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Sample records for abc multidrug transporters

  1. Multidrug resistance in parasites: ABC transporters, P-glycoproteins and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Jones, P M; George, A M

    2005-04-30

    Parasitic diseases, caused by protozoa, helminths and arthropods, rank among the most important problems in human and veterinary medicine, and in agriculture, leading to debilitating sicknesses and loss of life. In the absence of vaccines and with the general failure of vector eradication programs, drugs are the main line of defence, but the newest drugs are being tracked by the emergence of resistance in parasites, sharing ominous parallels with multidrug resistance in bacterial pathogens. Any of a number of mechanisms will elicit a drug resistance phenotype in parasites, including: active efflux, reduced uptake, target modification, drug modification, drug sequestration, by-pass shunting, or substrate competition. The role of ABC transporters in parasitic multidrug resistance mechanisms is being subjected to more scrutiny, due in part to the established roles of certain ABC transporters in human diseases, and also to an increasing portfolio of ABC transporters from parasite genome sequencing projects. For example, over 100 ABC transporters have been identified in the Escherichia coli genome, but to date only about 65 in all parasitic genomes. Long established laboratory investigations are now being assisted by molecular biology, bioinformatics, and computational modelling, and it is in these areas that the role of ABC transporters in parasitic multidrug resistance mechanisms may be defined and put in perspective with that of other proteins. We discuss ABC transporters in parasites, and conclude with an example of molecular modelling that identifies a new interaction between the structural domains of a parasite P-glycoprotein.

  2. A Silent ABC Transporter Isolated from Streptomyces rochei F20 Induces Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.; Carbó, Lázaro; Cuesta, Trinidad; Vallín, Carlos; Malpartida, Francisco

    1998-01-01

    In the search for heterologous activators for actinorhodin production in Streptomyces lividans, 3.4 kb of DNA from Streptomyces rochei F20 (a streptothricin producer) were characterized. Subcloning experiments showed that the minimal DNA fragment required for activation was 0.4 kb in size. The activation is mediated by increasing the levels of transcription of the actII-ORF4 gene. Sequencing of the minimal activating fragment did not reveal any clues about its mechanism; nevertheless, it was shown to overlap the 3′ end of two convergent genes, one of whose translated products (ORF2) strongly resembles that of other genes belonging to the ABC transporter superfamily. Computer-assisted analysis of the 3.4-kb DNA sequence showed the 3′ terminus of an open reading frame (ORF), i.e., ORFA, and three complete ORFs (ORF1, ORF2, and ORFB). Searches in the databases with their respective gene products revealed similarities for ORF1 and ORF2 with ATP-binding proteins and transmembrane proteins, respectively, which are found in members of the ABC transporter superfamily. No similarities for ORFA and ORFB were found in the databases. Insertional inactivation of ORF1 and ORF2, their transcription analysis, and their cloning in heterologous hosts suggested that these genes were not expressed under our experimental conditions; however, cloning of ORF1 and ORF2 together (but not separately) under the control of an expressing promoter induced resistance to several chemically different drugs: oleandomycin, erythromycin, spiramycin, doxorubicin, and tetracycline. Thus, this genetic system, named msr, is a new bacterial multidrug ABC transporter. PMID:9696745

  3. ABC multidrug transporters: target for modulation of drug pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Béatrice; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2011-05-01

    Nine proteins of the ABC superfamily (P-glycoprotein, 7 MRPs and BCRP) are involved in multidrug transport. Being localised at the surface of endothelial or epithelial cells, they expel drugs back to the external medium (if located at the apical side [P-glycoprotein, BCRP, MRP2, MRP4 in the kidney]) or to the blood (if located at the basolateral side [MRP1, MRP3, MRP4, MRP5]), modulating thereby their absorption, distribution, and elimination. In the CNS, most transporters are oriented to expel drugs to the blood. Transporters also cooperate with Phase I/Phase II metabolism enzymes by eliminating drug metabolites. Their major features are (i) their capacity to recognize drugs belonging to unrelated pharmacological classes, and (ii) their redundancy, a single molecule being possibly substrate for different transporters. This ensures an efficient protection of the body against invasion by xenobiotics. Competition for transport is now characterized as a mechanism of interaction between co-administered drugs, one molecule limiting the transport of the other, potentially affecting bioavailability, distribution, and/or elimination. Again, this mechanism reinforces drug interactions mediated by cytochrome P450 inhibition, as many substrates of P-glycoprotein and CYP3A4 are common. Induction of the expression of genes coding for MDR transporters is another mechanism of drug interaction, which could affect all drug substrates of the up-regulated transporter. Overexpression of MDR transporters confers resistance to anticancer agents and other therapies. All together, these data justify why studying drug active transport should be part of the evaluation of new drugs, as recently recommended by the FDA.

  4. Application of fluorescent dye substrates for functional characterization of ABC multidrug transporters at a single cell level.

    PubMed

    Nerada, Zsuzsanna; Hegyi, Zoltán; Szepesi, Áron; Tóth, Szilárd; Hegedüs, Csilla; Várady, György; Matula, Zsolt; Homolya, László; Sarkadi, Balázs; Telbisz, Ágnes

    2016-09-01

    ABC multidrug transporters are key players in cancer multidrug resistance and in determining the ADME-Tox properties of drugs and xenobiotics. The most sensitive and specific detection of these transporters is based on functional assays. Assessment of the transporter-dependent reduction of cellular uptake of the fluorescent dyes, such as Hoechst 33342 (Ho) and more recently DyeCycle Violet (DCV), have been widely advocated for the characterization of both ABCB1 and ABCG2 multidrug transporters. Detailed comparison of these supravital DNA-binding dyes revealed that DCV is less toxic to ABCG2- and ABCB1-expressing cells than Ho. ATPase measurements imply that DCV and Ho are similarly handled by ABCB1, whereas ABCG2 seems to transport DVC more effectively. In addition, we have developed an image-based high content microscopy screening method for simultaneous in situ measurement of the cellular activity and expression of the ABCG2 multidrug transporter. We demonstrated the applicability of this method for identifying ABCG2-positive cells in heterogeneous cell population by a single dye uptake measurement. These results may promote multidrug transporter studies at a single cell level and allow the quantitative detection of clinically important drug-resistant sub-populations. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  5. Interaction of ABC multidrug transporters with anticancer protein kinase inhibitors: substrates and/or inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Csilla; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Szakács, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2009-05-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors (PKI) are becoming key agents in modern cancer chemotherapy, and combination of PKIs with classical chemotherapeutic drugs may help to overcome currently untreatable metastatic cancers. Since chemotherapy resistance is a recurrent problem, mechanisms of resistance should be clarified in order to help further drug development. Here we suggest that in addition to PKI resistance based on altered target structures, the active removal of these therapeutic agents by the MDR-ABC transporters should also be considered as a major cause of clinical resistance. We discuss the occurring systemic and cellular mechanisms, which may hamper PKI efficiency, and document the role of selected MDR-ABC transporters in these phenomena through their interactions with these anticancer agents. Moreover, we suggest that PKI interactions with ABC transporters may modulate overall drug metabolism, including the fate of diverse, chemically or target-wise unrelated drugs. These effects are based on multiple forms of MDR-ABC transporter interaction with PKIs, as these compounds may be both substrates and/or inhibitors of an ABC transporter. We propose that these interactions should be carefully considered in clinical application, and a combined MDR-ABC transporter and PKI effect may bring a major advantage in future drug development.

  6. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances multidrug resistance in breast cancer cell lines by translational regulation of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Theile, Dirk; Ruiz, María Laura; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-06-28

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women. Multidrug resistance due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a common cause of chemotherapy failure and disease recurrence. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen present in soybeans and hormone supplements. We investigated the effect of GNT on the expression and function of ABC transporters in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Results demonstrated an induction at the protein level of ABCC1 and ABCG2 and of ABCC1 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. MCF-7 cells showed a concomitant increase in doxorubicin and mitoxantrone efflux and resistance, dependent on ABCG2 activity. ABCC1 induction by GNT in MDA-MB-231 cells modified neither drug efflux nor chemoresistance due to simultaneous acute inhibition of the transporter activity by GNT. All inductions took place at the translational level, as no increment in mRNA was observed and protein increase was prevented by cycloheximide. miR-181a, already demonstrated to inhibit ABCG2 translation, was down-regulated by GNT, explaining translational induction. Effects were independent of classical estrogen receptors. Results suggest potential nutrient-drug interactions that could threaten chemotherapy efficacy, especially in ABCG2-expressing tumors treated with substrates of this transporter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [The ABC transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wawrzycka, Donata

    2011-01-01

    The ABC transporters (ATP Binding Cassette) compose one of the bigest protein family with the great medical, industrial and economical impact. They are found in all organism from bacteria to man. ABC proteins are responsible for resistance of microorganism to antibiotics and fungicides and multidrug resistance of cancer cells. Mutations in ABC transporters genes cause seriuos deseases like cystic fibrosis, adrenoleucodystrophy or ataxia. Transport catalized by ABC proteins is charged with energy from the ATP hydrolysis. The ABC superfamily contains transporters, canals, receptors. Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome allowed to distinguish 30 potential ABC proteins which are classified into 6 subfamilies. The structural and functional similarity of the yeast and human ABC proteins allowes to use the S. cerevisiae as a model organism for ABC transporters characterisation. In this work the present state of knowleadge on yeast S. cerevisiae ABC proteins was summarised.

  8. Stubborn contaminants: influence of detergents on the purity of the multidrug ABC transporter BmrA.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Benjamin; Kilburg, Arnaud; Chaptal, Vincent; Reyes-Mejia, Gina Catalina; Sarwan, Jonathan; Falson, Pierre; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in membrane proteins, their crystallization remains a major challenge. In the course of a crystallographic study on the multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporter BmrA, mass spectral analyses on samples purified with six selected detergents revealed unexpected protein contamination visible for the most part on overloaded SDS-PAGE. A major contamination from the outer membrane protein OmpF was detected in purifications with Foscholine 12 (FC12) but not with Lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO) or any of the maltose-based detergents. Consequently, in the FC12 purified BmrA, OmpF easily crystallized over BmrA in a new space group, and whose structure is reported here. We therefore devised an optimized protocol to eliminate OmpF during the FC12 purification of BmrA. On the other hand, an additional band visible at ∼110 kDa was detected in all samples purified with the maltose-based detergents. It contained AcrB that crystallized over BmrA despite its trace amounts. Highly pure BmrA preparations could be obtained using either a ΔacrAB E. coli strain and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside, or a classical E. coli strain and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol for the overexpression and purification, respectively. Overall our results urge to incorporate a proteomics-based purity analysis into quality control checks prior to commencing crystallization assays of membrane proteins that are notoriously arduous to crystallize. Moreover, the strategies developed here to selectively eliminate obstinate contaminants should be applicable to the purification of other membrane proteins overexpressed in E. coli.

  9. Stubborn Contaminants: Influence of Detergents on the Purity of the Multidrug ABC Transporter BmrA

    PubMed Central

    Chaptal, Vincent; Reyes-Mejia, Gina Catalina; Sarwan, Jonathan; Falson, Pierre; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in membrane proteins, their crystallization remains a major challenge. In the course of a crystallographic study on the multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporter BmrA, mass spectral analyses on samples purified with six selected detergents revealed unexpected protein contamination visible for the most part on overloaded SDS-PAGE. A major contamination from the outer membrane protein OmpF was detected in purifications with Foscholine 12 (FC12) but not with Lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO) or any of the maltose-based detergents. Consequently, in the FC12 purified BmrA, OmpF easily crystallized over BmrA in a new space group, and whose structure is reported here. We therefore devised an optimized protocol to eliminate OmpF during the FC12 purification of BmrA. On the other hand, an additional band visible at ∼110 kDa was detected in all samples purified with the maltose-based detergents. It contained AcrB that crystallized over BmrA despite its trace amounts. Highly pure BmrA preparations could be obtained using either a ΔacrAB E. coli strain and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside, or a classical E. coli strain and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol for the overexpression and purification, respectively. Overall our results urge to incorporate a proteomics-based purity analysis into quality control checks prior to commencing crystallization assays of membrane proteins that are notoriously arduous to crystallize. Moreover, the strategies developed here to selectively eliminate obstinate contaminants should be applicable to the purification of other membrane proteins overexpressed in E. coli. PMID:25517996

  10. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Dominik; Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, D-69120 Heidelberg; Daniel, Volker

    2010-04-16

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity ofmore » P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.« less

  11. Separating the roles of acropetal and basipetal auxin transport on gravitropism with mutations in two Arabidopsis multidrug resistance-like ABC transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel R; Miller, Nathan D; Splitt, Bessie L; Wu, Guosheng; Spalding, Edgar P

    2007-06-01

    Two Arabidopsis thaliana ABC transporter genes linked to auxin transport by various previous results were studied in a reverse-genetic fashion. Mutations in Multidrug Resistance-Like1 (MDR1) reduced acropetal auxin transport in roots by 80% without affecting basipetal transport. Conversely, mutations in MDR4 blocked 50% of basipetal transport without affecting acropetal transport. Developmental and auxin distribution phenotypes associated with these altered auxin flows were studied with a high-resolution morphometric system and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vertically grown mdr1 roots produced positive and negative curvatures threefold greater than the wild type, possibly due to abnormal auxin distribution observed in the elongation zone. However, upon 90 degrees reorientation, mdr1 gravitropism was inseparable from the wild type. Thus, acropetal auxin transport maintains straight growth but contributes surprisingly little to gravitropism. Conversely, vertically maintained mdr4 roots grew as straight as the wild type, but their gravitropism was enhanced. Upon reorientation, curvature in this mutant developed faster, was distributed more basally, and produced a greater total angle than the wild type. An amplified auxin asymmetry may explain the mdr4 hypertropism. Double mutant analysis indicated that the two auxin transport streams are more independent than interdependent. The hypothesis that flavanols regulate MDR-dependent auxin transport was supported by the epistatic relationship of mdr4 to the tt4 phenylpropanoid pathway mutation.

  12. The multidrug ABC transporter BmrC/BmrD of Bacillus subtilis is regulated via a ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Reilman, Ewoud; Mars, Ruben A. T.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Denham, Emma L.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of particular drug transporters in response to antibiotic pressure is a critical element in the development of bacterial multidrug resistance, and represents a serious concern for human health. To obtain a better understanding of underlying regulatory mechanisms, we have dissected the transcriptional activation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter BmrC/BmrD of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. By using promoter-GFP fusions and live cell array technology, we demonstrate a temporally controlled transcriptional activation of the bmrCD genes in response to antibiotics that target protein synthesis. Intriguingly, bmrCD expression only occurs during the late-exponential and stationary growth stages, irrespective of the timing of the antibiotic challenge. We show that this is due to tight transcriptional control by the transition state regulator AbrB. Moreover, our results show that the bmrCD genes are co-transcribed with bmrB (yheJ), a small open reading frame immediately upstream of bmrC that harbors three alternative stem-loop structures. These stem-loops are apparently crucial for antibiotic-induced bmrCD transcription. Importantly, the antibiotic-induced bmrCD expression requires translation of bmrB, which implies that BmrB serves as a regulatory leader peptide. Altogether, we demonstrate for the first time that a ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanism can control the expression of a multidrug ABC transporter. PMID:25217586

  13. Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), a “Multitasking” ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Susan P. C.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) encoded by ABCC1 was originally discovered as a cause of multidrug resistance in tumor cells. However, it is now clear that MRP1 serves a broader role than simply mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of drugs from cells. The antioxidant GSH and the pro-inflammatory cysteinyl leukotriene C4 have been identified as key physiological organic anions effluxed by MRP1, and an ever growing body of evidence indicates that additional lipid-derived mediators are also substrates of this transporter. As such, MRP1 is a multitasking transporter that likely influences the etiology and progression of a host of human diseases. PMID:25281745

  14. The multidrug ABC transporter BmrC/BmrD of Bacillus subtilis is regulated via a ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Reilman, Ewoud; Mars, Ruben A T; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Denham, Emma L

    2014-10-01

    Expression of particular drug transporters in response to antibiotic pressure is a critical element in the development of bacterial multidrug resistance, and represents a serious concern for human health. To obtain a better understanding of underlying regulatory mechanisms, we have dissected the transcriptional activation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter BmrC/BmrD of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. By using promoter-GFP fusions and live cell array technology, we demonstrate a temporally controlled transcriptional activation of the bmrCD genes in response to antibiotics that target protein synthesis. Intriguingly, bmrCD expression only occurs during the late-exponential and stationary growth stages, irrespective of the timing of the antibiotic challenge. We show that this is due to tight transcriptional control by the transition state regulator AbrB. Moreover, our results show that the bmrCD genes are co-transcribed with bmrB (yheJ), a small open reading frame immediately upstream of bmrC that harbors three alternative stem-loop structures. These stem-loops are apparently crucial for antibiotic-induced bmrCD transcription. Importantly, the antibiotic-induced bmrCD expression requires translation of bmrB, which implies that BmrB serves as a regulatory leader peptide. Altogether, we demonstrate for the first time that a ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanism can control the expression of a multidrug ABC transporter. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Increased expression of the yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter Pdr18 leads to increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production in high gravity alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The understanding of the molecular basis of yeast tolerance to ethanol may guide the design of rational strategies to increase process performance in industrial alcoholic fermentations. A set of 21 genes encoding multidrug transporters from the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Superfamily and Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) in S. cerevisiae were scrutinized for a role in ethanol stress resistance. Results A yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter encoded by the PDR18 gene, proposed to play a role in the incorporation of ergosterol in the yeast plasma membrane, was found to confer resistance to growth inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 expression was seen to contribute to decreased 3 H-ethanol intracellular concentrations and decreased plasma membrane permeabilization of yeast cells challenged with inhibitory ethanol concentrations. Given the increased tolerance to ethanol of cells expressing PDR18, the final concentration of ethanol produced during high gravity alcoholic fermentation by yeast cells devoid of PDR18 was lower than the final ethanol concentration produced by the corresponding parental strain. Moreover, an engineered yeast strain in which the PDR18 promoter was replaced in the genome by the stronger PDR5 promoter, leading to increased PDR18 mRNA levels during alcoholic fermentation, was able to attain a 6 % higher ethanol concentration and a 17 % higher ethanol production yield than the parental strain. The improved fermentative performance of yeast cells over-expressing PDR18 was found to correlate with their increased ethanol tolerance and ability to restrain plasma membrane permeabilization induced throughout high gravity fermentation. Conclusions PDR18 gene over-expression increases yeast ethanol tolerance and fermentation performance leading to the production of highly inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 overexpression in industrial yeast strains appears to be a promising approach to improve alcoholic

  16. The naphthoquinones, vitamin K3 and its structural analog plumbagin, are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ABC drug transporter ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Wu, Chung-Pu; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin K3 (Menadione; 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a structural precursor of vitamins K1 and K2 which are essential for blood clotting. The naturally occurring structural analog of this vitamin, plumbagin (5-hydroxy-menadione), is known to modulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, and radioresistance. We, here, report that both vitamin K3 and plumbagin are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter, ABCG2. Vitamin K3 and plumbagin specifically inhibited the ABCG2-mediated efflux of mitoxantrone, but did not have any effect on the ABCB1-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123. This inhibition of ABCG2 function was due to their interaction at the substrate-binding site(s). They inhibited the binding of [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP), a substrate of ABCG2, to this transporter in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 7.3 and 22.6 μM, respectively, but had no effect on the binding of this photoaffinity analog to ABCB1. Both compounds stimulated ABCG2-mediated ATP hydrolysis and also inhibited the mitoxantrone-stimulated ATPase activity of this transporter, but did not have any significant effect on the ATPase activity of ABCB1. In a cytotoxicity assay, ABCG2-expressing HEK cells were 2.8- and 2.3-fold resistant to plumbagin and vitamin K3, respectively, compared to the control cells, suggesting that they are substrates of this transporter. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time that vitamin K3 is a substrate of the ABCG2 transporter. Thus, ABCG2 may have a role in the regulation of vitamin K3 levels in the body. In addition, vitamin K3 and its structural derivative, plumbagin, could potentially be used to modulate ABCG2 function. PMID:18065489

  17. Catalytic and transport cycles of ABC exporters.

    PubMed

    Al-Shawi, Marwan K

    2011-09-07

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters are arguably the most important family of ATP-driven transporters in biology. Despite considerable effort and advances in determining the structures and physiology of these transporters, their fundamental molecular mechanisms remain elusive and highly controversial. How does ATP hydrolysis by ABC transporters drive their transport function? Part of the problem in answering this question appears to be a perceived need to formulate a universal mechanism. Although it has been generally hoped and assumed that the whole superfamily of ABC transporters would exhibit similar conserved mechanisms, this is proving not to be the case. Structural considerations alone suggest that there are three overall types of coupling mechanisms related to ABC exporters, small ABC importers and large ABC importers. Biochemical and biophysical characterization leads us to the conclusion that, even within these three classes, the catalytic and transport mechanisms are not fully conserved, but continue to evolve. ABC transporters also exhibit unusual characteristics not observed in other primary transporters, such as uncoupled basal ATPase activity, that severely complicate mechanistic studies by established methods. In this chapter, I review these issues as related to ABC exporters in particular. A consensus view has emerged that ABC exporters follow alternating-access switch transport mechanisms. However, some biochemical data suggest that alternating catalytic site transport mechanisms are more appropriate for fully symmetrical ABC exporters. Heterodimeric and asymmetrical ABC exporters appear to conform to simple alternating-access-type mechanisms.

  18. Comparison of mechanistic transport cycle models of ABC exporters.

    PubMed

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Rose-Sperling, Dania; Hellmich, Ute A; Stockner, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporters, ubiquitous in all kingdoms of life, carry out essential substrate transport reactions across cell membranes. Their transmembrane domains bind and translocate substrates and are connected to a pair of nucleotide binding domains, which bind and hydrolyze ATP to energize import or export of substrates. Over four decades of investigations into ABC transporters have revealed numerous details from atomic-level structural insights to their functional and physiological roles. Despite all these advances, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanistic principles of ABC transporter function remains elusive. The human multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1, also referred to as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), is one of the most intensively studied ABC exporters. Using ABCB1 as the reference point, we aim to compare the dominating mechanistic models of substrate transport and ATP hydrolysis for ABC exporters and to highlight the experimental and computational evidence in their support. In particular, we point out in silico studies that enhance and complement available biochemical data. "This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain." Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The interaction of gut microbes with host ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Lubo, Regino

    2010-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are increasingly recognized for their ability to modulate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, secretion and toxicity of xenobiotics. In addition to their essential function in drug resistance, there is also emerging evidence documenting the important role ABC transporters play in tissue defense. In this respect, the gastrointestinal tract represents a critical vanguard of defense against oral exposure of drugs while at the same time functions as a physical barrier between the lumenal contents (including bacteria) and the intestinal epithelium. Given emerging evidence suggesting that multidrug resistance protein (MDR) plays an important role in host-bacterial interactions in the gastrointestinal tract, this review will discuss the interplay between MDR of the intestinal epithelial cell barrier and gut microbes in health and disease. In particular, we will explore host-microbe interactions involving three apically restricted ABC transporters of the intestinal epithelium; P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR). PMID:21327038

  20. Evolutionary Trajectories of Entomopathogenic Fungi ABC Transporters.

    PubMed

    Baral, Bikash

    2017-01-01

    The ABC protein superfamily-also called traffic ATPases-are energy-dependent ubiquitous proteins, representing one of the crucial and the largest family in the fungal genomes. The ATP-binding cassette endows a characteristic 200-250 amino acids and is omnipresent in all organisms ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Unlike in bacteria with nutrient import functions, ABC transporters in fungal entomopathogens serve as effective efflux pumps that are largely involved in the shuttle of metabolites across the biological membranes. Thus, the search for ABC proteins may prove of immense importance in elucidating the functional and molecular mechanism at the host-pathogen (insect-fungus) interface. Their sequence homology, domain topology, and functional traits led to the actual identification of nine different families in fungal entomopathogens. Evolutionary relationships within the ABC superfamily are discussed, concentrating on computational approaches for comparative identification of ABC transporters in insect-pathogenic fungi (entomopathogens) with those of animals, plants, and their bacterial orthologs. Ancestors of some fungal candidates have duplicated extensively in some phyla, while others were lost in one lineage or the other, and predictions for the cause of their duplications and/or loss in some phyla are made. ABC transporters of fungal insect-pathogens serve both defensive and offensive functions effective against land-dwelling and ground foraging voracious insects. This study may help to unravel the molecular cascades of ABC proteins to illuminate the means through which insects cope with fungal infection and fungal-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiple molecular mechanisms for multidrug resistance transporters.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christopher F

    2007-04-12

    The acquisition of multidrug resistance is a serious impediment to improved healthcare. Multidrug resistance is most frequently due to active transporters that pump a broad spectrum of chemically distinct, cytotoxic molecules out of cells, including antibiotics, antimalarials, herbicides and cancer chemotherapeutics in humans. The paradigm multidrug transporter, mammalian P-glycoprotein, was identified 30 years ago. Nonetheless, success in overcoming or circumventing multidrug resistance in a clinical setting has been modest. Recent structural and biochemical data for several multidrug transporters now provide mechanistic insights into how they work. Organisms have evolved several elegant solutions to ridding the cell of such cytotoxic compounds. Answers are emerging to questions such as how multispecificity for different drugs is achieved, why multidrug resistance arises so readily, and what chance there is of devising a clinical solution.

  2. Sensitive and Specific Fluorescent Probes for Functional Analysis of the Three Major Types of Mammalian ABC Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, Irina V.; Pande, Praveen; Patton, Wayne F.

    2011-01-01

    An underlying mechanism for multi drug resistance (MDR) is up-regulation of the transmembrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins. ABC transporters also determine the general fate and effect of pharmaceutical agents in the body. The three major types of ABC transporters are MDR1 (P-gp, P-glycoprotein, ABCB1), MRP1/2 (ABCC1/2) and BCRP/MXR (ABCG2) proteins. Flow cytometry (FCM) allows determination of the functional expression levels of ABC transporters in live cells, but most dyes used as indicators (rhodamine 123, DiOC2(3), calcein-AM) have limited applicability as they do not detect all three major types of ABC transporters. Dyes with broad coverage (such as doxorubicin, daunorubicin and mitoxantrone) lack sensitivity due to overall dimness and thus may yield a significant percentage of false negative results. We describe two novel fluorescent probes that are substrates for all three common types of ABC transporters and can serve as indicators of MDR in flow cytometry assays using live cells. The probes exhibit fast internalization, favorable uptake/efflux kinetics and high sensitivity of MDR detection, as established by multidrug resistance activity factor (MAF) values and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical analysis. Used in combination with general or specific inhibitors of ABC transporters, both dyes readily identify functional efflux and are capable of detecting small levels of efflux as well as defining the type of multidrug resistance. The assay can be applied to the screening of putative modulators of ABC transporters, facilitating rapid, reproducible, specific and relatively simple functional detection of ABC transporter activity, and ready implementation on widely available instruments. PMID:21799851

  3. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; van Opstal, Edward J.; Alink, Gerrit M.; Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.

    2013-06-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size 45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size 50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  4. Diversity in ABC transporters: Type I, II and III importers

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Austin J.; Park, Aekyung

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are multi-subunit membrane pumps that transport substrates across membranes. While significant in the transport process, transporter architecture exhibits a range of diversity that we are only beginning to recognize. This divergence may provide insight into the mechanisms of substrate transport and homeostasis. Until recently, ABC importers have been classified into two types, but with the emergence of energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters there are potentially three types of ABC importers. In this review, we summarize an expansive body of research on the three types of importers with an emphasis on the basics that underlie ABC importers, such as structure, subunit composition and mechanism. PMID:25155087

  5. Harnessing Drug Resistance: Using ABC Transporter Proteins To Target Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Heather M.; Kachadourian, Remy; Day, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) class of proteins is one of the most functionally diverse transporter families found in biological systems. Although the abundance of ABC proteins varies between species, they are highly conserved in sequence and often demonstrate similar functions across prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Beginning with a brief summary of the events leading to our present day knowledge of ABC transporters, the purpose of this review is to discuss the potential for utilizing ABC transporters as a means for cellular glutathione (GSH) modulation. GSH is one of the most abundant thiol antioxidants in cells. It is involved in cellular division, protein and DNA synthesis, maintenance of cellular redox status and xenobiotic metabolism. Cellular GSH levels are often altered in many disease states including cancer. Over the past two decades there has been considerable emphasis on methods to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and ionization radiation therapy by GSH depletion. We contend that ABC transporters, particularly multi-drug resistant proteins (MRPs), may be used as therapeutic targets for applications aimed at modulation of GSH levels. This review will emphasize MRP-mediated modulation of intracellular GSH levels as a potential alternative and adjunctive approach for cancer therapy. PMID:17585883

  6. The mitochondrial transporter ABC-me (ABCB10), a downstream target of GATA-1, is essential for erythropoiesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hyde, B B; Liesa, M; Elorza, A A; Qiu, W; Haigh, S E; Richey, L; Mikkola, H K; Schlaeger, T M; Shirihai, O S

    2012-07-01

    The mitochondrial transporter ATP binding cassette mitochondrial erythroid (ABC-me/ABCB10) is highly induced during erythroid differentiation by GATA-1 and its overexpression increases hemoglobin production rates in vitro. However, the role of ABC-me in erythropoiesis in vivo is unknown. Here we report for the first time that erythrocyte development in mice requires ABC-me. ABC-me-/- mice die at day 12.5 of gestation, showing nearly complete eradication of primitive erythropoiesis and lack of hemoglobinized cells at day 10.5. ABC-me-/- erythroid cells fail to differentiate because they exhibit a marked increase in apoptosis, both in vivo and ex vivo. Erythroid precursors are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress and ABC-me in the heart and its yeast ortholog multidrug resistance-like 1 have been shown to protect against oxidative stress. Thus, we hypothesized that increased apoptosis in ABC-me-/- erythroid precursors was caused by oxidative stress. Within this context, ABC-me deletion causes an increase in mitochondrial superoxide production and protein carbonylation in erythroid precursors. Furthermore, treatment of ABC-me-/- erythroid progenitors with the mitochondrial antioxidant MnTBAP (superoxide dismutase 2 mimetic) supports survival, ex vivo differentiation and increased hemoglobin production. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that ABC-me is essential for erythropoiesis in vivo.

  7. The mitochondrial transporter ABC-me (ABCB10), a downstream target of GATA-1, is essential for erythropoiesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, B B; Liesa, M; Elorza, A A; Qiu, W; Haigh, S E; Richey, L; Mikkola, H K; Schlaeger, T M; Shirihai, O S

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial transporter ATP binding cassette mitochondrial erythroid (ABC-me/ABCB10) is highly induced during erythroid differentiation by GATA-1 and its overexpression increases hemoglobin production rates in vitro. However, the role of ABC-me in erythropoiesis in vivo is unknown. Here we report for the first time that erythrocyte development in mice requires ABC-me. ABC-me−/− mice die at day 12.5 of gestation, showing nearly complete eradication of primitive erythropoiesis and lack of hemoglobinized cells at day 10.5. ABC-me−/− erythroid cells fail to differentiate because they exhibit a marked increase in apoptosis, both in vivo and ex vivo. Erythroid precursors are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress and ABC-me in the heart and its yeast ortholog multidrug resistance-like 1 have been shown to protect against oxidative stress. Thus, we hypothesized that increased apoptosis in ABC-me−/− erythroid precursors was caused by oxidative stress. Within this context, ABC-me deletion causes an increase in mitochondrial superoxide production and protein carbonylation in erythroid precursors. Furthermore, treatment of ABC-me−/− erythroid progenitors with the mitochondrial antioxidant MnTBAP (superoxide dismutase 2 mimetic) supports survival, ex vivo differentiation and increased hemoglobin production. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that ABC-me is essential for erythropoiesis in vivo. PMID:22240895

  8. Placental ABC Transporters: Biological Impact and Pharmaceutical Significance.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anand A; Vaidya, Soniya S; St-Pierre, Marie V; Mikheev, Andrei M; Desino, Kelly E; Nyandege, Abner N; Audus, Kenneth L; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Gerk, Phillip M

    2016-12-01

    The human placenta fulfills a variety of essential functions during prenatal life. Several ABC transporters are expressed in the human placenta, where they play a role in the transport of endogenous compounds and may protect the fetus from exogenous compounds such as therapeutic agents, drugs of abuse, and other xenobiotics. To date, considerable progress has been made toward understanding ABC transporters in the placenta. Recent studies on the expression and functional activities are discussed. This review discusses the placental expression and functional roles of several members of ABC transporter subfamilies B, C, and G including MDR1/P-glycoprotein, the MRPs, and BCRP, respectively. Since placental ABC transporters modulate fetal exposure to various compounds, an understanding of their functional and regulatory mechanisms will lead to more optimal medication use when necessary in pregnancy.

  9. Placental ABC Transporters: Biological Impact and Pharmaceutical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anand A.; Vaidya, Soniya S.; St-Pierre, Marie V.; Mikheev, Andrei M.; Desino, Kelly E.; Nyandege, Abner N.; Audus, Kenneth L.; Unadkat, Jashvant D.; Gerk, Phillip M.

    2017-01-01

    The human placenta fulfills a variety of essential functions during prenatal life. Several ABC transporters are expressed in the human placenta, where they play a role in the transport of endogenous compounds and may protect the fetus from exogenous compounds such as therapeutic agents, drugs of abuse, and other xenobiotics. To date, considerable progress has been made toward understanding ABC transporters in the placenta. Recent studies on the expression and functional activities are discussed. This review discusses the placental expression and functional roles of several members of ABC transporter subfamilies B, C, and G including MDR1/P-glycoprotein, the MRPs, and BCRP, respectively. Since placental ABC transporters modulate fetal exposure to various compounds, an understanding of their functional and regulatory mechanisms will lead to more optimal medication use when necessary in pregnancy. PMID:27644937

  10. ABC-B transporter genes in Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed

    Bourguinat, Catherine; Che, Hua; Mani, Thangadurai; Keller, Kathy; Prichard, Roger K

    2016-08-01

    Dirofilaria immitis is a filarial nematode causing infection and heartworm disease in dogs and other canids, cats, and occasionally in humans. Prevention with macrocyclic lactones (ML) is recommended during the mosquito transmission season. Recently, ML resistance has been reported. ABC-B transporter genes are thought to be involved in the mechanism of ML resistance in other nematodes. This study aimed to identify all the ABC-B transporter genes in D. immitis using as a reference the nDi.2.2 D. immitis whole genome, which is not completely annotated. Using bioinformatic tools and PCR amplification on pooled D. immitis genomic DNA and on pooled cDNA, nine ABC transporter genes including one pseudogene were characterized. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses allowed identification of three P-glycoproteins (Pgps) (Dim-pgp-3 Dim-pgp-10, Dim-pgp-11), of two ABC-B half transporter genes (one ortholog of Cel-haf-4 and Cel-haf-9; and one ortholog of Cel-haf-1 and Cel-haf-3), of one ABC half transporter gene (ortholog of Cel-haf-5) that contained an ABC-C motif, and of one additional half transporter that would require functional study for characterization. The number of ABC-B transporter genes identified was lower than in Caenorhabditis elegans and Haemonchus contortus. Further studies are needed to understand their possible role in ML resistance in D. immitis. These ABC transporters constitute a base for ML resistance investigation in D. immitis and advance our understanding of the molecular biology of this parasite. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Multidrug efflux transporter, AcrB--the pumping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Satoshi

    2008-08-01

    Resistance nodulation cell division (RND) transporters are one of the main causes of the bacterial multidrug resistance. They pump a wide range of antibiotics out of the cell by proton motive force. AcrB is the major RND transporter in Escherichia coli. Recently, the crystal structures of AcrB have been determined by different space groups. All these structures are consistent with asymmetric trimer. Each monomer has different conformation corresponding to one of the three functional states of the transport cycle. Transporting hydrophobic drug was bound in the periplasmic domain on one of the three monomers. The transport pathway with alternating access mechanism is located at the hydrophilic domain protruded into the periplasmic space while this mechanism of other transporter families like ATP binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter is located in the membrane-embedded region. For the RND, protonation might also take place asymmetrically at the functionally important charged residues in the transmembrane (TM) region. The structures indicate that drugs are transported by a three-step functional rotation in which substrates undergo ordered binding change.

  12. Detergent-free purification of ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) transporters.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sonali; Jamshad, Mohammed; Knowles, Timothy J; Morrison, Kerrie A; Downing, Rebecca; Cant, Natasha; Collins, Richard; Koenderink, Jan B; Ford, Robert C; Overduin, Michael; Kerr, Ian D; Dafforn, Timothy R; Rothnie, Alice J

    2014-07-15

    ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) transporters carry out many vital functions and are involved in numerous diseases, but study of the structure and function of these proteins is often hampered by their large size and membrane location. Membrane protein purification usually utilizes detergents to solubilize the protein from the membrane, effectively removing it from its native lipid environment. Subsequently, lipids have to be added back and detergent removed to reconstitute the protein into a lipid bilayer. In the present study, we present the application of a new methodology for the extraction and purification of ABC transporters without the use of detergent, instead, using a copolymer, SMA (polystyrene-co-maleic acid). SMA inserts into a bilayer and assembles into discrete particles, essentially solubilizing the membrane into small discs of bilayer encircled by a polymer, termed SMALPs (SMA lipid particles). We show that this polymer can extract several eukaryotic ABC transporters, P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), MRP1 (multidrug-resistance protein 1; ABCC1), MRP4 (ABCC4), ABCG2 and CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator; ABCC7), from a range of different expression systems. The SMALP-encapsulated ABC transporters can be purified by affinity chromatography, and are able to bind ligands comparably with those in native membranes or detergent micelles. A greater degree of purity and enhanced stability is seen compared with detergent solubilization. The present study demonstrates that eukaryotic ABC transporters can be extracted and purified without ever being removed from their lipid bilayer environment, opening up a wide range of possibilities for the future study of their structure and function.

  13. Drug resistance-associated changes in sphingolipids and ABC transporters occur in different regions of membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, John W J; Klappe, Karin; van Riezen, Manon; Kok, Jan W

    2005-11-01

    We have recently shown that two ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are enriched in Lubrol-resistant noncaveolar membrane domains in multidrug-resistant human cancer cells [Hinrichs, J. W. J., K. Klappe, I. Hummel, and J. W. Kok. 2004. ATP-binding cassette transporters are enriched in non-caveolar detergent-insoluble glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane domains (DIGs) in human multidrug-resistant cancer cells. J. Biol. Chem. 279: 5734-5738]. Here, we show that aminophospholipids are relatively enriched in Lubrol-resistant membrane domains compared with Triton X-100-resistant membrane domains, whereas sphingolipids are relatively enriched in the latter. Moreover, Lubrol-resistant membrane domains contain more protein and lipid mass. Based on these results, we postulate a model for detergent-insoluble glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane domains consisting of a Lubrol-insoluble/Triton X-100-insoluble region and a Lubrol-insoluble/Triton X-100-soluble region. The latter region contains most of the ABC transporters as well as lipids known to be necessary for their efflux activity. Compared with drug-sensitive cells, the detergent-insoluble glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane domains (DIGs) in drug-resistant cells differ specifically in sphingolipid content and not in protein, phospholipid, or cholesterol content. In drug-resistant cells, sphingolipids with specific fatty acids (especially C24:1) are enriched in these membrane domains. Together, these data show that multidrug resistance-associated changes in both sphingolipids and ABC transporters occur in DIGs, but in different regions of these domains.

  14. The ABC of Biofilm Drug Tolerance: the MerR-Like Regulator BrlR Is an Activator of ABC Transport Systems, with PA1874-77 Contributing to the Tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms to Tobramycin.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Bandita; Sauer, Karin

    2018-02-01

    A hallmark of biofilms is their tolerance to killing by antimicrobial agents. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa , biofilm drug tolerance requires the c-di-GMP-responsive MerR transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm drug tolerance has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that BrlR activates the expression of at least 7 ABC transport systems, including the PA1874-PA1875-PA1876-PA1877 (PA1874-77) operon, with chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter region of PA1874-77. Insertional inactivation of the 7 ABC transport systems rendered P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms susceptible to tobramycin or norfloxacin. Susceptibility was linked to drug accumulation, with BrlR contributing to norfloxacin accumulation in a manner dependent on multidrug efflux pumps and the PA1874-77 ABC transport system. Inactivation of the respective ABC transport system, furthermore, eliminated the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by tobramycin but not norfloxacin, indicating that drug accumulation is not linked to biofilm drug tolerance. Our findings indicate for the first time that BrlR, a MerR-type transcriptional activator, activates genes encoding several ABC transport systems, in addition to multiple multidrug efflux pump genes. Moreover, our data confirm a BrlR target contributing to drug tolerance, likely countering the prevailing dogma that biofilm tolerance arises from a multiplicity of factors. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Structure of the MacAB-TolC ABC-type tripartite multidrug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Llabrés, Salomé; Neuberger, Arthur; Blaza, James N.; Bai, Xiao-chen; Okada, Ui; Murakami, Satoshi; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Zachariae, Ulrich; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Luisi, Ben F.

    2017-01-01

    The MacA-MacB-TolC assembly of Escherichia coli is a transmembrane machine that spans the cell envelope and actively extrudes substrates, including macrolide antibiotics and polypeptide virulence factors. These transport processes are energized by the ATPase MacB, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. We present an electron cryo-microscopy structure of the ABC-type tripartite assembly at near-atomic resolution. A hexamer of the periplasmic protein MacA bridges between a TolC trimer in the outer membrane and a MacB dimer in the inner membrane, generating a quaternary structure with a central channel for substrate translocation. A gating ring found in MacA is proposed to act as a one-way valve in substrate transport. The MacB structure features an atypical transmembrane domain (TMD) with a closely packed dimer interface and a periplasmic opening that is the likely portal for substrate entry from the periplasm, with subsequent displacement through an allosteric transport mechanism. PMID:28504659

  16. ABC Transporters Involved in Export of Cell Surface Glycoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Leslie; Kos, Veronica; Whitfield, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Complex glycoconjugates play critical roles in the biology of microorganisms. Despite the remarkable diversity in glycan structures and the bacteria that produce them, conserved themes are evident in the biosynthesis-export pathways. One of the primary pathways involves representatives of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. These proteins are responsible for the export of a wide variety of cell surface oligo- and polysaccharides in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Recent investigations of the structure and function of ABC transporters involved in the export of lipopolysaccharide O antigens have revealed two fundamentally different strategies for coupling glycan polymerization to export. These mechanisms are distinguished by the presence (or absence) of characteristic nonreducing terminal modifications on the export substrates, which serve as chain termination and/or export signals, and by the presence (or absence) of a discrete substrate-binding domain in the nucleotide-binding domain polypeptide of the ABC transporter. A bioinformatic survey examining ABC exporters from known oligo- and polysaccharide biosynthesis loci identifies conserved nucleotide-binding domain protein families that correlate well with themes in the structures and assembly of glycans. The familial relationships among the ABC exporters generate hypotheses concerning the biosynthesis of structurally diverse oligo- and polysaccharides, which play important roles in the biology of bacteria with different lifestyles. PMID:20805402

  17. ABC transporters affect the elimination and toxicity of CdTe quantum dots in liver and kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mingli; Yin, Huancai; Bai, Pengli

    This paper aimed to investigate the role of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters on the efflux and the toxicity of nanoparticles in liver and kidney cells. In this study, we synthesized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) that were monodispersed and emitted green fluorescence (maximum peak at 530 nm). Such QDs tended to accumulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2), human kidney cells 2 (HK-2), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and cause significant toxicity in all the three cell lines. Using specific inhibitors and inducers of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance associated proteins (Mrps), the cellular accumulation and subsequent toxicity ofmore » QDs in HepG2 and HK-2 cells were significantly affected, while only slight changes appeared in MDCK cells, corresponding well with the functional expressions of ABC transporters in cells. Moreover, treatment of QDs caused concentration- and time- dependent induction of ABC transporters in HepG2 and HK-2 cells, but such phenomenon was barely found in MDCK cells. Furthermore, the effects of CdTe QDs on ABC transporters were found to be greater than those of CdCl{sub 2} at equivalent concentrations of cadmium, indicating that the effects of QDs should be a combination of free Cd{sup 2+} and specific properties of QDs. Overall, these results indicated a strong dependence between the functional expressions of ABC transporters and the efflux of QDs, which could be an important reason for the modulation of QDs toxicity by ABC transporters. - Highlights: • ABC transporters contributed actively to the cellular efflux of CdTe quantum dots. • ABC transporters affected the cellular toxicity of CdTe quantum dots. • Treatment of CdTe quantum dots induced the gene expression of ABC transporters. • Free Cd{sup 2+} should be partially involved in the effects of QDs on ABC transporters. • Cellular efflux of quantum dots could be an important modulator for its toxicity.« less

  18. ABC transporters and immunity: mechanism of self-defense.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Andreas; Tampé, Robert

    2012-06-26

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is a prototype of an asymmetric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, which uses ATP binding and hydrolysis to translocate peptides from the cytosol to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here, we review molecular details of peptide binding and ATP binding and hydrolysis as well as the resulting allosteric cross-talk between the nucleotide-binding domains and the transmembrane domains that drive translocation of the solute across the ER membrane. We also discuss the general molecular architecture of ABC transporters and demonstrate the importance of structural and functional studies for a better understanding of the role of the noncanonical site of asymmetric ABC transporters. Several aspects of peptide binding and specificity illustrate details of peptide translocation by TAP. Furthermore, this ABC transporter forms the central part of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) peptide-loading machinery. Hence, TAP is confronted with a number of viral factors, which prevent antigen translocation and MHC I loading in virally infected cells. We review how these viral factors have been used as molecular tools to decipher mechanistic aspects of solute translocation and discuss how they can help in the structural analysis of TAP.

  19. Characterization and regulation of the resistance-nodulation-cell division-type multidrug efflux pumps MdtABC and MdtUVW from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge

    2014-07-11

    The Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of the devastating disease fire blight in rosaceous plants such as apple, pear, quince, raspberry, and cotoneaster. In order to survive and multiply in a host, microbes must be able to circumvent the toxic effects of antimicrobial plant compounds, such as flavonoids and tannins. E. amylovora uses multidrug efflux transporters that recognize and actively export toxic compounds out of the cells. Here, two heterotrimeric resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type multidrug efflux pumps, MdtABC and MdtUVW, from E. amylovora were identified. These RND systems are unusual in that they contain two different RND proteins forming a functional pump. To find the substrate specificities of the two efflux systems, we overexpressed the transporters in a hypersensitive mutant lacking the major RND pump AcrB. Both transporters mediated resistance to several flavonoids, fusidic acid and novobiocin. Additionally, MdtABC mediated resistance towards josamycin, bile salts and silver nitrate, and MdtUVW towards clotrimazole. The ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock was reduced. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression of the transporter genes was induced during infection of apple rootstock. The polyphenolic plant compound tannin, as well as the heavy metal salt tungstate was found to induce the expression of mdtABC. Finally, the expression of the mdtABC genes was shown to be regulated by BaeR, the response regulator of the two-component system BaeSR, a cell envelope stress response system that controls the adaptive responses to changes in the environment. The expression of MdtABC and MdtUVW is induced during growth of E. amylovora in planta. We identified the plant polyphenol tannin as inducer of mdtABC expression. The reduced ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock suggests that the efflux pumps are involved in

  20. Characterization and regulation of the Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-type multidrug efflux pumps MdtABC and MdtUVW from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of the devastating disease fire blight in rosaceous plants such as apple, pear, quince, raspberry, and cotoneaster. In order to survive and multiply in a host, microbes must be able to circumvent the toxic effects of antimicrobial plant compounds, such as flavonoids and tannins. E. amylovora uses multidrug efflux transporters that recognize and actively export toxic compounds out of the cells. Here, two heterotrimeric resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type multidrug efflux pumps, MdtABC and MdtUVW, from E. amylovora were identified. These RND systems are unusual in that they contain two different RND proteins forming a functional pump. Results To find the substrate specificities of the two efflux systems, we overexpressed the transporters in a hypersensitive mutant lacking the major RND pump AcrB. Both transporters mediated resistance to several flavonoids, fusidic acid and novobiocin. Additionally, MdtABC mediated resistance towards josamycin, bile salts and silver nitrate, and MdtUVW towards clotrimazole. The ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock was reduced. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression of the transporter genes was induced during infection of apple rootstock. The polyphenolic plant compound tannin, as well as the heavy metal salt tungstate was found to induce the expression of mdtABC. Finally, the expression of the mdtABC genes was shown to be regulated by BaeR, the response regulator of the two-component system BaeSR, a cell envelope stress response system that controls the adaptive responses to changes in the environment. Conclusions The expression of MdtABC and MdtUVW is induced during growth of E. amylovora in planta. We identified the plant polyphenol tannin as inducer of mdtABC expression. The reduced ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock suggests that the

  1. Pharmacogenomics of the human ABC transporter ABCG2: from functional evaluation to drug molecular design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Tamura, Ai; Saito, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    In the post-genome-sequencing era, emerging genomic technologies are shifting the paradigm for drug discovery and development. Nevertheless, drug discovery and development still remain high-risk and high-stakes ventures with long and costly timelines. Indeed, the attrition of drug candidates in preclinical and development stages is a major problem in drug design. For at least 30% of the candidates, this attrition is due to poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Thus, pharmaceutical companies have begun to seriously re-evaluate their current strategies of drug discovery and development. In that light, we propose that a transport mechanism-based design might help to create new, pharmacokinetically advantageous drugs, and as such should be considered an important component of drug design strategy. Performing enzyme- and/or cell-based drug transporter, interaction tests may greatly facilitate drug development and allow the prediction of drug-drug interactions. We recently developed methods for high-speed functional screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to study the substrate specificity of ABC transporters and to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms on their function. These methods would provide a practical tool to screen synthetic and natural compounds, and these data can be applied to the molecular design of new drugs. In this review article, we present an overview on the genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and new camptothecin analogues that can circumvent AGCG2-associated multidrug resistance of cancer.

  2. Interaction of the P-Glycoprotein Multidrug Transporter with Sterols.

    PubMed

    Clay, Adam T; Lu, Peihua; Sharom, Frances J

    2015-11-03

    The ABC transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) actively exports structurally diverse substrates from within the lipid bilayer, leading to multidrug resistance. Many aspects of Pgp function are altered by the phospholipid environment, but its interactions with sterols remain enigmatic. In this work, the functional interaction between purified Pgp and various sterols was investigated in detergent solution and proteoliposomes. Fluorescence studies showed that dehydroergosterol, cholestatrienol, and NBD-cholesterol interact intimately with Pgp, resulting in both quenching of protein Trp fluorescence and enhancement of sterol fluorescence. Kd values indicated binding affinities in the range of 3-9 μM. Collisional quenching experiments showed that Pgp-bound NBD-cholesterol was protected from the external milieu, resonance energy transfer was observed between Pgp Trp residues and the sterol, and the fluorescence emission of bound sterol was enhanced. These observations suggested an intimate interaction of bound sterols with the transporter at a protected nonpolar site. Cholesterol hemisuccinate altered the thermal unfolding of Pgp and greatly stabilized its basal ATPase activity in both a detergent solution and reconstituted proteoliposomes of certain phospholipids. Other sterols, including dehydroergosterol, did not stabilize the basal ATPase activity of detergent-solubilized Pgp, which suggests that this is not a generalized sterol effect. The phospholipid composition and cholesterol hemisuccinate content of Pgp proteoliposomes altered the basal ATPase and drug transport cycles differently. Sterols may interact with Pgp and modulate its structure and function by occupying part of the drug-binding pocket or by binding to putative consensus cholesterol-binding (CRAC/CARC) motifs located within the transmembrane domains.

  3. Multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporters are essential for hepatic development of Plasmodium sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Rijpma, Sanna R; van der Velden, Maarten; González-Pons, Maria; Annoura, Takeshi; van Schaijk, Ben C L; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Ramesar, Jai; Chevalley-Maurel, Severine; Ploemen, Ivo H; Khan, Shahid M; Franetich, Jean-Francois; Mazier, Dominique; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Serrano, Adelfa E; Russel, Frans G M; Janse, Chris J; Sauerwein, Robert W; Koenderink, Jan B; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) belong to the C-family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins and are known to transport a variety of physiologically important compounds and to be involved in the extrusion of pharmaceuticals. Rodent malaria parasites encode a single ABC transporter subfamily C protein, whereas human parasites encode two: MRP1 and MRP2. Although associated with drug resistance, their biological function and substrates remain unknown. To elucidate the role of MRP throughout the parasite life cycle, Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium falciparum mutants lacking MRP expression were generated. P. berghei mutants lacking expression of the single MRP as well as P. falciparum mutants lacking MRP1, MRP2 or both proteins have similar blood stage growth kinetics and drug-sensitivity profiles as wild type parasites. We show that MRP1-deficient parasites readily invade primary human hepatocytes and develop into mature liver stages. In contrast, both P. falciparum MRP2-deficient parasites and P. berghei mutants lacking MRP protein expression abort in mid to late liver stage development, failing to produce mature liver stages. The combined P. berghei and P. falciparum data are the first demonstration of a critical role of an ABC transporter during Plasmodium liver stage development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Structure of a Type-1 Secretion System ABC Transporter.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jacob L W; Acheson, Justin F; Zimmer, Jochen

    2017-03-07

    Type-1 secretion systems (T1SSs) represent a widespread mode of protein secretion across the cell envelope in Gram-negative bacteria. The T1SS is composed of an inner-membrane ABC transporter, a periplasmic membrane-fusion protein, and an outer-membrane porin. These three components assemble into a complex spanning both membranes and providing a conduit for the translocation of unfolded polypeptides. We show that ATP hydrolysis and assembly of the entire T1SS complex is necessary for protein secretion. Furthermore, we present a 3.15-Å crystal structure of AaPrtD, the ABC transporter found in the Aquifex aeolicus T1SS. The structure suggests a substrate entry window just above the transporter's nucleotide binding domains. In addition, highly kinked transmembrane helices, which frame a narrow channel not observed in canonical peptide transporters, are likely involved in substrate translocation. Overall, the AaPrtD structure supports a polypeptide transport mechanism distinct from alternating access. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of multidrug resistance and drug transport proteins on chemotherapy drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Helena; McCann, Andrew; Clynes, Martin; Larkin, Annemarie

    2015-05-01

    Chemotherapy involving the use of anticancer drugs remains an important strategy in the overall management of patients with metastatic cancer. Acquisition of multidrug resistance remains a major impediment to successful chemotherapy. Drug transporters in cell membranes and intracellular drug metabolizing enzymes contribute to the resistance phenotype and determine the pharmacokinetics of anticancer drugs in the body. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate the transport of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics including cytotoxic drugs out of cells. Solute carrier (SLC) transporters mediate the influx of cytotoxic drugs into cells. This review focuses on the substrate interaction of these transporters, on their biology and what role they play together with drug metabolizing enzymes in eliminating therapeutic drugs from cells. The majority of anticancer drugs are substrates for the ABC transporter and SLC transporter families. Together, these proteins have the ability to control the influx and the efflux of structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic drugs, thereby modulating the intracellular drug concentration. These interactions have important clinical implications for chemotherapy because ultimately they determine therapeutic efficacy, disease progression/relapse and the success or failure of patient treatment.

  6. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in caprine preantral follicles: gene and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Denise Damasceno; de Lima, Laritza Ferreira; Mbemya, Gildas Tetaping; Maside, Carolina Mielgo; Miranda, André Marrocos; Tavares, Kaio César Simiano; Alves, Benner Geraldo; Faustino, Luciana Rocha; Smitz, Johan; de Figueiredo, José Ricardo; Rodrigues, Ana Paula Ribeiro

    2018-06-01

    The multidrug resistance proteins ABCB1, ABCC2 and ABCG2 are an energy-dependent efflux pump that functions in systemic detoxification processes. Physiologically expressed in a variety of tissues, most abundantly in the liver and intestinal epithelia, placenta, blood-brain barrier and various stem cells, until now, these pumps were not identified in goat ovarian tissue. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze ABCB1, ABCC2, and ABCG2 mRNA and protein expression in goat preantral follicles. Fragments (3 × 3 × 1 mm) from five pairs of ovary (n = 10) obtained from five goat were collected and immediately submitted to qPCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence assay for mRNA detection and identification and localization of the ABC transporters, respectively. mRNA for ABCB1, ABCC2, and ABCG2 and the presence of their proteins were observed on ovarian tissue samples. Positive marks were observed for the three transport proteins in all follicular categories studied. However, the marks were primarily localized in the oocyte of primordial, transition and primary follicle categories. In conclusion, goat ovarian tissue expresses mRNA for the ABCB1, ABCC2 and ABCG2 transporters and the expression of these proteins in the preantral follicles is a follicle-dependent stage.

  7. Investigating the dynamic nature of the ABC transporters: ABCB1 and MsbA as examples for the potential synergies of MD theory and EPR applications.

    PubMed

    Stockner, Thomas; Mullen, Anna; MacMillan, Fraser

    2015-10-01

    ABC transporters are primary active transporters found in all kingdoms of life. Human multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1, or P-glycoprotein, has an extremely broad substrate spectrum and confers resistance against chemotherapy drug treatment in cancer cells. The bacterial ABC transporter MsbA is a lipid A flippase and a homolog to the human ABCB1 transporter, with which it partially shares its substrate spectrum. Crystal structures of MsbA and ABCB1 have been solved in multiple conformations, providing a glimpse into the possible conformational changes the transporter could be going through during the transport cycle. Crystal structures are inherently static, while a dynamic picture of the transporter in motion is needed for a complete understanding of transporter function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can provide structural information on ABC transporters, but the strength of these two methods lies in the potential to characterise the dynamic regime of these transporters. Information from the two methods is quite complementary. MD simulations provide an all atom dynamic picture of the time evolution of the molecular system, though with a narrow time window. EPR spectroscopy can probe structural, environmental and dynamic properties of the transporter in several time regimes, but only through the attachment sites of an exogenous spin label. In this review the synergistic effects that can be achieved by combining the two methods are highlighted, and a brief methodological background is also presented. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  8. Identification of ABC Transporter Genes of Fusarium graminearum with Roles in Azole Tolerance and/or Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Döll, Katharina; Karlovsky, Petr; Deising, Holger B.; Wirsel, Stefan G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a plant pathogen infecting several important cereals, resulting in substantial yield losses and mycotoxin contamination of the grain. Triazole fungicides are used to control diseases caused by this fungus on a worldwide scale. Our previous microarray study indicated that 15 ABC transporter genes were transcriptionally upregulated in response to tebuconazole treatment. Here, we deleted four ABC transporter genes in two genetic backgrounds of F. graminearum representing the DON (deoxynivalenol) and the NIV (nivalenol) trichothecene chemotypes. Deletion of FgABC3 and FgABC4 belonging to group I of ABC-G and to group V of ABC-C subfamilies of ABC transporters, respectively, considerably increased the sensitivity to the class I sterol biosynthesis inhibitors triazoles and fenarimol. Such effects were specific since they did not occur with any other fungicide class tested. Assessing the contribution of the four ABC transporters to virulence of F. graminearum revealed that, irrespective of their chemotypes, deletion mutants of FgABC1 (ABC-C subfamily group V) and FgABC3 were impeded in virulence on wheat, barley and maize. Phylogenetic context and analyses of mycotoxin production suggests that FgABC3 may encode a transporter protecting the fungus from host-derived antifungal molecules. In contrast, FgABC1 may encode a transporter responsible for the secretion of fungal secondary metabolites alleviating defence of the host. Our results show that ABC transporters play important and diverse roles in both fungicide resistance and pathogenesis of F. graminearum. PMID:24244413

  9. Overexpression of the ABC transporter AvtAB increases avermectin production in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jingfan; Zhuo, Ying; Zhu, Dongqing; Zhou, Xiufen; Zhang, Lixin; Bai, Linquan; Deng, Zixin

    2011-10-01

    Avermectins are 16-membered macrocyclic polyketides with potent antiparasitic activities, produced by Streptomyces avermitilis. Upstream of the avermectin biosynthetic gene cluster, there is the avtAB operon encoding the ABC transporter AvtAB, which is highly homologous to the mammalian multidrug efflux pump P-glycoprotein (Pgp). Inactivation of avtAB had no effect, but increasing the concentration of avtAB mRNA 30-500-fold, using a multi-copy plasmid in S. avermitilis, enhanced avermectin production about two-fold both in the wild-type and in a high-yield producer strain on agar plates. In liquid industrial fermentation medium, the overall productivity of avermectin B1a in the engineered high-yield producer was improved for about 50%, from 3.3 to 4.8 g/l. In liquid YMG medium, moreover, the ratio of intracellular to extracellular accumulation of avermectin B1a was dropped from 6:1 to 4.5:1 in response to multiple copies of avtAB. Additionally, the overexpression of avtAB did not cause any increased expression of the avermectin biosynthetic genes through RT-PCR analysis. We propose that the AvtAB transporter exports avermectin, and thus reduces the feedback inhibition on avermectin production inside the cell. This strategy may be useful for enhancing the production of other antibiotics.

  10. A new fluorescent dye accumulation assay for parallel measurements of the ABCG2, ABCB1 and ABCC1 multidrug transporter functions.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Edit; Türk, Dóra; Telbisz, Ágnes; Kucsma, Nóra; Horváth, Tamás; Szakács, Gergely; Homolya, László; Sarkadi, Balázs; Várady, György

    2018-01-01

    ABC multidrug transporters are key players in cancer multidrug resistance and in general xenobiotic elimination, thus their functional assays provide important tools for research and diagnostic applications. In this study we have examined the potential interactions of three key human ABC multidrug transporters with PhenGreen diacetate (PGD), a cell permeable fluorescent metal ion indicator. The non-fluorescent, hydrophobic PGD rapidly enters the cells and, after cleavage by cellular esterases, in the absence of quenching metal ions, PhenGreen (PG) becomes highly fluorescent. We found that in cells expressing functional ABCG2, ABCB1, or ABCC1 transporters, cellular PG fluorescence is strongly reduced. This fluorescence signal in the presence of specific transporter inhibitors is increased to the fluorescence levels in the control cells. Thus the PG accumulation assay is a new, unique tool for the parallel determination of the function of the ABCG2, ABCB1, and ABCC1 multidrug transporters. Since PG has very low cellular toxicity, the PG accumulation assay also allows the selection, separation and culturing of selected cell populations expressing either of these transporters.

  11. Effects of selected OATP and/or ABC transporter inhibitors on the brain and whole-body distribution of glyburide.

    PubMed

    Tournier, Nicolas; Saba, Wadad; Cisternino, Salvatore; Peyronneau, Marie-Anne; Damont, Annelaure; Goutal, Sébastien; Dubois, Albertine; Dollé, Frédéric; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Valette, Héric; Kuhnast, Bertrand; Bottlaender, Michel

    2013-10-01

    Glyburide (glibenclamide, GLB) is a widely prescribed antidiabetic with potential beneficial effects in central nervous system injury and diseases. In vitro studies show that GLB is a substrate of organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter families, which may influence GLB distribution and pharmacokinetics in vivo. In the present study, we used [(11)C]GLB positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to non-invasively observe the distribution of GLB at a non-saturating tracer dose in baboons. The role of OATP and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in [(11)C]GLB whole-body distribution, plasma kinetics, and metabolism was assessed using the OATP inhibitor rifampicin and the dual OATP/P-gp inhibitor cyclosporine. Finally, we used in situ brain perfusion in mice to pinpoint the effect of ABC transporters on GLB transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). PET revealed the critical role of OATP on liver [(11)C]GLB uptake and its subsequent impact on [(11)C]GLB metabolism and plasma clearance. OATP-mediated uptake also occurred in the myocardium and kidney parenchyma but not the brain. The inhibition of P-gp in addition to OATP did not further influence [(11)C]GLB tissue and plasma kinetics. At the BBB, the inhibition of both P-gp and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) was necessary to demonstrate the role of ABC transporters in limiting GLB brain uptake. This study demonstrates that GLB distribution, metabolism, and elimination are greatly dependent on OATP activity, the first step in GLB hepatic clearance. Conversely, P-gp, BCRP, and probably multidrug resistance protein 4 work in synergy to limit GLB brain uptake.

  12. ABC transporters are involved in defense against permethrin insecticide in the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Epis, Sara; Porretta, Daniele; Mastrantonio, Valentina; Comandatore, Francesco; Sassera, Davide; Rossi, Paolo; Cafarchia, Claudia; Otranto, Domenico; Favia, Guido; Genchi, Claudio; Bandi, Claudio; Urbanelli, Sandra

    2014-07-29

    Proteins from the ABC family (ATP-binding cassette) represent the largest known group of efflux pumps, responsible for transporting specific molecules across lipid membranes in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In arthropods they have been shown to play a role in insecticide defense/resistance. The presence of ABC transporters and their possible association with insecticide transport have not yet been investigated in the mosquito Anopheles stephensi, the major vector of human malaria in the Middle East and South Asian regions. Here we investigated the presence and role of ABCs in transport of permethrin insecticide in a susceptible strain of this mosquito species. To identify ABC transporter genes we obtained a transcriptome from untreated larvae of An. stephensi and then compared it with the annotated transcriptome of Anopheles gambiae. To analyse the association between ABC transporters and permethrin we conducted bioassays with permethrin alone and in combination with an ABC inhibitor, and then we investigated expression profiles of the identified genes in larvae exposed to permethrin. Bioassays showed an increased mortality of mosquitoes when permethrin was used in combination with the ABC-transporter inhibitor. Genes for ABC transporters were detected in the transcriptome, and five were selected (AnstABCB2, AnstABCB3, AnstABCB4, AnstABCmember6 and AnstABCG4). An increased expression in one of them (AnstABCG4) was observed in larvae exposed to the LD50 dose of permethrin. Contrary to what was found in other insect species, no up-regulation was observed in the AnstABCB genes. Our results show for the first time the involvement of ABC transporters in larval defense against permethrin in An. stephensi and, more in general, confirm the role of ABC transporters in insecticide defense. The differences observed with previous studies highlight the need of further research as, despite the growing number of studies on ABC transporters in insects, the

  13. Disulfide Cross-linking of a Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion Transporter Impacts Multidrug Efflux*

    PubMed Central

    Radchenko, Martha; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters contribute to multidrug resistance by extruding different drugs across cell membranes. The MATE transporters alternate between their extracellular and intracellular facing conformations to propel drug export, but how these structural changes occur is unclear. Here we combine site-specific cross-linking and functional studies to probe the movement of transmembrane helices in NorM from Neiserria gonorrheae (NorM-NG), a MATE transporter with known extracellular facing structure. We generated an active, cysteine-less NorM-NG and conducted pairwise cysteine mutagenesis on this variant. We found that copper phenanthroline catalyzed disulfide bond formation within five cysteine pairs and increased the electrophoretic mobility of the corresponding mutants. Furthermore, copper phenanthroline abolished the activity of the five paired cysteine mutants, suggesting that these substituted amino acids come in spatial proximity during transport, and the proximity changes are functionally indispensable. Our data also implied that the substrate-binding transmembrane helices move up to 10 Å in NorM-NG during transport and afforded distance restraints for modeling the intracellular facing transporter, thereby casting new light on the underlying mechanism. PMID:26975373

  14. Effect of β-elemene on the kinetics of intracellular transport of d-luciferin potassium salt (ABC substrate) in doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells and the associated molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chao-Yuan; Zhu, Li-Xin; Yu, Jian-Dong; Chen, Zhi; Gu, Man-Cang; Mu, Chao-Feng; Liu, Qi; Xiong, Yang

    2018-07-30

    In order to explore the mechanism of the reversing multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes by β-elemene (β-ELE) in doxorubicin (DOX)-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/DOX), both the functionality and quantity of the ABC transporters in MCF-7/DOX were studied. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was used to study the efflux of d-luciferin potassium salt, the substrate of ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters), in MCF-7/DOX cells treated by β-ELE. At the same time three major ABC transport proteins and genes-related MDR, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP, ABCC1) as well as breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) were analyzed by q-PCR and Western blot. To investigate the efflux functionality of ABC transporters, MCF-7/DOX Fluc cell line with stably-overexpressed luciferase was established. BLI was then used to real-time monitor the efflux kinetics of d-luciferin potassium salt before and after MCF-7/DOX Fluc cells being treated with β-ELE or not. The results showed that the efflux of d-luciferin potassium salt from MCF-7/DOX Fluc was lessened when pretreated with β-ELE, which means that β-ELE may dampen the functionality of ABC transporters, thus decrease the efflux of d-fluorescein potassium or other chemotherapies which also serve as the substrates of ABC transporters. As the effect of β-ELE on the expression of ABC transporters, the results of q-PCR and Western blot showed that gene and protein expression of ABC transporters such as P-gp, MRP, and BCRP were down-regulated after the treatment of β-ELE. To verify the efficacy of β-ELE on reversing MDR, MCF-7/DOX cells were treated with the combination of DOX and β-ELE. MTT assay showed that β-ELE increased the inhibitory effect of DOX on the proliferation of MCF-7/DOX, and the IC 50 of the combination group was much lower than that of the single DOX or β-ELE treatment. In all, β-ELE may reverse MDR through the substrates of ABC transporters

  15. Diversity of ABC transporter genes across the plant kingdom and their potential utility in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lane, Thomas S; Rempe, Caroline S; Davitt, Jack; Staton, Margaret E; Peng, Yanhui; Soltis, Douglas Edward; Melkonian, Michael; Deyholos, Michael; Leebens-Mack, James H; Chase, Mark; Rothfels, Carl J; Stevenson, Dennis; Graham, Sean W; Yu, Jun; Liu, Tao; Pires, J Chris; Edger, Patrick P; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Yinlong; Zhu, Ying; Carpenter, Eric; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Stewart, C Neal

    2016-05-31

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene superfamily is ubiquitous among extant organisms and prominently represented in plants. ABC transporters act to transport compounds across cellular membranes and are involved in a diverse range of biological processes. Thus, the applicability to biotechnology is vast, including cancer resistance in humans, drug resistance among vertebrates, and herbicide and other xenobiotic resistance in plants. In addition, plants appear to harbor the highest diversity of ABC transporter genes compared with any other group of organisms. This study applied transcriptome analysis to survey the kingdom-wide ABC transporter diversity in plants and suggest biotechnology applications of this diversity. We utilized sequence similarity-based informatics techniques to infer the identity of ABC transporter gene candidates from 1295 phylogenetically-diverse plant transcriptomes. A total of 97,149 putative (approximately 25 % were full-length) ABC transporter gene members were identified; each RNA-Seq library (plant sample) had 88 ± 30 gene members. As expected, simpler organisms, such as algae, had fewer unique members than vascular land plants. Differences were also noted in the richness of certain ABC transporter subfamilies. Land plants had more unique ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG transporter gene members on average (p < 0.005), and green algae, red algae, and bryophytes had significantly more ABCF transporter gene members (p < 0.005). Ferns had significantly fewer ABCA transporter gene members than all other plant groups (p < 0.005). We present a transcriptomic overview of ABC transporter gene members across all major plant groups. An increase in the number of gene family members present in the ABCB, ABCC, and ABCD transporter subfamilies may indicate an expansion of the ABC transporter superfamily among green land plants, which include all crop species. The striking difference between the number of ABCA subfamily transporter

  16. Genome-wide identification of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and their roles in response to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the copepod Paracyclopina nana.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Duck-Hyun; Kang, Hye-Min; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Hui-Su; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2017-02-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily is one of the largest gene families and is highly conserved in all domains. The ABC proteins play roles in several biological processes, including multi-xenobiotic resistance (MXR), by functioning as transporters in the cellular membrane. They also mediate the cellular efflux of a wide range of substrates against concentration gradients. In this study, 37 ABC genes belonging to eight distinct subfamilies were identified in the marine copepod Paracyclopina nana and annotated based on a phylogenetic analysis. Also, the functions of P-glycoproteins (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), conferring MXR, were verified using fluorescent substrates and specific inhibitors. The activities of MXR-mediated ABC proteins and their transcriptional level were examined in response to polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), main components of the water-accommodated fraction. This study increases the understanding of the protective role of MXR in response to PAHs over the comparative evolution of ABC gene families. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcriptome-Based Identification of ABC Transporters in the Western Tarnished Plant Bug Lygus hesperus

    PubMed Central

    Hull, J. Joe; Chaney, Kendrick; Geib, Scott M.; Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Brent, Colin S.; Walsh, Douglas; Lavine, Laura Corley

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a large superfamily of proteins that mediate diverse physiological functions by coupling ATP hydrolysis with substrate transport across lipid membranes. In insects, these proteins play roles in metabolism, development, eye pigmentation, and xenobiotic clearance. While ABC transporters have been extensively studied in vertebrates, less is known concerning this superfamily in insects, particularly hemipteran pests. We used RNA-Seq transcriptome sequencing to identify 65 putative ABC transporter sequences (including 36 full-length sequences) from the eight ABC subfamilies in the western tarnished plant bug (Lygus hesperus), a polyphagous agricultural pest. Phylogenetic analyses revealed clear orthologous relationships with ABC transporters linked to insecticide/xenobiotic clearance and indicated lineage specific expansion of the L. hesperus ABCG and ABCH subfamilies. The transcriptional profile of 13 LhABCs representative of the ABCA, ABCB, ABCC, ABCG, and ABCH subfamilies was examined across L. hesperus development and within sex-specific adult tissues. All of the transcripts were amplified from both reproductively immature and mature adults and all but LhABCA8 were expressed to some degree in eggs. Expression of LhABCA8 was spatially localized to the testis and temporally timed with male reproductive development, suggesting a potential role in sexual maturation and/or spermatozoa protection. Elevated expression of LhABCC5 in Malpighian tubules suggests a possible role in xenobiotic clearance. Our results provide the first transcriptome-wide analysis of ABC transporters in an agriculturally important hemipteran pest and, because ABC transporters are known to be important mediators of insecticidal resistance, will provide the basis for future biochemical and toxicological studies on the role of this protein family in insecticide resistance in Lygus species. PMID:25401762

  18. ABC Transporter Genes and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Schou, Jesper; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Møller, Holger J.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Alterations of pancreatic β-cell cholesterol content may contribute to β-cell dysfunction. Two important determinants of intracellular cholesterol content are the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters A1 (ABCA1) and -G1 (ABCG1). Whether genetic variation in ABCA1 and ABCG1 predicts risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population is unknown. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We tested whether genetic variation in the promoter and coding regions of ABCA1 and ABCG1 predicted risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population. Twenty-seven variants, identified by previous resequencing of both genes, were genotyped in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS) (n = 10,185). Two loss-of-function mutations (ABCA1 N1800H and ABCG1 g.-376C>T) (n = 322) and a common variant (ABCG1 g.-530A>G) were further genotyped in the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS) (n = 30,415). RESULTS Only one of the variants examined, ABCG1 g.-530A>G, predicted a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in the CCHS (P for trend = 0.05). Furthermore, when validated in the CGPS or in the CCHS and CGPS combined (n = 40,600), neither the two loss-of-function mutations (ABCA1 N1800H, ABCG1 g.-376C>T) nor ABCG1 g.-530A>G were associated with type 2 diabetes (P values >0.57 and >0.30, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Genetic variations in ABCA1 and ABCG1 were not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population. These data were obtained in general population samples harboring the largest number of heterozygotes for loss-of-function mutations in ABCA1 and ABCG1. PMID:23139370

  19. A PhoPQ-Regulated ABC Transporter System Exports Tetracycline in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Duan, Kangmin

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important human pathogen whose infections are difficult to treat due to its high intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Here, we show that the disruption of PA4456, encoding the ATP binding component of a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, increased the bacterium's susceptible to tetracycline and other antibiotics or toxic chemicals. Fluorescence spectroscopy and antibiotic accumulation tests showed that the interruption of the ABC transporter caused increased intracellular accumulation of tetracycline, demonstrating a role of the ABC transporter in tetracycline expulsion. Site-directed mutagenesis proved that the conserved residues of E170 in the Walker B motif and H203 in the H-loop, which are important for ATP hydrolysis, were essential for the function of PA4456. Through a genome-wide search, the PhoPQ two-component system was identified as a regulator of the computationally predicted PA4456-4452 operon that encodes the ABC transporter system. A >5-fold increase of the expression of this operon was observed in the phoQ mutant. The results obtained also show that the expression of the phzA1B1C1D1E1 operon and the production of pyocyanin were significantly higher in the ABC transporter mutant, signifying a connection between the ABC transporter and pyocyanin production. These results indicated that the PhoPQ-regulated ABC transporter is associated with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and other adverse compounds in P. aeruginosa, probably by extruding them out of the cell. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Transcriptomic insights on the ABC transporter gene family in the salmon louse Caligus rogercresseyi.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Sturm, Armin; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2015-04-09

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family encode for membrane proteins involved in the transport of various biomolecules through the cellular membrane. These proteins have been identified in all taxa and present important physiological functions, including the process of insecticide detoxification in arthropods. For that reason the ectoparasite Caligus rogercresseyi represents a model species for understanding the molecular underpinnings involved in insecticide drug resistance. llumina sequencing was performed using sea lice exposed to 2 and 3 ppb of deltamethrin and azamethiphos. Contigs obtained from de novo assembly were annotated by Blastx. RNA-Seq analysis was performed and validated by qPCR analysis. From the transcriptome database of C. rogercresseyi, 57 putative members of ABC protein sequences were identified and phylogenetically classified into the eight subfamilies described for ABC transporters in arthropods. Transcriptomic profiles for ABC proteins subfamilies were evaluated throughout C. rogercresseyi development. Moreover, RNA-Seq analysis was performed for adult male and female salmon lice exposed to the delousing drugs azamethiphos and deltamethrin. High transcript levels of the ABCB and ABCC subfamilies were evidenced. Furthermore, SNPs mining was carried out for the ABC proteins sequences, revealing pivotal genomic information. The present study gives a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of ABC proteins from C. rogercresseyi, providing relevant information about transporter roles during ontogeny and in relation to delousing drug responses in salmon lice. This genomic information represents a valuable tool for pest management in the Chilean salmon aquaculture industry.

  1. Dimeric isoxazolyl-1,4-dihydropyridines have enhanced binding at the multi-drug resistance transporter.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Scott A; Li, Chun; Backos, Donald S; Reigan, Philip; Natale, N R

    2017-06-15

    A series of dimeric isoxazolyl-1,4-dihydropyridines (IDHPs) were prepared by click chemistry and examined for their ability to bind the multi-drug resistance transporter (MDR-1), a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily (ABC). Eight compounds in the present study exhibited single digit micromolar binding to this efflux transporter. One monomeric IDHP m-Br-1c, possessed submicromolar binding of 510nM at MDR-1. Three of the dimeric IDHPs possessed <1.5µM activity, and 4b and 4c were observed to have superior binding selectivity compared to their corresponding monomers verses the voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC). The dimer with the best combination of activity and selectivity for MDR-1 was analog 4c containing an m-Br phenyl moiety in the 3-position of the isoxazole, and a tether with five ethyleneoxy units, referred to herein as Isoxaquidar. Two important controls, mono-triazole 5 and pyridine 6, also were examined, indicating that the triazole - incorporated as part of the click assembly as a spacer - contributes to MDR-1 binding. Compounds were also assayed at the allosteric site of the mGluR5 receptor, as a GPCR 7TM control, indicating that the p-Br IDHPs 4d, 4e and 4f with tethers of from n=2 to 5 ethylenedioxy units, had sub-micromolar affinities with 4d being the most efficacious at 193nM at mGluR5. The results are interpreted using a docking study using a human ABC as our current working hypothesis, and suggest that the distinct SARs emerging for these three divergent classes of biomolecular targets may be tunable, and amenable to the development of further selectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transcriptome-based identification of ABC transporters in the western tarnished plant bug lygus hesperus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a large superfamily of proteins that mediate diverse physiological functions by coupling ATP hydrolysis with substrate transport across lipid membranes. In insects, these proteins play roles in metabolism, development, eye pigmentation, and xenobiotic cle...

  3. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters: expression and clinical value in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Dréan, Antonin; Rosenberg, Shai; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Goli, Larissa; Nadaradjane, Aravindan Arun; Guehennec, Jérémy; Schmitt, Charlotte; Verreault, Maïté; Bielle, Franck; Mokhtari, Karima; Sanson, Marc; Carpentier, Alexandre; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2018-03-08

    ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters) regulate traffic of multiple compounds, including chemotherapeutic agents, through biological membranes. They are expressed by multiple cell types and have been implicated in the drug resistance of some cancer cells. Despite significant research in ABC transporters in the context of many diseases, little is known about their expression and clinical value in glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed expression of 49 ABC transporters in both commercial and patient-derived GBM cell lines as well as from 51 human GBM tumor biopsies. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort as a training dataset and our cohort as a validation dataset, we also investigated the prognostic value of these ABC transporters in newly diagnosed GBM patients, treated with the standard of care. In contrast to commercial GBM cell lines, GBM-patient derived cell lines (PDCL), grown as neurospheres in a serum-free medium, express ABC transporters similarly to parental tumors. Serum appeared to slightly increase resistance to temozolomide correlating with a tendency for an increased expression of ABCB1. Some differences were observed mainly due to expression of ABC transporters by microenvironmental cells. Together, our data suggest that the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents may be misestimated in vitro if they are the targets of efflux pumps whose expression can be modulated by serum. Interestingly, several ABC transporters have prognostic value in the TCGA dataset. In our cohort of 51 GBM patients treated with radiation therapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide, ABCA13 overexpression is associated with a decreased progression free survival in univariate (p < 0.01) and multivariate analyses including MGMT promoter methylation (p = 0.05) suggesting reduced sensitivity to temozolomide in ABCA13 overexpressing GBM. Expression of ABC transporters is: (i) detected in GBM and microenvironmental cells and (ii) better reproduced in GBM

  4. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Knudsen, Lina Almind; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Holmskov, Uffe; Stensballe, Allan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in colonic pathophysiology as they had recently been related to colorectal cancer (CRC) development. METHODS: Literature search was conducted on PubMed using combinations of the following terms: ABC transporters, ATP binding cassette transporter proteins, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative, colitis, Crohns disease, colorectal cancer, colitis, intestinal inflammation, intestinal carcinogenesis, ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp/CD243/MDR1), ABCC2/multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), Abcb1/Mdr1a, abcc2/Mrp2, abcg2/Bcrp, knock-out mice, tight junction, membrane lipid function. RESULTS: Recently, human studies reported that changes in the levels of ABC transporters were early events in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence leading to CRC. A link between ABCB1, high fat diet and gut microbes in relation to colitis was suggested by the animal studies. The finding that colitis was preceded by altered gut bacterial composition suggests that deletion of Abcb1 leads to fundamental changes of host-microbiota interaction. Also, high fat diet increases the frequency and severity of colitis in specific pathogen-free Abcb1 KO mice. The Abcb1 KO mice might thus serve as a model in which diet/environmental factors and microbes may be controlled and investigated in relation to intestinal inflammation. Potential molecular mechanisms include defective transport of inflammatory mediators and/or phospholipid translocation from one side to the other of the cell membrane lipid bilayer by ABC transporters affecting inflammatory response and/or function of tight junctions, phagocytosis and vesicle trafficking. Also, diet and microbes give rise to molecules which are potential substrates for the ABC transporters and which may additionally affect ABC transporter function through nuclear receptors and transcriptional regulation. Another critical role of ABCB1 was suggested by the finding that

  5. Secondary Metabolites from Plants Inhibiting ABC Transporters and Reversing Resistance of Cancer Cells and Microbes to Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Ashour, Mohamed L.; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Fungal, bacterial, and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial, or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: (1) Activation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, (2) Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidize lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulfate, or amino acids, and (3) Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarizes the evidence that secondary metabolites (SM) of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics, and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids [monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins), steroids (including cardiac glycosides), and tetraterpenes] but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids) function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, multiple resistance-associated protein 1, and Breast cancer resistance protein in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA) and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones) directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse multidrug resistance, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these SM are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion. PMID:22536197

  6. ABC transporter activity linked to radiation resistance and molecular subtype in pediatric medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to radiation treatment remains a major clinical problem for patients with brain cancer. Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, and occurs in the cerebellum. Though radiation treatment has been critical in increasing survival rates in recent decades, the presence of resistant cells in a substantial number of medulloblastoma patients leads to relapse and death. Methods Using the established medulloblastoma cell lines UW228 and Daoy, we developed a novel model system to enrich for and study radiation tolerant cells early after radiation exposure. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, dead cells and cells that had initiated apoptosis were removed, allowing surviving cells to be investigated before extensive proliferation took place. Results Isolated surviving cells were tumorigenic in vivo and displayed elevated levels of ABCG2, an ABC transporter linked to stem cell behavior and drug resistance. Further investigation showed another family member, ABCA1, was also elevated in surviving cells in these lines, as well as in early passage cultures from pediatric medulloblastoma patients. We discovered that the multi-ABC transporter inhibitors verapamil and reserpine sensitized cells from particular patients to radiation, suggesting that ABC transporters have a functional role in cellular radiation protection. Additionally, verapamil had an intrinsic anti-proliferative effect, with transient exposure in vitro slowing subsequent in vivo tumor formation. When expression of key ABC transporter genes was assessed in medulloblastoma tissue from 34 patients, levels were frequently elevated compared with normal cerebellum. Analysis of microarray data from independent cohorts (n = 428 patients) showed expression of a number of ABC transporters to be strongly correlated with certain medulloblastoma subtypes, which in turn are associated with clinical outcome. Conclusions ABC transporter inhibitors are already being

  7. Purification of a Multidrug Resistance Transporter for Crystallization Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Kamela O.; Law, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization of integral membrane proteins is a challenging field and much effort has been invested in optimizing the overexpression and purification steps needed to obtain milligram amounts of pure, stable, monodisperse protein sample for crystallography studies. Our current work involves the structural and functional characterization of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance transporter MdtM, a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Here we present a protocol for isolation of MdtM to increase yields of recombinant protein to the milligram quantities necessary for pursuit of structural studies using X-ray crystallography. Purification of MdtM was enhanced by introduction of an elongated His-tag, followed by identification and subsequent removal of chaperonin contamination. For crystallization trials of MdtM, detergent screening using size exclusion chromatography determined that decylmaltoside (DM) was the shortest-chain detergent that maintained the protein in a stable, monodispersed state. Crystallization trials of MdtM performed using the hanging-drop diffusion method with commercially available crystallization screens yielded 3D protein crystals under several different conditions. We contend that the purification protocol described here may be employed for production of high-quality protein of other multidrug efflux members of the MFS, a ubiquitous, physiologically and clinically important class of membrane transporters. PMID:27025617

  8. ABCdb: an online resource for ABC transporter repertories from sequenced archaeal and bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Fichant, Gwennaele; Basse, Marie-Jeanne; Quentin, Yves

    2006-03-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are one of the major classes of active transporters. They are widespread in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, indicating that they have arisen early in evolution. They are involved in many essential physiological processes, but the majority import or export a wide variety of compounds across cellular membranes. These systems share a common architecture composed of four (exporters) or five (importers) domains. To identify and reconstruct functional ABC transporters encoded by archaeal and bacterial genomes, we have developed a bioinformatic strategy. Cross-reference to the transport classification system is used to predict the type of compound transported. A high quality of annotation is achieved by manual verification of the predictions. However, in order to face the rapid increase in the number of published genomes, we also include analyses of genomes issuing directly from the automated strategy. Querying the database (http://www-abcdb.biotoul.fr) allows to easily retrieve ABC transporter repertories and related data. Additional query tools have been developed for the analysis of the ABC family from both functional and evolutionary perspectives.

  9. Virtual screening of ABCC1 transporter nucleotidebinding domains as a therapeutic target in multidrug resistant cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rungsardthong, Kanin; Mares- Sámano, Sergio; Penny, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    ABCC1 is a member of the ATP-binding Cassette super family of transporters, actively effluxes xenobiotics from cells. Clinically, ABCC1 expression is linked to cancer multidrug resistance. Substrate efflux is energised by ATP binding and hydrolysis at the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) and inhibition of these events may help combat drug resistance. The aim of this study is to identify potential inhibitors of ABCC1 through virtual screening of National Cancer Institute (NCI) compounds. A threedimensional model of ABCC1 NBD2 was generated using MODELLER whilst the X-ray crystal structure of ABCC1 NBD1 was retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. A pharmacophore hypothesis was generated based on flavonoids known to bind at the NBDs using PHASE, and used to screen the NCI database. GLIDE was employed in molecular docking studies for all hit compounds identified by pharmacophore screening. The best potential inhibitors were identified as compounds possessing predicted binding affinities greater than ATP. Approximately 5% (13/265) of the hit compounds possessed lower docking scores than ATP in ABCC1 NBD1 (NSC93033, NSC662377, NSC319661, NSC333748, NSC683893, NSC226639, NSC94231, NSC55979, NSC169121, NSC166574, NSC73380, NSC127738, NSC115534), whereas approximately 7% (7/104) of docked NCI compounds were predicted to possess lower docking scores than ATP in ABCC1 NBD2 (NSC91789, NSC529483, NSC211168, NSC318214, NSC116519, NSC372332, NSC526974). Analyses of docking orientations revealed P-loop residues of each NBD and the aromatic amino acids Trp653 (NBD1) and Tyr1302 (NBD2) were key in interacting with high-affinity compounds. On the basis of docked orientation and docking score the compounds identified may be potential inhibitors of ABCC1 and require further pharmacological analysis. Abbreviations ABC - ATP-binding cassette, DHS - dehydrosilybin, MDR - multidrug resistance, NBD - nucleotide-binding domain, PDB - protein data bank. PMID:23144549

  10. Antibiotic Resistance Mediated by the MacB ABC Transporter Family: A Structural and Functional Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Nicholas P.; Kaplan, Elise; Crow, Allister; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2018-01-01

    The MacB ABC transporter forms a tripartite efflux pump with the MacA adaptor protein and TolC outer membrane exit duct to expel antibiotics and export virulence factors from Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we review recent structural and functional data on MacB and its homologs. MacB has a fold that is distinct from other structurally characterized ABC transporters and uses a unique molecular mechanism termed mechanotransmission. Unlike other bacterial ABC transporters, MacB does not transport substrates across the inner membrane in which it is based, but instead couples cytoplasmic ATP hydrolysis with transmembrane conformational changes that are used to perform work in the extra-cytoplasmic space. In the MacAB-TolC tripartite pump, mechanotransmission drives efflux of antibiotics and export of a protein toxin from the periplasmic space via the TolC exit duct. Homologous tripartite systems from pathogenic bacteria similarly export protein-like signaling molecules, virulence factors and siderophores. In addition, many MacB-like ABC transporters do not form tripartite pumps, but instead operate in diverse cellular processes including antibiotic sensing, cell division and lipoprotein trafficking. PMID:29892271

  11. Antibiotic Resistance Mediated by the MacB ABC Transporter Family: A Structural and Functional Perspective.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas P; Kaplan, Elise; Crow, Allister; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2018-01-01

    The MacB ABC transporter forms a tripartite efflux pump with the MacA adaptor protein and TolC outer membrane exit duct to expel antibiotics and export virulence factors from Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we review recent structural and functional data on MacB and its homologs. MacB has a fold that is distinct from other structurally characterized ABC transporters and uses a unique molecular mechanism termed mechanotransmission. Unlike other bacterial ABC transporters, MacB does not transport substrates across the inner membrane in which it is based, but instead couples cytoplasmic ATP hydrolysis with transmembrane conformational changes that are used to perform work in the extra-cytoplasmic space. In the MacAB-TolC tripartite pump, mechanotransmission drives efflux of antibiotics and export of a protein toxin from the periplasmic space via the TolC exit duct. Homologous tripartite systems from pathogenic bacteria similarly export protein-like signaling molecules, virulence factors and siderophores. In addition, many MacB-like ABC transporters do not form tripartite pumps, but instead operate in diverse cellular processes including antibiotic sensing, cell division and lipoprotein trafficking.

  12. Multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins as transporters of antimicrobial drugs.

    PubMed

    Nies, Anne T; Damme, Katja; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias

    2012-12-01

    Antimicrobial drugs are essential in the treatment of infectious diseases. A better understanding of transport processes involved in drug disposition will improve the predictability of drug-drug interactions with consequences for drug response. Multidrug And Toxin Extrusion (MATE; SLC47A) proteins are efflux transporters mediating the excretion of several antimicrobial drugs as well as other organic compounds into bile and urine, thereby contributing to drug disposition. This review summarizes current knowledge of the structural and molecular features of human MATE transporters including their functional role in drug transport with a specific focus on antimicrobial drugs. The PubMed database was searched using the terms "MATE1," "MATE-2K," "MATE2," "SLC47A1," "SLC47A2," and "toxin extrusion protein" (up to June 2012). MATE proteins have been recognized as important transporters mediating the final excretion step of cationic drugs into bile and urine. These include the antiviral drugs acyclovir, amprenavir, and ganciclovir, the antibiotics cephalexin, cephradine and levofloxacin, as well as the antimalarial agents chloroquine and quinine. It is therefore important to enhance our understanding of the role of MATEs in drug extrusion with particular emphasis on the functional consequences of genetic variants on disposition of these antimicrobial drugs.

  13. Phosphorylation is required for the pathogen defense function of the Arabidopsis PEN3 ABC transporter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Arabidopsis PEN3 ABC transporter accumulates at sites of pathogen detection, where it is involved in defense against multiple pathogens. Perception of PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors initiates recruitment of PEN3 and also leads to PEN3 phosphorylation at multiple amino acid residues. Whet...

  14. Vital and dispensable roles of Plasmodium multidrug resistance transporters during blood- and mosquito-stage development.

    PubMed

    Rijpma, Sanna R; van der Velden, Maarten; Annoura, Takeshi; Matz, Joachim M; Kenthirapalan, Sanketha; Kooij, Taco W A; Matuschewski, Kai; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Siebelink-Stoter, Rianne; Graumans, Wouter; Ramesar, Jai; Klop, Onny; Russel, Frans G M; Sauerwein, Robert W; Janse, Chris J; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M; Koenderink, Jan B

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins belong to the B subfamily of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters, which export a wide range of compounds including pharmaceuticals. In this study, we used reverse genetics to study the role of all seven Plasmodium MDR proteins during the life cycle of malaria parasites. Four P. berghei genes (encoding MDR1, 4, 6 and 7) were refractory to deletion, indicating a vital role during blood stage multiplication and validating them as potential targets for antimalarial drugs. Mutants lacking expression of MDR2, MDR3 and MDR5 were generated in both P. berghei and P. falciparum, indicating a dispensable role for blood stage development. Whereas P. berghei mutants lacking MDR3 and MDR5 had a reduced blood stage multiplication in vivo, blood stage growth of P. falciparum mutants in vitro was not significantly different. Oocyst maturation and sporozoite formation in Plasmodium mutants lacking MDR2 or MDR5 was reduced. Sporozoites of these P. berghei mutants were capable of infecting mice and life cycle completion, indicating the absence of vital roles during liver stage development. Our results demonstrate vital and dispensable roles of MDR proteins during blood stages and an important function in sporogony for MDR2 and MDR5 in both Plasmodium species. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. ABC Transporters and Isothiocyanates: Potential for Pharmacokinetic Diet–Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Telang, Urvi; Ji, Yan; Morris, Marilyn E.

    2013-01-01

    Isothiocyanates, a class of anti-cancer agents, are derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage and watercress, and have demonstrated chemopreventive activity in a number of cancer models and epidemiologic studies. Due to public interest in cancer prevention and alternative therapies in cancer, the consumption of herbal supplements and vegetables containing these compounds is widespread and increasing. Isothiocyanates interact with ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP, and may influence the pharmacokinetics of substrates of these transporters. This review discusses the pharmacokinetic properties of isothiocyanates, their interactions with ABC transporters, and presents some data describing the potential for isothiocyanate-mediated diet–drug interactions. PMID:19623673

  16. A bacterial-type ABC transporter is involved in aluminum tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao Feng; Yamaji, Naoki; Mitani, Namiki; Yano, Masahiro; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Ma, Jian Feng

    2009-02-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major factor limiting crop production in acidic soil, but the molecular mechanisms of Al tolerance are poorly understood. Here, we report that two genes, STAR1 (for sensitive to Al rhizotoxicity1) and STAR2, are responsible for Al tolerance in rice. STAR1 encodes a nucleotide binding domain, while STAR2 encodes a transmembrane domain, of a bacterial-type ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter. Disruption of either gene resulted in hypersensitivity to aluminum toxicity. Both STAR1 and STAR2 are expressed mainly in the roots and are specifically induced by Al exposure. Expression in onion epidermal cells, rice protoplasts, and yeast showed that STAR1 interacts with STAR2 to form a complex that localizes to the vesicle membranes of all root cells, except for those in the epidermal layer of the mature zone. When expressed together in Xenopus laevis oocytes, STAR1/2 shows efflux transport activity specific for UDP-glucose. Furthermore, addition of exogenous UDP-glucose rescued root growth in the star1 mutant exposed to Al. These results indicate that STAR1 and STAR2 form a complex that functions as an ABC transporter, which is required for detoxification of Al in rice. The ABC transporter transports UDP-glucose, which may be used to modify the cell wall.

  17. Interaction of forskolin with the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Ming s, D.I.; Seamon, K.B.; Speicher, L.A.

    1991-08-27

    Forskolin and 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, an analogue that does not activate adenylyl cyclase, were tested for their ability to enhance the cytotoxic effects of adriamycin in human ovarian carcinoma cells, SKOV3, which are sensitive to adriamycin and express low levels of P-glycoprotein, and a variant cell line, SKVLB, which overexpresses the P-glycoprotein and has the multidrug reing ance (MDR) phenotype. Forskolin and 1,9-dideoxyforskolin both increased the cytotoxic effects of adriamycin in SKVLB cells, yet had no effect on SKOV3 cells. Two photoactive derivatives of forskolin have been synthesized, 7-O-((2-(3-(4-azido-3-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)propionamido)ethyl)carbamyl)forskolin, {sup 125}I-6-AIPP-Fsk, and 6-O-((2-(3-(4-azido-3-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)propionamido)ethyl)carbamyl)forskolin, {sup 125}I-6-AIPP-Fsk, which exhibit specificity for labelingmore » the glucose transporter and aing lyl cyclase, respectively. Both photolabels identified a 140-kDa protein in membranes from SKVLB cells whose labeling was inhibited by forskolin and 1,9-dideoxyforskolin. The data are consistent with forskolin binding to the P-glycoprotein analogous to that of other chemosensitizing drugs that have been shown to partially reverse MDR. The ability of forskolin photolabels to specifically label the transporter, the adenylyl cyclase, and the P-glycoprotein suggests that these proteins may share a common biing g domain for forskolin analogues.« less

  18. Temporal dynamics of the ABC transporter response to insecticide treatment: insights from the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epis, Sara; Porretta, Daniele; Mastrantonio, Valentina; Urbanelli, Sandra; Sassera, Davide; De Marco, Leone; Mereghetti, Valeria; Montagna, Matteo; Ricci, Irene; Favia, Guido; Bandi, Claudio

    2014-12-01

    In insects, ABC transporters have been shown to contribute to defence/resistance to insecticides by reducing toxic concentrations in cells/tissues. Despite the extensive studies about this detoxifying mechanism, the temporal patterns of ABC transporter activation have been poorly investigated. Using the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi as a study system, we investigated the expression profile of ABC genes belonging to different subfamilies in permethrin-treated larvae at different time points (30 min to 48 h). Our results showed that the expression of ABCB and ABCG subfamily genes was upregulated at 1 h after treatment, with the highest expression observed at 6 h. Therefore, future investigations on the temporal dynamics of ABC gene expression will allow a better implementation of insecticide treatment regimens, including the use of specific inhibitors of ABC efflux pumps.

  19. Nucleotide-induced conformational dynamics in ABC transporters from structure-based coarse grained modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flechsig, Holger

    2016-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins which mediate the exchange of diverse substrates across membranes powered by ATP molecules. Our understanding of their activity is still hampered since the conformational dynamics underlying the operation of such proteins cannot yet be resolved in detailed molecular dynamics studies. Here a coarse grained model which allows to mimic binding of nucleotides and follow subsequent conformational motions of full-length transporter structures in computer simulations is proposed and implemented. To justify its explanatory quality, the model is first applied to the maltose transporter system for which multiple conformations are known and we find that the model predictions agree remarkably well with the experimental data. For the MalK subunit the switching from open to the closed dimer configuration upon ATP binding is reproduced and, moreover, for the full-length maltose transporter, progression from inward-facing to the outward-facing state is correctly obtained. For the heme transporter HmuUV, for which only the free structure could yet be determined, the model was then applied to predict nucleotide-induced conformational motions. Upon binding of ATP-mimicking ligands the structure changed from a conformation in which the nucleotide-binding domains formed an open shape, to a conformation in which they were found in tight contact, while, at the same time, a pronounced rotation of the transmembrane domains was observed. This finding is supported by normal mode analysis, and, comparison with structural data of the homologous vitamin B12 transporter BtuCD suggests that the observed rotation mechanism may contribute a common functional aspect for this class of ABC transporters. Although in HmuuV noticeable rearrangement of essential transmembrane helices was detected, there are no indications from our simulations that ATP binding alone may facilitate propagation of substrate molecules in this transporter

  20. Predictive Structure and Topology of Peroxisomal ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Andreoletti, Pierre; Raas, Quentin; Gondcaille, Catherine; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    The peroxisomal ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transporters, which are called ABCD1, ABCD2 and ABCD3, are transmembrane proteins involved in the transport of various lipids that allow their degradation inside the organelle. Defective ABCD1 leads to the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids and is associated with a complex and severe neurodegenerative disorder called X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). Although the nucleotide-binding domain is highly conserved and characterized within the ABC transporters family, solid data are missing for the transmembrane domain (TMD) of ABCD proteins. The lack of a clear consensus on the secondary and tertiary structure of the TMDs weakens any structure-function hypothesis based on the very diverse ABCD1 mutations found in X-ALD patients. Therefore, we first reinvestigated thoroughly the structure-function data available and performed refined alignments of ABCD protein sequences. Based on the 2.85  Å resolution crystal structure of the mitochondrial ABC transporter ABCB10, here we propose a structural model of peroxisomal ABCD proteins that specifies the position of the transmembrane and coupling helices, and highlight functional motifs and putative important amino acid residues. PMID:28737695

  1. The Role of the Photoreceptor ABC Transporter ABCA4 in Lipid Transport and Stargardt Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molday, Robert S.; Zhong, Ming; Quazi, Faraz

    2009-01-01

    ABCA4 is a member of the ABCA subfamily of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters that is expressed in rod and cone photoreceptors of the vertebrate retina. ABCA4, also known as the Rim protein and ABCR, is a large 2273 amino acid glycoprotein organized as two tandem halves, each containing a single membrane spanning segment followed sequentially by a large exocytoplasmic domain, a multispanning membrane domain and a nucleotide binding domain. Over 500 mutations in the gene encoding ABCA4 are associated with a spectrum of related autosomal recessive retinal degenerative diseases including Stargardt macular degeneration, cone-rod dystrophy and a subset of retinitis pigmentosa. Biochemical studies on the purified ABCA4 together with analysis of abca4 knockout mice and patients with Stargardt disease have implicated ABCA4 as a retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine transporter that facilitates the removal of potentially reactive retinal derivatives from photoreceptors following photoexcitation. Knowledge of the genetic and molecular basis for ABCA4 related retinal degenerative diseases is being used to develop rationale therapeutic treatments for this set of disorders. PMID:19230850

  2. Multidrug resistance in fungi: regulation of transporter-encoding gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2014-01-01

    A critical risk to the continued success of antifungal chemotherapy is the acquisition of resistance; a risk exacerbated by the few classes of effective antifungal drugs. Predictably, as the use of these drugs increases in the clinic, more resistant organisms can be isolated from patients. A particularly problematic form of drug resistance that routinely emerges in the major fungal pathogens is known as multidrug resistance. Multidrug resistance refers to the simultaneous acquisition of tolerance to a range of drugs via a limited or even single genetic change. This review will focus on recent progress in understanding pathways of multidrug resistance in fungi including those of most medical relevance. Analyses of multidrug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided the most detailed outline of multidrug resistance in a eukaryotic microorganism. Multidrug resistant isolates of S. cerevisiae typically result from changes in the activity of a pair of related transcription factors that in turn elicit overproduction of several target genes. Chief among these is the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-encoding gene PDR5. Interestingly, in the medically important Candida species, very similar pathways are involved in acquisition of multidrug resistance. In both C. albicans and C. glabrata, changes in the activity of transcriptional activator proteins elicits overproduction of a protein closely related to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 called Cdr1. The major filamentous fungal pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, was previously thought to acquire resistance to azole compounds (the principal antifungal drug class) via alterations in the azole drug target-encoding gene cyp51A. More recent data indicate that pathways in addition to changes in the cyp51A gene are important determinants in A. fumigatus azole resistance. We will discuss findings that suggest azole resistance in A. fumigatus and Candida species may share more mechanistic similarities than previously thought. PMID:24795641

  3. Multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins mediate cellular transport of cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hong; Guo, Dong; Obianom, Obinna N.

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmentally prevalent toxicant posing increasing risk to human health worldwide. As compared to the extensive research in Cd tissue accumulation, little was known about the elimination of Cd, particularly its toxic form, Cd ion (Cd{sup 2+}). In this study, we aimed to examine whether Cd{sup 2+} is a substrate of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) that are important in renal xenobiotic elimination. HEK-293 cells overexpressing the human MATE1 (HEK-hMATE1), human MATE2-K (HEK-hMATE2-K) and mouse Mate1 (HEK-mMate1) were used to study the cellular transport and toxicity of Cd{sup 2+}. The cells overexpressing MATEs showed a 2–4more » fold increase of Cd{sup 2+} uptake that could be blocked by the MATE inhibitor cimetidine. A saturable transport profile was observed with the Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}) of 130 ± 15.8 μM for HEK-hMATE1; 139 ± 21.3 μM for HEK-hMATE2-K; and 88.7 ± 13.5 μM for HEK-mMate1, respectively. Cd{sup 2+} could inhibit the uptake of metformin, a substrate of MATE transporters, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) of 97.5 ± 6.0 μM, 20.2 ± 2.6 μM, and 49.9 ± 6.9 μM in HEK-hMATE1, HEK-hMATE2-K, and HEK-mMate1 cells, respectively. In addition, hMATE1 could transport preloaded Cd{sup 2+} out of the HEK-hMATE1 cells, thus resulting in a significant decrease of Cd{sup 2+}-induced cytotoxicity. The present study has provided the first evidence supporting that MATEs transport Cd{sup 2+} and may function as cellular elimination machinery in Cd intoxication. - Highlights: • Cadmium is an environmentally prevalent toxicant. • Little was known regarding the elimination and detoxification of cadmium. • Cadmium ion is here demonstrated as a substrate of MATE transporters. • MATEs may function as cellular elimination machinery in cadmium detoxification.« less

  4. Alzheimer’s and ABC transporters - new opportunities for diagnostics and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pahnke, Jens; Langer, Oliver; Krohn, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Much has been said about the increasing number of demented patients and the main risk factor ‘age’. Frustratingly, we do not know the precise pattern and all modulating factors that provoke the pathologic changes in the brains of affected elderly. We have to diagnose early to be able to stop the progression of diseases that irreversibly destroy brain substance. Familiar AD cases have mislead some researchers for almost 20 years, which has unfortunately narrowed the scientific understanding and has, thus, lead to insufficient funding of independent approaches. Therefore, basic researchers hardly have been able to develop causative treatments and clinicians still do not have access to prognostic and early diagnostic tools. During the recent years it became clear that insufficient Aβ export, physiologically facilitated by the ABC transporter superfamily at the brain’s barriers, plays a fundamental role in disease initiation and progression. Furthermore, export mechanisms that are deficient in affected elderly are new targets for activation and, thus, treatment, but ideally also for prevention. In sporadic AD disturbed clearance of β-amyloid from the brain is so far the most important factor for its accumulation in the parenchyma and vessel walls. Here, we review findings about the contribution of ABC transporters and of the perivascular drainage/glymphatic system on β-amyloid clearance. We highlight their potential value for innovative early diagnostics using PET and describe recently described, effective ABC transporter-targeting agents as potential causative treatment for neurodegenerative proteopathies/dementias. PMID:24746857

  5. Alzheimer's and ABC transporters--new opportunities for diagnostics and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pahnke, Jens; Langer, Oliver; Krohn, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Much has been said about the increasing number of demented patients and the main risk factor 'age'. Frustratingly, we do not know the precise pattern and all modulating factors that provoke the pathologic changes in the brains of affected elderly. We have to diagnose early to be able to stop the progression of diseases that irreversibly destroy brain substance. Familiar AD cases have mislead some researchers for almost 20 years, which has unfortunately narrowed the scientific understanding and has, thus, lead to insufficient funding of independent approaches. Therefore, basic researchers hardly have been able to develop causative treatments and clinicians still do not have access to prognostic and early diagnostic tools. During the recent years it became clear that insufficient Aβ export, physiologically facilitated by the ABC transporter superfamily at the brain's barriers, plays a fundamental role in disease initiation and progression. Furthermore, export mechanisms that are deficient in affected elderly are new targets for activation and, thus, treatment, but ideally also for prevention. In sporadic AD disturbed clearance of β-amyloid from the brain is so far the most important factor for its accumulation in the parenchyma and vessel walls. Here, we review findings about the contribution of ABC transporters and of the perivascular drainage/glymphatic system on β-amyloid clearance. We highlight their potential value for innovative early diagnostics using PET and describe recently described, effective ABC transporter-targeting agents as potential causative treatment for neurodegenerative proteopathies/dementias. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Jump into a New Fold—A Homology Based Model for the ABCG2/BCRP Multidrug Transporter

    PubMed Central

    László, Laura; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    ABCG2/BCRP is a membrane protein, involved in xenobiotic and endobiotic transport in key pharmacological barriers and drug metabolizing organs, in the protection of stem cells, and in multidrug resistance of cancer. Pharmacogenetic studies implicated the role of ABCG2 in response to widely used medicines and anticancer agents, as well as in gout. Its Q141K variant exhibits decreased functional expression thus increased drug accumulation and decreased urate secretion. Still, there has been no reliable molecular model available for this protein, as the published structures of other ABC transporters could not be properly fitted to the ABCG2 topology and experimental data. The recently published high resolution structure of a close homologue, the ABCG5-ABCG8 heterodimer, revealed a new ABC transporter fold, unique for ABCG proteins. Here we present a structural model of the ABCG2 homodimer based on this fold and detail the experimental results supporting this model. In order to describe the effect of mutations on structure and dynamics, and characterize substrate recognition and cholesterol regulation we performed molecular dynamics simulations using full length ABCG2 protein embedded in a membrane bilayer and in silico docking simulations. Our results show that in the Q141K variant the introduced positive charge diminishes the interaction between the nucleotide binding and transmembrane domains and the R482G variation alters the orientation of transmembrane helices. Moreover, the R482 position, which plays a role the substrate specificity of the transporter, is located in one of the substrate binding pockets identified by the in silico docking calculations. In summary, the ABCG2 model and in silico simulations presented here may have significant impact on understanding drug distribution and toxicity, as well as drug development against cancer chemotherapy resistance or gout. PMID:27741279

  7. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 is a bile transporter of Clonorchis sinensis simulated by in silico docking.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fuhong; Yoo, Won Gi; Lee, Ji-Yun; Lu, Yanyan; Pak, Jhang Ho; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2017-11-21

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) is a member of the C subfamily of the ABC family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. MRP4 regulates ATP-dependent efflux of various organic anionic substrates and bile acids out of cells. Since Clonorchis sinensis lives in host's bile duct, accumulation of bile juice can be toxic to the worm's tissues and cells. Therefore, C. sinensis needs bile transporters to reduce accumulation of bile acids within its body. We cloned MRP4 (CsMRP4) from C. sinensis and obtained a cDNA encoding an open reading frame of 1469 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that CsMRP4 belonged to the MRP/SUR/CFTR subfamily. A tertiary structure of CsMRP4 was generated by homology modeling based on multiple structures of MRP1 and P-glycoprotein. CsMRP4 had two membrane-spanning domains (MSD1 & 2) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 & 2) as common structural folds. Docking simulation with nine bile acids showed that CsMRP4 transports bile acids through the inner cavity. Moreover, it was found that CsMRP4 mRNA was more abundant in the metacercariae than in the adults. Mouse immune serum, generated against the CsMRP4-NBD1 (24.9 kDa) fragment, localized CsMRP4 mainly in mesenchymal tissues and oral and ventral suckers of the metacercariae and the adults. Our findings shed new light on MRPs and their homologs and provide a platform for further structural and functional investigations on the bile transporters and parasites' survival.

  8. Synthetic Analogs of Curcumin Modulate the Function of Multidrug Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Megumi; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Fukuda, Michihiro; Chufan, Eduardo E; Kudoh, Katsuyoshi; Kanehara, Keigo; Sugisawa, Norihiko; Ishida, Masaharu; Naitoh, Takeshi; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Unno, Michiaki

    2017-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in cancer cells is a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. Previous studies have shown that curcumin, a natural product and a dietary constituent of turmeric, inhibits the function of MDR-related ABC transporters, including ABCB1, ABCC1, and especially ABCG2. However, the limited bioavailability of curcumin prevents its use for modulation of the function of these transporters in the clinical setting. In this study, we investigated the effects of 24 synthetic curcumin analogs with increased bioavailability on the transport function of ABCG2. The screening of the 24 synthetic analogs by means of flow cytometry revealed that four of the curcumin analogs (GO-Y030, GO-Y078, GO-Y168, and GO-Y172) significantly inhibited the efflux of the ABCG2 substrates, mitoxantrone and pheophorbide A, from ABCG2-overexpressing K562/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) cells. Biochemical analyses showed that GO-Y030, GO-Y078, and GO-Y172 stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCG2 at nanomolar concentrations and inhibited the photolabeling of ABCG2 with iodoarylazidoprazosin, suggesting that these analogs interact with the substrate-binding sites of ABCG2. In addition, when used in cytotoxicity assays, GO-Y030 and GO-Y078 were found to improve the sensitivity of the anticancer drug, SN-38, in K562/BCRP cells. Taken together, these results suggest that nontoxic synthetic curcumin analogs with increased bioavailability, especially GO-Y030 and GO-Y078, inhibit the function of ABCG2 by directly interacting at the substrate-binding site. These synthetic curcumin analogs could therefore be developed as potent modulators to overcome ABCG2-mediated MDR in cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Structural basis for lipopolysaccharide extraction by ABC transporter LptB2FG.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qingshan; Yang, Xu; Yu, Shan; Shi, Huigang; Wang, Kun; Xiao, Le; Zhu, Guangyu; Sun, Chuanqi; Li, Tingting; Li, Dianfan; Zhang, Xinzheng; Zhou, Min; Huang, Yihua

    2017-05-01

    After biosynthesis, bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are transiently anchored to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM). The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter LptB 2 FG extracts LPS molecules from the IM and transports them to the outer membrane. Here we report the crystal structure of nucleotide-free LptB 2 FG from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The structure reveals that lipopolysaccharide transport proteins LptF and LptG each contain a transmembrane domain (TMD), a periplasmic β-jellyroll-like domain and a coupling helix that interacts with LptB on the cytoplasmic side. The LptF and LptG TMDs form a large outward-facing V-shaped cavity in the IM. Mutational analyses suggest that LPS may enter the central cavity laterally, via the interface of the TMD domains of LptF and LptG, and is expelled into the β-jellyroll-like domains upon ATP binding and hydrolysis by LptB. These studies suggest a mechanism for LPS extraction by LptB 2 FG that is distinct from those of classical ABC transporters that transport substrates across the IM.

  10. The Yeast Plasma Membrane ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Aus1

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Magdalena; Milles, Sigrid; Schreiber, Gabriele; Daleke, David L.; Dittmar, Gunnar; Herrmann, Andreas; Müller, Peter; Pomorski, Thomas Günther

    2011-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Aus1 is expressed under anaerobic growth conditions at the plasma membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is required for sterol uptake. These observations suggest that Aus1 promotes the translocation of sterols across membranes, but the precise transport mechanism has yet to be identified. In this study, an extraction and purification procedure was developed to characterize the Aus1 transporter. The detergent-solubilized protein was able to bind and hydrolyze ATP. Mutagenesis of the conserved lysine to methionine in the Walker A motif abolished ATP hydrolysis. Likewise, ATP hydrolysis was inhibited by classical inhibitors of ABC transporters. Upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, the ATPase activity of Aus1 was specifically stimulated by phosphatidylserine (PS) in a stereoselective manner. We also found that Aus1-dependent sterol uptake, but not Aus1 expression and trafficking to the plasma membrane, was affected by changes in cellular PS levels. These results suggest a direct interaction between Aus1 and PS that is critical for the activity of the transporter. PMID:21521689

  11. Describing the role of Drosophila melanogaster ABC transporters in insecticide biology using CRISPR-Cas9 knockouts.

    PubMed

    Denecke, Shane; Fusetto, Roberto; Batterham, Philip

    2017-12-01

    ABC transporters have a well-established role in drug resistance, effluxing xenobiotics from cells and tissues within the organism. More recently, research has been dedicated to understanding the role insect ABC transporters play in insecticide toxicity, but progress in understanding the contribution of specific transporters has been hampered by the lack of functional genetic tools. Here, we report knockouts of three Drosophila melanogaster ABC transporter genes, Mdr49, Mdr50, and Mdr65, that are homologous to the well-studied mammalian ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein). Each knockout mutant was created in the same wild type background and tested against a panel of insecticides representing different chemical classes. Mdr65 knockouts were more susceptible to all neuroactive insecticides tested, but Mdr49 and Mdr50 knockouts showed increased susceptibility or resistance depending on the insecticide used. Mdr65 was chosen for further analysis. Calculation of LC 50 values for the Mdr65 knockout allowed the substrate specificity of this transporter to be examined. No obvious distinguishing structural features were shared among MDR65 substrates. A role for Mdr65 in insecticide transport was confirmed by testing the capacity of the knockout to synergize with the ABC inhibitor verapamil and by measuring the levels of insecticide retained in the body of knockout flies. These data unambiguously establish the influence of ABC transporters on the capacity of wild type D. melanogaster to tolerate insecticide exposure and suggest that both tissue and substrate specificity underpin this capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Substrate-bound structure of the E. coli multidrug resistance transporter MdfA

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Jie; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Fan, Junping; Wang, Xianping; Zhao, Yongfang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious threat to public health. Proton motive force-driven antiporters from the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) constitute a major group of multidrug-resistance transporters. Currently, no reports on crystal structures of MFS antiporters in complex with their substrates exist. The E. coli MdfA transporter is a well-studied model system for biochemical analyses of multidrug-resistance MFS antiporters. Here, we report three crystal structures of MdfA-ligand complexes at resolutions up to 2.0 Å, all in the inward-facing conformation. The substrate-binding site sits proximal to the conserved acidic residue, D34. Our mutagenesis studies support the structural observations of the substrate-binding mode and the notion that D34 responds to substrate binding by adjusting its protonation status. Taken together, our data unveil the substrate-binding mode of MFS antiporters and suggest a mechanism of transport via this group of transporters. PMID:26238402

  13. Detergent Screening and Purification of the Human Liver ABC Transporters BSEP (ABCB11) and MDR3 (ABCB4) Expressed in the Yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Stindt, Jan; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    The human liver ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters bile salt export pump (BSEP/ABCB11) and the multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3/ABCB4) fulfill the translocation of bile salts and phosphatidylcholine across the apical membrane of hepatocytes. In concert with ABCG5/G8, these two transporters are responsible for the formation of bile and mutations within these transporters can lead to severe hereditary diseases. In this study, we report the heterologous overexpression and purification of human BSEP and MDR3 as well as the expression of the corresponding C-terminal GFP-fusion proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that BSEP-GFP and MDR3-GFP are localized in the plasma membrane of P. pastoris. Furthermore, we demonstrate the first purification of human BSEP and MDR3 yielding ∼1 mg and ∼6 mg per 100 g of wet cell weight, respectively. By screening over 100 detergents using a dot blot technique, we found that only zwitterionic, lipid-like detergents such as Fos-cholines or Cyclofos were able to extract both transporters in sufficient amounts for subsequent functional analysis. For MDR3, fluorescence-detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC) screens revealed that increasing the acyl chain length of Fos-Cholines improved monodispersity. BSEP purified in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside or Cymal-5 after solubilization with Fos-choline 16 from P. pastoris membranes showed binding to ATP-agarose. Furthermore, detergent-solubilized and purified MDR3 showed a substrate-inducible ATPase activity upon addition of phosphatidylcholine lipids. These results form the basis for further biochemical analysis of human BSEP and MDR3 to elucidate the function of these clinically relevant ABC transporters. PMID:23593265

  14. Overcoming the heterologous bias: An in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} First report to demonstrate an in vivo expression system of an ABC multidrug transporter CgCdr1p of C. glabrata. {yields} First report on the structure and functional characterization of CgCdr1p. {yields} Functional conservation of divergent but typical residues of CgCdr1p. {yields} CgCdr1p elicits promiscuity towards substrates and has a large drug binding pocket with overlapping specificities. -- Abstract: We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplishedmore » by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the arte

  15. NFκBP65 transcription factor modulates resistance to doxorubicin through ABC transporters in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Velaei, Kobra; Samadi, Nasser; Soltani, Sina; Barazvan, Balal; Soleimani Rad, Jafar

    2017-07-01

    Shedding light on chemoresistance biology of breast cancer could contribute to enhance the clinical outcome. Intrinsic or acquired resistance to chemotherapy is a major problem in breast cancer treatment. The NFκB pathway by siRNAP65 and JSH-23 as a translocational inhibitor of NFκBP65 in the doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/Dox) and MCF-7 cells was blocked. Then, the ABC transporter expression and function were assessed by real-time qRT-PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Induction of apoptosis was evaluated after inhibition of the NFΚB pathway as well. Our study underlined the upregulation of NFκBP65 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and downregulation of pro-apoptotic Bax in the MCF-7/Dox cells compared with control MCF-7 cells. Here, we showed that interplay between nuclear factor kappa B P65 (NFkBP65) as a transcriptional regulator and ABC transporters in the MCF-7/Dox cancer cells. We found that inhibition of the elevated expression of NFκBP65 in the resistant breast cancer, whether translocational inhibition or silencing by siRNA, decreased the expression and function of MDR1 and MRP1 efflux pumps. Furthermore, the blockade of NFκBP65 promoted apoptosis via modulating Bcl-2 and BAX expression. After inhibition of the NFκBP65 signaling pathway, elevated baseline expression of survival Bcl-2 gene in the resistant breast cells significantly decreased. Suppression of the NFκB pathway has a profound dual impact on promoting the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and reducing ABC transporter function and expression, which are some of the chemoresistance features. It was speculated that the NFκB pathway directly acts on doxorubicin-induced MDR1 and MRP1 expression in MCF-7/Dox cells.

  16. Pharmacotherapy in pregnancy; effect of ABC and SLC transporters on drug transport across the placenta and fetal drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Staud, Frantisek; Cerveny, Lukas; Ceckova, Martina

    2012-11-01

    Pharmacotherapy during pregnancy is often inevitable for medical treatment of the mother, the fetus or both. The knowledge of drug transport across placenta is, therefore, an important topic to bear in mind when deciding treatment in pregnant women. Several drug transporters of the ABC and SLC families have been discovered in the placenta, such as P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein, or organic anion/cation transporters. It is thus evident that the passage of drugs across the placenta can no longer be predicted simply on the basis of their physical-chemical properties. Functional expression of placental drug transporters in the trophoblast and the possibility of drug-drug interactions must be considered to optimize pharmacotherapy during pregnancy. In this review we summarize current knowledge on the expression and function of ABC and SLC transporters in the trophoblast. Furthermore, we put this data into context with medical conditions that require maternal and/or fetal treatment during pregnancy, such as gestational diabetes, HIV infection, fetal arrhythmias and epilepsy. Proper understanding of the role of placental transporters should be of great interest not only to clinicians but also to pharmaceutical industry for future drug design and development to control the degree of fetal exposure.

  17. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    DOE PAGES

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; ...

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, whichmore » coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.« less

  18. Inhibition of multidrug/xenobiotic resistance transporter by MK571 improves dye (Fura 2) accumulation in crustacean tissues from lobster, shrimp, and isopod.

    PubMed

    Lüders, Ann-Katrin; Saborowski, Reinhard; Bickmeyer, Ulf

    2009-09-01

    Multidrug/xenobiotic resistance transporters are present in living organisms as a first line defence system against small, potentially harmful molecules from the environment or from internal metabolic reactions. Multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRP) are one type of ATP-Binding-Cassette (ABC) transporters, which also transport dyes such as Fura 2, a calcium chelating fluorescence indicator. The specific MRP inhibitor MK571 was used to investigate the fluorescence intensity of cells in tissues of the brain and the midgut gland of the crustaceans Homarus gammarus (lobster), Crangon crangon (brown shrimp) and Idotea emarginata (isopod) during incubation with Fura 2AM (1 microM). In the presence of the inhibitor MK571 (50 microM), the fluorescence of brain tissue significantly increased in all of the three species. The midgut gland of H. gammarus showed a significant increase of fluorescence, whereas there was no effect in the midgut glands of C. crangon and I. baltica. The half maximal concentration of MK571 was 50 microM as measured in the midgut gland of H. gammarus. In conclusion, MRP transporters are present in the three investigated crustacean nervous systems. Using the midgut glands of the three species, only in H. gammarus MK571 inhibited dye extrusion, indicating species-specific differences of transporter systems, their specificity, or tissue specific expression.

  19. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path–Force Matching QM/MM Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Ojeda-May, P.; Nagaraju, M.; Pu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path–force matching (RP–FM) has been developed. In RP–FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP–FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  20. A mutation within the extended X loop abolished substrate-induced ATPase activity of the human liver ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter MDR3.

    PubMed

    Kluth, Marianne; Stindt, Jan; Dröge, Carola; Linnemann, Doris; Kubitz, Ralf; Schmitt, Lutz

    2015-02-20

    The human multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3/ABCB4) belongs to the ubiquitous family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and is located in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. There it flops the phospholipids of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) family from the inner to the outer leaflet. Here, we report the characterization of wild type MDR3 and the Q1174E mutant, which was identified previously in a patient with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC-3). We expressed different variants of MDR3 in the yeast Pichia pastoris, purified the proteins via tandem affinity chromatography, and determined MDR3-specific ATPase activity in the presence or absence of phospholipids. The ATPase activity of wild type MDR3 was stimulated 2-fold by liver PC or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. Furthermore, the cross-linking of MDR3 with a thiol-reactive fluorophore blocked ATP hydrolysis and exhibited no PC stimulation. Similarly, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin lipids did not induce an increase of wild type MDR3 ATPase activity. The phosphate analogues beryllium fluoride and aluminum fluoride led to complete inhibition of ATPase activity, whereas orthovanadate inhibited exclusively the PC-stimulated ATPase activity of MDR3. The Q1174E mutation is located in the nucleotide-binding domain in direct proximity of the leucine of the ABC signature motif and extended the X loop, which is found in ABC exporters. Our data on the Q1174E mutant demonstrated basal ATPase activity, but PC lipids were incapable of stimulating ATPase activity highlighting the role of the extended X loop in the cross-talk of the nucleotide-binding domain and the transmembrane domain. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. A Mutation within the Extended X Loop Abolished Substrate-induced ATPase Activity of the Human Liver ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter MDR3*

    PubMed Central

    Kluth, Marianne; Stindt, Jan; Dröge, Carola; Linnemann, Doris; Kubitz, Ralf; Schmitt, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3/ABCB4) belongs to the ubiquitous family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and is located in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. There it flops the phospholipids of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) family from the inner to the outer leaflet. Here, we report the characterization of wild type MDR3 and the Q1174E mutant, which was identified previously in a patient with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC-3). We expressed different variants of MDR3 in the yeast Pichia pastoris, purified the proteins via tandem affinity chromatography, and determined MDR3-specific ATPase activity in the presence or absence of phospholipids. The ATPase activity of wild type MDR3 was stimulated 2-fold by liver PC or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. Furthermore, the cross-linking of MDR3 with a thiol-reactive fluorophore blocked ATP hydrolysis and exhibited no PC stimulation. Similarly, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin lipids did not induce an increase of wild type MDR3 ATPase activity. The phosphate analogues beryllium fluoride and aluminum fluoride led to complete inhibition of ATPase activity, whereas orthovanadate inhibited exclusively the PC-stimulated ATPase activity of MDR3. The Q1174E mutation is located in the nucleotide-binding domain in direct proximity of the leucine of the ABC signature motif and extended the X loop, which is found in ABC exporters. Our data on the Q1174E mutant demonstrated basal ATPase activity, but PC lipids were incapable of stimulating ATPase activity highlighting the role of the extended X loop in the cross-talk of the nucleotide-binding domain and the transmembrane domain. PMID:25533467

  2. GxySBA ABC Transporter of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Its Role in Sugar Utilization and vir Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinlei

    2014-01-01

    Monosaccharides available in the extracellular milieu of Agrobacterium tumefaciens can be transported into the cytoplasm, or via the periplasmic sugar binding protein, ChvE, play a critical role in controlling virulence gene expression. The ChvE-MmsAB ABC transporter is involved in the utilization of a wide range of monosaccharide substrates but redundant transporters are likely given the ability of a chvE-mmsAB deletion strain to grow, albeit more slowly, in the presence of particular monosaccharides. In this study, a putative ABC transporter encoded by the gxySBA operon is identified and shown to be involved in the utilization of glucose, xylose, fucose, and arabinose, which are also substrates for the ChvE-MmsAB ABC transporter. Significantly, GxySBA is also shown to be the first characterized glucosamine ABC transporter. The divergently transcribed gene gxyR encodes a repressor of the gxySBA operon, the function of which can be relieved by a subset of the transported sugars, including glucose, xylose, and glucosamine, and this substrate-induced expression can be repressed by glycerol. Furthermore, deletion of the transporter can increase the sensitivity of the virulence gene expression system to certain sugars that regulate it. Collectively, the results reveal a remarkably diverse set of substrates for the GxySBA transporter and its contribution to the repression of sugar sensitivity by the virulence-controlling system, thereby facilitating the capacity of the bacterium to distinguish between the soil and plant environments. PMID:24957625

  3. Structures of a Na+-coupled, substrate-bound MATE multidrug transporter

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Symersky, Jindrich; Radchenko, Martha; Koide, Akiko; Guo, Yi; Nie, Rongxin; Koide, Shohei

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family expel dissimilar lipophilic and cationic drugs across cell membranes by dissipating a preexisting Na+ or H+ gradient. Despite its clinical relevance, the transport mechanism of MATE proteins remains poorly understood, largely owing to a lack of structural information on the substrate-bound transporter. Here we report crystal structures of a Na+-coupled MATE transporter NorM from Neisseria gonorrheae in complexes with three distinct translocation substrates (ethidium, rhodamine 6G, and tetraphenylphosphonium), as well as Cs+ (a Na+ congener), all captured in extracellular-facing and drug-bound states. The structures revealed a multidrug-binding cavity festooned with four negatively charged amino acids and surprisingly limited hydrophobic moieties, in stark contrast to the general belief that aromatic amino acids play a prominent role in multidrug recognition. Furthermore, we discovered an uncommon cation–π interaction in the Na+-binding site located outside the drug-binding cavity and validated the biological relevance of both the substrate- and cation-binding sites by conducting drug resistance and transport assays. Additionally, we uncovered potential rearrangement of at least two transmembrane helices upon Na+-induced drug export. Based on our structural and functional analyses, we suggest that Na+ triggers multidrug extrusion by inducing protein conformational changes rather than by directly competing for the substrate-binding amino acids. This scenario is distinct from the canonical antiport mechanism, in which both substrate and counterion compete for a shared binding site in the transporter. Collectively, our findings provide an important step toward a detailed and mechanistic understanding of multidrug transport. PMID:23341609

  4. Sulfadiazine resistance in Toxoplasma gondii: no involvement of overexpression or polymorphisms in genes of therapeutic targets and ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Doliwa, Christelle; Escotte-Binet, Sandie; Aubert, Dominique; Sauvage, Virginie; Velard, Frédéric; Schmid, Aline; Villena, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Several treatment failures have been reported for the treatment of toxoplasmic encephalitis, chorioretinitis, and congenital toxoplasmosis. Recently we found three Toxoplasma gondii strains naturally resistant to sulfadiazine and we developed in vitro two sulfadiazine resistant strains, RH-RSDZ and ME-49-RSDZ, by gradual pressure. In Plasmodium, common mechanisms of drug resistance involve, among others, mutations and/or amplification within genes encoding the therapeutic targets dhps and dhfr and/or the ABC transporter genes family. To identify genotypic and/or phenotypic markers of resistance in T. gondii, we sequenced and analyzed the expression levels of therapeutic targets dhps and dhfr, three ABC genes, two Pgp, TgABC.B1 and TgABC.B2, and one MRP, TgABC.C1, on sensitive strains compared to sulfadiazine resistant strains. Neither polymorphism nor overexpression was identified. Contrary to Plasmodium, in which mutations and/or overexpression within gene targets and ABC transporters are involved in antimalarial resistance, T. gondii sulfadiazine resistance is not related to these toxoplasmic genes studied. PMID:23707894

  5. Phosphorylation is required for the pathogen defense function of the Arabidopsis PEN3 ABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Underwood, William; Somerville, Shauna C

    2017-10-03

    The Arabidopsis PEN3 ABC transporter accumulates at sites of pathogen detection, where it is involved in defense against a number of pathogens. Perception of PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors initiates recruitment of PEN3 and also leads to PEN3 phosphorylation at multiple amino acid residues. Whether PAMP-induced phosphorylation of PEN3 is important for its defense function or focal recruitment has not been addressed. In this study, we evaluated the role of PEN3 phosphorylation in modulating the localization and defense function of the transporter. We report that PEN3 phosphorylation is critical for its function in defense, but dispensable for recruitment to powdery mildew penetration sites. These results indicate that PAMP-induced phosphorylation is likely to regulate the transport activity of PEN3.

  6. Overcoming the heterologous bias: an in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika; Sanglard, Dominique; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-01-07

    We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplished by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the artefactual concerns encountered in using heterologous systems are totally excluded. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Genes in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Li, Shangqi; Peng, Wenzhu; Feng, Shuaisheng; Feng, Jianxin; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Xu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family is considered to be one of the largest gene families in all forms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic life. Although the ABC transporter genes have been annotated in some species, detailed information about the ABC superfamily and the evolutionary characterization of ABC genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) are still unclear. In this research, we identified 61 ABC transporter genes in the common carp genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into seven subfamilies, namely 11 ABCAs, six ABCBs, 19 ABCCs, eight ABCDs, two ABCEs, four ABCFs, and 11 ABCGs. Comparative analysis of the ABC genes in seven vertebrate species including common carp, showed that at least 10 common carp genes were retained from the third round of whole genome duplication, while 12 duplicated ABC genes may have come from the fourth round of whole genome duplication. Gene losses were also observed for 14 ABC genes. Expression profiles of the 61 ABC genes in six common carp tissues (brain, heart, spleen, kidney, intestine, and gill) revealed extensive functional divergence among the ABC genes. Different copies of some genes had tissue-specific expression patterns, which may indicate some gene function specialization. This study provides essential genomic resources for future studies in common carp.

  8. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Genes in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wenzhu; Feng, Shuaisheng; Feng, Jianxin; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A.

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family is considered to be one of the largest gene families in all forms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic life. Although the ABC transporter genes have been annotated in some species, detailed information about the ABC superfamily and the evolutionary characterization of ABC genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) are still unclear. In this research, we identified 61 ABC transporter genes in the common carp genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into seven subfamilies, namely 11 ABCAs, six ABCBs, 19 ABCCs, eight ABCDs, two ABCEs, four ABCFs, and 11 ABCGs. Comparative analysis of the ABC genes in seven vertebrate species including common carp, showed that at least 10 common carp genes were retained from the third round of whole genome duplication, while 12 duplicated ABC genes may have come from the fourth round of whole genome duplication. Gene losses were also observed for 14 ABC genes. Expression profiles of the 61 ABC genes in six common carp tissues (brain, heart, spleen, kidney, intestine, and gill) revealed extensive functional divergence among the ABC genes. Different copies of some genes had tissue-specific expression patterns, which may indicate some gene function specialization. This study provides essential genomic resources for future studies in common carp. PMID:27058731

  9. Emission of volatile organic compounds from petunia flowers is facilitated by an ABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Adebesin, Funmilayo; Widhalm, Joshua R; Boachon, Benoît; Lefèvre, François; Pierman, Baptiste; Lynch, Joseph H; Alam, Iftekhar; Junqueira, Bruna; Benke, Ryan; Ray, Shaunak; Porter, Justin A; Yanagisawa, Makoto; Wetzstein, Hazel Y; Morgan, John A; Boutry, Marc; Schuurink, Robert C; Dudareva, Natalia

    2017-06-30

    Plants synthesize a diversity of volatile molecules that are important for reproduction and defense, serve as practical products for humans, and influence atmospheric chemistry and climate. Despite progress in deciphering plant volatile biosynthesis, their release from the cell has been poorly understood. The default assumption has been that volatiles passively diffuse out of cells. By characterization of a Petunia hybrida adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, PhABCG1, we demonstrate that passage of volatiles across the plasma membrane relies on active transport. PhABCG1 down-regulation by RNA interference results in decreased emission of volatiles, which accumulate to toxic levels in the plasma membrane. This study provides direct proof of a biologically mediated mechanism of volatile emission. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. NtPDR3, an iron-deficiency inducible ABC transporter in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Ducos, Eric; Fraysse, Staffan; Boutry, Marc

    2005-12-19

    In plants, the ABC transporter PDR (pleiotropic drug resistance) subfamily is composed of approximately 15 genes, few of which have been analyzed. We have identified NtPDR3, a Nicotiana tabacum PDR gene belonging to a cluster for which no functional data was previously available. NtPDR3 was found to be induced in suspension cells treated with methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, 1-naphthalene acetic acid, or cembrene, a macrocyclic diterpene. In agreement with the identification of a putative iron deficiency element in the NtPDR3 transcription promoter region, we found that iron deficiency in the culture medium induced NtPDR3 expression, thus suggesting a new function of the PDR transporter family.

  11. A new ABC half-transporter in Leishmania major is involved in resistance to antimony.

    PubMed

    Manzano, J I; García-Hernández, R; Castanys, S; Gamarro, F

    2013-08-01

    The characterization of ABCI4, a new intracellular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) half-transporter in Leishmania major, is described. We show that ABCI4 is involved in heavy metal export, thereby conferring resistance to Pentostam, to Sb(III), and to As(III) and Cd(II). Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 showed a lower mitochondrial toxic effect of antimony by decreasing reactive oxygen species production and maintained higher values of both the mitochondrial electrochemical potential and total ATP levels with respect to controls. The ABCI4 half-transporter forms homodimers as determined by a coimmunoprecipitation assay. A combination of subcellular localization studies under a confocal microscope and a surface biotinylation assay using parasites expressing green fluorescent protein- and FLAG-tagged ABCI4 suggests that the transporter presents a dual localization in both mitochondria and the plasma membrane. Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 present an increased replication in mouse peritoneal macrophages. We have determined that porphyrins are substrates for ABCI4. Consequently, the overexpression of ABCI4 confers resistance to some toxic porphyrins, such as zinc-protoporphyrin, due to the lower accumulation resulting from a significant efflux, as determined using the fluorescent zinc-mesoporphyrin, a validated heme analog. In addition, ABCI4 has a significant ability to efflux thiol after Sb(III) incubation, thus meaning that ABCI4 could be considered to be a potential thiol-X-pump that is able to recognize metal-conjugated thiols. In summary, we have shown that this new ABC transporter is involved in drug sensitivity to antimony and other compounds by efflux as conjugated thiol complexes.

  12. EmrE, a multidrug transporter from Escherichia coli, transports monovalent and divalent substrates with the same stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Rotem, Dvir; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2004-11-19

    Multidrug transporters recognize and transport substrates with apparently little common structural features. At times these substrates are neutral, negatively, or positively charged, and only limited information is available as to how these proteins deal with the energetic consequences of transport of substrates with different charges. Multidrug transporters and drug-specific efflux systems are responsible for clinically significant resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in pathogenic bacteria, fungi, parasites, and human cancer cells. Understanding how these efflux systems handle different substrates may also have practical implications in the development of strategies to overcome the resistance mechanisms mediated by these proteins. Here, we compare transport of monovalent and divalent substrates by EmrE, a multidrug transporter from Escherichia coli, in intact cells and in proteoliposomes reconstituted with the purified protein. The results demonstrated that whereas the transport of monovalent substrates involves charge movement (i.e. electrogenic), the transport of divalent substrate does not (i.e. electroneutral). Together with previous results, these findings suggest that an EmrE dimer exchanges two protons per substrate molecule during each transport cycle. In intact cells, under conditions where the only driving force is the electrical potential, EmrE confers resistance to monovalent substrates but not to divalent ones. In the presence of proton gradients, resistance to both types of substrates is detected. The finding that under some conditions EmrE does not remove certain types of drugs points out the importance of an in-depth understanding of mechanisms of action of multidrug transporters to devise strategies for coping with the problem of multidrug resistance.

  13. Identification of Residues in the Lipopolysaccharide ABC Transporter That Coordinate ATPase Activity with Extractor Function.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Brent W; Owens, Tristan W; Orabella, Matthew J; Davis, Rebecca M; May, Janine M; Trauger, Sunia A; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2016-10-18

    The surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), creating a permeability barrier against toxic molecules, including many antimicrobials. To assemble LPS on their surface, Gram-negative bacteria must extract newly synthesized LPS from the inner membrane, transport it across the aqueous periplasm, and translocate it across the outer membrane. The LptA to -G proteins assemble into a transenvelope complex that transports LPS from the inner membrane to the cell surface. The Lpt system powers LPS transport from the inner membrane by using a poorly characterized ATP-binding cassette system composed of the ATPase LptB and the transmembrane domains LptFG. Here, we characterize a cluster of residues in the groove region of LptB that is important for controlling LPS transport. We also provide the first functional characterization of LptFG and identify their coupling helices that interact with the LptB groove. Substitutions at conserved residues in these coupling helices compromise both the assembly and function of the LptB 2 FG complex. Defects in LPS transport conferred by alterations in the LptFG coupling helices can be rescued by changing a residue in LptB that is adjacent to functionally important residues in the groove region. This suppression is achieved by increasing the ATPase activity of the LptB 2 FG complex. Taken together, these data identify a specific binding site in LptB for the coupling helices of LptFG that is responsible for coupling of ATP hydrolysis by LptB with LptFG function to achieve LPS extraction. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is synthesized at the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and transported across several compartments to the cell surface, where it forms a barrier that protects these organisms from antibiotics. The LptB 2 FG proteins form an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that uses energy from ATP hydrolysis in the cytoplasm to facilitate extraction of LPS from the outer face of the

  14. Hop resistance in the beer spoilage bacterium Lactobacillus brevis is mediated by the ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter HorA.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K; Margolles, A; van Veen, H W; Konings, W N

    2001-09-01

    Lactobacillus brevis is a major contaminant of spoiled beer. The organism can grow in beer in spite of the presence of antibacterial hop compounds that give the beer a bitter taste. The hop resistance in L. brevis is, at least in part, dependent on the expression of the horA gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of HorA is 53% identical to that of LmrA, an ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter in Lactococcus lactis. To study the role of HorA in hop resistance, HorA was functionally expressed in L. lactis as a hexa-histidine-tagged protein using the nisin-controlled gene expression system. HorA expression increased the resistance of L. lactis to hop compounds and cytotoxic drugs. Drug transport studies with L. lactis cells and membrane vesicles and with proteoliposomes containing purified HorA protein identified HorA as a new member of the ABC family of multidrug transporters.

  15. Multi-Drug Resistance Transporter 2 Regulates Mucosal Inflammation by Facilitating the Synthesis of Hepoxilin A3

    PubMed Central

    Pazos, Michael; Siccardi, Dario; Mumy, Karen L.; Bien, Jeffrey D.; Louie, Steve; Shi, Hai Ning; Gronert, Karsten; Mrsny, Randall J.; McCormick, Beth A.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrophil transmigration across mucosal surfaces contributes to dysfunction of epithelial barrier properties, a characteristic underlying many mucosal inflammatory diseases. Thus, insight into the directional movement of neutrophils across epithelial barriers will provide important information relating to the mechanisms of such inflammatory disorders. The eicosanoid hepoxilin A3, an endogenous product of 12-lipoxygenase activity, is secreted from the apical surface of the epithelial barrier and establishes a chemotatic gradient to guide neutrophils from the submucosa, across epithelia to the luminal site of an inflammatory stimulus - the final step in neutrophil recruitment. Currently, little is known regarding how hepoxilin A3 is secreted from the intestinal epithelium during an inflammatory insult. In this study we reveal that hepoxilin A3 is a substrate for the apical efflux ABC transporter, multi-drug resistance protein 2 (MRP2). Moreover, using multiple in vitro and in vivo models we show that induction of intestinal inflammation profoundly up-regulates apical expression of MRP2, and that interfering with hepoxilin A3 synthesis and/or inhibition of MRP2 function results in a marked reduction in inflammation and severity of disease. Lastly, examination of inflamed intestinal epithelia in human biopsies revealed up-regulation of MRP2. Thus, blocking hepoxilin A3 synthesis and/or inhibiting MRP2 may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of epithelial-associated inflammatory conditions. PMID:19017997

  16. Barley has two peroxisomal ABC transporters with multiple functions in β-oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Mendiondo, Guillermina M.; Medhurst, Anne; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Zhang, Xuebin; Devonshire, Jean; Scholefield, Duncan; Fernández, José; Axcell, Barry; Ramsay, Luke; Waterham, Hans R.; Waugh, Robbie; Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In oilseed plants, peroxisomal β-oxidation functions not only in lipid catabolism but also in jasmonate biosynthesis and metabolism of pro-auxins. Subfamily D ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate import of β-oxidation substrates into the peroxisome, and the Arabidopsis ABCD protein, COMATOSE (CTS), is essential for this function. Here, the roles of peroxisomal ABCD transporters were investigated in barley, where the main storage compound is starch. Barley has two CTS homologues, designated HvABCD1 and HvABCD2, which are widely expressed and present in embryo and aleurone tissues during germination. Suppression of both genes in barley RNA interference (RNAi) lines indicated roles in metabolism of 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyrate (2,4-DB) and indole butyric acid (IBA), jasmonate biosynthesis, and determination of grain size. Transformation of the Arabidopsis cts-1 null mutant with HvABCD1 and HvABCD2 confirmed these findings. HvABCD2 partially or completely complemented all tested phenotypes of cts-1. In contrast, HvABCD1 failed to complement the germination and establishment phenotypes of cts-1 but increased the sensitivity of hypocotyls to 100 μM IBA and partially complemented the seed size phenotype. HvABCD1 also partially complemented the yeast pxa1/pxa2Δ mutant for fatty acid β-oxidation. It is concluded that the core biochemical functions of peroxisomal ABC transporters are largely conserved between oilseeds and cereals but that their physiological roles and importance may differ. PMID:24913629

  17. Investigation of the quaternary structure of an ABC transporter in living cells using spectrally resolved resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Deo Raj

    Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has become an important tool to study proteins inside living cells. It has been used to explore membrane protein folding and dynamics, determine stoichiometry and geometry of protein complexes, and measure the distance between two molecules. In this dissertation, we use a method based on FRET and optical micro-spectroscopy (OptiMiS) technology, developed in our lab, to probe the structure of dynamic (as opposed to static) protein complexes in living cells. We use this method to determine the association stoichiometry and quaternary structure of an ABC transporter in living cells. Specifically, the transporter we investigate originates from the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative bacterium with several virulence factors, lipopolysaccharides being one of them. This pathogen coexpresses two unique forms of lipopolysaccharides on its surface, the A- and B-bands. The A-band polysaccharides, synthesized in the cytoplasm, are translocated into the periplasm through an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter consisting of a transmembranar protein, Wzm, and a nucleotide-binding protein, Wzt. In P. aeruginosa, all of the biochemical studies of A-band LPS are concentrated on the stages of the synthesis and ligation of polysaccharides (PSs), leaving the export stage involving ABC transporter unexplored. The mode of PS export through ABC transporters is still unknown. This difficulty is due to the lack of information about sub-unit composition and structure of this bi-component ABC transporter. Using the FRET-OptiMiS combination method developed by our lab, we found that Wzt forms a rhombus-shaped homo-tetramer which becomes a square upon co-expression with Wzm, and that Wzm forms a square-shaped homo-tetramer both in the presence and absence of Wzt. Based on these results, we propose a structural model for the double-tetramer complex formed by the bi-component ABC transporter in living cells. An understanding of the

  18. Trichothecene resistance in wheat: Development of molecular markers for PDR-type ABC transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Mitterbauer, R; Heinrich, M; Rauscher, R; Lemmens, M; Bürstmayr, H; Adam, G

    2003-03-01

    Infection withFusarium graminearum andF. culmorum not only causes severe yield and quality losses, the most relevant concern is the contamination of cereal foods and feeds with trichothecenes (e.g. deoxynivalenol, DON). The ability to synthesize trichothecenes has been shown to be a virulence factor ofF. graminearum on wheat and, on the other hand, toxin resistance is most likely an important component of field resistance. Our hypothesis is that pleiotropic drug resistance mediated by PDR-type ABC transporter proteins (acting as membrane located drug efflux pumps) is a relevant mechanism of DON resistance not only in yeast but also in wheat. Goal of this project is the development of molecular markers for this gene family for use in marker-assisted plant breeding programs. The technical difficulties caused by the large size of the PDR-family are discussed.

  19. Human and Rat ABC Transporter Efflux of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol A Glucuronide: Interspecies Comparison and Implications for Pharmacokinetic Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant interspecies differences exist between human and rodent with respect to absorption, distribution, and excretion of bisphenol A (BPA) and its primary metabolite, BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G). ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter enzymes play important roles in these physi...

  20. Inhibition of the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    High body burdens of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in infants and young children have led to increased concern over their potential impact on human development. PBDE exposure can alter the expression of genes involved in thyroid homeostasis, including those of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which mediate cellular xenobiotic efflux. However, little information exists on how PBDEs interact with ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the interactions of 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and its hydroxylated metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with P-gp and BCRP, using human MDR1- and BCRP-expressing membrane vesicles and stably transfected NIH-3T3-MDR1 and MDCK-BCRP cells. In P-gp membranes, BDE-47 did not affect P-gp activity; however, 6-OH-BDE-47 inhibited P-gp activity at low µM concentrations (IC50 = 11.7 µM). In BCRP membranes, BDE-47 inhibited BCRP activity; however, 6-OH-BDE-47 was a stronger inhibitor [IC50 = 45.9 µM (BDE-47) vs. IC50 = 9.4 µM (6-OH-BDE-47)]. Intracellular concentrations of known P-gp and BCRP substrates [(3H)-paclitaxel and (3H)-prazosin, respectively] were significantly higher (indicating less efflux) in NIH-3T3-MDR1 and MDCK-BCRP cells in the presence of 6-OH-BDE-47, but not BDE-47. Collectively, our results indicate that the BDE-47 metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 is an inhibitor of both P-gp and BCRP efflux activity.

  1. P-glycoproteins and other multidrug resistance transporters in the pharmacology of anthelmintics: Prospects for reversing transport-dependent anthelmintic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lespine, Anne; Ménez, Cécile; Bourguinat, Catherine; Prichard, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic helminths cause significant disease in animals and humans. In the absence of alternative treatments, anthelmintics remain the principal agents for their control. Resistance extends to the most important class of anthelmintics, the macrocyclic lactone endectocides (MLs), such as ivermectin, and presents serious problems for the livestock industries and threatens to severely limit current parasite control strategies in humans. Understanding drug resistance is important for optimizing and monitoring control, and reducing further selection for resistance. Multidrug resistance (MDR) ABC transporters have been implicated in ML resistance and contribute to resistance to a number of other anthelmintics. MDR transporters, such as P-glycoproteins, are essential for many cellular processes that require the transport of substrates across cell membranes. Being overexpressed in response to chemotherapy in tumour cells and to ML-based treatment in nematodes, they lead to therapy failure by decreasing drug concentration at the target. Several anthelmintics are inhibitors of these efflux pumps and appropriate combinations can result in higher treatment efficacy against parasites and reversal of resistance. However, this needs to be balanced against possible increased toxicity to the host, or the components of the combination selecting on the same genes involved in the resistance. Increased efficacy could result from modifying anthelmintic pharmacokinetics in the host or by blocking parasite transporters involved in resistance. Combination of anthelmintics can be beneficial for delaying selection for resistance. However, it should be based on knowledge of resistance mechanisms and not simply on mode of action classes, and is best started before resistance has been selected to any member of the combination. Increasing knowledge of the MDR transporters involved in anthelmintic resistance in helminths will play an important role in allowing for the identification of markers

  2. An allosteric transport mechanism for the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Fan, Guizhen; Hryc, Corey F; Blaza, James N; Serysheva, Irina I; Schmid, Michael F; Chiu, Wah; Luisi, Ben F; Du, Dijun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial efflux pumps confer multidrug resistance by transporting diverse antibiotics from the cell. In Gram-negative bacteria, some of these pumps form multi-protein assemblies that span the cell envelope. Here, we report the near-atomic resolution cryoEM structures of the Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump in resting and drug transport states, revealing a quaternary structural switch that allosterically couples and synchronizes initial ligand binding with channel opening. Within the transport-activated state, the channel remains open even though the pump cycles through three distinct conformations. Collectively, our data provide a dynamic mechanism for the assembly and operation of the AcrAB-TolC pump. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24905.001 PMID:28355133

  3. The ABC transporter Rv1272c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances the import of long-chain fatty acids in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Martin, Audrey; Daniel, Jaiyanth

    2018-02-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which causes tuberculosis, is capable of accumulating triacylglycerol (TAG) by utilizing fatty acids from host cells. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are involved in transport processes in all organisms. Among the classical ABC transporters in Mtb none have been implicated in fatty acid import. Since the transport of fatty acids from the host cell is important for dormancy-associated TAG synthesis in the pathogen, mycobacterial ABC transporter(s) could potentially be involved in this process. Based on sequence identities with a bacterial ABC transporter that mediates fatty acid import for TAG synthesis, we identified Rv1272c, a hitherto uncharacterized ABC-transporter in Mtb that also shows sequence identities with a plant ABC transporter involved in fatty acid transport. We expressed Rv1272c in E. coli and show that it enhances the import of radiolabeled fatty acids. We also show that Rv1272c causes a significant increase in the metabolic incorporation of radiolabeled long-chain fatty acids into cardiolipin, a tetra-acylated phospholipid, and phosphatidylglycerol in E. coli. This is the first report on the function of Rv1272c showing that it displays a long-chain fatty acid transport function. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of acquired paclitaxel resistance of breast cancer cells and involvement of ABC transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta, E-mail: vlasta.furstova@

    Development of taxane resistance has become clinically very important issue. The molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance are still unclear. To address this issue, we established paclitaxel-resistant sublines of the SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines that are capable of long-term proliferation in 100 nM and 300 nM paclitaxel, respectively. Application of these concentrations leads to cell death in the original counterpart cells. Both sublines are cross-resistant to doxorubicin, indicating the presence of the MDR phenotype. Interestingly, resistance in both paclitaxel-resistant sublines is circumvented by the second-generation taxane SB-T-1216. Moreover, we demonstrated that it was not possible to establish sublinesmore » of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells resistant to this taxane. It means that at least the tested breast cancer cells are unable to develop resistance to some taxanes. Employing mRNA expression profiling of all known human ABC transporters and subsequent Western blot analysis of the expression of selected transporters, we demonstrated that only the ABCB1/PgP and ABCC3/MRP3 proteins were up-regulated in both paclitaxel-resistant sublines. We found up-regulation of ABCG2/BCRP and ABCC4 proteins only in paclitaxel-resistant SK-BR-3 cells. In paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7 cells, ABCB4/MDR3 and ABCC2/MRP2 proteins were up-regulated. Silencing of ABCB1 expression using specific siRNA increased significantly, but did not completely restore full sensitivity to both paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Thus we showed a key, but not exclusive, role for ABCB1 in mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance. It suggests the involvement of multiple mechanisms in paclitaxel resistance in tested breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Expression of all ABC transporters in paclitaxel-resistant sublines of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells was analyzed. • SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells are unable to develop resistance to some taxanes. • Some taxanes are able to overcome developed resistance to

  5. Osimertinib (AZD9291) Attenuates the Function of Multidrug Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB1 in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sung-Han; Lu, Yu-Jen; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Wu, Chung-Pu

    2016-06-06

    The effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy is often circumvented by multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 (MDR1, P-glycoprotein). Several epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been shown previously capable of modulating the function of ABCB1 and reversing ABCB1-mediated MDR in human cancer cells. Furthermore, some TKIs are transported by ABCB1, which results in low oral bioavailability, reduced distribution, and the development of acquired resistance to these TKIs. In this study, we investigated the interaction between ABCB1 and osimertinib, a novel selective, irreversible third-generation EGFR TKI that has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We also evaluated the potential impact of ABCB1 on the efficacy of osimertinib in cancer cells, which can present a therapeutic challenge to clinicians in the future. We revealed that although osimertinib stimulates the ATPase activity of ABCB1, overexpression of ABCB1 does not confer resistance to osimertinib. Our results suggest that it is unlikely that the overexpression of ABCB1 can be a major contributor to the development of osimertinib resistance in cancer patients. More significantly, we revealed an additional action of osimertinib that directly inhibits the function of ABCB1 without affecting the expression level of ABCB1, enhances drug-induced apoptosis, and reverses the MDR phenotype in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. Considering that osimertinib is a clinically approved third-generation EGFR TKI, our findings suggest that a combination therapy with osimertinib and conventional anticancer drugs may be beneficial to patients with MDR tumors.

  6. The structure of the human ABC transporter ABCG2 reveals a novel mechanism for drug extrusion.

    PubMed

    Khunweeraphong, Narakorn; Stockner, Thomas; Kuchler, Karl

    2017-10-23

    The human ABC transporter ABCG2 (Breast Cancer Resistance Protein, BCRP) is implicated in anticancer resistance, in detoxification across barriers and linked to gout. Here, we generate a novel atomic model of ABCG2 using the crystal structure of ABCG5/G8. Extensive mutagenesis verifies the structure, disclosing hitherto unrecognized essential residues and domains in the homodimeric ABCG2 transporter. The elbow helix, the first intracellular loop (ICL1) and the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) constitute pivotal elements of the architecture building the transmission interface that borders a central cavity which acts as a drug trap. The transmission interface is stabilized by salt-bridge interactions between the elbow helix and ICL1, as well as within ICL1, which is essential to control the conformational switch of ABCG2 to the outward-open drug-releasing conformation. Importantly, we propose that ICL1 operates like a molecular spring that holds the NBD dimer close to the membrane, thereby enabling efficient coupling of ATP hydrolysis during the catalytic cycle. These novel mechanistic data open new opportunities to therapeutically target ABCG2 in the context of related diseases.

  7. Alkyl-Lysophospholipid Resistance in Multidrug-Resistant Leishmania tropica and Chemosensitization by a Novel P-Glycoprotein-Like Transporter Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Victoria, José M.; Pérez-Victoria, F. Javier; Parodi-Talice, Adriana; Jiménez, Ignacio A.; Ravelo, Angel G.; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    Drug resistance has emerged as a major impediment in the treatment of leishmaniasis. Alkyl-lysophospholipids (ALP), originally developed as anticancer drugs, are considered to be the most promising antileishmanial agents. In order to anticipate probable clinical failure in the near future, we have investigated possible mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Leishmania spp. The results presented here support the involvement of a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, the Leishmania P-glycoprotein-like transporter, in the resistance to ALP. (i) First, a multidrug resistance (MDR) Leishmania tropica line overexpressing a P-glycoprotein-like transporter displays significant cross-resistance to the ALP miltefosine and edelfosine, with resistant indices of 9.2- and 7.1-fold, respectively. (ii) Reduced expression of P-glycoprotein in the MDR line correlates with a significant decrease in ALP resistance. (iii) The ALP were able to modulate the P-glycoprotein-mediated resistance to daunomycin in the MDR line. (iv) We have found a new inhibitor of this transporter, the sesquiterpene C-3, that completely sensitizes MDR parasites to ALP. (v) Finally, the MDR line exhibits a lower accumulation than the wild-type line of bodipy-C5-PC, a fluorescent analogue of phosphatidylcholine that has a structure resembling that of edelfosine. Also, C-3 significantly increases the accumulation of the fluorescent analogue to levels similar to those of wild-type parasites. The involvement of the Leishmania P-glycoprotein-like transporter in resistance to drugs used in the treatment of leishmaniasis also supports the importance of developing new specific inhibitors of this ABC transporter. PMID:11502516

  8. Multiple ABC glucoside transporters mediate sugar-stimulated growth in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Morión, Mercedes; Flores, Enrique

    2018-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are generally capable of photoautotrophic growth and are widely distributed on Earth. The model filamentous, heterocyst-forming strain Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 has long been considered as a strict photoautotroph but is now known to be able to assimilate fructose. We have previously described two components of ABC glucoside uptake transporters from Anabaena that are involved in uptake of the sucrose analog esculin: GlsC [a nucleotide-binding domain subunit (NBD)] and GlsP [a transmembrane component (TMD)]. Here, we created Anabaena mutants of genes encoding three further ABC transporter components needed for esculin uptake: GlsD (NBD), GlsQ (TMD) and GlsR (periplasmic substrate-binding protein). Phototrophic growth of Anabaena was significantly stimulated by sucrose, fructose and glucose. Whereas the glsC and glsD mutants were drastically hampered in sucrose-stimulated growth, the different gls mutants were generally impaired in sugar-dependent growth. Our results suggest the participation of Gls and other ABC transporters encoded in the Anabaena genome in sugar-stimulated growth. Additionally, Gls transporter components influence the function of septal junctions in the Anabaena filament. We suggest that mixotrophic growth is important in cyanobacterial physiology and may be relevant for the wide success of these organisms in diverse environments. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Functional assignment of solute-binding proteins of ABC transporters using a fluorescence-based thermal shift assay.

    SciTech Connect

    Giulliani, S. E.; Frank, A. E.; Collart, F. R.

    2008-12-08

    We have used a fluorescence-based thermal shift (FTS) assay to identify amino acids that bind to solute-binding proteins in the bacterial ABC transporter family. The assay was validated with a set of six proteins with known binding specificity and was consistently able to map proteins with their known binding ligands. The assay also identified additional candidate binding ligands for several of the amino acid-binding proteins in the validation set. We extended this approach to additional targets and demonstrated the ability of the FTS assay to unambiguously identify preferential binding for several homologues of amino acid-binding proteins with known specificity andmore » to functionally annotate proteins of unknown binding specificity. The assay is implemented in a microwell plate format and provides a rapid approach to validate an anticipated function or to screen proteins of unknown function. The ABC-type transporter family is ubiquitous and transports a variety of biological compounds, but the current annotation of the ligand-binding proteins is limited to mostly generic descriptions of function. The results illustrate the feasibility of the FTS assay to improve the functional annotation of binding proteins associated with ABC-type transporters and suggest this approach that can also be extended to other protein families.« less

  10. ABC transporter content diversity in Streptococcus pneumoniae impacts competence regulation and bacteriocin production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charles Y; Patel, Nisha; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Dawid, Suzanne

    2018-06-19

    The opportunistic pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) uses natural genetic competence to increase its adaptability through horizontal gene transfer. One method of acquiring DNA is through predation of neighboring strains with antimicrobial peptides called "bacteriocins." Competence and production of the major family of pneumococcal bacteriocins, pneumocins, are regulated by the quorum-sensing systems com and blp , respectively. In the classical paradigm, the ABC transporters ComAB and BlpAB each secretes its own system's signaling pheromone and in the case of BlpAB also secretes the pneumocins. While ComAB is found in all pneumococci, only 25% of strains encode an intact version of BlpAB [BlpAB(+)] while the rest do not [BlpAB(-)]. Contrary to the classical paradigm, it was previously shown that BlpAB(-) strains can activate blp through ComAB-mediated secretion of the blp pheromone during brief periods of competence. To better understand the full extent of com - blp crosstalk, we examined the contribution of each transporter to competence development and pneumocin secretion. We found that BlpAB(+) strains have a greater capacity for competence activation through BlpAB-mediated secretion of the com pheromone. Similarly, we show that ComAB and BlpAB are promiscuous and both can secrete pneumocins. Consequently, differences in pneumocin secretion between BlpAB(+) and BlpAB(-) strains derive from the regulation and kinetics of transporter expression rather than substrate specificity. We speculate that BlpAB(-) strains (opportunists) use pneumocins mainly in a narrowly tailored role for DNA acquisition and defense during competence while BlpAB(+) strains (aggressors) expand their use for the general inhibition of rival strains. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  11. Multiple ABC transporters are involved in the acquisition of petrobactin in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Shandee D.; Janes, Brian K.; Bourgis, Alexandra; Carlson, Paul E.; Hanna, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In Bacillus anthracis the siderophore petrobactin is vital for iron acquisition and virulence. The petrobactin-binding receptor FpuA is required for these processes. Here additional components of petrobactin reacquisition are described. To identify these proteins, mutants of candidate permease and ATPase genes were generated allowing for characterization of multiple petrobactin ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-import systems. Either of two distinct permeases, FpuB or FatCD, are required for iron acquisition and play redundant roles in petrobactin transport. A mutant strain lacking both permeases, ΔfpuBΔfatCD, was incapable of using petrobactin as an iron source and exhibited attenuated virulence in a murine model of inhalational anthrax infection. ATPase mutants were generated in either of the permease mutant backgrounds to identify the ATPase(s) interacting with each individual permease channel. Mutants lacking the FpuB permease and FatE ATPase (ΔfpuBΔfatE) and a mutant lacking the distinct ATPases FpuC and FpuD generated in the ΔfatCD background (ΔfatCDΔfpuCΔfpuD) displayed phenotypic characteristics of a mutant deficient in petrobactin import. A mutant lacking all three of the identified ATPases (ΔfatEΔfpuCΔfpuD) exhibited the same growth defect in iron-depleted conditions. Taken together, these results provide the first description of the permease and ATPase proteins required for the import of petrobactin in B. anthracis. PMID:22429808

  12. Minireview: SLCO and ABC Transporters: A Role for Steroid Transport in Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunpi; Montgomery, R. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Androgens play a critical role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and androgen deprivation therapy via surgical or medical castration is front-line therapy for patients with advanced PCa. However, intratumoral testosterone levels are elevated in metastases from patients with castration-resistant disease, and residual intratumoral androgens have been implicated in mediating ligand-dependent mechanisms of androgen receptor activation. The source of residual tissue androgens present despite castration has not been fully elucidated, but proposed mechanisms include uptake and conversion of adrenal androgens, such as dehdroepiandrosterone to testosterone and dihydrotestosterone, or de novo androgen synthesis from cholesterol or progesterone precursors. In this minireview, we discuss the emerging evidence that suggests a role for specific transporters in mediating transport of steroids into or out of prostate cells, thereby influencing intratumoral androgen levels and PCa development and progression. We focus on the solute carrier and ATP binding cassette gene families, which have the most published data for a role in PCa-related steroid transport, and review the potential impact of genetic variation on steroid transport activity and PCa outcomes. Continued assessment of transport activity in PCa models and human tumor tissue is needed to better delineate the different roles these transporters play in physiologic and neoplastic settings, and in order to determine whether targeting the uptake of steroid substrates by specific transporters may be a clinically feasible therapeutic strategy. PMID:25147980

  13. Osmoregulated ABC-transport system of Lactococcus lactis senses water stress via changes in the physical state of the membrane.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, T; Poolman, B

    2000-06-20

    An osmoregulated ABC transporter (OpuA) with novel structural features has been identified that responds to water stress. This glycine betaine transport system consists of an ATP-binding/hydrolyzing subunit (OpuAA) and a protein (OpuABC) that contains both the translocator and the substrate-binding domain. The components of OpuA have been overexpressed, purified, and functionally incorporated into liposomes with an ATP-regenerating system in the vesicle lumen. A transmembrane osmotic gradient (outside hyperosmotic relative to the inside) of both ionic and nonionic compounds was able to osmotically activate OpuA in the proteoliposomal system. Hypoosmotic medium conditions inhibited the basal activity of the system. The data show that OpuAA and OpuABC are sufficient for osmoregulated transport, indicating that OpuA can act both as osmosensor and osmoregulator. Strikingly, OpuA could also be activated by low concentrations of cationic and anionic amphipaths, which interact with the membrane. This result indicates that activation by a transmembrane osmotic gradient is mediated by changes in membrane properties/protein-lipid interactions.

  14. The ABC transporter Tba of Amycolatopsis balhimycina is required for efficient export of the glycopeptide antibiotic balhimycin.

    PubMed

    Menges, R; Muth, G; Wohlleben, W; Stegmann, E

    2007-11-01

    All known gene clusters for glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis contain a conserved gene supposed to encode an ABC-transporter. In the balhimycin-producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina this gene (tba) is localised between the prephenate dehydrogenase gene pdh and the peptide synthetase gene bpsA. Inactivation of tba in A. balhimycina by gene replacement did not interfere with growth and did not affect balhimycin resistance. However, in the supernatant of the tba mutant RM43 less balhimycin was accumulated compared to the wild type; and the intra-cellular balhimycin concentration was ten times higher in the tba mutant RM43 than in the wild type. These data suggest that the ABC transporter encoded in the balhimycin biosynthesis gene cluster is not involved in resistance but is required for the efficient export of the antibiotic. To elucidate the activity of Tba it was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His-tag and purified by nickel chromatography. A photometric assay revealed that His(6)-Tba solubilised in dodecylmaltoside possesses ATPase activity, characteristic for ABC-transporters.

  15. Osmoregulated ABC-transport system of Lactococcus lactis senses water stress via changes in the physical state of the membrane

    PubMed Central

    van der Heide, Tiemen; Poolman, Bert

    2000-01-01

    An osmoregulated ABC transporter (OpuA) with novel structural features has been identified that responds to water stress. This glycine betaine transport system consists of an ATP-binding/hydrolyzing subunit (OpuAA) and a protein (OpuABC) that contains both the translocator and the substrate-binding domain. The components of OpuA have been overexpressed, purified, and functionally incorporated into liposomes with an ATP-regenerating system in the vesicle lumen. A transmembrane osmotic gradient (outside hyperosmotic relative to the inside) of both ionic and nonionic compounds was able to osmotically activate OpuA in the proteoliposomal system. Hypoosmotic medium conditions inhibited the basal activity of the system. The data show that OpuAA and OpuABC are sufficient for osmoregulated transport, indicating that OpuA can act both as osmosensor and osmoregulator. Strikingly, OpuA could also be activated by low concentrations of cationic and anionic amphipaths, which interact with the membrane. This result indicates that activation by a transmembrane osmotic gradient is mediated by changes in membrane properties/protein–lipid interactions. PMID:10860977

  16. Autophagy and Transporter-Based Multi-Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyank; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Degenhardt, Kurt; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    All the therapeutic strategies for treating cancers aim at killing the cancer cells via apoptosis (programmed cell death type I). Defective apoptosis endow tumor cells with survival. The cell can respond to such defects with autophagy. Autophagy is a cellular process by which cytoplasmic material is either degraded to maintain homeostasis or recycled for energy and nutrients in starvation. A plethora of evidence has shown that the role of autophagy in tumors is complex. A lot of effort is needed to underline the functional status of autophagy in tumor progression and treatment, and elucidate how to tweak autophagy to treat cancer. Furthermore, during the treatment of cancer, the limitation for the cure rate and survival is the phenomenon of multi drug resistance (MDR). The development of MDR is an intricate process that could be regulated by drug transporters, enzymes, anti-apoptotic genes or DNA repair mechanisms. Reports have shown that autophagy has a dual role in MDR. Furthermore, it has been reported that activation of a death pathway may overcome MDR, thus pointing the importance of other death pathways to regulate tumor cell progression and growth. Therefore, in this review we will discuss the role of autophagy in MDR tumors and a possible link amongst these phenomena. PMID:24710490

  17. Iowa ABC connections.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-06-01

    For several years the Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT), Iowa State University, the Federal Highway Administration, : and several Iowa counties have been working to develop accelerated bridge construction (ABC) concepts, details, and processes....

  18. ATP- and glutathione-dependent transport of chemotherapeutic drugs by the multidrug resistance protein MRP1

    PubMed Central

    Renes, Johan; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Nienhuis, Edith F; Jansen, Peter L M; Müller, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the ability of the multidrug resistance protein (MRP1) to transport different cationic substrates in comparison with MDR1-P-glycoprotein (MDR1). Transport studies were performed with isolated membrane vesicles from in vitro selected multidrug resistant cell lines overexpressing MDR1 (A2780AD) or MRP1 (GLC4/Adr) and a MRP1-transfected cell line (S1(MRP)). As substrates we used 3H-labelled derivatives of the hydrophilic monoquaternary cation N-(4′,4′-azo-n-pentyl)-21-deoxy-ajmalinium (APDA), the basic drug vincristine and the more hydrophobic basic drug daunorubicin. All three are known MDR1-substrates. MRP1 did not mediate transport of these substrates per se. In the presence of reduced glutathione (GSH), there was an ATP-dependent uptake of vincristine and daunorubicin, but not of APDA, into GLC4/Adr and S1(MRP) membrane vesicles which could be inhibited by the MRP1-inhibitor MK571. ATP- and GSH-dependent transport of daunorubicin and vincristine into GLC4/Adr membrane vesicles was inhibited by the MRP1-specific monoclonal antibody QCRL-3. MRP1-mediated daunorubicin transport rates were dependent on the concentration of GSH and were maximal at concentrations ⩾10 mM. The apparent KM value for GSH was 2.7 mM. Transport of daunorubicin in the presence of 10 mM GSH was inhibited by MK571 with an IC50 of 0.4 μM. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that MRP1 transports vincristine and daunorubicin in an ATP- and GSH-dependent manner. APDA is not a substrate for MRP1. PMID:10188979

  19. The multidrug transporter ABCG2 (BCRP) is inhibited by plant-derived cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Holland, M L; Lau, D T T; Allen, J D; Arnold, J C

    2007-11-01

    Cannabinoids are used therapeutically for the palliation of the adverse side effects associated with cancer chemotherapy. However, cannabinoids also inhibit both the activity and expression of the multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein in vitro. Here we address the interaction of cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD) and delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) with the related multidrug transporter, ABCG2. Cannabinoid inhibition of Abcg2/ABCG2 was assessed using flow cytometric analysis of substrate accumulation and ATPase activity assays. The cytotoxicity and chemosensitization by cannabinoids was determined with cell viability assays. Expression of cannabinoid and vanilloid receptors was assessed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and cannabinoid modulation of ABCG2 expression was examined using immunoblotting. CBN, CBD and THC increased the intracellular accumulation of the Abcg2/ABCG2 substrate, mitoxantrone, in an over-expressing cell line. The THC metabolite, (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-THC was much less potent. The plant cannabinoids inhibited both basal and substrate stimulated ATPase activity of human ABCG2. Cannabinoid cytotoxicity occurred in the absence of known cannabinoid cell surface receptors, and only at concentrations higher than those required for Abcg2/ABCG2 inhibition. Sub-toxic concentrations of the cannabinoids resensitized the overexpressing cell line to the cytotoxic effect of Abcg2/ABCG2 substrates, mitoxantrone and topotecan. This occurred in the absence of any effect on ABCG2 expression. Cannabinoids are novel Abcg2/ABCG2 inhibitors, reversing the Abcg2-mediated multidrug-resistant phenotype in vitro. This finding may have implications for the co-administration of cannabinoids with pharmaceuticals that are ABCG2 substrates.

  20. The multidrug transporter ABCG2 (BCRP) is inhibited by plant-derived cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Holland, M L; Lau, D T T; Allen, J D; Arnold, J C

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cannabinoids are used therapeutically for the palliation of the adverse side effects associated with cancer chemotherapy. However, cannabinoids also inhibit both the activity and expression of the multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein in vitro. Here we address the interaction of cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) with the related multidrug transporter, ABCG2. Experimental approach: Cannabinoid inhibition of Abcg2/ABCG2 was assessed using flow cytometric analysis of substrate accumulation and ATPase activity assays. The cytotoxicity and chemosensitization by cannabinoids was determined with cell viability assays. Expression of cannabinoid and vanilloid receptors was assessed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and cannabinoid modulation of ABCG2 expression was examined using immunoblotting. Key results: CBN, CBD and THC increased the intracellular accumulation of the Abcg2/ABCG2 substrate, mitoxantrone, in an over-expressing cell line. The THC metabolite, (−)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-THC was much less potent. The plant cannabinoids inhibited both basal and substrate stimulated ATPase activity of human ABCG2. Cannabinoid cytotoxicity occurred in the absence of known cannabinoid cell surface receptors, and only at concentrations higher than those required for Abcg2/ABCG2 inhibition. Sub-toxic concentrations of the cannabinoids resensitized the overexpressing cell line to the cytotoxic effect of Abcg2/ABCG2 substrates, mitoxantrone and topotecan. This occurred in the absence of any effect on ABCG2 expression. Conclusions and implications: Cannabinoids are novel Abcg2/ABCG2 inhibitors, reversing the Abcg2-mediated multidrug-resistant phenotype in vitro. This finding may have implications for the co-administration of cannabinoids with pharmaceuticals that are ABCG2 substrates. PMID:17906686

  1. Characterization of SiaA, a streptococcal heme-binding protein associated with a heme ABC transport system.

    PubMed

    Sook, Brian R; Block, Darci R; Sumithran, Suganya; Montañez, Griselle E; Rodgers, Kenton R; Dawson, John H; Eichenbaum, Zehava; Dixon, Dabney W

    2008-02-26

    Many pathogenic bacteria require heme and obtain it from their environment. Heme transverses the cytoplasmic membrane via an ATP binding cassette (ABC) pathway. Although a number of heme ABC transport systems have been described in pathogenic bacteria, there is as yet little biophysical characterization of the proteins in these systems. The sia (hts) gene cluster encodes a heme ABC transporter in the Gram positive Streptococcus pyogenes. The lipoprotein-anchored heme binding protein (HBP) of this transporter is SiaA (HtsA). In the current study, resonance Raman (rR), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to determine the coordination state and spin state of both the ferric and ferrous forms of this protein. Identifiers from these techniques suggest that the heme is six-coordinate and low-spin in both oxidation states of the protein, with methionine and histidine as axial ligands. SiaA has a pKa of 9.7 +/- 0.1, attributed to deprotonation of the axial histidine. Guanidinium titration studies show that the ferric state is less stable than the ferrous state, with DeltaG(H2O) values for the oxidized and reduced proteins of 7.3 +/- 0.8 and 16.0 +/- 3.6 kcal mol-1, respectively. The reductive and oxidative midpoint potentials determined via spectroelectrochemistry are 83 +/- 3 and 64 +/- 3 mV, respectively; the irreversibility of heme reduction suggests that redox cycling of the heme is coupled to a kinetically sluggish change in structure or conformation. The biophysical characterization described herein will significantly advance our understanding of structure-function relationships in HBP.

  2. A wheat ABC transporter contributes to both grain formation and mycotoxin tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stephanie; Kahla, Amal; Arunachalam, Chanemoughasoundharam; Perochon, Alexandre; Khan, Mojibur R.; Scofield, Steven R.; Doohan, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) acts as a disease virulence factor for Fusarium fungi, and tolerance of DON enhances wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease. Two variants of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family C transporter gene were cloned from DON-treated wheat mRNA, namely TaABCC3.1 and TaABCC3.2. These represent two of three putative genes identified on chromosomes 3A, 3B, and 3D of the wheat genome sequence. Variant TaABCC3.1 represents the DON-responsive transcript previously associated with DON resistance in wheat. PCR-based mapping and in silico sequence analyses located TaABCC3.1 to the short arm of wheat chromosome 3B (not within the FHB resistance quantitative trait locus Fhb1). In silico analyses of microarray data indicated that TaABCC3 genes are expressed in reproductive tissue and roots, and in response to the DON producer Fusarium graminearum. Gene expression studies showed that TaABCC3.1 is activated as part of the early host response to DON and in response to the FHB defence hormone jasmonic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) confirmed that TaABCC3 genes contributed to DON tolerance. VIGS was performed using two independent viral construct applications: one specifically targeted TaABCC3.1 for silencing, while the other targeted this gene and the chromosome 3A homeologue. In both instances, VIGS resulted in more toxin-induced discoloration of spikelets, compared with the DON effects in non-silenced spikelets at 14 d after toxin treatment (≥2.2-fold increase, P<0.05). Silencing by both VIGS constructs enhanced head ripening, and especially so in DON-treated heads. VIGS of TaABCC3 genes also reduced the grain number by more than 28% (P<0.05), both with and without DON treatment, and the effects were greater for the construct that targeted the two homeologues. Hence, DON-responsive TaABCC3 genes warrant further study to determine their potential as disease resistance breeding targets and their function in grain formation

  3. The ABC transporter ABCG29 is involved in H2O2 tolerance and biocontrol traits in the fungus Clonostachys rosea.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Mukesh; Jensen, Dan Funck; Karlsson, Magnus

    2016-04-01

    For successful biocontrol interactions, biological control organisms must tolerate toxic metabolites produced by themselves or plant pathogens during mycoparasitic/antagonistic interactions, by host plant during colonization of the plant, and xenobiotics present in the environment. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters can play a significant role in tolerance of toxic compounds by mediating active transport across the cellular membrane. This paper reports on functional characterization of an ABC transporter ABCG29 in the biocontrol fungus Clonostachys rosea strain IK726. Gene expression analysis showed induced expression of abcG29 during exposure to the Fusarium spp. mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) and the fungicides Cantus, Chipco Green and Apron. Expression of abcG29 in C. rosea was significantly higher during C. rosea-C. rosea (Cr-Cr) interaction or in exposure to C. rosea culture filtrate for 2 h, compared to interaction with Fusarium graminearum or 2 h exposure to F. graminearum culture filtrate. In contrast with gene expression data, ΔabcG29 strains did not display reduced tolerance towards ZEA, fungicides or chemical agents known for inducing oxidative, cell wall or osmotic stress, compared to C. rosea WT. The exception was a significant reduction in tolerance to H2O2 (10 mM) in ΔabcG29 strains when conidia were used as an inoculum. The antagonistic ability of ΔabcG29 strains towards F. graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum or Botrytis cinerea in dual plate assays were not different compared with WT. However, in biocontrol assays ΔabcG29 strains displayed reduced ability to protect Arabidopsis thaliana leaves from B. cinerea, and barley seedling from F. graminearum as measured by an A. thaliana detached leaf assay and a barley foot rot disease assay, respectively. These data show that the ABCG29 is dispensable for ZEA and fungicides tolerance, and antagonism but not H2O2 tolerance and biocontrol effects in C. rosea.

  4. Molecular cloning and expression profile of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene from the hemipteran insect Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Zha, W J; Li, S H; Zhou, L; Chen, Z J; Liu, K; Yang, G C; Hu, G; He, G C; You, A Q

    2015-03-30

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters belong to a large superfamily of proteins that have important physiological functions in all living organisms. In insects, ABC transporters have important functions in the transport of molecules, and are also involved in insecticide resistance, metabolism, and development. In this study, the Nilaparvata lugens Stal (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) ABCG (NlABCG) gene was identified and characterized. The complete mRNA sequence of NlABCG was 2608-bp long, with an open reading frame of 2064 bp encoding a protein comprised of 687 amino acids. The conserved regions include three N-glycosylation and 34 phosphorylation sites, as well as seven transmembrane domains. The amino acid identity with the closely related species Acyrthosiphon pisum was 42.8%. Developmental expression analysis using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR suggested that the NlABCG transcript was expressed at all developmental stages of N. lugens. The lowest expression of NlABCG was in the 1st instar, and levels increased with larval growth. The transcript profiles of NlABCG were analyzed in various tissues from a 5th instar nymph, and the highest expression was observed in the midgut. These results suggest that the sequence, characteristics, and expression of NlABCG are highly conserved, and basic information is provided for its functional analysis.

  5. Structural elucidation of transmembrane domain zero (TMD0) of EcdL: A multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) family of ATP-binding cassette transporter protein revealed by atomistic simulation.

    PubMed

    Bera, Krishnendu; Rani, Priyanka; Kishor, Gaurav; Agarwal, Shikha; Kumar, Antresh; Singh, Durg Vijay

    2017-09-20

    ATP-Binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an extensive role in the translocation of diverse sets of biologically important molecules across membrane. EchnocandinB (antifungal) and EcdL protein of Aspergillus rugulosus are encoded by the same cluster of genes. Co-expression of EcdL and echinocandinB reflects tightly linked biological functions. EcdL belongs to Multidrug Resistance associated Protein (MRP) subfamily of ABC transporters with an extra transmembrane domain zero (TMD0). Complete structure of MRP subfamily comprising of TMD0 domain, at atomic resolution is not known. We hypothesized that the transportation of echonocandinB is mediated via EcdL protein. Henceforth, it is pertinent to know the topological arrangement of TMD0, with other domains of protein and its possible role in transportation of echinocandinB. Absence of effective template for TMD0 domain lead us to model by I-TASSER, further structure has been refined by multiple template modelling using homologous templates of remaining domains (TMD1, NBD1, TMD2, NBD2). The modelled structure has been validated for packing, folding and stereochemical properties. MD simulation for 0.1 μs has been carried out in the biphasic environment for refinement of modelled protein. Non-redundant structures have been excavated by clustering of MD trajectory. The structural alignment of modelled structure has shown Z-score -37.9; 31.6, 31.5 with RMSD; 2.4, 4.2, 4.8 with ABC transporters; PDB ID 4F4C, 4M1 M, 4M2T, respectively, reflecting the correctness of structure. EchinocandinB has been docked to the modelled as well as to the clustered structures, which reveals interaction of echinocandinB with TMD0 and other TM helices in the translocation path build of TMDs.

  6. Homologs of the Acinetobacter baumannii AceI transporter represent a new family of bacterial multidrug efflux systems.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Karl A; Liu, Qi; Henderson, Peter J F; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-02-10

    Multidrug efflux systems are a major cause of resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria, including those pathogenic to humans, animals, and plants. These proteins are ubiquitous in these pathogens, and five families of bacterial multidrug efflux systems have been identified to date. By using transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, we recently identified the novel AceI (Acinetobacter chlorhexidine efflux) protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that conferred resistance to the biocide chlorhexidine, via an active efflux mechanism. Proteins homologous to AceI are encoded in the genomes of many other bacterial species and are particularly prominent within proteobacterial lineages. In this study, we expressed 23 homologs of AceI and examined their resistance and/or transport profiles. MIC analyses demonstrated that, like AceI, many of the homologs conferred resistance to chlorhexidine. Many of the AceI homologs conferred resistance to additional biocides, including benzalkonium, dequalinium, proflavine, and acriflavine. We conducted fluorimetric transport assays using the AceI homolog from Vibrio parahaemolyticus and confirmed that resistance to both proflavine and acriflavine was mediated by an active efflux mechanism. These results show that this group of AceI homologs represent a new family of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps, which we have designated the proteobacterial antimicrobial compound efflux (PACE) family of transport proteins. Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are an important class of resistance determinants that can be found in every bacterial genome sequenced to date. These transport proteins have important protective functions for the bacterial cell but are a significant problem in the clinical setting, since a single efflux system can mediate resistance to many structurally and mechanistically diverse antibiotics and biocides. In this study, we demonstrate that proteins related to the Acinetobacter baumannii AceI transporter are a new class of multidrug

  7. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Human Cancer Cells by Natural Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nabekura, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a phenomenon whereby tumors become resistant to structurally unrelated anticancer drugs. P-glycoprotein belongs to the large ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily of membrane transport proteins. P-glycoprotein mediates resistance to various classes of anticancer drugs including vinblastine, daunorubicin, and paclitaxel, by actively extruding the drugs from the cells. The quest for inhibitors of anticancer drug efflux transporters has uncovered natural compounds, including (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, curcumin, capsaicin, and guggulsterone, as promising candidates. In this review, studies on the effects of natural compounds on P-glycoprotein and anticancer drug efflux transporters are summarized. PMID:22069634

  8. Polymorphisms in ABC Transporter Genes and Concentrations of Mercury in Newborns – Evidence from Two Mediterranean Birth Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Sabrina; Engström, Karin; Ballester, Ferran; Franforte, Elisa; Alhamdow, Ayman; Pisa, Federica; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Mazej, Datja; Murcia, Mario; Rebagliato, Marisa; Bustamante, Mariona; Sunyer, Jordi; Sofianou-Katsoulis, Αikaterini; Prasouli, Alexia; Antonopoulou, Eleni; Antoniadou, Ioanna; Nakou, Sheena; Barbone, Fabio; Horvat, Milena; Broberg, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background The genetic background may influence methylmercury (MeHg) metabolism and neurotoxicity. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters actively transport various xenobiotics across biological membranes. Objective To investigate the role of ABC polymorphisms as modifiers of prenatal exposure to MeHg. Methods The study population consisted of participants (n = 1651) in two birth cohorts, one in Italy and Greece (PHIME) and the other in Spain (INMA). Women were recruited during pregnancy in Italy and Spain, and during the perinatal period in Greece. Total mercury concentrations were measured in cord blood samples by atomic absorption spectrometry. Maternal fish intake during pregnancy was determined from questionnaires. Polymorphisms (n = 5) in the ABC genes ABCA1, ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCC2 were analysed in both cohorts. Results ABCB1 rs2032582, ABCC1 rs11075290, and ABCC2 rs2273697 modified the associations between maternal fish intake and cord blood mercury concentrations. The overall interaction coefficient between rs2032582 and log2-transformed fish intake was negative for carriers of GT (β = −0.29, 95%CI −0.47, −0.12) and TT (β = −0.49, 95%CI −0.71, −0.26) versus GG, meaning that for a doubling in fish intake of the mothers, children with the rs2032582 GG genotype accumulated 35% more mercury than children with TT. For rs11075290, the interaction coefficient was negative for carriers of TC (β = −0.12, 95%CI −0.33, 0.09), and TT (β = −0.28, 95%CI −0.51, −0.06) versus CC. For rs2273697, the interaction coefficient was positive when combining GA+AA (β = 0.16, 95%CI 0.01, 0.32) versus GG. Conclusion The ABC transporters appear to play a role in accumulation of MeHg during early development. PMID:24831289

  9. A multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporter mediates berberine accumulation into vacuoles in Coptis japonica.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Kojiro; Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sasaki, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Yoko; Sato, Fumihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2017-06-01

    Plants produce a large variety of alkaloids, which have diverse chemical structures and biological activities. Many of these alkaloids accumulate in vacuoles. Although some membrane proteins on tonoplasts have been identified as alkaloid uptake transporters, few have been characterized to date, and relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying alkaloid transport and accumulation in plant cells. Berberine is a model alkaloid. Although all genes involved in berberine biosynthesis, as well as the master regulator, have been identified, the gene responsible for the final accumulation of berberine at tonoplasts has not been determined. This study showed that a multidrug and toxic compound extrusion protein 1 (CjMATE1) may act as a berberine transporter in cultured Coptis japonica cells. CjMATE1 was found to localize at tonoplasts in C. japonica cells and, in intact plants, to be expressed preferentially in rhizomes, the site of abundant berberine accumulation. Cellular transport analysis using a yeast expression system showed that CjMATE1 could transport berberine. Expression analysis showed that RNAi suppression of CjbHLH1, a master transcription factor of the berberine biosynthetic pathway, markedly reduced the expression of CjMATE1 in a manner similar to the suppression of berberine biosynthetic genes. These results strongly suggest that CjMATE1 is the transporter that mediates berberine accumulation in vacuoles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multidrug efflux transporter activity in sea urchin embryos:Does localization provide a diffusive advantage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xianfeng; Setayeshgar, Sima; Cole, Bryan; Hamdoun, Amro; Epel, David

    2008-03-01

    Experiments have shown upregulation of multidrug efflux transporter activity approximately 30 min after fertilization in the sea urchin embryo [1]. These ATP-hydrolyzing transporter proteins pump moderately hydrophobic molecules out of the cell and represent the cell's first line of defense againstexogenous toxins. It has also been shown that transporters are moved in vesicles along microfilaments and localized to tips of microvilli prior to activation. We have constructed a geometrically realistic model of the embryo, including microvilli, to explore the functional role of this localization in the efficient elimination of toxins from the standpoint of diffusion. We compute diffusion of toxins in extracellular, membrane and intracellular spaces coupled with transporter activity, using experimentally derived values for physical parameters. For transporters uniformly distributed along microvilli and tip-localized transporters we compare regions in parameter space where each distribution provides diffusive advantage, and comment on the physically expected conditions. [1] A. M. Hamdoun, G. N. Cherr, T. A. Roepke and D. Epel, Developmental Biology 276 452 (2004).

  11. Inactivation of the Ecs ABC transporter of Staphylococcus aureus attenuates virulence by altering composition and function of bacterial wall.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Juuti, Jarmo T; François, Patrice; AlMajidi, Rana; Pietiäinen, Milla; Girard, Myriam; Lindholm, Catharina; Saller, Manfred J; Driessen, Arnold J M; Kuusela, Pentti; Bokarewa, Maria; Schrenzel, Jacques; Kontinen, Vesa P

    2010-12-02

    Ecs is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter present in aerobic and facultative anaerobic gram-positive Firmicutes. Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis Ecs causes pleiotropic changes in the bacterial phenotype including inhibition of intramembrane proteolysis. The molecule(s) transported by Ecs is (are) still unknown. In this study we mutated the ecsAB operon in two Staphylococcus aureus strains, Newman and LS-1. Phenotypic and functional characterization of these Ecs deficient mutants revealed a defect in growth, increased autolysis and lysostaphin sensitivity, altered composition of cell wall proteins including the precursor form of staphylokinase and an altered bacterial surface texture. DNA microarray analysis indicated that the Ecs deficiency changed expression of the virulence factor regulator protein Rot accompanied by differential expression of membrane transport proteins, particularly ABC transporters and phosphate-specific transport systems, protein A, adhesins and capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis proteins. Virulence of the ecs mutants was studied in a mouse model of hematogenous S. aureus infection. Mice inoculated with the ecs mutant strains developed markedly milder infections than those inoculated with the wild-type strains and had consequently lower mortality, less weight loss, milder arthritis and decreased persistence of staphylococci in the kidneys. The ecs mutants had higher susceptibility to ribosomal antibiotics and plant alkaloids chelerythrine and sanguinarine. Our results show that Ecs is essential for staphylococcal virulence and antimicrobial resistance probably since the transport function of Ecs is essential for the normal structure and function of the cell wall. Thus targeting Ecs may be a new approach in combating staphylococcal infection.

  12. Candida Drug Resistance Protein 1, a Major Multidrug ATP Binding Cassette Transporter of Candida albicans, Translocates Fluorescent Phospholipids in a Reconstituted System†

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Sudhanshu; Rai, Versha; Saini, Preeti; Banerjee, Dibyendu; Menon, Anant K.; Prasad, Rajendra

    2008-01-01

    Candida albicans drug resistance protein 1 (Cdr1p), an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump, contributes to multidrug resistance in Candida-infected immunocompromised patients. Previous cell-based assays suggested that Cdr1p also acts as a phospholipid translocator. To investigate this, we reconstituted purified Cdr1p into sealed membrane vesicles. Comparison of the ATPase activities of sealed and permeabilized proteoliposomes indicated that Cdr1p was asymmetrically reconstituted such that ~70% of the molecules had their ATP binding sites accessible to the extravesicular space. Fluorescent glycerophospholipids were incorporated into the outer leaflet of the proteoliposomes, and their transport into the inner leaflet was tracked with a quenching assay using membrane-impermeant dithionite. We observed ATP-dependent transport of the fluorescent lipids into the inner leaflet of the vesicles. With ~6 molecules of Cdr1p per vesicle on average, the half-time to reach the maximal extent of transport was ~15 min. Transport was reduced in vesicles reconstituted with Cdr1p variants with impaired ATPase activity and could be competed out to different levels by a molar excess of drugs such as fluconazole and miconazole that are known to be effluxed by Cdr1p. Transport was not affected by ampicillin, a compound that is not effluxed by Cdr1p. Our results suggest a direct link between the ability of Cdr1p to translocate fluorescent phospholipids and efflux drugs. We note that only a few members of the ABC superfamily of Candida have a well-defined role as drug exporters; thus, lipid translocation mediated by Cdr1p could reflect its cellular function. PMID:17924650

  13. The reliability of molecular dynamics simulations of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein in a membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Condic-Jurkic, Karmen; Subramanian, Nandhitha; Mark, Alan E; O'Mara, Megan L

    2018-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanism of action of the ABC multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) remains elusive. Due to experimental limitations, many researchers have turned to molecular dynamics simulation studies in order to investigate different aspects of P-gp function. However, such studies are challenging and caution is required when interpreting the results. P-gp is highly flexible and the time scale on which it can be simulated is limited. There is also uncertainty regarding the accuracy of the various crystal structures available, let alone the structure of the protein in a physiologically relevant environment. In this study, three alternative structural models of mouse P-gp (3G5U, 4KSB, 4M1M), all resolved to 3.8 Å, were used to initiate sets of simulations of P-gp in a membrane environment in order to determine: a) the sensitivity of the results to differences in the starting configuration; and b) the extent to which converged results could be expected on the times scales commonly simulated for this system. The simulations suggest that the arrangement of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) observed in the crystal structures is not stable in a membrane environment. In all simulations, the NBDs rapidly associated (within 10 ns) and changes within the transmembrane helices were observed. The secondary structure within the transmembrane domain was best preserved in the 4M1M model under the simulation conditions used. However, the extent to which replicate simulations diverged on a 100 to 200 ns timescale meant that it was not possible to draw definitive conclusions as to which structure overall was most stable, or to obtain converged and reliable results for any of the properties examined. The work brings into question the reliability of conclusions made in regard to the nature of specific interactions inferred from previous simulation studies on this system involving similar sampling times. It also highlights the need to demonstrate the

  14. The reliability of molecular dynamics simulations of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein in a membrane environment

    PubMed Central

    Condic-Jurkic, Karmen; Subramanian, Nandhitha; Mark, Alan E.

    2018-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanism of action of the ABC multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) remains elusive. Due to experimental limitations, many researchers have turned to molecular dynamics simulation studies in order to investigate different aspects of P-gp function. However, such studies are challenging and caution is required when interpreting the results. P-gp is highly flexible and the time scale on which it can be simulated is limited. There is also uncertainty regarding the accuracy of the various crystal structures available, let alone the structure of the protein in a physiologically relevant environment. In this study, three alternative structural models of mouse P-gp (3G5U, 4KSB, 4M1M), all resolved to 3.8 Å, were used to initiate sets of simulations of P-gp in a membrane environment in order to determine: a) the sensitivity of the results to differences in the starting configuration; and b) the extent to which converged results could be expected on the times scales commonly simulated for this system. The simulations suggest that the arrangement of the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) observed in the crystal structures is not stable in a membrane environment. In all simulations, the NBDs rapidly associated (within 10 ns) and changes within the transmembrane helices were observed. The secondary structure within the transmembrane domain was best preserved in the 4M1M model under the simulation conditions used. However, the extent to which replicate simulations diverged on a 100 to 200 ns timescale meant that it was not possible to draw definitive conclusions as to which structure overall was most stable, or to obtain converged and reliable results for any of the properties examined. The work brings into question the reliability of conclusions made in regard to the nature of specific interactions inferred from previous simulation studies on this system involving similar sampling times. It also highlights the need to demonstrate the

  15. ALS3 encodes a phloem-localized ABC transporter-like protein that is required for aluminum tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Paul B; Geisler, Matt J B; Jones, Carol A; Williams, Kelly M; Cancel, Jesse D

    2005-02-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity in acid soils is a worldwide agricultural problem that severely limits crop productivity through inhibition of root growth. Previously, Arabidopsis mutants with increased Al sensitivity were isolated in order to identify genes important for Al tolerance in plants. One mutant, als3, exhibited extreme root growth inhibition in the presence of Al, suggesting that this mutation negatively impacts a gene required for Al tolerance. Map-based cloning of the als3-1 mutation resulted in the isolation of a novel gene that encodes a previously undescribed ABC transporter-like protein, which is highly homologous to a putative bacterial metal resistance protein, ybbM. Northern analysis for ALS3 expression revealed that it is found in all organs examined, which is consistent with the global nature of Al sensitivity displayed by als3, and that expression increases in roots following Al treatment. Based on GUS fusion and in situ hybridization analyses, ALS3 is primarily expressed in leaf hydathodes and the phloem throughout the plant, along with the root cortex following Al treatment. Immunolocalization indicates that ALS3 predominantly accumulates in the plasma membrane of cells that express ALS3. From our results, it appears that ALS3 encodes an ABC transporter-like protein that is required for Al resistance/tolerance and may function to redistribute accumulated Al away from sensitive tissues in order to protect the growing root from the toxic effects of Al.

  16. The reconstituted P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter is a flippase for glucosylceramide and other simple glycosphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Eckford, Paul D W; Sharom, Frances J

    2005-07-15

    The Pgp (P-glycoprotein) multidrug transporter, which is linked to multidrug resistance in human cancers, functions as an efflux pump for non-polar drugs, powered by the hydrolysis of ATP at its nucleotide binding domains. The drug binding sites of Pgp appear to be located within the cytoplasmic leaflet of the membrane bilayer, suggesting that Pgp may function as a 'flippase' for hydrophobic compounds. Pgp has been shown to translocate fluorescent phospholipids, and it has been suggested that it may also interact with GlcCer (glucosylceramide). Here we use a dithionite fluorescence quenching technique to show that reconstituted Pgp can flip several NBD (nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole)-labelled simple glycosphingolipids, including NBD-GlcCer, from one leaflet of the bilayer to the other in an ATP-dependent, vanadate-sensitive fashion. The rate of NBD-GlcCer flipping was similar to that observed for NBD-labelled PC (phosphatidylcholine). NBD-GlcCer flipping was inhibited in a concentration-dependent, saturable fashion by various Pgp substrates and modulators, and inhibition correlated well with the Kd for binding to the protein. The addition of a second sugar to the headgroup of the glycolipid to form NBD-lactosylceramide drastically reduced the rate of flipping compared with NBD-PC, probably because of the increased size and polarity contributed by the additional sugar residue. We conclude that Pgp functions as a broad-specificity outwardly-directed flippase for simple glycosphingolipids and membrane phospholipids.

  17. Protonation-dependent conformational dynamics of the multidrug transporter EmrE

    PubMed Central

    Dastvan, Reza; Mishra, Smriti; Meiler, Jens; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2016-01-01

    The small multidrug transporter from Escherichia coli, EmrE, couples the energetically uphill extrusion of hydrophobic cations out of the cell to the transport of two protons down their electrochemical gradient. Although principal mechanistic elements of proton/substrate antiport have been described, the structural record is limited to the conformation of the substrate-bound state, which has been shown to undergo isoenergetic alternating access. A central but missing link in the structure/mechanism relationship is a description of the proton-bound state, which is an obligatory intermediate in the transport cycle. Here we report a systematic spin labeling and double electron electron resonance (DEER) study that uncovers the conformational changes of EmrE subsequent to protonation of critical acidic residues in the context of a global description of ligand-induced structural rearrangements. We find that protonation of E14 leads to extensive rotation and tilt of transmembrane helices 1–3 in conjunction with repacking of loops, conformational changes that alter the coordination of the bound substrate and modulate its access to the binding site from the lipid bilayer. The transport model that emerges from our data posits a proton-bound, but occluded, resting state. Substrate binding from the inner leaflet of the bilayer releases the protons and triggers alternating access between inward- and outward-facing conformations of the substrate-loaded transporter, thus enabling antiport without dissipation of the proton gradient. PMID:26787875

  18. Tangeretin, a citrus pentamethoxyflavone, antagonizes ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance by inhibiting its transport function.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sen-Ling; Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhong-Qiu; Xie, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and tumor metastasis are the main causes of chemotherapeutic treatment failure and mortality in cancer patients. In this study, at achievable nontoxic plasma concentrations, citrus flavonoid tangeretin has been shown to reverse ABCB1-mediated cancer resistance to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents effectively. Co-treatment of cells with tangeretin and paclitaxel activated apoptosis as well as arrested cell cycle at G2/M-phase. Tangeretin profoundly inhibited the ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin, and flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the expression of ABCB1. Moreover, it stimulated the ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. The molecular docking results indicated a favorable binding of tangeretin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled ABCB1 transporter. The overall results demonstrated that tangeretin could sensitize ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to chemotherapeutical agents by directly inhibiting ABCB1 transporter function, which encouraged further animal and clinical studies in the treatment of resistant cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental Conditions Influence Induction of Key ABC-Transporter Genes Affecting Glyphosate Resistance Mechanism in Conyza canadensis

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Eleni; Chachalis, Demosthenis; Travlos, Ilias S.; Bilalis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Conyza canadensis has been reported to be the most frequent weed species that evolved resistance to glyphosate in various parts of the world. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of environmental conditions (temperature and light) on the expression levels of the EPSPS gene and two major ABC-transporter genes (M10 and M11) on glyphosate susceptible (GS) and glyphosate resistant (GR) horseweed populations, collected from several regions across Greece. Real-time PCR was conducted to determine the expression level of the aforementioned genes when glyphosate was applied at normal (1×; 533 g·a.e.·ha−1) and high rates (4×, 8×), measured at an early one day after treatment (DAT) and a later stage (four DAT) of expression. Plants were exposed to light or dark conditions, at three temperature regimes (8, 25, 35 °C). GR plants were made sensitive when exposed to 8 °C with light; those sensitized plants behaved biochemically (shikimate accumulation) and molecularly (expression of EPSPS and ABC-genes) like the GS plants. Results from the current study show the direct link between the environmental conditions and the induction level of the above key genes that likely affect the efficiency of the proposed mechanism of glyphosate resistance. PMID:27104532

  20. Environmental Conditions Influence Induction of Key ABC-Transporter Genes Affecting Glyphosate Resistance Mechanism in Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Tani, Eleni; Chachalis, Demosthenis; Travlos, Ilias S; Bilalis, Dimitrios

    2016-04-20

    Conyza canadensis has been reported to be the most frequent weed species that evolved resistance to glyphosate in various parts of the world. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of environmental conditions (temperature and light) on the expression levels of the EPSPS gene and two major ABC-transporter genes (M10 and M11) on glyphosate susceptible (GS) and glyphosate resistant (GR) horseweed populations, collected from several regions across Greece. Real-time PCR was conducted to determine the expression level of the aforementioned genes when glyphosate was applied at normal (1×; 533 g·a.e.·ha(-1)) and high rates (4×, 8×), measured at an early one day after treatment (DAT) and a later stage (four DAT) of expression. Plants were exposed to light or dark conditions, at three temperature regimes (8, 25, 35 °C). GR plants were made sensitive when exposed to 8 °C with light; those sensitized plants behaved biochemically (shikimate accumulation) and molecularly (expression of EPSPS and ABC-genes) like the GS plants. Results from the current study show the direct link between the environmental conditions and the induction level of the above key genes that likely affect the efficiency of the proposed mechanism of glyphosate resistance.

  1. Mutations in the Arabidopsis Peroxisomal ABC Transporter COMATOSE Allow Differentiation between Multiple Functions In Planta: Insights from an Allelic Series

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Daniela; Schmuths, Heike; Lousa, Carine De Marcos; Baldwin, Jocelyn M.; Baldwin, Stephen A.; Baker, Alison; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    COMATOSE (CTS), the Arabidopsis homologue of human Adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP), is required for import of substrates for peroxisomal β-oxidation. A new allelic series and a homology model based on the bacterial ABC transporter, Sav1866, provide novel insights into structure-function relations of ABC subfamily D proteins. In contrast to ALDP, where the majority of mutations result in protein absence from the peroxisomal membrane, all CTS mutants produced stable protein. Mutation of conserved residues in the Walker A and B motifs in CTS nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) 1 resulted in a null phenotype but had little effect in NBD2, indicating that the NBDs are functionally distinct in vivo. Two alleles containing mutations in NBD1 outside the Walker motifs (E617K and C631Y) exhibited resistance to auxin precursors 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid (2,4-DB) and indole butyric acid (IBA) but were wild type in all other tests. The homology model predicted that the transmission interfaces are domain-swapped in CTS, and the differential effects of mutations in the conserved “EAA motif” of coupling helix 2 supported this prediction, consistent with distinct roles for each NBD. Our findings demonstrate that CTS functions can be separated by mutagenesis and the structural model provides a framework for interpretation of phenotypic data. PMID:19019987

  2. Iowa ABC connections : [tech transfer summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-06-01

    The Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) and other organizations have : been developing accelerated bridge construction (ABC) concepts, details, and : processes, and Iowa has come to be viewed as a national leader in the area of : ABC. However, th...

  3. The enriched fraction of Vernonia cinerea L. induces apoptosis and inhibits multi-drug resistance transporters in human epithelial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Appadath Beeran, Asmy; Maliyakkal, Naseer; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2014-12-02

    Vernonia cinerea Less. (VC) of the family Asteraceaes is considered as the sacred plant; 'Dasapushpam' which is ethnopharmacologically significant to the people of Kerala in India. In fact, VC has been used in the traditional system of medicine (Ayurveda) for the treatment of various ailments including cancer. Cytotoxicity of the ethanolic extract of VC (VC-ET), petroleum ether fraction (VC-PET), dichloromethane fraction (VC-DCM), n-butyl alcohol fraction (VC-BT), and rest fraction (VC-R) was evaluated in cervical carcinoma (HeLa), lung adenocarcinoma (A549), breast cancer (MCF-7), and colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells using Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. The apoptotic effects of VC-DCM were assessed in cancer cells using Annexin V assay. The effects of VC-DCM on multi-drug resistance (MDR) transporters in HeLa, A549, MCF-7, and Caco-2 cells were evaluated using flow cytometry based functional assays. Similarly, drug uptake in cancer cells and sensitization of cancer cells towards chemotherapeutic drugs in the presence of VC-DCM were studied using Daunorubicin (DNR) accumulation assay and SRB assay, respectively. Cytotoxicity assay revealed that the enriched fraction of VC (VC-DCM) possessed dose-dependent cytotoxic effects in human epithelial cancer cells (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, and Caco-2). Further, treatment of cancer cells (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, and Caco-2) with VC-DCM led to a significant increase in both early and late apoptosis, indicating the induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, VC-DCM significantly inhibited functional activity of MDR transporters (ABC-B1 and ABC-G2), enhanced DNR-uptake in cancer cells, and sensitized cancer cells towards chemotherapeutic drug-mediated cytotoxicity, thus indicating the ability of VC-DCM to reverse MDR in cancer and enhance the cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs. A methodological investigation on the anti-cancer properties of Vernonia cinerea Less. (VC) revealed that an enriched fraction of VC (VC-DCM) possessed cytotoxic

  4. Structures and transport dynamics of a Campylobacter jejuni multidrug efflux pump

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih-Chia; Yin, Linxiang; Kumar, Nitin

    2017-08-01

    Resistance-nodulation-cell division efflux pumps are integral membrane proteins that catalyze the export of substrates across cell membranes. Within the hydrophobe-amphiphile efflux subfamily, these resistance-nodulation-cell division proteins largely form trimeric efflux pumps. The drug efflux process has been proposed to entail a synchronized motion between subunits of the trimer to advance the transport cycle, leading to the extrusion of drug molecules. Here we use X-ray crystallography and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging to elucidate the structures and functional dynamics of the Campylobacter jejuni CmeB multidrug efflux pump. We find that the CmeB trimer displays a very unique conformation. A directmore » observation of transport dynamics in individual CmeB trimers embedded in membrane vesicles indicates that each CmeB subunit undergoes conformational transitions uncoordinated and independent of each other. On the basis of our findings and analyses, we propose a model for transport mechanism where CmeB protomers function independently within the trimer.« less

  5. Glaucarubinone sensitizes KB cells to paclitaxel by inhibiting ABC transporters via ROS-dependent and p53-mediated activation of apoptotic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Subburayan; Hoti, Sugeerappa Laxmanappa; Nazeer, Yasin; Hegde, Harsha Vasudev

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is considered to be the major contributor to failure of chemotherapy in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study was aimed to explore the effects and mechanisms of glaucarubinone (GLU), one of the major quassinoids from Simarouba glauca DC, in potentiating cytotoxicity of paclitaxel (PTX), an anticancer drug in KB cells. Our data showed that the administration of GLU pre-treatment significantly enhanced PTX anti-proliferative effect in ABCB1 over-expressing KB cells. The Rh 123 drug efflux studies revealed that there was a significant transport function inhibition by GLU-PTX treatment. Interestingly, it was also found that this enhanced anticancer efficacy of GLU was associated with PTX-induced cell arrest in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, the combined treatment of GLU-PTX had significant decrease in the expression levels of P-gp, MRPs, and BCRP in resistant KB cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the combination treatments showed significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, chromatin condensation and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in resistant KB cells. The results from DNA fragmentation analysis also demonstrated the GLU induced apoptosis in KB cells and its synergy with PTX. Importantly, GLU and/or PTX triggered apoptosis through the activation of pro-apoptotic proteins such as p53, Bax, and caspase-9. Our findings demonstrated for the first time that GLU causes cell death in human oral cancer cells via the ROS-dependent suppression of MDR transporters and p53-mediated activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Additionally, the present study also focussed on investigation of the protective effect of GLU and combination drugs in human normal blood lymphocytes. Normal blood lymphocytes assay indicated that GLU is able to induce selective toxicity in cancer cells and in silico molecular docking studies support the choice of GLU as ABC inhibitor to enhance PTX efficacy

  6. Interaction and Transport of Methamphetamine and its Primary Metabolites by Organic Cation and Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion Transporters.

    PubMed

    Wagner, David J; Sager, Jennifer E; Duan, Haichuan; Isoherranen, Nina; Wang, Joanne

    2017-07-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most abused illicit drugs with roughly 1.2 million users in the United States alone. A large portion of methamphetamine and its metabolites is eliminated by the kidney with renal clearance larger than glomerular filtration clearance. Yet the mechanism of active renal secretion is poorly understood. The goals of this study were to characterize the interaction of methamphetamine and its major metabolites with organic cation transporters (OCTs) and multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) transporters and to identify the major transporters involved in the disposition of methamphetamine and its major metabolites, amphetamine and para -hydroxymethamphetamine ( p -OHMA). We used cell lines stably expressing relevant transporters to show that methamphetamine and its metabolites inhibit human OCTs 1-3 (hOCT1-3) and hMATE1/2-K with the greatest potencies against hOCT1 and hOCT2. Methamphetamine and amphetamine are substrates of hOCT2, hMATE1, and hMATE2-K, but not hOCT1 and hOCT3. p -OHMA is transported by hOCT1-3 and hMATE1, but not hMATE2-K. In contrast, organic anion transporters 1 and 3 do not interact with or transport these compounds. Methamphetamine and its metabolites exhibited complex interactions with hOCT1 and hOCT2, suggesting the existence of multiple binding sites. Our studies suggest the involvement of the renal OCT2/MATE pathway in tubular secretion of methamphetamine and its major metabolites and the potential of drug-drug interactions with substrates or inhibitors of the OCTs. This information may be considered when prescribing medications to suspected or known abusers of methamphetamine to mitigate the risk of increased toxicity or reduced therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Multidrug Efflux Transporters Limit Accumulation of Inorganic, but Not Organic, Mercury in Sea Urchin Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Bošnjak, Ivana; Uhlinger, Kevin R.; Heim, Wesley; Smital, Tvrtko; Franekić-Čolić, Jasna; Coale, Kenneth; Epel, David; Hamdoun, Amro

    2011-01-01

    Mercuric compounds are persistent global pollutants that accumulate in marine organisms and in humans who consume them. While the chemical cycles and speciation of mercury in the oceans are relatively well described, the cellular mechanisms that govern which forms of mercury accumulate in cells and why they persist are less understood. In this study we examined the role of multidrug efflux transport in the differential accumulation of inorganic (HgCl2) and organic (CH3HgCl) mercury in sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos. We found that inhibition of MRP/ABCC-type transporters increases intracellular accumulation of inorganic mercury but had no effect on accumulation of organic mercury. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of metal conjugating enzymes by ligands GST/GSH significantly increases this antimitotic potency of inorganic mercury, but had no effect on the potency of organic mercury. Our results point to MRP-mediated elimination of inorganic mercury conjugates as a cellular basis for differences in the accumulation and potency of the two major forms of mercury found in marine environments. PMID:19924972

  8. The multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 transports methoxychlor and protects the seminiferous epithelium from injury.

    PubMed

    Tribull, Tiffany E; Bruner, Richard H; Bain, Lisa J

    2003-04-30

    We examined the ability of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) to transport pesticides, as this transporter mediates the cellular efflux of a variety of xenobiotics, typically as glucuronide, sulfate, or glutathione conjugates. NIH3T3 cells stably expressing MRP1 were 3.37-fold more resistant to the toxicity of fenitrothion, 3.12-fold more resistant to chlorpropham, and 2.5-fold more resistant to methoxychlor, a pesticide with estrogenic and anti-androgenic metabolites. The cells expressing MRP1 also eliminated methoxychlor two times more rapidly than their mock-transfected counterparts. We then examined whether mrp1 expression could alter the toxicity of methoxychlor in vivo using male FVB/mrp1 knockout mice (FVB/mrp1-/-). Both control and knockout mice were fed 25 mg/kg methoxychlor in honey for 39 days, and its effects on testicular morphology were examined. Methoxychlor treatment did not significantly affect testicular morphology in the FVB mice, but markedly reduced the number of developing spermatocytes in the FVB/mrp1-/- mice. These results suggest that MRPI may play a role in protecting the seminiferous tubules from methoxychlor-induced damage.

  9. Functional Dependence between Septal Protein SepJ from Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 and an Amino Acid ABC-Type Uptake Transporter.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Leticia; Mariscal, Vicente; Flores, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    In the diazotrophic filaments of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, two different cell types, the CO2-fixing vegetative cells and the N2-fixing heterocysts, exchange nutrients, including some amino acids. In the model organism Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the SepJ protein, composed of periplasmic and integral membrane (permease) sections, is located at the intercellular septa joining adjacent cells in the filament. The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 bears a gene, Synpcc7942_1024 (here designated dmeA), encoding a permease homologous to the SepJ permease domain. Synechococcus strains lacking dmeA or lacking dmeA and expressing Anabaena sepJ were constructed. The Synechococcus dmeA mutant showed a significant 22 to 32% decrease in the uptake of aspartate, glutamate, and glutamine, a phenotype that could be partially complemented by Anabaena sepJ. Synechococcus mutants of an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC)-type transporter for polar amino acids showed >98% decreased uptake of glutamate irrespective of the presence of dmeA or Anabaena sepJ in the same strain. Thus, Synechococcus DmeA or Anabaena SepJ is needed to observe full (or close to full) activity of the ABC transporter. An Anabaena sepJ deletion mutant was significantly impaired in glutamate and aspartate uptake, which also in this cyanobacterium requires the activity of an ABC-type transporter for polar amino acids. SepJ appears therefore to generally stimulate the activity of cyanobacterial ABC-type transporters for polar amino acids. Conversely, an Anabaena mutant of three ABC-type transporters for amino acids was impaired in the intercellular transfer of 5-carboxyfluorescein, a SepJ-related property. Our results unravel possible functional interactions in transport elements important for diazotrophic growth. Membrane transporters are essential for many aspects of cellular life, from uptake and export of substances in unicellular organisms to intercellular molecular exchange in

  10. Phospholipid flippase activity of the reconstituted P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter.

    PubMed

    Romsicki, Y; Sharom, F J

    2001-06-12

    The P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter acts as an ATP-powered efflux pump for a large variety of hydrophobic drugs, natural products, and peptides. The protein is proposed to interact with its substrates within the hydrophobic interior of the membrane. There is indirect evidence to suggest that P-glycoprotein can also transport, or "flip", short chain fluorescent lipids between leaflets of the membrane. In this study, we use a fluorescence quenching technique to directly show that P-glycoprotein reconstituted into proteoliposomes translocates a wide variety of NBD lipids from the outer to the inner leaflet of the bilayer. Flippase activity depended on ATP hydrolysis at the outer surface of the proteoliposome, and was inhibited by vanadate. P-Glycoprotein exhibited a broad specificity for phospholipids, and translocated phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin. Lipid derivatives that were flipped included molecules with long, short, unsaturated, and saturated acyl chains and species with the NBD group covalently linked to either acyl chains or the headgroup. The extent of lipid translocation from the outer to the inner leaflet in a 20 min period at 37 degrees C was directly estimated, and fell in the range of 0.36-1.83 nmol/mg of protein. Phospholipid flipping was inhibited in a concentration-dependent, saturable fashion by various substrates and modulators, including vinblastine, verapamil, and cyclosporin A, and the efficiency of inhibition correlated well with the affinity of binding to Pgp. Taken together, these results suggest that P-glycoprotein carries out both lipid translocation and drug transport by the same path. The transporter may be a generic flippase for hydrophobic molecules with the correct steric attributes that are present within the membrane interior.

  11. Therapeutic and biological importance of getting nucleotides out of cells: a case for the ABC transporters, MRP4 and 5.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Masashi; Reid, Glen; Schuetz, John D

    2002-11-18

    The energy dependent transport of drugs contributes to cellular resistance and is undoubtedly a prime suspect in chemotherapeutic failure of a variety of disease processes. Early studies focused on a single gene, the multidrug resistance gene, MDR1, as a main contributor to chemotherapeutic failure. However, the multifaceted nature of cellular resistance lead to the discovery of the MRP gene. This pivotal finding and the concurrent rapid development of gene databases lead to the expansion of the MRP gene family. The purpose of this review is to discuss two of the recently described MRP family members that were orphans until their role in drug resistance was discovered. This review will provide an overview of the current state of our understanding of MRP4 and 5.

  12. Multidrug Transport Protein NorM from Vibrio cholerae Simultaneously Couples to Sodium- and Proton-Motive Force*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yoonhee; Nair, Asha; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family mediate the efflux of unrelated pharmaceuticals from the interior of the cell in organisms ranging from bacteria to human. These proteins are thought to fall into two classes that couple substrate efflux to the influx of either Na+ or H+. We studied the energetics of drug extrusion by NorM from Vibrio cholerae in proteoliposomes in which purified NorM protein was functionally reconstituted in an inside-out orientation. We establish that NorM simultaneously couples to the sodium-motive force and proton-motive force, and biochemically identify protein regions and residues that play important roles in Na+ or H+ binding. As the positions of protons are not available in current medium and high-resolution crystal structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters, our findings add a previously unrecognized parameter to mechanistic models based of these structures. PMID:24711447

  13. P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter in inflammatory bowel diseases: More questions than answers

    PubMed Central

    Cario, Elke

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal barrier is constantly exposed to numerous environmental substrates that are foreign and potentially harmful. These xenobiotics can cause shifts in the intestinal microbiota composition, affect mucosal immune responses, disturb tissue integrity and impair regeneration. The multidrug transporter ABCB1/MDR1 p-glycoprotein (p-gp) plays a key role at the front line of host defence by efficiently protecting the gastrointestinal barrier from xenobiotic accumulation. This Editorial discusses how altered expression and function of ABCB1/MDR1 p-gp may contribute to the development and persistence of chronic intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Recent evidence implies multiple interactions between intestinal microbiota, innate immunity and xenobiotic metabolism via p-gp. While decreased efflux activity may promote disease susceptibility and drug toxicity, increased efflux activity may confer resistance to therapeutic drugs in IBD. Mice deficient in MDR1A develop spontaneously chronic colitis, providing a highly valuable murine IBD model for the study of intestinal epithelial barrier function, immunoregulation, infectious co-triggers and novel therapeutic approaches. Possible associations of human ABCB1 gene polymorphisms with IBD susceptibility have been evaluated, but results are inconsistent. Future studies must focus on further elucidation of the pathophysiological relevance and immunological functions of p-gp and how its ambiguous effects could be therapeutically targeted in IBD. PMID:28321153

  14. P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter in inflammatory bowel diseases: More questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Cario, Elke

    2017-03-07

    The gastrointestinal barrier is constantly exposed to numerous environmental substrates that are foreign and potentially harmful. These xenobiotics can cause shifts in the intestinal microbiota composition, affect mucosal immune responses, disturb tissue integrity and impair regeneration. The multidrug transporter ABCB1/MDR1 p-glycoprotein (p-gp) plays a key role at the front line of host defence by efficiently protecting the gastrointestinal barrier from xenobiotic accumulation. This Editorial discusses how altered expression and function of ABCB1/MDR1 p-gp may contribute to the development and persistence of chronic intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Recent evidence implies multiple interactions between intestinal microbiota, innate immunity and xenobiotic metabolism via p-gp. While decreased efflux activity may promote disease susceptibility and drug toxicity, increased efflux activity may confer resistance to therapeutic drugs in IBD. Mice deficient in MDR1A develop spontaneously chronic colitis, providing a highly valuable murine IBD model for the study of intestinal epithelial barrier function, immunoregulation, infectious co-triggers and novel therapeutic approaches. Possible associations of human ABCB1 gene polymorphisms with IBD susceptibility have been evaluated, but results are inconsistent. Future studies must focus on further elucidation of the pathophysiological relevance and immunological functions of p-gp and how its ambiguous effects could be therapeutically targeted in IBD.

  15. Coarse-grained Simulations of Substrate Export through Multidrug Efflux Transporter AcrB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewel, Yead; Dutta, Prashanta; Liu, Jin

    2017-11-01

    The treatment of bacterial infectious diseases hampered by the overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) systems. The MDR system actively pumps the antibiotic drugs as well as other toxic compounds out of the cells. During the pumping, AcrB (one of the key MDR components) undergoes a series of large-scale proton/substrate dependent conformational changes. In this work, we implement a hybrid coarse-grained PACE force field that couples the united-atom protein model with the coarse-grained MARTINI water/lipid, to investigate the conformational changes of AcrB. We first develop the substrate force field which is compatible with PACE, then we implement the force field to explore large scale structural changes of AcrB in microsecond simulations. The effects of the substrate and the protonation states of two key residues: Asp407 and Asp408, are investigated. Our results show that the drug export through AcrB is proton as well as substrate dependent. Our simulations explain molecular mechanisms of substrate transport through AcrB complex, as well as provide valuable insights for designing proper antibiotic drugs. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01GM122081.

  16. Novel Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum ABC Transporter Genes Are Associated with Major ACT Antimalarial Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, Maria Isabel; Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Jörnhagen, Louise; Malmberg, Maja; Kone, Aminatou; Schmidt, Berit Aydin; Petzold, Max; Björkman, Anders; Nosten, Francois; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a critical component of malaria control. However, the most deadly malaria pathogen, Plasmodium falciparum, has repeatedly mounted resistance against a series of antimalarial drugs used in the last decades. Southeast Asia is an epicenter of emerging antimalarial drug resistance, including recent resistance to the artemisinins, the core component of all recommended antimalarial combination therapies. Alterations in the parasitic membrane proteins Pgh-1, PfCRT and PfMRP1 are believed to be major contributors to resistance through decreasing intracellular drug accumulation. The pfcrt, pfmdr1 and pfmrp1 genes were sequenced from a set of P.falciparum field isolates from the Thai-Myanmar border. In vitro drug susceptibility to artemisinin, dihydroartemisinin, mefloquine and lumefantrine were assessed. Positive correlations were seen between the in vitro susceptibility responses to artemisinin and dihydroartemisinin and the responses to the arylamino-alcohol quinolines lumefantrine and mefloquine. The previously unstudied pfmdr1 F1226Y and pfmrp1 F1390I SNPs were associated significantly with artemisinin, mefloquine and lumefantrine in vitro susceptibility. A variation in pfmdr1 gene copy number was also associated with parasite drug susceptibility of artemisinin, mefloquine and lumefantrine. Our work unveils new candidate markers of P. falciparum multidrug resistance in vitro, while contributing to the understanding of subjacent genetic complexity, essential for future evidence-based drug policy decisions. PMID:21633513

  17. Novel polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum ABC transporter genes are associated with major ACT antimalarial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Maria Isabel; Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Jörnhagen, Louise; Malmberg, Maja; Kone, Aminatou; Schmidt, Berit Aydin; Petzold, Max; Björkman, Anders; Nosten, Francois; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a critical component of malaria control. However, the most deadly malaria pathogen, Plasmodium falciparum, has repeatedly mounted resistance against a series of antimalarial drugs used in the last decades. Southeast Asia is an epicenter of emerging antimalarial drug resistance, including recent resistance to the artemisinins, the core component of all recommended antimalarial combination therapies. Alterations in the parasitic membrane proteins Pgh-1, PfCRT and PfMRP1 are believed to be major contributors to resistance through decreasing intracellular drug accumulation. The pfcrt, pfmdr1 and pfmrp1 genes were sequenced from a set of P.falciparum field isolates from the Thai-Myanmar border. In vitro drug susceptibility to artemisinin, dihydroartemisinin, mefloquine and lumefantrine were assessed. Positive correlations were seen between the in vitro susceptibility responses to artemisinin and dihydroartemisinin and the responses to the arylamino-alcohol quinolines lumefantrine and mefloquine. The previously unstudied pfmdr1 F1226Y and pfmrp1 F1390I SNPs were associated significantly with artemisinin, mefloquine and lumefantrine in vitro susceptibility. A variation in pfmdr1 gene copy number was also associated with parasite drug susceptibility of artemisinin, mefloquine and lumefantrine. Our work unveils new candidate markers of P. falciparum multidrug resistance in vitro, while contributing to the understanding of subjacent genetic complexity, essential for future evidence-based drug policy decisions.

  18. Insights on Na(+) binding and conformational dynamics in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporter NorM.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianing; Ji, Changge; Zhang, John Z H

    2014-02-01

    MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter proteins mediate metabolite transport in plants and multidrug resistance in bacteria and mammals. MATE transporter NorM from Vibrio cholerae is an antiporter that is driven by Na+ gradient to extrude the substrates. To understand the molecular mechanism of Na+-substrate exchange, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study conformational changes of both wild-type and mutant NorM with and without cation bindings. Our results show that NorM is able to bind two Na(+) ions simultaneously, one to each of the carboxylic groups of E255 and D371 in the binding pocket. Furthermore, this di-Na(+) binding state is likely more efficient for conformational changes of NorM_VC toward the inward-facing conformation than single-Na(+) binding state. The observation of two Na(+) binding sites of NorM_VC is consistent with the previous study that two sites for ion binding (denoted as Na1/Na2 sites) are found in the transporter LeuT and BetP, another two secondary transporters. Taken together, our findings shed light on the structure rearrangements of NorM on Na(+) binding and enrich our knowledge of the transport mechanism of secondary transporters. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Alzheimer's disease: neuroprogesterone, epoxycholesterol, and ABC transporters as determinants of neurodesmosterol tissue levels and its role in amyloid protein processing.

    PubMed

    Javitt, Norman B

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that during the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), changes in the synthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and progesterone are occurring that may or may not affect the progression of the disease. The concept arose from the recognition that dehydrocholesterol 24-reductase (DHCR24/Seladin-1), one of the nine enzymes in the endoplasmic reticulum that determines the transformation of lanosterol to cholesterol, is selectively reduced in late AD. As a consequence, the tissue level of desmosterol increases, affecting the expression of ABC transporters and the structure of lipid rafts, both determinants of amyloid-β processing. However, the former effect is considered beneficial and the latter detrimental to processing. Other determinants of desmosterol tissue levels are 24,25 epoxycholesterol and the ABCG1 and ABCG4 transporters. Progesterone and its metabolites are determinants of tissue levels of desmosterol and several other sterol intermediates in cholesterol synthesis. Animal models indicate marked elevations in the tissue levels of these sterols at early time frames in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. The low level of neuroprogesterone and metabolites in AD are consonant with the low level of desmosterol and may have a role in amyloid-β processing. The sparse data that has accumulated appears to be a sufficient basis for proposing a systematic evaluation of the biologic roles of sterol intermediates in the slowly progressive neurodegeneration characteristic of AD.

  20. ABC transporters and cytochromes P450 in the human central nervous system: influence on brain pharmacokinetics and contribution to neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Dutheil, Fabien; Jacob, Aude; Dauchy, Sandrine; Beaune, Philippe; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Declèves, Xavier; Loriot, Marie-Anne

    2010-10-01

    The identification of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (i.e., CYP) and transporters (i.e., ABC transporters) (XMET) in the human brain, including the BBB, raises the question whether these transporters and enzymes have specific functions in brain physiology, neuropharmacology and toxicology. Relevant literature was identified using PubMed search articles published up to March 2010. Search terms included 'ABC transporters and P450 or CYP', 'drug metabolism, effect and toxicity' and 'neurodegenerative disease (Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases)' restricted to the field of 'brain or human brain'. This review aims to provide a better understanding of XMET functions in the human brain and show their pharmacological importance for improving drug delivery and efficacy and also for managing their side effects. Finally, the impact of brain XMET activity during neurodegenerative processes is discussed, giving an opportunity to identify new markers of human brain diseases. During the last 2 decades, much evidence concerning the specific distribution patterns of XMET, their induction by xenobiotics and endobiotics and their genetic variations have made cerebral ABC transporters and CYP enzymes key elements in the way individual patients respond to centrally acting drugs.

  1. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M.; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2−∕−), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−Abcg2−∕−) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders. PMID:27257556

  2. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-)), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2 (-∕-)), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-) Abcg2 (-∕-)) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders.

  3. Induction of hepatic ABC transporter expression is part of the PPARalpha-mediated fasting response in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kok, Tineke; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Havinga, Rick; Jansen, Peter L M; Staels, Bart; Kuipers, Folkert

    2003-01-01

    Fatty acids are natural ligands of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Synthetic ligands of this nuclear receptor, i.e., fibrates, induce the hepatic expression of the multidrug resistance 2 gene (Mdr2), encoding the canalicular phospholipid translocator, and affect hepatobiliary lipid transport. We tested whether fasting-associated fatty acid release from adipose tissues alters hepatic transporter expression and bile formation in a PPARalpha-dependent manner. A 24-hour fasting/48-hour refeeding schedule was used in wild-type and Pparalpha((-/-)) mice. Expression of genes involved in the control of bile formation was determined and related to secretion rates of biliary components. Expression of Pparalpha, farnesoid X receptor, and liver X receptor alpha genes encoding nuclear receptors that control hepatic bile salt and sterol metabolism was induced on fasting in wild-type mice only. The expression of Mdr2 was 5-fold increased in fasted wild-type mice and increased only marginally in Pparalpha((-/-)) mice, and it normalized on refeeding. Mdr2 protein levels and maximal biliary phospholipid secretion rates were clearly increased in fasted wild-type mice. Hepatic expression of the liver X receptor target genes ATP binding cassette transporter a1 (Abca1), Abcg5, and Abcg8, implicated in hepatobiliary cholesterol transport, was induced in fasted wild-type mice only. However, the maximal biliary cholesterol secretion rate was reduced by approximately 50%. Induction of Mdr2 expression and function is part of the PPARalpha-mediated fasting response in mice. Fasting also induces expression of the putative hepatobiliary cholesterol transport genes Abca1, Abcg5, and Abcg8, but, nonetheless, maximal biliary cholesterol excretion is decreased after fasting.

  4. The ABCs of membrane transporters in health and disease (SLC series): Introduction☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Hediger, Matthias A.; Clémençon, Benjamin; Burrier, Robert E.; Bruford, Elspeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The field of transport biology has steadily grown over the past decade and is now recognized as playing an important role in manifestation and treatment of disease. The SLC (solute carrier) gene series has grown to now include 52 families and 395 transporter genes in the human genome. A list of these genes can be found at the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) website (see www.genenames.org/genefamilies/SLC). This special issue features mini-reviews for each of these SLC families written by the experts in each field. The existing online resource for solute carriers, the Bioparadigms SLC Tables (www.bioparadigms.org), has been updated and significantly extended with additional information and cross-links to other relevant databases, and the nomenclature used in this database has been validated and approved by the HGNC. In addition, the Bioparadigms SLC Tables functionality has been improved to allow easier access by the scientific community. This introduction includes: an overview of all known SLC and “non-SLC” transporter genes; a list of transporters of water soluble vitamins; a summary of recent progress in the structure determination of transporters (including GLUT1/SLC2A1); roles of transporters in human diseases and roles in drug approval and pharmaceutical perspectives. PMID:23506860

  5. The novel ABC transporter ABCH1 is a potential target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Zhu, Xun; Xia, Jixing; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-09-03

    Insect pests cause serious crop damage and develop high-level resistance to chemical insecticides and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal Cry toxins. A new promising approach for controlling them and overcoming this resistance is RNA interference (RNAi). The RNAi-based insect control strategy depends on the selection of suitable target genes. In this study, we cloned and characterized a novel ABC transporter gene PxABCH1 in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Phylogenetic analysis showed that PxABCH1 is closely related to ABCA and ABCG subfamily members. Spatial-temporal expression detection revealed that PxABCH1 was expressed in all tissues and developmental stages, and highest expressed in head and male adult. Midgut sequence variation and expression analyses of PxABCH1 in all the susceptible and Bt-resistant P. xylostella strains and the functional analysis by sublethal RNAi demonstrated that Cry1Ac resistance was independent of this gene. Silencing of PxABCH1 by a relatively high dose of dsRNA dramatically reduced its expression and resulted in larval and pupal lethal phenotypes in both susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella strains. To our knowledge, this study provides the first insight into ABCH1 in lepidopterans and reveals it as an excellent target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management.

  6. The novel ABC transporter ABCH1 is a potential target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Zhu, Xun; Xia, Jixing; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests cause serious crop damage and develop high-level resistance to chemical insecticides and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal Cry toxins. A new promising approach for controlling them and overcoming this resistance is RNA interference (RNAi). The RNAi-based insect control strategy depends on the selection of suitable target genes. In this study, we cloned and characterized a novel ABC transporter gene PxABCH1 in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Phylogenetic analysis showed that PxABCH1 is closely related to ABCA and ABCG subfamily members. Spatial-temporal expression detection revealed that PxABCH1 was expressed in all tissues and developmental stages, and highest expressed in head and male adult. Midgut sequence variation and expression analyses of PxABCH1 in all the susceptible and Bt-resistant P. xylostella strains and the functional analysis by sublethal RNAi demonstrated that Cry1Ac resistance was independent of this gene. Silencing of PxABCH1 by a relatively high dose of dsRNA dramatically reduced its expression and resulted in larval and pupal lethal phenotypes in both susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella strains. To our knowledge, this study provides the first insight into ABCH1 in lepidopterans and reveals it as an excellent target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management. PMID:26333918

  7. Translocation of the ABC transporter ABCD4 from the endoplasmic reticulum to lysosomes requires the escort protein LMBD1.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Okamoto, Takumi; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2016-07-26

    We previously demonstrated that ABCD4 does not localize to peroxisomes but rather, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), because it lacks the NH2-terminal hydrophilic region required for peroxisomal targeting. It was recently reported that mutations in ABCD4 result in a failure to release vitamin B12 from lysosomes. A similar phenotype is caused by mutations in LMBRD1, which encodes the lysosomal membrane protein LMBD1. These findings suggested to us that ABCD4 translocated from the ER to lysosomes in association with LMBD1. In this report, it is demonstrated that ABCD4 interacts with LMBD1 and then localizes to lysosomes, and this translocation depends on the lysosomal targeting ability of LMBD1. Furthermore, endogenous ABCD4 was localized to both lysosomes and the ER, and its lysosomal localization was disturbed by knockout of LMBRD1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the subcellular localization of the ABC transporter is determined by its association with an adaptor protein.

  8. Bombyx mori ABC transporter C2 structures responsible for the receptor function of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiho; Endo, Haruka; Adegawa, Satomi; Iizuka, Ami; Imamura, Kazuhiro; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2017-12-01

    Because Bombyx mori ABC transporter C2 (BmABCC2) has 1000-fold higher potential than B. mori cadherin-like protein as a receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin (Tanaka et al., 2013), the gate-opening ability of the latent pore under six extracellular loops (ECLs) of BmABCC2 was expected to be the reason for its higher potential (Heckel, 2012). In this study, cell swelling assays in Sf9 cells showed that BmABCC2 mutants lacking substrate-excreting activity retained receptor activity, indicating that the gate-opening activity of BmABCC2 is not responsible for Cry1Aa toxicity. The analysis of 29 BmABCC2 mutants demonstrated that 770 DYWL 773 of ECL 4 comprise a putative binding site to Cry1Aa. This suggests that specific toxicity of Cry1Aa toxin to a restricted range of lepidopteran insects is dependent on conservation and variation in the amino acid residues around 770 DYWL 773 of ECL 4 in the ABCC2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the transcriptional regulation of brain ABC transporters during acute acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Carolina I; Rudraiah, Swetha; Bataille, Amy M; Vigo, María B; Goedken, Michael J; Manautou, José E

    2015-04-01

    Changes in expression of liver ABC transporters have been described during acute APAP intoxication. However, the effect of APAP on brain ABC transporters is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of APAP on brain ABC transporters expression and the role of the oxidative stress sensor Nrf2. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered APAP (400mg/kg) for analysis of brain mRNA and protein expression of Mrp1-6, Bcrp and P-gp. The results show induction of P-gp, Mrp2 and Mrp4 proteins, with no changes in Bcrp, Mrp1 or Mrp5-6. The protein values were accompanied by corresponding changes in mRNA levels. Additionally, brain Nrf2 nuclear translocation and expression of two Nrf2 target genes, quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and Hemoxygenase 1 (Ho-1), was evaluated at 6, 12 and 24h after APAP treatment. Nrf2 nuclear content increased by 58% at 12h after APAP along with significant increments in mRNA and protein expression of Nqo1 and Ho-1. Furthermore, APAP treated Nrf2 knockout mice did not increase mRNA or protein expression of Mrp2 and Mrp4 as observed in wildtypes. In contrast, P-gp induction by APAP was observed in both genotypes. In conclusion, acute APAP intoxication induces protein expression of brain P-gp, Mrp2 and Mrp4. This study also suggests that brain changes in Mrp2 and Mrp4 expression may be due to in situ Nrf2 activation by APAP, while P-gp induction is independent of Nrf2 function. The functional consequences of these changes in brain ABC transporters by APAP deserve further attention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. ATP-induced conformational changes of nucleotide-binding domains in an ABC transporter. Importance of the water-mediated entropic force.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Chiba, Shuntaro; Kaneta, Yusuke; Furuta, Tadaomi; Sakurai, Minoru

    2014-11-06

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins belong to a superfamily of active transporters. Recent experimental and computational studies have shown that binding of ATP to the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of ABC proteins drives the dimerization of NBDs, which, in turn, causes large conformational changes within the transmembrane domains (TMDs). To elucidate the active substrate transport mechanism of ABC proteins, it is first necessary to understand how the NBD dimerization is driven by ATP binding. In this study, we selected MalKs (NBDs of a maltose transporter) as a representative NBD and calculated the free-energy change upon dimerization using molecular mechanics calculations combined with a statistical thermodynamic theory of liquids, as well as a method to calculate the translational, rotational, and vibrational entropy change. This combined method is applied to a large number of snapshot structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations containing explicit water molecules. The results suggest that the NBD dimerization proceeds with a large gain of water entropy when ATP molecules bind to the NBDs. The energetic gain arising from direct NBD-NBD interactions is canceled by the dehydration penalty and the configurational-entropy loss. ATP hydrolysis induces a loss of the shape complementarity between the NBDs, which leads to the dissociation of the dimer, due to a decrease in the water-entropy gain and an increase in the configurational-entropy loss. This interpretation of the NBD dimerization mechanism in concert with ATP, especially focused on the water-mediated entropy force, is potentially applicable to a wide variety of the ABC transporters.

  11. Structural and functional insights into the lipopolysaccharide ABC transporter LptB2FG.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haohao; Zhang, Zhengyu; Tang, Xiaodi; Paterson, Neil G; Dong, Changjiang

    2017-08-09

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria contains lipopolysaccharide that is essential for their viability and drug resistance. A 134-kDa protein complex LptB 2 FG is unique among ATP-binding cassette transporters because it extracts lipopolysaccharide from the external leaflet of the inner membrane and propels it along a filament that extends across the periplasm to directly deliver lipopolysaccharide into the external leaflet of the outer membrane. Here we report the crystal structure of the lipopolysaccharide transporter LptB 2 FG from Klebsiella pneumoniae, in which both LptF and LptG are composed of a β-jellyroll-like periplasmic domain and six α-helical segments in the transmembrane domain. LptF and LptG form a central cavity containing highly conserved hydrophobic residues. Structural and functional studies suggest that LptB 2 FG uses an alternating lateral access mechanism to extract lipopolysaccharide and traffic it along the hydrophobic cavity toward the transporter's periplasmic domains.Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are synthesized at the periplasmic side of the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and are then extracted by the LptB 2 FG complex during the first step of LPS transport to the outer membrane. Here the authors present the LptB 2 FG structure, which supports an alternating lateral access mechanism for LPS extraction.

  12. Drosophila ABC Transporter DmHMT-1 Confers Tolerance to Cadmium.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Half molecule ATP-binding cassette transporters of the HMT1(heavy metal tolerance factor 1)subfamily are required for Cd2+ tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and have homologs in other species, including plants and humans. Based on studies i...

  13. Identification of Residues in the Lipopolysaccharide ABC Transporter That Coordinate ATPase Activity with Extractor Function

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; Owens, Tristan W.; Orabella, Matthew J.; Davis, Rebecca M.; May, Janine M.; Trauger, Sunia A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), creating a permeability barrier against toxic molecules, including many antimicrobials. To assemble LPS on their surface, Gram-negative bacteria must extract newly synthesized LPS from the inner membrane, transport it across the aqueous periplasm, and translocate it across the outer membrane. The LptA to -G proteins assemble into a transenvelope complex that transports LPS from the inner membrane to the cell surface. The Lpt system powers LPS transport from the inner membrane by using a poorly characterized ATP-binding cassette system composed of the ATPase LptB and the transmembrane domains LptFG. Here, we characterize a cluster of residues in the groove region of LptB that is important for controlling LPS transport. We also provide the first functional characterization of LptFG and identify their coupling helices that interact with the LptB groove. Substitutions at conserved residues in these coupling helices compromise both the assembly and function of the LptB2FG complex. Defects in LPS transport conferred by alterations in the LptFG coupling helices can be rescued by changing a residue in LptB that is adjacent to functionally important residues in the groove region. This suppression is achieved by increasing the ATPase activity of the LptB2FG complex. Taken together, these data identify a specific binding site in LptB for the coupling helices of LptFG that is responsible for coupling of ATP hydrolysis by LptB with LptFG function to achieve LPS extraction. PMID:27795402

  14. A lower isoelectric point increases signal sequence-mediated secretion of recombinant proteins through a bacterial ABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Byun, Hyunjong; Park, Jiyeon; Kim, Sun Chang; Ahn, Jung Hoon

    2017-12-01

    Efficient protein production for industrial and academic purposes often involves engineering microorganisms to produce and secrete target proteins into the culture. Pseudomonas fluorescens has a TliDEF ATP-binding cassette transporter, a type I secretion system, which recognizes C-terminal LARD3 signal sequence of thermostable lipase TliA. Many proteins are secreted by TliDEF in vivo when recombined with LARD3, but there are still others that cannot be secreted by TliDEF even when LARD3 is attached. However, the factors that determine whether or not a recombinant protein can be secreted through TliDEF are still unknown. Here, we recombined LARD3 with several proteins and examined their secretion through TliDEF. We found that the proteins secreted via LARD3 are highly negatively charged with highly-acidic isoelectric points (pI) lower than 5.5. Attaching oligo-aspartate to lower the pI of negatively-charged recombinant proteins improved their secretion, and attaching oligo-arginine to negatively-charged proteins blocked their secretion by LARD3. In addition, negatively supercharged green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed improved secretion, whereas positively supercharged GFP did not secrete. These results disclosed that proteins' acidic pI and net negative charge are major factors that determine their secretion through TliDEF. Homology modeling for TliDEF revealed that TliD dimer forms evolutionarily-conserved positively-charged clusters in its pore and substrate entrance site, which also partially explains the pI dependence of the TliDEF-dependent secretions. In conclusion, lowering the isoelectric point improved LARD3-mediated protein secretion, both widening the range of protein targets for efficient production via secretion and signifying an important aspect of ABC transporter-mediated secretions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Rethinking Drug Treatment Approaches in ALS by Targeting ABC Efflux Transporters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    for ALS patients. One of the problems in finding highly efficacious treatments in ALS may derive from the so far underestimated issue of disease... efficacy the SOD1-G93A ALS mice. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Drug resistance, ALS, Therapy, Riluzole, Drug Efflux Transporters 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...improves efficacy of ALS therapeutics Michael R. Jablonski1, Shashirekha S. Markandaiah1, Dena Jacob1, Ni J. Meng1, Ke Li2, Victoria Gennaro1, Angelo

  16. Structure of a Bacterial ABC Transporter Involved in the Import of an Acidic Polysaccharide Alginate.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yukie; Itoh, Takafumi; Kaneko, Ai; Nishitani, Yu; Mikami, Bunzo; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2015-09-01

    The acidic polysaccharide alginate represents a promising marine biomass for the microbial production of biofuels, although the molecular and structural characteristics of alginate transporters remain to be clarified. In Sphingomonas sp. A1, the ATP-binding cassette transporter AlgM1M2SS is responsible for the import of alginate across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here, we present the substrate-transport characteristics and quaternary structure of AlgM1M2SS. The addition of poly- or oligoalginate enhanced the ATPase activity of reconstituted AlgM1M2SS coupled with one of the periplasmic solute-binding proteins, AlgQ1 or AlgQ2. External fluorescence-labeled oligoalginates were specifically imported into AlgM1M2SS-containing proteoliposomes in the presence of AlgQ2, ATP, and Mg(2+). The crystal structure of AlgQ2-bound AlgM1M2SS adopts an inward-facing conformation. The interaction between AlgQ2 and AlgM1M2SS induces the formation of an alginate-binding tunnel-like structure accessible to the solvent. The translocation route inside the transmembrane domains contains charged residues suitable for the import of acidic saccharides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Conserved ABC Transport System Regulated by the General Stress Response Pathways of Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Herrou, Julien; Willett, Jonathan W; Czyż, Daniel M; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang; Crosson, Sean

    2017-03-01

    Brucella abortus σ E1 is an EcfG family sigma factor that regulates the transcription of dozens of genes in response to diverse stress conditions and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a mouse model. A putative ATP-binding cassette transporter operon, bab1_0223-bab1_0226 , is among the most highly activated gene sets in the σ E1 regulon. The proteins encoded by the operon resemble quaternary ammonium-compatible solute importers but are most similar in sequence to the broadly conserved YehZYXW system, which remains largely uncharacterized. Transcription of yehZYXW is activated by the general stress sigma factor σ S in Enterobacteriaceae , which suggests a functional role for this transport system in bacterial stress response across the classes Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria We present evidence that B. abortus YehZYXW does not function as an importer of known compatible solutes under physiological conditions and does not contribute to the virulence defect of a σ E1 -null strain. The sole in vitro phenotype associated with genetic disruption of this putative transport system is reduced growth in the presence of high Li + ion concentrations. A crystal structure of B. abortus YehZ revealed a class II periplasmic binding protein fold with significant structural homology to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ProX, which binds glycine betaine. However, the structure of the YehZ ligand-binding pocket is incompatible with high-affinity binding to glycine betaine. This is consistent with weak measured binding of YehZ to glycine betaine and related compatible solutes. We conclude that YehZYXW is a conserved, stress-regulated transport system that is phylogenetically and functionally distinct from quaternary ammonium-compatible solute importers. IMPORTANCE Brucella abortus σ E1 regulates transcription in response to stressors encountered in its mammalian host and is necessary for maintenance of chronic infection in a mouse model. The functions of the

  18. Conserved ABC Transport System Regulated by the General Stress Response Pathways of Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Herrou, Julien; Willett, Jonathan W.; Czyż, Daniel M.

    ABSTRACT Brucella abortusσ E1is an EcfG family sigma factor that regulates the transcription of dozens of genes in response to diverse stress conditions and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a mouse model. A putative ATP-binding cassette transporter operon,bab1_0223-bab1_0226, is among the most highly activated gene sets in the σ E1regulon. The proteins encoded by the operon resemble quaternary ammonium-compatible solute importers but are most similar in sequence to the broadly conserved YehZYXW system, which remains largely uncharacterized. Transcription ofyehZYXWis activated by the general stress sigma factor σ SinEnterobacteriaceae, which suggests a functional role for this transport systemmore » in bacterial stress response across the classesAlphaproteobacteriaandGammaproteobacteria. We present evidence thatB. abortusYehZYXW does not function as an importer of known compatible solutes under physiological conditions and does not contribute to the virulence defect of a σ E1-null strain. The solein vitrophenotype associated with genetic disruption of this putative transport system is reduced growth in the presence of high Li +ion concentrations. A crystal structure ofB. abortusYehZ revealed a class II periplasmic binding protein fold with significant structural homology toArchaeoglobus fulgidusProX, which binds glycine betaine. However, the structure of the YehZ ligand-binding pocket is incompatible with high-affinity binding to glycine betaine. This is consistent with weak measured binding of YehZ to glycine betaine and related compatible solutes. We conclude that YehZYXW is a conserved, stress-regulated transport system that is phylogenetically and functionally distinct from quaternary ammonium-compatible solute importers. IMPORTANCEBrucella abortusσ E1regulates transcription in response to stressors encountered in its mammalian host and is necessary for maintenance of chronic infection in a mouse model. The functions of the majority of

  19. The babel of the ABCs: novel transporters involved in the regulation of sterol absorption and excretion.

    PubMed

    Ordovas, Jose M; Tai, E Shyong

    2002-01-01

    Hypercholesterolaemia is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Therefore, the reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is one of the primary targets of the current recommendations to decrease CHD risk in the population. Whereas, the mechanisms involved in de novo cholesterol synthesis and its uptake by cells via the LDL receptor are well known, we still need better understanding about the mechanisms involved in intestinal cholesterol absorption and excretion. The recent discovery of ABCG5 and ABCG8 transporters will significantly improve our understanding of cholesterol trafficking and it will lead to better and new therapeutic strategies to maintain cholesterol homeostasis.

  20. ABC Transporters and Their Role in the Neoadjuvant Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vaclavikova, Radka; Neoral, Cestmir; Vrba, Jiri; Aujesky, Rene; Matzenauer, Marcel; Melichar, Bohuslav

    2018-01-01

    The prognosis of esophageal cancer (EC) is poor, despite considerable effort of both experimental scientists and clinicians. The tri-modality treatment consisting of neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery has remained the gold standard over decades, unfortunately, without significant progress in recent years. Suitable prognostic factors indicating which patients will benefit from this tri-modality treatment are missing. Some patients rapidly progress on the neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, which is thus useless and sometimes even harmful. At the same time, other patients achieve complete remission on neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and subsequent surgery may increase their risk of morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of patients ranges from excellent to extremely poor. Considering these differences, the role of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters, among other factors, in the EC response to chemotherapy may be more important compared, for example, with pancreatic cancer where all patients progress on chemotherapy regardless of the treatment or disease stage. This review surveys published literature describing the potential role of ATP-binding cassette transporters, the genetic polymorphisms, epigenetic regulations, and phenotypic changes in the prognosis and therapy of EC. The review provides knowledge base for further research of potential predictive biomarkers that will allow the stratification of patients into defined groups for optimal therapeutic outcome. PMID:29543757

  1. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells.

  2. Convergent Loss of ABC Transporter Genes From Clostridioides difficile Genomes Is Associated With Impaired Tyrosine Uptake and p-Cresol Production.

    PubMed

    Steglich, Matthias; Hofmann, Julia D; Helmecke, Julia; Sikorski, Johannes; Spröer, Cathrin; Riedel, Thomas; Bunk, Boyke; Overmann, Jörg; Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Nübel, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    We report the frequent, convergent loss of two genes encoding the substrate-binding protein and the ATP-binding protein of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter from the genomes of unrelated Clostridioides difficile strains. This specific genomic deletion was strongly associated with the reduced uptake of tyrosine and phenylalanine and production of derived Stickland fermentation products, including p -cresol, suggesting that the affected ABC transporter had been responsible for the import of aromatic amino acids. In contrast, the transporter gene loss did not measurably affect bacterial growth or production of enterotoxins. Phylogenomic analysis of publically available genome sequences indicated that this transporter gene deletion had occurred multiple times in diverse clonal lineages of C. difficile , with a particularly high prevalence in ribotype 027 isolates, where 48 of 195 genomes (25%) were affected. The transporter gene deletion likely was facilitated by the repetitive structure of its genomic location. While at least some of the observed transporter gene deletions are likely to have occurred during the natural life cycle of C. difficile , we also provide evidence for the emergence of this mutation during long-term laboratory cultivation of reference strain R20291.

  3. Convergent Loss of ABC Transporter Genes From Clostridioides difficile Genomes Is Associated With Impaired Tyrosine Uptake and p-Cresol Production

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Matthias; Hofmann, Julia D.; Helmecke, Julia; Sikorski, Johannes; Spröer, Cathrin; Riedel, Thomas; Bunk, Boyke; Overmann, Jörg; Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Nübel, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    We report the frequent, convergent loss of two genes encoding the substrate-binding protein and the ATP-binding protein of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter from the genomes of unrelated Clostridioides difficile strains. This specific genomic deletion was strongly associated with the reduced uptake of tyrosine and phenylalanine and production of derived Stickland fermentation products, including p-cresol, suggesting that the affected ABC transporter had been responsible for the import of aromatic amino acids. In contrast, the transporter gene loss did not measurably affect bacterial growth or production of enterotoxins. Phylogenomic analysis of publically available genome sequences indicated that this transporter gene deletion had occurred multiple times in diverse clonal lineages of C. difficile, with a particularly high prevalence in ribotype 027 isolates, where 48 of 195 genomes (25%) were affected. The transporter gene deletion likely was facilitated by the repetitive structure of its genomic location. While at least some of the observed transporter gene deletions are likely to have occurred during the natural life cycle of C. difficile, we also provide evidence for the emergence of this mutation during long-term laboratory cultivation of reference strain R20291. PMID:29867812

  4. N-retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine is the preferred retinoid substrate for the photoreceptor-specific ABC transporter ABCA4 (ABCR).

    PubMed

    Beharry, Seelochan; Zhong, Ming; Molday, Robert S

    2004-12-24

    ABCA4, a member of the family of ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins found in rod and cone photoreceptors, has been implicated in the transport of retinoid compounds across the outer segment disk membrane following the photoactivation of rhodopsin. Mutations in the ABCA4 gene are responsible for Stargardt macular dystrophy and related retinal degenerative diseases that cause a loss in vision. To identify the retinoid substrate that interacts with ABCA4, we have isolated ABCA4 from rod outer segment disk membranes on an immunoaffinity matrix and analyzed retinoid compounds that bind to ABCA4 using high performance liquid chromatography and radiolabeling methods. When all-trans-retinal was added to ABCA4 in the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine, approximately 0.9 mol of N-retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine and 0.3 mol of all-trans-retinal were bound per mol of ABCA4 with an apparent K(d) of 2-5 microm. ATP and GTP released these retinoids from ABCA4, whereas ADP, GDP, and nonhydrolyzable derivatives, adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)triphosphate and guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)triphosphate, were ineffective. One mole of N-retinyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, the reduced form of N-retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine, bound per mol of ABCA4, whereas 0.3 mol of all-trans-retinal were bound in the absence of phosphatidylethanolamine. No binding of all-trans-retinol to ABCA4 was observed. Our results indicate that ABCA4 preferentially binds N-retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine with high affinity in the absence of ATP. Our studies further suggest that ATP binding and hydrolysis induces a protein conformational change that causes N-retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine to dissociate from ABCA4.

  5. An ABC Transporter System of Yersinia pestis Allows Utilization of Chelated Iron by Escherichia coli SAB11

    PubMed Central

    Bearden, Scott W.; Staggs, Teanna M.; Perry, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    The acquisition of iron is an essential component in the pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis, the agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. A cosmid library derived from the genomic DNA of Y. pestis KIM6+ was used for transduction of an Escherichia coli mutant (SAB11) defective in the biosynthesis of the siderophore enterobactin. Recombinant plasmids which had a common 13-kb BamHI fragment were isolated from SAB11 transductants in which growth but not enterobactin synthesis was restored on media containing the iron chelator EDDA [ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid)]. Subcloning and transposon mutagenesis revealed a 5.6-kb region, designated yfe, essential for SAB11 growth stimulation. In vitro transcription-translation analysis identified polypeptides of 18, 29.5, 32, and 33 kDa encoded by the yfe locus. Sequence analysis shows this locus to be comprised of five genes in two separate operons which have potential Fur-binding sequences in both promoters. A putative polycistronic operon, yfeABCD, is Fur regulated and responds to iron and manganese. A functional Fur protein is required for the observed manganese repression of this operon. This operon encodes polypeptides which have strong similarity to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters and include a periplasmic binding protein (YfeA), an ATP-binding protein (YfeB), and two integral membrane proteins (YfeC and -D), which likely function in the acquisition of inorganic iron and possibly other ions. The ∼21-kDa protein encoded by the separately transcribed yfeE gene may be located in the cell envelope, since a yfeE::TnphoA fusion is PhoA+. Mutations in this gene abrogate growth of SAB11 on iron-chelated media. PMID:9495751

  6. An ABC transporter system of Yersinia pestis allows utilization of chelated iron by Escherichia coli SAB11.

    PubMed

    Bearden, S W; Staggs, T M; Perry, R D

    1998-03-01

    The acquisition of iron is an essential component in the pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis, the agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. A cosmid library derived from the genomic DNA of Y. pestis KIM6+ was used for transduction of an Escherichia coli mutant (SAB11) defective in the biosynthesis of the siderophore enterobactin. Recombinant plasmids which had a common 13-kb BamHI fragment were isolated from SAB11 transductants in which growth but not enterobactin synthesis was restored on media containing the iron chelator EDDA [ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid)]. Subcloning and transposon mutagenesis revealed a 5.6-kb region, designated yfe, essential for SAB11 growth stimulation. In vitro transcription-translation analysis identified polypeptides of 18, 29.5, 32, and 33 kDa encoded by the yfe locus. Sequence analysis shows this locus to be comprised of five genes in two separate operons which have potential Fur-binding sequences in both promoters. A putative polycistronic operon, yfeABCD, is Fur regulated and responds to iron and manganese. A functional Fur protein is required for the observed manganese repression of this operon. This operon encodes polypeptides which have strong similarity to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters and include a periplasmic binding protein (YfeA), an ATP-binding protein (YfeB), and two integral membrane proteins (YfeC and -D), which likely function in the acquisition of inorganic iron and possibly other ions. The approximately 21-kDa protein encoded by the separately transcribed yfeE gene may be located in the cell envelope, since a yfeE::TnphoA fusion is PhoA+. Mutations in this gene abrogate growth of SAB11 on iron-chelated media.

  7. Research Advances: Less Expensive and More Convenient Gaucher's Disease Treatment; Structural Loop Regions: Key to Multidrug-Resistance Transporters?; New Method Identifies Proteins in Old Artwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray structure of EmrD, a multidrug transporter protein from Escherichia coli, common bacteria known to cause several food-borne illnesses was determined by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute. The hydrophobic residues in the EmrD internal cavity are likely to contribute to the general mechanism transporting various compounds through…

  8. ATP-binding cassette transporters are enriched in non-caveolar detergent-insoluble glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane domains (DIGs) in human multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, John W J; Klappe, Karin; Hummel, Ina; Kok, Jan W

    2004-02-13

    In this study we show that P-glycoprotein in multidrug-resistant 2780AD human ovarian carcinoma cells and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 in multidrug-resistant HT29col human colon carcinoma cells are predominantly located in Lubrol-based detergent-insoluble glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane domains. This localization is independent of caveolae, since 2780AD cells do not express caveolin-1. Although HT29col cells do express caveolin-1, the ATP-binding cassette transporter and caveolin-1 were dissociated on the basis of differential solubility in Triton X-100 and absence of microscopical colocalization. While both the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and caveolin-1 are located in Lubrol-based membrane domains, they occupy different regions of these domains.

  9. The yeast plasma membrane ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Aus1: purification, characterization, and the effect of lipids on its activity.

    PubMed

    Marek, Magdalena; Milles, Sigrid; Schreiber, Gabriele; Daleke, David L; Dittmar, Gunnar; Herrmann, Andreas; Müller, Peter; Pomorski, Thomas Günther

    2011-06-17

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Aus1 is expressed under anaerobic growth conditions at the plasma membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is required for sterol uptake. These observations suggest that Aus1 promotes the translocation of sterols across membranes, but the precise transport mechanism has yet to be identified. In this study, an extraction and purification procedure was developed to characterize the Aus1 transporter. The detergent-solubilized protein was able to bind and hydrolyze ATP. Mutagenesis of the conserved lysine to methionine in the Walker A motif abolished ATP hydrolysis. Likewise, ATP hydrolysis was inhibited by classical inhibitors of ABC transporters. Upon reconstitution into proteoliposomes, the ATPase activity of Aus1 was specifically stimulated by phosphatidylserine (PS) in a stereoselective manner. We also found that Aus1-dependent sterol uptake, but not Aus1 expression and trafficking to the plasma membrane, was affected by changes in cellular PS levels. These results suggest a direct interaction between Aus1 and PS that is critical for the activity of the transporter.

  10. Whole-Genome Survey of the Putative ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Family Genes in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily constitutes one of the largest protein families known in plants. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of ABC protein genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with ABC protein members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified 135 putative ABC proteins with 1 or 2 NBDs in V. vinifera. Of these, 120 encode intrinsic membrane proteins, and 15 encode proteins missing TMDs. V. vinifera ABC proteins can be divided into 13 subfamilies with 79 “full-size,” 41 “half-size,” and 15 “soluble” putative ABC proteins. The main feature of the Vitis ABC superfamily is the presence of 2 large subfamilies, ABCG (pleiotropic drug resistance and white-brown complex homolog) and ABCC (multidrug resistance-associated protein). We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative ABC transporters in different species. This work represents the first complete inventory of ABC transporters in V. vinifera. The identification of Vitis ABC transporters and their comparative analysis with the Arabidopsis counterparts revealed a strong conservation between the 2 species. This inventory could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these transporters in V. vinifera. PMID:24244377

  11. Multidrug transport protein norM from vibrio cholerae simultaneously couples to sodium- and proton-motive force.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yoonhee; Nair, Asha; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2014-05-23

    Membrane transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family mediate the efflux of unrelated pharmaceuticals from the interior of the cell in organisms ranging from bacteria to human. These proteins are thought to fall into two classes that couple substrate efflux to the influx of either Na(+) or H(+). We studied the energetics of drug extrusion by NorM from Vibrio cholerae in proteoliposomes in which purified NorM protein was functionally reconstituted in an inside-out orientation. We establish that NorM simultaneously couples to the sodium-motive force and proton-motive force, and biochemically identify protein regions and residues that play important roles in Na(+) or H(+) binding. As the positions of protons are not available in current medium and high-resolution crystal structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters, our findings add a previously unrecognized parameter to mechanistic models based of these structures. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Constitutive mRNA expression and protein activity levels of nine ABC efflux transporters in seven permanent cell lines derived from different tissues of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Stephan; Loncar, Jovica; Zaja, Roko; Schnell, Sabine; Schirmer, Kristin; Smital, Tvrtko; Luckenbach, Till

    2011-01-25

    Permanent fish cell lines have become common model systems for determining ecotoxicological effects of pollutants. For these cell lines little is known on the cellular active transport mechanisms that control the amount of a compound entering the cell, such as the MXR (multixenobiotic resistance) system mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins. Therefore, for toxic evaluation of chemicals with those cells information on MXR is important. We here present data on constitutive mRNA expression and protein activity levels of a series of ABC efflux transporters in seven permanent cell lines derived from liver (RTL-W1; R1) and liver hepatoma (RTH-149), gill (RTgill-W1), gonad (RTG-2), gut (RTgutGC) and brain (RTbrain) of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In addition to known transporters abcb1 (designated here abcb1a), abcb11, abcc1-3, abcc5 and abcg2, we quantified expression levels of a newly identified abcb1 isoform (abcb1b) and abcc4, previously unknown in trout. Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) indicated that mRNA of the examined ABC transporters was constitutively expressed in all cell lines. Transporter mRNA expression patterns were similar in all cell lines, with expression levels of abcc transporters being 80 to over 1000 fold higher than for abcg2, abcb1a/b and abcb11 (abcc1-5>abcg2>abcb1a/b, 11). Transporter activity in the cell lines was determined by measuring uptake of transporter type specific fluorescent substrates in the presence of activity inhibitors. The combination of the ABCB1 and ABCC transporter substrate calcein-AM with inhibitors cyclosporine A, PSC833 and MK571 resulted in a concentration-dependent fluorescence increase of up to 3-fold, whereas reversin 205 caused a slight, but not concentration-dependent fluorescence increase. Accumulation of the dyes Hoechst 33342 and 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate was basically unchanged in the presence of Ko134 and taurocholate, respectively, indicating low Abcg2 and Abcb11

  13. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 ABC Transporter NppA1A2BCD Is Required for Uptake of Peptidyl Nucleoside Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Daniel; Braun, Yvonne; Dubiley, Svetlana; Lafon, Corinne; Köhler, Thilo; Page, Malcolm G P; Mourez, Michael; Severinov, Konstantin; Weingart, Helge

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of the genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 revealed the presence of an operon encoding an ABC-type transporter (NppA1A2BCD) showing homology to the Yej transporter of Escherichia coli. The Yej transporter is involved in the uptake of the peptide-nucleotide antibiotic microcin C, a translation inhibitor that targets the enzyme aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. Furthermore, it was recently shown that the Opp transporter from P. aeruginosa PAO1, which is identical to Npp, is required for uptake of the uridyl peptide antibiotic pacidamycin, which targets the enzyme translocase I (MraY), which is involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. We used several approaches to further explore the substrate specificity of the Npp transporter. Assays of growth in defined minimal medium containing peptides of various lengths and amino acid compositions as sole nitrogen sources, as well as Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays, showed that the Npp transporter is not required for di-, tri-, and oligopeptide uptake. Overexpression of the npp operon increased susceptibility not just to pacidamycin but also to nickel chloride and the peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic blasticidin S. Furthermore, heterologous expression of the npp operon in a yej-deficient mutant of E. coli resulted in increased susceptibility to albomycin, a naturally occurring sideromycin with a peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic. Additionally, heterologous expression showed that microcin C is recognized by the P. aeruginosa Npp system. Overall, these results suggest that the NppA1A2BCD transporter is involved in the uptake of peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics by P. aeruginosa PA14. One of the world's most serious health problems is the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. There is a desperate need to find novel antibiotic therapeutics that either act on new biological targets or are able to bypass known resistance mechanisms. Bacterial ABC transporters play an important role in nutrient uptake from the environment. These uptake

  14. Maltose Uptake by the Novel ABC Transport System MusEFGK2I Causes Increased Expression of ptsG in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Alexander; Kuhlmann, Nora; Eck, Alexander W.; Krämer, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum efficiently metabolizes maltose by a pathway involving maltodextrin and glucose formation by 4-α-glucanotransferase, glucose phosphorylation by glucose kinases, and maltodextrin degradation via maltodextrin phosphorylase and α-phosphoglucomutase. However, maltose uptake in C. glutamicum has not been investigated. Interestingly, the presence of maltose in the medium causes increased expression of ptsG in C. glutamicum by an unknown mechanism, although the ptsG-encoded glucose-specific EII permease of the phosphotransferase system itself is not required for maltose utilization. We identified the maltose uptake system as an ABC transporter encoded by musK (cg2708; ATPase subunit), musE (cg2705; substrate binding protein), musF (cg2704; permease), and musG (cg2703; permease) by combination of data obtained from characterization of maltose uptake and reanalyses of transcriptome data. Deletion of the mus gene cluster in C. glutamicum Δmus abolished maltose uptake and utilization. Northern blotting and reverse transcription-PCR experiments revealed that musK and musE are transcribed monocistronically, whereas musF and musG are part of an operon together with cg2701 (musI), which encodes a membrane protein of unknown function with no homologies to characterized proteins. Characterization of growth and [14C]maltose uptake in the musI insertion strain C. glutamicum IMcg2701 showed that musI encodes a novel essential component of the maltose ABC transporter of C. glutamicum. Finally, ptsG expression during cultivation on different carbon sources was analyzed in the maltose uptake-deficient strain C. glutamicum Δmus. Indeed, maltose uptake by the novel ABC transport system MusEFGK2I is required for the positive effect of maltose on ptsG expression in C. glutamicum. PMID:23543710

  15. Requirement of ABC transporter inhibition and Hoechst 33342 dye deprivation for the assessment of side population-defined C6 glioma stem cell metabolism using fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Murota, Yoshitaka; Tabu, Kouichi; Taga, Tetsuya

    2016-11-04

    Elucidating the precise properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is indispensable for the development of effective therapies against tumors, because CSCs are key drivers of tumor development, metastasis and relapse. We previously reported that the Hoechst 33342 dye-low staining side population (SP) method can enrich for CSCs in the C6 glioma cell line, and that the positively stained main population (MP) cells are non-CSCs. Presence of cancer stem-like SP cells is reported in various types of cancer. Although altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, very little has been studied on the applicability of fluorescent probes for the understanding of CSC energy metabolism. The metabolic status of C6 SP and MP cells are evaluated by CellROX, MitoTracker Green (MTG) and JC-1 for cellular oxidative stress, mitochondrial amount, and mitochondrial membrane potential, respectively. SP cells were found to exhibit significantly lower fluorescent intensities of CellROX and MTG than MP cells. However, inhibition of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters by verapamil enhanced the intensities of these probes in SP cells to the levels similar to those in MP cells, indicating that SP cells expel the probes outside of the cells through ABC transporters. Next, SP cells were stained with JC-1 dye which exhibits membrane potential dependent accumulation in mitochondrial matrix, followed by formation of aggregates. The mitochondrial membrane potential indicated by the aggregates of JC-1 was 5.0-fold lower in SP cells than MP cells. Inhibition of ABC transporters enhanced the fluorescent intensities of the JC-1 aggregates in both SP and MP cells, the former of which was still 2.2-fold lower than the latter. This higher JC-1 signal in MP cells was further found to be due to the Hoechst 33342 dye existing in MP cells. When SP and MP cells were recultured to deprive the intracellular Hoechst 33342 dye and then stained with JC-1 in the presence of verapamil, the intensities of

  16. Multi-Drug Resistance Transporters and a Mechanism-Based Strategy for Assessing Risks of Pesticide Combinations to Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Guseman, Alex J.; Miller, Kaliah; Kunkle, Grace; Dively, Galen P.; Pettis, Jeffrey S.; Evans, Jay D.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Hawthorne, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Annual losses of honey bee colonies remain high and pesticide exposure is one possible cause. Dangerous combinations of pesticides, plant-produced compounds and antibiotics added to hives may cause or contribute to losses, but it is very difficult to test the many combinations of those compounds that bees encounter. We propose a mechanism-based strategy for simplifying the assessment of combinations of compounds, focusing here on compounds that interact with xenobiotic handling ABC transporters. We evaluate the use of ivermectin as a model substrate for these transporters. Compounds that increase sensitivity of bees to ivermectin may be inhibiting key transporters. We show that several compounds commonly encountered by honey bees (fumagillin, Pristine, quercetin) significantly increased honey bee mortality due to ivermectin and significantly reduced the LC50 of ivermectin suggesting that they may interfere with transporter function. These inhibitors also significantly increased honey bees sensitivity to the neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid. This mechanism-based strategy may dramatically reduce the number of tests needed to assess the possibility of adverse combinations among pesticides. We also demonstrate an in vivo transporter assay that provides physical evidence of transporter inhibition by tracking the dynamics of a fluorescent substrate of these transporters (Rhodamine B) in bee tissues. Significantly more Rhodamine B remains in the head and hemolymph of bees pretreated with higher concentrations of the transporter inhibitor verapamil. Mechanism-based strategies for simplifying the assessment of adverse chemical interactions such as described here could improve our ability to identify those combinations that pose significantly greater risk to bees and perhaps improve the risk assessment protocols for honey bees and similar sensitive species. PMID:26840460

  17. Multi-Drug Resistance Transporters and a Mechanism-Based Strategy for Assessing Risks of Pesticide Combinations to Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Guseman, Alex J; Miller, Kaliah; Kunkle, Grace; Dively, Galen P; Pettis, Jeffrey S; Evans, Jay D; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Hawthorne, David J

    2016-01-01

    Annual losses of honey bee colonies remain high and pesticide exposure is one possible cause. Dangerous combinations of pesticides, plant-produced compounds and antibiotics added to hives may cause or contribute to losses, but it is very difficult to test the many combinations of those compounds that bees encounter. We propose a mechanism-based strategy for simplifying the assessment of combinations of compounds, focusing here on compounds that interact with xenobiotic handling ABC transporters. We evaluate the use of ivermectin as a model substrate for these transporters. Compounds that increase sensitivity of bees to ivermectin may be inhibiting key transporters. We show that several compounds commonly encountered by honey bees (fumagillin, Pristine, quercetin) significantly increased honey bee mortality due to ivermectin and significantly reduced the LC50 of ivermectin suggesting that they may interfere with transporter function. These inhibitors also significantly increased honey bees sensitivity to the neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid. This mechanism-based strategy may dramatically reduce the number of tests needed to assess the possibility of adverse combinations among pesticides. We also demonstrate an in vivo transporter assay that provides physical evidence of transporter inhibition by tracking the dynamics of a fluorescent substrate of these transporters (Rhodamine B) in bee tissues. Significantly more Rhodamine B remains in the head and hemolymph of bees pretreated with higher concentrations of the transporter inhibitor verapamil. Mechanism-based strategies for simplifying the assessment of adverse chemical interactions such as described here could improve our ability to identify those combinations that pose significantly greater risk to bees and perhaps improve the risk assessment protocols for honey bees and similar sensitive species.

  18. ABC transporter Cdr1p harbors charged residues in the intracellular loop and nucleotide-binding domain critical for protein trafficking and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Banerjee, Atanu; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Saxena, Ajay Kumar; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-08-01

    The ABC transporter Cdr1 protein of Candida albicans, which plays a major role in antifungal resistance, has two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). The 12 transmembrane helices of TMDs that are interconnected by extracellular and intracellular loops (ICLs) mainly harbor substrate recognition sites where drugs bind while cytoplasmic NBDs hydrolyze ATP which powers drug efflux. The coupling of ATP hydrolysis to drug transport requires proper communication between NBDs and TMDs typically accomplished by ICLs. This study examines the role of cytoplasmic ICLs of Cdr1p by rationally predicting the critical residues on the basis of their interatomic distances. Among nine pairs that fall within a proximity of <4 Å, an ion pair between K577 of ICL1 and E315 of NBD1 was found to be critical. The substitution, swapping and changing of the length or charge of K577 or E315 by directed mutagenesis led to a misfolded, non-rescuable protein entrapped in intracellular structures. Furthermore, the equipositional ionic pair-forming residues from ICL3 and NBD2 (R1260 and E1014) did not impact protein trafficking. These results point to a new role for ICL/NBD interacting residues in PDR ABC transporters in protein folding and trafficking. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. eUnaG: a new ligand-inducible fluorescent reporter to detect drug transporter activity in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Johannes T.-H.; Nam, Kwangho; Yeh, Joshua T.-H.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of metabolites and toxic organic solutes are orchestrated by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and the organic solute carrier family (SLC) proteins. A large number of ABC and SLC transpoters exist; however, only a small number have been well characterized. To facilitate the analysis of these transporters, which is important for drug safety and physiological studies, we developed a sensitive genetically encoded bilirubin (BR)-inducible fluorescence sensor (eUnaG) to detect transporter-coupled influx/efflux of organic compounds. This sensor can be used in live cells to measure transporter activity, as excretion of BR depends on ABC and SLC transporters. Applying eUnaG in functional RNAi screens, we characterize l(2)03659 as a Drosophila multidrug resistant-associated ABC transporter. PMID:28176814

  20. Multidrug Resistance in Breast Cancer: From In Vitro Models to Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wind, N. S.; Holen, I.

    2011-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) and subsequent relapse on therapy is a widespread problem in breast cancer, but our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is incomplete. Numerous studies have aimed to establish the role of drug transporter pumps in MDR and to link their expression to response to chemotherapy. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are central to breast cancer MDR, and increases in ABC expression levels have been shown to correlate with decreases in response to various chemotherapy drugs and a reduction in overall survival. But as there is a large degree of redundancy between different ABC transporters, this correlation has not been seen in all studies. This paper provides an introduction to the key molecules associated with breast cancer MDR and summarises evidence of their potential roles reported from model systems and clinical studies. We provide possible explanations for why despite several decades of research, the precise role of ABC transporters in breast cancer MDR remains elusive. PMID:22332018

  1. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC Transporter HI1470/71 through Its Cognate Molybdate Periplasmic Binding Protein, MolA

    SciTech Connect

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.

    2014-10-02

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB{sub 2}C{sub 2} (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The {approx}100 {mu}M binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate.more » The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus.« less

  2. Complete sequence of Enterococcus faecium pVEF3 and the detection of an omega-epsilon-zeta toxin-antitoxin module and an ABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Sletvold, H; Johnsen, P J; Hamre, I; Simonsen, G S; Sundsfjord, A; Nielsen, K M

    2008-07-01

    Glycopeptide resistant Enterococcus faecium (GREF) persists on Norwegian poultry farms despite the ban on the growth promoter avoparcin. The biological basis for long-term persistence of avoparcin resistance is not fully understood. This study presents the complete DNA sequence of the E. faecium R-plasmid pVEF3 and functional studies of some plasmid-encoded traits (a toxin-antitoxin (TA) system and an ABC transporter) that may be of importance for plasmid persistence. The pVEF3 (63.1 kbp), isolated from an E. faecium strain of poultry origin sampled in Norway in 1999, has 71 coding sequences including the vanA avoparcin/vancomycin resistance encoding gene cluster. pVEF3 encodes the TA system omega-epsilon-zeta, and plasmid stability tests and transcription analysis show that omega-epsilon-zeta is functional in Enterococcus faecalis OGIX, although with decreasing effect over time. The predicted ABC transporter was not found to confer reduced susceptibility to any of the 28 substances tested. The TA system identified in the pVEF-type plasmids may contribute to vanA plasmid persistence on Norwegian poultry farms. However, size and compositional heterogeneity among E. faecium vanA plasmids suggest that additional plasmid maintenance systems in combination with host specific factors and frequent horizontal gene transfer and rearrangement causes the observed plasmid composition and distribution patterns.

  3. Zinc transporters YbtX and ZnuABC are required for the virulence of Yersinia pestis in bubonic and pneumonic plague in mice.

    PubMed

    Bobrov, Alexander G; Kirillina, Olga; Fosso, Marina Y; Fetherston, Jacqueline D; Miller, M Clarke; VanCleave, Tiva T; Burlison, Joseph A; Arnold, William K; Lawrenz, Matthew B; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Perry, Robert D

    2017-06-21

    A number of bacterial pathogens require the ZnuABC Zinc (Zn 2+ ) transporter and/or a second Zn 2+ transport system to overcome Zn 2+ sequestration by mammalian hosts. Previously we have shown that in addition to ZnuABC, Yersinia pestis possesses a second Zn 2+ transporter that involves components of the yersiniabactin (Ybt), siderophore-dependent iron transport system. Synthesis of the Ybt siderophore and YbtX, a member of the major facilitator superfamily, are both critical components of the second Zn 2+ transport system. Here we demonstrate that a ybtX znu double mutant is essentially avirulent in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague while a ybtX mutant retains high virulence in both plague models. While sequestration of host Zn is a key nutritional immunity factor, excess Zn appears to have a significant antimicrobial role in controlling intracellular bacterial survival. Here, we demonstrate that ZntA, a Zn 2+ exporter, plays a role in resistance to Zn toxicity in vitro, but that a zntA zur double mutant retains high virulence in both pneumonic and bubonic plague models and survival in macrophages. We also confirm that Ybt does not directly bind Zn 2+ in vitro under the conditions tested. However, we detect a significant increase in Zn 2+ -binding ability of filtered supernatants from a Ybt + strain compared to those from a strain unable to produce the siderophore, supporting our previously published data that Ybt biosynthetic genes are involved in the production of a secreted Zn-binding molecule (zincophore). Our data suggest that Ybt or a modified Ybt participate in or promote Zn-binding activity in culture supernatants and is involved in Zn acquisition in Y. pestis.

  4. The human multidrug-resistance-associated protein MRP1 mediates ATP-dependent transport of unconjugated bilirubin

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Results of previous studies have suggested that UCB (unconjugated bilirubin) may be transported by MRP1/Mrp1 (multidrug-resistance-associated protein 1). To test this hypothesis directly, [3H]UCB transport was assessed in plasma-membrane vesicles from MDCKII cells (Madin–Darby canine kidney II cells) stably transfected with human MRP1 or MRP2; wild-type MDCKII cells served as controls. As revealed by Western blotting, transfection achieved abundant expression of MRP1 and MRP2. [3H]UCB uptake was measured in the presence of 60 μM human serum albumin at a free (unbound) concentration of UCB (BF) ranging from 5 to 72 nM and in the presence of 3 mM ATP or 3 mM AMP-PCP (adenosine 5′-[β,γ-methylene]triphosphate). MRP1-transfected vesicles showed transport activity three and five times higher respectively compared with MRP2 or wild-type vesicles, whose transport did not differ significantly. [3H]UCB transport was stimulated 4-fold by 1.5 mM GSH, occurred into an osmotically sensitive space, was inhibited by 3 μM MK571 and followed saturative kinetics with Km=10±3 nM (BF) and Vmax=100±13 pmol·min−1·(mg of protein)−1. UCB significantly inhibited the transport of LTC4 (leukotriene C4), a leukotriene substrate known to have high affinity for MRP1. Collectively, these results prove directly that MRP1 mediates ATP-dependent cellular export of UCB and supports its role in protecting cells from bilirubin toxicity. PMID:15245331

  5. Prediction of multi-drug resistance transporters using a novel sequence analysis method [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    DOE PAGES

    McDermott, Jason E.; Bruillard, Paul; Overall, Christopher C.; ...

    2015-03-09

    There are many examples of groups of proteins that have similar function, but the determinants of functional specificity may be hidden by lack of sequencesimilarity, or by large groups of similar sequences with different functions. Transporters are one such protein group in that the general function, transport, can be easily inferred from the sequence, but the substrate specificity can be impossible to predict from sequence with current methods. In this paper we describe a linguistic-based approach to identify functional patterns from groups of unaligned protein sequences and its application to predict multi-drug resistance transporters (MDRs) from bacteria. We first showmore » that our method can recreate known patterns from PROSITE for several motifs from unaligned sequences. We then show that the method, MDRpred, can predict MDRs with greater accuracy and positive predictive value than a collection of currently available family-based models from the Pfam database. Finally, we apply MDRpred to a large collection of protein sequences from an environmental microbiome study to make novel predictions about drug resistance in a potential environmental reservoir.« less

  6. Identification of the High-affinity Substrate-binding Site of the Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) Family Transporter from Pseudomonas stutzeri*

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Laiyin; Grell, Ernst; Malviya, Viveka Nand; Xie, Hao; Wang, Jingkang; Michel, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters exist in all three domains of life. They confer multidrug resistance by utilizing H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradients to extrude various drugs across the cell membranes. The substrate binding and the transport mechanism of MATE transporters is a fundamental process but so far not fully understood. Here we report a detailed substrate binding study of NorM_PS, a representative MATE transporter from Pseudomonas stutzeri. Our results indicate that NorM_PS is a proton-dependent multidrug efflux transporter. Detailed binding studies between NorM_PS and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) were performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and spectrofluorometry. Two exothermic binding events were observed from ITC data, and the high-affinity event was directly correlated with the extrusion of DAPI. The affinities are about 1 μm and 0.1 mm for the high and low affinity binding, respectively. Based on our homology model of NorM_PS, variants with mutations of amino acids that are potentially involved in substrate binding, were constructed. By carrying out the functional characterization of these variants, the critical amino acid residues (Glu-257 and Asp-373) for high-affinity DAPI binding were determined. Taken together, our results suggest a new substrate-binding site for MATE transporters. PMID:27235402

  7. HG-829 Is a Potent Noncompetitive Inhibitor of the ATP-Binding Cassette Multidrug Resistance Transporter ABCB1

    PubMed Central

    Caceres, Gisela; Robey, Robert W.; Sokol, Lubomir; McGraw, Kathy L.; Clark, Justine; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Sebti, Said M.; Wiese, Michael; List, Alan F.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane drug export mediated by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein contributes to clinical resistance to antineoplastics. In this study, we identified the substituted quinoline HG-829 as a novel, noncompetitive, and potent P-glycoprotein inhibitor that overcomes in vitro and in vivo drug resistance. We found that nontoxic concentrations of HG-829 restored sensitivity to P-glycoprotein oncolytic substrates. In ABCB1-overexpressing cell lines, HG-829 significantly enhanced cytotoxicity to daunorubicin, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, and etoposide. Coadministration of HG-829 fully restored in vivo antitumor activity of daunorubicin in mice without added toxicity. Functional assays showed that HG-829 is not a Pgp substrate or competitive inhibitor of Pgp-mediated drug efflux but rather acts as a noncompetitive modulator of P-glycoprotein transport function. Taken together, our findings indicate that HG-829 is a potent, long-acting, and noncompetitive modulator of P-glycoprotein export function that may offer therapeutic promise for multidrugresistant malignancies. PMID:22761337

  8. Apatinib (YN968D1) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of multiple ATP-binding cassette transporters

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yan-jun; Liang, Yong-ju; Huang, Hong-bing; Zhao, Hong-yun; Wu, Chung-Pu; Wang, Fang; Tao, Li-yang; Zhang, Chuan-zhao; Dai, Chun-Ling; Tiwari, Amit K.; Ma, Xiao-xu; Wah To, Kenneth Kin; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Fu, Li-wu

    2010-01-01

    Apatinib, a small-molecule multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is in phase III clinical trial for treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer and gastric cancer in China. In this study, we determined the effect of apatinib on the interaction of specific antineoplastic compounds with P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2). Our results showed that apatinib significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of ABCB1 or ABCG2 substrate drugs in KBv200, MCF-7/adr and HEK293/ABCB1 cells overexpressing ABCB1 and S1-M1-80, MCF-7/FLV1000 and HEK293/ABCG2-R2 cells overexpressing ABCG2 (wild-type). In contrast, apatinib did not alter the cytotoxicity of specific substrates in the parental cells and cells overexpressing ABCC1. Apatinib significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin in the multidrug resistance (MDR) cells. Furthermore, apatinib significantly inhibited the photolabeling of both ABCB1 and ABCG2 with [125I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin in a concentration-dependent fashion. The ATPase activity of both ABCB1 and ABCG2 was significantly increased by apatinib. However, apatinib, at a concentration the produced a reversal of MDRl, did not significantly alter the expression of the ABCB1 or ABCG2 protein or mRNA levels or the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2. Importantly, apatinib significantly enhanced the effect of paclitaxel against the ABCB1 resistant KBv200 cancer cell xenografts in nude mice. In conclusion, apatinib reverses ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR by inhibiting their transport function, but not by blocking AKT or ERK1/2 pathway or downregulating ABCB1 or ABCG2 expression. Apatinib may be useful in circumventing MDR to other conventional antineoplastic drugs. PMID:20876799

  9. Transport of bile acids in multidrug-resistance-protein 3-overexpressing cells co-transfected with the ileal Na+-dependent bile-acid transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Zelcer, Noam; Saeki, Tohru; Bot, Ilse; Kuil, Annemieke; Borst, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Many of the transporters involved in the transport of bile acids in the enterohepatic circulation have been characterized. The basolateral bile-acid transporter of ileocytes and cholangiocytes remains an exception. It has been suggested that rat multidrug resistance protein 3 (Mrp3) fulfills this function. Here we analyse bile-salt transport by human MRP3. Membrane vesicles from insect ( Spodoptera frugiperda ) cells expressing MRP3 show time-dependent uptake of glycocholate and taurocholate. Furthermore, sulphated bile salts were high-affinity competitive inhibitors of etoposide glucuronide transport by MRP3 (IC50 approximately 10 microM). Taurochenodeoxycholate, taurocholate and glycocholate inhibited transport at higher concentrations (IC50 approximately 100, 250 and 500 microM respectively). We used mouse fibroblast-like cell lines derived from mice with disrupted Mdr1a, Mdr1b and Mrp1 genes to generate transfectants that express the murine apical Na+-dependent bile-salt transporter (Asbt) and MRP3. Uptake of glycocholate by these cells is Na+-dependent, with a K(m) and V(max) of 29+/-7 microM and 660 +/- 63 pmol/min per mg of protein respectively and is inhibited by several organic-aniontransport inhibitors. Expression of MRP3 in these cells limits the accumulation of glycocholate and increases the efflux from cells preloaded with taurocholate or glycocholate. In conclusion, we find that MRP3 transports both taurocholate and glycocholate, albeit with low affinity, in contrast with the high-affinity transport by rat Mrp3. Our results suggest that MRP3 is unlikely to be the principal basolateral bile-acid transporter of ileocytes and cholangiocytes, but that it may have a role in the removal of bile acids from the liver in cholestasis. PMID:12220224

  10. The trehalose-specific transporter LpqY-SugABC is required for antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity of trehalose analogues in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Wolber, Jeffrey M; Urbanek, Bailey L; Meints, Lisa M; Piligian, Brent F; Lopez-Casillas, Irene C; Zochowski, Kailey M; Woodruff, Peter J; Swarts, Benjamin M

    2017-10-10

    Mycobacteria, including the bacterial pathogen that causes human tuberculosis, possess distinctive pathways for synthesizing and utilizing the non-mammalian disaccharide trehalose. Trehalose metabolism is essential for mycobacterial viability and has been linked to in vitro biofilm formation, which may bear relevance to in vivo drug tolerance. Previous research has shown that some trehalose analogues bearing modifications at the 6-position inhibit growth of various mycobacterial species. In this work, 2-, 5-, and 6-position-modified trehalose analogues were synthesized using our previously reported one-step chemoenzymatic method and shown to inhibit growth and biofilm formation in the two-to three-digit micromolar range in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The trehalose-specific ABC transporter LpqY-SugABC was essential for antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity, suggesting that inhibition by monosubstituted trehalose analogues requires cellular uptake and does not proceed via direct action on extracellular targets such as antigen 85 acyltransferases or trehalose dimycolate hydrolase. Although the potency of the described compounds in in vitro growth and biofilm assays is moderate, this study reports the first trehalose-based mycobacterial biofilm inhibitors and reinforces the concept of exploiting unique sugar uptake pathways to deliver inhibitors and other chemical cargo to mycobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Drug-protein hydrogen bonds govern the inhibition of the ATP hydrolysis of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chufan, Eduardo E; Kapoor, Khyati; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. This multidrug transporter utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of a variety of hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Most of the substrates and modulators of P-gp stimulate its basal ATPase activity, although some inhibit it. The molecular mechanisms that are in play in either case are unknown. In this report, mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies of P-gp led to the identification of a pair of phenylalanine-tyrosine structural motifs in the transmembrane region that mediate the inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by certain drugs (zosuquidar, elacridar and tariquidar), with high affinity (IC50's ranging from 10 to 30nM). Upon mutation of any of these residues, drugs that inhibit the ATPase activity of P-gp switch to stimulation of the activity. Molecular modeling revealed that the phenylalanine residues F978 and F728 interact with tyrosine residues Y953 and Y310, respectively, in an edge-to-face conformation, which orients the tyrosines in such a way that they establish hydrogen-bond contacts with the inhibitor. Biochemical investigations along with transport studies in intact cells showed that the inhibitors bind at a high affinity site to produce inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and transport function. Upon mutation, they bind at lower affinity sites, stimulating ATP hydrolysis and only poorly inhibiting transport. These results also reveal that screening chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the basal ATP hydrolysis can be a reliable tool to identify modulators with high affinity for P-gp. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Multidrug efflux pumps: the structures of prokaryotic ATP-binding cassette transporter efflux pumps and implications for our understanding of eukaryotic P-glycoproteins and homologues.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian D; Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2010-02-01

    One of the Holy Grails of ATP-binding cassette transporter research is a structural understanding of drug binding and transport in a eukaryotic multidrug resistance pump. These transporters are front-line mediators of drug resistance in cancers and represent an important therapeutic target in future chemotherapy. Although there has been intensive biochemical research into the human multidrug pumps, their 3D structure at atomic resolution remains unknown. The recent determination of the structure of a mouse P-glycoprotein at subatomic resolution is complemented by structures for a number of prokaryotic homologues. These structures have provided advances into our knowledge of the ATP-binding cassette exporter structure and mechanism, and have provided the template data for a number of homology modelling studies designed to reconcile biochemical data on these clinically important proteins.

  13. Hydrogenase activity in the foodborne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni depends upon a novel ABC-type nickel transporter (NikZYXWV) and is SlyD-independent.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Robert M; Hughes, Bethan M; Hitchcock, Andrew; Kelly, David J

    2012-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a human pathogen of worldwide significance. It is commensal in the gut of many birds and mammals, where hydrogen is a readily available electron donor. The bacterium possesses a single membrane-bound, periplasmic-facing NiFe uptake hydrogenase that depends on the acquisition of environmental nickel for activity. The periplasmic binding protein Cj1584 (NikZ) of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter encoded by the cj1584c-cj1580c (nikZYXWV) operon in C. jejuni strain NCTC 11168 was found to be nickel-repressed and to bind free nickel ions with a submicromolar K(d) value, as measured by fluorescence spectroscopy. Unlike the Escherichia coli NikA protein, NikZ did not bind EDTA-chelated nickel and lacks key conserved residues implicated in metallophore interaction. A C. jejuni cj1584c null mutant strain showed an approximately 22-fold decrease in intracellular nickel content compared with the wild-type strain and a decreased rate of uptake of (63)NiCl(2). The inhibition of residual nickel uptake at higher nickel concentrations in this mutant by hexa-ammine cobalt (III) chloride or magnesium ions suggests that low-affinity uptake occurs partly through the CorA magnesium transporter. Hydrogenase activity was completely abolished in the cj1584c mutant after growth in unsupplemented media, but was fully restored after growth with 0.5 mM nickel chloride. Mutation of the putative metallochaperone gene slyD (cj0115) had no effect on either intracellular nickel accumulation or hydrogenase activity. Our data reveal a strict dependence of hydrogenase activity in C. jejuni on high-affinity nickel uptake through an ABC transporter that has distinct properties compared with the E. coli Nik system.

  14. An operon from Lactobacillus helveticus composed of a proline iminopeptidase gene (pepI) and two genes coding for putative members of the ABC transporter family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Varmanen, P; Rantanen, T; Palva, A

    1996-12-01

    A proline iminopeptidase gene (pepI) of an industrial Lactobacillus helveticus strain was cloned and found to be organized in an operon-like structure of three open reading frames (ORF1, ORF2 and ORF3). ORF1 was preceded by a typical prokaryotic promoter region, and a putative transcription terminator was found downstream of ORF3, identified as the pepI gene. Using primer-extension analyses, only one transcription start site, upstream of ORF1, was identifiable in the predicted operon. Although the size of mRNA could not be judged by Northern analysis either with ORF1-, ORF2- or pepI-specific probes, reverse transcription-PCR analyses further supported the operon structure of the three genes. ORF1, ORF2 and ORF3 had coding capacities for 50.7, 24.5 and 33.8 kDa proteins, respectively. The ORF3-encoded PepI protein showed 65% identity with the PepI proteins from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis. The ORF1-encoded protein had significant homology with several members of the ABC transporter family but, with two distinct putative ATP-binding sites, it would represent an unusual type among the bacterial ABC transporters. ORF2 encoded a putative integral membrane protein also characteristic of the ABC transporter family. The pepI gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purified PepI hydrolysed only di and tripeptides with proline in the first position. Optimum PepI activity was observed at pH 7.5 and 40 degrees C. A gel filtration analysis indicated that PepI is a dimer of M(r) 53,000. PepI was shown to be a metal-independent serine peptidase having thiol groups at or near the active site. Kinetic studies with proline-p-nitroanilide as substrate revealed Km and Vmax values of 0.8 mM and 350 mmol min-1 mg-1, respectively, and a very high turnover number of 135,000 s-1.

  15. Profiling of ABC transporters ABCB5, ABCF2 and nestin-positive stem cells in nevi, in situ and invasive melanoma.

    PubMed

    Setia, Namrata; Abbas, Ossama; Sousa, Yessica; Garb, Jane L; Mahalingam, Meera

    2012-08-01

    Distinct ABCB5 forms and ABCF2, members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters, are normally expressed in various tissues and cells, and enhanced expression of both has been demonstrated in select cancers. In melanoma cell lines, gene expression profiling of ABC transporters has revealed enhanced expression of melanocyte-specific ABCB5 and ABCF2 proteins. Given this, our primary aim was to ascertain immunohistochemical expression of the ABC transporters ABCB5 and ABCF2 and, the stem cell marker, nestin in a spectrum of benign and malignant nevomelanocytic proliferations, including nevi (n=30), in situ (n=31) and invasive (n=24) primary cutaneous melanomas to assess their role in the stepwise development of malignancy. In addition, their expression was compared with established melanoma prognosticators to ascertain their utility as independent prognosticators. A semiquantitative scoring system was utilized by deriving a cumulative score (based on percentage positivity cells and intensity of expression) and statistical analyses was carried out using analysis of variance with linear contrasts. Mean cumulative score in nevi, in situ and invasive melanoma were as follows: 3.8, 4.4 and 5.3 for ABCB5, respectively (P<0.005 for all), and 4.6, 4.6 and 5.3 for nestin, respectively (P=not significant for all). No appreciable expression of ABCF2 was noted in any of the groups. While ulcerated lesions of melanoma demonstrated lower levels of expression of ABCB5 and nestin than non-ulcerated lesions, and nestin expression was lower in lesions with mitoses >1, after controlling for the presence of ulceration and mitotic activity, the expression of both proteins did not significantly correlate with known melanoma prognosticators. The gradual increase in the expression of ABCB5 from benign nevus to in situ to invasive melanoma suggests that it plays a role in melanomagenesis. On the basis of our findings, a prospective study with follow-up data is required to

  16. ATP-binding cassette transporters in reproduction: a new frontier

    PubMed Central

    Bloise, E.; Ortiga-Carvalho, T.M.; Reis, F.M.; Lye, S.J.; Gibb, W.; Matthews, S.G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The transmembrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters actively efflux an array of clinically relevant compounds across biological barriers, and modulate biodistribution of many physiological and pharmacological factors. To date, over 48 ABC transporters have been identified and shown to be directly and indirectly involved in peri-implantation events and fetal/placental development. They efflux cholesterol, steroid hormones, vitamins, cytokines, chemokines, prostaglandins, diverse xenobiotics and environmental toxins, playing a critical role in regulating drug disposition, immunological responses and lipid trafficking, as well as preventing fetal accumulation of drugs and environmental toxins. METHODS This review examines ABC transporters as important mediators of placental barrier functions and key reproductive processes. Expression, localization and function of all identified ABC transporters were systematically reviewed using PubMed and Google Scholar websites to identify relevant studies examining ABC transporters in reproductive tissues in physiological and pathophysiological states. Only reports written in English were incorporated with no restriction on year of publication. While a major focus has been placed on the human, extensive evidence from animal studies is utilized to describe current understanding of the regulation and function of ABC transporters relevant to human reproduction. RESULTS ABC transporters are modulators of steroidogenesis, fertilization, implantation, nutrient transport and immunological responses, and function as ‘gatekeepers’ at various barrier sites (i.e. blood-testes barrier and placenta) against potentially harmful xenobiotic factors, including drugs and environmental toxins. These roles appear to be species dependent and change as a function of gestation and development. The best-described ABC transporters in reproductive tissues (primarily in the placenta) are the multidrug transporters p-glycoprotein and

  17. Inhibition of the NorA multi-drug transporter by oxygenated monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Coêlho, Mayara Ladeira; Ferreira, Josie Haydée Lima; de Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto; Kaatz, Glenn W; Barreto, Humberto Medeiros; de Carvalho Melo Cavalcante, Ana Amélia

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate intrinsic antimicrobial activity of three monoterpenes nerol, dimethyl octanol and estragole, against bacteria and yeast strains, as well as, investigate if these compounds are able to inhibit the NorA efflux pump related to fluoroquinolone resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the monoterpenes against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans strains were determined by micro-dilution assay. MICs of the norfloxacin against a S. aureus strain overexpressing the NorA protein were determined in the absence or in the presence of the monoterpenes at subinhibitory concentrations, aiming to verify the ability of this compounds act as efflux pump inhibitors. The monoterpenes were inactive against S. aureus however the nerol was active against E. coli and C. albicans. The addition of the compounds to growth media at sub-inhibitory concentrations enhanced the activity of norfloxacin against S. aureus SA1199-B. This result shows that bioactives tested, especially the nerol, are able to inhibit NorA efflux pump indicating a potential use as adjuvants of norfloxacin for therapy of infections caused by multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Coarse-grained Simulations of Conformational Changes in Multidrug Resistance Transporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewel, S. M. Yead; Dutta, Prashanta; Liu, Jin

    2016-11-01

    The overexpression of multidrug resistance (MDR) systems on the gram negative bacteria causes serious problems for treatment of bacterial infectious diseases. The system effectively pumps the antibiotic drugs out of the bacterial cells. During the pumping process one of the MDR components, AcrB undergoes a series of large-scale conformational changes which are responsible for drug recognition, binding and expelling. All-atom simulations are unable to capture those conformational changes because of computational cost. Here, we implement a hybrid coarse-grained force field that couples the united-atom protein models with the coarse-grained MARTINI water/lipid, to investigate the proton-dependent conformational changes of AcrB. The simulation results in early stage ( 100 ns) of proton-dependent conformational changes agree with all-atom simulations, validating the coarse-grained model. The coarse-grained force field allows us to explore the process in microsecond simulations. Starting from the crystal structures of Access(A)/Binding(B)/Extrusion(E) monomers in AcrB, we find that deprotonation of Asp407 and Asp408 in monomer E causes a series of large-scale conformational changes from ABE to AAA in absence of drug molecules, which is consistent with experimental findings. This work is supported by NIH Grant: 1R01GM122081-01.

  19. Glutathione and multidrug resistance protein transporter mediate a self-propelled disposal of bismuth in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yifan; Lai, Yau-Tsz; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung; Sun, Hongzhe

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) play an important role on the metabolism of a variety of drugs. Bismuth drugs have been used to treat gastrointestinal disorder and Helicobacter pylori infection for decades without exerting acute toxicity. They were found to interact with a wide variety of biomolecules, but the major metabolic pathway remains unknown. For the first time (to our knowledge), we systematically and quantitatively studied the metabolism of bismuth in human cells. Our data demonstrated that over 90% of bismuth was passively absorbed, conjugated to glutathione, and transported into vesicles by MRP transporter. Mathematical modeling of the system reveals an interesting phenomenon. Passively absorbed bismuth consumes intracellular glutathione, which therefore activates de novo biosynthesis of glutathione. Reciprocally, sequestration by glutathione facilitates the passive uptake of bismuth and thus completes a self-sustaining positive feedback circle. This mechanism robustly removes bismuth from both intra- and extracellular space, protecting critical systems of human body from acute toxicity. It elucidates the selectivity of bismuth drugs between human and pathogens that lack of glutathione, such as Helicobacter pylori, opening new horizons for further drug development. PMID:25737551

  20. Coupling of remote alternating-access transport mechanisms for protons and substrates in the multidrug efflux pump AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, Thomas; Seeger, Markus A; Anselmi, Claudio; Zhou, Wenchang; Brandstätter, Lorenz; Verrey, François; Diederichs, Kay; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Pos, Klaas M

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters of the RND superfamily confer multidrug resistance to pathogenic bacteria, and are essential for cholesterol metabolism and embryonic development in humans. We use high-resolution X-ray crystallography and computational methods to delineate the mechanism of the homotrimeric RND-type proton/drug antiporter AcrB, the active component of the major efflux system AcrAB-TolC in Escherichia coli, and one most complex and intriguing membrane transporters known to date. Analysis of wildtype AcrB and four functionally-inactive variants reveals an unprecedented mechanism that involves two remote alternating-access conformational cycles within each protomer, namely one for protons in the transmembrane region and another for drugs in the periplasmic domain, 50 Å apart. Each of these cycles entails two distinct types of collective motions of two structural repeats, coupled by flanking α-helices that project from the membrane. Moreover, we rationalize how the cross-talk among protomers across the trimerization interface might lead to a more kinetically efficient efflux system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03145.001 PMID:25248080

  1. Functional rotation induced by alternating protonation states in the multidrug transporter AcrB: all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Tsutomu; Murakami, Satoshi; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2013-10-29

    The multidrug transporter AcrB actively exports a wide variety of noxious compounds using proton-motive force as an energy source in Gram-negative bacteria. AcrB adopts an asymmetric structure comprising three protomers with different conformations that are sequentially converted during drug export; these cyclic conformational changes during drug export are referred to as functional rotation. To investigate functional rotation driven by proton-motive force, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were performed. Using different protonation states for the titratable residues in the middle of the transmembrane domain, our simulations revealed the correlation between the specific protonation states and the side-chain configurations. Changing the protonation state for Asp408 induced a spontaneous structural transition, which suggests that the proton translocation stoichiometry may be one proton per functional rotation cycle. Furthermore, our simulations demonstrate that alternating the protonation states in the transmembrane domain induces functional rotation in the porter domain, which is primarily responsible for drug transport.

  2. Effect of glucose transport inhibitors on vincristine efflux in multidrug-resistant murine erythroleukaemia cells overexpressing the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and two glucose transport proteins, GLUT1 and GLUT3.

    PubMed Central

    Martell, R. L.; Slapak, C. A.; Levy, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between mammalian facilitative glucose transport proteins (GLUT) and multidrug resistance was examined in two vincristine (VCR)-selected murine erythroleukaemia (MEL) PC4 cell lines. GLUT proteins, GLUT1 and GLUT3, were constitutively coexpressed in the parental cell line and also in the VCR-selected cell lines. Increased expression of the GLUT1 isoform was noted both in the PC-V40 (a non-P-glycoprotein, mrp-overexpressing subline) and in the more resistant PC-V160 (overexpressing mrp and mdr3) cell lines. Overexpression of GLUT3 was detected only in the PC-V160 subline. An increased rate of facilitative glucose transport (Vmax) and level of plasma membrane GLUT protein expression paralleled increased VCR resistance, active VCR efflux and decreased VCR steady-state accumulation in these cell lines. Glucose transport inhibitors (GTIs), cytochalasin B (CB) and phloretin blocked the active efflux and decreased steady-state accumulation of VCR in the PC-V40 subline. GTIs did not significantly affect VCR accumulation in the parental or PC-V160 cells. A comparison of protein sequences among GLUT1, GLUT3 and MRP revealed a putative cytochalasin B binding site in MRP, which displayed 44% sequence similarity/12% identity with that previously identified in GLUT1 and GLUT3; these regions also exhibited a similar hydropathy plot pattern. The findings suggested that CB bound to MRP and directly or indirectly lowered VCR efflux and/or CB bound to one or both GLUT proteins, which acted to lower the VCR efflux mediated by MRP. This is the first report of a non-neuronal murine cell line that expressed GLUT3. Images Figure 3 PMID:9010020

  3. Interaction of BDE-47 and its Hydroxylated Metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and BCRP: Considerations for Human Exposure and Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp; also known as MDR1, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; also known as ABCG2), are membrane-bound proteins that mediate the cellular efflux of xenobiotics as an important defense against chemic...

  4. Ketoconazole and the modulation of multidrug resistance-mediated transport in Caco-2 and MDCKII-MDR1 drug transport models.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Rodriguez-Proteau, R

    2008-02-01

    The hypothesis tested was that ketoconazole can modulate P-glycoprotein, thereby altering cellular uptake and apparent permeability (P(app)) of multidrug-resistant substrates, such as cyclosporin A (CSA) and digoxin, across Caco-2, MDCKII-MDR1, and MDCKII wild-type cell transport models. (3)H-CSA/(3)H-digoxin transport experiments were performed with and without co-exposure to ketoconazole, and (3)H-ketoconzole transport experiments were performed with and without co-exposure to dietary flavonoids, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, and xanthohumol. Ketoconazole (3 microM) reduced the P(app) efflux of CSA and digoxin from 5.07 x 10(-6) to 2.91 x 10(-6) cm s(-1) and from 2.60 x 10(-6) to 1.41 x 10(-6) cm s(-1), respectively, in Caco-2 cells. In the MDCKII-MDR1 cells, ketoconazole reduced the P(app) efflux of CSA and increased the P(app) absorption of digoxin. Cellular uptake of ketoconazole in the Caco-2 cells was significantly inhibited by CSA and digoxin, whereas epigallocatechin-3-gallate and xanthohumol exhibited biphasic responses. In conclusion, ketoconazole modulates the P(app) of P-glycoprotein substrates by interacting with MDR1 protein. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate and xanthohumol modulate the transport and uptake of ketoconazole.

  5. Down-regulation of a novel ABC transporter gene (Pxwhite) is associated with Cry1Ac resistance in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.).

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Zhu, Xun; Xia, Jixing; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-04-01

    Biopesticides or transgenic crops based on Cry toxins from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) effectively control agricultural insect pests. The sustainable use of Bt biopesticides and Bt crops is threatened, however, by the development of Cry resistance in the target pests. The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), is the first pest that developed resistance to a Bt biopesticide in the field, and a recent study has shown that the resistance of P. xylostella to Cry1Ac is caused by a mutation in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene (ABCC2). In this study, we report that down-regulation of a novel ABC transporter gene from ABCG subfamily (Pxwhite) is associated with Cry1Ac resistance in P. xylostella. The full-length cDNA sequence of Pxwhite was cloned and analyzed. Spatial-temporal expression detection revealed that Pxwhite was expressed in all tissues and developmental stages, and highest expressed in Malpighian tubule tissue and in egg stage. Sequence variation analysis of Pxwhite indicated the absence of constant non-synonymous mutations between susceptible and resistant strains, whereas midgut transcript analysis showed that Pxwhite was remarkably reduced in all resistant strains and further reduced when larvae of the moderately resistant SZ-R strain were subjected to selection with Cry1Ac toxin. Furthermore, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated suppression of Pxwhite gene expression significantly reduced larval susceptibility to Cry1Ac toxin, and genetic linkage analysis confirmed that down-regulation of Pxwhite gene is tightly linked to Cry1Ac resistance in P. xylostella. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that Pxwhite gene is involved in Cry1Ac resistance in P. xylostella. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 (MRP2) Mediated Transport of Oxaliplatin-Derived Platinum in Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Myint, Khine; Li, Yan; Paxton, James; McKeage, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The platinum-based anticancer drug oxaliplatin is important clinically in cancer treatment. However, the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in controlling oxaliplatin membrane transport, in vivo handling, toxicity and therapeutic responses is unclear. In the current study, preparations of MRP2-expressing and control membrane vesicles, containing inside-out orientated vesicles, were used to directly characterise the membrane transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxaliplatin inhibited the ATP-dependent accumulation of the model MRP2 fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxy-2,'7'-dichlorofluorescein, in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles. MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles accumulated up to 19-fold more platinum during their incubation with oxaliplatin and ATP as compared to control membrane vesicles and in the absence of ATP. The rate of ATP-dependent MRP2-mediated active transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum increased non-linearly with increasing oxaliplatin exposure concentration, approaching a plateau value (Vmax) of 2680 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes (95%CI, 2010 to 3360 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes), with the half-maximal platinum accumulation rate (Km) at an oxaliplatin exposure concentration of 301 μM (95% CI, 163 to 438 μM), in accordance with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (r2 = 0.954). MRP2 inhibitors (myricetin and MK571) reduced the ATP-dependent accumulation of oxaliplatin-derived platinum in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. To identify whether oxaliplatin, or perhaps a degradation product, was the likely substrate for this active transport, HPLC studies were undertaken showing that oxaliplatin degraded slowly in membrane vesicle incubation buffer containing chloride ions and glutathione, with approximately 95% remaining intact after a 10 minute incubation time and a degradation half-life of 2.24 hours (95%CI, 2.08 to 2.43 hours). In

  7. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 (MRP2) Mediated Transport of Oxaliplatin-Derived Platinum in Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Myint, Khine; Li, Yan; Paxton, James; McKeage, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The platinum-based anticancer drug oxaliplatin is important clinically in cancer treatment. However, the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in controlling oxaliplatin membrane transport, in vivo handling, toxicity and therapeutic responses is unclear. In the current study, preparations of MRP2-expressing and control membrane vesicles, containing inside-out orientated vesicles, were used to directly characterise the membrane transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxaliplatin inhibited the ATP-dependent accumulation of the model MRP2 fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxy-2,'7'-dichlorofluorescein, in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles. MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles accumulated up to 19-fold more platinum during their incubation with oxaliplatin and ATP as compared to control membrane vesicles and in the absence of ATP. The rate of ATP-dependent MRP2-mediated active transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum increased non-linearly with increasing oxaliplatin exposure concentration, approaching a plateau value (Vmax) of 2680 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes (95%CI, 2010 to 3360 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes), with the half-maximal platinum accumulation rate (Km) at an oxaliplatin exposure concentration of 301 μM (95% CI, 163 to 438 μM), in accordance with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (r2 = 0.954). MRP2 inhibitors (myricetin and MK571) reduced the ATP-dependent accumulation of oxaliplatin-derived platinum in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. To identify whether oxaliplatin, or perhaps a degradation product, was the likely substrate for this active transport, HPLC studies were undertaken showing that oxaliplatin degraded slowly in membrane vesicle incubation buffer containing chloride ions and glutathione, with approximately 95% remaining intact after a 10 minute incubation time and a degradation half-life of 2.24 hours (95%CI, 2.08 to 2.43 hours). In

  8. A New Natural Product Analog of Blasticidin S Reveals Cellular Uptake Facilitated by the NorA Multidrug Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Jack R.; Lohith, Katheryn M.; Wang, Xiaoning; Bobyk, Kostyantyn; Mandadapu, Sivakoteswara R.; Lee, Su-Lin; Cencic, Regina; Nelson, Justin; Simpkins, Scott; Frank, Karen M.; Pelletier, Jerry; Myers, Chad L.; Piotrowski, Jeff; Smith, Harold E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The permeation of antibiotics through bacterial membranes to their target site is a crucial determinant of drug activity but in many cases remains poorly understood. During screening efforts to discover new broad-spectrum antibiotic compounds from marine sponge samples, we identified a new analog of the peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic blasticidin S that exhibited up to 16-fold-improved potency against a range of laboratory and clinical bacterial strains which we named P10. Whole-genome sequencing of laboratory-evolved strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to blasticidin S and P10, combined with genome-wide assessment of the fitness of barcoded Escherichia coli knockout strains in the presence of the antibiotics, revealed that restriction of cellular access was a key feature in the development of resistance to this class of drug. In particular, the gene encoding the well-characterized multidrug efflux pump NorA was found to be mutated in 69% of all S. aureus isolates resistant to blasticidin S or P10. Unexpectedly, resistance was associated with inactivation of norA, suggesting that the NorA transporter facilitates cellular entry of peptidyl nucleosides in addition to its known role in the efflux of diverse compounds, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics. PMID:28373194

  9. A New Natural Product Analog of Blasticidin S Reveals Cellular Uptake Facilitated by the NorA Multidrug Transporter.

    PubMed

    Davison, Jack R; Lohith, Katheryn M; Wang, Xiaoning; Bobyk, Kostyantyn; Mandadapu, Sivakoteswara R; Lee, Su-Lin; Cencic, Regina; Nelson, Justin; Simpkins, Scott; Frank, Karen M; Pelletier, Jerry; Myers, Chad L; Piotrowski, Jeff; Smith, Harold E; Bewley, Carole A

    2017-06-01

    The permeation of antibiotics through bacterial membranes to their target site is a crucial determinant of drug activity but in many cases remains poorly understood. During screening efforts to discover new broad-spectrum antibiotic compounds from marine sponge samples, we identified a new analog of the peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic blasticidin S that exhibited up to 16-fold-improved potency against a range of laboratory and clinical bacterial strains which we named P10. Whole-genome sequencing of laboratory-evolved strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to blasticidin S and P10, combined with genome-wide assessment of the fitness of barcoded Escherichia coli knockout strains in the presence of the antibiotics, revealed that restriction of cellular access was a key feature in the development of resistance to this class of drug. In particular, the gene encoding the well-characterized multidrug efflux pump NorA was found to be mutated in 69% of all S. aureus isolates resistant to blasticidin S or P10. Unexpectedly, resistance was associated with inactivation of norA , suggesting that the NorA transporter facilitates cellular entry of peptidyl nucleosides in addition to its known role in the efflux of diverse compounds, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. The fast release of sticky protons: Kinetics of substrate binding and proton release in a multidrug transporter

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Yoav; Tayer, Naama; Rotem, Dvir; Schreiber, Gideon; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2007-01-01

    EmrE is an Escherichia coli H+-coupled multidrug transporter that provides a unique experimental paradigm because of its small size and stability, and because its activity can be studied in detergent solution. In this work, we report a study of the transient kinetics of substrate binding and substrate-induced proton release in EmrE. For this purpose, we measured transient changes in the tryptophan fluorescence upon substrate binding and the rates of substrate-induced proton release. The fluorescence of the essential and fully conserved Trp residue at position 63 is sensitive to the occupancy of the binding site with either protons or substrate. The maximal rate of binding to detergent-solubilized EmrE of TPP+, a high-affinity substrate, is 2 × 107 M−1·s−1, a rate typical of diffusion-limited reactions. Rate measurements with medium- and low-affinity substrates imply that the affinity is determined mainly by the koff of the substrate. The rates of substrate binding and substrate-induced release of protons are faster at basic pHs and slower at lower pHs. These findings imply that the substrate-binding rates are determined by the generation of the species capable of binding; this is controlled by the high affinity to protons of the glutamate at position 14, because an Asp replacement with a lower pK is faster at the same pHs. PMID:17984053

  11. Multidrug resistance transporters Snq2p and Pdr5p mediate caffeine efflux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Otake, Kazuya; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Okada, Ryutaro; Miyazaki, Toshitaka; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    2015-01-01

    SNQ2 was identified as a caffeine-resistance gene by screening a genomic library of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a multicopy vector YEp24. SNQ2 encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter and is highly homologous to PDR5. Multicopy of PDR5 also conferred resistance to caffeine, while its resistance was smaller than that of SNQ2. Residual caffeine contents were analyzed after transiently exposing cells to caffeine. The ratios of caffeine contents were 21.3 ± 8.8% (YEp24-SNQ2) and 81.9 ± 8.7% (YEp24-PDR5) relative to control (YEp24, 100%). In addition, multicopies of SNQ2 or PDR5 conferred resistance to rhodamine 6G (R6G), which was widely used as a substrate for transport assay. R6G was exported by both transporters, and their efflux activities were inhibited by caffeine with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of 5.3 ± 1.9 (YEp24-SNQ2) and 17.2 ± 9.6 mM (YEp24-PDR5). These results demonstrate that Snq2p is a more functional transporter of caffeine than Pdr5p in yeast cells.

  12. Uremic Toxins Inhibit Transport by Breast Cancer Resistance Protein and Multidrug Resistance Protein 4 at Clinically Relevant Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Mutsaers, Henricus A. M.; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; Ringens, Lauke H. J.; Dankers, Anita C. A.; Russel, Frans G. M.; Wetzels, Jack F. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G.; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2011-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD), there is a progressive accumulation of toxic solutes due to inadequate renal clearance. Here, the interaction between uremic toxins and two important efflux pumps, viz. multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) was investigated. Membrane vesicles isolated from MRP4- or BCRP-overexpressing human embryonic kidney cells were used to study the impact of uremic toxins on substrate specific uptake. Furthermore, the concentrations of various uremic toxins were determined in plasma of CKD patients using high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Our results show that hippuric acid, indoxyl sulfate and kynurenic acid inhibit MRP4-mediated [3H]-methotrexate ([3H]-MTX) uptake (calculated Ki values: 2.5 mM, 1 mM, 25 µM, respectively) and BCRP-mediated [3H]-estrone sulfate ([3H]-E1S) uptake (Ki values: 4 mM, 500 µM and 50 µM, respectively), whereas indole-3-acetic acid and phenylacetic acid reduce [3H]-MTX uptake by MRP4 only (Ki value: 2 mM and IC50 value: 7 mM, respectively). In contrast, p-cresol, p-toluenesulfonic acid, putrescine, oxalate and quinolinic acid did not alter transport mediated by MRP4 or BCRP. In addition, our results show that hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, kynurenic acid and phenylacetic acid accumulate in plasma of end-stage CKD patients with mean concentrations of 160 µM, 4 µM, 129 µM, 1 µM and 18 µM, respectively. Moreover, calculated Ki values are below the maximal plasma concentrations of the tested toxins. In conclusion, this study shows that several uremic toxins inhibit active transport by MRP4 and BCRP at clinically relevant concentrations. PMID:21483698

  13. Structure of the transcriptional regulator LmrR and its mechanism of multidrug recognition.

    PubMed

    Madoori, Pramod Kumar; Agustiandari, Herfita; Driessen, Arnold J M; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H

    2009-01-21

    LmrR is a PadR-related transcriptional repressor that regulates the production of LmrCD, a major multidrug ABC transporter in Lactococcus lactis. Transcriptional regulation is presumed to follow a drug-sensitive induction mechanism involving the direct binding of transporter ligands to LmrR. Here, we present crystal structures of LmrR in an apo state and in two drug-bound states complexed with Hoechst 33342 and daunomycin. LmrR shows a common topology containing a typical beta-winged helix-turn-helix domain with an additional C-terminal helix involved in dimerization. Its dimeric organization is highly unusual with a flat-shaped hydrophobic pore at the dimer centre serving as a multidrug-binding site. The drugs bind in a similar manner with their aromatic rings sandwiched in between the indole groups of two dimer-related tryptophan residues. Multidrug recognition is facilitated by conformational plasticity and the absence of drug-specific hydrogen bonds. Combined analyses using site-directed mutagenesis, fluorescence-based drug binding and protein-DNA gel shift assays reveal an allosteric coupling between the multidrug- and DNA-binding sites of LmrR that most likely has a function in the induction mechanism.

  14. Performance of Four Transport and Storage Systems for Molecular Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rabodoarivelo, Marie Sylvianne; Imperiale, Bélen; andrianiavomikotroka, Rina; Brandao, Angela; Kumar, Parveen; Singh, Sarman; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine; Morcillo, Nora; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Vandamme, Peter; Martin, Anandi

    2015-01-01

    Background Detection of drug-resistant tuberculosis is essential for the control of the disease but it is often hampered by the limitation of transport and storage of samples from remote locations to the reference laboratory. We performed a retrospective field study to evaluate the performance of four supports enabling the transport and storage of samples to be used for molecular detection of drug resistance using the GenoType MTBDRplus. Methods Two hundred Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were selected and spotted on slides, FTA cards, GenoCards, and in ethanol. GenoType MTBDRplus was subsequently performed with the DNA extracted from these supports. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared to the results obtained by drug susceptibility testing. Results For all supports, the overall sensitivity and specificity for detection of resistance to RIF was between 95% and 100%, and for INH between 95% and 98%. Conclusion The four transport and storage supports showed a good sensitivity and specificity for the detection of resistance to RIF and INH in M. tuberculosis strains using the GenoType MTBDRplus. These supports can be maintained at room temperature and could represent an important alternative cost-effective method useful for rapid molecular detection of drug-resistant TB in low-resource settings. PMID:26431352

  15. Validation of membrane vesicle-based breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance protein 2 assays to assess drug transport and the potential for drug-drug interaction to support regulatory submissions.

    PubMed

    Elsby, Robert; Smith, Veronica; Fox, Lisa; Stresser, David; Butters, Caroline; Sharma, Pradeep; Surry, Dominic D

    2011-09-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) can play a role in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, impacting on the potential for drug-drug interactions. This study has characterized insect cell- and mammalian cell-derived ABC-transporter-expressing membrane vesicle test systems and validated methodologies for evaluation of candidate drugs as substrates or inhibitors of BCRP or MRP2. Concentration-dependent uptake of BCRP ([³H]oestrone 3-sulfate, [³H]methotrexate, [³H]rosuvastatin) and MRP2 ([³H]oestradiol 17β-glucuronide, [³H]pravastatin, carboxydichlorofluorescein) substrates, and inhibitory potencies (IC₅₀) of BCRP (sulfasalazine, novobiocin, fumitremorgin C) and MRP2 (benzbromarone, MK-571, terfenadine) inhibitors were determined. The apparent K(m) for probes [³H]oestrone 3-sulfate and [³H]oestradiol 17β-glucuronide was determined in insect cell vesicles to be 7.4 ± 1.7 and 105 ± 8.3 µM, respectively. All other substrates exhibited significant uptake ratios. Positive control inhibitors sulfasalazine and benzbromarone gave IC₅₀ values of 0.74 ± 0.18 and 36 ± 6.1 µM, respectively. All other inhibitors exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition. There was no significant difference in parameters generated between test systems. On the basis of the validation results, acceptance criteria to identify substrates/inhibitors of BCRP and MRP2 were determined for insect cell vesicles. The approach builds on earlier validations to support drug registration and extends from those cell-based systems to encompass assay formats using membrane vesicles.

  16. 75 FR 49549 - ABC & D Recycling, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35397] ABC & D Recycling, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption--a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA ABC & D Recycling, Inc. (ABC & D..., ABC & D Recycling, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption--a Line of Railroad in Ware, Massachusetts (STB...

  17. Determination of multidrug resistance mechanisms in Clostridium perfringens type A isolates using RNA sequencing and 2D-electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Hua; Ye, Gui-Sheng

    2018-06-11

    In this study, we screened differentially expressed genes in a multidrug-resistant isolate strain of Clostridium perfringens by RNA sequencing. We also separated and identified differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in the isolate strain by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS). The RNA sequencing results showed that, compared with the control strain, 1128 genes were differentially expressed in the isolate strain, and these included 227 up-regulated genes and 901 down-regulated genes. Bioinformatics analysis identified the following genes and gene categories that are potentially involved in multidrug resistance (MDR) in the isolate strain: drug transport, drug response, hydrolase activity, transmembrane transporter, transferase activity, amidase transmembrane transporter, efflux transmembrane transporter, bacterial chemotaxis, ABC transporter, and others. The results of the 2-DE showed that 70 proteins were differentially expressed in the isolate strain, 45 of which were up-regulated and 25 down-regulated. Twenty-seven DEPs were identified by MS and these included the following protein categories: ribosome, antimicrobial peptide resistance, and ABC transporter, all of which may be involved in MDR in the isolate strain of C. perfringens. The results provide reference data for further investigations on the drug resistant molecular mechanisms of C. perfringens.

  18. Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs/ABCCs) in Cancer Chemotherapy and Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Tiwari, Amit K.

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a superfamily of membrane proteins that are best known for their ability to transport a wide variety of exogenous and endogenous substances across membranes against a concentration gradient via ATP hydrolysis. There are seven subfamilies of human ABC transporters, one of the largest being the ‘C’ subfamily (gene symbol ABCC). Nine ABCC subfamily members, the so-called Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) 1-9, have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance in tumor cells to varying degrees as the efflux extrude chemotherapeutic compounds (or their metabolites) from malignant cells. Some of the MRPs are also known to either influence drug disposition in normal tissues or modulate the elimination of drugs (or their metabolites) via hepatobiliary or renal excretory pathways. In addition, the cellular efflux of physiologically important organic anions such as leukotriene C4 and cAMP is mediated by one or more of the MRPs. Finally, mutations in several MRPs are associated with human genetic disorders. In this review article, the current biochemical and physiological knowledge of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy and human genetic disease is summarized. The mutations in MRP2/ABCC2 leading to conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (Dubin-Johnson syndrome) and in MRP6/ABCC6 leading to the connective tissue disorder Pseudoxanthoma elasticum are also discussed. PMID:21740521

  19. Role of the Caenorhabditis elegans multidrug resistance gene, mrp-4, in gut granule differentiation.

    PubMed

    Currie, Erin; King, Brian; Lawrenson, Andrea L; Schroeder, Lena K; Kershner, Aaron M; Hermann, Greg J

    2007-11-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans gut granules are lysosome-related organelles with birefringent contents. mrp-4, which encodes an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter homologous to mammalian multidrug resistance proteins, functions in the formation of gut granule birefringence. mrp-4(-) embryos show a delayed appearance of birefringent material in the gut granule but otherwise appear to form gut granules properly. mrp-4(+) activity is required for the extracellular mislocalization of birefringent material, body-length retraction, and NaCl sensitivity, phenotypes associated with defective gut granule biogenesis exhibited by embryos lacking the activity of GLO-1/Rab38, a putative GLO-1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor GLO-4, and the AP-3 complex. Multidrug resistance protein (MRP)-4 localizes to the gut granule membrane, consistent with it playing a direct role in the transport of molecules that compose and/or facilitate the formation of birefringent crystals within the gut granule. However, MRP-4 is also present in oocytes and early embryos, and our genetic analyses indicate that its site of action in the formation of birefringent material may not be limited to just the gut granule in embryos. In a search for genes that function similarly to mrp-4(+), we identified WHT-2, another ABC transporter that acts in parallel to MRP-4 for the formation of birefringent material in the gut granule.

  20. Functional Interaction between the Cytoplasmic ABC Protein LptB and the Inner Membrane LptC Protein, Components of the Lipopolysaccharide Transport Machinery in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Martorana, Alessandra M.; Benedet, Mattia; Maccagni, Elisa A.; Sperandeo, Paola; Villa, Riccardo; Dehò, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The assembly of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) requires the transenvelope Lpt (lipopolysaccharide transport) complex, made in Escherichia coli of seven essential proteins located in the inner membrane (IM) (LptBCFG), periplasm (LptA), and OM (LptDE). At the IM, LptBFG constitute an unusual ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter, composed by the transmembrane LptFG proteins and the cytoplasmic LptB ATPase, which is thought to extract LPS from the IM and to provide the energy for its export across the periplasm to the cell surface. LptC is a small IM bitopic protein that binds to LptBFG and recruits LptA via its N- and C-terminal regions, and its role in LPS export is not completely understood. Here, we show that the expression level of lptB is a critical factor for suppressing lethality of deletions in the C-terminal region of LptC and the functioning of a hybrid Lpt machinery that carries Pa-LptC, the highly divergent LptC orthologue from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that LptB overexpression stabilizes C-terminally truncated LptC mutant proteins, thereby allowing the formation of a sufficient amount of stable IM complexes to support growth. Moreover, the LptB level seems also critical for the assembly of IM complexes carrying Pa-LptC which is otherwise defective in interactions with the E. coli LptFG components. Overall, our data suggest that LptB and LptC functionally interact and support a model whereby LptB plays a key role in the assembly of the Lpt machinery. IMPORTANCE The asymmetric outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria contains in its outer leaflet an unusual glycolipid, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS largely contributes to the peculiar permeability barrier properties of the OM that prevent the entry of many antibiotics, thus making Gram-negative pathogens difficult to treat. In Escherichia coli the LPS transporter (the Lpt machine) is made of seven essential proteins (LptABCDEFG) that form a

  1. UDP-galactose and acetyl-CoA transporters as Plasmodium multidrug resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Michelle Yi-Xiu; LaMonte, Gregory; Lee, Marcus C S; Reimer, Christin; Tan, Bee Huat; Corey, Victoria; Tjahjadi, Bianca F; Chua, Adeline; Nachon, Marie; Wintjens, René; Gedeck, Peter; Malleret, Benoit; Renia, Laurent; Bonamy, Ghislain M C; Ho, Paul Chi-Lui; Yeung, Bryan K S; Chow, Eric D; Lim, Liting; Fidock, David A; Diagana, Thierry T; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Bifani, Pablo

    2016-09-19

    A molecular understanding of drug resistance mechanisms enables surveillance of the effectiveness of new antimicrobial therapies during development and deployment in the field. We used conventional drug resistance selection as well as a regime of limiting dilution at early stages of drug treatment to probe two antimalarial imidazolopiperazines, KAF156 and GNF179. The latter approach permits the isolation of low-fitness mutants that might otherwise be out-competed during selection. Whole-genome sequencing of 24 independently derived resistant Plasmodium falciparum clones revealed four parasites with mutations in the known cyclic amine resistance locus (pfcarl) and a further 20 with mutations in two previously unreported P. falciparum drug resistance genes, an acetyl-CoA transporter (pfact) and a UDP-galactose transporter (pfugt). Mutations were validated both in vitro by CRISPR editing in P. falciparum and in vivo by evolution of resistant Plasmodium berghei mutants. Both PfACT and PfUGT were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by fluorescence microscopy. As mutations in pfact and pfugt conveyed resistance against additional unrelated chemical scaffolds, these genes are probably involved in broad mechanisms of antimalarial drug resistance.

  2. Molecular identification of an ABC transporter complex for manganese: analysis of a cyanobacterial mutant strain impaired in the photosynthetic oxygen evolution process.

    PubMed Central

    Bartsevich, V V; Pakrasi, H B

    1995-01-01

    During photosynthesis, the photosystem II (PSII) pigment-protein complex catalyzes oxygen evolution, a reaction in which a four-manganese ensemble plays a crucial role. Using a newly developed selection scheme, we have isolated BP13, a random photosynthesis-deficient mutant strain of the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis 6803. This mutant grew slowly under photoautotrophic conditions, and had a low oxygen evolution activity. Biochemical analysis revealed that the lesion in this mutant strain had specifically affected the Mn ensemble in PSII. Interestingly, incubation of BP13 cells with micromolar levels of added Mn induced rapid recovery of oxygen evolution activity. The mutant could be complemented with a fragment of wild-type chromosomal DNA containing three closely linked genes, mntA, mntB and mntC. These gene products showed significant sequence similarities with polypeptide components of bacterial permeases that are members of the 'ABC (ATP binding cassette) superfamily' of transporter proteins. We determined that in the BP13 strain, a single nucleotide change had resulted in the replacement of an alanine by an aspartic acid residue in MntA, a soluble protein containing ATP binding motifs. These results suggest that the mntCAB gene cluster encodes polypeptide components of a Mn transporter, the first such protein complex identified in any organism. PMID:7743991

  3. Whole genome re-sequencing identifies a mutation in an ABC transporter (mdr2) in a Plasmodium chabaudi clone with altered susceptibility to antifolate drugs☆

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Axel; Henriques, Gisela; Cravo, Pedro; Hunt, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In malaria parasites, mutations in two genes of folate biosynthesis encoding dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) modify responses to antifolate therapies which target these enzymes. However, the involvement of other genes which modify the availability of exogenous folate, for example, has been proposed. Here, we used short-read whole-genome re-sequencing to determine the mutations in a clone of the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi, which has altered susceptibility to both sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine. This clone bears a previously identified S106N mutation in dhfr and no mutation in dhps. Instead, three additional point mutations in genes on chromosomes 2, 13 and 14 were identified. The mutated gene on chromosome 13 (mdr2 K392Q) encodes an ABC transporter. Because Quantitative Trait Locus analysis previously indicated an association of genetic markers on chromosome 13 with responses to individual and combined antifolates, MDR2 is proposed to modulate antifolate responses, possibly mediated by the transport of folate intermediates. PMID:20858498

  4. ABC-transporters are localized in caveolin-1-positive and reggie-1-negative and reggie-2-negative microdomains of the canalicular membrane in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ismair, Manfred G; Häusler, Stephanie; Stuermer, Claudia A; Guyot, Christelle; Meier, Peter J; Roth, Jürgen; Stieger, Bruno

    2009-05-01

    The canalicular plasma membrane is constantly exposed to bile acids acting as detergents. Bile acids are essential to mediate release of biliary lipids from the canalicular membrane. Membrane microdomains (previously called lipid rafts) are biochemically defined by their resistance to detergent solubilization at cold temperature. We aimed to investigate the canalicular plasma membrane for the presence of microdomains, which could protect this membrane against the detergent action of bile acids. Highly purified rat liver canalicular plasma membrane vesicles were extracted with 1% Triton X-100 or 1% Lubrol WX at 4 degrees C and subjected to flotation through sucrose step gradients. Both detergents yielded detergent-resistant membranes containing the microdomain markers alkaline phosphatase and sphingomyelin. However, cholesterol was resistant to Lubrol WX solubilization, whereas it was only marginally resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100. The microdomain marker caveolin-1 was localized to the canalicular plasma membrane domain and was resistant to Lubrol WX, but to a large extent solubilized by Triton X-100. The two additional microdomain markers, reggie-1 and reggie-2, were localized to the basolateral and canalicular plasma membrane and were partially resistant to Lubrol WX but resistant to Triton X-100. The canalicular transporters bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance protein 2, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, and Abcg5 were largely resistant to Lubrol WX but were solubilized by Triton X-100. These results indicate the presence of two different types of microdomains in the canalicular plasma membrane: "Lubrol-microdomains" and "Triton-microdomains". "Lubrol-microdomains" contain the machinery for canalicular bile formation and may be the starting place for canalicular lipid secretion.

  5. Kinetic Parameters of Efflux of Penicillins by the Multidrug Efflux Transporter AcrAB-TolC of Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Siew Ping; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The multidrug efflux transporter AcrAB-TolC is known to pump out a diverse range of antibiotics, including β-lactams. However, the kinetic constants of the efflux process, needed for the quantitative understanding of resistance, were not available until those accompanying the efflux of some cephalosporins were recently determined by combining efflux with the hydrolysis of drugs by the periplasmic β-lactamase. In the present study we extended this approach to the study of a wide range of penicillins, from ampicillin and penicillin V to ureidopenicillins and isoxazolylpenicillins, by combining efflux with hydrolysis with the OXA-7 penicillinase. We found that the penicillins had a much stronger apparent affinity to AcrB and higher maximum rates of efflux than the cephalosporins. All penicillins showed strong positive cooperativity kinetics for export. The kinetic constants obtained were validated, as the MICs theoretically predicted on the basis of efflux and hydrolysis kinetics were remarkably similar to the observed MICs (except for the isoxazolylpenicillins). Surprisingly, however, the efflux kinetics of cloxacillin, for example, whose MIC decreased 512-fold in Escherichia coli upon the genetic deletion of the acrB gene, were quite similar to those of ampicillin, whose MIC decreased only 2-fold with the same treatment. Analysis of this phenomenon showed that the extensive decrease in the MIC for the acrB mutant is primarily due to the low permeation of the drug and that comparison of the MICs between the parent and the acrB strains is a very poor measure of the ability of AcrB to pump a drug out. PMID:20160052

  6. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-07-08

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds.

  7. Biochemical characterization of an ABC transporter LptBFGC complex required for the outer membrane sorting of lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-07-07

    Seven Lpt proteins (A through G) are thought to be involved in lipopolysaccharide transport from the inner to outer membrane of Escherichia coli. LptB belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Although the lptB gene lacks neighboring genes encoding membrane subunits, bioinformatic analyses recently indicated that two distantly located consecutive genes, lptF and lptG, could encode membrane subunits. To examine this possibility, LptB was expressed with LptF and LptG. We report here that both LptF and LptG formed a complex with LptB. Furthermore, an inner membrane protein, LptC, which had been implicated in lipopolysaccharide transport, was also included in this complex.

  8. Attenuated mutant strain of Salmonella Typhimurium lacking the ZnuABC transporter contrasts tumor growth promoting anti-cancer immune response.

    PubMed

    Chirullo, Barbara; Ammendola, Serena; Leonardi, Leonardo; Falcini, Roberto; Petrucci, Paola; Pistoia, Claudia; Vendetti, Silvia; Battistoni, Andrea; Pasquali, Paolo

    2015-07-10

    Salmonella Typhimurium has been shown to be highly effective as antitumor agent. The aim of this study was to investigate the tumor targeting efficacy and the mechanism of action of a specific attenuated mutant strain of Salmonella Typhimurium (STM) devoid of the whole operon coding for the high-affinity zinc transporter ZnuABC, which is required for bacterial growth in environments poor in zinc and for conferring full virulence to different Gram-negative pathogens.We showed that STM is able to penetrate and replicate into tumor cells in in vitro and in vivo models. The subcutaneous administration of STM in mammary adenocarcinoma mouse model led to both reduction of tumor growth and increase in life expectancy of STM treated mice. Moreover, investigating the potential mechanism behind the favorable clinical outcomes, we provide evidence that STM stimulates a potent inflammatory response and a specific immune pattern, recruiting a large number of innate and adaptive immune cells capable to contrast the immunosuppressive environment generated by tumors.

  9. Characterization of a lactose-responsive promoter of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene from Lactobacillus acidophilus 05-172.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhu; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2017-09-01

    A novel lactose-responsive promoter of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene Lba1680 of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain 05-172 isolated from a traditionally fermented dairy product koumiss was characterized. In L. acidophilus 05-172, expression of Lba1680 was induced by lactose, with lactose-induced transcription of Lba1680 being 6.1-fold higher than that induced by glucose. This is in contrast to L. acidophilus NCFM, a strain isolated from human feces, in which expression of Lba1680 and Lba1679 is induced by glucose. Both gene expression and enzyme activity assays in L. paracasei transformed with a vector containing the inducible Lba1680 promoter (PLba1680) of strain 05-172 and a heme-dependent catalase gene as reporter confirmed that PLba1680 is specifically induced by lactose. Its regulatory expression could not be repressed by glucose, and was independent of cAMP receptor protein. This lactose-responsive promoter might be used in the expression of functional genes in L. paracasei incorporated into a lactose-rich environment, such as dairy products. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The ABC model of recombination reinterpreted: Impact on understanding carrier transport and efficiency droop in InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, M. A.; Allsopp, D. W. E.; Kappers, M. J.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    The efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) remains a topic of great contemporary interest due to their potential to reduce the amount of energy consumed in lighting. The current consensus is that electrons and holes distribute themselves through the emissive region by a drift-diffusion process which results in a highly non-uniform distribution of the light emission and can reduce efficiency. In this paper, the measured variations in the external quantum efficiency of a range of InGaN/GaN LEDs with different numbers of quantum wells (QWs) are shown to compare closely with the predictions of a revised ABC model, in which it is assumed that the electrically injected electrons and holes are uniformly distributed through the multi-quantum well (MQW) region, or nearly so, and hence carrier recombination occurs equally in all the quantum wells. The implications of the reported results are that drift-diffusion plays a far lesser role in cross-well carrier transport than previously thought; that the dominant cause of efficiency droop is intrinsic to the quantum wells and that reductions in the density of non-radiative recombination centers in the MQW would enable the use of more QWs and thereby reduce Auger losses by spreading carriers more evenly across a wider emissive region.

  11. Mutations of the central tyrosines of putative cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) sequences modify folding, activity, and sterol-sensing of the human ABCG2 multidrug transporter.

    PubMed

    Gál, Zita; Hegedüs, Csilla; Szakács, Gergely; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs; Özvegy-Laczka, Csilla

    2015-02-01

    Human ABCG2 is a plasma membrane glycoprotein causing multidrug resistance in cancer. Membrane cholesterol and bile acids are efficient regulators of ABCG2 function, while the molecular nature of the sterol-sensing sites has not been elucidated. The cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC, L/V-(X)(1-5)-Y-(X)(1-5)-R/K) sequence is one of the conserved motifs involved in cholesterol binding in several proteins. We have identified five potential CRAC motifs in the transmembrane domain of the human ABCG2 protein. In order to define their roles in sterol-sensing, the central tyrosines of these CRACs (Y413, 459, 469, 570 and 645) were mutated to S or F and the mutants were expressed both in insect and mammalian cells. We found that mutation in Y459 prevented protein expression; the Y469S and Y645S mutants lost their activity; while the Y570S, Y469F, and Y645F mutants retained function as well as cholesterol and bile acid sensitivity. We found that in the case of the Y413S mutant, drug transport was efficient, while modulation of the ATPase activity by cholesterol and bile acids was significantly altered. We suggest that the Y413 residue within a putative CRAC motif has a role in sterol-sensing and the ATPase/drug transport coupling in the ABCG2 multidrug transporter. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Analysis of Tryptophan Residues in the Staphylococcal Multidrug Transporter QacA Reveals Long-Distance Functional Associations of Residues on Opposite Sides of the Membrane▿

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Karl A.; Souhani, Talal; Skurray, Ronald A.; Brown, Melissa H.

    2008-01-01

    Tryptophan residues can possess a multitude of functions within a multidrug transport protein, e.g., mediating interactions with substrates or distal parts of the protein, or fulfilling a structural requirement, such as guiding the depth of membrane insertion. In this study, the nine tryptophan residues of the staphylococcal QacA multidrug efflux protein were individually mutated to alanine and phenylalanine, and the functional consequences of these changes were determined. Phenylalanine substitutions for each tryptophan residue were functionally tolerated. However, alanine modifications revealed an important functional role for three tryptophan residues, W58, W149, and W173, each of which is well conserved among QacA-related transport proteins in the major facilitator superfamily. The most functionally compromising mutation, an alanine substitution for W58, likely to be located at the extracellular interface of transmembrane segment 2, abolished all detectable QacA-mediated resistance and transport function. Second-site suppressor analyses identified several mutations that rescued the function of the W58A QacA mutant. Remarkably, all of these suppressor mutations were shown to be located in cytoplasmic loops between transmembrane helices 2 and 3 or 12 and 13, demonstrating novel functional associations between amino acid positions on opposite sides of the membrane and in distal N- and C-terminal regions of the QacA protein. PMID:18223078

  13. The ABC and AUSSAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarritty, Ian

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's (ABC) utilization of the AUSSAT telecommunications satellite to extend its television and radio transmission range to reach remote Australian audiences; the satellite's program gathering and interchange capabilities; and ABC's generation of other benefits to offset cost of satellite services.…

  14. RCN1/OsABCG5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is required for hypodermal suberization of roots in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Shiono, Katsuhiro; Ando, Miho; Nishiuchi, Shunsaku; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Kohtaro; Nakamura, Motoaki; Matsuo, Yuichi; Yasuno, Naoko; Yamanouchi, Utako; Fujimoto, Masaru; Takanashi, Hideki; Ranathunge, Kosala; Franke, Rochus B; Shitan, Nobukazu; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Takamure, Itsuro; Yano, Masahiro; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Schreiber, Lukas; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2014-10-01

    Suberin is a complex polymer composed of aliphatic and phenolic compounds. It is a constituent of apoplastic plant interfaces. In many plant species, including rice (Oryza sativa), the hypodermis in the outer part of roots forms a suberized cell wall (the Casparian strip and/or suberin lamellae), which inhibits the flow of water and ions and protects against pathogens. To date, there is no genetic evidence that suberin forms an apoplastic transport barrier in the hypodermis. We discovered that a rice reduced culm number1 (rcn1) mutant could not develop roots longer than 100 mm in waterlogged soil. The mutated gene encoded an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter named RCN1/OsABCG5. RCN1/OsABCG5 gene expression in the wild type was increased in most hypodermal and some endodermal roots cells under stagnant deoxygenated conditions. A GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 fusion protein localized at the plasma membrane of the wild type. Under stagnant deoxygenated conditions, well suberized hypodermis developed in wild types but not in rcn1 mutants. Under stagnant deoxygenated conditions, apoplastic tracers (periodic acid and berberine) were blocked at the hypodermis in the wild type but not in rcn1, indicating that the apoplastic barrier in the mutant was impaired. The amount of the major aliphatic suberin monomers originating from C(28) and C(30) fatty acids or ω-OH fatty acids was much lower in rcn1 than in the wild type. These findings suggest that RCN1/OsABCG5 has a role in the suberization of the hypodermis of rice roots, which contributes to formation of the apoplastic barrier. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. An ABC transporter B family protein, ABCB19, is required for cytoplasmic streaming and gravitropism of the inflorescence stems.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Keishi; Ueda, Haruko; Shimada, Tomoo; Tamura, Kentaro; Koumoto, Yasuko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    A significant feature of plant cells is the extensive motility of organelles and the cytosol, which was originally defined as cytoplasmic streaming. We suggested previously that a three-way interaction between plant-specific motor proteins myosin XIs, actin filaments, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was responsible for cytoplasmic streaming. (1) Currently, however, there are no reports of molecular components for cytoplasmic streaming other than the actin-myosin-cytoskeleton and ER-related proteins. In the present study, we found that elongated cells of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit vigorous cytoplasmic streaming. Statistical analysis showed that the maximal velocity of plastid movements is 7.26 µm/s, which is much faster than the previously reported velocities of organelles. Surprisingly, the maximal velocity of streaming in the inflorescence stem cells was significantly reduced to 1.11 µm/s in an Arabidopsis mutant, abcb19-101, which lacks ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUBFAMILY B19 (ABCB19) that mediates the polar transport of the phytohormone auxin together with PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Polar auxin transport establishes the auxin concentration gradient essential for plant development and tropisms. Deficiency of ABCB19 activity eventually caused enhanced gravitropic responses of the inflorescence stems and abnormally flexed inflorescence stems. These results suggest that ABCB19-mediated auxin transport plays a role not only in tropism regulation, but also in cytoplasmic streaming.

  16. AST1306, a potent EGFR inhibitor, antagonizes ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2-mediated multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, De-Shen; Kathawala, Rishil J; Patel, Atish; Talele, Tanaji T; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Fu, Li-Wu

    2014-08-01

    AST1306, an inhibitor of EGFR and ErbB2, is currently in phase I of clinical trials. We evaluated the effect of AST306 on the reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) induced by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. We found that AST1306 significantly sensitized the ABC subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2)-overexpressing cells to ABCG2 substrate chemotherapeutics. AST1306 significantly increased intracellular accumulation of [(3)H]-mitoxantrone in ABCG2-overexpressing cells by blocking ABCG2 efflux function. Moreover, AST1306 stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCG2. Homology modeling predicted the binding conformation of AST1306 to be within the transmembrane region of ABCG2. In conclusion, AST1306 could notably reverse ABCG2-mediated MDR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. LABCG2, a New ABC Transporter Implicated in Phosphatidylserine Exposure, Is Involved in the Infectivity and Pathogenicity of Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    González-Rey, Elena; Delgado, Mario; Castanys, Santiago; Pérez-Victoria, José M.; Gamarro, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected disease produced by the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania. In the present study, we show that LABCG2, a new ATP-binding cassette half-transporter (ABCG subfamily) from Leishmania, is involved in parasite virulence. Down-regulation of LABCG2 function upon expression of an inactive mutant version of this half-transporter (LABCG2K/M) is shown to reduce the translocation of short-chain analogues of phosphatidylserine (PS). This dominant-negative phenotype is specific for the headgroup of the phospholipid, as the movement of phospholipid analogues of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine or sphingomyelin is not affected. In addition, promastigotes expressing LABCG2K/M expose less endogenous PS in the stationary phase than control parasites. Transient exposure of PS at the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane is known to be one of the mechanisms used by Leishmania to infect macrophages and to silence their immune response. Stationary phase/metacyclic promastigotes expressing LABCG2K/M are less infective for macrophages and show decreased pathogenesis in a mouse model of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Thus, mice infected with parasites expressing LABCG2K/M did not develop any lesion and showed significantly lower inflammation and parasite burden than mice infected with control parasites. Our results indicate that LABCG2 function is required for the externalization of PS in Leishmania promastigotes, a process that is involved in the virulence of the parasite. PMID:23638200

  18. Metabolic Interactions of Purine Derivatives with Human ABC Transporter ABCG2: Genetic Testing to Assess Gout Risk.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Aw, Wanping; Kaneko, Kiyoko

    2013-11-04

    In mammals, excess purine nucleosides are removed from the body by breakdown in the liver and excretion from the kidneys. Uric acid is the end product of purine metabolism in humans. Two-thirds of uric acid in the human body is normally excreted through the kidney, whereas one-third undergoes uricolysis (decomposition of uric acid) in the gut. Elevated serum uric acid levels result in gout and could be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Recent studies have shown that human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 plays a role of renal excretion of uric acid. Two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), i.e., 421C>A (major) and 376C>T (minor), in the ABCG2 gene result in impaired transport activity, owing to ubiquitination-mediated proteosomal degradation and truncation of ABCG2, respectively. These genetic polymorphisms are associated with hyperuricemia and gout. Allele frequencies of those SNPs are significantly higher in Asian populations than they are in African and Caucasian populations. A rapid and isothermal genotyping method has been developed to detect the SNP 421C>A, where one drop of peripheral blood is sufficient for the detection. Development of simple genotyping methods would serve to improve prevention and early therapeutic intervention for high-risk individuals in personalized healthcare.

  19. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaojing; Xu, Yonghong; Meng, Xiangning

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABCmore » gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.« less

  20. Transport of N-acetyl-S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, a metabolite of trichloroethylene, by mouse multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (Mrp2)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Koag, Myong-Chul

    2010-04-15

    N-acetyl-S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (Ac-DCVC) and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) are the glutathione conjugation pathway metabolites of a common industrial contaminant and potent nephrotoxicant trichloroethylene (TCE). Ac-DCVC and DCVC are accumulated in the renal proximal tubule where they may be secreted into the urine by an unknown apical transporter(s). In this study, we explored the hypothesis that the apical transport of Ac-DCVC and/or DCVC may be mediated by the multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (Mrp2, ABCC2), which is known to mediate proximal tubular apical ATP-dependent transport of glutathione and numerous xenobiotics and endogenous substances conjugated with glutathione. Transport experiments using membrane vesicles prepared from mousemore » proximal tubule derived cells expressing mouse Mrp2 utilizing ATPase assay and direct measurements of Ac-DCVC/DCVC using liquid chromatography/tandem mass-spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) demonstrated that mouse Mrp2 mediates ATP-dependent transport of Ac-DCVC. Expression of mouse Mrp2 antisense mRNA significantly inhibited the vectorial basolateral to apical transport of Ac-DCVC but not DCVC in mouse proximal tubule derived cells endogenously expressing mouse Mrp2. The results suggest that Mrp2 may be involved in the renal secretion of Ac-DCVC.« less

  1. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W.; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T.; Ko, Seung-Hyun B.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Lam, Joseph S.; Muruve, Daniel A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite (A-NO2−, pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to A-NO2−. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to A-NO2−, but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with A-NO2− plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM A-NO2−, and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to A-NO2− in biofilms. A-NO2− sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, A-NO2− as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains. PMID:27064218

  2. ABC transporters and the proteasome complex are implicated in susceptibility to Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis across multiple drugs.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Paola; Bansal, Mukesh; Lefebvre, Celine; Guarnieri, Paolo; Shen, Yufeng; Pe'er, Itsik; Califano, Andrea; Floratos, Aris

    2015-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) represent rare but serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Both are characterized by distinctive blistering lesions and significant mortality rates. While there is evidence for strong drug-specific genetic predisposition related to HLA alleles, recent genome wide association studies (GWAS) on European and Asian populations have failed to identify genetic susceptibility alleles that are common across multiple drugs. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the low to moderate effect size of individual genetic risk factors. To test this hypothesis we developed Pointer, a new algorithm that assesses the aggregate effect of multiple low risk variants on a pathway using a gene set enrichment approach. A key advantage of our method is the capability to associate SNPs with genes by exploiting physical proximity as well as by using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) that capture information about both cis- and trans-acting regulatory effects. We control for known bias-inducing aspects of enrichment based analyses, such as: 1) gene length, 2) gene set size, 3) presence of biologically related genes within the same linkage disequilibrium (LD) region, and, 4) genes shared among multiple gene sets. We applied this approach to publicly available SJS/TEN genome-wide genotype data and identified the ABC transporter and Proteasome pathways as potentially implicated in the genetic susceptibility of non-drug-specific SJS/TEN. We demonstrated that the innovative SNP-to-gene mapping phase of the method was essential in detecting the significant enrichment for those pathways. Analysis of an independent gene expression dataset provides supportive functional evidence for the involvement of Proteasome pathways in SJS/TEN cutaneous lesions. These results suggest that Pointer provides a useful framework for the integrative analysis of pharmacogenetic GWAS data, by increasing the power to detect aggregate effects

  3. Forkhead-associated (FHA) Domain Containing ABC Transporter Rv1747 Is Positively Regulated by Ser/Thr Phosphorylation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Spivey, Vicky L.; Molle, Virginie; Whalan, Rachael H.; Rodgers, Angela; Leiba, Jade; Stach, Lasse; Walker, K. Barry; Smerdon, Stephen J.; Buxton, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    One major signaling method employed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is through reversible phosphorylation of proteins mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases. This study concerns one of these enzymes, the serine/threonine protein kinase PknF, that is encoded in an operon with Rv1747, an ABC transporter that is necessary for growth of M. tuberculosis in vivo and contains two forkhead-associated (FHA) domains. FHA domains are phosphopeptide recognition motifs that specifically recognize phosphothreonine-containing epitopes. Experiments to determine how PknF regulates the function of Rv1747 demonstrated that phosphorylation occurs on two specific threonine residues, Thr-150 and Thr-208. To determine the in vivo consequences of phosphorylation, infection experiments were performed in bone marrow-derived macrophages and in mice using threonine-to-alanine mutants of Rv1747 that prevent specific phosphorylation and revealed that phosphorylation positively modulates Rv1747 function in vivo. The role of the FHA domains in this regulation was further demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, using peptides containing both phosphothreonine residues. FHA-1 domain mutation resulted in attenuation in macrophages highlighting the critical role of this domain in Rv1747 function. A mutant deleted for pknF did not, however, have a growth phenotype in an infection, suggesting that other kinases can fulfill its role when it is absent. This study provides the first information on the molecular mechanism(s) regulating Rv1747 through PknF-dependent phosphorylation but also indicates that phosphorylation activates Rv1747, which may have important consequences in regulating growth of M. tuberculosis. PMID:21622570

  4. Substrate Binding Protein DppA1 of ABC Transporter DppBCDF Increases Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Inhibiting Pf5 Prophage Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yunho; Song, Sooyeon; Sheng, Lili; Zhu, Lei; Kim, Jun-Seob; Wood, Thomas K.

    2018-01-01

    Filamentous phage impact biofilm development, stress tolerance, virulence, biofilm dispersal, and colony variants. Previously, we identified 137 Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 mutants with more than threefold enhanced and 88 mutants with more than 10-fold reduced biofilm formation by screening 5850 transposon mutants (PLoS Pathogens 5: e1000483, 2009). Here, we characterized the function of one of these 225 mutations, dppA1 (PA14_58350), in regard to biofilm formation. DppA1 is a substrate-binding protein (SBP) involved in peptide utilization via the DppBCDF ABC transporter system. We show that compared to the wild-type strain, inactivating dppA1 led to 68-fold less biofilm formation in a static model and abolished biofilm formation in flow cells. Moreover, the dppA1 mutant had a delay in swarming and produced 20-fold less small-colony variants, and both biofilm formation and swarming were complemented by producing DppA1. A whole-transcriptome analysis showed that only 10 bacteriophage Pf5 genes were significantly induced in the biofilm cells of the dppA1 mutant compared to the wild-type strain, and inactivation of dppA1 resulted in a 600-fold increase in Pf5 excision and a million-fold increase in phage production. As expected, inactivating Pf5 genes PA0720 and PA0723 increased biofilm formation substantially. Inactivation of DppA1 also reduced growth (due to cell lysis). Hence, DppA1 increases biofilm formation by repressing Pf5 prophage. PMID:29416528

  5. Impaired phloem loading in zmsweet13a,b,c sucrose transporter triple knock-out mutants in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Bezrutczyk, Margaret; Hartwig, Thomas; Horschman, Marc; Char, Si Nian; Yang, Jinliang; Yang, Bing; Frommer, Wolf B; Sosso, Davide

    2018-04-01

    Crop yield depends on efficient allocation of sucrose from leaves to seeds. In Arabidopsis, phloem loading is mediated by a combination of SWEET sucrose effluxers and subsequent uptake by SUT1/SUC2 sucrose/H + symporters. ZmSUT1 is essential for carbon allocation in maize, but the relative contribution to apoplasmic phloem loading and retrieval of sucrose leaking from the translocation path is not known. Here we analysed the contribution of SWEETs to phloem loading in maize. We identified three leaf-expressed SWEET sucrose transporters as key components of apoplasmic phloem loading in Zea mays L. ZmSWEET13 paralogues (a, b, c) are among the most highly expressed genes in the leaf vasculature. Genome-edited triple knock-out mutants were severely stunted. Photosynthesis of mutants was impaired and leaves accumulated high levels of soluble sugars and starch. RNA-seq revealed profound transcriptional deregulation of genes associated with photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) analyses may indicate that variability in ZmSWEET13s correlates with agronomical traits, especifically flowering time and leaf angle. This work provides support for cooperation of three ZmSWEET13s with ZmSUT1 in phloem loading in Z. mays. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. ¹⁸FDG a PET tumor diagnostic tracer is not a substrate of the ABC transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Krasznai, Zoárd T; Trencsényi, György; Krasznai, Zoltán; Mikecz, Pál; Nizsalóczki, Enikő; Szalóki, Gábor; Szabó, Judit P; Balkay, László; Márián, Teréz; Goda, Katalin

    2014-11-20

    2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ((18)FDG) is a tumor diagnostic radiotracer of great importance in both diagnosing primary and metastatic tumors and in monitoring the efficacy of the treatment. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an active transporter that is often expressed in various malignancies either intrinsically or appears later upon disease progression or in response to chemotherapy. Several authors reported that the accumulation of (18)FDG in P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expressing cancer cells (Pgp(+)) and tumors is different from the accumulation of the tracer in Pgp nonexpressing (Pgp(-)) ones, therefore we investigated whether (18)FDG is a substrate or modulator of Pgp pump. Rhodamine 123 (R123) accumulation experiments and ATPase assay were used to detect whether (18)FDG is substrate for Pgp. The accumulation and efflux kinetics of (18)FDG were examined in two different human gynecologic (A2780/A2780AD and KB-3-1/KB-V1) and a mouse fibroblast (3T3 and 3T3MDR1) Pgp(+) and Pgp(-) cancer cell line pairs both in cell suspension and monolayer cultures. We found that (18)FDG and its derivatives did not affect either the R123 accumulation in Pgp(+) cells or the basal and the substrate stimulated ATPase activity of Pgp supporting that they are not substrates or modulators of the pump. Measuring the accumulation and efflux kinetics of (18)FDG in different Pgp(+) and Pgp(-) cell line pairs, we have found that the Pgp(+) cells exhibited significantly higher (p⩽0.01) (18)FDG accumulation and slightly faster (18)FDG efflux kinetics compared to their Pgp(-) counterparts. The above data support the idea that expression of Pgp may increase the energy demand of cells resulting in higher (18)FDG accumulation and faster efflux. We concluded that (18)FDG and its metabolites are not substrates of Pgp. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Basic Residues R260 and K357 Affect the Conformational Dynamics of the Major Facilitator Superfamily Multidrug Transporter LmrP

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary-active multidrug transporters can confer resistance on cells to pharmaceuticals by mediating their extrusion away from intracellular targets via substrate/H+(Na+) antiport. While the interactions of catalytic carboxylates in these transporters with coupling ions and substrates (drugs) have been studied in some detail, the functional importance of basic residues has received much less attention. The only two basic residues R260 and K357 in transmembrane helices in the Major Facilitator Superfamily transporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis are present on the outer surface of the protein, where they are exposed to the phospholipid head group region of the outer leaflet (R260) and inner leaflet (K357) of the cytoplasmic membrane. Although our observations on the proton-motive force dependence and kinetics of substrate transport, and substrate-dependent proton transport demonstrate that K357A and R260A mutants are affected in ethidium-proton and benzalkonium-proton antiport compared to wildtype LmrP, our findings suggest that R260 and K357 are not directly involved in the binding of substrates or the translocation of protons. Secondary-active multidrug transporters are thought to operate by a mechanism in which binding sites for substrates are alternately exposed to each face of the membrane. Disulfide crosslinking experiments were performed with a double cysteine mutant of LmrP that reports the substrate-stimulated transition from the outward-facing state to the inward-facing state with high substrate-binding affinity. In the experiments, the R260A and K357A mutations were found to influence the dynamics of these major protein conformations in the transport cycle, potentially by removing the interactions of R260 and K357 with phospholipids and/or other residues in LmrP. The R260A and K357A mutations therefore modify the maximum rate at which the transport cycle can operate and, as the transitions between conformational states are differently affected by

  8. A single-component multidrug transporter of the major facilitator superfamily is part of a network that protects E scherichia coli from bile salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Stephanie; Alegre, Kamela O; Holdsworth, Scarlett R; Rice, Matthew; Brown, James A; McVeigh, Paul; Kelly, Sharon M; Law, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to high concentrations of bile salts in the human intestinal tract is vital for the survival of enteric bacteria such as E scherichia coli. Although the tripartite AcrAB–TolC efflux system plays a significant role in this resistance, it is purported that other efflux pumps must also be involved. We provide evidence from a comprehensive suite of experiments performed at two different pH values (7.2 and 6.0) that reflect pH conditions that E . coli may encounter in human gut that MdtM, a single-component multidrug resistance transporter of the major facilitator superfamily, functions in bile salt resistance in E . coli by catalysing secondary active transport of bile salts out of the cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, assays performed on a chromosomal ΔacrB mutant transformed with multicopy plasmid encoding MdtM suggested a functional synergism between the single-component MdtM transporter and the tripartite AcrAB–TolC system that results in a multiplicative effect on resistance. Substrate binding experiments performed on purified MdtM demonstrated that the transporter binds to cholate and deoxycholate with micromolar affinity, and transport assays performed on inverted vesicles confirmed the capacity of MdtM to catalyse electrogenic bile salt/H+ antiport. PMID:24684269

  9. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance. PMID:25268163

  10. Identification of ABC transporter genes conferring combined pleuromutilin-lincosamide-streptogramin A resistance in bovine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Sarah; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan

    2015-06-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of combined pleuromutilin-lincosamide-streptogramin A resistance in 26 unrelated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from dairy cows suffering from mastitis. The 26 pleuromutilin-resistant staphylococcal isolates were screened for the presence of the genes vga(A), vga(B), vga(C), vga(E), vga(E) variant, sal(A), vmlR, cfr, lsa(A), lsa(B), lsa(C), and lsa(E) by PCR. None of the 26 isolates carried the genes vga(B), vga(C), vga(E), vga(E) variant, vmlR, cfr, lsa(A), lsa(B), or lsa(C). Two Staphylococcus haemolyticus and single Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus lentus, and Staphylococcus hominis were vga(A)-positive. Twelve S. aureus, two Staphylococcus warneri, as well as single S. lentus and S. xylosus carried the lsa(E) gene. Moreover, single S. aureus, S. haemolyticus, S. xylosus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were positive for both genes, vga(A) and lsa(E). The sal(A) gene was found in a single Staphylococcus sciuri. All ABC transporter genes were located in the chromosomal DNA, except for a plasmid-borne vga(A) gene in the S. epidermidis isolate. The genetic environment of the lsa(E)-positive isolates was analyzed using previously described PCR assays. Except for the S. warneri and S. xylosus, all lsa(E)-positive isolates harbored a part of the previously described enterococcal multiresistance gene cluster. This is the first report of the novel lsa(E) gene in the aforementioned bovine CoNS species. This is also the first identification of the sal(A) gene in a S. sciuri from a case of bovine mastitis. Moreover, the sal(A) gene was shown to also confer pleuromutilin resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Neisseria meningitidis fbpABC mutant is incapable of using nonheme iron for growth.

    PubMed

    Khun, H H; Kirby, S D; Lee, B C

    1998-05-01

    The neisserial fbpABC locus has been proposed to act as an iron-specific ABC transporter system. To confirm this assigned function, we constructed an fbpABC mutant in Neisseria meningitidis by insertional inactivation of fbpABC with a selectable antibiotic marker. The mutant was unable to use iron supplied from human transferrin, human lactoferrin, or iron chelates. However, the use of iron from heme and human hemoglobin was unimpaired. These results support the obligatory participation of fbpABC in neisserial periplasmic iron transport and do not indicate a role for this genetic locus in the heme iron pathway.

  12. A Neisseria meningitidis fbpABC Mutant Is Incapable of Using Nonheme Iron for Growth

    PubMed Central

    Khun, Heng H.; Kirby, Shane D.; Lee, B. Craig

    1998-01-01

    The neisserial fbpABC locus has been proposed to act as an iron-specific ABC transporter system. To confirm this assigned function, we constructed an fbpABC mutant in Neisseria meningitidis by insertional inactivation of fbpABC with a selectable antibiotic marker. The mutant was unable to use iron supplied from human transferrin, human lactoferrin, or iron chelates. However, the use of iron from heme and human hemoglobin was unimpaired. These results support the obligatory participation of fbpABC in neisserial periplasmic iron transport and do not indicate a role for this genetic locus in the heme iron pathway. PMID:9573125

  13. Kinetic control of TolC recruitment by multidrug efflux complexes.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Elena B; Dastidar, Vishakha; Rybenkov, Valentin V; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2009-09-22

    In Gram-negative pathogens, multidrug efflux pumps that provide clinically significant levels of antibiotic resistance function as three-component complexes. They are composed of the inner membrane transporters belonging to one of three superfamilies of proteins, RND, ABC, or MF; periplasmic proteins belonging to the membrane fusion protein (MFP) family; and outer membrane channels exemplified by the Escherichia coli TolC. The three-component complexes span the entire two-membrane envelope of Gram-negative bacteria and expel toxic molecules from the cytoplasmic membrane to the medium. The architecture of these complexes is expected to vary significantly because of the structural diversity of the inner membrane transporters. How the three-component pumps are assembled, their architecture, and their dynamics remain unclear. In this study, we reconstituted interactions and compared binding kinetics of the E. coli TolC with AcrA, MacA, and EmrA, the periplasmic MFPs that function in multidrug efflux with transporters from the RND, ABC, and MF superfamilies, respectively. By using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrate that TolC interactions with MFPs are highly dynamic and sensitive to pH. The affinity of TolC to MFPs decreases in the order MacA > EmrA > AcrA. We further show that MFPs are prone to oligomerization, but differ dramatically from each other in oligomerization kinetics and stability of oligomers. The propensity of MFPs to oligomerize correlates with the stability of MFP-TolC complexes and structural features of inner membrane transporters. We propose that recruitment of TolC by various MFPs is determined not only by kinetics of MFP-TolC interactions but also by oligomerization kinetics of MFPs and pH.

  14. Effects of Zuccagnia punctata extracts and their flavonoids on the function and expression of ABCB1/P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter.

    PubMed

    Chieli, Elisabetta; Romiti, Nadia; Catiana Zampini, Iris; Garrido, Gabino; Inés Isla, María

    2012-12-18

    Zuccagnia punctata extracts (ZpE) are used in ethnomedicine as antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory drugs. The pharmacological properties of ZpE and their polyphenolic components suggest that they may be used as potential modulators on the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) multidrug transporter. P-gp is well known for its role in the acquired drug resistance by tumors following chemotherapy, causing a low drug bioavailability by extruding them out of the cells. To evaluate the effects of ZpE and three of their phenolic components: 7-hydroxyflavanone (HF), 3,7-dihydroxyflavone (DHF) and 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone (DHC) on P-gp activity and expression. The effects of natural products on ABCB1/P-gp function and expression were evaluated by R-123 accumulation assay and western blot analysis using HK-2 cells as experimental model. The ABCB1 mRNA content was determined by SQRT-PCR. The accumulation of R-123 in HK-2 cells was significantly increased by ZpE and DHF, and to a lesser extent by DHC, indicating their roles on the efflux transporter activity. However, HF did not show any effect. HK-2 cells maintained in the presence of ZpE or DHF for 72 h, showed an increase in P-gp expression whereas activity was unchanged or decreased. No changes were observed in ABCB1 mRNA content. Furthermore, in these assay conditions, more sensibility of HK-2 cells to the cytotoxic action of cyclosporine A (P-gp substrate) was observed. These results may suggest an impact of Zuccagnia punctata and some of its components on the pharmacokinetics of drugs that are P-gp substrates, as well as a potential role on multidrug resistance modulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 11991 - ABC & D Recycling, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [STB Finance Docket No. 35356] ABC & D Recycling, Inc.--Lease and Operation Exemption--a Line of Railroad in Ware, MA ABC & D Recycling, Inc. (ABC & D), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to lease from O...

  16. High-throughput screening identifies Ceefourin 1 and Ceefourin 2 as highly selective inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4).

    PubMed

    Cheung, Leanna; Flemming, Claudia L; Watt, Fujiko; Masada, Nanako; Yu, Denise M T; Huynh, Tony; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Tivnan, Amanda; Polinsky, Alexander; Gudkov, Andrei V; Munoz, Marcia A; Vishvanath, Anasuya; Cooper, Dermot M F; Henderson, Michelle J; Cole, Susan P C; Fletcher, Jamie I; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D

    2014-09-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, is an organic anion transporter capable of effluxing a wide range of physiologically important signalling molecules and drugs. MRP4 has been proposed to contribute to numerous functions in both health and disease; however, in most cases these links remain to be unequivocally established. A major limitation to understanding the physiological and pharmacological roles of MRP4 has been the absence of specific small molecule inhibitors, with the majority of established inhibitors also targeting other ABC transporter family members, or inhibiting the production, function or degradation of important MRP4 substrates. We therefore set out to identify more selective and well tolerated inhibitors of MRP4 that might be used to study the many proposed functions of this transporter. Using high-throughput screening, we identified two chemically distinct small molecules, Ceefourin 1 and Ceefourin 2, that inhibit transport of a broad range of MRP4 substrates, yet are highly selective for MRP4 over other ABC transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp), ABCG2 (Breast Cancer Resistance Protein; BCRP) and MRP1 (multidrug resistance protein 1; ABCC1). Both compounds are more potent MRP4 inhibitors in cellular assays than the most widely used inhibitor, MK-571, requiring lower concentrations to effect a comparable level of inhibition. Furthermore, Ceefourin 1 and Ceefourin 2 have low cellular toxicity, and high microsomal and acid stability. These newly identified inhibitors should be of great value for efforts to better understand the biological roles of MRP4, and may represent classes of compounds with therapeutic application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Overexpression of an ABC transporter and mutations of GyrA, GyrB, and ParC in contributing to high-level ciprofloxacin resistance in Streptococcus suis type 2.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Shang, Kexin; Huang, Jinhu; Ran, Wei; Kashif, Jam; Wang, Liping

    2014-04-01

    Streptococcus suis is a pathogen of zoonotic diseases. Moreover, the emergence of fluoro-quinolones (FQs) resistance in this pathogen has severe consequences for pigs and human health. In this study, the molecular mechanism of FQs resistance in S. suis type 2 (SS2) sensitive strains isolated from pigs was assessed after in vitro induction of resistance against the most frequently used FQs: ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and enrofloxacin. Proteome analysis, sequencing and real-time RT-PCR results strongly established an overexpression of an ABC transporter protein (other than SatAB) and topoisomerase mutations in GyrA (Ser81Arg), GyrB (Glu354Lys), and ParC (Ser79Phe) in contributing to high level ciprofloxacin resistance in SS2. Due to the overexpression of the ABC transporter, intracellular ciprofloxacin concentrations were significantly lower in the resistant strains than those of sensitive strains after 20, 35, and 60 min exposures to ciprofloxacin (p < 0.05). It was concluded that improper use of FQs is one of the main causes of the emergence of this zoonotic pathogen as a multiresistant organism against commonly used antibiotics. The existence of an efflux-like protein is an incentive to find new drug targets to avoid the spread of FQs-resistant S. suis isolates in pigs and the human population.

  18. LysoTracker and MitoTracker Red are transport substrates of P-glycoprotein: implications for anticancer drug design evading multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhitomirsky, Benny; Farber, Hodaya; Assaraf, Yehuda G

    2018-04-01

    LysoTracker and MitoTracker Red are fluorescent probes widely used for viable cell staining of lysosomes and mitochondria, respectively. They are utilized to study organelle localization and their resident proteins, assess organelle functionality and quantification of organelle numbers. The ATP-driven efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is expressed in normal and malignant tissues and extrudes structurally distinct endogenous and exogenous cytotoxic compounds. Thus, once aromatic hydrophobic compounds such as the above-mentioned fluorescent probes are recognized as transport substrates, efflux pumps including P-gp may abolish their ability to reach their cellular target organelles. Herein, we show that LysoTracker and MitoTracker Red are expelled from P-gp-overexpressing cancer cells, thus hindering their ability to fluorescently mark target organelles. We further demonstrate that tariquidar, a potent P-gp transport inhibitor, restores LysoTracker and MitoTracker Red cell entry. We conclude that LysoTracker and MitoTracker Red are P-gp transport substrates, and therefore, P-gp expression must be taken into consideration prior to cellular applications using these probes. Importantly, as MitoTracker was a superior P-gp substrate than LysoTracker Red, we discuss the implications for the future design of chemotherapeutics evading cancer multidrug resistance. Furthermore, restoration of MitoTracker Red fluorescence in P-gp-overexpressing cells may facilitate the identification of potent P-gp transport inhibitors (i.e. chemosensitizers). © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. The naphthoquinones, vitamin K3 and its structural analogue plumbagin, are substrates of the multidrug resistance linked ATP binding cassette drug transporter ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Suneet; Wu, Chung-Pu; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2007-12-01

    Vitamin K3 (menadione; 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a structural precursor of vitamins K1 and K2, which are essential for blood clotting. The naturally occurring structural analogue of this vitamin, plumbagin (5-hydroxy-menadione), is known to modulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, and radioresistance. We here report that both vitamin K3 and plumbagin are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ATP binding cassette drug transporter, ABCG2. Vitamin K3 and plumbagin specifically inhibited the ABCG2-mediated efflux of mitoxantrone but did not have any effect on the ABCB1-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123. This inhibition of ABCG2 function was due to their interaction at the substrate-binding site(s). Vitamin K3 and plumbagin inhibited the binding of [(125)I]iodoarylazidoprazosin, a substrate of ABCG2, to this transporter in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) values of 7.3 and 22.6 micromol/L, respectively, but had no effect on the binding of the photoaffinity analogue to ABCB1. Both compounds stimulated ABCG2-mediated ATP hydrolysis and also inhibited the mitoxantrone-stimulated ATPase activity of the ABCG2 transporter, but did not have any significant effect on the ATPase activity of ABCB1. In a cytotoxicity assay, ABCG2-expressing HEK cells were 2.8- and 2.3-fold resistant to plumbagin and vitamin K3, respectively, compared with the control cells, suggesting that they are substrates of this transporter. Collectively, these data show for the first time that vitamin K3 is a substrate of the ABCG2 transporter. Thus, ABCG2 may have a role in the regulation of vitamin K3 levels in the body. In addition, vitamin K3 and its structural derivative, plumbagin, could potentially be used to modulate ABCG2 function.

  20. Single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography imaging of multi-drug resistant P-glycoprotein--monitoring a transport activity important in cancer, blood-brain barrier function and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Piwnica-Worms, David; Kesarwala, Aparna H; Pichler, Andrea; Prior, Julie L; Sharma, Vijay

    2006-11-01

    Overexpression of multi-drug resistant P-glycoprotein (Pgp) remains an important barrier to successful chemotherapy in cancer patients and impacts the pharmacokinetics of many important drugs. Pgp is also expressed on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelial cells wherein Pgp functionally comprises a major component of the blood-brain barrier by limiting central nervous system penetration of various therapeutic agents. In addition, Pgp in brain capillary endothelial cells removes amyloid-beta from the brain. Several single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography radiopharmaceutical have been shown to be transported by Pgp, thereby enabling the noninvasive interrogation of Pgp-mediated transport activity in vivo. Therefore, molecular imaging of Pgp activity may enable noninvasive dynamic monitoring of multi-drug resistance in cancer, guide therapeutic choices in cancer chemotherapy, and identify transporter deficiencies of the blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Nanodrug delivery in reversing multidrug resistance in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapse-Mistry, Sonali; Govender, Thirumala; Srivastava, Rohit; Yergeri, Mayur

    2014-01-01

    Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance (MDR) which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective, and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells, or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses, and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading, or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1α gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-κB. “Theragnostics” combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent, and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  2. THE ROLE OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED PROTEIN (MRP) IN THE BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER AND OPIOID ANALGESIA

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wendy; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2013-01-01

    The blood brain barrier protects the brain from circulating compounds and drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is involved with the barrier, both preventing the influx of agent from the blood into the brain and facilitating the efflux of compounds from the brain into the blood, raising the possibility of a similar role for other transporters. Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP), a 190 kDa protein similar to Pgp is also ABC transport that has been implicated in the blood brain barrier. The current study explores its role in opioid action. Immunohistochemically, it is localized in the choroid plexus in ratsand can be selectively downregulated by antisense treatment at both the level of mRNA, as shown by RT-PCR, and protein, as demonstrated immunohistochemically. Behaviorally, downregulation of MRP significantly enhances the analgesic potency of systemic morphine in MRP knockout mice and in antisense-treated rats by lowering the blood brain barrier. Following intracerebroventricular administration, a number of compounds, including some opioids, are rapidly secreted from the brain into the blood where they contribute to the overall analgesic effects by activating peripheral systems. MRP plays a role in this efflux. Downregulating MRP expression leads to a corresponding decrease in the transport and a diminished analgesic response from opioids administered intracerebroventricularly. Thus, the transporter protein MRP plays a role in maintaining the blood-brain barrier and modulates the activity of opioids. PMID:23508590

  3. Independent activity of the homologous small regulatory RNAs AbcR1 and AbcR2 in the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Torres-Quesada, Omar; Millán, Vicenta; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Bardou, Florian; Crespi, Martín; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I

    2013-01-01

    The legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti expresses a plethora of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) whose function is mostly unknown. Here, we have functionally characterized two tandemly encoded S. meliloti Rm1021 sRNAs that are similar in sequence and structure. Homologous sRNAs (designated AbcR1 and AbcR2) have been shown to regulate several ABC transporters in the related α-proteobacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Brucella abortus. In Rm1021, AbcR1 and AbcR2 exhibit divergent unlinked regulation and are stabilized by the RNA chaperone Hfq. AbcR1 is transcribed in actively dividing bacteria, either in culture, rhizosphere or within the invasion zone of mature alfalfa nodules. Conversely, AbcR2 expression is induced upon entry into stationary phase and under abiotic stress. Only deletion of AbcR1 resulted into a discrete growth delay in rich medium, but both are dispensable for symbiosis. Periplasmic proteome profiling revealed down-regulation of the branched-chain amino acid binding protein LivK by AbcR1, but not by AbcR2. A double-plasmid reporter assay confirmed the predicted specific targeting of the 5'-untranslated region of the livK mRNA by AbcR1 in vivo. Our findings provide evidences of independent regulatory functions of these sRNAs, probably to fine-tune nutrient uptake in free-living and undifferentiated symbiotic rhizobia.

  4. Independent Activity of the Homologous Small Regulatory RNAs AbcR1 and AbcR2 in the Legume Symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Quesada, Omar; Millán, Vicenta; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Bardou, Florian; Crespi, Martín; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I.

    2013-01-01

    The legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti expresses a plethora of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) whose function is mostly unknown. Here, we have functionally characterized two tandemly encoded S. meliloti Rm1021 sRNAs that are similar in sequence and structure. Homologous sRNAs (designated AbcR1 and AbcR2) have been shown to regulate several ABC transporters in the related α-proteobacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Brucella abortus. In Rm1021, AbcR1 and AbcR2 exhibit divergent unlinked regulation and are stabilized by the RNA chaperone Hfq. AbcR1 is transcribed in actively dividing bacteria, either in culture, rhizosphere or within the invasion zone of mature alfalfa nodules. Conversely, AbcR2 expression is induced upon entry into stationary phase and under abiotic stress. Only deletion of AbcR1 resulted into a discrete growth delay in rich medium, but both are dispensable for symbiosis. Periplasmic proteome profiling revealed down-regulation of the branched-chain amino acid binding protein LivK by AbcR1, but not by AbcR2. A double-plasmid reporter assay confirmed the predicted specific targeting of the 5′-untranslated region of the livK mRNA by AbcR1 in vivo. Our findings provide evidences of independent regulatory functions of these sRNAs, probably to fine-tune nutrient uptake in free-living and undifferentiated symbiotic rhizobia. PMID:23869210

  5. Regulation of Expression of abcA and Its Response to Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Villet, Regis A.; Truong-Bolduc, Que Chi; Wang, Yin; Estabrooks, Zoe; Medeiros, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The ATP-dependent transporter gene abcA in Staphylococcus aureus confers resistance to hydrophobic β-lactams. In strain ISP794, abcA is regulated by the transcriptional regulators MgrA and NorG and shares a 420-nucleotide intercistronic region with the divergently transcribed pbp4 gene, which encodes the transpeptidase Pbp4. Exposure of exponentially growing cells to iron-limited media, oxidative stress, and acidic pH (5.5) for 0.5 to 2 h had no effect on abcA expression. In contrast, nutrient limitation produced a significant increase in abcA transcripts. We identified three additional regulators (SarA, SarZ, and Rot) that bind to the overlapping promoter region of abcA and pbp4 in strain MW2 and investigated their role in the regulation of abcA expression. Expression of abcA is decreased by 10.0-fold in vivo in a subcutaneous abscess model. In vitro, abcA expression depends on rot and sarZ regulators. Moenomycin A exposure of strain MW2 produced an increase in abcA transcripts. Relative to MW2, the MIC of moenomycin was decreased 8-fold for MW2ΔabcA and increased 10-fold for the MW2 abcA overexpresser, suggesting that moenomycin is a substrate of AbcA. PMID:24509312

  6. High-Affinity Binding of Silybin Derivatives to the Nucleotide-Binding Domain of a Leishmania tropica P-Glycoprotein-Like Transporter and Chemosensitization of a Multidrug-Resistant Parasite to Daunomycin

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Victoria, José M.; Pérez-Victoria, F. Javier; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Maitrejean, Mathias; Comte, Gilles; Barron, Denis; Di Pietro, Attilio; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    In order to overcome the multidrug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein-like transporters in Leishmania spp., we have studied the effects produced by derivatives of the flavanolignan silybin and related compounds lacking the monolignol unit on (i) the affinity of binding to a recombinant C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the L. tropica P-glycoprotein-like transporter and (ii) the sensitization to daunomycin on promastigote forms of a multidrug-resistant L. tropica line overexpressing the transporter. Oxidation of the flavanonol silybin to the corresponding flavonol dehydrosilybin, the presence of the monolignol unit, and the addition of a hydrophobic substituent such as dimethylallyl, especially at position 8 of ring A, considerably increased the binding affinity. The in vitro binding affinity of these compounds for the recombinant cytosolic domain correlated with their modulation of drug resistance phenotype. In particular, 8-(3,3-dimethylallyl)-dehydrosilybin effectively sensitized multidrug-resistant Leishmania spp. to daunomycin. The cytosolic domains are therefore attractive targets for the rational design of inhibitors against P-glycoprotein-like transporters. PMID:11158738

  7. Uncaria alkaloids reverse ABCB1-mediated cancer multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bao-Yuan; Zeng, Yu; Li, Ying-Jie; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Hu, Nan; Yao, Nan; Chen, Min-Feng; Yang, Zai-Gang; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Zeng, Chang-Qing

    2017-01-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is the main cause of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR), which leads to chemotherapy failure. Uncaria alkaloids are the major active components isolated from uncaria, which is a common Chinese herbal medicine. In this study, the MDR-reversal activities of uncaria alkaloids, including rhynchophylline, isorhynchophylline, corynoxeine, isocorynoxeine (Icory), hirsutine and hirsuteine, were screened; they all exhibited potent reversal efficacy when combined with doxorubicin. Among them, Icory significantly sensitized ABCB1-overexpressing HepG2/ADM and MCF-7/ADR cells to vincristine, doxorubicin and paclitaxel, but not to the non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Noteworthy, Icory selectively reversed ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cancer cells but not ABCC1- or ABCG2-mediated MDR. Further mechanistic study revealed that Icory increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin in ABCB1-overexpressing cells by blocking the efflux function of ABCB1. Instead of inhibiting ABCB1 expression and localization, Icory acts as a substrate of the ABCB1 transporter by competitively binding to substrate binding sites. Collectively, these results indicated that Icory reversed ABCB1-mediated MDR by suppressing its efflux function, and it would be beneficial to increase the efficacy of these types of uncaria alkaloids and develop them to be selective ABCB1-mediated MDR-reversal agents. PMID:28534954

  8. Thyroxine (T4) Transfer from Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid in Sheep Isolated Perfused Choroid Plexus: Role of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins and Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Zibara, Kazem; Zein, Nabil El; Sabra, Mirna; Hneino, Mohammad; Harati, Hayat; Mohamed, Wael; Kobeissy, Firas H.; Kassem, Nouhad

    2017-01-01

    Thyroxine (T4) enters the brain either directly across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) or indirectly via the choroid plexus (CP), which forms the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (B-CSF-B). In this study, using isolated perfused CP of the sheep by single-circulation paired tracer and steady-state techniques, T4 transport mechanisms from blood into lateral ventricle CP has been characterized as the first step in the transfer across the B-CSF-B. After removal of sheep brain, the CPs were perfused with 125I-T4 and 14C-mannitol. Unlabeled T4 was applied during single tracer technique to assess the mode of maximum uptake (Umax) and the net uptake (Unet) on the blood side of the CP. On the other hand, in order to characterize T4 protein transporters, steady-state extraction of 125I-T4 was measured in presence of different inhibitors such as probenecid, verapamil, BCH, or indomethacin. Increasing the concentration of unlabeled-T4 resulted in a significant reduction in Umax%, which was reflected by a complete inhibition of T4 uptake into CP. In fact, the obtained Unet% decreased as the concentration of unlabeled-T4 increased. The addition of probenecid caused a significant inhibition of T4 transport, in comparison to control, reflecting the presence of a carrier mediated process at the basolateral side of the CP and the involvement of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs: MRP1 and MRP4) and organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatp1, Oatp2, and Oatp14). Moreover, verapamil, the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate, resulted in ~34% decrease in the net extraction of T4, indicating that MDR1 contributes to T4 entry into CSF. Finally, inhibition in the net extraction of T4 caused by BCH or indomethacin suggests, respectively, a role for amino acid “L” system and MRP1/Oatp1 in mediating T4 transfer. The presence of a carrier-mediated transport mechanism for cellular uptake on the basolateral membrane of the CP, mainly P-gp and Oatp2, would account for the

  9. How a microbial drug transporter became essential for crop cultivation on acid soils: aluminium tolerance conferred by the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family

    PubMed Central

    Magalhaes, Jurandir V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Aluminium (Al) toxicity is a major agricultural constraint for crop cultivation on acid soils, which comprise a large portion of the world's arable land. One of the most widely accepted mechanisms of Al tolerance in plants is based on Al-activated organic acid release into the rhizosphere, with organic acids forming stable, non-toxic complexes with Al. This mechanism has recently been validated by the isolation of bona-fide Al-tolerance genes in crop species, which encode membrane transporters that mediate Al-activated organic acid release leading to Al exclusion from root apices. In crop species such as sorghum and barley, members in the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family underlie Al tolerance by a mechanism based on Al-activated citrate release. Scope and Conclusions The study of Al tolerance in plants as conferred by MATE family members is in its infancy. Therefore, much is yet to be discovered about the functional diversity and evolutionary dynamics that led MATE proteins to acquire transport properties conducive to Al tolerance in plants. In this paper we review the major characteristics of transporters in the MATE family and will relate this knowledge to Al tolerance in plants. The MATE family is clearly extremely flexible with respect to substrate specificity, which raises the possibility that Al tolerance as encoded by MATE proteins may not be restricted to Al-activated citrate release in plant species. There are also indications that regulatory loci may be of pivotal importance to fully explore the potential for Al-tolerance improvement based on MATE genes. PMID:20511585

  10. Multidrug Resistance: Physiological Principles and Nanomedical Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug (MDR) resistance is a pathophysiological phenomenon employed by cancer cells which limits the prolonged and effective use of chemotherapeutic agents. MDR is primarily based on the over-expression of drug efflux pumps in the cellular membrane. Prominent examples of such efflux pumps, which belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of proteins, are Pgp (P-glycoprotein) and MRP (multidrug resistance-associated protein), nowadays officially known as ABCB1 and ABCC1. Over the years, several strategies have been evaluated to overcome MDR, based not only on the use of low-molecular-weight MDR modulators, but also on the implementation of 1-100(0) nm-sized drug delivery systems. In the present manuscript, after introducing the most important physiological principles of MDR, we summarize prototypic nanomedical strategies to overcome multidrug resistance, including the use of carrier materials with intrinsic anti-MDR properties, the use of nanomedicines to modify the mode of cellular uptake, and the co-formulation of chemotherapeutic drugs together with low- and high-molecular-weight MDR inhibitors within a single drug delivery system. While certain challenges still need to be overcome before such constructs and concepts can be widely applied in the clinic, the insights obtained and the progress made strongly suggest that nanomedicine formulations hold significant potential for improving the treatment of multidrug-resistant malignancies. PMID:24120954

  11. Doxorubicin loaded iron oxide nanoparticles overcome multidrug resistance in cancer in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Wang, Freddy Y.; Fang, Chen; Mok, Hyejung; Wang, Kui; Silber, John R.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is characterized by the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that actively pump a broad class of hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drugs out of cancer cells. MDR is a major mechanism of treatment resistance in a variety of human tumors, and clinically applicable strategies to circumvent MDR remain to be characterized. Here we describe the fabrication and characterization of a drug-loaded iron oxide nanoparticle designed to circumvent MDR. Doxorubicin (DOX), an anthracycline antibiotic commonly used in cancer chemotherapy and substrate for ABC-mediated drug efflux, was covalently bound to polyethylenimine via a pH sensitive hydrazone linkage and conjugated to an iron oxide nanoparticle coated with amine terminated polyethylene glycol. Drug loading, physiochemical properties and pH lability of the DOX-hydrazone linkage were evaluated in vitro. Nanoparticle uptake, retention, and dose-dependent effects on viability were compared in wild-type and DOX-resistant ABC transporter over-expressing rat glioma C6 cells. We found that DOX release from nanoparticles was greatest at acidic pH, indicative of cleavage of the hydrazone linkage. DOX-conjugated nanoparticles were readily taken up by wild-type and drug-resistant cells. In contrast to free drug, DOX-conjugated nanoparticles persisted in drug-resistant cells, indicating that they were not subject to drug efflux. Greater retention of DOX-conjugated nanoparticles was accompanied by reduction of viability relative to cells treated with free drug. Our results suggest that DOX-conjugated nanoparticles could improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by circumventing MDR. PMID:21277920

  12. Disruption of the ABC transporter genes PDR5, YOR1, and SNQ2, and their participation in improved fermentative activity of a sake yeast mutant showing pleiotropic drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Mizoguchi, H; Nishimura, A

    2000-01-01

    Clotrimazole-resistant mutants from sake yeasts show improved fermentative activity in sake mash and pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR). The PDR mechanism is interpreted by overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which extrude various kinds of drugs out of a cell. In a clotrimazole-resistant mutant, CTZ21, isolated from the haploid sake yeast HL69, the levels of mRNA for three major ABC transporter genes, PDR5, SNQ2, and YOR1, markedly increased. These three genes of CTZ21 were disrupted to investigate which participated in the improved fermentative activity of CTZ21. The fermentative activities of deltapdr5 and deltasnq2 strains of CTZ21 were reduced to that of HL69 in the initial and middle stages of fermentation. In the last stage, however, the sake meter [(1/gravity - 1) x 1443] of the deltapdr5 and deltasnq2 strains rose faster than that of HL69. On the other hand, a deltayor1 strain of CTZ21 fermented sake mash in a manner nearly identical to that of CTZ21 until the last stage of fermentation. But in the last stage, fermentation of the deltayor1 slowed down compared with that of CTZ21. A deltayor1 strain of HL69 also exhibited much reduced fermentative activity in the middle and last fermentation stages. The YOR1 gene seems necessary for sake fermentation to be completed efficiently. The ATP content in sake mash brewed with CTZ21 was drastically decreased throughout the whole fermentation period. This low ATP level was restored to a medium level in the cases of both the deltapdr5 and deltasnq2 strains of CTZ21. In contrast, the deltayor1 of CTZ21 exhibited a low ATP level in sake mash in the same manner as CTZ21. These results suggest that the low ATP level of CTZ21 contributes to a certain extent its improved fermentative activity in the initial and middle stages of sake fermentation.

  13. The role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP-1) as an active efflux transporter on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.

    PubMed

    Lingineni, Karthik; Belekar, Vilas; Tangadpalliwar, Sujit R; Garg, Prabha

    2017-05-01

    Drugs acting on central nervous system (CNS) may take longer duration to reach the market as these compounds have a higher attrition rate in clinical trials due to the complexity of the brain, side effects, and poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability compared to non-CNS-acting compounds. The roles of active efflux transporters with BBB are still unclear. The aim of the present work was to develop a predictive model for BBB permeability that includes the MRP-1 transporter, which is considered as an active efflux transporter. A support vector machine model was developed for the classification of MRP-1 substrates and non-substrates, which was validated with an external data set and Y-randomization method. An artificial neural network model has been developed to evaluate the role of MRP-1 on BBB permeation. A total of nine descriptors were selected, which included molecular weight, topological polar surface area, ClogP, number of hydrogen bond donors, number of hydrogen bond acceptors, number of rotatable bonds, P-gp, BCRP, and MRP-1 substrate probabilities for model development. We identified 5 molecules that fulfilled all criteria required for passive permeation of BBB, but they all have a low logBB value, which suggested that the molecules were effluxed by the MRP-1 transporter.

  14. Heat shock factor-1 knockout enhances cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and multidrug transporter (MDR1) gene expressions to attenuate atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Karthikeyan; Glaser, Shannon; Alpini, Gianfranco D.; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Liu, Zhenguo; Ilangovan, Govindasamy

    2016-01-01

    Aims Stress response, in terms of activation of stress factors, is known to cause obesity and coronary heart disease such as atherosclerosis in human. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of these pathways are not known. Here, we investigated the effect of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) on atherosclerosis. Methods and results HSF-1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) double knockout (HSF-1−/−/LDLr−/−) and LDLr knockout (LDLr−/−) mice were fed with atherogenic western diet (WD) for 12 weeks. WD-induced weight gain and atherosclerotic lesion in aortic arch and carotid regions were reduced in HSF-1−/−/LDLr−/− mice, compared with LDLr−/− mice. Also, repression of PPAR-γ2 and AMPKα expression in adipose tissue, low hepatic steatosis, and lessened plasma adiponectins and lipoproteins were observed. In HSF-1−/−/LDLr−/− liver, higher cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and multidrug transporter [MDR1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp)] gene expressions were observed, consistent with higher bile acid transport and larger hepatic bile ducts. Luciferase reporter gene assays with wild-type CYP7A1 and MDR1 promoters showed lesser luminescence than with mutant promoters (HSF-1 binding site deleted), indicating that HSF-1 binding is repressive of CYP7A1 and MDR1 gene expressions. Conclusion HSF-1 ablation not only eliminates heat shock response, but it also transcriptionally up-regulates CYP7A1 and MDR1/P-gp axis in WD-diet fed HSF-1−/−/LDLr−/− mice to reduce atherosclerosis. PMID:27131506

  15. Assessment of vandetanib as an inhibitor of various human renal transporters: inhibition of multidrug and toxin extrusion as a possible mechanism leading to decreased cisplatin and creatinine clearance.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Yang, Zheng; Zhao, Weiping; Zhang, Yueping; Rodrigues, A David

    2013-12-01

    Vandetanib was evaluated as an inhibitor of human organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1), OAT3, organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), and multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE1 and MATE2K) transfected (individually) into human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). Although no inhibition of OAT1 and OAT3 was observed, inhibition of OCT2-mediated uptake of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) and metformin was evident (IC(50) of 73.4 ± 14.8 and 8.8 ± 1.9 µM, respectively). However, vandetanib was an even more potent inhibitor of MATE1- and MATE2K-mediated uptake of MPP(+) (IC(50) of 1.23 ± 0.05 and 1.26 ± 0.06 µM, respectively) and metformin (IC(50) of 0.16 ± 0.05 and 0.30 ± 0.09 µM, respectively). Subsequent cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that transport inhibition by vandetanib (2.5 µM) significantly decreased the sensitivity [right shift in concentration of cisplatin giving rise to 50% cell death; IC(50(CN))] of MATE1-HEK and MATE2K-HEK cells to cisplatin [IC(50(CN)) of 1.12 ± 0.13 versus 2.39 ± 0.44 µM; 0.85 ± 0.09 versus 1.99 ± 0.16 µM; P < 0.05), but not OCT2-HEK cells (1.36 ± 0.19 versus 1.47 ± 0.24 µM) versus vandetanib untreated cells and Mock-HEK cells [IC(50(CN)) of 2.34 ± 0.31 µM]. In summary, the results show that vandetanib is a potent inhibitor of MATE1 and MATE2K (versus OCT2). Inhibition of the two transporters may explain why there are reports of decreased creatinine clearance, and increased cisplatin nephrotoxicity (reduced cisplatin clearance), in some subjects receiving vandetanib therapy.

  16. Reporter Dyes Demonstrate Functional Expression of Multidrug Resistance Proteins in the Marine Flatworm Macrostomum lignano: The Sponge-Derived Dye Ageladine A Is Not a Substrate of These Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Tietje, Kristin; Rivera-Ingraham, Georgina; Petters, Charlotte; Abele, Doris; Dringen, Ralf; Bickmeyer, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    The marine plathyhelminth Macrostomum lignano was recently isolated from Adriatic shore sediments where it experiences a wide variety of environmental challenges, ranging from hypoxia and reoxygenation, feeding on toxic algae, to exposure to anthropogenic contaminants. As multidrug resistance transporters constitute the first line of defense against toxins and toxicants we have studied the presence of such transporters in M. lignano in living animals by applying optical methods and pharmacological inhibitors that had been developed for mammalian cells. Application of the MDR1 inhibitor Verapamil or of the MRP1 inhibitors MK571 or Probenecid increased the intracellular fluorescence of the reporter dyes Fura-2 am, Calcein am, Fluo-3 am in the worms, but did not affect their staining with the dyes Rhodamine B, CMFDA or Ageladine A. The marine sponge alkaloid Ageladine A remained intracellularly trapped for several days in the worms, suggesting that it does not serve as substrate of multidrug resistance exporters. In addition, Ageladine A did not affect multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)-mediated dye export from M. lignano or the MRP1-mediated glutathione (GSH) export from cultured rat brain astrocytes. The data obtained demonstrate that life-imaging is a useful tool to address physiological drug export from intact marine transparent flatworms by using multiphoton scanning microscopy. PMID:24135911

  17. ABC's of Construction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater Baton Rouge Chamber of Commerce, LA.

    The ABC's of Construction project was a demonstration project designed to integrate basic skills training with an industry-developed vocational-craft training program. The program was located at the central training facility of the Pelican Chapter of Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), an organization made up of nearly 300 member companies…

  18. Do You Know Your ABC?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Within primary schools, the core subjects of literacy and numeracy are highly regarded, and rightly so, as children need to learn to read, write and be numerically literate. This means that all children learn their ABCs at an early age, But, what about the "other ABC"--"Airway, Breathing and Circulation?" Accidents and medical…

  19. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) Controls Efflux Transport of Hesperetin Sulfates in Sulfotransferase 1A3-Overexpressing Human Embryonic Kidney 293 Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua; Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Xiaotong; Lu, Danyi; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2015-10-01

    Sulfonation is an important metabolic pathway for hesperetin. However, the mechanisms for the cellular disposition of hesperetin and its sulfate metabolites are not fully established. In this study, disposition of hesperetin via the sulfonation pathway was investigated using human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells overexpressing sulfotransferase 1A3. Two monosulfates, hesperetin-3'-O-sulfate (H-3'-S) and hesperetin-7-O-sulfate (H-7-S), were rapidly generated and excreted into the extracellular compartment upon incubation of the cells with hesperetin. Regiospecific sulfonation of hesperetin by the cell lysate followed the substrate inhibition kinetics (Vmax = 0.66 nmol/min per mg, Km = 12.9 μM, and Ksi= 58.1 μM for H-3'-S; Vmax = 0.29 nmol/min per mg, Km = 14.8 μM, and Ksi= 49.1 μM for H-7-S). The pan-multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) inhibitor MK-571 at 20 μM essentially abolished cellular excretion of both H-3'-S and H-7-S (the excretion activities were only 6% of the control), whereas the breast cancer resistance protein-selective inhibitor Ko143 had no effects on sulfate excretion. In addition, knockdown of MRP4 led to a substantial reduction (>47.1%; P < 0.01) in sulfate excretion. Further, H-3'-S and H-7-S were good substrates for transport by MRP4 according to the vesicular transport assay. Moreover, sulfonation of hesperetin and excretion of its metabolites were well characterized by a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model that integrated drug uptake and sulfonation with MRP4-mediated sulfate excretion. In conclusion, the exporter MRP4 controlled efflux transport of hesperetin sulfates in HEK293 cells. Due to significant expression in various organs/tissues (including the liver and kidney), MRP4 should be a determining factor for the elimination and body distribution of hesperetin sulfates. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Interaction of the EGFR inhibitors gefitinib, vandetanib, pelitinib and neratinib with the ABCG2 multidrug transporter: implications for the emergence and reversal of cancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Csilla; Truta-Feles, Krisztina; Antalffy, Géza; Várady, György; Német, Katalin; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Kéri, György; Orfi, László; Szakács, Gergely; Settleman, Jeffrey; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2012-08-01

    Human ABCG2 is a plasma membrane glycoprotein that provides physiological protection against xenobiotics. ABCG2 also significantly influences biodistribution of drugs through pharmacological tissue barriers and confers multidrug resistance to cancer cells. Moreover, ABCG2 is the molecular determinant of the side population that is characteristically enriched in normal and cancer stem cells. Numerous tumors depend on unregulated EGFR signaling, thus inhibition of this receptor by small molecular weight inhibitors such as gefitinib, and the novel second generation agents vandetanib, pelitinib and neratinib, is a promising therapeutic option. In the present study, we provide detailed biochemical characterization regarding the interaction of these EGFR inhibitors with ABCG2. We show that ABCG2 confers resistance to gefitinib and pelitinib, whereas the intracellular action of vandetanib and neratinib is unaltered by the presence of the transporter. At higher concentrations, however, all these EGFR inhibitors inhibit ABCG2 function, thereby promoting accumulation of ABCG2 substrate drugs. We also report enhanced expression of ABCG2 in gefitinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cells, suggesting potential clinical relevance of ABCG2 in acquired drug resistance. Since ABCG2 has important impact on both the pharmacological properties and anti-cancer efficiencies of drugs, our results regarding the novel EGFR inhibitors should provide useful information about their therapeutic applicability against ABCG2-expressing cancer cells depending on EGFR signaling. In addition, the finding that these EGFR inhibitors efficiently block ABCG2 function may help to design novel drug-combination therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling reduces multidrug transporter activity and anti-epileptic drug resistance in refractory epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yiye; Wang, Cuicui; Hong, Zhen; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-03-01

    It is widely recognized that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediates drug resistance in refractory epilepsy. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the up-regulation of P-gp expression remains unclear. Our previous studies have demonstrated that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) regulates P-gp expression in cultured K562 cells. However, a lack of in vivo research leaves unanswered questions regarding whether p38MAPK regulates P-gp expression or drug resistance in refractory epilepsy. This in vivo study examined the effects of p38MAPK on the expression of P-gp and mdr1 in the rat brain and quantified antiepileptic drug (AED) concentrations in the hippocampal extracellular fluid. In addition, the role of p38MAPK in electrical and behavioral activity in a rat epilepsy model was studied. The results indicated that p38MAPK inhibition by SB202190 reduced P-gp expression, while increasing AED concentration in the hippocampal extracellular fluid in refractory epileptic rats. SB202190 also reduced the resistance to AEDs in drug-resistant rats and significantly reduced the severity of seizure activity. These results suggest that p38MAPK could participate in drug resistance in refractory epilepsy through the regulation of P-gp. We show that the specific inhibitor of p38MAPK could down-regulate the expression of multidrug transporter (P-glycoprotein) in blood-brain barrier, increase the concentration of antiepileptic drugs in the hippocampal extracellular fluid and reduce anti-epileptic drug resistance in refractory epileptic rats. We propose that the p38MAPK signaling pathway participates in drug resistance in refractory epilepsy through the regulation of P-glycoprotein expression. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Cytotoxicity of South-African medicinal plants towards sensitive and multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohamed E M; Meyer, Marion; Hussein, Ahmed; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-06-20

    Traditional medicine plays a major role for primary health care worldwide. Cancer belongs to the leading disease burden in industrialized and developing countries. Successful cancer therapy is hampered by the development of resistance towards established anticancer drugs. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of 29 extracts from 26 medicinal plants of South-Africa against leukemia cell lines, most of which are used traditionally to treat cancer and related symptoms. We have investigated the plant extracts for their cytotoxic activity towards drug-sensitive parental CCRF-CEM leukemia cells and their multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein-overexpressing subline, CEM/ADR5000 by means of the resazurin assay. A panel of 60 NCI tumor cell lines have been investigated for correlations between selected phytochemicals from medicinal plants and the expression of resistance-conferring genes (ABC-transporters, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes). Seven extracts inhibited both cell lines (Acokanthera oppositifolia, Hypoestes aristata, Laurus nobilis, Leonotis leonurus, Plectranthus barbatus, Plectranthus ciliates, Salvia apiana). CEM/ADR5000 cells exhibited a low degree of cross-resistance (3.35-fold) towards the L. leonurus extract, while no cross-resistance was observed to other plant extracts, although CEM/ADR5000 cells were highly resistant to clinically established drugs. The log10IC50 values for two out of 14 selected phytochemicals from these plants (acovenoside A and ouabain) of 60 tumor cell lines were correlated to the expression of ABC-transporters (ABCB1, ABCB5, ABCC1, ABCG2), oncogenes (EGFR, RAS) and tumor suppressors (TP53). Sensitivity or resistance of the cell lines were not statistically associated with the expression of these genes, indicating that multidrug-resistant, refractory tumors expressing these genes may still respond to acovenoside A and ouabain. The bioactivity of South African medicinal plants may represent a basis for the development

  3. Extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity or lipid raft localization and efflux function of the ABC transporter MRP1.

    PubMed

    Klappe, Karin; Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Hummel, Ina; van Dam, Annie; Ivanova, Pavlina T; Milne, Stephen B; Myers, David S; Brown, H Alex; Permentier, Hjalmar; Kok, Jan W

    2010-09-15

    We show that highly efficient depletion of sphingolipids in two different cell lines does not abrogate the ability to isolate Lubrol-based DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) or detergent-free lipid rafts from these cells. Compared with control, DRM/detergent-free lipid raft fractions contain equal amounts of protein, cholesterol and phospholipid, whereas the classical DRM/lipid raft markers Src, caveolin-1 and flotillin display the same gradient distribution. DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts themselves are severely depleted of sphingolipids. The fatty acid profile of the remaining sphingolipids as well as that of the glycerophospholipids shows several differences compared with control, most prominently an increase in highly saturated C(16) species. The glycerophospholipid headgroup composition is unchanged in sphingolipid-depleted cells and cell-derived detergent-free lipid rafts. Sphingolipid depletion does not alter the localization of MRP1 (multidrug-resistance-related protein 1) in DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts or MRP1-mediated efflux of carboxyfluorescein. We conclude that extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity in two cell lines and does not affect the function of the lipid-raft-associated protein MRP1.

  4. Extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity or lipid raft localization and efflux function of the ABC transporter MRP1

    PubMed Central

    Klappe, Karin; Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Hummel, Ina; vanDam, Annie; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Myers, David S.; Brown, H. Alex; Permentier, Hjalmar; Kok, Jan W.

    2013-01-01

    We show that highly efficient depletion of sphingolipids in two different cell lines does not abrogate the ability to isolate Lubrol-based DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) or detergent-free lipid rafts from these cells. Compared with control, DRM/detergent-free lipid raft fractions contain equal amounts of protein, cholesterol and phospholipid, whereas the classical DRM/lipid raft markers Src, caveolin-1 and flotillin display the same gradient distribution. DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts themselves are severely depleted of sphingolipids. The fatty acid profile of the remaining sphingolipids as well as that of the glycerophospholipids shows several differences compared with control, most prominently an increase in highly saturated C16 species. The glycerophospholipid headgroup composition is unchanged in sphingolipid-depleted cells and cell-derived detergent-free lipid rafts. Sphingolipid depletion does not alter the localization of MRP1 (multidrug-resistance-related protein 1) in DRMs/detergent-free lipid rafts or MRP1-mediated efflux of carboxyfluorescein. We conclude that extensive sphingolipid depletion does not affect lipid raft integrity in two cell lines and does not affect the function of the lipid-raft-associated protein MRP1. PMID:20604746

  5. ATP-binding cassette transporters in tumor endothelial cells and resistance to metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hida, Kyoko; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Maishi, Nako; Hida, Yasuhiro

    2017-08-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in anticancer therapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have a role in the multidrug resistance. A new regimen of chemotherapy has been proposed, called "metronomic chemotherapy". Metronomic chemotherapy is the frequent, regular administration of drug doses designed to maintain low, but active, concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs over prolonged periods of time, without causing serious toxicities. Metronomic chemotherapy regimens were developed to optimize the antitumor efficacy of agents that target the tumor vasculature instead of tumor cells, and to reduce toxicity of antineoplastic drugs [1]. Nevertheless, recent studies revealed that ABC transporters are expressed at a higher level in the endothelium in the tumor. To avoid resistance to metronomic anti-angiogenic chemotherapy, ABC transporter inhibition of tumor endothelial cells may be a promising strategy. In this mini-review, we discuss the possible mechanism of resistance to metronomic chemotherapy from the viewpoint of tumor endothelial cell biology, focusing on ABC transporters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Anticancer Effects of the Nitric Oxide-Modified Saquinavir Derivative Saquinavir-NO against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Rothweiler, Florian; Michaelis, Martin; Brauer, Peter; Otte, Jürgen; Weber, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Wiese, Michael; Kreuter, Jörg; Al-Abed, Yousef; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2010-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor saquinavir shows anticancer activity. Although its nitric oxide-modified derivative saquinavir-NO (saq-NO) was less toxic to normal cells, it exerted stronger inhibition of B16 melanoma growth in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice than saquinavir did. Saq-NO has been shown to block proliferation, upregulate p53 expression, and promote differentiation of C6 glioma and B16 cells. The anticancer activity of substances is frequently hampered by cancer cell chemoresistance mechanisms. Therefore, we here investigated the roles of p53 and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), and breast cancer resistance protein 1 (BCRP1) in cancer cell sensitivity to saq-NO to get more information about the potential of saq-NO as anticancer drug. Saq-NO exerted anticancer effects in lower concentrations than saquinavir in a panel of human cancer cell lines. Neither p53 mutation or depletion nor expression of P-gp, MRP1, or BCRP1 affected anticancer activity of saq-NO or saquinavir. Moreover, saq-NO sensitized P-gp-, MRP1-, or BCRP1-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapy. Saq-NO induced enhanced sensitization of P-gp- or MRP1-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapy compared with saquinavir, whereas both substances similarly sensitized BCRP1-expressing cells. Washout kinetics and ABC transporter ATPase activities demonstrated that saq-NO is a substrate of P-gp as well as of MRP1. These data support the further investigation of saq-NO as an anticancer drug, especially in multidrug-resistant tumors. PMID:21170266

  7. The ABCs of Sex Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroka, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Cites statistics on extent of sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancies among adolescents; describes ideological dispute over how to teach sex education; advocates teaching the ABCs of sex education: Abstinence, Be Monogamous, and Condoms. (PKP)

  8. Expression and significance of glucose transporter-1, P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein and glutathione S-transferase-π in laryngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhong-Ping; Zhao, Li-Jun; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Liu, Meng-Qin; Tan, Wei-Feng; Yao, Hong-Tian

    2015-02-01

    Increasing glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) activity is one of the most important ways to increase the cellular influx of glucose. We previously demonstrated that increased GLUT-1 expression was an independent predictor of survival in patients with laryngeal carcinoma. Thus, GLUT-1 may present a novel therapeutic target in laryngeal carcinoma. In this study, the expression of GLUT-1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and glutathione S-transferase-π (GST-π) in laryngeal carcinomas was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Additionally, possible correlations between GLUT-1 and P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π and various clinicopathological parameters were analyzed. In this study, 52.9% (18/34), 58.8% (20/34), 20.6% (7/34) and 58.8% (20/34) of the laryngeal carcinomas were positive for GLUT-1, P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π, respectively. The expression of GLUT-1, P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π was higher in laryngeal carcinoma specimens when compared with laryngeal precancerous lesions (P<0.05). Pearson's correlation analysis showed correlations between GLUT-1 and P-gp (r=0.364; P=0.034), GLUT-1 and MRP1 (r=0.359; P=0.037) and P-gp and GST-π (r=0.426; P=0.012). GLUT-1 expression was found to significantly correlate with tumor-node-metastasis classification (P=0.02) and clinical stage (P=0.037). Furthermore, P-gp was found to significantly correlate with clinical stage (P=0.026). Univariate analysis showed that MRP1 expression was significantly associated with poor survival (c 2 =5.16; P=0.023). Multivariate analysis revealed that lymph node metastasis (P=0.009) and MRP1 overexpression (P=0.023) were significant predictors of poor survival. In the present study, the expression of GLUT-1, P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π in laryngeal carcinomas was investigated, as well as the correlations between these proteins. P-gp was found to significantly correlate with clinical stage, while MRP1 overexpression was significantly associated with poor survival.

  9. Vibrio cholerae NspS, a homologue of ABC-type periplasmic solute binding proteins, facilitates transduction of polyamine signals independent of their transport

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, Steven R.; Rutkovsky, Alex C.; Zayner, Josiah P.; Cooper, Rebecca E.; Porter, Lindsay R.; Pendergraft, Sam S.; Parker, Zach M.; McGinnis, Marcus W.

    2014-01-01

    The polyamines norspermidine and spermidine are among the environmental signals that regulate Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation. The effects of these polyamines are mediated by NspS, a member of the bacterial periplasmic solute binding protein superfamily. Almost all members of this superfamily characterized to date are components of ATP-binding cassette-type transporters involved in nutrient uptake. Consequently, in the current annotation of the V. cholerae genome, NspS has been assigned a function in transport. The objective of this study was to further characterize NspS and investigate its potential role in transport. Our results support a role for NspS in signal transduction in response to norspermidine and spermidine, but not their transport. In addition, we provide evidence that these polyamine signals are processed by c-di-GMP signalling networks in the cell. Furthermore, we present comparative genomics analyses which reveal the presence of NspS-like proteins in a variety of bacteria, suggesting that periplasmic ligand binding proteins may be widely utilized for sensory transduction. PMID:24530989

  10. Uptake of L-cystine via an ABC transporter contributes defense of oxidative stress in the L-cystine export-dependent manner in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Iwao; Kawano, Yusuke; Suzuki, Marina; Morigasaki, Susumu; Saiki, Kyohei; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Nonaka, Gen; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular thiols like L-cystine and L-cystine play a critical role in the regulation of cellular processes. Here we show that Escherichia coli has two L-cystine transporters, the symporter YdjN and the ATP-binding cassette importer FliY-YecSC. These proteins import L-cystine, an oxidized product of L-cystine from the periplasm to the cytoplasm. The symporter YdjN, which is expected to be a new member of the L-cystine regulon, is a low affinity L-cystine transporter (Km = 1.1 μM) that is mainly involved in L-cystine uptake from outside as a nutrient. E. coli has only two L-cystine importers because ΔydjNΔyecS mutant cells are not capable of growing in the minimal medium containing L-cystine as a sole sulfur source. Another protein YecSC is the FliY-dependent L-cystine transporter that functions cooperatively with the L-cystine transporter YdeD, which exports L-cystine as reducing equivalents from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, to prevent E. coli cells from oxidative stress. The exported L-cystine can reduce the periplasmic hydrogen peroxide to water, and then generated L-cystine is imported back into the cytoplasm via the ATP-binding cassette transporter YecSC with a high affinity to L-cystine (Km = 110 nM) in a manner dependent on FliY, the periplasmic L-cystine-binding protein. The double disruption of ydeD and fliY increased cellular levels of lipid peroxides. From these findings, we propose that the hydrogen peroxide-inducible L-cystine/L-cystine shuttle system plays a role of detoxification of hydrogen peroxide before lipid peroxidation occurs, and then might specific prevent damage to membrane lipids.

  11. Accelerated bridge construction (ABC) decision making and economic modeling tool.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-12-01

    In this FHWA-sponsored pool funded study, a set of decision making tools, based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) was developed. This tool set is prepared for transportation specialists and decision-makers to determine if ABC is more effective ...

  12. Cystathionine β-Synthase (CBS) Domains 1 and 2 Fulfill Different Roles in Ionic Strength Sensing of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter OpuA*

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, Akira; Erkens, Guus B.; Berntsson, Ronnie P.-A.; Otten, Renee; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Mulder, Frans A. A.; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    The cystathionine β-synthase module of OpuA in conjunction with an anionic membrane surface acts as a sensor of internal ionic strength, which allows the protein to respond to osmotic stress. We now show by chemical modification and cross-linking studies that CBS2-CBS2 interface residues are critical for transport activity and/or ionic regulation of transport, whereas CBS1 serves no functional role. We establish that Cys residues in CBS1, CBS2, and the nucleotide-binding domain are more accessible for cross-linking at high than low ionic strength, indicating that these domains undergo conformational changes when transiting between the active and inactive state. Structural analyses suggest that the cystathionine β-synthase module is largely unstructured. Moreover, we could substitute CBS1 by a linker and preserve ionic regulation of transport. These data suggest that CBS1 serves as a linker and the structured CBS2-CBS2 interface forms a hinge point for ionic strength-dependent rearrangements that are transmitted to the nucleotide-binding domain and thereby affect translocation activity. PMID:21878634

  13. Retinoid Binding Properties of Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 of the Stargardt Disease-associated ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter, ABCA4*

    PubMed Central

    Biswas-Fiss, Esther E.; Affet, Stephanie; Ha, Malissa; Biswas, Subhasis B.

    2012-01-01

    The retina-specific ATP binding cassette transporter, ABCA4 protein, is associated with a broad range of inherited macular degenerations, including Stargardt disease, autosomal recessive cone rod dystrophy, and fundus flavimaculatus. In order to understand its role in retinal transport in rod out segment discs, we have investigated the interactions of the soluble domains of ABCA4 with both 11-cis- and all-trans-retinal. Using fluorescence anisotropy-based binding analysis and recombinant polypeptides derived from the amino acid sequences of the four soluble domains of ABCA4, we demonstrated that the nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) specifically bound 11-cis-retinal. Its affinity for all-trans-retinal was markedly reduced. Stargardt disease-associated mutations in this domain resulted in attenuation of 11-cis-retinal binding. Significant differences in 11-cis-retinal binding affinities were observed between NBD1 and other cytoplasmic and lumenal domains of ABCA4. The results suggest a possible role of ABCA4 and, in particular, the NBD1 domain in 11-cis-retinal binding. These results also correlate well with a recent report on the in vivo role of ABCA4 in 11-cis-retinal transport. PMID:23144455

  14. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Gene Family in Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) Reveal the Role of AcABCG38 in Pollen Development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Piaojuan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Lihua; Hou, Zhimin; Yan, Maokai; Hu, Bingyan; Liu, Yanhui; Azam, Syed Muhammad; Zhang, Ziyan; Rahman, Zia ur; Liu, Liping; Qin, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) cultivation commonly relies on asexual reproduction which is easily impeded by many factors in agriculture production. Sexual reproduction might be a novel approach to improve the pineapple planting. However, genes controlling pineapple sexual reproduction are still remain elusive. In different organisms a conserved superfamily proteins known as ATP binding cassette (ABC) participate in various biological processes. Whereas, till today the ABC gene family has not been identified in pineapple. Here 100 ABC genes were identified in the pineapple genome and grouped into eight subfamilies (5 ABCAs, 20 ABCBs, 16 ABCCs, 2 ABCDs, one ABCEs, 5 ABCFs, 42 ABCGs and 9 ABCIs). Gene expression profiling revealed the dynamic expression pattern of ABC gene family in various tissues and different developmental stages. AcABCA5, AcABCB6, AcABCC4, AcABCC7, AcABCC9, AcABCG26, AcABCG38 and AcABCG42 exhibited preferential expression in ovule and stamen. Over-expression of AcABCG38 in the Arabidopsis double mutant abcg1-2abcg16-2 partially restored its pollen abortion defects, indicating that AcABCG38 plays important roles in pollen development. Our study on ABC gene family in pineapple provides useful information for developing sexual pineapple plantation which could be utilized to improve pineapple agricultural production. PMID:29312399

  15. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Gene Family in Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) Reveal the Role of AcABCG38 in Pollen Development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Piaojuan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Lihua; Hou, Zhimin; Yan, Maokai; Hu, Bingyan; Liu, Yanhui; Azam, Syed Muhammad; Zhang, Ziyan; Rahman, Zia Ur; Liu, Liping; Qin, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Pineapple ( Ananas comosus L .) cultivation commonly relies on asexual reproduction which is easily impeded by many factors in agriculture production. Sexual reproduction might be a novel approach to improve the pineapple planting. However, genes controlling pineapple sexual reproduction are still remain elusive. In different organisms a conserved superfamily proteins known as ATP binding cassette (ABC) participate in various biological processes. Whereas, till today the ABC gene family has not been identified in pineapple. Here 100 ABC genes were identified in the pineapple genome and grouped into eight subfamilies (5 ABCAs , 20 ABCB s, 16 ABCCs , 2 ABCDs , one ABCEs , 5 ABCFs , 42 ABCGs and 9 ABCIs ). Gene expression profiling revealed the dynamic expression pattern of ABC gene family in various tissues and different developmental stages. AcABCA5, AcABCB6, AcABCC4 , AcABCC7 , AcABCC9 , AcABCG26 , AcABCG38 and AcABCG42 exhibited preferential expression in ovule and stamen. Over-expression of AcABCG38 in the Arabidopsis double mutant abcg1-2abcg16-2 partially restored its pollen abortion defects, indicating that AcABCG38 plays important roles in pollen development. Our study on ABC gene family in pineapple provides useful information for developing sexual pineapple plantation which could be utilized to improve pineapple agricultural production.

  16. ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transport System Solute-binding Protein-guided Identification of Novel d-Altritol and Galactitol Catabolic Pathways in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58*

    PubMed Central

    Wichelecki, Daniel J.; Vetting, Matthew W.; Chou, Liyushang; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Bouvier, Jason T.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Innovations in the discovery of the functions of uncharacterized proteins/enzymes have become increasingly important as advances in sequencing technology flood protein databases with an exponentially growing number of open reading frames. This study documents one such innovation developed by the Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI; U54GM093342), the use of solute-binding proteins for transport systems to identify novel metabolic pathways. In a previous study, this strategy was applied to the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters. Here, we apply this strategy to the ATP-binding cassette transporters and report the discovery of novel catabolic pathways for d-altritol and galactitol in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58. These efforts resulted in the description of three novel enzymatic reactions as follows: 1) oxidation of d-altritol to d-tagatose via a dehydrogenase in Pfam family PF00107, a previously unknown reaction; 2) phosphorylation of d-tagatose to d-tagatose 6-phosphate via a kinase in Pfam family PF00294, a previously orphan EC number; and 3) epimerization of d-tagatose 6-phosphate C-4 to d-fructose 6-phosphate via a member of Pfam family PF08013, another previously unknown reaction. The epimerization reaction catalyzed by a member of PF08013 is especially noteworthy, because the functions of members of PF08013 have been unknown. These discoveries were assisted by the following two synergistic bioinformatics web tools made available by the Enzyme Function Initiative: the EFI-Enzyme Similarity Tool and the EFI-Genome Neighborhood Tool. PMID:26472925

  17. Expression and activity of multidrug resistance protein 1 in a murine thymoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria-Lima, Juliana; Kyle-Cezar, Fernanda; Leite, Daniela F P; Capella, Luiz; Capella, Márcia A M; Rumjanek, Vivian M

    2005-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins [MRPs and P-glycoprotein (Pgp)] are members of the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins, originally described as being involved in the resistance against anti-cancer agents in tumour cells. These proteins act as ATP-dependent efflux pumps and have now been described in normal cells where they exert physiological roles. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression and activity of MRP and Pgp in the thymoma cell line, EL4. It was observed that EL4 cells expressed mRNA for MRP1, but not for MRP2, MRP3 or Pgp. The activity of ABC transport proteins was evaluated by using the efflux of the fluorescent probes carboxy-2′-7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and rhodamine 123 (Rho 123). EL4 cells did not retain CFDA intracellularly, and MRP inhibitors (probenecid, indomethacin and MK 571) decreased MRP1 activity in a concentration-dependent manner. As expected, EL4 cells accumulated Rho 123, and the presence of cyclosporin A and verapamil did not modify this accumulation. Most importantly, when EL4 cells were incubated in the presence of the MRP1 inhibitors indomethacin and MK 571 for 6 days, they started to express CD4 and CD8 molecules on their surface, producing double-positive cells and CD8 single-positive cells. Our results suggest that MRP activity is important for the maintenance of the undifferentiated state in this cell type. This finding might have implications in the physiological process of normal thymocyte maturation. PMID:15804283

  18. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadsby, David C.; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-03-01

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR channels has led to a unifying mechanism explaining those ATP-driven conformational changes.

  19. Structural basis of RND-type multidrug exporters

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akihito; Nakashima, Ryosuke; Sakurai, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug exporters are intrinsic membrane transporters that act as cellular self-defense mechanism. The most notable characteristics of multidrug exporters is that they export a wide range of drugs and toxic compounds. The overexpression of these exporters causes multidrug resistance. Multidrug-resistant pathogens have become a serious problem in modern chemotherapy. Over the past decade, investigations into the structure of bacterial multidrug exporters have revealed the multidrug recognition and export mechanisms. In this review, we primarily discuss RND-type multidrug exporters particularly AcrAB-TolC, major drug exporter in Gram-negative bacteria. RND-type drug exporters are tripartite complexes comprising a cell membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and an adaptor protein. Cell membrane transporters and outer membrane channels are homo-trimers; however, there is no consensus on the number of adaptor proteins in these tripartite complexes. The three monomers of a cell membrane transporter have varying conformations (access, binding, and extrusion) during transport. Drugs are exported following an ordered conformational change in these three monomers, through a functional rotation mechanism coupled with the proton relay cycle in ion pairs, which is driven by proton translocation. Multidrug recognition is based on a multisite drug-binding mechanism, in which two voluminous multidrug-binding pockets in cell membrane exporters recognize a wide range of substrates as a result of permutations at numerous binding sites that are specific for the partial structures of substrate molecules. The voluminous multidrug-binding pocket may have numerous binding sites even for a single substrate, suggesting that substrates may move between binding sites during transport, an idea named as multisite-drug-oscillation hypothesis. This hypothesis is consistent with the apparently broad substrate specificity of cell membrane exporters and their highly efficient

  20. Structural basis of RND-type multidrug exporters.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akihito; Nakashima, Ryosuke; Sakurai, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug exporters are intrinsic membrane transporters that act as cellular self-defense mechanism. The most notable characteristics of multidrug exporters is that they export a wide range of drugs and toxic compounds. The overexpression of these exporters causes multidrug resistance. Multidrug-resistant pathogens have become a serious problem in modern chemotherapy. Over the past decade, investigations into the structure of bacterial multidrug exporters have revealed the multidrug recognition and export mechanisms. In this review, we primarily discuss RND-type multidrug exporters particularly AcrAB-TolC, major drug exporter in Gram-negative bacteria. RND-type drug exporters are tripartite complexes comprising a cell membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and an adaptor protein. Cell membrane transporters and outer membrane channels are homo-trimers; however, there is no consensus on the number of adaptor proteins in these tripartite complexes. The three monomers of a cell membrane transporter have varying conformations (access, binding, and extrusion) during transport. Drugs are exported following an ordered conformational change in these three monomers, through a functional rotation mechanism coupled with the proton relay cycle in ion pairs, which is driven by proton translocation. Multidrug recognition is based on a multisite drug-binding mechanism, in which two voluminous multidrug-binding pockets in cell membrane exporters recognize a wide range of substrates as a result of permutations at numerous binding sites that are specific for the partial structures of substrate molecules. The voluminous multidrug-binding pocket may have numerous binding sites even for a single substrate, suggesting that substrates may move between binding sites during transport, an idea named as multisite-drug-oscillation hypothesis. This hypothesis is consistent with the apparently broad substrate specificity of cell membrane exporters and their highly efficient

  1. Down-regulation of aminopeptidase N and ABC transporter subfamily G transcripts in Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac resistant Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiantao; Coates, Brad S.; Wang, Yueqin; Wang, Yidong; Bai, Shuxiong; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai

    2017-01-01

    The Asian corn borer (ACB), Ostrinia furnacalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is a highly destructive pest of cultivated maize throughout East Asia. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystalline protein (Cry) toxins cause mortality by a mechanism involving pore formation or signal transduction following toxin binding to receptors along the midgut lumen of susceptible insects, but this mechanism and mutations therein that lead to resistance are not fully understood. In the current study, quantitative comparisons were made among midgut expressed transcripts from O. furnacalis susceptible (ACB-BtS) and laboratory selected strains resistant to Cry1Ab (ACB-AbR) and Cry1Ac toxins (ACB-AcR) when feeding on non-Bt diet. From a combined de novo transcriptome assembly of 83,370 transcripts, ORFs of ≥ 100 amino acids were predicted and annotated for 28,940 unique isoforms derived from 12,288 transcripts. Transcriptome-wide expression estimated from RNA-seq read depths predicted significant down-regulation of transcripts for previously known Bt resistance genes, aminopeptidase N1 (apn1) and apn3, as well as a putative ATP binding cassette transporter group G (abcg) gene in both ACB-AbR and -AcR (log2[fold-change] ≥ 1.36; P < 0.0001). The transcripts that were most highly differentially regulated in both ACB-AbR and -AcR compared to ACB-BtS (log2[fold-change] ≥ 2.0; P < 0.0001) included up- and down-regulation of serine proteases, storage proteins and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, as well as up-regulation of genes with predicted transport function. This study predicted the significant down-regulation of transcripts for previously known Bt resistance genes, aminopeptidase N1 (apn1) and apn3, as well as abccg gene in both ACB-AbR and -AcR. These data are important for the understanding of systemic differences between Bt resistant and susceptible genotypes. PMID:28808417

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 interacts with the putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Rv1747 to regulate mycobacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Glass, Lisa N; Swapna, Ganduri; Chavadi, Sivagami Sundaram; Tufariello, JoAnn M; Mi, Kaixia; Drumm, Joshua E; Lam, TuKiet T; Zhu, Guofeng; Zhan, Chenyang; Vilchéze, Catherine; Arcos, Jesus; Chen, Yong; Bi, Lijun; Mehta, Simren; Porcelli, Steven A; Almo, Steve C; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Jacobs, William R; Torrelles, Jordi B; Chan, John

    2017-07-01

    We have previously shown that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth and may be required for the establishment of tuberculous persistence. Here, yeast two-hybrid and affinity chromatography experiments have demonstrated that Rv2623 interacts with one of the two forkhead-associated domains (FHA I) of Rv1747, a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter annotated to export lipooligosaccharides. FHA domains are signaling protein modules that mediate protein-protein interactions to modulate a wide variety of biological processes via binding to conserved phosphorylated threonine (pT)-containing oligopeptides of the interactors. Biochemical, immunochemical and mass spectrometric studies have shown that Rv2623 harbors pT and specifically identified threonine 237 as a phosphorylated residue. Relative to wild-type Rv2623 (Rv2623WT), a mutant protein in which T237 has been replaced with a non-phosphorylatable alanine (Rv2623T237A) exhibits decreased interaction with the Rv1747 FHA I domain and diminished growth-regulatory capacity. Interestingly, compared to WT bacilli, an M. tuberculosis Rv2623 null mutant (ΔRv2623) displays enhanced expression of phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs), while the ΔRv1747 mutant expresses decreased levels of PIMs. Animal studies have previously shown that ΔRv2623 is hypervirulent, while ΔRv1747 is growth-attenuated. Collectively, these data have provided evidence that Rv2623 interacts with Rv1747 to regulate mycobacterial growth; and this interaction is mediated via the recognition of the conserved Rv2623 pT237-containing FHA-binding motif by the Rv1747 FHA I domain. The divergent aberrant PIM profiles and the opposing in vivo growth phenotypes of ΔRv2623 and ΔRv1747, together with the annotated lipooligosaccharide exporter function of Rv1747, suggest that Rv2623 interacts with Rv1747 to modulate mycobacterial growth by negatively regulating the activity of Rv1747; and that Rv

  3. Identification of a new biocontrol gene in Trichoderma atroviride: the role of an ABC transporter membrane pump in the interaction with different plant-pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Michelina; Lanzuise, Stefania; Vinale, Francesco; Marra, Roberta; Turrà, David; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Lorito, Matteo

    2009-03-01

    Successful biocontrol interactions often require that the beneficial microbes involved are resistant or tolerant to a variety of toxicants, including antibiotics produced by themselves or phytopathogens, plant antimicrobial compounds, and synthetic chemicals or contaminants. The ability of Trichoderma spp., the most widely applied biocontrol fungi, to withstand different chemical stresses, including those associated with mycoparasitism, is well known. In this work, we identified an ATP-binding cassette transporter cell membrane pump as an important component of the above indicated resistance mechanisms that appears to be supported by an extensive and powerful cell detoxification system. The encoding gene, named Taabc2, was cloned from a strain of Trichoderma atroviride and characterized. Its expression was found to be upregulated in the presence of pathogen-secreted metabolites, specific mycotoxins and some fungicides, and in conditions that stimulate the production in Trichoderma spp. of antagonism-related factors (toxins and enzymes). The key role of this gene in antagonism and biocontrol was demonstrated by the characterization of the obtained deletion mutants. They suffered an increased susceptibility to inhibitory compounds either secreted by pathogenic fungi or possibly produced by the biocontrol microbe itself and lost, partially or entirely, the ability to protect tomato plants from Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani attack.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nooter, K; Stoter, G

    1996-07-01

    The occurrence of multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the main obstacles in the successful chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer. MDR cell lines are resistant to the so-called naturally occurring anti-cancer drugs, such as anthracyclines, Vinca alkaloids and epipodophyllotoxins, but are not cross-resistant to alkylating agents, antimetabolites and cisplatin. So far, three separate forms of MDR have been characterized in more detail: classical MDR, non-Pgp MDR and atypical MDR. Although all three MDR phenotypes have much in common with respect to cross-resistance patterns, the underlying mechanisms certainly differ. Atypical MDR is associated with quantitative and qualitative alterations in topoisomerase II alpha, a nuclear enzyme that actively participates in the lethal action of cytotoxic drugs. Atypical MDR cells do not overexpress P-glycoprotein, and are unaltered in their ability to accumulate drugs. In this review we will focus on classical and non-Pgp MDR. The molecular mechanism of classical and non-Pgp MDR is transcriptional activation of membrane-bound transport proteins. These transport proteins belong to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transport systems. The classical MDR phenotype is characterized by a reduced ability to accumulate drugs, due to activity of an energy-dependent uni-directional, membrane-bound, drug-efflux pump with broad substrate specificity. The classical MDR drug pump is composed of a transmembrane glycoprotein (P-glyco-protein-Pgp) with a molecular weight of 170 kD, and is, in man, encoded by the so-called multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene. Typically, non-Pgp MDR has no P-gly-coprotein expression, yet has about the same cross-resistance pattern as classical MDR. This non-Pgp MDR phenotype is caused by overexpression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) gene, which encodes a 190 kD membrane-bound glycoprotein (MRP). MRP probably works by direct extrusion of cytotoxic drugs from the cell and/or by mediating

  5. Inhibition of cholesterol absorption associated with a PPAR alpha-dependent increase in ABC binding cassette transporter A1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Knight, Brian L; Patel, Dilip D; Humphreys, Sandy M; Wiggins, David; Gibbons, Geoffrey F

    2003-11-01

    Dietary supplementation with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) ligand WY 14,643 gave rise to a 4- to 5-fold increase in the expression of mRNA for the ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in the intestine of normal mice. There was no effect in the intestine of PPAR alpha-null mice. Consumption of a high-cholesterol diet also increased intestinal ABCA1 expression. The effects of WY 14,643 and the high-cholesterol diet were not additive. WY 14,643 feeding reduced intestinal absorption of cholesterol in the normal mice, irrespective of the dietary cholesterol concentration, and this resulted in lower diet-derived cholesterol and cholesteryl ester concentrations in plasma and liver. At each concentration of dietary cholesterol, there was a similar significant inverse correlation between intestinal ABCA1 mRNA content and the amount of cholesterol absorbed. The fibrate-induced changes in the intestines of the normal mice were accompanied by an increased concentration of the mRNA encoding the sterol-regulatory element binding protein-1c gene (SREBP-1c), a known target gene for the oxysterol receptor liver X receptor alpha (LXR alpha). There was a correlation between intestinal ABCA1 mRNA and SREBP-1c mRNA contents, but not between SREBP-1c mRNA content and cholesterol absorption. These results suggest that PPAR alpha influences cholesterol absorption through modulating ABCA1 activity in the intestine by a mechanism involving LXR alpha.

  6. The ABCs of Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Seth A.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Parsons, Allison Ward

    2014-01-01

    Student engagement is an important consideration for teachers and administrators because it is explicitly associated with achievement. What the authors call the ABC's of engagement they outline as: Affective engagement, Behavioral engagement, and Cognitive engagement. They also present "Three Things Every Teacher Needs to Know about…

  7. Piperine, a piperidine alkaloid from Piper nigrum re-sensitizes P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP dependent multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Lei, Yu; Jia, Yingjie; Li, Na; Wink, Michael; Ma, Yonggang

    2011-12-15

    Over-expression of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP in tumor cells is one of the important mechanisms leading to multidrug resistance (MDR), which impairs the efficacy of chemotherapy. P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP are ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters, which can expel a variety of lipophilic anti-cancer drugs and protect tumor cells. During a screening of MDR reversal agents among alkaloids of various structural types, a piperidine alkaloid, piperine (a main piperidine alkaloid in Piper nigurm) was identified as an inhibitor. Piperine can potentiate the cytotoxicity of anti-cancer drugs in resistant sublines, such as MCF-7/DOX and A-549/DDP, which were derived from MCF-7 and A-549 cell lines. At a concentration of 50 μM piperine could reverse the resistance to doxorubicin 32.16 and 14.14 folds, respectively. It also re-sensitized cells to mitoxantrone 6.98 folds. In addition, long-term treatment of cells by piperine inhibits transcription of the corresponding ABC transporter genes. These results suggest that piperine can reverse MDR by multiple mechanisms and it may be a promising lead compound for future studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Homologues of the human multidrug resistance genes MRP and MDR contribute to heavy metal resistance in the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Broeks, A; Gerrard, B; Allikmets, R; Dean, M; Plasterk, R H

    1996-01-01

    Acquired resistance of mammalian cells to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs can result from enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), which belongs to the ABC transporter superfamily. ABC transporters play a role in the protection of organisms against exogenous toxins by cellular detoxification processes. We have identified four MRP homologues in the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and we have studied one member, mrp-1, in detail. Using an mrp::lacZ gene fusion, mrp-l expression was found in cells of the pharynx, the pharynx-intestinal valve and the anterior intestinal cells, the rectum-intestinal valve and the epithelial cells of the vulva. Targeted inactivation of mrp-l resulted in increased sensitivity to the heavy metal ions cadmium and arsenite, to which wild-type worms are highly tolerant. The most pronounced effect of the mrp-1 mutation is on the ability of animals to recover from temporary exposure to high concentrations of heavy metals. Nematodes were found to be hypersensitive to heavy metals when both the MRP homologue, mrp-1, and a member of the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) gene family, pgp-1, were deleted. We conclude that nematodes have multiple proteins, homologues of mammalian proteins involved in the cellular resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, that protect them against heavy metals. Images PMID:8947035

  9. Multidrug resistance in enteric and other gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    George, A M

    1996-05-15

    In Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug resistance is a term that is used to describe mechanisms of resistance by chromosomal genes that are activated by induction or mutation caused by the stress of exposure to antibiotics in natural and clinical environments. Unlike plasmid-borne resistance genes, there is no alteration or degradation of drugs or need for genetic transfer. Exposure to a single drug leads to cross-resistance to many other structurally and functionally unrelated drugs. The only mechanism identified for multidrug resistance in bacteria is drug efflux by membrane transporters, even though many of these transporters remain to be identified. The enteric bacteria exhibit mostly complex multidrug resistance systems which are often regulated by operons or regulons. The purpose of this review is to survey molecular mechanisms of multidrug resistance in enteric and other Gram-negative bacteria, and to speculate on the origins and natural physiological functions of the genes involved.

  10. Cross-functioning between the extraneuronal monoamine transporter and multidrug resistance protein 1 in the uptake of adrenaline and export of 5-(glutathion-S-yl)adrenaline in rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vera Marisa; Ferreira, Lusa Maria; Branco, Paula Srio; Carvalho, Flix; Bastos, Maria Lourdes; Carvalho, Rui Albuquerque; Carvalho, Mrcia; Remio, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Isolated heart cells are highly susceptible to the toxicity of catecholamine oxidation products, namely, to catecholamine-glutathione adducts. Although cellular uptake and/or efflux of these products may constitute a crucial step, the knowledge about the involvement of transporters is still very scarce. This work aimed to contribute to the characterization of membrane transport mechanisms, namely, extraneuronal monoamine transporter (EMT), the multidrug resistant protein 1 (MRP1), and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in freshly isolated cardiomyocytes from adult rats. These transporters may be accountable for uptake and/or efflux of adrenaline and an adrenaline oxidation product, 5-(glutathion-S-yl)adrenaline, in cardiomyocyte suspensions. Our results showed that 5-(glutathion-S-yl)adrenaline efflux was mediated by MRP1. Additionally, we demonstrated that the adduct formation occurs within the cardiomyocytes, since EMT inhibition reduced the intracellular adduct levels. The classical uptake2 transport in rat myocardial cells was inhibited by the typical EMT inhibitor, corticosterone, and surprisingly was also inhibited by low concentrations of another drug, a well-known P-gp inhibitor, GF120918. The P-gp activity was absent in the cells since P-gp-mediated efflux of quinidine was not blocked by GF120918. In conclusion, this work showed that freshly isolated cardiomyocytes from adult rats constitute a good model for the study of catecholamines and catecholamines metabolites membrane transport. The cardiomyocytes maintain EMT and MRP1 fully active, and these transporters contribute to the formation and efflux of 5-(glutathion-S-yl)adrenaline. In the present experimental conditions, P-gp activity is absent in the isolated cardiomyocytes.

  11. A subset of virus-specific CD161+ T cells selectively express the multidrug transporter MDR1 and are resistant to chemotherapy in AML

    PubMed Central

    Alsuliman, Abdullah; Muftuoglu, Muharrem; Khoder, Ahmad; Ahn, Yong-Oon; Basar, Rafet; Verneris, Michael R.; Muranski, Pawel; Barrett, A. John; Liu, Enli; Li, Li; Stringaris, Kate; Armstrong-James, Darius; Shaim, Hila; Kondo, Kayo; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Andersson, Borje; Marin, David; Champlin, Richard E.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of long-lived pathogen-specific T cells is a fundamental property of the adaptive immune response. However, the mechanisms underlying long-term persistence of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells are not well-defined. Here we identify a subset of memory CD4+ T cells capable of effluxing cellular toxins, including rhodamine (Rho), through the multidrug efflux protein MDR1 (also known as P-glycoprotein and ABCB1). Drug-effluxing CD4+ T cells were characterized as CD161+CD95+CD45RA−CD127hiCD28+CD25int cells with a distinct chemokine profile and a Th1-polarized pro-inflammatory phenotype. CD4+CD161+Rho-effluxing T cells proliferated vigorously in response to stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 beads and gave rise to CD161− progeny in vitro. These cells were also capable of self-renewal and maintained their phenotypic and functional characteristics when cultured with homeostatic cytokines. Multidrug-effluxing CD4+CD161+ T cells were enriched within the viral-specific Th1 repertoire of healthy donors and patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and survived exposure to daunorubicin chemotherapy in vitro. Multidrug-effluxing CD4+CD161+ T cells also resisted chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity in vivo and underwent significant expansion in AML patients rendered lymphopenic after chemotherapy, contributing to the repopulation of anti-CMV immunity. Finally, after influenza vaccination, the proportion of influenza-specific CD4+ T cells coexpressing CD161 was significantly higher after 2 years compared with 4 weeks after immunization, suggesting CD161 is a marker for long-lived antigen-specific memory T cells. These findings suggest that CD4+CD161+ T cells with rapid efflux capacity contribute to the maintenance of viral-specific memory T cells. These data provide novel insights into mechanisms that preserve antiviral immunity in patients undergoing chemotherapy and have implications for the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27821506

  12. Montelukast is a potent and durable inhibitor of multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2)-mediated efflux of taxol and saquinavir

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Upal; Chakravarty, Geetika; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Mondal, Debasis

    2009-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC)-transporters are energy dependent efflux pumps which regulate the pharmacokinetics of both anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agents, e.g. taxol, and of HIV-1 protease inhibitors (HPIs), e.g. saquinavir. Increased expression of several ABC-transporters, especially P-gp and MRP2, are observed in multidrug resistant (MDR) tumor cells and on HIV-1 infected lymphocytes. In addition, due to their apical expression on vascular endothelial barriers, both P-gp and MRP2 are of crucial importance towards dictating drug access into sequestered tissues. However, although a number of P-gp inhibitors are currently in clinical trials, possible inhibitors of MRP2 are not being thoroughly investigated. The experimental leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA), MK-571 is known to be a potent inhibitor of MRP transporters. Using the MRP2 over-expressing cell line, MDCKII-MRP2, we evaluated whether the clinically approved LTRAs, e.g. montelukast (Singulair™) and zafirlukast (Accolate™), can similarly suppress MRP2-mediated efflux. We compared the efficacy of increasing concentrations (20-100 μM) of MK-571, montelukast, and zafirlukast, in suppressing the efflux of calcein-AM, a fluorescent MRP substrate, and the radiolabeled [3H-] drugs, taxol and saquinavir. Montelukast was the most potent inhibitor (p<0.01) of MRP2-mediated efflux of all three substrates. Montelukast also increased (p<0.01) the duration of intracellular retention of both taxol and saquinavir. More than 50% of the drugs were retained in cells even after 90 mins post removal of montelukast from the medium. Our findings implicate that montelukast, a relatively safe anti-asthmatic agent, may be used as an adjunct therapy to suppress the efflux of taxol and saquinavir from MRP2 overexpressing cells. PMID:19952419

  13. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    DOE PAGES

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; ...

    2015-08-06

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H + or Na + electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H +-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H +-coupled DinF and a Na +-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm themore » biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.« less

  14. Effect of drug efflux transporters on placental transport of antiretroviral agent abacavir.

    PubMed

    Neumanova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Greenwood, Susan L; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2015-11-01

    Abacavir is as a frequent part of combination antiretroviral therapy used in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to investigate, using in vitro, in situ and ex vivo experimental approaches, whether the transplacental pharmacokinetics of abacavir is affected by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters functionally expressed in the placenta: P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (ABCC2) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 5 (ABCC5). In vitro transport assays revealed that abacavir is a substrate of human ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters but not of ABCC2 or ABCC5. In addition, in situ experiments using dually perfused rat term placenta confirmed interactions of abacavir with placental Abcb1/Abcg2. In contrast, uptake studies in human placental villous fragments did not reveal any interaction of abacavir with efflux transporters suggesting a large contribution of passive diffusion and/or influx mechanisms to net transplacental abacavir transfer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Increasing the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in breast cancer MCF-7 cells with multidrug resistance using a mesoporous silica nanoparticle drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Teng, Zhaogang; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Chunyan; Liu, Ying; Tang, Yuxia; Wu, Jiang; Sun, Jin; Wang, Hai; Wang, Jiandong; Lu, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy is the main cause of therapeutic failure and death in women with breast cancer. Overexpression of various members of the superfamily of adenosine triphosphate binding cassette (ABC)-transporters has been shown to be associated with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype in breast cancer cells. MDR1 protein promotes the intracellular efflux of drugs. A novel approach to address cancer drug resistance is to take advantage of the ability of nanocarriers to sidestep drug resistance mechanisms by endosomal delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Doxorubicin (DOX) is an anthracycline antibiotic commonly used in breast cancer chemotherapy and a substrate for ABC-mediated drug efflux. In the present study, we developed breast cancer MCF-7 cells with overexpression of MDR1 and designed mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) which were used as a drug delivery system. We tested the efficacy of DOX in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7/MDR1 and in a MCF-7/MDR1 xenograft nude mouse model using the MSNs drug delivery system. Our data show that drug resistance in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7/MDR1 can be overcome by treatment with DOX encapsulated within mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

  16. Natural lignans from Arctium lappa modulate P-glycoprotein efflux function in multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan; Cheng, Xinlai; Wink, Michael

    2015-02-15

    Arctium lappa is a well-known traditional medicinal plant in China (TCM) and Europe that has been used for thousands of years to treat arthritis, baldness or cancer. The plant produces lignans as secondary metabolites which have a wide range of bioactivities. Yet, their ability to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells has not been explored. In this study, we isolated six lignans from A. lappa seeds, namely arctigenin, matairesinol, arctiin, (iso)lappaol A, lappaol C, and lappaol F. The MDR reversal potential of the isolated lignans and the underlying mechanism of action were studied using two MDR cancer cell lines, CaCo2 and CEM/ADR 5000 which overexpress P-gp and other ABC transporters. In two-drug combinations of lignans with the cytotoxic doxorubicin, all lignans exhibited synergistic effects in CaCo2 cells and matairesinol, arctiin, lappaol C and lappaol F display synergistic activity in CEM/ADR 5000 cells. Additionally, in three-drug combinations of lignans with the saponin digitonin and doxorubicin MDR reversal activity was even stronger enhanced. The lignans can increase the retention of the P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 in CEM/ADR 5000 cells, indicating that lignans can inhibit the activity of P-gp. Our study provides a first insight into the potential chemosensitizing activity of a series of natural lignans, which might be candidates for developing novel adjuvant anticancer agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Multidrug resistance proteins restrain the intestinal absorption of trans-resveratrol in rats.

    PubMed

    Juan, M Emília; González-Pons, Eulalia; Planas, Joana M

    2010-03-01

    trans-Resveratrol, a natural antioxidant, has been described as a nutraceutic compound with important beneficial effects on health, but its low oral bioavailability hinders its therapeutic activity. Here, we studied the mechanisms of apical transport of trans-resveratrol in enterocytes and the role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the secretion of resveratrol glucuronide and sulfate resulting from the rapid intracellular metabolism. An intestinal perfusion method with recirculation in vivo was used in rats. Jejunal loops were perfused with increasing concentrations of trans-resveratrol and results showed that its uptake occurs by simple diffusion without the participation of a mediated transport. The apparent diffusion constant was 8.1 +/- 0.3 microL/(5 min.mg dry weight). The glycoprotein-P (Pgp, ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) located in the apical membrane of enterocytes were investigated using specific inhibitors. The Pgp inhibitors verapamil (5 micromol/L) and cyclosporin A (5 micromol/L) did not affect the efflux of trans-resveratrol and its conjugates. The MRP2 inhibitors probenecid (2 mmol/L) and MK571 (10 micromol/L) reduced the efflux of glucuronide by 61 and 55%, respectively, and of sulfate by 43 and 28%, respectively. The BCRP inhibitor Ko143 (0.5 micromol/L) decreased the secretion of glucuronide by 64% and of sulfate by 46%. Our experiments identify MRP2 and BCRP as the 2 apical transporters involved in the efflux of resveratrol conjugates.

  18. Inhibition of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Tivnan, Amanda; Zakaria, Zaitun; O'Leary, Caitrín; Kögel, Donat; Pokorny, Jenny L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30-40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10-20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1) in high grade glioma, and it's role in BBB active transport, highlights this member of the ABC transporter family as a target for improving drug responses in GBM. In this study we show that small molecule inhibitors and gene silencing of MRP1 had a significant effect on GBM cell response to temozolomide (150 μM), vincristine (100 nM), and etoposide (2 μM). Pre-treatment with Reversan (inhibitor of MRP1 and P-glycoprotein) led to a significantly improved response to cell death in the presence of all three chemotherapeutics, in both primary and recurrent GBM cells. The presence of MK571 (inhibitor of MRP1 and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) led to an enhanced effect of vincristine and etoposide in reducing cell viability over a 72 h period. Specific MRP1 inhibition led to a significant increase in vincristine and etoposide-induced cell death in all three cell lines assessed. Treatment with MK571, or specific MRP1 knockdown, did not have any effect on temozolomide drug response in these cells. These findings have significant implications in providing researchers an opportunity to improve currently used chemotherapeutics for the initial treatment of primary GBM, and improved treatment for recurrent GBM patients.

  19. Small-molecule inhibitors of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and related processes: A historic approach and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Sven Marcel; Wiese, Michael

    2018-05-29

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport protein. This efflux pump uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to export structurally diverse antineoplastic agents in human cancers. The upregulation of MRP1 (either inherent or acquired) is one major reason for the occurrence of the phenomenon called multidrug resistance (MDR). MDR is characterized by a reduced outcome of chemotherapy due to the active intracellular clearance of cytostatic drugs below the necessary effect concentration. Much effort has been made to overcome MDR, which implied high-throughput screenings of already known pharmacological and natural compounds, modification of intrinsic substrates, as well as design and synthesis of new inhibitors. This review is meant not only to summarize the most recent results over the past 10 years, but also to highlight major achievements regarding reversal of MRP1-mediated MDR, from the time of its discovery until today. The focus lies on small-molecule compounds that feature either direct MRP1 inhibition/transport blockage, toxicity against MRP1-overexpressing cells, inhibition/modification of intracellular processes necessary for MRP1 function, or modification of MRP1-related metabolic and genomic mechanisms. Considering all aspects, this review might be useful to (re)consider possible strategies to overcome MRP1-mediated MDR. Furthermore, it may be the basis for developing new, even better, highly potent, less toxic, and selective (as well as broad-spectrum) MRP1 inhibitors that will enter clinical evaluations in different malignancies and finally conduce to overcome MDR in general. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Rational design of cancer-targeted selenium nanoparticles to antagonize multidrug resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Zeng, Lilan; Jiang, Wenting; Fu, Yuanting; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Tianfeng

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug resistance is one of the greatest challenges in cancer therapy. Herein we described the synthesis of folate (FA)-conjugated selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) as cancer-targeted nano-drug delivery system for ruthenium polypyridyl (RuPOP) exhibits strong fluorescence, which allows the direct imaging of the cellular trafficking of the nanosystem. This nanosystem could effectively antagonize against multidrug resistance in liver cancer. FA surface conjugation significantly enhanced the cellular uptake of SeNPs by FA receptor-mediated endocytosis through nystain-dependent lipid raft-mediated and clathrin-mediated pathways. The nanomaterials overcame the multidrug resistance in R-HepG2 cells through inhibition of ABC family proteins expression. Internalized nanoparticles triggered ROS overproduction and induced apoptosis by activating p53 and MAPKs pathways. Moreover, FA-SeNPs exhibited low in vivo acute toxicity, which verified the safety and application potential of FA-SeNPs as nanodrugs. This study provides an effective strategy for the design of cancer-targeted nanodrugs against multidrug resistant cancers. In the combat against hepatocellular carcinoma, multidrug resistance remains one of the obstacles to be overcome. The authors designed and synthesized folate (FA)-conjugated selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) with enhanced cancer-targeting capability. This system carried ruthenium polypyridyl (RuPOP), an efficient metal-based anti-cancer drug with strong fluorescence. It was shown that this combination was effective in antagonizing against multidrug resistance in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Estrogen Enhances the Expression of the Multidrug Transporter Gene ABCG2-Increasing Drug Resistance of Breast Cancer Cells through Estrogen Receptors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fung-Wei; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Liu, Jui-Ming; Fan, Tai-Ping; Jing, Jin; Yang, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Ren-Jun

    2017-01-14

    Multidrug resistance is a major obstacle in the successful therapy of breast cancer. Studies have proved that this kind of drug resistance happens in both human cancers and cultured cancer cell lines. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance is important for the reasonable design and use of new treatment strategies to effectively confront cancers. In our study, ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase and cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc (COX6C) were over-expressed more in the MCF-7/MX cell line than in the normal MCF7 cell line. Therefore, we believe that these three genes increase the tolerance of MCF7 to mitoxantrone (MX). The data showed that the high expression of COX6C made MCF-7/MX have more stable on mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) expression than normal MCF7 cells under hypoxic conditions. The accumulation of MX was greater in the ATP-depleted treatment MCF7/MX cells than in normal MCF7/MX cells. Furthermore, E2 increased the tolerance of MCF7 cells to MX through inducing the expression of ABCG2. However, E2 could not increase the expression of ABCG2 after the inhibition of estrogen receptor α (ERα) in MCF7 cells. According to the above data, under the E2 treatment, MDA-MB231, which lacks ER, had a higher sensitivity to MX than MCF7 cells. E2 induced the expression of ABCG2 through ERα and the over-expressed ABCG2 made MCF7 more tolerant to MX. Moreover, the over-expressed ATP synthase and COX6c affected mitochondrial genes and function causing the over-expressed ABCG2 cells pumped out MX in a concentration gradient from the cell matrix. Finally lead to chemoresistance.

  2. Estrogen Enhances the Expression of the Multidrug Transporter Gene ABCG2—Increasing Drug Resistance of Breast Cancer Cells through Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Fung-Wei; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Liu, Jui-Ming; Fan, Tai-Ping; Jing, Jin; Yang, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Ren-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multidrug resistance is a major obstacle in the successful therapy of breast cancer. Studies have proved that this kind of drug resistance happens in both human cancers and cultured cancer cell lines. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance is important for the reasonable design and use of new treatment strategies to effectively confront cancers. Results: In our study, ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase and cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc (COX6C) were over-expressed more in the MCF-7/MX cell line than in the normal MCF7 cell line. Therefore, we believe that these three genes increase the tolerance of MCF7 to mitoxantrone (MX). The data showed that the high expression of COX6C made MCF-7/MX have more stable on mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) expression than normal MCF7 cells under hypoxic conditions. The accumulation of MX was greater in the ATP-depleted treatment MCF7/MX cells than in normal MCF7/MX cells. Furthermore, E2 increased the tolerance of MCF7 cells to MX through inducing the expression of ABCG2. However, E2 could not increase the expression of ABCG2 after the inhibition of estrogen receptor α (ERα) in MCF7 cells. According to the above data, under the E2 treatment, MDA-MB231, which lacks ER, had a higher sensitivity to MX than MCF7 cells. Conclusions: E2 induced the expression of ABCG2 through ERα and the over-expressed ABCG2 made MCF7 more tolerant to MX. Moreover, the over-expressed ATP synthase and COX6c affected mitochondrial genes and function causing the over-expressed ABCG2 cells pumped out MX in a concentration gradient from the cell matrix. Finally lead to chemoresistance. PMID:28098816

  3. Random Mutagenesis of the Multidrug Transporter AcrB from Escherichia coli for Identification of Putative Target Residues of Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Samay; Buck, Annika; Dambacher, Christine; König, Armin; Bohnert, Jürgen A.; Kern, Winfried V.

    2014-01-01

    Efflux is an important mechanism of bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR), and the inhibition of MDR pumps by efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) could be a promising strategy to overcome MDR. 1-(1-Naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP) and phenylalanine-arginine-β-naphthylamide (PAβN) are model EPIs with activity in various Gram-negative bacteria expressing AcrB, the major efflux pump of Escherichia coli, or similar homologous pumps of the resistance-nodulation-cell division class. The aim of the present study was to generate E. coli AcrB mutants resistant to the inhibitory action of the two model EPIs and to identify putative EPI target residues in order to better understand mechanisms of pump inhibition. Using an in vitro random mutagenesis approach focusing on the periplasmic domain of AcrB, we identified the double mutation G141D N282Y, which substantially compromised the synergistic activity of NMP with linezolid, was associated with similar intracellular linezolid concentrations in the presence and absence of NMP, and did not impair the intrinsic MICs of various pump substrates and dye accumulation. We propose that these mutations near the outer face of the distal substrate binding pocket reduce NMP trapping. Other residues found to be relevant for efflux inhibition by NMP were G288 and A279, but mutations at these sites also changed the susceptibility to several pump substrates. Unlike with NMP, we were unable to generate AcrB periplasmic domain mutants with resistance or partial resistance to the EPI activity of PAβN, which is consistent with the modes of action of PAβN differing from those of NMP. PMID:25182653

  4. Interaction of Food Additives with Intestinal Efflux Transporters.

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Noora; Deng, Feng; Rauvala, Oskari; Tepponen, Tuomas; Kidron, Heidi

    2017-11-06

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (MRP2) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are ABC transporters that are expressed in the intestine, where they are involved in the efflux of many drugs from enterocytes back into the intestinal lumen. The inhibition of BCRP, MRP2, and P-gp can result in enhanced absorption and exposure of substrate drugs. Food additives are widely used by the food industry to improve the stability, flavor, and consistency of food products. Although they are considered safe for consumption, their interactions with intestinal transporters are poorly characterized. Therefore, in this study, selected food additives, including preservatives, colorants, and sweeteners, were studied in vitro for their inhibitory effects on intestinal ABC transporters. Among the studied compounds, several colorants were able to inhibit BCRP and MRP2, whereas P-gp was fairly insensitive to inhibition. Additionally, one sweetener was identified as a potent inhibitor of BCRP. Dose-response studies revealed that the IC 50 values of the inhibitors were lower than the estimated intestinal concentrations after the consumption of beverages containing food colorants. This suggests that there is potential for previously unrecognized transporter-mediated food additive-drug interactions.

  5. Alectinib (CH5424802) antagonizes ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Chen, Yifan; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Wang, Fang; Li, Delan; Chen, Likun; Fu, Liwu

    2017-03-17

    Alectinib, an inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we investigated the reversal effect of alectinib on multidrug resistance (MDR) induced by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which is the primary cause of chemotherapy failure. We provide the first evidence that alectinib increases the sensitivity of ABCB1- and ABCG2-overexpressing cells to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, alectinib increased the intracellular accumulation of ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates such as doxorubicin (DOX) and Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) by inhibiting the efflux function of the transporters in ABCB1- or ABCG2-overexpressing cells but not in their parental sensitive cells. Furthermore, alectinib stimulated ATPase activity and competed with substrates of ABCB1 or ABCG2 and competed with [125I] iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP) photolabeling bound to ABCB1 or ABCG2 but neither altered the expression and localization of ABCB1 or ABCG2 nor the phosphorylation levels of AKT and ERK. Alectinib also enhanced the cytotoxicity of DOX and the intracellular accumulation of Rho 123 in ABCB1-overexpressing primary leukemia cells. These findings suggest that alectinib combined with traditional chemotherapy may be beneficial to patients with ABCB1- or ABCG2-mediated MDR.

  6. Alectinib (CH5424802) antagonizes ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke; Chen, Yifan; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Wang, Fang; Li, Delan; Chen, Likun; Fu, Liwu

    2017-01-01

    Alectinib, an inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we investigated the reversal effect of alectinib on multidrug resistance (MDR) induced by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which is the primary cause of chemotherapy failure. We provide the first evidence that alectinib increases the sensitivity of ABCB1- and ABCG2-overexpressing cells to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, alectinib increased the intracellular accumulation of ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates such as doxorubicin (DOX) and Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) by inhibiting the efflux function of the transporters in ABCB1- or ABCG2-overexpressing cells but not in their parental sensitive cells. Furthermore, alectinib stimulated ATPase activity and competed with substrates of ABCB1 or ABCG2 and competed with [125I] iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP) photolabeling bound to ABCB1 or ABCG2 but neither altered the expression and localization of ABCB1 or ABCG2 nor the phosphorylation levels of AKT and ERK. Alectinib also enhanced the cytotoxicity of DOX and the intracellular accumulation of Rho 123 in ABCB1-overexpressing primary leukemia cells. These findings suggest that alectinib combined with traditional chemotherapy may be beneficial to patients with ABCB1- or ABCG2-mediated MDR. PMID:28303028

  7. Inhibition of Human Drug Transporter Activities by the Pyrethroid Pesticides Allethrin and Tetramethrin

    PubMed Central

    Chedik, Lisa; Bruyere, Arnaud; Le Vee, Marc; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Potin, Sophie; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Pyrethroids are widely-used chemical insecticides, to which humans are commonly exposed, and known to alter functional expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. Limited data have additionally suggested that drug transporters, that constitute key-actors of the drug detoxification system, may also be targeted by pyrethroids. The present study was therefore designed to analyze the potential regulatory effects of these pesticides towards activities of main ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) drug transporters, using transporter-overexpressing cells. The pyrethroids allethrin and tetramethrin were found to inhibit various ABC and SLC drug transporters, including multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), organic anion transporter polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter (MATE) 1, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and OCT2, with IC50 values however ranging from 2.6 μM (OCT1 inhibition by allethrin) to 77.6 μM (OAT3 inhibition by tetramethrin) and thus much higher than pyrethroid concentrations (in the nM range) reached in environmentally pyrethroid-exposed humans. By contrast, allethrin and tetramethrin cis-stimulated OATP2B1 activity and failed to alter activities of OATP1B3, OAT1 and MATE2-K, whereas P-glycoprotein activity was additionally moderately inhibited. Twelve other pyrethoids used at 100 μM did not block activities of the various investigated transporters, or only moderately inhibited some of them (inhibition by less than 50%). In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that molecular parameters, including molecular weight and lipophilicity, are associated with transporter inhibition by allethrin/tetramethrin and successfully predicted transporter inhibition by the pyrethroids imiprothrin and prallethrin. Taken together, these data fully demonstrated that two pyrethoids, i.e., allethrin and tetramethrin, can

  8. Celecoxib sensitizes imatinib-resistant K562 cells to imatinib by inhibiting MRP1-5, ABCA2 and ABCG2 transporters via Wnt and Ras signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Dharmapuri, Gangappa; Doneti, Ravinder; Philip, Gundala Harold; Kalle, Arunasree M

    2015-07-01

    Imatinib mesylate, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is very effective in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, development of resistance to imatinib therapy is also a very common mechanism observed with long-term administration of the drug. Our previous studies have highlighted the role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in regulating the expression of multidrug resistant protein-1 (MDR1), P-gp, in imatinib-resistant K562 cells (IR-K562) via PGE2-cAMP-PKC-NF-κB pathway and inhibition of COX-2 by celecoxib, a COX-2 specific inhibitor, inhibits this pathway and reverses the drug resistance. Studies have identified that not only MDR1 but other ATP-binding cassette transport proteins (ABC transporters) are involved in the development of imatinib resistance. Here, we tried to study the role of COX-2 in the regulation of other ABC transporters such as MRP1, MRP2, MRP3, ABCA2 and ABCG2 that have been already implicated in imatinib resistance development. The results of the study clearly indicated that overexpression of COX-2 lead to upregulation of MRP family proteins in IR-K562 cells and celecoxib down-regulated the ABC transporters through Wnt and MEK signaling pathways. The study signifies that celecoxib in combination with the imatinib can be a good alternate treatment strategy for the reversal of imatinib resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter and Multidrug Resistance 1 Genes: Parasite Risk Factors that Affect Treatment Outcomes for P. falciparum Malaria after Artemether-Lumefantrine and Artesunate-Amodiaquine

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B.; Stepniewska, Kasia; Dahal, Prabin; Nsanzabana, Christian; Moriera, Clarissa; Price, Ric N.; Mårtensson, Andreas; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Dorsey, Grant; Sutherland, Colin J.; Guérin, Philippe; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Ménard, Didier; Adam, Ishag; Ademowo, George; Arze, Cesar; Baliraine, Frederick N.; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Björkman, Anders; Borrmann, Steffen; Checchi, Francesco; Desai, Meghna; Dhorda, Mehul; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A.; El-Sayed, Badria B.; Eshetu, Teferi; Eyase, Frederick; Falade, Catherine; Faucher, Jean-François; Fröberg, Gabrielle; Grivoyannis, Anastasia; Hamour, Sally; Houzé, Sandrine; Johnson, Jacob; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Kariuki, Simon; Kiechel, Jean-René; Kironde, Fred; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; LeBras, Jacques; Malmberg, Maja; Mwai, Leah; Ngasala, Billy; Nosten, Francois; Nsobya, Samuel L.; Nzila, Alexis; Oguike, Mary; Otienoburu, Sabina Dahlström; Ogutu, Bernhards; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Piola, Patrice; Rombo, Lars; Schramm, Birgit; Somé, A. Fabrice; Thwing, Julie; Ursing, Johan; Wong, Rina P. M.; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Zongo, Issaka; Plowe, Christopher V.; Sibley, Carol Hopkins

    2014-01-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated with decreased sensitivity to amodiaquine and lumefantrine, but effects of these polymorphisms on therapeutic responses to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) have not been clearly defined. Individual patient data from 31 clinical trials were harmonized and pooled by using standardized methods from the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network. Data for more than 7,000 patients were analyzed to assess relationships between parasite polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1 and clinically relevant outcomes after treatment with AL or ASAQ. Presence of the pfmdr1 gene N86 (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.74, 95% confidence interval = 2.29 – 9.78, P < 0.001) and increased pfmdr1 copy number (adjusted hazards ratio = 6.52, 95% confidence interval = 2.36–17.97, P < 0.001) were significant independent risk factors for recrudescence in patients treated with AL. AL and ASAQ exerted opposing selective effects on single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1. Monitoring selection and responding to emerging signs of drug resistance are critical tools for preserving efficacy of artemisinin combination therapies; determination of the prevalence of at least pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y should now be routine. PMID:25048375

  10. Hepatocyte SLAMF3 reduced specifically the multidrugs resistance protein MRP-1 and increases HCC cells sensitization to anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Demey, Baptiste; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Bagami, Mohammed Al; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Naassila, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance MDR proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. MRPs can transport drugs including anticancer drugs, nucleoside analogs, antimetabolites and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Drugs used in HCC therapy, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, are substrates of uptake and/or efflux transporters. Variable expression of MRPs at the plasma membrane of tumor cells may contribute to drug resistance and subsequent clinical response. Recently, we reported that the hepatocyte SLAMF3 expression (Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family member 3) was reduced in tumor cells from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to its high expression in adjacent tissues. In the present study, we make a strong correlation between induced SLAMF3 overexpression and the specific loss of MRP-1 expression and its functionalities as a drugs resistance transporter. No changes were observed on expression of ABCG2 and MDR. More importantly, we highlight a strong inverse correlation between MRP-1 and SLAMF3 expression in patients with HCC. We propose that the SLAMF3 overexpression in cancerous cells could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to improve the drugs sensibility of resistant cells and thus control the therapeutic failure in HCC patients. PMID:27081035

  11. Hepatocyte SLAMF3 reduced specifically the multidrugs resistance protein MRP-1 and increases HCC cells sensitization to anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Fouquet, Grégory; Debuysscher, Véronique; Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Demey, Baptiste; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Al Bagami, Mohammed; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Naassila, Mickael; Marcq, Ingrid; Bouhlal, Hicham

    2016-05-31

    Multidrug resistance MDR proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. MRPs can transport drugs including anticancer drugs, nucleoside analogs, antimetabolites and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Drugs used in HCC therapy, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, are substrates of uptake and/or efflux transporters. Variable expression of MRPs at the plasma membrane of tumor cells may contribute to drug resistance and subsequent clinical response. Recently, we reported that the hepatocyte SLAMF3 expression (Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family member 3) was reduced in tumor cells from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to its high expression in adjacent tissues. In the present study, we make a strong correlation between induced SLAMF3 overexpression and the specific loss of MRP-1 expression and its functionalities as a drugs resistance transporter. No changes were observed on expression of ABCG2 and MDR. More importantly, we highlight a strong inverse correlation between MRP-1 and SLAMF3 expression in patients with HCC. We propose that the SLAMF3 overexpression in cancerous cells could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to improve the drugs sensibility of resistant cells and thus control the therapeutic failure in HCC patients.

  12. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins in aquatic invertebrates: Evolutionary significance and application in marine ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Hui-Su; Kang, Hye-Min; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2017-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily is known to play a fundamental role in biological processes and is highly conserved across animal taxa. The ABC proteins function as active transporters for multiple substrates across the cellular membrane by ATP hydrolysis. As this superfamily is derived from a common ancestor, ABC genes have evolved via lineage-specific duplications through the process of adaptation. In this review, we summarized information about the ABC gene families in aquatic invertebrates, considering their evolution and putative functions in defense mechanisms. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted to examine the evolutionary significance of ABC gene families in aquatic invertebrates. Particularly, a massive expansion of multixenobiotic resistance (MXR)-mediated efflux transporters was identified in the absence of the ABCG2 (BCRP) gene in Ecdysozoa and Platyzoa, suggesting that a loss of Abcg2 gene occurred sporadically in these species during divergence of Protostome to Lophotrochozoa. Furthermore, in aquatic invertebrates, the ecotoxicological significance of MXR is discussed while considering the role of MXR-mediated efflux transporters in response to various environmental pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. ATP-Binding Cassette Efflux Transporters in Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhanglin; Mao, Qingcheng

    2010-01-01

    Pregnant women are often complicated with diseases including viral or bacterial infections, epilepsy, hypertension, or pregnancy-induced conditions such as depression and gestational diabetes that require treatment with medication. In addition, substance abuse during pregnancy remains a major public health problem. Many drugs used by pregnant women are off label without the necessary dose, efficacy, and safety data required for rational dosing regimens of these drugs. Thus, a major concern arising from the widespread use of drugs by pregnant women is the transfer of drugs across the placental barrier, leading to potential toxicity to the developing fetus. Knowledge regarding the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters, which play an important role in drug transfer across the placental barrier, is absolutely critical for optimizing the therapeutic strategy to treat the mother while protecting the fetus during pregnancy. Such transporters include P-glycoprotein (P-gp, gene symbol ABCB1), the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, gene symbol ABCG2), and the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs, gene symbol ABCCs). In this review, we summarize the current knowledge with respect to developmental expression and regulation, membrane localization, functional significance, and genetic polymorphisms of these ABC transporters in the placenta and their relevance to fetal drug exposure and toxicity. PMID:21118087

  14. Involvement of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance associated protein 1 in the transport of tanshinone IIB, a primary active diterpenoid quinone from the roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza, across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Xiao; Liang, Jun; Yu, Xi-Yong; Wen, Jing-Yuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2007-08-01

    Tanshinone IIB (TSB) is a major constituent of Salvia miltiorrhiza, which is widely used in treatment of cardiovascular and central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as coronary heart disease and stroke. This study aimed to investigate the role of various drug transporters in the brain penetration of TSB using several in vitro and in vivo mouse and rat models. The uptake and efflux of TSB in rat primary microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVECs) were ATP-dependent and significantly altered in the presence of a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or multidrug resistance associated protein (Mrp1/2) inhibitor. A polarized transport of TSB was found in RBMVEC monolayers with facilitated efflux from the abluminal to luminal side. Addition of a P-gp inhibitor (e.g. verapamil) in both abluminal and luminal sides attenuated the polarized transport. In an in situ rat brain perfusion model, TSB crossed the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier at a greater rate than that for sucrose, and the brain penetration was increased in the presence of a P-gp or Mrp1/2 inhibitor. The brain levels of TSB were only about 30% of that in the plasma and it could be increased to up to 72% of plasma levels when verapamil, quinidine, or probenecid was co-administered in rats. The entry of TSB to CNS increased by 67-97% in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion or treatment with the neurotoxin, quinolinic acid, compared to normal rats. Furthermore, The brain levels of TSB in mdr1a(-/-) and mrp1(-/-) mice were 28- to 2.6-fold higher than those in the wild-type mice. TSB has limited brain penetration through the BBB due to the contribution of P-gp and to a lesser extent of Mrp1 in rodents. Further studies are needed to confirm whether these corresponding transporters in humans are involved in limiting the penetration of TSB across the BBB and the clinical relevance.

  15. Beyond cellular detoxification: a plethora of physiological roles for MDR transporter homologs in plants

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Estelle; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Higher plants possess a multitude of Multiple Drug Resistance (MDR) transporter homologs that group into three distinct and ubiquitous families—the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily, the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS), and the Multidrug And Toxic compound Extrusion (MATE) family. As in other organisms, such as fungi, mammals, and bacteria, MDR transporters make a primary contribution to cellular detoxification processes in plants, mainly through the extrusion of toxic compounds from the cell or their sequestration in the central vacuole. This review aims at summarizing the currently available information on the in vivo roles of MDR transporters in plant systems. Taken together, these data clearly indicate that the biological functions of ABC, MFS, and MATE carriers are not restricted to xenobiotic and metal detoxification. Importantly, the activity of plant MDR transporters also mediates biotic stress resistance and is instrumental in numerous physiological processes essential for optimal plant growth and development, including the regulation of ion homeostasis and polar transport of the phytohormone auxin. PMID:24910617

  16. The feoABC Locus of Yersinia pestis Likely Has Two Promoters Causing Unique Iron Regulation

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Lauren; Fetherston, Jacqueline D.; Perry, Robert D.

    2017-01-01

    The FeoABC ferrous transporter is a wide-spread bacterial system. While the feoABC locus is regulated by a number of factors in the bacteria studied, we have previously found that regulation of feoABC in Yersinia pestis appears to be unique. None of the non-iron responsive transcriptional regulators that control expression of feoABC in other bacteria do so in Y. pestis. Another unique factor is the iron and Fur regulation of the Y. pestis feoABC locus occurs during microaerobic but not aerobic growth. Here we show that this unique iron-regulation is not due to a unique aspect of the Y. pestis Fur protein but to DNA sequences that regulate transcription. We have used truncations, alterations, and deletions of the feoA::lacZ reporter to assess the mechanism behind the failure of iron to repress transcription under aerobic conditions. These studies plus EMSAs and DNA sequence analysis have led to our proposal that the feoABC locus has two promoters: an upstream P1 promoter whose expression is relatively iron-independent but repressed under microaerobic conditions and the known downstream Fur-regulated P2 promoter. In addition, we have identified two regions that bind Y. pestis protein(s), although we have not identified these protein(s) or their function. Finally we used iron uptake assays to demonstrate that both FeoABC and YfeABCD transport ferrous iron in an energy-dependent manner and also use ferric iron as a substrate for uptake. PMID:28785546

  17. Step 2: Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 2: Know Your Diabetes ABCs Past Issues / Fall ... 2 Diabetes" Articles Diabetes Is Serious But Manageable / Step 1: Learn About Diabetes / Step 2: Know Your ...

  18. Identification of residues in ABCG2 affecting protein trafficking and drug transport, using co-evolutionary analysis of ABCG sequences.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ameena J; Cox, Megan H; Jones, Natalie; Goode, Alice J; Bridge, Katherine S; Wong, Kelvin; Briggs, Deborah; Kerr, Ian D

    2015-07-17

    ABCG2 is an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter with a physiological role in urate transport in the kidney and is also implicated in multi-drug efflux from a number of organs in the body. The trafficking of the protein and the mechanism by which it recognizes and transports diverse drugs are important areas of research. In the current study, we have made a series of single amino acid mutations in ABCG2 on the basis of sequence analysis. Mutant isoforms were characterized for cell surface expression and function. One mutant (I573A) showed disrupted glycosylation and reduced trafficking kinetics. In contrast with many ABC transporter folding mutations which appear to be 'rescued' by chemical chaperones or low temperature incubation, the I573A mutation was not enriched at the cell surface by either treatment, with the majority of the protein being retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Two other mutations (P485A and M549A) showed distinct effects on transport of ABCG2 substrates reinforcing the role of TM helix 3 in drug recognition and transport and indicating the presence of intracellular coupling regions in ABCG2. © 2015 Authors.

  19. Physiological characterisation of the efflux pump system of antibiotic-susceptible and multidrug-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Martins, A; Spengler, G; Martins, M; Rodrigues, L; Viveiros, M; Davin-Regli, A; Chevalier, J; Couto, I; Pagès, J M; Amaral, L

    2010-10-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes predominates amongst Enterobacteriaceae species that are increasingly reported as producers of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases. Although this mechanism of resistance to beta-lactams is important, other mechanisms bestowing a multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype in this species are now well documented. Amongst these mechanisms is the overexpression of efflux pumps that extrude structurally unrelated antibiotics prior to their reaching their targets. Interestingly, although knowledge of the genetic background behind efflux pumps is rapidly advancing, few studies assess the physiological nature of the overall efflux pump system of this, or for that matter any other, bacterium. The study reported here evaluates physiologically the efflux pump system of an E. aerogenes ATCC reference as well as two strains whose MDR phenotypes are mediated by overexpressed efflux pumps. The activities of the efflux pumps in these strains are modulated by pH and glucose, although the effects of the latter are essentially restricted to pH 8, suggesting the presence of two general efflux pump systems, i.e. proton-motive force-dependent and ABC transporter types, respectively. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. [¹⁸F]Altanserin and small animal PET: impact of multidrug efflux transporters on ligand brain uptake and subsequent quantification of 5-HT₂A receptor densities in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Tina; Elmenhorst, David; Matusch, Andreas; Celik, A Avdo; Wedekind, Franziska; Weisshaupt, Angela; Beer, Simone; Bauer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The selective 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2a receptor (5-HT(2A)R) radiotracer [(18)F]altanserin is a promising ligand for in vivo brain imaging in rodents. However, [(18)F]altanserin is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in rats. Its applicability might therefore be constrained by both a differential expression of P-gp under pathological conditions, e.g. epilepsy, and its relatively low cerebral uptake. The aim of the present study was therefore twofold: (i) to investigate whether inhibition of multidrug transporters (MDT) is suitable to enhance the cerebral uptake of [(18)F]altanserin in vivo and (ii) to test different pharmacokinetic, particularly reference tissue-based models for exact quantification of 5-HT(2A)R densities in the rat brain. Eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats, either treated with the MDT inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA, 50 mg/kg, n=8) or vehicle (n=10) underwent 180-min PET scans with arterial blood sampling. Kinetic analyses of tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were performed to validate invasive and non-invasive pharmacokinetic models. CsA application lead to a two- to threefold increase of [(18)F]altanserin uptake in different brain regions and showed a trend toward higher binding potentials (BP(ND)) of the radioligand. MDT inhibition led to an increased cerebral uptake of [(18)F]altanserin but did not improve the reliability of BP(ND) as a non-invasive estimate of 5-HT(2A)R. This finding is most probable caused by the heterogeneous distribution of P-gp in the rat brain and its incomplete blockade in the reference region (cerebellum). Differential MDT expressions in experimental animal models or pathological conditions are therefore likely to influence the applicability of imaging protocols and have to be carefully evaluated. © 2013.

  1. Conserved Allosteric Hot Spots in the Transmembrane Domains of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Channels and Multidrug Resistance Protein (MRP) Pumps*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C.; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5′-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs. PMID:24876383

  2. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Multidrug-Resistant TB

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Helen; Coomans, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress (REBSP) is a little-known but potentially valuable right that can contribute to rights-based approaches to addressing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). We argue that better understanding of the REBSP may help to advance legal and civil society action for health rights. While the REBSP does not provide an individual entitlement to have a new drug developed for MDR-TB, it sets up entitlements to expect a state to establish a legislative and policy framework aimed at developing scientific capacity to address the most important health issues and at disseminating the outcomes of scientific research. By making scientific findings available and accessible, people can be enabled to claim the use of science for social benefits. Inasmuch as the market fails to address neglected diseases such as MDR-TB, the REBSP provides a potential counterbalance to frame a positive obligation on states to both marshal their own resources and to coordinate the actions of multiple other actors towards this goal, including non-state actors. While the latter do not hold the same level of accountability as states, the REBSP can still enable the recognition of obligations at a level of “soft law” responsibilities. PMID:27780997

  4. Bypassing multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells with lipid/polymer particle assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Xu, Hui; Li, Zhen; Yao, Mingfei; Xie, Meng; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Wang, Xinshi; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the overexpression of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), remains one of the major obstacles to effective cancer chemotherapy. In this study, lipid/particle assemblies named LipoParticles (LNPs), consisting of a dimethyldidodecylammonium bromide (DMAB)-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticle core surrounded by a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) shell, were specially designed for anticancer drugs to bypass MDR in human breast cancer cells that overexpress P-gp. Methods Doxorubicin (DOX), a chemotherapy drug that is a P-gp substrate, was conjugated to PLGA and encapsulated in the self-assembled LNP structure. Physiochemical properties of the DOX-loaded LNPs were characterized in vitro. Cellular uptake, intracellular accumulation, and cytotoxicity were compared in parental Michigan Cancer Foundation (MCF)-7 cells and P-gp-overexpressing, resistant MCF-7/adriamycin (MCF-7/ADR) cells. Results This study found that the DOX formulated in LNPs showed a significantly increased accumulation in the nuclei of drug-resistant cells relative to the free drug, indicating that LNPs could alter intracellular traffic and bypass drug efflux. The cytotoxicity of DOX loaded-LNPs had a 30-fold lower half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value than free DOX in MCF-7/ADR, measured by the colorimetric cell viability (MTT) assay, correlated with the strong nuclear retention of the drug. Conclusion The results show that this core-shell lipid/particle structure could be a promising strategy to bypass MDR. PMID:22275834

  5. Insights into the molecular mechanism of action of Celastraceae sesquiterpenes as specific, non-transported inhibitors of human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; Reyes, Carolina P; Pérez-Lomas, Antonio L; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Gamarro, Francisco; Castanys, Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Dihydro-beta-agarofuran sesquiterpenes from Celastraceae have been recently shown to bind to human P-glycoprotein (Pgp), functioning as specific, mixed-type inhibitors of its drug transport activity, as well as multidrug resistance (MDR) modulators in vitro. However, nothing is known about whether such compounds are themselves transported by Pgp, or whether they affect Pgp expression as well as its activity, or about the location of their binding site within the protein. We performed transport experiments with a newly synthesized fluorescent sesquiterpene derivative, which retains the anti-Pgp activity of its natural precursor. This probe was poorly transported by Pgp, MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP transporters, compared with classical MDR substrates. Moreover, Pgp did not confer cross-resistance to the most potent dihydro-beta-agarofurans, which did not affect Pgp expression levels in several MDR cell lines. Finally, we observed competitive and non-competitive interactions between one of such dihydro-beta-agarofurans (Mama12) and classical Pgp modulators such as cyclosporin A, verapamil, progesterone, vinblastine and GF120918. These findings suggest that multidrug ABC transporters do not confer resistance to dihydro-beta-agarofurans and could not affect their absorption and biodistribution in the body. Moreover, we mapped their binding site(s) within Pgp, which may prove useful for the rational design of improved modulators based on the structure of dihydro-beta-agarofurans.

  6. Plasma membrane dynamics and tetrameric organisation of ABCG2 transporters in mammalian cells revealed by single particle imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin; Briddon, Stephen J; Holliday, Nicholas D; Kerr, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    ABCG2 is one of three human ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters involved in the export from cells of a chemically and structurally diverse range of compounds. This multidrug efflux capability, together with a broad tissue distribution in the body, means that ABCG2 exerts a range of effects on normal physiology such as kidney urate transport, as well as contributing towards the pharmacokinetic profiles of many exogenous drugs. The primary sequence of ABCG2 contains only half the number of domains required for a functioning ABC transporter and so it must oligomerise in order to function, yet its oligomeric state in intact cell membranes remains uncharacterized. We have analysed ABCG2 in living cell membranes using a combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, photon counting histogram analysis, and stepwise photobleaching to demonstrate a predominantly tetrameric structure for ABCG2 in the presence or absence of transport substrates. These results provide the essential basis for exploring pharmacological manipulation of oligomeric state as a strategy to modulate ABCG2 activity in future selective therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zager, Ellen M; McNerney, Ruth

    2008-01-25

    With almost 9 million new cases each year, tuberculosis remains one of the most feared diseases on the planet. Led by the STOP-TB Partnership and WHO, recent efforts to combat the disease have made considerable progress in a number of countries. However, the emergence of mutated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are resistant to the major anti-tuberculosis drugs poses a deadly threat to control efforts. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has been reported in all regions of the world. More recently, extensively drug resistant-tuberculosis (XDR-TB) that is also resistant to second line drugs has emerged in a number of countries. To ensure that adequate resources are allocated to prevent the emergence and spread of drug resistance it is important to understand the scale of the problem. In this article we propose that current methods of describing the epidemiology of drug resistant tuberculosis are not adequate for this purpose and argue for the inclusion of population based statistics in global surveillance data. Whereas the prevalence of tuberculosis is presented as the proportion of individuals within a defined population having disease, the prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis is usually presented as the proportion of tuberculosis cases exhibiting resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Global surveillance activities have identified countries in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and regions of China as having a high proportion of MDR-TB cases and international commentary has focused primarily on the urgent need to improve control in these settings. Other regions, such as sub-Saharan Africa have been observed as having a low proportion of drug resistant cases. However, if one considers the incidence of new tuberculosis cases with drug resistant disease in terms of the population then countries of sub-Saharan Africa have amongst the highest rates of transmitted MDR-TB in the world. We propose that inclusion of population based statistics in

  8. The ABC's of Learning in Infancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Minta M.

    Learning in infancy is based on activity, beginnings, and curiosity, the so-called ABC's. Earliest behavior consists of mass activity, the period from birth to 24 months of sensory-motor development which provides the foundation for all future learning. Adults must provide space, toys, and affectionate care to help infants proceed through…

  9. Calculus ABCs: A Gateway for Freshman Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Scott R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a gateway testing program designed to ensure that students acquire basic skills in freshman calculus. Students must demonstrate they have mastered standards for "Absolutely Basic Competency"--the Calculus ABCs--in order to pass the course with a grade of C or better. We describe the background, standards, and testing program.…

  10. Molecular and structural characteristics of multidrug resistance-associated protein 7 in Chinese liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fuhong; Yoo, Won Gi; Lee, Ji-Yun; Lu, Yanyan; Pak, Jhang Ho; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2017-03-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10) is a C subfamily member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. MRP7 is a lipophilic anion transporter that pumps endogenous and xenobiotic substrates from the cytoplasm to the extracellular milieu. Here, we cloned and characterized CsMRP7 as a novel ABC transporter from the Chinese liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis. Full-length cDNA of CsMRP7 was 5174 nt, encoded 1636 amino acids (aa), and harbored a 147-bp 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) and 116-bp 3'-UTR. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that CsMRP7 was closer to the ABCC subfamily than the ABCB subfamily. Tertiary structures of the N-terminal region (1-322 aa) and core region (323-1621 aa) of CsMRP7 were generated by homology modeling using glucagon receptor (PDB ID: 5ee7_A) and P-glycoprotein (PDB ID: 4f4c_A) as templates, respectively. CsMRP7 nucleotide-binding domain 2 (NBD2) was conserved more than NBD1, which was the sites of ATP binding and hydrolysis. Like typical long MRPs, CsMRP7 has an additional membrane-spanning domain 0 (MSD0) and cytoplasmic loop, along with a common structural fold consisting of MSD1-NBD1-MSD2-NBD2 as a single polypeptide assembly. MSD0, MSD1, and MSD2 consisted of TM1-7, TM8-13, and TM14-19, respectively. The CsMRP7 transcript was more abundant in the metacercariae than in the adult worms. Truncated NBD1 (39 kDa) and NBD2 (44 kDa) were produced in bacteria and mouse immune sera were raised. CsMRP7 was localized in the apical side of the intestinal epithelium, sperm in the testes and seminal receptacle, receptacle membrane, and mesenchymal tissue around intestine in the adult worm. These results provide molecular information and insights into structural and functional characteristics of CsMRP7 and homologs of flukes.

  11. [Biological characteristics of an enteroinvasive Escherichia coli strain with tatABC deletion].

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhaolong; Ye, Changyun; Liu, Xiaobing; Zhang, Min; Zhuo, Qin

    2013-05-04

    To study the relationship between twin-arginine translocation system (Tat) system with the biological characteristics of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC). Through homologous recombination, we constructed EIEC's tatABC gene deletion strain and complementary strain, and explored their impact on bacterial form, substrate transport function as well as on HeLa cells and guinea pig's corneal invasion force. The tatABC gene deletion strain had apparent changes in bacterial form, loss of substrate transporter function, and significant weakened bacterial invasion force (the number of the deletion strain invading into HeLa cells was decreased significantly, and the ability of its corneal lesion capacity of the guinea pig was significantly weakened), while the complementary strain was similar to the wild strain in the above respects. EIEC's Tat protein transport system is closely related with the biological characteristics of EIEC.

  12. LC-MS/MS Based Quantitation of ABC and SLC Transporter Proteins in Plasma Membranes of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells and Immortalized ARPE19 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, Laura; Sato, Kazuki; Reinisalo, Mika; Kidron, Heidi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Watanabe, Michitoshi; Uchida, Yasuo; Urtti, Arto; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2017-03-06

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) forms the outer blood-retinal barrier between neural retina and choroid. The RPE has several important vision supporting functions, such as transport mechanisms that may also modify pharmacokinetics in the posterior eye segment. Expression of plasma membrane transporters in the RPE cells has not been quantitated. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare transporter protein expression in the ARPE19 cell line and hfRPE (human fetal RPE) cells by using quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP). Among 41 studied transporters, 16 proteins were expressed in hfRPE and 13 in ARPE19 cells. MRP1, MRP5, GLUT1, 4F2hc, TAUT, CAT1, LAT1, and MATE1 proteins were detected in both cell lines within 4-fold differences. MPR7, OAT2 and RFC1 were detected in the hfRPE cells, but their expression levels were below the limit of quantification in ARPE19 cells. PCFT was detected in both studied cell lines, but the expression was over 4-fold higher in hfRPE cells. MCT1, MCT4, MRP4, and Na + /K + ATPase were upregulated in the ARPE19 cell line showing over 4-fold differences in the quantitative expression values. Expression levels of 25 transporters were below the limit of quantification in both cell models. In conclusion, we present the first systematic and quantitative study on transporter protein expression in the plasma membranes of ARPE19 and hfRPE cells. Overall, transporter expression in the ARPE19 and hfRPE cells correlated well and the absolute expression levels were similar, but not identical. The presented quantitative expression levels could be a useful basis for further studies on drug permeation in the outer blood-retinal barrier.

  13. Loss of plastoglobule kinases ABC1K1 and ABC1K3 causes conditional degreening, modified prenyl-lipids, and recruitment of the jasmonic acid pathway

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid-protein particles. This study examines the function of PG-localized kinases ABC1K1 and ABC1K3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Several lines of evidence suggested that ABC1K1 and ABC1K3 form a protein complex. Null mutants for both genes (abc1k1 and abc1k3) and the dou...

  14. Phase behavior of model ABC triblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Joon

    The phase behavior of poly(isoprene-b-styrene- b-ethylene oxide) (ISO), a model ABC triblock copolymer has been studied. This class of materials exhibit self-assembly, forming a large array of ordered morphologies at length scales of 5-100 nm. The formation of stable three-dimensionally continuous network morphologies is of special interest in this study. Since these nanostructures considerably impact the material properties, fundamental knowledge for designing ABC systems have high technological importance for realizing applications in the areas of nanofabrication, nanoporous media, separation membranes, drug delivery and high surface area catalysts. A comprehensive framework was developed to describe the phase behavior of the ISO triblock copolymers at weak to intermediate segregation strengths spanning a wide range of composition. Phases were characterized through a combination of characterization techniques, including small angle x-ray scattering, dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and birefringence measurements. Combined with previous investigations on ISO, six different stable ordered state symmetries have been identified: lamellae (LAM), Fddd orthorhombic network (O70), double gyroid (Q230), alternating gyroid (Q214), hexagonal (HEX), and body-centered cubic (BCC). The phase map was found to be somewhat asymmetric around the fI = fO isopleth. This work provides a guide for theoretical studies and gives insight into the intricate effects of various parameters on the self-assembly of ABC triblock copolymers. Experimental SAXS data evaluated with a simple scattering intensity model show that local mixing varies continuously across the phase map between states of two- and three-domain segregation. Strategies of blending homopolymers with ISO triblock copolymer were employed for studying the swelling properties of a lamellar state. Results demonstrate that lamellar domains swell or shrink depending upon the type of homopolymer that

  15. Modulation of expression and activity of intestinal multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 by xenobiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2) is a transporter that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. In the intestine, it is localized to the apical membrane of the enterocyte and plays a key role in limiting the absorption of xenobiotics incorporated orally. MRP2 may also play a role in systemic clearance of xenobiotics available from the serosal side of the intestine. MRP2 transports a wide range of substrates, mainly organic anions conjugated with glucuronic acid, glutathione and sulfate and its expression can be modulated by xenobiotics at transcriptional- and post-transcriptional levels. Transcriptional regulation is usually mediated by a groupmore » of nuclear receptors. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a major member of this group. Relevant drugs described to up-regulate intestinal MRP2 via PXR are rifampicin, spironolactone and carbamazepine, among others. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) was also reported to modulate MRP2 expression, phenobarbital being a typical activator. Dietary compounds, including micronutrients and other natural products, are also capable of regulating intestinal MRP2 expression transcriptionally. We have given them particular attention since the composition of the food ingested daily is not necessarily supervised and may result in interactions with therapeutic drugs. Post-transcriptional regulation of MRP2 activity by xenobiotics, e.g. as a consequence of inhibitory actions, is also described in this review. Unfortunately, only few studies report on drug-drug or nutrient-drug interactions as a consequence of modulation of intestinal MRP2 activity by xenobiotics. Future clinical studies are expected to identify additional interactions resulting in changes in efficacy or safety of therapeutic drugs. - Highlights: • Intestinal MRP2 (ABCC2) expression and activity can be regulated by xenobiotics. • PXR and CAR are major MRP2 modulators through a transcriptional mechanism.

  16. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance via Photodestruction of ABCG2-Rich Extracellular Vesicles Sequestering Photosensitive Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Goler-Baron, Vicky; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a dominant impediment to curative cancer chemotherapy. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily including ABCG2, ABCB1 and ABCC1 mediate MDR to multiple structurally and functionally distinct antitumor agents. Recently we identified a novel mechanism of MDR in which ABCG2-rich extracellular vesicles (EVs) form in between attached neighbor breast cancer cells and highly concentrate various chemotherapeutics in an ABCG2-dependent manner, thereby sequestering them away from their intracellular targets. Hence, development of novel strategies to overcome MDR modalities is a major goal of cancer research. Towards this end, we here developed a novel approach to selectively target and kill MDR cancer cells. We show that illumination of EVs that accumulated photosensitive cytotoxic drugs including imidazoacridinones (IAs) and topotecan resulted in intravesicular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and severe damage to the EVs membrane that is shared by EVs-forming cells, thereby leading to tumor cell lysis and the overcoming of MDR. Furthermore, consistent with the weak base nature of IAs, MDR cells that are devoid of EVs but contained an increased number of lysosomes, highly accumulated IAs in lysosomes and upon photosensitization were efficiently killed via ROS-dependent lysosomal rupture. Combining targeted lysis of IAs-loaded EVs and lysosomes elicited a synergistic cytotoxic effect resulting in MDR reversal. In contrast, topotecan, a bona fide transport substrate of ABCG2, accumulated exclusively in EVs of MDR cells but was neither detected in lysosomes of normal breast epithelial cells nor in non-MDR breast cancer cells. This exclusive accumulation in EVs enhanced the selectivity of the cytotoxic effect exerted by photodynamic therapy to MDR cells without harming normal cells. Moreover, lysosomal alkalinization with bafilomycin A1 abrogated lysosomal accumulation of IAs, consequently preventing

  17. Crystal Structure of a Plant Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion Family Protein.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiki; Iwaki, Shigehiro; Tsukazaki, Tomoya

    2017-09-05

    The multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of proteins consists of transporters responsible for multidrug resistance in prokaryotes. In plants, a number of MATE proteins were identified by recent genomic and functional studies, which imply that the proteins have substrate-specific transport functions instead of multidrug extrusion. The three-dimensional structure of eukaryotic MATE proteins, including those of plants, has not been reported, preventing a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of these proteins. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a MATE protein from the plant Camelina sativa at 2.9 Å resolution. Two sets of six transmembrane α helices, assembled pseudo-symmetrically, possess a negatively charged internal pocket with an outward-facing shape. The crystal structure provides insight into the diversity of plant MATE proteins and their substrate recognition and transport through the membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Plant Flavonoids—Biosynthesis, Transport and Involvement in Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petrussa, Elisa; Braidot, Enrico; Zancani, Marco; Peresson, Carlo; Bertolini, Alberto; Patui, Sonia; Vianello, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at analysing the synthesis of flavonoids, their import and export in plant cell compartments, as well as their involvement in the response to stress, with particular reference to grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.). A multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) as well as ABC transporters have been demonstrated in the tonoplast of grape berry, where they perform a flavonoid transport. The involvement of a glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene has also been inferred. Recently, a putative flavonoid carrier, similar to mammalian bilitranslocase (BTL), has been identified in both grape berry skin and pulp. In skin the pattern of BTL expression increases from véraison to harvest, while in the pulp its expression reaches the maximum at the early ripening stage. Moreover, the presence of BTL in vascular bundles suggests its participation in long distance transport of flavonoids. In addition, the presence of a vesicular trafficking in plants responsible for flavonoid transport is discussed. Finally, the involvement of flavonoids in the response to stress is described. PMID:23867610

  19. Structural basis for allosteric cross-talk between the asymmetric nucleotide binding sites of a heterodimeric ABC exporter.

    PubMed

    Hohl, Michael; Hürlimann, Lea M; Böhm, Simon; Schöppe, Jendrik; Grütter, Markus G; Bordignon, Enrica; Seeger, Markus A

    2014-07-29

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate vital transport processes in every living cell. ATP hydrolysis, which fuels transport, displays positive cooperativity in numerous ABC transporters. In particular, heterodimeric ABC exporters exhibit pronounced allosteric coupling between a catalytically impaired degenerate site, where nucleotides bind tightly, and a consensus site, at which ATP is hydrolyzed in every transport cycle. Whereas the functional phenomenon of cooperativity is well described, its structural basis remains poorly understood. Here, we present the apo structure of the heterodimeric ABC exporter TM287/288 and compare it to the previously solved structure with adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) bound at the degenerate site. In contrast to other ABC exporter structures, the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of TM287/288 remain in molecular contact even in the absence of nucleotides, and the arrangement of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) is not influenced by AMP-PNP binding, a notion confirmed by double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements. Nucleotide binding at the degenerate site results in structural rearrangements, which are transmitted to the consensus site via two D-loops located at the NBD interface. These loops owe their name from a highly conserved aspartate and are directly connected to the catalytically important Walker B motif. The D-loop at the degenerate site ties the NBDs together even in the absence of nucleotides and substitution of its aspartate by alanine is well-tolerated. By contrast, the D-loop of the consensus site is flexible and the aspartate to alanine mutation and conformational restriction by cross-linking strongly reduces ATP hydrolysis and substrate transport.

  20. Fluconazole Resistance Associated with Drug Efflux and Increased Transcription of a Drug Transporter Gene, PDH1, in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Haruko; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Geber, Antonia; Parkinson, Tanya; Hitchcock, Christopher; Falconer, Derek J.; Ward, Douglas J.; Marsden, Katherine; Bennett, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Sequential Candida glabrata isolates were obtained from the mouth of a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 who was receiving high doses of fluconazole for oropharyngeal thrush. Fluconazole-susceptible colonies were replaced by resistant colonies that exhibited both increased fluconazole efflux and increased transcripts of a gene which codes for a protein with 72.5% identity to Pdr5p, an ABC multidrug transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The deduced protein had a molecular mass of 175 kDa and was composed of two homologous halves, each with six putative transmembrane domains and highly conserved sequences of ATP-binding domains. When the earliest and most azole-susceptible isolate of C. glabrata from this patient was exposed to fluconazole, increased transcripts of the PDR5 homolog appeared, linking azole exposure to regulation of this gene. PMID:9661006

  1. Statistical Hypothesis Testing in Intraspecific Phylogeography: NCPA versus ABC

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Nested clade phylogeographic analysis (NCPA) and approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) have been used to test phylogeographic hypotheses. Multilocus NCPA tests null hypotheses, whereas ABC discriminates among a finite set of alternatives. The interpretive criteria of NCPA are explicit and allow complex models to be built from simple components. The interpretive criteria of ABC are ad hoc and require the specification of a complete phylogeographic model. The conclusions from ABC are often influenced by implicit assumptions arising from the many parameters needed to specify a complex model. These complex models confound many assumptions so that biological interpretations are difficult. Sampling error is accounted for in NCPA, but ABC ignores important sources of sampling error that creates pseudo-statistical power. NCPA generates the full sampling distribution of its statistics, but ABC only yields local probabilities, which in turn make it impossible to distinguish between a good fitting model, a non-informative model, and an over-determined model. Both NCPA and ABC use approximations, but convergences of the approximations used in NCPA are well defined whereas those in ABC are not. NCPA can analyze a large number of locations, but ABC cannot. Finally, the dimensionality of tested hypothesis is known in NCPA, but not for ABC. As a consequence, the “probabilities” generated by ABC are not true probabilities and are statistically non-interpretable. Accordingly, ABC should not be used for hypothesis testing, but simulation approaches are valuable when used in conjunction with NCPA or other methods that do not rely on highly parameterized models. PMID:19192182

  2. CREATING AN IPHONE APPLICATION FOR COLLECTING CONTINUOUS ABC DATA

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Seth W; Dixon, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview and task analysis for creating a continuous ABC data-collection application using Xcode on a Mac computer. Behavior analysts can program an ABC data collection system, complete with a customized list of target clients, antecedents, behaviors, and consequences to be recorded, and have the data automatically sent to an e-mail account after observations have concluded. Further suggestions are provided to customize the ABC data- collection system for individual preferences and clinical needs. PMID:23060682

  3. Directed evolution of P-glycoprotein cysteines reveals site-specific, non-conservative substitutions that preserve multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Douglas J; Mok, Leo; Botta, Sri K; Singh, Anukriti; Altenberg, Guillermo A; Urbatsch, Ina L

    2014-06-25

    Pgp (P-glycoprotein) is a prototype ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) transporter involved in multidrug resistance of cancer. We used directed evolution to replace six cytoplasmic Cys (cysteine) residues in Pgp with all 20 standard amino acids and selected for active mutants. From a pool of 75000 transformants for each block of three Cys, we identified multiple mutants that preserved drug resistance and yeast mating activity. The most frequent substitutions were glycine and serine for Cys427 (24 and 20%, respectively) and Cys1070 (37 and 25%) of the Walker A motifs in the NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains), Cys1223 in NBD2 (25 and 8%) and Cys638 in the linker region (24 and 16%), whereas close-by Cys669 tolerated glycine (16%) and alanine (14%), but not serine (absent). Cys1121 in NBD2 showed a clear preference for positively charged arginine (38%) suggesting a salt bridge with Glu269 in the ICL2 (intracellular loop 2) may stabilize domain interactions. In contrast, three Cys residues in transmembrane α-helices could be successfully replaced by alanine. The resulting CL (Cys-less) Pgp was fully active in yeast cells, and purified proteins displayed drug-stimulated ATPase activities indistinguishable from WT (wild-type) Pgp. Overall, directed evolution identified site-specific, non-conservative Cys substitutions that allowed building of a robust CL Pgp, an invaluable new tool for future functional and structural studies, and that may guide the construction of other CL proteins where alanine and serine have proven unsuccessful.

  4. Characterization and analyses of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) polymorphisms in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ji-Ye; Huang, Qiong; Yang, Youyun; Zhang, Jian-Ting; Zhong, Mei-Zuo; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major obstacles for successful cancer chemotherapy. Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters such as MRP1/ABCC1 has been suggested to cause MDR. In this study, we explored the distribution frequencies of four common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MRP1/ABCC1 in a mainland Chinese population and investigated whether these SNPs affect the expression and function of the MRP1/ABCC1. We found that the allelic frequencies of Cys43Ser (128G>C), Thr73Ile (218C>T), Arg723Gln (2168G>A) and Arg1058Gln (3173G>A) in mainland Chinese were 0.5%, 1.4%, 5.8% and 0.5%, respectively. These four SNPs were recreated by site-directed mutagenesis and tested for their effect on MRP1/ABCC1 expression and MDR function in HEK293 and CHO-K1 cells lines. We found that none of these mutations had any effect on MRP1/ABCC1 expression and trafficking, but that Arg723Gln mutation significantly reduced MRP1/ABCC1-mediated resistance to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, etoposide, vinblastine and vincristine. The Cys43Ser mutation did not affect all tested drugs resistance. On the other hand, the Thr73Ile mutation reduced resistance to methotrexate and etoposide while the Arg1058Gln mutation increased the response of two anthracycline drugs and etoposide in HEK293 and CHO-K1 cells as well as vinblastine and methotrexate in CHO-K1 cells. We conclude that the allelic frequency of the Arg723Gln mutation is relatively higher than other SNPs in mainland Chinese population and therefore this mutation significantly reduces MRP1/ABCC1 activity in MDR. PMID:19214144

  5. Multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 4 attenuates benzo[a]pyrene-mediated DNA-adduct formation in human bronchoalveolar H358 cells.

    PubMed

    Gelhaus, Stacy L; Gilad, Oren; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Penning, Trevor M; Blair, Ian A

    2012-02-25

    Multi-drug resistance protein (MRP) 4, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, has broad substrate specificity. It facilitates the transport of bile salt conjugates, conjugated steroids, nucleoside analogs, eicosanoids, and cardiovascular drugs. Recent studies in liver carcinoma cells and hepatocytes showed that MRP4 expression is regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The AhR has particular importance in the lung and is most commonly associated with the up-regulation of cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-mediated metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) to reactive intermediates. Treatment of H358, human bronchoalveolar, cells with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or (-)-benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydro-7,8-diol (B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol), the proximate carcinogen of B[a]P, revealed that MRP4 expression was increased compared to control. This suggested that MRP4 expression might contribute to the paradoxical decrease in (+)-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene-2'-deoxyguanosine ((+)-anti-trans-B[a]PDE-dGuo) DNA-adducts observed in TCDD-treated H358 cells. We have now found that decreased MRP4 expression induced by a short hairpin RNA (shRNA), or chemical inhibition with probenecid, increased (+)-anti-trans-B[a]PDE-dGuo formation in cells treated with (-)-B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol, but not the ultimate carcinogen (+)-anti-trans-B[a]PDE. Thus, up-regulation of MRP4 increased cellular efflux of (-)-B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol, which attenuated DNA-adduct formation. This is the first report identifying a specific MRP efflux transporter that decreases DNA damage arising from an environmental carcinogen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nonlinear resonances in the ABC-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didov, A. A.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we study resonances of the ABC-flow in the near integrable case ( C ≪1 ). This is an interesting example of a Hamiltonian system with 3/2 degrees of freedom in which simultaneous existence of two resonances of the same order is possible. Analytical conditions of the resonance existence are received. It is shown numerically that the largest n :1 (n = 1, 2, 3) resonances exist, and their energies are equal to theoretical energies in the near integrable case. We provide analytical and numerical evidences for existence of two branches of the two largest n :1 (n = 1, 2) resonances in the region of finite motion.

  7. A Salmonella nanoparticle mimic overcomes multidrug resistance in tumours.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Lubo, Regino; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zhao, Liang; Rossi, Kyle; Wu, Xiang; Zou, Yekui; Castillo, Antonio; Leonard, Jack; Bortell, Rita; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Han, Gang; McCormick, Beth A

    2016-07-25

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is a food-borne pathogen that also selectively grows in tumours and functionally decreases P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a multidrug resistance transporter. Here we report that the Salmonella type III secretion effector, SipA, is responsible for P-gp modulation through a pathway involving caspase-3. Mimicking the ability of Salmonella to reverse multidrug resistance, we constructed a gold nanoparticle system packaged with a SipA corona, and found this bacterial mimic not only accumulates in tumours but also reduces P-gp at a SipA dose significantly lower than free SipA. Moreover, the Salmonella nanoparticle mimic suppresses tumour growth with a concomitant reduction in P-gp when used with an existing chemotherapeutic drug (that is, doxorubicin). On the basis of our finding that the SipA Salmonella effector is fundamental for functionally decreasing P-gp, we engineered a nanoparticle mimic that both overcomes multidrug resistance in cancer cells and increases tumour sensitivity to conventional chemotherapeutics.

  8. A Manual for Implementation of ABC Video Duplication Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Joseph, Ed.

    The ABC (Appalachian BOCES Consortium) consists of 10 BOCES (Boards of Cooperative Educational Services) which serve the 14 southern counties of New York State designated as Appalachia. Each year since 1974, the ABC has participated in regional video duplication projects, which have yielded a total of nearly 4,000 video titles. The complexity of…

  9. ABCs of Being Smart: S Is for Supporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Joanne Foster's article "R We There Yet?" was first published in "Parenting for High Potential" ("PHP") in 2006, which became the springboard for the "ABCs of Being Smart" series of columns. At that time, Foster invited "PHP" readers to think about their own versions of the "ABCs of Being…

  10. Tripartite assembly of RND multidrug efflux pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daury, Laetitia; Orange, François; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Verchère, Alice; Monlezun, Laura; Gounou, Céline; Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle; Pos, Klaas M.; Lambert, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Tripartite multidrug efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria are composed of an inner membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and a periplasmic adaptor protein. They are assumed to form ducts inside the periplasm facilitating drug exit across the outer membrane. Here we present the reconstitution of native Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM and Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC tripartite Resistance Nodulation and cell Division (RND) efflux systems in a lipid nanodisc system. Single-particle analysis by electron microscopy reveals the inner and outer membrane protein components linked together via the periplasmic adaptor protein. This intrinsic ability of the native components to self-assemble also leads to the formation of a stable interspecies AcrA-MexB-TolC complex suggesting a common mechanism of tripartite assembly. Projection structures of all three complexes emphasize the role of the periplasmic adaptor protein as part of the exit duct with no physical interaction between the inner and outer membrane components.

  11. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 3 (Mrp3/Abcc3/Moat-D) Is Expressed in the SAE Squalus acanthias Shark Embryo–Derived Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Parton, Angela; Czechanski, Anne; Durkin, Christopher; Kong, Chi-Chon; Barnes, David

    2008-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3/Mrp3) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family of membrane transporters and related proteins that act on a variety of xenobiotic and anionic molecules to transfer these substrates in an ATP-dependent manner. In recent years, useful comparative information regarding evolutionarily conserved structure and transport functions of these proteins has accrued through the use of primitive marine animals such as cartilaginous fish. Until recently, one missing tool in comparative studies with cartilaginous fish was cell culture. We have derived from the embryo of Squalus acanthias, the spiny dogfish shark, the S. acanthias embryo (SAE) mesenchymal stem cell line. This is the first continuously proliferating cell line from a cartilaginous fish. We identified expression of Mrp3 in this cell line, cloned the molecule, and examined molecular and cellular physiological aspects of the protein. Shark Mrp3 is characterized by three membrane-spanning domains and two nucleotide-binding domains. Multiple alignments with other species showed that the shark Mrp3 amino acid sequence was well conserved. The shark sequence was overall 64% identical to human MRP3, 72% identical to chicken Mrp3, and 71% identical to frog and stickleback Mrp3. Highest identity between shark and human amino acid sequence (82%) was seen in the carboxyl-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the proteins. Cell culture experiments showed that mRNA for the protein was induced as much as 25-fold by peptide growth factors, fetal bovine serum, and lipid nutritional components, with the largest effect mediated by a combination of lipids including unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and vitamin E. PMID:18284333

  12. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (Mrp3/Abcc3/Moat-D) is expressed in the SAE Squalus acanthias shark embryo-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Parton, Angela; Czechanski, Anne; Durkin, Christopher; Kong, Chi-Chon; Barnes, David

    2007-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3/Mrp3) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family of membrane transporters and related proteins that act on a variety of xenobiotic and anionic molecules to transfer these substrates in an ATP-dependent manner. In recent years, useful comparative information regarding evolutionarily conserved structure and transport functions of these proteins has accrued through the use of primitive marine animals such as cartilaginous fish. Until recently, one missing tool in comparative studies with cartilaginous fish was cell culture. We have derived from the embryo of Squalus acanthias, the spiny dogfish shark, the S. acanthias embryo (SAE) mesenchymal stem cell line. This is the first continuously proliferating cell line from a cartilaginous fish. We identified expression of Mrp3 in this cell line, cloned the molecule, and examined molecular and cellular physiological aspects of the protein. Shark Mrp3 is characterized by three membrane-spanning domains and two nucleotide-binding domains. Multiple alignments with other species showed that the shark Mrp3 amino acid sequence was well conserved. The shark sequence was overall 64% identical to human MRP3, 72% identical to chicken Mrp3, and 71% identical to frog and stickleback Mrp3. Highest identity between shark and human amino acid sequence (82%) was seen in the carboxyl-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the proteins. Cell culture experiments showed that mRNA for the protein was induced as much as 25-fold by peptide growth factors, fetal bovine serum, and lipid nutritional components, with the largest effect mediated by a combination of lipids including unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and vitamin E.

  13. ABCA Transporter Gene Expression and Poor Outcome in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hedditch, Ellen L.; Gao, Bo; Russell, Amanda J.; Lu, Yi; Emmanuel, Catherine; Beesley, Jonathan; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Harnett, Paul; George, Joshy; Williams, Rebekka T.; Flemming, Claudia; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Walsh, Christine; Fasching, Peter; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Nakanishi, Toru; Yatabe, Yasushi; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Heitz, Florian; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susan K.; Jensen, Allan; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Brown, Bob; Flanagan, James; Metcalf, Michelle D; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sellers, Thomas; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Schildkraut, Joellen; Iversen, Ed; Weber, Rachel P.; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen; Bowtell, David D.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; deFazio, Anna; Norris, Murray D.; MacGregor, Stuart; Haber, Michelle; Henderson, Michelle J.

    2014-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play various roles in cancer biology and drug resistance, but their association with outcomes in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is unknown. Methods The relationship between clinical outcomes and ABC transporter gene expression in two independent cohorts of high-grade serous EOC tumors was assessed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, analysis of expression microarray data, and immunohistochemistry. Associations between clinical outcomes and ABCA transporter gene single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested in a genome-wide association study. Impact of short interfering RNA–mediated gene suppression was determined by colony forming and migration assays. Association with survival was assessed with Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Associations with outcome were observed with ABC transporters of the “A” subfamily, but not with multidrug transporters. High-level expression of ABCA1, ABCA6, ABCA8, and ABCA9 in primary tumors was statistically significantly associated with reduced survival in serous ovarian cancer patients. Low levels of ABCA5 and the C-allele of rs536009 were associated with shorter overall survival (hazard ratio for death = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.26 to 1.79; P = 6.5e−6). The combined expression pattern of ABCA1, ABCA5, and either ABCA8 or ABCA9 was associated with particularly poor outcome (mean overall survival in group with adverse ABCA1, ABCA5 and ABCA9 gene expression = 33.2 months, 95% CI = 26.4 to 40.1; vs 55.3 months in the group with favorable ABCA gene expression, 95% CI = 49.8 to 60.8; P = .001), independently of tumor stage or surgical debulking status. Suppression of cholesterol transporter ABCA1 inhibited ovarian cancer cell growth and migration in vitro, and statin treatment reduced ovarian cancer cell migration. Conclusions Expression of ABCA transporters was associated with poor

  14. ABCA transporter gene expression and poor outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedditch, Ellen L; Gao, Bo; Russell, Amanda J; Lu, Yi; Emmanuel, Catherine; Beesley, Jonathan; Johnatty, Sharon E; Chen, Xiaoqing; Harnett, Paul; George, Joshy; Williams, Rebekka T; Flemming, Claudia; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Walsh, Christine; Fasching, Peter; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hein, Alexander; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Nakanishi, Toru; Yatabe, Yasushi; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Heitz, Florian; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susan K; Jensen, Allan; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Brown, Bob; Flanagan, James; Metcalf, Michelle D; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sellers, Thomas; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Schildkraut, Joellen; Iversen, Ed; Weber, Rachel P; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen; Bowtell, David D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; deFazio, Anna; Norris, Murray D; MacGregor, Stuart; Haber, Michelle; Henderson, Michelle J

    2014-07-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play various roles in cancer biology and drug resistance, but their association with outcomes in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is unknown. The relationship between clinical outcomes and ABC transporter gene expression in two independent cohorts of high-grade serous EOC tumors was assessed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, analysis of expression microarray data, and immunohistochemistry. Associations between clinical outcomes and ABCA transporter gene single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested in a genome-wide association study. Impact of short interfering RNA-mediated gene suppression was determined by colony forming and migration assays. Association with survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. Associations with outcome were observed with ABC transporters of the "A" subfamily, but not with multidrug transporters. High-level expression of ABCA1, ABCA6, ABCA8, and ABCA9 in primary tumors was statistically significantly associated with reduced survival in serous ovarian cancer patients. Low levels of ABCA5 and the C-allele of rs536009 were associated with shorter overall survival (hazard ratio for death = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.26 to 1.79; P = 6.5e-6). The combined expression pattern of ABCA1, ABCA5, and either ABCA8 or ABCA9 was associated with particularly poor outcome (mean overall survival in group with adverse ABCA1, ABCA5 and ABCA9 gene expression = 33.2 months, 95% CI = 26.4 to 40.1; vs 55.3 months in the group with favorable ABCA gene expression, 95% CI = 49.8 to 60.8; P = .001), independently of tumor stage or surgical debulking status. Suppression of cholesterol transporter ABCA1 inhibited ovarian cancer cell growth and migration in vitro, and statin treatment reduced ovarian cancer cell migration. Expression of ABCA transporters was associated with poor outcome in serous ovarian cancer, implicating lipid

  15. Quasiparticle renormalization in ABC graphene trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Xu; Jaefari, Akbar; Barlas, Yafis; Uchoa, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the effect of electron-electron interactions in ABC stacked graphene trilayers. In the gapless regime, we show that the self-energy corrections lead to the renormalization of the dynamical exponent z = 3 +α1 / N , with α1 ~ 0 . 52 and N is the number of fermionic species. Although the quasiparticle residue is suppressed near the neutrality point, the lifetime has a sublinear scaling with the energy and the quasiparticles are well defined even at zero energy. We calculate the renormalization of a variety of physical observables, which can be directly measured in experiments. X.D., A.J., and B.U. acknowledge University of Oklahoma for support. B.U. acknowledges NSF Career Grant No. DMR-1352604 for partial support.

  16. The minimal-ABC trees with B1-branches.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Darko; Du, Zhibin; Fonseca, Carlos M da

    2018-01-01

    The atom-bond connectivity index (or, for short, ABC index) is a molecular structure descriptor bridging chemistry to graph theory. It is probably the most studied topological index among all numerical parameters of a graph that characterize its topology. For a given graph G = (V, E), the ABC index of G is defined as [Formula: see text], where di denotes the degree of the vertex i, and ij is the edge incident to the vertices i and j. A combination of physicochemical and the ABC index properties are commonly used to foresee the bioactivity of different chemical composites. Additionally, the applicability of the ABC index in chemical thermodynamics and other areas of chemistry, such as in dendrimer nanostars, benzenoid systems, fluoranthene congeners, and phenylenes is well studied in the literature. While finding of the graphs with the greatest ABC-value is a straightforward assignment, the characterization of the tree(s) with minimal ABC index is a problem largely open and has recently given rise to numerous studies and conjectures. A B1-branch of a graph is a pendent path of order 2. In this paper, we provide an important step forward to the full characterization of these minimal trees. Namely, we show that a minimal-ABC tree contains neither 4 nor 3 B1-branches. The case when the number of B1-branches is 2 is also considered.

  17. Computer simulations suggest direct and stable tip to tip interaction between the outer membrane channel TolC and the isolated docking domain of the multidrug RND efflux transporter AcrB.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas H; Raunest, Martin; Fischer, Nadine; Reith, Dirk; Kandt, Christian

    2016-07-01

    One way by which bacteria achieve antibiotics resistance is preventing drug access to its target molecule for example through an overproduction of multi-drug efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division (RND) protein super family of which AcrAB-TolC in Escherichia coli is a prominent example. Although representing one of the best studied efflux systems, the question of how AcrB and TolC interact is still unclear as the available experimental data suggest that either both proteins interact in a tip to tip manner or do not interact at all but are instead connected by a hexamer of AcrA molecules. Addressing the question of TolC-AcrB interaction, we performed a series of 100 ns - 1 µs-molecular dynamics simulations of membrane-embedded TolC in presence of the isolated AcrB docking domain (AcrB(DD)). In 5/6 simulations we observe direct TolC-AcrB(DD) interaction that is only stable on the simulated time scale when both proteins engage in a tip to tip manner. At the same time we find TolC opening and closing freely on extracellular side while remaining closed at the inner periplasmic bottleneck region, suggesting that either the simulated time is too short or additional components are required to unlock TolC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetics of MDR Transport in Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koshkin, Vasilij; Yang, Burton B.; Krylov, Sergey N.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) driven by ABC (ATP binding cassette) membrane transporters is one of the major causes of treatment failure in human malignancy. MDR capacity is thought to be unevenly distributed among tumor cells, with higher capacity residing in tumor-initiating cells (TIC) (though opposite finding are occasionally reported). Functional evidence for enhanced MDR of TICs was previously provided using a “side population” assay. This assay estimates MDR capacity by a single parameter - cell’s ability to retain fluorescent MDR substrate, so that cells with high MDR capacity (“side population”) demonstrate low substrate retention. In the present work MDR in TICs was investigated in greater detail using a kinetic approach, which monitors MDR efflux from single cells. Analysis of kinetic traces obtained allowed for the estimation of both the velocity (V max) and affinity (K M) of MDR transport in single cells. In this way it was shown that activation of MDR in TICs occurs in two ways: through the increase of V max in one fraction of cells, and through decrease of K M in another fraction. In addition, kinetic data showed that heterogeneity of MDR parameters in TICs significantly exceeds that of bulk cells. Potential consequences of these findings for chemotherapy are discussed. PMID:24223908

  19. Down-regulation of a hepatic transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 is involved in alteration of pharmacokinetics of glycyrrhizin and its metabolites in a rat model of chronic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Makino, Toshiaki; Ohtake, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Akito; Tsuchiya, Naoko; Imamura, Sachiko; Iizuka, Seiichi; Inoue, Makoto; Mizukami, Hajime

    2008-07-01

    Glycyrrhizin (GL) has been used to treat chronic hepatitis in Japan and Europe. It is thought to induce pseudoaldosteronism via inhibition of type 2 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD2) by glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), a major metabolite of GL. A previous clinical study suggested that 3-monoglucuronyl-glycyrrhetinic acid (3MGA), another metabolite of GL, might play a more important role in the pathogenesis of pseudoaldosteronism. The present study evaluates the pharmacokinetics of GL and its metabolites in rats with chronic liver injury induced by a choline-deficient l-amino acid-defined (CDAA) diet to clarify the relationship between 3MGA and pseudoaldosteronism. In rats fed a CDAA diet, plasma concentrations and urinary eliminations of GL and 3MGA were markedly higher than in the rats fed the control diet; the plasma concentration of GA was unaffected when GL was orally administered. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the suppression of levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp) 2 and its localization in the hepatic tissue of rats fed a CDAA diet. When 3MGA was i.v. injected in rats fed a CDAA diet or injected in Mrp2-dysfunctional Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats, plasma concentrations of 3MGA were higher, and biliary excretion of 3MGA was lower than in each control group. The results suggested that 3MGA would be excreted to bile via hepatic Mrp2 and that its dysfunction would reduce 3MGA clearance. 3MGA accumulated by liver fibrosis resulted in the increased excretion through renal tubule and might be strongly related to the pathogenesis of pseudoaldosteronism because 11beta-HSD2 is expressed in renal tubular epithelial cells.

  20. Research Progress in Reversal of Tumor Multi-drug Resistance via Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi; Cao, Hongyan; Qi, Xianghui; Li, Huikai; Ye, Peizhi; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Danqiao; Sun, Mingyu

    2017-11-24

    Multidrug resistance occurs when a tumor develops resistance to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs, which may include antitumor drugs with different chemical structures and mechanisms. Multidrug resistance limits the treatment effects of antitumor drugs, and is the main cause of chemotherapy failure. Multidrug resistance is caused by numerous factors including changes in ATP-binding cassette transporters, target proteins, detoxification, deoxyribonucleic acid repair, drug metabolic enzymes, and signal pathways of apoptosis. Clinical research indicates that natural products have great potential to treat tumors and reverse multidrug resistance. Natural products, which often have multiple targets, could play an important role in tumor treatment, have beneficial effects on tumor inhibition, improve symptoms, reduce radiotherapy and chemotherapy side effects, enhance immunity, and prolong survival. Because natural products often have few adverse reactions and less drug resistance, the antitumor activities of natural products have attracted extensive research. We aimed to review the basic research and clinical application of natural products in the reversal of multidrug resistance. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Flavone-resistant Leishmania donovani Overexpresses LdMRP2 Transporter in the Parasite and Activates Host MRP2 on Macrophages to Circumvent the Flavone-mediated Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan; Mukhopadhyay, Rupkatha; Saha, Sourav; Mishra, Amartya; Sengupta, Souvik; Roy, Syamal; Majumder, Hemanta K.

    2014-01-01

    In parasites, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent an important family of proteins related to drug resistance and other biological activities. Resistance of leishmanial parasites to therapeutic drugs continues to escalate in developing countries, and in many instances, it is due to overexpressed ABC efflux pumps. Progressively adapted baicalein (BLN)-resistant parasites (pB25R) show overexpression of a novel ABC transporter, which was classified as ABCC2 or Leishmania donovani multidrug resistance protein 2 (LdMRP2). The protein is primarily localized in the flagellar pocket region and in internal vesicles. Overexpressed LdABCC2 confers substantial BLN resistance to the parasites by rapid drug efflux. The BLN-resistant promastigotes when transformed into amastigotes in macrophage cells cannot be cured by treatment of macrophages with BLN. Amastigote resistance is concomitant with the overexpression of macrophage MRP2 transporter. Reporter analysis and site-directed mutagenesis assays demonstrated that antioxidant response element 1 is activated upon infection. The expression of this phase II detoxifying gene is regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant response element activation. In view of the fact that the signaling pathway of phosphoinositol 3-kinase controls microfilament rearrangement and translocation of actin-associated proteins, the current study correlates with the intricate pathway of phosphoinositol 3-kinase-mediated nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which activates MRP2 expression in macrophages upon infection by the parasites. In contrast, phalloidin, an agent that prevents depolymerization of actin filaments, inhibits Nrf2 translocation and Mrp2 gene activation by pB25R infection. Taken together, these results provide insight into the mechanisms by which resistant clinical isolates of L. donovani induce intracellular events relevant to drug resistance. PMID:24706751

  2. Yang-Mills theory and the ABC conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui; Hu, Zhi; Probst, Malte; Read, James

    2018-05-01

    We establish a precise correspondence between the ABC Conjecture and 𝒩 = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory. This is achieved by combining three ingredients: (i) Elkies’ method of mapping ABC-triples to elliptic curves in his demonstration that ABC implies Mordell/Faltings; (ii) an explicit pair of elliptic curve and associated Belyi map given by Khadjavi-Scharaschkin; and (iii) the fact that the bipartite brane-tiling/dimer model for a gauge theory with toric moduli space is a particular dessin d’enfant in the sense of Grothendieck. We explore this correspondence for the highest quality ABC-triples as well as large samples of random triples. The conjecture itself is mapped to a statement about the fundamental domain of the toroidal compactification of the string realization of 𝒩 = 4 SYM.

  3. ABC's of Being Smart: I Can "C" Clearly Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author focuses on C of the ABC's of being smart. She continues to categorize the points for readers. These categories include the following: (1) being; (2) doing; and (3) stretching.

  4. Compilation of accelerated bridge construction (ABC) bridges : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-01-01

    Development of accelerated bridge construction (ABC) technologies has been occurring across the country, many times in : isolation. Although FHWA and others have worked to facilitate communication between these efforts, there was not a : comprehensiv...

  5. Multidrug resistance in amoebiasis patients.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Devendra; Sehgal, Rakesh; Chawla, Yogesh; Malla, Nancy; Mahajan, R C

    2006-08-01

    Amoebiasis, caused by Entamoeba sp. a protozoan parasite, is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries. The symptomatic patients are treated by specific chemotherapy. However, there are reports of treatment failure in some cases suggesting the possibility of drug resistance. The present study was therefore planned to assess the presence and expression of mRNA of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene in clinical isolates of Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar. Forty five clinical isolates of Entamoeba sp. [E. histolytica (15) and E. dispar (30)] were maintained in polyxenic followed by monoxenic medium. DNA and total RNA were extracted from clinical isolates of Entamoeba sp. and from sensitive strain of E. histolytica (HM1: IMSS) and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiplex reverse transcription (RT)-PCR techniques. The 344 bp segment of E. histolytica DNA was seen by PCR using primers specific to EhPgp1 in all clinical isolates and sensitive strain of E. histolytica. Over expression of EhPgp1 was observed only in resistant mutant of E. histolytica; however, transcription of EhPgp1 was not seen in any clinical isolates and sensitive strain of E. histolytica. The findings of the present study indicate that, so far, drug resistance in clinical isolates of E. histolytica does not seem to be a major problem in this country. However, susceptibility of clinical isolates of E. histolytica against various antiamoebic drugs needs to be investigated for better management.

  6. The Yersinia pestis Siderophore, Yersiniabactin, and the ZnuABC system both contribute to Zinc acquisition and the development of lethal septicemic plague in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bobrov, Alexander G.; Kirillina, Olga; Fetherston, Jacqueline D.; Miller, M. Clarke; Burlison, Joseph A.; Perry, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial pathogens must overcome host sequestration of zinc (Zn2+), an essential micronutrient, during the infectious disease process. While the mechanisms to acquire chelated Zn2+ by bacteria are largely undefined, many pathogens rely upon the ZnuABC family of ABC transporters. Here we show that in Yersinia pestis, irp2, a gene encoding the synthetase (HMWP2) for the siderophore yersiniabactin (Ybt) is required for growth under Zn2+-deficient conditions in a strain lacking ZnuABC. Moreover, growth stimulation with exogenous, purified apo-Ybt provides evidence that Ybt may serve as a zincophore for Zn2+ acquisition. Studies with the Zn2+-dependent transcriptional reporter znuA∷lacZ indicate that the ability to synthesize Ybt affects the levels of intracellular Zn2+. However, the outer membrane receptor Psn and TonB as well as the inner membrane (IM) ABC transporter YbtPQ, that are required for Fe3+ acquisition by Ybt, are not needed for Ybt-dependent Zn2+ uptake. In contrast, the predicted IM protein YbtX, a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily, was essential for Ybt-dependent Zn2+ uptake. Finally, we show that the ZnuABC system and the Ybt synthetase HMWP2, presumably by Ybt synthesis, both contribute to the development of a lethal infection in a septicemic plague mouse model. PMID:24979062

  7. The Yersinia pestis siderophore, yersiniabactin, and the ZnuABC system both contribute to zinc acquisition and the development of lethal septicaemic plague in mice.

    PubMed

    Bobrov, Alexander G; Kirillina, Olga; Fetherston, Jacqueline D; Miller, M Clarke; Burlison, Joseph A; Perry, Robert D

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial pathogens must overcome host sequestration of zinc (Zn(2+) ), an essential micronutrient, during the infectious disease process. While the mechanisms to acquire chelated Zn(2+) by bacteria are largely undefined, many pathogens rely upon the ZnuABC family of ABC transporters. Here we show that in Y