controlling P-gp expression. Herein, we aimed to investigate P-gp induction activity of T0901317 and establish its structure-activity relationship. T0901317 along with a series of N-triazolyl-methylene-linked benzenesulfonamides were synthesized and screened for P-gp induction activity using a rhodamine-123 based efflux assay in the P-gp overexpressing human adenocarcinoma LS-180 cells, wherein several compounds showed potent P-gp induction activity at 5 μM. Treatment with benzene sulphonamides led to the decrease in intracellular accumulation of a fluorescent P-gp substrate rhodamine-123 up to 48% (control 100%). In the western-blot studies, T0901317 (6) and its triazole linked analog 26e at 5 μM displayed induction of P-gp expression in LS180 cells. These compounds were non-toxic in LS-180 and human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells (IC50 > 50 μM). The compound 26e showed significant P-gp induction even at 0.3 μM, indicating an excellent therapeutic window. These results clearly indicate promise of this class of compounds as potential agents to enhance amyloid-β clearance in Alzheimers patients.

  8. Latrunculin A-Induced Perturbation of the Actin Cytoskeleton Mediates Pap1p-Dependent Induction of the Caf5p Efflux Pump in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Farzad; Chakraborty, Bidhan; Karagiannis, Jim

    2016-01-01

    As part of an earlier study aimed at uncovering gene products with roles in defending against latrunculin A (LatA)-induced cytoskeletal perturbations, we identified three members of the oxidative stress response pathway: the Pap1p AP-1-like transcription factor, the Imp1p α-importin, and the Caf5p efflux pump. In this report, we characterize the pathway further and show that Pap1p translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in an Imp1p-dependent manner upon LatA treatment. Moreover, preventing this translocation, through the addition of a nuclear export signal (NES), confers the same characteristic LatA-sensitive phenotype exhibited by pap1Δ cells. Lastly, we show that the caf5 gene is induced upon exposure to LatA and that Pap1p is required for this transcriptional upregulation. Importantly, the expression of trr1, a Pap1p target specifically induced in response to oxidative stress, is not significantly altered by LatA treatment. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which LatA-mediated cytoskeletal perturbations are sensed, triggering the Imp1p-dependent translocation of Pap1p to the nucleus and the induction of the caf5 gene (independently of oxidative stress). PMID:28040778

  9. Tet38 Efflux Pump Affects Staphylococcus aureus Internalization by Epithelial Cells through Interaction with CD36 and Contributes to Bacterial Escape from Acidic and Nonacidic Phagolysosomes.

    PubMed

    Truong-Bolduc, Q C; Khan, N S; Vyas, J M; Hooper, D C

    2017-02-01

    We previously reported that the Tet38 efflux pump is involved in internalization of Staphylococcus aureus by A549 lung epithelial cells. A lack of tet38 reduced bacterial uptake by A549 cells to 36% of that of the parental strain RN6390. Using invasion assays coupled with confocal microscopy imaging, we studied the host cell receptor(s) responsible for bacterial uptake via interaction with Tet38. We also assessed the ability of S. aureus to survive following alkalinization of the phagolysosomes by chloroquine. Antibody to the scavenger receptor CD36 reduced the internalization of S. aureus RN6390 by A549 cells, but the dependence on CD36 was reduced in QT7 tet38, suggesting that an interaction between Tet38 and CD36 contributed to S. aureus internalization. Following fusion of the S. aureus-associated endosomes with lysosomes, alkalinization of the acidic environment with chloroquine led to a rapid increase in the number of S. aureus RN6390 bacteria in the cytosol, followed by a decrease shortly thereafter. This effect of chloroquine was not seen in the absence of intact Tet38 in mutant QT7. These data taken together suggest that Tet38 plays a role both in bacterial internalization via interaction with CD36 and in bacterial escape from the phagolysosomes.

  10. Induction of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 MexAB-OprM multidrug efflux pump by flavonoids is mediated by the repressor PmeR.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Paola; Felipe, Antonia; Michán, Carmen; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the expression of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 mexAB-oprM efflux pump operon and of the regulatory gene pmeR, and we have investigated the role of the PmeR protein on transcription from both promoters. We demonstrate that mexAB-oprM and pmeR are expressed in vivo at a relatively high and moderate basal level, respectively, which, in both cases, increases in the presence of different flavonoids and other compounds, such as butyl and methylparaben. We show that PmeR is the local repressor of the mexAB-oprM promoter and is able to regulate its own expression. The mechanism for this regulation includes binding to a pseudopalindromic operator site which overlaps both mexAB-oprM and pmeR promoters. We have also proven that flavonoids are able to interact with PmeR and induce a conformational change that interferes with the DNA binding ability of PmeR, thereby modulating mexAB-oprM and pmeR expression. Finally, we demonstrate by in vivo experiments that the PmeR/MexAB-OprM system contributes to the colonization of tomato plants. These results provide new insight into a transcriptional regulator and a transport system that play essential roles in the ability of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 to resist the action of flavonoids produced by the host.

  11. Latrunculin A-Induced Perturbation of the Actin Cytoskeleton Mediates Pap1p-Dependent Induction of the Caf5p Efflux Pump in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Farzad; Chakraborty, Bidhan; Karagiannis, Jim

    2017-02-09

    As part of an earlier study aimed at uncovering gene products with roles in defending against latrunculin A (LatA)-induced cytoskeletal perturbations, we identified three members of the oxidative stress response pathway: the Pap1p AP-1-like transcription factor, the Imp1p α-importin, and the Caf5p efflux pump. In this report, we characterize the pathway further and show that Pap1p translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in an Imp1p-dependent manner upon LatA treatment. Moreover, preventing this translocation, through the addition of a nuclear export signal (NES), confers the same characteristic LatA-sensitive phenotype exhibited by pap1Δ cells. Lastly, we show that the caf5 gene is induced upon exposure to LatA and that Pap1p is required for this transcriptional upregulation. Importantly, the expression of trr1, a Pap1p target specifically induced in response to oxidative stress, is not significantly altered by LatA treatment. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which LatA-mediated cytoskeletal perturbations are sensed, triggering the Imp1p-dependent translocation of Pap1p to the nucleus and the induction of the caf5 gene (independently of oxidative stress).

  12. CpxR Activates MexAB-OprM Efflux Pump Expression and Enhances Antibiotic Resistance in Both Laboratory and Clinical nalB-Type Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xue-Xian; O’Gara, Fergal; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) efflux pumps are responsible for multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we demonstrate that CpxR, previously identified as a regulator of the cell envelope stress response in Escherichia coli, is directly involved in activation of expression of RND efflux pump MexAB-OprM in P. aeruginosa. A conserved CpxR binding site was identified upstream of the mexA promoter in all genome-sequenced P. aeruginosa strains. CpxR is required to enhance mexAB-oprM expression and drug resistance, in the absence of repressor MexR, in P. aeruginosa strains PA14. As defective mexR is a genetic trait associated with the clinical emergence of nalB-type multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa during antibiotic treatment, we investigated the involvement of CpxR in regulating multidrug resistance among resistant isolates generated in the laboratory via antibiotic treatment and collected in clinical settings. CpxR is required to activate expression of mexAB-oprM and enhances drug resistance, in the absence or presence of MexR, in ofloxacin-cefsulodin-resistant isolates generated in the laboratory. Furthermore, CpxR was also important in the mexR-defective clinical isolates. The newly identified regulatory linkage between CpxR and the MexAB-OprM efflux pump highlights the presence of a complex regulatory network modulating multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27736975

  13. RND type efflux pump system MexAB-OprM of pseudomonas aeruginosa selects bacterial languages, 3-oxo-acyl-homoserine lactones, for cell-to-cell communication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteria release a wide variety of small molecules including cell-to-cell signaling compounds. Gram-negative bacteria use a variety of self-produced autoinducers such as acylated homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs) as signal compounds for quorum sensing (QS) within and between bacterial species. QS plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and in beneficial symbiosis by responding to acyl-HSLs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is considered that the selection of bacterial languages is necessary to regulate gene expression and thus it leads to the regulation of virulence and provides a growth advantage in several environments. In this study, we hypothesized that RND-type efflux pump system MexAB-OprM of P. aeruginosa might function in the selection of acyl-HSLs, and we provide evidence to support this hypothesis. Results Loss of MexAB-OprM due to deletion of mexB caused increases in QS responses, as shown by the expression of gfp located downstream of the lasB promoter and LasB elastase activity, which is regulated by a LasR-3-oxo-C12-HSL complex. Either complementation with a plasmid containing wild-type mexB or the addition of a LasR-specific inhibitor, patulin, repressed these high responses to 3-oxo-acyl-HSLs. Furthermore, it was shown that the acyl-HSLs-dependent response of P. aeruginosa was affected by the inhibition of MexB transport activity and the mexB mutant. The P. aeruginosa MexAB-OprM deletion mutant showed a strong QS response to 3-oxo-C10-HSL produced by Vibrio anguillarum in a bacterial cross-talk experiment. Conclusion This work demonstrated that MexAB-OprM does not control the binding of LasR to 3-oxo-Cn-HSLs but rather accessibility of non-cognate acyl-HSLs to LasR in P. aeruginosa. MexAB-OprM not only influences multidrug resistance, but also selects acyl-HSLs and regulates QS in P. aeruginosa. The results demonstrate a new QS regulation mechanism via the efflux system MexAB-OprM in P. aeruginosa. PMID:22574700

  14. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  15. Characterization of a transferable bcrABC and cadAC genes-harboring plasmid in Listeria monocytogenes strain isolated from food products of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongyang; Nie, Qing; Wang, Wenyan; Shi, Lei; Yan, He

    2016-01-18

    In this study, we characterized a bcrABC cassette and its genetic environment harbored by a plasmid in Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) 11GZL18, a strain isolated from raw meat in 2011. The bcrABC cassette and its genetic environment were characterized, with a total of 33,727 nt nucleotide sequence obtained. The nucleotide sequences of the bcrABC cassette in strain 11GZL18 exhibited 100% identity to that on plasmid pLM80, which is harbored by L. monocytogenes strain H7550 and H7858, and the neighboring 21,678 nt nucleotide sequence of bcrABC cassette showed 99% identity with plasmid pLM80. The plasmid curing experiment demonstrated the role of the plasmid in conferring benzalkonium chloride (BC) and cadmium (Cd) tolerance in this strain. The bcrABC cassette and cadAC genes from the L. monocytogenes 11GZL18 were harbored by plasmid, functional and transmissible, and led to the acquired tolerance in Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α by chemical and natural transformation. Besides, the efflux pump activity that is conferring tolerance to BC and Cd was observed in strain 11GZL18, while not in a plasmid-cured strain 11GZL18-C, confirming that efflux pumps play a role in plasmid-mediated tolerance to BC and Cd in L. monocytogenes 11GZL18. In this study we characterized the genetic organization of a novel BC and Cd tolerance determinants-harboring plasmid in a L. monocytogenes strain isolated from raw meat of animal origin, and demonstrated the potential horizontal transferability of this bcrABC cassette-harboring plasmid to E. coli. The findings will further improve our understanding of the adaptations of this organism to disinfectants such as BC and may contribute to elucidating possible dissemination of BC tolerance in foodborne L. monocytogenes.

  16. Fluoroquinolone Efflux in Streptococcus suis Is Mediated by SatAB and Not by SmrA ▿

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Jose Antonio; San Millan, Alvaro; Gutierrez, Belen; Hidalgo, Laura; La Ragione, Roberto M.; AbuOun, Manal; Galimand, Marc; Ferrándiz, María José; Domínguez, Lucas; de la Campa, Adela G.; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an emerging zoonotic pathogen. With the lack of an effective vaccine, antibiotics remain the main tool to fight infections caused by this pathogen. We have previously observed a reserpine-sensitive fluoroquinolone (FQ) efflux phenotype in this species. Here, SatAB and SmrA, two pumps belonging to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) and the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), respectively, have been analyzed in the fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolate BB1013. Genes encoding these pumps were overexpressed either constitutively or in the presence of ciprofloxacin in this strain. These genes could not be cloned in plasmids in Escherichia coli despite strong expression repression. Finally, site-directed insertion of smrA and satAB in the amy locus of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome using ligated PCR amplicons allowed for the functional expression and study of both pumps. Results showed that SatAB is a narrow-spectrum fluoroquinolone exporter (norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin), susceptible to reserpine, whereas SmrA was not involved in fluoroquinolone resistance. Chromosomal integration in Bacillus is a novel method for studying efflux pumps from Gram-positive bacteria, which enabled us to demonstrate the possible role of SatAB, and not SmrA, in fluoroquinolone efflux in S. suis. PMID:21930876

  17. Adaptation to benzalkonium chloride and ciprofloxacin affects biofilm formation potential, efflux pump and haemolysin activity of Escherichia coli of dairy origin.

    PubMed

    Pagedar, Ankita; Singh, Jitender; Batish, Virender K

    2012-11-01

    The present study investigates the effect of adaptive resistance to ciprofloxacin (Cip) and benzalkonium chloride (BC) on biofilm formation potential (BFP), efflux pump activity (EPA) and haemolysin activity of Escherichia coli isolates of dairy origin. All the isolates, irrespective of antimicrobial susceptibility, developed significant adaptive resistance (P < 0·05). All the resistant phenotypes (antibiotic resistant: AR; & biocide resistant: BR) were stronger biofilm former and post-adaptation, an insignificant change was observed in their BFP. Whereas, post-adaptation, non-resistant isolates (antibiotic non-resistant: ANR; biocide non-resistant: BNR) transformed from poor or moderate to strong biofilm formers. Post-adaptive percentage increase in EPA was highly significant in non-resistant categories (P < 0·01) and significant at P < 0·05 in BR category. Interestingly, post-adaptive increase in EPA in BR isolates was more than that in AR yet, the latter exhibited greater adaptive resistance than the former. These findings indicated prevalence of some other specific resistance mechanism/s responsible for adaptive resistance against Cip. Strain specific variations were observed for stability of adaptive resistance and haemolysin activity for all the categories. Our findings especially in reference to post-adaptation upgradation of BFP status of non-resistant isolates seems to be providing an insight into the process of conversion of non-resistant isolate into resistant ones with enhanced BFP. These observations emphasize the serious implications of sub-lethal residual levels of antimicrobials in food environments and suggest a role of food chain in emergence of antimicrobial resistances.

  18. Bacillus subtilis MntR coordinates the transcriptional regulation of manganese uptake and efflux systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojuan; Shin, Jung-Ho; Pinochet-Barros, Azul; Su, Tina T; Helmann, John D

    2017-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis MntR metalloregulatory protein senses manganese, an essential element required for central metabolism, oxidative stress resistance and replication. An mntR null mutant is highly sensitive to Mn(II) intoxication, which is attributed in part to the constitutive expression of two importers: the proton-dependent NRAMP family transporter MntH and the ABC transporter MntABCD. Here, we show that an mntR null mutant is still sensitive to Mn(II) intoxication even if both of the import systems are absent. This Mn(II) sensitivity results from the requirement for MntR to activate the transcription of two genes encoding cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family efflux pumps. Physiological studies indicate that MneP (formerly YdfM) serves as the primary Mn(II) efflux pump with MneS (formerly YeaB) playing a secondary role. Mutant strains lacking mneP are Mn(II) sensitive and accumulate elevated levels of Mn(II), and these effects are exacerbated in a mneP mneS double mutant. DNA-binding and in vitro transcription studies demonstrate that MntR binds to both the mneP and mneS regulatory regions and directly activates transcription in response to levels of Mn(II) several-fold higher than required for repression of import genes. These results highlight the delicate balance of Mn(II) uptake and efflux systems controlled by MntR.

  19. In vitro infection model characterizing the effect of efflux pump inhibition on prevention of resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Louie, Arnold; Brown, David L; Liu, Weiguo; Kulawy, Robert W; Deziel, Mark R; Drusano, George L

    2007-11-01

    The prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is slowly rising as a consequence of the increased use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics to treat community-acquired pneumonia. We tested the hypothesis that increased efflux pump (EP) expression by S. pneumoniae may facilitate the emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance. By using an in vitro pharmacodynamic infection system, a wild-type S. pneumoniae strain (Spn-058) and an isogenic strain with EP overexpression (Spn-RC2) were treated for 10 days with ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin in the presence or absence of the EP inhibitor reserpine to evaluate the effect of EP inhibition on the emergence of resistance. Cultures of Spn-058 and Spn-RC2 were exposed to concentration-time profiles simulating those in humans treated with a regimen of ciprofloxacin at 750 mg orally once every 12 h and with regimens of levofloxacin at 500 and 750 mg orally once daily (QD; with or without continuous infusions of 20 microg of reserpine/ml). The MICs of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin for Spn-058 were both 1 microg/ml when susceptibility testing was conducted with each antibiotic alone and with each antibiotic in the presence of reserpine. For Spn-RC2, the MIC of levofloxacin alone and with reserpine was also 1 mug/ml; the MICs of ciprofloxacin were 2 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, when determined with ciprofloxacin alone and in combination with reserpine. Reserpine, alone, had no effect on the growth of Spn-058 and Spn-RC2. For Spn-058, simulated regimens of ciprofloxacin at 750 mg every 12 h or levofloxacin at 500 mg QD were associated with the emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance. However, the use of ciprofloxacin at 750 mg every 12 h and levofloxacin at 500 mg QD in combination with reserpine rapidly killed Spn-058 and prevented the emergence of resistance. For Spn-RC2, levofloxacin at 500 mg QD was associated with the emergence of resistance, but again, the resistance was prevented when this levofloxacin regimen

  20. Transplacental pharmacokinetics of glyburide, rhodamine 123, and BODIPY FL prazosin: effect of drug efflux transporters and lipid solubility.

    PubMed

    Cygalova, Lenka Hahnova; Hofman, Jakub; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2009-12-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are the most abundantly expressed ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters in the placenta. They recognize a large, partly overlapping spectrum of chemically unrelated compounds and affect their transplacental passage. In this study we investigate the effect of Bcrp and P-gp on the transplacental pharmacokinetics of their specific and common substrates employing the technique of dually perfused rat placenta. We show that the clearance of rhodamine 123 (P-gp substrate), glyburide (BCRP substrate) and BODIPY FL prazosin (P-gp and BCRP substrate) in fetal-to-maternal direction is 11, 11.2 and 4 times higher, respectively, than that in the maternal-to-fetal direction. In addition, all of these substances were found to be transported from the fetal compartment even against concentration gradient. We thus demonstrate the ability of placental ABC transporters to hinder maternal-to-fetal and accelerate fetal-to-maternal transport in a concentration-dependent manner. However, by means of pharmacokinetic modeling we describe the inverse correlation between lipid solubility of a molecule and its active transport by placental ABC efflux transporters. Therefore, in the case of highly lipophilic substrates, such as BODIPY FL prazosin in this study, the efficacy of efflux transporters to pump the molecule back to the maternal circulation is markedly limited.

  1. Overexpression and purification of the three components of the Enterobacter aerogenes AcrA-AcrB-TolC multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Masi, Muriel; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Pradel, Elizabeth

    2003-03-25

    The tripartite AcrA-AcrB-TolC system is the major efflux pump of the nosocomial pathogen Enterobacter aerogenes. AcrA is a trimeric periplasmic lipoprotein anchored in the inner membrane, AcrB is an inner membrane transporter and TolC is a trimeric outer membrane channel. In order to reconstitute the AcrA-AcrB-TolC system of E. aerogenes in artificial membranes, we overexpressed and purified the three proteins. The E. aerogenes acrA, acrB and tolC open reading frames were individually inserted in the expression vector pET24a(+), in frame with a sequence coding a C-terminal hexahistidine tag to allow purification by INAC (Immobilized Nickel Affinity Chromatography). The mature AcrA-6His was overproduced in a soluble form in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). AcrA-6His was purified under native conditions in two steps using INAC and gel permeation chromatography. We obtained about 25 mg of 97% pure AcrA-6His per liter of culture. AcrB-6His was solubilized from the membrane fraction of E. coli C43(DE3) in 300 mM NaCl, 5% Triton X-100 and purified in one step by INAC. The AcrB-6His enriched fraction was eluted with 100 mM imidazole. The final yield was 1-2 mg of 95% pure AcrB-6His per liter of culture. The membrane fraction of E. coli BL21(DE3)pLysS containing TolC-6His was first treated with 2% Triton X-100, 30 mM MgCl(2) to solubilize the inner membrane proteins. After ultracentrifugation, the pellet was treated with 5% Triton X-100, 5 mM EDTA to solubilize the outer membrane proteins. Approximately 5 mg of 95% pure TolC-6His trimers per liter of culture was purified by INAC.

  2. An OXA-66/OXA-51-like carbapenemase and possibly an efflux pump are associated with resistance to imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wensi S; Yao, Shu-Man; Fung, Chang-Phone; Hsieh, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chang-Pan; Lin, Jing-Fang

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the mechanisms involved in imipenem resistance in 23 clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed the presence of a 30-kDa protein in imipenem-intermediate A. baumannii (IIAB) and imipenem-resistant A. baumannii (IRAB) strains; this protein was almost undetectable in imipenem-susceptible A. baumannii (ISAB) strains. The 30-kDa protein was identified as an OXA-51-like carbapenemase using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Similar to other recent findings, bla(OXA-51-like) genes were found to exist in all 23 clinical strains; however, the transcript levels of bla(OXA-51-like) in the IIAB and IRAB were higher than in the ISAB strains using reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and real-time RT-PCR assays. This change was due to the presence of an insertion sequence, ISAba1, upstream of bla(OXA-51-like) in the IIAB and IRAB strains that was not present in the ISAB strains. The introduction of bla(OXA-66) (a bla(OXA-51)(-like) gene), identified in ISAB ab1254 and IRAB ab1266, into Escherichia coli TOP10 cells resulted in 3.95-fold and 7.90-fold elevations in resistance to imipenem, respectively. Furthermore, when ISAB ab8 and ISAB ab1254 and their in vitro-selected imipenem-resistant mutants ISAB ab8(r) and ISAB ab1254(r) were compared, the results showed no change in the bla(OXA-66)/bla(OXA-51-like) gene sequences, in expression of the gene, and in the outer membrane protein profiles. However, there was a four- to eightfold reduction in imipenem resistance upon adding carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Taken together, these results suggest that the OXA-66/OXA-51-like carbapenemase contributes to intrinsic resistance to imipenem; however, drug export by an efflux pump may be more important and/or occur more frequently in imipenem-resistant A. baumannii. Furthermore, this is the first report of a Taiwanese strain of an OXA-66/OXA-51-like

  3. An electrically tight in vitro blood-brain barrier model displays net brain-to-blood efflux of substrates for the ABC transporters, P-gp, Bcrp and Mrp-1.

    PubMed

    Helms, Hans Christian; Hersom, Maria; Kuhlmann, Louise Borella; Badolo, Lasina; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2014-09-01

    Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily including breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp/Abcg2), P-glycoprotein (P-gp/Abcb1) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrp's/Abcc's) are expressed in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The aim of this study was to investigate if a bovine endothelial/rat astrocyte in vitro BBB co-culture model displayed polarized transport of known efflux transporter substrates. The co-culture model displayed low mannitol permeabilities of 0.95 ± 0.1 · 10(-6) cm·s(-1) and high transendothelial electrical resistances of 1,177 ± 101 Ω·cm(2). Bidirectional transport studies with (3)H-digoxin, (3)H-estrone-3-sulphate and (3)H-etoposide revealed polarized transport favouring the brain-to-blood direction for all substrates. Steady state efflux ratios of 2.5 ± 0.2 for digoxin, 4.4 ± 0.5 for estrone-3-sulphate and 2.4 ± 0.1 for etoposide were observed. These were reduced to 1.1 ± 0.08, 1.4 ± 0.2 and 1.5 ± 0.1, by addition of verapamil (digoxin), Ko143 (estrone-3-sulphate) or zosuquidar + reversan (etoposide), respectively. Brain-to-blood permeability of all substrates was investigated in the presence of the efflux transporter inhibitors verapamil, Ko143, zosuquidar, reversan and MK 571 alone or in combinations. Digoxin was mainly transported via P-gp, estrone-3-sulphate via Bcrp and Mrp's and etoposide via P-gp and Mrp's. The expression of P-gp, Bcrp and Mrp-1 was confirmed using immunocytochemistry. The findings indicate that P-gp, Bcrp and at least one isoform of Mrp are functionally expressed in our bovine/rat co-culture model and that the model is suitable for investigations of small molecule transport.

  4. Total alkaloids of Sophorea alopecuroides-induced down-regulation of AcrAB-TolC efflux pump reverses susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in clinical multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuezhang; Jia, Fang; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2012-11-01

    In this report, total alkaloids extracted from the seeds of Sophorea alopecuroides (TASA) was evaluated against clinical Escherichia coli isolates resistant to four tested antibiotics, ampicillin (AM), amikacin (AN), cefotaxime (CTX) and ciprofloxacin (CIP). The TASA showed an antibacterial activity against the multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates. In combination with TASA, synergistic effects on the tested antibiotics against the MRD isolates were observed. Similarly, the isolates pretreated with a lower dose of TASA yielded increased and stable susceptibilities to CIP by 16-32-fold determined by a microbroth dilution checkerboard method. Moreover, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed a constitutive overexpression of the AcrAB-TolC pump system in the tested MDR isolates. The pretreatment of MDR isolates with TASA resulted in a statistically down-regulated expression of acrA and acrB genes, and an up-regulated expression of acrR gene (p < 0.05). But the expression of tolC gene was not significantly altered (p > 0.05). These results suggested that the TASA-induced reversal resistance to CIP might be partially through a mechanism of inhibition of the AcrAB-TolC pump activity in these isolates, implying that the TASA can be used as a potential natural source to develop efflux pump inhibitors (EPI) against AcrAB-TolC pump mediated MDR in E. coli isolates.

  5. Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.W.; Abdul.Hye, A.B.M.

    1983-10-25

    A pump for injecting chemicals into a well employs a pivot arm for synchronous movement with a well pump. The pivot arm causes reciprocation of a plunger within the body of the chemical pump. The plunger, during its upward stroke causes the entry of chemicals from an outside source into the pump body and, during its downward stroke, causes the exiting of the chemicals into the well. (2 claims.

  6. Expression of the mef(E) gene encoding the macrolide efflux pump protein increases in Streptococcus pneumoniae with increasing resistance to macrolides.

    PubMed

    Wierzbowski, Aleksandra K; Boyd, Dave; Mulvey, Michael; Hoban, Daryl J; Zhanel, George G

    2005-11-01

    Active macrolide efflux is a major mechanism of macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae in many parts of the world, especially North America. In Canada, this active macrolide efflux in S. pneumoniae is predominantly due to acquisition of the mef(E) gene. In the present study, we assessed the mef(E) gene sequence as well as mef(E) expression in variety of low- and high-level macrolide-resistant, clindamycin-susceptible (M-phenotype) S. pneumoniae isolates (erythromycin MICs, 1 to 32 microg/ml; clindamycin MICs, < or = 0.25 microg/ml). Southern blot hybridization with mef(E) probe and EcoRI digestion and relative real-time reverse transcription-PCR were performed to study the mef(E) gene copy number and expression. Induction of mef(E) expression was analyzed by Etest susceptibility testing pre- and postincubation with subinhibitory concentrations of erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, telithromycin, and clindamycin. The macrolide efflux gene, mef(E), was shown to be a single-copy gene in all 23 clinical S. pneumoniae isolates tested, and expression post-macrolide induction increased 4-, 6-, 20-, and 200-fold in isolates with increasing macrolide resistance (erythromycin MICs 2, 4, 8, and 32 microg/ml, respectively). Sequencing analysis of the macrolide efflux genetic assembly (mega) revealed that mef(E) had a 16-bp deletion 153 bp upstream of the putative start codon in all 23 isolates. A 119-bp intergenic region between mef(E) and mel was sequenced, and a 99-bp deletion was found in 11 of the 23 M-phenotype S. pneumoniae isolates compared to the published mega sequence. However, the mef(E) gene was fully conserved among both high- and low-level macrolide-resistant isolates. In conclusion, increased expression of mef(E) is associated with higher levels of macrolide resistance in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae.

  7. Substrate Specificities of MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, and MexXY-OprM Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Nobuhisa; Sakagawa, Eiko; Ohya, Satoshi; Gotoh, Naomasa; Tsujimoto, Hideto; Nishino, Takeshi

    2000-01-01

    To find the exact substrate specificities of three species of tripartite efflux systems of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, and MexXY-OprM, we constructed a series of isogenic mutants, each of which constitutively overproduced one of the three efflux systems and lacked the other two, and their isogenic mutants, which lacked all these systems. Comparison of the susceptibilities of the constructed mutants to 52 antimicrobial agents belonging to various groups suggested the following substrate specificities. All of the efflux systems extrude a wide variety of antimicrobial agent groups, i.e., quinolones, macrolides, tetracyclines, lincomycin, chloramphenicol, most penicillins (all but carbenicillin and sulbenicillin), most cephems (all but cefsulodin and ceftazidime), meropenem, and S-4661, but none of them extrude polymyxin B or imipenem. Extrusion of aminoglycosides is specific to MexXY-OprM, and extrusion of a group of the β-lactams, i.e., carbenicillin, sulbenicillin, ceftazidime, moxalactam, and aztreonam, is specific to MexAB-OprM. Moreover, MexAB-OprM and MexCD-OprJ extrude novobiocin, cefsulodin, and flomoxef, while MexXY-OprM does not. These substrate specificities are distinct from those reported previously. PMID:11083635

  8. A New ABC Half-Transporter in Leishmania major Is Involved in Resistance to Antimony

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, J. I.; García-Hernández, R.; Castanys, S.

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of ABCI4, a new intracellular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) half-transporter in Leishmania major, is described. We show that ABCI4 is involved in heavy metal export, thereby conferring resistance to Pentostam, to Sb(III), and to As(III) and Cd(II). Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 showed a lower mitochondrial toxic effect of antimony by decreasing reactive oxygen species production and maintained higher values of both the mitochondrial electrochemical potential and total ATP levels with respect to controls. The ABCI4 half-transporter forms homodimers as determined by a coimmunoprecipitation assay. A combination of subcellular localization studies under a confocal microscope and a surface biotinylation assay using parasites expressing green fluorescent protein- and FLAG-tagged ABCI4 suggests that the transporter presents a dual localization in both mitochondria and the plasma membrane. Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 present an increased replication in mouse peritoneal macrophages. We have determined that porphyrins are substrates for ABCI4. Consequently, the overexpression of ABCI4 confers resistance to some toxic porphyrins, such as zinc-protoporphyrin, due to the lower accumulation resulting from a significant efflux, as determined using the fluorescent zinc-mesoporphyrin, a validated heme analog. In addition, ABCI4 has a significant ability to efflux thiol after Sb(III) incubation, thus meaning that ABCI4 could be considered to be a potential thiol-X-pump that is able to recognize metal-conjugated thiols. In summary, we have shown that this new ABC transporter is involved in drug sensitivity to antimony and other compounds by efflux as conjugated thiol complexes. PMID:23716044

  9. Effects of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) on multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) related efflux transporter activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Cunha, V; Burkhardt-Medicke, K; Wellner, P; Santos, M M; Moradas-Ferreira, P; Luckenbach, T; Ferreira, M

    2017-02-01

    Certain ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins, such as zebrafish Abcb4, are efflux pumps acting as a cellular defence against a wide range of different, potentially toxic chemical compounds thus mediating so called multixenobiotic resistance (MXR). Certain chemicals target MXR proteins and, as so called chemosensitisers, inhibit the activity of these proteins thus increasing the toxicity of other chemicals that would normally be effluxed. In this study 14 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) that are being increasingly detected in aquatic systems, were assessed for interference with the MXR system of zebrafish (Danio rerio). Concentration dependent effects of test compounds were recorded with the dye accumulation assay using zebrafish embryos and in ATPase assays with recombinant zebrafish Abcb4. In the dye accumulation assay embryos at 24h post fertilisation (hpf) were exposed to 8µm rhodamine 123 along with test compounds for 2h. The rhodamine 123 tissue levels upon the exposure served as a measure for MXR transporter efflux activity of the embryo (low rhodamine levels - high activity; high levels - low activity). The known ABC protein inhibitors MK571, vinblastine and verapamil served as positive controls. All tested PPCPs affected rhodamine 123 accumulation in embryos. For seven compounds rhodamine tissue levels were either both decreased and increased depending on the compound concentration indicating both stimulation and inhibition of rhodamine 123 efflux by those compounds, only increased (inhibition, six compounds) or only decreased (stimulation, one compound). Recombinant zebrafish Abcb4 was obtained with the baculovirus expression system and PPCPs were tested for stimulation/inhibition of basal transporter ATPase activity and for inhibition of the transporter ATPase activity stimulated with verapamil. Eight of the tested PPCPs showed effects on Abcb4 ATPase activity indicating that their effects in the dye accumulation assay may

  10. The α-barrel tip region of Escherichia coli TolC homologs of Vibrio vulnificus interacts with the MacA protein to form the functional macrolide-specific efflux pump MacAB-TolC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Hyun-Lee; Song, Saemee; Joo, Minju; Lee, Seunghwa; Kim, Daeyoung; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Ha, Nam-Chul; Lee, Kangseok

    2013-04-01

    TolC and its homologous family of proteins are outer membrane factors that are essential for exporting small molecules and toxins across the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. Two open reading frames in the Vibrio vulnificus genome that encode proteins homologous to Escherichia coli TolC, designated TolCV1 and TolCV2, have 51.3% and 29.6% amino acid identity to TolC, respectively. In this study, we show that TolCV1 and TolCV2 functionally and physically interacted with the membrane fusion protein, MacA, a component of the macrolide-specific MacAB-TolC pump of E. coli. We further show that the conserved residues located at the aperture tip region of the α-hairpin of TolCV1 and TolCV2 played an essential role in the formation of the functional MacAB-TolC pump using site-directed mutational analyses. Our findings suggest that these outer membrane factors have conserved tip-to-tip interaction with the MacA membrane fusion protein for action of the drug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria.

  11. ABC-transporters: implications on drug resistance from microorganisms to human cancers.

    PubMed

    Lage, Hermann

    2003-09-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a common clinical problem in patients with infectious diseases as well as in patients with cancer. During treatment of infections or malignant tumors, the drug targets of prokaryotic or eukaryotic microorganisms and neoplastic cells are often found to be refractory to a variety of drugs that have different structures and functions. This phenomenon has been termed multidrug resistance (MDR). The mechanisms leading to MDR are frequently caused by trans-membrane xenobiotic transport molecules belonging to the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. There is an urgent need to understand the structure-function relationships of these efflux pumps that underlie their transport mechanism and drug selectivity. This knowledge may allow the rational design of new drugs that can inhibit or circumvent the activity of these MDR transport molecules. Furthermore, the development of such chemosensitizing agents would help us learn more about the physiological functions and substrates of these pump proteins. This review will discuss the current state of knowledge of the functional and structural similarities among ABC-transporters in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their impact on MDR.

  12. Expression of the AcrAB Components of the AcrAB-TolC Multidrug Efflux Pump of Yersinia enterocolitica Is Subject to Dual Regulation by OmpR.

    PubMed

    Raczkowska, Adrianna; Trzos, Joanna; Lewandowska, Olga; Nieckarz, Marta; Brzostek, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    OmpR is a transcriptional regulator implicated in the control of various cellular processes and functions in Enterobacteriaceae. This study was undertaken to identify genes comprising the OmpR regulon in the human gastrointestinal pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. Derivatives of an ompR-negative strain with random transposon insertions creating transcriptional fusions with the reporter gene lacZ were isolated. These were supplied with the wild-type ompR allele in trans and then screened for OmpR-dependent changes in β-galactosidase activity. Using this strategy, five insertions in genes/operons positively regulated by OmpR and two insertions in genes negatively regulated by this protein were identified. Genetic analysis of one of these fusion strains revealed that the gene acrR, encoding transcriptional repressor AcrR is negatively regulated by OmpR. Differential analysis of membrane proteins by SDS-PAGE followed by mass spectrometry identified the protein AcrB, a component of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump, as being positively regulated by OmpR. Analysis of the activity of the acrR and acrAB promoters using gfp fusions confirmed their OmpR-dependent repression and activation, respectively. The identification of putative OmpR-binding sites and electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that this regulator binds specifically to both promoter regions with different affinity. Examination of the activity of the acrR and acrAB promoters after the exposure of cells to different chemicals showed that bile salts can act as an OmpR-independent inducer. Taken together, our findings suggest that OmpR positively controls the expression of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump involved in the adaptive response of Y. enterocolitica O:9 to different chemical stressors, thus conferring an advantage in particular ecological niches.

  13. Rifaximin resistance in Escherichia coli associated with inflammatory bowel disease correlates with prior rifaximin use, mutations in rpoB, and activity of Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide-inhibitable efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Kothary, Vishesh; Scherl, Ellen J; Bosworth, Brian; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Dupont, Herbert L; Harel, Josee; Simpson, Kenneth W; Dogan, Belgin

    2013-02-01

    Escherichia coli is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable derivative of rifampin effective against E. coli, improves symptoms in mild-to-moderate IBD. However, rifaximin resistance can develop in a single step in vitro. We examined the prevalence and mechanisms of rifaximin resistance in 62 strains of E. coli isolated from the ileal mucosa of 50 patients (19 with ileal Crohn's disease [L1+L3], 6 with colonic Crohn's disease [L2], 13 with ulcerative colitis [UC], 4 with symptomatic non-IBD diagnoses [NI], and 8 healthy [H]). Resistance (MIC > 1,024 mg/liter) was present in 12/48 IBD-associated ileal E. coli strains. Resistance correlated with prior rifaximin treatment (P < 0.00000001) but not with the presence of ileal inflammation (P = 0.73) or E. coli phylogroup. Mutations in a 1,057-bp region of rpoB, which encodes the bacterial target of rifaximin, were identified in 10/12 resistant strains versus 0/50 sensitive strains (P < 0.000000001) and consisted of seven amino acid substitutions. The efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide (PAβN) lowered the MIC of 9/12 resistant strains 8- to 128-fold. Resistance was stable in the absence of rifaximin in 10/12 resistant strains after 30 passages. We conclude that IBD-associated ileal E. coli frequently manifest resistance to rifaximin that correlates with prior rifaximin use, amino acid substitutions in rpoB, and activity of PAβN-inhibitable efflux pumps, but not with the presence of ileal inflammation or E. coli phylogroup. These findings have significant implications for treatment trials targeting IBD-associated E. coli.

  14. Promoter deletions of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-encoding genes (blaKPC -2) and efflux pump (AcrAB) on β-lactam susceptibility in KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Seecoomar, Gomattie D; Marmol, Brenda C; Kwon, Dong H

    2013-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-encoding genes containing promoter-deletions (bla(KPC-2a), bla(KPC-2b), and bla(KPC-2c) have disseminated in Enterobacteriaceae. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to β-lactams in clinical KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae range from susceptible to high-level resistant, resulting in diagnostic problems. To better understand the variability in β-lactam MICs among KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae, three isoforms of bla(KPC-2) gene were used to transform Escherichia coli W4573 and its deletion mutant of an efflux pump (AcrAB) to examine the effects on β-lactam susceptibility. MICs to β-lactams in E. coli W4573 and its acrAB mutant strain increased 1- to 500-fold (MIC from 0.125 to 64 μg mL(-1) of aztreonam) in the bla(KPC-2a), bla(KPC-2b), and bla(KPC-2c) transformants compared with the cloning vector alone. However, transformants of the acrAB mutant strain remained susceptible to all β-lactams tested except for aztreonam and carbenicillin. Levels of the three promoters' length and carbapenemase activities in the transformants harboring the bla(KPC-2a), bla(KPC-2b), and bla(KPC-2c) were correlated to the levels of β-lactam MICs in both E. coli W4573 and its mutant of an efflux pump (AcrAB). Overall, these results suggest that promoter-deletions of bla(KPC-2) gene and AcrAB may be associated with the variability in β-lactam MICs in KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

  15. Role of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump in determining susceptibility of Haemophilus influenzae to the novel peptide deformylase inhibitor LBM415.

    PubMed

    Dean, Charles R; Narayan, Shubha; Daigle, Denis M; Dzink-Fox, JoAnn L; Puyang, Xiaoling; Bracken, Kathryn R; Dean, Karl E; Weidmann, Beat; Yuan, Zhengyu; Jain, Rakesh; Ryder, Neil S

    2005-08-01

    Haemophilus influenzae isolates vary widely in their susceptibilities to the peptide deformylase inhibitor LBM415 (MIC range, 0.06 to 32 microg/ml); however, on average, they are less susceptible than gram-positive organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Insertional inactivation of the H. influenzae acrB or tolC gene in strain NB65044 (Rd strain KW20) increased susceptibility to LBM415, confirming a role for the AcrAB-TolC pump in determining resistance. Consistent with this, sequencing of a PCR fragment generated with primers flanking the acrRA region from an LBM415-hypersusceptible H. influenzae clinical isolate revealed a genetic deletion of acrA. Inactivation of acrB or tolC in several clinical isolates with atypically reduced susceptibility to LBM415 (MIC of 16 microg/ml or greater) significantly increased susceptibility, confirming that the pump is also a determinant of decreased susceptibility in these clinical isolates. Examination of acrR, encoding the putative repressor of pump gene expression, from several of these strains revealed mutations introducing frameshifts, stop codons, and amino acid changes relative to the published sequence, suggesting that loss of pump repression leads to decreased susceptibility. Supporting this, NB65044 acrR mutants selected by exposure to LBM415 at 8 microg/ml had susceptibilities to LBM415 and other pump substrates comparable to the least sensitive clinical isolates and showed increased expression of pump genes.

  16. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  17. Effect of Phoneutria nigriventer venom on the expression of junctional protein and P-gp efflux pump function in the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Rapôso, Catarina; Odorissi, Paulo Alexandre Miranda; Oliveira, Alexandre L R; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Ferreira, Carmen Verissima; Verinaud, Liana; Fontana, Karina; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta R; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2012-09-01

    Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom (PNV) contains Ca(2+), K(+) and Na(+) channel-acting peptides that affect neurotransmitter release and causes excitotoxicity in PNS and CNS. It has been demonstrated that PNV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown of hippocampal microvessels time-dependently through enhanced microtubule-mediated vesicular transport. Herein, it is hypothesized that PNV can cause BBB breakdown in the hippocampus and cerebellum time-dependently through other molecular mechanisms. The BBB integrity was assessed through the analysis of expression of Poly-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux transporter protein, laminin from basement membrane and endothelial tight junctional and adhesion junctional (TJ/AJ) proteins. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) expression, which are known to have a role in the phosphorylation of junctional proteins and BBB opening, were also investigated. Astrocytes P-gp activity was determined by flow cytometry. The study demonstrated temporary decreased expression of laminin, TJ and AJ proteins (ZO1//occludin//claudin-5//beta-catenin) and P-gp (more prominently in hippocampus), which was completely or partially resolved between 2 and 5 h (and more quickly for cerebellum). PNV inhibited P-gp activity in astrocytes. PP2A phosphorylation, which inhibits the enzyme activity, was increased in both regions (15-45 min); however the phosphorylation level returned to baseline after 2 h. In conclusion, PNV disrupts paracellular transport in the BBB and possesses substrates for the active P-gp efflux transporter located in the BBB complex. Further studies into cellular mechanisms of astrocyte/endothelial interactions, using PNV as tool, may identify how astrocytes regulate the BBB, a characteristic that may be useful for the temporary opening of the BBB.

  18. The Acinetobacter baumannii Two-Component System AdeRS Regulates Genes Required for Multidrug Efflux, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence in a Strain-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Grace E.; Evans, Laura P.; Anderson, Michele J.; Wand, Matthew E.; Bonney, Laura C.; Ivens, Alasdair; Chua, Kim Lee; Webber, Mark A.; Sutton, J. Mark; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to persist in the environment and is often multidrug resistant (MDR), causing difficulties in the treatment of infections. Here, we show that the two-component system AdeRS, which regulates the production of the AdeABC multidrug resistance efflux pump, is required for the formation of a protective biofilm in an ex vivo porcine mucosal model, which mimics a natural infection of the human epithelium. Interestingly, deletion of adeB impacted only on the ability of strain AYE to form a biofilm on plastic and only on the virulence of strain Singapore 1 for Galleria mellonella. RNA-Seq revealed that loss of AdeRS or AdeB significantly altered the transcriptional landscape, resulting in the changed expression of many genes, notably those associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence interactions. For example, A. baumannii lacking AdeRS displayed decreased expression of adeABC, pil genes, com genes, and a pgaC-like gene, whereas loss of AdeB resulted in increased expression of pil and com genes and decreased expression of ferric acinetobactin transport system genes. These data define the scope of AdeRS-mediated regulation, show that changes in the production of AdeABC mediate important phenotypes controlled by AdeRS, and suggest that AdeABC is a viable target for antimicrobial drug and antibiofilm discovery. PMID:27094331

  19. Learning the ABC of oral fungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins are ubiquitous in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They are involved in energy-dependent transport of molecules across membranes. ABC proteins are often promiscuous transporters that can translocate a variety of substrates. In oral fungi, especially in Candida species, they have been implicated as major contributors to the high-level azole resistance of clinical isolates from infections that do not respond to drug therapy. Although this is predominantly due to efflux of azoles from the cells, ABC proteins can contribute to fungal drug resistance in other ways as well. Cells in biofilms are notoriously resistant to antifungal agents. ABC proteins can contribute to this resistance through the efflux of drugs. Biofilms are complex communities of myriad microorganisms which, to survive in such a milieu, need to communicate with, and respond to, other microorganisms and their products. ABC proteins are involved in the secretion of fungal mating factors and quorum sensing molecules. These molecules affect biofilm structure and behavior that can result in increased drug resistance. Hence, ABC proteins make multiple contributions to oral fungal drug resistance through a variety of responses to environmental signals.

  20. Impact of ABC single nucleotide polymorphisms upon the efficacy and toxicity of induction chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Megías-Vericat, Juan Eduardo; Montesinos, Pau; Herrero, María José; Moscardó, Federico; Bosó, Virginia; Rojas, Luis; Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Hervás, David; Boluda, Blanca; García-Robles, Ana; Rodríguez-Veiga, Rebeca; Martín-Cerezuela, María; Cervera, José; Sendra, Luis; Sanz, Jaime; Miguel, Antonio; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Poveda, José Luis; Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Aliño, Salvador F

    2017-05-01

    Anthracycline uptake could be affected by efflux pumps of the ABC family. The influence of 7 SNPs of ABC genes was evaluated in 225 adult de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. After multivariate logistic regression there were no significant differences in complete remission, though induction death was associated to ABCB1 triple variant haplotype (p = .020). The ABCB1 triple variant haplotype was related to higher nephrotoxicity (p = .016), as well as this haplotype and the variant allele of ABCB1 rs1128503, rs2032582 to hepatotoxicity (p = .001; p = .049; p < .001). Furthermore, the variant allele of ABCC1 rs4148350 was related to severe hepatotoxicity (p = .044), and the variant allele of ABCG2 rs2231142 was associated to greater cardiac (p = .004) and lung toxicities (p = .038). Delayed time to neutropenia recovery was observed with ABCB1 rs2032582 variant (p = .047). This study shows the impact of ABC polymorphisms in AML chemotherapy safety. Further prospective studies with larger population are needed to validate these associations.

  1. Poloxamines display a multiple inhibitory activity of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Sosnik, Alejandro; Mathet, Verónica L

    2011-08-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most common fatal cancer worldwide with more than 500,000 annual deaths. Approximately 40% of the patients with HCC showed tumoral overexpression of transmembrane proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette protein superfamily (ABC) which pump drugs out of cells. The overexpression of these efflux transporters confers on the cells a multiple drug resistance phenotype, which is considered a crucial cause of treatment refractoriness in patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of different concentrations of pH- and temperature-responsive X-shaped poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers (poloxamines, Tetronic, PEO-PPO) showing a wide range of molecular weights and EO/PO ratios on the functional activity of three different ABC proteins, namely P-glycoprotein (P-gp or MDR1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1, in two human hepatocarcinoma cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7. First, the cytotoxicity of the different copolymers (at different concentrations) on both liver carcinoma cell lines was thoroughly evaluated by means of apoptosis analysis using annexin V and propidium iodide (PI). Thus, viable cells (AV-/PI-), early apoptotic cells (AV+/PI-) and late apoptotic cells (V-FITC+/PI+) were identified. Results pointed out copolymers of intermediate to high hydrophobicity and intermediate molecular weight (e.g., T904) as the most cytotoxic. Then, DiOC2, rhodamine 123 and vinblastine were used as differential substrates of these pumps. HeLa, an epithelial cell line of human cervical cancer that does not express P-gp, was used exclusively as a control and enabled the discerning between P-gp and MRP1 inhibition. Moderate to highly hydrophobic poloxamines T304, T904 and T1301 showed inhibitory activity against P-gp and BCRP but not against MRP1 in both hepatic cell lines. A remarkable dependence of this effect on the

  2. Direct measurement of efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using an environment-sensitive fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ramkumar; Erwin, Alice L

    2015-01-01

    Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND) family pumps AcrB and MexB are the major efflux routes in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively. Fluorescent environment-sensitive dyes provide a means to study efflux pump function in live bacterial cells in real-time. Recently, we demonstrated the utility of this approach using the dye Nile Red to quantify AcrB-mediated efflux and measured the ability of antibiotics and other efflux pump substrates to compete with efflux of Nile Red, independent of antibacterial activity. Here, we extend this method to P. aeruginosa and describe a novel application that permits the comparison and rank-ordering of bacterial strains by their inherent efflux potential. We show that glucose and l-malate re-energize Nile Red efflux in P. aeruginosa, and we highlight differences in the glucose dependence and kinetics of efflux between P. aeruginosa and E. coli. We quantify the differences in efflux among a set of P. aeruginosa laboratory strains, which include PAO1, the hyper-sensitive strain ATCC 35151 and its parent, ATCC 12055. Efflux of Nile Red in P. aeruginosa is mediated by MexAB-OprM and is slower than in E. coli. In conclusion, we describe an efflux measurement tool for use in antibacterial drug discovery and basic research on P. aeruginosa efflux pumps.

  3. Interaction of ABC transport proteins with toxic metals at the level of gene and transport activity in the PLHC-1 fish cell line.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Camilla; Zaja, Roko; Loncar, Jovica; Smital, Tvrtko; Focardi, Silvano; Corsi, Ilaria

    2012-06-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of four toxic metals with ABC transport proteins in piscine cell line PLHC-1. Cells were exposed for 24 h to 0.01-1 μM of CdCl(2), HgCl(2), As(2)O(3), or K(2)Cr(2)O(7) and the expression of a series of ABC genes (abcb1, abcc1-4) was determined using qRT-PCR. Using the fluorescent model substrates calcein-AM and monochlorbimane we measured interaction of metals with the transport activity of ABC transporters. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity was measured in PLHC-1/dox (P-gp overexpressing cells) while activity and interactions of metals with MRPs was measured in PLHC-1/wt cells. After 24 h exposure, abcc2-4 genes were dose-dependently up-regulated by all metals, while abcb1 and abcc1 were less affected. Up-regulation of abcc2 was more pronounced, with up to 8-fold increase in expression. Abcc3 and abcc4 were moderately inducible by HgCl(2) with 3.3-fold and 2.2-fold, respectively. All metals caused a significant inhibition of both P-gp (2.9- to 4-fold vs. controls) and MRP (1.3- to 1.8-fold) transport activities. Modulation of ABC genes and transport activities was further investigated in PLHC-1/wt cells exposed to 1 μM HgCl(2) for 72 h and in Hg resistant cells selected by long term cultivation of PLHC-1/wt cells in increasing concentrations of HgCl(2). Exposure to HgCl(2) for 72 h induced MRP genes expression and efflux activity. The long term cultivation of PLHC-1/wt cells in HgCl(2), did not cause prolonged up-regulation of the tested abc genes but resulted in higher MRP transport activities as determined by the increased sensitivity of these cells to MK571 (MRP specific inhibitor). Results of the present study indicated specific interaction of metals with selected ABC transport proteins. Modulation of ABC transporters takes place at both transcriptional and functional level. An active involvement of efflux pumps in Hg clearance in fish is suggested.

  4. Effects of fluconazole on Candida glabrata biofilms and its relationship with ABC transporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Elza; Silva, Sónia; Rodrigues, Célia Fortuna; Alves, Carlos Tiago; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata has emerged as the second most prevalent fungal pathogen and its ability to form biofilms has been considered one of the most important virulence factors, since biofilms present a high tolerance to antifungal agents used in fungal infection treatment. The mechanisms of biofilm tolerance to antifungal agents remain poorly understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of fluconazole (FLU) on the formation and control of C. glabrata biofilms and its relation with the expression of genes encoding for ABC transporters, CDR1, SNQ2, and PDR1. For that, minimal inhibitory concentration values for seven C. glabrata strains were determined and the effect of FLU against C. glabrata biofilms was evaluated by total biomass quantification and viable cell enumeration. Matrices from biofilms were analyzed in terms of protein, carbohydrate and DNA content. ABC transporter gene expression was analyzed for quantitative real-time PCR. In addition to the high amounts of proteins and carbohydrates detected in the extracellular matrices in the presence of FLU, this work showed that the overexpression of efflux pumps is a possible mechanism of biofilm tolerance to FLU and this phenomenon alters the structure of C. glabrata biofilms by creating cell clusters.

  5. Multidrug Efflux Systems in Microaerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zeling; Yan, Aixin

    2015-01-01

    Active drug efflux constitutes an important mechanism of antibiotic and multidrug resistance in bacteria. Understanding the distribution, expression, and physiological functions of multidrug efflux pumps, especially under physiologically and clinically relevant conditions of the pathogens, is the key to combat drug resistance. In animal hosts, most wounded, infected and inflamed tissues display low oxygen tensions. In this article, we summarize research development on multidrug efflux pumps in the medicinally relevant microaerobic and anaerobic pathogens and their implications in the effort to combat drug-resistant infections. PMID:27025630

  6. Pathways of Arsenic Uptake and Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Chi; Fu, Hsueh-Liang; Lin, Yung-Feng; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic substance and ranks first on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund List. Arsenic is a carcinogen and a causative agent of numerous human diseases. Paradoxically arsenic is used as a chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Inorganic arsenic has two biological important oxidation states: As(V) (arsenate) and As(III) (arsenite). Arsenic uptake is adventitious because the arsenate and arsenite are chemically similar to required nutrients. Arsenate resembles phosphate and is a competitive inhibitor of many phosphate-utilizing enzymes. Arsenate is taken up by phosphate transport systems. In contrast, at physiological pH, the form of arsenite is As(OH)3, which resembles organic molecules such as glycerol. Consequently, arsenite is taken into cells by aquaglyceroporin channels. Arsenic efflux systems are found in nearly every organism and evolved to rid cells of this toxic metalloid. These efflux systems include members of the multidrug resistance protein family and the bacterial exchangers Acr3 and ArsB. ArsB can also be a subunit of the ArsAB As(III)-translocating ATPase, an ATP-driven efflux pump. The ArsD metallochaperone binds cytosolic As(III) and transfers it to the ArsA subunit of the efflux pump. Knowledge of the pathways and transporters for arsenic uptake and efflux is essential for understanding its toxicity and carcinogenicity and for rational design of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:23046656

  7. Functional implications of an intermeshing cogwheel-like interaction between TolC and MacA in the action of macrolide-specific efflux pump MacAB-TolC.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongbin; Song, Saemee; Moeller, Arne; Kim, Nahee; Piao, Shunfu; Sim, Se-Hoon; Kang, Mooseok; Yu, Wookyung; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Kangseok; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2011-04-15

    Macrolide-specific efflux pump MacAB-TolC has been identified in diverse gram-negative bacteria including Escherichia coli. The inner membrane transporter MacB requires the outer membrane factor TolC and the periplasmic adaptor protein MacA to form a functional tripartite complex. In this study, we used a chimeric protein containing the tip region of the TolC α-barrel to investigate the role of the TolC α-barrel tip region with regard to its interaction with MacA. The chimeric protein formed a stable complex with MacA, and the complex formation was abolished by substitution at the functionally essential residues located at the MacA α-helical tip region. Electron microscopic study delineated that this complex was made by tip-to-tip interaction between the tip regions of the α-barrels of TolC and MacA, which correlated well with the TolC and MacA complex calculated by molecular dynamics. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the MacA hexamer interacts with TolC in a tip-to-tip manner, and implies the manner by which MacA induces opening of the TolC channel.

  8. An attenuated mutant of the Rv1747 ATP-binding cassette transporter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a mutant of its cognate kinase, PknF, show increased expression of the efflux pump-related iniBAC operon

    PubMed Central

    Spivey, Vicky L; Whalan, Rachael H; Hirst, Elizabeth M A; Smerdon, Stephen J; Buxton, Roger S

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter Rv1747 is required for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice and in macrophages. Its structure suggests it is an exporter. Rv1747 forms a two-gene operon with pknF coding for the serine/threonine protein kinase PknF, which positively modulates the function of the transporter. We show that deletion of Rv1747 or pknF results in a number of transcriptional changes which could be complemented by the wild type allele, most significantly up-regulation of the iniBAC genes. This operon is inducible by isoniazid and ethambutol and by a broad range of inhibitors of cell wall biosynthesis and is required for efflux pump functioning. However, neither the Rv1747 or pknF mutant showed increased susceptibility to a range of drugs and cell wall stress reagents including isoniazid and ethambutol, cell wall structure and cell division appear normal by electron microscopy, and no differences in lipoarabinomannan were found. Transcription from the pknF promoter was not induced by a range of stress reagents. We conclude that the loss of Rv1747 affects cell wall biosynthesis leading to the production of intermediates that cause induction of iniBAC transcription and implicates it in exporting a component of the cell wall, which is necessary for virulence. PMID:23915284

  9. In vitro activity of levofloxacin against planktonic and biofilm Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lifestyles under conditions relevant to pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis, and relationship with SmeDEF multidrug efflux pump expression.

    PubMed

    Pompilio, Arianna; Crocetta, Valentina; Verginelli, Fabio; Bonaventura, Giovanni Di

    2016-07-01

    The activity of levofloxacin against planktonic and biofilm Stenotrophomonas maltophilia cells and the role played by the multidrug efflux pump SmeDEF were evaluated under conditions relevant to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. MIC, MBC and MBEC of levofloxacin were assessed, against five CF strains, under 'standard' (CLSI-recommended) and 'CF-like' (pH 6.8, 5% CO2, in a synthetic CF sputum) conditions. Levofloxacin was tested against biofilms at concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μg mL(-1)) corresponding to achievable serum levels and sputum levels by aerosolisation. smeD expression was evaluated, under both conditions, in planktonic and biofilm cells by RT-PCR. The bactericidal effect of levofloxacin was decreased, in three out of five strains tested, under 'CF-like' conditions (MBC: 2-4 vs 8-16 μg mL(-1), under 'standard' and 'CF-like' conditions, respectively). Biofilm was intrinsically resistant to levofloxacin, regardless of conditions tested (MBECs ≥ 100 μg mL(-1) for all strains). Only under 'CF-like' conditions, smeD expression increased during planktonic-to-biofilm transition, and in biofilm cells compared to stationary planktonic cells. Our findings confirmed that S. maltophilia biofilm is intrinsically resistant to therapeutic concentrations of levofloxacin. Under conditions relevant to CF, smeD overexpression could contribute to levofloxacin resistance. Further studies are warranted to define the clinical relevance of our findings.

  10. The Crystal Structure of the YknZ Extracellular Domain of ABC Transporter YknWXYZ from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lulu; Jiang, Rui; Jin, Xiaoling; Liu, Jing; Fan, Shengdi; Quan, Chun-Shan; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus possesses the peptide toxin Sporulation-Delaying Protein (SDP), which can kill cells within a biofilm to support continued growth, thereby delaying the onset of biofilm sporulation. The four-component transporter YknWXYZ acts as a major SDP efflux pump to protect cells against the endogenous SDP toxin, for which YknYZ is a non-canonical ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type transporter. YknYZ consists of the following two components: (1) an individual protein (YknY) and (2) a respective permease (YknZ). To date, the crystal structure, molecular function, and mechanism of action of the integral membrane protein YknZ remain to be elucidated. In this study, to characterize the structural and biochemical roles of YknZ in the functional assembly of YknWXYZ, we predicted and overexpressed the YknZ extracellular domain. We determined the crystal structure of B. amyloliquefaciens YknZ at a resolution of 2.0 Å. The structure revealed that the YknZ extracellular region exhibits significant structural similarity with the MacB periplasmic domain, which is a non-canonical ABC-type transporter in the tripartite macrolide-specific efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria. We also found that the YknZ extracellular domain can directly bind to an extracellular component of YknX. This structural and biochemical study provides insights into the assembly of YknWXYZ, which may be relevant to understanding cannibalistic peptide toxin resistance in Bacillus and controlling bacterial growth. PMID:27243566

  11. Pseudoatomic Structure of the Tripartite Multidrug Efflux Pump AcrAB-TolC Reveals the Intermeshing Cogwheel-like Interaction between AcrA and TolC.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeongseop; Kim, Jin-Sik; Song, Saemee; Shigematsu, Hideki; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Hyun, Jaekyung; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2016-02-02

    The resistance-nodulation-division type tripartite pump AcrAB-TolC and its homologs are responsible for multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria by expelling a wide variety of toxic substrates. The three essential components, AcrA, AcrB, and TolC, must function in concert with each respective binding partner within the complex. In this study, we report an 8.2-Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) 3D reconstruction of the complex that consists of an AcrAB fusion protein and a chimeric TolC protein. The pseudoatomic structure derived from the cryo-EM reconstruction clearly demonstrates a model only compatible with the adaptor bridging mechanism, wherein the funnel-like AcrA hexamer forms an intermeshing cogwheel-like interaction with the α-barrel tip region of TolC. These observations provide a structural milestone for understanding multidrug resistance in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and may also lead to the design of new antibacterial drugs.

  12. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  13. The Role of Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic ABC Transporter Family in Failure of Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    El-Awady, Raafat; Saleh, Ekram; Hashim, Amna; Soliman, Nehal; Dallah, Alaa; Elrasheed, Azza; Elakraa, Ghada

    2017-01-01

    Over the years chemotherapy failure has been a vital research topic as researchers have been striving to discover reasons behind it. The extensive studies carried out on chemotherapeutic agents confirm that resistance to chemotherapy is a major reason for treatment failure. “Resistance to chemotherapy,” however, is a comprehensive phrase that refers to a variety of different mechanisms in which ATP-binding cassette (ABC) mediated efflux dominates. The ABC is one of the largest gene superfamily of transporters among both eukaryotes and prokaryotes; it represents a variety of genes that code for proteins, which perform countless functions, including drug efflux – a natural process that protects cells from foreign chemicals. Up to date, chemotherapy failure due to ABC drug efflux is an active research topic that continuously provides further evidence on multiple drug resistance (MDR), aiding scientists in tackling and overcoming this issue. This review focuses on drug resistance by ABC efflux transporters in human, viral, parasitic, fungal and bacterial cells and highlights the importance of the MDR permeability glycoprotein being the mutual ABC transporter among all studied organisms. Current developments and future directions to overcome this problem are also discussed. PMID:28119610

  14. Levofloxacin Efflux and smeD in Clinical Isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Chong, So Young; Lee, Kyungwon; Chung, Hae-Sun; Hong, Seong Geun; Suh, Younghee; Chong, Yunsop

    2017-03-01

    Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is the first-line antimicrobial combination for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infections. However, allergy or intolerance and increasing resistance limit the use of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Quinolones can be used as an alternative therapeutic option, but resistance can emerge rapidly during therapy. We analyzed the contribution of SmeABC and SmeDEF efflux pumps to levofloxacin resistance in clinical isolates of S. maltophilia. Nonduplicate clinical isolates of S. maltophilia were collected in 2010 from 11 university hospitals (n = 102). Fifty-five levofloxacin nonsusceptible (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥4 μg/ml) and 47 susceptible (MIC ≤2 μg/ml) isolates were tested for efflux pump overexpression. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR was performed for amplification and quantification of smeB, smeC, smeD, and smeF mRNA. To determine which antimicrobials were affected by smeD overexpression, the growth rates of a levofloxacin-susceptible S. maltophilia isolate were compared by measuring absorbance of antimicrobial-supplemented Luria-Bertani broth (LB) cultures with or without triclosan. Significant relationships between sme gene overexpression and resistance were observed for smeD against levofloxacin, smeC and smeF against ceftazidime, and smeC against ticarcillin-clavulanate. The mean MICs of moxifloxacin and tigecycline did not significantly differ for isolates with or without overexpression of smeB, smeC, and smeF, but were significantly higher for isolates with smeD overexpression. The mean MICs of amikacin were significantly higher for smeC or smeF overexpressing isolates. Increased growth of a levofloxacin-susceptible isolate was observed in LB with 1/2 MIC levofloxacin in the presence of triclosan. These data suggest that the expression of smeD plays a role in levofloxacin resistance in S. maltophilia.

  15. Efflux systems in bacteria and their metabolic engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher M; Hernández Lozada, Néstor J; Pfleger, Brian F

    2015-11-01

    The production of valuable chemicals from metabolically engineered microbes can be limited by excretion from the cell. Efflux is often overlooked as a bottleneck in metabolic pathways, despite its impact on alleviating feedback inhibition and product toxicity. In the past, it has been assumed that endogenous efflux pumps and membrane porins can accommodate product efflux rates; however, there are an increasing number of examples wherein overexpressing efflux systems is required to improve metabolite production. In this review, we highlight specific examples from the literature where metabolite export has been studied to identify unknown transporters, increase tolerance to metabolites, and improve the production capabilities of engineered bacteria. The review focuses on the export of a broad spectrum of valuable chemicals including amino acids, sugars, flavins, biofuels, and solvents. The combined set of examples supports the hypothesis that efflux systems can be identified and engineered to confer export capabilities on industrially relevant microbes.

  16. Control of Angiogenesis by AIBP-mediated Cholesterol Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Longhou; Choi, Soo-Ho; Baek, Ji Sun; Liu, Chao; Almazan, Felicidad; Ulrich, Florian; Wiesner, Philipp; Taleb, Adam; Deer, Elena; Pattison, Jennifer; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús; Li, Andrew C.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol is a structural component of the cell, indispensable for normal cellular function, but its excess often leads to abnormal proliferation, migration, inflammatory responses and/or cell death. To prevent cholesterol overload, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate cholesterol efflux from the cells to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) and to the ApoA-I-containing high-density lipoprotein (HDL)1-3. Maintaining efficient cholesterol efflux is essential for normal cellular function4-6. However, the role of cholesterol efflux in angiogenesis and the identity of its local regulators are poorly understood. Here we show that ApoA-I binding protein (AIBP) accelerates cholesterol efflux from endothelial cells (EC) to HDL and thereby regulates angiogenesis. AIBP/HDL-mediated cholesterol depletion reduces lipid rafts, interferes with VEGFR2 dimerization and signaling, and inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and mouse aortic neovascularization ex vivo. Remarkably, Aibp regulates the membrane lipid order in embryonic zebrafish vasculature and functions as a non-cell autonomous regulator of zebrafish angiogenesis. Aibp knockdown results in dysregulated sprouting/branching angiogenesis, while forced Aibp expression inhibits angiogenesis. Dysregulated angiogenesis is phenocopied in Abca1/Abcg1-deficient embryos, and cholesterol levels are increased in Aibp-deficient and Abca1/Abcg1-deficient embryos. Our findings demonstrate that secreted AIBP positively regulates cholesterol efflux from EC and that effective cholesterol efflux is critical for proper angiogenesis. PMID:23719382

  17. The Asp20-to-Asn Substitution in the Response Regulator AdeR Leads to Enhanced Efflux Activity of AdeB in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jennifer; Schneiders, Thamarai; Seifert, Harald; Higgins, Paul G

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of the resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux pump AdeABC is often associated with multidrug resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii and has been linked to mutations in the genes encoding the AdeRS two-component system. In a previous study, we reported that the Asp20→Asn amino acid substitution in the response regulator AdeR is associated with adeB overexpression and reduced susceptibility to the antimicrobials levofloxacin, tigecycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. To further characterize the effect of the Asp20→Asn substitution on antimicrobial susceptibility, the expression of the efflux genes adeB, adeJ, and adeG, and substrate accumulation, four plasmid constructs [containing adeR(Asp20)S, adeR(Asn20)S, adeR(Asp20)SABC, and adeR(Asn20)SABC] were introduced into the adeRSABC-deficient A. baumannii isolate NIPH 60. Neither adeRS construct induced changes in antimicrobial susceptibility or substrate accumulation from that for the vector-only control. The adeR(Asp20)SABC transformant showed reduced susceptibility to 6 antimicrobials and accumulated 12% less ethidium than the control, whereas the Asn20 variant showed reduced susceptibility to 6 of 8 antimicrobial classes tested, and its ethidium accumulation was only 72% of that observed for the vector-only construct. adeB expression was 7-fold higher in the adeR(Asn20)SABC transformant than in its Asp20 variant. No changes in adeG or adeJ expression or in acriflavine or rhodamine 6G accumulation were detected. The antimicrobial susceptibility data suggest that AdeRS does not regulate any resistance determinants other than AdeABC. Furthermore, the characterization of the Asp20→Asn20 substitution proves that the reduced antimicrobial susceptibility previously associated with this substitution was indeed caused by enhanced efflux activity of AdeB.

  18. PET and SPECT Radiotracers to Assess Function and Expression of ABC Transporters in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mairinger, Severin; Erker, Thomas; Müller, Markus; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) are expressed in high concentrations at various physiological barriers (e.g. blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, blood-tumor barrier), where they impede the tissue accumulation of various drugs by active efflux transport. Changes in ABC transporter expression and function are thought to be implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The availability of a non-invasive imaging method which allows for measuring ABC transporter function or expression in vivo would be of great clinical use in that it could facilitate the identification of those patients that would benefit from treatment with ABC transporter modulating drugs. To date three different kinds of imaging probes have been described to measure ABC transporters in vivo: i) radiolabelled transporter substrates ii) radiolabelled transporter inhibitors and iii) radiolabelled prodrugs which are enzymatically converted into transporter substrates in the organ of interest (e.g. brain). The design of new imaging probes to visualize efflux transporters is inter alia complicated by the overlapping substrate recognition pattern of different ABC transporter types. The present article will describe currently available ABC transporter radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and critically discuss strengths and limitations of individual probes and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21434859

  19. Mitochondrial ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Lill, R; Kispal, G

    2001-01-01

    In contrast to bacteria, mitochondria contain only a few ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters in their inner membrane. The known mitochondrial ABC proteins fall into two major classes that, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are represented by the half-transporter Atm1p and the two closely homologous proteins Mdl1p and Mdl2p. In humans two Atm1p orthologues (ABC7 and MTABC3) and two proteins homologous to Mdll/2p have been localized to mitochondria. The Atm1p-like proteins perform an important function in mitochondrial iron homeostasis and in the maturation of Fe/S proteins in the cytosol. Mutations in ABC7 are causative of hereditary X-linked sideroblastic anemia and cerebellar ataxia (XLSA/A). MTABC3 may be a candidate gene for the lethal neonatal syndrome. The function of the mitochondrial Mdl1/2p-like proteins is not clear at present with the notable exception of murine ABC-me that may transport intermediates of heme biosynthesis from the matrix to the cytosol in erythroid tissues.

  20. Contribution of Efflux to the Emergence of Isoniazid and Multidrug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Perdigão, João; Rodrigues, Liliana; Portugal, Isabel; Baptista, Pedro; Veigas, Bruno; Amaral, Leonard; Viveiros, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most effective drugs used in tuberculosis therapy. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which resistance towards isoniazid develops and how overexpression of efflux pumps favors accumulation of mutations in isoniazid targets, thus establishing a MDR phenotype. The study was based on the in vitro induction of an isoniazid resistant phenotype by prolonged serial exposure of M. tuberculosis strains to the critical concentration of isoniazid employed for determination of drug susceptibility testing in clinical isolates. Results show that susceptible and rifampicin monoresistant strains exposed to this concentration become resistant to isoniazid after three weeks; and that resistance observed for the majority of these strains could be reduced by means of efflux pumps inhibitors. RT-qPCR assessment of efflux pump genes expression showed overexpression of all tested genes. Enhanced real-time efflux of ethidium bromide, a common efflux pump substrate, was also observed, showing a clear relation between overexpression of the genes and increased efflux pump function. Further exposure to isoniazid resulted in the selection and stabilization of spontaneous mutations and deletions in the katG gene along with sustained increased efflux activity. Together, results demonstrate the relevance of efflux pumps as one of the factors of isoniazid resistance in M. tuberculosis. These results support the hypothesis that activity of efflux pumps allows the maintenance of an isoniazid resistant population in a sub-optimally treated patient from which isoniazid genetically resistant mutants emerge. Therefore, the use of inhibitors of efflux should be considered in the development of new therapeutic strategies for preventing the emergence of MDR-TB during treatment. PMID:22493700

  1. Contribution of efflux to the emergence of isoniazid and multidrug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Perdigão, João; Rodrigues, Liliana; Portugal, Isabel; Baptista, Pedro; Veigas, Bruno; Amaral, Leonard; Viveiros, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most effective drugs used in tuberculosis therapy. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which resistance towards isoniazid develops and how overexpression of efflux pumps favors accumulation of mutations in isoniazid targets, thus establishing a MDR phenotype. The study was based on the in vitro induction of an isoniazid resistant phenotype by prolonged serial exposure of M. tuberculosis strains to the critical concentration of isoniazid employed for determination of drug susceptibility testing in clinical isolates. Results show that susceptible and rifampicin monoresistant strains exposed to this concentration become resistant to isoniazid after three weeks; and that resistance observed for the majority of these strains could be reduced by means of efflux pumps inhibitors. RT-qPCR assessment of efflux pump genes expression showed overexpression of all tested genes. Enhanced real-time efflux of ethidium bromide, a common efflux pump substrate, was also observed, showing a clear relation between overexpression of the genes and increased efflux pump function. Further exposure to isoniazid resulted in the selection and stabilization of spontaneous mutations and deletions in the katG gene along with sustained increased efflux activity. Together, results demonstrate the relevance of efflux pumps as one of the factors of isoniazid resistance in M. tuberculosis. These results support the hypothesis that activity of efflux pumps allows the maintenance of an isoniazid resistant population in a sub-optimally treated patient from which isoniazid genetically resistant mutants emerge. Therefore, the use of inhibitors of efflux should be considered in the development of new therapeutic strategies for preventing the emergence of MDR-TB during treatment.

  2. ACTIVE EFFLUX OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS BY PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA S12 IS INDUCED BY SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of the membrane-associated organic solvent efflux system SrpABC of Pseudomonas putida S12 was examined by cloning a 312-bp DNA fragment, containing the srp promoter, in the broad-host-range reporter vector pKRZ-1. Compounds that are capable of inducing expression of the...

  3. ABC's of Being Smart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Determining what giftedness is all about means focusing on many aspects of the individual. In this paper, the author focuses on letter D of the ABC's of being smart. She starts with specifics about giftedness (details), and then moves on to some ways of thinking (dispositions).

  4. 1968 ABC Summer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Frances M.; Russell, Valerie E.

    A talent development project at Mount Holyoke College, part of A Better Chance (ABC)-Independent Schools Talent Search program, was offered during the summer of 1968 to 71 disadvantaged high school students from 13 states. Major aims of the program were to help these students with college potential to strengthen their academic skills and…

  5. Plant ABC Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joohyun; Park, Jiyoung; Choi, Hyunju; Burla, Bo; Kretzschmar, Tobias; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    ABC transporters constitute one of the largest protein families found in all living organisms. ABC transporters are driven by ATP hydrolysis and can act as exporters as well as importers. The plant genome encodes for more than 100 ABC transporters, largely exceeding that of other organisms. In Arabidopsis, only 22 out of 130 have been functionally analyzed. They are localized in most membranes of a plant cell such as the plasma membrane, the tonoplast, chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes and fulfill a multitude of functions. Originally identified as transporters involved in detoxification processes, they have later been shown to be required for organ growth, plant nutrition, plant development, response to abiotic stresses, pathogen resistance and the interaction of the plant with its environment. To fulfill these roles they exhibit different substrate specifies by e.g. depositing surface lipids, accumulating phytate in seeds, and transporting the phytohormones auxin and abscisic acid. The aim of this review is to give an insight into the functions of plant ABC transporters and to show their importance for plant development and survival. PMID:22303277

  6. Reversal of ABC drug transporter-mediated multidrug resistance in cancer cells: Evaluation of current strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Calcagno, Anna Maria; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters that actively efflux a variety of amphipathic compounds can cause multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells, which is a major obstacle in the success of cancer chemotherapy. The development of synthetic small molecule compounds or the identification of natural products that block ABC transporter-mediated efflux has been the conventional approach used to combat MDR. The strategy of using chemosensitizers, however, has not been successful in clinical cancer chemotherapy. Therefore, alternative approaches to identify or to synthesize compounds that can induce selective toxicity in cancer cells overexpressing one or more ABC transporters have been undertaken. This review summarizes the recent advances in identifying strategies to restore sensitivity to chemotherapeutics in multidrug resistant cancer cells. PMID:19079736

  7. Antitubercular Agent Delamanid and Metabolites as Substrates and Inhibitors of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Masakazu; Hashizume, Kenta; Hamasako, Yusuke; Ohzone, Yoshihiro; Kashiyama, Eiji; Umehara, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Delamanid (Deltyba, OPC-67683) is the first approved drug in a novel class of nitro-dihydro-imidazooxazoles developed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis require treatment with multiple drugs, several of which have known drug-drug interactions. Transporters regulate drug absorption, distribution, and excretion; therefore, the inhibition of transport by one agent may alter the pharmacokinetics of another, leading to unexpected adverse events. Therefore, it is important to understand how delamanid affects transport activity. In the present study, the potencies of delamanid and its main metabolites as the substrates and inhibitors of various transporters were evaluated in vitro. Delamanid was not transported by the efflux ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), solute carrier (SLC) transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides, or organic cation transporter 1. Similarly, metabolite 1 (M1) was not a substrate for any of these transporters except P-gp. Delamanid showed no inhibitory effect on ABC transporters MDR1, BCRP, and bile salt export pump (BSEP; ABCB11), SLC transporters, or organic anion transporters. M1 and M2 inhibited P-gp- and BCRP-mediated transport but did so only at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (M1, 4.65 and 5.71 μmol/liter, respectively; M2, 7.80 and 6.02 μmol/liter, respectively), well above the corresponding maximum concentration in plasma values observed following the administration of multiple doses in clinical trials. M3 and M4 did not affect the activities of any of the transporters tested. These in vitro data suggest that delamanid is unlikely to have clinically relevant interactions with drugs for which absorption and disposition are mediated by this group of transporters. PMID:27021329

  8. The Cus efflux system removes toxic ions via a methionine shuttle.

    PubMed

    Su, Chih-Chia; Long, Feng; Yu, Edward W

    2011-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently utilize tripartite efflux complexes in the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family to expel diverse toxic compounds from the cell. These efflux systems span the entire cell envelope to mediate the phenomenon of bacterial multidrug resistance. The three parts of the efflux complexes are: (1) a membrane fusion protein (MFP) connecting (2) a substrate-binding inner membrane transporter to (3) an outer membrane-anchored channel in the periplasmic space. One such efflux system CusCBA is responsible for extruding biocidal Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions. We recently determined the crystal structures of both the inner membrane transporter CusA and MFP CusB of the CusCBA tripartite efflux system from E. coli. These are the first structures of the heavy-metal efflux (HME) subfamily of the RND efflux pumps. Here, we summarize the structural information of these two efflux proteins and present the accumulated evidence that this efflux system utilizes methionine residues to bind and export Cu(I)/Ag(I). Genetic and structural analyses suggest that the CusA pump is capable of picking up the metal ions from both the periplasm and cytoplasm. We propose a stepwise shuttle mechanism for this pump to extrude metal ions from the cell.

  9. Low levels of graphene and graphene oxide inhibit cellular xenobiotic defense system mediated by efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Bing; Yu, Jing; Yu, Haiyan; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Cherr, Gary N

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) are considered to be environmentally safe. In this study, we analyzed the potential effects of graphene and GO at relatively low concentrations on cellular xenobiotic defense system mediated by efflux transporters. The results showed that graphene (<0.5 μg/mL) and GO (<20 μg/mL) did not decrease cell viability, generate reactive oxygen species, or disrupt mitochondrial function. However, graphene and GO at the nontoxic concentrations could increase calcein-AM (CAM, an indicator of membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter) activity) accumulation, indicating inhibition of ABC transporters' efflux capabilities. This inhibition was observed even at 0.005 μg/mL graphene and 0.05 μg/mL GO, which are 100 times and 400 times lower than their lowest toxic concentration from cytotoxicity experiments, respectively. The inhibition of ABC transporters significantly increased the toxicity of paraquat and arsenic, known substrates of ABC transporters. The inhibition of ABC transporters was found to be based on graphene and GO damaging the plasma membrane structure and fluidity, thus altering functions of transmembrane ABC transporters. This study demonstrates that low levels of graphene and GO are not environmentally safe since they can significantly make cell more susceptible to other xenobiotics, and this chemosensitizing activity should be considered in the risk assessment of graphene and GO.

  10. Tunicamycin Depresses P-Glycoprotein Glycosylation Without an Effect on Its Membrane Localization and Drug Efflux Activity in L1210 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Šereš, Mário; Cholujová, Dana; Bubenčíkova, Tatiana; Breier, Albert; Sulová, Zdenka

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), also known as ABCB1, is a member of the ABC transporter family of proteins. P-gp is an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump that is localized to the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and confers multidrug resistance in neoplastic cells. P-gp is a 140-kDa polypeptide that is glycosylated to a final molecular weight of 170 kDa. Our experimental model used two variants of L1210 cells in which overexpression of P-gp was achieved: either by adaptation of parental cells (S) to vincristine (R) or by transfection with the human gene encoding P-gp (T). R and T cells were found to differ from S cells in transglycosylation reactions in our recent studies. The effects of tunicamycin on glycosylation, drug efflux activity and cellular localization of P-gp in R and T cells were examined in the present study. Treatment with tunicamycin caused less concentration-dependent cellular damage to R and T cells compared with S cells. Tunicamycin inhibited P-gp N-glycosylation in both of the P-gp-positive cells. However, tunicamycin treatment did not alter either the P-gp cellular localization to the plasma membrane or the P-gp transport activity. The present paper brings evidence that independently on the mode of P-gp expression (selection with drugs or transfection with a gene encoding P-gp) in L1210 cells, tunicamycin induces inhibition of N-glycosylation of this protein, without altering its function as plasma membrane drug efflux pump. PMID:22174631

  11. Secondary Metabolites from Plants Inhibiting ABC Transporters and Reversing Resistance of Cancer Cells and Microbes to Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Ashour, Mohamed L.; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Fungal, bacterial, and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial, or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: (1) Activation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, (2) Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidize lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulfate, or amino acids, and (3) Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarizes the evidence that secondary metabolites (SM) of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics, and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids [monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins), steroids (including cardiac glycosides), and tetraterpenes] but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids) function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, multiple resistance-associated protein 1, and Breast cancer resistance protein in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA) and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones) directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse multidrug resistance, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these SM are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion. PMID:22536197

  12. ABC transporters and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Begley, David J

    2004-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) form a very effective barrier to the free diffusion of many polar solutes into the brain. Many metabolites that are polar have their brain entry facilitated by specific inwardly-directed transport mechanisms. In general the more lipid soluble a molecule or drug is, the more readily it will tend to partition into brain tissue. However, a very significant number of lipid soluble molecules, among them many useful therapeutic drugs have lower brain permeability than would be predicted from a determination of their lipid solubility. These molecules are substrates for the ABC efflux transporters which are present in the BBB and BCSB and the activity of these transporters very efficiently removes the drug from the CNS, thus limiting brain uptake. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) was the first of these ABC transporters to be described, followed by the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) and more recently breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). All are expressed in the BBB and BCSFB and combine to reduce the brain penetration of many drugs. This phenomenon of "multidrug resistance" is a major hurdle when it comes to the delivery of therapeutics to the brain, not to mention the problem of cancer chemotherapy in general. Therefore, the development of strategies for bypassing the influence of these ABC transporters and for the design of effective drugs that are not substrates and the development of inhibitors for the ABC transporters becomes a high imperative for the pharmaceutical industry.

  13. The challenge of efflux-mediated antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Plésiat, Patrick; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps.

  14. The Challenge of Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps. PMID:25788514

  15. Contribution of efflux activity to isoniazid resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Liliana; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Amaral, Leonard; Viveiros, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Resistance to isoniazid (INH), one of the main drugs used in tuberculosis (TB) therapy, is mostly due to chromosomal mutations in target genes. However, approximately 20-30% of INH resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates do not have mutations in any of the genes associated with INH resistance. This suggests that other mechanism(s) may be involved, namely efflux pump systems capable of extruding the drug to the exterior of the cell. In a previous work, we have induced clinical INH susceptible M. tuberculosis isolates and the H37Rv reference strain to high-level resistance to INH, by gradual exposure to increasing concentrations of this drug. In the present study, we have characterized these strains and Mycobacterium bovis BCG induced to INH resistance with respect to their efflux activity and its contribution to INH resistance using the following approach: determination of the susceptibility to INH in the presence and absence of the efflux inhibitors (EIs) chlorpromazine, thioridazine and verapamil; evaluation of efflux activity by a semi-automated fluorometric method; and quantification of the expression level of genes coding for efflux pumps by real-time RT-qPCR. The EIs decreased INH resistance in the INH induced strains, in particular verapamil promoted a reversal of resistance in some of the strains tested. The induced strains presented an increased efflux activity that was inhibited by the EIs and showed overexpression of the efflux pump genes efpA, mmpL7, mmr, p55 and the Tap-like gene Rv1258c. Altogether, these results correlate efflux activity with INH resistance and demonstrate that efflux pumps play an important role in acquired INH resistance in M. tuberculosis complex. The development of EIs that can restore the antimicrobial activity of the antibiotic subject to efflux is an approach that can be useful in order to prevent the emergence of this resistance and guide the development of new effective anti-TB therapeutical approaches.

  16. Enhancement of antibiotic activity by efflux inhibitors against multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Tatiane; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Maschmann, Raquel; Ramos, Daniela; von Groll, Andrea; Rossetti, Maria L; Silva, Pedro A; Viveiros, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis continues to increase and new approaches for its treatment are necessary. The identification of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates presenting efflux as part of their resistant phenotype has a major impact in tuberculosis treatment. In this work, we used a checkerboard procedure combined with the tetrazolium microplate-based assay (TEMA) to study single combinations between antituberculosis drugs and efflux inhibitors (EIs) against multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates using the fully susceptible strain H37Rv as reference. Efflux activity was studied on a real-time basis by a fluorometric method that uses ethidium bromide as efflux substrate. Quantification of efflux pump genes mRNA transcriptional levels were performed by RT-qPCR. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC) indicated synergistic activity for the interactions between isoniazid, rifampicin, amikacin, ofloxacin, and ethidium bromide plus the EIs verapamil, thioridazine and chlorpromazine. The FICs ranged from 0.25, indicating a four-fold reduction on the MICs, to 0.015, 64-fold reduction. The detection of active efflux by real-time fluorometry showed that all strains presented intrinsic efflux activity that contributes to the overall resistance which can be inhibited in the presence of the EIs. The quantification of the mRNA levels of the most important efflux pump genes on these strains shows that they are intrinsically predisposed to expel toxic compounds as the exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were not necessary to increase the pump mRNA levels when compared with the non-exposed counterpart. The results obtained in this study confirm that the intrinsic efflux activity contributes to the overall resistance in multidrug resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and that the inhibition of efflux pumps by the EIs can enhance the clinical effect of antibiotics that are their substrates.

  17. Do You Know Your ABC?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Within primary schools, the core subjects of literacy and numeracy are highly regarded, and rightly so, as children need to learn to read, write and be numerically literate. This means that all children learn their ABCs at an early age, But, what about the "other ABC"--"Airway, Breathing and Circulation?" Accidents and medical…

  18. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition.

  19. A Survey of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Gene Superfamily in the Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis)

    PubMed Central

    Heumann, Jan; Taggart, John B.; Gharbi, Karim; Bron, James E.; Bekaert, Michaël; Sturm, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), are fish ectoparasites causing significant economic damage in the mariculture of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758. The control of L. salmonis at fish farms relies to a large extent on treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. A problem related to chemical control is the potential for development of resistance, which in L. salmonis is documented for a number of drug classes including organophosphates, pyrethroids and avermectins. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily is found in all biota and includes a range of drug efflux transporters that can confer drug resistance to cancers and pathogens. Furthermore, some ABC transporters are recognised to be involved in conferral of insecticide resistance. While a number of studies have investigated ABC transporters in L. salmonis, no systematic analysis of the ABC gene family exists for this species. This study presents a genome-wide survey of ABC genes in L. salmonis for which, ABC superfamily members were identified through homology searching of the L. salmonis genome. In addition, ABC proteins were identified in a reference transcriptome of the parasite generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of a multi-stage RNA library. Searches of both genome and transcriptome allowed the identification of a total of 33 genes / transcripts coding for ABC proteins, of which 3 were represented only in the genome and 4 only in the transcriptome. Eighteen sequences were assigned to ABC subfamilies known to contain drug transporters, i.e. subfamilies B (4 sequences), C (11) and G (2). The results suggest that the ABC gene family of L. salmonis possesses fewer members than recorded for other arthropods. The present survey of the L. salmonis ABC gene superfamily will provide the basis for further research into potential roles of ABC transporters in the toxicity of salmon delousing agents and as potential mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:26418738

  20. Calcium Efflux Systems in Stress Signaling and Adaptation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Jayakumar; Pottosin, Igor I.; Shabala, Stanislav S.; Palmgren, Michael G.; Shabala, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Transient cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) elevation is an ubiquitous denominator of the signaling network when plants are exposed to literally every known abiotic and biotic stress. These stress-induced [Ca2+]cyt elevations vary in magnitude, frequency, and shape, depending on the severity of the stress as well the type of stress experienced. This creates a unique stress-specific calcium “signature” that is then decoded by signal transduction networks. While most published papers have been focused predominantly on the role of Ca2+ influx mechanisms to shaping [Ca2+]cyt signatures, restoration of the basal [Ca2+]cyt levels is impossible without both cytosolic Ca2+ buffering and efficient Ca2+ efflux mechanisms removing excess Ca2+ from cytosol, to reload Ca2+ stores and to terminate Ca2+ signaling. This is the topic of the current review. The molecular identity of two major types of Ca2+ efflux systems, Ca2+-ATPase pumps and Ca2+/H+ exchangers, is described, and their regulatory modes are analyzed in detail. The spatial and temporal organization of calcium signaling networks is described, and the importance of existence of intracellular calcium microdomains is discussed. Experimental evidence for the role of Ca2+ efflux systems in plant responses to a range of abiotic and biotic factors is summarized. Contribution of Ca2+-ATPase pumps and Ca2+/H+ exchangers in shaping [Ca2+]cyt signatures is then modeled by using a four-component model (plasma- and endo-membrane-based Ca2+-permeable channels and efflux systems) taking into account the cytosolic Ca2+ buffering. It is concluded that physiologically relevant variations in the activity of Ca2+-ATPase pumps and Ca2+/H+ exchangers are sufficient to fully describe all the reported experimental evidence and determine the shape of [Ca2+]cyt signatures in response to environmental stimuli, emphasizing the crucial role these active efflux systems play in plant adaptive responses to environment. PMID:22639615

  1. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol-Hee

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:16202168

  2. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Liam K. R.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to an in vitro translation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosome in vitro. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection. PMID:27006457

  3. Development, Maintenance, and Reversal of Multiple Drug Resistance: At the Crossroads of TFPI1, ABC Transporters, and HIF1α

    PubMed Central

    Arnason, Terra; Harkness, Troy

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and improved therapies for many cancers are enhancing survival rates. Although many cytotoxic therapies are approved for aggressive or metastatic cancer; response rates are low and acquisition of de novo resistance is virtually universal. For decades; chemotherapeutic treatments for cancer have included anthracyclines such as Doxorubicin (DOX); and its use in aggressive tumors appears to remain a viable option; but drug resistance arises against DOX; as for all other classes of compounds. Our recent work suggests the anticoagulant protein Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor 1α (TFPI1α) plays a role in driving the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR); but not maintenance; of the MDR state. Other factors; such as the ABC transporter drug efflux pumps MDR-1/P-gp (ABCB1) and BCRP (ABCG2); are required for MDR maintenance; as well as development. The patient population struggling with therapeutic resistance specifically requires novel treatment options to resensitize these tumor cells to therapy. In this review we discuss the development, maintenance, and reversal of MDR as three distinct phases of cancer biology. Possible means to exploit these stages to reverse MDR will be explored. Early molecular detection of MDR cancers before clinical failure has the potential to offer new approaches to fighting MDR cancer. PMID:26501324

  4. Essential letters in the fungal alphabet: ABC and MFS transporters and their roles in survival and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Perlin, Michael H; Andrews, Jared; Toh, Su San

    2014-01-01

    Fungi depend heavily on their ability to exploit resources that may become available to them in their myriad of possible lifestyles. Whether this requires simple uptake of sugars as saprobes or competition for host-derived carbohydrates or peptides, fungi must rely on transporters that effectively allow the fungus to accumulate such nutrients from their environments. In other cases, fungi secrete compounds that facilitate their interactions with potential hosts and/or neutralize their competition. Finally, fungi that find themselves on the receiving end of insults, from hosts, competitors, or the overall environment are better served if they can get rid of such toxins or xenobiotics. In this chapter, we update studies on the most ubiquitous transporters, the ABC and MFS superfamilies. In addition, we discuss the importance of subsets of these proteins with particular relevance to plant pathogenic fungi. The availability of ever-increasing numbers of sequenced fungal genomes, combined with high-throughput methods for transcriptome analysis, provides insights previously inaccessible prior to the -omics era. As examples of such broader perspectives, we point to revelations about exploitive use of sugar transporters by plant pathogens, expansion of trichothecene efflux pumps in fungi that do not produce these mycotoxins, and the discovery of a fungal-specific oligopeptide transporter class that, so far, is overrepresented in the plant pathogenic fungi.

  5. Development, Maintenance, and Reversal of Multiple Drug Resistance: At the Crossroads of TFPI1, ABC Transporters, and HIF1.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Terra; Harkness, Troy

    2015-10-16

    Early detection and improved therapies for many cancers are enhancing survival rates. Although many cytotoxic therapies are approved for aggressive or metastatic cancer; response rates are low and acquisition of de novo resistance is virtually universal. For decades; chemotherapeutic treatments for cancer have included anthracyclines such as Doxorubicin (DOX); and its use in aggressive tumors appears to remain a viable option; but drug resistance arises against DOX; as for all other classes of compounds. Our recent work suggests the anticoagulant protein Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor 1α (TFPI1α) plays a role in driving the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR); but not maintenance; of the MDR state. Other factors; such as the ABC transporter drug efflux pumps MDR-1/P-gp (ABCB1) and BCRP (ABCG2); are required for MDR maintenance; as well as development. The patient population struggling with therapeutic resistance specifically requires novel treatment options to resensitize these tumor cells to therapy. In this review we discuss the development, maintenance, and reversal of MDR as three distinct phases of cancer biology. Possible means to exploit these stages to reverse MDR will be explored. Early molecular detection of MDRcancers before clinical failure has the potential to offer new approaches to fightingMDRcancer.

  6. The ABCs of Sex Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroka, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Cites statistics on extent of sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancies among adolescents; describes ideological dispute over how to teach sex education; advocates teaching the ABCs of sex education: Abstinence, Be Monogamous, and Condoms. (PKP)

  7. The Asp20-to-Asn Substitution in the Response Regulator AdeR Leads to Enhanced Efflux Activity of AdeB in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Jennifer; Schneiders, Thamarai; Seifert, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux pump AdeABC is often associated with multidrug resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii and has been linked to mutations in the genes encoding the AdeRS two-component system. In a previous study, we reported that the Asp20→Asn amino acid substitution in the response regulator AdeR is associated with adeB overexpression and reduced susceptibility to the antimicrobials levofloxacin, tigecycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. To further characterize the effect of the Asp20→Asn substitution on antimicrobial susceptibility, the expression of the efflux genes adeB, adeJ, and adeG, and substrate accumulation, four plasmid constructs [containing adeR(Asp20)S, adeR(Asn20)S, adeR(Asp20)SABC, and adeR(Asn20)SABC] were introduced into the adeRSABC-deficient A. baumannii isolate NIPH 60. Neither adeRS construct induced changes in antimicrobial susceptibility or substrate accumulation from that for the vector-only control. The adeR(Asp20)SABC transformant showed reduced susceptibility to 6 antimicrobials and accumulated 12% less ethidium than the control, whereas the Asn20 variant showed reduced susceptibility to 6 of 8 antimicrobial classes tested, and its ethidium accumulation was only 72% of that observed for the vector-only construct. adeB expression was 7-fold higher in the adeR(Asn20)SABC transformant than in its Asp20 variant. No changes in adeG or adeJ expression or in acriflavine or rhodamine 6G accumulation were detected. The antimicrobial susceptibility data suggest that AdeRS does not regulate any resistance determinants other than AdeABC. Furthermore, the characterization of the Asp20→Asn20 substitution proves that the reduced antimicrobial susceptibility previously associated with this substitution was indeed caused by enhanced efflux activity of AdeB. PMID:26643347

  8. Fluid transport by the cornea endothelium is dependent on buffering lactic acid efflux.

    PubMed

    Li, Shimin; Kim, Edward; Bonanno, Joseph A

    2016-07-01

    Maintenance of corneal hydration is dependent on the active transport properties of the corneal endothelium. We tested the hypothesis that lactic acid efflux, facilitated by buffering, is a component of the endothelial fluid pump. Rabbit corneas were perfused with bicarbonate-rich (BR) or bicarbonate-free (BF) Ringer of varying buffering power, while corneal thickness was measured. Perfusate was collected and analyzed for lactate efflux. In BF with no added HEPES, the maximal corneal swelling rate was 30.0 ± 4.1 μm/h compared with 5.2 ± 0.9 μm/h in BR. Corneal swelling decreased directly with [HEPES], such that with 60 mM HEPES corneas swelled at 7.5 ± 1.6 μm/h. Perfusate [lactate] increased directly with [HEPES]. Similarly, reducing the [HCO3 (-)] increased corneal swelling and decreased lactate efflux. Corneal swelling was inversely related to Ringer buffering power (β), whereas lactate efflux was directly related to β. Ouabain (100 μM) produced maximal swelling and reduction in lactate efflux, whereas carbonic anhydrase inhibition and an monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 inhibitor produced intermediate swelling and decreases in lactate efflux. Conversely, 10 μM adenosine reduced the swelling rate to 4.2 ± 0.8 μm/h and increased lactate efflux by 25%. We found a strong inverse relation between corneal swelling and lactate efflux (r = 0.98, P < 0.0001). Introducing lactate in the Ringer transiently increased corneal thickness, reaching a steady state (0 ± 0.6 μm/h) within 90 min. We conclude that corneal endothelial function does not have an absolute requirement for bicarbonate; rather it requires a perfusing solution with high buffering power. This facilitates lactic acid efflux, which is directly linked to water efflux, indicating that lactate flux is a component of the corneal endothelial pump.

  9. Regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters and cholesterol efflux by glucose in primary human monocytes and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis. This may be partially attributable to suppression of macrophage ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated cholesterol efflux by sustained elevated blood glucose concentrations. Two models were used...

  10. Expression of the marA, soxS, acrB and ramA genes related to the AcrAB/TolC efflux pump in Salmonella enterica strains with and without quinolone resistance-determining regions gyrA gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Rafaela Gomes; Galiana, Antonio; Cremades, Rosa; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos; Magnani, Marciane; Tognim, Maria Cristina Bronharo; Oliveira, Tereza C R M; Royo, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted in recent years to elucidate the structure, function and significance of AcrB, MarA, SoxS and RamA in Salmonella enterica. In this study, the relative quantification of acrB, soxS, marA and ramA genes expression was evaluated in 14 strains of S. enterica, with or without accompanying mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the gyrA gene, that were exposed to ciprofloxacin during the exponential growth phase. The presence of ciprofloxacin during the log phase of bacterial growth activated the genes marA, soxS, ramA and acrB in all S. enterica strains analyzed in this study. The highest expression levels for acrB were observed in strains with gyrA mutation, and marA showed the highest expression in the strains without mutation. Considering only the strains with ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration values<0.125 μg/mL (sensitive to ciprofloxacin), the most expressed gene in the strains both with and without mutations was acrB. In the strains with ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration values ≥ 0.125 μg/mL (low susceptibility), with and without mutations in gyrA, the most expressed gene was marA. In this study, we observed that strains resistant to nalidixic acid may express genes associated with the efflux pump and the expression of the AcrAB-TolC pump genes seems to occur independently of mutations in gyrA.

  11. The ABCs of Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Seth A.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Parsons, Allison Ward

    2014-01-01

    Student engagement is an important consideration for teachers and administrators because it is explicitly associated with achievement. What the authors call the ABC's of engagement they outline as: Affective engagement, Behavioral engagement, and Cognitive engagement. They also present "Three Things Every Teacher Needs to Know about…

  12. Heavy metal transport by the CusCFBA efflux system

    PubMed Central

    Delmar, Jared A; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the increased use of antibiotics has resulted in bacteria with developed resistance to such treatments. These organisms are capable of forming multi-protein structures that bridge both the inner and outer membrane to expel diverse toxic compounds directly from the cell. Proteins of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux pumps, composed of an inner membrane transporter, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane factor channel protein. These machines are the most powerful antimicrobial efflux machinery available to bacteria. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex is the only known RND transporter with a specificity for heavy metals, detoxifying both Cu+ and Ag+ ions. In this review, we discuss the known structural information for the CusCFBA proteins, with an emphasis on their assembly, interaction, and the relationship between structure and function. PMID:26258953

  13. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; van Opstal, Edward J.; Alink, Gerrit M.; Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.

    2013-06-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size 45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size 50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  14. ATP-Binding Cassette Efflux Transporters in Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhanglin; Mao, Qingcheng

    2010-01-01

    Pregnant women are often complicated with diseases including viral or bacterial infections, epilepsy, hypertension, or pregnancy-induced conditions such as depression and gestational diabetes that require treatment with medication. In addition, substance abuse during pregnancy remains a major public health problem. Many drugs used by pregnant women are off label without the necessary dose, efficacy, and safety data required for rational dosing regimens of these drugs. Thus, a major concern arising from the widespread use of drugs by pregnant women is the transfer of drugs across the placental barrier, leading to potential toxicity to the developing fetus. Knowledge regarding the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters, which play an important role in drug transfer across the placental barrier, is absolutely critical for optimizing the therapeutic strategy to treat the mother while protecting the fetus during pregnancy. Such transporters include P-glycoprotein (P-gp, gene symbol ABCB1), the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, gene symbol ABCG2), and the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs, gene symbol ABCCs). In this review, we summarize the current knowledge with respect to developmental expression and regulation, membrane localization, functional significance, and genetic polymorphisms of these ABC transporters in the placenta and their relevance to fetal drug exposure and toxicity. PMID:21118087

  15. Exploring conformational equilibria of a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    PubMed Central

    Timachi, M Hadi; Hutter, Cedric AJ; Hohl, Michael; Assafa, Tufa; Böhm, Simon; Mittal, Anshumali; Seeger, Markus A; Bordignon, Enrica

    2017-01-01

    ABC exporters pump substrates across the membrane by coupling ATP-driven movements of nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) to the transmembrane domains (TMDs), which switch between inward- and outward-facing (IF, OF) orientations. DEER measurements on the heterodimeric ABC exporter TM287/288 from Thermotoga maritima, which contains a non-canonical ATP binding site, revealed that in the presence of nucleotides the transporter exists in an IF/OF equilibrium. While ATP binding was sufficient to partially populate the OF state, nucleotide trapping in the pre- or post-hydrolytic state was required for a pronounced conformational shift. At physiologically high temperatures and in the absence of nucleotides, the NBDs disengage asymmetrically while the conformation of the TMDs remains unchanged. Nucleotide binding at the degenerate ATP site prevents complete NBD separation, a molecular feature differentiating heterodimeric from homodimeric ABC exporters. Our data suggest hydrolysis-independent closure of the NBD dimer, which is further stabilized as the consensus site nucleotide is committed to hydrolysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20236.001 PMID:28051765

  16. Peptide mediators of cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan

    2013-04-09

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  17. Pyrazinoic acid efflux rate in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a better proxy of pyrazinamide resistance.

    PubMed

    Zimic, Mirko; Fuentes, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H; Gutiérrez, Andrés H; Kirwan, Daniela; Sheen, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Pyrazinamide is one of the most important drugs in the treatment of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The emergence of strains resistant to pyrazinamide represents an important public health problem, as both first- and second-line treatment regimens include pyrazinamide. The accepted mechanism of action states that after the conversion of pyrazinamide into pyrazinoic acid by the bacterial pyrazinamidase enzyme, the drug is expelled from the bacteria by an efflux pump. The pyrazinoic acid is protonated in the extracellular environment and then re-enters the mycobacterium, releasing the proton and causing a lethal disruption of the membrane. Although it has been shown that mutations causing significant loss of pyrazinamidase activity significantly contribute to pyrazinamide resistance, the mechanism of resistance is not completely understood. The pyrazinoic acid efflux rate may depend on multiple factors, including pyrazinamidase activity, intracellular pyrazinamidase concentration, and the efficiency of the efflux pump. Whilst the importance of the pyrazinoic acid efflux rate to the susceptibility to pyrazinamide is recognized, its quantitative effect remains unknown. Thirty-four M. tuberculosis clinical isolates and a Mycobacterium smegmatis strain (naturally resistant to PZA) were selected based on their susceptibility to pyrazinamide, as measured by Bactec 460TB and the Wayne method. For each isolate, the initial velocity at which pyrazinoic acid is released from the bacteria and the initial velocity at which pyrazinamide enters the bacteria were estimated. The data indicated that pyrazinoic acid efflux rates for pyrazinamide-susceptible M. tuberculosis strains fell within a specific range, and M. tuberculosis strains with a pyrazinoic acid efflux rate below this range appeared to be resistant. This finding contrasts with the high pyrazinoic acid efflux rate for M. smegmatis, which is innately resistant to pyrazinamide: its pyrazinoic acid efflux

  18. ABC transporters in the CNS - an inventory.

    PubMed

    Hartz, A M S; Bauer, B

    2011-04-01

    In the present review we provide a summary of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the central nervous system (CNS). Our review is focused on transporters of the ABC A, B, C, D, and G families that have been detected in the cells of the neurovascular unit/blood-brain barrier including brain capillary endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, and neurons, as well as in other brain cells, such as microglia, oligodendrocytes, and choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this review, we provide an overview, organized by ABC family, of transporter expression, localization, and function. We summarize recent findings on ABC transporter regulation in the CNS and address the role of ABC transporters in CNS diseases including brain cancer, seizures/epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we discuss new therapeutic strategies focused on ABC transporters in CNS disease.

  19. Evidence of nickel (Ni) efflux in Ni-tolerant ectomycorhizal Pisolithus albus isolated from ultramafic soil.

    PubMed

    Majorel, Clarisse; Hannibal, Laure; Ducousso, Marc; Lebrun, Michel; Jourand, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Nickel (Ni)-tolerant ectomycorrhizal Pisolithus albus was isolated from extreme ultramafic soils that are naturally rich in heavy metals. This study aimed to identify the specific molecular mechanisms associated with the response of P. albus to nickel. In presence of high concentration of nickel, P. albus Ni-tolerant isolate showed a low basal accumulation of nickel in its fungal tissues and was able to perform a metal efflux mechanism. Three genes putatively involved in metal efflux were identified from the P. albus transcriptome, and their overexpression was confirmed in the mycelium that was cultivated in vitro in the presence of nickel and in fungal tissues that were sampled in situ. Cloning these genes in yeast provided significant advantages in terms of nickel tolerance (+ 31% Ni EC50) and growth (+ 83% μ) compared with controls. Furthermore, nickel efflux was also detected in the transformed yeast cells. Protein sequence analysis indicated that the genes encoded a P-type-ATPase, an ABC transporter and a major facilitator superfamily permease (MFS). This study sheds light on a global mechanism of metal efflux by P. albus cells that supports nickel tolerance. These specific responses to nickel might contribute to the fungal adaptation in ultramafic soil.

  20. Ethidium bromide efflux by Salmonella: modulation by metabolic energy, pH, ions and phenothiazines.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Leonard; Cerca, Pedro; Spengler, Gabriella; Machado, Lisa; Martins, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Fanning, Séamus; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2011-08-01

    The main efflux pump of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, which obtains its energy for the extrusion of noxious agents from the proton-motive force, was studied with the aid of an ethidium bromide (EtBr) semi-automated method under conditions that define the role of metabolic energy, ions and pH in the extrusion of the universal substrate EtBr. The results obtained in this study indicate that in minimal medium containing sodium at pH 5 efflux of EtBr is independent of glucose, whereas at pH 8 metabolic energy is an absolute requirement for the maintenance of efflux. In deionised water at pH 5.5, metabolic energy is required for the maintenance of efflux. The inhibitory effect of the ionophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) on efflux is shown to be minimised by low pH, and at high pH by metabolic energy. Similarly, thioridazine, an inhibitor of metabolic enzymes, inhibits efflux of EtBr only at pH 8 and the degree of inhibition is lessened by the presence of metabolic energy.

  1. Structure and operation of bacterial tripartite pumps.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Symmons, Martyn F; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, tripartite membrane machineries, or pumps, determine the efflux of small noxious molecules, such as detergents, heavy metals, and antibiotics, and the export of large proteins including toxins. They are therefore influential in bacterial survival, particularly during infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. In these tripartite pumps an inner membrane transporter, typically an ATPase or proton antiporter, binds and translocates export or efflux substrates. In cooperation with a periplasmic adaptor protein it recruits and opens a TolC family cell exit duct, which is anchored in the outer membrane and projects across the periplasmic space between inner and outer membranes. Assembled tripartite pumps thus span the entire bacterial cell envelope. We review the atomic structures of each of the three pump components and discuss how these have allowed high-resolution views of tripartite pump assembly, operation, and possible inhibition.

  2. Calcium Efflux from Barnacle Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J. M.; Blaustein, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    Calcium-45 was injected into single giant barnacle muscle fibers, and the rate of efflux was measured under a variety of conditions. The rate constant (k) for 45Ca efflux into standard seawater averaged 17 x 10–4 min–1 which corresponds to an efflux of about 1–2 pmol/cm2·s. Removal of external Ca (Cao) reduced the efflux by 50%. In most fibers about 40% of the 45Ca efflux into Ca-free seawater was dependent on external Na (Nao); treatment with 3.5 mM caffeine increased the magnitude of the Nao-dependent efflux. In a few fibers removal of Nao, in the absence of Cao, either had no effect or increased k; caffeine (2–3.5 mM) unmasked an Nao-dependent efflux in these fibers. The Nao-dependent Ca efflux had a Q10 of about 3.7. The data are consistent with the idea that a large fraction of the Ca efflux may be carrier-mediated, and may involve both Ca-Ca and Na-Ca counterflow. The relation between the Nao-dependent Ca efflux and the external Na concentration is sigmoid, and suggests that two, or more likely three, external Na+ ions may activate the efflux of one Ca+2. With a three-for-one Na-Ca exchange, the Na electrochemical gradient may be able to supply sufficient energy to maintain the Ca gradient in these fibers. Other, more complex models are not excluded, however, and may be required to explain some puzzling features of the Ca efflux such as the variable Nao-dependence. PMID:4812633

  3. Rethinking Drug Treatment Approaches in ALS by Targeting ABC Efflux Transporters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Despite multiple therapeutic efforts targeting a variety of underlying pathogenic mechanisms...approaches to cure the mouse the models amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have failed. With the exception of Riluzole (the only drug approved by the... Sclerosis (ALS), but there is limited progress translating effective treatments to animal models and patients, and ALS remains a disease with no

  4. Rethinking Drug Treatment Approaches in ALS by Targeting ABC Efflux Transporters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have failed. With the exception of Riluzole (the only drug approved by the FDA for treatment of ALS), we have been...paragraph)  describes  the  subject,  purpose  and  scope  of   the  research):     Research on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS

  5. The ABC transporters in Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlin; Cong, Qian; Pei, Jimin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Ca. L. asiaticus) is a Gram-negative bacterium and the pathogen of Citrus Greening disease (Huanglongbing, HLB). As a parasitic bacterium, Ca. L. asiaticus harbors ABC transporters that play important roles in exchanging chemical compounds between Ca. L. asiaticus and its host. Here, we analyzed all the ABC transporter-related proteins in Ca. L. asiaticus. We identified 14 ABC transporter systems and predicted their structures and substrate specificities. In-depth sequence and structure analysis including multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree reconstruction, and structure comparison further support their function predictions. Our study shows that this bacterium could use these ABC transporters to import metabolites (amino acids and phosphates) and enzyme cofactors (choline, thiamine, iron, manganese, and zinc), resist to organic solvent, heavy metal, and lipid-like drugs, maintain the composition of the outer membrane (OM), and secrete virulence factors. Although the features of most ABC systems could be deduced from the abundant experimental data on their orthologs, we reported several novel observations within ABC system proteins. Moreover, we identified seven nontransport ABC systems that are likely involved in virulence gene expression regulation, transposon excision regulation, and DNA repair. Our analysis reveals several candidates for further studies to understand and control the disease, including the type I virulence factor secretion system and its substrate that are likely related to Ca. L. asiaticus pathogenicity and the ABC transporter systems responsible for bacterial OM biosynthesis that are good drug targets. PMID:22807026

  6. Proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems.

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, I T; Brown, M H; Skurray, R A

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug efflux systems display the ability to transport a variety of structurally unrelated drugs from a cell and consequently are capable of conferring resistance to a diverse range of chemotherapeutic agents. This review examines multidrug efflux systems which use the proton motive force to drive drug transport. These proteins are likely to operate as multidrug/proton antiporters and have been identified in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Such proton-dependent multidrug efflux proteins belong to three distinct families or superfamilies of transport proteins: the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family, and the resistance/ nodulation/cell division (RND) family. The MFS consists of symporters, antiporters, and uniporters with either 12 or 14 transmembrane-spanning segments (TMS), and we show that within the MFS, three separate families include various multidrug/proton antiport proteins. The SMR family consists of proteins with four TMS, and the multidrug efflux proteins within this family are the smallest known secondary transporters. The RND family consists of 12-TMS transport proteins and includes a number of multidrug efflux proteins with particularly broad substrate specificity. In gram-negative bacteria, some multidrug efflux systems require two auxiliary constituents, which might enable drug transport to occur across both membranes of the cell envelope. These auxiliary constituents belong to the membrane fusion protein and the outer membrane factor families, respectively. This review examines in detail each of the characterized proton-linked multidrug efflux systems. The molecular basis of the broad substrate specificity of these transporters is discussed. The surprisingly wide distribution of multidrug efflux systems and their multiplicity in single organisms, with Escherichia coli, for instance, possessing at least nine proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems with overlapping specificities, is examined. We also

  7. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  8. An ABC for decision making*

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Luiz Henrique Costa; Ferreira, Bruna Cortez

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed at proposing a systematic evaluation of cranial computed tomography, identifying the main aspects to be analyzed in order to facilitate the decision making process regarding diagnosis and management in emergency settings. The present descriptive study comprised a literature review at the following databases: Access Medicine and Access Emergency Medicine (McGraw- Hill Education); British Medical Journal Evidence Center; UptoDate; Bireme; PubMed; Lilacs; SciELO; ProQuest; Micromedex (Thomson Reuters); Embase. Once the literature review was completed, the authors identified the main diseases with tomographic repercussions and proposed the present system to evaluate cranial computed tomography images. An easy-to-memorize ABC system will facilitate the decision making in emergency settings, as it covers the main diseases encountered by intensivists and emergency physicians, and provides a sequential guidance about anatomical structures to be investigated as well as their respective alterations. PMID:25987751

  9. An ABC for decision making.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Luiz Henrique Costa; Ferreira, Bruna Cortez

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed at proposing a systematic evaluation of cranial computed tomography, identifying the main aspects to be analyzed in order to facilitate the decision making process regarding diagnosis and management in emergency settings. The present descriptive study comprised a literature review at the following databases: Access Medicine and Access Emergency Medicine (McGraw- Hill Education); British Medical Journal Evidence Center; UptoDate; Bireme; PubMed; Lilacs; SciELO; ProQuest; Micromedex (Thomson Reuters); Embase. Once the literature review was completed, the authors identified the main diseases with tomographic repercussions and proposed the present system to evaluate cranial computed tomography images. An easy-to-memorize ABC system will facilitate the decision making in emergency settings, as it covers the main diseases encountered by intensivists and emergency physicians, and provides a sequential guidance about anatomical structures to be investigated as well as their respective alterations.

  10. Effect of vildagliptin and pravastatin combination on cholesterol efflux in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ahmed M; Hamdy, Nadia M; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; El-Mesallamy, Hala O

    2016-07-01

    Many reports suggested that some statins are almost ineffective in reducing triglycerides or enhancing HDL-C plasma levels, although statin treatment was still efficacious in reducing LDL-C. In diabetic dyslipidemic patients, it may therefore be necessary to use a combination therapy with other drugs to achieve either LDL-C- and triglyceride-lowering or HDL-C-enhancing goals. Such ineffectiveness of statins can be attributed to their effect on the liver X receptor (LXR) which regulates the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1. A decrease in the expression of these transporters eventually leads to decreased cholesterol efflux from peripheral tissues leading to low levels of HDL-C. Although manipulating the LXR pathway may complement the effects of statins, LXR synthetic ligands as T091317 have shown significant hypertriglyceridemic action which limits their use. We recently found that the antidiabetic drug vildagliptin stimulates LXR expression leading to increased ABCB1/ABCG1 expression which improves cholesterol efflux from adipocytes. Therefore, a combination of vildagliptin and statin may provide a solution without the hypertriglyceridemic action observed with LXR agonist. We hypothesize that a combination of vildagliptin and pravastatin will improve cholesterol efflux in adipocytes. Statin-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with vildagliptin, and the expression of LXR-ABCA1/ABCG1 cascade and the cholesterol efflux were then determined. Our data indicate that a combination of vildagliptin and pravastatin significantly induces the expression of LXR-ABCA1/ABCG1 cascade and improves cholesterol efflux (P > 0.05) in adipocytes. Our data may explain, at least in part, the improvement in HDL-C levels observed in patients receiving both medications. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(7):535-543, 2016.

  11. Crystal structure of the CusBA heavy-metal efflux complex of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Su, Chih-Chia; Long, Feng; Zimmermann, Michael T; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Jernigan, Robert L; Yu, Edward W

    2011-02-24

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, expel toxic chemicals through tripartite efflux pumps that span both the inner and outer membrane. The three parts are an inner membrane, substrate-binding transporter; a membrane fusion protein; and an outer-membrane-anchored channel. The fusion protein connects the transporter to the channel within the periplasmic space. A crystallographic model of this tripartite efflux complex has been unavailable because co-crystallization of the various components of the system has proven to be extremely difficult. We previously described the crystal structures of both the inner membrane transporter CusA and the membrane fusion protein CusB of the CusCBA efflux system of E. coli. Here we report the co-crystal structure of the CusBA efflux complex, showing that the transporter (or pump) CusA, which is present as a trimer, interacts with six CusB protomers and that the periplasmic domain of CusA is involved in these interactions. The six CusB molecules seem to form a continuous channel. The affinity of the CusA and CusB interaction was found to be in the micromolar range. Finally, we have predicted a three-dimensional structure for the trimeric CusC outer membrane channel and developed a model of the tripartite efflux assemblage. This CusC(3)-CusB(6)-CusA(3) model shows a 750-kilodalton efflux complex that spans the entire bacterial cell envelope and exports Cu I and Ag I ions.

  12. On the physics of multidrug efflux through a biomolecular complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, Hirokazu; Oshima, Hiraku; Yasuda, Satoshi; Amano, Ken-ichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2013-11-01

    focused on the entropic component. We show that the entropically inserted solute can be released by a continuous variation of the vessel geometry which forms a time-dependent entropic force continuing to accelerate the solute motion to the exit. Solutes with a wide range of sizes are entropically released using the same vessel-geometry variation. The results obtained are fairly general and also applicable to the efflux pump protein AcrB and ATP-binding cassette transporter.

  13. Homologs of the Acinetobacter baumannii AceI Transporter Represent a New Family of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Henderson, Peter J. F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug efflux systems are a major cause of resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria, including those pathogenic to humans, animals, and plants. These proteins are ubiquitous in these pathogens, and five families of bacterial multidrug efflux systems have been identified to date. By using transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, we recently identified the novel AceI (Acinetobacter chlorhexidine efflux) protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that conferred resistance to the biocide chlorhexidine, via an active efflux mechanism. Proteins homologous to AceI are encoded in the genomes of many other bacterial species and are particularly prominent within proteobacterial lineages. In this study, we expressed 23 homologs of AceI and examined their resistance and/or transport profiles. MIC analyses demonstrated that, like AceI, many of the homologs conferred resistance to chlorhexidine. Many of the AceI homologs conferred resistance to additional biocides, including benzalkonium, dequalinium, proflavine, and acriflavine. We conducted fluorimetric transport assays using the AceI homolog from Vibrio parahaemolyticus and confirmed that resistance to both proflavine and acriflavine was mediated by an active efflux mechanism. These results show that this group of AceI homologs represent a new family of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps, which we have designated the proteobacterial antimicrobial compound efflux (PACE) family of transport proteins. PMID:25670776

  14. Bioluminescent imaging of drug efflux at the blood–brain barrier mediated by the transporter ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Wei, Bih-Rong; Chang, Ki-Eun; Shukla, Suneet; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Simpson, R. Mark; Gottesman, Michael M.; Hall, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a group of transmembrane proteins that maintain chemical homeostasis through efflux of compounds out of organelles and cells. Among other functions, ABC transporters play a key role in protecting the brain parenchyma by efflux of xenobiotics from capillary endothelial cells at the blood–brain barrier (BBB). They also prevent the entry of therapeutic drugs at the BBB, thereby limiting their efficacy. One of the key transporters playing this role is ABCG2. Although other ABC transporters can be studied through various imaging modalities, no specific probe exists for imaging ABCG2 function in vivo. Here we show that d-luciferin, the endogenous substrate of firefly luciferase, is a specific substrate for ABCG2. We hypothesized that ABCG2 function at the BBB could be evaluated by using bioluminescence imaging in transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase in the brain. Bioluminescence signal in the brain of mice increased with coadministration of the ABCG2 inhibitors Ko143, gefitinib, and nilotinib, but not an ABCB1 inhibitor. This method for imaging ABCG2 function at the BBB will facilitate understanding of the function and pharmacokinetic inhibition of this transporter. PMID:24297888

  15. The ABC`s of nuclear science workshop

    SciTech Connect

    McMahn, P.; Carlock, M.S.; Mattis, H.; Norman, E.; Seaborg, G.

    1997-12-31

    Over the last several years the Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) has developed two wall charts which illustrate contemporary aspects of particle and plasma physics for high school and undergraduate students. We are now working with CPEP on the development of a similar chart for nuclear science. This chart will illustrate the basics of nuclear science coupled with the exciting research which is being done in this field. This workshop will explore the wall chart, along with materials and experiments that have been developed to accompany it. The set of experiments have been developed by high school teachers, chemists, and physicists working together, and include experiments such as, {open_quotes}the ABCs of Nuclear Science,{close_quotes} and experiments exploring the various kinds of radioactive decay, radioactivity in common household products, half-live measurements, radiography, etc. Teachers who join the project as chart field testers will receive a poster size chart and accompanying materials free of charge. The materials also include a video about cosmic rays has also been produced for the classroom.

  16. Interaction of gatifloxacin with efflux transporters: a possible mechanism for drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kwatra, Deep; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to screen the interactions of fourth generation fluoroquinolone-gatifloxacin with efflux pumps i.e. P-gp, MRP2 and BCRP. Mechanism of gatifloxacin interaction with efflux transporters may explain its acquired resistance. Such clarification may lead to the development of strategies to overcome efflux and enhance its bioavailability at target site. This process will aid in the reduction of dose volume, further eliminating the chances of systemic toxicity from topical gatifloxacin eye drops. MDCK cell lines transfected with the targeted efflux transporters were used for this study. [14C] Erythromycin was selected as a model substrate for P-gp and MRP2 whereas Hoechst 33342 was employed as a substrate for BCRP. Uptake and transport studies of these substrates were performed in the presence of gatifloxacin to delineate its interaction with efflux transporters. Further the efflux ratio in the presence of gatifloxacin was calculated from bidirectional transport studies. The concentration of [14C] erythromycin and Hoechst 33342 were measured using scintillation counter and fluorescence plate reader respectively. A concentration dependent inhibition effect in the presence of gatifloxacin was revealed on [14C] erythromycin uptake. The efflux ratio (BL-AP/AP-BL) of substrates was found to approach unity at higher gatifloxacin concentrations. Increased concentration of gatifloxacin did not elevate uptake of Hoechst 33342. All these studies were validated with known inhibitors as positive control. Uptake and transport studies support the hypothesis that gatifloxacin is a substrate for P-gp, MRP2 but not for BCRP. Possible interactions of gatifloxacin with P-gp and MRP2 may be a possible mechanism for acquired resistance of gatifloxacin. This information can be further extended to design prodrugs or formulations in order to prevent development of acquired resistance and improve therapeutic efficacy with its reduction in side effects. PMID:20573570

  17. Genomic potential for arsenic efflux and methylation varies among global Prochlorococcus populations.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Jaclyn K; Rocap, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    The globally significant picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is the main primary producer in oligotrophic subtropical gyres. When phosphate concentrations are very low in the marine environment, the mol:mol availability of phosphate relative to the chemically similar arsenate molecule is reduced, potentially resulting in increased cellular arsenic exposure. To mediate accidental arsenate uptake, some Prochlorococcus isolates contain genes encoding a full or partial efflux detoxification pathway, consisting of an arsenate reductase (arsC), an arsenite-specific efflux pump (acr3) and an arsenic-related repressive regulator (arsR). This efflux pathway was the only previously known arsenic detox pathway in Prochlorococcus. We have identified an additional putative arsenic mediation strategy in Prochlorococcus driven by the enzyme arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase (ArsM) which can convert inorganic arsenic into more innocuous organic forms and appears to be a more widespread mode of detoxification. We used a phylogenetically informed approach to identify Prochlorococcus linked arsenic genes from both pathways in the Global Ocean Sampling survey. The putative arsenic methylation pathway is nearly ubiquitously present in global Prochlorococcus populations. In contrast, the complete efflux pathway is only maintained in populations which experience extremely low PO4:AsO4, such as regions in the tropical and subtropical Atlantic. Thus, environmental exposure to arsenic appears to select for maintenance of the efflux detoxification pathway in Prochlorococcus. The differential distribution of these two pathways has implications for global arsenic cycling, as their associated end products, arsenite or organoarsenicals, have differing biochemical activities and residence times.

  18. Microbial Efflux Systems and Inhibitors: Approaches to Drug Discovery and the Challenge of Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Kourtesi, Christina; Ball, Anthony R; Huang, Ying-Ying; Jachak, Sanjay M; Vera, D Mariano A; Khondkar, Proma; Gibbons, Simon; Hamblin, Michael R; Tegos, George P

    2013-01-01

    Conventional antimicrobials are increasingly ineffective due to the emergence of multidrug-resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. The need to overcome these deficiencies has triggered exploration for novel and unconventional approaches to controlling microbial infections. Multidrug efflux systems (MES) have been a profound obstacle in the successful deployment of antimicrobials. The discovery of small molecule efflux system blockers has been an active and rapidly expanding research discipline. A major theme in this platform involves efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) from natural sources. The discovery methodologies and the available number of natural EPI-chemotypes are increasing. Advances in our understanding of microbial physiology have shed light on a series of pathways and phenotypes where the role of efflux systems is pivotal. Complementing existing antimicrobial discovery platforms such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) with efflux inhibition is a subject under investigation. This core information is a stepping stone in the challenge of highlighting an effective drug development path for EPIs since the puzzle of clinical implementation remains unsolved. This review summarizes advances in the path of EPI discovery, discusses potential avenues of EPI implementation and development, and underlines the need for highly informative and comprehensive translational approaches. PMID:23569468

  19. CO2 efflux along the trans-Alaska pipeline in snow-thawing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.

    2010-12-01

    This research was conducted to estimate CO2 efflux along the trans-Alaska pipeline (ca. 660 km) before and during the snow-thawing season (April 7 to 23) of 2010. The sampling sites are in white and black spruce forest soils, which cover more than 60% of Alaska’s terrestrial ecosystem. CO2 efflux was measured with a dynamic chamber system that consisted of a chamber (22 cm in diameter and 6 cm high), pump, NDIR (CO2 analyzer), and a laptop computer. Soil temperature and soil moisture were measured with a portable thermocouple and a soil moisture sensor. Remarkably, before and during the snow-thawing season, mean CO2 efflux between both seasons appeared to show the magnitude of an order. The efflux ranged from 21±4 mgCO2/m2/day near coastal tundra to 1670±240 mgCO2/m2/day in white spruce forest during the snow-thawing season. A relationship between mean CO2 efflux at each site and mean soil temperature at 5 cm below the surface along the trans-Alaska pipeline is a good exponential, which the equation is as follows: CO2 efflux = 885×exp(0.335×Ts) (R2=0.86; p<0.001). CO2 efflux in a white spruce forest during the snow-thawing season is measured in four directions from the bottom stem. The measurements show apparent differences of CO2 efflux between the exposed soil and the snow-covered soil in the four directions. This may be due to the fast decomposition of soil organic carbon and/or active root respiration in the exposed soil caused by strong radiation in the spring. The efflux increases in the order of east, south, west, and north at 60 cm from the stem. Although the snow-thawing period is relatively short, CO2 efflux during that season in white and black spruce forest soils of Alaska should not be overlooked.

  20. The ABC's of Cultural Understanding and Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Patricia R.

    1998-01-01

    Reports the impressions of 20 preservice and inservice teachers as they experienced the "ABC's of Cultural Understanding and Communication" model, a program to promote cultural sensitivity among teachers. Insights these teachers gained are discussed. (SLD)

  1. Snow-melting season CO2 efflux along the trans-Alaska pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Nakai, T.

    2011-12-01

    This research was conducted to estimate CO2 effluxes in exposed and snow-covered soils along the trans-Alaska pipeline (ca. 660 km) during snow-melting seasons of April 2010 and April-May 2011. In-situ CO2 efflux was measured with a dynamic chamber system that consisted of a chamber (22 cm in diameter and 6 cm high), pump, NDIR (CO2 analyzer), and a laptop computer. Soil temperature and snow depth were measured with a portable thermocouple and from snow pit-wall. The difference in snow-melting season CO2 efflux was remarkably showed in exposed and snow-covered soils of boreal forest and tundra, suggesting the distinctly latitudinal CO2 efflux gradient. Mean CO2 efflux was 0.88±0.51 and 2.4±3.4 gCO2-C/m2/day in soil temperature of -1.8±4.0 and -1.1±3.4 °C during the snow-melting period of 2010 and 2011, respectively. When the snow was disappeared, mean CO2 efflux was 1.3±0.3 and 5.4±3.7 gCO2-C/m2/day for 2010 and 2011; on the other hand, when the seasonal covered snow was melting, mean CO2 efflux was 0.2±0.2 and 0.3±0.3 gCO2-C/m2/day for both years. However, the coastal site near Arctic sea was not still melted, showing much lower CO2 efflux was 0.02±0.02 and 0.08±0.12 gCO2-C/m2/day in soil temperature of -12.4±2.2 and -12.9±3.4 °C for 2010 and 2011, respectively. A relationship between mean CO2 efflux at each site and mean soil temperature at 5 cm below the surface along the trans-Alaska pipeline is a good exponential, which the equation is as follows: CO2 efflux = 885×exp(0.335×Ts) (R2=0.86; p<0.001) and CO2 efflux = 888×exp(0.337×Ts) (R2=0.92; p<0.001) for 2010 and 2011, respectively. CO2 efflux in a white spruce forest during the snow-thawing season was measured in four directions from the bottom stem, suggesting that distinct differences of CO2 efflux between the exposed soil and the snow-covered soil in the four directions. This may be due to the fast decomposition of soil organic carbon and/or active root respiration in the exposed soil

  2. Spectinamides: A New Class of Semisynthetic Anti-Tuberculosis Agents that Overcome Native Drug Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Vaddady, Pavan K; Zheng, Zhong; Qi, Jianjun; Akbergenov, Rashid; Das, Sourav; Madhura, Dora B.; Rathi, Chetan; Trivedi, Ashit; Villellas, Cristina; Lee, Robin. B.; Rakesh; Waidyarachchi, Samanthi L.; Sun, Dianqing; McNeil, Michael R.; Ainsa, Jose A.; Boshoff, Helena I.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Although the classical antibiotic spectinomycin is a potent bacterial protein synthesis inhibitor, poor antimycobacterial activity limits its clinical application for treating tuberculosis. Using structure-based design, a novel semisynthetic series of spectinomycin analogs was generated with selective ribosomal inhibition and excellent narrow-spectrum antitubercular activity. In multiple murine infection models, these spectinamides were well tolerated, significantly reduced lung mycobacterial burden and increased survival. In vitro studies demonstrated a lack of cross-resistance with existing tuberculosis therapeutics, activity against MDR/XDR-tuberculosis, and an excellent pharmacological profile. Key to their potent antitubercular properties was their structural modification to evade the Rv1258c efflux pump, which is upregulated in MDR strains and is implicated in macrophage induced drug tolerance. The antitubercular efficacy of spectinamides demonstrates that synthetic modifications to classical antibiotics can overcome the challenge of intrinsic efflux pump-mediated resistance and expands opportunities for target based tuberculosis drug discovery. PMID:24464186

  3. ABCB1 and ABCC4 efflux transporters are involved in methyl parathion detoxification in ZFL cells.

    PubMed

    Nornberg, Bruna Félix; Batista, Carolina Reyes; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Trindade, Gilma Santos; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2015-02-01

    The multi-xenobiotics resistance (MXR) mechanisms are the first line of defense against toxic substances in aquatic organisms and present great importance in the adaptation related to contaminated environments. Methyl parathion (MP) is a widely used organophosphate pesticide, which has been associated to various toxic effects in organisms. In the present work, we studied the main genes related to efflux transporters in zebrafish liver (ZFL) cells exposed to MP with and without an inhibitor of ABC transporters (verapamil). The results concerning transporters activity showed that the MXR mechanism is activated to detoxify from methyl parathion. The toxic effects of MP on ZFL cells were increased in the presence of the efflux transporter inhibitor, once cell viability was significantly decreased in co-exposure experiments. The combined exposure to MP and the inhibitor caused an increase in gene expression of P-gp1 (Abcb1) and MRP4 (Abcc4), suggesting that these transporters isoforms are associated with MP efflux. In general, the expression of genes related to the antioxidant defense system (ADS) was significantly increased in ZFL cells co-exposed to MP and verapamil. These data provide useful insights for better understanding of MP detoxification mechanism in fish hepatocytes.

  4. Effect of biofilm formation by clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori on the efflux-mediated resistance to commonly used antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Attaran, Bahareh; Falsafi, Tahereh; Ghorbanmehr, Nassim

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of biofilm formation on the resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to commonly prescribed antibiotics, the expression rates of resistance genes in biofilm-forming and planktonic cells were compared. METHODS A collection of 33 H. pylori isolates from children and adult patients with chronic infection were taken for the present study. The isolates were screened for biofilm formation ability, as well as for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reaction with HP1165 and hp1165 efflux pump genes. Susceptibilities of the selected strains to antibiotic and differences between susceptibilities of planktonic and biofilm-forming cell populations were determined. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis was performed using 16S rRNA gene as a H. pylori-specific primer, and two efflux pumps-specific primers, hp1165 and hefA. RESULTS The strains were resistant to amoxicillin, metronidazole, and erythromycin, except for one strain, but they were all susceptible to tetracycline. Minimum bactericidal concentrations of antibiotics in the biofilm-forming cells were significantly higher than those of planktonic cells. qPCR demonstrated that the expression of efflux pump genes was significantly higher in the biofilm-forming cells as compared to the planktonic ones. CONCLUSION The present work demonstrated an association between H. pylori biofilm formation and decreased susceptibility to all the antibiotics tested. This decreased susceptibility to antibiotics was associated with enhanced functional activity of two efflux pumps: hp1165 and hefA. PMID:28275296

  5. Sialidase, chondroitinase ABC, and combination therapy after spinal cord contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Andrea; Zahner, Matthew R; Sturgill, Elizabeth R; Riley, Christopher J; Aston, Jeffrey W; Oudega, Martin; Schramm, Lawrence P; Hurtado, Andres; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2013-02-01

    Axon regeneration in the central nervous system is severely hampered, limiting functional recovery. This is in part because of endogenous axon regeneration inhibitors that accumulate at the injury site. Therapeutic targeting of these inhibitors and their receptors may facilitate axon outgrowth and enhance recovery. A rat model of spinal cord contusion injury was used to test the effects of two bacterial enzyme therapies that target independent axon regeneration inhibitors, sialidase (Vibrio cholerae) and chondroitinase ABC (ChABC, Proteus vulgaris). The two enzymes, individually and in combination, were infused for 2 weeks via implanted osmotic pumps to the site of a moderate thoracic spinal cord contusion injury. Sialidase was completely stable, whereas ChABC retained>30% of its activity in vivo over the 2 week infusion period. Immunohistochemistry revealed that infused sialidase acted robustly throughout the spinal cord gray and white matter, whereas ChABC activity was more intense superficially. Sialidase treatment alone resulted in improved behavioral and anatomical outcomes. Rats treated exclusively with sialidase showed significantly increased hindlimb motor function, evidenced by higher Basso Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) and BBB subscores, and fewer stepping errors on a horizontal ladder. Sialidase-treated rats also had increased serotonergic axons caudal to the injury. ChABC treatment, in contrast, did not enhance functional recovery or alter axon numbers after moderate spinal cord contusion injury, and dampened the response of sialidase in the dual enzyme treatment group. We conclude that sialidase infusion enhanced recovery from spinal cord contusion injury, and that combining sialidase with ChABC failed to improve outcomes.

  6. Comparison of Cytotoxicity and Inhibition of Membrane ABC Transporters Induced by MWCNTs with Different Length and Functional Groups.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Liu, Su; Wu, Bing; Shen, Zhuoyan; Cherr, Gary N; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Li, Mei

    2016-04-05

    Experimental studies indicate that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have the potential to induce cytotoxicity. However, the reports are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, adverse effects of MWCNTs at low concentration are not well understood. In this study, we systemically compared adverse effects of six MWCNTs including pristine MWCNTs, hydroxyl-MWCNTs and carboxyl-MWCNTs of two different lengths (0.5-2 μm and 10-30 μm) on human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Results showed that MWCNTs induced cytotoxicity by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and damaging cell function. Pristine short MWCNTs induced higher cytotoxicity than pristine long MWCNTs. Functionalization increased cytotoxicity of long MWCNTs, but reduced cytotoxicity of short MWCNTs. Further, our results indicated that the six MWCNTs, at nontoxic concentration, might not be environmentally safe as they inhibited ABC transporters' efflux capabilities. This inhibition was observed even at very low concentrations, which were 40-1000 times lower than their effective concentrations on cytotoxicity. The inhibition of ABC transporters significantly increased cytotoxicity of arsenic, a known substrate of ABC transporters, indicating a chemosensitizing effect of MWCNTs. Plasma membrane damage was likely the mechanism by which the six MWCNTs inhibited ABC transporter activity. This study provides insight into risk assessments of low levels of MWCNTs in the environment.

  7. Energy Metabolism and Drug Efflux in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Black, Philippa A.; Warren, Robin M.; Louw, Gail E.; van Helden, Paul D.; Victor, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent drug susceptibility of microorganisms is determined by multiple factors, including growth state, the rate of drug diffusion into and out of the cell, and the intrinsic vulnerability of drug targets with regard to the corresponding antimicrobial agent. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), remains a significant source of global morbidity and mortality, further exacerbated by its ability to readily evolve drug resistance. It is well accepted that drug resistance in M. tuberculosis is driven by the acquisition of chromosomal mutations in genes encoding drug targets/promoter regions; however, a comprehensive description of the molecular mechanisms that fuel drug resistance in the clinical setting is currently lacking. In this context, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that active extrusion of drugs from the cell is critical for drug tolerance. M. tuberculosis encodes representatives of a diverse range of multidrug transporters, many of which are dependent on the proton motive force (PMF) or the availability of ATP. This suggests that energy metabolism and ATP production through the PMF, which is established by the electron transport chain (ETC), are critical in determining the drug susceptibility of M. tuberculosis. In this review, we detail advances in the study of the mycobacterial ETC and highlight drugs that target various components of the ETC. We provide an overview of some of the efflux pumps present in M. tuberculosis and their association, if any, with drug transport and concomitant effects on drug resistance. The implications of inhibiting drug extrusion, through the use of efflux pump inhibitors, are also discussed. PMID:24614376

  8. Group X Secretory Phospholipase A2 Negatively Regulates ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression and cholesterol efflux in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shridas, Preetha; Bailey, William M; Gizard, Florence; Oslund, Rob C; Gelb, Michael H; Bruemmer, Dennis; Webb, Nancy R

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Group X secretory phospholipase A2 (GX sPLA2) potently hydrolyzes plasma membranes to generate lysophospholipids and free fatty acids and has been implicated in inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. Here we identify a novel role for GX sPLA2 in modulating ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression and hence macrophage cholesterol efflux. Methods and Results Overexpression or exogenous addition of GX sPLA2 significantly reduced ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in J774 macrophage-like cells, whereas GX sPLA2 deficiency in mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) was associated with enhanced expression. Altered ABC transporter expression led to reduced cholesterol efflux in GX sPLA2 overexpressing J774 cells, and increased efflux in GX sPLA2-deficient MPMs. Gene regulation was dependent on GX sPLA2 catalytic activity, mimicked by arachidonic acid, abrogated when LXRα/β expression was suppressed, and partially reversed by the LXR agonist T0901317. Reporter assays indicated that GX sPLA2 suppresses the ability of LXR to trans-activate its promoters through a mechanism involving the C-terminal portion of LXR spanning the ligand binding domain. Conclusions GX sPLA2 modulates gene expression in macrophages by generating lipolytic products that suppress LXR activation. GX sPLA2 may play a previously unrecognized role in atherosclerotic lipid accumulation by negatively regulating genes critical for cellular cholesterol efflux. PMID:20844270

  9. Expression of Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein 5 (MRP5) on Cornea and Its Role in Drug Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Karla, Pradeep K.; Quinn, Tim L.; Herndon, Betty L.; Thomas, Priscilla; Pal, Dhananjay

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Purpose The purpose of this manuscript is to investigate the presence of nucleoside/nucleotide efflux transporter in cornea and to evaluate the role in ocular drug efflux. Methods RT-PCR, immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis and immunostaining were employed to establish molecular presence of multidrug resistance associated protein 5 (MRP5) on cornea. Corneal efflux by MRP5 was studied with bis(POM)-PMEA and acyclovir using rabbit and human corneal epithelial cells along with MRP5 over expressing cells (MDCKII-MRP5). Ex vivo studies using excised rabbit cornea and in vivo ocular microdialysis in male New Zealand white rabbits were used to further evaluate the role of MRP5 in conferring ocular drug resistance. Results RT-PCR confirms the expression of MRP5 in both rabbit and human corneal epithelial cells along with MDCKII-MRP5 cells. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis using a rat (M511–54) monoclonal antibody that reacts with human epitope confirms the expression of MRP5 protein in human corneal epithelial cells and MDCKII-MRP5 cells. Immunostaining performed on human cornea indicates the localization of this efflux pump on both epithelium and endothelium. Efflux studies reveal that depletion of ATP decreased PMEA efflux significantly. MRP5 inhibitors also diminished PMEA and acyclovir efflux. However, depletion of glutathione did not alter efflux. MDR1 and MRP2 did not contribute to PMEA efflux. However, MRP2 is involved in acyclovir efflux while MDR1 do not participate in this process. TLC/autoradiography suggested the conversion of bis(POM)-PMEA to PMEA in rabbit and human corneal epithelial cells. Two well known antiglaucoma drugs, bimatoprost and latanoprost were rapidly effluxed by MRP5. Ex vivo study on intact rabbit corneas demonstrated accumulation of PMEA in cornea in the presence of ATP-depleting medium. In vivo ocular pharmacokinetics also revealed a significant increase in maximum aqueous humor

  10. An Arg-Gly-Asp peptide stimulates Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors through a novel mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K.; Duncan, R.; Hruska, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence on 45Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors. 45Ca(2+)-loaded osteoclast precursors were treated with GRGDSP (170 microM) for 10 min after 30 min of basal perfusion with a bicarbonate-containing buffer. GRGDSP significantly increased fractional efflux of Ca2+ from treated cells compared with vehicle-treated cells (P < 0.01) or cells treated with up to 200 micrograms/ml of a control peptide containing GRGESP. The effect of RGD was sustained for 15 min after the peptide was removed from the perfusate, but control levels of Ca2+ efflux returned by 1 h. The Ca2+ efflux effect of GRGDSP was most likely due to activation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) pump, as indicated by its inhibition with vanadate and a calmodulin antagonist, N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide, and the absence of an effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition. An inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases, N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide (0.1 mM), failed to inhibit GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux. However, genistein and herbimycin A, inhibitors of protein-tyrosine kinases, blocked Ca2+ efflux stimulated by GRGDSP. The results indicate that RGD sequences of matrix proteins may stimulate Ca2+ efflux from osteoclasts through activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux is mediated via the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  11. Contribution of Target Gene Mutations and Efflux to Decreased Susceptibility of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium to Fluoroquinolones and Other Antimicrobials▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Cui, Shenghui; McDermott, Patrick F.; Zhao, Shaohua; White, David G.; Paulsen, Ian; Meng, Jianghong

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in fluoroquinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica include target alterations and overexpression of efflux pumps. The present study evaluated the role of known and putative multidrug resistance efflux pumps and mutations in topoisomerase genes among laboratory-selected and naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains. Strains with ciprofloxacin MICs of 0.25, 4, 32, and 256 μg/ml were derived in vitro using serovar Typhimurium S21. These mutants also showed decreased susceptibility or resistance to many nonfluoroquinolone antimicrobials, including tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and several β-lactams. The expression of efflux pump genes acrA, acrB, acrE, acrF, emrB, emrD, and mdlB were substantially increased (≥2-fold) among the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants. Increased expression was also observed, but to a lesser extent, with three other putative efflux pumps: mdtB (yegN), mdtC (yegO), and emrA among mutants with ciprofloxacin MICs of ≥32 μg/ml. Deletion of acrAB or tolC in S21 and its fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants resulted in increased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and other tested antimicrobials. In naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant serovar Typhimurium strains, deletion of acrAB or tolC increased fluoroquinolone susceptibility 4-fold, whereas replacement of gyrA double mutations (S83F D87N) with wild-type gyrA increased susceptibility >500-fold. These results indicate that a combination of topoisomerase gene mutations, as well as enhanced antimicrobial efflux, plays a critical role in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in both laboratory-derived and naturally occurring quinolone-resistant serovar Typhimurium strains. PMID:17043131

  12. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND) efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putati