Science.gov

Sample records for abc transporters abcb1

  1. Nitensidine A, a guanidine alkaloid from Pterogyne nitens, is a novel substrate for human ABC transporter ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Tamura, Ai; Kadioglu, Onat; Satake, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Yuji; Murase, Hayato; Regasini, Luis Octavio; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Fricker, Gert; Efferth, Thomas

    2014-02-15

    The Pterogyne nitens (Fabaceae) tree, native to South America, has been found to produce guanidine alkaloids as well as bioactive flavonols such as kaempferol, quercetin, and rutin. In the present study, we examined the possibility of interaction between human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 and four guanidine alkaloids isolated from P. nitens (i.e., galegine, nitensidine A, pterogynidine, and pterogynine) using human T cell lymphoblast-like leukemia cell line CCRF-CEM and its multi-drug resistant (MDR) counterpart CEM/ADR5000. In XTT assays, CEM/ADR5000 cells were resistant to the four guanidine alkaloids compared to CCRF-CEM cells, although the four guanidine alkaloids exhibited some level of cytotoxicity against both CCRF-CEM and CEM/ADR5000 cells. In ATPase assays, three of the four guanidine alkaloids were found to stimulate the ATPase activity of ABCB1. Notably, nitensidine A was clearly found to stimulate the ATPase activity of ABCB1 as strongly as the control drug, verapamil. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of nitensidine A on CEM/ADR5000 cells was synergistically enhanced by verapamil. Nitensidine A inhibited the extrusion of calcein by ABCB1. In the present study, the possibility of interaction between ABCB1 and two synthetic nitensidine A analogs (nitensidine AT and AU) were examined to gain insight into the mechanism by which nitensidine A stimulates the ATPase activity of ABCB1. The ABCB1-dependent ATPase activity stimulated by nitensidine A was greatly reduced by substituting sulfur (S) or oxygen (O) for the imino nitrogen atom (N) in nitensidine A. Molecular docking studies on human ABCB1 showed that, guanidine alkaloids from P. nitens dock to the same binding pocket as verapamil. Nitensidine A and its analogs exhibit similar binding energies to verapamil. Taken together, this research clearly indicates that nitensidine A is a novel substrate for ABCB1. The present results also suggest that the number, binding site, and polymerization

  2. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Knudsen, Lina Almind; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Holmskov, Uffe; Stensballe, Allan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in colonic pathophysiology as they had recently been related to colorectal cancer (CRC) development. METHODS: Literature search was conducted on PubMed using combinations of the following terms: ABC transporters, ATP binding cassette transporter proteins, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative, colitis, Crohns disease, colorectal cancer, colitis, intestinal inflammation, intestinal carcinogenesis, ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp/CD243/MDR1), ABCC2/multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), Abcb1/Mdr1a, abcc2/Mrp2, abcg2/Bcrp, knock-out mice, tight junction, membrane lipid function. RESULTS: Recently, human studies reported that changes in the levels of ABC transporters were early events in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence leading to CRC. A link between ABCB1, high fat diet and gut microbes in relation to colitis was suggested by the animal studies. The finding that colitis was preceded by altered gut bacterial composition suggests that deletion of Abcb1 leads to fundamental changes of host-microbiota interaction. Also, high fat diet increases the frequency and severity of colitis in specific pathogen-free Abcb1 KO mice. The Abcb1 KO mice might thus serve as a model in which diet/environmental factors and microbes may be controlled and investigated in relation to intestinal inflammation. Potential molecular mechanisms include defective transport of inflammatory mediators and/or phospholipid translocation from one side to the other of the cell membrane lipid bilayer by ABC transporters affecting inflammatory response and/or function of tight junctions, phagocytosis and vesicle trafficking. Also, diet and microbes give rise to molecules which are potential substrates for the ABC transporters and which may additionally affect ABC transporter function through nuclear receptors and transcriptional regulation. Another critical role of ABCB1 was suggested by the finding that

  3. Investigating the dynamic nature of the ABC transporters: ABCB1 and MsbA as examples for the potential synergies of MD theory and EPR applications.

    PubMed

    Stockner, Thomas; Mullen, Anna; MacMillan, Fraser

    2015-10-01

    ABC transporters are primary active transporters found in all kingdoms of life. Human multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1, or P-glycoprotein, has an extremely broad substrate spectrum and confers resistance against chemotherapy drug treatment in cancer cells. The bacterial ABC transporter MsbA is a lipid A flippase and a homolog to the human ABCB1 transporter, with which it partially shares its substrate spectrum. Crystal structures of MsbA and ABCB1 have been solved in multiple conformations, providing a glimpse into the possible conformational changes the transporter could be going through during the transport cycle. Crystal structures are inherently static, while a dynamic picture of the transporter in motion is needed for a complete understanding of transporter function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can provide structural information on ABC transporters, but the strength of these two methods lies in the potential to characterise the dynamic regime of these transporters. Information from the two methods is quite complementary. MD simulations provide an all atom dynamic picture of the time evolution of the molecular system, though with a narrow time window. EPR spectroscopy can probe structural, environmental and dynamic properties of the transporter in several time regimes, but only through the attachment sites of an exogenous spin label. In this review the synergistic effects that can be achieved by combining the two methods are highlighted, and a brief methodological background is also presented. PMID:26517918

  4. Trametinib modulates cancer multidrug resistance by targeting ABCB1 transporter

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Li, Yong; Zhao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Mei, Xiao-Long; Xue, You-Qiu; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Wei, Meng-Ning; Shi, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of adenine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is one of the main reasons of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. Trametinib, a novel specific small-molecule mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor, is currently used for the treatment of melanoma in clinic. In this study, we investigated the effect of trametinib on MDR mediated by ABC transporters. Trametinib significantly potentiated the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells overexpressed ABCB1, but not ABCC1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, trametinib did not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, trametinib potently blocked the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. Importantly, trametinib remarkably enhanced the effect of vincristine against the xenografts of ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells in nude mice. The predicted binding mode showed the hydrophobic interactions of trametinib within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. Consequently, our findings may have important implications for use of trametinib in combination therapy for cancer treatment. PMID:25915534

  5. UMMS-4 enhanced sensitivity of chemotherapeutic agents to ABCB1-overexpressing cells via inhibiting function of ABCB1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongjuan; Tang, Shangjun; Aslam, Sana; Ahmad, Matloob; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Wang, Fang; Huang, Zhencong; Cai, Jiye; Fu, Liwu

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters through efflux of antineoplastic agents from cancer cells is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. The inhibition of these ABC transporters is thus a logical approach to circumvent MDR. There has been intensive research effort to design and develop novel inhibitors for the ABC transporters to achieve this goal. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of UMMS-4 to modulate P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1)-, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2)- and multidrug resistance protein (MRP1/ABCC1)-mediated MDR in cancer cells. Our findings showed that UMMS-4, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, apparently circumvents resistance to ABCB1 substrate anticancer drugs in ABCB1-overexpressing cells. When used at a concentration of 20 μmol/L, UMMS-4 produced a 17.53-fold reversal of MDR, but showed no effect on the sensitivity of drug-sensitive parental cells. UMMS-4, however, did not significantly alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrates in all cells and was unable to reverse ABCG2- and ABCC1-mediated MDR. Additionally, UMMS-4 profoundly inhibited the transport of rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) and doxorubicin (Dox) by the ABCB1 transporter. Furthermore, UMMS-4 did not alter the expression of ABCB1 at the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the results of ATPase assays showed that UMMS-4 stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCB1. Taken together, we conclude that UMMS-4 antagonizes ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer cells through direct inhibition of the drug efflux function of ABCB1. These findings may be useful for the development of safer and more effective MDR modulator. PMID:24660104

  6. Substrate-specific effects of pirinixic acid derivatives on ABCB1-mediated drug transport

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Wurglics, Mario; Aniceto, Natália; Dittrich, Michaela; Zettl, Heiko; Wiese, Michael; Wass, Mark; Ghafourian, Taravat; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2016-01-01

    Pirinixic acid derivatives, a new class of drug candidates for a range of diseases, interfere with targets including PPARα, PPARγ, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and microsomal prostaglandin and E2 synthase-1 (mPGES1). Since 5-LO, mPGES1, PPARα, and PPARγ represent potential anti-cancer drug targets, we here investigated the effects of 39 pirinixic acid derivatives on prostate cancer (PC-3) and neuroblastoma (UKF-NB-3) cell viability and, subsequently, the effects of selected compounds on drug-resistant neuroblastoma cells. Few compounds affected cancer cell viability in low micromolar concentrations but there was no correlation between the anti-cancer effects and the effects on 5-LO, mPGES1, PPARα, or PPARγ. Most strikingly, pirinixic acid derivatives interfered with drug transport by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 in a drug-specific fashion. LP117, the compound that exerted the strongest effect on ABCB1, interfered in the investigated concentrations of up to 2μM with the ABCB1-mediated transport of vincristine, vinorelbine, actinomycin D, paclitaxel, and calcein-AM but not of doxorubicin, rhodamine 123, or JC-1. In silico docking studies identified differences in the interaction profiles of the investigated ABCB1 substrates with the known ABCB1 binding sites that may explain the substrate-specific effects of LP117. Thus, pirinixic acid derivatives may offer potential as drug-specific modulators of ABCB1-mediated drug transport. PMID:26887049

  7. Substrate-specific effects of pirinixic acid derivatives on ABCB1-mediated drug transport.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Wurglics, Mario; Aniceto, Natália; Dittrich, Michaela; Zettl, Heiko; Wiese, Michael; Wass, Mark; Ghafourian, Taravat; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2016-03-01

    Pirinixic acid derivatives, a new class of drug candidates for a range of diseases, interfere with targets including PPARα, PPARγ, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and microsomal prostaglandin and E2 synthase-1 (mPGES1). Since 5-LO, mPGES1, PPARα, and PPARγ represent potential anti-cancer drug targets, we here investigated the effects of 39 pirinixic acid derivatives on prostate cancer (PC-3) and neuroblastoma (UKF-NB-3) cell viability and, subsequently, the effects of selected compounds on drug-resistant neuroblastoma cells. Few compounds affected cancer cell viability in low micromolar concentrations but there was no correlation between the anti-cancer effects and the effects on 5-LO, mPGES1, PPARα, or PPARγ. Most strikingly, pirinixic acid derivatives interfered with drug transport by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 in a drug-specific fashion. LP117, the compound that exerted the strongest effect on ABCB1, interfered in the investigated concentrations of up to 2μM with the ABCB1-mediated transport of vincristine, vinorelbine, actinomycin D, paclitaxel, and calcein-AM but not of doxorubicin, rhodamine 123, or JC-1. In silico docking studies identified differences in the interaction profiles of the investigated ABCB1 substrates with the known ABCB1 binding sites that may explain the substrate-specific effects of LP117. Thus, pirinixic acid derivatives may offer potential as drug-specific modulators of ABCB1-mediated drug transport. PMID:26887049

  8. Osimertinib (AZD9291) Attenuates the Function of Multidrug Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB1 in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sung-Han; Lu, Yu-Jen; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Wu, Chung-Pu

    2016-06-01

    The effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy is often circumvented by multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 (MDR1, P-glycoprotein). Several epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been shown previously capable of modulating the function of ABCB1 and reversing ABCB1-mediated MDR in human cancer cells. Furthermore, some TKIs are transported by ABCB1, which results in low oral bioavailability, reduced distribution, and the development of acquired resistance to these TKIs. In this study, we investigated the interaction between ABCB1 and osimertinib, a novel selective, irreversible third-generation EGFR TKI that has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We also evaluated the potential impact of ABCB1 on the efficacy of osimertinib in cancer cells, which can present a therapeutic challenge to clinicians in the future. We revealed that although osimertinib stimulates the ATPase activity of ABCB1, overexpression of ABCB1 does not confer resistance to osimertinib. Our results suggest that it is unlikely that the overexpression of ABCB1 can be a major contributor to the development of osimertinib resistance in cancer patients. More significantly, we revealed an additional action of osimertinib that directly inhibits the function of ABCB1 without affecting the expression level of ABCB1, enhances drug-induced apoptosis, and reverses the MDR phenotype in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. Considering that osimertinib is a clinically approved third-generation EGFR TKI, our findings suggest that a combination therapy with osimertinib and conventional anticancer drugs may be beneficial to patients with MDR tumors. PMID:27169328

  9. Fluorimetric Methods for Analysis of Permeability, Drug Transport Kinetics, and Inhibition of the ABCB1 Membrane Transporter.

    PubMed

    Armada, Ana; Martins, Célia; Spengler, Gabriella; Molnar, Joseph; Amaral, Leonard; Rodrigues, António Sebastião; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The cell membrane P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1, ABCB1) is an energy-dependent efflux pump that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters, and has been associated with drug resistance in eukaryotic cells. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is related to an increased expression and function of the ABCB1 (P-gp) efflux pump that often causes chemotherapeutic failure in cancer. Modulators of this efflux pump, such as the calcium channel blocker verapamil (VP) and cyclosporine A (CypA), can reverse the MDR phenotype but in vivo studies have revealed disappointing results due to adverse side effects. Currently available methods are unable to visualize and assess in a real-time basis the effectiveness of ABCB1 inhibitors on the uptake and efflux of ABCB1 substrates. However, predicting and testing ABCB1 modulation activity using living cells during drug development are crucial. The use of ABCB1-transfected mouse T-lymphoma cell line to study the uptake/efflux of fluorescent probes like ethidium bromide (EB), rhodamine 123 (Rh-123), and carbocyanine dye DiOC2, in the presence and absence of potential inhibitors, is currently used in our laboratories to evaluate the ability of a drug to inhibit ABCB1-mediated drug accumulation and efflux. Here we describe and compare three in vitro methods, which evaluate the permeability, transport kinetics of fluorescent substrates, and inhibition of the ABCB1 efflux pump by drugs of chemical synthesis or extracted from natural sources, using model cancer cell lines overexpressing this transporter, namely (1) real-time fluorimetry that assesses the accumulation of ethidium bromide, (2) flow cytometry, and (3) fluorescent microscopy using rhodamine 123 and DiOC2. PMID:26910071

  10. Opioid-induced respiratory depression: ABCB1 transporter pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Sadhasivam, S; Chidambaran, V; Zhang, X; Meller, J; Esslinger, H; Zhang, K; Martin, L J; McAuliffe, J

    2015-04-01

    Opioid-related respiratory depression (RD) is a serious clinical problem as it causes multiple deaths and anoxic brain injuries. Morphine is subject to efflux via P-glycoprotein transporter encoded by ABCB1, also known as MDR1. ABCB1 polymorphisms may affect blood-brain barrier transport of morphine and therefore individual response to its central analgesic and adverse effects. This study aimed to determine specific associations between common ABCB1 genetic variants and clinically important outcomes including RD and RD resulting in prolonged stay in hospital with intravenous morphine in a homogenous pediatric surgical pain population of 263 children undergoing tonsillectomy. Children with GG and GA genotypes of ABCB1 polymorphism rs9282564 had higher risks of RD resulting in prolonged hospital stays; adding one copy of the minor allele (G) increased the odds of prolonged hospital stay due to postoperative RD by 4.7-fold (95% confidence interval: 2.1-10.8, P=0.0002). PMID:25311385

  11. Human ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB1 Confers Resistance to Volasertib (BI 6727), a Selective Inhibitor of Polo-like Kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Hsiao, Sung-Han; Luo, Shi-Yu; Su, Ching-Ya; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Huang, Chiun-Wei; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    The overexpression of the serine/threonine specific polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is associated with poor prognosis in many types of cancer. Consequently, Plk1 has emerged as a valid therapeutic target for anticancer drug design. Volasertib is a potent inhibitor of Plk1 that inhibits the proliferation of multiple human cancer cell lines by promoting cell cycle arrest at nanomolar concentrations. However, the risk of developing drug resistance, which is often associated with the overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein), can present a therapeutic challenge for volasertib and many other therapeutic drugs. Although volasertib is highly effective against the proliferation of numerous cancer cell lines, we found that the overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells leads to cellular resistance to volasertib and reduces the level of volasertib-stimulated G2/M cell cycle arrest and subsequent onset of apoptosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that volasertib competitively inhibits the function of ABCB1 and stimulates the basal ATPase activity of ABCB1 in a concentration-dependent manner, which is consistent with substrate transport by ABCB1. More importantly, we discovered that the coadministration of an inhibitor or drug substrate of ABCB1 restored the anticancer activity of volasertib in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. In conclusion, the results of our study reveal that ABCB1 negatively affects the efficacy of volasertib and supports its combination with a modulator of ABCB1 to improve clinical responses. PMID:26412161

  12. Hernandezine, a Bisbenzylisoquinoline Alkaloid with Selective Inhibitory Activity against Multidrug-Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Drug Transporter ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sung-Han; Lu, Yu-Jen; Yang, Chun-Chiao; Tuo, Wei-Cherng; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Hung, Tai-Ho; Wu, Chung-Pu

    2016-08-26

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, MDR1) is the most studied mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR), which remains a major obstacle in clinical cancer chemotherapy. Consequently, resensitizing MDR cancer cells by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 has been considered as a potential strategy to overcome ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer patients. However, the task of developing a suitable modulator of ABCB1 has been hindered mostly by the lack of selectivity and high intrinsic toxicity of candidate compounds. Considering the wide range of diversity and relatively nontoxic nature of natural products, developing a potential modulator of ABCB1 from natural sources is particularly valuable. Through screening of a large collection of purified bioactive natural products, hernandezine was identified as a potent and selective reversing agent for ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer cells. Experimental data demonstrated that the bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid hernandezine is selective for ABCB1, effectively inhibits the transport function of ABCB1, and enhances drug-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. More importantly, hernandezine significantly resensitizes ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs at nontoxic, nanomolar concentrations. Collectively, these findings reveal that hernandezine has great potential to be further developed into a novel reversal agent for combination therapy in MDR cancer patients. PMID:27504669

  13. Polymorphisms in the drug transporter gene ABCB1 predict antidepressant treatment response in depression.

    PubMed

    Uhr, Manfred; Tontsch, Alina; Namendorf, Christian; Ripke, Stephan; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Dose, Tatjana; Ebinger, Martin; Rosenhagen, Marcus; Kohli, Martin; Kloiber, Stefan; Salyakina, Daria; Bettecken, Thomas; Specht, Michael; Pütz, Benno; Binder, Elisabeth B; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Holsboer, Florian

    2008-01-24

    The clinical efficacy of a systemically administered drug acting on the central nervous system depends on its ability to pass the blood-brain barrier, which is regulated by transporter molecules such as ABCB1 (MDR1). Here we report that polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene predict the response to antidepressant treatment in those depressed patients receiving drugs that have been identified as substrates of ABCB1 using abcb1ab double-knockout mice. Our results indicate that the combined consideration of both the medication's capacity to act as an ABCB1-transporter substrate and the patient's ABCB1 genotype are strong predictors for achieving a remission. This finding can be viewed as a further step into personalized antidepressant treatment. PMID:18215618

  14. Role of ABCB1, ABCG2, ABCC2 and ABCC5 transporters in placental passage of zidovudine.

    PubMed

    Neumanova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is one of the most frequently used antiretroviral drugs in prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV. However, safety concerns on AZT use in pregnancy still persist as severe side effects are associated with AZT exposure in children. In our study we aimed to contribute to current knowledge on AZT transplacental transport and to evaluate potential involvement of the main human drug efflux ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, p-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 and 5 (ABCC2 and ABCC5) in the disposition of AZT between mother and fetus. In order to elucidate this issue we investigated the effect of selected ABC transporters on AZT transepithelial transport across MDCKII cell monolayers. In addition we used the in situ method of dually perfused rat term placenta to further study the role of ABC transporters in AZT transplacental transport. In vitro studies revealed significant effect of ABCB1 and ABCG2 on AZT transport which was subsequently confirmed also on organ level. Lamivudine, an antiretroviral agent commonly co-administered with AZT, did not affect ABC transporter-mediated AZT transfer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26390406

  15. Tangeretin, a citrus pentamethoxyflavone, antagonizes ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance by inhibiting its transport function.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sen-Ling; Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhong-Qiu; Xie, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and tumor metastasis are the main causes of chemotherapeutic treatment failure and mortality in cancer patients. In this study, at achievable nontoxic plasma concentrations, citrus flavonoid tangeretin has been shown to reverse ABCB1-mediated cancer resistance to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents effectively. Co-treatment of cells with tangeretin and paclitaxel activated apoptosis as well as arrested cell cycle at G2/M-phase. Tangeretin profoundly inhibited the ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin, and flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the expression of ABCB1. Moreover, it stimulated the ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. The molecular docking results indicated a favorable binding of tangeretin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled ABCB1 transporter. The overall results demonstrated that tangeretin could sensitize ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to chemotherapeutical agents by directly inhibiting ABCB1 transporter function, which encouraged further animal and clinical studies in the treatment of resistant cancers. PMID:27058921

  16. Vascular and extravascular distribution of the ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCB1 and ABCC1 in aged human brain and pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Hölzl, Gloria; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Hildebrandt, Jens; Trübner, Kurt; Krohn, Markus; Bogerts, Bernhard; Pahnke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an increasing role in the understanding of pathologic peptide deposition in neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. To describe the location of the most important ABC transporters for NDs in human brain tissue, we investigated ABCB1 and ABCC1 immunohistologically in the adult human brain and pituitary. Both transporters have similar but not identical expression patterns. In brain regions with an established blood-brain barrier (BBB), ABCB1 and ABCC1 were ubiquitously expressed in endothelial cells of the microvasculature and in a subset of larger blood vessels (mostly venules). Remarkably, both transporters were also found in fenestrated capillaries in circumventricular organs where the BBB is absent. Moreover, ABCB1 and ABCC1 were also expressed in various non-endothelia cells such as pericytes, astrocytes, choroid plexus epithelia, ventricle ependymal cells, and neurons. With regard to their neuronal expression it was shown that both transporters are located in specific nerve cell populations, which are also immunopositive for three putative cell markers of purinergic cell signalling, namely 5´-nucleotidase, adenosine deaminase and nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-2. Therefore, we speculate that neuronal expression of ABCB1 and ABCC1 might be linked to adenosinergic/purinergic neuromodulation. Lastly, both transporters were observed in multiple adenohypophyseal cells. PMID:25218792

  17. [Structural and Pharmacological Studies of an ABC Multidrug Transporter].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    A drug's effectiveness against a disease depends not only on its interaction with receptors but also its pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and extrusion; ADME). ATP binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters are important proteins that influence the ADME properties of a drug, especially the ABC transporter subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1). Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of ABCB1 will contribute to our understanding of the molecular basis of ADME. Human ABCB1 is expressed in many organelles, and exports various substrates from cells using energy generated by its ATP hydrolase (ATPase) activity. The ATPase activity depends on the concentration of the transport substrates, and the characteristic behavior of the substrate-dependent ATPase activity can be related to the molecular mechanism of ABCB1. Recently, we have revealed the molecular mechanisms of a eukaryotic ABCB1 homolog, CmABCB1, based on structural and functional studies. In this review, I discuss the relationship between key structural features and the behavior of transport substrate-dependent ATPase activity of CmABCB1, including its role in determining the molecular basis of ADME. PMID:26831793

  18. Bafetinib (INNO-406) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Patel, Bhargav A; Talele, Tanaji T; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters are involved in the efflux of xenobiotic compounds and are responsible for decreasing drug accumulation in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. Discovered by structure-based virtual screening algorithms, bafetinib, a Bcr-Abl/Lyn tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to have inhibitory effects on both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR in this in-vitro investigation. Bafetinib significantly sensitized ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing MDR cells to their anticancer substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of anticancer drugs, particularly doxorubicin and [(3)H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells; mitoxantrone and [(3)H]-mitoxantrone in ABCG2 overexpressing cells, respectively. Bafetinib stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activities while inhibited ABCG2 ATPase activities. There were no significant changes in the expression level or the subcellular distribution of ABCB1 and ABCG2 in the cells exposed to 3 μM of bafetinib. Overall, our study indicated that bafetinib reversed ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR by blocking the drug efflux function of these transporters. These findings might be useful in developing combination therapy for MDR cancer treatment. PMID:27157787

  19. Bafetinib (INNO-406) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Patel, Bhargav A.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters are involved in the efflux of xenobiotic compounds and are responsible for decreasing drug accumulation in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. Discovered by structure-based virtual screening algorithms, bafetinib, a Bcr-Abl/Lyn tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to have inhibitory effects on both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR in this in-vitro investigation. Bafetinib significantly sensitized ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing MDR cells to their anticancer substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of anticancer drugs, particularly doxorubicin and [3H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells; mitoxantrone and [3H]-mitoxantrone in ABCG2 overexpressing cells, respectively. Bafetinib stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activities while inhibited ABCG2 ATPase activities. There were no significant changes in the expression level or the subcellular distribution of ABCB1 and ABCG2 in the cells exposed to 3 μM of bafetinib. Overall, our study indicated that bafetinib reversed ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR by blocking the drug efflux function of these transporters. These findings might be useful in developing combination therapy for MDR cancer treatment. PMID:27157787

  20. HG-829 is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of the ATP-binding cassette multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Gisela; Robey, Robert W; Sokol, Lubomir; McGraw, Kathy L; Clark, Justine; Lawrence, Nicholas J; Sebti, Said M; Wiese, Michael; List, Alan F

    2012-08-15

    Transmembrane drug export mediated by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein contributes to clinical resistance to antineoplastics. In this study, we identified the substituted quinoline HG-829 as a novel, noncompetitive, and potent P-glycoprotein inhibitor that overcomes in vitro and in vivo drug resistance. We found that nontoxic concentrations of HG-829 restored sensitivity to P-glycoprotein oncolytic substrates. In ABCB1-overexpressing cell lines, HG-829 significantly enhanced cytotoxicity to daunorubicin, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, and etoposide. Coadministration of HG-829 fully restored in vivo antitumor activity of daunorubicin in mice without added toxicity. Functional assays showed that HG-829 is not a Pgp substrate or competitive inhibitor of Pgp-mediated drug efflux but rather acts as a noncompetitive modulator of P-glycoprotein transport function. Taken together, our findings indicate that HG-829 is a potent, long-acting, and noncompetitive modulator of P-glycoprotein export function that may offer therapeutic promise for multidrug-resistant malignancies. PMID:22761337

  1. Incorporation of ABCB1-mediated transport into a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of docetaxel in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hudachek, Susan F.

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel is one of the most widely used anticancer agents. While this taxane has proven to be an effective chemotherapeutic drug, noteworthy challenges exist in relation to docetaxel administration due to the considerable interindividual variability in efficacy and toxicity associated with the use of this compound, largely attributable to differences between individuals in their ability to metabolize and eliminate docetaxel. Regarding the latter, the ATP-binding cassette transporter B1 (ABCB1, PGP, MDR1) is primarily responsible for docetaxel elimination. To further understand the role of ABCB1 in the biodistribution of docetaxel in mice, we utilized physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling that included ABCB1-mediated transport in relevant tissues. Transporter function was evaluated by studying docetaxel pharmacokinetics in wild-type FVB and Mdr1a/b constitutive knockout (KO) mice and incorporating this concentration–time data into a PBPK model comprised of eight tissue compartments (plasma, brain, heart, lung, kidney, intestine, liver and slowly perfused tissues) and, in addition to ABCB1-mediated transport, included intravenous drug administration, specific binding to intracellular tubulin, intestinal and hepatic metabolism, glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption. For all tissues in both the FVB and KO cohorts, the PBPK model simulations closely mirrored the observed data. Furthermore, both models predicted AUC values that were with 15 % of the observed AUC values, indicating that our model-simulated drug exposures accurately reflected the observed tissue exposures. Overall, our PBPK model furthers the understanding of the role of ABCB1 in the biodistribution of docetaxel. Additionally, this exemplary model structure can be applied to investigate the pharmacokinetics of other ABCB1 transporter substrates. PMID:23616082

  2. Motesanib (AMG706), a potent multikinase inhibitor, antagonizes multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux activity of the ABCB1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Patel, Atish; Kumar, Priyank; Shukla, Suneet; Fung, King Leung; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells often become resistant to chemotherapy through a phenomenon known as multidrug resistance (MDR). Several factors are responsible for the development of MDR, preeminent among them being the accelerated drug efflux mediated by overexpression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Some small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were recently reported to modulate the activity of ABC transporters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if motesanib, a multikinase inhibitor, could reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR. The results showed that motesanib significantly sensitized both ABCB1-transfected and drug-selected cell lines overexpressing this transporter to its substrate anticancer drugs. Motesanib significantly increased the accumulation of [3H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells by blocking the efflux function of ABCB1 transporter. In contrast, no significant change in the expression levels and localization pattern of ABCB1 was observed when ABCB1 overexpressing cells were exposed to 3 µM motesanib for 72 h. Moreover, motesanib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCB1 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. Consistent with these findings, the docking studies indicated favorable binding of motesanib within the transmembrane region of homology modeled human ABCB1. Here, we report for the first time, motesanib, at clinically achievable plasma concentrations, antagonizes MDR by inhibiting the efflux activity of the ABCB1 transporter. These findings may be useful for cancer combination therapy with TKIs in the clinic. PMID:24937702

  3. Motesanib (AMG706), a potent multikinase inhibitor, antagonizes multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux activity of the ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Patel, Atish; Kumar, Priyank; Shukla, Suneet; Fung, King Leung; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Talele, Tanaji T; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-08-15

    Cancer cells often become resistant to chemotherapy through a phenomenon known as multidrug resistance (MDR). Several factors are responsible for the development of MDR, preeminent among them being the accelerated drug efflux mediated by overexpression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Some small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were recently reported to modulate the activity of ABC transporters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if motesanib, a multikinase inhibitor, could reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR. The results showed that motesanib significantly sensitized both ABCB1-transfected and drug-selected cell lines overexpressing this transporter to its substrate anticancer drugs. Motesanib significantly increased the accumulation of [(3)H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells by blocking the efflux function of ABCB1 transporter. In contrast, no significant change in the expression levels and localization pattern of ABCB1 was observed when ABCB1 overexpressing cells were exposed to 3μM motesanib for 72h. Moreover, motesanib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCB1 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. Consistent with these findings, the docking studies indicated favorable binding of motesanib within the transmembrane region of homology modeled human ABCB1. Here, we report for the first time, motesanib, at clinically achievable plasma concentrations, antagonizes MDR by inhibiting the efflux activity of the ABCB1 transporter. These findings may be useful for cancer combination therapy with TKIs in the clinic. PMID:24937702

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Is Determinant for ABCB1 and ABCG2 Drug-Efflux Transporters Function

    PubMed Central

    Atisha-Fregoso, Yemil; Lima, Guadalupe; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Baños-Peláez, Miguel; Fragoso-Loyo, Hilda; Jakez-Ocampo, Juan; Contreras-Yáñez, Irazú; Llorente, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare drug efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with active disease and in remission. Methods Twenty two active RA patients (DAS28 ≥3.2) and 22 patients in remission (DAS28<2.6) were selected from an early RA clinic. All patients were evaluated at study inclusion and six months later. ABCB1 and ABCG2 functional activity was measured in peripheral lymphocytes by flow cytometry. The percentage of cells able to extrude substrates for ABCB1 and ABCG2 was recorded. Results Active patients had higher ABCB1 and ABCG2 activity compared with patients in remission (median [interquartile range]): 3.9% (1.4–22.2) vs (1.3% (0.6–3.2), p = 0.003 and 3.9% (1.1–13.3) vs 0.9% (0.5–1.9) p = 0.006 respectively. Both transporters correlated with disease activity assessed by DAS28, rho = 0.45, p = 0.002 and rho = 0.47, p = 0.001 respectively. Correlation was observed between the time from the beginning of treatment and transporter activity: rho = 0.34, p = 0.025 for ABCB1 and rho = 0.35, p = 0.018 for ABCG2. The linear regression model showed that DAS28 and the time from the onset of treatment are predictors of ABCB1 and ABCG2 functional activity, even after adjustment for treatment. After six months we calculated the correlation between change in DAS28 and change in the functional activity in both transporters and found a moderate and significant correlation for ABCG2 (rho = 0.28, p = 0.04) and a non-significant correlation for ABCB1 (rho = 0.22, p = 0.11). Conclusions Patients with active RA have an increased function of ABCB1 and ABCG2, and disease activity is the main determinant of this phenomena. PMID:27442114

  5. Sildenafil reverses ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated chemotherapeutic drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhi; Tiwari, Amit K; Shukla, Suneet; Robey, Robert W.; Singh, Satyakam; Kim, In-Wha; Bates, Susan E.; Peng, Xingxiang; Abraham, Ioana; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Sildenafil is a potent and selective inhibitor of the type 5 cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase that is used clinically to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Here we report that sildenafil has differential effects on cell surface ABC transporters such as ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2 that modulate intracompartmental and intracellular concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs. In ABCB1-overexpressing cells, non-toxic doses of sildenafil inhibited resistance and increased the effective intracellular concentration of ABCB1 substrate drugs, such as paclitaxel. Similarly, in ABCG2-overexpressing cells, sildenafil inhibited resistance to ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs, for example, increasing the effective intracellular concentration of mitoxantrone or the fluorescent compound BODIPY-prazosin. Sildenafil also moderately inhibited the transport of E217βG and methotrexate by the ABCG2 transporter. Mechanistic investigations revealed that sildenafil stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activity and inhibited photolabeling of ABCB1 with [125I]-IAAP, whereas it only slightly stimulated ABCG2 ATPase activity and inhibited photolabeling of ABCG2 with [125I]-IAAP. In contrast, Sildenafil did not alter the sensitivity of parental, ABCB1- or ABCG2-overexpressing cells to non-ABCB1 and non-ABCG2 substrate drugs, nor did sildenafil affect the function of another ABC drug transporter ABCC1. Homology modeling predicted the binding conformation of sildenafil within the large cavity of the transmembrane region of ABCB1. Overall, we found that sildenafil inhibits the transporter function of ABCB1 and ABCG2, with a stronger effect on ABCB1. Our findings suggest a possible strategy to enhance the distribution and potentially the activity of anti-cancer drugs by jointly using a clinically approved drug with known side effects and drug-drug interactions. PMID:21402712

  6. Sildenafil reverses ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi; Tiwari, Amit K; Shukla, Suneet; Robey, Robert W; Singh, Satyakam; Kim, In-Wha; Bates, Susan E; Peng, Xingxiang; Abraham, Ioana; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Talele, Tanaji T; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-04-15

    Sildenafil is a potent and selective inhibitor of the type 5 cGMP (cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate)-specific phosphodiesterase that is used clinically to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Here, we report that sildenafil has differential effects on cell surface ABC transporters such as ABCB1, ABCC1, and ABCG2 that modulate intracompartmental and intracellular concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs. In ABCB1-overexpressing cells, nontoxic doses of sildenafil inhibited resistance and increased the effective intracellular concentration of ABCB1 substrate drugs such as paclitaxel. Similarly, in ABCG2-overexpressing cells, sildenafil inhibited resistance to ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs, for example, increasing the effective intracellular concentration of mitoxantrone or the fluorescent compound BODIPY-prazosin. Sildenafil also moderately inhibited the transport of E(2)17βG and methotrexate by the ABCG2 transporter. Mechanistic investigations revealed that sildenafil stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activity and inhibited photolabeling of ABCB1 with [(125)I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP), whereas it only slightly stimulated ABCG2 ATPase activity and inhibited photolabeling of ABCG2 with [(125)I]-IAAP. In contrast, sildenafil did not alter the sensitivity of parental, ABCB1-, or ABCG2-overexpressing cells to non-ABCB1 and non-ABCG2 substrate drugs, nor did sildenafil affect the function of another ABC drug transporter, ABCC1. Homology modeling predicted the binding conformation of sildenafil within the large cavity of the transmembrane region of ABCB1. Overall, we found that sildenafil inhibits the transporter function of ABCB1 and ABCG2, with a stronger effect on ABCB1. Our findings suggest a possible strategy to enhance the distribution and potentially the activity of anticancer drugs by jointly using a clinically approved drug with known side effects and drug-drug interactions. PMID:21402712

  7. Enzastaurin inhibits ABCB1-mediated drug efflux independently of effects on protein kinase C signalling and the cellular p53 status

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Löschmann, Nadine; Sharifi, Mohsen; Ghafourian, Taravat; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2015-01-01

    The PKCβ inhibitor enzastaurin was tested in parental neuroblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, their vincristine-resistant sub-lines, primary neuroblastoma cells, ABCB1-transduced, ABCG2-transduced, and p53-depleted cells. Enzastaurin IC50s ranged from 3.3 to 9.5 μM in cell lines and primary cells independently of the ABCB1, ABCG2, or p53 status. Enzastaurin 0.3125 μM interfered with ABCB1-mediated drug transport. PKCα and PKCβ may phosphorylate and activate ABCB1 under the control of p53. However, enzastaurin exerted similar effects on ABCB1 in the presence or absence of functional p53. Also, enzastaurin inhibited PKC signalling only in concentrations ≥ 1.25 μM. The investigated cell lines did not express PKCβ. PKCα depletion reduced PKC signalling but did not affect ABCB1 activity. Intracellular levels of the fluorescent ABCB1 substrate rhodamine 123 rapidly decreased after wash-out of extracellular enzastaurin, and enzastaurin induced ABCB1 ATPase activity resembling the ABCB1 substrate verapamil. Computational docking experiments detected a direct interaction of enzastaurin and ABCB1. These data suggest that enzastaurin directly interferes with ABCB1 function. Enzastaurin further inhibited ABCG2-mediated drug transport but by a different mechanism since it reduced ABCG2 ATPase activity. These findings are important for the further development of therapies combining enzastaurin with ABC transporter substrates. PMID:25749379

  8. ABC Transporters and the Alzheimer's Disease Enigma.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Andrea; Bauer, Björn; Hartz, Anika M S

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is considered the "disease of the twenty-first century." With a 10-fold increase in global incidence over the past 100 years, AD is now reaching epidemic proportions and by all projections, AD patient numbers will continue to rise. Despite intense research efforts, AD remains a mystery and effective therapies are still unavailable. This represents an unmet need resulting in clinical, social, and economic problems. Over the last decade, a new AD research focus has emerged: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. In this article, we provide an overview of the ABC transporters ABCA1, ABCA2, P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), MRP1 (ABCC1), and BCRP (ABCG2), all of which are expressed in the brain and have been implicated in AD. We summarize recent findings on the role of these five transporters in AD, and discuss their potential to serve as therapeutic targets. PMID:22675311

  9. Multiple transport-active binding sites are available for a single substrate on human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1).

    PubMed

    Chufan, Eduardo E; Kapoor, Khyati; Sim, Hong-May; Singh, Satyakam; Talele, Tanaji T; Durell, Stewart R; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) is an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter that is associated with the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Pgp transports a variety of chemically dissimilar amphipathic compounds using the energy from ATP hydrolysis. In the present study, to elucidate the binding sites on Pgp for substrates and modulators, we employed site-directed mutagenesis, cell- and membrane-based assays, molecular modeling and docking. We generated single, double and triple mutants with substitutions of the Y307, F343, Q725, F728, F978 and V982 residues at the proposed drug-binding site with cys in a cysless Pgp, and expressed them in insect and mammalian cells using a baculovirus expression system. All the mutant proteins were expressed at the cell surface to the same extent as the cysless wild-type Pgp. With substitution of three residues of the pocket (Y307, Q725 and V982) with cysteine in a cysless Pgp, QZ59S-SSS, cyclosporine A, tariquidar, valinomycin and FSBA lose the ability to inhibit the labeling of Pgp with a transport substrate, [(125)I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin, indicating these drugs cannot bind at their primary binding sites. However, the drugs can modulate the ATP hydrolysis of the mutant Pgps, demonstrating that they bind at secondary sites. In addition, the transport of six fluorescent substrates in HeLa cells expressing triple mutant (Y307C/Q725C/V982C) Pgp is also not significantly altered, showing that substrates bound at secondary sites are still transported. The homology modeling of human Pgp and substrate and modulator docking studies support the biochemical and transport data. In aggregate, our results demonstrate that a large flexible pocket in the Pgp transmembrane domains is able to bind chemically diverse compounds. When residues of the primary drug-binding site are mutated, substrates and modulators bind to secondary sites on the transporter and more than one transport-active binding site is available for each

  10. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression and localization in sea urchin development

    PubMed Central

    Shipp, Lauren E.; Hamdoun, Amro

    2012-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane proteins that regulate intracellular concentrations of myriad compounds and ions. There are >100 ABC transporter predictions in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, including 40 annotated ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG “multidrug efflux” transporters. Despite the importance of multidrug transporters for protection and signaling, their expression patterns have not been characterized in deuterostome embryos. Results Sea urchin embryos expressed 20 ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG transporter genes in the first 58 hours of development, from unfertilized egg to early prism. We quantified transcripts of ABCB1a, ABCB4a, ABCC1, ABCC5a, ABCC9a, and ABCG2b, and found that ABCB1a mRNA was 10–100 times more abundant than other transporter mRNAs. In situ hybridization showed ABCB1a was expressed ubiquitously in embryos, while ABCC5a was restricted to secondary mesenchyme cells and their precursors. Fluorescent protein fusions showed localization of ABCB1a on apical cell surfaces, and ABCC5a on basolateral surfaces. Conclusions Embryos utilize many ABC transporters with predicted functions in cell signaling, lysosomal and mitochondrial homeostasis, potassium channel regulation, pigmentation, and xenobiotic efflux. Detailed characterization of ABCB1a and ABCC5a revealed that they have different temporal and spatial gene expression profiles and protein localization patterns that correlate to their predicted functions in protection and development, respectively. PMID:22473856

  11. P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) inhibited network of mitochondrion transport along microtubule and BMP signal-induced cell shape in chimpanzee left cerebrum by systems-theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Minghu; Huang, Juxiang; Qi, Lianxiu

    2012-10-01

    We constructed the significant low-expression P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) inhibited transport and signal network in chimpanzee compared with high-expression (fold change ≥2) the human left cerebrum in GEO data set, by using integration of gene regulatory activated and inhibited network inference method with gene ontology (GO) analysis. Our result showed that ABCB1 transport and signal upstream network RAB2A inhibited ABCB1, and downstream ABCB1-inhibited SMAD1_2, NCK2, SLC25A46, GDF10, RASGRP1, EGFR, LRPPRC, RASSF2, RASA4, CA2, CBLB, UBR5, SLC25A16, ITGB3BP, DDIT4, PDPN, RAB2A in chimpanzee left cerebrum. We obtained that the different biological processes of ABCB1 inhibited transport and signal network repressed carbon dioxide transport, ER to Golgi vesicle-mediated transport, folic acid transport, mitochondrion transport along microtubule, water transport, BMP signaling pathway, Ras protein signal transduction, transforming growth factor beta receptor signaling pathway in chimpanzee compared with the inhibited network of the human left cerebrum, as a result of inducing inhibition of mitochondrion transport along microtubule and BMP signal-induced cell shape in chimpanzee left cerebrum. Our hypothesis was verified by the same and different biological processes of ABCB1 inhibited transport and signal network of chimpanzee compared with the corresponding activated network of chimpanzee and the human left cerebrum, respectively. PMID:22674380

  12. Identification of a putatively multixenobiotic resistance related Abcb1 transporter in amphipod species endemic to the highly pristine Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Pavlichenko, Vasiliy V; Protopopova, Marina V; Timofeyev, Maxim; Luckenbach, Till

    2015-04-01

    The fauna of Lake Baikal in Eastern Siberia, the largest freshwater body on Earth, is characterized by high degrees of biodiversity and endemism. Amphipods, a prominent taxon within the indigenous fauna, occur in an exceptionally high number of endemic species. Considering the specific water chemistry of Lake Baikal with extremely low levels of potentially toxic natural organic compounds, it seems conceivable that certain adaptions to adverse environmental factors are missing in endemic species, such as cellular defense mechanisms mitigating toxic effects of chemicals. The degree to which the endemic fauna is affected by the recently occurring anthropogenic water pollution of Lake Baikal may depend on the existence of such cellular defense mechanisms in those species. We here show that endemic amphipods express transcripts for Abcb1, a major component of the cellular multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) defense against toxic chemicals. Based on a partial abcb1 cDNA sequence from Gammarus lacustris, an amphipod species common across Northern Eurasia but only rarely found in Lake Baikal, respective homologous sequences were cloned from five amphipods endemic to Lake Baikal, Eulimnogammarus verrucosus, E. vittatus, E. cyaneus, E. marituji, and Gmelinoides fasciatus, confirming that abcb1 is transcribed in those species. The effects of thermal (25 °C) and chemical stress (1-2 mg L(-1) phenanthrene) in short-term exposures (up to 24 h) on transcript levels of abcb1 and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), used as a proxy for cellular stress in the experiments, were exemplarily examined in E. verrucosus, E. cyaneus, and Gammarus lacustris. Whereas increases of abcb1 transcripts upon treatments occurred only in the Baikalian species E. verrucosus and E. cyaneus but not in Gammarus lacustris, changes of hsp70 transcript levels were seen in all three species. At least for species endemic to Lake Baikal, the data thus indicate that regulation of the identified amphipod abcb1 is

  13. Cloning and molecular characterization of apical efflux transporters (ABCB1, ABCB11 and ABCC2) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zaja, Roko; Munić, Vesna; Klobucar, Roberta Sauerborn; Ambriović-Ristov, Andreja; Smital, Tvrtko

    2008-12-11

    Fish possess similar mechanisms of billiary excretion of xeno(endo)biotics and their metabolites as found in higher vertebrates and various types of ABC efflux proteins expressed in apical membranes of polarized cells appears to be key mediators of this vectorial transport. To test this hypothesis the main goals of this study were identification and cloning of genes coding for different types of ABC transport proteins, determination of the gene transcript (mRNA) levels, and characterization of the related protein transport activities in primary cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. We have cloned one partial and two full gene sequences, which show high degree of identity with mammalian Pgp1 (ABCB1), BSEP (ABCB11) and MRP2 (ABCC2) efflux transporters. Using real-time RT-PCR expression levels of the mRNA of these genes were determined. Identical relative expression patterns of identified efflux transporters (BSEP>MRP2>Pgp1) were observed for both liver and primary hepatocytes, with expression of all three transporter mRNAs approximately 3-4-fold lower in primary hepatocytes in comparison to intact liver. In addition, the presence of Pgp1-, BSEP- and MRP-like transport activities were indicated using putative specific fluorescent substrates (rhodamine 123, calcein-AM, bodipy-verapamil and dihydrofluorescein diacetat), model inhibitors (verapamil, cyclosporine A, MK571, reversine 205, taurocholate and taurochenodeoxycholate) and their combinations. Taken together the results of this study showed that primary trout hepatocytes express critical components of detoxification pathways-phase I and II enzymes, as well as the ABC proteins involved in transport of xenobiotics, affirming this in vitro model as a promising tool in (eco)toxicological research. PMID:19008001

  14. ABC-Transporter Expression Does Not Correlate with Response to Irinotecan in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trumpi, K.; Emmink, B.L.; Prins, A.M.; van Oijen, M.G.H.; van Diest, P.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Koopman, M.; Kranenburg, O.; Rinkes, I.H.M. Borel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Active efflux of irinotecan by ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporters, in particular ABCB1 and ABCG2, is a well-established drug resistance mechanism in vitro and in pre-clinical mouse models, but its relevance in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unknown. Therefore, we assessed the association between ABC-transporter expression and tumour response to irinotecan in patients with metastatic CRC. Methods: Tissue microarrays of a large cohort of metastatic CRC patients treated with irinotecan in a prospective study (CAIRO study; n=566) were analysed for expression of ABCB1 and ABCG2 by immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed to assess the association of ABC transporter expression with irinotecan response. Gene expression profiles of 17 paired tumours were used to assess the concordance of ABCB1/ABCG2 expression in primary CRC and corresponding metastases. Results: The response to irinotecan was not significantly different between primary tumours with positive versus negative expression of ABCB1 (5.8 vs 5.7 months, p=0.696) or ABCG2 (5.7 vs 6.1 months, p=0.811). Multivariate analysis showed neither ABCB1 nor ABCG2 were independent predictors for progression free survival. There was a mediocre to poor concordance between ABC-transporter expression in paired tumours. Conclusion: In metastatic CRC, ABC-transporter expression in the primary tumour does not predict irinotecan response. PMID:26516354

  15. Fentanyl Enhances Hepatotoxicity of Paclitaxel via Inhibition of CYP3A4 and ABCB1 Transport Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jia-Hao; Bi, Bing-Tian; Feng, Kun-Yao; Huang, Wan; Zeng, Wei-An

    2015-01-01

    Fentanyl, a potent opioid analgesic that is used to treat cancer pain, is commonly administered with paclitaxel in advanced tumors. However, the effect of fentanyl on the hepatotoxicity of paclitaxel and its potential mechanism of action is not well studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fentanyl on the hepatotoxicity of paclitaxel and its potential mechanisms of action. Pharmacokinetic parameters of paclitaxel were tested using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and mouse liver histopathology were examined. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of anti-carcinogens was examined using 1-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT), and the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and rhodamine 123 was detected by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression of ABCB1 and the activity of ABCB1 ATPase and CYP3A4 were also examined. In this study, the co-administration of fentanyl and paclitaxel prolonged the half-life (t1/2) of paclitaxel from 1.455 hours to 2.344 hours and decreased the clearance (CL) from 10.997 ml/h to 7.014 ml/h in mice. Fentanyl significantly increased the levels of ALT in mice to 88.2 U/L, which is more than 2-fold higher than the level detected in the control group, and it increased the histological damage in mouse livers. Furthermore, fentanyl enhanced the cytotoxicity of anti-carcinogens that are ABCB1 substrates and increased the accumulation of doxorubicin and rhodamine 123. Additionally, fentanyl stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activity and inhibited CYP3A4 activity in the liver microsomes of mice. Our study indicates that the obvious hepatotoxicity during this co-administration was due to the inhibition of CYP3A4 activity and ABCB1 transport activity. These findings suggested that the accumulation-induced hepatotoxicity of paclitaxel when it is combined with fentanyl should be avoided. PMID:26633878

  16. Cetuximab enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agent in ABCB1/P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Huang, Yue; Zhao, Jianming; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Ke; Ma, Shaolin; Huang, Liyan; Wah To, Kenneth Kin; Gu, Yong; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is closely associated with the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in certain types of cancer, which represents a formidable obstacle to the successful cancer chemotherapy. Here, we investigated that cetuximab, an EGFR monoclonal antibody, reversed the chemoresistance mediated by ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1. Our results showed that cetuximab significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of ABCB1 substrate agent in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cells but had no effect in their parental drug sensitive cells and ABCC1, ABCG2 overexpressing cells. Furthermore, cetuximab markedly increased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Cetuximab stimulated the ATPase activity but did not alter the expression level of ABCB1 or block phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. Interestingly, cetuximab decreased the cell membrane fluidity which was known to decrease the function of ABCB1. Our findings advocate further clinical investigation of combination chemotherapy of cetuximab and conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer patients. PMID:26506420

  17. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  18. Significant activity of ecdysteroids on the resistance to doxorubicin in mammalian cancer cells expressing the human ABCB1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana; Tóth, Noémi; Ványolós, Attila; Béni, Zoltán; Zupkó, István; Molnár, József; Báthori, Mária; Hunyadi, Attila

    2012-06-14

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. Fifty-eight ecdysteroids, herbal analogues of the insect molting hormone and their semisynthetic derivatives, were tested for their activity against L5178 mouse T-cell lymphoma cells (non-MDR) and their subcell line transfected with pHa MDR1/A retrovirus overexpressing the human ABCB1 efflux pump (MDR cell line). The compounds showed very low antiproliferative activities but modulated the efflux of rhodamine 123 mediated by the ABCB1 transporter. Roughly depending on the polarity, mild to strong synergism or antagonism was observed by combining ecdysteroids with doxorubicin, and specific structure-activity relationships were also found. Our results show the effect of ecdysteroids on MDR cancer cells for the first time. Less polar derivatives may serve as valuable leads toward a potent and safe resistance modulator. Biological significance of the resistance-increasing activity of the most abundant phytoecdysteroids including 20-hydroxyecdysone is yet to be clarified. PMID:22578055

  19. Saracatinib (AZD0530) is a potent modulator of ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke-Jun; He, Jie-Hua; Su, Xiao-Dong; Sim, Hong-May; Xie, Jing-Dun; Chen, Xing-Gui; Wang, Fang; Liang, Yong-Ju; Singh, Satyakam; Sodani, Kamlesh; Talele, Tanaji T; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Wu, Hai-Ying; Fu, Li-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Saracatinib, a highly selective, dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, is currently in a Phase II clinical trial for the treatment of ovarian cancer. In our study, we investigated the effect of saracatinib on the reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) induced by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that saracatinib significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of ABCB1 substrate drugs in ABCB1 overexpressing HeLa/v200, MCF-7/adr and HEK293/ABCB1 cells, an effect that was stronger than that of gefitinib, whereas it had no effect on the cytotoxicity of the substrates in ABCC1 overexpressing HL-60/adr cells and its parental sensitive cells. Additionally, saracatinib significantly increased the doxorubicin (Dox) and Rho 123 accumulation in HeLa/v200 and MCF-7/adr cells, whereas it had no effect on HeLa and MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, saracatinib stimulated the ATPase activity and inhibited photolabeling of ABCB1 with [(125)I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the homology modeling predicted the binding conformation of saracatinib within the large hydrophobic drug-binding cavity of human ABCB1. However, neither the expression level of ABCB1 nor the phosphorylation level of Akt was altered at the reversal concentrations of saracatinib. Importantly, saracatinib significantly enhanced the effect of paclitaxel against ABCB1-overexpressing HeLa/v200 cancer cell xenografts in nude mice. In conclusion, saracatinib reverses ABCB1-mediated MDR in vitro and in vivo by directly inhibiting ABCB1 transport function, without altering ABCB1 expression or AKT phosphorylation. These findings may be helpful to attenuate the effect of MDR by combining saracatinib with other chemotherapeutic drugs in the clinic. PMID:22623106

  20. Plant ABC Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joohyun; Park, Jiyoung; Choi, Hyunju; Burla, Bo; Kretzschmar, Tobias; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    ABC transporters constitute one of the largest protein families found in all living organisms. ABC transporters are driven by ATP hydrolysis and can act as exporters as well as importers. The plant genome encodes for more than 100 ABC transporters, largely exceeding that of other organisms. In Arabidopsis, only 22 out of 130 have been functionally analyzed. They are localized in most membranes of a plant cell such as the plasma membrane, the tonoplast, chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes and fulfill a multitude of functions. Originally identified as transporters involved in detoxification processes, they have later been shown to be required for organ growth, plant nutrition, plant development, response to abiotic stresses, pathogen resistance and the interaction of the plant with its environment. To fulfill these roles they exhibit different substrate specifies by e.g. depositing surface lipids, accumulating phytate in seeds, and transporting the phytohormones auxin and abscisic acid. The aim of this review is to give an insight into the functions of plant ABC transporters and to show their importance for plant development and survival. PMID:22303277

  1. ABC multidrug transporters in schistosomes and other parasitic flatworms

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease affecting hundreds of millions, is caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. Treatment and control of schistosomiasis relies almost exclusively on a single drug, praziquantel (PZQ), a dangerous situation for a disease of this magnitude. Though PZQ is highly effective overall, it has drawbacks, and reports of worms showing PZQ resistance, either induced in the laboratory or isolated from the field, are disconcerting. Multidrug transporters underlie multidrug resistance (MDR), a phenomenon in which resistance to a single drug is accompanied by unexpected cross-resistance to several structurally unrelated compounds. Some of the best studied multidrug transporters are members of the ancient and very large ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of efflux transporters. ABC multidrug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1) are also associated with drug resistance in parasites, including helminths such as schistosomes. In addition to their association with drug resistance, however, ABC transporters also function in a wide variety of physiological processes in metazoans. In this review, we examine recent studies that help define the role of schistosome ABC transporters in regulating drug susceptibility, and in normal schistosome physiology, including reproduction and excretory activity. We postulate that schistosome ABC transporters could be useful targets for compounds that enhance the effectiveness of current therapeutics as well as for agents that act as antischistosomals on their own. PMID:23474413

  2. Osimertinib (AZD9291) Enhanced the Efficacy of Chemotherapeutic Agents in ABCB1- and ABCG2-Overexpressing Cells In Vitro, In Vivo, and Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Chen, Yifan; Xu, Meng; Chen, Likun; Zhang, Xu; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Zhao, Hongyun; Wang, Fang; Xia, Zhongjun; Chen, Xiaoqin; Fu, Liwu

    2016-08-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters has been proved to be a major trigger for multidrug resistance (MDR) in certain types of cancer. In our study, we investigated whether osimertinib (AZD9291), a third-generation irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both activating EGFR mutations and resistance-associated T790M point mutation, could reverse MDR induced by ABCB1 and ABCG2 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo Our results showed that osimertinib significantly increased the sensitivity of ABCB1- and ABCG2-overexpressing cells to their substrate chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in the model of ABCB1-overexpressing KBv200 cell xenograft in nude mice. Mechanistically, osimertinib increased the intracellular accumulations of doxorubicin (DOX) and Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) by inhibiting the efflux function of the transporters in ABCB1- or ABCG2-overexpressing cells but not in their parental sensitive cells. Furthermore, osimertinib stimulated the ATPase activity of both ABCB1 and ABCG2 and competed with the [(125)I] iodoarylazidoprazosin photolabeling bound to ABCB1 or ABCG2, but did not alter the localization and expression of ABCB1 or ABCG2 in mRNA and protein levels nor the phosphorylations of EGFR, AKT, and ERK. Importantly, osimertinib also enhanced the cytotoxicity of DOX and intracellular accumulation of Rho 123 in ABCB1-overexpressing primary leukemia cells. Overall, these findings suggest osimertinib reverses ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR via inhibiting ABCB1 and ABCG2 from pumping out chemotherapeutic agents and provide possibility for cancer combinational therapy with osimertinib in the clinic. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1845-58. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196753

  3. Molecular model of the outward facing state of the human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), and comparison to a model of the human MRP5 (ABCC5)

    PubMed Central

    Ravna, Aina W; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Sager, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance is a particular limitation to cancer chemotherapy, antibiotic treatment and HIV medication. The ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporters human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and the human MRP5 (ABCC5) are involved in multidrug resistance. Results In order to elucidate structural and molecular concepts of multidrug resistance, we have constructed a molecular model of the ATP-bound outward facing conformation of the human multidrug resistance protein ABCB1 using the Sav1866 crystal structure as a template, and compared the ABCB1 model with a previous ABCC5 model. The electrostatic potential surface (EPS) of the ABCB1 substrate translocation chamber, which transports cationic amphiphilic and lipophilic substrates, was neutral with negative and weakly positive areas. In contrast, EPS of the ABCC5 substrate translocation chamber, which transports organic anions, was generally positive. Positive-negative ratios of amino acids in the TMDs of ABCB1 and ABCC5 were also analyzed, and the positive-negative ratio of charged amino acids was higher in the ABCC5 TMDs than in the ABCB1 TMDs. In the ABCB1 model residues Leu65 (transmembrane helix 1 (TMH1)), Ile306 (TMH5), Ile340 (TMH6) and Phe343 (TMH6) may form a binding site, and this is in accordance with previous site directed mutagenesis studies. Conclusion The Sav1866 X-ray structure may serve as a suitable template for the ABCB1 model, as it did with ABCC5. The EPS in the substrate translocation chambers and the positive-negative ratio of charged amino acids were in accordance with the transport of cationic amphiphilic and lipophilic substrates by ABCB1, and the transport of organic anions by ABCC5. PMID:17803828

  4. Multidrug resistance ABC transporter structure predictions by homology modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Honorat, Mylène; Falson, Pierre; Terreux, Raphael; Di Pietro, Attilio; Dumontet, Charles; Payen, Léa

    2011-03-01

    Human multidrug resistance ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane proteins responsible for the efflux of multiple, endogenous or exogenous, compounds out of the cells, and therefore they are involved in multi-drug resistance phenotype (MDR). They thus deeply impact the pharmacokinetic parameters and toxicity properties of drugs. A great pressure to develop inhibitors of these pumps is carried out, by either ligand-based drug design or (more ideally) structure-based drug design. In that goal, many biochemical studies have been carried out to characterize their transport functions, and many efforts have been spent to get high-resolution structures. Currently, beside the 3D-structures of bacterial ABC transporters Sav1866 and MsbA, only the mouse ABCB1 complete structure has been published at high-resolution, illustrating the tremendous difficulty in getting such information, taking into account that the human genome accounts for 48 ABC transporters encoding genes. Homology modeling is consequently a reasonable approach to overcome this obstacle. The present review describes, in the first part, the different approaches which have been published to set up human ABC pump 3D-homology models allowing the localization of binding sites for drug candidates, and the identification of critical residues therein. In a second part, the review proposes a more accurate strategy and practical keys to use such biological tools for initiating structure-based drug design. PMID:21470105

  5. Wallichinine reverses ABCB1-mediated cancer multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Lv, Min; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Huang, Jia-Rong; Wang, Kun; Wei, Meng-Ning; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). Wallichinine is a compound isolated from piper wallichii and works as an antagonist of platelet activiating factor receptor to inhibit the gathering of blood platelet. In this study, we investigate the effect of wallichinine on cancer MDR mediated by ABCB1 transporter. Wallichinine significantly potentiates the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, wallichinine do not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, wallichinine blocks the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. The predicted binding mode shows the hydrophobic interactions of wallichinine within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. At all, our study of the interaction of wallichinine with ABCB1 presented herein provides valuable clues for the development of novel MDR reversal reagents from natural products. PMID:27508017

  6. Wallichinine reverses ABCB1-mediated cancer multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Min; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Huang, Jia-Rong; Wang, Kun; Wei, Meng-Ning; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). Wallichinine is a compound isolated from piper wallichii and works as an antagonist of platelet activiating factor receptor to inhibit the gathering of blood platelet. In this study, we investigate the effect of wallichinine on cancer MDR mediated by ABCB1 transporter. Wallichinine significantly potentiates the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, wallichinine do not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, wallichinine blocks the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. The predicted binding mode shows the hydrophobic interactions of wallichinine within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. At all, our study of the interaction of wallichinine with ABCB1 presented herein provides valuable clues for the development of novel MDR reversal reagents from natural products. PMID:27508017

  7. ABC transporters and neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Denise M T; Huynh, Tony; Truong, Alan M; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common cancer of infancy and accounts for 15% of all pediatric oncology deaths. Survival rates of high-risk neuroblastoma remain less than 50%, with amplification of the MYCN oncogene the most important aberration associated with poor outcome. Direct transcriptional targets of MYCN include a number of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, of which ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCC3 (MRP3), and ABCC4 (MRP4) are the best characterized. These three transporter genes have been shown to be strongly prognostic of neuroblastoma outcome in primary untreated neuroblastoma. In addition to their ability to efflux a number of chemotherapeutic drugs, evidence suggests that these transporters also contribute to neuroblastoma outcome independent of any role in cytotoxic drug efflux. Endogenous substrates of ABCC1 and ABCC4 that may be potential candidates affecting neuroblastoma biology include molecules such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. These bioactive lipid mediators have the ability to influence biological processes contributing to cancer initiation and progression, such as angiogenesis, cell signaling, inflammation, proliferation, and migration and invasion. ABCC1 and ABCC4 are thus potential targets for therapeutic suppression in high-risk neuroblastoma, and recently developed small-molecule inhibitors may be an effective strategy in treating aggressive forms of this cancer, as well as other cancers that express high levels of these transporters. PMID:25640269

  8. Effects of cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) and the drug transporters P-glycoprotein (MDR1/ABCB1) and MRP2 (ABCC2) on the pharmacokinetics of lopinavir

    PubMed Central

    van Waterschoot, RAB; ter Heine, R; Wagenaar, E; van der Kruijssen, CMM; Rooswinkel, RW; Huitema, ADR; Beijnen, JH; Schinkel, AH

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Lopinavir is extensively metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) and is considered to be a substrate for the drug transporters ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) and ABCC2 (MRP2). Here, we have assessed the individual and combined effects of CYP3A, ABCB1 and ABCC2 on the pharmacokinetics of lopinavir and the relative importance of intestinal and hepatic metabolism. We also evaluated whether ritonavir increases lopinavir oral bioavailability by inhibition of CYP3A, ABCB1 and/or ABCC2. Experimental approach: Lopinavir transport was measured in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing ABCB1 or ABCC2. Oral lopinavir kinetics (+/− ritonavir) was studied in mice with genetic deletions of Cyp3a, Abcb1a/b and/or Abcc2, or in transgenic mice expressing human CYP3A4 exclusively in the liver and/or intestine. Key results: Lopinavir was transported by ABCB1 but not by ABCC2 in vitro. Lopinavir area under the plasma concentration – time curve (AUC)oral was increased in Abcb1a/b−/− mice (approximately ninefold vs. wild-type) but not in Abcc2−/− mice. Increased lopinavir AUCoral (>2000-fold) was observed in cytochrome P450 3A knockout (Cyp3a−/−) mice compared with wild-type mice. No difference in AUCoral between Cyp3a−/− and Cyp3a/Abcb1a/b/Abcc2−/− mice was observed. CYP3A4 activity in intestine or liver, separately, reduced lopinavir AUCoral (>100-fold), compared with Cyp3a−/− mice. Ritonavir markedly increased lopinavir AUCoral in all CYP3A-containing mouse strains. Conclusions and implications: CYP3A was the major determinant of lopinavir pharmacokinetics, far more than Abcb1a/b. Both intestinal and hepatic CYP3A activity contributed importantly to low oral bioavailability of lopinavir. Ritonavir increased lopinavir bioavailability primarily by inhibiting CYP3A. Effects of Abcb1a/b were only detectable in the presence of CYP3A, suggesting saturation of Abcb1a/b in the absence of CYP3A activity. PMID:20590614

  9. Targeting ABCB1 and ABCC1 with their Specific Inhibitor CBT-1® can Overcome Drug Resistance in Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Marilù; Hattinger, Claudia Maria; Vella, Serena; Tavanti, Elisa; Michelacci, Francesca; Gudeman, Beth; Barnett, Daryl; Picci, Piero; Serra, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Clinical treatment response achievable with conventional chemotherapy in high-grade osteosarcoma (OS) is severely limited by the presence of intrinsic or acquired drug resistance, which in previous studies has been mainly addressed for overexpression of ABCB1 (MDR1/P-glycoprotein). This study was aimed to estimate the impact on OS drug resistance of a group of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which in other human tumors have been associated with unresponsiveness to the drugs that represent the backbone of multidrug treatment regimens for OS (doxorubicin, methotrexate, cisplatin). By using a group of 6 drug-sensitive and 20 drug-resistant human OS cell lines, the most relevant transporter which proved to be associated with the degree of drug resistance in OS cells, in addition to ABCB1, was ABCC1. We therefore evaluated the in vitro activity of the orally administrable ABCB1/ABCC1 inhibitor CBT-1(®) (Tetrandrine, NSC-77037). We found that in our OS cell lines this agent was able to revert the ABCB1/ABCC1-mediated resistance against doxorubicin, as well as against the drugs used in second-line OS treatments that are substrates of these transporters (taxotere, etoposide, vinorelbine). Our findings indicated that inhibiting ABCB1 and ABCC1 with CBT-1(®), used in association with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs, may become an interesting new therapeutic option for unresponsive or relapsed OS patients. PMID:26548759

  10. Overexpression of human ABCB1 in cancer cells leads to reduced activity of GSK461364, a specific inhibitor of polo-like kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Hsiao, Sung-Han; Luo, Shi-Yu; Tuo, Wei-Cherng; Su, Ching-Ya; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung

    2014-10-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a serine/threonine kinase involved in the regulation of mitosis and is overexpressed in many tumor types. Inhibition of Plk1 leads to cell cycle arrest, onset of apoptosis, and cell death, thus Plk1 has emerged as an important target for cancer treatment. GSK461364 is a potent inhibitor of Plk1 that inhibits the proliferation of multiple human cancer cell lines by promoting G2/M cell cycle arrest at low concentrations. However, as is the case for many therapeutic drugs, the risk of developing drug resistance to GSK461364 can present a therapeutic challenge to clinicians. Since the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 is one of the most common mechanisms of drug resistance, we aimed to investigate the effect of ABCB1 on the cellular efficacy of GSK461364. In this study, we observed a significantly reduced activity of GSK461364 in cells overexpressing human ABCB1. We showed that GSK461364 stimulates the ABCB1 ATPase activity and competitively inhibits ABCB1-mediated efflux of calcein-AM in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, as a way to assess the impact of ABCB1 on the efficacy of GSK461364, we evaluated the G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by GSK461364. We discovered that, by inhibiting the function of ABCB1, the reduced G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and sensitivity to GSK461364 treatment in ABCB1-overexpressing cells can be significantly restored. In conclusion, in order to achieve a better therapeutic outcome, combination therapy of GSK461364 with a modulator of ABCB1 should be further investigated as a potential treatment approach. PMID:25192198

  11. Apical ABC transporters and cancer chemotherapeutic drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Selvi; Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane efflux transporters that mediate cellular extrusion of a broad range of substrates ranging from amino acids, lipids, and ions to xenobiotics including many anticancer drugs. ABCB1 (P-GP) and ABCG2 (BCRP) are the most extensively studied apical ABC drug efflux transporters. They are highly expressed in apical membranes of many pharmacokinetically relevant tissues such as epithelial cells of the small intestine and endothelial cells of the blood capillaries in brain and testis, and in the placental maternal-fetal barrier. In these tissues, they have a protective function as they efflux their substrates back to the intestinal lumen or blood and thus restrict the intestinal uptake and tissue disposition of many compounds. This presents a major challenge for the use of many (anticancer) drugs, as most currently used anticancer drugs are substrates of these transporters. Herein, we review the latest findings on the role of apical ABC transporters in the disposition of anticancer drugs. We discuss that many new, rationally designed anticancer drugs are substrates of these transporters and that their oral availability and/or brain disposition are affected by this interaction. We also summarize studies that investigate the improvement of oral availability and brain disposition of many cytotoxic (e.g., taxanes) and rationally designed (e.g., tyrosine kinase inhibitor) anticancer drugs, using chemical inhibitors of these transporters. These findings provide a better understanding of the importance of apical ABC transporters in chemotherapy and may therefore advance translation of promising preclinical insights and approaches to clinical studies. PMID:25640265

  12. Characterization of functional activity of ABCB1 and ABCC1 proteins in eggs and embryonic cells of the sea urchin Echinometra lucunter.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Mônica Queiroz Vasconcelos; Barros, Taíssa Valéria; Torrezan, Elis; Cavalcanti, Airlla Laana de Medeiros; Figueiredo, Regina Celia Bressan Queiroz; Marques-Santos, Luis Fernando

    2010-08-01

    ABC transporter (ATP-binding-cassette transporter) proteins have been strongly associated with the phenomenon of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Furthermore, their physiological expression has been studied in many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants and vertebrate or invertebrate animals. Their widespread expression through the evolution demonstrates their relevance to the survival of living things. In the present study, we characterized the functional activity of ABCB1 and ABCC1 proteins in gametes and embryonic cells of the sea urchin Echinometra lucunter. The ABC transporter proteins' functional activity was up-regulated post-fertilization. Eggs and spermatozoa of E. lucunter accumulated more C-AM (calcein acetoxymethyl ester), a fluorescent substrate of ABCB1 and ABCC1 proteins, than embryonic cells. Verapamil, reversin 205 and indomethacin were able to increase C-AM influx in eggs and embryos. However, verapamil and reversin 205 were more efficient than indomethacin, suggesting a predominance of ABCB1 protein over ABCC1 protein activity. Multidrug resistance modulating agents, at the concentration range that inhibited ABC transporter proteins, did not block the embryonic development until blastula stage. However, inhibition of ABCB1-mediated efflux by reversin 205 circumvented resistance of embryos to the antimitotic vinca alkaloid vinblastine. Embryonic development was more efficiently blocked when colchicine was previously added to eggs than to embryos 5 min after fertilization. This set of results suggests that these proteins act as a fundamental biochemical barrier conferring a protective physiological role against toxic xenobiotics in E. lucunter embryos. PMID:19689431

  13. Schistosome ABC multidrug transporters: From pharmacology to physiology

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Praziquantel (PZQ) is essentially the only drug currently available for treatment and control of schistosomiasis, a disease affecting hundreds of millions worldwide. Though highly effective overall, PZQ has limitations, most notably its significant lack of activity against immature schistosomes. Furthermore, the availability of only a single drug for a disease of this magnitude makes reports of PZQ-resistant isolates particularly troubling. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1) are efflux transporters that underlie multidrug resistance (MDR); changes in their expression or structure are also associated with drug resistance in parasites, including helminths. This review will discuss the role these transporters might play in modulating schistosome susceptibility to PZQ, and the implications for developing new or repurposed treatments that enhance the efficacy of PZQ. However, in addition to influencing drug susceptibility, ABC transporters play important roles in several critical physiological functions such as excretion and maintenance of permeability barriers. They also transport signaling molecules with high affinity, and several lines of evidence implicate mammalian transporters in a diverse array of physiological functions, including regulation of immune responses. Like their mammalian counterparts, schistosome ABC transporters appear to be involved in functions critical to the parasite, including excretory activity and reproduction, and we hypothesize that they underlie at least some aspects of parasite–host interactions. Thus, in addition to their potential as targets for enhancers of PZQ susceptibility, these transporters might also serve as candidate targets for agents that disrupt the parasite life cycle and act as antischistosomals on their own. PMID:25516841

  14. Induction of CYP1A and ABC transporters in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) upon 2,3,7,8-TCDD waterborne exposure.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Camilla; Mariottini, Michela; Vannuccini, Maria Luisa; Trisciani, Anna; Marchi, Davide; Corsi, Ilaria

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the responsiveness of CYP1A and ABC transport proteins in European Sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) waterborne exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) (46 pg/L) for 24 h and 7 days. Genes modulation (abcb1, abcc1-2, cyp1a), EROD activity were investigated in liver and 2,3,7,8-TCDD bioconcentration in liver and muscle. TCDD induced significantly cyp1a gene expression and EROD activity at 24 h and 7 d. A significant up-regulation of abcb1 was also observed but only after 7 days. No modulation of abcc1 and abcc2 genes was observed. Waterborne TCDD exposure was able to induce CYP1A and abcb1 encoding for P-glycoprotein in juvenile of European sea bass. PMID:25016329

  15. Effect of ceritinib (LDK378) on enhancement of chemotherapeutic agents in ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Ke; Xu, Meng; To, Kenneth K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the leading cause of treatment failure in cancer chemotherapy. The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, particularly ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2, play a key role in mediating MDR by pumping anticancer drugs out from cancer cells. Ceritinib (LDK378) is a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) currently in phase III clinical trial for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Here, we found that ceritinib remarkably enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in ABCB1 or ABCG2 over-expressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Ceritinib significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin (DOX) by inhibiting ABCB1 or ABCG2-mediated drug efflux in the transporters-overexpressing cells. Mechanistically, ceritinib is likely a competitive inhibitor of ABCB1 and ABCG2 because it competed with [125I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin for photo affinity labeling of the transporters. On the other hand, at the transporters-inhibiting concentrations, ceritinib did not alter the expression level of ABCB1 and ABCG2, and phosphorylation status of AKT and ERK1/2. Thus the findings advocate further clinical investigation of combination chemotherapy of ceritinib and other conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in chemo-refractory cancer patients. PMID:26556876

  16. Arabidopsis TWISTED DWARF1 functionally interacts with auxin exporter ABCB1 on the root plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bangjun; Bailly, Aurélien; Zwiewka, Marta; Henrichs, Sina; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Friml, Jirí; Schulz, Alexander; Geisler, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Plant architecture is influenced by the polar, cell-to-cell transport of auxin that is primarily provided and regulated by plasma membrane efflux catalysts of the PIN-FORMED and B family of ABC transporter (ABCB) classes. The latter were shown to require the functionality of the FK506 binding protein42 TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1), although underlying mechanisms are unclear. By genetic manipulation of TWD1 expression, we show here that TWD1 affects shootward root auxin reflux and, thus, downstream developmental traits, such as epidermal twisting and gravitropism of the root. Using immunological assays, we demonstrate a predominant lateral, mainly outward-facing, plasma membrane location for TWD1 in the root epidermis characterized by the lateral marker ABC transporter G36/PLEIOTROPIC DRUG-RESISTANCE8/PENETRATION3. At these epidermal plasma membrane domains, TWD1 colocalizes with nonpolar ABCB1. In planta bioluminescence resonance energy transfer analysis was used to verify specific ABC transporter B1 (ABCB1)-TWD1 interaction. Our data support a model in which TWD1 promotes lateral ABCB-mediated auxin efflux via protein-protein interaction at the plasma membrane, minimizing reflux from the root apoplast into the cytoplasm. PMID:23321285

  17. Interaction of BDE-47 and its Hydroxylated Metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and BCRP: Considerations for Human Exposure and Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp; also known as MDR1, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; also known as ABCG2), are membrane-bound proteins that mediate the cellular efflux of xenobiotics as an important defense against chemic...

  18. Abcb1 gene expression pattern and function of copper detoxification in Fujian oyster, Crassostrea angulata.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Xiang, Xu; Ke, Yizhou; Zhou, Long; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-12-01

    Oysters are considered hyper-accumulators of Cu, but the molecular mechanism by which they maintain Cu cell homeostasis is still unclear. ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1, P-glycoprotein) can transport a variety of substrates across the cell membrane in aquatic animals. In this study, to provide insight into the roles of ABCB1 in resistance against Cu in oysters, complete cDNA of abcb1 gene in Crassostrea angulata was cloned and analyzed. The complete sequence of C. angulata ABCB1 showed high identity to ABCB1 from other bivalves and contained some classical motifs of ABCB transport proteins. Abcb1 was mainly expressed in the apical epithelial cell of gills and epithelia of mantles. Abcb1 expression and Cu accumulation were also studied in control oysters and oysters exposed to Cu (30, 100, 300 μg/L Cu, 1-15 days). Cu accumulation in the gill and mantle were measured after abcb1 gene interference. The complete sequence of C. angulata ABCB1 showed high identity to ABCB1 from other bivalves and contained some classical motifs of ABCB transport proteins. The mRNA transcript of abcb1 showed hypersensitivity to Cu exposure. A concentration-dependent highest abcb1 mRNA level (up to 5.61-fold to the control) in the gill and mantle existed across all Cu exposure concentrations after 3 days of Cu exposure. The gill and mantle Cu concentration were significantly higher after the abcb1 mRNA interference. According to these results, it is here speculated that ABCB1 may underlie cell protection against Cu in C. angulata. PMID:26310361

  19. ABC transporters and xenobiotic defense systems in early life stages of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kropf, Christian; Segner, Helmut; Fent, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of oviparous fish, in contrast to (ovo) viviparous species, develop in the aquatic environment, and therefore need solute transport systems at their body surfaces for maintaining internal homeostasis and defending against potentially harmful substances. We hypothesized that solute transporters undergo changes in tissue distribution from the embryo to the larval stage. We therefore studied the mRNA profiles of eight ABC transporters (abcb1a, abcb1b, abcc1, abcc2, abcc3, abcc4, abcc5, abcg2) and three solute carriers (oatp1d, putative oatp2 putative, mate1) in different body regions (head, yolk sac epithelium, abdominal viscera, skin/muscles) of developing rainbow trout. Additionally, we investigated mRNA levels of phase I (cyp1a, cyp3a) and phase II (gstp, putative ugt1, putative ugt2) biotransformation enzymes. The study covered the developmental period from the eleuthero-embryo stage to the first-feeding larval stage (1-20days post-hatch, dph). At 1dph, transcripts of abcc2, abcc4, abcg2, cyp3a, gstp, putative mate1, and putative oatp2 occurred primarily in the yolk sac epithelium, whereas at later stages expression of these genes was predominantly observed in the abdominal viscera. The functional activity of ABC transporters in fish early life stages was assessed by rhodamine B accumulation assays. Finally, we investigated the potential impact of xenobiotics (clotrimazole, clofibric acid) on the ABC and biotransformation systems of trout early life stages. While clofibric acid had no effect, clotrimazole lead to an increased rhodamine B accumulation. The results provide evidence that the transition from the eleuthero-embryo to the larval stage is accompanied by a major alteration in tissue expression of ABC transporters. PMID:26945521

  20. ABC transporters: The power to change

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Douglas C.; Johnson, Eric; Lewinson, Oded

    2010-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute a ubiquitous superfamily of integral membrane proteins that are responsible for the ATP powered translocation of many substrates across membranes. The highly conserved ABC domains provide the nucleotide dependent engine that drives transport. By contrast, the transmembrane domains that create the translocation pathway are more variable. Recent structural advances with prokaryotic ABC transporters have provided a qualitative molecular framework for deciphering the transport cycle; an important goal is to develop quantitative models that detail the kinetic and molecular mechanisms by which ABC transporters couple the binding and hydrolysis of ATP to substrate translocation. PMID:19234479

  1. Mapping the functional yeast ABC transporter interactome.

    PubMed

    Snider, Jamie; Hanif, Asad; Lee, Mid Eum; Jin, Ke; Yu, Analyn R; Graham, Chris; Chuk, Matthew; Damjanovic, Dunja; Wierzbicka, Marta; Tang, Priscilla; Balderes, Dina; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Darowski, Katelyn D; San Luis, Bryan-Joseph; Shevelev, Igor; Sturley, Stephen L; Boone, Charles; Greenblatt, Jack F; Zhang, Zhaolei; Paumi, Christian M; Babu, Mohan; Park, Hay-Oak; Michaelis, Susan; Stagljar, Igor

    2013-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a ubiquitous class of integral membrane proteins of immense clinical interest because of their strong association with human disease and pharmacology. To improve our understanding of these proteins, we used membrane yeast two-hybrid technology to map the protein interactome of all of the nonmitochondrial ABC transporters in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and combined this data with previously reported yeast ABC transporter interactions in the BioGRID database to generate a comprehensive, integrated 'interactome'. We show that ABC transporters physically associate with proteins involved in an unexpectedly diverse range of functions. We specifically examine the importance of the physical interactions of ABC transporters in both the regulation of one another and in the modulation of proteins involved in zinc homeostasis. The interaction network presented here will be a powerful resource for increasing our fundamental understanding of the cellular role and regulation of ABC transporters. PMID:23831759

  2. Butorphanol, a synthetic opioid, sensitizes ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance via inhibition of the efflux function of ABCB1 in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Zhang, Tao; Shan, Zhi-Ming; Qi, Min-Yue; Xiu, Huan-Huan; Liu, Lei; Wu, Shi-Zhe; Jia, Zhen; Xu, Kang-Qing

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a formidable challenge in the use of chemotherapy and represents a powerful obstacle to the treatment of leukemia. ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) is a recognized factor which causes MDR and is closely related to poor outcome and relapse in leukemia. Ongoing research concerning the strategy for inhibiting the abnormally high activity of the ABCB1 transporter is critically needed. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the interaction between ABCB1 transporter and butorphanol. Our results showed that butorphanol significantly antagonized ABCB1-mediated drug efflux and increased the intracellular drug concentration by inhibiting the transport activity of ABCB1 in leukemia cells. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that butorphanol did not alter the protein expression or localization of ABCB1 in HL60/VCR and K562/ADR cells. Furthermore, homology modeling indicated that butorphanol could fit into the large drug-binding cavity of ABCB1 and form a binding conformation. In conclusion, butorphanol reversed the ABCB1-mediated MDR in leukemia cells by directly suppressing the efflux activity of ABCB1. PMID:26062728

  3. Bioinformatic survey of ABC transporters in dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Gadzalski, Marek; Ciesielska, Anita; Stączek, Paweł

    2016-01-15

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute a very large and ubiquitous superfamily of membrane proteins. They are responsible for ATP hydrolysis driven translocation of countless substrates. Being a very old and diverse group of proteins present in all organisms they share a common feature, which is the presence of an evolutionary conservative nucleotide binding domain (NBD)--the engine that drives the transport. Another common domain is a transmembrane domain (TMD) which consists of several membrane-spanning helices. This part of protein is substrate-specific, thus it is much more variable. ABC transporters are known for driving drug efflux in many pathogens and cancer cells, therefore they are the subject of extensive studies. There are many examples of conferring a drug resistance phenotype in fungal pathogens by ABC transporters, however, little is known about these proteins in dermatophytes--a group of fungi causing superficial mycoses. So far only a single ABC transporter has been extensively studied in this group of pathogens. We analyzed available genomic sequences of seven dermatophyte species in order to provide an insight into dermatophyte ABC protein inventory. Phylogenetic studies of ABC transporter genes and their products were conducted and included ABC transporters of other fungi. Our results show that each dermatophyte genome studied possesses a great variety of ABC transporter genes. Detailed analysis of selected genes and their products indicates that relatively recent duplication of ABC transporter genes could lead to novel substrate specificity. PMID:26524502

  4. Structural determinants of peripheral O-arylcarbamate FAAH inhibitors render them dual substrates for Abcb1 and Abcg2 and restrict their access to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Barrera, Borja; Armirotti, Andrea; Bertozzi, Sine M.; Scarpelli, Rita; Bandiera, Tiziano; Prieto, Julio G.; Duranti, Andrea; Tarzia, Giorgio; Merino, Gracia

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main entry route for chemicals into the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Two transmembrane transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family – Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2 in humans, Abcg2 in rodents) and P-glycoprotein (ABCB1 in humans, Abcb1 in rodents) – play a key role in mediating this process. Pharmacological and genetic evidence suggests that Abcg2 prevents CNS access to a group of highly potent and selective O-arylcarbamate fatty-acid amidohydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors, which include the compound URB937 (cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3′-carbamoyl-6-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl ester). To define structure-activity relationships of the interaction of these molecules with Abcg2, in the present study we tested various peripherally restricted and non-restricted O-arylcarbamate FAAH inhibitors for their ability to serve as transport substrates in monolayer cultures of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney-II (MDCKII) cells over-expressing Abcg2. Surprisingly, we found that the majority of compounds tested – even those able to enter the CNS in vivo – were substrates for Abcg2 in vitro. Additional experiments in MDCKII cells overexpressing ABCB1 revealed that only those compounds that were dual substrates for ABCB1 and Abcg2 in vitro were also peripherally restricted in vivo. The extent of such restriction seems to depend upon other physicochemical features of the compounds, in particular the polar surface area. Consistent with these in vitro results, we found that URB937 readily enters the brain in dual knockout mice lacking both Abcg2 and Abcb1, whereas it is either partially or completely excluded from the brain of mice lacking either transporter alone. The results suggest that Abcg2 and Abcb1 act together to restrict the access of URB937 to the CNS. PMID:24993496

  5. P-glycoprotein ABCB1: a major player in drug handling by mammals.

    PubMed

    Borst, Piet; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian P-glycoproteins are active drug efflux transporters located in the plasma membrane. In the early nineties, we generated knockouts of the three P-glycoprotein genes of mice, the Mdr1a, Mdr1b, and Mdr2 P-glycoproteins, now known as Abcb1a, Abcb1b, and Abcb4, respectively. In the JCI papers that are the subject of this Hindsight, we showed that loss of Mdr1a (Abcb1a) had a profound effect on the tissue distribution and especially the brain accumulation of a range of drugs frequently used in humans, including dexamethasone, digoxin, cyclosporin A, ondansetron, domperidone, and loperamide. All drugs were shown to be excellent substrates of the murine ABCB1A P-glycoprotein and its human counterpart, the MDR1 P-glycoprotein, ABCB1. We found that the ability of ABCB1 to prevent accumulation of some drugs in the brain is a prerequisite for their clinical use, as absence of the transporter led to severe toxicity or undesired CNS pharmacodynamic effects. Subsequent work has fully confirmed the profound effect of the drug-transporting ABCB1 P-glycoprotein on the pharmacokinetics of drugs in humans. In fact, every new drug is now screened for transport by ABCB1, as this limits oral availability and penetration into sanctuaries protected by ABCB1, such as the brain. PMID:24084745

  6. The ABC transporters in Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlin; Cong, Qian; Pei, Jimin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-11-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Ca. L. asiaticus) is a Gram-negative bacterium and the pathogen of Citrus Greening disease (Huanglongbing, HLB). As a parasitic bacterium, Ca. L. asiaticus harbors ABC transporters that play important roles in exchanging chemical compounds between Ca. L. asiaticus and its host. Here, we analyzed all the ABC transporter-related proteins in Ca. L. asiaticus. We identified 14 ABC transporter systems and predicted their structures and substrate specificities. In-depth sequence and structure analysis including multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree reconstruction, and structure comparison further support their function predictions. Our study shows that this bacterium could use these ABC transporters to import metabolites (amino acids and phosphates) and enzyme cofactors (choline, thiamine, iron, manganese, and zinc), resist to organic solvent, heavy metal, and lipid-like drugs, maintain the composition of the outer membrane (OM), and secrete virulence factors. Although the features of most ABC systems could be deduced from the abundant experimental data on their orthologs, we reported several novel observations within ABC system proteins. Moreover, we identified seven nontransport ABC systems that are likely involved in virulence gene expression regulation, transposon excision regulation, and DNA repair. Our analysis reveals several candidates for further studies to understand and control the disease, including the type I virulence factor secretion system and its substrate that are likely related to Ca. L. asiaticus pathogenicity and the ABC transporter systems responsible for bacterial OM biosynthesis that are good drug targets. PMID:22807026

  7. The ABC transporters in Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlin; Cong, Qian; Pei, Jimin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2012-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Ca. L. asiaticus) is a Gram-negative bacterium and the pathogen of Citrus Greening disease (Huanglongbing, HLB). As a parasitic bacterium, Ca. L. asiaticus harbors ABC transporters that play important roles in exchanging chemical compounds between Ca. L. asiaticus and its host. Here, we analyzed all the ABC transporter-related proteins in Ca. L. asiaticus. We identified 14 ABC transporter systems and predicted their structures and substrate specificities. In-depth sequence and structure analysis including multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree reconstruction, and structure comparison further support their function predictions. Our study shows that this bacterium could use these ABC transporters to import metabolites (amino acids and phosphates) and enzyme cofactors (choline, thiamine, iron, manganese, and zinc), resist to organic solvent, heavy metal, and lipid-like drugs, maintain the composition of the outer membrane (OM), and secrete virulence factors. Although the features of most ABC systems could be deduced from the abundant experimental data on their orthologs, we reported several novel observations within ABC system proteins. Moreover, we identified seven nontransport ABC systems that are likely involved in virulence gene expression regulation, transposon excision regulation, and DNA repair. Our analysis reveals several candidates for further studies to understand and control the disease, including the type I virulence factor secretion system and its substrate that are likely related to Ca. L. asiaticus pathogenicity and the ABC transporter systems responsible for bacterial OM biosynthesis that are good drug targets. PMID:22807026

  8. Semi-synthetic ocotillol analogues as selective ABCB1-mediated drug resistance reversal agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Zhang, Hengyuan; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J; Si, Rui; Patel, Bhargav A; Xu, Jinyi; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-09-15

    Overexpression of ATP-Binding Cassette transporters leads to multidrug resistance in cancer cells and results in the failure of chemotherapy. In this in-vitro study, we investigated whether or not (20S, 24R/S)-epoxy-12β, 25-dihydroxy-dommarane-3β-amine (ORA and OSA), a pair of semi-synthetic ocotillol analogue epimers, could inhibit the ABCB1 transporter. ORA (1 μM and 3 μM) significantly reversed the resistance to paclitaxel and vincristine in ABCB1-overexpressing SW620/Ad300 and HEK/ABCB1 cells, whereas OSA had no significant effects. In addition, ORA (3 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-paclitaxel by suppressing the efflux function of ABCB1. Meanwhile, both ORA (3 μM) and OSA (3 μM) did not significantly alter the expression level or the subcellular location of ABCB1 protein. Moreover, the ABCB1 ATPase study suggested that ORA had a stronger stimulatory effect on the ATPase activity than OSA. ORA also exhibited a higher docking score as compared with OSA inside transmembrane domain of ABCB1. Overall, we concluded that ORA reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR by competitively inhibiting the ABCB1 drug efflux function. PMID:26296969

  9. Semi-synthetic ocotillol analogues as selective ABCB1-mediated drug resistance reversal agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Si, Rui; Patel, Bhargav A.; Xu, Jinyi; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of ATP-Binding Cassette transporters leads to multidrug resistance in cancer cells and results in the failure of chemotherapy. In this in-vitro study, we investigated whether or not (20S, 24R/S)-epoxy-12β, 25-dihydroxy-dommarane-3β-amine (ORA and OSA), a pair of semi-synthetic ocotillol analogue epimers, could inhibit the ABCB1 transporter. ORA (1 μM and 3 μM) significantly reversed the resistance to paclitaxel and vincristine in ABCB1-overexpressing SW620/Ad300 and HEK/ABCB1 cells, whereas OSA had no significant effects. In addition, ORA (3 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-paclitaxel by suppressing the efflux function of ABCB1. Meanwhile, both ORA (3 μM) and OSA (3 μM) did not significantly alter the expression level or the subcellular location of ABCB1 protein. Moreover, the ABCB1 ATPase study suggested that ORA had a stronger stimulatory effect on the ATPase activity than OSA. ORA also exhibited a higher docking score as compared with OSA inside transmembrane domain of ABCB1. Overall, we concluded that ORA reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR by competitively inhibiting the ABCB1 drug efflux function. PMID:26296969

  10. Is P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) a phase 0 or a phase 3 colchicine transporter depending on colchicine exposure conditions?

    SciTech Connect

    Decleves, Xavier. E-mail: xavier.decleves@univ-paris5.fr; Niel, Elisabeth; Debray, Marcel; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel

    2006-12-01

    This study investigates the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated transport of its substrates in accumulation or efflux modes under steady-state conditions. The kinetics of colchicine uptake and efflux, a substrate of both Pgp and intracellular tubulin, were studied in HL60 and HL60/DNR cells; HL60/DNR cells contain 25 times more Pgp than do HL60 cells. HL60/DNR cells in a medium containing 6.25 nM colchicine, which mimics therapeutic conditions, reached steady-state twice as rapidly as did HL60 cells, and accumulated 24-times less colchicine than did HL60 cells. The Pgp inhibitor GF120918, increased colchicine uptake by HL60 cells 1.2-fold and that of HL60/DNR cells 17-fold, while it had no effect on colchicine efflux from either cell line that had been incubated with colchicine for 24 h. Colchicine kinetics fitted well a two closed-compartment model, showing that the low intracellular accumulation of colchicine in HL60/DNR cells resulted from a 11-fold decrease in colchicine uptake and a 2.3-fold increase in colchicine efflux, that could be attributed to Pgp-mediated efflux activity in HL60/DNR cells. Intracellular colchicine was mainly and similarly distributed in the cytosol in both cell lines. These data demonstrate that the kinetics of the intracellular colchicine accumulation depend on the density of Pgp and that Pgp is more a phase 0 (preventing cellular uptake) than a phase 3 (effluxing intracellular substrate) transporter under steady-state conditions, although the situation is reversed after a short incubation time (30 min), when intracellular free colchicine concentration is probably high enough for it to be removed from the cell by Pgp.

  11. Correction: Learning from each other: ABC transporter regulation by protein phosphorylation in plant and mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Bibek; Laurent, Christophe; Geisler, Markus

    2016-04-15

    The ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter family in higher plants is highly expanded compared with those of mammalians. Moreover, some members of the plant ABCB subfamily display very high substrate specificity compared with their mammalian counterparts that are often associated with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomena. In this review we highlight prominent functions of plant and mammalian ABC transporters and summarize our knowledge on their post-transcriptional regulation with a focus on protein phosphorylation. A deeper comparison of regulatory events of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and ABCB1 from the model plantArabidopsisreveals a surprisingly high degree of similarity. Both physically interact with orthologues of the FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) that chaperon both transporters to the plasma membrane in an action that seems to involve Hsp90. Further both transporters are phosphorylated at regulatory domains that connect both nucleotide-binding folds. Taken together it appears that ABC transporters exhibit an evolutionary conserved but complex regulation by protein phosphorylation, which apparently is, at least in some cases, tightly connected with protein-protein interactions (PPI). PMID:27068986

  12. Identification of ABC transporters in Sarcoptes scabiei.

    PubMed

    Mounsey, K E; Holt, D C; McCarthy, J; Walton, S F

    2006-06-01

    We have identified and partially sequenced 8 ABC transporters from an EST dataset of Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis, the causative agent of scabies. Analysis confirmed that most of the known ABC subfamilies are represented in the EST dataset including several members of the multidrug resistance protein subfamily (ABC-C). Although P-glycoprotein (ABC-B) sequences were not found in the EST dataset, a partial P-glycoprotein sequence was subsequently obtained using a degenerate PCR strategy and library screening. Thus a total of 9 potential S. scabiei ABC transporters representing the subfamilies A, B, C, E, F and H have been identified. Ivermectin is currently used in the treatment of hyper-infested (crusted) scabies, and has also been identified as a potentially effective acaricide for mass treatment programmes in scabies-endemic communities. The observation of clinical and in vitro ivermectin resistance in 2 crusted scabies patients who received multiple treatments has raised serious concerns regarding the sustainability of such programmes. One possible mechanism for ivermectin resistance is through ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein. This work forms an important foundation for further studies to elucidate the potential role of ABC transporters in ivermectin resistance of S. scabiei. PMID:16454864

  13. Yeast ABC transporters in lipid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Banerjee, Atanu

    2016-08-01

    Throughout its evolution, the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily has experienced a rapid expansion in its substrate repertoire and functions. Of the diverse functions that these pumps offer, their drug transport properties have attracted considerable attention primarily owing to their clinical significance. Despite this fact, emerging evidence suggests that physiological substrates of transporters also affect the overall functioning of an organism. Lipids, as substrates of ABC transporters, constitute one feature found in all representative groups of the living kingdom. Due to the importance of lipid species in the cellular physiology of an organism, their proper distribution within cells is crucial. This fact is well exemplified by the vast number of medical conditions that have been caused as a result of perturbations in ABC transporter-mediated lipid transport in higher organisms. In yeasts, apart from providing transport functions, ABC transporters also coordinate regulatory networks with lipids. This review focuses on yeast ABC transporters involved in the transport of lipids and briefly discusses the integration of their regulatory network with that of the lipid species. PMID:27259587

  14. Identification of ABC Transporter Interaction of a Novel Cyanoquinoline Radiotracer and Implications for Tumour Imaging by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Rozanna L.; Pisaneschi, Federica; Nguyen, Quang-De; Smith, Graham; Carroll, Laurence; Beckley, Alice; Kaliszczak, Maciej A.; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in many cancers including lung, ovarian, breast, head and neck and brain. Mutation of this receptor has been shown to play a crucial role in the response of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) to EGFR-targeted therapies. It is envisaged that imaging of EGFR using positron emission tomography (PET) could aid in selection of patients for treatment with novel inhibitors. We recognised multi-drug resistant phenotype as a threat to development of successful imaging agents. In this report, we describe discovery of a novel cyanoquinoline radiotracer that lacks ABC transporter activity. Methods Cellular retention of the prototype cyanoquinoline [18F](2E)-N-{4-[(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)amino]-3-cyano-7-ethoxyquinolin-6-yl}-4-({[1-(2-fluoroethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl]methyl}amino)-but-2-enamide ([18F]FED6) and [18F](2E)-N-{4-[(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)amino]-3-cyano-7-ethoxyquinolin-6-yl}-4-[({1-[(2R,5S)-3-fluoro-4,5-dihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxan-2-yl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl}methyl)amino]but-2-enamide ([18F]FED20) were evaluated to establish potential for imaging specificity. The substrate specificity of a number of cyanoquinolines towards ABC transporters was investigated in cell lines proficient or deficient in ABCB1 or ABCG2. Results FED6 demonstrated substrate specificity for both ABCG2 and ABCB1, a property that was not observed for all cyanoquinolines tested, suggesting scope for designing novel probes. ABC transporter activity was confirmed by attenuating the activity of transporters with drug inhibitors or siRNA. We synthesized a more hydrophilic compound [18F]FED20 to overcome ABC transporter activity. FED20 lacked substrate specificity for both ABCB1 and ABCG2, and maintained a strong affinity for EGFR. Furthermore, FED20 showed higher inhibitory affinity for active mutant EGFR versus wild-type or resistant mutant EGFR; this property resulted in higher [18F]FED20 cellular retention in active

  15. Vatalanib sensitizes ABCB1 and ABCG2-overexpressing multidrug resistant colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Li-wu

    2015-09-01

    Cancer microenvironment is characterized by significantly lower oxygen concentration. This hypoxic condition is known to reduce drug responsiveness to cancer chemotherapy via multiple mechanisms, among which the upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters confers resistance to a wide variety of structurally unrelated anticancer drugs. Vatalanib (PTK787/ZK22584) is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor for all isoforms of VEGFR, PDGFR and c-Kit, which exhibit potent anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the potentiation effect of vatalanib on the anticancer activity of conventional cytotoxic drugs in colon cancer cell lines under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Mechanistically, vatalanib was found to inhibit ABCG2 and ABCB1 efflux activity, presumably by acting as a competitive inhibitor and interfering with their ATPase activity. Under hypoxic growth condition, ABCG2 and ABCB1-overexpressing cells sorted out by FACS technique as side population (SP) were found to be significantly more responsive to SN-38 (ABCG2 and ABCB1 substrate anticancer drug) in the presence of vatalanib. The anchorage independent soft agar colony formation capacity of the SP cells was remarkably reduced upon treatment with a combination of SN-38 and vatalanib, compared to SN-38 alone. However, vatalanib, at concentrations that produced the circumvention of the transporters-mediated resistance, did not appreciably alter ABCG2/ABCB1 mRNA or protein expression levels or the phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Our study thus advocates the further investigation of vatalanib for use in combination chemotherapy to eradicate drug-resistant cancer cells under hypoxia. PMID:26206183

  16. Structural insights into ABC transporter mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Davidson, Amy L.; Chen, Jue

    2010-07-27

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters utilize the energy from ATP hydrolysis to transport substances across the membrane. In recent years, crystal structures of several ABC transporters have become available. These structures show that both importers and exporters oscillate between two conformations: an inward-facing conformation with the substrate translocation pathway open to the cytoplasm and an outward-facing conformation with the translocation pathway facing the opposite side of the membrane. In this review, conformational differences found in the structures of homologous ABC transporters are analyzed to understand how alternating-access is achieved. It appears that rigid-body rotations of the transmembrane subunits, coinciding with the opening and closing of the nucleotide-binding subunits, couples ATP hydrolysis to substrate translocation.

  17. PKCε inhibits isolation and stemness of side population cells via the suppression of ABCB1 transporter and PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK signaling in renal cell carcinoma cell line 769P.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Fu, Shun Jun; Fan, Wen Zhe; Wang, Zhong Hua; Chen, Ze Bin; Guo, Sheng Jie; Chen, Jun Xing; Qiu, Shao Peng

    2016-06-28

    Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), a member of the novel PKC family, is known to be a transforming oncogene and tumor biomarker for many human solid cancers including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We isolated side population (SP) cells from the RCC 769P cell line, and proved that those cells possess cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics. In this study, to identify the function of PKCε in cancer stemness of 769P SP cells, we reduced the expression of PKCε in those cells, following the results demonstrated that PKCε depletion had a negative correlation with the existence of SP cells in 769P cell line. Down-regulation of PKCε also suppresses the CSC potential of sorted 769P SP cells in several ways: proliferation potential, resistance to chemotherapeutics and in vivo tumor formation ability. Our study also reveals that PKCε is associated with ABCB1 and this association probably contributed to the SP cells isolation from 769P cell line. Furthermore, the expression of ABCB1 is directly regulated by PKCε. Additionally, after the depletion of PKCε, the phosphorylation of pAkt, pStat3 and pERK was apparently suppressed in 769P SP cells, whereas PKCε overexpression could promote the phosphorylation of AKT, STAT3 and ERK in 769P Non-SP cells. Overall, PKCε down-regulation suppresses sorting and the cancer stem-like phenotype of RCC 769P SP cells through the regulation of ABCB1 transporter and the PI3K/Akt, Stat3 and MAPK/ERK pathways that are dependent on the phosphorylation effects. Thus, PKCε may work as an important mediator in cancer stem cell pathogenesis of renal cell cancer. PMID:27037060

  18. Identification of an ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein)-positive carfilzomib-resistant myeloma subpopulation by the pluripotent stem cell fluorescent dye CDy1

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Teresa S.; Riz, Irene; Yang, Wenjing; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; DePalma, Louis; Chang, Young-Tae; Peng, Weiqun; Zhu, Jun; Hawley, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the malignant expansion of differentiated plasma cells. Although many chemotherapeutic agents display cytotoxic activity toward MM cells, patients inevitably succumb to their disease because the tumor cells become resistant to the anticancer drugs. The cancer stem cell hypothesis postulates that a small subpopulation of chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells is responsible for propagation of the tumor. Herein we report that efflux of the pluripotent stem cell dye CDy1 identifies a subpopulation in MM cell lines characterized by increased expression of P-glycoprotein, a member of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) superfamily of transporters encoded by ABCB1. We also demonstrate that ABCB1-overexpressing MM cells are resistant to the second-generation proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib that recently received accelerated approval for the treatment of therapy-refractive MM by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Moreover, increased resistance to carfilzomib in sensitive MM cells following drug selection was associated with upregulation of ABCB1 cell-surface expression which correlated with increased transporter activity as measured by CDy1 efflux. We further show that chemosensitization of MM cells to carfilzomib could be achieved in vitro by cotreatment with vismodegib, a hedgehog pathway antagonist which is currently in MM clinical trials. CDy1 efflux may therefore be a useful assay to determine whether high expression of ABCB1 is predictive of poor clinical responses in MM patients treated with carfilzomib. Our data also suggest that inclusion of vismodegib might be a potential strategy to reverse ABCB1-mediated drug resistance should it occur. PMID:23475625

  19. ABCB1 in children's brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Beth; Kessler, Maya; Sabnis, Durgagauri H; Kerr, Ian D

    2015-10-01

    Tumours of the central nervous system are the most common solid tumour, accounting for a quarter of the 1500 cases of childhood cancer diagnosed each year in the U.K. They are the most common cause of cancer-related death in children. Treatment consists of surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Survival rates have generally increased, but many survivors suffer from radiotherapy-related neurocognitive and endocrine side effects as well as an increased risk of secondary cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy is normally given in combination to circumvent chemoresistance, but several studies have demonstrated it to be ineffective in the absence of radiotherapy. The identification of children with drug-resistant disease at the outset could allow stratification of those that are potentially curable by chemotherapy alone. Ultimately, however, what is required is a means to overcome this drug resistance and restore the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Medulloblastomas and ependymomas account for over 30% of paediatric brain tumours. Advances in neurosurgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy have led to improvements in 5-year overall survival rates. There remain, however, significant numbers of medulloblastoma patients that have intrinsically drug-resistant tumours and/or present with disseminated disease. Local relapse in ependymoma is also common and has an extremely poor prognosis with only 25% of children surviving first relapse. Each of these is consistent with the acquisition of drug and radiotherapy resistance. Since the majority of chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat these patients are transport substrates for ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1) we will address the hypothesis that ABCB1 expression underlies this drug resistance. PMID:26517917

  20. Antitubercular Agent Delamanid and Metabolites as Substrates and Inhibitors of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Masakazu; Hashizume, Kenta; Hamasako, Yusuke; Ohzone, Yoshihiro; Kashiyama, Eiji; Umehara, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Delamanid (Deltyba, OPC-67683) is the first approved drug in a novel class of nitro-dihydro-imidazooxazoles developed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis require treatment with multiple drugs, several of which have known drug-drug interactions. Transporters regulate drug absorption, distribution, and excretion; therefore, the inhibition of transport by one agent may alter the pharmacokinetics of another, leading to unexpected adverse events. Therefore, it is important to understand how delamanid affects transport activity. In the present study, the potencies of delamanid and its main metabolites as the substrates and inhibitors of various transporters were evaluated in vitro Delamanid was not transported by the efflux ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), solute carrier (SLC) transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides, or organic cation transporter 1. Similarly, metabolite 1 (M1) was not a substrate for any of these transporters except P-gp. Delamanid showed no inhibitory effect on ABC transporters MDR1, BCRP, and bile salt export pump (BSEP; ABCB11), SLC transporters, or organic anion transporters. M1 and M2 inhibited P-gp- and BCRP-mediated transport but did so only at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (M1, 4.65 and 5.71 μmol/liter, respectively; M2, 7.80 and 6.02 μmol/liter, respectively), well above the corresponding maximum concentration in plasma values observed following the administration of multiple doses in clinical trials. M3 and M4 did not affect the activities of any of the transporters tested. These in vitro data suggest that delamanid is unlikely to have clinically relevant interactions with drugs for which absorption and disposition are mediated by this group of transporters. PMID:27021329

  1. ABC transporters in fish species: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Marta; Costa, Joana; Reis-Henriques, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins were first recognized for their role in multidrug resistance (MDR) in chemotherapeutic treatments, which is a major impediment for the successful treatment of many forms of malignant tumors in humans. These proteins, highly conserved throughout vertebrate species, were later related to cellular detoxification and accounted as responsible for protecting aquatic organisms from xenobiotic insults in the so-called multixenobiotic resistance mechanism (MXR). In recent years, research on these proteins in aquatic species has highlighted their importance in the detoxification mechanisms in fish thus it is necessary to continue these studies. Several transporters have been pointed out as relevant in the ecotoxicological context associated to the transport of xenobiotics, such as P-glycoproteins (Pgps), multidrug-resistance-associated proteins (MRPs 1-5) and breast cancer resistance associated protein (BCRP). In mammals, several nuclear receptors have been identified as mediators of phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and ABC transporters. In aquatic species, knowledge on co-regulation of the detoxification mechanism is scarce and needs to be addressed. The interaction of emergent contaminants that can act as chemosensitizers, with ABC transporters in aquatic organisms can compromise detoxification processes and have population effects and should be studied in more detail. This review intends to summarize the recent advances in research on MXR mechanisms in fish species, focusing in (1) regulation and functioning of ABC proteins; (2) cooperation with phase I and II biotransformation enzymes; and (3) ecotoxicological relevance and information on emergent pollutants with ability to modulate ABC transporters expression and activity. Several lines of evidence are clearly suggesting the important role of these transporters in detoxification mechanisms and must be further investigated in fish to underlay the mechanism to consider their use as

  2. Peroxisomal ABC transporters: functions and mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Alison; Carrier, David J.; Schaedler, Theresia; Waterham, Hans R.; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Theodoulou, Frederica L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are arguably the most biochemically versatile of all eukaryotic organelles. Their metabolic functions vary between different organisms, between different tissue types of the same organism and even between different developmental stages or in response to changed environmental conditions. New functions for peroxisomes are still being discovered and their importance is underscored by the severe phenotypes that can arise as a result of peroxisome dysfunction. The β-oxidation pathway is central to peroxisomal metabolism, but the substrates processed are very diverse, reflecting the diversity of peroxisomes across species. Substrates for β-oxidation enter peroxisomes via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of subfamily D; (ABCD) and are activated by specific acyl CoA synthetases for further metabolism. Humans have three peroxisomal ABCD family members, which are half transporters that homodimerize and have distinct but partially overlapping substrate specificity; Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two half transporters that heterodimerize and plants have a single peroxisomal ABC transporter that is a fused heterodimer and which appears to be the single entry point into peroxisomes for a very wide variety of β-oxidation substrates. Our studies suggest that the Arabidopsis peroxisomal ABC transporter AtABCD1 accepts acyl CoA substrates, cleaves them before or during transport followed by reactivation by peroxisomal synthetases. We propose that this is a general mechanism to provide specificity to this class of transporters and by which amphipathic compounds are moved across peroxisome membranes. PMID:26517910

  3. A 20(S)-protopanoxadiol derivative overcomes multi-drug resistance by antagonizing ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wantao; Xu, Qin; Xiao, Meng; Hu, Lihong; Mao, Li; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, failure of chemotherapy is often caused by the ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1), and few drugs have been successfully developed to overcome ABCB1-mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR). To suppress ABCB1 activity, we previously designed and synthesized a new series of derivatives based on 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD). In the present study, we investigated the role of PPD derivatives in the function of ABC transporters. Non-toxic concentrations of the PPD derivative PPD12 sensitized ABCB1-overexpressing cells to their anti-cancer substrates better than either the parental PPD or inactive PPD11. PPD12 increased intracellular accumulation of adriamycin and rhodamine123 in resistant cancer cells. Although PPD12 did not suppress the expression of ABCB1 mRNA or protein, it stimulated the activity of ABCB1 ATPase. Because PPD12 is a competitive inhibitor, it was predicted to bind to the large hydrophobic cavity of homology-modeled human ABCB1. PPD12 also enhanced the efficacy of adriamycin against ABCB1-overexpressing KB/VCR xenografts in nude mice. In conclusion, PPD12 enhances the efficacy of substrate drugs in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. These findings suggest that a combination therapy consisting of PPD12 with conventional chemotherapeutic agents may be an effective treatment for ABCB1-mediated MDR cancer patients. PMID:26824187

  4. Use of Baculovirus BacMam Vectors for Expression of ABC Drug Transporters in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Schwartz, Candice; Kapoor, Khyati; Kouanda, Abdul

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters ABCB1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp)] and ABCG2 are expressed in many tissues including those of the intestines, the liver, the kidney and the brain and are known to influence the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of therapeutic drugs. In vitro studies involving their functional characteristics provide important information that allows improvements in drug delivery or drug design. In this study, we report use of the BacMam (baculovirus-based expression in mammalian cells) expression system to express and characterize the function of Pgp and ABCG2 in mammalian cell lines. BacMam-Pgp and BacMam-ABCG2 baculovirus-transduced cell lines showed similar cell surface expression (as detected by monoclonal antibodies with an external epitope) and transport function of these transporters compared to drug-resistant cell lines that overexpress the two transporters. Transient expression of Pgp was maintained in HeLa cells for up to 72 h after transduction (48 h after removal of the BacMam virus). These BacMam-baculovirus-transduced mammalian cells expressing Pgp or ABCG2 were used for assessing the functional activity of these transporters. Crude membranes isolated from these cells were further used to study the activity of these transporters by biochemical techniques such as photo-cross-linking with transport substrate and adenosine triphosphatase assays. In addition, we show that the BacMam expression system can be exploited to coexpress both Pgp and ABCG2 in mammalian cells to determine their contribution to the transport of a common anticancer drug substrate. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the BacMam-baculovirus-based expression system can be used to simultaneously study the transport function and biochemical properties of ABC transporters. PMID:22041108

  5. Use of baculovirus BacMam vectors for expression of ABC drug transporters in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Suneet; Schwartz, Candice; Kapoor, Khyati; Kouanda, Abdul; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2012-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters ABCB1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp)] and ABCG2 are expressed in many tissues including those of the intestines, the liver, the kidney and the brain and are known to influence the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of therapeutic drugs. In vitro studies involving their functional characteristics provide important information that allows improvements in drug delivery or drug design. In this study, we report use of the BacMam (baculovirus-based expression in mammalian cells) expression system to express and characterize the function of Pgp and ABCG2 in mammalian cell lines. BacMam-Pgp and BacMam-ABCG2 baculovirus-transduced cell lines showed similar cell surface expression (as detected by monoclonal antibodies with an external epitope) and transport function of these transporters compared to drug-resistant cell lines that overexpress the two transporters. Transient expression of Pgp was maintained in HeLa cells for up to 72 h after transduction (48 h after removal of the BacMam virus). These BacMam-baculovirus-transduced mammalian cells expressing Pgp or ABCG2 were used for assessing the functional activity of these transporters. Crude membranes isolated from these cells were further used to study the activity of these transporters by biochemical techniques such as photo-cross-linking with transport substrate and adenosine triphosphatase assays. In addition, we show that the BacMam expression system can be exploited to coexpress both Pgp and ABCG2 in mammalian cells to determine their contribution to the transport of a common anticancer drug substrate. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the BacMam-baculovirus-based expression system can be used to simultaneously study the transport function and biochemical properties of ABC transporters. PMID:22041108

  6. Epigenetic modulation of the drug resistance genes MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance of the highly aggressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) to drug therapy is a major clinical problem resulting in a poor patient’s prognosis. Beside promoter methylation of the O 6 -methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene the efflux transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 have been suggested as pivotal factors contributing to drug resistance, but the methylation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 has not been assessed before in GBM. Methods Therefore, we evaluated the proportion and prognostic significance of promoter methylation of MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in 64 GBM patient samples using pyrosequencing technology. Further, the single nucleotide polymorphisms MGMT C-56 T (rs16906252), ABCB1 C3435T (rs1045642) and ABCG2 C421A (rs2231142) were determined using the restriction fragment length polymorphism method (RFLP). To study a correlation between promoter methylation and gene expression, we analyzed MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 expression in 20 glioblastoma and 7 non-neoplastic brain samples. Results Despite a significantly increased MGMT and ABCB1 promoter methylation in GBM tissue, multivariate regression analysis revealed no significant association between overall survival of glioblastoma patients and MGMT or ABCB1 promoter methylation. However, a significant negative correlation between promoter methylation and expression could be identified for MGMT but not for ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, MGMT promoter methylation was significantly associated with the genotypes of the MGMT C-56 T polymorphism showing a higher methylation level in the T allele bearing GBM. Conclusions In summary, the data of this study confirm the previous published relation of MGMT promoter methylation and gene expression, but argue for no pivotal role of MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 promoter methylation in GBM patients’ survival. PMID:24380367

  7. Identification and functional characterization of Penicillium marneffei pleiotropic drug resistance transporters ABC1 and ABC2.

    PubMed

    Panapruksachat, Siribun; Iwatani, Shun; Oura, Takahiro; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Chindamporn, Ariya; Niimi, Kyoko; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Cannon, Richard D; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    Penicilliosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei is an endemic, AIDS-defining illness and, after tuberculosis and cryptococcosis, the third most common opportunistic infection of AIDS patients in tropical Southeast Asia. Untreated, patients have poor prognosis; however, primary amphotericin B treatment followed by prolonged itraconazole prophylaxis is effective. To identify ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that may play a role in potential multidrug resistance of P. marneffei, we identified and classified all 46 P. marneffei ABC transporters from the genome sequence. PmABC1 and PmABC2 were most similar to the archetype Candida albicans multidrug efflux pump gene CDR1. P. marneffei Abc1p (PmAbc1p) was functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, although at rather low levels, and correctly localized to the plasma membrane, causing cells to be fourfold to eightfold more resistant to azoles and many other xenobiotics than untransformed cells. P. marneffei Abc2p (PmAbc2p) was expressed at similarly low levels, but it had no efflux activity and did not properly localize to the plasma membrane. Interestingly, PmAbc1p mislocalized and lost its transport activity when cells were shifted to 37 °C. We conclude that expression of PmAbc1p in S. cerevisiae confers resistance to several xenobiotics indicating that PmAbc1p may be a multidrug efflux pump. PMID:26782644

  8. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-)), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2 (-∕-)), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-) Abcg2 (-∕-)) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders. PMID:27257556

  9. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M.; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2−∕−), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−Abcg2−∕−) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders. PMID:27257556

  10. Isolation and Characterization of the Colletotrichum acutatum ABC Transporter CaABC1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suyoung; Park, Sook-Young; Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Dongyoung; Lee, Seon-Woo; Kim, Heung Tae; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Choi, Woobong

    2014-12-01

    Fungi tolerate exposure to various abiotic stresses, including cytotoxic compounds and fungicides, via their ATP-driven efflux pumps belonging to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. To clarify the molecular basis of interaction between the fungus and various abiotic stresses including fungicides, we constructed a cDNA library from germinated conidia of Colletotrichum acutatum, a major anthracnose pathogen of pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Over 1,000 cDNA clones were sequenced, of which single clone exhibited significant nucleotide sequence homology to ABC transporter genes. We isolated three fosmid clones containing the C. acutatum ABC1 (CaABC1) gene in full-length from genomic DNA library screening. The CaABC1 gene consists of 4,059 bp transcript, predicting a 1,353-aa protein. The gene contains the typical ABC signature and Walker A and B motifs. The 5'-flanking region contains a CAAT motif, a TATA box, and a Kozak region. Phylogenetic and structural analysis suggested that the CaABC1 is a typical ABC transporter gene highly conserved in various fungal species, as well as in Chromista, Metazoans, and Viridiplantae. We also found that CaABC1 was up-regulated during conidiation and a minimal medium condition. Moreover, CaABC1 was induced in iprobenfos, kresoxim-methyl, thiophanate-methyl, and hygromycin B. These results demonstrate that CaABC1 is necessary for conidiation, abiotic stress, and various fungicide resistances. These results will provide the basis for further study on the function of ABC transporter genes in C. acutatum. PMID:25506302

  11. Isolation and Characterization of the Colletotrichum acutatum ABC Transporter CaABC1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suyoung; Park, Sook-Young; Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Dongyoung; Lee, Seon-Woo; Kim, Heung Tae; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Choi, Woobong

    2014-01-01

    Fungi tolerate exposure to various abiotic stresses, including cytotoxic compounds and fungicides, via their ATP-driven efflux pumps belonging to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. To clarify the molecular basis of interaction between the fungus and various abiotic stresses including fungicides, we constructed a cDNA library from germinated conidia of Colletotrichum acutatum, a major anthracnose pathogen of pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Over 1,000 cDNA clones were sequenced, of which single clone exhibited significant nucleotide sequence homology to ABC transporter genes. We isolated three fosmid clones containing the C. acutatum ABC1 (CaABC1) gene in full-length from genomic DNA library screening. The CaABC1 gene consists of 4,059 bp transcript, predicting a 1,353-aa protein. The gene contains the typical ABC signature and Walker A and B motifs. The 5′-flanking region contains a CAAT motif, a TATA box, and a Kozak region. Phylogenetic and structural analysis suggested that the CaABC1 is a typical ABC transporter gene highly conserved in various fungal species, as well as in Chromista, Metazoans, and Viridiplantae. We also found that CaABC1 was up-regulated during conidiation and a minimal medium condition. Moreover, CaABC1 was induced in iprobenfos, kresoxim-methyl, thiophanate-methyl, and hygromycin B. These results demonstrate that CaABC1 is necessary for conidiation, abiotic stress, and various fungicide resistances. These results will provide the basis for further study on the function of ABC transporter genes in C. acutatum. PMID:25506302

  12. Association between ABCB1 Polymorphisms and Antidepressant Treatment Response in Taiwanese Major Depressive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui Hua; Chou, Chen-Hsi; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Po See

    2015-01-01

    Objective The multidrug resistance 1 (ABCB1, MDR1) gene, encoding P-glycoprotein, is extensively distributed and expressed in various tissues, such as a blood-brain barrier transporter. P-glycoprotein plays an important role in controlling the passage of substances between the blood and brain. The current study aimed to investigate possible associations of functional ABCB1 polymorphisms (C3435T, G2677T and C1236T) with response to antidepressant treatment and serum cortisol levels in Taiwanese patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods We recruited 112 MDD patients who were randomized to fluoxetine (n=58, mean dose: 21.4±4.5 mg/day) or venlafaxine (n=54, 80.2±34.7 mg/day) treatment for 6 weeks. The 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) was administered initially and biweekly after treatment, and cortisol levels were assessed initially and after 6-week antidepressant treatment. Results The initial HDRS scores and the HDRS scores after six weeks of antidepressant treatment were not significantly different among the different genotypes in each polymorphism of ABCB1. The percentage changes of HDRS scores over time were significantly different in the polymorphisms of ABCB1 G2677T (p=0.002). MDD patients with the G/G genotype of ABCB1 G2677T had a worse antidepressant treatment response. However, the polymorphisms of ABCB1 genotypes were not significantly associated with cortisol levels before and after antidepressant treatment in MDD patients. Conclusion The results suggested that the variants of ABCB1 may influence the short-term antidepressant response in MDD patients. Further details of the underlying mechanisms of ABCB1 in antidepressant treatment remain to be clarified. PMID:26598582

  13. Brief Report: High Peak Level of Plasma Raltegravir Concentration in Patients With ABCB1 and ABCG2 Genetic Variants.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Hayashida, Tsunefusa; Hamada, Akinobu; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Raltegravir was recently identified to be a substrate of ATP-binding cassette transporter B1 (ABCB1) and G2 (ABCG2), which are efflux transporters and expressed in the intestines. We analyzed the relations between plasma raltegravir concentrations and single nucleotide polymorphism of ABCB1 and ABCG2 genes. The peak plasma concentration of raltegravir was significantly higher in the patients with ABCB1 4036 AG/GG and ABCG2 421 CA/AA than in other genotype holders (P = 0.0052), though no difference was identified in trough raltegravir concentrations, which may be explained by reduced expression of efflux transporters in intestine by these genetic variants. PMID:27097364

  14. The naphthoquinones, vitamin K3 and its structural analog plumbagin, are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ABC drug transporter ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Wu, Chung-Pu; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin K3 (Menadione; 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a structural precursor of vitamins K1 and K2 which are essential for blood clotting. The naturally occurring structural analog of this vitamin, plumbagin (5-hydroxy-menadione), is known to modulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, and radioresistance. We, here, report that both vitamin K3 and plumbagin are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter, ABCG2. Vitamin K3 and plumbagin specifically inhibited the ABCG2-mediated efflux of mitoxantrone, but did not have any effect on the ABCB1-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123. This inhibition of ABCG2 function was due to their interaction at the substrate-binding site(s). They inhibited the binding of [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP), a substrate of ABCG2, to this transporter in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 7.3 and 22.6 μM, respectively, but had no effect on the binding of this photoaffinity analog to ABCB1. Both compounds stimulated ABCG2-mediated ATP hydrolysis and also inhibited the mitoxantrone-stimulated ATPase activity of this transporter, but did not have any significant effect on the ATPase activity of ABCB1. In a cytotoxicity assay, ABCG2-expressing HEK cells were 2.8- and 2.3-fold resistant to plumbagin and vitamin K3, respectively, compared to the control cells, suggesting that they are substrates of this transporter. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time that vitamin K3 is a substrate of the ABCG2 transporter. Thus, ABCG2 may have a role in the regulation of vitamin K3 levels in the body. In addition, vitamin K3 and its structural derivative, plumbagin, could potentially be used to modulate ABCG2 function. PMID:18065489

  15. Polymorphisms in ABC Transporter Genes and Concentrations of Mercury in Newborns – Evidence from Two Mediterranean Birth Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Sabrina; Engström, Karin; Ballester, Ferran; Franforte, Elisa; Alhamdow, Ayman; Pisa, Federica; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Mazej, Datja; Murcia, Mario; Rebagliato, Marisa; Bustamante, Mariona; Sunyer, Jordi; Sofianou-Katsoulis, Αikaterini; Prasouli, Alexia; Antonopoulou, Eleni; Antoniadou, Ioanna; Nakou, Sheena; Barbone, Fabio; Horvat, Milena; Broberg, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background The genetic background may influence methylmercury (MeHg) metabolism and neurotoxicity. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters actively transport various xenobiotics across biological membranes. Objective To investigate the role of ABC polymorphisms as modifiers of prenatal exposure to MeHg. Methods The study population consisted of participants (n = 1651) in two birth cohorts, one in Italy and Greece (PHIME) and the other in Spain (INMA). Women were recruited during pregnancy in Italy and Spain, and during the perinatal period in Greece. Total mercury concentrations were measured in cord blood samples by atomic absorption spectrometry. Maternal fish intake during pregnancy was determined from questionnaires. Polymorphisms (n = 5) in the ABC genes ABCA1, ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCC2 were analysed in both cohorts. Results ABCB1 rs2032582, ABCC1 rs11075290, and ABCC2 rs2273697 modified the associations between maternal fish intake and cord blood mercury concentrations. The overall interaction coefficient between rs2032582 and log2-transformed fish intake was negative for carriers of GT (β = −0.29, 95%CI −0.47, −0.12) and TT (β = −0.49, 95%CI −0.71, −0.26) versus GG, meaning that for a doubling in fish intake of the mothers, children with the rs2032582 GG genotype accumulated 35% more mercury than children with TT. For rs11075290, the interaction coefficient was negative for carriers of TC (β = −0.12, 95%CI −0.33, 0.09), and TT (β = −0.28, 95%CI −0.51, −0.06) versus CC. For rs2273697, the interaction coefficient was positive when combining GA+AA (β = 0.16, 95%CI 0.01, 0.32) versus GG. Conclusion The ABC transporters appear to play a role in accumulation of MeHg during early development. PMID:24831289

  16. Placental Transfer of Maraviroc in an Ex Vivo Human Cotyledon Perfusion Model and Influence of ABC Transporter Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vinot, C.; Gavard, L.; Tréluyer, J. M.; Manceau, S.; Courbon, E.; Scherrmann, J. M.; Declèves, X.; Duro, D.; Peytavin, G.; Mandelbrot, L.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, antiretroviral therapy is recommended during pregnancy to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. However, for many antiretroviral drugs, including maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist, very little data exist regarding placental transfer. Besides, various factors may modulate this transfer, including efflux transporters belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. We investigated maraviroc placental transfer and the influence of ABC transporter expression on this transfer using the human cotyledon perfusion model. Term placentas were perfused ex vivo for 90 min with maraviroc (600 ng/ml) either in the maternal-to-fetal (n = 10 placentas) or fetal-to-maternal (n = 6 placentas) direction. Plasma concentrations were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Fetal transfer rates (FTR) and clearance indexes (CLI) were calculated as ratios of fetal to maternal concentrations at steady state (mean values between 30 and 90 min) and ratios of FTR of maraviroc to that of antipyrine, respectively. ABC transporter gene expression levels were determined by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and ABCB1 protein expression by Western blotting. For the maternal-to-fetal direction, the mean FTR and CLI were 8.0% ± 3.0 and 0.26 ± 0.07, respectively, whereas the mean CLI was 0.52 ± 0.23 for the fetal-to-maternal direction. We showed a significant inverse correlation between maraviroc CLI and ABCC2, ABCC10, and ABCC11 placental gene expression levels (P < 0.05). To conclude, we report a low maraviroc placental transfer probably involving ABC efflux transporters and thus in all likelihood associated with a limited fetal exposition. Nevertheless, these results would need to be supported by in vivo data obtained from paired maternal and cord blood samples. PMID:23295922

  17. Ferrocenyl 2,5-Piperazinediones as Tubulin-Binding Organometallic ABCB1 and ABCG2 Inhibitors Active against MDR Cells.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Anna; Błauż, Andrzej; Zakrzewski, Janusz; Rychlik, Błażej; Plażuk, Damian

    2016-06-01

    The tubulin-microtubule system is a common target of many anticancer drugs. However, the use of chemotherapeutics frequently leads to the development of a clinically relevant phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR). One of the basic mechanisms involved in MDR involves elevated expression and/or activity of several ATP-binding cassette superfamily members (ABC transporters) which are normally responsible for the efflux of xenobiotics or secondary metabolites outside the cell. Here we present the synthesis and biological characteristics of ferrocenyl analogues of plinabulin, i.e. one of the so-called "spindle poisons". We found that replacement of the phenyl group of plinabulin by the ferrocenyl moiety turns this compound into a potent inhibitor of ABCB1 and ABCG2, thus making it possible to overcome the multidrug resistance phenomenon. We also demonstrated that the alkyl group attached to the imidazole moiety of ferrocenyl analogues of plinabulin strongly affects their potency to inhibit tubulin polymerization. PMID:27326336

  18. Diversity in ABC transporters: Type I, II and III importers

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Austin J.; Park, Aekyung

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are multi-subunit membrane pumps that transport substrates across membranes. While significant in the transport process, transporter architecture exhibits a range of diversity that we are only beginning to recognize. This divergence may provide insight into the mechanisms of substrate transport and homeostasis. Until recently, ABC importers have been classified into two types, but with the emergence of energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters there are potentially three types of ABC importers. In this review, we summarize an expansive body of research on the three types of importers with an emphasis on the basics that underlie ABC importers, such as structure, subunit composition and mechanism. PMID:25155087

  19. How heterogeneous is the involvement of ABC transporters against insecticides?

    PubMed

    Porretta, Daniele; Epis, Sara; Mastrantonio, Valentina; Ferrari, Marco; Bellini, Romeo; Favia, Guido; Urbanelli, Sandra

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular defense against xenobiotic compounds is a main research issue in medical and veterinary entomology, as insecticide/acaricide resistance is a major threat in the control of arthropods. ABC transporters are recognized as a component of the detoxifying mechanism in arthropods. We investigated the possible involvement of ABC transporters in defense to the organophosphate insecticide temephos in the malarial vector Anopheles stephensi. We performed bioassays on larvae of An. stephensi, using insecticide alone and in combination with ABC-transporter inhibitors, to assess synergism between these compounds. Next, we investigated the expression profiles of six ABC transporter genes in larvae exposed to temephos. Surprisingly, neither bioassays nor gene expression analyses provided any evidence for a major role of ABC transporters in defense against temephos in An. stephensi. We thus decided to review existing literature to generate a record of other studies that failed to reveal a role for ABC transporters against particular insecticides/acaricides. A review of the scientific literature led to the recovery of 569 papers about ABC transporters; among these, 50 involved arthropods, and 10 reported negative results. Our study on An. stephensi and accompanying literature review highlight the heterogeneity that exists in ABC transporter involvement in defense/resistance mechanisms in arthropods. PMID:26855383

  20. Nobiletin enhances the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in ABCB1 overexpression cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenzhe; Feng, Senling; Yao, Xiaojun; Yuan, Zhongwen; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major obstacle to the successful chemotherapy treatment of many cancers. Here we found that nobiletin, a citrus methoxyflavone, significantly sensitized ABCB1 overexpressing cells A2780/T and A549/T to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel (a 433-fold reversal of MDR to PTX at 9 μM), doxorubicin (DOX), docetaxel and dounorubicin. Nobiletin profoundly inhibited ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of DOX and Flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the mRNA and protein expression of ABCB1. Moreover, nobiletin stimulated ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. Consistent with these findings, molecular docking analysis also identified favorable binding of nobiletin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled human ABCB1 transporter. Moreover, the Nrf2 protein expression and phosphorylation levels of AKT/ERK were suppressed by co-treated with nobiletin and PTX at the reversal concentrations, suggesting that inhibition of the AKT/ERK/Nrf2 pathway was associated with the sensitizing effect of nobiletin. These findings encourage further animal and clinical MDR studies with the combination therapy of nobiletin and chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26689156

  1. Nobiletin enhances the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in ABCB1 overexpression cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenzhe; Feng, Senling; Yao, Xiaojun; Yuan, Zhongwen; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major obstacle to the successful chemotherapy treatment of many cancers. Here we found that nobiletin, a citrus methoxyflavone, significantly sensitized ABCB1 overexpressing cells A2780/T and A549/T to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel (a 433-fold reversal of MDR to PTX at 9 μM), doxorubicin (DOX), docetaxel and dounorubicin. Nobiletin profoundly inhibited ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of DOX and Flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the mRNA and protein expression of ABCB1. Moreover, nobiletin stimulated ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. Consistent with these findings, molecular docking analysis also identified favorable binding of nobiletin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled human ABCB1 transporter. Moreover, the Nrf2 protein expression and phosphorylation levels of AKT/ERK were suppressed by co-treated with nobiletin and PTX at the reversal concentrations, suggesting that inhibition of the AKT/ERK/Nrf2 pathway was associated with the sensitizing effect of nobiletin. These findings encourage further animal and clinical MDR studies with the combination therapy of nobiletin and chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26689156

  2. Use of a combined effect model approach for discriminating between ABCB1- and ABCC1-type efflux activities in native bivalve gill tissue.

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; Pavlichenko, Vasiliy; Burkhardt-Medicke, Kathleen; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Altenburger, Rolf; Barata, Carlos; Luckenbach, Till

    2016-04-15

    Aquatic organisms, such as bivalves, employ ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters for efflux of potentially toxic chemicals. Anthropogenic water contaminants can, as chemosensitizers, disrupt efflux transporter function enabling other, putatively toxic compounds to enter the organism. Applying rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR we identified complete cDNAs encoding ABCB1- and ABCC1-type transporter homologs from zebra mussel providing the molecular basis for expression of both transporter types in zebra mussel gills. Further, efflux activities of both transporter types in gills were indicated with dye accumulation assays where efflux of the dye calcein-am was sensitive to both ABCB1- (reversin 205, verapamil) and ABCC1- (MK571) type specific inhibitors. The assumption that different inhibitors targeted different efflux pump types was confirmed when comparing measured effects of binary inhibitor compound mixtures in dye accumulation assays with predictions from mixture effect models. Effects by the MK571/reversin 205 mixture corresponded better with independent action, whereas reversin 205/verapamil joint effects were better predicted by the concentration addition model indicating different and equal targets, respectively. The binary mixture approach was further applied to identify the efflux pump type targeted by environmentally relevant chemosensitizing compounds. Pentachlorophenol and musk ketone, which were selected after a pre-screen of twelve compounds that previously had been identified as chemosensitizers, showed mixture effects that corresponded better with concentration addition when combined with reversine 205 but with independent action predictions when combined with MK571 indicating targeting of an ABCB1-type efflux pump by these compounds. PMID:26929997

  3. Fungal ABC transporter deletion and localization analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Andriy; Weber, Stefan S; Nijland, Jeroen G; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2012-01-01

    Fungal cells are highly complex as their metabolism is compartmentalized harboring various types of subcellular organelles that are bordered by one or more membranes. Knowledge about the intracellular localization of transporter proteins is often required for the understanding of their biological function. Among different approaches available, the localization analysis based on the expression of GFP fusions is commonly used as a relatively fast and cost-efficient method that allows visualization of proteins of interest in both live and fixed cells. In addition, inactivation of transporter genes is an important tool to resolve their specific function. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the deletion and localization analysis of ABC transporters in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. It includes construction of expression plasmids, their transformation into fungal strains, cultivation of transformants, microscopy analysis, as well as additional protocols on staining of fungal cells with organelle-specific dyes like Hoechst 33342, MitoTracker DeepRed, and FM4-64. PMID:22183644

  4. A Drosophila ABC transporter regulates lifespan.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Lu-Bo, Ying; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2014-12-01

    MRP4 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 4) is a member of the MRP/ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that are essential for many cellular processes requiring the transport of substrates across cell membranes. Although MRP4 has been implicated as a detoxification protein by transport of structurally diverse endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including antivirus and anticancer drugs, that usually induce oxidative stress in cells, its in vivo biological function remains unknown. In this study, we investigate the biological functions of a Drosophila homolog of human MRP4, dMRP4. We show that dMRP4 expression is elevated in response to oxidative stress (paraquat, hydrogen peroxide and hyperoxia) in Drosophila. Flies lacking dMRP4 have a shortened lifespan under both oxidative and normal conditions. Overexpression of dMRP4, on the other hand, is sufficient to increase oxidative stress resistance and extend lifespan. By genetic manipulations, we demonstrate that dMRP4 is required for JNK (c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase) activation during paraquat challenge and for basal transcription of some JNK target genes under normal condition. We show that impaired JNK signaling is an important cause for major defects associated with dMRP4 mutations, suggesting that dMRP4 regulates lifespan by modulating the expression of a set of genes related to both oxidative resistance and aging, at least in part, through JNK signaling. PMID:25474322

  5. The ABC transporter gene family of Daphnia pulex

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Armin; Cunningham, Phil; Dean, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background The large gene superfamily of ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters encodes membrane proteins involved in trafficking processes across biological membranes and further essential cell biological functions. ABC transporters are evolutionary ancient and involved in the biochemical defence against toxicants. We report here a genome-wide survey of ABC proteins of Daphnia pulex, providing for the first time information on ABC proteins in crustacea, a primarily aquatic arthropod subphylum of high ecological and economical importance. Results We identified 64 ABC proteins in the Daphnia genome, which possesses members of all current ABC subfamilies A to H. To unravel phylogenetic relationships, ABC proteins of Daphnia were compared to those from yeast, worm, fruit fly and human. A high conservation of Daphnia of ABC transporters was observed for proteins involved in fundamental cellular processes, including the mitochondrial half transporters of the ABCB subfamily, which function in iron metabolism and transport of Fe/S protein precursors, and the members of subfamilies ABCD, ABCE and ABCF, which have roles in very long chain fatty acid transport, initiation of gene transcription and protein translation, respectively. A number of Daphnia proteins showed one-to-one orthologous relationships to Drosophila ABC proteins including the sulfonyl urea receptor (SUR), the ecdysone transporter ET23, and the eye pigment precursor transporter scarlet. As the fruit fly, Daphnia lacked homologues to the TAP protein, which plays a role in antigene processing, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which functions as a chloride channel. Daphnia showed two proteins homologous to MDR (multidrug resistance) P-glycoproteins (ABCB subfamily) and six proteins homologous to MRPs (multidrug resistance-associated proteins) (ABCC subfamily). However, lineage specific gene duplications in the ABCB and ABCC subfamilies complicated the inference of function. A

  6. Human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    There exist four fundamentally different classes of membrane-bound transport proteins: ion channels; transporters; aquaporins; and ATP-powered pumps. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an example of ATP-dependent pumps. ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane-bound proteins, present in all prokaryotes, as well as plants, fungi, yeast and animals. These pumps can move substrates in (influx) or out (efflux) of cells. In mammals, ABC transporters are expressed predominantly in the liver, intestine, blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, placenta and kidney. ABC proteins transport a number of endogenous substrates, including inorganic anions, metal ions, peptides, amino acids, sugars and a large number of hydrophobic compounds and metabolites across the plasma membrane, and also across intracellular membranes. The human genome contains 49 ABC genes, arranged in eight subfamilies and named via divergent evolution. That ABC genes are important is underscored by the fact that mutations in at least I I of these genes are already known to cause severe inherited diseases (eg cystic fibrosis and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy [X-ALD]). ABC transporters also participate in the movement of most drugs and their metabolites across cell surface and cellular organelle membranes; thus, defects in these genes can be important in terms of cancer therapy, pharmacokinetics and innumerable pharmacogenetic disorders. PMID:19403462

  7. Regulation of ABC Transporter Function Via Phosphorylation by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Stolarczyk, Elzbieta I.; Reiling, Cassandra J.; Paumi, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are multispanning membrane proteins that utilize ATP to move a broad range of substrates across cellular membranes. ABC transporters are involved in a number of human disorders and diseases [1]. Overexpression of a subset of the transporters has been closely linked to multidrug resistance in both bacteria and viruses and in cancer. A poorly understood and important aspect of ABC transporter biology is the role of phosphorylation as a mechanism to regulate transporter function. In this review, we summarize the current literature addressing the role of phosphorylation in regulating ABC transporter function. A comprehensive list of all the phosphorylation sites that have been identified for the human ABC transporters is presented, and we discuss the role of individual kinases in regulating transporter function. We address the potential pitfalls and difficulties associated with identifying phosphorylation sites and the corresponding kinase(s), and we discuss novel techniques that may circumvent these problems. We conclude by providing a brief perspective on studying ABC transporter phosphorylation. PMID:21118091

  8. THE ABC TRANSPORTER, AbcB3, MEDIATES cAMP EXPORT IN D. DISCOIDEUM DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Edward Roshan; Nam, Edward A.; Kuspa, Adam; Shaulsky, Gad

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular cAMP functions as a primary ligand for cell surface cAMP receptors throughout Dictyostelium discoideum development, controlling chemotaxis and morphogenesis. The developmental consequences of cAMP signaling and the metabolism of cAMP have been studied in great detail, but it has been unclear how cells export cAMP across the plasma membrane. Here we show pharmacologically and genetically that ABC transporters mediate cAMP export. Using an evolutionary-developmental biology approach, we identified several candidate abc genes and characterized one of them, abcB3, in more detail. Genetic and biochemical evidence suggest that AbcB3 is a component of the cAMP export mechanism in D. discoideum development. PMID:25448698

  9. Astrocytes drive upregulation of the multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1 (P-Glycoprotein) in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier in mutant superoxide dismutase 1-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; Lichter, Jessica; Sarlo, Mark; Markandaiah, Shashirekha S; McAvoy, Kevin; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Jablonski, Michael R; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2016-08-01

    The efficacy of drugs targeting the CNS is influenced by their limited brain access, which can lead to complete pharmacoresistance. Recently a tissue-specific and selective upregulation of the multidrug efflux transporter ABCB1 or P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the spinal cord of both patients and the mutant SOD1-G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease that prevalently kills motor neurons has been reported. Here, we extended the analysis of P-gp expression in the SOD1-G93A ALS mouse model and found that P-gp upregulation was restricted to endothelial cells of the capillaries, while P-gp expression was not detected in other cells of the spinal cord parenchyma such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons. Using both in vitro human and mouse models of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we found that mutant SOD1 astrocytes were driving P-gp upregulation in endothelial cells. In addition, a significant increase in reactive oxygen species production, Nrf2 and NFκB activation in endothelial cells exposed to mutant SOD1 astrocytes in both human and murine BBB models were observed. Most interestingly, astrocytes expressing FUS-H517Q, a different familial ALS-linked mutated gene, also drove NFκB-dependent upregulation of P-gp. However, the pathway was not dependent on oxidative stress but rather involved TNF-α release. Overall, these findings indicated that nuclear translocation of NFκB was a converging mechanism used by endothelial cells of the BBB to upregulate P-gp expression in mutant SOD1-linked ALS and possibly other forms of familial ALS. GLIA 2016 GLIA 2016;64:1298-1313. PMID:27158936

  10. ABC transporter research: going strong 40 years on

    PubMed Central

    Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Kerr, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    In most organisms, ABC transporters constitute one of the largest families of membrane proteins. In humans, their functions are diverse and underpin numerous key physiological processes, as well as being causative factors in a number of clinically relevant pathologies. Advances in our understanding of these diseases have come about through combinations of genetic and protein biochemical investigations of these transporters and the power of in vitro and in vivo investigations is helping to develop genotype–phenotype understanding. However, the importance of ABC transporter research goes far beyond human biology; microbial ABC transporters are of great interest in terms of understanding virulence and drug resistance and industrial biotechnology researchers are exploring the potential of prokaryotic ABC exporters to increase the capacity of synthetic biology systems. Plant ABC transporters play important roles in transport of hormones, xenobiotics, metals and secondary metabolites, pathogen responses and numerous aspects of development, all of which are important in the global food security area. For 3 days in Chester, this Biochemical Society Focused Meeting brought together researchers with diverse experimental approaches and with different fundamental questions, all of which are linked by the commonality of ABC transporters. PMID:26517919

  11. The skin cancer chemotherapeutic agent ingenol-3-angelate (PEP005) is a substrate for the epidermal multidrug transporter (ABCB1) and targets tumor vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luowei; Shukla, Suneet; Lee, Andrew; Garfield, Susan H.; Maloney, David J.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    2010-01-01

    Ingenol-3-angelate (Ing3A), extracted from Euphorbia peplus, is currently in clinical trials for eradicating basal cell carcinoma (BCC), actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ by topical application. Although structurally related to phorbol esters and a PKC activator, topical Ing3A, but not phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), inhibited the growth of subcutaneous tumors derived from PAM212 (mouse SCC) and B16 (mouse melanoma). Ing3A and PMA both induced acute neutrophilic inflammation on mouse skin, but only Ing3A caused subcutaneous hemorrhage and vascular damage. Both Ing3A and PMA activated Erk1/2 in epidermis, but Ing3A also activated Erk1/2 in skin dermal fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Pretreatment with topical cyclosporin A (CsA), verapamil or XR9576, modulators of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), prevented Ing3A-induced hemorrhage but not neutrophil infiltration. CsA also impaired Ing3A’s anti-cancer activity while the anti-inflammatory dexamethasone did not. Ing3A, but not PMA, blocked photoaffinity labeling of human P-gp with [125I]-Iodoaryazidoprazosin and inhibited P-gp mediated drug resistance to HCT-15 cells. The intracellular levels of Ing3A were significantly lower in P-gp expressing cells and treatment with XR9576 increased the levels to those of cells that do not express P-gp, demonstrating that Ing3A binds to and is transported by P-gp. Taken together, our results suggest that P-gp mediated absorptive transport, dermal penetration and vascular damage contribute to the anti-cancer activity of Ing3A in vivo. PMID:20460505

  12. ABC-B transporter genes in Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed

    Bourguinat, Catherine; Che, Hua; Mani, Thangadurai; Keller, Kathy; Prichard, Roger K

    2016-08-01

    Dirofilaria immitis is a filarial nematode causing infection and heartworm disease in dogs and other canids, cats, and occasionally in humans. Prevention with macrocyclic lactones (ML) is recommended during the mosquito transmission season. Recently, ML resistance has been reported. ABC-B transporter genes are thought to be involved in the mechanism of ML resistance in other nematodes. This study aimed to identify all the ABC-B transporter genes in D. immitis using as a reference the nDi.2.2 D. immitis whole genome, which is not completely annotated. Using bioinformatic tools and PCR amplification on pooled D. immitis genomic DNA and on pooled cDNA, nine ABC transporter genes including one pseudogene were characterized. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses allowed identification of three P-glycoproteins (Pgps) (Dim-pgp-3 Dim-pgp-10, Dim-pgp-11), of two ABC-B half transporter genes (one ortholog of Cel-haf-4 and Cel-haf-9; and one ortholog of Cel-haf-1 and Cel-haf-3), of one ABC half transporter gene (ortholog of Cel-haf-5) that contained an ABC-C motif, and of one additional half transporter that would require functional study for characterization. The number of ABC-B transporter genes identified was lower than in Caenorhabditis elegans and Haemonchus contortus. Further studies are needed to understand their possible role in ML resistance in D. immitis. These ABC transporters constitute a base for ML resistance investigation in D. immitis and advance our understanding of the molecular biology of this parasite. PMID:27164440

  13. Microarray-based detection and expression analysis of ABC and SLC transporters in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Ruciński, Marcin; Zabel, Maciej

    2013-04-01

    Multiple drug resistance of cancer cells is multifactorial. A microarray technique may provide information about new candidate genes playing a role in drug resistance. Drug membrane transporters from ABC and SLC families play a main role in this phenomenon. This study demonstrates alterations in ABC and SLC gene expression levels in methotrexate, cisplatin, doxorubicin, vincristine, topotecan and paclitaxel-resistant variant of W1 ovarian cancer cell line. Resistant W1 cell lines were derived by stepwise selection of cells in increasing concentration of drugs. Affymetrix GeneChip(®) Human Genome U219 Array Strip was used for hybridizations. Statistical significance was determined by independent sample t-test. The genes having altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scater plot. Genes up/downregulated more than threefolds were selected and listed. Among ABC genes, seven were upregulated and three were downregulated. Three genes: ABCB1, ABCB4 and ABCG2 were upregulated very significantly (over tenfold). One ABCA8 was significantly downregulated. Among 38 SLC genes, 18 were upregulated, 16 were downregulated and four were up- or downregulated dependent on the cell line. Expression of 10 SLC genes was changed very significantly (over tenfold). Four genes were significantly increased: SLC6A1, SLC9A2, SLC12A1, SLC16A6 and six genes were significantly decreased: SLC2A14, SLC7A3, SLC7A8, SLC7A11, SLC16A14, SLC38A9. Based on the expression profiles, our results provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and expression of membrane transporters involved in drug resistance. Correlation of specific drug transporter with drug resistance requires further analysis. PMID:23462296

  14. The multidrug resistance pump ABCB1 is a substrate for the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-1

    PubMed Central

    Akkaya, Begum G.; Zolnerciks, Joseph K.; Ritchie, Tasha K.; Bauer, Bjoern; Hartz, Anika M.S.; Sullivan, James A.; Linton, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    The ATP Binding Cassette transporter ABCB1 can export the neurotoxic peptide β-amyloid from endothelial cells that line the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This has the potential to lower cerebral levels of β-amyloid, but ABCB1 expression in the BBB appears to be progressively reduced in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The surface density of many membrane proteins is regulated by ubiquitination catalysed by ubiquitin E3 ligases. In brain capillaries of mice challenged with β-amyloid ex vivo, we show that the level of the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 increases concomitant with reduction in Abcb1. In vitro we show that human ABCB1 is a substrate for human NEDD4-1 ligase. Recombinant ABCB1 was purified from Sf21 insect cells and incubated with recombinant NEDD4-1 purified from E. coli. The treated ABCB1 had reduced mobility on SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry identified eight lysine residues, K271, K272, K575, K685, K877, K885, K887 and K1062 that were ubiquitinated by NEDD4-1. Molecular modelling showed that all of the residues are exposed on the surface of the intracellular domains of ABCB1. K877, K885 and K887 in particular, are located in the intracellular loop of transmembrane helix 10 (TMH10) in close proximity, in the tertiary fold, to a putative NEDD4-1 binding site in the intracellular helix extending from TMH12 (PxY motif, residues 996-998). Transient expression of NEDD4-1 in HEK293 Flp-In cells stably expressing ABCB1 was shown to reduce the surface density of the transporter. Together, the data identify this ubiquitin ligase as a potential target for intervention in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26006083

  15. Function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ABC proteins in lipid transport.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Antje; Devaux, Philippe F; Herrmann, Andreas

    2005-03-21

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic origins are implicated in the transport of lipids. In humans, members of the ABC protein families A, B, C, D and G are mutated in a number of lipid transport and metabolism disorders, such as Tangier disease, Stargardt syndrome, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, adrenoleukodystrophy or sitosterolemia. Studies employing transfection, overexpression, reconstitution, deletion and inhibition indicate the transbilayer transport of endogenous lipids and their analogs by some of these proteins, modulating lipid transbilayer asymmetry. Other proteins appear to be involved in the exposure of specific lipids on the exoplasmic leaflet, allowing their uptake by acceptors and further transport to specific sites. Additionally, lipid transport by ABC proteins is currently being studied in non-human eukaryotes, e.g. in sea urchin, trypanosomatides, arabidopsis and yeast, as well as in prokaryotes such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis. Here, we review current information about the (putative) role of both pro- and eukaryotic ABC proteins in the various phenomena associated with lipid transport. Besides providing a better understanding of phenomena like lipid metabolism, circulation, multidrug resistance, hormonal processes, fertilization, vision and signalling, studies on pro- and eukaryotic ABC proteins might eventually enable us to put a name on some of the proteins mediating transbilayer lipid transport in various membranes of cells and organelles. It must be emphasized, however, that there are still many uncertainties concerning the functions and mechanisms of ABC proteins interacting with lipids. In particular, further purification and reconstitution experiments with an unambiguous role of ATP hydrolysis are needed to demonstrate a clear involvement of ABC proteins in lipid transbilayer asymmetry. PMID:15749056

  16. The multidrug resistance 1 gene Abcb1 in brain and placenta: comparative analysis in human and guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Jane J; Petropoulos, Sophie; Suderman, Matthew; Iqbal, Majid; Moisiadis, Vasilis; Turecki, Gustavo; Matthews, Stephen G; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    The Multidrug Resistance 1 (MDR1; alternatively ABCB1) gene product P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP binding cassette transporter, extrudes multiple endogenous and exogenous substrates from the cell, playing an important role in normal physiology and xenobiotic distribution and bioavailability. To date, the predominant animal models used to investigate the role of P-gp have been the mouse and rat, which have two distinct genes, Abcb1a and Abcb1b. In contrast, the human has a single gene, ABCB1, for which only a single isoform has been validated. We and others have previously shown important differences between Abcb1a and Abcb1b, limiting the extrapolation from rodent findings to the human. Since the guinea pig has a relatively long gestation, hemomonochorial placentation and neuroanatomically mature offspring, it is more similar to the human, and may provide a more comparable model for investigating the regulation of P-gp in the brain and placenta, however, to date, the Abcb1 gene in the guinea pig remains to be characterized. The placenta and fetal brain are barrier sites that express P-gp and that play a critical role of protection of the fetus and the fetal brain from maternally administered drugs and other xenobiotics. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative PCR (QPCR) to sequence the expressed isoforms of guinea pig Abcb1, we demonstrate that like the human, the guinea pig genome contains one gene for Abcb1 but that it is expressed as at least three different isoforms via alternative splicing and alternate exon usage. Further, we demonstrate that these isoforms are more closely related to human than to rat or mouse isoforms. This striking, overall similarity and evolutionary relatedness between guinea pig Abcb1 and human ABCB1 indicate that the guinea pig represents a relevant animal model for investigating the function and regulation of P-gp in the placenta and brain. PMID:25353162

  17. Improving the stability and function of purified ABCB1 and ABCA4: the influence of membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Naomi L; McDevitt, Christopher A; Collins, Richard; Niesten, Petronella H M; Prince, Stephen; Kerr, Ian D; Ford, Robert C; Callaghan, Richard

    2014-01-01

    ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters play prominent roles in numerous cellular processes and many have been implicated in human diseases. Unfortunately, detailed mechanistic information on the majority of ABC transporters has not yet been elucidated. The slow rate of progress of molecular and high resolution structural studies may be attributed to the difficulty in the investigation of integral membrane proteins. These difficulties include the expression of functional, non-aggregated protein in heterologous systems. Furthermore, the extraction of membrane proteins from source material remains a major bottle-neck in the process since there are relatively few guidelines for selection of an appropriate detergent to achieve optimal extraction. Whilst affinity tag strategies have simplified the purification of membrane proteins; many challenges remain. For example, the chromatographic process and associated steps can rapidly lead to functional inactivation, random aggregation, or even precipitation of the target protein. Furthermore, optimisation of high yield and purity, does not guarantee successful structure determination. Based on this series of potential issues, any investigation into structure-function of membrane proteins requires a systematic evaluation of preparation quality. In particular, the evaluation should focus on function, homogeneity and mono-dispersity. The present investigation provides a detailed assessment of the quality of purified ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters; namely ABCB1 (P-gp) and ABCA4 (ABCR). A number of suggestions are provided to facilitate the production of functional, homogeneous and mono-disperse preparations using the insect cell expression system. Finally, the ABCA4 samples have been used to provide structural insights into this essential photo-receptor cell protein. PMID:24036079

  18. Selected ABCB1, ABCB4 and ABCC2 Polymorphisms Do Not Enhance the Risk of Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity in a Spanish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ulzurrun, Eugenia; Stephens, Camilla; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Robles-Diaz, Mercedes; Saenz-López, Pablo; Hallal, Hacibe; Soriano, German; Roman, Eva; Fernandez, M. Carmen; Lucena, M. Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Flawed ABC transporter functions may contribute to increased risk of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). We aimed to analyse the influence of genetic variations in ABC transporters on the risk of DILI development and clinical presentations in a large Spanish DILI cohort. Methods A total of ten polymorphisms in ABCB1 (1236T>C, 2677G>T,A, 3435T>C), ABCB4 (1954A>G) and ABCC2 (−1774G>del, −1549A>G, −24C>T, 1249G>A, 3972C>T and 4544G>A) were genotyped using Taqman 5′ allelic discrimination assays or sequencing in 141 Spanish DILI patients and 161 controls. The influence of specific genotypes, alleles and haplotypes on the risk of DILI development and clinical presentations was analysed. Results None of the individual polymorphisms or haplotypes was found to be associated with DILI development. Carriers homozygous for the ABCC2 −1774del allele were however only found in DILI patients. Hence, this genotype could potentially be associated with increased risk, though its low frequency in our Spanish cohort prevented a final conclusion. Furthermore, carriers homozygous for the ABCC2 −1774G/−1549A/−24T/1249G/3972T/4544G haplotype were found to have a higher propensity for total bilirubin elevations when developing DILI. Conclusions Our findings do not support a role for the analysed polymorphisms in the ABCB1, ABCB4 and ABCC2 transporter genes in DILI development in Spanish patients. The ABCC2 −1774deldel genotype was however restricted to DILI cases and could potentially contribute to enhanced DILI susceptibility. PMID:24732756

  19. The effect of ABCB1 polymorphisms on the outcome of breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Tulsyan, Sonam; Mittal, Rama Devi; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-01-01

    The ABCB1 gene encodes a permeability glycoprotein, which is one of the most extensively studied human adenosine-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent efflux transporters. Permeability glycoprotein is expressed in the apical membranes of tissues such as intestine, liver, blood-brain barrier, kidney, placenta, and testis and contributes to intracellular drug disposition. It is also highly expressed in tumor cells conferring drug resistance, which is one of the major problems in the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy treatment. ABCB1 is highly polymorphic, and three well-known single-nucleotide polymorphisms such as 1236C>T, 2677G>T/A, and 3435C>T have been found to be associated with altered messenger RNA levels, protein folding, and drug pharmacokinetics. Many association studies and meta-analyses have demonstrated the clinical impact of ABCB1 polymorphisms in breast cancer treatment outcomes with respect to therapeutic response, chemotoxicity, and overall survival. Therefore, the aim of this review was to evaluate the effects of ABCB1 polymorphisms on the outcome of breast cancer treatment which, in future, would be important for tailoring individualized anticancer therapy. PMID:27175090

  20. Ferulic acid reverses ABCB1-mediated paclitaxel resistance in MDR cell lines.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Ganesan; Balupillai, Agilan; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Gunaseelan, Srithar; Mary, Beaulah; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. The use of the dietary phytochemicals as chemosensitizing agents to enhance the efficacy of conventional cytostatic drugs has recently gained the attention as a plausible approach for overcoming the drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a naturally occurring diet-based phenolic acid, ferulic acid, could sensitize paclitaxel efficacy in ABCB1 overexpressing (P-glycoprotein) colchicine selected KB Ch(R)8-5 cell line. In vitro drug efflux assays demonstrated that ferulic acid inhibits P-glycoprotein transport function in drug resistant KB Ch(R)8-5 cell lines. However, ferulic acid significantly downregulates ABCB1 expression in a concentration dependent manner. Cytotoxicity assay reveals that ferulic acid decreased paclitaxel resistance in KBCh(R)8-5 and HEK293/ABCB1 cells, which indicates its chemosensitizing potential. Clonogenic cell survival assay and apoptotic morphological staining further confirm the chemosensitizing potential of ferulic acid in drug resistant KB Ch(R)8-5 cell lines. Ferulic acid treatment enhances paclitaxel mediated cell cycle arrest and upregulates paclitaxel-induced apoptotic signaling in KB resistant cells. Hence, it has been concluded that downregulation of ABCB1 and subsequent induction of paclitaxel-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptotic signaling may be the cause for the chemosensitizing potential of ferulic acid in P-gp overexpressing cell lines. PMID:27262378

  1. The effect of ABCB1 polymorphisms on the outcome of breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tulsyan, Sonam; Mittal, Rama Devi; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-01-01

    The ABCB1 gene encodes a permeability glycoprotein, which is one of the most extensively studied human adenosine-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent efflux transporters. Permeability glycoprotein is expressed in the apical membranes of tissues such as intestine, liver, blood–brain barrier, kidney, placenta, and testis and contributes to intracellular drug disposition. It is also highly expressed in tumor cells conferring drug resistance, which is one of the major problems in the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy treatment. ABCB1 is highly polymorphic, and three well-known single-nucleotide polymorphisms such as 1236C>T, 2677G>T/A, and 3435C>T have been found to be associated with altered messenger RNA levels, protein folding, and drug pharmacokinetics. Many association studies and meta-analyses have demonstrated the clinical impact of ABCB1 polymorphisms in breast cancer treatment outcomes with respect to therapeutic response, chemotoxicity, and overall survival. Therefore, the aim of this review was to evaluate the effects of ABCB1 polymorphisms on the outcome of breast cancer treatment which, in future, would be important for tailoring individualized anticancer therapy. PMID:27175090

  2. Impacts of ABCB1 (G1199A) polymorphism on resistance, uptake, and efflux to steroid drugs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rui; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Dan-Yun

    2016-10-01

    1. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates, including steroid drugs, involve in the inter-individual differences in resistant phenotype. This study was performed to evaluate whether G1199A polymorphism in ABCB1 gene can alter the sensitivity, accumulation, and transepithelial efflux to steroids in LLC-PK1 cells. 2. The stable recombinant LLC-PK1 cell lines transfected with ABCB1 1199G and ABCB1 1199A were used to assess the sensitivity, accumulation, and transepithelial permeability to steroids. 3. The cells transfected with 1199A allele displayed stronger resistance to aldosterone, dexamethasone, and cortisol (2.5-, 2.0-, and 1.6-fold, respectively) than cells overexpressing 1199G allele, while the two types of recombinant cells showed a similar resistance to corticosterone. The accumulation of aldosterone, dexamethasone, and cortisol in recombinant 1199A cells were significantly decreased when compared to 1199G cells (2.9-, 4.4-, and 3.9-fold, respectively). The net efflux ratios of P-gp-mediated aldosterone, dexamethasone, and cortisol in cells expressing 1199A allele were apparently greater than cells transfected with 1199G allele (3.3-, 3.5-, and 4.0-fold, respectively). 4. The impacts of ABCB1 (G1199A) single nucleotide polymorphism on the efflux of P-gp substrates presented as drug-specific. Overall, the transport ability of P-gp-dependent steroid drugs in recombinant model overexpressing variant 1199A allele is stronger in comparison to cells overexpressing wild-type 1199G allele. Therefore, the ABCB1 (G1199A) polymorphism may affect effective steroids concentration in target cells by regulating the drug transport and distribution. PMID:26822676

  3. Differential effects of c-myc and ABCB1 silencing on reversing drug resistance in HepG2/Dox cells.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Shaymaa M M; Hamed, Ahmed R; Emara, Mohamed; Soltan, Maha M; Abd-Ellatef, Gamal Eldein F; Abdelnasser, Salma M

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in various kinds of cancers represents a true obstacle which hinders the successes of most of current available chemotherapies. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) trasporter proteins have been shown to contribute to the majority of MDR in various types of malignancies. c-myc has recently been reported to participate, at least partly, in MDR to some types of cancers. This study aimed to test whether c-myc could play a role, solely or with coordination with other ABCs, in the resistance of HepG2 cells to doxorubicin (Dox). MDR has been induced in wild-type HepG2 and has been verified both on gene and protein levels. Various assays including efflux assays as well as siRNA targeting ABCB1 and c-myc have been employed to explore the role of both candidate molecules in MDR in HepG2. Results obtained, with regard to ABCB1 silencing on HepG2/Dox cells, have shown that ABCB1-deficient cells exhibited a significant reduction in ABCC1 expression as compared to ABCB1-sufficient cells. However, these cells did not show a significant reduction in other tested ABCs (ABCC5 and ABCC10) while c-myc silencing had no significant effect on any of the studied ABCs. Moreover, silencing of ABCB1 on HepG2 significantly increased fluorescent calcein retention in HepG2 cells as compared to the control cells while downregulation of c-myc did not have any effect on fluorescent calcein retention. Altogether, this work clearly demonstrates that c-myc has no role in MDR of HepG2 to Dox which has been shown to be ABCB1-mediated in a mechanism which might involve ABCC1. PMID:26596829

  4. ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP gene expressions are altered by LDL, HDL, and serum deprivation in a human doxorubicin-resistant uterine sarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Celestino, Andréa Turbuck; Levy, Débora; Maria Ruiz, Jorge Luis; Bydlowski, Sérgio Paulo

    2015-02-20

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major cause of cancer treatment failure. The ATP-binding cassette-B1 (ABCB1) transporter, also known as MDR1 or P-glycoprotein, is thought to promote the efflux of drugs from cells. MDR is also associated with the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (ABCC1) and the lung resistance-related protein (LRP), a human major vault protein. Moreover, MDR has a complex relationship with lipids. The ABCB1 has been reported to modulate cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Conversely, cholesterol has been reported to modulate multidrug transporters. However, results reported to date are contradictory and confusing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LDL, HDL, and serum deprivation could influence ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP expression in a human doxorubicin-resistant uterine sarcoma cell line. ABCB1 and ABCC1 expression increased after 24 h of serum deprivation, and expression returned to basal levels after 72 h. LDL, depending on concentration, increased ABCB1, ABCC1, and LRP expression. ABCB1 expression increased at low HDL, and decreased at high HDL concentrations. We demonstrated that serum deprivation and lipoproteins, particularly LDL, modulated ABCB1 expression and, to a lesser extent, ABCC1 expression. This finding may link the phenomena of drug transport, cholesterol metabolism and cancer. PMID:25603048

  5. Development, Maintenance, and Reversal of Multiple Drug Resistance: At the Crossroads of TFPI1, ABC Transporters, and HIF1α

    PubMed Central

    Arnason, Terra; Harkness, Troy

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and improved therapies for many cancers are enhancing survival rates. Although many cytotoxic therapies are approved for aggressive or metastatic cancer; response rates are low and acquisition of de novo resistance is virtually universal. For decades; chemotherapeutic treatments for cancer have included anthracyclines such as Doxorubicin (DOX); and its use in aggressive tumors appears to remain a viable option; but drug resistance arises against DOX; as for all other classes of compounds. Our recent work suggests the anticoagulant protein Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor 1α (TFPI1α) plays a role in driving the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR); but not maintenance; of the MDR state. Other factors; such as the ABC transporter drug efflux pumps MDR-1/P-gp (ABCB1) and BCRP (ABCG2); are required for MDR maintenance; as well as development. The patient population struggling with therapeutic resistance specifically requires novel treatment options to resensitize these tumor cells to therapy. In this review we discuss the development, maintenance, and reversal of MDR as three distinct phases of cancer biology. Possible means to exploit these stages to reverse MDR will be explored. Early molecular detection of MDR cancers before clinical failure has the potential to offer new approaches to fighting MDR cancer. PMID:26501324

  6. ATP-binding cassette transporters as pitfalls in selection of transgenic cells.

    PubMed

    Theile, Dirk; Staffen, Bianca; Weiss, Johanna

    2010-04-15

    Puromycin, hygromycin, and geneticin (G418) are antibiotics frequently used to select genetically engineered eukaryotic cells after transfection or transduction. Because intrinsic or acquired high expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp/ABCB1) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP/ABCC1), can hamper efficient selection, it is important to know whether these antibiotics are substrates and/or inducers of efflux transporters. Therefore, we investigated the influence of these antibiotics on drug transporter expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in the induction model cell line LS180. Moreover, we assessed whether ABC transporters influence the growth inhibitory effects of these antibiotics by proliferation assays using Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells overexpressing the particular transporter. The results obtained indicate that puromycin and G418 are substrates of several ABC transporters, mainly Pgp/ABCB1. In contrast, hygromycin seems to be no good substrate for any of the ABC transporters investigated. Puromycin induced ABCC1/MRP1, whereas G418 suppressed ABCB1/Pgp, at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level. In contrast, hygromycin had no effect on ABC transporter mRNA expressions. In conclusion, this study emphasizes the significance of ABC transporters for the efficacy of selection processes. Consciousness of the results is supposed to guide the molecular biologist to the right choice of adequate experimental conditions for successful selection of genetically engineered eukaryotic cells. PMID:20018165

  7. Establishment and characterization of an MDCK cell line stably-transfected with chicken Abcb1 encoding P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Guo, Tingting; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; Chen, Li; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Liping

    2016-06-01

    Chicken P-glycoprotein (chP-gp), encoded by Abcb1, determines the bioavailability because of its effect on pharmacokinetics of various drugs. However, comprehensive studies on chP-gp are still limited. In this study, the chicken full-length cDNA was first successfully cloned and then stably expressed in MDCK cell line. The open reading frame of chicken Abcb1 consists of 3864 nucleotides, encoding for a 1287-amino acid protein. Sequence alignments analysis showed that chicken P-gp had high identities with the homologues of turkey (95%), human (72%), pig (72%), rat (71%) and cattle (68%). The efflux ratio of rhodamine123 (Rho123, a human P-gp substrate) in chAbcb1 transfected MDCK cells was significantly higher than that in the wild type MDCK cell (6.24 vs 1.64, P<0.05), suggesting a good transporting function of chicken P-gp overexpressed in the transfected cell. Importantly, MDCK-chAbcb1 cells, unlike Caco-2 cells, exhibited biphasic saturation kinetics in transporting Rho123. In conclusion, an MDCK cell line stably expressing chAbcb1 was successfully established, which could provide a new cell model to screen its substrates and inhibitors and study the drug-drug interaction medicated via chicken P-gp. PMID:27234533

  8. Placental passage of olomoucine II, but not purvalanol A, is affected by p-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (ABCCs).

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jakub; Kučera, Radim; Neumanova, Zuzana; Klimes, Jiri; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    1. Purine cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors have recently been recognised as promising candidates for the treatment of various cancers. While pharmacodynamic properties of these compounds are relatively well understood, their pharmacokinetics including possible interactions with placental transport systems have not been characterised to date. 2. In this study, we investigated transplacental passage of olomoucine II and purvalanol A in rat focusing on possible role of p-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and/or multidrug resistance-associated proteins (ABCCs). Employing the in situ method of dually perfused rat term placenta, we demonstrate transplacental passage of both olomoucine II and purvalanol A against the concentration gradient in foetus-to-mother direction. Using several ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter inhibitors, we confirm the participation of ABCB1, ABCG2 and ABCCs transporters in the placental passage of olomoucine II, but not purvalanol A. 3. Transplacental passage of olomoucine II and purvalanol A from mother to foetus is significantly reduced by active transporters, restricting thereby foetal exposure and providing protection against harmful effects of these xenobiotics. Importantly, we demonstrate that in spite of their considerable structural similarity, the two molecules utilise distinct placental transport systems. These facts should be kept in mind when introducing these prospective anticancer candidates and/or their analogues into the clinical area. PMID:26364927

  9. Insights into how nucleotide-binding domains power ABC transport.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W; Bilton, Paul; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Sadler, Peter J; Campopiano, Dominic J; Sansom, Mark S P; Iwata, So

    2009-09-01

    The mechanism by which nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters power the transport of substrates across cell membranes is currently unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of an NBD, FbpC, from the Neisseria gonorrhoeae ferric iron uptake transporter with an unusual and substantial domain swap in the C-terminal regulatory domain. This entanglement suggests that FbpC is unable to open to the same extent as the homologous protein MalK. Using molecular dynamics we demonstrate that this is not the case: both NBDs open rapidly once ATP is removed. We conclude from this result that the closed structures of FbpC and MalK have higher free energies than their respective open states. This result has important implications for our understanding of the mechanism of power generation in ABC transporters, because the unwinding of this free energy ensures that the opening of these two NBDs is also powered. PMID:19748342

  10. Cloning of two novel ABC transporters mapping on human chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Luciani, M.F.; Savary, S.; Chimini, G. ); Denizot, F. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1994-05-01

    The family of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters or traffic ATPases is composed of several membrane-associated proteins that transport a great variety of solutes across cellular membranes. Two novel mammalian members of the family, ABC1 and ABC2, have been identified by a PCR-based approach. They belong to a group of traffic ATPases encoded as a single multifunctional protein, such as CFTR, STE 6, and P-glycoproteins. Their peculiar structural features and close relationship to ABC transporters involved in nodulation suggest that ABC1 and ABC2 define a novel subgroup of mammalian traffic ATPases. 51 refs., 7 figs.

  11. The ABCs of Candida albicans Multidrug Transporter Cdr1

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Atanu; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni

    2015-01-01

    In the light of multidrug resistance (MDR) among pathogenic microbes and cancer cells, membrane transporters have gained profound clinical significance. Chemotherapeutic failure, by far, has been attributed mainly to the robust and diverse array of these proteins, which are omnipresent in every stratum of the living world. Candida albicans, one of the major fungal pathogens affecting immunocompromised patients, also develops MDR during the course of chemotherapy. The pivotal membrane transporters that C. albicans has exploited as one of the strategies to develop MDR belongs to either the ATP binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) class of proteins. The ABC transporter Candida drug resistance 1 protein (Cdr1p) is a major player among these transporters that enables the pathogen to outplay the battery of antifungals encountered by it. The promiscuous Cdr1 protein fulfills the quintessential need of a model to study molecular mechanisms of multidrug transporter regulation and structure-function analyses of asymmetric ABC transporters. In this review, we cover the highlights of two decades of research on Cdr1p that has provided a platform to study its structure-function relationships and regulatory circuitry for a better understanding of MDR not only in yeast but also in other organisms. PMID:26407965

  12. The ABCs of Candida albicans Multidrug Transporter Cdr1.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Banerjee, Atanu; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni

    2015-12-01

    In the light of multidrug resistance (MDR) among pathogenic microbes and cancer cells, membrane transporters have gained profound clinical significance. Chemotherapeutic failure, by far, has been attributed mainly to the robust and diverse array of these proteins, which are omnipresent in every stratum of the living world. Candida albicans, one of the major fungal pathogens affecting immunocompromised patients, also develops MDR during the course of chemotherapy. The pivotal membrane transporters that C. albicans has exploited as one of the strategies to develop MDR belongs to either the ATP binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) class of proteins. The ABC transporter Candida drug resistance 1 protein (Cdr1p) is a major player among these transporters that enables the pathogen to outplay the battery of antifungals encountered by it. The promiscuous Cdr1 protein fulfills the quintessential need of a model to study molecular mechanisms of multidrug transporter regulation and structure-function analyses of asymmetric ABC transporters. In this review, we cover the highlights of two decades of research on Cdr1p that has provided a platform to study its structure-function relationships and regulatory circuitry for a better understanding of MDR not only in yeast but also in other organisms. PMID:26407965

  13. Possible association of rare polymorphism in the ABCB1 gene with rifampin and ethambutol drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castillo, José Alberto; Arce-Mendoza, Alma Y; Quintanilla-Siller, Armando; Rendon, Adrian; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G

    2015-09-01

    Human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a membrane transporter encoded by ABCB1 (also known as MDR1) that plays a critical role in pharmacokinetics of many unrelated drugs. Rifampin (RMP) and ethambutol (ETB), two anti-tubercular agents, are substrates of P-gp. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ABCB1 have been associated with resistance to several drugs; however, their association with RMP and ETB resistance in tuberculosis patients has not yet been studied. Genotype/allele frequencies in C1236T, G2677T/A and C3435T SNPs of ABCB1 were obtained from 99 tuberculosis patients susceptible or resistant to RMP and ETB (NoRER or RER). 2677G>A allele prevalence was found to be significantly higher in the RER group compared to NoRER (5 resistant vs 2 non-resistant patients, P < 0.01; OR, 11.0; 95% CI, 2.00-56.00). No differences were found in genotype/allele frequencies in C1236T and C3435T SNPs of ABCB1 and resistance to RMP and ETB in tuberculosis patients (P > 0.05). The present study suggests the 2677G>A allele of ABCB1 could be associated with simultaneous resistance to RMP and ETB in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm this association and explore its nature. PMID:26067842

  14. Impact of ABCB1 1236C > T-2677G > T-3435C > T polymorphisms on the anti-proliferative activity of imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib.

    PubMed

    Dessilly, Géraldine; Panin, Nadtha; Elens, Laure; Haufroid, Vincent; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 (also called P-glycoprotein) confers resistance to multiple anticancer drugs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Several ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms affect the transporter activity. The most common ABCB1 variants are 1236C > T, 2677G > T, 3435C > T and have been associated with clinical response to imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) in some studies. We evaluated the impact of these polymorphisms on the anti-proliferative effect and the intracellular accumulation of TKIs (imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib) in transfected HEK293 and K562 cells. ABCB1 overexpression increased the resistance of cells to doxorubicin, vinblastine and TKIs. Imatinib anti-proliferative effect and accumulation were decreased to a larger extent in cells expressing the ABCB1 wild-type protein compared with the 1236T-2677T-3435T variant relatively to control cells. By contrast, ABCB1 polymorphisms influenced the activity of nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib to a much lesser extent. In conclusion, our data suggest that wild-type ABCB1 exports imatinib more efficiently than the 1236T-2677T-3435T variant protein, providing a molecular basis for the reported association between ABCB1 polymorphisms and the response to imatinib in CML. Our results also point to a weaker impact of ABCB1 polymorphisms on the activity of nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib. PMID:27405085

  15. Impact of ABCB1 1236C > T-2677G > T-3435C > T polymorphisms on the anti-proliferative activity of imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib

    PubMed Central

    Dessilly, Géraldine; Panin, Nadtha; Elens, Laure; Haufroid, Vincent; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 (also called P-glycoprotein) confers resistance to multiple anticancer drugs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Several ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms affect the transporter activity. The most common ABCB1 variants are 1236C > T, 2677G > T, 3435C > T and have been associated with clinical response to imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) in some studies. We evaluated the impact of these polymorphisms on the anti-proliferative effect and the intracellular accumulation of TKIs (imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib) in transfected HEK293 and K562 cells. ABCB1 overexpression increased the resistance of cells to doxorubicin, vinblastine and TKIs. Imatinib anti-proliferative effect and accumulation were decreased to a larger extent in cells expressing the ABCB1 wild-type protein compared with the 1236T-2677T-3435T variant relatively to control cells. By contrast, ABCB1 polymorphisms influenced the activity of nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib to a much lesser extent. In conclusion, our data suggest that wild-type ABCB1 exports imatinib more efficiently than the 1236T-2677T-3435T variant protein, providing a molecular basis for the reported association between ABCB1 polymorphisms and the response to imatinib in CML. Our results also point to a weaker impact of ABCB1 polymorphisms on the activity of nilotinib, dasatinib and ponatinib. PMID:27405085

  16. Tonoplast-localized Abc2 Transporter Mediates Phytochelatin Accumulation in Vacuoles and Confers Cadmium Tolerance*

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Zhai, Zhiyang; Jobe, Timothy O.; Akmakjian, Garo Z.; Song, Won-Yong; Limbo, Oliver; Russell, Matthew R.; Kozlovskyy, Volodymyr I.; Martinoia, Enrico; Vatamaniuk, Olena K.; Russell, Paul; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Phytochelatins mediate tolerance to heavy metals in plants and some fungi by sequestering phytochelatin-metal complexes into vacuoles. To date, only Schizosaccharomyces pombe Hmt1 has been described as a phytochelatin transporter and attempts to identify orthologous phytochelatin transporters in plants and other organisms have failed. Furthermore, recent data indicate that the hmt1 mutant accumulates significant phytochelatin levels in vacuoles, suggesting that unidentified phytochelatin transporters exist in fungi. Here, we show that deletion of all vacuolar ABC transporters abolishes phytochelatin accumulation in S. pombe vacuoles and abrogates 35S-PC2 uptake into S. pombe microsomal vesicles. Systematic analysis of the entire S. pombe ABC transporter family identified Abc2 as a full-size ABC transporter (ABCC-type) that mediates phytochelatin transport into vacuoles. The S. pombe abc1 abc2 abc3 abc4 hmt1 quintuple and abc2 hmt1 double mutant show no detectable phytochelatins in vacuoles. Abc2 expression restores phytochelatin accumulation into vacuoles and suppresses the cadmium sensitivity of the abc quintuple mutant. A novel, unexpected, function of Hmt1 in GS-conjugate transport is also shown. In contrast to Hmt1, Abc2 orthologs are widely distributed among kingdoms and are proposed as the long-sought vacuolar phytochelatin transporters in plants and other organisms. PMID:20937798

  17. Fungal ABC transporters and microbial interactions in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Schoonbeek, Henk-jan; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Waard, Maarten A

    2002-11-01

    In natural environments, microorganisms are exposed to a wide variety of antibiotic compounds produced by competing organisms. Target organisms have evolved various mechanisms of natural resistance to these metabolites. In this study, the role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in interactions between the plant-pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea and antibiotic-producing Pseudomonas bacteria was investigated in detail. We discovered that 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN), broad-spectrum antibiotics produced by Pseudomonas spp., induced expression of several ABC transporter genes in B. cinerea. Phenazines strongly induced expression of BcatrB, and deltaBcatrB mutants were significantly more sensitive to these antibiotics than their parental strain. Treatment of B. cinerea germlings with PCN strongly affected the accumulation of [14C]fludioxonil, a phenylpyrrole fungicide known to be transported by BcatrB, indicating that phenazines also are transported by BcatrB. Pseudomonas strains producing phenazines displayed a stronger antagonistic activity in vitro toward ABcatrB mutants than to the parental B. cinerea strain. On tomato leaves, phenazine-producing Pseudomonas strains were significantly more effective in reducing gray mold symptoms incited by a ABcatrB mutant than by the parental strain. We conclude that the ABC transporter BcatrB provides protection to B. cinerea in phenazine-mediated interactions with Pseudomonas spp. Collectively, these results indicate that fungal ABC transporters can play an important role in antibiotic-mediated interactions between bacteria and fungi in plant-associated environments. The implications of these findings for the implementation and sustainability of crop protection by antagonistic microorganisms are discussed. PMID:12423022

  18. Ethnicity-Related Polymorphisms and Haplotypes in the Human ABCB1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Marple, Andrew H; Shinar, Shiri; Kimchi, Avraham M.; Scavo, David; Roma, M. Isabella; Kim, In-Wha; Jones, Adam; Arora, Mili; Gribar, John; Gurwitz, David; Gottesman, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The human multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1, ABCB1) codes for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an important membrane-bound efflux transporter known to confer anti-cancer drug resistance as well as affect the pharmacokinetics of many drugs and xenobiotics. A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified throughout the ABCB1 gene which may have an effect on P-gp expression levels and function. Haplotype as well as genotype analysis of SNPs is becoming increasingly important in identifying genetic variants underlying susceptibility to human disease. Three SNPs, 1236C>T, 2677G>T, and 3435C>T have been repeatedly shown to predict changes in the function of P-gp. The frequencies with which these polymorphisms exist in a population have also been shown to be ethnically related. Methods In this study, 95 individuals representative of the entire ethnic make-up of the United States were compared to 101 individuals from an Ashkenazi Jewish population. These individuals were analyzed by genomic sequencing and PCR-RFLP to calculate their genotype frequencies. Results Twenty-five SNPs were located in the exons of the ABCB1 gene. All of the polymorphisms identified were in parts of the ABCB1 gene product predicted to be intracellular, and 16 appear to be novel as compared to those listed by NCBI. Frequencies of the 1236C>T and 2677G>T/A/C SNPs were similar for the American and Ashkenazi populations (64.2% and 60.4% respectively for 1236C>T – χ2 is 0.30 p≤1; 55.8% and 64.4% for 2677G>T/A/C χ2 is 1.49 p≤1), but were different for 3435C>T (24.2% for the American population and 69.3% for the Ashkenazi population χ2 is 39.927 p<0.001). The 1236T/2677T/3435T haplotype occurred in 23.6% (SE 0.013) of the Ashkenazi population. Conclusion The SNP at location 3435C>T plays a significant role in the ABCB1 gene. The haplotype and genotype analysis from these data may be used as a basis for studies on the relationship between ABCB1 genotypes and drug

  19. Know your ABCs: Characterization and gene expression dynamics of ABC transporters in the polyphagous herbivore Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Anne; Heckel, David G; Vogel, Heiko

    2016-05-01

    Polyphagous insect herbivores are adapted to many different secondary metabolites of their host plants. However, little is known about the role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a multigene family involved in detoxification processes. To study the larval response of the generalist Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera) and the putative role of ABC transporters, we performed developmental assays on artificial diet supplemented with secondary metabolites from host plants (atropine-scopolamine, nicotine and tomatine) and non-host plants (taxol) in combination with a replicated RNAseq experiment. A maximum likelihood phylogeny identified the subfamily affiliations of the ABC transporter sequences. Larval performance was equal on the atropine-scopolamine diet and the tomatine diet. For the latter we could identify a treatment-specific upregulation of five ABC transporters in the gut. No significant developmental difference was detected between larvae fed on nicotine or taxol. This was also mirrored in the upregulation of five ABC transporters when fed on either of the two diets. The highest number of differentially expressed genes was recorded in the gut samples in response to feeding on secondary metabolites. Our results are consistent with the expectation of a general detoxification response in a polyphagous herbivore. This is the first study to characterize the multigene family of ABC transporters and identify gene expression changes across different developmental stages and tissues, as well as the impact of secondary metabolites in the agricultural pest H. armigera. PMID:26951878

  20. Beta amyloid effects on expression of multidrug efflux transporters in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kania, Katarzyna D; Wijesuriya, Hasini C; Hladky, Stephen B; Barrand, Margery A

    2011-10-18

    ABC (ATP Binding Cassette) efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier, P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), multidrug resistance associated protein 4 (ABCC4) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), are important for protecting the brain from circulating xenobiotics. Their expression is regulated by signals from surrounding brain tissue that may alter in CNS pathologies. Differences have been reported in transporter expression on brain vasculature of Alzheimer's subjects where raised levels of β-amyloid (Aβ) occur. The present study examines in vitro the effects of Aβ using immortalised brain endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). Significantly lower expression of ABCB1 but not ABCC4 or ABCG2 was found following exposure to Aβ(1-42) peptide but not its scrambled equivalent. This was evident at both protein and transcript level and was reflected in lower transcriptional activity of the ABCB1 promoter as judged from the luciferase reporter gene assay and in decreases in ABCB1-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123. Aβ exposure also affected Wnt/β-catenin signalling, decreasing levels of β-catenin protein, reducing activation of TOPFLASH and increasing transcript levels of endogenous inhibitor, Dkk-1. Application of Wnt3a reversed the Aβ-induced changes to ABCB1 protein. These results suggest that Aβ may impair Wnt/β-catenin signalling at the blood-brain barrier but that activation of this pathway may restore ABCB1. PMID:21920506

  1. Environment sensing and response mediated by ABC transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, Sarah E; Frank, Ashley M; Corgliano, Danielle M; Siefert, Catherine; Hauser, Loren John; Collart, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: Transporter proteins are one of an organism s primary interfaces with the environment. The expressed set of transporters mediates cellular metabolic capabilities and influences signal transduction pathways and regulatory networks. The functional annotation of most transporters is currently limited to general classification into families. The development of capabilities to map ligands with specific transporters would improve our knowledge of the function of these proteins, improve the annotation of related genomes, and facilitate predictions for their role in cellular responses to environmental changes. Results: To improve the utility of the functional annotation for ABC transporters, we expressed and purified the set of solute binding proteins from Rhodopseudomonas palustris and characterized their ligand-binding specificity. Our approach utilized ligand libraries consisting of environmental and cellular metabolic compounds, and fluorescence thermal shift based high throughput ligand binding screens. This process resulted in the identification of specific binding ligands for approximately 64% of the purified and screened proteins. The collection of binding ligands is representative of common functionalities associated with many bacterial organisms as well as specific capabilities linked to the ecological niche occupied by R. palustris. Conclusion: The functional screen identified specific ligands that bound to ABC transporter periplasmic binding subunits from R. palustris. These assignments provide unique insight for the metabolic capabilities of this organism and are consistent with the ecological niche of strain isolation. This functional insight can be used to improve the annotation of related organisms and provides a route to evaluate the evolution of this important and diverse group of transporter proteins.

  2. A reciprocating twin-channel model for ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2014-08-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large, diverse, and ubiquitous superfamily of membrane active transporters. Their core architecture is a dimer of dimers, comprising two transmembrane (TM) domains that bind substrate, and two ATP-binding cassettes, which use the cell's energy currency to couple substrate translocation to ATP hydrolysis. Despite the availability of over a dozen resolved structures and a wealth of biochemical and biophysical data, this field is bedeviled by controversy and long-standing mechanistic questions remain unresolved. The prevailing paradigm for the ABC transport mechanism is the Switch Model, in which the ATP-binding cassettes dimerize upon binding two ATP molecules, and thence dissociate upon sequential ATP hydrolysis. This cycle of nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) dimerization and dissociation is coupled to a switch between inward- or outward facing conformations of a single TM channel; this alternating access enables substrate binding on one face of the membrane and its release at the other. Notwithstanding widespread acceptance of the Switch Model, there is substantial evidence that the NBDs do not separate very much, if at all, and thus physical separation of the ATP cassettes observed in crystallographic structures may be an artefact. An alternative Constant Contact Model has been proposed, in which ATP hydrolysis occurs alternately at the two ATP-binding sites, with one of the sites remaining closed and containing occluded nucleotide at all times. In this model, the cassettes remain in contact and the active sites swing open in an alternately seesawing motion. Whilst the concept of NBD association/dissociation in the Switch Model is naturally compatible with a single alternating-access channel, the asymmetric functioning proposed by the Constant Contact model suggests an alternating or reciprocating function in the TMDs. Here, a new model for the function of ABC transporters is proposed in which the sequence of ATP binding, hydrolysis, and

  3. Genomewide analysis of ABCBs with a focus on ABCB1 and ABCB19 in Malus domestica.

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan Juan; Han, Mingyu

    2016-03-01

    The B subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins (ABCB) plays a vital role in auxin efflux. However, no systematic study has been done in apple. In this study, we performed genomewide identification and expression analyses of the ABCB family in Malus domestica for the first time. We identified a total of 25 apple ABCBs that were divided into three clusters based on the phylogenetic analysis. Most ABCBs within the same cluster demonstrated a similar exon-intron organization. Additionally, the digital expression profiles of ABCB genes shed light on their functional divergence. ABCB1 and ABCB19 are two well-studied auxin efflux carrier genes, and we found that their expression levels are higher in young shoots of M106 than in young shoots ofM9. Since young shoots are the main source of auxin synthesis and auxin efflux involves in tree height control. This suggests that ABCB1 and ABCB19 may also take a part in the auxin efflux and tree height control in apple. PMID:27019441

  4. Localization and Substrate Selectivity of Sea Urchin Multidrug (MDR) Efflux Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Gökirmak, Tufan; Campanale, Joseph P.; Shipp, Lauren E.; Moy, Gary W.; Tao, Houchao; Hamdoun, Amro

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized Stronglycentrotus purpuratus (Sp) ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. This screen identified three multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters with functional homology to the major types of MDR transporters found in humans. When overexpressed in embryos, the apical transporters Sp-ABCB1a, ABCB4a, and ABCG2a can account for as much as 87% of the observed efflux activity, providing a robust assay for their substrate selectivity. Using this assay, we found that sea urchin MDR transporters export canonical MDR susbtrates such as calcein-AM, bodipy-verapamil, bodipy-vinblastine, and mitoxantrone. In addition, we characterized the impact of nonconservative substitutions in the primary sequences of drug binding domains of sea urchin versus murine ABCB1 by mutation of Sp-ABCB1a and treatment of embryos with stereoisomeric cyclic peptide inhibitors (QZ59 compounds). The results indicated that two substitutions in transmembrane helix 6 reverse stereoselectivity of Sp-ABCB1a for QZ59 enantiomers compared with mouse ABCB1a. This suggests that subtle changes in the primary sequence of transporter drug binding domains could fine-tune substrate specificity through evolution. PMID:23124201

  5. Development and characterization of P-glycoprotein 1 (Pgp1, ABCB1)-mediated doxorubicin-resistant PLHC-1 hepatoma fish cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zaja, Roko; Caminada, Daniel; Loncar, Jovica; Fent, Karl; Smital, Tvrtko

    2008-03-01

    The development of the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype in mammals is often mediated by the overexpression of the P-glycoprotein1 (Pgp, ABCB1) or multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)-like ABC transport proteins. A similar phenomenon has also been observed and considered as an important part of the multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) defence system in aquatic organisms. We have recently demonstrated the presence of ABC transporters in the widely used in vitro fish model, the PLHC-1 hepatoma cell line. In the present study we were able to select a highly resistant PLHC-1 sub-clone (PLHC-1/dox) by culturing the wild-type cells in the presence of 1 {mu}M doxorubicin. Using quantitative PCR a 42-fold higher expression of ABCB1 gene was determined in the PLHC-1/dox cells compared to non-selected wild-type cells (PLHC-1/wt). The efflux rates of model fluorescent Pgp1 substrates rhodamine 123 and calcein-AM were 3- to 4-fold higher in the PLHC-1/dox in comparison to the PLHC-1/wt cells. PLHC-1/dox were 45-fold more resistant to doxorubicin cytotoxicity than PLHC-1/wt. Similarly to mammalian cell lines, typical cross-resistance to cytotoxicity of other chemotherapeutics such as daunorubicin, vincristine, vinblastine, etoposide and colchicine, occurred. Furthermore, cyclosporine A, verapamil and PSC833, specific inhibitors of Pgp1 transport activity, completely reversed resistance of PLHC-1/dox cells to all tested drugs, resulting in EC50 values similar to the EC50 values found for PLHC-1/wt. In contrast, MK571, a specific inhibitor of MRP type of efflux transporters, sensitized PLHC-1/dox cells, neither to doxorubicin, nor to any other of the chemotherapeutics used in the study. These data demonstrate for the first time that a specific Pgp1-mediated doxorubicin resistance mechanism is present in the PLHC-1 fish hepatoma cell line. In addition, the fact that low micromolar concentrations of specific inhibitors may completely reverse a highly expressed doxorubicin

  6. Role of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters in the Placental Transport of Lamivudine.

    PubMed

    Ceckova, Martina; Reznicek, Josef; Ptackova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Müller, Fabian; Kacerovsky, Marian; Fromm, Martin F; Glazier, Jocelyn D; Staud, Frantisek

    2016-09-01

    Lamivudine is one of the antiretroviral drugs of choice for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) in HIV-positive women. In this study, we investigated the relevance of drug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (MDR1 [ABCB1]), BCRP (ABCG2), MRP2 (ABCC2), and MATE1 (SLC47A1) for the transmembrane transport and transplacental transfer of lamivudine. We employed in vitro accumulation and transport experiments on MDCK cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters, in situ-perfused rat term placenta, and vesicular uptake in microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles isolated from human term placenta. MATE1 significantly accelerated lamivudine transport in MATE1-expressing MDCK cells, whereas no transporter-driven efflux of lamivudine was observed in MDCK-MDR1, MDCK-MRP2, and MDCK-BCRP monolayers. MATE1-mediated efflux of lamivudine appeared to be a low-affinity process (apparent Km of 4.21 mM and Vmax of 5.18 nmol/mg protein/min in MDCK-MATE1 cells). Consistent with in vitro transport studies, the transplacental clearance of lamivudine was not affected by P-gp, BCRP, or MRP2. However, lamivudine transfer across dually perfused rat placenta and the uptake of lamivudine into human placental MVM vesicles revealed pH dependency, indicating possible involvement of MATE1 in the fetal-to-maternal efflux of the drug. To conclude, placental transport of lamivudine does not seem to be affected by P-gp, MRP2, or BCRP, but a pH-dependent mechanism mediates transport of lamivudine in the fetal-to-maternal direction. We suggest that MATE1 might be, at least partly, responsible for this transport. PMID:27401571

  7. The ABC gene family in arthropods: comparative genomics and role in insecticide transport and resistance.

    PubMed

    Dermauw, Wannes; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    About a 100 years ago, the Drosophila white mutant marked the birth of Drosophila genetics. The white gene turned out to encode the first well studied ABC transporter in arthropods. The ABC gene family is now recognized as one of the largest transporter families in all kingdoms of life. The majority of ABC proteins function as primary-active transporters that bind and hydrolyze ATP while transporting a large diversity of substrates across lipid membranes. Although extremely well studied in vertebrates for their role in drug resistance, less is known about the role of this family in the transport of endogenous and exogenous substances in arthropods. The ABC families of five insect species, a crustacean and a chelicerate have been annotated in some detail. We conducted a thorough phylogenetic analysis of the seven arthropod and human ABC protein subfamilies, to infer orthologous relationships that might suggest conserved function. Most orthologous relationships were found in the ABCB half transporter, ABCD, ABCE and ABCF subfamilies, but specific expansions within species and lineages are frequently observed and discussed. We next surveyed the role of ABC transporters in the transport of xenobiotics/plant allelochemicals and their involvement in insecticide resistance. The involvement of ABC transporters in xenobiotic resistance in arthropods is historically not well documented, but an increasing number of studies using unbiased differential gene expression analysis now points to their importance. We give an overview of methods that can be used to link ABC transporters to resistance. ABC proteins have also recently been implicated in the mode of action and resistance to Bt toxins in Lepidoptera. Given the enormous interest in Bt toxicology in transgenic crops, such findings will provide an impetus to further reveal the role of ABC transporters in arthropods. PMID:24291285

  8. Quantitative evaluation of ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance based on the determination of the anticancer activity of camptothecin against breast cancer stem cells using TIRF.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Parthasarathy; Song, Joon Myong

    2016-06-13

    Elevated expression of drug efflux pumps such as multidrug resistant protein-1 (MDR1/ABCB1) and multidrug resistance associated protein-1 (MRP1/ABCC1) in cancer stem cells (CSCs) among a bulky tumor cell population was attributed to drug resistance. For the first time, we have quantitatively evaluated the cytotoxic profile of camptothecin (CPT) against the CSC. In the present study, a Qdot based total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) detection system effectively interpreted that drug resistance to CPT was reduced in the CSC under ABCB1 inhibited conditions. This study revealed that quantitative finding of the EC50 value for apoptosis and necrosis in correlation with the ABC inhibitor and CSC population using TIRF could provide more details of the anti-cancer efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27182942

  9. ABCB1 and cytochrome P450 polymorphisms: clinical pharmacogenetics of clozapine.

    PubMed

    Jaquenoud Sirot, Eveline; Knezevic, Branka; Morena, Gina Perla; Harenberg, Sabine; Oneda, Beatrice; Crettol, Séverine; Ansermot, Nicolas; Baumann, Pierre; Eap, Chin B

    2009-08-01

    To examine the genetic factors influencing clozapine kinetics in vivo, 75 patients treated with clozapine were genotyped for CYPs and ABCB1 polymorphisms and phenotyped for CYP1A2 and CYP3A activity. CYP1A2 activity and dose-corrected trough steady-state plasma concentrations of clozapine correlated significantly (r = -0.61; P = 1 x 10), with no influence of the CYP1A2*1F genotype (P = 0.38). CYP2C19 poor metabolizers (*2/*2 genotype) had 2.3-fold higher (P = 0.036) clozapine concentrations than the extensive metabolizers (non-*2/*2). In patients comedicated with fluvoxamine, a strong CYP1A2 inhibitor, clozapine and norclozapine concentrations correlate with CYP3A activity (r = 0.44, P = 0.075; r = 0.63, P = 0.007, respectively). Carriers of the ABCB1 3435TT genotype had a 1.6-fold higher clozapine plasma concentrations than noncarriers (P = 0.046). In conclusion, this study has shown for the first time a significant in vivo role of CYP2C19 and the P-gp transporter in the pharmacokinetics of clozapine. CYP1A2 is the main CYP isoform involved in clozapine metabolism, with CYP2C19 contributing moderately, and CYP3A4 contributing only in patients with reduced CYP1A2 activity. In addition, ABCB1, but not CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A5, nor CYP3A7 polymorphisms, influence clozapine pharmacokinetics. PMID:19593168

  10. Screening of Streptococcus pneumoniae ABC transporter mutants demonstrates that LivJHMGF, a branched-chain amino acid ABC transporter, is necessary for disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Basavanna, Shilpa; Khandavilli, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Cohen, Jonathan M; Hosie, Arthur H F; Webb, Alexander J; Thomas, Gavin H; Brown, Jeremy S

    2009-08-01

    Bacterial ABC transporters are an important class of transmembrane transporters that have a wide variety of substrates and are important for the virulence of several bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, many S. pneumoniae ABC transporters have yet to be investigated for their role in virulence. Using insertional duplication mutagenesis mutants, we investigated the effects on virulence and in vitro growth of disruption of 9 S. pneumoniae ABC transporters. Several were partially attenuated in virulence compared to the wild-type parental strain in mouse models of infection. For one ABC transporter, required for full virulence and termed LivJHMGF due to its similarity to branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) transporters, a deletion mutant (DeltalivHMGF) was constructed to investigate its phenotype in more detail. When tested by competitive infection, the DeltalivHMGF strain had reduced virulence in models of both pneumonia and septicemia but was fully virulent when tested using noncompetitive experiments. The DeltalivHMGF strain had no detectable growth defect in defined or complete laboratory media. Recombinant LivJ, the substrate binding component of the LivJHMGF, was shown by both radioactive binding experiments and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy to specifically bind to leucine, isoleucine, and valine, confirming that the LivJHMGF substrates are BCAAs. These data demonstrate a previously unsuspected role for BCAA transport during infection for S. pneumoniae and provide more evidence that functioning ABC transporters are required for the full virulence of bacterial pathogens. PMID:19470745

  11. Defining the blanks – Pharmacochaperoning of SLC6 transporters and ABC transporters?

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Peter; Freissmuth, Michael; Stockner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    SLC6 family members and ABC transporters represent two extremes: SLC6 transporters are confined to the membrane proper and only expose small segments to the hydrophilic milieu. In ABC transporters the hydrophobic core is connected to a large intracellular (eponymous) ATP binding domain that is comprised of two discontiguous repeats. Accordingly, their folding problem is fundamentally different. This can be gauged from mutations that impair the folding of the encoded protein and give rise to clinically relevant disease phenotypes: in SLC6 transporters, these cluster at the protein–lipid interface on the membrane exposed surface. Mutations in ABC-transporters map to the interface between nucleotide binding domains and the coupling helices, which provide the connection to the hydrophobic core. Folding of these mutated ABC-transporters can be corrected with ligands/substrates that bind to the hydrophobic core. This highlights a pivotal role of the coupling helices in the folding trajectory. In contrast, insights into pharmacochaperoning of SLC6 transporters are limited to monoamine transporters – in particular the serotonin transporter (SERT) – because of their rich pharmacology. Only ligands that stabilize the inward facing conformation act as effective pharmacochaperones. This indicates that the folding trajectory of SERT proceeds via the inward facing conformation. Mutations that impair folding of SLC6 family members can be transmitted as dominant or recessive alleles. The dominant phenotype of the mutation can be rationalized, because SLC6 transporters are exported in oligomeric form from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Recessive transmission requires shielding of the unaffected gene product from the mutated transporter in the ER. This can be accounted for by a chaperone-COPII (coatomer protein II) exchange model, where proteinaceous ER-resident chaperones engage various intermediates prior to formation of the oligomeric state and subsequent export from the

  12. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol-Hee

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:16202168

  13. Genetic identification of three ABC transporters as essential elements for nitrate respiration in Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, C; Soppa, J

    1999-01-01

    More than 40 nitrate respiration-deficient mutants of Haloferax volcanii belonging to three different phenotypic classes were isolated. All 15 mutants of the null phenotype were complemented with a genomic library of the wild type. Wild-type copies of mutated genes were recovered from complemented mutants using two different approaches. The DNA sequences of 13 isolated fragments were determined. Five fragments were found to overlap; therefore nine different genomic regions containing genes essential for nitrate respiration could be identified. Three genomic regions containing genes coding for subunits of ABC transporters were further characterized. In two cases, genes coding for an ATP-binding subunit and a permease subunit were clustered and overlapped by four nucleotides. The third gene for a permease subunit had no additional ABC transporter gene in proximity. One ABC transporter was found to be glucose specific. The mutant reveals that the ABC transporter solely mediates anaerobic glucose transport. Based on sequence similarity, the second ABC transporter is proposed to be molybdate specific, explaining its essential role in nitrate respiration. The third ABC transporter is proposed to be anion specific. Genome sequencing has shown that ABC transporters are widespread in Archaea. Nevertheless, this study represents only the second example of a functional characterization. PMID:10430572

  14. Research Progress on the Role of ABC Transporters in the Drug Resistance Mechanism of Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Mao, Ding-an; Liu, Li-qun

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy is not fully clear. In recent years, both animal and clinical trials have shown that the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is increased in patients with intractable epilepsy; additionally, epileptic seizures can lead to an increase in the number of sites that express ABC transporters. These findings suggest that ABC transporters play an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of epilepsy. ABC transporters can perform the funcions of a drug efflux pump, which can reduce the effective drug concentration at epilepsy lesions by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier to antiepileptic drugs, thus causing resistance to antiepileptic drugs. Given the important role of ABC transporters in refractory epilepsy drug resistance, antiepileptic drugs that are not substrates of ABC transporters were used to obtain ABC transporter inhibitors with strong specificity, high safety, and few side effects, making them suitable for long-term use; therefore, these drugs can be used for future clinical treatment of intractable epilepsy. PMID:26491660

  15. Characterization of Two ABC Transporters from Biocontrol and Phytopathogenic Fusarium oxysporus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABC transporter genes from four strains of Fusarium oxysporum [two biocontrol and two phytopathogenic (f. sp. lycopersici Race 1) isolates] indicated that this gene is well conserved. However, sequences of promoter regions of FoABC1 differed between 8 phytopathogenic and 11 biocontrol strains of F....

  16. Plant ABC Transporters Enable Many Unique Aspects of a Terrestrial Plant's Lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Ung; Song, Won-Yong; Hong, Daewoong; Ko, Donghwi; Yamaoka, Yasuyo; Jang, Sunghoon; Yim, Sojeong; Lee, Eunjung; Khare, Deepa; Kim, Kyungyoon; Palmgren, Michael; Yoon, Hwan Su; Martinoia, Enrico; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-03-01

    Terrestrial plants have two to four times more ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes than other organisms, including their ancestral microalgae. Recent studies found that plants harboring mutations in these transporters exhibit dramatic phenotypes, many of which are related to developmental processes and functions necessary for life on dry land. These results suggest that ABC transporters multiplied during evolution and assumed novel functions that allowed plants to adapt to terrestrial environmental conditions. Examining the literature on plant ABC transporters from this viewpoint led us to propose that diverse ABC transporters enabled many unique and essential aspects of a terrestrial plant's lifestyle, by transporting various compounds across specific membranes of the plant. PMID:26902186

  17. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone with genetic polymorphisms of CYP2D6 and ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hee-Doo; Cho, Hea-Young; Lee, Sang-No; Yoon, Hwa; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2012-08-01

    This study estimated the population pharmacokinetics of risperidone and its active metabolite, 9-hydroxyrisperidone, according to genetic polymorphisms in the metabolizing enzyme (CYP2D6) and transporter (ABCB1) genes in healthy subjects. Eighty healthy subjects who received a single oral dose of 2 mg risperidone participated in this study. However, eight subjects with rare genotype variants in CYP2D6 alleles were excluded from the final model built in this study. We conducted the population pharmacokinetic analysis of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling (NONMEM) method and explored the possible influence of genetic polymorphisms in CYP2D6 alleles and ABCB1 (2677G>T/A and 3435C>T) on the population pharmacokinetics of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone. A two-compartment model with a first-order absorption and lag time fitted well to serum concentration-time curve for risperidone. 9-hydroxyrisperidone was well described by a one-compartment model as an extension of the parent drug (risperidone) model with first-order elimination and absorption partially from the depot. Significant covariates for risperidone clearance were genetic polymorphisms of CYP2D6*10, including CYP2D6*1/*10 (27.5 % decrease) and CYP2D6*10/*10 (63.8 % decrease). There was significant difference in the absorption rate constant (k ( a )) of risperidone among the CYP2D6*10 genotype groups. In addition, combined ABCB1 3435C>T and CYP2D6*10 genotypes had a significant (P < 0.01) effect on the fraction of metabolite absorbed from the depot. The population pharmacokinetic model of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone including the genetic polymorphisms of CYP2D6*10 and ABCB1 3435C>T as covariates was successfully constructed. The estimated contribution of genetic polymorphisms in CYP2D6*10 and ABCB1 3435C>T to population pharmacokinetics of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone suggests the interplay of CYP2D6 and ABCB1 on the pharmacokinetics of

  18. Pelitinib (EKB-569) targets the up-regulation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 induced by hyperthermia to eradicate lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pelitinib is a potent irreversible EGFR TK inhibitor currently in clinical trials for the treatment of lung cancer. Hyperthermia has been applied concomitantly with chemotherapy and radiotherapy to enhance treatment outcome. In this study, we investigated the ability of the combination of pelitinib with other conventional anticancer drugs to specifically target cancer cells with up-regulated efflux transporters ABCB1/ABCG2 after hyperthermia as a novel way to eradicate the cancer stem-like cells responsible for cancer recurrence. Experimental Approach Alterations in intracellular topotecan accumulation, the efflux of fluorescent probe substrates, expression and ATPase activity of ABCB1/ABCG2 and tumoursphere formation capacity of side population (SP) cells sorted after hyperthermia were examined to elucidate the mechanism of pelitinib-induced chemosensitization. Key Results While pelitinib did not modulate ABCB1/ABCG2 expressions, the combination of pelitinib with transporter substrate anticancer drugs induced more marked apoptosis, specifically in cells exposed to hyperthermia. The flow cytometric assay showed that both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated drug effluxes were significantly inhibited by pelitinib in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition kinetics suggested that pelitinib is a competitive inhibitor of ABCB1/ABCG2, which is consistent with its ability to stimulate their ATPase activity. SP cells sorted after hyperthermia were found to be more resistant to anticancer drugs, presumably due to the up-regulation of ABCB1 and ABCG2. Importantly, pelitinib specifically enhanced the chemosensitivity but reduced the tumoursphere formation capacity of these SP cells. Conclusions and Implications This study demonstrated a novel approach, exploiting drug resistance, to selectively kill cancer stem-like cells after hyperthermia. PMID:25988710

  19. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model

    PubMed Central

    Vaquer, Sergi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Rabadán, Arnau; González, Albert; Fenollosa, Felip; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay ® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary) was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG) transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and

  20. Control of Plasma Membrane Permeability by ABC Transporters.

    PubMed

    Khakhina, Svetlana; Johnson, Soraya S; Manoharlal, Raman; Russo, Sarah B; Blugeon, Corinne; Lemoine, Sophie; Sunshine, Anna B; Dunham, Maitreya J; Cowart, L Ashley; Devaux, Frédéric; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2015-05-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters Pdr5 and Yor1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae control the asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the plasma membrane as well as serving as ATP-dependent drug efflux pumps. Mutant strains lacking these transporter proteins were found to exhibit very different resistance phenotypes to two inhibitors of sphingolipid biosynthesis that act either late (aureobasidin A [AbA]) or early (myriocin [Myr]) in the pathway leading to production of these important plasma membrane lipids. These pdr5Δ yor1 strains were highly AbA resistant but extremely sensitive to Myr. We provide evidence that these phenotypic changes are likely due to modulation of the plasma membrane flippase complexes, Dnf1/Lem3 and Dnf2/Lem3. Flippases act to move phospholipids from the outer to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Genetic analyses indicate that lem3Δ mutant strains are highly AbA sensitive and Myr resistant. These phenotypes are fully epistatic to those seen in pdr5Δ yor1 strains. Direct analysis of AbA-induced signaling demonstrated that loss of Pdr5 and Yor1 inhibited the AbA-triggered phosphorylation of the AGC kinase Ypk1 and its substrate Orm1. Microarray experiments found that a pdr5Δ yor1 strain induced a Pdr1-dependent induction of the entire Pdr regulon. Our data support the view that Pdr5/Yor1 negatively regulate flippase function and activity of the nuclear Pdr1 transcription factor. Together, these data argue that the interaction of the ABC transporters Pdr5 and Yor1 with the Lem3-dependent flippases regulates permeability of AbA via control of plasma membrane protein function as seen for the high-affinity tryptophan permease Tat2. PMID:25724885

  1. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaojing; Xu, Yonghong; Meng, Xiangning; Watari, Fumio; Liu, Hudan; Chen, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  2. The Predicted ABC Transporter AbcEDCBA Is Required for Type IV Secretion System Expression and Lysosomal Evasion by Brucella ovis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Teane M. A.; Mol, Juliana P. S.; Winter, Maria G.; Atluri, Vidya; Xavier, Mariana N.; Pires, Simone F.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Andrade, Hélida M.; Santos, Renato L.; Tsolis, Renee M.

    2014-01-01

    Brucella ovis is a major cause of reproductive failure in rams and it is one of the few well-described Brucella species that is not zoonotic. Previous work showed that a B. ovis mutant lacking a species-specific ABC transporterabcBA) was attenuated in mice and was unable to survive in macrophages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of this ABC transporter during intracellular survival of B. ovis. In HeLa cells, B. ovis WT was able to survive and replicate at later time point (48 hpi), whereas an ΔabcBA mutant was attenuated at 24 hpi. The reduced survival of the ΔabcBA mutant was associated with a decreased ability to exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, suggesting a failure to establish a replicative niche. The ΔabcBA mutant showed a reduced abundance of the Type IV secretion system (T4SS) proteins VirB8 and VirB11 in both rich and acid media, when compared to WT B. ovis. However, mRNA levels of virB1, virB8, hutC, and vjbR were similar in both strains. These results support the notion that the ABC transporter encoded by abcEDCBA or its transported substrate acts at a post-transcriptional level to promote the optimal expression of the B. ovis T4SS within infected host cells. PMID:25474545

  3. Identification of a nonsense mutation in feline ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Mealey, K L; Burke, N S

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to sequence all exons of the ABCB1 (MDR1) gene in cats that had experienced adverse reactions to P-glycoprotein substrate drugs (phenotyped cats). Eight phenotyped cats were included in the study consisting of eight cats that experienced central nervous system toxicosis after receiving ivermectin (n = 2), a combination product containing moxidectin and imidacloprid (n = 3), a combination product containing praziquantel and emodepside (n = 1) or selamectin (n = 2), and 1 cat that received the product containing praziquantel and emodepside but did not experience toxicity (n = 1). Fifteen exons contained polymorphisms and twelve exons showed no variation from the reference sequence. The most significant finding was a nonsense mutation (ABCB11930_1931del TC) in one of the ivermectin-treated cats. This cat was homozygous for the deletion mutation. All of the other phenotyped cats were homozygous for the wild-type allele. However, 14 missense mutations were identified in one or more phenotyped cats. ABCB11930_1931del TC was also identified in four nonphenotyped cats (one homozygous and three heterozygous for the mutant allele). Cats affected by ABCB11930_1931del TC would be expected to have a similar phenotype as dogs with the previously characterized ABCB1-1Δ mutation. PMID:25660379

  4. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in normal and pathological lung

    PubMed Central

    van der Deen, Margaretha; de Vries, Elisabeth GE; Timens, Wim; Scheper, Rik J; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Postma, Dirkje S

    2005-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transmembrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes in an energy-dependent manner. Many ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are highly expressed in bronchial epithelium. This review aims to give new insights in the possible functions of ABC molecules in the lung in view of their expression in different cell types. Furthermore, their role in protection against noxious compounds, e.g. air pollutants and cigarette smoke components, will be discussed as well as the (mal)function in normal and pathological lung. Several pulmonary drugs are substrates for ABC transporters and therefore, the delivery of these drugs to the site of action may be highly dependent on the presence and activity of many ABC transporters in several cell types. Three ABC transporters are known to play an important role in lung functioning. Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene can cause cystic fibrosis, and mutations in ABCA1 and ABCA3 are responsible for respectively Tangier disease and fatal surfactant deficiency. The role of altered function of ABC transporters in highly prevalent pulmonary diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have hardly been investigated so far. We especially focused on polymorphisms, knock-out mice models and in vitro results of pulmonary research. Insight in the function of ABC transporters in the lung may open new ways to facilitate treatment of lung diseases. PMID:15967026

  5. Effect of ABCB1 C3435T polymorphism on docetaxel pharmacokinetics according to menopausal status in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Fajac, A; Gligorov, J; Rezai, K; Lévy, P; Lévy, E; Selle, F; Beerblock, K; Avenin, D; Saintigny, P; Hugonin, S; Bernaudin, J-F; Lokiec, F

    2010-01-01

    Background: It can be hypothesised that inherited polymorphisms in the drug-transporter ABCB1 gene may interfere with interindividual variations in drug response in breast cancer patients. Docetaxel is a substrate for ABCB1 whose function has been shown to be modulated by oestrogen and progesterone. Methods: Whether ABCB1 polymorphisms including T-129C, A61G, C1236T, G2677T/A and C3435T polymorphisms could account for variations in the disposition of docetaxel and whether menopausal status at the time of diagnosis might interact with this effect were analysed in women receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer (n=86). Results: A highly significant association was observed, but restricted to premenopausal women (n=53), between the pharmacokinetics of docetaxel and C3435T polymorphism, as patients with CC genotype had lower mean values of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of docetaxel than patients with CT and TT genotypes (P<0.0001). Comparison between pre- and postmenopausal women with the same C3435T genotype yielded a significant difference in docetaxel AUC only for CC genotype (P<0.0001). Conclusion: These results suggest that C3435T polymorphism genotyping and menopausal status at the time of diagnosis might be useful when considering chemotherapy regimens including docetaxel in breast cancer patients. PMID:20628376

  6. Cellodextrin and Laminaribiose ABC Transporters in Clostridium thermocellum▿

    PubMed Central

    Nataf, Yakir; Yaron, Sima; Stahl, Frank; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.; Scheper, Thomas-Helmut; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Shoham, Yuval

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that grows efficiently on cellulosic biomass. This bacterium produces and secretes a highly active multienzyme complex, the cellulosome, that mediates the cell attachment to and hydrolysis of the crystalline cellulosic substrate. C. thermocellum can efficiently utilize only β-1,3 and β-1,4 glucans and prefers long cellodextrins. Since the bacterium can also produce ethanol, it is considered an attractive candidate for a consolidated fermentation process in which cellulose hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation occur in a single process. In this study, we have identified and characterized five sugar ABC transporter systems in C. thermocellum. The putative transporters were identified by sequence homology of the putative solute-binding lipoprotein to known sugar-binding proteins. Each of these systems is transcribed from a gene cluster, which includes an extracellular solute-binding protein, one or two integral membrane proteins, and, in most cases, an ATP-binding protein. The genes of the five solute-binding proteins were cloned, fused to His tags, overexpressed, and purified, and their abilities to interact with different sugars was examined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Three of the sugar-binding lipoproteins (CbpB to -D) interacted with different lengths of cellodextrins (G2 to G5), with disassociation constants in the micromolar range. One protein, CbpA, binds only cellotriose (G3), while another protein, Lbp (laminaribiose-binding protein) interacts with laminaribiose. The sugar specificity of the different binding lipoproteins is consistent with the observed substrate preference of C. thermocellum, in which cellodextrins (G3 to G5) are assimilated faster than cellobiose. PMID:18952792

  7. Multidrug resistance in parasites: ABC transporters, P-glycoproteins and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Jones, P M; George, A M

    2005-04-30

    Parasitic diseases, caused by protozoa, helminths and arthropods, rank among the most important problems in human and veterinary medicine, and in agriculture, leading to debilitating sicknesses and loss of life. In the absence of vaccines and with the general failure of vector eradication programs, drugs are the main line of defence, but the newest drugs are being tracked by the emergence of resistance in parasites, sharing ominous parallels with multidrug resistance in bacterial pathogens. Any of a number of mechanisms will elicit a drug resistance phenotype in parasites, including: active efflux, reduced uptake, target modification, drug modification, drug sequestration, by-pass shunting, or substrate competition. The role of ABC transporters in parasitic multidrug resistance mechanisms is being subjected to more scrutiny, due in part to the established roles of certain ABC transporters in human diseases, and also to an increasing portfolio of ABC transporters from parasite genome sequencing projects. For example, over 100 ABC transporters have been identified in the Escherichia coli genome, but to date only about 65 in all parasitic genomes. Long established laboratory investigations are now being assisted by molecular biology, bioinformatics, and computational modelling, and it is in these areas that the role of ABC transporters in parasitic multidrug resistance mechanisms may be defined and put in perspective with that of other proteins. We discuss ABC transporters in parasites, and conclude with an example of molecular modelling that identifies a new interaction between the structural domains of a parasite P-glycoprotein. PMID:15826647

  8. Transcriptome-Based Identification of ABC Transporters in the Western Tarnished Plant Bug Lygus hesperus

    PubMed Central

    Hull, J. Joe; Chaney, Kendrick; Geib, Scott M.; Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Brent, Colin S.; Walsh, Douglas; Lavine, Laura Corley

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a large superfamily of proteins that mediate diverse physiological functions by coupling ATP hydrolysis with substrate transport across lipid membranes. In insects, these proteins play roles in metabolism, development, eye pigmentation, and xenobiotic clearance. While ABC transporters have been extensively studied in vertebrates, less is known concerning this superfamily in insects, particularly hemipteran pests. We used RNA-Seq transcriptome sequencing to identify 65 putative ABC transporter sequences (including 36 full-length sequences) from the eight ABC subfamilies in the western tarnished plant bug (Lygus hesperus), a polyphagous agricultural pest. Phylogenetic analyses revealed clear orthologous relationships with ABC transporters linked to insecticide/xenobiotic clearance and indicated lineage specific expansion of the L. hesperus ABCG and ABCH subfamilies. The transcriptional profile of 13 LhABCs representative of the ABCA, ABCB, ABCC, ABCG, and ABCH subfamilies was examined across L. hesperus development and within sex-specific adult tissues. All of the transcripts were amplified from both reproductively immature and mature adults and all but LhABCA8 were expressed to some degree in eggs. Expression of LhABCA8 was spatially localized to the testis and temporally timed with male reproductive development, suggesting a potential role in sexual maturation and/or spermatozoa protection. Elevated expression of LhABCC5 in Malpighian tubules suggests a possible role in xenobiotic clearance. Our results provide the first transcriptome-wide analysis of ABC transporters in an agriculturally important hemipteran pest and, because ABC transporters are known to be important mediators of insecticidal resistance, will provide the basis for future biochemical and toxicological studies on the role of this protein family in insecticide resistance in Lygus species. PMID:25401762

  9. An ABC Transporter Plays a Developmental Aggregation Role in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Mandy J.; Mok, Kenny C.; Astling, David P.; Lew, Helen; Zusman, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a gram-negative bacterium which has a complex life cycle. Autochemotaxis, a process whereby cells release a self-generated signaling molecule, may be the principal mechanism facilitating directed motility in both the vegetative swarming and developmental aggregation stages of this life cycle. The process requires the Frz signal transduction system, including FrzZ, a protein which is composed of two domains, both showing homology to the enteric chemotaxis response regulator CheY. The first domain of FrzZ (FrzZ1), when expressed as bait in the yeast two-hybrid system and screened against a library, was shown to potentially interact with the C-terminal portion of a protein encoding an ATP-binding cassette (AbcA). The activation domain-AbcA fusion protein did not interact with the second domain of FrzZ (FrzZ2) or with two other M. xanthus response regulator-containing proteins presented as bait, suggesting that the FrzZ1-AbcA interaction may be specific. Cloning and sequencing of the upstream region of the abcA gene showed the ATP-binding cassette to be linked to a large hydrophobic, potentially membrane-spanning domain. This domain organization is characteristic of a subgroup of ABC transporters which perform export functions. Cloning and sequencing downstream of abcA indicated that the ABC transporter is at the start of an operon containing three open reading frames. An insertion mutation in the abcA gene resulted in cells displaying the frizzy aggregation phenotype, providing additional evidence that FrzZ and AbcA may be part of the same signal transduction pathway. Cells with mutations in genes downstream of abcA showed no developmental defects. Analysis of the proposed exporter role of AbcA in cell mixing experiments showed that the ABC transporter mutant could be rescued by extracellular complementation. We speculate that the AbcA protein may be involved in the export of a molecule required for the autochemotactic process. PMID:9791121

  10. A PhoPQ-Regulated ABC Transporter System Exports Tetracycline in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Duan, Kangmin

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important human pathogen whose infections are difficult to treat due to its high intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Here, we show that the disruption of PA4456, encoding the ATP binding component of a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, increased the bacterium's susceptible to tetracycline and other antibiotics or toxic chemicals. Fluorescence spectroscopy and antibiotic accumulation tests showed that the interruption of the ABC transporter caused increased intracellular accumulation of tetracycline, demonstrating a role of the ABC transporter in tetracycline expulsion. Site-directed mutagenesis proved that the conserved residues of E170 in the Walker B motif and H203 in the H-loop, which are important for ATP hydrolysis, were essential for the function of PA4456. Through a genome-wide search, the PhoPQ two-component system was identified as a regulator of the computationally predicted PA4456-4452 operon that encodes the ABC transporter system. A >5-fold increase of the expression of this operon was observed in the phoQ mutant. The results obtained also show that the expression of the phzA1B1C1D1E1 operon and the production of pyocyanin were significantly higher in the ABC transporter mutant, signifying a connection between the ABC transporter and pyocyanin production. These results indicated that the PhoPQ-regulated ABC transporter is associated with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and other adverse compounds in P. aeruginosa, probably by extruding them out of the cell. PMID:26953208

  11. Identifying candidate causal variants responsible for altered activity of the ABCB1 multidrug resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Soranzo, Nicole; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Weale, Michael E; Wood, Nicholas W; Depondt, Chantal; Marguerie, Richard; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Goldstein, David B

    2004-07-01

    The difficulty of fine localizing the polymorphisms responsible for genotype-phenotype correlations is emerging as an important constraint in the implementation and interpretation of genetic association studies, and calls for the definition of protocols for the follow-up of associated variants. One recent example is the 3435C>T polymorphism in the multidrug transporter gene ABCB1, associated with protein expression and activity, and with several clinical conditions. Available data suggest that 3435C>T may not directly cause altered transport activity, but may be associated with one or more causal variants in the poorly characterized stretch of linkage disequilibrium (LD) surrounding it. Here we describe a strategy for the follow-up of reported associations, including a Bayesian formalization of the associated interval concept previously described by Goldstein. We focus on the region of high LD around 3435C>T to compile an exhaustive list of variants by (1) using a relatively coarse set of marker typings to assess the pattern of LD, and (2) resequencing derived and ancestral chromosomes at 3435C>T through the associated interval. We identified three intronic sites that are strongly associated with the 3435C>T polymorphism. One of them is associated with multidrug resistance in patients with epilepsy (chi2 = 3.78, P = 0.052), and sits within a stretch of significant evolutionary conservation. We argue that these variants represent additional candidates for influencing multidrug resistance due to P-glycoprotein activity, with the IVS 26+80 T>C being the best candidate among the three intronic sites. Finally, we describe a set of six haplotype tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms that represent common ABCB1 variation surrounding 3435C>T in Europeans. PMID:15197162

  12. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  13. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J.; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L.; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  14. ABC transporters: one, two or four extracytoplasmic substrate-binding sites?

    PubMed Central

    van der Heide, Tiemen; Poolman, Bert

    2002-01-01

    Two families of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in which one or two extracytoplasmic substrate-binding domains are fused to either the N- or C-terminus of the translocator protein have been detected. This suggests that two, or even four, substrate-binding sites may function in the ABC transporter complex. This domain organization in ABC transporters, widely represented among microorganisms, raises new possibilities for how the substrate-binding protein(s) (SBPs) might interact with the translocator. One appealing hypothesis is that multiple substrate-binding sites in proximity to the entry site of the translocation pore enhance the transport capacity. We also discuss the implications of multiple substrate-binding sites in close proximity to the translocator in terms of broadened substrate specificity and possible cooperative interactions between SBPs and the translocator. PMID:12370206

  15. Transcriptome-based identification of ABC transporters in the western tarnished plant bug lygus hesperus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a large superfamily of proteins that mediate diverse physiological functions by coupling ATP hydrolysis with substrate transport across lipid membranes. In insects, these proteins play roles in metabolism, development, eye pigmentation, and xenobiotic cle...

  16. Adaptive Evolution of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Plasticity of the ABC Transporter Network

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Haythem; Sahin, Merve; Tarasova, Janna; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Portnoy, Vasiliy A.; Nogales, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Thermotoga maritima is a hyperthermophilic anaerobe that utilizes a vast network of ABC transporters to efficiently metabolize a variety of carbon sources to produce hydrogen. For unknown reasons, this organism does not metabolize glucose as readily as it does glucose di- and polysaccharides. The leading hypothesis implicates the thermolability of glucose at the physiological temperatures at which T. maritima lives. After a 25-day laboratory evolution, phenotypes were observed with growth rates up to 1.4 times higher than and glucose utilization rates exceeding 50% those of the wild type. Genome resequencing revealed mutations in evolved cultures related to glucose-responsive ABC transporters. The native glucose ABC transporter, GluEFK, has more abundant transcripts either as a result of gene duplication-amplification or through mutations to the operator sequence regulating this operon. Conversely, BglEFGKL, a transporter of beta-glucosides, is substantially downregulated due to a nonsense mutation to the solute binding protein or due to a deletion of the upstream promoter. Analysis of the ABC2 uptake porter families for carbohydrate and peptide transport revealed that the solute binding protein, often among the transcripts detected at the highest levels, is predominantly downregulated in the evolved cultures, while the membrane-spanning domain and nucleotide binding components are less varied. Similar trends were observed in evolved strains grown on glycerol, a substrate that is not dependent on ABC transporters. Therefore, improved growth on glucose is achieved through mutations favoring GluEFK expression over BglEFGKL, and in lieu of carbon catabolite repression, the ABC transporter network is modulated to achieve improved growth fitness. PMID:26048924

  17. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. PMID:27449595

  18. Role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in interactions between natural products and drugs.

    PubMed

    Aszalos, Adorjan

    2008-12-01

    Medicinal use of natural products such as extracts of plants has existed for many years in China and in other countries and they are now available worldwide. Citrus fruit juices are consumed on a daily basis around the world. Modern medicine provides well-tested compounds or drugs for most sicknesses. However, the simultaneous consumption of plant extracts, food supplements, and fruit juices with drugs can create metabolic aberrations in humans. Interactions between drugs used simultaneously are regulated by government agencies. Not regulated, but warned against in drug inserts are potential interactions between drugs and food and food-additives containing certain compounds with potential side effects. Summarized here are the results of investigations that point out possible interactions at the level of transporter molecules by drugs and compounds of natural origin. These transporter molecules play important roles in absorption in the intestines, at the blood brain barrier, in the liver, the kidney and in some other parts of the human body. Drugs and metabolites pass through these pumps and may compete with compounds from food supplements. The most studied natural compounds that are potential modulators of these transport molecules are flavonoids, found in fruit juices, vegetables, flowers and tea. Mycotoxins found in cereal grains are also shown to modulate transporter proteins. We detail here how such constituents of natural origin were shown to modulate three types of the major transporter molecules, P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), multidrug resistance proteins (ABCCs) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2). Interference of these natural compounds with drugs at the transporter level is also discussed. PMID:19075617

  19. Conformational coupling of the nucleotide-binding and the transmembrane domains in ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Wen, Po-Chao; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2011-08-01

    Basic architecture of ABC transporters includes two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Although the transport process takes place in the TMDs, which provide the substrate translocation pathway across the cell membrane and control its accessibility between the two sides of the membrane, the energy required for the process is provided by conformational changes induced in the NBDs by binding and hydrolysis of ATP. Nucleotide-dependent conformational changes in the NBDs, therefore, need to be coupled to structural changes in the TMDs. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the structural elements involved in the conformational coupling between the NBDs and the TMDs in the Escherichia coli maltose transporter, an ABC importer for which an intact structure is available both in inward-facing and outward-facing conformations. The prevailing model of coupling is primarily based on a single structural motif, known as the coupling helices, as the main structural element for the NBD-TMD coupling. Surprisingly, we find that in the absence of the NBDs the coupling helices can be conformationally decoupled from the rest of the TMDs, despite their covalent connection. That is, the structural integrity of the coupling helices and their tight coupling to the core of the TMDs rely on the contacts provided by the NBDs. Based on the conformational and dynamical analysis of the simulation trajectories, we propose that the core coupling elements in the maltose transporter involve contributions from several structural motifs located at the NBD-TMD interface, namely, the EAA loops from the TMDs, and the Q-loop and the ENI motifs from the NBDs. These three structural motifs in small ABC importers show a high degree of correlation in motion and mediate the necessary conformational coupling between the core of TMDs and the helical subdomains of NBDs. A comprehensive analysis of the structurally known ABC transporters shows a high degree

  20. Regulation of ABC transporters blood-brain barrier: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Miller, David S

    2015-01-01

    The brain capillary endothelial cells that constitute the blood-brain barrier express multiple ABC transport proteins on the luminal, blood-facing, plasma membrane. These transporters function as ATP-driven efflux pumps for xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites. High expression of these ABC transporters at the barrier is a major obstacle to the delivery of therapeutics, including chemotherapeutics, to the CNS. Here, I review the signals that alter ABC transporter expression and transport function with an emphasis on P-glycoprotein, Mrp2, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), the efflux transporters for which we have the most detailed picture of regulation. Recent work shows that transporter protein expression can be upregulated in response to inflammatory and oxidative stress, therapeutic drugs, diet, and persistent environmental pollutants; as a consequence, drug delivery to the brain is reduced (potentially bad and ugly). In contrast, basal transport activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP can be reduced through complex signaling pathways that involve events in and on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Targeting these signaling events provides opportunities to rapidly and reversibly increase brain accumulation of drugs that are substrates for the transporters (potentially good). The clinical usefulness of targeting signaling to reduce efflux transporter activity and improve drug delivery to the CNS remains to be established. PMID:25640266

  1. Structural basis for the channel function of a degraded ABC transporter, CFTR (ABCC7).

    PubMed

    Bai, Yonghong; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2011-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, but little is known about how this ion channel that harbors an uninterrupted ion permeation pathway evolves from a transporter that works by alternately exposing its substrate conduit to the two sides of the membrane. Here, we assessed reactivity of intracellularly applied thiol-specific probes with cysteine residues substituted into the 12th transmembrane segment (TM12) of CFTR. Our experimental data showing high reaction rates of substituted cysteines toward the probes, strong blocker protection of cysteines against reaction, and reaction-induced alterations in channel conductance support the idea that TM12 of CFTR contributes to the lining of the ion permeation pathway. Together with previous work, these findings raise the possibility that pore-lining elements of CFTR involve structural components resembling those that form the substrate translocation pathway of ABC transporters. In addition, comparison of reaction rates in the open and closed states of the CFTR channel leads us to propose that upon channel opening, the wide cytoplasmic vestibule tightens and the pore-lining TM12 rotates along its helical axis. This simple model for gating conformational changes in the inner pore domain of CFTR argues that the gating transition of CFTR and the transport cycle of ABC proteins share analogous conformational changes. Collectively, our data corroborate the popular hypothesis that degradation of the cytoplasmic-side gate turned an ABC transporter into the CFTR channel. PMID:22042986

  2. Structural basis for the channel function of a degraded ABC transporter, CFTR (ABCC7)

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yonghong

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, but little is known about how this ion channel that harbors an uninterrupted ion permeation pathway evolves from a transporter that works by alternately exposing its substrate conduit to the two sides of the membrane. Here, we assessed reactivity of intracellularly applied thiol-specific probes with cysteine residues substituted into the 12th transmembrane segment (TM12) of CFTR. Our experimental data showing high reaction rates of substituted cysteines toward the probes, strong blocker protection of cysteines against reaction, and reaction-induced alterations in channel conductance support the idea that TM12 of CFTR contributes to the lining of the ion permeation pathway. Together with previous work, these findings raise the possibility that pore-lining elements of CFTR involve structural components resembling those that form the substrate translocation pathway of ABC transporters. In addition, comparison of reaction rates in the open and closed states of the CFTR channel leads us to propose that upon channel opening, the wide cytoplasmic vestibule tightens and the pore-lining TM12 rotates along its helical axis. This simple model for gating conformational changes in the inner pore domain of CFTR argues that the gating transition of CFTR and the transport cycle of ABC proteins share analogous conformational changes. Collectively, our data corroborate the popular hypothesis that degradation of the cytoplasmic-side gate turned an ABC transporter into the CFTR channel. PMID:22042986

  3. Molecular and immunological analysis of an ABC transporter complex required for cytochrome c biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goldman, B S; Beckman, D L; Bali, A; Monika, E M; Gabbert, K K; Kranz, R G

    1997-05-16

    The helABC genes are predicted to encode an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter necessary for heme export for ligation in bacterial cytochrome c biogenesis. The recent discoveries of homologs of the helB and helC genes in plant mitochondrial genomes suggest this is a highly conserved transporter in prokaryotes and some eukaryotes with the HelB and HelC proteins comprising the transmembrane components. Molecular genetic analysis in the Gram-negative bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus was used to show that the helABC and helDX genes are part of an operon linked to the secDF genes. To facilitate analysis of this transporter, strains with non-polar deletions in each gene, epitope and reporter-tagged HelABCD proteins, and antisera specific to the HelA and HelX proteins were generated. We directly demonstrate that this transporter is present in the cytoplasmic membrane as an HelABCD complex. The HelB and HelC but not HelD proteins are necessary for the binding and stability of the HelA protein, the cytoplasmic subunit containing the ATP-binding region. In addition we show that the HelA protein co-immunoprecipitates with either the HelC or HelD proteins. Thus, the HelABCD heme export complex is distinguished by the presence of four membrane-associated subunits and represents a unique subfamily of ABC transporters. PMID:9175857

  4. The role of ABCG-type ABC transporters in phytohormone transport

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Lorenzo; Kang, Joohyun; Ko, Donghwi; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormones (phytohormones) integrate endogenous and exogenous signals thus synchronizing plant growth with environmental and developmental changes. Similar to animals, phytohormones have distinct source and target tissues, hence controlled transport and focused targeting are required for their functions. Many evidences accumulated in the last years about the regulation of long-distance and directional transport of phytohormones. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters turned out to play major roles in routing phytohormones not only in the plant body but also towards the outer environment. The ABCG-type proteins ABCG25 and ABCG40 are high affinity abscisic acid (ABA) transporters. ABCG14 is highly co-expressed with cytokinin biosynthesis and is the major root-to-shoot cytokinin transporter. Pleiotropic drug resistance1 (PDR1) from Petunia hybrida transports strigolactones (SLs) from the root tip to the plant shoot but also outside to the rhizosphere, where SLs are the main attractants to mycorrhizal fungi. Last but not least, ABCG36 and ABCG37 possibly play a dual role in coumarine and IBA transport. PMID:26517905

  5. Reduced ABCB1 Expression and Activity in the Presence of Acrylic Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Ramin; Baradaran, Behzad; Valizadeh, Hadi; Yousefi, Bahman; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1), an integral membrane protein in the apical surface of human intestinal epithelial cells, plays a crucial role in the intestinal transport and efflux leading to changes in the bioavailability of oral pharmaceutical compounds. This study was set to examine the potential effects of three Eudragits RL100, S100 and L100 on the intestinal epithelial membrane transport of rhodammine-123 (Rho-123), a substrate of P-gp using a monolayer of human colon cancer cell line (Caco-2). Methods: The least non-cytotoxic concentrations of the excipients were assessed in Caco-2 cells by the MTT assay. Then the transepithelial transport of Rho-123 across Caco-2 monolayers was determined with a fluorescence spectrophotometer. Besides, the expression of the P-gp in cells exposed to the polymers was demonstrated using Western-blotting analysis. Results: Treatment of cells with Eudragit RL100 and L100 led to a very slight change while Eudragit S100 showed 61% increase in Rho-123 accumulation (P<0.001) and also reduced transporter expression. Conclusion: Our studies suggest that using proper concentrations of the Eudragit S100 in drug formulation would improve intestinal permeability and absorption of p-gp substrate drugs. PMID:24754004

  6. A wheat ABC transporter contributes to both grain formation and mycotoxin tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium fungi which acts as a disease virulence factor, aiding fungal pathogenesis of cereals spikelets and spread of the economically important Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease. Previously, a fragment of a wheat ABC transporter gene was shown to be...

  7. Tissue-Specific Transcript Profiling for ABC Transporters in the Sequestering Larvae of the Phytophagous Leaf Beetle Chrysomela populi

    PubMed Central

    Gretscher, René R.; Groth, Marco; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Background Insects evolved ingenious adaptations to use extraordinary food sources. Particularly, the diet of herbivores enriched with noxious plant secondary metabolites requires detoxification mechanisms. Sequestration, which involves the uptake, transfer, and concentration of occasionally modified phytochemicals into specialized tissues or hemolymph, is one of the most successful detoxification strategies found in most insect orders. Due to the ability of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) carriers to transport a wide range of molecules including phytochemicals and xenobiotics, it is highly likely that they play a role in this sequestration process. To shed light on the role of ABC proteins in sequestration, we describe an inventory of putative ABC transporters in various tissues in the sequestering juvenile poplar leaf beetle, Chrysomela populi. Results In the transcriptome of C. populi, we predicted 65 ABC transporters. To link the proteins with a possible function, we performed comparative phylogenetic analyses with ABC transporters of other insects and of humans. While tissue-specific profiling of each ABC transporter subfamily suggests that ABCB, C and G influence the plant metabolite absorption in the gut, ABCC with 14 members is the preferred subfamily responsible for the excretion of these metabolites via Malpighian tubules. Moreover, salicin, which is sequestered from poplar plants, is translocated into the defensive glands for further deterrent production. In these glands and among all identified ABC transporters, an exceptionally high transcript level was observed only for Cpabc35 (Cpmrp). RNAi revealed the deficiency of other ABC pumps to compensate the function of CpABC35, demonstrating its key role during sequestration. Conclusion We provide the first comprehensive phylogenetic study of the ABC family in a phytophagous beetle species. RNA-seq data from different larval tissues propose the importance of ABC pumps to achieve a homeostasis of plant

  8. ABCB1 and ABCC2 and the risk of distant metastasis in Thai breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Sensorn, Insee; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Sirachainan, Ekaphop; Chamnanphon, Montri; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Trachu, Narumol; Supavilai, Porntip; Pinthong, Darawan; Wongwaisayawan, Sansanee

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters have been extensively studied with regard to tamoxifen treatment outcomes. However, the results are inconclusive. Analysis of organ-specific metastasis may reveal the association of these pharmacogenetic factors. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of CYP3A5, CYP2D6, ABCB1, and ABCC2 polymorphisms on the risk of all distant and organ-specific metastases in Thai patients who received tamoxifen adjuvant therapy. Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of 73 patients with breast cancer who received tamoxifen adjuvant therapy. CYP3A5 (6986A>G), CYP2D6 (100C>T), ABCB1 (3435C>T), and ABCC2 (−24C>T) were genotyped using allelic discrimination real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. The impacts of prognostic clinical factors and genetic variants on disease-free survival were analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis. Results In the univariate analysis, primary tumor size >5 cm was significantly associated with increased risk of distant metastasis (P=0.004; hazard ratio [HR] =3.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44–6.47). In the multivariate analysis, tumor size >5 cm remained predictive of distant metastasis (P<0.001; HR=5.49; 95% CI, 2.30–13.10). ABCC2 −24CC were shown to be associated with increased risk of distant metastasis (P=0.040; adjusted HR=2.34; 95% CI, 1.04–5.27). The combined genotype of ABCC2 −24CC − ABCB1 3435 CT+TT was associated with increased risk of distant and bone metastasis (P=0.020; adjusted HR=2.46; 95% CI, 1.15–5.26 and P=0.040; adjusted HR=3.70; 95% CI, 1.06–12.89, respectively). Conclusion This study indicates that polymorphisms of ABCC2 and ABCB1 are independently associated with bone metastasis. Further prospective studies with larger sample sizes are needed to verify this finding. PMID:27110128

  9. Abcb1 in Pigs: Molecular cloning, tissues distribution, functional analysis, and its effect on pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingting; Huang, Jinhu; Zhang, Hongyu; Dong, Lingling; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; He, Fang; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the best-known ATP-dependent efflux transporters, contributing to differences in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions. Until now, studies on pig P-gp have been scarce. In our studies, the full-length porcine P-gp cDNA was cloned and expressed in a Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. P-gp expression was then determined in tissues and its role in the pharmacokinetics of oral enrofloxacin in pigs was studied. The coding region of pig Abcb1 gene was 3,861 bp, encoding 1,286 amino acid residues (Mw = 141,966). Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close evolutionary relationship between porcine P-gp and those of cow and sheep. Pig P-gp was successfully stably overexpressed in MDCK cells and had efflux activity for rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-gp. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that P-gp was highly expressed in brain capillaries, small intestine, and liver. In MDCK-pAbcb1 cells, enrofloxacin was transported by P-gp with net efflux ratio of 2.48 and the efflux function was blocked by P-gp inhibitor verapamil. High expression of P-gp in the small intestine could modify the pharmacokinetics of orally administrated enrofloxacin by increasing the Cmax, AUC and Ka, which was demonstrated using verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp. PMID:27572343

  10. Abcb1 in Pigs: Molecular cloning, tissues distribution, functional analysis, and its effect on pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tingting; Huang, Jinhu; Zhang, Hongyu; Dong, Lingling; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; He, Fang; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the best-known ATP-dependent efflux transporters, contributing to differences in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions. Until now, studies on pig P-gp have been scarce. In our studies, the full-length porcine P-gp cDNA was cloned and expressed in a Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. P-gp expression was then determined in tissues and its role in the pharmacokinetics of oral enrofloxacin in pigs was studied. The coding region of pig Abcb1 gene was 3,861 bp, encoding 1,286 amino acid residues (Mw = 141,966). Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close evolutionary relationship between porcine P-gp and those of cow and sheep. Pig P-gp was successfully stably overexpressed in MDCK cells and had efflux activity for rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-gp. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that P-gp was highly expressed in brain capillaries, small intestine, and liver. In MDCK-pAbcb1 cells, enrofloxacin was transported by P-gp with net efflux ratio of 2.48 and the efflux function was blocked by P-gp inhibitor verapamil. High expression of P-gp in the small intestine could modify the pharmacokinetics of orally administrated enrofloxacin by increasing the Cmax, AUC and Ka, which was demonstrated using verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp. PMID:27572343

  11. ABC transporter and metallothionein expression affected by NI and Epichloe endophyte infection in tall fescue.

    PubMed

    Mirzahossini, Zahra; Shabani, Leila; Sabzalian, Mohammad R; Sharifi-Tehrani, Majid

    2015-10-01

    Epichloe endophytes are symbiotic fungi which unlike mycorrhiza grow within aerial parts of host plants. The fungi may increase host tolerance to both biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, the effect of endophyte infection on growth and tolerance, carbohydrate contents and ABC (ABC transporter) and MET (metallothionein) expression in the leaves of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) plants cultivated in Ni polluted soil were evaluated. The endophyte infected (E+) and non-infected (E-) fescue plants were cultivated in soil under different Ni concentrations (30, 90 and 180mgkg(-1)). Growth parameters including root, shoot, total biomass, tiller number and total chlorophyll content of plants and H2O2 content of shoots were measured at the end of experiment. Ni translocation to the shoots, carbohydrate contents in roots and expression of ABC and MET of the leaves were also measured after 10 weeks of growth. Results demonstrated the beneficial effect of endophyte association on growth and Ni tolerance of tall fescue under Ni stress through an avoidance mechanism (reduction of Ni accumulation and translocation to the shoots). Endophyte infected plants showed less ABC and MET expression compared to the endophyte free plants. In endophyte free plants, H2O2 production had a significant positive correlation with genes expression, indicating that an increase in H2O2 might be involved in the up-regulation of ABC and MET under Ni stress. PMID:26024809

  12. Genetic association analysis of ATP binding cassette protein family reveals a novel association of ABCB1 genetic variants with epilepsy risk, but not with drug-resistance.

    PubMed

    Balan, Shabeesh; Bharathan, Sumitha Prameela; Vellichiramal, Neetha Nanoth; Sathyan, Sanish; Joseph, Vijai; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Banerjee, Moinak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED)-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy); juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy); and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T) rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004). This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004) and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05) cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with greater tendency for MTLE

  13. Genetic Association Analysis of ATP Binding Cassette Protein Family Reveals a Novel Association of ABCB1 Genetic Variants with Epilepsy Risk, but Not with Drug-Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Shabeesh; Bharathan, Sumitha Prameela; Vellichiramal, Neetha Nanoth; Sathyan, Sanish; Joseph, Vijai; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Banerjee, Moinak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED)-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy); juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy); and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T) rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004). This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004) and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05) cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with

  14. Regulation of ABC efflux transporters at blood-brain barrier in health and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; Miller, David S; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in providing protection to the central nervous system from exposure to circulating chemicals is maintained by tight junctions between endothelial cells and by a broad range of transporter proteins that regulate exchange between CNS and blood. The most important transporters that restrict the permeability of large number of toxins as well as therapeutic agents are the ABC transporters. Among them, P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 are the utmost studied. These efflux transporters are neuroprotective, limiting the brain entry of neurotoxins; however, they could also restrict the entry of many therapeutics and contribute to CNS pharmacoresistance. Characterization of several regulatory pathways that govern expression and activity of ABC efflux transporters in the endothelium of brain capillaries have led to an emerging consensus that these processes are complex and contain several cellular and molecular elements. Alterations in ABC efflux transporters expression and/or activity occur in several neurological diseases. Here, we review the signaling pathways that regulate expression and transport activity of P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 as well as how their expression/activity changes in neurological diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26187753

  15. Evidence for an ABC-Type Riboflavin Transporter System in Pathogenic Spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Biddy, Brent A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial transporter proteins are involved in the translocation of many essential nutrients and metabolites. However, many of these key bacterial transport systems remain to be identified, including those involved in the transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2). Pathogenic spirochetes lack riboflavin biosynthetic pathways, implying reliance on obtaining riboflavin from their hosts. Using structural and functional characterizations of possible ligand-binding components, we have identified an ABC-type riboflavin transport system within pathogenic spirochetes. The putative lipoprotein ligand-binding components of these systems from three different spirochetes were cloned, hyperexpressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. Solutions of all three of the purified recombinant proteins were bright yellow. UV-visible spectra demonstrated that these proteins were likely flavoproteins; electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography confirmed that they contained riboflavin. A 1.3-Å crystal structure of the protein (TP0298) encoded by Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete, demonstrated that the protein’s fold is similar to the ligand-binding components of ABC-type transporters. The structure also revealed other salient details of the riboflavin binding site. Comparative bioinformatics analyses of spirochetal genomes, coupled with experimental validation, facilitated the discovery of this new ABC-type riboflavin transport system(s). We denote the ligand-binding component as riboflavin uptake transporter A (RfuA). Taken together, it appears that pathogenic spirochetes have evolved an ABC-type transport system (RfuABCD) for survival in their host environments, particularly that of the human host. PMID:23404400

  16. ABC transporter AtABCG25 is involved in abscisic acid transport and responses

    PubMed Central

    Kuromori, Takashi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Shimizu, Hidetada; Sugimoto, Eriko; Kamiya, Asako; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is one of the most important phytohormones involved in abiotic stress responses, seed maturation, germination, and senescence. ABA is predominantly produced in vascular tissues and exerts hormonal responses in various cells, including guard cells. Although ABA responses require extrusion of ABA from ABA-producing cells in an intercellular ABA signaling pathway, the transport mechanisms of ABA through the plasma membrane remain unknown. Here we isolated an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, AtABCG25, from Arabidopsis by genetically screening for ABA sensitivity. AtABCG25 was expressed mainly in vascular tissues. The fluorescent protein-fused AtABCG25 was localized at the plasma membrane in plant cells. In membrane vesicles derived from AtABCG25-expressing insect cells, AtABCG25 exhibited ATP-dependent ABA transport. The AtABCG25-overexpressing plants showed higher leaf temperatures, implying an influence on stomatal regulation. These results strongly suggest that AtABCG25 is an exporter of ABA and is involved in the intercellular ABA signaling pathway. The presence of the ABA transport mechanism sheds light on the active control of multicellular ABA responses to environmental stresses among plant cells. PMID:20133881

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for assessing ABC transporters at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Raaphorst, R M; Windhorst, A D; Elsinga, P H; Colabufo, N A; Lammertsma, A A; Luurtsema, G

    2015-04-01

    ABC transporters protect the brain by transporting neurotoxic compounds from the brain back into the blood. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is the most investigated ABC (efflux) transporter, as it is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Altered function of P-gp can be studied in vivo, using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). To date, several radiopharmaceuticals have been developed to image P-gp function in vivo. So far, attempts to image expression levels of P-gp using radiolabeled P-gp inhibitors have not been successful. Improved knowledge of compound behavior toward P-gp from in vitro studies should increase predictability of in vivo outcome. PMID:25669763

  18. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the conserved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. Our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  19. ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer with phospholipids and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). β-Barreled outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins are embedded in the outer membrane. All of these constituents are essential to the function of the outer membrane. The transport systems for lipoproteins have been characterized in detail. An ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, LolCDE, initiates sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane to form a water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex in the periplasm. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB at the outer membrane and are incorporated into the lipid bilayer. A model analogous to the Lol system has been suggested for the transport of LPS, where an ABC transporter, LptBFG, mediates the detachment of LPS from the inner membrane. Recent developments in the functional characterization of ABC transporters involved in the biogenesis of the outer membrane in gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:21670534

  20. A bacterial-type ABC transporter is involved in aluminum tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao Feng; Yamaji, Naoki; Mitani, Namiki; Yano, Masahiro; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Ma, Jian Feng

    2009-02-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major factor limiting crop production in acidic soil, but the molecular mechanisms of Al tolerance are poorly understood. Here, we report that two genes, STAR1 (for sensitive to Al rhizotoxicity1) and STAR2, are responsible for Al tolerance in rice. STAR1 encodes a nucleotide binding domain, while STAR2 encodes a transmembrane domain, of a bacterial-type ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter. Disruption of either gene resulted in hypersensitivity to aluminum toxicity. Both STAR1 and STAR2 are expressed mainly in the roots and are specifically induced by Al exposure. Expression in onion epidermal cells, rice protoplasts, and yeast showed that STAR1 interacts with STAR2 to form a complex that localizes to the vesicle membranes of all root cells, except for those in the epidermal layer of the mature zone. When expressed together in Xenopus laevis oocytes, STAR1/2 shows efflux transport activity specific for UDP-glucose. Furthermore, addition of exogenous UDP-glucose rescued root growth in the star1 mutant exposed to Al. These results indicate that STAR1 and STAR2 form a complex that functions as an ABC transporter, which is required for detoxification of Al in rice. The ABC transporter transports UDP-glucose, which may be used to modify the cell wall. PMID:19244140

  1. A Bacterial-Type ABC Transporter Is Involved in Aluminum Tolerance in Rice[W

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao Feng; Yamaji, Naoki; Mitani, Namiki; Yano, Masahiro; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Ma, Jian Feng

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major factor limiting crop production in acidic soil, but the molecular mechanisms of Al tolerance are poorly understood. Here, we report that two genes, STAR1 (for sensitive to Al rhizotoxicity1) and STAR2, are responsible for Al tolerance in rice. STAR1 encodes a nucleotide binding domain, while STAR2 encodes a transmembrane domain, of a bacterial-type ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter. Disruption of either gene resulted in hypersensitivity to aluminum toxicity. Both STAR1 and STAR2 are expressed mainly in the roots and are specifically induced by Al exposure. Expression in onion epidermal cells, rice protoplasts, and yeast showed that STAR1 interacts with STAR2 to form a complex that localizes to the vesicle membranes of all root cells, except for those in the epidermal layer of the mature zone. When expressed together in Xenopus laevis oocytes, STAR1/2 shows efflux transport activity specific for UDP-glucose. Furthermore, addition of exogenous UDP-glucose rescued root growth in the star1 mutant exposed to Al. These results indicate that STAR1 and STAR2 form a complex that functions as an ABC transporter, which is required for detoxification of Al in rice. The ABC transporter transports UDP-glucose, which may be used to modify the cell wall. PMID:19244140

  2. A synonymous polymorphism in a common MDR1 (ABCB1) haplotype shapes protein function

    PubMed Central

    Fung, King Leung; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    The MDR1 (ABCB1) gene encodes a membrane-bound transporter that actively effluxes a wide range of compounds from cells. The overexpression of MDR1 by multidrug-resistant cancer cells is a serious impediment to chemotherapy. MDR1 is expressed in various tissues to protect them from the adverse effect of toxins. The pharmacokinetics of drugs that are also MDR1 substrates also influence disease outcome and treatment efficacy. Although MDR1 is a well conserved gene, there is increasing evidence that its polymorphisms affect substrate specificity. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occur frequently and have strong linkage, creating a common haplotype at positions 1236C>T (G412G), 2677G>T (A893S) and 3435C>T (I1145I). The frequency of the synonymous 3435C>T polymorphism has been shown to vary significantly according to ethnicity. Existing literature suggests that the haplotype plays a role in response to drugs and disease susceptibility. This review summarizes recent findings on the 3435C>T polymorphism of MDR1 and the haplotype to which it belongs. A possible molecular mechanism of action by ribosome stalling that can change protein structure and function by altering protein folding is discussed. PMID:19285158

  3. Temporal dynamics of the ABC transporter response to insecticide treatment: insights from the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Epis, Sara; Porretta, Daniele; Mastrantonio, Valentina; Urbanelli, Sandra; Sassera, Davide; De Marco, Leone; Mereghetti, Valeria; Montagna, Matteo; Ricci, Irene; Favia, Guido; Bandi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    In insects, ABC transporters have been shown to contribute to defence/resistance to insecticides by reducing toxic concentrations in cells/tissues. Despite the extensive studies about this detoxifying mechanism, the temporal patterns of ABC transporter activation have been poorly investigated. Using the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi as a study system, we investigated the expression profile of ABC genes belonging to different subfamilies in permethrin-treated larvae at different time points (30 min to 48 h). Our results showed that the expression of ABCB and ABCG subfamily genes was upregulated at 1 h after treatment, with the highest expression observed at 6 h. Therefore, future investigations on the temporal dynamics of ABC gene expression will allow a better implementation of insecticide treatment regimens, including the use of specific inhibitors of ABC efflux pumps. PMID:25504146

  4. Temporal dynamics of the ABC transporter response to insecticide treatment: insights from the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Epis, Sara; Porretta, Daniele; Mastrantonio, Valentina; Urbanelli, Sandra; Sassera, Davide; De Marco, Leone; Mereghetti, Valeria; Montagna, Matteo; Ricci, Irene; Favia, Guido; Bandi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    In insects, ABC transporters have been shown to contribute to defence/resistance to insecticides by reducing toxic concentrations in cells/tissues. Despite the extensive studies about this detoxifying mechanism, the temporal patterns of ABC transporter activation have been poorly investigated. Using the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi as a study system, we investigated the expression profile of ABC genes belonging to different subfamilies in permethrin-treated larvae at different time points (30 min to 48 h). Our results showed that the expression of ABCB and ABCG subfamily genes was upregulated at 1 h after treatment, with the highest expression observed at 6 h. Therefore, future investigations on the temporal dynamics of ABC gene expression will allow a better implementation of insecticide treatment regimens, including the use of specific inhibitors of ABC efflux pumps. PMID:25504146

  5. Temporal dynamics of the ABC transporter response to insecticide treatment: insights from the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epis, Sara; Porretta, Daniele; Mastrantonio, Valentina; Urbanelli, Sandra; Sassera, Davide; De Marco, Leone; Mereghetti, Valeria; Montagna, Matteo; Ricci, Irene; Favia, Guido; Bandi, Claudio

    2014-12-01

    In insects, ABC transporters have been shown to contribute to defence/resistance to insecticides by reducing toxic concentrations in cells/tissues. Despite the extensive studies about this detoxifying mechanism, the temporal patterns of ABC transporter activation have been poorly investigated. Using the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi as a study system, we investigated the expression profile of ABC genes belonging to different subfamilies in permethrin-treated larvae at different time points (30 min to 48 h). Our results showed that the expression of ABCB and ABCG subfamily genes was upregulated at 1 h after treatment, with the highest expression observed at 6 h. Therefore, future investigations on the temporal dynamics of ABC gene expression will allow a better implementation of insecticide treatment regimens, including the use of specific inhibitors of ABC efflux pumps.

  6. Novel insertion mutation of ABCB1 gene in an ivermectin-sensitive Border Collie.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-Ik; Son, Hyoung-Won; Park, Seung-Cheol; Na, Ki-Jeong

    2010-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is encoded by the ABCB1 gene and acts as an efflux pump for xenobiotics. In the Border Collie, a nonsense mutation caused by a 4-base pair deletion in the ABCB1 gene is associated with a premature stop to P-gp synthesis. In this study, we examined the full-length coding sequence of the ABCB1 gene in an ivermectin-sensitive Border Collie that lacked the aforementioned deletion mutation. The sequence was compared to the corresponding sequences of a wild-type Beagle and seven ivermectin-tolerant family members of the Border Collie. When compared to the wild-type Beagle sequence, that of the ivermectin-sensitive Border Collie was found to have one insertion mutation and eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding sequence of the ABCB1 gene. While the eight SNPs were also found in the family members' sequences, the insertion mutation was found only in the ivermectin-sensitive dog. These results suggest the possibility that the SNPs are species-specific features of the ABCB1 gene in Border Collies, and that the insertion mutation may be related to ivermectin intolerance. PMID:21113104

  7. Nucleotide-induced conformational dynamics in ABC transporters from structure-based coarse grained modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flechsig, Holger

    2016-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins which mediate the exchange of diverse substrates across membranes powered by ATP molecules. Our understanding of their activity is still hampered since the conformational dynamics underlying the operation of such proteins cannot yet be resolved in detailed molecular dynamics studies. Here a coarse grained model which allows to mimic binding of nucleotides and follow subsequent conformational motions of full-length transporter structures in computer simulations is proposed and implemented. To justify its explanatory quality, the model is first applied to the maltose transporter system for which multiple conformations are known and we find that the model predictions agree remarkably well with the experimental data. For the MalK subunit the switching from open to the closed dimer configuration upon ATP binding is reproduced and, moreover, for the full-length maltose transporter, progression from inward-facing to the outward-facing state is correctly obtained. For the heme transporter HmuUV, for which only the free structure could yet be determined, the model was then applied to predict nucleotide-induced conformational motions. Upon binding of ATP-mimicking ligands the structure changed from a conformation in which the nucleotide-binding domains formed an open shape, to a conformation in which they were found in tight contact, while, at the same time, a pronounced rotation of the transmembrane domains was observed. This finding is supported by normal mode analysis, and, comparison with structural data of the homologous vitamin B12 transporter BtuCD suggests that the observed rotation mechanism may contribute a common functional aspect for this class of ABC transporters. Although in HmuuV noticeable rearrangement of essential transmembrane helices was detected, there are no indications from our simulations that ATP binding alone may facilitate propagation of substrate molecules in this transporter

  8. Identification and characterization of a Streptococcus pyogenes ABC transporter with multiple specificity for metal cations.

    PubMed

    Janulczyk, R; Pallon, J; Björck, L

    1999-11-01

    Metal ions are crucial trace elements for bacteria infecting the human host. The LraI (lipoprotein receptor-associated antigen I) transporter in Streptococcus spp. belongs to the superfamily of ABC transporters. The transporter consists of a lipoprotein, an ATP-binding protein and a hydrophobic integral membrane protein. Here, we describe a new member of the LraI family in the important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. The system was identified in silico by analysis of the S. pyogenes Genome Sequencing Project. The S. pyogenes operon exhibits an atypical organization compared with equivalents in other Streptococcus spp. The presence and atypical organization of the operon was verified in a number of S. pyogenes strains of different serotypes. Transcriptional analysis of the LraI operon demonstrates a polycistronic transcription attenuated by a stable stem-loop structure, which allows the lipoprotein to be expressed in larger quantities than the other two components. The localization of the native lipoprotein at the bacterial surface was shown by proteolytic digestion of S. pyogenes bacteria and NH2-terminal sequencing of a released lipoprotein fragment. Recombinant lipoprotein was expressed as a GST fusion protein, and studies of molecular interactions with metal radioisotopes demonstrated that the protein has affinity for Zn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Zn(II) and Cu(II) were found to compete for the same binding site, whereas Fe(III) uses a second site. Also, proton-induced X-ray analysis of lipoprotein samples identified iron, copper and zinc. Finally, a mutant strain lacking a functional mtsABC operon was generated and showed reduced uptake of 55Fe and 65Zn compared with the wild-type strain. The operon encoding this novel ABC transporter with multiple specificity for metal cations is designated mtsABC, for metal transporter of Streptococcus. PMID:10564500

  9. The Role of the Photoreceptor ABC Transporter ABCA4 in Lipid Transport and Stargardt Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molday, Robert S.; Zhong, Ming; Quazi, Faraz

    2009-01-01

    ABCA4 is a member of the ABCA subfamily of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters that is expressed in rod and cone photoreceptors of the vertebrate retina. ABCA4, also known as the Rim protein and ABCR, is a large 2273 amino acid glycoprotein organized as two tandem halves, each containing a single membrane spanning segment followed sequentially by a large exocytoplasmic domain, a multispanning membrane domain and a nucleotide binding domain. Over 500 mutations in the gene encoding ABCA4 are associated with a spectrum of related autosomal recessive retinal degenerative diseases including Stargardt macular degeneration, cone-rod dystrophy and a subset of retinitis pigmentosa. Biochemical studies on the purified ABCA4 together with analysis of abca4 knockout mice and patients with Stargardt disease have implicated ABCA4 as a retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine transporter that facilitates the removal of potentially reactive retinal derivatives from photoreceptors following photoexcitation. Knowledge of the genetic and molecular basis for ABCA4 related retinal degenerative diseases is being used to develop rationale therapeutic treatments for this set of disorders. PMID:19230850

  10. Direct Observation of a Gate Tunable Band Gap in Electrical Transport in ABC-Trilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Khodkov, Tymofiy; Khrapach, Ivan; Craciun, Monica Felicia; Russo, Saverio

    2015-07-01

    Few layer graphene systems such as Bernal stacked bilayer and rhombohedral (ABC-) stacked trilayer offer the unique possibility to open an electric field tunable energy gap. To date, this energy gap has been experimentally confirmed in optical spectroscopy. Here we report the first direct observation of the electric field tunable energy gap in electronic transport experiments on doubly gated suspended ABC-trilayer graphene. From a systematic study of the nonlinearities in current versus voltage characteristics and the temperature dependence of the conductivity, we demonstrate that thermally activated transport over the energy-gap dominates the electrical response of these transistors. The estimated values for energy gap from the temperature dependence and from the current voltage characteristics follow the theoretically expected electric field dependence with critical exponent 3/2. These experiments indicate that high quality few-layer graphene are suitable candidates for exploring novel tunable terahertz light sources and detectors. PMID:26079989

  11. An intrinsic adenylate kinase activity regulates gating of the ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph; Welsh, Michael J

    2003-12-26

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Like other ABC transporters, it can hydrolyze ATP. Yet while ATP hydrolysis influences channel gating, it has long seemed puzzling that CFTR would require this reaction because anions flow passively through CFTR. Moreover, no other ion channel is known to require the large energy of ATP hydrolysis to gate. We found that CFTR also has adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP <=> ADP + ADP) that regulates gating. When functioning as an adenylate kinase, CFTR showed positive cooperativity for ATP suggesting its two nucleotide binding domains may dimerize. Thus, channel activity could be regulated by two different enzymatic reactions, ATPase and adenylate kinase, that share a common ATP binding site in the second nucleotide binding domain. At physiologic nucleotide concentrations, adenylate kinase activity, rather than ATPase activity may control gating, and therefore involve little energy consumption. PMID:14697202

  12. Getting in or out: early segregation between importers and exporters in the evolution of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters.

    PubMed

    Saurin, W; Hofnung, M; Dassa, E

    1999-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems, also called traffic ATPases, are found in eukaryotes and prokaryotes and almost all participate in the transport of a wide variety of molecules. ABC systems are characterized by a highly conserved ATPase module called here the ABC module, involved in coupling transport to ATP hydrolysis. We have used the sequence of one of the first representatives of bacterial ABC transporters, the MalK protein, to collect 250 closely related sequences from a nonredundant protein sequence database. The sequences collected by this objective method are all known or putative ABC transporters. After having eliminated short protein sequences and duplicates, the 197 remaining sequences were subjected to a phylogenetic analysis based on a mutational similarity matrix. An unrooted tree for these modules was found to display two major branches, one grouping all collected uptake systems and the other all collected export systems. This remarkable disposition strongly suggests that the divergence between these two functionally different types of ABC systems occurred once in the history of these systems and probably before the differentiation of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We discuss the implications of this finding and we propose a model accounting for the generation and the diversification of ABC systems. PMID:9873074

  13. ASSOCIATIONS OF ABCB1 3435C>T AND IL-10 -1082G>A POLYMORPHISMS WITH LONG-TERM SIROLIMUS DOSE REQUIREMENTS IN RENAL TRANSPLANT PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Wai-Johnn; Chamberlain, Christine E.; Lee, Su-Jun; Goldstein, Joyce A.; Hale, Douglas A.; Mannon, Roslyn B.; Kirk, Allan D.; Hon, Yuen Yi

    2011-01-01

    Backgrounds SRL absorption and metabolism are affected by Pgp-mediated transport and CYP3A enzyme activity, which are further under the influences of cytokine concentrations. This retrospective study determined the associations of ABCB1 1236C>T, 2677 G>T/A, and 3435C>T, CYP3A4 -392A>G, CYP3A5 6986A>G and 14690G>A, IL-10 -1082G>A, and TNF -308G>A polymorphisms with SRL dose-adjusted, weight-normalized trough concentrations (C/D) at 7 days, and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post initiation of SRL. Methods Genotypes for 86 renal transplant patients who received SRL-based maintenance immunosuppressive therapy were determined using polymerase chain reaction followed by chip-based mass spectrometry. The changes of log-transformed C/D over the days post transplantation were analyzed using a linear mixed-effects model, with adjustments for body mass index and weight-normalized doses of tacrolimus, prednisone, clotrimazole, and statins. Results ABCB1 3435C>T and IL-10 -1082G>A were significantly associated with log C/D (p=0.0016 and 0.0394, respectively). Mean SRL C/D was 48% higher in patients with ABCB1 3435CT/TT genotype than those with 3435CC genotype, and was 24% higher in IL-10 -1082GG compared to -1082AG/AA. Conclusions ABCB1 3435C>T and IL-10 -1082G>A were significantly associated with long-term SRL dose requirements. Genetics can play a significant role in SRL dosing and may be useful in therapeutic monitoring of SRL in renal transplantation. Future replication studies are needed to confirm these associations. PMID:22094953

  14. Analysis of genotype and haplotype effects of ABCB1 (MDR1) polymorphisms in the risk of medically refractory epilepsy in an Indian population.

    PubMed

    Vahab, Saadi Abdul; Sen, Supratim; Ravindran, Nivedita; Mony, Sridevi; Mathew, Anila; Vijayan, Neetha; Nayak, Geetha; Bhaskaranand, Nalini; Banerjee, Moinak; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2009-01-01

    The transmembrane P-glycoprotein that functions as a drug-efflux transporter coded by ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B, member 1/Multidrug Resistance 1 (ABCB1/MDR1) gene is considered relevant to drug absorption and elimination, with access to the central nervous system. Effects of three ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genotypic and haplotypic combination have been evaluated in a south Indian population for risk of pediatric medically refractory epilepsy. The study included age and sex matched medically refractory (N=113) cases and drug responsive epilepsy patients (N=129) as controls, belonging to the same ethnic population recruited from a tertiary referral centre, of Karnataka, Southern India. The genotype frequencies of SNPs c.1236C>T, c.2677G>T/A, and c.3435C>T were determined from genomic DNA of the cases and controls by PCR- RFLP and confirmatory DNA sequencing. 256 normal population samples of the same ethnicity were genotyped for the three loci to check for population stratification. Results indicate that there was no statistically significant difference between allele and genotype frequencies of refractory and drug responsive epilepsy patients. The predicted haplotype frequencies of the three polymorphisms did not show significant difference between cases and controls. The results confirm earlier observations on absence of association of ABCB1 polymorphisms with medically refractory epilepsy. PMID:19571437

  15. ABC transporters in CSCs membranes as a novel target for treating tumor relapse

    PubMed Central

    Zinzi, Laura; Contino, Marialessandra; Cantore, Mariangela; Capparelli, Elena; Leopoldo, Marcello; Colabufo, Nicola A.

    2014-01-01

    CSCs are responsible for the high rate of recurrence and chemoresistance of different types of cancer. The current antineoplastic agents able to inhibit bulk replicating cancer cells and radiation treatment are not efficacious toward CSCs since this subpopulation has several intrinsic mechanisms of resistance. Among these mechanisms, the expression of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters family and the activation of different signaling pathways (such as Wnt/β-catenin signaling, Hedgehog, Notch, Akt/PKB) are reported. Therefore, considering ABC transporters expression on CSCs membranes, compounds able to modulate MDR could induce cytotoxicity in these cells disclosing an exciting and alternative strategy for targeting CSCs in tumor therapy. The next challenge in the cure of cancer relapse may be a multimodal strategy, an approach where specific CSCs targeting drugs exert simultaneously the ability to circumvent tumor drug resistance (ABC transporters modulation) and cytotoxic activity toward CSCs and the corresponding differentiated tumor cells. The efficacy of suggested multimodal strategy could be probed by using several scaffolds active toward MDR pumps on CSCs isolated by tumor specimens. PMID:25071581

  16. Alzheimer’s and ABC transporters - new opportunities for diagnostics and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pahnke, Jens; Langer, Oliver; Krohn, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Much has been said about the increasing number of demented patients and the main risk factor ‘age’. Frustratingly, we do not know the precise pattern and all modulating factors that provoke the pathologic changes in the brains of affected elderly. We have to diagnose early to be able to stop the progression of diseases that irreversibly destroy brain substance. Familiar AD cases have mislead some researchers for almost 20 years, which has unfortunately narrowed the scientific understanding and has, thus, lead to insufficient funding of independent approaches. Therefore, basic researchers hardly have been able to develop causative treatments and clinicians still do not have access to prognostic and early diagnostic tools. During the recent years it became clear that insufficient Aβ export, physiologically facilitated by the ABC transporter superfamily at the brain’s barriers, plays a fundamental role in disease initiation and progression. Furthermore, export mechanisms that are deficient in affected elderly are new targets for activation and, thus, treatment, but ideally also for prevention. In sporadic AD disturbed clearance of β-amyloid from the brain is so far the most important factor for its accumulation in the parenchyma and vessel walls. Here, we review findings about the contribution of ABC transporters and of the perivascular drainage/glymphatic system on β-amyloid clearance. We highlight their potential value for innovative early diagnostics using PET and describe recently described, effective ABC transporter-targeting agents as potential causative treatment for neurodegenerative proteopathies/dementias. PMID:24746857

  17. Role of the Zinc Uptake ABC Transporter of Moraxella catarrhalis in Persistence in the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Aimee L.; Kirkham, Charmaine; Johnson, Antoinette; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We have identified and characterized a zinc uptake ABC transporter that is present in all strains of M. catarrhalis tested. A mutant in which the znu gene cluster is knocked out shows markedly impaired growth compared to the wild type in medium that contains trace zinc; growth is restored to wild-type levels by supplementing medium with zinc but not with other divalent cations. Thermal-shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein ZnuA binds zinc but does not bind other divalent cations. Invasion assays with human respiratory epithelial cells demonstrated that the zinc ABC transporter of M. catarrhalis is critical for invasion of respiratory epithelial cells, an observation that is especially relevant because an intracellular reservoir of M. catarrhalis is present in the human respiratory tract and this reservoir is important for persistence. The znu knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the zinc uptake ABC transporter mediates uptake of zinc in environments with very low zinc concentrations and is critical for full virulence of M. catarrhalis in the respiratory tract in facilitating intracellular invasion of epithelial cells and persistence in the respiratory tract. PMID:23817618

  18. Release of Entropic Spring Reveals Conformational Coupling Mechanism in the ABC Transporter BtuCD-F.

    PubMed

    Prieß, Marten; Schäfer, Lars V

    2016-06-01

    Substrate translocation by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters involves coupling of ATP binding and hydrolysis in the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to conformational changes in the transmembrane domains. We used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the atomic-level mechanism of conformational coupling in the ABC transporter BtuCD-F, which imports vitamin B12 across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. Our simulations show how an engineered disulfide bond across the NBD dimer interface reduces conformational fluctuations and hence configurational entropy. As a result, the disulfide bond is under substantial mechanical stress. Releasing this entropic spring, as is the case in the wild-type transporter, combined with analyzing the pairwise forces between individual residues, unravels the coupling mechanism. The identified pathways along which force is propagated from the NBDs via the coupling helix to the transmembrane domains are composed of highly conserved residues, underlining their functional relevance. This study not only reveals the details of conformational coupling in BtuCD-F, it also provides a promising approach to other long-range conformational couplings, e.g., in ABC exporters or other ATP-driven molecular machines. PMID:27276259

  19. How to move an amphipathic molecule across a lipid bilayer: different mechanisms for different ABC transporters?

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Frederica L; Carrier, David J; Schaedler, Theresia A; Baldwin, Stephen A; Baker, Alison

    2016-06-15

    Import of β-oxidation substrates into peroxisomes is mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters belonging to subfamily D. In order to enter the β-oxidation pathway, fatty acids are activated by conversion to fatty acyl-CoA esters, a reaction which is catalysed by acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs). Here, we present evidence for an unusual transport mechanism, in which fatty acyl-CoA substrates are accepted by ABC subclass D protein (ABCD) transporters, cleaved by the transporters during transit across the lipid bilayer to release CoA, and ultimately re-esterified in the peroxisome lumen by ACSs which interact with the transporter. We propose that this solves the biophysical problem of moving an amphipathic molecule across the peroxisomal membrane, since the intrinsic thioesterase activity of the transporter permits separate membrane translocation pathways for the hydrophobic fatty acid moiety and the polar CoA moiety. The cleavage/re-esterification mechanism also has the potential to control entry of disparate substrates into the β-oxidation pathway when coupled with distinct peroxisomal ACSs. A different solution to the movement of amphipathic molecules across a lipid bilayer is deployed by the bacterial lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) flippase, PglK, in which the hydrophilic head group and the hydrophobic polyprenyl tail of the substrate are proposed to have distinct translocation pathways but are not chemically separated during transport. We discuss a speculative alternating access model for ABCD proteins based on the mammalian ABC transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and compare it to the novel mechanism suggested by the recent PglK crystal structures and biochemical data. PMID:27284041

  20. How to move an amphipathic molecule across a lipid bilayer: different mechanisms for different ABC transporters?

    PubMed Central

    Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Carrier, David J.; Schaedler, Theresia A.; Baldwin, Stephen A.; Baker, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Import of β-oxidation substrates into peroxisomes is mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters belonging to subfamily D. In order to enter the β-oxidation pathway, fatty acids are activated by conversion to fatty acyl-CoA esters, a reaction which is catalysed by acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs). Here, we present evidence for an unusual transport mechanism, in which fatty acyl-CoA substrates are accepted by ABC subclass D protein (ABCD) transporters, cleaved by the transporters during transit across the lipid bilayer to release CoA, and ultimately re-esterified in the peroxisome lumen by ACSs which interact with the transporter. We propose that this solves the biophysical problem of moving an amphipathic molecule across the peroxisomal membrane, since the intrinsic thioesterase activity of the transporter permits separate membrane translocation pathways for the hydrophobic fatty acid moiety and the polar CoA moiety. The cleavage/re-esterification mechanism also has the potential to control entry of disparate substrates into the β-oxidation pathway when coupled with distinct peroxisomal ACSs. A different solution to the movement of amphipathic molecules across a lipid bilayer is deployed by the bacterial lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) flippase, PglK, in which the hydrophilic head group and the hydrophobic polyprenyl tail of the substrate are proposed to have distinct translocation pathways but are not chemically separated during transport. We discuss a speculative alternating access model for ABCD proteins based on the mammalian ABC transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and compare it to the novel mechanism suggested by the recent PglK crystal structures and biochemical data. PMID:27284041

  1. Association between ABCB1 genetic polymorphism and the effect on epilepsy following phenytoin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; Cao, Bo-Qiang; Wang, Bo; Wu, Shi-Qiang; Jiang, De-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms on the efficacy of phenytoin (PHT) treatment in epilepsy patients. In total, 200 epilepsy patients who were administered PHT were divided into the responsive and pharmaco-resistance groups depending on the clinical data of PHT treatment in epilepsy patients. The serum concentration of PHT was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). ABCB1 polymorphisms were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction restriction-fragment length polymorphism method. The C1236T, C3435T and G2677T/A haplotypes were reconstructed for the ABCB1 gene using SHEsis programs. One-way analysis of variance was used for data analysis. In ABCB1 C1236T, the rate of the CC genotype in pharmaco-resistance (17.5%) was higher than that of the responsive group (2.1%), while the rate of the TT genotype in pharmaco-resistance (41.6%) was lower than that of the responsive group (55.4%) (P<0.05). In ABCB1 G2677T/A, the rate of the GG genotype in pharmaco-resistance (29.6%) was higher than that of the responsive group (9.7%), while the rate of the TT genotype in pharmaco-resistance (4.6%) was lower than that of the responsive group (30.4%) (P<0.05). The rate of the TTC haploid in pharmaco-resistance (24.1%) was higher than that of the responsive group (8.8%) (P<0.05). The PHT serum concentration had no statistical significance in the patients with different genotypes. In conclusion, there was no association between ABCB1 genetic polymorphism and PHT serum concentration, although the polymorphisms affected the efficacy of PHT treatment in patients with epilepsy. PMID:27602091

  2. [Role of ABC efflux transporters in the oral bioavailability and drug-induced intestinal toxicity].

    PubMed

    Yokooji, Tomoharu

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the organ that absorbs nutrients and water from foods and drinks. This organ is often exposed to various harmful xenobiotics, and therefore possesses various detoxification/barrier systems, including metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters. Intestinal epithelial cells express ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and breast cancer resistance protein, in addition to various solute carrier (SLC) influx transporters. These transporters are expressed site- and membrane-specifically in enterocytes, which affects the bioavailability of ingested substrate drugs. Expression and/or function of transporters can be modulated by various compounds, including therapeutic drugs, herbal products, some foods, and by disease states. The modulation of transporters could cause unexpectedly higher or lower blood concentrations, marked inter- and intra-individual variations in pharmacokinetics, and unreliable pharmacological actions in association with toxicities of substrates. Recently, we found that hyperbilirubinemia, which occurs in some disease states, increased intestinal accumulation and toxicity of methotrexate, an MRP substrate, because of the suppression of MRP function by high plasma concentrations of conjugated bilirubin. We also attempted to ameliorate the intestinal toxicity of irinotecan hydrochloride by modulating the hepatic and intestinal functions of MRP2. This review summarizes our findings regarding the role of ABC transporters, especially MRPs, in oral bioavailability and in drug-induced intestinal toxicity. Our approach to treat intestinal toxicity using an MRP2 modulator is also described. PMID:23811769

  3. Characterization of berberine transport into Coptis japonica cells and the involvement of ABC protein.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kyoko; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sato, Fumihiko; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2002-09-01

    Cultured Coptis japonica cells are able to take up berberine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, from the medium and transport it exclusively into the vacuoles. Uptake activity depends on the growth phase of the cultured cells whereas the culture medium had no effect on uptake. Treatment with several inhibitors suggested that berberine uptake depended on the ATP level. Some inhibitors of P-glycoprotein, an ABC transporter involved in multiple drug resistance in cancer cells, strongly inhibited berberine uptake, whereas a specific inhibitor for glutathione biosynthesis and vacuolar ATPase, bafilomycin A1, had little effect. Vanadate-induced ATP trap experiments to detect ABC proteins expressed in C. japonica cells showed that three membrane proteins of between 120 and 150 kDa were photolabelled with 8-azido-[alpha-32P] ATP. Two revealed the same photoaffinity-labelling pattern as P-glycoprotein, and the interaction of these proteins with berberine was also demonstrated. These results suggest that ABC proteins of the MDR-type are involved in the uptake of berberine from the medium. PMID:12177126

  4. Arabidopsis mutant of AtABCG26, an ABC transporter gene, is defective in pollen maturation.

    PubMed

    Kuromori, Takashi; Ito, Takuya; Sugimoto, Eriko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2011-11-01

    In plants, pollen is the male gametophyte that is generated from microspores, which are haploid cells produced after meiosis of diploid pollen mother cells in floral anthers. In normal maturation, microspores interact with the tapetum, which consists of one layer of metabolically active cells enclosing the locule in anthers. The tapetum plays several important roles in the maturation of microspores. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a highly conserved protein super-family that uses the energy released in ATP hydrolysis to transport substrates. The ABC transporter gene family is more diverse in plants than in animals. Previously, we reported that an Arabidopsis half-size type ABC transporter gene, COF1/AtWBC11/AtABCG11, is involved in lipid transport for the construction of cuticle layers and pollen coats in normal organ formation, as compared to CER5/AtWBC12/AtABCG12. However, physiological functions of most other ABCG members are unknown. Here, we identified another family gene, AtABCG26, which is required for pollen development in Arabidopsis. An AtABCG26 mutant developed very few pollen grains, resulting in a male-sterile phenotype. By investigating microspore and pollen development in this mutant, we observed that there was a slight abnormality in tetrad morphology prior to the formation of haploid microspores. At a later stage, we could not detect exine deposition on the microspore surface. During pollen maturation, many grains in the mutant anthers got aborted, and surviving grains were found to be defective in mitosis. Transmission of the mutant allele through male gametophytes appeared to be normal in genetic transmission analysis, supporting the view that the pollen function was disturbed by sporophytic defects in the AtABCG26 mutant. AtABCG26 can be expected to be involved in the transport of substrates such as sporopollenin monomers from tapetum to microspores, which both are plant-specific structures critical to pollen development. PMID

  5. Distribution and Physiology of ABC-Type Transporters Contributing to Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lubelski, Jacek; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Membrane proteins responsible for the active efflux of structurally and functionally unrelated drugs were first characterized in higher eukaryotes. To date, a vast number of transporters contributing to multidrug resistance (MDR transporters) have been reported for a large variety of organisms. Predictions about the functions of genes in the growing number of sequenced genomes indicate that MDR transporters are ubiquitous in nature. The majority of described MDR transporters in bacteria use ion motive force, while only a few systems have been shown to rely on ATP hydrolysis. However, recent reports on MDR proteins from gram-positive organisms, as well as genome analysis, indicate that the role of ABC-type MDR transporters in bacterial drug resistance might be underestimated. Detailed structural and mechanistic analyses of these proteins can help to understand their molecular mode of action and may eventually lead to the development of new strategies to counteract their actions, thereby increasing the effectiveness of drug-based therapies. This review focuses on recent advances in the analysis of ABC-type MDR transporters in bacteria. PMID:17804667

  6. The Riboswitch Regulates a Thiamine Pyrophosphate ABC Transporter of the Oral Spirochete Treponema denticola ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Shen, Hongwu; Tu, Youbin; Yu, Aiming; Li, Chunhao

    2011-01-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), a biologically active form of thiamine (vitamin B1), is an essential cofactor in all living systems. Microorganisms either synthesize TPP via de novo biosynthesis pathways or uptake exogenous thiamine from the environment via specific transporters. The oral spirochete Treponema denticola is an important pathogen that is associated with human periodontal diseases. It lacks a de novo TPP biosynthesis pathway and needs exogenous TPP for growth, suggesting that it may obtain exogenous TPP via a thiamine transporter. In this study, we identified a gene cluster that encodes a TPP ABC transporter which consists of a TPP-binding protein (TDE0143), a transmembrane permease (TDE0144), and a cytosolic ATPase (TDE0145). Transcriptional and translational analyses showed that the genes encoding these three proteins are cotranscribed and form an operon (tbpABCTd) that is initiated by a σ70-like promoter. The expression level of this operon is negatively regulated by exogenous TPP and is mediated by a TPP-sensing riboswitch (Tdthi-box). Genetic and biochemical studies revealed that the TDE0143 deletion mutant (T. denticola ΔtbpA) had a decreased ability to transport exogenous TPP, and the mutant failed to grow when exogenous TPP was insufficient. These results taken together indicate that the tbpABCTd operon encodes an ABC transporter that is required for the uptake of exogenous TPP and that the expression of this operon is regulated by a TPP-binding riboswitch via a feedback inhibition mechanism. PMID:21622748

  7. Active transporters as enzymes: an energetic framework applied to major facilitator superfamily and ABC importer systems.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Brian H

    2015-04-15

    Active membrane transporters are dynamic molecular machines that catalyse transport across a membrane by coupling solute movement to a source of energy such as ATP or a secondary ion gradient. A central question for many active transporters concerns the mechanism by which transport is coupled to a source of energy. The transport process and associated energetic coupling involve conformational changes in the transporter. For efficient transport, the conformational changes must be tightly regulated and they must link energy use to movement of the substrate across the membrane. The present review discusses active transport using the well-established energetic framework for enzyme-mediated catalysis. In particular, membrane transport systems can be viewed as ensembles consisting of low-energy and high-energy conformations. The transport process involves binding interactions that selectively stabilize the higher energy conformations, and in this way promote conformational changes in the system that are coupled to decreases in free energy and substrate translocation. The major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters is used to illustrate these ideas, which are then be expanded to primary active transport mediated by ABC (ATP-binding cassette) import systems, with a focus on the well-studied maltose transporter. PMID:25837849

  8. ABCB1 regulation through LRPPRC is influenced by the methylation status of the GC -100 box in its promoter.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Stephany; Binato, Renata; Du Rocher, Bárbara; Ferreira, Gerson; Cappelletti, Paola; Soares-Lima, Sheila; Pinto, Luis Felipe; Mencalha, André; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2014-08-01

    One of the potential mechanisms of imatinib mesylate (IM) resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is increased level of P-glycoprotein (Pgp). Pgp is an efflux pump capable of activating the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The gene encoding Pgp (ABCB1) has several binding sites in its promoter region, along with CpG islands and GC boxes, involved in its epigenetic control. In previous work, we performed a proteomic study to identify proteins involved in IM cross-resistance in acute leukemia. Among these proteins, we identified LRPPRC as a potential regulator of ABCB1 transcription via an invMED1 binding site in ABCB1. Interestingly, this invMED1 binding site overlaps with the GC -100 box. In this work, we investigated the potential role of LRPPRC in the regulation of ABCB1 transcriptional activity in CML resistance. In addition, we evaluated the potential connection between this regulation and the methylation status of the ABCB1 promoter in its GC -100 box. Our results show that LRPPRC binds prominently to the ABCB1 promoter in Lucena cells, an IM-resistant cell line. Luciferase assays showed that ABCB1 transcription is positively regulated by LRPPRC upon its knockdown. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that the ABCB1 promoter is differentially methylated at its GC -100 box in K562 cells compared with Lucena cells, and in CML patients with different response to IM. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and Pgp expression after DNA demethylation treatment showed that LRPPRC binding is affected by the methylation status of ABCB1 GC -100 box. Taken together, our findings indicate that LRPPRC is a transcription factor related to ABCB1 expression and highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in CML resistance. PMID:25089713

  9. ABCB1 regulation through LRPPRC is influenced by the methylation status of the GC -100 box in its promoter

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Stephany; Binato, Renata; Du Rocher, Bárbara; Ferreira, Gerson; Cappelletti, Paola; Soares-Lima, Sheila; Pinto, Luis Felipe; Mencalha, André; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    One of the potential mechanisms of imatinib mesylate (IM) resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is increased level of P-glycoprotein (Pgp). Pgp is an efflux pump capable of activating the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The gene encoding Pgp (ABCB1) has several binding sites in its promoter region, along with CpG islands and GC boxes, involved in its epigenetic control. In previous work, we performed a proteomic study to identify proteins involved in IM cross-resistance in acute leukemia. Among these proteins, we identified LRPPRC as a potential regulator of ABCB1 transcription via an invMED1 binding site in ABCB1. Interestingly, this invMED1 binding site overlaps with the GC -100 box. In this work, we investigated the potential role of LRPPRC in the regulation of ABCB1 transcriptional activity in CML resistance. In addition, we evaluated the potential connection between this regulation and the methylation status of the ABCB1 promoter in its GC -100 box. Our results show that LRPPRC binds prominently to the ABCB1 promoter in Lucena cells, an IM-resistant cell line. Luciferase assays showed that ABCB1 transcription is positively regulated by LRPPRC upon its knockdown. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that the ABCB1 promoter is differentially methylated at its GC -100 box in K562 cells compared with Lucena cells, and in CML patients with different response to IM. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and Pgp expression after DNA demethylation treatment showed that LRPPRC binding is affected by the methylation status of ABCB1 GC -100 box. Taken together, our findings indicate that LRPPRC is a transcription factor related to ABCB1 expression and highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in CML resistance. PMID:25089713

  10. Mutations in the white gene of Drosophila melanogaster affecting ABC transporters that determine eye colouration.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, S M; Brooker, M R; Gill, T R; Cox, G B; Howells, A J; Ewart, G D

    1999-07-15

    The white, brown and scarlet genes of Drosophila melanogaster encode proteins which transport guanine or tryptophan (precursors of the red and brown eye colour pigments) and belong to the ABC transporter superfamily. Current models envisage that the white and brown gene products interact to form a guanine specific transporter, while white and scarlet gene products interact to form a tryptophan transporter. In this study, we report the nucleotide sequence of the coding regions of five white alleles isolated from flies with partially pigmented eyes. In all cases, single amino acid changes were identified, highlighting residues with roles in structure and/or function of the transporters. Mutations in w(cf) (G589E) and w(sat) (F590G) occur at the extracellular end of predicted transmembrane helix 5 and correlate with a major decrease in red pigments in the eyes, while brown pigments are near wild-type levels. Therefore, those residues have a more significant role in the guanine transporter than the tryptophan transporter. Mutations identified in w(crr) (H298N) and w(101) (G243S) affect amino acids which are highly conserved among the ABC transporter superfamily within the nucleotide binding domain. Both cause substantial and similar decreases of red and brown pigments indicating that both tryptophan and guanine transport are impaired. The mutation identified in w(Et87) alters an amino acid within an intracellular loop between transmembrane helices 2 and 3 of the predicted structure. Red and brown pigments are reduced to very low levels by this mutation indicating this loop region is important for the function of both guanine and tryptophan transporters. PMID:10407069

  11. ABC transporters coordinately expressed during lignification of Arabidopsis stems include a set of ABCBs associated with auxin transport

    PubMed Central

    Kaneda, M.; Schuetz, M.; Lin, B.S.P.; Chanis, C.; Hamberger, B.; Western, T.L.; Ehlting, J.; Samuels, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    The primary inflorescence stem of Arabidopsis thaliana is rich in lignified cell walls, in both vascular bundles and interfascicular fibres. Previous gene expression studies demonstrated a correlation between expression of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and a subset of genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, especially in the ABCB/multi-drug resistance/P-glycoprotein (ABCB/MDR/PGP) and ABCG/pleiotropic drug resistance (ABCG/PDR) subfamilies. The objective of this study was to characterize these ABC transporters in terms of their gene expression and their function in development of lignified cells. Based on in silico analyses, four ABC transporters were selected for detailed investigation: ABCB11/MDR8, ABCB14/MDR12, ABCB15/MDR13, and ABCG33/PDR5. Promoter::glucuronidase reporter assays for each gene indicated that promoters of ABCB11, ABCB14, ABCB15, and ABCG33 transporters are active in the vascular tissues of primary stem, and in some cases in interfascicular tissues as well. Homozygous T-DNA insertion mutant lines showed no apparent irregular xylem phenotype or alterations in interfascicular fibre lignification or morphology in comparison with wild type. However, in abcb14-1 mutants, stem vascular morphology was slightly disorganized, with decreased phloem area in the vascular bundle and decreased xylem vessel lumen diameter. In addition, abcb14-1 mutants showed both decreased polar auxin transport through whole stems and altered auxin distribution in the procambium. It is proposed that both ABCB14 and ABCB15 promote auxin transport since inflorescence stems in both mutants showed a reduction in polar auxin transport, which was not observed for any of the ABCG subfamily mutants tested. In the case of ABCB14, the reduction in auxin transport is correlated with a mild disruption of vascular development in the inflorescence stem. PMID:21239383

  12. ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters of the Human Respiratory Tract Pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis: Role in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F; Brauer, Aimee L.; Johnson, Antoinette; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media (middle ear infections) in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In view of the huge global burden of disease caused by M. catarrhalis, the development of vaccines to prevent these infections and better approaches to treatment have become priorities. In previous work, we used a genome mining approach that identified three substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as promising candidate vaccine antigens. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive assessment of 19 SBPs of 15 ABC transporter systems in the M. catarrhalis genome by engineering knockout mutants and studying their role in assays that assess mechanisms of infection. The capacity of M. catarrhalis to survive and grow in the nutrient-limited and hostile environment of the human respiratory tract, including intracellular growth, account in part for its virulence. The results show that ABC transporters that mediate uptake of peptides, amino acids, cations and anions play important roles in pathogenesis by enabling M. catarrhalis to 1) grow in nutrient-limited conditions, 2) invade and survive in human respiratory epithelial cells and 3) persist in the lungs in a murine pulmonary clearance model. The knockout mutants of SBPs and ABC transporters showed different patterns of activity in the assay systems, supporting the conclusion that different SBPs and ABC transporters function at different stages in the pathogenesis of infection. These results indicate that ABC transporters are nutritional virulence factors, functioning to enable the survival of M catarrhalis in the diverse microenvironments of the respiratory tract. Based on the role of ABC transporters as virulence factors of M. catarrhalis, these molecules represent potential drug targets to eradicate the organism from the human respiratory tract. PMID:27391026

  13. ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters of the Human Respiratory Tract Pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis: Role in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F; Brauer, Aimee L; Johnson, Antoinette; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media (middle ear infections) in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In view of the huge global burden of disease caused by M. catarrhalis, the development of vaccines to prevent these infections and better approaches to treatment have become priorities. In previous work, we used a genome mining approach that identified three substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as promising candidate vaccine antigens. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive assessment of 19 SBPs of 15 ABC transporter systems in the M. catarrhalis genome by engineering knockout mutants and studying their role in assays that assess mechanisms of infection. The capacity of M. catarrhalis to survive and grow in the nutrient-limited and hostile environment of the human respiratory tract, including intracellular growth, account in part for its virulence. The results show that ABC transporters that mediate uptake of peptides, amino acids, cations and anions play important roles in pathogenesis by enabling M. catarrhalis to 1) grow in nutrient-limited conditions, 2) invade and survive in human respiratory epithelial cells and 3) persist in the lungs in a murine pulmonary clearance model. The knockout mutants of SBPs and ABC transporters showed different patterns of activity in the assay systems, supporting the conclusion that different SBPs and ABC transporters function at different stages in the pathogenesis of infection. These results indicate that ABC transporters are nutritional virulence factors, functioning to enable the survival of M catarrhalis in the diverse microenvironments of the respiratory tract. Based on the role of ABC transporters as virulence factors of M. catarrhalis, these molecules represent potential drug targets to eradicate the organism from the human respiratory tract. PMID:27391026

  14. An ABC Transporter Mutation Is Correlated with Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Gahan, Linda J.; Pauchet, Yannick; Vogel, Heiko; Heckel, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt–expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field. PMID:21187898

  15. An ABC transporter mutation is correlated with insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    PubMed

    Gahan, Linda J; Pauchet, Yannick; Vogel, Heiko; Heckel, David G

    2010-12-01

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt-expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field. PMID:21187898

  16. Effect of ABCB1 polymorphisms and atorvastatin on sitagliptin pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Aquilante, Christina L.; Wempe, Michael F.; Sidhom, Maha S.; Kosmiski, Lisa A.; Predhomme, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine if ABCB1 polymorphisms are associated with interindividual variability in sitagliptin pharmacokinetics, and if atorvastatin alters the pharmacokinetic disposition of sitagliptin in healthy volunteers. Methods In this open-label, randomized, two-phase crossover study, healthy volunteers were prospectively stratified according to ABCB1 1236/2677/3435 diplotype (n=9, CGC/CGC; n=10, CGC/TTT; and n=10, TTT/TTT). In one phase, participants received a single 100 mg dose of sitagliptin. In the other phase, participants received 40 mg of atorvastatin for five days, with a single 100 mg dose of sitagliptin administered on day 5. A 24 hour pharmacokinetic study followed each sitagliptin dose, and the study phases were separated by a 14-day washout period. Results Sitagliptin pharmacokinetic parameters did not differ significantly between ABCB1 CGC/CGC, CGC/TTT, and TTT/TTT diplotype groups during the monotherapy phase. Atorvastatin administration did not significantly affect sitagliptin pharmacokinetics, with GMRs (90% CIs) for sitagliptin Cmax, AUC0-∞, CLR, and fe of 0.93 (0.86, 1.01), 0.96 (0.91, 1.01), 1.02 (0.93, 1.12), and 0.98 (0.90, 1.06), respectively. Conclusions ABCB1 CGC/CGC, CGC/TTT, and TTT/TTT diplotypes did not influence sitagliptin pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers. Furthermore, atorvastatin had no effect on the pharmacokinetics of sitagliptin in the setting of ABCB1 CGC/CGC, CGC/TTT, and TTT/TTT diplotypes. PMID:23407853

  17. Pharmacogenomics of the human ABC transporter ABCG2: from functional evaluation to drug molecular design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Tamura, Ai; Saito, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    In the post-genome-sequencing era, emerging genomic technologies are shifting the paradigm for drug discovery and development. Nevertheless, drug discovery and development still remain high-risk and high-stakes ventures with long and costly timelines. Indeed, the attrition of drug candidates in preclinical and development stages is a major problem in drug design. For at least 30% of the candidates, this attrition is due to poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Thus, pharmaceutical companies have begun to seriously re-evaluate their current strategies of drug discovery and development. In that light, we propose that a transport mechanism-based design might help to create new, pharmacokinetically advantageous drugs, and as such should be considered an important component of drug design strategy. Performing enzyme- and/or cell-based drug transporter, interaction tests may greatly facilitate drug development and allow the prediction of drug-drug interactions. We recently developed methods for high-speed functional screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to study the substrate specificity of ABC transporters and to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms on their function. These methods would provide a practical tool to screen synthetic and natural compounds, and these data can be applied to the molecular design of new drugs. In this review article, we present an overview on the genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and new camptothecin analogues that can circumvent AGCG2-associated multidrug resistance of cancer.

  18. Evidence that Bacterial ABC-Type Transporter Imports Free EDTA for Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hua; Herman, Jacob P.; Bolton, Harvey; Zhang, Zhicheng; Clark, Sue B.; Xun, Luying

    2007-11-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), a common chelating agent, is becoming a major organic pollutant in the form of metal-EDTA complexes in surface waters, partly due to its recalcitrance to biodegradation. Even an EDTA-degrading bacterium BNC1 does not degrade stable metal-EDTA complexes. An ABC-type transporter was identified for possible uptake of EDTA because the transporter genes and EDTA monooxygenase gene were expressed in a single operon in BNC1. The ABC-type transporter had a periplasmic binding protein (EppA) that should confer the substrate specificity for the transporter; therefore, EppA was produced in Escherichia coli,purified, and characterized. EppA was shown to bind free EDTA with a dissociation constant as low as 25 nM by using isothermal titration calorimetry. When unstable metal-EDTA complexes, e.g. MgEDTA2-, were added to the EppA solution, binding was also observed. However, experimental data and theoretical analysis only supported EppA binding of free EDTA. When stable metal-EDTA complexes, e.g. CuEDTA2-, are titrated into the EppA solution, no binding was observed. Since EDTA monooxygenase in the cytoplasm uses some of the stable metal-EDTA complexes as substrates, we suggest that the lack of EppA binding and EDTA uptake are responsible for the failure of BNC1 cells to degrade the stable complexes.

  19. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Lea M.; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis. In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis. Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  20. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Hürlimann, Lea M; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V; Tieleman, D Peter; Seeger, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  1. Gangliosides do not affect ABC transporter function in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dijkhuis, Anne-Jan; Klappe, Karin; Kamps, Willem; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    2006-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated a role for glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) in multidrug resistance (MDR), either related to turnover of ceramide (Cer) or generation of gangliosides, which modulate apoptosis and/or the activity of ABC transporters. This study challenges the hypothesis that gangliosides modulate the activity of ABC transporters and was performed in two human neuroblastoma cell lines, expressing either functional P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1). Two inhibitors of GCS, D,L-threo-1-phenyl-2-hexadecanoylamino-3-pyrrolidino-1-propanol (t-PPPP) and N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-dNJ), very efficiently depleted ganglioside content in two human neuroblastoma cell lines. This was established by three different assays: equilibrium radiolabeling, cholera toxin binding, and mass analysis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis showed that ganglioside depletion only slightly and in the opposite direction affected Pgp- and MRP1-mediated efflux activity. Moreover, both effects were marginal compared with those of well-established inhibitors of either MRP1 (i.e., MK571) or Pgp (i.e., GF120918). t-PPPP slightly enhanced cellular sensitivity to vincristine, as determined by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide analysis, in both neuroblastoma cell lines, whereas NB-dNJ was without effect. MRP1 expression and its localization in detergent-resistant membranes were not affected by ganglioside depletion. Together, these results show that gangliosides are not relevant to ABC transporter-mediated MDR in neuroblastoma cells. PMID:16547352

  2. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on the expression of peroxisomal ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Sabrina; Skrzypski, Jérémy; Courvoisier, Anne; Gondcaille, Catherine; Bonnetain, Franck; André, Agnès; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Bellenger, Sandrine; Bellenger, Jérôme; Narce, Michel; Savary, Stéphane

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomal ABC transporters encoded by the ABCD genes are thought to participate in the import of specific fatty acids in the peroxisomal matrix. ABCD1 deficiency is associated with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), the most frequent peroxisomal disorder which is characterized by the accumulation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). ABCD2 (the closest homolog of ABCD1) and ABCD3 have been shown to have partial functional redundancy with ABCD1; only when overexpressed, they can compensate for VLCFA accumulation. Other lipids, for instance polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), should be possible candidate substrates for the ABCD2 and ABCD3 gene products, ALDRP and PMP70 respectively. Moreover, PUFA, which are known regulators of gene expression, could therefore represent potent inducers of the ABCD genes. To test this hypothesis, littermates of n-3-deficient rats were subjected to an n-3-deficient diet or equilibrated diets containing ALA (alpha-linolenic acid, 18:3n-3) as unique source of n-3 fatty acids or ALA plus DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6n-3) at two different doses. We analyzed the expression of peroxisomal ABC transporters and of the peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase gene 1 (Acox1) in adrenals, brain and liver. Whatever the diet, we did not observe any difference in gene expression in adrenals and brain. However, the hepatic expression level of Abcd2 and Abcd3 genes was found to be significantly higher in the n-3-deficient rats than in the rats fed the ALA diet or the DHA supplemented diets. This was accompanied by important changes in hepatic fatty acid composition. In summary, the hepatic expression of Abcd2 and Abcd3 but not of Abcd1 and Abcd4 appears to be highly sensitive towards dietary PUFA. This difference could be linked to the substrate specificity of the peroxisomal ABC transporters and a specific involvement of Abcd2 and Abcd3 in PUFA metabolism. PMID:18585430

  3. Gene expression of ABC transporters in Cooperia oncophora after field and laboratory selection with macrocyclic lactones.

    PubMed

    Tydén, Eva; Skarin, Moa; Höglund, Johan

    2014-12-01

    The most widespread helminth parasites of grazing cattle in northern Europe are the gastrointestinal nematodes Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora. Heavy reliance on the use of macrocyclic lactone (ML) in cattle has led to world-wide emergence of resistance to this drug class in C. oncophora. There is evidence that members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, such as P-glycoproteins (P-gp) and multidrug-resistant proteins (MRP), play a role in resistance to ML. In this study gene expression of Con-pgp9, Con-pgp11, Con-pgp12, Con-pgp16 and Con-mrp1 was examined in two isolates of C. oncophora sharing the same genetic background but exposed to ML differently. For isolate one (Laboratory-selected), adult worms were recovered before and after treatment with ML in vivo. For isolate two (Field-selected), adult worms were collected from tracer animals that had never received anthelmintics themselves. One group grazed together with untreated animals and one group grazed with animals that received suppressive prophylactic treatment with ML at monthly intervals for up to two consecutive grazing seasons. Real-time PCR data demonstrated differences in gene expression after ML selection, with the highest constitutive expression levels for Con-pgp16 and Con-mrp1. Remarkably, the same pattern of increasing expression levels of the ABC transport genes was observed in both Laboratory- and Field-selected isolates, despite the Field-selected isolate not being directly exposed to ML. The higher expression levels of ABC transporters observed in the Field-selected isolate was thus not a response to direct exposure to ML, but rather appeared to reflect a genetic characteristic inherited from worms in the previous generation which had survived exposure to ML in the co-grazing treated animals. PMID:25619799

  4. A Silent ABC Transporter Isolated from Streptomyces rochei F20 Induces Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.; Carbó, Lázaro; Cuesta, Trinidad; Vallín, Carlos; Malpartida, Francisco

    1998-01-01

    In the search for heterologous activators for actinorhodin production in Streptomyces lividans, 3.4 kb of DNA from Streptomyces rochei F20 (a streptothricin producer) were characterized. Subcloning experiments showed that the minimal DNA fragment required for activation was 0.4 kb in size. The activation is mediated by increasing the levels of transcription of the actII-ORF4 gene. Sequencing of the minimal activating fragment did not reveal any clues about its mechanism; nevertheless, it was shown to overlap the 3′ end of two convergent genes, one of whose translated products (ORF2) strongly resembles that of other genes belonging to the ABC transporter superfamily. Computer-assisted analysis of the 3.4-kb DNA sequence showed the 3′ terminus of an open reading frame (ORF), i.e., ORFA, and three complete ORFs (ORF1, ORF2, and ORFB). Searches in the databases with their respective gene products revealed similarities for ORF1 and ORF2 with ATP-binding proteins and transmembrane proteins, respectively, which are found in members of the ABC transporter superfamily. No similarities for ORFA and ORFB were found in the databases. Insertional inactivation of ORF1 and ORF2, their transcription analysis, and their cloning in heterologous hosts suggested that these genes were not expressed under our experimental conditions; however, cloning of ORF1 and ORF2 together (but not separately) under the control of an expressing promoter induced resistance to several chemically different drugs: oleandomycin, erythromycin, spiramycin, doxorubicin, and tetracycline. Thus, this genetic system, named msr, is a new bacterial multidrug ABC transporter. PMID:9696745

  5. Pharmacogenetic evaluation of ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms in teratogenicity of anti-epileptic drugs in women with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Manna; Banerjee, Moinak; Mathew, Anila; Bharadwaj, Tashi; Vijayan, Neetha; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Pregnancy in women with epilepsy (WWE) who are on anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) has two- to three-fold increased risk of fetal malformations. AEDs are mostly metabolized by Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and Cyp3A4 and transported by ABCB1. Patients on AED therapy can have folate deficiency. We hypothesize that the polymorphisms in ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) might result in differential expression resulting in differential drug transport, drug metabolism and folate metabolism, which in turn may contribute to the teratogenic impact of AEDs. Materials and Methods: The ABCB1, Cyp2C9, Cyp2C19 and MTHFR polymorphisms were genotyped for their role in teratogenic potential and the nature of teratogenecity in response to AED treatment in WWE. The allelic, genotypic associations were tested in 266 WWE comprising of 143 WWE who had given birth to babies with WWE-malformation (WWE-M) and 123 WWE who had normal offsprings (WWE-N). Results: In WWE-M, CC genotype of Ex07 + 139C/T was overrepresented (P = 0.0032) whereas the poor metabolizer allele *2 and *2 *2 genotype of CYP2C219 was significantly higher in comparison to WWE-N group (P = 0.007 and P = 0.005, respectively). All these observations were independent of the nature of malformation (cardiac vs. non cardiac malformations). Conclusion: Our study indicates the possibility that ABCB1 and Cyp2C19 may play a pivotal role in the AED induced teratogenesis, which is independent of nature of malformation. This is one of the first reports indicating the pharmacogenetic role of Cyp2C19 and ABCB1 in teratogenesis of AED in pregnant WWE. PMID:25221392

  6. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, whichmore » coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.« less

  7. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  8. Lysimachia foenum-graecum Herba Extract, a Novel Biopesticide, Inhibits ABC Transporter Genes and Mycelial Growth of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjin

    2016-02-01

    To identify a novel biopesticide controlling rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, 700 plant extracts were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on mycelial growth of M. oryzae. The L. foenum-graecum Herba extract showed the lowest inhibition concentration (IC50) of 39.28 μg/ml, which is lower than the IC50 of blasticidin S (63.06 μg/ml), a conventional fungicide for rice blast disease. When treatments were combined, the IC50 of blasticidin S was dramatically reduced to 10.67 μg/ml. Since ABC transporter genes are involved in fungicide resistance of many organisms, we performed RT-PCR to investigate the transcriptional changes of 40 ABC transporter family genes of M. oryzae treated with the plant extract, blasticidin S, and tetrandrine, a recognized ABC transporter inhibitor. Four ABC transporter genes were prominently activated by blasticidin S treatment, but were suppressed by combinational treatment of blasticidin S with the plant extract, or with tetrandrine that didn't show cellular toxicity by itself in this study. Mycelial death was detected via confocal microscopy at 24 h after plant extract treatment. Finally, subsequent rice field study revealed that the plant extract had high control efficacy of 63.3% and should be considered a biopesticide for rice blast disease. These results showed that extract of L. foenum graecum Herba suppresses M. oryzae ABC transporter genes inducing mycelial death and therefore may be a potent novel biopesticide. PMID:26889110

  9. Lysimachia foenum-graecum Herba Extract, a Novel Biopesticide, Inhibits ABC Transporter Genes and Mycelial Growth of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youngjin

    2016-01-01

    To identify a novel biopesticide controlling rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, 700 plant extracts were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on mycelial growth of M. oryzae. The L. foenum-graecum Herba extract showed the lowest inhibition concentration (IC50) of 39.28 μg/ml, which is lower than the IC50 of blasticidin S (63.06 μg/ml), a conventional fungicide for rice blast disease. When treatments were combined, the IC50 of blasticidin S was dramatically reduced to 10.67 μg/ml. Since ABC transporter genes are involved in fungicide resistance of many organisms, we performed RT-PCR to investigate the transcriptional changes of 40 ABC transporter family genes of M. oryzae treated with the plant extract, blasticidin S, and tetrandrine, a recognized ABC transporter inhibitor. Four ABC transporter genes were prominently activated by blasticidin S treatment, but were suppressed by combinational treatment of blasticidin S with the plant extract, or with tetrandrine that didn’t show cellular toxicity by itself in this study. Mycelial death was detected via confocal microscopy at 24 h after plant extract treatment. Finally, subsequent rice field study revealed that the plant extract had high control efficacy of 63.3% and should be considered a biopesticide for rice blast disease. These results showed that extract of L. foenum graecum Herba suppresses M. oryzae ABC transporter genes inducing mycelial death and therefore may be a potent novel biopesticide. PMID:26889110

  10. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path–Force Matching QM/MM Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Ojeda-May, P.; Nagaraju, M.; Pu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path–force matching (RP–FM) has been developed. In RP–FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP–FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  11. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path-Force Matching QM/MM Method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Ojeda-May, P; Nagaraju, M; Pu, J

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path-force matching (RP-FM) has been developed. In RP-FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP-FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  12. Sulfadiazine resistance in Toxoplasma gondii: no involvement of overexpression or polymorphisms in genes of therapeutic targets and ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Doliwa, Christelle; Escotte-Binet, Sandie; Aubert, Dominique; Sauvage, Virginie; Velard, Frédéric; Schmid, Aline; Villena, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Several treatment failures have been reported for the treatment of toxoplasmic encephalitis, chorioretinitis, and congenital toxoplasmosis. Recently we found three Toxoplasma gondii strains naturally resistant to sulfadiazine and we developed in vitro two sulfadiazine resistant strains, RH-RSDZ and ME-49-RSDZ, by gradual pressure. In Plasmodium, common mechanisms of drug resistance involve, among others, mutations and/or amplification within genes encoding the therapeutic targets dhps and dhfr and/or the ABC transporter genes family. To identify genotypic and/or phenotypic markers of resistance in T. gondii, we sequenced and analyzed the expression levels of therapeutic targets dhps and dhfr, three ABC genes, two Pgp, TgABC.B1 and TgABC.B2, and one MRP, TgABC.C1, on sensitive strains compared to sulfadiazine resistant strains. Neither polymorphism nor overexpression was identified. Contrary to Plasmodium, in which mutations and/or overexpression within gene targets and ABC transporters are involved in antimalarial resistance, T. gondii sulfadiazine resistance is not related to these toxoplasmic genes studied. PMID:23707894

  13. An asymmetric post-hydrolysis state of the ABC transporter ATPase dimer.

    PubMed

    George, Anthony M; Jones, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    ABC transporters are a superfamily of enzyme pumps that hydrolyse ATP in exchange for translocation of substrates across cellular membranes. Architecturally, ABC transporters are a dimer of transmembrane domains coupled to a dimer of nucleotide binding domains (NBDs): the NBD dimer contains two ATP-binding sites at the intersubunit interface. A current controversy is whether the protomers of the NBD dimer separate during ATP hydrolysis cycling, or remain in constant contact. In order to investigate the ABC ATPase catalytic mechanism, MD simulations using the recent structure of the ADP+Pi-bound MJ0796 isolated NBD dimer were performed. In three independent simulations of the ADP+Pi/apo state, comprising a total of >0.5 µs, significant opening of the apo (empty) active site was observed; occurring by way of intrasubunit rotations between the core and helical subdomains within both NBD monomers. In contrast, in three equivalent simulations of the ATP/apo state, the NBD dimer remained close to the crystal structure, and no opening of either active site occurred. The results thus showed allosteric coupling between the active sites, mediated by intrasubunit conformational changes. Opening of the apo site is exquisitely tuned to the nature of the ligand, and thus to the stage of the reaction cycle, in the opposite site. In addition to this, in also showing how one active site can open, sufficient to bind nucleotide, while the opposite site remains occluded and bound to the hydrolysis products ADP+Pi, the results are consistent with a Constant Contact Model. Conversely, they show how there may be no requirement for the NBD protomers to separate to complete the catalytic cycle. PMID:23573213

  14. Interdomain regulation of the ATPase activity of the ABC transporter haemolysin B from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Sven; Poschmann, Gereon; Kanonenberg, Kerstin; Stühler, Kai; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-08-15

    Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) transport a wide range of substrates across both membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and are composed of an outer membrane protein, a membrane fusion protein and an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter. The ABC transporter HlyB (haemolysin B) is part of a T1SS catalysing the export of the toxin HlyA in E. coli HlyB consists of the canonical transmembrane and nucleotide-binding domains. Additionally, HlyB contains an N-terminal CLD (C39-peptidase-like domain) that interacts with the transport substrate, but its functional relevance is still not precisely defined. In the present paper, we describe the purification and biochemical characterization of detergent-solubilized HlyB in the presence of its transport substrate. Our results exhibit a positive co-operativity in ATP hydrolysis. We characterized further the influence of the CLD on kinetic parameters by using an HlyB variant lacking the CLD (HlyB∆CLD). The biochemical parameters of HlyB∆CLD revealed an increased basal maximum velocity but no change in substrate-binding affinity in comparison with full-length HlyB. We also assigned a distinct interaction of the CLD and a transport substrate (HlyA1), leading to an inhibition of HlyB hydrolytic activity at low HlyA1 concentrations. At higher HlyA1 concentrations, we observed a stimulation of the hydrolytic activities of both HlyB and HlyB∆CLD, which was completely independent of the interaction of HlyA1 with the CLD. Notably, all observed effects on ATPase activity, which were also analysed in detail by mass spectrometry, were independent of the HlyA1 secretion signal. These results assign an interdomain regulatory role for the CLD modulating the hydrolytic activity of HlyB. PMID:27279651

  15. Pleiotropic effects of the vacuolar ABC transporter MLT1 of Candida albicans on cell function and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Kaemmer, Philipp; Förster, Toni M.; Singh, Ashutosh; Coste, Alix T.; Andes, David R.; Hube, Bernhard; Sanglard, Dominique; Chauhan, Neeraj; Kaur, Rupinder; d'Enfert, Christophe; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Among the several mechanisms that contribute to MDR (multidrug resistance), the overexpression of drug-efflux pumps belonging to the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) superfamily is the most frequent cause of resistance to antifungal agents. The multidrug transporter proteins Cdr1p and Cdr2p of the ABCG subfamily are major players in the development of MDR in Candida albicans. Because several genes coding for ABC proteins exist in the genome of C. albicans, but only Cdr1p and Cdr2p have established roles in MDR, it is implicit that the other members of the ABC family also have alternative physiological roles. The present study focuses on an ABC transporter of C. albicans, Mlt1p, which is localized in the vacuolar membrane and specifically transports PC (phosphatidylcholine) into the vacuolar lumen. Transcriptional profiling of the mlt1∆/∆ mutant revealed a down-regulation of the genes involved in endocytosis, oxidoreductase activity, virulence and hyphal development. High-throughput MS-based lipidome analysis revealed that the Mlt1p levels affect lipid homoeostasis and thus lead to a plethora of physiological perturbations. These include a delay in endocytosis, inefficient sequestering of reactive oxygen species (ROS), defects in hyphal development and attenuated virulence. The present study is an emerging example where new and unconventional roles of an ABC transporter are being identified. PMID:27026051

  16. Pleiotropic effects of the vacuolar ABC transporter MLT1 of Candida albicans on cell function and virulence.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Kaemmer, Philipp; Förster, Toni M; Singh, Ashutosh; Coste, Alix T; Andes, David R; Hube, Bernhard; Sanglard, Dominique; Chauhan, Neeraj; Kaur, Rupinder; d'Enfert, Christophe; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-06-01

    Among the several mechanisms that contribute to MDR (multidrug resistance), the overexpression of drug-efflux pumps belonging to the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) superfamily is the most frequent cause of resistance to antifungal agents. The multidrug transporter proteins Cdr1p and Cdr2p of the ABCG subfamily are major players in the development of MDR in Candida albicans Because several genes coding for ABC proteins exist in the genome of C. albicans, but only Cdr1p and Cdr2p have established roles in MDR, it is implicit that the other members of the ABC family also have alternative physiological roles. The present study focuses on an ABC transporter of C. albicans, Mlt1p, which is localized in the vacuolar membrane and specifically transports PC (phosphatidylcholine) into the vacuolar lumen. Transcriptional profiling of the mlt1∆/∆ mutant revealed a down-regulation of the genes involved in endocytosis, oxidoreductase activity, virulence and hyphal development. High-throughput MS-based lipidome analysis revealed that the Mlt1p levels affect lipid homoeostasis and thus lead to a plethora of physiological perturbations. These include a delay in endocytosis, inefficient sequestering of reactive oxygen species (ROS), defects in hyphal development and attenuated virulence. The present study is an emerging example where new and unconventional roles of an ABC transporter are being identified. PMID:27026051

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of the bacterial ABC transporter SAV1866 in the closed form.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Bunker, Alex; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-03-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family of proteins contains members involved in ATP-mediated import or export of ligands at the cell membrane. For the case of exporters, the translocation mechanism involves a large-scale conformational change that involves a clothespin-like motion from an inward-facing open state, able to bind ligands and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to an outward-facing closed state. Our work focuses on SAV1866, a bacterial member of the ABC transporter family for which the structure is known for the closed state. To evaluate the ability of this protein to undergo conformational changes at physiological temperature, we first performed conventional molecular dynamics (MD) on the cocrystallized adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound structure and on a nucleotide-free structure. With this assessment of SAV1866's stability, conformational changes were induced by steered molecular dynamics (SMD), in which the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) were pushed apart, simulating the ATP hydrolysis energy expenditure. We found that the transmembrane domain is not easily perturbed by large-scale motions of the NBDs. PMID:22339391

  18. ABC transporters affect the elimination and toxicity of CdTe quantum dots in liver and kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingli; Yin, Huancai; Bai, Pengli; Miao, Peng; Deng, Xudong; Xu, Yingxue; Hu, Jun; Yin, Jian

    2016-07-15

    This paper aimed to investigate the role of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters on the efflux and the toxicity of nanoparticles in liver and kidney cells. In this study, we synthesized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) that were monodispersed and emitted green fluorescence (maximum peak at 530nm). Such QDs tended to accumulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2), human kidney cells 2 (HK-2), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and cause significant toxicity in all the three cell lines. Using specific inhibitors and inducers of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance associated proteins (Mrps), the cellular accumulation and subsequent toxicity of QDs in HepG2 and HK-2 cells were significantly affected, while only slight changes appeared in MDCK cells, corresponding well with the functional expressions of ABC transporters in cells. Moreover, treatment of QDs caused concentration- and time- dependent induction of ABC transporters in HepG2 and HK-2 cells, but such phenomenon was barely found in MDCK cells. Furthermore, the effects of CdTe QDs on ABC transporters were found to be greater than those of CdCl2 at equivalent concentrations of cadmium, indicating that the effects of QDs should be a combination of free Cd(2+) and specific properties of QDs. Overall, these results indicated a strong dependence between the functional expressions of ABC transporters and the efflux of QDs, which could be an important reason for the modulation of QDs toxicity by ABC transporters. PMID:27131644

  19. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Genes in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wenzhu; Feng, Shuaisheng; Feng, Jianxin; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A.

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family is considered to be one of the largest gene families in all forms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic life. Although the ABC transporter genes have been annotated in some species, detailed information about the ABC superfamily and the evolutionary characterization of ABC genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) are still unclear. In this research, we identified 61 ABC transporter genes in the common carp genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into seven subfamilies, namely 11 ABCAs, six ABCBs, 19 ABCCs, eight ABCDs, two ABCEs, four ABCFs, and 11 ABCGs. Comparative analysis of the ABC genes in seven vertebrate species including common carp, showed that at least 10 common carp genes were retained from the third round of whole genome duplication, while 12 duplicated ABC genes may have come from the fourth round of whole genome duplication. Gene losses were also observed for 14 ABC genes. Expression profiles of the 61 ABC genes in six common carp tissues (brain, heart, spleen, kidney, intestine, and gill) revealed extensive functional divergence among the ABC genes. Different copies of some genes had tissue-specific expression patterns, which may indicate some gene function specialization. This study provides essential genomic resources for future studies in common carp. PMID:27058731

  20. Pilot PET Study to Assess the Functional Interplay Between ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the Human Blood–Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, M; Römermann, K; Karch, R; Wulkersdorfer, B; Stanek, J; Philippe, C; Maier‐Salamon, A; Haslacher, H; Jungbauer, C; Wadsak, W; Jäger, W; Löscher, W; Hacker, M; Zeitlinger, M

    2016-01-01

    ABCB1 and ABCG2 work together at the blood–brain barrier (BBB) to limit brain distribution of dual ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates. In this pilot study we used positron emission tomography (PET) to assess brain distribution of two model ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates ([11C]elacridar and [11C]tariquidar) in healthy subjects without (c.421CC) or with (c.421CA) the ABCG2 single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.421C>A. Subjects underwent PET scans under conditions when ABCB1 and ABCG2 were functional and during ABCB1 inhibition with high‐dose tariquidar. In contrast to the ABCB1‐selective substrate (R)‐[11C]verapamil, [11C]elacridar and [11C]tariquidar showed only moderate increases in brain distribution during ABCB1 inhibition. This provides evidence for a functional interplay between ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the human BBB and suggests that both ABCB1 and ABCG2 need to be inhibited to achieve substantial increases in brain distribution of dual ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates. During ABCB1 inhibition c.421CA subjects had significantly higher increases in [11C]tariquidar brain distribution than c.421CC subjects, pointing to impaired cerebral ABCG2 function. PMID:26940368

  1. Pilot PET Study to Assess the Functional Interplay Between ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the Human Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; Römermann, K; Karch, R; Wulkersdorfer, B; Stanek, J; Philippe, C; Maier-Salamon, A; Haslacher, H; Jungbauer, C; Wadsak, W; Jäger, W; Löscher, W; Hacker, M; Zeitlinger, M; Langer, O

    2016-08-01

    ABCB1 and ABCG2 work together at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to limit brain distribution of dual ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates. In this pilot study we used positron emission tomography (PET) to assess brain distribution of two model ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates ([(11) C]elacridar and [(11) C]tariquidar) in healthy subjects without (c.421CC) or with (c.421CA) the ABCG2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.421C>A. Subjects underwent PET scans under conditions when ABCB1 and ABCG2 were functional and during ABCB1 inhibition with high-dose tariquidar. In contrast to the ABCB1-selective substrate (R)-[(11) C]verapamil, [(11) C]elacridar and [(11) C]tariquidar showed only moderate increases in brain distribution during ABCB1 inhibition. This provides evidence for a functional interplay between ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the human BBB and suggests that both ABCB1 and ABCG2 need to be inhibited to achieve substantial increases in brain distribution of dual ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates. During ABCB1 inhibition c.421CA subjects had significantly higher increases in [(11) C]tariquidar brain distribution than c.421CC subjects, pointing to impaired cerebral ABCG2 function. PMID:26940368

  2. Genome-wide analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaodong; Cheng, Tingcai; Wang, Genhong; Duan, Jun; Niu, Weihuan; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily is a larger protein family with diverse physiological functions in all kingdoms of life. We identified 53 ABC transporters in the silkworm genome, and classified them into eight subfamilies (A-H). Comparative genome analysis revealed that the silkworm has an expanded ABCC subfamily with more members than Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, or Homo sapiens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the ABCE and ABCF genes were highly conserved in the silkworm, indicating possible involvement in fundamental biological processes. Five multidrug resistance-related genes in the ABCB subfamily and two multidrug resistance-associated-related genes in the ABCC subfamily indicated involvement in biochemical defense. Genetic variation analysis revealed four ABC genes that might be evolving under positive selection. Moreover, the silkworm ABCC4 gene might be important for silkworm domestication. Microarray analysis showed that the silkworm ABC genes had distinct expression patterns in different tissues on day 3 of the fifth instar. These results might provide new insights for further functional studies on the ABC genes in the silkworm genome. PMID:22311044

  3. The ABC Transporter ABCG1 Is Required for Suberin Formation in Potato Tuber Periderm[W

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Ramona; Smolka, Ulrike; Altmann, Simone; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Senning, Melanie; Sonnewald, Sophia; Weigel, Benjamin; Frolova, Nadezhda; Strehmel, Nadine; Hause, Gerd; Scheel, Dierk; Böttcher, Christoph; Rosahl, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The lipid biopolymer suberin plays a major role as a barrier both at plant-environment interfaces and in internal tissues, restricting water and nutrient transport. In potato (Solanum tuberosum), tuber integrity is dependent on suberized periderm. Using microarray analyses, we identified ABCG1, encoding an ABC transporter, as a gene responsive to the pathogen-associated molecular pattern Pep-13. Further analyses revealed that ABCG1 is expressed in roots and tuber periderm, as well as in wounded leaves. Transgenic ABCG1-RNAi potato plants with downregulated expression of ABCG1 display major alterations in both root and tuber morphology, whereas the aerial part of the ABCG1-RNAi plants appear normal. The tuber periderm and root exodermis show reduced suberin staining and disorganized cell layers. Metabolite analyses revealed reduction of esterified suberin components and hyperaccumulation of putative suberin precursors in the tuber periderm of RNA interference plants, suggesting that ABCG1 is required for the export of suberin components. PMID:25122151

  4. Association of Extrarenal Adverse Effects of Posttransplant Immunosuppression With Sex and ABCB1 Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Venuto, Rocco C.; Meaney, Calvin J.; Chang, Shirley; Leca, Nicolae; Consiglio, Joseph D.; Wilding, Gregory E.; Brazeau, Daniel; Gundroo, Aijaz; Nainani, Neha; Morse, Sarah E.; Cooper, Louise M.; Tornatore, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Extrarenal adverse effects (AEs) associated with calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) and mycophenolic acid (MPA) occur frequently but are unpredictable posttransplant complications. AEs may result from intracellular CNI accumulation and low activity of P-glycoprotein, encoded by the ABCB1 gene. Since ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and sex influence P-glycoprotein, we investigated haplotypes and extrarenal AEs. A prospective, cross-sectional study evaluated 149 patients receiving tacrolimus and enteric coated mycophenolate sodium or cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Immunosuppressive AE assessment determined individual and composite gastrointestinal, neurologic, aesthetic, and cumulative AEs. Lipids were quantitated after 12-hour fast. ABCB1 SNPs: c.1236C>T (rs1128503), c.2677G>T/A (rs2032582), and c.3435C>T (rs1045642) were determined with haplotype associations computed using the THESIAS program, and evaluated by immunosuppression, sex and race using multivariate general linear models. Tacrolimus patients exhibited more frequent and higher gastrointestinal AE scores compared with cyclosporine with association to CTT (P = 0.018) and sex (P = 0.01). Aesthetic AE score was 3 times greater for cyclosporine with TTC haplotype (P = 0.005). Females had higher gastrointestinal (P = 0.022), aesthetic (P < 0.001), neurologic (P = 0.022), and cumulative AE ratios (P < 0.001). Total cholesterol (TCHOL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and triglycerides were higher with cyclosporine. The TTC haplotype had higher TCHOL (P < 0.001) and LDL (P = 0.005). Higher triglyceride (P = 0.034) and lower high-density lipoproteins (P = 0.057) were associated with TTT with sex-adjusted analysis. ABCB1 haplotypes and sex were associated with extrarenal AEs. Using haplotypes, certain female patients manifested more AEs regardless of CNI. Haplotype testing may identify patients with greater susceptibility to AEs and facilitate CNI

  5. MDR1/ABCB1 gene polymorphisms in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lardo, Mabel; Castro, Marcelo; Moiraghi, Beatriz; Rojas, Francisca; Borda, Natalia; Rey, Jorge A

    2015-01-01

    Background Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are the recommended treatment for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The MDR1/ABCB1 gene plays a role in resistance to a wide spectrum of drugs, including TKIs. However, the association of MDR1/ABCB1 gene polymorphisms (SNPs) such as C1236T, G2677T/A, and C3435T with the clinical therapeutic evolution of CML has been poorly studied. We investigated these gene polymorphisms in CML-patients treated with imatinib, nilotinib and/or dasatinib. Methods ABCB1-SNPs were studied in 22 CML-patients in the chronic phase (CP) and 2 CML-patients in blast crisis (BC), all of whom were treated with TKIs, and compared with 25 healthy controls using nested-PCR and sequencing techniques. Results Seventeen different haplotypes were identified: 7 only in controls, 6 only in CML-patients, and the remaining 4 in both groups. The distribution ratios of homozygous TT-variants present on each exon between controls and CML-patients were 2.9 for exon 12, and 0.32 for the other 2 exons. Heterozygous T-variants were observed in all controls (100%) and 75% of CML-patients. Wt-haplotype (CC-GG-CC) was observed in 6 CML-patients (25%). In this wt-group, two were treated with nilotinib and reached a major molecular response. The remaining 4 cases had either a minimal or null molecular response, or developed bone marrow aplasia. Conclusion Our results suggest that SNPs of the MDR1/ABCB1 gene could help to characterize the prognosis and the clinical-therapeutic evolution of CML-patients treated with TKIs. Wt-haplotype could be associated with a higher risk of developing CML, and a worse clinical-therapeutic evolution. PMID:26457282

  6. A New ABC Half-Transporter in Leishmania major Is Involved in Resistance to Antimony

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, J. I.; García-Hernández, R.; Castanys, S.

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of ABCI4, a new intracellular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) half-transporter in Leishmania major, is described. We show that ABCI4 is involved in heavy metal export, thereby conferring resistance to Pentostam, to Sb(III), and to As(III) and Cd(II). Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 showed a lower mitochondrial toxic effect of antimony by decreasing reactive oxygen species production and maintained higher values of both the mitochondrial electrochemical potential and total ATP levels with respect to controls. The ABCI4 half-transporter forms homodimers as determined by a coimmunoprecipitation assay. A combination of subcellular localization studies under a confocal microscope and a surface biotinylation assay using parasites expressing green fluorescent protein- and FLAG-tagged ABCI4 suggests that the transporter presents a dual localization in both mitochondria and the plasma membrane. Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 present an increased replication in mouse peritoneal macrophages. We have determined that porphyrins are substrates for ABCI4. Consequently, the overexpression of ABCI4 confers resistance to some toxic porphyrins, such as zinc-protoporphyrin, due to the lower accumulation resulting from a significant efflux, as determined using the fluorescent zinc-mesoporphyrin, a validated heme analog. In addition, ABCI4 has a significant ability to efflux thiol after Sb(III) incubation, thus meaning that ABCI4 could be considered to be a potential thiol-X-pump that is able to recognize metal-conjugated thiols. In summary, we have shown that this new ABC transporter is involved in drug sensitivity to antimony and other compounds by efflux as conjugated thiol complexes. PMID:23716044

  7. The Central Cavity of ABCB1 Undergoes Alternating Access During ATP Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Christopher A.; Thomson, Andrew J.; Kerr, Ian D.; MacMillan, Fraser; Callaghan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the process that underlies multi-drug recognition and efflux by P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) remains a key biological challenge. Structural data has recently become available for the murine and C. elegans homologues of ABCB1; however all structures were obtained in the absence of nucleotide. A feature of these structures was the presence of a central cavity that is inaccessible from the extracellular face of the protein. To determine the conformational dynamics of this region several residues in transmembrane helices TM6 (331, 343 and 354) and TM12 (980) were mutated to cysteine. Based upon structural predictions these residues are proposed to line, or reside proximal to, the central cavity. The mutant isoforms were labelled with a paramagnetic probe enabling the application of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods. Power saturation EPR spectra were recorded in the presence of hydrophobic (O2) or hydrophilic (NiEDDA) quenching agents to study the local environment of each residue. ABCB1 was trapped in both its nucleotide bound and post-hydrolytic conformations and EPR spectra were again recorded in the presence and absence of quenching agents. The EPR line shapes provide information on the movements of these residues within TM6 and TM12 during ATP hydrolysis. Rationalisation of the data with molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the cavity is converted to a configuration open to the aqueous phase following nucleotide binding, thereby suggesting alternating access to the cavity on opposite sides of the membrane during translocation. PMID:24597976

  8. Inhibition of ABC transport proteins by oil sands process affected water.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Hattan A; Saunders, David M V; Al-Mousa, Ahmed; Alcorn, Jane; Pereira, Alberto S; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve B

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporter proteins is important for detoxification of xenobiotics. For example, ABC transporters from the multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) subfamily are important for excretion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites. Effects of chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of relatively fresh oil sands process affected water (OSPW) from Base Mine Lake (BML-OSPW) and aged OSPW from Pond 9 (P9-OSPW) on the activity of MRP transporters were investigated in vivo by use of Japanese medaka at the fry stage of development. Activities of MRPs were monitored by use of the lipophilic dye calcein, which is transported from cells by ABC proteins, including MRPs. To begin to identify chemicals that might inhibit activity of MRPs, BML-OSPW and P9-OSPW were fractionated into acidic, basic, and neutral fractions by use of mixed-mode sorbents. Chemical compositions of fractions were determined by use of ultrahigh resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry in ESI(+) and ESI(-) mode. Greater amounts of calcein were retained in fry exposed to BML-OSPW at concentration equivalents greater than 1× (i.e., full strength). The neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW, but not the acidic fraction, caused greater retention of calcein. Exposure to P9-OSPW did not affect the amount of calcein in fry. Neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW contained relatively greater amounts of several oxygen-, sulfur, and nitrogen-containing chemical species that might inhibit MRPs, such as O(+), SO(+), and NO(+) chemical species, although secondary fractionation will be required to conclusively identify the most potent inhibitors. Naphthenic acids (O2(-)), which were dominant in the acidic fraction, did not appear to be the cause of the inhibition. This is the first study to demonstrate that chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of OSPW inhibit activity of this important class of proteins. However, aging of OSPW attenuates

  9. Tumor cycling hypoxia induces chemoresistance in glioblastoma multiforme by upregulating the expression and function of ABCB1

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chii-Wen; Wang, Chi-Chung; Wu, Chung-Pu; Lin, Yu-Jung; Lee, Yu-Chun; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Hsieh, Chia-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cycling hypoxia is now a well-recognized phenomenon in animal and human solid tumors. However, how tumor cycling hypoxia impacts chemotherapy is unclear. In the present study, we explored the impact and the mechanism of cycling hypoxia on tumor microenvironment-mediated chemoresistance. Hoechst 33342 staining and hypoxia-inducible factor–1 (HIF-1) activation labeling together with immunofluorescence imaging and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used to isolate hypoxic tumor subpopulations from human glioblastoma xenografts. ABCB1 expression, P-glycoprotein function, and chemosensitivity in tumor cells derived from human glioblastoma xenografts or in vitro cycling hypoxic stress-treated glioblastoma cells were determined using Western blot analysis, drug accumulation and efflux assays, and MTT assay, respectively. ABCB1 expression and P-glycoprotein function were upregulated under cycling hypoxia in glioblastoma cells concomitant with decreased responses to doxorubicin and BCNU. However, ABCB1 knockdown inhibited these effects. Moreover, immunofluorescence imaging and flow cytometric analysis for ABCB1, HIF-1 activation, and Hoechst 3342 in glioblastoma revealed highly localized ABCB1 expression predominantly in potentially cycling hypoxic areas with HIF-1 activation and blood perfusion in the solid tumor microenvironment. The cycling hypoxic tumor cells derived from glioblastoma xenografts exhibited higher ABCB1 expression, P-glycoprotein function, and chemoresistance, compared with chronic hypoxic and normoxic cells. Tumor-bearing mice that received YC-1, an HIF-1α inhibitor, exhibited suppressed tumor microenvironment-induced ABCB1 induction and enhanced survival rate in BCNU chemotherapy. Cycling hypoxia plays a vital role in tumor microenvironment-mediated chemoresistance through the HIF-1–dependent induction of ABCB1. HIF-1 blockade before and concurrent with chemotherapy could suppress cycling hypoxia-induced chemoresistance. PMID:22946104

  10. A vector system for ABC transporter-mediated secretion and purification of recombinant proteins in Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jaewook; Lee, Ukjin; Park, Jiye; Yoo, Do-Hyun; Ahn, Jung Hoon

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is an efficient platform for recombinant protein production. P. fluorescens has an ABC transporter secreting endogenous thermostable lipase (TliA) and protease, which can be exploited to transport recombinant proteins across the cell membrane. In this study, the expression vector pDART was constructed by inserting tliDEF, genes encoding the ABC transporter, along with the construct of the lipase ABC transporter recognition domain (LARD), into pDSK519, a widely used shuttle vector. When the gene for the target protein was inserted into the vector, the C-terminally fused LARD allowed it to be secreted through the ABC transporter into the extracellular medium. After secretion of the fused target protein, the LARD containing a hydrophobic C terminus enabled its purification through hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) using a methyl-Sepharose column. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) were used to validate the expression, export, and purification of target proteins by the pDART system. Both proteins were secreted into the extracellular medium in P. fluorescens. In particular, AP was secreted in several Pseudomonas species with its enzymatic activity in extracellular media. Furthermore, purification of the target protein using HIC yielded some degree of AP and GFP purification, where AP was purified to almost a single product. The pDART system will provide greater convenience for the secretory production and purification of recombinant proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas species. PMID:25548043

  11. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium--Effects of Prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  12. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium - Effects of Prochloraz

    PubMed Central

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H.; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  13. Barley has two peroxisomal ABC transporters with multiple functions in β-oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Mendiondo, Guillermina M.; Medhurst, Anne; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Zhang, Xuebin; Devonshire, Jean; Scholefield, Duncan; Fernández, José; Axcell, Barry; Ramsay, Luke; Waterham, Hans R.; Waugh, Robbie; Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In oilseed plants, peroxisomal β-oxidation functions not only in lipid catabolism but also in jasmonate biosynthesis and metabolism of pro-auxins. Subfamily D ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate import of β-oxidation substrates into the peroxisome, and the Arabidopsis ABCD protein, COMATOSE (CTS), is essential for this function. Here, the roles of peroxisomal ABCD transporters were investigated in barley, where the main storage compound is starch. Barley has two CTS homologues, designated HvABCD1 and HvABCD2, which are widely expressed and present in embryo and aleurone tissues during germination. Suppression of both genes in barley RNA interference (RNAi) lines indicated roles in metabolism of 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyrate (2,4-DB) and indole butyric acid (IBA), jasmonate biosynthesis, and determination of grain size. Transformation of the Arabidopsis cts-1 null mutant with HvABCD1 and HvABCD2 confirmed these findings. HvABCD2 partially or completely complemented all tested phenotypes of cts-1. In contrast, HvABCD1 failed to complement the germination and establishment phenotypes of cts-1 but increased the sensitivity of hypocotyls to 100 μM IBA and partially complemented the seed size phenotype. HvABCD1 also partially complemented the yeast pxa1/pxa2Δ mutant for fatty acid β-oxidation. It is concluded that the core biochemical functions of peroxisomal ABC transporters are largely conserved between oilseeds and cereals but that their physiological roles and importance may differ. PMID:24913629

  14. PDR-type ABC transporter mediates cellular uptake of the phytohormone abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joohyun; Hwang, Jae-Ung; Kim, Yu-Young; Assmann, Sarah M.; Martinoia, Enrico; Lee, Youngsook

    2010-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a ubiquitous phytohormone involved in many developmental processes and stress responses of plants. ABA moves within the plant, and intracellular receptors for ABA have been recently identified; however, no ABA transporter has been described to date. Here, we report the identification of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Arabidopsis thaliana Pleiotropic drug resistance transporter PDR12 (AtPDR12)/ABCG40 as a plasma membrane ABA uptake transporter. Uptake of ABA into yeast and BY2 cells expressing AtABCG40 was increased, whereas ABA uptake into protoplasts of atabcg40 plants was decreased compared with control cells. In response to exogenous ABA, the up-regulation of ABA responsive genes was strongly delayed in atabcg40 plants, indicating that ABCG40 is necessary for timely responses to ABA. Stomata of loss-of-function atabcg40 mutants closed more slowly in response to ABA, resulting in reduced drought tolerance. Our results integrate ABA-dependent signaling and transport processes and open another avenue for the engineering of drought-tolerant plants. PMID:20133880

  15. Cryo-EM Analysis of the Conformational Landscape of Human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) During its Catalytic Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Gabriel A.; Shukla, Suneet; Rao, Prashant; Borgnia, Mario J.; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Merk, Alan; Mobin, Aerfa; Esser, Lothar; Earl, Lesley A.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Xia, Di

    2016-01-01

    The multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) is an ATP-dependent pump that mediates the efflux of structurally diverse drugs and xenobiotics across cell membranes, affecting drug pharmacokinetics and contributing to the development of multidrug resistance. Structural information about the conformational changes in human P-gp during the ATP hydrolysis cycle has not been directly demonstrated, although mechanistic information has been inferred from biochemical and biophysical studies conducted with P-gp and its orthologs, or from structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. Using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy, we report the surprising discovery that, in the absence of the transport substrate and nucleotides, human P-gp can exist in both open [nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) apart; inward-facing] and closed (NBDs close; outward-facing) conformations. We also probe conformational states of human P-gp during the catalytic cycle, and demonstrate that, following ATP hydrolysis, P-gp transitions through a complete closed conformation to a complete open conformation in the presence of ADP. PMID:27190212

  16. Investigation of the quaternary structure of an ABC transporter in living cells using spectrally resolved resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Deo Raj

    Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has become an important tool to study proteins inside living cells. It has been used to explore membrane protein folding and dynamics, determine stoichiometry and geometry of protein complexes, and measure the distance between two molecules. In this dissertation, we use a method based on FRET and optical micro-spectroscopy (OptiMiS) technology, developed in our lab, to probe the structure of dynamic (as opposed to static) protein complexes in living cells. We use this method to determine the association stoichiometry and quaternary structure of an ABC transporter in living cells. Specifically, the transporter we investigate originates from the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative bacterium with several virulence factors, lipopolysaccharides being one of them. This pathogen coexpresses two unique forms of lipopolysaccharides on its surface, the A- and B-bands. The A-band polysaccharides, synthesized in the cytoplasm, are translocated into the periplasm through an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter consisting of a transmembranar protein, Wzm, and a nucleotide-binding protein, Wzt. In P. aeruginosa, all of the biochemical studies of A-band LPS are concentrated on the stages of the synthesis and ligation of polysaccharides (PSs), leaving the export stage involving ABC transporter unexplored. The mode of PS export through ABC transporters is still unknown. This difficulty is due to the lack of information about sub-unit composition and structure of this bi-component ABC transporter. Using the FRET-OptiMiS combination method developed by our lab, we found that Wzt forms a rhombus-shaped homo-tetramer which becomes a square upon co-expression with Wzm, and that Wzm forms a square-shaped homo-tetramer both in the presence and absence of Wzt. Based on these results, we propose a structural model for the double-tetramer complex formed by the bi-component ABC transporter in living cells. An understanding of the

  17. ABCB1, ABCC2, SCN1A, SCN2A, GABRA1 gene polymorphisms and drug resistant epilepsy in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Luo; Cao, Yuze; Long, Hongyu; Long, Lili; Xu, Lin; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhang, Ying; Xiao, Bo

    2015-06-01

    Drug resistance is common in epilepsy despite multiple available medications. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) may influence drug efficacy in epilepsy. We therefore aimed to clarify the association between polymorphisms of several controversial SNP loci and drug resistance in Chinese Han epilepsy patients from central China. Among all the 391 recruited subjects, 235 and 156 patients were classified into a drug responsive and resistant group, respectively, according to the definition of drug resistance proposed by the International League Against Epilepsy. The candidate SNP loci, including ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily gene ABCB1 rs2032582 and rs1045642; ABC subfamily gene ABCC2 rs717620 and rs2273697; sodium channel subunit gene SCN1A rs3812718, SCN2A rs2304016; γ-amino butyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subunit subtype gene GABRA1 rs2279020 were genotyped following the Illumina protocols. There were no significant differences in allelic or genotypic frequencies between the drug responsive and resistant patients. The polymorphisms of the above SNP loci may not be associated with drug resistance of epilepsy in the Chinese Han population. PMID:26189305

  18. The CydDC ABC transporter of Escherichia coli: new roles for a reductant efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Mark

    2015-10-01

    The CydDC complex of Escherichia coli is a heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that exports cysteine and glutathione to the periplasm. These reductants are thought to modulate periplasmic redox poise, impacting upon the disulfide folding of periplasmic and secreted proteins involved in bacterial virulence. Diminished CydDC activity abolishes the assembly of functional bd-type respiratory oxidases and perturbs haem ligation during the assembly of c-type cytochromes. The focus herein is upon a newly-discovered interaction of the CydDC complex with a haem cofactor; haem has recently been shown to modulate CydDC activity and structural modelling reveals a potential haem-binding site on the periplasmic surface of the complex. These findings have important implications for future investigations into the potential roles for the CydDC-bound haem in redox sensing and tolerance to nitric oxide (NO). PMID:26517902

  19. Role of the ABC transporter Mdr49 in Hedgehog signaling and germ cell migration.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Girish; Manry, Diane; Jourjine, Nicholas; Mogila, Vladic; Mozes, Henny; Bialistoky, Tzofia; Gerlitz, Offer; Schedl, Paul

    2016-06-15

    Coalescence of the embryonic gonad in Drosophila melanogaster requires directed migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) towards somatic gonadal precursor cells (SGPs). It was recently proposed that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter Mdr49 functions in the embryonic mesoderm to facilitate the transmission of the PGC attractant from the SGPs; however, the precise molecular identity of the Mdr49-dependent guidance signal remained elusive. Employing the loss- and gain-of-function strategies, we show that Mdr49 is a component of the Hedgehog (hh) pathway and it potentiates the signaling activity. This function is direct because in Mdr49 mutant embryos the Hh ligand is inappropriately sequestered in the hh-expressing cells. Our data also suggest that the role of Mdr49 is to provide cholesterol for the correct processing of the Hh precursor protein. Supporting this conclusion, PGC migration defects in Mdr49 embryos are substantially ameliorated by a cholesterol-rich diet. PMID:27122170

  20. Comparison of Cytotoxicity and Inhibition of Membrane ABC Transporters Induced by MWCNTs with Different Length and Functional Groups.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Liu, Su; Wu, Bing; Shen, Zhuoyan; Cherr, Gary N; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Li, Mei

    2016-04-01

    Experimental studies indicate that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have the potential to induce cytotoxicity. However, the reports are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, adverse effects of MWCNTs at low concentration are not well understood. In this study, we systemically compared adverse effects of six MWCNTs including pristine MWCNTs, hydroxyl-MWCNTs and carboxyl-MWCNTs of two different lengths (0.5-2 μm and 10-30 μm) on human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Results showed that MWCNTs induced cytotoxicity by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and damaging cell function. Pristine short MWCNTs induced higher cytotoxicity than pristine long MWCNTs. Functionalization increased cytotoxicity of long MWCNTs, but reduced cytotoxicity of short MWCNTs. Further, our results indicated that the six MWCNTs, at nontoxic concentration, might not be environmentally safe as they inhibited ABC transporters' efflux capabilities. This inhibition was observed even at very low concentrations, which were 40-1000 times lower than their effective concentrations on cytotoxicity. The inhibition of ABC transporters significantly increased cytotoxicity of arsenic, a known substrate of ABC transporters, indicating a chemosensitizing effect of MWCNTs. Plasma membrane damage was likely the mechanism by which the six MWCNTs inhibited ABC transporter activity. This study provides insight into risk assessments of low levels of MWCNTs in the environment. PMID:26943274

  1. Human and Rat ABC Transporter Efflux of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol A Glucuronide: Interspecies Comparison and Implications for Pharmacokinetic Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant interspecies differences exist between human and rodent with respect to absorption, distribution, and excretion of bisphenol A (BPA) and its primary metabolite, BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G). ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter enzymes play important roles in these physi...

  2. An ABC Transporter Mutation Alters Root Exudation of Phytochemicals that Provoke an Overhaul of Natural Soil Microbiota.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been shown that Arabidopsis root exudates can support the fungal community in native soils but not in non-native soils and recent evidence demonstrates the involvement of ABC transporters in the root secretion of phytochemicals. In this paper we examined differences in the root exudate profil...

  3. Functional Characterization of Corynebacterium alkanolyticum β-Xylosidase and Xyloside ABC Transporter in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Akira; Hiraga, Kazumi; Suda, Masako; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The Corynebacterium alkanolyticum xylEFGD gene cluster comprises the xylD gene that encodes an intracellular β-xylosidase next to the xylEFG operon encoding a substrate-binding protein and two membrane permease proteins of a xyloside ABC transporter. Cloning of the cluster revealed a recombinant β-xylosidase of moderately high activity (turnover for p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside of 111 ± 4 s−1), weak α-l-arabinofuranosidase activity (turnover for p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside of 5 ± 1 s−1), and high tolerance to product inhibition (Ki for xylose of 67.6 ± 2.6 mM). Heterologous expression of the entire cluster under the control of the strong constitutive tac promoter in the Corynebacterium glutamicum xylose-fermenting strain X1 enabled the resultant strain X1EFGD to rapidly utilize not only xylooligosaccharides but also arabino-xylooligosaccharides. The ability to utilize arabino-xylooligosaccharides depended on cgR_2369, a gene encoding a multitask ATP-binding protein. Heterologous expression of the contiguous xylD gene in strain X1 led to strain X1D with 10-fold greater β-xylosidase activity than strain X1EFGD, albeit with a total loss of arabino-xylooligosaccharide utilization ability and only half the ability to utilize xylooligosaccharides. The findings suggest some inherent ability of C. glutamicum to take up xylooligosaccharides, an ability that is enhanced by in the presence of a functional xylEFG-encoded xyloside ABC transporter. The finding that xylEFG imparts nonnative ability to take up arabino-xylooligosaccharides should be useful in constructing industrial strains with efficient fermentation of arabinoxylan, a major component of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates. PMID:25862223

  4. Endogenous mutagenesis by an insertion sequence element identifies Aeromonas salmonicida AbcA as an ATP-binding cassette transport protein required for biogenesis of smooth lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Noonan, B; Cavaignac, S; Trust, T J

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of an Aeromonas salmonicida A layer-deficient/O polysaccharide-deficient mutant carrying a Tn5 insertion in the structural gene for A protein (vapA) showed that the abcA gene immediately downstream of vapA had been interrupted by the endogenous insertion sequence element ISAS1. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that O polysaccharides did not accumulate at the inner membrane-cytoplasm interface of this mutant. abcA encodes an unusual protein; it carries both an amino-terminal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) domain showing high sequence similarity to ABC proteins implicated in the transport of certain capsular and O polysaccharides and a carboxyl-terminal potential DNA-binding domain, which distinguishes AbcA from other polysaccharide transport proteins in structural and evolutionary terms. The smooth lipopolysaccharide phenotype was restored by complementation with abcA but not by abcA carrying site-directed mutations in the sequence encoding the ATP-binding site of the protein. The genetic organization of the A. salmonicida ABC polysaccharide system differs from other bacteria. abcA also differs in apparently being required for both O-polysaccharide synthesis and in energizing the transport of O polysaccharides to the cell surface. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777581

  5. Involvement of an ABC transporter in a developmental pathway regulating hypocotyl cell elongation in the light

    PubMed Central

    Sidler, M; Hassa, P; Hasan, S; Ringli, C; Dudler, R

    1998-01-01

    In the dark, plant seedlings follow the skotomorphogenetic developmental program, which results in hypocotyl cell elongation. When the seedlings are exposed to light, a switch to photomorphogenetic development occurs, and hypocotyl cell elongation is inhibited. We have manipulated the expression of the AtPGP1 (for Arabidopsis thaliana P glycoprotein1) gene in transgenic Arabidopsis plants by using sense and antisense constructs. We show that within a certain light fluence rate window, overexpression of the AtPGP1 gene under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter causes plants to develop longer hypocotyls, whereas expression of the gene in antisense orientation results in hypocotyls shorter than those occurring in the wild type. In the dark, hypocotyls of transgenic and wild-type plants are indistinguishable. Because the AtPGP1 gene encodes a member of the superfamily of ATP binding cassette-containing (ABC) transporters, these results imply that a transport process is involved in a hypocotyl cell elongation pathway active in the light. The AtPGP1 transporter is localized in the plasmalemma, as indicated by immunohistochemical techniques and biochemical membrane separation methods. Analysis of the AtPGP1 expression pattern by using reporter gene constructs and in situ hybridization shows that in wild-type seedlings, AtPGP1 is expressed in both the root and shoot apices. PMID:9761790

  6. The ABC transporter gene family of Caenorhabditis elegans has implications for the evolutionary dynamics of multidrug resistance in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Sheps, Jonathan A; Ralph, Steven; Zhao, Zhongying; Baillie, David L; Ling, Victor

    2004-01-01

    Background Many drugs of natural origin are hydrophobic and can pass through cell membranes. Hydrophobic molecules must be susceptible to active efflux systems if they are to be maintained at lower concentrations in cells than in their environment. Multi-drug resistance (MDR), often mediated by intrinsic membrane proteins that couple energy to drug efflux, provides this function. All eukaryotic genomes encode several gene families capable of encoding MDR functions, among which the ABC transporters are the largest. The number of candidate MDR genes means that study of the drug-resistance properties of an organism cannot be effectively carried out without taking a genomic perspective. Results We have annotated sequences for all 60 ABC transporters from the Caenorhabditis elegans genome, and performed a phylogenetic analysis of these along with the 49 human, 30 yeast, and 57 fly ABC transporters currently available in GenBank. Classification according to a unified nomenclature is presented. Comparison between genomes reveals much gene duplication and loss, and surprisingly little orthology among analogous genes. Proteins capable of conferring MDR are found in several distinct subfamilies and are likely to have arisen independently multiple times. Conclusions ABC transporter evolution fits a pattern expected from a process termed 'dynamic-coherence'. This is an unusual result for such a highly conserved gene family as this one, present in all domains of cellular life. Mechanistically, this may result from the broad substrate specificity of some ABC proteins, which both reduces selection against gene loss, and leads to the facile sorting of functions among paralogs following gene duplication. PMID:15003118

  7. An ABC transporter from Bacillus thuringiensis is essential for beta-exotoxin I production.

    PubMed

    Espinasse, Sylvain; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier; Sanchis, Vincent

    2002-11-01

    beta-Exotoxin I is a nonspecific insecticidal metabolite secreted by some Bacillus thuringiensis strains. Several studies of B. thuringiensis strains that have lost the capacity to produce beta-exotoxin I have suggested that there is a strong correlation between high levels of beta-exotoxin I production and the ability to synthesize crystal proteins. In this study, we showed that a mutant strain, B. thuringiensis 407-1(Cry(-))(Pig(+)), with no crystal gene, produced considerable amounts of beta-exotoxin I together with a soluble brown melanin pigment. Therefore, beta-exotoxin I production can take place after a strain has lost the plasmids bearing the cry genes, which suggests that these curable plasmids probably contain determinants involved in the regulation of beta-exotoxin I production. Using a mini-Tn10 transposon, we constructed a library of strain 407-1(Cry(-))(Pig(+)) mutants. We screened for nonpigmented mutants with impaired beta-exotoxin I production and identified a genetic locus harboring two genes (berA and berB) essential for beta-exotoxin I production. The deduced amino acid sequence of the berA gene displayed significant similarity to the ATP-binding domains of the DRI (drug resistance and immunity) family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins involved in drug resistance and immunity to bacteriocins and lantibiotics. The berB gene encodes a protein with six putative transmembrane helices, which probably constitutes the integral membrane component of the transporter. The demonstration that berAB is required for beta-exotoxin I production and/or resistance in B. thuringiensis adds an adenine nucleotide analog to the wide range of substrates of the superfamily of ABC proteins. We suggest that berAB confers beta-exotoxin I immunity in B. thuringiensis, through active efflux of the molecule. PMID:12374817

  8. A common polymorphism in the ABCB1 gene is associated with side effects of PGP-dependent antidepressants in a large naturalistic Dutch cohort.

    PubMed

    Bet, P M; Verbeek, E C; Milaneschi, Y; Straver, D B M; Uithuisje, T; Bevova, M R; Hugtenburg, J G; Heutink, P; Penninx, B W J H; Hoogendijk, W J G

    2016-04-01

    The drug efflux transporter permeability glycoprotein (PGP) and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19 are important for eliminating antidepressants from the brain and body. The ABCB1 gene, encoding for PGP, and CYP2C19 gene have several variants that could influence enzyme function and thereby the effect of PGP- and 2C19-dependent antidepressants. We investigated the association of antidepressant side effect and common genetic variation in 789 antidepressant users. In PGP-dependent antidepressant users, the A-allele of the rs2032588 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was associated with a lower number of side effects after adjusting for gender, age, dosage and duration of use, (B=-0.44, q=4.6 × 10(-3)). This association was different from and absent in non-PGP-dependent antidepressant users. Other SNP associations as well as an interaction analysis between the rs2032588 SNP and the CYP2C19 SNPs were not statistically significant after adjusting for covariates and multiple comparisons. The association of rs2032588 with antidepressant side effects suggests the involvement of the ABCB1 genotype in the clinical pharmacology of PGP-dependent antidepressants. PMID:25987242

  9. Association between ABCB1 polymorphisms and haplotypes and Alzheimer's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Liu, Ming-Yan; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Wei, Min-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Although several epidemiological studies have investigated the association between ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) gene polymorphisms and Alzheimer's disease (AD) susceptibility, controversial results exist. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to assess whether ABCB1 polymorphisms 3435C > T (rs1045642), 2677G > T/A (rs2032582), 1236C > T (rs1128503) and haplotypes were associated with AD risk. Nine independent publications were included and analyzed. Crude odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were applied to investigate the strength of the association. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to measure the robustness of our analysis. A funnel plot and trim and fill method were used to test and adjust for publication bias. The results showed a significant association between the 3435C > T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and AD susceptibility (CT vs. CC: OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.06-1.45, P = 0.01; CT + TT vs. CC: OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.04-1.41, P = 0.01) in the total population, as well as in Caucasian subgroup. The 2677G > T/A SNP was related to a decreased AD risk in Caucasian subgroup (TT + TA + AA vs. GT + GA + GG: OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.47-0.98, P = 0.04). Moreover, the ABCB1 haplotype analysis showed that the 1236T/2677T/3435C haplotype was associated with a higher risk of AD (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.24-3.18, P = 0.00). Our results suggest that the ABCB1 3435C > T SNP, the 2677G > T/A SNP and 1236T/2677T/3435C haplotype are significantly associated with AD susceptibility. PMID:27600024

  10. Association between ABCB1 polymorphisms and haplotypes and Alzheimer’s disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xin; Liu, Ming-Yan; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Wei, Min-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Although several epidemiological studies have investigated the association between ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) gene polymorphisms and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) susceptibility, controversial results exist. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to assess whether ABCB1 polymorphisms 3435C > T (rs1045642), 2677G > T/A (rs2032582), 1236C > T (rs1128503) and haplotypes were associated with AD risk. Nine independent publications were included and analyzed. Crude odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were applied to investigate the strength of the association. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to measure the robustness of our analysis. A funnel plot and trim and fill method were used to test and adjust for publication bias. The results showed a significant association between the 3435C > T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and AD susceptibility (CT vs. CC: OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.06–1.45, P = 0.01; CT + TT vs. CC: OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.04–1.41, P = 0.01) in the total population, as well as in Caucasian subgroup. The 2677G > T/A SNP was related to a decreased AD risk in Caucasian subgroup (TT + TA + AA vs. GT + GA + GG: OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.47–0.98, P = 0.04). Moreover, the ABCB1 haplotype analysis showed that the 1236T/2677T/3435C haplotype was associated with a higher risk of AD (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.24–3.18, P = 0.00). Our results suggest that the ABCB1 3435C > T SNP, the 2677G > T/A SNP and 1236T/2677T/3435C haplotype are significantly associated with AD susceptibility. PMID:27600024

  11. The multidrug transporter Pdr5 on the 25th anniversary of its discovery: an important model for the study of asymmetric ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Golin, John; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters make up a significant proportion of this important superfamily of integral membrane proteins. These proteins contain one canonical (catalytic) ATP-binding site and a second atypical site with little enzymatic capability. The baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Pdr5 multidrug transporter is the founding member of the Pdr subfamily of asymmetric ABC transporters, which exist only in fungi and slime moulds. Because these organisms are of considerable medical and agricultural significance, Pdr5 has been studied extensively, as has its medically important homologue Cdr1 from Candida albicans. Genetic and biochemical analyses of Pdr5 have contributed important observations that are likely to be applicable to mammalian asymmetric ABC multidrug transporter proteins, including the basis of transporter promiscuity, the function of the non-catalytic deviant ATP-binding site, the most complete description of an in vivo transmission interface, and the recent discovery that Pdr5 is a molecular diode (one-way gate). In the present review, we discuss the observations made with Pdr5 and compare them with findings from clinically important asymmetric ABC transporters, such as CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), Cdr1 and Tap1/Tap2. PMID:25886173

  12. The multidrug transporter Pdr5 on the 25th anniversary of its discovery: an important model for the study of asymmetric ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Golin, John; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetric ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters make up a significant proportion of this important superfamily of integral membrane proteins. These proteins contain one canonical (catalytic) ATP-binding site and a second atypical site with little enzymatic capability. The baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Pdr5 multidrug transporter is the founding member of the Pdr subfamily of asymmetric ABC transporters, which exist only in fungi and slime moulds. Because these organisms are of considerable medical and agricultural significance, Pdr5 has been studied extensively, as has its medically important homologue Cdr1 from Candida albicans. Genetic and biochemical analyses of Pdr5 have contributed important observations that are likely to be applicable to mammalian asymmetric ABC multidrug transporter proteins, including the basis of transporter promiscuity, the function of the non-catalytic deviant ATP-binding site, the most complete description of an in vivo transmission interface, and the recent discovery that Pdr5 is a molecular diode (one-way gate). In the present review, we discuss the observations made with Pdr5 and compare them with findings from clinically important asymmetric ABC transporters, such as CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), Cdr1 and Tap1/Tap2. PMID:25886173

  13. The modulation of ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance in cancer: a review of the past decade.

    PubMed

    Kathawala, Rishil J; Gupta, Pranav; Ashby, Charles R; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent one of the largest and oldest families of membrane proteins in all extant phyla from prokaryotes to humans, which couple the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis essentially to translocate, among various substrates, toxic compounds across the membrane. The fundamental functions of these multiple transporter proteins include: (1) conserved mechanisms related to nutrition and pathogenesis in bacteria, (2) spore formation in fungi, and (3) signal transduction, protein secretion and antigen presentation in eukaryotes. Moreover, one of the major causes of multidrug resistance (MDR) and chemotherapeutic failure in cancer therapy is believed to be the ABC transporter-mediated active efflux of a multitude of structurally and mechanistically distinct cytotoxic compounds across membranes. It has been postulated that ABC transporter inhibitors known as chemosensitizers may be used in combination with standard chemotherapeutic agents to enhance their therapeutic efficacy. The current paper reviews the advance in the past decade in this important domain of cancer chemoresistance and summarizes the development of new compounds and the re-evaluation of compounds originally designed for other targets as transport inhibitors of ATP-dependent drug efflux pumps. PMID:25554624

  14. ABCB1 Overexpression Is a Key Initiator of Resistance to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in CML Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy P.; White, Deborah L.

    2016-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib has resulted in excellent responses in the majority of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) patients; however, resistance is observed in 20–30% of patients. More recently, resistance to the second generation TKIs, nilotinib and dasatinib, has also been observed albeit at a lower incidence. ABCB1 has previously been implicated in TKI export and its overexpression linked to TKI resistance. In this study the dynamics of nilotinib resistance was studied in CML cell lines with particular focus on ABCB1 expression levels during development of resistance. Results revealed ABCB1 overexpression is likely an important initiator of nilotinib resistance in vitro. ABCB1 overexpression was also observed in cell lines as an intermediate step during development of resistance to imatinib and dasatinib in vitro. We conclude that ABCB1 overexpression may provide an initial platform to facilitate development of additional mechanisms for resistance to TKIs. This provides a rationale for investigating this phenomenon in patients undergoing TKI therapy. PMID:27536777

  15. ABCB1 Overexpression Is a Key Initiator of Resistance to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in CML Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Eadie, Laura N; Hughes, Timothy P; White, Deborah L

    2016-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib has resulted in excellent responses in the majority of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) patients; however, resistance is observed in 20-30% of patients. More recently, resistance to the second generation TKIs, nilotinib and dasatinib, has also been observed albeit at a lower incidence. ABCB1 has previously been implicated in TKI export and its overexpression linked to TKI resistance. In this study the dynamics of nilotinib resistance was studied in CML cell lines with particular focus on ABCB1 expression levels during development of resistance. Results revealed ABCB1 overexpression is likely an important initiator of nilotinib resistance in vitro. ABCB1 overexpression was also observed in cell lines as an intermediate step during development of resistance to imatinib and dasatinib in vitro. We conclude that ABCB1 overexpression may provide an initial platform to facilitate development of additional mechanisms for resistance to TKIs. This provides a rationale for investigating this phenomenon in patients undergoing TKI therapy. PMID:27536777

  16. A subset of annular lipids is linked to the flippase activity of an ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechara, Chérine; Nöll, Anne; Morgner, Nina; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Tampé, Robert; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are critical components of membranes that could affect the properties of membrane proteins, yet the precise compositions of lipids surrounding membrane-embedded protein complexes is often difficult to discern. Here we report that, for the heterodimeric ABC transporter TmrAB, the extent of delipidation can be controlled by timed exposure to detergent. We subsequently characterize the cohort of endogenous lipids that are extracted in contact with the membrane protein complex, and show that with prolonged delipidation the number of neutral lipids is reduced in favour of their negatively charged counterparts. We show that lipid A is retained by the transporter and that the extent of its binding decreases during the catalytic cycle, implying that lipid A release is linked to adenosine tri-phosphate hydrolysis. Together, these results enable us to propose that a subset of annular lipids is invariant in composition, with negatively charged lipids binding tightly to TmrAB, and imply a role for this exporter in glycolipid translocation.

  17. ABC transporter functions as a pacemaker for sequestration of plant glucosides in leaf beetles

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Anja S; Peters, Sven; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions dominate the planet’s terrestrial ecology. When it comes to host–plant specialization, insects are among the most versatile evolutionary innovators, able to disarm multiple chemical plant defenses. Sequestration is a widespread strategy to detoxify noxious metabolites, frequently for the insect’s own benefit against predation. In this study, we describe the broad-spectrum ATP-binding cassette transporter CpMRP of the poplar leaf beetle, Chrysomela populi as the first candidate involved in the sequestration of phytochemicals in insects. CpMRP acts in the defensive glands of the larvae as a pacemaker for the irreversible shuttling of pre-selected metabolites from the hemolymph into defensive secretions. Silencing CpMRP in vivo creates a defenseless phenotype, indicating its role in the secretion process is crucial. In the defensive glands of related leaf beetle species, we identified sequences similar to CpMRP and assume therefore that exocrine gland-based defensive strategies, evolved by these insects to repel their enemies, rely on ABC transporters as a key element. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01096.001 PMID:24302568

  18. ABC transporter functions as a pacemaker for sequestration of plant glucosides in leaf beetles.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Anja S; Peters, Sven; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions dominate the planet's terrestrial ecology. When it comes to host-plant specialization, insects are among the most versatile evolutionary innovators, able to disarm multiple chemical plant defenses. Sequestration is a widespread strategy to detoxify noxious metabolites, frequently for the insect's own benefit against predation. In this study, we describe the broad-spectrum ATP-binding cassette transporter CpMRP of the poplar leaf beetle, Chrysomela populi as the first candidate involved in the sequestration of phytochemicals in insects. CpMRP acts in the defensive glands of the larvae as a pacemaker for the irreversible shuttling of pre-selected metabolites from the hemolymph into defensive secretions. Silencing CpMRP in vivo creates a defenseless phenotype, indicating its role in the secretion process is crucial. In the defensive glands of related leaf beetle species, we identified sequences similar to CpMRP and assume therefore that exocrine gland-based defensive strategies, evolved by these insects to repel their enemies, rely on ABC transporters as a key element. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01096.001. PMID:24302568

  19. A subset of annular lipids is linked to the flippase activity of an ABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Nöll, Anne; Morgner, Nina; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Tampé, Robert; Robinson, Carol V

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are critical components of membranes that could affect the properties of membrane proteins, yet the precise compositions of lipids surrounding membrane-embedded protein complexes is often difficult to discern. Here we report that, for the heterodimeric ABC transporter TmrAB, the extent of delipidation can be controlled by timed exposure to detergent. We subsequently characterize the cohort of endogenous lipids that are extracted in contact with the membrane protein complex, and show that with prolonged delipidation the number of neutral lipids is reduced in favour of their negatively charged counterparts. We show that lipid A is retained by the transporter and that the extent of its binding decreases during the catalytic cycle, implying that lipid A release is linked to adenosine tri-phosphate hydrolysis. Together, these results enable us to propose that a subset of annular lipids is invariant in composition, with negatively charged lipids binding tightly to TmrAB, and imply a role for this exporter in glycolipid translocation. PMID:25698336

  20. The dynamics of the MBP-MalFGK(2) interaction: a prototype for binding protein dependent ABC-transporter systems.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Brian H

    2008-09-01

    This review is focused on the interaction between maltose binding protein (MBP) and the maltose transporter complex, MalFGK(2), which is a member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily. The interaction between MBP and MalFGK(2) has a critical role in maltose transport, but a coherent description of the interaction is complicated because both MBP and MalFGK(2) can adopt multiple conformations. Drawing on genetic, structural, and biochemical data, the different conformations of MBP and MalFGK(2) are described and incorporated into a model for their interaction. The most important feature of this model is that ligand-bound MBP initiates the process of ATP-dependent maltose transport by stabilizing a high-energy conformation of MalFGK(2). In this model of the MBP-MalFGK(2) interaction, stabilization of a high-energy conformation of MalFGK(2) allows ATP to drive conformational changes in the system - in particular the opening of bound MBP - that leads to formation of a transition state for ATP hydrolysis. Such a role for ligand-bound MBP explains how MBP-independent MalFGK(2) mutants work, and represents a general mechanism for binding-protein dependent ABC import systems. In ABC export systems, which do not use a binding protein, the substrate itself is expected to play a role similar to ligand-bound MBP in the maltose transport system. The mechanistic model for the maltose transporter suggests that ABC-type import systems evolved to make use of a peripheral binding protein so that the transport process is essentially irreversible. PMID:17950243

  1. The Candida albicans CDR3 gene codes for an opaque-phase ABC transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Balan, I; Alarco, A M; Raymond, M

    1997-01-01

    We report the cloning and functional analysis of a third member of the CDR gene family in Candida albicans, named CDR3. This gene codes for an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter of 1,501 amino acids highly homologous to Cdr1p and Cdr2p (56 and 55% amino acid sequence identity, respectively), two transporters involved in fluconazole resistance in C. albicans. The predicted structure of Cdr3p is typical of the PDR/CDR family, with two similar halves, each comprising an N-terminal hydrophilic domain with consensus sequences for ATP binding and a C-terminal hydrophobic domain with six predicted transmembrane segments. Northern analysis showed that CDR3 expression is regulated in a cell-type-specific manner, with low levels of CDR3 mRNA in CAI4 yeast and hyphal cells, high levels in WO-1 opaque cells, and undetectable levels in WO-1 white cells. Disruption of both alleles of CDR3 in CAI4 resulted in no obvious changes in cell morphology, growth rate, or susceptibility to fluconazole. Overexpression of Cdr3p in C. albicans did not result in increased cellular resistance to fluconazole, cycloheximide, and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, which are known substrates for different transporters of the PDR/CDR family. These results indicate that despite a high degree of sequence conservation with C. albicans Cdr1p and Cdr2p, Cdr3p does not appear to be involved in drug resistance, at least to the compounds tested which include the clinically relevant antifungal agent fluconazole. Rather, the high level of Cdr3p expression in WO-1 opaque cells suggests an opaque-phase-associated biological function which remains to be identified. PMID:9393682

  2. The Staphylococcus aureus ABC-Type Manganese Transporter MntABC Is Critical for Reinitiation of Bacterial Replication Following Exposure to Phagocytic Oxidative Burst

    PubMed Central

    Coady, Alison; Xu, Min; Phung, Qui; Cheung, Tommy K.; Bakalarski, Corey; Alexander, Mary Kate; Lehar, Sophie M.; Kim, Janice; Park, Summer; Tan, Man-Wah; Nishiyama, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Manganese plays a central role in cellular detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, manganese acquisition is considered to be important for bacterial pathogenesis by counteracting the oxidative burst of phagocytic cells during host infection. However, detailed analysis of the interplay between bacterial manganese acquisition and phagocytic cells and its impact on bacterial pathogenesis has remained elusive for Staphylococcus aureus, a major human pathogen. Here, we show that a mntC mutant, which lacks the functional manganese transporter MntABC, was more sensitive to killing by human neutrophils but not murine macrophages, unless the mntC mutant was pre-exposed to oxidative stress. Notably, the mntC mutant formed strikingly small colonies when recovered from both type of phagocytic cells. We show that this phenotype is a direct consequence of the inability of the mntC mutant to reinitiate growth after exposure to phagocytic oxidative burst. Transcript and quantitative proteomics analyses revealed that the manganese-dependent ribonucleotide reductase complex NrdEF, which is essential for DNA synthesis and repair, was highly induced in the mntC mutant under oxidative stress conditions including after phagocytosis. Since NrdEF proteins are essential for S. aureus viability we hypothesize that cells lacking MntABC might attempt to compensate for the impaired function of NrdEF by increasing their expression. Our data suggest that besides ROS detoxification, functional manganese acquisition is likely crucial for S. aureus pathogenesis by repairing oxidative damages, thereby ensuring efficient bacterial growth after phagocytic oxidative burst, which is an attribute critical for disseminating and establishing infection in the host. PMID:26379037

  3. Identification and characterization of an iron ABC transporter operon in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal 5.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Lucia Soto; Vázquez-Candanedo, Ada P; Sánchez-Espíndola, Adriana; Ramírez, Carlos Ávila; Baca, Beatriz E

    2013-06-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium and endophyte of sugarcane. We have cloned and sequenced the genes coding for the components of the iron ABC-type acquisition system of G. diazotrophicus. Sequence analysis revealed three ORFs, (feuA, feuB, and feuC) organized as an operon and encoding polypeptides of 346 (38 kDa), 342 (34.2 kDa), and 240 (26 kDa) amino acids, respectively. The deduced translation products of the feu operon showed similarity with a periplasmic solute-binding protein (FeuA), permease (FeuB), and ATPase (FeuC) involved in Fe transport. The role of FeuB in the survival of G. diazotrophicus under iron depletion was evaluated by comparing the ability of wild-type and FeuB-Km(R) -mutant strains in a medium without iron supplementation and in a medium containing 2, 2'-dipyridyl (DP). Growth of the mutant was affected in the medium containing DP. The operon was expressed at higher levels in cells depleted for iron than in those that contained the metal. A decrease in nitrogenase activity was observed with the FeuB-Km(R) -mutant strain that with the wild-type under iron deficiency conditions, suggesting that the Feu operon play role in Fe nutrition of G. diazotrophicus. PMID:23624722

  4. An ABC transporter involved in the control of streptomycin production in Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hideaki; Toriumi, Naoe; Hirata, Mariko; Amano, Taisuke; Ohya, Takaaki; Shimada, Reona; Kusada, Hiroyuki; Amano, Sho-Ichi; Matsuda, Ko-Ichi; Beppu, Teruhiko; Ueda, Kenji

    2016-07-01

    We screened for a gene that inhibits streptomycin production in Streptomyces griseus when it is introduced on a high-copy-number plasmid pIJ702, and obtained a plasmid pKM545. The introduction of pKM545 abolished streptomycin production on all media tested including YMP-sugar and Nutrient broth. S1 protection analysis demonstrated that the introduction of this plasmid downregulated the transcriptional activity of the promoter preceding strR, the pathway-specific transcriptional regulator for streptomycin biosynthesis. The 2.8-kb BamHI fragment cloned onto pKM545 contained two coding sequences SGR_5442 and 5443. These coding sequences and the two downstream ones (SGR_5444 and 5445) constituted a possible operon structure designated to be rspABCD (regulation of streptomycin production). RspB and RspC exhibited a marked similarity with an ATP-binding domain and a membrane-associating domain of an ABC-2 type transporter, respectively, suggesting that the Rsp proteins comprise a membrane exporter. The gene cluster consisting of the rsp operon and the upstream divergent small coding sequence (SGR_5441) was widely distributed to Streptomyces genome. An rspB mutant of S. griseus produced 3-fold streptomycin of the parental strain in YMP liquid medium. The evidence implies that the Rsp translocator is involved in the export of a substance that specifies the expression level of streptomycin biosynthesis genes in S. griseus. PMID:27268270

  5. Lysophosphatidylinositol: a novel link between ABC transporters and G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Ruban, Emily L; Ferro, Riccardo; Arifin, Syamsul Ahmad; Falasca, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) is a well-known bioactive lipid that is able to activate signalling cascades relevant to cell proliferation, migration, survival and tumorigenesis. Our previous work suggested that LPI is involved in cancer progression since it can be released in the medium of Ras-transformed fibroblasts and can function as an autocrine modulator of cell growth. Different research groups have established that LPI is the specific and functional ligand for G-protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) and that this GPR55-LPI axis is able to activate signalling cascades that are relevant for different cell functions. Work in our laboratory has recently unravelled an autocrine loop, by which LPI synthesized by cytosolic phospholipase A₂ (cPLA₂) is pumped out of the cell by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter C1 (ABCC1)/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), initiating a signalling cascade downstream of GPR55. Our current work suggests that blockade of this pathway may represent a novel strategy to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25233417

  6. CD4+ T cell immunity to the Burkholderia pseudomallei ABC transporter LolC in melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Karen K.; Tippayawat, Patcharaporn; Walker, Nicola J.; Harding, Sarah V.; Atkins, Helen S.; Maillere, Bernard; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Altmann, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) causes melioidosis, a disease with a wide range of possible outcomes, from seroconversion and dormancy to sepsis and death. This spectrum of host-pathogen interactions poses challenging questions about heterogeneity in immunity to Bp. Models show protection to be dependent on CD4+ cells and IFNγ, but little is known about specific target antigens. Having previously implicated the ABC transporter, LolC, in protective immunity, we here use epitope prediction, HLA binding studies, HLA-transgenic models and studies of T cells from seropositive individuals to characterize HLA-restricted LolC responses. Immunized mice showed long-lasting memory to the protein, while predictive algorithms identified epitopes within LolC that subsequently demonstrated strong HLA class II binding. Immunization of HLA-DR transgenics with LolC stimulated T cell responses to four of these epitopes. Furthermore, responsiveness of HLA-transgenics to LolC revealed a hierarchy supportive of HLA polymorphism-determined differential susceptibility. Seropositive human donors of diverse HLA class II types showed T cell responses to LolC epitopes which are conserved among Burkholderia species including B. cenocepacia, associated with life-threatening cepacia complex in cystic fibrosis patients and B. mallei, which causes glanders. These findings suggest a role for LolC epitopes in multiepitope vaccine design for melioidosis and related diseases. PMID:21182082

  7. Pharmacogenetics of human ABC transporter ABCC11: new insights into apocrine gland growth and metabolite secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Toyoda, Yu; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Niikawa, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Cell secretion is an important physiological process that ensures smooth metabolic activities and tissue repair as well as growth and immunological functions in the body. Apocrine secretion occurs when the secretory process is accomplished with a partial loss of cell cytoplasm. The secretory materials are contained within secretory vesicles and are released during secretion as cytoplasmic fragments into the glandular lumen or interstitial space. The recent finding that the non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) 538G > A (rs17822931; Gly180Arg) in the ABCC11 gene determines the type of earwax in humans has shed light on the novel function of this ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter in apocrine glands. The wild-type (Gly180) of ABCC11 is associated with wet-type earwax, axillary osmidrosis, and colostrum secretion from the mammary gland as well as the potential risk of mastopathy. Furthermore, the SNP (538G > A) in the ABCC11 gene is suggested to be a clinical biomarker for the prediction of chemotherapeutic efficacy. The aim of this review article is to provide an overview on the discovery and characterization of genetic polymorphisms in the human ABCC11 gene and to explain the impact of ABCC11 538G > A on the apocrine phenotype as well as the anthropological aspect of this SNP in the ABCC11 gene and patients’ response to nucleoside-based chemotherapy. PMID:23316210

  8. A two-component system regulates the expression of an ABC transporter for xylo-oligosaccharides in Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Shulami, Smadar; Zaide, Galia; Zolotnitsky, Gennady; Langut, Yael; Feld, Geoff; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Shoham, Yuval

    2007-02-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 utilizes an extensive and highly regulated hemicellulolytic system. The genes comprising the xylanolytic system are clustered in a 39.7-kb chromosomal segment. This segment contains a 6-kb transcriptional unit (xynDCEFG) coding for a potential two-component system (xynDC) and an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system (xynEFG). The xynD promoter region contains a 16-bp inverted repeat resembling the operator site for the xylose repressor, XylR. XylR was found to bind specifically to this sequence, and binding was efficiently prevented in vitro in the presence of xylose. The ABC transport system was shown to comprise an operon of three genes (xynEFG) that is transcribed from its own promoter. The nonphosphorylated fused response regulator, His6-XynC, bound to a 220-bp fragment corresponding to the xynE operator. DNase I footprinting analysis showed four protected zones that cover the -53 and the +34 regions and revealed direct repeat sequences of a GAAA-like motif. In vitro transcriptional assays and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that xynE transcription is activated 140-fold in the presence of 1.5 microM XynC. The His6-tagged sugar-binding lipoprotein (XynE) of the ABC transporter interacted with different xylosaccharides, as demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry. The change in the heat capacity of binding (DeltaCp) for XynE with xylotriose suggests a stacking interaction in the binding site that can be provided by a single Trp residue and a sugar moiety. Taken together, our data show that XynEFG constitutes an ABC transport system for xylo-oligosaccharides and that its transcription is negatively regulated by XylR and activated by the response regulator XynC, which is part of a two-component sensing system. PMID:17142383

  9. Extracellular secretion of Pseudoalteromonas sp. cold-adapted esterase in Escherichia coli in the presence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. components of ABC transport system.

    PubMed

    Długołecka, Anna; Cieśliński, Hubert; Turkiewicz, Marianna; Białkowska, Aneta M; Kur, Józef

    2008-12-01

    Recently we described identification and characterization of GDSL esterase EstA from psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. 643A. Attempts to obtain heterologous overexpression of this enzyme in Escherichia coli system were not satisfactory. The EstA protein was expressed as inclusion bodies, most of that were inactive after purification step, and the recovery of esterolytic activity was very low after refolding. Based on the sequence analysis we found that the esterase EstA gene is clustered with three genes encoding components of ABC transport system. These genes, designated abc1, abc2, and abc3 encode an ATP-binding protein (ABC1) and two permease proteins (ABC2 and ABC3). In present study, to obtain larger amounts of the active cold-adapted EstA esterase from Pseudoalteromonas sp. 643A, we designed a two-plasmid E. coli expression system where the gene encoding EstA enzyme was cloned into pET30b(+) expression vector and three genes encoding components of ABC transport system were cloned into pACYC-pBAD vector. It was shown that the created expression system was useful for extracellular production of active EstA enzyme which was purified from the culture medium. In the presence of all the three transporter proteins the secretion of EstA was at the highest level. When one or two of these components were missing, EstA secretion was also possible, but not so effective. It indicates that ABC2 and ABC3 proteins of Pseudoalteromonas sp. 643A could be replaced with their homologous proteins of E. coli. PMID:18700165

  10. Minireview: SLCO and ABC Transporters: A Role for Steroid Transport in Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunpi; Montgomery, R. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Androgens play a critical role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and androgen deprivation therapy via surgical or medical castration is front-line therapy for patients with advanced PCa. However, intratumoral testosterone levels are elevated in metastases from patients with castration-resistant disease, and residual intratumoral androgens have been implicated in mediating ligand-dependent mechanisms of androgen receptor activation. The source of residual tissue androgens present despite castration has not been fully elucidated, but proposed mechanisms include uptake and conversion of adrenal androgens, such as dehdroepiandrosterone to testosterone and dihydrotestosterone, or de novo androgen synthesis from cholesterol or progesterone precursors. In this minireview, we discuss the emerging evidence that suggests a role for specific transporters in mediating transport of steroids into or out of prostate cells, thereby influencing intratumoral androgen levels and PCa development and progression. We focus on the solute carrier and ATP binding cassette gene families, which have the most published data for a role in PCa-related steroid transport, and review the potential impact of genetic variation on steroid transport activity and PCa outcomes. Continued assessment of transport activity in PCa models and human tumor tissue is needed to better delineate the different roles these transporters play in physiologic and neoplastic settings, and in order to determine whether targeting the uptake of steroid substrates by specific transporters may be a clinically feasible therapeutic strategy. PMID:25147980

  11. Molecular Cloning and Analysis of a Putative Siderophore ABC Transporter from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Julie A.; Cockayne, Alan; Hill, Philip J.; Williams, Paul

    2000-01-01

    From a mass-excised Staphylococcus aureus λZapII expression library, we cloned an operon encoding a novel ABC transporter with significant homology to bacterial siderophore transporter systems. The operon encodes four genes designated sstA, -B, -C, and -D encoding two putative cytoplasmic membrane proteins (sstA and sstB), an ATPase (sstC), and a membrane-bound 38-kDa lipoprotein (sstD). The sst operon is preceded by two putative Fur boxes, which indicated that expression of the sst operon was likely to be iron dependent. SstD was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified by Triton X-114 phase partitioning, and used to generate monospecific antisera in rats. Immunoblotting studies located SstD in the membrane fraction of S. aureus and showed that expression of the lipoprotein was reduced under iron-rich growth conditions. Triton X-114 partitioning studies on isolated membranes provided additional biochemical evidence that SstD in S. aureus is a lipoprotein. Immunoreactive polypeptides of approximately 38 kDa were detected in a wide range of staphylococcal species, but no antigenic homolog was detected in Bacillus subtilis. Expression of SstD in vivo was confirmed by immunoblotting studies with S. aureus recovered from a rat intraperitoneal chamber implant model. To further define the contribution of SstD in promoting growth of S. aureus in vitro and in vivo, we used antisense RNA technology to modulate expression of SstD. Expression of antisense sstD RNA in S. aureus resulted in a decrease in SstD expression under both iron-rich and iron-restricted growth conditions. However, this reduction in SstD levels did not affect the growth of S. aureus in vitro in an iron-limited growth medium or when grown in an intraperitoneal rat chamber implant model in vivo. PMID:11035736

  12. Modulation of Biotransformation Systems and ABC Transporters by Benznidazole in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Virginia G.; Rigalli, Juan P.; Villanueva, Silvina S. M.; Ruiz, María L.; Luquita, Marcelo G.; Echenique, Claudia G.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of antichagasic benznidazole (BZL; 100 mg/kg body weight/day, 3 consecutive days, intraperitoneally) on biotransformation systems and ABC transporters was evaluated in rats. Expression of cytochrome P-450 (CYP3A), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT1A), glutathione S-transferases (alpha glutathione S-transferase [GST-α], GST-μ, and GST-π), multidrug-resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2), and P glycoprotein (P-gp) in liver, small intestine, and kidney was estimated by Western blotting. Increases in hepatic CYP3A (30%) and GST-μ (40%) and in intestinal GST-α (72% in jejunum and 136% in ileum) were detected. Significant increases in Mrp2 (300%) and P-gp (500%) proteins in liver from BZL-treated rats were observed without changes in kidney. P-gp and Mrp2 were also increased by BZL in jejunum (170% and 120%, respectively). In ileum, only P-gp was increased by BZL (50%). The activities of GST, P-gp, and Mrp2 correlated well with the upregulation of proteins in liver and jejunum. Plasma decay of a test dose of BZL (5 mg/kg body weight) administered intraduodenally was faster (295%) and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) was lower (41%) for BZL-pretreated rats than for controls. The biliary excretion of BZL was higher (60%) in the BZL group, and urinary excretion of BZL did not show differences between groups. The amount of absorbed BZL in intestinal sacs was lower (25%) in pretreated rats than in controls. In conclusion, induction of biotransformation enzymes and/or transporters by BZL could increase the clearance and/or decrease the intestinal absorption of coadministered drugs that are substrates of these systems, including BZL itself. PMID:23877690

  13. Maltose transport system of Escherichia coli: an ABC-type transporter.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, H

    1994-06-01

    The maltose transport system of E. coli is composed of a periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MBP), the presumed transmembrane channel made up of MalF and MalG proteins, and two copies of the ATPase subunit, MalK. The membrane-associated transporter complex was purified in a functional form both from the wild-type strain and from mutants that do not require MBP for transport, and was reconstituted into proteoliposomes. A major function of MBP is to send a transmembrane signal, in the presence of ligands, to the ATPase subunits on the inner side of the membrane. In addition, MBP performs a special function in the translocation of the larger ligands, maltodextrins, perhaps by aligning them for entry into the channel. PMID:8206159

  14. Asymmetric localizations of the ABC transporter PaPDR1 trace paths of directional strigolactone transport.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Joëlle; Simon, Sibu; Gübeli, Christian; Liu, Guo-Wei; Cheng, Xi; Friml, Jiří; Bouwmeester, Harro; Martinoia, Enrico; Borghi, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Strigolactones, first discovered as germination stimulants for parasitic weeds [1], are carotenoid-derived phytohormones that play major roles in inhibiting lateral bud outgrowth and promoting plant-mycorrhizal symbiosis [2-4]. Furthermore, strigolactones are involved in the regulation of lateral and adventitious root development, root cell division [5, 6], secondary growth [7], and leaf senescence [8]. Recently, we discovered the strigolactone transporter Petunia axillaris PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE 1 (PaPDR1), which is required for efficient mycorrhizal colonization and inhibition of lateral bud outgrowth [9]. However, how strigolactones are transported through the plant remained unknown. Here we show that PaPDR1 exhibits a cell-type-specific asymmetric localization in different root tissues. In root tips, PaPDR1 is co-expressed with the strigolactone biosynthetic gene DAD1 (CCD8), and it is localized at the apical membrane of root hypodermal cells, presumably mediating the shootward transport of strigolactone. Above the root tip, in the hypodermal passage cells that form gates for the entry of mycorrhizal fungi, PaPDR1 is present in the outer-lateral membrane, compatible with its postulated function as strigolactone exporter from root to soil. Transport studies are in line with our localization studies since (1) a papdr1 mutant displays impaired transport of strigolactones out of the root tip to the shoot as well as into the rhizosphere and (2) DAD1 expression and PIN1/PIN2 levels change in plants deregulated for PDR1 expression, suggestive of variations in endogenous strigolactone contents. In conclusion, our results indicate that the polar localizations of PaPDR1 mediate directional shootward strigolactone transport as well as localized exudation into the soil. PMID:25683808

  15. An ABCG/WBC-type ABC transporter is essential for transport of sporopollenin precursors for exine formation in developing pollen.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunju; Jin, Jun-Young; Choi, Setbyoul; Hwang, Jae-Ung; Kim, Yu-Young; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Youngsook

    2011-01-01

    The exine of the pollen wall shows an intricate pattern, primarily comprising sporopollenin, a polymer of fatty acids and phenolic compounds. A series of enzymes synthesize sporopollenin precursors in tapetal cells, and the precursors are transported from the tapetum to the pollen surface. However, the mechanisms underlying the transport of sporopollenin precursors remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that strongly suggests that the Arabidopsis ABC transporter ABCG26/WBC27 is involved in the transport of sporopollenin precursors. Two independent mutations at ABCG26 coding region caused drastic decrease in seed production. This defect was complemented by expression of ABCG26 driven by its native promoter. The severely reduced fertility of the abcg26 mutants was caused by a failure to produce mature pollen, observed initially as a defect in pollen-wall development. The reticulate pattern of the exine of wild-type microspores was absent in abcg26 microspores at the vacuolate stage, and the vast majority of the mutant pollen degenerated thereafter. ABCG26 was expressed specifically in tapetal cells at the early vacuolate stage of pollen development. It showed high co-expression with genes encoding enzymes required for sporopollenin precursor synthesis, i.e. CYP704B1, ACOS5, MS2 and CYP703A2. Similar to two other mutants with defects in pollen-wall deposition, abcg26 tapetal cells accumulated numerous vesicles and granules. Taken together, these results suggest that ABCG26 plays a crucial role in the transfer of sporopollenin lipid precursors from tapetal cells to anther locules, facilitating exine formation on the pollen surface. PMID:21223384

  16. Structure-activity relationships and in silico models of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongming; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2013-11-01

    1. The efflux pump p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) has received enormous attention in drug (xenobiotic) disposition due to its role in modulation of the drug availability and in protection of sensitive organs. 2. P-gp mediated efflux is one of main mechanisms for multidrug resistance in cancer cells. A main approach to reverse the resistance and restore the drug efficacy is to use specific inhibitors of P-gp that suppress the efflux activity. 3. This review summarizes the binding capabilities of known chemical inhibitors based on the analyses of structure-activity relationships, and computational modeling of the inhibitors as well as the binding site of P-gp protein. 4. The molecular models will facilitate the design of lead inhibitors as drug candidates. Also, it helps scientists in early drug discovery phase to synthesize chemical series with better understanding of their P-gp binding liabilities. PMID:23617855

  17. The Allosteric Regulatory Mechanism of the Escherichia coli MetNI Methionine ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Janet G.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The MetNI methionine importer of Escherichia coli, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter, uses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to catalyze the high affinity uptake of d- and l-methionine. Early in vivo studies showed that the uptake of external methionine is repressed by the level of the internal methionine pool, a phenomenon termed transinhibition. Our understanding of the MetNI mechanism has thus far been limited to a series of crystal structures in an inward-facing conformation. To understand the molecular mechanism of transinhibition, we studied the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis using detergent-solubilized MetNI. We find that transinhibition is due to noncompetitive inhibition by l-methionine, much like a negative feedback loop. Thermodynamic analyses revealed two allosteric methionine binding sites per transporter. This quantitative analysis of transinhibition, the first to our knowledge for a structurally defined transporter, builds upon the previously proposed structurally based model for regulation. This mechanism of regulation at the transporter activity level could be applicable to not only ABC transporters but other types of membrane transporters as well. PMID:25678706

  18. Development of Fourth Generation ABC Inhibitors from Natural Products: A Novel Approach to Overcome Cancer Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Subburayan; Hoti, Sugeerappa Laxmanappa

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer caused due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a major problem in modern chemotherapy. Molecular investigations on MDR have revealed that the resistance is due to various transport proteins of the ABC superfamily which include Phosphoglycoprotein (P-gp/MDR1/ ABCB1), multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). They have been characterized functionally and are considered as major players in the development of MDR in cancer cells. These ATP-dependent transporter proteins cause MDR either by decreased uptake of the drug or increased efflux of the drug from the target organelles. Several MDR-reversing agents are being developed and are in various stages of clinical trials. The first three generations of ABC modulators such as quinine, verapamil, cyclosporine-A, tariquitor, PSC 833, LY335979, and GF120918 required to be administered in high doses to reverse MDR and were associated with adverse effects. Additionally, these modulators non-selectively inhibit ABC and adversely accumulate chemotherapeutic drugs in brain and kidney. Currently, research has stepped up towards reversing MDR by using natural products which exhibitted potential as chemosensitizers. Globally, there is a rich biodiversity of natural products which can be sourced for developing drugs. These products may provide more lead compounds with superior activity, foremost to the development of more effective therapies for MDR cancer cells. Here, we briefly review the status of natural products for reversing MDR modulators, and discuss the long term goal of MDR strategies in current clinical settings. PMID:25584696

  19. Spin Labeling Studies of Transmembrane Signaling and Transport: Applications to Phototaxis, ABC Transporters and Symporters.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins still represent a major challenge for structural biologists. This chapter will focus on the application of continuous wave and pulsed EPR spectroscopy on spin-labeled membrane proteins. Site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy has evolved as a powerful tool to study the structure and dynamics of proteins, especially membrane proteins, as this method works largely independently of the size and complexity of the biological system under investigation. This chapter describes applications of this technique to three different systems: the archaeal photoreceptor/-transducer complex SRII/HtrII as an example for transmembrane signaling and two transport systems, the histidine ATP-binding cassette transporter HisQMP, and the sodium-proline symporter PutP. PMID:26477256

  20. Epoxylathyrol Derivatives: Modulation of ABCB1-Mediated Multidrug Resistance in Human Colon Adenocarcinoma and Mouse T-Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ana M; Reis, Mariana; Duarte, Noélia; Spengler, Gabriella; Molnár, Joseph; Ferreira, Maria-José U

    2015-09-25

    Epoxyboetirane A (1), a macrocyclic diterpene that was found to be inactive as an ABCB1 modulator, was submitted to several chemical transformations, aimed at generating a series of compounds with improved multidrug resistance (MDR)-modifying activity. Overall, 23 new derivatives were prepared, in addition to the already reported epoxylathyrol (2) and methoxyboetirol (3). Their anti-MDR potential was assessed through both functional and chemosensitivity assays on resistant human colon adenocarcinoma and human ABCB1-gene transfected L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that different substitution patterns led to distinct ABCB1 inhibitory activities, although intrinsic cellular characteristics seemed to influence the modulatory behavior. A considerable enhancement in MDR-modifying activity was observed for aromatic compounds in both cell lines, particularly in 3,17-disubstituted esters derived from 3, a Payne-rearranged Michael adduct of 2. All compounds tested were revealed to interact synergistically with doxorubicin, and ATPase inhibition by three representative MDR-modifying compounds was also investigated. On account of its outstanding ABCB1 inhibitory activity at 0.2 μM and overall remarkable bioactive profile, methoxyboetirane B (22) was found to be a new promising lead for MDR-reversing anticancer drug development. PMID:26331763

  1. Whole-transcriptome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family genes in the latex-producing laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Zhiyi, Nie; Guijuan, Kang; Yu, Li; Longjun, Dai; Rizhong, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 'full-size', 21 'half-size' and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress) stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis. PMID:25615936

  2. Whole-Transcriptome Survey of the Putative ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Family Genes in the Latex-Producing Laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhiyi, Nie; Guijuan, Kang; Yu, Li; Longjun, Dai; Rizhong, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree). A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 ‘full-size’, 21 ‘half-size’ and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress) stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis. PMID:25615936

  3. ABCB1 polymorphism and gender affect the pharmacokinetics of amlodipine in Chinese patients with essential hypertension: a population analysis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiao-cong; Zhang, Wen-li; Yuan, Hong; Barrett, Jeffrey S; Hua, Ye; Huang, Zhi-jun; Zhou, Hong-hao; Pei, Qi; Guo, Cheng-xian; Wang, Jiang-lin; Yang, Guo-ping

    2014-01-01

    The effects of genetic polymorphisms of ABCB1 C3435T, POR*28, CYP3A4*1G and CYP3A5*3 variants and gender relating to metabolism on the exposure and response of amlodipine in Chinese hypertensive patients were determined. Population pharmacokinetic analyses were performed on data which were collected prospectively from 60 Chinese patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension [age range 40-74 years, males (n = 31), females (n = 29)] receiving oral racemic amlodipine for 4 weeks. Blood pressure was evaluated at the end of weeks 0 and 4. Blood samples were collected in heparinized tubes at the following times: 0, 2, 6, and 24 h on about day 28 after administration of amlodipine. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and absorption best described the amlodipine pharmacokinetic data. ABCB1 3435 genetic polymorphism and gender affect the amlodipine oral clearance (CL/F). CL/F (L/h) = 28.8 × (1 + GNDR)(-0.531) × (ABCB1 C3435T) where GNDR = 0 and 1 are for male and female, respectively. The CL/F value in a male patient with the ABCB1 3435CC or CT genotype is 28.8 L/h. Lower CL/F and higher exposure occurs in female subjects with the ABCB1 3435CC or CT genotype who have greater decreases in blood pressure after treatment with amlodipine. The results may help to improve the efficacy and tolerability of amlodipine in essential hypertensive patients. PMID:24522199

  4. Host ABC transporter proteins may influence the efficacy of ivermectin and possibly have broader implications for the development of resistance in parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Dooley, L A; Froese, E A; Chung, Y T; Burkman, E J; Moorhead, A R; Ardelli, B F

    2015-10-01

    ABC transporter proteins function to extrude compounds from the cell. These proteins present an obstacle for treatment and for overcoming drug resistance as they are expressed by both host and parasite, and function similarly. The contribution of host ABC proteins to drug efficacy was examined using ivermectin and a Brugia malayi model system. Parallel in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted using equal concentrations of ivermectin. The motilities and fecundity of B. malayi exposed to ivermectin in vitro were significantly lower than those treated in vivo. The higher motilities were correlated with low concentrations of ivermectin in worms extracted from treated hosts. The expression of ABC proteins was significantly higher in worms treated in vitro compared to those treated in vivo as well as in gerbils treated with ivermectin than in non-treated controls. The results suggest that host ABC transporters may influence the efficacy of ivermectin. PMID:26143231

  5. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances multidrug resistance in breast cancer cell lines by translational regulation of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Theile, Dirk; Ruiz, María Laura; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-06-28

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women. Multidrug resistance due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a common cause of chemotherapy failure and disease recurrence. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen present in soybeans and hormone supplements. We investigated the effect of GNT on the expression and function of ABC transporters in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Results demonstrated an induction at the protein level of ABCC1 and ABCG2 and of ABCC1 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. MCF-7 cells showed a concomitant increase in doxorubicin and mitoxantrone efflux and resistance, dependent on ABCG2 activity. ABCC1 induction by GNT in MDA-MB-231 cells modified neither drug efflux nor chemoresistance due to simultaneous acute inhibition of the transporter activity by GNT. All inductions took place at the translational level, as no increment in mRNA was observed and protein increase was prevented by cycloheximide. miR-181a, already demonstrated to inhibit ABCG2 translation, was down-regulated by GNT, explaining translational induction. Effects were independent of classical estrogen receptors. Results suggest potential nutrient-drug interactions that could threaten chemotherapy efficacy, especially in ABCG2-expressing tumors treated with substrates of this transporter. PMID:27033456

  6. The Influence of C3435T Polymorphism of the ABCB1 Gene on Genetic Susceptibility to Depression and Treatment Response in Polish Population - Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeleń, Agnieszka Maria; Sałagacka, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta Karolina; Mirowski, Marek; Talarowska, Monika; Gałecki, Piotr; Balcerczak, Ewa Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the high prevalence of depression, the mechanism of the origin of this disease as well as the causes of resistance to therapy in some patients are still not fully understood. Increasingly, the possible role of genetic factors is considered. One of them is polymorphisms in the ABCB1 (MDR1) gene which encodes P-glycoprotein, responsible for the transport of xenobiotics, including antidepressant drugs, through the blood-brain barrier. Methods: C3435T was evaluated in 90 patients with recurrent depressive disorders (rDD). Genotyping was performed using a polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Results: The obtained results indicate that the TT genotype occurred more frequently among patients with rDD than in healthy volunteers (p=0.0441). Also, at least one C allele was present significantly less frequent in the study group than in healthy individuals (p=0.0300). The severity of depressive symptoms was higher among patient with the CC genotype in comparison with the other genotypes (p=0.0106) but treatment response to antidepressants was better in this group than among patients with CT or TT genotypes (p=0.0301). Likewise, patients with the T allele have a significantly lower severity of symptoms (p=0.0026) and decreased therapy effectiveness (p=0.0142) than C allele carriers. Conclusions: This study suggests that C3435T polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene are strongly associated with a predisposition to depression development, the severity of depressive symptoms and the effectiveness of therapy with using different groups of antidepressant agents. PMID:26664259

  7. Tivantinib (ARQ 197) exhibits antitumor activity by directly interacting with tubulin and overcomes ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Aki; Katayama, Ryohei; Oh-Hara, Tomoko; Sato, Shigeo; Okuno, Yasushi; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-12-01

    Tivantinib (ARQ197) was first reported as a highly selective inhibitor of c-MET and is currently being investigated in a phase III clinical trial. However, as recently reported by us and another group, tivantinib showed cytotoxic activity independent of cellular c-MET status and also disrupted microtubule dynamics. To investigate if tivantinib exerts its cytotoxic activity by disrupting microtubules, we quantified polymerized tubulin in cells and xenograft tumors after tivantinib treatment. Consistent with our previous report, tivantinib reduced tubulin polymerization in cells and in mouse xenograft tumors in vivo. To determine if tivantinib directly binds to tubulin, we performed an in vitro competition assay. Tivantinib competitively inhibited colchicine but not vincristine or vinblastine binding to purified tubulin. These results imply that tivantinib directly binds to the colchicine binding site of tubulin. To predict the binding mode of tivantinib with tubulin, we performed computer simulation of the docking pose of tivantinib with tubulin using GOLD docking program. Computer simulation predicts tivantinib fitted into the colchicine binding pocket of tubulin without steric hindrance. Furthermore, tivantinib showed similar IC50 values against parental and multidrug-resistant cells. In contrast, other microtubule-targeting drugs, such as vincristine, paclitaxel, and colchicine, could not suppress the growth of cells overexpressing ABC transporters. Moreover, the expression level of ABC transporters did not correlate with the apoptosis-inducing ability of tivantinib different from other microtubule inhibitor. These results suggest that tivantinib can overcome ABC transporter-mediated multidrug-resistant tumor cells and is potentially useful against various tumors. PMID:25313010

  8. The ABC transporter ABCG29 is involved in H2O2 tolerance and biocontrol traits in the fungus Clonostachys rosea.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Mukesh; Jensen, Dan Funck; Karlsson, Magnus

    2016-04-01

    For successful biocontrol interactions, biological control organisms must tolerate toxic metabolites produced by themselves or plant pathogens during mycoparasitic/antagonistic interactions, by host plant during colonization of the plant, and xenobiotics present in the environment. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters can play a significant role in tolerance of toxic compounds by mediating active transport across the cellular membrane. This paper reports on functional characterization of an ABC transporter ABCG29 in the biocontrol fungus Clonostachys rosea strain IK726. Gene expression analysis showed induced expression of abcG29 during exposure to the Fusarium spp. mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) and the fungicides Cantus, Chipco Green and Apron. Expression of abcG29 in C. rosea was significantly higher during C. rosea-C. rosea (Cr-Cr) interaction or in exposure to C. rosea culture filtrate for 2 h, compared to interaction with Fusarium graminearum or 2 h exposure to F. graminearum culture filtrate. In contrast with gene expression data, ΔabcG29 strains did not display reduced tolerance towards ZEA, fungicides or chemical agents known for inducing oxidative, cell wall or osmotic stress, compared to C. rosea WT. The exception was a significant reduction in tolerance to H2O2 (10 mM) in ΔabcG29 strains when conidia were used as an inoculum. The antagonistic ability of ΔabcG29 strains towards F. graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum or Botrytis cinerea in dual plate assays were not different compared with WT. However, in biocontrol assays ΔabcG29 strains displayed reduced ability to protect Arabidopsis thaliana leaves from B. cinerea, and barley seedling from F. graminearum as measured by an A. thaliana detached leaf assay and a barley foot rot disease assay, respectively. These data show that the ABCG29 is dispensable for ZEA and fungicides tolerance, and antagonism but not H2O2 tolerance and biocontrol effects in C. rosea. PMID:26520102

  9. A wheat ABC transporter contributes to both grain formation and mycotoxin tolerance.

    PubMed

    Walter, Stephanie; Kahla, Amal; Arunachalam, Chanemoughasoundharam; Perochon, Alexandre; Khan, Mojibur R; Scofield, Steven R; Doohan, Fiona M

    2015-05-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) acts as a disease virulence factor for Fusarium fungi, and tolerance of DON enhances wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease. Two variants of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family C transporter gene were cloned from DON-treated wheat mRNA, namely TaABCC3.1 and TaABCC3.2. These represent two of three putative genes identified on chromosomes 3A, 3B, and 3D of the wheat genome sequence. Variant TaABCC3.1 represents the DON-responsive transcript previously associated with DON resistance in wheat. PCR-based mapping and in silico sequence analyses located TaABCC3.1 to the short arm of wheat chromosome 3B (not within the FHB resistance quantitative trait locus Fhb1). In silico analyses of microarray data indicated that TaABCC3 genes are expressed in reproductive tissue and roots, and in response to the DON producer Fusarium graminearum. Gene expression studies showed that TaABCC3.1 is activated as part of the early host response to DON and in response to the FHB defence hormone jasmonic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) confirmed that TaABCC3 genes contributed to DON tolerance. VIGS was performed using two independent viral construct applications: one specifically targeted TaABCC3.1 for silencing, while the other targeted this gene and the chromosome 3A homeologue. In both instances, VIGS resulted in more toxin-induced discoloration of spikelets, compared with the DON effects in non-silenced spikelets at 14 d after toxin treatment (≥2.2-fold increase, P<0.05). Silencing by both VIGS constructs enhanced head ripening, and especially so in DON-treated heads. VIGS of TaABCC3 genes also reduced the grain number by more than 28% (P<0.05), both with and without DON treatment, and the effects were greater for the construct that targeted the two homeologues. Hence, DON-responsive TaABCC3 genes warrant further study to determine their potential as disease resistance breeding targets and their function in grain formation

  10. Maltose and Maltodextrin Utilization by Listeria monocytogenes Depend on an Inducible ABC Transporter which Is Repressed by Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Shubha; Berg, Daniela; Hagen, Nicole; Schriefer, Eva-Maria; Stoll, Regina; Goebel, Werner; Kreft, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Background In the environment as well as in the vertebrate intestine, Listeriae have access to complex carbohydrates like maltodextrins. Bacterial exploitation of such compounds requires specific uptake and utilization systems. Methodology/Principal Findings We could show that Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species contain genes/gene products with high homology to the maltodextrin ABC transporter and utilization system of B. subtilis. Mutant construction and growth tests revealed that the L. monocytogenes gene cluster was required for the efficient utilization of maltodextrins as well as maltose. The gene for the ATP binding protein of the transporter was located distant from the cluster. Transcription analyses demonstrated that the system was induced by maltose/maltodextrins and repressed by glucose. Its induction was dependent on a LacI type transcriptional regulator. Repression by glucose was independent of the catabolite control protein CcpA, but was relieved in a mutant defective for Hpr kinase/phosphorylase. Conclusions/Significance The data obtained show that in L. monocytogenes the uptake of maltodextrin and, in contrast to B. subtilis, also maltose is exclusively mediated by an ABC transporter. Furthermore, the results suggest that glucose repression of the uptake system possibly is by inducer exclusion, a mechanism not described so far in this organism. PMID:20436965

  11. The contribution of methionine to the stability of the Escherichia coli MetNIQ ABC transporter - substrate binding protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phong T.; Li, Qi Wen; Kadaba, Neena S.; Lai, Jeffrey Y.; Yang, Janet G.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous role of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) importers in nutrient uptake, only the E. coli maltose and vitamin B12 ABC transporters have been structurally characterized in multiple conformations relevant to the alternating access transport mechanism. To complement our previous structure determination of the E. coli MetNI methionine importer in the inward facing conformation (Kadaba et al. (2008) Science 321, 250–253), we have explored conditions stabilizing the outward facing conformation. Using two variants, the Walker B E166Q mutation with ATP+EDTA to stabilize MetNI in the ATP-bound conformation and the N229A variant of the binding protein MetQ, shown in this work to disrupt methionine binding, a high affinity MetNIQ complex was formed with a dissociation constant measured to be 27 nM. Using wild type MetQ containing a co-purified methionine (for which the crystal structure is reported at 1.6 Å resolution), the dissociation constant for complex formation with MetNI is measured to be ~40-fold weaker, indicating that complex formation lowers the affinity of MetQ for methionine by this amount. Preparation of a stable MetNIQ complex is an essential step towards the crystallographic analysis of the outward facing conformation, a key intermediate in the uptake of methionine by this transport system. PMID:25803078

  12. The abcEDCBA-Encoded ABC Transporter and the virB Operon-Encoded Type IV Secretion System of Brucella ovis Are Critical for Intracellular Trafficking and Survival in Ovine Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Auricelio A.; Silva, Ana P. C.; Mol, Juliana P. S.; Costa, Luciana F.; Garcia, Luize N. N.; Araújo, Marcio S.; Martins Filho, Olindo A.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Santos, Renato L.

    2015-01-01

    Brucella ovis infection is associated with epididymitis, orchitis and infertility in rams. Most of the information available on B. ovis and host cell interaction has been generated using murine macrophages or epithelial cell lines, but the interaction between B. ovis and primary ovine macrophages has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the B. ovis abcEDCBA-encoded ABC transporter and the virB operon-encoded Type IV Secretion System (T4SS) during intracellular survival of B. ovis in ovine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutant strains were unable to survive in the intracellular environment when compared to the WT B. ovis at 48 hours post infection (hpi). In addition, these mutant strains cannot exclude the lysosomal marker LAMP1 from its vacuolar membrane, and their vacuoles do not acquire the endoplasmic reticulum marker calreticulin, which takes place in the WT B. ovis containing vacuole. Higher levels of nitric oxide production were observed in macrophages infected with WT B. ovis at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains. Conversely, higher levels of reactive oxygen species were detected in macrophages infected with the ΔabcBA or ΔvirB2 mutant strains at 48 hpi when compared to macrophages infected with the WT strain. Our results demonstrate that B. ovis is able to persist and multiply in ovine macrophages, while ΔabcBA and ΔvirB2 mutations prevent intracellular multiplication, favor phagolysosome fusion, and impair maturation of the B. ovis vacuole towards an endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartment. PMID:26366863

  13. Demonstration of phosphoryl group transfer indicates that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exhibits adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J

    2012-10-19

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl(-) channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP <==> 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the (32)P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  14. Demonstration of Phosphoryl Group Transfer Indicates That the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Exhibits Adenylate Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl− channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the 32P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  15. Alkylrhodamines enhance the toxicity of clotrimazole and benzalkonium chloride by interfering with yeast pleiotropic ABC-transporters.

    PubMed

    Knorre, Dmitry A; Besedina, Elizaveta; Karavaeva, Iuliia E; Smirnova, Ekaterina A; Markova, Olga V; Severin, Fedor F

    2016-06-01

    ABC-transporters with broad substrate specificity are responsible for pathogenic yeast resistance to antifungal compounds. Here we asked whether highly hydrophobic chemicals with delocalized positive charge can be used to overcome the resistance. Such molecules efficiently penetrate the plasma membrane and accumulate inside the cells. We reasoned that these properties can convert an active efflux of the compounds into a futile cycle thus interfering with the extrusion of the antibiotics. To test this, we studied the effects of several alkylated rhodamines on the drug resistance of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We found that octylrhodamine synergetically increases toxicity of Pdr5p substrate-clotrimazole, while the others were less effective. Next, we compared the contributions of three major pleiotropic ABC-transporters (Pdr5p, Yor1p, Snq2p) on the accumulation of the alkylated rhodamines. While all of the tested compounds were extruded by Pdr5p, Yor1p and Snq2p showed narrower substrate specificity. Interestingly, among the tested alkylated rhodamines, inactivation of Pdr5p had the strongest effect on the accumulation of octylrhodamine inside the cells, which is consistent with the fact that clotrimazole is a substrate of Pdr5p. As alkylated rhodamines were shown to be non-toxic on mice, our study makes them potential components of pharmacological antifungal compositions. PMID:27044313

  16. The ABC transporter YejABEF is required for resistance to antimicrobial peptides and the virulence of Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Bie, Pengfei; Cheng, Jie; Lu, Lin; Cui, Buyun; Wu, Qingmin

    2016-01-01

    The ability to resist the killing effects of host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) plays a vital role in the virulence of pathogens. The Brucella melitensis NI genome has a gene cluster that encodes ABC transport. In this study, we constructed yejA1, yejA2, yejB, yejE, yejF, and whole yej operon deletion mutants, none of which exhibited discernible growth defect in TSB or minimal medium. Unlike their parental strain, the mutants showed a significantly increased sensitivity to acidic stress. The NIΔyejE and NIΔyejABEF mutants were also more sensitive than B. melitensis NI to polymyxin B, and the expression of yej operon genes was induced by polymyxin B. Moreover, cell and mouse infection assays indicated that NIΔyejE and NIΔyejABEF have restricted invasion and replication abilities inside macrophages and are rapidly cleared from the spleens of infected mice. These findings indicate that the ABC transporter YejABEF is required for the virulence of Brucella, suggesting that resistance to host antimicrobials is a key mechanism for Brucella to persistently survive in vivo. This study provided insights that led us to further investigate the potential correlation of AMP resistance with the mechanisms of immune escape and persistent infection by pathogens. PMID:27550726

  17. The ABC transporter YejABEF is required for resistance to antimicrobial peptides and the virulence of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Bie, Pengfei; Cheng, Jie; Lu, Lin; Cui, Buyun; Wu, Qingmin

    2016-01-01

    The ability to resist the killing effects of host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) plays a vital role in the virulence of pathogens. The Brucella melitensis NI genome has a gene cluster that encodes ABC transport. In this study, we constructed yejA1, yejA2, yejB, yejE, yejF, and whole yej operon deletion mutants, none of which exhibited discernible growth defect in TSB or minimal medium. Unlike their parental strain, the mutants showed a significantly increased sensitivity to acidic stress. The NIΔyejE and NIΔyejABEF mutants were also more sensitive than B. melitensis NI to polymyxin B, and the expression of yej operon genes was induced by polymyxin B. Moreover, cell and mouse infection assays indicated that NIΔyejE and NIΔyejABEF have restricted invasion and replication abilities inside macrophages and are rapidly cleared from the spleens of infected mice. These findings indicate that the ABC transporter YejABEF is required for the virulence of Brucella, suggesting that resistance to host antimicrobials is a key mechanism for Brucella to persistently survive in vivo. This study provided insights that led us to further investigate the potential correlation of AMP resistance with the mechanisms of immune escape and persistent infection by pathogens. PMID:27550726

  18. The non-ABC drug transporter RLIP76 (RALBP-1) plays a major role in the mechanisms of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Yogesh C; Sharma, Rajendra; Yadav, Sushma; Dwivedi, Seema; Sharma, Abha; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2007-05-01

    RLIP76 or Ral binding protein (RalBP-1) was initially cloned as a Ral-effector that was proposed as a link between Ral and Ras pathways. This protein is encoded in humans on chromosome 18p11.3 by a gene with 11 exons and 9 introns and is found ubiquitously from drosophila to humans. RLIP76 displays inhibitory GTPase activity toward Rho/Rac class G-protein cdc42 which is involved in regulation of cytoskeletal organization, lamellipodia, cell migration and apoptosis via Ras. We have recently shown that RLIP76 is also a multispecific transporter of chemotherapeutic agents and glutathione conjugates (GS-E). In human cells RLIP76 accounts for more than two third of the transport activity for GS-E and drugs as opposed to the ABC-transporters including MRP1, which account for less than one third of this activity. Evidence is mounting that RLIP76 is a stress-responsive multi-specific, non-ABC transporter which represents an entirely novel link between stress-inducible G-protein signaling, receptor tyrosine-kinase signaling, endocytosis, heat-shock and stress defense pathways, and transport mediated drug-resistance. The expression of RLIP76 is significantly greater in human cancer cells of diverse origin as compared to the non-malignant cells. Inhibition of RLIP76, using antibodies towards a cell surface epitope, or depletion of RLIP76 using either siRNA or anti-sense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides preferentially causes apoptosis in malignant cells. Administration of RLIP76 antibodies, siRNA, or anti-sense oligonucleotides to mice bearing syngeneic B16 mouse melanoma tumors causes rapid and complete regression of tumors. Studies summarized in this review strongly suggest that RLIP76 is a logical target for clinical intervention of not only multi-drug resistance but also for diseases resulting from oxidative stress. PMID:17504221

  19. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity.

    PubMed

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  20. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  1. The prevalence of ABCB1:c.227_230delATAG mutation in affected dog breeds from European countries.

    PubMed

    Firdova, Zuzana; Turnova, Evelina; Bielikova, Marcela; Turna, Jan; Dudas, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    Deletion of 4-base pairs in the canine ABCB1 (MDR1) gene, responsible for encoding P-glycoprotein, leads to nonsense frame-shift mutation, which causes hypersensitivity to macrocyclic lactones drugs (e.g. ivermectin). To date, at least 12 purebred dog breeds have been found to be affected by this mutation. The aim of this study was to update information about the prevalence of ABCB1 mutation (c.227_230delATAG) in predisposed breeds in multiple European countries. This large scale survey also includes countries which were not involved in previous studies. The samples were collected in the period from 2012 to 2014. The overview is based on genotyping data of 4729 individuals. The observed mutant allele frequencies were 58.5% (Smooth Collie), 48.3% (Rough Collie), 35% (Australian Shepherd), 30.3% (Shetland Sheepdog), 28.1% (Silken Windhound), 26.1% (Miniature Australian Shepherd), 24.3% (Longhaired Whippet), 16.2% (White Swiss Shepherd) and 0% (Border Collie). The possible presence of an ABCB1 mutant allele in Akita-Inu breed has been investigated with negative results. This information could be helpful for breeders in optimization of their breeding strategy and for veterinarians when prescribing drug therapy for dogs of predisposed breeds. PMID:27234542

  2. Expression of intestinal transporter genes in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    CHO, SOO-MIN; PARK, SUNG-WON; KIM, NA-HYUN; PARK, JIN-A; YI, HEE; CHO, HEE-JUNG; PARK, KI-HWAN; HWANG, INGYUN; SHIN, HO-CHUL

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to produce a transcriptional database of the intestinal transporters of beagle dogs. Total RNA was isolated from the duodenum and the expression of various mRNAs was measured using GeneChip® oligonucleotide arrays. A total of 124 transporter genes were detected. Genes for fatty acid, peptide, amino acid and glucose and multidrug resistance/multidrug resistance-associated protein (MDR/MRP) transport were expressed at relatively higher levels than the other transporter types. The dogs exhibited abundant mRNA expression of the fatty acid transporters (fatty acid binding proteins, FABPs) FABP1 and FABP2, the ATP-binding cassettes (ABCs) ABCB1A and ABCC2, the amino acid/peptide transporters SLC3A1 and SLC15A1, the glucose transporters SLC5A1, SLC2A2 and SLC2A5, the organic anion transporter SLC22A9 and the phosphate transporters SLC20A1 and SLC37A4. In mice, a similar profile was observed with high expression of the glucose transporters SLC5A1 and SLC2As, the fatty acid transporters FABP1 and FABP2, the MDR/MRP transporters ABCB1A and ABCC2 and the phosphate transporter SLC37A4. However, the overall data reveal diverse transcriptomic profiles of the intestinal transporters of dogs and mice. Therefore, the current database may be useful for comparing the intestinal transport systems of dogs with those of mice to better evaluate xenobiotics. PMID:23251289

  3. The ABC-transporter AtmA is involved in nickel and cobalt resistance of Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34.

    PubMed

    Mikolay, André; Nies, Dietrich H

    2009-08-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 genome contains an ortholog of Atm1p named AtmA (Rmet_0391, YP_582546). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ABC-type transport system Atm1p is involved in export of iron-sulfur clusters from mitochondria into the cytoplasm for assembly of cytoplasmic iron-sulfur containing proteins. An atmA mutant of C. metallidurans was sensitive to nickel and cobalt but not iron cations. AtmA increased also resistance to these cations in Escherichia coli strains that carry deletions of the genes for other nickel and cobalt transport systems. In C. metallidurans, atmA expression was not significantly induced by nickel and cobalt, but repressed by zinc. AtmA was purified as a 70 kDa protein after expression in E. coli. ATPase activity of AtmA was stimulated by nickel and cobalt. PMID:19132541

  4. Alterations in function and expression of ABC transporters at blood-brain barrier under diabetes and the clinical significances

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a systematic metabolic disease, which often develops a number of well-recognized vascular complications including brain complications which may partly result from the dysfunction of blood-brain barrier (BBB). BBB is generally considered as a mechanism for protecting the brain from unwanted actions resulting from substances in the blood and maintaining brain homeostasis via monitoring the entry or efflux of compounds. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters including P-glycoprotein (P-GP) and breast cancer-related protein (BCRP), widely expressed in the luminal membrane of the microvessel endothelium and in the apical membrane of the choroids plexus epithelium, play important roles in the function of BBB. However, these transporters are easily altered by some diseases. The present article was focused on the alteration in expression and function of both P-GP and BCRP at BBB by diabetes and the clinical significances. PMID:25540622

  5. Inward facing conformations of the MetNI methionine ABC transporter: Implications for the mechanism of transinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric; Nguyen, Phong T; Yeates, Todd O; Rees, Douglas C

    2012-01-01

    Two new crystal structures of the Escherichia coli high affinity methionine uptake ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter MetNI, purified in the detergents cyclohexyl-pentyl-β-d-maltoside (CY5) and n-decyl-β-d-maltopyranoside (DM), have been solved in inward facing conformations to resolutions of 2.9 and 4.0 Å, respectively. Compared to the previously reported 3.7 Å resolution structure of MetNI purified in n-dodecyl-β-d-maltopyranoside (DDM), the higher resolution of the CY5 data enabled significant improvements to the structural model in several regions, including corrections to the sequence registry, and identification of ADP in the nucleotide binding site. CY5 crystals soaked with selenomethionine established details of the methionine binding site in the C2 regulatory domain of the ABC subunit, including the displacement of the side chain of MetN residue methionine 301 by the exogenous ligand. When compared to the CY5 or DDM structures, the DM structure exhibits a significant repositioning of the dimeric C2 domains, including an unexpected register shift in the intermolecular β-sheet hydrogen bonding between monomers, and a narrowing of the nucleotide binding space. The immediate proximity of the exogenous methionine binding site to the conformationally variable dimeric interface provides an indication of how methionine binding to the regulatory domains might mediate the phenomenon of transinhibition. PMID:22095702

  6. Environmental Conditions Influence Induction of Key ABC-Transporter Genes Affecting Glyphosate Resistance Mechanism in Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Tani, Eleni; Chachalis, Demosthenis; Travlos, Ilias S; Bilalis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Conyza canadensis has been reported to be the most frequent weed species that evolved resistance to glyphosate in various parts of the world. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of environmental conditions (temperature and light) on the expression levels of the EPSPS gene and two major ABC-transporter genes (M10 and M11) on glyphosate susceptible (GS) and glyphosate resistant (GR) horseweed populations, collected from several regions across Greece. Real-time PCR was conducted to determine the expression level of the aforementioned genes when glyphosate was applied at normal (1×; 533 g·a.e.·ha(-1)) and high rates (4×, 8×), measured at an early one day after treatment (DAT) and a later stage (four DAT) of expression. Plants were exposed to light or dark conditions, at three temperature regimes (8, 25, 35 °C). GR plants were made sensitive when exposed to 8 °C with light; those sensitized plants behaved biochemically (shikimate accumulation) and molecularly (expression of EPSPS and ABC-genes) like the GS plants. Results from the current study show the direct link between the environmental conditions and the induction level of the above key genes that likely affect the efficiency of the proposed mechanism of glyphosate resistance. PMID:27104532

  7. Environmental Conditions Influence Induction of Key ABC-Transporter Genes Affecting Glyphosate Resistance Mechanism in Conyza canadensis

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Eleni; Chachalis, Demosthenis; Travlos, Ilias S.; Bilalis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Conyza canadensis has been reported to be the most frequent weed species that evolved resistance to glyphosate in various parts of the world. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of environmental conditions (temperature and light) on the expression levels of the EPSPS gene and two major ABC-transporter genes (M10 and M11) on glyphosate susceptible (GS) and glyphosate resistant (GR) horseweed populations, collected from several regions across Greece. Real-time PCR was conducted to determine the expression level of the aforementioned genes when glyphosate was applied at normal (1×; 533 g·a.e.·ha−1) and high rates (4×, 8×), measured at an early one day after treatment (DAT) and a later stage (four DAT) of expression. Plants were exposed to light or dark conditions, at three temperature regimes (8, 25, 35 °C). GR plants were made sensitive when exposed to 8 °C with light; those sensitized plants behaved biochemically (shikimate accumulation) and molecularly (expression of EPSPS and ABC-genes) like the GS plants. Results from the current study show the direct link between the environmental conditions and the induction level of the above key genes that likely affect the efficiency of the proposed mechanism of glyphosate resistance. PMID:27104532

  8. Structural basis for the hydrolysis of ATP by a nucleotide binding subunit of an amino acid ABC transporter from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Devi, Seenivasan Karthiga; Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka Reddy; Jeyakanthan, J; Velmurugan, D; Sivaraman, J

    2015-06-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a major family of small molecule transporter proteins, and their deregulation is associated with several diseases, including cancer. Here, we report the crystal structure of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of an amino acid ABC transporter from Thermus thermophilus (TTHA1159) in its apo form and as a complex with ADP along with functional studies. TTHA1159 is a putative arginine ABC transporter. The apo-TTHA1159 was crystallized in dimeric form, a hitherto unreported form of an apo NBD. Structural comparison of the apo and ADP-Mg(2+) complexes revealed that Phe14 of TTHA1159 undergoes a significant conformational change to accommodate ADP, and that the bound ADP interacts with the P-loop (Gly40-Thr45). Modeling of ATP-Mg(2+):TTHA1159 complex revealed that Gln86 and Glu164 are involved in water-mediated hydrogen bonding contacts and Asp163 in Mg(2+) ion-mediated hydrogen bonding contacts with the γ-phosphate of ATP, consistent with the findings of other ABC transporters. Mutational studies confirmed the necessity of each of these residues, and a comparison of the apo/ADP Mg(2+):TTHA1159 with its ATP-complex model suggests the likelihood of a key conformational change to the Gln86 side chain for ATP hydrolysis. PMID:25916755

  9. Secondary Metabolites from Plants Inhibiting ABC Transporters and Reversing Resistance of Cancer Cells and Microbes to Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Ashour, Mohamed L.; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Fungal, bacterial, and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial, or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: (1) Activation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, (2) Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidize lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulfate, or amino acids, and (3) Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarizes the evidence that secondary metabolites (SM) of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics, and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids [monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins), steroids (including cardiac glycosides), and tetraterpenes] but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids) function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, multiple resistance-associated protein 1, and Breast cancer resistance protein in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA) and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones) directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse multidrug resistance, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these SM are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion. PMID:22536197

  10. The Crystal Structure of the YknZ Extracellular Domain of ABC Transporter YknWXYZ from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lulu; Jiang, Rui; Jin, Xiaoling; Liu, Jing; Fan, Shengdi; Quan, Chun-Shan; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus possesses the peptide toxin Sporulation-Delaying Protein (SDP), which can kill cells within a biofilm to support continued growth, thereby delaying the onset of biofilm sporulation. The four-component transporter YknWXYZ acts as a major SDP efflux pump to protect cells against the endogenous SDP toxin, for which YknYZ is a non-canonical ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type transporter. YknYZ consists of the following two components: (1) an individual protein (YknY) and (2) a respective permease (YknZ). To date, the crystal structure, molecular function, and mechanism of action of the integral membrane protein YknZ remain to be elucidated. In this study, to characterize the structural and biochemical roles of YknZ in the functional assembly of YknWXYZ, we predicted and overexpressed the YknZ extracellular domain. We determined the crystal structure of B. amyloliquefaciens YknZ at a resolution of 2.0 Å. The structure revealed that the YknZ extracellular region exhibits significant structural similarity with the MacB periplasmic domain, which is a non-canonical ABC-type transporter in the tripartite macrolide-specific efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria. We also found that the YknZ extracellular domain can directly bind to an extracellular component of YknX. This structural and biochemical study provides insights into the assembly of YknWXYZ, which may be relevant to understanding cannibalistic peptide toxin resistance in Bacillus and controlling bacterial growth. PMID:27243566

  11. Defining key roles for auxiliary proteins in an ABC transporter that maintains bacterial outer membrane lipid asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Shuhua; Ercan, Bilge; Torta, Federico; Fong, Zhen Yang; Wong, Hui Yi Alvina; Wenk, Markus R; Chng, Shu-Sin

    2016-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipid asymmetry is critical for the function of the outer membrane (OM) as a selective permeability barrier, but how it is established and maintained is poorly understood. Here, we characterize a non-canonical ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter in Escherichia coli that provides energy for maintaining OM lipid asymmetry via the transport of aberrantly localized phospholipids (PLs) from the OM to the inner membrane (IM). We establish that the transporter comprises canonical components, MlaF and MlaE, and auxiliary proteins, MlaD and MlaB, of previously unknown functions. We further demonstrate that MlaD forms extremely stable hexamers within the complex, functions in substrate binding with strong affinity for PLs, and modulates ATP hydrolytic activity. In addition, MlaB plays critical roles in both the assembly and activity of the transporter. Our work provides mechanistic insights into how the MlaFEDB complex participates in ensuring active retrograde PL transport to maintain OM lipid asymmetry. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19042.001 PMID:27529189

  12. Differential Regulation of Iron- and Manganese-Specific MtsABC and Heme-Specific HtsABC Transporters by the Metalloregulator MtsR of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Tracey S.; Liu, Mengyao; McClure, Michael J.; Fukumura, Maki; Duffy, Angela; Lei, Benfang

    2006-01-01

    The genome of the human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) encodes the transporters MtsABC, FtsABCD, and HtsABC to take up ferric and manganese ions, ferric ferrichrome, and heme, respectively. The GAS genome also encodes two metalloregulators PerR and MtsR. To understand the regulation of the expression of these transporters, the mtsR and perR deletion mutants of a GAS serotype M1 strain were generated, and the effects of the deletions and Fe3+, Mn2+, and Zn2+ on the expression of mtsA, htsA, and ftsB were examined. Mn2+ dramatically depresses mtsA transcription and levels of the MtsA protein but does not downregulate the expression of htsA and ftsB. Fe3+ decreases the expression of mtsA and htsA but has no effect on ftsB expression. Zn2+ has no effect on the expression of all three genes. The deletion of mtsR abolishes the Mn2+- and Fe3+-induced depression of mtsA expression and the Fe3+-dependent decrease in htsA expression. The deletion of mtsR does not significantly alter GAS virulence in a mouse model of subcutaneous infection. The deletion of perR does not affect the expression of the genes in response to the metal ions. MtsR binds to the mts promoter region in the presence of Mn2+ or Fe2+. The results indicate that MtsR differentially regulates the expression of mtsABC and htsABC. PMID:16926405

  13. Alleviation of temperature-sensitive secretion defect of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, TliDEF, by a change of single amino acid in the ABC protein, TliD.

    PubMed

    Eom, Gyeong Tae; Oh, Joon Young; Park, Ji Hyun; Lim, Hye Jin; Lee, So Jeong; Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Ji-Eun; Jegal, Jonggeon; Song, Bong Keun; Yu, Ju-Hyun; Song, Jae Kwang

    2016-09-01

    An ABC transporter, TliDEF, from Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1, mediates the secretion of its cognate lipase, TliA, in a temperature-dependent secretion manner; the TliDEF-mediated secretion of TliA was impossible at the temperatures over 33°C. To isolate a mutant TliDEF capable of secreting TliA at 35°C, the mutagenesis of ABC protein (TliD) was performed. The mutated tliD library where a random point mutation was introduced by error-prone PCR was coexpressed with the wild-type tliE, tliF and tliA in Escherichia coli. Among approximately 10,000 colonies of the tliD library, we selected one colony that formed transparent halo on LB-tributyrin plates at 35°C. At the growth temperature of 35°C, the selected mutant TliD showed 1.75 U/ml of the extracellular lipase activity, while the wild-type TliDEF did not show any detectable lipase activity in the culture supernatant of E. coli. Moreover, the mutant TliD also showed higher level of TliA secretion than the wild-type TliDEF at other culture temperatures, 20°C, 25°C and 30°C. The mutant TliD had a single amino acid change (Ser287Pro) in the predicted transmembrane region in the membrane domain of TliD, implying that the corresponding region of TliD was important for causing the temperature-dependent secretion of TliDEF. These results suggested that the property of ABC transporter could be changed by the change of amino acid in the ABC protein. PMID:27033673

  14. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  15. Cell differentiation and infectivity of Leishmania mexicana are inhibited in a strain resistant to an ABC-transporter blocker.

    PubMed

    Silva, N; Camacho, N; Figarella, K; Ponte-Sucre, A

    2004-06-01

    We analysed whether markers of cell differentiation and infectivity differed when compared to the parental sensitive strain [NR(Gs)] in an in vitro selected Leishmania strain [NR(Gr)] resistant to Glibenclamide, an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC)-transporter blocker. The data show that the cell body area was larger in NR(Gr) compared to NR(Gs) and that functional characters associated with an infective metacyclic phenotype, such as resistance to the lytic effect of the alternative complement pathway and expression of the Meta-1 protein, were reduced. The infectivity of NR(Gr) to J774.1 macrophages was also significantly reduced. These results suggest that resistance in Leishmania against Glibenclamide, a general blocker of P-glycoproteins, could produce functional modifications that may be relevant for Leishmania differentiation, infectivity and survival. PMID:15206465

  16. A stable ATP binding to the nucleotide binding domain is important for reliable gating cycle in an ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Yu, Ying-Chun; Kono, Koichi; Kubota, Takahiro; Yasui, Masato; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel, a member of ABC transporter superfamily, gates following ATP-dependent conformational changes of the nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Reflecting the hundreds of milliseconds duration of the channel open state corresponding to the dimerization of two NBDs, macroscopic WT-CFTR currents usually showed a fast, single exponential relaxation upon removal of cytoplasmic ATP. Mutations of tyrosine1219, a residue critical for ATP binding in second NBD (NBD2), induced a significant slow phase in the current relaxation, suggesting that weakening ATP binding affinity at NBD2 increases the probability of the stable open state. The slow phase was effectively diminished by a higher affinity ATP analogue. These data suggest that a stable binding of ATP to NBD2 is required for normal CFTR gating cycle, andthat the instability of ATP binding frequently halts the gating cycle in the open state presumably through a failure of ATP hydrolysis at NBD2. PMID:20628841

  17. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Dominik; Daniel, Volker; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Opelz, Gerhard; Naujokat, Cord

    2010-04-16

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  18. The expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and a putative ABC transporter permease is inversely correlated during biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes 4b G

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the molecular basis of biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) of the deletion mutant of lm.G_1771 gene, which encodes for a putative ABC_transporter permease, is highly expressed in biofilm. In this study, the sod gene deletion mutant delta ...

  19. Construction of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame deletions in putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and analysis of their growth under stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that is difficult to eliminate since it can survive under multiple stress conditions such as low pH and low temperature. Understanding its survival under stress conditions is important to control this pathogen in food. ABC transporters have been shown...

  20. Relative Rates of Amino Acid Import via the ABC Transporter GlnPQ Determine the Growth Performance of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Fulyani, Faizah; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The GlnPQ transporter from Lactococcus lactis has the remarkable feature of having two substrate-binding domains (SBDs) fused to the N terminus of the transmembrane domain (TMD), and thus four SBDs are present in the homodimeric complex. Although X-ray structures and ligand binding data are available for both SBDs, little is known of how different amino acids compete with each other for transport via GlnPQ. Here we show GlnPQ has a broader substrate specificity than previously thought, with the ability to take up asparagine, glutamine, and glutamic acid, albeit via different routes and with different affinities. Asparagine and glutamine compete with each other at the level of binding to SBD1 and SBD2 (with differences in dissociation constant), but at the same time SBD1 and SBD2 compete with each other at the level of interaction with the translocator domain (with differences in affinity constant and rate of transport). Although glutamine transport via SBD1 is outcompeted by physiological concentrations of asparagine, SBD2 ensures high rates of import of the essential amino acid glutamine. Taken together, this study demonstrates that even in the presence of competing asparagine concentrations, GlnPQ has a high capacity to transport glutamine, which matches the high needs of the cell for glutamine and glutamate. IMPORTANCE GlnPQ is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter for glutamine, glutamic acid, and asparagine. The system is essential in various Gram-positive bacteria, including L. lactis and several pathogens. Here we show how the amino acids compete with each other for binding to the multiple SBDs of GlnPQ and how these SBDs compete with each other for substrate delivery to the transporter. Overall, our results show that GlnPQ has evolved to transport diverse substrates via different paths and to optimally acquire the abundant and essential amino acid glutamine. PMID:26553850

  1. Functional Dependence between Septal Protein SepJ from Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 and an Amino Acid ABC-Type Uptake Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Leticia; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the diazotrophic filaments of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, two different cell types, the CO2-fixing vegetative cells and the N2-fixing heterocysts, exchange nutrients, including some amino acids. In the model organism Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the SepJ protein, composed of periplasmic and integral membrane (permease) sections, is located at the intercellular septa joining adjacent cells in the filament. The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 bears a gene, Synpcc7942_1024 (here designated dmeA), encoding a permease homologous to the SepJ permease domain. Synechococcus strains lacking dmeA or lacking dmeA and expressing Anabaena sepJ were constructed. The Synechococcus dmeA mutant showed a significant 22 to 32% decrease in the uptake of aspartate, glutamate, and glutamine, a phenotype that could be partially complemented by Anabaena sepJ. Synechococcus mutants of an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC)-type transporter for polar amino acids showed >98% decreased uptake of glutamate irrespective of the presence of dmeA or Anabaena sepJ in the same strain. Thus, Synechococcus DmeA or Anabaena SepJ is needed to observe full (or close to full) activity of the ABC transporter. An Anabaena sepJ deletion mutant was significantly impaired in glutamate and aspartate uptake, which also in this cyanobacterium requires the activity of an ABC-type transporter for polar amino acids. SepJ appears therefore to generally stimulate the activity of cyanobacterial ABC-type transporters for polar amino acids. Conversely, an Anabaena mutant of three ABC-type transporters for amino acids was impaired in the intercellular transfer of 5-carboxyfluorescein, a SepJ-related property. Our results unravel possible functional interactions in transport elements important for diazotrophic growth. IMPORTANCE Membrane transporters are essential for many aspects of cellular life, from uptake and export of substances in unicellular organisms to intercellular

  2. Genome-wide association data suggest ABCB1 and immune-related gene sets may be involved in adult antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, J E; Edwards, A C; McClintick, J N; Bigdeli, T B; Adkins, A; Aliev, F; Edenberg, H J; Foroud, T; Hesselbrock, V; Kramer, J; Nurnberger, J I; Schuckit, M; Tischfield, J A; Xuei, X; Dick, D M

    2015-01-01

    Adult antisocial behavior (AAB) is moderately heritable, relatively common and has adverse consequences for individuals and society. We examined the molecular genetic basis of AAB in 1379 participants from a case-control study in which the cases met criteria for alcohol dependence. We also examined whether genes of interest were expressed in human brain. AAB was measured using a count of the number of Antisocial Personality Disorder criteria endorsed under criterion A from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV). Participants were genotyped on the Illumina Human 1M BeadChip. In total, all single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) accounted for 25% of the variance in AAB, although this estimate was not significant (P=0.09). Enrichment tests indicated that more significantly associated genes were over-represented in seven gene sets, and most were immune related. Our most highly associated SNP (rs4728702, P=5.77 × 10(-7)) was located in the protein-coding adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette, sub-family B (MDR/TAP), member 1 (ABCB1). In a gene-based test, ABCB1 was genome-wide significant (q=0.03). Expression analyses indicated that ABCB1 was robustly expressed in the brain. ABCB1 has been implicated in substance use, and in post hoc tests we found that variation in ABCB1 was associated with DSM-IV alcohol and cocaine dependence criterion counts. These results suggest that ABCB1 may confer risk across externalizing behaviors, and are consistent with previous suggestions that immune pathways are associated with externalizing behaviors. The results should be tempered by the fact that we did not replicate the associations for ABCB1 or the gene sets in a less-affected independent sample. PMID:25918995

  3. Genome-wide association data suggest ABCB1 and immune-related gene sets may be involved in adult antisocial behavior

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, J E; Edwards, A C; McClintick, J N; Bigdeli, T B; Adkins, A; Aliev, F; Edenberg, H J; Foroud, T; Hesselbrock, V; Kramer, J; Nurnberger, J I; Schuckit, M; Tischfield, J A; Xuei, X; Dick, D M

    2015-01-01

    Adult antisocial behavior (AAB) is moderately heritable, relatively common and has adverse consequences for individuals and society. We examined the molecular genetic basis of AAB in 1379 participants from a case–control study in which the cases met criteria for alcohol dependence. We also examined whether genes of interest were expressed in human brain. AAB was measured using a count of the number of Antisocial Personality Disorder criteria endorsed under criterion A from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV). Participants were genotyped on the Illumina Human 1M BeadChip. In total, all single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) accounted for 25% of the variance in AAB, although this estimate was not significant (P=0.09). Enrichment tests indicated that more significantly associated genes were over-represented in seven gene sets, and most were immune related. Our most highly associated SNP (rs4728702, P=5.77 × 10−7) was located in the protein-coding adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette, sub-family B (MDR/TAP), member 1 (ABCB1). In a gene-based test, ABCB1 was genome-wide significant (q=0.03). Expression analyses indicated that ABCB1 was robustly expressed in the brain. ABCB1 has been implicated in substance use, and in post hoc tests we found that variation in ABCB1 was associated with DSM-IV alcohol and cocaine dependence criterion counts. These results suggest that ABCB1 may confer risk across externalizing behaviors, and are consistent with previous suggestions that immune pathways are associated with externalizing behaviors. The results should be tempered by the fact that we did not replicate the associations for ABCB1 or the gene sets in a less-affected independent sample. PMID:25918995

  4. The ABC of ABCS: a phylogenetic and functional classification of ABC systems in living organisms.

    PubMed

    Dassa, E; Bouige, P

    2001-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) systems constitute one of the most abundant superfamilies of proteins. They are involved not only in the transport of a wide variety of substances, but also in many cellular processes and in their regulation. In this paper, we made a comparative analysis of the properties of ABC systems and we provide a phylogenetic and functional classification. This analysis will be helpful to accurately annotate ABC systems discovered during the sequencing of the genome of living organisms and to identify the partners of the ABC ATPases. PMID:11421270

  5. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence gene chvE is part of a putative ABC-type sugar transport operon.

    PubMed Central

    Kemner, J M; Liang, X; Nester, E W

    1997-01-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence determinant ChvE is a periplasmic binding protein which participates in chemotaxis and virulence gene induction in response to monosaccharides which occur in the plant wound environment. The region downstream of the A. tumefaciens chvE gene was cloned and sequenced for nucleotide and expression analysis. Three open reading frames transcribed in the same direction as chvE were revealed. The first two, together with chvE, encode putative proteins of a periplasmic binding protein-dependent sugar uptake system, or ABC-type (ATP binding cassette) transporter. The third open reading frame encodes a protein of unknown function. The deduced transporter gene products are related on the amino acid level to bacterial sugar transporters and probably function in glucose and galactose uptake. We have named these genes gguA, -B, and -C, for glucose galactose uptake. Mutations in gguA, gguB, or gguC do not affect virulence of A. tumefaciens on Kalanchoe diagremontiana; growth on 1 mM galactose, glucose, xylose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, or sucrose; or chemotaxis toward glucose, galactose, xylose, or arabinose. PMID:9079938

  6. Engineering of Ion Sensing by the Cystathionine β-Synthase Module of the ABC Transporter OpuA*

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Nik A. B. N.; Biemans-Oldehinkel, Esther; Poolman, Bert

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that the C-terminal cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domains of the nucleotide-binding domains of the ABC transporter OpuA, in conjunction with an anionic membrane surface function, act as sensor of internal ionic strength (Iin). Here, we show that a surface-exposed cationic region in the CBS module domain is critical for ion sensing. The consecutive substitution of up to five cationic residues led to a gradual decrease of the ionic strength dependence of transport. In fact, a 5-fold mutant was essentially independent of salt in the range from 0 to 250 mm KCl (or NaCl), supplemented to medium of 30 mm potassium phosphate. Importantly, the threshold temperature for transport was lowered by 5–7 °C and the temperature coefficient Q10 was lowered from 8 to ∼1.5 in the 5-fold mutant, indicating that large conformational changes are accompanying the CBS-mediated regulation of transport. Furthermore, by replacing the anionic C-terminal tail residues that extend the CBS module with histidines, the transport of OpuA became pH-dependent, presumably by additional charge interactions of the histidine residues with the membrane. The pH dependence was not observed at high ionic strength. Altogether the analyses of the CBS mutants support the notion that the osmotic regulation of OpuA involves a simple biophysical switching mechanism, in which nonspecific electrostatic interactions of a protein module with the membrane are sufficient to lock the transporter in the inactive state. PMID:19329426

  7. Polarized location of SLC and ABC drug transporters in monolayer-cultured human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Noel, Gregory; Stieger, Bruno; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    Human hepatocytes cultured in a monolayer configuration represent a well-established in vitro model in liver toxicology, notably used in drug transporter studies. Polarized status of drug transporters, i.e., their coordinated location at sinusoidal or canalicular membranes, remains however incompletely documented in these cultured hepatocytes. The present study was therefore designed to analyze transporter expression and location in such cells. Most of drug transporters were first shown to be present at notable mRNA levels in monolayer-cultured human hepatocytes. Cultured human hepatocytes, which morphologically exhibited bile canaliculi-like structures, were next demonstrated, through immunofluorescence staining, to express the influx transporters organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, OATP2B1 and organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and the efflux transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 3 at their sinusoidal pole. In addition, the efflux transporters P-glycoprotein and MRP2 were detected at the canalicular pole of monolayer-cultured human hepatocytes. Moreover, canalicular secretion of reference substrates for the efflux transporters bile salt export pump, MRP2 and P-glycoprotein as well as sinusoidal drug transporter activities were observed. This polarized and functional expression of drug transporters in monolayer-cultured human hepatocytes highlights the interest of using this human in vitro cell model in xenobiotic transport studies. PMID:25862123

  8. Inhibition of multixenobiotic resistance transporters (MXR) by silver nanoparticles and ions in vitro and in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Georgantzopoulou, Anastasia; Cambier, Sébastien; Serchi, Tommaso; Kruszewski, Marcin; Balachandran, Yekkuni L; Grysan, Patrick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Ziebel, Johanna; Guignard, Cédric; Gutleb, Arno C; Murk, AlberTinka J

    2016-11-01

    The P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), important members of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters, protect cells and organisms via efflux of xenobiotics and are responsible for the phenomenon of multidrug or multixenobiotic resistance (MXR). In this study we first evaluated, in vitro, the interaction of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20, 23 and 27nm), Ag 200nm particles and Ag ions (AgNO3) with MXR efflux transporters using MDCKII and the P-gp over-expressing MDCKII-MDR1 cells and calcein-AM as a substrate of the transporters. Next the in vivo modulation of MXR activity was studied in Daphnia magna juveniles with the model P-gp and MRP1 inhibitors verapamil-HCl and MK571, respectively. The common environmental contaminants perfluorooctane sulfonate and bisphenol A, previously observed to interfere with the P-gp in vitro, also inhibited the efflux of calcein in vivo. Small-sized Ag NPs (with biomolecules present on the surface) and AgNO3 inhibited the MXR activity in daphnids and MDCKII-MDR1 cells, but abcb1 gene expression remained unchanged. Both Ag NPs and dissolved ions contributed to the effects. This study provides evidence of the interference of Ag NPs and AgNO3 with the MXR activity both in vitro and in D. magna, and should be taken into account when Ag NP toxicity is assessed. PMID:27376922

  9. Influence of ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of risperidone in healthy subjects with CYP2D6*10/*10

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hee-Doo; Lee, Sang-No; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Cho, Hea-Young; Lee, Il-Kwon; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The objective of this study was to investigate the combined influence of genetic polymorphisms in ABCB1 and CYP2D6 genes on risperidone pharmacokinetics. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Seventy-two healthy Korean volunteers receiving a single oral dose of 2 mg risperidone were included in this study. KEY RESULTS Significant differences were observed between the ABCB1 3435C>T genotypes for the pharmacokinetic parameters (peak serum concentration) of risperidone and the active moiety (risperidone and its main metabolite, 9-hydroxyrisperidone). There were no significant differences in the area under the serum concentration-time curves of risperidone and the active moiety among the ABCB1 2677G>T/A and 3435C>T genotypes. However, the peak serum concentration and area under the serum concentration-time curves were significantly different among the ABCB1 3435C>T genotypes in CYP2D6*10/*10. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings indicate that polymorphisms of ABCB1 3435C>T in individuals with CYP2D6*10/*10, which has low metabolic activity, could play an important role in the potential adverse effects or toxicity of risperidone. PMID:21449914

  10. Enhanced exposure of phosphatidylserine in human gastric carcinoma cells overexpressing the half-size ABC transporter BCRP (ABCG2).

    PubMed Central

    Woehlecke, Holger; Pohl, Antje; Alder-Baerens, Nele; Lage, Hermann; Herrmann, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Members of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter super-family are emerging to be involved in lipid transport. In the present study, we studied the organization of phospholipids in the plasma membrane of EPG85-257 human gastric carcinoma cells overexpressing BCRP (breast cancer resistance protein, ABCG-2), a half-size transporter belonging to the ABCG subfamily. A significantly increased plasma membrane association of the PS (phosphatidylserine)-binding probe FITC-Annexin V in comparison with control cells was observed. Treatment of BCRP -overexpressing cells with the inhibitor Tryprostatin A decreased FITC-Annexin V binding almost to the control level. This suggests an enhanced exposure of PS in BCRP -overexpressing cells, which is dependent on functional BCRP. A role of BCRP in the transverse distribution of lipids in the plasma membrane is supported by the increased outward transport of the lipid analogue C6- N -(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-PS in BCRP -overexpressing EPG85-257 cells and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. As shown for BCRP -overexpressing EPG85-257 cells, enhanced outward redistribution of the lipid analogue is inhibited by Tryprostatin A as well as by reduction of BCRP expression on transfection with an anti- BCRP -ribozyme. We also observed an enhanced outward transport of C6- N -(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-phosphatidylcholine in BCRP -overexpressing EPG85-257 cells, suggesting that the influence of BCRP on transverse lipid organization is not highly specific. PMID:12946267

  11. Caught in the act: ATP hydrolysis of an ABC-multidrug transporter followed by real-time magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Ute A; Haase, Winfried; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2008-10-15

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis transports cytotoxic molecules at the expense of ATP. Molecular and kinetic details of LmrA can be assessed by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), if functional reconstitution at a high protein-lipid ratio can be achieved and the kinetic rate constants are small enough. In order to follow ATP hydrolysis directly by 31P-magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we generated such conditions by reconstituting LmrA-dK388, a mutant with slower ATP turnover rate, at a protein-lipid ration of 1:150. By analysing time-resolved 31P spectra, protein activity has been directly assessed. These data demonstrate the general possibility to perform ssNMR studies on a fully active full length ABC transporter and also form the foundation for further kinetic studies on LmrA by NMR. PMID:18817774

  12. The Klebsiella pneumoniae O12 ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Recognizes the Terminal Residue of Its O-antigen Polysaccharide Substrate.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Mallette, Evan; Clarke, Bradley R; Kimber, Matthew S; Whitfield, Chris

    2016-04-29

    Export of the Escherichia coli serotype O9a O-antigenic polysaccharides (O-PS) involves an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. The process requires a non-reducing terminal residue, which is recognized by a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) appended to the C terminus of the nucleotide-binding domain of the transporter. Here, we investigate the process in Klebsiella pneumoniae serotype O12 (and Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257). The O12 polysaccharide is terminated at the non-reducing end by a β-linked 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) residue. The O12 ABC transporter also binds its cognate O-PS via a CBM, and export is dependent on the presence of the terminal β-Kdo residue. The overall structural architecture of the O12 CBM resembles the O9a prototype, but they share only weak sequence similarity, and the putative binding pocket for the O12 glycan is different. Removal of the CBM abrogated O-PS transport, but export was restored when the CBM was expressed in trans with the mutant CBM-deficient ABC transporter. These results demonstrate that the CBM-mediated substrate-recognition mechanism is evolutionarily conserved and can operate with glycans of widely differing structures. PMID:26934919

  13. Efficient and stable reconstitution of the ABC transporter BmrA for solid-state NMR studies

    PubMed Central

    Kunert, Britta; Gardiennet, Carole; Lacabanne, Denis; Calles-Garcia, Daniel; Falson, Pierre; Jault, Jean-Michel; Meier, Beat H.; Penin, François; Böckmann, Anja

    2014-01-01

    We present solid-state NMR sample preparation and first 2D spectra of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter BmrA, a membrane protein involved in multidrug resistance. The homodimeric 130-kDa protein is a challenge for structural characterization due to its membrane-bound nature, size, inherent flexibility and insolubility. We show that reconstitution of this protein in lipids from Bacillus subtilis at a lipid-protein ratio of 0.5 w/w allows for optimal protein insertion in lipid membranes with respect to two central NMR requirements, high signal-to-noise in the spectra and sample stability over a time period of months. The obtained spectra point to a well-folded protein and a highly homogenous preparation, as witnessed by the narrow resonance lines and the signal dispersion typical for the expected secondary structure distribution of BmrA. This opens the way for studies of the different conformational states of the transporter in the export cycle, as well as on interactions with substrates, via chemical-shift fingerprints and sequential resonance assignments. PMID:25988146

  14. Attenuation of high sucrose diet–induced insulin resistance in ABC transporter deficient white mutant of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Navrotskaya, Valeriya; Oxenkrug, Gregory; Vorobyova, Lyudmila; Summergrad, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high sugar diet (HSD) is an experimental model of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in mammals and insects. In Drosophila, HSD-induced IR delays emergence of pupae from larvae and eclosion of imago from pupae. Understanding of mechanisms of IR/T2D is essential for refining T2D prevention and treatment strategies. Dysregulation of tryptophan (Trp)-kynurenine (Kyn) pathway was suggested as one of the mechanisms of IR/T2D development. Rate-limiting enzyme of Trp-Kyn pathway in Drosophila is Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), an evolutionary conserved ortholog of human TDO. We previously reported attenuation of HSD-induced IR in vermilion mutants with inactive TDO. Conversion of Trp to Kyn is regulated not only by TDO activity but by intracellular Trp transport via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter encoded by white gene in Drosophila. In order to evaluate the possible impact of deficient intracellular Trp transport on the inducement of IR by HSD, we compared the effect of HSD on pre-imago development in wild type flies, Canton-Special (C-S), and C-S flies containing white gene, white (C-S). Presence of white gene attenuated (by 50%) HSD-induced delay of pupae emergence from larvae and female and male imago eclosion from pupae. Present study together with our earlier report reveals that both decreased TDO activity (due to vermilion gene mutation) or deficient Trp transport into cell without affecting TDO levels (due to white gene mutation) attenuate HSD-induced development of IR in Drosophila model of T2D. Our data provide further support for hypothesis that dysregulation of Trp-Kyn pathway is one of the pathophysiological mechanisms and potential target for early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of IR/T2D. PMID:27375855

  15. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein.

    PubMed

    Tay, Wee Tek; Mahon, Rod J; Heckel, David G; Walsh, Thomas K; Downes, Sharon; James, William J; Lee, Sui-Fai; Reineke, Annette; Williams, Adam K; Gordon, Karl H J

    2015-11-01

    The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton) expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests) to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the detailed mode

  16. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Wee Tek; Mahon, Rod J.; Heckel, David G.; Walsh, Thomas K.; Downes, Sharon; James, William J.; Lee, Sui-Fai; Reineke, Annette; Williams, Adam K.; Gordon, Karl H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton) expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests) to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the detailed mode

  17. The N-Terminal Extension Domain of the C. elegans Half-Molecule ABC Transporter, HMT-1, Is Required for Protein-Protein Interactions and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungjin; Selote, Devarshi S.; Vatamaniuk, Olena K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Members of the HMT-1 (heavy metal tolerance factor 1) subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily detoxify heavy metals and have unique topology: they are half-molecule ABC transporters that, in addition to a single transmembrane domain (TMD1) and a single nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), possess a hydrophobic NH2-terminal extension (NTE). These structural features distinguish HMTs from other ABC transporters in different species including Drosophila and humans. Functional ABC transporters, however, are comprised of at least four-domains (two TMDs and two NDBs) formed from either a single polypeptide or by the association of two or four separate subunits. Whether HMTs act as oligomers and what role the NTE domain plays in their function have not been determined. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we examined the oligomeric status of Caenorhabditis elegans HMT-1 and the functional significance of its NTE using gel-filtration chromatography in combination with the mating-based split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid system (mbSUS) and functional in vivo assays. We found that HMT-1 exists in a protein complex in C. elegans. Studies in S. cerevisiae showed that HMT-1 at a minimum homodimerizes and that oligomerization is essential for HMT-1 to confer cadmium tolerance. We also established that the NTE domain plays an important structural and functional role: it is essential for HMT-1 oligomerization and Cd-detoxification function. However, the NTE itself was not sufficient for oligomerization suggesting that multiple structural features of HMT-1 must associate to form a functional transporter. Conclusions The prominence of heavy metals as environmental toxins and the remarkable conservation of HMT-1 structural architecture and function in different species reinforce the value of continued studies of HMT-1 in model systems for identifying functional domains in HMT1 of humans. PMID:20886084

  18. The ABCs of membrane transporters in health and disease (SLC series): Introduction☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Hediger, Matthias A.; Clémençon, Benjamin; Burrier, Robert E.; Bruford, Elspeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The field of transport biology has steadily grown over the past decade and is now recognized as playing an important role in manifestation and treatment of disease. The SLC (solute carrier) gene series has grown to now include 52 families and 395 transporter genes in the human genome. A list of these genes can be found at the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) website (see www.genenames.org/genefamilies/SLC). This special issue features mini-reviews for each of these SLC families written by the experts in each field. The existing online resource for solute carriers, the Bioparadigms SLC Tables (www.bioparadigms.org), has been updated and significantly extended with additional information and cross-links to other relevant databases, and the nomenclature used in this database has been validated and approved by the HGNC. In addition, the Bioparadigms SLC Tables functionality has been improved to allow easier access by the scientific community. This introduction includes: an overview of all known SLC and “non-SLC” transporter genes; a list of transporters of water soluble vitamins; a summary of recent progress in the structure determination of transporters (including GLUT1/SLC2A1); roles of transporters in human diseases and roles in drug approval and pharmaceutical perspectives. PMID:23506860

  19. AB249. 15-oxospiramilactone reverses multidrug resistance in the Human Renal Cell Carcinoma by targeting ABCB1 through Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tianyi; Yi, Xiaoming; Zhou, Wenquan

    2016-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main barrier to the success of chemotherapy for Human Renal Cell Carcinoma. P-glycoprotein ABCB1 plays a major role in MDR of malignant cells and is regulated by various transcription factors, including Wnt/β-catenin /TCF4. We previously reported 15-oxospiramilactone was a new Wnt molecule inhibiter. In this study, ABCB1 was found to be significantly down regulated in A498 and ACHN cells by using 15-oxospiramilactone, suggesting an important role for the Wnt/b-catenin/TCF4 signaling pathway in cancer drug resistance. Methods Here we demonstrated thatin the renal cancer cell lines A498and ACHN, the level of ABCB1 expression and function correlate with nuclear TCF7L2-luciferase reporter gene activity (A498>ACHN). We constructed TCF7L2 interference vector withLV-TCF7L2-GFPplasmid reduced the expression of TCF7L2 by shRNA-mediated partial depletion.15-oxospiramilactone was treated ACHN, A498 andTCF7L2 knock down RCC cell lines. Carcinogenesis and tumor development measured by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and clonogenic survival assays. The efflux function of P glycoprotein was assayed by ABCB1 efflux assay. Protein and mRNA expression were assayed by western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The association between ABCB1 and TCF7L2 was assayed by luciferase reporter assay. Results 15-oxospiramilactone could cooperate with toxicity to suppress RCC cell lines proliferation while had no significant effect in shTCF7L2 groups. 15-oxospiramilactone could inhibit the efflux function of P glycoprotein and had no obvious effect in shTCF7L2 groups either. The association between ABCB1 and TCF7L2 was ensured by luciferase reporter assay. Protein and mRNA of ABCB1, TCF4 andβ-catenin expression were significant down regulated while MRP1 had no obvious change in 15-oxospiramilactone treated group, however, 15-oxospiramilactonehad no obvious effect in shTCF7L2 groups in RCC

  20. Optimized Purification of a Heterodimeric ABC Transporter in a Highly Stable Form Amenable to 2-D Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Galián, Carmen; Manon, Florence; Dezi, Manuela; Torres, Cristina; Ebel, Christine; Lévy, Daniel; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Optimized protocols for achieving high-yield expression, purification and reconstitution of membrane proteins are required to study their structure and function. We previously reported high-level expression in Escherichia coli of active BmrC and BmrD proteins from Bacillus subtilis, previously named YheI and YheH. These proteins are half-transporters which belong to the ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) superfamily and associate in vivo to form a functional transporter able to efflux drugs. In this report, high-yield purification and functional reconstitution were achieved for the heterodimer BmrC/BmrD. In contrast to other detergents more efficient for solubilizing the transporter, dodecyl-ß-D-maltoside (DDM) maintained it in a drug-sensitive and vanadate-sensitive ATPase-competent state after purification by affinity chromatography. High amounts of pure proteins were obtained which were shown either by analytical ultracentrifugation or gel filtration to form a monodisperse heterodimer in solution, which was notably stable for more than one month at 4°C. Functional reconstitution using different lipid compositions induced an 8-fold increase of the ATPase activity (kcat∼5 s−1). We further validated that the quality of the purified BmrC/BmrD heterodimer is suitable for structural analyses, as its reconstitution at high protein densities led to the formation of 2-D crystals. Electron microscopy of negatively stained crystals allowed the calculation of a projection map at 20 Å resolution revealing that BmrC/BmrD might assemble into oligomers in a lipidic environment. PMID:21602923

  1. Optimized purification of a heterodimeric ABC transporter in a highly stable form amenable to 2-D crystallization.

    PubMed

    Galián, Carmen; Manon, Florence; Dezi, Manuela; Torres, Cristina; Ebel, Christine; Lévy, Daniel; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Optimized protocols for achieving high-yield expression, purification and reconstitution of membrane proteins are required to study their structure and function. We previously reported high-level expression in Escherichia coli of active BmrC and BmrD proteins from Bacillus subtilis, previously named YheI and YheH. These proteins are half-transporters which belong to the ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) superfamily and associate in vivo to form a functional transporter able to efflux drugs. In this report, high-yield purification and functional reconstitution were achieved for the heterodimer BmrC/BmrD. In contrast to other detergents more efficient for solubilizing the transporter, dodecyl-ß-D-maltoside (DDM) maintained it in a drug-sensitive and vanadate-sensitive ATPase-competent state after purification by affinity chromatography. High amounts of pure proteins were obtained which were shown either by analytical ultracentrifugation or gel filtration to form a monodisperse heterodimer in solution, which was notably stable for more than one month at 4°C. Functional reconstitution using different lipid compositions induced an 8-fold increase of the ATPase activity (k(cat)∼5 s(-1)). We further validated that the quality of the purified BmrC/BmrD heterodimer is suitable for structural analyses, as its reconstitution at high protein densities led to the formation of 2-D crystals. Electron microscopy of negatively stained crystals allowed the calculation of a projection map at 20 Å resolution revealing that BmrC/BmrD might assemble into oligomers in a lipidic environment. PMID:21602923

  2. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC Transporter HI1470/71 through Its Cognate Molybdate Periplasmic Binding Protein, MolA

    SciTech Connect

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.; Pinkett, Heather W.

    2014-10-02

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB{sub 2}C{sub 2} (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The {approx}100 {mu}M binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus.

  3. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC transporter HI1470/71 through its cognate molybdate periplasmic binding protein, MolA.

    PubMed

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C; Pinkett, Heather W

    2011-11-01

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB(2)C(2) (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 Å resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The ∼100 μM binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus. PMID:22078568

  4. Mapping of the rod photoreceptor ABC transporter (ABCR) to 1p21-p22.1 and identification of novel mutations in Stargardt's disease.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, I; Illing, M; Koehler, M R; Schmid, M; Molday, R S; Weber, B H

    1998-01-01

    Using a bovine rod photoreceptor cell-specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cDNA we have cloned the full-length transcript of the homologous human gene and demonstrate that it is identical to the photoreceptor cell-specific ABC transporter (ABCR) recently shown to be mutated in Stargardt's disease. By fluorescence in situ hybridization we have mapped the ABCR gene to chromosomal band 1p21-p22.1. Mutational analysis of part of the gene in 15 Stargardt's disease patients has identified four disease-causing mutations, of which two represent potential null alleles. This brings the total number of independently identified mutations to 23, providing further evidence that the human ABCR gene is associated with Stargardt's disease. PMID:9490294

  5. The novel ABC transporter ABCH1 is a potential target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Zhu, Xun; Xia, Jixing; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests cause serious crop damage and develop high-level resistance to chemical insecticides and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal Cry toxins. A new promising approach for controlling them and overcoming this resistance is RNA interference (RNAi). The RNAi-based insect control strategy depends on the selection of suitable target genes. In this study, we cloned and characterized a novel ABC transporter gene PxABCH1 in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Phylogenetic analysis showed that PxABCH1 is closely related to ABCA and ABCG subfamily members. Spatial-temporal expression detection revealed that PxABCH1 was expressed in all tissues and developmental stages, and highest expressed in head and male adult. Midgut sequence variation and expression analyses of PxABCH1 in all the susceptible and Bt-resistant P. xylostella strains and the functional analysis by sublethal RNAi demonstrated that Cry1Ac resistance was independent of this gene. Silencing of PxABCH1 by a relatively high dose of dsRNA dramatically reduced its expression and resulted in larval and pupal lethal phenotypes in both susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella strains. To our knowledge, this study provides the first insight into ABCH1 in lepidopterans and reveals it as an excellent target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management. PMID:26333918

  6. Translocation of the ABC transporter ABCD4 from the endoplasmic reticulum to lysosomes requires the escort protein LMBD1.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Okamoto, Takumi; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that ABCD4 does not localize to peroxisomes but rather, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), because it lacks the NH2-terminal hydrophilic region required for peroxisomal targeting. It was recently reported that mutations in ABCD4 result in a failure to release vitamin B12 from lysosomes. A similar phenotype is caused by mutations in LMBRD1, which encodes the lysosomal membrane protein LMBD1. These findings suggested to us that ABCD4 translocated from the ER to lysosomes in association with LMBD1. In this report, it is demonstrated that ABCD4 interacts with LMBD1 and then localizes to lysosomes, and this translocation depends on the lysosomal targeting ability of LMBD1. Furthermore, endogenous ABCD4 was localized to both lysosomes and the ER, and its lysosomal localization was disturbed by knockout of LMBRD1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the subcellular localization of the ABC transporter is determined by its association with an adaptor protein. PMID:27456980

  7. The novel ABC transporter ABCH1 is a potential target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Zhu, Xun; Xia, Jixing; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests cause serious crop damage and develop high-level resistance to chemical insecticides and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal Cry toxins. A new promising approach for controlling them and overcoming this resistance is RNA interference (RNAi). The RNAi-based insect control strategy depends on the selection of suitable target genes. In this study, we cloned and characterized a novel ABC transporter gene PxABCH1 in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Phylogenetic analysis showed that PxABCH1 is closely related to ABCA and ABCG subfamily members. Spatial-temporal expression detection revealed that PxABCH1 was expressed in all tissues and developmental stages, and highest expressed in head and male adult. Midgut sequence variation and expression analyses of PxABCH1 in all the susceptible and Bt-resistant P. xylostella strains and the functional analysis by sublethal RNAi demonstrated that Cry1Ac resistance was independent of this gene. Silencing of PxABCH1 by a relatively high dose of dsRNA dramatically reduced its expression and resulted in larval and pupal lethal phenotypes in both susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella strains. To our knowledge, this study provides the first insight into ABCH1 in lepidopterans and reveals it as an excellent target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management. PMID:26333918

  8. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP<==> ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  9. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  10. Translocation of the ABC transporter ABCD4 from the endoplasmic reticulum to lysosomes requires the escort protein LMBD1

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Okamoto, Takumi; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that ABCD4 does not localize to peroxisomes but rather, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), because it lacks the NH2-terminal hydrophilic region required for peroxisomal targeting. It was recently reported that mutations in ABCD4 result in a failure to release vitamin B12 from lysosomes. A similar phenotype is caused by mutations in LMBRD1, which encodes the lysosomal membrane protein LMBD1. These findings suggested to us that ABCD4 translocated from the ER to lysosomes in association with LMBD1. In this report, it is demonstrated that ABCD4 interacts with LMBD1 and then localizes to lysosomes, and this translocation depends on the lysosomal targeting ability of LMBD1. Furthermore, endogenous ABCD4 was localized to both lysosomes and the ER, and its lysosomal localization was disturbed by knockout of LMBRD1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the subcellular localization of the ABC transporter is determined by its association with an adaptor protein. PMID:27456980

  11. Application of Human Placental Villous Tissue Explants to Study ABC Transporter Mediated Efflux of 2,4-Dinitrophenyl-S-Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Soniya S.; Walsh, Scott W.; Gerk, Phillip M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize the human term placental villous tissue explant culture model as a tool to study the formation and efflux of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) conjugate 2,4-dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione (DNP-SG) as a model system for phase II metabolism and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-mediated cellular efflux. Methods Placental tissue samples were obtained after cesarean section following normal pregnancies (n=9). Cultured villous tissue was monitored up to 48 h to study the effect of time in culture on biochemical parameters, formation and efflux of DNP-SG in the absence or presence of ATPase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate and the protein expression of ABC transporters - multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (MRP2), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and enzyme glutathione-S-transferase isoform P1-1 (GSTP1-1). Results Villous tissue structure, tissue viability and expression of BCRP, GSTP1-1 remained unchanged, while expression of MRP2, P-gp and total tissue glutathione decreased with time in culture. Tissue integrity was unchanged up to 24 h but declined at 48 h. However, DNP-SG formation, DNP-SG efflux, and the extent of inhibition of DNP-SG efflux by sodium orthovanadate showed only minor changes through 48 h. Sodium orthovanadate decreased DNP-SG efflux, consistent with inhibition of apical ABC transporters. Conclusion The results support the use of the cultured human term placental villous tissue explants model to study coordinated function of GSTP1-1 and apical ABC transporters in the formation and efflux of the model substrate DNP-SG. PMID:21342117

  12. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; King, Jerry D; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways. PMID:26330553

  13. Involvement of the Carboxyl-Terminal Region of the Yeast Peroxisomal Half ABC Transporter Pxa2p in Its Interaction with Pxa1p and in Transporter Function

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Ling-Yun; Fu, Ru-Huei; Chen, Shih-Ming; Ho, Ming-Hua; Huang, Jie-Mau; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wang, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Meng-Shian; Tsai, Rong-Tzong

    2014-01-01

    Background The peroxisome is a single membrane-bound organelle in eukaryotic cells involved in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation of fatty acids. The human genetic disorder X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene (encoding ALDP, a peroxisomal half ATP-binding cassette [ABC] transporter). This disease is characterized by defective peroxisomal β-oxidation and a large accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in brain white matter, adrenal cortex, and testis. ALDP forms a homodimer proposed to be the functional transporter, whereas the peroxisomal transporter in yeast is a heterodimer comprising two half ABC transporters, Pxa1p and Pxa2p, both orthologs of human ALDP. While the carboxyl-terminal domain of ALDP is engaged in dimerization, it remains unknown whether the same region is involved in the interaction between Pxa1p and Pxa2p. Methods/Principal Findings Using a yeast two-hybrid assay, we found that the carboxyl-terminal region (CT) of Pxa2p, but not of Pxa1p, is required for their interaction. Further analysis indicated that the central part of the CT (designated CT2) of Pxa2p was indispensable for its interaction with the carboxyl terminally truncated Pxa1_NBD. An interaction between the CT of Pxa2p and Pxa1_NBD was not detected, but could be identified in the presence of Pxa2_NBD-CT1. A single mutation of two conserved residues (aligned with X-ALD-associated mutations at the same positions in ALDP) in the CT2 of the Pxa2_NBD-CT protein impaired its interaction with Pxa1_NBD or Pxa1_NBD-CT, resulting in a mutant protein that exhibited a proteinase K digestion profile different from that of the wild-type protein. Functional analysis of these mutant proteins on oleate plates indicated that they were defective in transporter function. Conclusions/Significance The CT of Pxa2p is involved in its interaction with Pxa1p and in transporter function. This concept may be applied to human ALDP studies, helping to establish

  14. The putative ABC transporter encoded by the orf19.4531 plays a role in the sensitivity of Candida albicans cells to azole antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Linghuo; Xu, Dayong; Chen, Zhen; Cao, Yongbing; Gao, Pinghui; Jiang, Yuanying

    2016-05-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute a large superfamily of integral membrane proteins in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, there are 28 genes encoding ABC transporters and many of them have not been characterized so far. The orf19.4531 (also known as IPF7530) encodes a putative ABC transporter. In this study, we have demonstrated that disruption of orf19.4531 causes C. albicans cells to become tolerant to azoles, but not to polyene antifungals and terbinafine. Therefore, the protein encoded by orf19.4531 is involved in azole sensitivity and we name it as ROA1, the regulator of azole sensitivity 1 gene. Consistently, we show that the expression of ROA1 is responsive to treatment of either fluconazole or ketoconazole inC. albicans In addition, through a GFP tagging approach, Roa1 is localized in a small punctuate compartment adjacent to the vacuolar membrane. However, ROA1 is not essential for the in vitro filamentation of C. albicans cells. PMID:26975389

  15. Formation of a Chloride-conducting State in the Maltose ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Michael L; Bao, Huan; Duong, Franck

    2016-06-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters use an alternating access mechanism to move substrates across cellular membranes. This mode of transport ensures the selective passage of molecules while preserving membrane impermeability. The crystal structures of MalFGK2, inward- and outward-facing, show that the transporter is sealed against ions and small molecules. It has yet to be determined whether membrane impermeability is maintained when MalFGK2 cycles between these two conformations. Through the use of a mutant that resides in intermediate conformations close to the transition state, we demonstrate that not only is chloride conductance occurring, but also to a degree large enough to compromise cell viability. Introduction of mutations in the periplasmic gate lead to the formation of a channel that is quasi-permanently open. MalFGK2 must therefore stay away from these ion-conducting conformations to preserve the membrane barrier; otherwise, a few mutations that increase access to the ion-conducting states are enough to convert an ATP-binding cassette transporter into a channel. PMID:27059961

  16. Drosophila ABC Transporter DmHMT-1 Confers Tolerance to Cadmium.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Half molecule ATP-binding cassette transporters of the HMT1(heavy metal tolerance factor 1)subfamily are required for Cd2+ tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and have homologs in other species, including plants and humans. Based on studies i...

  17. Compartment-specific roles of ABC transporters define differential topotecan distribution in brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jun; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Hubbard, K. Elaine; Tagen, Michael; Wynn, Henry G.; Panetta, John C.; Waters, Christopher M.; Elmeliegy, Mohamed A.; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2009-01-01

    Topotecan is a substrate of the ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp/MDR1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). To define the role of these transporters in topotecan penetration into the ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (vCSF) and brain parenchymal extracellular fluid (ECF) compartments we performed intracerebral microdialysis on transporter-deficient mice after an intravenous dose of topotecan (4 mg/kg). vCSF penetration of unbound topotecan lactone was measured as the ratio of vCSF-to-plasma area under the concentration-time curves (AUCs). The mean (±SD) ratios for wild-type, Mdr1a/b−/−, Bcrp1−/− and Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− mice were 3.07±0.09, 2.57±0.17, 1.63±0.12 and 0.86±0.05, respectively. In contrast, the ECF-to-plasma ratios for wild-type, Bcrp1−/− and Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− mice were 0.36±0.06, 0.42±0.06 and 0.88±0.07. Topotecan lactone was below detectable limits in the ECF of Mdr1a/b−/−mice. When gefitinib (200 mg/kg) was pre-administered to inhibit Bcrp1 and P-gp, the vCSF-to-plasma ratio decreased to 1.29±0.09 in wild-type mice and increased to 1.13±0.13 in Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− mice, whereas the ECF-to-plasma ratio increased to 0.74±0.14 in wild-type and 1.07±0.03 in Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− mice. Preferential active transport of topotecan lactone over topotecan carboxylate was shown in vivo by vCSF lactone-to-carboxylate AUC ratios for wild-type, Mdr1a/b−/−, Bcrp1−/− and Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− mice of 5.69±0.83, 3.85±0.64, 3.61±0.46 and 0.78±0.19. Our results suggest that Bcrp1 and P-gp transport topotecan into vCSF and out of brain parenchyma through the blood-brain barrier. These findings may help to improve pharmacological strategies to treat brain tumors. PMID:19567673

  18. Substrate specificities and expression patterns reflect the evolutionary divergence of maltose ABC transporters in Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Dhaval M; Nguyen, Tu N; Noll, Kenneth M

    2005-03-01

    Duplication of transporter genes is apparent in the genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. The physiological impacts of these duplications are not well understood, so we used the bacterium's two putative maltose transporters to begin a study of the evolutionary relationship between a transporter's function and the control of expression of its genes. We show that the substrate binding proteins encoded by these operons, MalE1 and MalE2, have different substrate specificities and affinities and that they are expressed under different growth conditions. MalE1 binds maltose (dissociation constant [KD], 24 +/- 1 microM), maltotriose (KD, 8 +/- 0.5 nM), and beta-(1-->4)-mannotetraose (KD, 38 +/- 1 microM). In contrast, MalE2 binds maltose (KD, 8.4 +/- 1 microM), maltotriose (KD, 11.5 +/- 1.5 microM), and trehalose (KD, 9.5 +/- 1.0 microM) confirming the findings of Wassenberg et al. (J. Mol. Biol. 295:279-288, 2000). Neither protein binds lactose. We examined the expression of these operons at both the transcriptional and translational levels and found that MalE1 is expressed in cells grown on lactose or guar gum and that MalE2 is highly expressed in starch- and trehalose-grown cells. Evidence is provided that malE1, malF1, and perhaps malG1 are cotranscribed and so constitute an operon. An open reading frame encoding a putative transcriptional regulatory protein adjacent to this operon (TM1200) is also up-regulated in response to growth on lactose. These evolutionarily related transporter operons have diverged both in function and expression to assume apparently different physiological roles. PMID:15743948

  19. Structure of a Bacterial ABC Transporter Involved in the Import of an Acidic Polysaccharide Alginate.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yukie; Itoh, Takafumi; Kaneko, Ai; Nishitani, Yu; Mikami, Bunzo; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2015-09-01

    The acidic polysaccharide alginate represents a promising marine biomass for the microbial production of biofuels, although the molecular and structural characteristics of alginate transporters remain to be clarified. In Sphingomonas sp. A1, the ATP-binding cassette transporter AlgM1M2SS is responsible for the import of alginate across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here, we present the substrate-transport characteristics and quaternary structure of AlgM1M2SS. The addition of poly- or oligoalginate enhanced the ATPase activity of reconstituted AlgM1M2SS coupled with one of the periplasmic solute-binding proteins, AlgQ1 or AlgQ2. External fluorescence-labeled oligoalginates were specifically imported into AlgM1M2SS-containing proteoliposomes in the presence of AlgQ2, ATP, and Mg(2+). The crystal structure of AlgQ2-bound AlgM1M2SS adopts an inward-facing conformation. The interaction between AlgQ2 and AlgM1M2SS induces the formation of an alginate-binding tunnel-like structure accessible to the solvent. The translocation route inside the transmembrane domains contains charged residues suitable for the import of acidic saccharides. PMID:26235029

  20. Solid phase synthesis of tariquidar-related modulators of ABC transporters preferring breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Puentes, Cristian Ochoa; Höcherl, Peter; Kühnle, Matthias; Bauer, Stefanie; Bürger, Kira; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; König, Burkhard

    2011-06-15

    Aiming at structural optimization of potent and selective ABCG2 inhibitors, such as UR-ME22-1, from our laboratory, an efficient solid phase synthesis was developed to get convenient access to this class of compounds. 7-Carboxyisatoic anhydride was attached to Wang resin to give resin bound 2-aminoterephthalic acid. Acylation with quinoline-2- or -6-carbonyl chlorides, coupling with tetrahydroisoquinolinylethylphenylamine derivatives, cleavage of the carboxylic acids from solid support and treatment with trimethylsilydiazomethane gave the corresponding methyl esters. Among these esters highly potent and selective ABCG2 modulators were identified (inhibition of ABCB1 and ABCG2 determined in the calcein-AM and the Hoechst 33342 microplate assay, respectively). Interestingly, compounds bearing triethyleneglycol ether groups at the tetrahydroisoquinoline moiety (UR-COP77, UR-COP78) were comparable to UR-ME22-1 in potency but considerably more efficient (max inhibition 83% and 88% vs 60%, rel. to fumitremorgin c, 100%) These results support the hypothesis that solubility of the new ABCG2 modulators and of the reference compounds tariquidar and elacridar in aqueous media is the efficacy-limiting factor. PMID:21570282

  1. Kidney versus Liver Specification of SLC and ABC Drug Transporters, Tight Junction Molecules, and Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Martovetsky, Gleb; Bush, Kevin T; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2016-07-01

    The hepatocyte nuclear factors, Hnf1a and Hnf4a, in addition to playing key roles in determining hepatocyte fate, have been implicated as candidate lineage-determining transcription factors in the kidney proximal tubule (PT) [Martovetsky et. al., (2012) Mol Pharmacol 84:808], implying an additional level of regulation that is potentially important in developmental and/or tissue-engineering contexts. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) transduced with Hnf1a and Hnf4a form tight junctions and express multiple PT drug transporters (e.g., Slc22a6/Oat1, Slc47a1/Mate1, Slc22a12/Urat1, Abcg2/Bcrp, Abcc2/Mrp2, Abcc4/Mrp4), nutrient transporters (e.g., Slc34a1/NaPi-2, Slco1a6), and tight junction proteins (occludin, claudin 6, ZO-1/Tjp1, ZO-2/Tjp2). In contrast, the coexpression (with Hnf1a and Hnf4a) of GATA binding protein 4 (Gata4), as well as the forkhead box transcription factors, Foxa2 and Foxa3, in MEFs not only downregulates PT markers but also leads to upregulation of several hepatocyte markers, including albumin, apolipoprotein, and transferrin. A similar result was obtained with primary mouse PT cells. Thus, the presence of Gata4 and Foxa2/Foxa3 appears to alter the effect of Hnf1a and Hnf4a by an as-yet unidentified mechanism, leading toward the generation of more hepatocyte-like cells as opposed to cells exhibiting PT characteristics. The different roles of Hnf4a in the kidney and liver was further supported by reanalysis of ChIP-seq data, which revealed Hnf4a colocalization in the kidney near PT-enriched genes compared with those genes enriched in the liver. These findings provide valuable insight, not only into the developmental, and perhaps organotypic, regulation of drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and tight junctions, but also for regenerative medicine strategies aimed at restoring the function of the liver and/or kidney (acute kidney injury, AKI; chronic kidney disease, CKD). PMID:27044799

  2. Subunit interactions in ABC transporters: a conserved sequence in hydrophobic membrane proteins of periplasmic permeases defines an important site of interaction with the ATPase subunits.

    PubMed

    Mourez, M; Hofnung, M; Dassa, E

    1997-06-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane proteins of bacterial binding protein-dependent transporters belong to the superfamily of ABC transporters. The hydrophobic proteins display a conserved, at least 20 amino acid EAA---G---------I-LP region exposed in the cytosol, the EAA region. We mutagenized the EAA regions of MalF and MalG proteins of the Escherichia coli maltose transport system. Substitutions at the same positions in MalF and MalG have different phenotypes, indicating that EAA regions do not act symmetrically. Mutations in malG or malF that slightly affect or do not affect transport, determine a completely defective phenotype when present together. This suggests that EAA regions of MalF and MalG may interact during transport. Maltose-negative mutants fall into two categories with respect to the cellular localization of the MalK ATPase: in the first, MalK is membrane-bound, as in wild-type strains, while in the second, it is cytosolic, as in strains deleted in the malF and malG genes. From maltose-negative mutants of the two categories, we isolated suppressor mutations within malK that restore transport. They map mainly in the putative helical domain of MalK, suggesting that EAA regions may constitute a recognition site for the ABC ATPase helical domain. PMID:9214624

  3. Increased Risk for Congenital Heart Defects in Children Carrying the ABCB1 Gene C3435T Polymorphism and Maternal Periconceptional Toxicants Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kaiyu; Zhan, Yalan; Li, Yifei; Li, Huaying; Qiao, Lina; Wang, Fang; Hua, Yimin

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds The etiology of congenital heart defect (CHD) is commonly believed to involve the interaction of multiple environmental and genetic factors. This study aimed to explore the joint effects of the ABCB1 gene C3435T polymorphism and maternal periconceptional toxicants exposure on the CHD risk in a Han Chinese population. Methods An age and gender matched case-control study with standardized data collection involving 201 pairs was conducted. Periconceptional toxicants exposure was obtained through a structured questionnaire. A job exposure matrix (JEM) was used for toxicants exposure assessment. Genotyping of the ABCB1 C3435T polymorphism was performed by sequencing. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the joint effects of the ABCB1 gene C3435T polymorphism and toxicants exposure on the risk of CHD. Placenta tissues and umbilical cords were collected to investigate the impact of C3435T polymorphism on the transcription and translation activities of ABCB1 gene. Results Maternal periconceptional exposures to phthalates (adjusted OR: 1.6; 95%CI: 1.0–2.6) and alkylphenolic compounds (adjusted OR:1.8; 95%CI:1.1–3.0) were associated with a higher incidence of CHDs in general. More cases were carriers of the ABCB1 CC/CT genotypes (OR: 2.0, 95%CI: 1.1–3.5, P-value: 0.021). Children carrying the CC/CT genotype and periconceptionally exposed to phthalates and alkylphenolic compounds suffered almost 3.5-fold increased risk of having CHD than non-exposed children with TT genotype (adjusted OR: 3.5, 95%CI: 1.5–7.9, P-value: 0.003), and the OR changed to 4.4 for septal defects (adjusted OR: 4.4,95%CI:1.8–10.9,P-value:0.001). The ABCB1 mRNA expression of the TT genotype was significantly higher than that of the CC genotype (P = 0.03). Compared with TT genotype, lower P-glycoprotein expression was observed for the CC/CT genotypes. Conclusion The C3435T polymorphism in the ABCB1 gene of fetus increases the risks of CHD in a Han Chinese

  4. Lateral gene transfer of an ABC transporter complex between major constituents of the human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several links have been established between the human gut microbiome and conditions such as obesity and inflammatory bowel syndrome. This highlights the importance of understanding what properties of the gut microbiome can affect the health of the human host. Studies have been undertaken to determine the species composition of this microbiome and infer functional profiles associated with such host properties. However, lateral gene transfer (LGT) between community members may result in misleading taxonomic attributions for the recipient organisms, thus making species-function links difficult to establish. Results We identified a peptides/nickel transport complex whose components differed in abundance based upon levels of host obesity, and assigned the encoded proteins to members of the microbial community. Each protein was assigned to several distinct taxonomic groups, with moderate levels of agreement observed among different proteins in the complex. Phylogenetic trees of these proteins produced clusters that differed greatly from taxonomic attributions and indicated that habitat-directed LGT of this complex is likely to have occurred, though not always between the same partners. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that certain membrane transport systems may be an important factor within an obese-associated gut microbiome and that such complexes may be acquired several times by different strains of the same species. Additionally, an example of individual proteins from different organisms being transferred into one operon was observed, potentially demonstrating a functional complex despite the donors of the subunits being taxonomically disparate. Our results also highlight the potential impact of habitat-directed LGT on the resident microbiota. PMID:23116195

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa capability to recruit zinc under conditions of limited metal availability is affected by inactivation of the ZnuABC transporter

    PubMed Central

    D'Orazio, Melania; Mastropasqua, Maria Chiara; Cerasi, Mauro; Pacello, Francesca; Consalvo, Ada; Chirullo, Barbara; Mortensen, Brittany; Skaar, Eric P.; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Pasquali, Paolo; Battistoni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The ability of a large number of bacterial pathogens to multiply in the infected host and cause disease is dependent on their ability to express high affinity zinc importers. In many bacteria ZnuABC, a transporter of the ABC family, plays a central role in the process of zinc uptake in zinc poor environments, including the tissues of the infected host. To initiate an investigation into the relevance of the zinc uptake apparatus for Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity, we have generated a znuA mutant in the PA14 strain. We have found that this mutant strain displays a limited growth defect in zinc depleted media. The znuA mutant strain is more sensitive than the wild type strain to calprotectin-mediated growth inhibition, but both the strains are highly resistant to this zinc sequestering antimicrobial protein. Moreover, intracellular zinc content is not evidently affected by inactivation of the ZnuABC transporter. These findings suggest that P. aeruginosa is equipped with redundant mechanisms for the acquisition of zinc that might favor P. aeruginosa colonization of environments containing low levels of this metal. Nonetheless, deletion of znuA affects alginate production, reduces the activity of extracellular zinc-containing proteases, including LasA, LasB and Protease IV, and decreases the ability of P. aeruginosa to disseminate during systemic infections. These results indicate that efficient zinc acquisition is critical for the expression of various virulence features typical of P. aeruginosa and that ZnuABC also plays an important role in zinc homeostasis in this microorganism. PMID:25751674

  6. The cloning of a human ABC gene (ABC3) mapping to chromosome 16p13.3

    SciTech Connect

    Connors, T.D.; Van Raay, T.J.; Petry, L.R.

    1997-01-15

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, or traffic ATPases, constitute a large family of proteins responsible for the transport of a wide variety of substrates across cell membranes in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. We describe a human ABC protein with regions of strong homology to the recently described murine ABC1 and ABC2 transporters. The gene for this novel protein, human ABC3, maps near the polycystic kidney disease type 1 (PKD1) gene on chromosome 16p13.3. The ABC3 gene is expressed at highest levels in lung compared to other tissues. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Role of the Oligopeptide Permease ABC Transporter of Moraxella catarrhalis in Nutrient Acquisition and Persistence in the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Megan M.; Johnson, Antoinette; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Kirkham, Charmaine; Brauer, Aimee L.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a strict human pathogen that causes otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults, resulting in significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. M. catarrhalis has a growth requirement for arginine; thus, acquiring arginine is important for fitness and survival. M. catarrhalis has a putative oligopeptide permease ABC transport operon (opp) consisting of five genes (oppB, oppC, oppD, oppF, and oppA), encoding two permeases, two ATPases, and a substrate binding protein. Thermal shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein OppA binds to peptides 3 to 16 amino acid residues in length regardless of the amino acid composition. A mutant in which the oppBCDFA gene cluster is knocked out showed impaired growth in minimal medium where the only source of arginine came from a peptide 5 to 10 amino acid residues in length. Whether methylated arginine supports growth of M. catarrhalis is important in understanding fitness in the respiratory tract because methylated arginine is abundant in host tissues. No growth of wild-type M. catarrhalis was observed in minimal medium in which arginine was present only in methylated form, indicating that the bacterium requires l-arginine. An oppA knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the Opp system mediates both uptake of peptides and fitness in the respiratory tract. PMID:25156736

  8. Conserved Surface Accessible Nucleoside ABC Transporter Component SP0845 Is Essential for Pneumococcal Virulence and Confers Protection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sneha; Khan, Naeem; Dehinwal, Ruchika; Kumar, Ajay; Sehgal, Devinder

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis. Surface accessible proteins of S. pneumoniae are being explored for the development of a protein-based vaccine in order to overcome the limitations of existing polysaccharide-based pneumococcal vaccines. To identify a potential vaccine candidate, we resolved surface-associated proteins of S. pneumoniae TIGR4 strain using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting with antisera generated against whole heat-killed TIGR4. Ten immunoreactive spots were identified by mass spectrometric analysis that included a putative lipoprotein SP0845. Analysis of the inferred amino acid sequence of sp0845 homologues from 36 pneumococcal strains indicated that SP0845 was highly conserved (>98% identity) and showed less than 11% identity with any human protein. Our bioinformatic and functional analyses demonstrated that SP0845 is the substrate-binding protein of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that is involved in nucleoside uptake with cytidine, uridine, guanosine and inosine as the preferred substrates. Deletion of the gene encoding SP0845 renders pneumococci avirulent suggesting that it is essential for virulence. Immunoblot analysis suggested that SP0845 is expressed in in vitro grown pneumococci and during mice infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry data indicated that SP0845 is surface exposed in encapsulated strains and accessible to antibodies. Subcutaneous immunization with recombinant SP0845 induced high titer antibodies in mice. Hyperimmune sera raised against SP0845 promoted killing of encapsulated pneumococcal strains in a blood bactericidal assay. Immunization with SP0845 protected mice from intraperitoneal challenge with heterologous pneumococcal serotypes. Based on its surface accessibility, role in virulence and ability to elicit protective immunity, we propose that SP0845 may be a potential candidate for a protein

  9. An ABC Transporter System of Yersinia pestis Allows Utilization of Chelated Iron by Escherichia coli SAB11

    PubMed Central

    Bearden, Scott W.; Staggs, Teanna M.; Perry, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    The acquisition of iron is an essential component in the pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis, the agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. A cosmid library derived from the genomic DNA of Y. pestis KIM6+ was used for transduction of an Escherichia coli mutant (SAB11) defective in the biosynthesis of the siderophore enterobactin. Recombinant plasmids which had a common 13-kb BamHI fragment were isolated from SAB11 transductants in which growth but not enterobactin synthesis was restored on media containing the iron chelator EDDA [ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid)]. Subcloning and transposon mutagenesis revealed a 5.6-kb region, designated yfe, essential for SAB11 growth stimulation. In vitro transcription-translation analysis identified polypeptides of 18, 29.5, 32, and 33 kDa encoded by the yfe locus. Sequence analysis shows this locus to be comprised of five genes in two separate operons which have potential Fur-binding sequences in both promoters. A putative polycistronic operon, yfeABCD, is Fur regulated and responds to iron and manganese. A functional Fur protein is required for the observed manganese repression of this operon. This operon encodes polypeptides which have strong similarity to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters and include a periplasmic binding protein (YfeA), an ATP-binding protein (YfeB), and two integral membrane proteins (YfeC and -D), which likely function in the acquisition of inorganic iron and possibly other ions. The ∼21-kDa protein encoded by the separately transcribed yfeE gene may be located in the cell envelope, since a yfeE::TnphoA fusion is PhoA+. Mutations in this gene abrogate growth of SAB11 on iron-chelated media. PMID:9495751

  10. β-Cyclodextrins Decrease Cholesterol Release and ABC-Associated Transporter Expression in Smooth Muscle Cells and Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coisne, Caroline; Hallier-Vanuxeem, Dorothée; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Hachani, Johan; Tilloy, Sébastien; Bricout, Hervé; Monflier, Eric; Wils, Daniel; Serpelloni, Michel; Parissaux, Xavier; Fenart, Laurence; Gosselet, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    -CDs can significantly reduce the cellular cholesterol content of cells forming atherosclerotic lesions and can subsequently modulate the expression of ABC transporters involved in RCT. The use of methylated β-CDs would represent a valuable and efficient tool to interfere with atherosclerosis pathogenesis in patients, nonetheless their mode of action still needs further investigations to be fully understood and finely controlled at the cellular level. PMID:27252658

  11. Simultaneous evaluation of human CYP3A4 and ABCB1 induction by reporter assay in LS174T cells, stably expressing their reporter genes.

    PubMed

    Inami, Keita; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Kumagai, Takeshi; Nagata, Kiyoshi

    2015-04-01

    The bioavailability of orally administered therapies are often significantly limited in the human intestine by the metabolic activities of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Predicting whether candidate compounds induce CYP3A4 and P-gp is a crucial stage in the drug development process, as drug-drug interactions may result in the induction of intestinal CYP3A4 and P-gp. However, the assay systems needed to evaluate both CYP3A4 and P-gp induction in the intestine are yet to be established. To address this urgent requirement, LS174T cells were used to create two stable cell lines expressing the CYP3A4 or ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1, encoding P-gp) reporter genes. First, these stable cells were tested by treatment with 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis RA) that induce CYP3A4 and P-gp in the intestines. All these compounds significantly increased both CYP3A4 and ABCB1 reporter activities in the stable cell lines. To simultaneously assess the induction of CYP3A4 and ABCB1, both stable cells were co-cultivated to measure their reporter activities. The mixed cells showed a significant increase in the CYP3A4 and ABCB1 reporter activities following treatment with 1,25(OH)2 D3, ATRA, and 9-cis RA. These activity levels were maintained after passaging more than 20 times and following multiple freeze-thaw cycles. These results demonstrate that our established cell lines can be used to evaluate simultaneously CYP3A4 and ABCB1 induction in the intestines, providing a valuable in vitro model for the evaluation of future drug candidates. PMID:25410880

  12. Membrane topology and functional importance of the periplasmic region of ABC transporter LolCDE.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masaki; Iguchi-Yokoyama, Asako; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime; Narita, Shin-ichiro

    2009-10-01

    The LolCDE complex is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that mediates the release of newly synthesized lipoproteins from the cytoplasmic membrane of gram-negative bacteria, which results in the initiation of outer-membrane sorting of lipoproteins through the Lol pathway. LolCDE is composed of one copy each of membrane subunits LolC and LolE, and two copies of nucleotide-binding subunit LolD. In this study, we examined the membrane topology of LolC and LolE by PhoA fusion analysis. Both LolC and LolE were found to have four transmembrane segments with a large periplasmic loop exposed to the periplasm. Despite similarities in sequence and topology, the accessibility of a sulfhydryl reagent to Cys introduced into the periplasmic loop suggested that the structure of the periplasmic region differs between LolC and LolE. Inhibition of the release of lipoproteins by the sulfhydryl reagent supported a previous proposal that LolC and LolE have distinct functions. PMID:19809197

  13. Identification and transcriptional analysis of a Treponema pallidum operon encoding a putative ABC transport system, an iron-activated repressor protein homolog, and a glycolytic pathway enzyme homolog.

    PubMed

    Hardham, J M; Stamm, L V; Porcella, S F; Frye, J G; Barnes, N Y; Howell, J K; Mueller, S L; Radolf, J D; Weinstock, G M; Norris, S J

    1997-09-15

    We have characterized a 5.2-kilobase (kb) putative transport related operon (tro) locus of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain) (Tp) encoding six proteins: TroA, TroB, TroC, TroD, TroR and Phosphoglycerate mutase (Pgm). Four of these gene products (TroA-TroD) are homologous to members of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of bacterial transport proteins. TroA (previously identified as Tromp1) has significant sequence similarity to a family of Gram-negative periplasmic substrate-binding proteins and to a family of streptococcal proteins that may have dual roles as substrate binding proteins and adhesins. TroB is homologous to the ATP-binding protein component, whereas TroC and TroD are related to the hydrophobic membrane protein components of ABC transport systems. TroR is similar to Gram-positive iron-activated repressor proteins (DesR, DtxR, IdeR, and SirR). The last open reading frame (ORF) of the tro operon encodes a protein that is highly homologous to the glycolytic pathway enzyme, Pgm. Primer extension results demonstrated that the tro operon is transcribed from a sigma 70-type promoter element. Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions provided evidence for the presence of a primary 1-kb troA transcript and a secondary, less abundant, troA-pgm transcript. The tro operon is flanked by a Holliday structure DNA helicase homolog (upstream) and two ORFs representing a purine nucleoside phosphorylase homolog and tpp15, a previously characterized gene encoding a membrane lipoprotein (downstream). The presence of a complex operon containing a putative ABC transport system and a DtxR homolog indicates a possible linkage between transport and gene regulation in Tp. PMID:9332349

  14. Stubborn Contaminants: Influence of Detergents on the Purity of the Multidrug ABC Transporter BmrA

    PubMed Central

    Chaptal, Vincent; Reyes-Mejia, Gina Catalina; Sarwan, Jonathan; Falson, Pierre; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in membrane proteins, their crystallization remains a major challenge. In the course of a crystallographic study on the multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporter BmrA, mass spectral analyses on samples purified with six selected detergents revealed unexpected protein contamination visible for the most part on overloaded SDS-PAGE. A major contamination from the outer membrane protein OmpF was detected in purifications with Foscholine 12 (FC12) but not with Lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO) or any of the maltose-based detergents. Consequently, in the FC12 purified BmrA, OmpF easily crystallized over BmrA in a new space group, and whose structure is reported here. We therefore devised an optimized protocol to eliminate OmpF during the FC12 purification of BmrA. On the other hand, an additional band visible at ∼110 kDa was detected in all samples purified with the maltose-based detergents. It contained AcrB that crystallized over BmrA despite its trace amounts. Highly pure BmrA preparations could be obtained using either a ΔacrAB E. coli strain and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside, or a classical E. coli strain and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol for the overexpression and purification, respectively. Overall our results urge to incorporate a proteomics-based purity analysis into quality control checks prior to commencing crystallization assays of membrane proteins that are notoriously arduous to crystallize. Moreover, the strategies developed here to selectively eliminate obstinate contaminants should be applicable to the purification of other membrane proteins overexpressed in E. coli. PMID:25517996

  15. Mutational Analysis of Cvab, an ABC Transporter Involved in the Secretion of Active Colicin V

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Phang C.

    2012-01-01

    CvaB is the central membrane transporter of the colicin V secretion system that belongs to an ATP-binding cassette superfamily. Previous data showed that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CvaB are essential for the function of CvaB. N-terminal domain of CvaB possesses Ca2+-dependent cysteine proteolytic activity, and two critical residues, Cys32 and His105, have been identified. In this study, we also identify Asp121 as being the third residue of the putative catalytic triad within the active site of the enzyme. The Asp121 mutants lose both their colicin V secretion activity and N-terminal proteolytic activity. The adjacent residue Pro122 also appears to play a critical role in the colicin V secretion. However, the reversal of the two residues D121P - P122D results in loss of activity. Based on molecular modeling and protein sequence alignment, several residues adjacent to the critical residues, Cys32 and His105, were also examined and characterized. Site-directed mutagenesis of Trp101, Asp102, Val108, Leu76, Gly77, and Gln26 indicate that the neighboring residues around the catalytic triad affect colicin V secretion. Several mutated CvaB proteins with defective secretion were also tested, including Asp121 and Pro122, and were found to be structurally stable. These results indicate that the residues surrounding the identified catalytic triad are functionally involved in the secretion of biologically active colicin V. PMID:22539970

  16. Stubborn contaminants: influence of detergents on the purity of the multidrug ABC transporter BmrA.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Benjamin; Kilburg, Arnaud; Chaptal, Vincent; Reyes-Mejia, Gina Catalina; Sarwan, Jonathan; Falson, Pierre; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in membrane proteins, their crystallization remains a major challenge. In the course of a crystallographic study on the multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporter BmrA, mass spectral analyses on samples purified with six selected detergents revealed unexpected protein contamination visible for the most part on overloaded SDS-PAGE. A major contamination from the outer membrane protein OmpF was detected in purifications with Foscholine 12 (FC12) but not with Lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO) or any of the maltose-based detergents. Consequently, in the FC12 purified BmrA, OmpF easily crystallized over BmrA in a new space group, and whose structure is reported here. We therefore devised an optimized protocol to eliminate OmpF during the FC12 purification of BmrA. On the other hand, an additional band visible at ∼110 kDa was detected in all samples purified with the maltose-based detergents. It contained AcrB that crystallized over BmrA despite its trace amounts. Highly pure BmrA preparations could be obtained using either a ΔacrAB E. coli strain and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside, or a classical E. coli strain and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol for the overexpression and purification, respectively. Overall our results urge to incorporate a proteomics-based purity analysis into quality control checks prior to commencing crystallization assays of membrane proteins that are notoriously arduous to crystallize. Moreover, the strategies developed here to selectively eliminate obstinate contaminants should be applicable to the purification of other membrane proteins overexpressed in E. coli. PMID:25517996

  17. Subtle Structural Differences Trigger Inhibitory Activity of Propafenone Analogues at the Two Polyspecific ABC Transporters: P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP).

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Theresa; Montanari, Floriane; Cseke, Anna; Wlcek, Katrin; Visvader, Lene; Palme, Sarah; Chiba, Peter; Kuchler, Karl; Urban, Ernst; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2016-06-20

    The transmembrane ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are widely recognized for their role in cancer multidrug resistance and absorption and distribution of compounds. Furthermore, they are linked to drug-drug interactions and toxicity. Nevertheless, due to their polyspecificity, a molecular understanding of the ligand-transporter interaction, which allows designing of both selective and dual inhibitors, is still in its infancy. This study comprises a combined approach of synthesis, in silico prediction, and in vitro testing to identify molecular features triggering transporter selectivity. Synthesis and testing of a series of 15 propafenone analogues with varied rigidity and basicity of substituents provide first trends for selective and dual inhibitors. Results indicate that both the flexibility of the substituent at the nitrogen atom, as well as the basicity of the nitrogen atom, trigger transporter selectivity. Furthermore, inhibitory activity of compounds at P-gp seems to be much more influenced by logP than those at BCRP. Exploiting these differences further should thus allow designing specific inhibitors for these two polyspecific ABC-transporters. PMID:26970257

  18. 3D cryo-electron reconstruction of BmrA, a bacterial multidrug ABC transporter in an inward-facing conformation and in a lipidic environment.

    PubMed

    Fribourg, Pierre Frederic; Chami, Mohamed; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Gubellini, Francesca; Marabini, Roberto; Marco, Sergio; Jault, Jean-Michel; Lévy, Daniel

    2014-05-15

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) membrane exporters are efflux transporters of a wide diversity of molecule across the membrane at the expense of ATP. A key issue regarding their catalytic cycle is whether or not their nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) are physically disengaged in the resting state. To settle this controversy, we obtained structural data on BmrA, a bacterial multidrug homodimeric ABC transporter, in a membrane-embedded state. BmrA in the apostate was reconstituted in lipid bilayers forming a mixture of ring-shaped structures of 24 or 39 homodimers. Three-dimensional models of the ring-shaped structures of 24 or 39 homodimers were calculated at 2.3 nm and 2.5 nm resolution from cryo-electron microscopy, respectively. In these structures, BmrA adopts an inward-facing open conformation similar to that found in mouse P-glycoprotein structure with the NBDs separated by 3 nm. Both lipidic leaflets delimiting the transmembrane domains of BmrA were clearly resolved. In planar membrane sheets, the NBDs were even more separated. BmrA in an ATP-bound conformation was determined from two-dimensional crystals grown in the presence of ATP and vanadate. A projection map calculated at 1.6 nm resolution shows an open outward-facing conformation. Overall, the data are consistent with a mechanism of drug transport involving large conformational changes of BmrA and show that a bacterial ABC exporter can adopt at least two open inward conformations in lipid membrane. PMID:24630999

  19. Maltose Uptake by the Novel ABC Transport System MusEFGK2I Causes Increased Expression of ptsG in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Alexander; Kuhlmann, Nora; Eck, Alexander W.; Krämer, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum efficiently metabolizes maltose by a pathway involving maltodextrin and glucose formation by 4-α-glucanotransferase, glucose phosphorylation by glucose kinases, and maltodextrin degradation via maltodextrin phosphorylase and α-phosphoglucomutase. However, maltose uptake in C. glutamicum has not been investigated. Interestingly, the presence of maltose in the medium causes increased expression of ptsG in C. glutamicum by an unknown mechanism, although the ptsG-encoded glucose-specific EII permease of the phosphotransferase system itself is not required for maltose utilization. We identified the maltose uptake system as an ABC transporter encoded by musK (cg2708; ATPase subunit), musE (cg2705; substrate binding protein), musF (cg2704; permease), and musG (cg2703; permease) by combination of data obtained from characterization of maltose uptake and reanalyses of transcriptome data. Deletion of the mus gene cluster in C. glutamicum Δmus abolished maltose uptake and utilization. Northern blotting and reverse transcription-PCR experiments revealed that musK and musE are transcribed monocistronically, whereas musF and musG are part of an operon together with cg2701 (musI), which encodes a membrane protein of unknown function with no homologies to characterized proteins. Characterization of growth and [14C]maltose uptake in the musI insertion strain C. glutamicum IMcg2701 showed that musI encodes a novel essential component of the maltose ABC transporter of C. glutamicum. Finally, ptsG expression during cultivation on different carbon sources was analyzed in the maltose uptake-deficient strain C. glutamicum Δmus. Indeed, maltose uptake by the novel ABC transport system MusEFGK2I is required for the positive effect of maltose on ptsG expression in C. glutamicum. PMID:23543710

  20. Aquaporin 4-Specific T Cells in Neuromyelitis Optica Exhibit a Th17 Bias and Recognize Clostridium ABC Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Varrin-Doyer, Michel; Spencer, Collin M; Schulze-Topphoff, Ulf; Nelson, Patricia A; Stroud, Robert M; C Cree, Bruce A; Zamvil, Scott S

    2012-01-01

    Objective Aquaporin 4 (AQP4)-specific autoantibodies in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are immunoglobulin (Ig)G1, a T cell-dependent Ig subclass, indicating that AQP4-specific T cells participate in NMO pathogenesis. Our goal was to identify and characterize AQP4-specific T cells in NMO patients and healthy controls (HC). Methods Peripheral blood T cells from NMO patients and HC were examined for recognition of AQP4 and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Monocytes were evaluated for production of T cell-polarizing cytokines and expression of costimulatory molecules. Results T cells from NMO patients and HC proliferated to intact AQP4 or AQP4 peptides (p11–30, p21–40, p61–80, p131–150, p156–170, p211–230, and p261–280). T cells from NMO patients demonstrated greater proliferation to AQP4 than those from HC, and responded most vigorously to p61–80, a naturally processed immunodominant determinant of intact AQP4. T cells were CD4+, and corresponding to association of NMO with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*0301 and DRB3, AQP4 p61–80-specific T cells were HLA-DR restricted. The T-cell epitope within AQP4 p61–80 was mapped to 63–76, which contains 10 residues with 90% homology to a sequence within Clostridium perfringens adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter permease. T cells from NMO patients proliferated to this homologous bacterial sequence, and cross-reactivity between it and self-AQP4 was observed, supporting molecular mimicry. In NMO, AQP4 p61–80-specific T cells exhibited Th17 polarization, and furthermore, monocytes produced more interleukin 6, a Th17-polarizing cytokine, and expressed elevated CD40 and CD80 costimulatory molecules, suggesting innate immunologic dysfunction. Interpretation AQP4-specific T-cell responses are amplified in NMO, exhibit a Th17 bias, and display cross-reactivity to a protein of an indigenous intestinal bacterium, providing new perspectives for investigating NMO pathogenesis. ANN