Science.gov

Sample records for abcc8 dna variations

  1. Mutational analysis of ABCC8, KCNJ11, GLUD1, HNF4A and GCK genes in 30 Chinese patients with congenital hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yanmei; Xu, Zidi; Liu, Min; Yan, Jie; Wu, Yujun; Zhu, Cheng; Ni, Guichen

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a cohort study to elucidate the molecular spectrum of congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) in Chinese pediatric patients. Thirty Chinese children with CHI were chosen as research subjects, 16 of whom were responsive to diazoxide and 13 of whom were not (1 patient was not given the drug for medical reasons). All exons of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) genes KCNJ11 and ABCC8, the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4A) gene, and the Glucokinase (GCK) gene as well as exons 6 and 7 and 10-12 of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1) gene were amplified from genomic DNA and directly sequenced. Mutations were identified in 14 of 30 patients (47%): 3 in GLUD1 (10%) and 11 in the KATP channel genes (37%). Six patients had paternally derived monoallelic KATP channel mutations predictive of the focal CHI form. We found a novel de novo ABCC8 mutation, p. C1000*, a novel paternally inherited ABCC8 mutation, D1505H, and a dominantly inherited ABCC8 mutation, R1217K. The GLUD1 activating mutation R269H was found in 2 patients: 1 de novo and the other paternally inherited. A de novo S445L mutation was found in 1 patient. No significant HNF4A or GCK mutations were found. CHI has complex genetic onset mechanisms. Paternally inherited monoallelic mutations of ABCC8 and KCNJ11 are likely the main causes of KATP-CHI in Chinese patients. Glutamate dehydrogenase-CHI is the second most common cause of CHI, while HNF4A and GCK are rare types of CHI in Chinese patients.

  2. ABCC8 R1420H Loss-of-Function Variant in a Southwest American Indian Community: Association With Increased Birth Weight and Doubled Risk of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Baier, Leslie J; Muller, Yunhua Li; Remedi, Maria Sara; Traurig, Michael; Piaggi, Paolo; Wiessner, Gregory; Huang, Ke; Stacy, Alyssa; Kobes, Sayuko; Krakoff, Jonathan; Bennett, Peter H; Nelson, Robert G; Knowler, William C; Hanson, Robert L; Nichols, Colin G; Bogardus, Clifton

    2015-12-01

    Missense variants in KCNJ11 and ABCC8, which encode the KIR6.2 and SUR1 subunits of the β-cell KATP channel, have previously been implicated in type 2 diabetes, neonatal diabetes, and hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (HHI). To determine whether variation in these genes affects risk for type 2 diabetes or increased birth weight as a consequence of fetal hyperinsulinemia in Pima Indians, missense and common noncoding variants were analyzed in individuals living in the Gila River Indian Community. A R1420H variant in SUR1 (ABCC8) was identified in 3.3% of the population (N = 7,710). R1420H carriers had higher mean birth weights and a twofold increased risk for type 2 diabetes with a 7-year earlier onset age despite being leaner than noncarriers. One individual homozygous for R1420H was identified; retrospective review of his medical records was consistent with HHI and a diagnosis of diabetes at age 3.5 years. In vitro studies showed that the R1420H substitution decreases KATP channel activity. Identification of this loss-of-function variant in ABCC8 with a carrier frequency of 3.3% affects clinical care as homozygous inheritance and potential HHI will occur in 1/3,600 births in this American Indian population. PMID:26246406

  3. Screening for Mutations in ABCC8 and KCNJ11 Genes in Saudi Persistent Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia of Infancy (PHHI) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Adi, Ahmad; Bin Abbas, Bassam; Al Hamed, Mohamed; Al Tassan, Nada; Bakheet, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The autosomal recessive form of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) is associated with mutations in either ABCC8 or KCNJ11 genes. In the present study, we describe the clinical features and results of genetic analysis of 13 Saudi Arabian patients with PHHI. Clinically, most patients presented with infantile seizures and/or developmental delay, with a subset of patients who were also found to have abnormal brain imaging and electrophysiological studies. Interestingly no coding pathogenic mutations were identified in these two genes by direct sequencing. However, two splice variants were identified in ABCC8 gene in two patients, and a large deletion of exons 1-22 of the ABCC8 gene was identified in three patients. Our data shows that large deletions in ABCC8 gene are the common genetic mechanism in the Saudi population. PMID:25871929

  4. Monoallelic ABCC8 mutations are a common cause of diazoxide-unresponsive diffuse form of congenital hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Saint-Martin, C; Zhou, Q; Martin, G M; Vaury, C; Leroy, G; Arnoux, J-B; de Lonlay, P; Shyng, S-L; Bellanné-Chantelot, C

    2015-05-01

    ABCC8 encodes a subunit of the β-cell potassium channel (KATP ) whose loss of function is responsible for congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI). Patients with two recessive mutations of ABCC8 typically have severe diffuse forms of CHI unresponsive to diazoxide. Some dominant ABCC8 mutations are responsible for a subset of diffuse diazoxide-unresponsive forms of CHI. We report the analysis of 21 different ABCC8 mutations identified in 25 probands with diazoxide-unresponsive diffuse CHI and carrying a single mutation in ABCC8. Nine missense ABCC8 mutations were subjected to in vitro expression studies testing traffic efficiency and responses of mutant channels to activation by MgADP and diazoxide. Eight of the 9 missense mutations exhibited normal trafficking. Seven of the 8 mutants reaching the plasma membrane had dramatically reduced response to MgADP or to diazoxide (<10% of wild-type response). In our cohort, dominant KATP mutations account for 22% of the children with diffuse unresponsive-diazoxide CHI. Their clinical phenotype being indistinguishable from that of children with focal CHI and diffuse CHI forms due to two recessive KATP mutations, we show that functional testing is essential to make the most reliable diagnosis and offer appropriate genetic counseling.

  5. Nateglinide is Effective for Diabetes Mellitus with Reactive Hypoglycemia in a Child with a Compound Heterozygous ABCC8 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Yorifuji, Tohru; Kanno, Junko; Kure, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma

    2012-07-01

    ABCC8 encodes the sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) subunits of the beta-cell ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel playing a critical role in the regulation of insulin secretion, and inactivating mutations in ABCC8 cause congenital hyperinsulinism. Recently, ABCC8 inactivating mutations were reported to be involved in the development of diabetes mellitus later in life. We report a girl who was born macrosomic with transient hypoglycemia and thereafter developed diabetes mellitus accompanied by severe reactive hypoglycemia at the age of 11 yr. An OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) revealed hyperglycemia due to poor early insulin response and subsequent hypoglycemia due to delayed prolonged insulin secretion. Hypoglycemia was improved by the combination of nateglinide, which stimulates early insulin secretion, and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, voglibose. Sequencing of the ABCC8 identified a compound heterozygous mutation (R1420H/F591fs604X), suggesting that this mutation may alter regulation of insulin secretion with advancing age, leading to diabetes mellitus with reactive hypoglycemia from hyperinsulinism. Therefore, long-term follow-up and periodic OGTTs are important for early detection of insulin dysregulation in congenital hyperinsulinism patients carrying the ABCC8 mutation, even though hypoglycemia resolves spontaneously during infancy. Furthermore, nateglinide may be useful therapeutically in the treatment of not only diabetes mellitus but also reactive hypoglycemia. PMID:23926410

  6. Variations in brain DNA

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesús; Gómez-Ramos, Alberto; Soriano, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    It is assumed that DNA sequences are conserved in the diverse cell types present in a multicellular organism like the human being. Thus, in order to compare the sequences in the genome of DNA from different individuals, nucleic acid is commonly isolated from a single tissue. In this regard, blood cells are widely used for this purpose because of their availability. Thus blood DNA has been used to study genetic familiar diseases that affect other tissues and organs, such as the liver, heart, and brain. While this approach is valid for the identification of familial diseases in which mutations are present in parental germinal cells and, therefore, in all the cells of a given organism, it is not suitable to identify sporadic diseases in which mutations might occur in specific somatic cells. This review addresses somatic DNA variations in different tissues or cells (mainly in the brain) of single individuals and discusses whether the dogma of DNA invariance between cell types is indeed correct. We will also discuss how single nucleotide somatic variations arise, focusing on the presence of specific DNA mutations in the brain. PMID:25505410

  7. ABCC8-Related Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY12): Clinical Features and Treatment Perspective.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikova, Alla K; Rymar, Oksana D; Shakhtshneider, Elena V; Klimontov, Vadim V; Koroleva, Elena A; Myakina, Natalya E; Voevoda, Mikhail I

    2016-09-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a heterogeneous group of diseases associated with gene mutations leading to dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells. Thirteen identified MODY variants differ from each other by the clinical course and treatment requirement. Currently, MODY subtypes 1-5 are best-studied, descriptions of the other forms are sporadic. This article reports a MODY12 clinical case, caused by a mutation in the gene of the ATP-binding cassette transporter sub-family C member 8 (ABCC8), encoding sulfonylurea receptor 1. Diabetes manifested in a 27-year-old non-obese man with epilepsy in anamnesis. No evidence of ketosis was present, pancreatic antibodies were undetectable, and C-peptide remained within the reference range. During the initial investigation, non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy and elevated albumin excretion rate was revealed. After 4 months, diabetes was complicated by pre-proliferative retinopathy and diabetic macular edema. Recurrent hypoglycemia and an increase in body weight was observed on moderate and even small insulin doses. Taking into account the clinical features and the presence of diabetes in four generations on the maternal side, screening for all MODY subtypes was performed. A mutation in the ABCC8 gene was found in proband and in his mother. After the insulin discontinuation, gliclazide modified release combined with sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors was started. This treatment eliminated hypoglycemia and improved glycemic variability parameters. A decrease in the amplitude of glucose excursions was documented by continuous glucose monitoring. After 3 months of treatment, glycemic control was still optimal, and no hypoglycemic episodes were observed. The case report demonstrates the clinical features of ABCC8-associated MODY and the therapeutic potential of a combination of sulfonylurea with SGLT2 inhibitor in this disease. PMID:27538677

  8. Replication of KCNJ11 (p.E23K) and ABCC8 (p.S1369A) Association in Russian Diabetes Mellitus 2 Type Cohort and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Ekaterina Alekseevna; Bondar, Irina Arkadievna; Shabelnikova, Olesya Yurievna; Pyankova, Olga Vladimirovna; Filipenko, Maxim Leonidovich

    2015-01-01

    The genes ABCC8 and KCNJ11 have received intense focus in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) research over the past two decades. It has been hypothesized that the p.E23K (KCNJ11) mutation in the 11p15.1 region may play an important role in the development of T2DM. In 2009, Hamming et al. found that the p.1369A (ABCC8) variant may be a causal factor in the disease; therefore, in this study we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including our original data on the Siberian population (1384 T2DM and 414 controls). We found rs5219 and rs757110 were not associated with T2DM in this population, and that there was linkage disequilibrium in Siberians (D’=0.766, r2= 0.5633). In addition, the haplotype rs757110[T]-rs5219[C] (p.23K/p.S1369) was associated with T2DM (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.04-2.24). We included 44 original studies published by June 2014 in a meta-analysis of the p.E23K association with T2DM. The total OR was 1.14 (95% CI: 1.11-1.17) for p.E23K for a total sample size of 137,298. For p.S1369A, a meta-analysis was conducted on a total of 10 studies with a total sample size of 14,136 and pooled OR of 1.14 [95% CI (1.08-1.19); p = 2 x 10-6]. Our calculations identified causal genetic variation within the ABCC8/KCNJ11 region for T2DM with an OR of approximately 1.15 in Caucasians and Asians. Moreover, the OR value was not dependent on the frequency of p.E23K or p.S1369A in the populations. PMID:25955821

  9. Glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in a patient with ABCC8 mutation and Fanconi-Bickel syndrome caused by maternal isodisomy of chromosome 3.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, T L; Blanco, E; Lane, A; Galvin-Parton, P; Gadi, I; Santer, R; DeLeón, D; Stanley, C; Wilson, T A

    2007-06-01

    Fanconi-Bickel syndrome (FBS) is a rare disorder of glucose transport caused by autosomal recessive mutations in GLUT2. Clinically, FBS results in growth failure, hepatomegaly, renal Fanconi syndrome, and abnormal glucose homeostasis. We report a 23 month old female with FBS characterized by more severe and refractory hypoglycemia than typically seen in this disorder. Although previous reports indicate that FBS patients have diminished insulin secretion, our patient showed evidence of hyperinsulinism (HI). Sequence analysis showed that the patient was homozygous for a known null mutation in GLUT2, confirming the clinical diagnosis of FBS. Parental genotyping showed that the mother was heterozygous for the GLUT2 mutation, while the father was wild type. Tandem repeat marker analysis showed that the patient inherited the GLUT2 mutation via maternal isodisomy of chromosome 3. Further molecular testing showed that the patient was heterozygous for a mutation in ABCC8, a known cause of congenital HI. We discuss the patient's biochemical responses in light of the molecular findings. PMID:17539904

  10. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  11. Retroviral DNA Transposition: Themes and Variations.

    PubMed

    Skala, Anna Marie

    2014-10-01

    Retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons are transposable elements that encapsidate the RNAs that are intermediates in the transposition of DNA copies of their genomes (proviruses), from one cell (or one locus) to another. Mechanistic similarities in DNA transposase enzymes and retroviral/retrotransposon integrases underscore the close evolutionary relationship among these elements. The retroviruses are very ancient infectious agents, presumed to have evolved from Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons (1), and DNA copies of their sequences can be found embedded in the genomes of most, if not all, members of the tree of life. All retroviruses share a specific gene arrangement and similar replication strategies. However, given their ancestries and occupation of diverse evolutionary niches, it should not be surprising that unique sequences have been acquired in some retroviral genomes and that the details of the mechanism by which their transposition is accomplished can vary. While every step in the retrovirus lifecycle is, in some sense, relevant to transposition, this Chapter focuses mainly on the early phase of retroviral replication, during which viral DNA is synthesized and integrated into its host genome. Some of the initial studies that set the stage for current understanding are highlighted, as well as more recent findings obtained through use of an ever-expanding technological toolbox including genomics, proteomics, and siRNA screening. Persistence in the area of structural biology has provided new insight into conserved mechanisms as well as variations in detail among retroviruses, which can also be instructive.

  12. Retroviral DNA Transposition: Themes and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Skalka, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons are transposable elements that encapsidate the RNAs that are intermediates in the transposition of DNA copies of their genomes (proviruses), from one cell (or one locus) to another. Mechanistic similarities in DNA transposase enzymes and retroviral/retrotransposon integrases underscore the close evolutionary relationship among these elements. The retroviruses are very ancient infectious agents, presumed to have evolved from Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons (1), and DNA copies of their sequences can be found embedded in the genomes of most, if not all, members of the tree of life. All retroviruses share a specific gene arrangement and similar replication strategies. However, given their ancestries and occupation of diverse evolutionary niches, it should not be surprising that unique sequences have been acquired in some retroviral genomes and that the details of the mechanism by which their transposition is accomplished can vary. While every step in the retrovirus lifecycle is, in some sense, relevant to transposition, this Chapter focuses mainly on the early phase of retroviral replication, during which viral DNA is synthesized and integrated into its host genome. Some of the initial studies that set the stage for current understanding are highlighted, as well as more recent findings obtained through use of an ever-expanding technological toolbox including genomics, proteomics, and siRNA screening. Persistence in the area of structural biology has provided new insight into conserved mechanisms as well as variations in detail among retroviruses, which can also be instructive. PMID:25844274

  13. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Santaniello, Adam; Caillier, Stacy J.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Hauser, Stephen L.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation on multiple sclerosis (MS) risk in cases and controls part of an international consortium. Methods: We analyzed 115 high-quality mtDNA variants and common haplogroups from a previously published genome-wide association study among 7,391 cases from the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium and 14,568 controls from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 project from 7 countries. Significant single nucleotide polymorphism and haplogroup associations were replicated in 3,720 cases and 879 controls from the University of California, San Francisco. Results: An elevated risk of MS was detected among haplogroup JT carriers from 7 pooled clinic sites (odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07–1.24, p = 0.0002) included in the discovery study. The increased risk of MS was observed for both haplogroup T (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.06–1.29, p = 0.002) and haplogroup J carriers (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01–1.22, p = 0.03). These haplogroup associations with MS were not replicated in the independent sample set. An elevated risk of primary progressive (PP) MS was detected for haplogroup J participants from 3 European discovery populations (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.10–2.01, p = 0.009). This elevated risk was borderline significant in the US replication population (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 0.99–2.08, p = 0.058) and remained significant in pooled analysis of discovery and replication studies (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.14–1.81, p = 0.002). No common individual mtDNA variants were associated with MS risk. Conclusions: Identification and validation of mitochondrial genetic variants associated with MS and PPMS may lead to new targets for treatment and diagnostic tests for identifying potential responders to interventions that target mitochondria. PMID:26136518

  15. Mitochondrial DNA variation in human radiation and disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Douglas C

    2015-09-24

    Environmental adaptation, predisposition to common diseases, and, potentially, speciation may all be linked through the adaptive potential of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations of bioenergetics. This Perspective synthesizes evidence that human mtDNA variants may be adaptive or deleterious depending on environmental context and proposes that the accrual of mtDNA variation could contribute to animal speciation via adaptation to marginal environments.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Human Radiation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental adaptation, predisposition to common diseases, and, potentially, speciation may all be linked through the adaptive potential of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations of bioenergetics. This Perspective synthesizes evidence that human mtDNA variants may be adaptive or deleterious depending on environmental context and proposes that the accrual of mtDNA variation could contribute to animal speciation via adaptation to marginal environments. PMID:26406369

  17. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in Greeks.

    PubMed

    Kouvatsi, A; Karaiskou, N; Apostolidis, A; Kirmizidis, G

    2001-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences were determined in 54 unrelated Greeks, coming from different regions in Greece, for both segments HVR-I and HVR-II. Fifty-two different mtDNA haplotypes were revealed, one of which was shared by three individuals. A very low heterogeneity was found among Greek regions. No one cluster of lineages was specific to individuals coming from a certain region. The average pairwise difference distribution showed a value of 7.599. The data were compared with that for other European or neighbor populations (British, French, Germans, Tuscans, Bulgarians, and Turks). The genetic trees that were constructed revealed homogeneity between Europeans. Median networks revealed that most of the Greek mtDNA haplotypes are clustered to the five known haplogroups and that a number of haplotypes are shared among Greeks and other European and Near Eastern populations.

  18. DNA methylation: A source of random variation in natural populations.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, Rachel; Whitelaw, Emma; Angers, Bernard

    2011-04-01

    Epigenetic processes (e.g., DNA methylation) have been proposed as potentially important evolutionary mechanisms. However, before drawing conclusions about their evolutionary relevance, we need to evaluate the independence of epigenetic variation from genetic variation, as well as the extent of methylation polymorphism in nature. We evaluated these in natural populations of a clonal fish, Chrosomus eos-neogaeus, for which genetically identical individuals may be found in distinct environments. A genomic survey confirms the genetic uniformity of individuals, whereas a substantial level of inter-individual variation results in DNA methylation. Survey of the methylation status of the CpG dinucleotides of a fragment of a retrotransposon confirmed a marked difference in epiallelic composition among tissues, as well as among individuals. This study provides further evidence of epigenetic variation in the absence of genetic variation and demonstrates that this process can be a source of random variation in natural populations. PMID:21266851

  19. No variation and low synonymous substitution rates in coral mtDNA despite high nuclear variation

    PubMed Central

    Hellberg, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of most animals evolves more rapidly than nuclear DNA, and often shows higher levels of intraspecific polymorphism and population subdivision. The mtDNA of anthozoans (corals, sea fans, and their kin), by contrast, appears to evolve slowly. Slow mtDNA evolution has been reported for several anthozoans, however this slow pace has been difficult to put in phylogenetic context without parallel surveys of nuclear variation or calibrated rates of synonymous substitution that could permit quantitative rate comparisons across taxa. Here, I survey variation in the coding region of a mitochondrial gene from a coral species (Balanophyllia elegans) known to possess high levels of nuclear gene variation, and estimate synonymous rates of mtDNA substitution by comparison to another coral (Tubastrea coccinea). Results The mtDNA surveyed (630 bp of cytochrome oxidase subunit I) was invariant among individuals sampled from 18 populations spanning 3000 km of the range of B. elegans, despite high levels of variation and population subdivision for allozymes over these same populations. The synonymous substitution rate between B. elegans and T. coccinea (0.05%/site/106 years) is similar to that in most plants, but 50–100 times lower than rates typical for most animals. In addition, while substitutions to mtDNA in most animals exhibit a strong bias toward transitions, mtDNA from these corals does not. Conclusion Slow rates of mitochondrial nucleotide substitution result in low levels of intraspecific mtDNA variation in corals, even when nuclear loci vary. Slow mtDNA evolution appears to be the basal condition among eukaryotes. mtDNA substitution rates switch from slow to fast abruptly and unidirectionally. This switch may stem from the loss of just one or a few mitochondrion-specific DNA repair or replication genes. PMID:16542456

  20. Mitochondrial DNA copy number variation across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Miller, Martin L; Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Riaz, Nadeem; Sarungbam, Judy; Tickoo, Satish K; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Lee, William; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Hakimi, A Ari; Sander, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Mutations, deletions, and changes in copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), are observed throughout cancers. Here, we survey mtDNA copy number variation across 22 tumor types profiled by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We observe a tendency for some cancers, especially of the bladder, breast, and kidney, to be depleted of mtDNA, relative to matched normal tissue. Analysis of genetic context reveals an association between incidence of several somatic alterations, including IDH1 mutations in gliomas, and mtDNA content. In some but not all cancer types, mtDNA content is correlated with the expression of respiratory genes, and anti-correlated to the expression of immune response and cell-cycle genes. In tandem with immunohistochemical evidence, we find that some tumors may compensate for mtDNA depletion to sustain levels of respiratory proteins. Our results highlight the extent of mtDNA copy number variation in tumors and point to related therapeutic opportunities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10769.001 PMID:26901439

  1. Y-Chromosomal DNA Variation in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Raheel; Ayub, Qasim; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Helgason, Agnar; Mazhar, Kehkashan; Mansoor, Atika; Zerjal, Tatiana; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Mehdi, S. Qasim

    2002-01-01

    Eighteen binary polymorphisms and 16 multiallelic, short-tandem-repeat (STR) loci from the nonrecombining portion of the human Y chromosome were typed in 718 male subjects belonging to 12 ethnic groups of Pakistan. These identified 11 stable haplogroups and 503 combination binary marker/STR haplotypes. Haplogroup frequencies were generally similar to those in neighboring geographical areas, and the Pakistani populations speaking a language isolate (the Burushos), a Dravidian language (the Brahui), or a Sino-Tibetan language (the Balti) resembled the Indo-European–speaking majority. Nevertheless, median-joining networks of haplotypes revealed considerable substructuring of Y variation within Pakistan, with many populations showing distinct clusters of haplotypes. These patterns can be accounted for by a common pool of Y lineages, with substantial isolation between populations and drift in the smaller ones. Few comparative genetic or historical data are available for most populations, but the results can be compared with oral traditions about origins. The Y data support the well-established origin of the Parsis in Iran, the suggested descent of the Hazaras from Genghis Khan’s army, and the origin of the Negroid Makrani in Africa, but do not support traditions of Tibetan, Syrian, Greek, or Jewish origins for other populations. PMID:11898125

  2. Y-chromosomal DNA variation in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Raheel; Ayub, Qasim; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Helgason, Agnar; Mazhar, Kehkashan; Mansoor, Atika; Zerjal, Tatiana; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Mehdi, S Qasim

    2002-05-01

    Eighteen binary polymorphisms and 16 multiallelic, short-tandem-repeat (STR) loci from the nonrecombining portion of the human Y chromosome were typed in 718 male subjects belonging to 12 ethnic groups of Pakistan. These identified 11 stable haplogroups and 503 combination binary marker/STR haplotypes. Haplogroup frequencies were generally similar to those in neighboring geographical areas, and the Pakistani populations speaking a language isolate (the Burushos), a Dravidian language (the Brahui), or a Sino-Tibetan language (the Balti) resembled the Indo-European-speaking majority. Nevertheless, median-joining networks of haplotypes revealed considerable substructuring of Y variation within Pakistan, with many populations showing distinct clusters of haplotypes. These patterns can be accounted for by a common pool of Y lineages, with substantial isolation between populations and drift in the smaller ones. Few comparative genetic or historical data are available for most populations, but the results can be compared with oral traditions about origins. The Y data support the well-established origin of the Parsis in Iran, the suggested descent of the Hazaras from Genghis Khan's army, and the origin of the Negroid Makrani in Africa, but do not support traditions of Tibetan, Syrian, Greek, or Jewish origins for other populations.

  3. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Vink, Cornelis; Rudenko, Gloria; Seifert, H. Steven

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a microorganism are continuously modified. As a consequence, the host is forced to constantly adapt its humoral immune response against this pathogen. An antigenic change thus provides the microorganism with an opportunity to persist and/or replicate within the host (population) for an extended period of time or to effectively infect a previously infected host. In most cases, antigenic variation is caused by genetic processes that lead to modification of the amino acid sequence of a particular antigen or to alterations in the expression of biosynthesis genes that induce changes in expression of a variant antigen. Here, we will review antigenic variation systems that rely on homologous DNA recombination and which are found in a wide range of cellular, human pathogens, including bacteria (such as Neisseria spp., Borrelia spp., Treponema pallidum and Mycoplasma spp.), fungi (like Pneumocystis carinii) and parasites (such as the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei). Specifically, the various DNA recombination-based antigenic variation systems will be discussed with a focus on the employed mechanisms of recombination, the DNA substrates, and the enzymatic machinery involved. PMID:22212019

  4. DNA Methylation Variation Trends during the Embryonic Development of Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shizhao; Zhu, Yufei; Zhi, Lihui; Han, Xiaoying; Shen, Jing; Liu, Yanli; Yao, Junhu; Yang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The embryogenesis period is critical for epigenetic reprogramming and is thus of great significance in the research field of poultry epigenetics for elucidation of the trends in DNA methylation variations during the embryonic development of birds, particularly due to differences in embryogenesis between birds and mammals. Here, we first examined the variations in genomic DNA methylation during chicken embryogenesis through high-performance liquid chromatography using broilers as the model organism. We then identified the degree of DNA methylation of the promoters and gene bodies involved in two specific genes (IGF2 and TNF-α) using the bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction method. In addition, we measured the expression levels of IGF2, TNF-α and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1, 3a and 3b. Our results showed that the genomic DNA methylation levels in the liver, heart and muscle increased during embryonic development and that the methylation level of the liver was significantly higher in mid-anaphase. In both the muscle and liver, the promoter methylation levels of TNF-α first increased and then decreased, whereas the gene body methylation levels remained lower at embryonic ages E8, 11 and 14 before increasing notably at E17. The promoter methylation level of IGF2 decreased persistently, whereas the methylation levels in the gene body showed a continuous increase. No differences in the expression of TNF-α were found among E8, 11 and 14, whereas a significant increase was observed at E17. IGF2 showed increasing expression level during the examined embryonic stages. In addition, the mRNA and protein levels of DNMTs increased with increasing embryonic ages. These results suggest that chicken shows increasing genomic DNA methylation patterns during the embryonic period. Furthermore, the genomic DNA methylation levels in tissues are closely related to the genes expression levels, and gene expression may be simultaneously regulated by promoter hypomethylation

  5. Plant genome size variation: bloating and purging DNA.

    PubMed

    Michael, Todd P

    2014-07-01

    Plant genome size variation is a dynamic process of bloating and purging DNA. While it was thought plants were on a path to obesity through continual DNA bloating, recent research supports that most plants activity purge DNA. Plant genome size research has greatly benefited from the cataloguing of genome size estimates at the Kew Plant DNA C-values Database, and the recent availability of over 50 fully sequenced and published plant genomes. The emerging trend is that plant genomes bloat due to the copy-and-paste proliferation of a few long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTRs) and aggressively purge these proliferating LTRs through several mechanisms including illegitimate and incomplete recombination, and double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. However, ultra-small genomes such as Utricularia gibba (Bladderwort), which is 82 megabases (Mb), purge excess DNA through genome fractionation and neofunctionalization during multiple rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD). In contrast, the largest published genome, Picea abies (Norway Spruce) at 19 800 Mb, has no detectable WGD but has bloated with diverse and diverged LTRs that either have evaded purging mechanisms or these purging mechanism are absent in gymnosperms. Finally, advances in DNA methylation studies suggest that smaller genomes have a more aggressive epigenomic surveillance system to purge young LTR retrotransposons, which is less active or missing in larger genomes like the bloated gymnosperms. While genome size may not reflect genome complexity, evidence is mounting that genome size may reflect evolutionary status.

  6. Patterns of DNA Barcode Variation in Canadian Marine Molluscs

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Kara K.S.; Martel, André L.; Hebert, Paul DN.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molluscs are the most diverse marine phylum and this high diversity has resulted in considerable taxonomic problems. Because the number of species in Canadian oceans remains uncertain, there is a need to incorporate molecular methods into species identifications. A 648 base pair segment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene has proven useful for the identification and discovery of species in many animal lineages. While the utility of DNA barcoding in molluscs has been demonstrated in other studies, this is the first effort to construct a DNA barcode registry for marine molluscs across such a large geographic area. Methodology/Principal Findings This study examines patterns of DNA barcode variation in 227 species of Canadian marine molluscs. Intraspecific sequence divergences ranged from 0–26.4% and a barcode gap existed for most taxa. Eleven cases of relatively deep (>2%) intraspecific divergence were detected, suggesting the possible presence of overlooked species. Structural variation was detected in COI with indels found in 37 species, mostly bivalves. Some indels were present in divergent lineages, primarily in the region of the first external loop, suggesting certain areas are hotspots for change. Lastly, mean GC content varied substantially among orders (24.5%–46.5%), and showed a significant positive correlation with nearest neighbour distances. Conclusions/Significance DNA barcoding is an effective tool for the identification of Canadian marine molluscs and for revealing possible cases of overlooked species. Some species with deep intraspecific divergence showed a biogeographic partition between lineages on the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific coasts, suggesting the role of Pleistocene glaciations in the subdivision of their populations. Indels were prevalent in the barcode region of the COI gene in bivalves and gastropods. This study highlights the efficacy of DNA barcoding for providing insights into sequence variation across a broad

  7. Variation of DNA Methylome of Zebrafish Cells under Cold Pressure.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingshe; Li, Wenhao; Chen, Zuozhou; Xu, Qiongqiong; Luo, Juntao; Shi, Yingdi; Li, Xiaoxia; Yan, Xiaonan; Zhang, Junfang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in multiple biological processes. However, the relationship between DNA methylation and cold acclimation remains poorly understood. In this study, Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation Sequencing (MeDIP-seq) was performed to reveal a genome-wide methylation profile of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryonic fibroblast cells (ZF4) and its variation under cold pressure. MeDIP-seq assay was conducted with ZF4 cells cultured at appropriate temperature of 28°C and at low temperature of 18°C for 5 (short-term) and 30 (long-term) days, respectively. Our data showed that DNA methylation level of whole genome increased after a short-term cold exposure and decreased after a long-term cold exposure. It is interesting that metabolism of folate pathway is significantly hypomethylated after short-term cold exposure, which is consistent with the increased DNA methylation level. 21% of methylation peaks were significantly altered after cold treatment. About 8% of altered DNA methylation peaks are located in promoter regions, while the majority of them are located in non-coding regions. Methylation of genes involved in multiple cold responsive biological processes were significantly affected, such as anti-oxidant system, apoptosis, development, chromatin modifying and immune system suggesting that those processes are responsive to cold stress through regulation of DNA methylation. Our data indicate the involvement of DNA methylation in cellular response to cold pressure, and put a new insight into the genome-wide epigenetic regulation under cold pressure. PMID:27494266

  8. Variation of DNA Methylome of Zebrafish Cells under Cold Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiongqiong; Luo, Juntao; Shi, Yingdi; Li, Xiaoxia; Yan, Xiaonan; Zhang, Junfang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in multiple biological processes. However, the relationship between DNA methylation and cold acclimation remains poorly understood. In this study, Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation Sequencing (MeDIP-seq) was performed to reveal a genome-wide methylation profile of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryonic fibroblast cells (ZF4) and its variation under cold pressure. MeDIP-seq assay was conducted with ZF4 cells cultured at appropriate temperature of 28°C and at low temperature of 18°C for 5 (short-term) and 30 (long-term) days, respectively. Our data showed that DNA methylation level of whole genome increased after a short-term cold exposure and decreased after a long-term cold exposure. It is interesting that metabolism of folate pathway is significantly hypomethylated after short-term cold exposure, which is consistent with the increased DNA methylation level. 21% of methylation peaks were significantly altered after cold treatment. About 8% of altered DNA methylation peaks are located in promoter regions, while the majority of them are located in non-coding regions. Methylation of genes involved in multiple cold responsive biological processes were significantly affected, such as anti-oxidant system, apoptosis, development, chromatin modifying and immune system suggesting that those processes are responsive to cold stress through regulation of DNA methylation. Our data indicate the involvement of DNA methylation in cellular response to cold pressure, and put a new insight into the genome-wide epigenetic regulation under cold pressure. PMID:27494266

  9. Nuclear DNA content variation and evolution in liverworts.

    PubMed

    Bainard, Jillian D; Forrest, Laura L; Goffinet, Bernard; Newmaster, Steven G

    2013-09-01

    Across embryophytes there is a significant range in DNA content, both in regards to genome size (total DNA in an unreduced chromosome complement) and degree of endoreduplication (when DNA replication not followed by division resulting in various ploidy levels within the same individual). However, there is little information available on DNA content evolution in liverworts, the likely sister group to all other living plants. This study seeks to detect a phylogenetic structure in the variation in genome size and degree of endopolyploidy within liverworts. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that shifts in breeding systems and genome size are correlated, as polyploidy is suggested to be a possible mechanism for the evolution of monoecy in liverworts and could therefore be associated with larger genome sizes. Genome size was determined for 67 liverwort species from 33 families using flow cytometry. Estimates for 48 species and 16 families are new to science. A phylogeny was reconstructed using the plastid gene rbcL. Over all taxa analyzed, there was a considerable range in genome size estimates with 1C-values from 0.27 pg (Jungermannia rubra) to 20.46 pg (Phyllothallia fuegiana). Large genome sizes were also found in the Haplomitriopsida. None of the liverwort species showed evidence of endopolyploidy. Although some taxa may be polyploids, a correlation between shifts in genome size and breeding system is lacking. Importantly, genome size variation in liverworts exhibits strong phylogenetic signal (Pagel's λ=0.99955).

  10. Intra- and interspecific variation in DNA content in Cistus (Cistaceae).

    PubMed

    Ellul, Philippe; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar; Moreno, Vicente; Rosselló, Josep A

    2002-09-01

    Flow cytometry, using propidium iodide and 4',6-diamidano-2-phenylindole staining, was used to estimate the nuclear DNA content (2C) and the proportion of A-T base pairs in 16 species of the Mediterranean genus Cistus. Genome sizes were shown to be constant within species, since no significant intraspecific variation in 2C DNA content was detected. At the genus level, up to about 1.5-fold differences in absolute DNA amounts were observed, ranging from 3.92 pg in C. crispus to 5.88 pg in C. monspeliensis. The (AT) : (GC) ratio was close to 1, and was similar for all species examined, ranging from 47.87% A-T content in C clusii, to 50.67% in C. populifolius. Pink-flowered species (subgenus Cistus) had lower DNA amounts than white-flowered species (subgenera Leucocistus and Halimioides). However, the distribution of DNA amounts in Cistus appeared to be continuous and did not permit a clear separation of infra-generic ranks in the genus. PMID:12234146

  11. Intra‐ and Interspecific Variation in DNA Content in Cistus (Cistaceae)

    PubMed Central

    ELLUL, PHILIPPE; BOSCAIU, MONICA; VICENTE, OSCAR; MORENO, VICENTE; ROSSELLÓ, JOSEP A.

    2002-01-01

    Flow cytometry, using propidium iodide and 4′,6‐diamidano‐2-phenylindole staining, was used to estimate the nuclear DNA content (2C) and the proportion of A–T base pairs in 16 species of the Mediterranean genus Cistus. Genome sizes were shown to be constant within species, since no significant intraspecific variation in 2C DNA content was detected. At the genus level, up to about 1·5‐fold differences in absolute DNA amounts were observed, ranging from 3·92 pg in C. crispus to 5·88 pg in C. monspeliensis. The (AT) : (GC) ratio was close to 1, and was similar for all species examined, ranging from 47·87 % A–T content in C. clusii, to 50·67 % in C. populifolius. Pink‐flowered species (subgenus Cistus) had lower DNA amounts than white‐flowered species (subgenera Leucocistus and Halimioides). However, the distribution of DNA amounts in Cistus appeared to be continuous and did not permit a clear separation of infra‐generic ranks in the genus. PMID:12234146

  12. Nuclear DNA Content Variation among Central European Koeleria Taxa

    PubMed Central

    PECINKA, ALES; SUCHÁNKOVÁ, PAVLA; LYSAK, MARTIN A.; TRÁVNÍČEK, BOHUMIL; DOLEŽEL, JAROSLAV

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Polyploidization plays an important role in the evolution of many plant genera, including Koeleria. The knowledge of ploidy, chromosome number and genome size may enable correct taxonomic treatment when other features are insufficient as in Koeleria. Therefore, these characteristics and their variability were determined for populations of six central European Koeleria taxa. • Methods Chromosome number analysis was performed by squashing root meristems, and ploidy and 2C nuclear DNA content were estimated by flow cytometry. • Key Results Three diploids (K. glauca, K. macrantha var. macrantha and var. pseudoglauca), one tetraploid (K. macrantha var. majoriflora), one decaploid (K. pyramidata) and one dodecaploid (K. tristis) were found. The 2C nuclear DNA content of the diploids ranged from 4·85 to 5·20 pg. The 2C DNA contents of tetraploid, decaploid and dodecaploid taxa were 9·31 pg, 22·89 pg and 29·23 pg, respectively. The DNA content of polyploids within the K. macrantha aggregate (i.e. within K. macrantha and K. pyramidata) was smaller than the expected multiple of the diploid genome (K. macrantha var. macrantha). Geography-correlated variation of DNA content was found for some taxa. Czech populations of K. macrantha var. majoriflora had a 5·06 % smaller genome than the Slovak ones. An isolated eastern Slovakian population of K. tristis revealed 8·04 % less DNA than populations from central Slovakia. In central and north-west Bohemia, diploid and tetraploid cytotypes of K. macrantha were sympatric; east from this region diploid populations, and towards the west tetraploid populations were dominant. • Conclusions Remarkable intra-specific inter-population differences in nuclear DNA content were found between Bohemian and Pannonian populations of Koeleria macrantha var. majoriflora and between geographically isolated central and eastern Slovakian populations of K. tristis. These differences occur over a relatively small

  13. Nonneutral mitochondrial DNA variation in humans and chimpanzees

    SciTech Connect

    Nachman, M.W.; Aquadro, C.F.; Brown, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    We sequenced the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (ND3) gene from a sample of 61 humans, five common chimpanzees, and one gorilla to test whether patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation are consistent with a neutral model of molecular evolution. Within humans and within chimpanzees, the ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions was higher than observed in comparisons between species, contrary to neutral expectations. To test the generality of this result, we reanalyzed published human RFLP data from the entire mitochondrial genome. Gains of restriction sites relative to a known human mtDNA sequence were used to infer unambiguous nucleotide substitutions. We also compared the complete mtDNA sequences of three humans. Both the RFLP data and the sequence data reveal a higher ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions within humans than is seen between species. This pattern is observed at most or all human mitochondrial genes and is inconsistent with a strictly neutral model. These data suggest that many mitochondrial protein polymorphisms are slightly deleterious, consistent with studies of human mitochondrial diseases. 59 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Flow cytometry reliability analysis and variations in sugarcane DNA content.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A C L; Pasqual, M; Bruzi, A T; Pio, L A S; Mendonça, P M S; Soares, J D R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of flow cytometry analysis and the use of this technique to differentiate species and varieties of sugarcane (Saccharum spp) according to their relative DNA content. We analyzed 16 varieties and three species belonging to this genus. To determine a reliable protocol, we evaluated three extraction buffers (LB01, Marie, and Tris·MgCl2), the presence and absence of RNase, six doses of propidium iodide (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 μg), four periods of exposure to propidium iodide (0, 5, 10, and 20 min), and seven external reference standards (peas, beans, corn, radish, rye, soybean, and tomato) with reference to the coefficient of variation and the DNA content. For statistical analyses, we used the programs Sisvar(®) and Xlstat(®). We recommend using the Marie extraction buffer and at least 15 μg propidium iodide. The samples should not be analyzed immediately after the addition of propidium iodide. The use of RNase is optional, and tomato should be used as an external reference standard. The results show that sugarcane has a variable genome size (8.42 to 12.12 pg/2C) and the individuals analyzed could be separated into four groups according to their DNA content with relative equality in the genome sizes of the commercial varieties.

  15. Minifish shows high genetic variation in mtDNA size.

    PubMed

    Chen, X-W; Li, Q-L; Hu, X-J; Yuan, Y-M; Wen, M; Peng, L-Y; Liu, S-J; Hong, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    The genus Paedocypris is a newly described taxon of minifish species that are characterized by extensive chromosome evolution and one of the smallest known vertebrate nuclear genomes. Paedocypris features a tiny adult size, a short generation time, low fecundity and fragmented tropical habitats, which are factors that favor rapid speciation. Most recently, we have revealed that P. progenetica (Pp), the type species of the genus Paedocypris, has an unusual mtDNA bearing - within its D-loop - a tandem array of a 34-bp repeat sequence called the minifish repeat, which shows compromised replication efficiency in vitro. Here we report that Pp exhibits high genetic variation in mtDNA size. The efficiency of D-loop amplification was found to depend upon primers. Interestingly, Pp individuals of one and the same population differed drastically in mtDNA size resulting from varying copy numbers of the minifish repeat. We conclude that minifish has a high mutation rate and perhaps represents a rapidly evolving taxon of vertebrates.

  16. Differential roles of homologous recombination pathways in Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilin antigenic variation, DNA transformation and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Mehr, I J; Seifert, H S

    1998-11-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) pili undergo antigenic variation when the amino acid sequence of the pilin protein is changed, aiding in immune avoidance and altering pilus expression. Pilin antigenic variation occurs by RecA-dependent unidirectional transfer of DNA sequences from a silent pilin locus to the expressed pilin gene through high-frequency recombination events that occur at limited regions of homology. We show that the Gc recQ and recO genes are essential for pilin antigenic and phase variation and DNA repair but are not involved in natural DNA transformation. This suggests that a RecF-like pathway of recombination exists in Gc. In addition, mutations in the Gc recB, recC or recD genes revealed that a Gc RecBCD pathway also exists and is involved in DNA transformation and DNA repair but not in pilin antigenic variation. PMID:10094619

  17. Association of DNA sequence variation in mitochondrial DNA polymerase with mitochondrial DNA synthesis and risk of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sayantan; Ray, Anindita; Roy, Roshni; Roy, Bidyut

    2016-01-10

    Enzymes responsible for mitochondrial (mt) DNA synthesis and transcription are encoded by nuclear genome and inherited mutations in these genes may play important roles in enhancing risk of precancer and cancer. Here, genetic variations in 23 functionally relevant tagSNPs in 6 genes responsible for mtDNA synthesis and transcription were studied in 522 cancer and 241 precancer (i.e. leukoplakia) patients and 525 healthy controls using Illumina Golden Gate assay to explore association with risk of oral precancer and cancer. Two SNPs, rs41553913 at POLRMT and rs9905016 at POLG2, significantly increased risk of oral leukoplakia and cancer, respectively, at both genotypic and allelic levels. Gene-environment interaction models also revealed that tobacco habits and SNPs at POLG2 and TFAM may modulate risk of both leukoplakia and cancer. In silico analysis of published data-set also revealed that variant heterozygote (TC) significantly increased transcription of POLG2 compared to wild genotype (p=0.03). Cancer tissues having variant allele genotypes (TC+CC) at POLG2 contained 1.6 times (p<0.01) more mtDNA compared to cancer tissues having wild genotype (TT). In conclusion, polymorphisms at POLG2 and POLRMT increased risk of oral cancer and leukoplakia, respectively, probably modulating synthesis and activity of the enzymes. Enhanced synthesis of mtDNA in cancer tissues may have implication in carcinogenesis, but the mechanism is yet to be explored. PMID:26403317

  18. Association of DNA sequence variation in mitochondrial DNA polymerase with mitochondrial DNA synthesis and risk of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sayantan; Ray, Anindita; Roy, Roshni; Roy, Bidyut

    2016-01-10

    Enzymes responsible for mitochondrial (mt) DNA synthesis and transcription are encoded by nuclear genome and inherited mutations in these genes may play important roles in enhancing risk of precancer and cancer. Here, genetic variations in 23 functionally relevant tagSNPs in 6 genes responsible for mtDNA synthesis and transcription were studied in 522 cancer and 241 precancer (i.e. leukoplakia) patients and 525 healthy controls using Illumina Golden Gate assay to explore association with risk of oral precancer and cancer. Two SNPs, rs41553913 at POLRMT and rs9905016 at POLG2, significantly increased risk of oral leukoplakia and cancer, respectively, at both genotypic and allelic levels. Gene-environment interaction models also revealed that tobacco habits and SNPs at POLG2 and TFAM may modulate risk of both leukoplakia and cancer. In silico analysis of published data-set also revealed that variant heterozygote (TC) significantly increased transcription of POLG2 compared to wild genotype (p=0.03). Cancer tissues having variant allele genotypes (TC+CC) at POLG2 contained 1.6 times (p<0.01) more mtDNA compared to cancer tissues having wild genotype (TT). In conclusion, polymorphisms at POLG2 and POLRMT increased risk of oral cancer and leukoplakia, respectively, probably modulating synthesis and activity of the enzymes. Enhanced synthesis of mtDNA in cancer tissues may have implication in carcinogenesis, but the mechanism is yet to be explored.

  19. Thermal adaptation and clinal mitochondrial DNA variation of European anchovy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gonçalo; Lima, Fernando P.; Martel, Paulo; Castilho, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations of widely distributed organisms often exhibit genetic clinal variation over their geographical ranges. The European anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, illustrates this by displaying a two-clade mitochondrial structure clinally arranged along the eastern Atlantic. One clade has low frequencies at higher latitudes, whereas the other has an anti-tropical distribution, with frequencies decreasing towards the tropics. The distribution pattern of these clades has been explained as a consequence of secondary contact after an ancient geographical isolation. However, it is not unlikely that selection acts on mitochondria whose genes are involved in relevant oxidative phosphorylation processes. In this study, we performed selection tests on a fragment of 1044 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene using 455 individuals from 18 locations. We also tested correlations of six environmental features: temperature, salinity, apparent oxygen utilization and nutrient concentrations of phosphate, nitrate and silicate, on a compilation of mitochondrial clade frequencies from 66 sampling sites comprising 2776 specimens from previously published studies. Positive selection in a single codon was detected predominantly (99%) in the anti-tropical clade and temperature was the most relevant environmental predictor, contributing with 59% of the variance in the geographical distribution of clade frequencies. These findings strongly suggest that temperature is shaping the contemporary distribution of mitochondrial DNA clade frequencies in the European anchovy. PMID:25143035

  20. Biomarkers of Adiponectin: Plasma Protein Variation and Genomic DNA Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Harvest F.

    2009-01-01

    Adiponectin is secreted by white adipose tissue and exists as the most abundant adipokine in the human plasma. Recent research has indicated that plasma adiponectin levels are inversely correlated with body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance. Reduction of plasma adiponectin levels is commonly observed in the patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and/or in those who are obese in comparison with healthy control individuals. The adiponectin (AdipoQ) gene has a moderate linkage disequilibrium (LD), but two small LD blocks are observed, respectively, in the promoter region and the boundary of exon 2-intron 2. Genetic association studies have demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) +45G15G(T/G) in exon 2 and +276G/T in intron 2 of the AdipoQ gene confer the risk susceptibility to the development of T2D, obesity and diabetic nephropathy (DN). The SNPs in the promoter region, including −11426A/G, −11377C/G and −11391G/A, are found to be associated with T2D and DN. Recent research has indicated that the promoter polymorphisms interfere with the AdipoQ promoter activity. The haplotypes constructed by the promoter polymorphisms and SNP +276G/T in intron 2 are associated with circulating adiponectin levels. This review summarises genetic and pathophysiological relevancies of adiponectin and discusses about the biomarkers of adiponectin plasma protein variation and genomic DNA polymorphisms. PMID:20029651

  1. Effects of Wolbachia on mitochondrial DNA variation in populations of Athetis lepigone (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria that infect arthropods and incompatibility among strains can affect gene flow within host insect populations, that can result in significant host mitochondrial DNA (MtD) variation. The effects of Wolbachia infection on mtDNA variation was studied in Athetis lepi...

  2. Genomic profiling of plastid DNA variation in the Mediterranean olive tree

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Characterisation of plastid genome (or cpDNA) polymorphisms is commonly used for phylogeographic, population genetic and forensic analyses in plants, but detecting cpDNA variation is sometimes challenging, limiting the applications of such an approach. In the present study, we screened cpDNA polymorphism in the olive tree (Olea europaea L.) by sequencing the complete plastid genome of trees with a distinct cpDNA lineage. Our objective was to develop new markers for a rapid genomic profiling (by Multiplex PCRs) of cpDNA haplotypes in the Mediterranean olive tree. Results Eight complete cpDNA genomes of Olea were sequenced de novo. The nucleotide divergence between olive cpDNA lineages was low and not exceeding 0.07%. Based on these sequences, markers were developed for studying two single nucleotide substitutions and length polymorphism of 62 regions (with variable microsatellite motifs or other indels). They were then used to genotype the cpDNA variation in cultivated and wild Mediterranean olive trees (315 individuals). Forty polymorphic loci were detected on this sample, allowing the distinction of 22 haplotypes belonging to the three Mediterranean cpDNA lineages known as E1, E2 and E3. The discriminating power of cpDNA variation was particularly low for the cultivated olive tree with one predominating haplotype, but more diversity was detected in wild populations. Conclusions We propose a method for a rapid characterisation of the Mediterranean olive germplasm. The low variation in the cultivated olive tree indicated that the utility of cpDNA variation for forensic analyses is limited to rare haplotypes. In contrast, the high cpDNA variation in wild populations demonstrated that our markers may be useful for phylogeographic and populations genetic studies in O. europaea. PMID:21569271

  3. DNA and RNA ligases: structural variations and shared mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pascal, John M

    2008-02-01

    DNA and RNA ligases join 3' OH and 5' PO4 ends in polynucleotide substrates using a three-step reaction mechanism that involves covalent modification of both the ligase enzyme and the polynucleotide substrate with AMP. In the past three years, several polynucleotide ligases have been crystallized in complex with nucleic acid, providing the introductory views of ligase enzymes engaging their substrates. Crystal structures for two ATP-dependent DNA ligases, an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase, and an ATP-dependent RNA ligase demonstrate how ligases utilize the AMP group and their multi-domain architectures to manipulate nucleic acid structure and catalyze the end-joining reaction. Together with unliganded crystal structures of DNA and RNA ligases, a more comprehensive and dynamic understanding of the multi-step ligation reaction mechanism has emerged.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Southeastern Pre-Columbian Canids.

    PubMed

    Brzeski, Kristin E; DeBiasse, Melissa B; Rabon, David R; Chamberlain, Michael J; Taylor, Sabrina S

    2016-05-01

    The taxonomic status of the red wolf (Canis rufus) is heavily debated, but could be clarified by examining historic specimens from the southeastern United States. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 3 ancient (350-1900 year olds) putative wolf samples excavated from middens and sinkholes within the historic red wolf range. We detected 3 unique mtDNA haplotypes, which grouped with the coyote mtDNA clade, suggesting that the canids inhabiting southeastern North America prior to human colonization from Europe were either coyotes, which would vastly expand historic coyote distributions, an ancient coyote-wolf hybrid, or a North American evolved red wolf lineage related to coyotes. Should the red wolf prove to be a distinct species, our results support the idea of either an ancient hybrid origin for red wolves or a shared common ancestor between coyotes and red wolves.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Southeastern Pre-Columbian Canids.

    PubMed

    Brzeski, Kristin E; DeBiasse, Melissa B; Rabon, David R; Chamberlain, Michael J; Taylor, Sabrina S

    2016-05-01

    The taxonomic status of the red wolf (Canis rufus) is heavily debated, but could be clarified by examining historic specimens from the southeastern United States. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 3 ancient (350-1900 year olds) putative wolf samples excavated from middens and sinkholes within the historic red wolf range. We detected 3 unique mtDNA haplotypes, which grouped with the coyote mtDNA clade, suggesting that the canids inhabiting southeastern North America prior to human colonization from Europe were either coyotes, which would vastly expand historic coyote distributions, an ancient coyote-wolf hybrid, or a North American evolved red wolf lineage related to coyotes. Should the red wolf prove to be a distinct species, our results support the idea of either an ancient hybrid origin for red wolves or a shared common ancestor between coyotes and red wolves. PMID:26774058

  6. Survey of variation in human transcription factors reveals prevalent DNA binding changes

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Luis A.; Rogers, Julia M.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Woodard, Jaie; Mariani, Luca; Kock, Kian Hong; Inukai, Sachi; Siggers, Trevor; Shokri, Leila; Gordân, Raluca; Sahni, Nidhi; Cotsapas, Chris; Hao, Tong; Yi, Song; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J.; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of exomes and genomes has revealed abundant genetic variation affecting the coding sequences of human transcription factors (TFs), but the consequences of such variation remain largely unexplored. We developed a computational, structure-based approach to evaluate TF variants for their impact on DNA-binding activity and used universal protein binding microarrays to assay sequence-specific DNA-binding activity across 41 reference and 117 variant alleles found in individuals of diverse ancestries and families with Mendelian diseases. We found 77 variants in 28 genes that affect DNA-binding affinity or specificity and identified thousands of rare alleles likely to alter the DNA-binding activity of human sequence-specific TFs. Our results suggest that most individuals have unique repertoires of TF DNA-binding activities, which may contribute to phenotypic variation. PMID:27013732

  7. DNA content variation and its significance in the evolution of the genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales, Streptophyta).

    PubMed

    Poulíčková, Aloisie; Poulíèková, Aloisie; Mazalová, Petra; Vašut, Radim J; Šarhanová, Petra; Neustupa, Jiří; Neustupa, Jiøí; Škaloud, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    It is now clear that whole genome duplications have occurred in all eukaryotic evolutionary lineages, and that the vast majority of flowering plants have experienced polyploidisation in their evolutionary history. However, study of genome size variation in microalgae lags behind that of higher plants and seaweeds. In this study, we have addressed the question whether microalgal phylogeny is associated with DNA content variation in order to evaluate the evolutionary significance of polyploidy in the model genus Micrasterias. We applied flow-cytometric techniques of DNA quantification to microalgae and mapped the estimated DNA content along the phylogenetic tree. Correlations between DNA content and cell morphometric parameters were also tested using geometric morphometrics. In total, DNA content was successfully determined for 34 strains of the genus Micrasterias. The estimated absolute 2C nuclear DNA amount ranged from 2.1 to 64.7 pg; intraspecific variation being 17.4-30.7 pg in M. truncata and 32.0-64.7 pg in M. rotata. There were significant differences between DNA contents of related species. We found strong correlation between the absolute nuclear DNA content and chromosome numbers and significant positive correlation between the DNA content and both cell size and number of terminal lobes. Moreover, the results showed the importance of cell/life cycle studies for interpretation of DNA content measurements in microalgae.

  8. DNA content variation and its significance in the evolution of the genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales, Streptophyta).

    PubMed

    Poulíčková, Aloisie; Poulíèková, Aloisie; Mazalová, Petra; Vašut, Radim J; Šarhanová, Petra; Neustupa, Jiří; Neustupa, Jiøí; Škaloud, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    It is now clear that whole genome duplications have occurred in all eukaryotic evolutionary lineages, and that the vast majority of flowering plants have experienced polyploidisation in their evolutionary history. However, study of genome size variation in microalgae lags behind that of higher plants and seaweeds. In this study, we have addressed the question whether microalgal phylogeny is associated with DNA content variation in order to evaluate the evolutionary significance of polyploidy in the model genus Micrasterias. We applied flow-cytometric techniques of DNA quantification to microalgae and mapped the estimated DNA content along the phylogenetic tree. Correlations between DNA content and cell morphometric parameters were also tested using geometric morphometrics. In total, DNA content was successfully determined for 34 strains of the genus Micrasterias. The estimated absolute 2C nuclear DNA amount ranged from 2.1 to 64.7 pg; intraspecific variation being 17.4-30.7 pg in M. truncata and 32.0-64.7 pg in M. rotata. There were significant differences between DNA contents of related species. We found strong correlation between the absolute nuclear DNA content and chromosome numbers and significant positive correlation between the DNA content and both cell size and number of terminal lobes. Moreover, the results showed the importance of cell/life cycle studies for interpretation of DNA content measurements in microalgae. PMID:24465986

  9. DNA Content Variation and Its Significance in the Evolution of the Genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales, Streptophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Poulíèková, Aloisie; Mazalová, Petra; Vašut, Radim J.; Šarhanová, Petra; Neustupa, Jiøí; Škaloud, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    It is now clear that whole genome duplications have occurred in all eukaryotic evolutionary lineages, and that the vast majority of flowering plants have experienced polyploidisation in their evolutionary history. However, study of genome size variation in microalgae lags behind that of higher plants and seaweeds. In this study, we have addressed the question whether microalgal phylogeny is associated with DNA content variation in order to evaluate the evolutionary significance of polyploidy in the model genus Micrasterias. We applied flow-cytometric techniques of DNA quantification to microalgae and mapped the estimated DNA content along the phylogenetic tree. Correlations between DNA content and cell morphometric parameters were also tested using geometric morphometrics. In total, DNA content was successfully determined for 34 strains of the genus Micrasterias. The estimated absolute 2C nuclear DNA amount ranged from 2.1 to 64.7 pg; intraspecific variation being 17.4–30.7 pg in M. truncata and 32.0–64.7 pg in M. rotata. There were significant differences between DNA contents of related species. We found strong correlation between the absolute nuclear DNA content and chromosome numbers and significant positive correlation between the DNA content and both cell size and number of terminal lobes. Moreover, the results showed the importance of cell/life cycle studies for interpretation of DNA content measurements in microalgae. PMID:24465986

  10. Epigenetic and genetic influences on DNA methylation variation in maize populations.

    PubMed

    Eichten, Steven R; Briskine, Roman; Song, Jawon; Li, Qing; Swanson-Wagner, Ruth; Hermanson, Peter J; Waters, Amanda J; Starr, Evan; West, Patrick T; Tiffin, Peter; Myers, Chad L; Vaughn, Matthew W; Springer, Nathan M

    2013-08-01

    DNA methylation is a chromatin modification that is frequently associated with epigenetic regulation in plants and mammals. However, genetic changes such as transposon insertions can also lead to changes in DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiles of DNA methylation for 20 maize (Zea mays) inbred lines were used to discover differentially methylated regions (DMRs). The methylation level for each of these DMRs was also assayed in 31 additional maize or teosinte genotypes, resulting in the discovery of 1966 common DMRs and 1754 rare DMRs. Analysis of recombinant inbred lines provides evidence that the majority of DMRs are heritable. A local association scan found that nearly half of the DMRs with common variation are significantly associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms found within or near the DMR. Many of the DMRs that are significantly associated with local genetic variation are found near transposable elements that may contribute to the variation in DNA methylation. Analysis of gene expression in the same samples used for DNA methylation profiling identified over 300 genes with expression patterns that are significantly associated with DNA methylation variation. Collectively, our results suggest that DNA methylation variation is influenced by genetic and epigenetic changes that are often stably inherited and can influence the expression of nearby genes.

  11. Genome-wide DNA methylation map of human neutrophils reveals widespread inter-individual epigenetic variation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Stockwell, Peter A; Rodger, Euan J; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Parry, Matthew F; Weeks, Robert J; Morison, Ian M

    2015-11-27

    The extent of variation in DNA methylation patterns in healthy individuals is not yet well documented. Identification of inter-individual epigenetic variation is important for understanding phenotypic variation and disease susceptibility. Using neutrophils from a cohort of healthy individuals, we generated base-resolution DNA methylation maps to document inter-individual epigenetic variation. We identified 12851 autosomal inter-individual variably methylated fragments (iVMFs). Gene promoters were the least variable, whereas gene body and upstream regions showed higher variation in DNA methylation. The iVMFs were relatively enriched in repetitive elements compared to non-iVMFs, and were associated with genome regulation and chromatin function elements. Further, variably methylated genes were disproportionately associated with regulation of transcription, responsive function and signal transduction pathways. Transcriptome analysis indicates that iVMF methylation at differentially expressed exons has a positive correlation and local effect on the inclusion of that exon in the mRNA transcript.

  12. Concerted copy number variation balances ribosomal DNA dosage in human and mouse genomes.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, John G; Branco, Alan T; Godinho, Susana A; Yu, Shoukai; Lemos, Bernardo

    2015-02-24

    Tandemly repeated ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are among the most evolutionary dynamic loci of eukaryotic genomes. The loci code for essential cellular components, yet exhibit extensive copy number (CN) variation within and between species. CN might be partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance between the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays. The arrays are nonhomologous, physically unlinked in mammals, and encode functionally interdependent RNA components of the ribosome. Here we show that the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays exhibit concerted CN variation (cCNV). Despite 5S and 45S rDNA elements residing on different chromosomes and lacking sequence similarity, cCNV between these loci is strong, evolutionarily conserved in humans and mice, and manifested across individual genotypes in natural populations and pedigrees. Finally, we observe that bisphenol A induces rapid and parallel modulation of 5S and 45S rDNA CN. Our observations reveal a novel mode of genome variation, indicate that natural selection contributed to the evolution and conservation of cCNV, and support the hypothesis that 5S CN is partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance with the 45S rDNA array. We suggest that human disease variation might be traced to disrupted rDNA dosage balance in the genome.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA control region variation in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Alshamali, Farida; Brandstätter, Anita; Zimmermann, Bettina; Parson, Walther

    2008-01-01

    249 entire mtDNA control region sequences were generated and analyzed in a population sample from Dubai, one of the seven United Arab Emirates. The control region was amplified in one piece and sequenced with different sequencing primers. Sequence evaluation was performed twice and validated by a third senior mtDNA scientist. Phylogenetic analyses were used for quality assurance purposes and for the determination of the haplogroup affiliation of the samples. Upon publication, the population data are going to be available in the EMPOP database (www.empop.org).

  14. Algorithm of detecting structural variations in DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Charkiewicz, Katarzyna; Nowak, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Whole genome sequencing enables to use the longest common subsequence algorithm to detect genetic structure variations. We propose to search position of short unique fragments, genetic markers, to achieve acceptable time and space complexity. The markers are generated by algorithms searching the genetic sequence or its Fourier transformation. The presented methods are checked on structural variations generated in silico on bacterial genomes giving the comparable or better results than other solutions.

  15. Bovine Genetic Diversity Revealed By mtDNA Sequence Variation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data were used to determine genetic distance, nucleotide diversity, construction of haplotypes, estimation of information contents, and phylogenic relationships in bovine HapMap breeds. The Bovine International HapMap panel consists of 720 anima...

  16. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway.

    PubMed

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-19

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway.

    PubMed

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-19

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland. PMID:25487335

  18. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway

    PubMed Central

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-01

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland. PMID:25487335

  19. A localized transition in the size variation of circular DNA in nanoslits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strychalski, Elizabeth A.; Stavis, Samuel M.; Geist, Jon

    2013-03-01

    We observe a localized transition in the size variation of circular DNA between strong and moderate regimes of nanofluidic slitlike confinement. We applied a rigorous statistical analysis to our recent experimental measurements of DNA size for linear and circular topologies in nanoslits with depths around ~2p, where p is the DNA persistence length [E. A. Strychalski, J. Geist, M. Gaitan, L. E. Locascio, S. M. Stavis. Macromolecules, 45, 1602-1611 (2012)]. Our empirical approach revealed a localized transition between confinement regimes for circular DNA at a nanoslit depth of ~3p but detected no such transition for linear DNA with a similar contour length. These results provide the first indication of the localized influence of polymer topology on size variation across changing nanoslit depths. Improved understanding of differences in polymer behavior due to topology in this controversial system is of fundamental importance in polymer science and will inform new nanofluidic methods for biopolymer analysis.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in human evolution and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, D C

    1994-01-01

    Germ-line and somatic mtDNA mutations are hypothesized to act together to shape our history and our health. Germ-line mtDNA mutations, both ancient and recent, have been associated with a variety of degenerative diseases. Mildly to moderately deleterious germ-line mutations, like neutral polymorphisms, have become established in the distant past through genetic drift but now may predispose certain individuals to late-onset degenerative diseases. As an example, a homoplasmic, Caucasian, tRNA(Gln) mutation at nucleotide pair (np) 4336 has been observed in 5% of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease patients and may contribute to the multifactorial etiology of these diseases. Moderately to severely deleterious germ-line mutations, on the other hand, appear repeatedly but are eliminated by selection. Hence, all extant mutations of this class are recent and associated with more devastating diseases of young adults and children. Representative of these mutations is a heteroplasmic mutation in MTND6 at np 14459 whose clinical presentations range from adult-onset blindness to pediatric dystonia and basal ganglial degeneration. To the inherited mutations are added somatic mtDNA mutations which accumulate in random arrays within stable tissues. These mutations provide a molecular clock that measures our age and may cause a progressive decline in tissue energy output that could precipitate the onset of degenerative diseases in individuals harboring inherited deleterious mutations. Images PMID:8090716

  1. MICROSATELLITE DNA VARIATION IN TWO FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) STOCKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse effects on more than 2000 species of fish in the U.S. and Canada are estimated by sensitvity results of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) acute toxicity tests. Whether survival and susceptibility to toxicants are influenced by genetic variation is still under question...

  2. Large scale variation in DNA copy number in chicken breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Detecting genetic variation is a critical step in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic diversity. Until recently, such detection has mostly focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) because of the ease in screening complete genomes. Another type of variant, c...

  3. Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA variation in Lithuanians.

    PubMed

    Kasperaviciūte, D; Kucinskas, V; Stoneking, M

    2004-09-01

    The genetic composition of the Lithuanian population was investigated by analysing mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region 1, RFLP polymorphisms and Y chromosomal biallelic and STR markers in six ethnolinguistic groups of Lithuanians, to address questions about the origin and genetic structure of the present day population. There were no significant genetic differences among ethnolinguistic groups, and an analysis of molecular variance confirmed the homogeneity of the Lithuanian population. MtDNA diversity revealed that Lithuanians are close to both Slavic (Indo-European) and Finno-Ugric speaking populations of Northern and Eastern Europe. Y-chromosome SNP haplogroup analysis showed Lithuanians to be closest to Latvians and Estonians. Significant differences between Lithuanian and Estonian Y chromosome STR haplotypes suggested that these populations have had different demographic histories. We suggest that the observed pattern of Y chromosome diversity in Lithuanians may be explained by a population bottleneck associated with Indo-European contact. Different Y chromosome STR distributions in Lithuanians and Estonians might be explained by different origins or, alternatively, be the result of some period of isolation and genetic drift after the population split. PMID:15469421

  4. Mitochondrial DNA variation of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Resende, Adriana; Gonçalves, Joana; Muigai, Anne W T; Pereira, Filipe

    2016-06-01

    The history of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Africa remains largely unknown. After being first introduced from the Near East, sheep gradually spread through the African continent with pastoral societies. The eastern part of Africa was important either for the first diffusion of sheep southward or for putative secondary introductions from the Arabian Peninsula or southern Asia. We analysed mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of 91 domestic sheep from Kenya and found a high diversity of matrilines from the widespread haplogroup B, whereas only a single individual from haplogroup A was detected. Our phylogeography analyses of more than 500 available mitochondrial DNA sequences also identified ancestral haplotypes that were probably first introduced in Africa and are now widely distributed. Moreover, we found no evidence of an admixture between East and West African sheep. The presence of shared haplotypes in eastern and ancient southern African sheep suggests the possible southward movement of sheep along the eastern part of Africa. Finally, we found no evidence of an extensive introduction of sheep from southern Asia into Africa via the Indian Ocean trade. The overall findings on the phylogeography of East African domestic sheep set the grounds for understanding the origin and subsequent movements of sheep in Africa. The richness of maternal lineages in Kenyan breeds is of prime importance for future conservation and breeding programmes. PMID:26765790

  5. Mitochondrial DNA variation of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Resende, Adriana; Gonçalves, Joana; Muigai, Anne W T; Pereira, Filipe

    2016-06-01

    The history of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Africa remains largely unknown. After being first introduced from the Near East, sheep gradually spread through the African continent with pastoral societies. The eastern part of Africa was important either for the first diffusion of sheep southward or for putative secondary introductions from the Arabian Peninsula or southern Asia. We analysed mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of 91 domestic sheep from Kenya and found a high diversity of matrilines from the widespread haplogroup B, whereas only a single individual from haplogroup A was detected. Our phylogeography analyses of more than 500 available mitochondrial DNA sequences also identified ancestral haplotypes that were probably first introduced in Africa and are now widely distributed. Moreover, we found no evidence of an admixture between East and West African sheep. The presence of shared haplotypes in eastern and ancient southern African sheep suggests the possible southward movement of sheep along the eastern part of Africa. Finally, we found no evidence of an extensive introduction of sheep from southern Asia into Africa via the Indian Ocean trade. The overall findings on the phylogeography of East African domestic sheep set the grounds for understanding the origin and subsequent movements of sheep in Africa. The richness of maternal lineages in Kenyan breeds is of prime importance for future conservation and breeding programmes.

  6. Human body epigenome maps reveal noncanonical DNA methylation variation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Matthew D; He, Yupeng; Whitaker, John W; Hariharan, Manoj; Mukamel, Eran A; Leung, Danny; Rajagopal, Nisha; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Chen, Huaming; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Jung, Inkyung; Schmitt, Anthony D; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Ren, Bing; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Wang, Wei; Ecker, Joseph R

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the diversity of human tissues is fundamental to disease and requires linking genetic information, which is identical in most of an individual's cells, with epigenetic mechanisms that could have tissue-specific roles. Surveys of DNA methylation in human tissues have established a complex landscape including both tissue-specific and invariant methylation patterns. Here we report high coverage methylomes that catalogue cytosine methylation in all contexts for the major human organ systems, integrated with matched transcriptomes and genomic sequence. By combining these diverse data types with each individuals' phased genome, we identified widespread tissue-specific differential CG methylation (mCG), partially methylated domains, allele-specific methylation and transcription, and the unexpected presence of non-CG methylation (mCH) in almost all human tissues. mCH correlated with tissue-specific functions, and using this mark, we made novel predictions of genes that escape X-chromosome inactivation in specific tissues. Overall, DNA methylation in several genomic contexts varies substantially among human tissues.

  7. DNA methylation mediates genetic variation for adaptive transgenerational plasticity.

    PubMed

    Herman, Jacob J; Sultan, Sonia E

    2016-09-14

    Environmental stresses experienced by individual parents can influence offspring phenotypes in ways that enhance survival under similar conditions. Although such adaptive transgenerational plasticity is well documented, its transmission mechanisms are generally unknown. One possible mechanism is environmentally induced DNA methylation changes. We tested this hypothesis in the annual plant Polygonum persicaria, a species known to express adaptive transgenerational plasticity in response to parental drought stress. Replicate plants of 12 genetic lines (sampled from natural populations) were grown in dry versus moist soil. Their offspring were exposed to the demethylating agent zebularine or to control conditions during germination and then grown in dry soil. Under control germination conditions, the offspring of drought-stressed parents grew longer root systems and attained greater biomass compared with offspring of well-watered parents of the same genetic lines. Demethylation removed these adaptive developmental effects of parental drought, but did not significantly alter phenotypic expression in offspring of well-watered parents. The effect of demethylation on the expression of the parental drought effect varied among genetic lines. Differential seed provisioning did not contribute to the effect of parental drought on offspring phenotypes. These results demonstrate that DNA methylation can mediate adaptive, genotype-specific effects of parental stress on offspring phenotypes. PMID:27629032

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Variation and Heteroplasmy in Monozygotic Twins Clinically Discordant for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Souren, Nicole Y P; Gerdes, Lisa A; Kümpfel, Tania; Lutsik, Pavlo; Klopstock, Thomas; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Walter, Jörn

    2016-08-01

    We examined the debated link between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation and multiple sclerosis (MS) using 49 monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs clinically discordant for MS, which enables to associate de novo mtDNA variants, skewed heteroplasmy, and mtDNA copy number with MS manifestation. Ultra-deep sequencing of blood-derived mtDNA revealed 25 heteroplasmic variants with potentially pathogenic features in 18 pairs. All variants were pair-specific and had low and/or similar heteroplasmy levels in both cotwins. In one pair, a confirmed pathogenic variant (m.11778G>A, heteroplasmy ∼50%) associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy was detected. Detailed diagnostic investigation revealed subclinical MS signs in the prior nondiseased cotwin. Moreover, neither mtDNA deletions nor copy-number variations were involved. Furthermore, the majority of heteroplasmic variants were shared among MZ twins and exhibited more similar heteroplasmy levels in the same tissue of MZ twins as compared with different tissues of the same individual. Heteroplasmy levels were also more similar within MZ twins compared with nonidentical siblings. Our analysis excludes mtDNA variation as a major driver of the discordant clinical manifestation of MS in MZ twins, and provides valuable insights into the occurrence and distribution of heteroplasmic variants within MZ twins and nonidentical siblings, and across different tissues. PMID:27119776

  9. [Mitochondrial DNA sequence variations of Keriyan in the Taklamakan desert].

    PubMed

    Duan, Ran-Hui; Cui, Yin-Qiu; Zhou, Hui; Zhu, Hong

    2003-05-01

    The Keriyans live in the center of the Taklamakan desert of Xinjiang Province and they have never married with outsiders. Nobody knows clearly how they immigrated here and who was their origin. The mtDNA hypervariable segment I sequences were sequenced in 75 Keriyans. Seventy-one unique HVS I types were identified, varying at 68 nucleotide positions. Nucleotide diversity and the mean pairwise differences of Keriyan are intermediate between those reported for Eastern and Western populations. Keriyan's low Tajima's D statistics and bell-shaped pairwise-difference distributions can be interpreted as the hallmark of an ancient population expansion. Phylogenetic analysis shows Central Asian populations occupy a position intermediate between the Eastern and Western populations, moreover, the Keriyan presents shorter genetic distances to Xinjiang Uighur and Uighur in other places than to other populations.

  10. Geographical variation in prevalence of hepatitis B virus DNA in HBsAg negative patients.

    PubMed

    Lo, Y M; Lo, E S; Mehal, W Z; Sampietro, M; Fiorelli, G; Ronchi, G; Tse, C H; Fleming, K A

    1993-04-01

    AIMS--To study the geographical variation of the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) negative subjects. METHODS--A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to amplify the core region of HBV. The assay was able to detect 10 molecules of a full length HBV plasmid. RESULTS--When applied to HBsAg negative paraffin wax embedded liver samples from Italy, Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom, a geographical variation in the prevalence of HBV-DNA positivity was noted. Two of 18 (11%) of Italian samples and 2/29 (6.9%) of Hong Kong samples were positive for HBV-DNA while none of the 70 cases from the United Kingdom was positive by nested PCR. Contamination by plasmid DNA was excluded using a novel method based on heteroduplex formation. One HBV-DNA positive case had idiopathic chronic active hepatitis, but the diagnoses in the other three HBV-DNA positive cases did not suggest any aetiological connection between HBV-DNA positivity and liver pathology. CONCLUSIONS--HBV-DNA could be detected in the liver tissues of a proportion of HBsAg negative subjects. The prevalence of such cases is related to the endemic rate of a geographical region. The use of HBV PCR on paraffin wax embedded tissues will be valuable for future studies on the molecular epidemiology of HBV.

  11. Inter- and intraspecific mitochondrial DNA variation in North American bears (Ursus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, M.A.; Amstrup, S.; Garner, G.; Vyse, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    We assessed mitochondrial DNA variation in North American black bears (Ursus americanus), brown bears (Ursus arctos), and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Divergent mitochondrial DNA haplotypes (0.05 base substitutions per nucleotide) were identified in populations of black bears from Montana and Oregon. In contrast, very similar haplotypes occur in black bears across North America. This discordance of haplotype phylogeny and geographic distribution indicates that there has been maintenance of polymorphism and considerable gene flow throughout the history of the species. Intraspecific mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence in brown bears and polar bears is lower than in black bears. The two morphological forms of U. arctos, grizzly and coastal brown bears, are not in distinct mtDNA lineages. Interspecific comparisons indicate that brown bears and polar bears share similar mitochondrial DNA (0.023 base substitutions per nucleotide) which is quite divergent (0.078 base substitutions per nucleotide) from that of black bears. High mitochondrial DNA divergence within black bears and paraphyletic relationships of brown and polar bear mitochondrial DNA indicate that intraspecific variation across species' ranges should be considered in phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA.

  12. Geographical variation in prevalence of hepatitis B virus DNA in HBsAg negative patients.

    PubMed

    Lo, Y M; Lo, E S; Mehal, W Z; Sampietro, M; Fiorelli, G; Ronchi, G; Tse, C H; Fleming, K A

    1993-04-01

    AIMS--To study the geographical variation of the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) negative subjects. METHODS--A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to amplify the core region of HBV. The assay was able to detect 10 molecules of a full length HBV plasmid. RESULTS--When applied to HBsAg negative paraffin wax embedded liver samples from Italy, Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom, a geographical variation in the prevalence of HBV-DNA positivity was noted. Two of 18 (11%) of Italian samples and 2/29 (6.9%) of Hong Kong samples were positive for HBV-DNA while none of the 70 cases from the United Kingdom was positive by nested PCR. Contamination by plasmid DNA was excluded using a novel method based on heteroduplex formation. One HBV-DNA positive case had idiopathic chronic active hepatitis, but the diagnoses in the other three HBV-DNA positive cases did not suggest any aetiological connection between HBV-DNA positivity and liver pathology. CONCLUSIONS--HBV-DNA could be detected in the liver tissues of a proportion of HBsAg negative subjects. The prevalence of such cases is related to the endemic rate of a geographical region. The use of HBV PCR on paraffin wax embedded tissues will be valuable for future studies on the molecular epidemiology of HBV. PMID:8496385

  13. Geographical variation in prevalence of hepatitis B virus DNA in HBsAg negative patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Y M; Lo, E S; Mehal, W Z; Sampietro, M; Fiorelli, G; Ronchi, G; Tse, C H; Fleming, K A

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To study the geographical variation of the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) negative subjects. METHODS--A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to amplify the core region of HBV. The assay was able to detect 10 molecules of a full length HBV plasmid. RESULTS--When applied to HBsAg negative paraffin wax embedded liver samples from Italy, Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom, a geographical variation in the prevalence of HBV-DNA positivity was noted. Two of 18 (11%) of Italian samples and 2/29 (6.9%) of Hong Kong samples were positive for HBV-DNA while none of the 70 cases from the United Kingdom was positive by nested PCR. Contamination by plasmid DNA was excluded using a novel method based on heteroduplex formation. One HBV-DNA positive case had idiopathic chronic active hepatitis, but the diagnoses in the other three HBV-DNA positive cases did not suggest any aetiological connection between HBV-DNA positivity and liver pathology. CONCLUSIONS--HBV-DNA could be detected in the liver tissues of a proportion of HBsAg negative subjects. The prevalence of such cases is related to the endemic rate of a geographical region. The use of HBV PCR on paraffin wax embedded tissues will be valuable for future studies on the molecular epidemiology of HBV. Images PMID:8496385

  14. Sequence variation in the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer of Tridacna crocea.

    PubMed

    Yu, E T; Juinio-Meñez, M A; Monje, V D

    2000-11-01

    DNA-based genetic markers are needed to augment existing allozyme markers in the assessment of genetic diversity of wild giant clam populations. The dearth of polymorphic mitochondrial DNA regions amplified from known universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers has led us to search other regions of the genome for viable sources of DNA polymorphism. We have designed tridacnid-specific PCR primers for the amplification of internal transcribed spacer regions. Sequences of the first internal transcribed spacer segment (ITS-1) revealed very high polymorphism, showing 29% variation arising from base substitutions alone. Preliminary restriction analysis of the ITS regions using 8 restriction enzymes revealed cryptic changes in the DNA sequence. These mutations are promising as marker tools for differentiating geographically separated populations. Such variation in the ITS region can possibly be used for population genetic analysis.

  15. Inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage using a standard comet assay protocol.

    PubMed

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Ersson, Clara; Loft, Steffen; Möller, Lennart; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik J; Jones, George D D; Higgins, Jennifer A; Cooke, Marcus; Mistry, Vilas; Karbaschi, Mahsa; Collins, Andrew R; Azqueta, Amaya; Phillips, David H; Sozeri, Osman; Routledge, Michael N; Nelson-Smith, Kirsty; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa; Matullo, Giuseppe; Allione, Alessandra; Stępnik, Maciej; Steepnik, Maciej; Komorowska, Magdalena; Teixeira, João Paulo; Costa, Solange; Corcuera, Laura-Ana; López de Cerain, Adela; Laffon, Blanca; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Møller, Peter

    2012-11-01

    There are substantial inter-laboratory variations in the levels of DNA damage measured by the comet assay. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adherence to a standard comet assay protocol would reduce inter-laboratory variation in reported values of DNA damage. Fourteen laboratories determined the baseline level of DNA strand breaks (SBs)/alkaline labile sites and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites in coded samples of mononuclear blood cells (MNBCs) from healthy volunteers. There were technical problems in seven laboratories in adopting the standard protocol, which were not related to the level of experience. Therefore, the inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage was only analysed using the results from laboratories that had obtained complete data with the standard comet assay protocol. This analysis showed that the differences between reported levels of DNA SBs/alkaline labile sites in MNBCs were not reduced by applying the standard assay protocol as compared with the laboratory's own protocol. There was large inter-laboratory variation in FPG-sensitive sites by the laboratory-specific protocol and the variation was reduced when the samples were analysed by the standard protocol. The SBs and FPG-sensitive sites were measured in the same experiment, indicating that the large spread in the latter lesions was the main reason for the reduced inter-laboratory variation. However, it remains worrying that half of the participating laboratories obtained poor results using the standard procedure. This study indicates that future comet assay validation trials should take steps to evaluate the implementation of standard procedures in participating laboratories.

  16. Transforming single DNA molecules into fluorescent magnetic particles for detection and enumeration of genetic variations

    PubMed Central

    Dressman, Devin; Yan, Hai; Traverso, Giovanni; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert

    2003-01-01

    Many areas of biomedical research depend on the analysis of uncommon variations in individual genes or transcripts. Here we describe a method that can quantify such variation at a scale and ease heretofore unattainable. Each DNA molecule in a collection of such molecules is converted into a single magnetic particle to which thousands of copies of DNA identical in sequence to the original are bound. This population of beads then corresponds to a one-to-one representation of the starting DNA molecules. Variation within the original population of DNA molecules can then be simply assessed by counting fluorescently labeled particles via flow cytometry. This approach is called BEAMing on the basis of four of its principal components (beads, emulsion, amplification, and magnetics). Millions of individual DNA molecules can be assessed in this fashion with standard laboratory equipment. Moreover, specific variants can be isolated by flow sorting and used for further experimentation. BEAMing can be used for the identification and quantification of rare mutations as well as to study variations in gene sequences or transcripts in specific populations or tissues. PMID:12857956

  17. Genetic Variation in DNA of Coho Salmon from the Lower Columbia River : Final Report 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Fobes, Stephen; Knudsen, Kathy; Allendorf, Fred

    1993-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop techniques to provide the information needed to determine if Lower Columbia River coho salmon represent a 'species' under the Endangered Species Act. Our report features two new nuclear DNA approaches to the improved detection of genetic variation: (1) Studies of DNA-level genetic variation for two nuclear growth hormone genes; (2) Use of arbitrary DNA primers (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, or 'RAPD' primers) to detect variation at large numbers of nuclear genes. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify variable sections (introns) of two growth hormone genes (GH-I and G/f-Z) in several salmonid species. Coho salmon had three DNA length variants for G/-I intron C. Restriction analysis and sequencing provided valuable information about the mode of evolution of these DNA sequences. We tested segregation of the variants in captive broods of coho salmon, and demonstrated that they are alleles at a single Mendelian locus. Population studies using the GH-1 alleles showed highly significant frequency differences between Lower Columbia River and Oregon Coast coho salmon, and marginal differences among stocks within these regions. These new markers are adequately defined and tested to use in coho salmon population studies of any size. The nature of the variation at GH-1 (Variable Number Tandem Repeats, or 'VNTRs') suggests that more genetic variants will be found in coho salmon from other areas. GH-2 intron C also showed length variation in coho salmon, and this variation was found to be sex-linked. Because PCR methods require minute amounts of tissue, this discovery provides a technique to determine the gender of immature coho salmon without killing them. Chinook salmon had restriction patterns and sequence divergences similar to coho salmon. Thus, we expect that sex linkage of GH-2 alleles predates the evolutionary divergence of Pacific salmon species, and that gender testing with this system will work on the

  18. Inheritance and Variation of Genomic DNA Methylation in Diploid and Triploid Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qun; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2016-02-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that could be responsive to environmental changes indicating a potential role in natural selection and adaption. In order to evaluate an evolutionary role of DNA methylation, it is essential to first gain a better insight into inheritability. To address this question, this study investigated DNA methylation variation from parents to offspring in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas using fluorescent-labeled methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (F-MSAP) analysis. Most of parental methylated loci were stably transmitted to offspring segregating following Medelian expectation. However, methylated loci deviated more often than non-methylated loci and offspring showed a few de novo methylated loci indicating DNA methylation changes from parents to offspring. Interestingly, some male-specific methylated loci were found in this study which might help to explore sex determination in oyster. Despite environmental stimuli, genomic stresses such as polyploidization also can induce methylation changes. This study also compared global DNA methylation level and individual methylated loci between diploid and triploid oysters. Results showed no difference in global methylation state but a few ploidy-specific loci were detected. DNA methylation variation during polyploidization was less than autonomous methylation variation from parents to offspring.

  19. Sequential Model Selection based Segmentation to Detect DNA Copy Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianhua; Zhang, Liwen; Wang, Huixia Judy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Array-based CGH experiments are designed to detect genomic aberrations or regions of DNA copy-number variation that are associated with an outcome, typically a state of disease. Most of the existing statistical methods target on detecting DNA copy number variations in a single sample or array. We focus on the detection of group effect variation, through simultaneous study of multiple samples from multiple groups. Rather than using direct segmentation or smoothing techniques, as commonly seen in existing detection methods, we develop a sequential model selection procedure that is guided by a modified Bayesian information criterion. This approach improves detection accuracy by accumulatively utilizing information across contiguous clones, and has computational advantage over the existing popular detection methods. Our empirical investigation suggests that the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the existing detection methods, in particular, in detecting small segments or separating neighboring segments with differential degrees of copy-number variation. PMID:26954760

  20. Mitochondrial DNA Variation and Introgression in Siberian Taimen Hucho taimen

    PubMed Central

    Balakirev, Evgeniy S.; Romanov, Nikolai S.; Mikheev, Pavel B.; Ayala, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Siberian taimen Hucho taimen is the largest representative of the family Salmonidae inhabiting rivers of northern Eurasia. The species is under intensive aquaculture activity. To monitor natural taimen populations we have sequenced a portion (8,141 bp) of the mitochondrial (mt) genome in 28 specimens of H. taimen from six localities in the Amur River basin. Nucleotide variability is low (π = 0.0010), but structured in two divergent haplotype groups. A comparison of the data with the GenBank H. taimen mt genome (HQ897271) reveals significant differences between them in spite of the fact that the fish specimens come from neighboring geographical areas. The distribution of divergence is non-uniform with two highly pronounced divergent regions centered on two genes, ND3 and ND6. To clarify the pattern of divergence we sequenced the corresponding portion of the mt genome of lenok Brachymystax tumensis and analyzed the GenBank complete mt genomes of related species. We have found that the first and second divergent regions are identical between the GenBank H. taimen and two lenok subspecies, B. lenok and B. lenok tsinlingensis, respectively. Consequently, both divergent regions represent introgressed mtDNA resulting from intergeneric hybridization between the two lenok subspecies and H. taimen. Introgression is, however, not detected in our specimens. This plus the precise identity of the introgressed fragments between the donor and the recipient GenBank sequence suggests that the introgression is local and very recent, probably due to artificial manipulations involving taimen – lenok intergeneric hybridization. Human-mediated hybridization may become a major threat to aquatic biodiversity. Consequently we suggest that due attention needs to be given to this threat by means of responsible breeding program management, so as to prevent a potential spread of hybrid fishes that could jeopardize the resilience of locally adapted gene pools of the native H. taimen

  1. Extensive Variation in the Density and Distribution of DNA Polymorphism in Sorghum Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Joseph; McCormick, Ryan F.; Morishige, Daryl; Olson, Sara N.; Weers, Brock; Hilley, Josie; Klein, Patricia; Rooney, William; Mullet, John

    2013-01-01

    Sorghum genotypes currently used for grain production in the United States were developed from African landraces that were imported starting in the mid-to-late 19th century. Farmers and plant breeders selected genotypes for grain production with reduced plant height, early flowering, increased grain yield, adaptation to drought, and improved resistance to lodging, diseases and pests. DNA polymorphisms that distinguish three historically important grain sorghum genotypes, BTx623, BTx642 and Tx7000, were characterized by genome sequencing, genotyping by sequencing, genetic mapping, and pedigree-based haplotype analysis. The distribution and density of DNA polymorphisms in the sequenced genomes varied widely, in part because the lines were derived through breeding and selection from diverse Kafir, Durra, and Caudatum race accessions. Genomic DNA spanning dw1 (SBI-09) and dw3 (SBI-07) had identical haplotypes due to selection for reduced height. Lower SNP density in genes located in pericentromeric regions compared with genes located in euchromatic regions is consistent with background selection in these regions of low recombination. SNP density was higher in euchromatic DNA and varied >100-fold in contiguous intervals that spanned up to 300 Kbp. The localized variation in DNA polymorphism density occurred throughout euchromatic regions where recombination is elevated, however, polymorphism density was not correlated with gene density or DNA methylation. Overall, sorghum chromosomes contain distal euchromatic regions characterized by extensive, localized variation in DNA polymorphism density, and large pericentromeric regions of low gene density, diversity, and recombination. PMID:24265758

  2. Extensive variation in the density and distribution of DNA polymorphism in sorghum genomes.

    PubMed

    Evans, Joseph; McCormick, Ryan F; Morishige, Daryl; Olson, Sara N; Weers, Brock; Hilley, Josie; Klein, Patricia; Rooney, William; Mullet, John

    2013-01-01

    Sorghum genotypes currently used for grain production in the United States were developed from African landraces that were imported starting in the mid-to-late 19(th) century. Farmers and plant breeders selected genotypes for grain production with reduced plant height, early flowering, increased grain yield, adaptation to drought, and improved resistance to lodging, diseases and pests. DNA polymorphisms that distinguish three historically important grain sorghum genotypes, BTx623, BTx642 and Tx7000, were characterized by genome sequencing, genotyping by sequencing, genetic mapping, and pedigree-based haplotype analysis. The distribution and density of DNA polymorphisms in the sequenced genomes varied widely, in part because the lines were derived through breeding and selection from diverse Kafir, Durra, and Caudatum race accessions. Genomic DNA spanning dw1 (SBI-09) and dw3 (SBI-07) had identical haplotypes due to selection for reduced height. Lower SNP density in genes located in pericentromeric regions compared with genes located in euchromatic regions is consistent with background selection in these regions of low recombination. SNP density was higher in euchromatic DNA and varied >100-fold in contiguous intervals that spanned up to 300 Kbp. The localized variation in DNA polymorphism density occurred throughout euchromatic regions where recombination is elevated, however, polymorphism density was not correlated with gene density or DNA methylation. Overall, sorghum chromosomes contain distal euchromatic regions characterized by extensive, localized variation in DNA polymorphism density, and large pericentromeric regions of low gene density, diversity, and recombination. PMID:24265758

  3. Meta-Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Barral-Arca, Ruth; Pischedda, Sara; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Pastoriza, Ana; Mosquera-Miguel, Ana; López-Soto, Manuel; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Salas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The Iberian Peninsula has been the focus of attention of numerous studies dealing with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation, most of them targeting the control region segment. In the present study we sequenced the control region of 3,024 Spanish individuals from areas where available data were still limited. We also compiled mtDNA haplotypes from the literature involving 4,588 sequences and 28 population groups or small regions. We meta-analyzed all these data in order to shed further light on patterns of geographic variation, taking advantage of the large sample size and geographic coverage, in contrast with the atomized sampling strategy of previous work. The results indicate that the main mtDNA haplogroups show primarily clinal geographic patterns across the Iberian geography, roughly along a North-South axis. Haplogroup HV0 (where haplogroup U is nested) is more prevalent in the Franco Cantabrian region, in good agreement with previous findings that identified this area as a climate refuge during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), prior to a subsequent demographic re-expansion towards Central Europe and the Mediterranean. Typical sub-Saharan and North African lineages are slightly more prevalent in South Iberia, although at low frequencies; this pattern has been shaped mainly by the transatlantic slave trade and the Arab invasion of the Iberian Peninsula. The results also indicate that summary statistics that aim to measure molecular variation, or AMOVA, have limited sensitivity to detect population substructure, in contrast to patterns revealed by phylogeographic analysis. Overall, the results suggest that mtDNA variation in Iberia is substantially stratified. These patterns might be relevant in biomedical studies given that stratification is a common cause of false positives in case-control mtDNA association studies, and should be also considered when weighting the DNA evidence in forensic casework, which is strongly dependent on haplotype frequencies.

  4. Meta-Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Iberian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Barral-Arca, Ruth; Pischedda, Sara; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Pastoriza, Ana; Mosquera-Miguel, Ana; López-Soto, Manuel; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Salas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The Iberian Peninsula has been the focus of attention of numerous studies dealing with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation, most of them targeting the control region segment. In the present study we sequenced the control region of 3,024 Spanish individuals from areas where available data were still limited. We also compiled mtDNA haplotypes from the literature involving 4,588 sequences and 28 population groups or small regions. We meta-analyzed all these data in order to shed further light on patterns of geographic variation, taking advantage of the large sample size and geographic coverage, in contrast with the atomized sampling strategy of previous work. The results indicate that the main mtDNA haplogroups show primarily clinal geographic patterns across the Iberian geography, roughly along a North-South axis. Haplogroup HV0 (where haplogroup U is nested) is more prevalent in the Franco Cantabrian region, in good agreement with previous findings that identified this area as a climate refuge during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), prior to a subsequent demographic re-expansion towards Central Europe and the Mediterranean. Typical sub-Saharan and North African lineages are slightly more prevalent in South Iberia, although at low frequencies; this pattern has been shaped mainly by the transatlantic slave trade and the Arab invasion of the Iberian Peninsula. The results also indicate that summary statistics that aim to measure molecular variation, or AMOVA, have limited sensitivity to detect population substructure, in contrast to patterns revealed by phylogeographic analysis. Overall, the results suggest that mtDNA variation in Iberia is substantially stratified. These patterns might be relevant in biomedical studies given that stratification is a common cause of false positives in case-control mtDNA association studies, and should be also considered when weighting the DNA evidence in forensic casework, which is strongly dependent on haplotype frequencies. PMID

  5. Meta-Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Barral-Arca, Ruth; Pischedda, Sara; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Pastoriza, Ana; Mosquera-Miguel, Ana; López-Soto, Manuel; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Salas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The Iberian Peninsula has been the focus of attention of numerous studies dealing with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation, most of them targeting the control region segment. In the present study we sequenced the control region of 3,024 Spanish individuals from areas where available data were still limited. We also compiled mtDNA haplotypes from the literature involving 4,588 sequences and 28 population groups or small regions. We meta-analyzed all these data in order to shed further light on patterns of geographic variation, taking advantage of the large sample size and geographic coverage, in contrast with the atomized sampling strategy of previous work. The results indicate that the main mtDNA haplogroups show primarily clinal geographic patterns across the Iberian geography, roughly along a North-South axis. Haplogroup HV0 (where haplogroup U is nested) is more prevalent in the Franco Cantabrian region, in good agreement with previous findings that identified this area as a climate refuge during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), prior to a subsequent demographic re-expansion towards Central Europe and the Mediterranean. Typical sub-Saharan and North African lineages are slightly more prevalent in South Iberia, although at low frequencies; this pattern has been shaped mainly by the transatlantic slave trade and the Arab invasion of the Iberian Peninsula. The results also indicate that summary statistics that aim to measure molecular variation, or AMOVA, have limited sensitivity to detect population substructure, in contrast to patterns revealed by phylogeographic analysis. Overall, the results suggest that mtDNA variation in Iberia is substantially stratified. These patterns might be relevant in biomedical studies given that stratification is a common cause of false positives in case-control mtDNA association studies, and should be also considered when weighting the DNA evidence in forensic casework, which is strongly dependent on haplotype frequencies. PMID

  6. Microsatellite DNA and mitochondrial DNA variation in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the Beaufort and Chukchi seas, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, M.A.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Scribner, K.T.

    2006-01-01

    Radiotelemetry data have shown that polar bears (Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1774) occur in separate subpopulations in the Chukchi Sea and the southern Beaufort Sea. However, segregation is not absolute, and there is overlap of ranges of animals in each subpopulation. We used genetic variation at eight microsatellite DNA loci and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to further assess the degree of spatial structure of polar bears from the Chukchi and southern Beaufort seas. Microsatellite allele frequencies and mtDNA haplotype frequencies of bears from the southern Beaufort and Chukchi seas did not differ significantly. Lack of differentiation at both maternally inherited mtDNA and bi-parentally inherited microsatellite loci suggests that gene flow between the two areas is mediated by both sexes. The genetic data indicate that polar bears in the southern Beaufort and Chukchi seas compose one interbreeding population. However, there is considerable fidelity to ranges in each area, particularly by adult females. The combined genetic and movement data suggest that polar bears could be managed as Beaufort Sea and Chukchi Sea subpopulations of a combined southern Beaufort Sea and Chukchi Sea population. ?? 2006 NRC.

  7. Estimation of the Proportion of Variation Accounted for by DNA Tests. I: Genetic Variance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proportion of genetic variation accounted for (Rg2) is an important characteristic of a DNA test. For each of 3 levels of narrow sense heritability of the observed trait (h2gy) and 4 levels of Rg2, 500 independent replicates of an observed trait and a molecular breeding value (MBV) for 1000 offs...

  8. Estimation of the Proportion of Genetic Variation Accounted for by DNA Tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An increasingly relevant question in evaluating commercial DNA tests is "What proportion of the additive genetic variation in the target trait is accounted for by the test?" Therefore, several estimators of this quantity were evaluated by simulation of a population of 1000 animals with 100 sires, ea...

  9. Estimation Of The Proportion Of Variation Accounted For By DNA Tests. II: Phenotypic Variance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proportion of phenotypic variation accounted for (Rp2) is an important characteristic of a DNA test. Therefore, several estimators of this quantity were evaluated by simulation of 500 replicates of a population of 1000 progeny of 100 sires (3 levels of narrow sense heritability and 4 levels of ...

  10. Neurons show distinctive DNA methylation profile and higher interindividual variations compared with non-neurons

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Kazuya; Bundo, Miki; Ueda, Junko; Oldham, Michael C.; Ukai, Wataru; Hashimoto, Eri; Saito, Toshikazu; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Kato, Tadafumi

    2011-01-01

    Epigenome information in mammalian brain cells reflects their developmental history, neuronal activity, and environmental exposures. Studying the epigenetic modifications present in neuronal cells is critical to a more complete understanding of the role of the genome in brain functions. We performed comprehensive DNA methylation analysis in neuronal and non-neuronal nuclei obtained from the human prefrontal cortex. Neuronal nuclei manifest qualitatively and quantitatively distinctive DNA methylation patterns, including relative global hypomethylation, differential enrichment of transcription-factor binding sites, and higher methylation of genes expressed in astrocytes. Non-neuronal nuclei showed indistinguishable DNA methylation patterns from bulk cortex and higher methylation of synaptic transmission-related genes compared with neuronal nuclei. We also found higher variation in DNA methylation in neuronal nuclei, suggesting that neuronal cells have more potential ability to change their epigenetic status in response to developmental and environmental conditions compared with non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system. PMID:21467265

  11. Mitochondrial-DNA variation among subspecies and populations of sea otters (Enhydra lutris)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, M.A.; Bodkin, J.L.; Ballachey, B.E.; Estes, J.A.; Patton, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    We used restriction-enzyme analysis of polymerase-chain reaction-amplified, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to assess genetic differentiation of subspecies and populations of sea otters throughout the range of the species. There were several haplotypes of mtDNA in each subspecies and geographically separate populations. MtDNA sequence divergence of haplotypes of sea otters was 0.0004-0.0041 base substitutions per nucleotide. E. l. nereis appears to have monophyletic mitochondrial DNA, while E. l. lutris and E. l. kenyoni do not. Different frequencies of haplotypes of mtDNA among populations reflect current restriction of gene flow and the unique histories of different populations. There are two or three haplotypes of mtDNA and diversity of haplotypes is 0.1376-0.5854 in each population of otters. This is consistent with theoretical work, which suggests that population bottlenecks of sea otters probably did not result in major losses of genetic variation for individual populations, or the species as a whole.

  12. Varietal Tracing of Virgin Olive Oils Based on Plastid DNA Variation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Jiménez, Marga; Besnard, Guillaume; Dorado, Gabriel; Hernandez, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Olive oil traceability remains a challenge nowadays. DNA analysis is the preferred approach to an effective varietal identification, without any environmental influence. Specifically, olive organelle genomics is the most promising approach for setting up a suitable set of markers as they would not interfere with the pollinator variety DNA traces. Unfortunately, plastid DNA (cpDNA) variation of the cultivated olive has been reported to be low. This feature could be a limitation for the use of cpDNA polymorphisms in forensic analyses or oil traceability, but rare cpDNA haplotypes may be useful as they can help to efficiently discriminate some varieties. Recently, the sequencing of olive plastid genomes has allowed the generation of novel markers. In this study, the performance of cpDNA markers on olive oil matrices, and their applicability on commercial Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) oils were assessed. By using a combination of nine plastid loci (including multi-state microsatellites and short indels), it is possible to fingerprint six haplotypes (in 17 Spanish olive varieties), which can discriminate high-value commercialized cultivars with PDO. In particular, a rare haplotype was detected in genotypes used to produce a regional high-value commercial oil. We conclude that plastid haplotypes can help oil traceability in commercial PDO oils and set up an experimental methodology suitable for organelle polymorphism detection in the complex olive oil matrices. PMID:23950947

  13. Exploration of methods to identify polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair capacity phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Irene M; Thomas, Cynthia B; Xi, Tina; Mohrenweiser, Harvey W; Nelson, David O

    2007-03-01

    Elucidating the relationship between polymorphic sequences and risk of common disease is a challenge. For example, although it is clear that variation in DNA repair genes is associated with familial cancer, aging and neurological disease, progress toward identifying polymorphisms associated with elevated risk of sporadic disease has been slow. This is partly due to the complexity of the genetic variation, the existence of large numbers of mostly low frequency variants and the contribution of many genes to variation in susceptibility. There has been limited development of methods to find associations between genotypes having many polymorphisms and pathway function or health outcome. We have explored several statistical methods for identifying polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair phenotypes. The model system used was 80 cell lines that had been resequenced to identify variation; 191 single nucleotide substitution polymorphisms (SNPs) are included, of which 172 are in 31 base excision repair pathway genes, 19 in 5 anti-oxidation genes, and DNA repair phenotypes based on single strand breaks measured by the alkaline Comet assay. Univariate analyses were of limited value in identifying SNPs associated with phenotype variation. Of the multivariable model selection methods tested: the easiest that provided reduced error of prediction of phenotype was simple counting of the variant alleles predicted to encode proteins with reduced activity, which led to a genotype including 52 SNPs; the best and most parsimonious model was achieved using a two-step analysis without regard to potential functional relevance: first SNPs were ranked by importance determined by random forests regression (RFR), followed by cross-validation in a second round of RFR modeling that included ever more SNPs in declining order of importance. With this approach six SNPs were found to minimize prediction error. The results should encourage research into utilization of multivariate

  14. Exploration of methods to identify polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair capacity phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Xi, T; Mohrenweiser, H W; Nelson, D O

    2006-07-03

    Elucidating the relationship between polymorphic sequences and risk of common disease is a challenge. For example, although it is clear that variation in DNA repair genes is associated with familial cancer, aging and neurological disease, progress toward identifying polymorphisms associated with elevated risk of sporadic disease has been slow. This is partly due to the complexity of the genetic variation, the existence of large numbers of mostly low frequency variants and the contribution of many genes to variation in susceptibility. There has been limited development of methods to find associations between genotypes having many polymorphisms and pathway function or health outcome. We have explored several statistical methods for identifying polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair phenotypes. The model system used was 80 cell lines that had been resequenced to identify variation; 191 single nucleotide substitution polymorphisms (SNPs) are included, of which 172 are in 31 base excision repair pathway genes, 19 in 5 anti-oxidation genes, and DNA repair phenotypes based on single strand breaks measured by the alkaline Comet assay. Univariate analyses were of limited value in identifying SNPs associated with phenotype variation. Of the multivariable model selection methods tested: the easiest that provided reduced error of prediction of phenotype was simple counting of the variant alleles predicted to encode proteins with reduced activity, which led to a genotype including 52 SNPs; the best and most parsimonious model was achieved using a two-step analysis without regard to potential functional relevance: first SNPs were ranked by importance determined by Random Forests Regression (RFR), followed by cross-validation in a second round of RFR modeling that included ever more SNPs in declining order of importance. With this approach 6 SNPs were found to minimize prediction error. The results should encourage research into utilization of multivariate

  15. Variation in DNA content of blood cells of largemouth bass from contaminated and uncontaminated waters

    SciTech Connect

    Lingenfelser, S.F.; Dallas, C.E.; Jagoe, C.H.; Smith, M.H.; Brisbin, I.L. Jr.; Chesser, R.K.

    1997-10-01

    Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were collected from locations with and without documented histories of pollution in Georgia and South Carolina. Whole blood samples were collected from over 3,000 bass and analyzed by flow cytometry to measure changes in cellular DNA content and cell cycle distribution. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the cell cycle phase G{sub 0}G{sub 1} peak was used as a measure of variation in DNA content within an individual. The mean CV varied significantly among locations, and some locations with known chemical or radioactive contaminants had higher CVs. Plotting the frequency distribution of CV values for each site revealed greater skewness and kurtosis in most locations with known contaminants. In each case, a right skewness indicated higher proportions of bass with unusually high CV in these locations. Aneuploid-like patterns were detected in the DNA histograms of five fish, all from locations with histories of contamination. The percentage of cells distributed among phases of the cell cycle (G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}, S, and G{sub 2}M) varied significantly among locations, but there was no apparent relationship to contaminant distribution. Differences in CV and frequency of aneuploids among sites with and without histories of pollution were generally small, but increased variation in DNA content may be associated with contaminant exposure at some locations.

  16. DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Telomeres Play Important Roles in Trypanosoma brucei Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human-infecting microbial pathogens all face a serious problem of elimination by the host immune response. Antigenic variation is an effective immune evasion mechanism where the pathogen regularly switches its major surface antigen. In many cases, the major surface antigen is encoded by genes from the same gene family, and its expression is strictly monoallelic. Among pathogens that undergo antigenic variation, Trypanosoma brucei (a kinetoplastid), which causes human African trypanosomiasis, Plasmodium falciparum (an apicomplexan), which causes malaria, Pneumocystis jirovecii (a fungus), which causes pneumonia, and Borrelia burgdorferi (a bacterium), which causes Lyme disease, also express their major surface antigens from loci next to the telomere. Except for Plasmodium, DNA recombination-mediated gene conversion is a major pathway for surface antigen switching in these pathogens. In the last decade, more sophisticated molecular and genetic tools have been developed in T. brucei, and our knowledge of functions of DNA recombination in antigenic variation has been greatly advanced. VSG is the major surface antigen in T. brucei. In subtelomeric VSG expression sites (ESs), VSG genes invariably are flanked by a long stretch of upstream 70-bp repeats. Recent studies have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), particularly those in 70-bp repeats in the active ES, are a natural potent trigger for antigenic variation in T. brucei. In addition, telomere proteins can influence VSG switching by reducing the DSB amount at subtelomeric regions. These findings will be summarized and their implications will be discussed in this review. PMID:25576484

  17. Epigenetic Switch Driven by DNA Inversions Dictates Phase Variation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juanjuan; An, Haoran; Liu, Yanni; Wang, Kailing; Miao, Zhun; Liang, Wenbo; Sebra, Robert; Wang, Guilin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism for phenotypic diversification in all forms of life. We previously described remarkable cell-to-cell heterogeneity in epigenetic pattern within a clonal population of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a leading human pathogen. We here report that the epigenetic diversity is caused by extensive DNA inversions among hsdSA, hsdSB, and hsdSC, three methyltransferase hsdS genes in the Spn556II type-I restriction modification (R-M) locus. Because hsdSA encodes the sequence recognition subunit of this type-I R-M DNA methyltransferase, these site-specific recombinations generate pneumococcal cells with variable HsdSA alleles and thereby diverse genome methylation patterns. Most importantly, the DNA methylation pattern specified by the HsdSA1 allele leads to the formation of opaque colonies, whereas the pneumococci lacking HsdSA1 produce transparent colonies. Furthermore, this HsdSA1-dependent phase variation requires intact DNA methylase activity encoded by hsdM in the Spn556II (renamed colony opacity determinant or cod) locus. Thus, the DNA inversion-driven ON/OFF switch of the hsdSA1 allele in the cod locus and resulting epigenetic switch dictate the phase variation between the opaque and transparent phenotypes. Phase variation has been well documented for its importance in pneumococcal carriage and invasive infection, but its molecular basis remains unclear. Our work has discovered a novel epigenetic cause for this significant pathobiology phenomenon in S. pneumoniae. Lastly, our findings broadly represents a significant advancement in our understanding of bacterial R-M systems and their potential in shaping epigenetic and phenotypic diversity of the prokaryotic organisms because similar site-specific recombination systems widely exist in many archaeal and bacterial species. PMID:27427949

  18. Epigenetic Switch Driven by DNA Inversions Dictates Phase Variation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Li, Jing-Wen; Feng, Zhixing; Wang, Juanjuan; An, Haoran; Liu, Yanni; Wang, Yang; Wang, Kailing; Zhang, Xuegong; Miao, Zhun; Liang, Wenbo; Sebra, Robert; Wang, Guilin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism for phenotypic diversification in all forms of life. We previously described remarkable cell-to-cell heterogeneity in epigenetic pattern within a clonal population of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a leading human pathogen. We here report that the epigenetic diversity is caused by extensive DNA inversions among hsdSA, hsdSB, and hsdSC, three methyltransferase hsdS genes in the Spn556II type-I restriction modification (R-M) locus. Because hsdSA encodes the sequence recognition subunit of this type-I R-M DNA methyltransferase, these site-specific recombinations generate pneumococcal cells with variable HsdSA alleles and thereby diverse genome methylation patterns. Most importantly, the DNA methylation pattern specified by the HsdSA1 allele leads to the formation of opaque colonies, whereas the pneumococci lacking HsdSA1 produce transparent colonies. Furthermore, this HsdSA1-dependent phase variation requires intact DNA methylase activity encoded by hsdM in the Spn556II (renamed colony opacity determinant or cod) locus. Thus, the DNA inversion-driven ON/OFF switch of the hsdSA1 allele in the cod locus and resulting epigenetic switch dictate the phase variation between the opaque and transparent phenotypes. Phase variation has been well documented for its importance in pneumococcal carriage and invasive infection, but its molecular basis remains unclear. Our work has discovered a novel epigenetic cause for this significant pathobiology phenomenon in S. pneumoniae. Lastly, our findings broadly represents a significant advancement in our understanding of bacterial R-M systems and their potential in shaping epigenetic and phenotypic diversity of the prokaryotic organisms because similar site-specific recombination systems widely exist in many archaeal and bacterial species. PMID:27427949

  19. Variation in rDNA locus number and position among legume species and detection of 2 linked rDNA loci in the model Medicago truncatula by FISH.

    PubMed

    Abirached-Darmency, Mona; Prado-Vivant, Emilce; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Pouthier, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Within Fabaceae, legume species have a variable genome size, chromosome number, and ploidy level. The genome distribution of ribosomal genes, easily detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), is a good tool for anchoring physical and genetic comparative maps. The organisation of 45S rDNA and 5S loci was analysed by FISH in the 4 closely related species: Pisum sativum, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa (2 diploid taxa), and Lathyrus sativus. The 2 types of rDNA arrays displayed interspecific variation in locus number and location, but little intraspecific variation was detected. In the model legume, M. truncatula, the presence of 2 adjacent 45S rDNA loci was demonstrated, and the location of the rDNA loci was independent of the general evolution of the genome DNA. The different parameters relative to clustering of the rDNA loci in specific chromosome regions and the possible basis of rDNA instability are discussed. PMID:16121252

  20. The Adaptive Significance of Natural Genetic Variation in the DNA Damage Response of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Svetec, Nicolas; Cridland, Julie M.; Zhao, Li; Begun, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of work, our understanding of the distribution of fitness effects of segregating genetic variants in natural populations remains largely incomplete. One form of selection that can maintain genetic variation is spatially varying selection, such as that leading to latitudinal clines. While the introduction of population genomic approaches to understanding spatially varying selection has generated much excitement, little successful effort has been devoted to moving beyond genome scans for selection to experimental analysis of the relevant biology and the development of experimentally motivated hypotheses regarding the agents of selection; it remains an interesting question as to whether the vast majority of population genomic work will lead to satisfying biological insights. Here, motivated by population genomic results, we investigate how spatially varying selection in the genetic model system, Drosophila melanogaster, has led to genetic differences between populations in several components of the DNA damage response. UVB incidence, which is negatively correlated with latitude, is an important agent of DNA damage. We show that sensitivity of early embryos to UVB exposure is strongly correlated with latitude such that low latitude populations show much lower sensitivity to UVB. We then show that lines with lower embryo UVB sensitivity also exhibit increased capacity for repair of damaged sperm DNA by the oocyte. A comparison of the early embryo transcriptome in high and low latitude embryos provides evidence that one mechanism of adaptive DNA repair differences between populations is the greater abundance of DNA repair transcripts in the eggs of low latitude females. Finally, we use population genomic comparisons of high and low latitude samples to reveal evidence that multiple components of the DNA damage response and both coding and non-coding variation likely contribute to adaptive differences in DNA repair between populations. PMID:26950216

  1. The Adaptive Significance of Natural Genetic Variation in the DNA Damage Response of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Svetec, Nicolas; Cridland, Julie M; Zhao, Li; Begun, David J

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of work, our understanding of the distribution of fitness effects of segregating genetic variants in natural populations remains largely incomplete. One form of selection that can maintain genetic variation is spatially varying selection, such as that leading to latitudinal clines. While the introduction of population genomic approaches to understanding spatially varying selection has generated much excitement, little successful effort has been devoted to moving beyond genome scans for selection to experimental analysis of the relevant biology and the development of experimentally motivated hypotheses regarding the agents of selection; it remains an interesting question as to whether the vast majority of population genomic work will lead to satisfying biological insights. Here, motivated by population genomic results, we investigate how spatially varying selection in the genetic model system, Drosophila melanogaster, has led to genetic differences between populations in several components of the DNA damage response. UVB incidence, which is negatively correlated with latitude, is an important agent of DNA damage. We show that sensitivity of early embryos to UVB exposure is strongly correlated with latitude such that low latitude populations show much lower sensitivity to UVB. We then show that lines with lower embryo UVB sensitivity also exhibit increased capacity for repair of damaged sperm DNA by the oocyte. A comparison of the early embryo transcriptome in high and low latitude embryos provides evidence that one mechanism of adaptive DNA repair differences between populations is the greater abundance of DNA repair transcripts in the eggs of low latitude females. Finally, we use population genomic comparisons of high and low latitude samples to reveal evidence that multiple components of the DNA damage response and both coding and non-coding variation likely contribute to adaptive differences in DNA repair between populations. PMID:26950216

  2. Variation in Ribosomal DNA among Isolates of the Mycorrhizal Fungus Cenococcum Geophilum FR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobuglio, Katherine Frances

    1990-01-01

    Cenococcum geophilum Fr., a cosmopolitan mycorrhizal fungus, is well-known for its extremely wide host and habitat range. The ecological diversity of C. geophilum sharply contrasts its present taxonomic status as a monotypic form -genus. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was used to assess the degree of genetic variation among 72 isolates of C. geophilum. The probe used in this study was the rDNA repeat cloned from C. geophilum isolate A145 (pCG15). Length of the rDNA repeat was approximately 9 kb. The rDNA clone was mapped for 5 restriction endonucleases. Hybridization with cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae rDNA (pSR118, and pSR125 containing the 18S, and 5.8-25S rRNA genes respectively), and alignment of restriction endonuclease sites conserved in the rDNA genes of other fungi, were used to position the corresponding rDNAs of C. geophilum. Southern hybridizations with EcoRI, HindIII, XhoI, and PstI digested DNAs indicated extensive variation among the C. geophilum isolates, greater than has been previously reported to occur within a fungal species. Most of the rDNA polymorphisms occurred in the IGS region. Restriction endonuclease site and length polymorphisms were also observed in the 5.8S-26S genic regions. Sixteen size categories of length mutations, 6 restriction endonuclease site additions, and 4 restriction endonuclease site deletions were determined using isolate A145 as a reference. The rDNA repeat length among the isolates varied from approximately 8.5 to 10.2 kb. RFLPs were also observed in the mitochondrial (mt) 24S rRNA gene and flanking regions of HindIII digested DNAs of C. geophilum isolates representing both geographically distinct and similar origins. Among the C. geophilum isolates analyzed there were fewer RFLPs in mt-DNA than in nuclear rDNA. EcoRI rDNA phenotypes between C. geophilum and Elaphomyces anthracinus, its proposed teleomorph or sexual state, did not correspond. In addition, the four

  3. Genome-wide quantitative assessment of variation in DNA methylation patterns

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hehuang; Wang, Min; de Andrade, Alexandre; de F. Bonaldo, Maria; Galat, Vasil; Arndt, Kelly; Rajaram, Veena; Goldman, Stewart; Tomita, Tadanori; Soares, Marcelo B.

    2011-01-01

    Genomic DNA methylation contributes substantively to transcriptional regulations that underlie mammalian development and cellular differentiation. Much effort has been made to decipher the molecular mechanisms governing the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation patterns. However, little is known about genome-wide variation of DNA methylation patterns. In this study, we introduced the concept of methylation entropy, a measure of the randomness of DNA methylation patterns in a cell population, and exploited it to assess the variability in DNA methylation patterns of Alu repeats and promoters. A few interesting observations were made: (i) within a cell population, methylation entropy varies among genomic loci; (ii) among cell populations, the methylation entropies of most genomic loci remain constant; (iii) compared to normal tissue controls, some tumors exhibit greater methylation entropies; (iv) Alu elements with high methylation entropy are associated with high GC content but depletion of CpG dinucleotides and (v) Alu elements in the intronic regions or far from CpG islands are associated with low methylation entropy. We further identified 12 putative allelic-specific methylated genomic loci, including four Alu elements and eight promoters. Lastly, using subcloned normal fibroblast cells, we demonstrated the highly variable methylation patterns are resulted from low fidelity of DNA methylation inheritance. PMID:21278160

  4. A genetic basis for the variation in the vulnerability of cancer to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Yard, Brian D; Adams, Drew J; Chie, Eui Kyu; Tamayo, Pablo; Battaglia, Jessica S; Gopal, Priyanka; Rogacki, Kevin; Pearson, Bradley E; Phillips, James; Raymond, Daniel P; Pennell, Nathan A; Almeida, Francisco; Cheah, Jaime H; Clemons, Paul A; Shamji, Alykhan; Peacock, Craig D; Schreiber, Stuart L; Hammerman, Peter S; Abazeed, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is not currently informed by the genetic composition of an individual patient's tumour. To identify genetic features regulating survival after DNA damage, here we conduct large-scale profiling of cellular survival after exposure to radiation in a diverse collection of 533 genetically annotated human tumour cell lines. We show that sensitivity to radiation is characterized by significant variation across and within lineages. We combine results from our platform with genomic features to identify parameters that predict radiation sensitivity. We identify somatic copy number alterations, gene mutations and the basal expression of individual genes and gene sets that correlate with the radiation survival, revealing new insights into the genetic basis of tumour cellular response to DNA damage. These results demonstrate the diversity of tumour cellular response to ionizing radiation and establish multiple lines of evidence that new genetic features regulating cellular response after DNA damage can be identified.

  5. Population genetic structure of Indian shad, Tenualosa ilisha inferred from variation in mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Behera, B K; Singh, N S; Paria, P; Sahoo, A K; Panda, D; Meena, D K; Das, P; Pakrashi, S; Biswas, D K; Sharma, A P

    2015-09-01

    Indian shad, Tenualosa ilisha, is a commercially important anadromous fish representing major catch in Indo-pacific region. The present study evaluated partial Cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequence of mtDNA in T. ilisha for determining genetic variation from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea origins. The genomic DNA extracted from T. ilisha samples representing two distant rivers in the Indian subcontinent, the Bhagirathi (lower stretch of Ganges) and the Tapi was analyzed. Sequencing of 307 bp mtDNA Cytochrome b gene fragment revealed the presence of 5 haplotypes, with high haplotype diversity (Hd) of 0.9048 with variance 0.103 and low nucleotide diversity (π) of 0.14301. Three population specific haplotypes were observed in river Ganga and two haplotypes in river Tapi. Neighbour-joining tree based on Cytochrome b gene sequences of T. ilisha showed that population from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea origins belonged to two distinct clusters.

  6. Population genetic structure of Indian shad, Tenualosa ilisha inferred from variation in mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Behera, B K; Singh, N S; Paria, P; Sahoo, A K; Panda, D; Meena, D K; Das, P; Pakrashi, S; Biswas, D K; Sharma, A P

    2015-09-01

    Indian shad, Tenualosa ilisha, is a commercially important anadromous fish representing major catch in Indo-pacific region. The present study evaluated partial Cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequence of mtDNA in T. ilisha for determining genetic variation from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea origins. The genomic DNA extracted from T. ilisha samples representing two distant rivers in the Indian subcontinent, the Bhagirathi (lower stretch of Ganges) and the Tapi was analyzed. Sequencing of 307 bp mtDNA Cytochrome b gene fragment revealed the presence of 5 haplotypes, with high haplotype diversity (Hd) of 0.9048 with variance 0.103 and low nucleotide diversity (π) of 0.14301. Three population specific haplotypes were observed in river Ganga and two haplotypes in river Tapi. Neighbour-joining tree based on Cytochrome b gene sequences of T. ilisha showed that population from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea origins belonged to two distinct clusters. PMID:26521565

  7. A genetic basis for the variation in the vulnerability of cancer to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Yard, Brian D.; Adams, Drew J.; Chie, Eui Kyu; Tamayo, Pablo; Battaglia, Jessica S.; Gopal, Priyanka; Rogacki, Kevin; Pearson, Bradley E.; Phillips, James; Raymond, Daniel P.; Pennell, Nathan A.; Almeida, Francisco; Cheah, Jaime H.; Clemons, Paul A.; Shamji, Alykhan; Peacock, Craig D.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Abazeed, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is not currently informed by the genetic composition of an individual patient's tumour. To identify genetic features regulating survival after DNA damage, here we conduct large-scale profiling of cellular survival after exposure to radiation in a diverse collection of 533 genetically annotated human tumour cell lines. We show that sensitivity to radiation is characterized by significant variation across and within lineages. We combine results from our platform with genomic features to identify parameters that predict radiation sensitivity. We identify somatic copy number alterations, gene mutations and the basal expression of individual genes and gene sets that correlate with the radiation survival, revealing new insights into the genetic basis of tumour cellular response to DNA damage. These results demonstrate the diversity of tumour cellular response to ionizing radiation and establish multiple lines of evidence that new genetic features regulating cellular response after DNA damage can be identified. PMID:27109210

  8. Intra-individual variation and short-term temporal trend in DNA methylation of human blood

    PubMed Central

    Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Song, Min-Ae; Cai, Qiuyin; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Yu, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Background Between- and within-person variation in DNA methylation levels are important parameters to be considered in epigenome-wide association studies. Temporal change is one source of within-person variation in DNA methylation that has been linked to aging and disease. Methods We analyzed CpG-site-specific intra-individual variation and short-term temporal trend in leukocyte DNA methylation among 24 healthy Chinese women, with blood samples drawn at study entry and after 9 months. Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip was used to measure methylation. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and trend estimates were summarized by genomic location and probe type. Results The median ICC was 0.36 across nonsex chromosomes and 0.80 on the X chromosome. There was little difference in ICC profiles by genomic region and probe type. Among CpG loci with high variability between participants, over 99% had ICC > 0.8. Statistically significant trend was observed in 10.9% CpG loci before adjustment for cell type composition and in 3.4% loci after adjustment. Conclusions For CpG loci differentially methylated across subjects, methylation levels can be reliably assessed with one blood sample. More samples per subject are needed for low-variability and unmethylated loci. Temporal changes are largely driven by changes in cell type composition of blood samples, but temporal trend unrelated to cell types is detected in a small percentage of CpG sites. PMID:25538225

  9. Population subdivision in Europe's great bustard inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Pitra, C; Lieckfeldt, D; Alonso, J C

    2000-08-01

    A continent-wide survey of sequence variation in mitochondrial (mt) and nuclear (n) DNA of the endangered great bustard (Otis tarda) was conducted to assess the extent of phylogeographic structure in a morphologically monotypic bird. DNA sequence variation in a combined 809 bp segment of the mtDNA genome from 66 individuals from the last six breeding regions showed relatively low levels of intraspecific sequence diversity (n = 0.32%) but significant differences in the regional distribution of 11 haplotypes (phiST = 0.49). Despite their exceptional potential for dispersal, a complete and long-term historical separation between the populations from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain) and mainland Europe (Hungary, Slovakia, Germany, and Russia) was demonstrated. Divergence between populations based on a 3-bp insertion-deletion polymorphism within the intron region of the nuclear CHD-Z gene was geographically concordant with the primary subdivision identified within the mtDNA sequences. Inferred aspects of phylogeography were used to formulate conservation recommendations for this endangered species.

  10. Genetic variation detected by quantitative analysis of end-labeled genomic DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, Jun-Ichi; Kodaira, Mieko; Satoh, Chiyoko; Kuick, R.; Hanash, S.M.; Neel, J.V.

    1994-09-13

    The continuing efforts to evaluate specific human populations for altered germinal mutation rates would profit from more efficient and more specific approaches than those of the past. To this end, the authors have explored the potential usefulness of two-dimensional electrophoresis of DNA fragments obtained from restriction-enzyme-digested genomic DNA. This permits the analysis, on a single preparation, of {approx} 2000 DNA fragments varying in size from 1.0 to 5.0 kb in the first dimension and from 0.3 to 2.0 kb in the second dimension. To enter into a genetic analysis, these fragments must exhibit positional and quantitative stability. With respect to the latter, if spots are the product of only one fragment, the coefficient of variation of spot intensity should be approximately {le} 0.12. At present, 482 of the spots in preparations meet these standards. In an examination of preparations based on three Japanese mother/father/child trios, 43 of these 482 spots were found to exhibit variation that segregated within families according to mendelian principles. The authors have established the feasibility of cloning a variant fragment from such gels and establishing its nucleotide sequence. This technology should be highly efficient in monitoring for mutations resulting in loss/gain/rearrangement events in DNA fragments distributed throughout the genome. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Ribosomal DNA and Stellate gene copy number variation on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1989-01-01

    Multigene families on the Y chromosome face an unusual array of evolutionary forces. Both ribosomal DNA and Stellate, the two families examined here, have multiple copies of similar sequences on the X and Y chromosomes. Although the rate of sequence divergence on the Y chromosome depends on rates of mutation, gene conversion and exchange with the X chromosome, as well as purifying selection, the regulation of gene copy number may also depend on other pleiotropic functions, such as maintenance of chromosome pairing. Gene copy numbers were estimated for a series of 34 Y chromosome replacement lines using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster. Scans of autoradiographs of the same blots probed with the cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene, a single copy gene, served as internal standards. Copy numbers span a 6-fold range for ribosomal DNA and a 3-fold range for Stellate DNA. Despite this magnitude of variation, there was no association between copy number and segregation variation of the sex chromosomes. Images PMID:2494656

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Variation and the Evolution of Robertsonian Chromosomal Races of House Mice, Mus Domesticus

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, M. W.; Boyer, S. N.; Searle, J. B.; Aquadro, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    The house mouse, Mus domesticus, includes many distinct Robertsonian (Rb) chromosomal races with diploid numbers from 2n = 22 to 2n = 38. Although these races are highly differentiated karyotypically, they are otherwise indistinguishable from standard karyotype (i.e., 2n = 40) mice, and consequently their evolutionary histories are not well understood. We have examined mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation from the control region and the ND3 gene region among 56 M. domesticus from Western Europe, including 15 Rb populations and 13 standard karyotype populations, and two individuals of the sister species, Mus musculus. mtDNA exhibited an average sequence divergence of 0.84% within M. domesticus and 3.4% between M. domesticus and M. musculus. The transition/transversion bias for the regions sequenced is 5.7:1, and the overall rate of sequence evolution is approximately 10% divergence per million years. The amount of mtDNA variation was as great among different Rb races as among different populations of standard karyotype mice, suggesting that different Rb races do not derive from a single recent maternal lineage. Phylogenetic analysis of the mtDNA sequences resulted in a parsimony tree which contained six major clades. Each of these clades contained both Rb and standard karyotype mice, consistent with the hypothesis that Rb races have arisen independently multiple times. Discordance between phylogeny and geography was attributable to ancestral polymorphism as a consequence of the recent colonization of Western Europe by mice. Two major mtDNA lineages were geographically localized and contained both Rb and standard karyotype mice. The age of these lineages suggests that mice have moved into Europe only within the last 10,000 years and that Rb populations in different geographic regions arose during this time. PMID:8005418

  13. Nuclear DNA content in Miscanthus sp. and the geographical variation pattern in Miscanthus lutarioriparius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jiajing; Hu, Xiaohu; Zeng, Xiaofei; Li, Ye; Zhou, Fasong; Hu, Zhongli; Jin, Surong; Diao, Ying

    2016-10-01

    The genome sizes of five Miscanthus species, including 79 accessions of M. lutarioriparius, 8 of M. floridulus, 6 of M. sacchariflorus, 7 of M. sinensis, and 4 of M. × giganteus were examined using flow cytometry. The overall average nuclear DNA content were 4.256 ± 0.6 pg/2C in M. lutarioriparius, 5.175 ± 0.3 pg/2C in M. floridulus, 3.956 ± 0.2 pg/2C in M. sacchariflorus, 5.272 ± 0.2 pg/2C in M. sinensis, and 6.932 ± 0.1 pg/2C in M. × giganteus. Interspecific variation was found at the diploid level, suggesting that DNA content might be a parameter that can be used to differentiate the species. Tetraploid populations were found in M. lutarioriparius, M. sacchariflorus, and M. sinensis, and their DNA content were 8.34 ± 1.2, 8.52, and 8.355 pg, respectively. The association between the DNA content of M. lutarioriparius, collected from representative ranges across the Yangtze River, and its geographic distribution was statistically analyzed. A consistent pattern of DNA content variation in 79 M. lutarioriparius accessions across its entire geographic range was found in this study. Along the Yangtze River, the DNA content of M. lutarioriparius tended to increase from the upstream to the downstream areas, and almost all tetraploids gathered in the upstream area extended to coastal regions.

  14. Nuclear DNA content in Miscanthus sp. and the geographical variation pattern in Miscanthus lutarioriparius

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiajing; Hu, Xiaohu; Zeng, Xiaofei; Li, Ye; Zhou, Fasong; Hu, Zhongli; Jin, Surong; Diao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The genome sizes of five Miscanthus species, including 79 accessions of M. lutarioriparius, 8 of M. floridulus, 6 of M. sacchariflorus, 7 of M. sinensis, and 4 of M. × giganteus were examined using flow cytometry. The overall average nuclear DNA content were 4.256 ± 0.6 pg/2C in M. lutarioriparius, 5.175 ± 0.3 pg/2C in M. floridulus, 3.956 ± 0.2 pg/2C in M. sacchariflorus, 5.272 ± 0.2 pg/2C in M. sinensis, and 6.932 ± 0.1 pg/2C in M. × giganteus. Interspecific variation was found at the diploid level, suggesting that DNA content might be a parameter that can be used to differentiate the species. Tetraploid populations were found in M. lutarioriparius, M. sacchariflorus, and M. sinensis, and their DNA content were 8.34 ± 1.2, 8.52, and 8.355 pg, respectively. The association between the DNA content of M. lutarioriparius, collected from representative ranges across the Yangtze River, and its geographic distribution was statistically analyzed. A consistent pattern of DNA content variation in 79 M. lutarioriparius accessions across its entire geographic range was found in this study. Along the Yangtze River, the DNA content of M. lutarioriparius tended to increase from the upstream to the downstream areas, and almost all tetraploids gathered in the upstream area extended to coastal regions. PMID:27698438

  15. Abundant mitochondrial DNA variation and world-wide population structure in humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Baker, C S; Perry, A; Bannister, J L; Weinrich, M T; Abernethy, R B; Calambokidis, J; Lien, J; Lambertsen, R H; Ramírez, J U; Vasquez, O

    1993-09-01

    Hunting during the last 200 years reduced many populations of mysticete whales to near extinction. To evaluate potential genetic bottlenecks in these exploited populations, we examined mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from 90 individual humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) representing six subpopulations in three ocean basins. Comparisons of relative nucleotide and nucleotype diversity reveal an abundance of genetic variation in all but one of the oceanic subpopulations. Phylogenetic reconstruction of nucleotypes and analysis of maternal gene flow show that current genetic variation is not due to postexploitation migration between oceans but is a relic of past population variability. Calibration of the rate of control region evolution across three families of whales suggests that existing humpback whale lineages are of ancient origin. Preservation of preexploitation variation in humpback whales may be attributed to their long life-span and overlapping generations and to an effective, though perhaps not timely, international prohibition against hunting. PMID:8367488

  16. Confocal 3D DNA Cytometry: Assessment of Required Coefficient of Variation by Computer Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ploeger, Lennert S.; Beliën, Jeroen A.M.; Poulin, Neal M.; Grizzle, William; van Diest, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) provides the opportunity to perform 3D DNA content measurements on intact cells in thick histological sections. So far, sample size has been limited by the time consuming nature of the technology. Since the power of DNA histograms to resolve different stemlines depends on both the sample size and the coefficient of variation (CV) of histogram peaks, interpretation of 3D CLSM DNA histograms might be hampered by both a small sample size and a large CV. The aim of this study was to analyze the required CV for 3D CLSM DNA histograms given a realistic sample size. Methods: By computer simulation, virtual histograms were composed for sample sizes of 20000, 10000, 5000, 1000, and 273 cells and CVs of 30, 25, 20, 15, 10 and 5%. By visual inspection, the histogram quality with respect to resolution of G0/1 and G2/M peaks of a diploid stemline was assessed. Results: As expected, the interpretability of DNA histograms deteriorated with decreasing sample sizes and higher CVs. For CVs of 15% and lower, a clearly bimodal peak pattern with well distinguishable G0/1 and G2/M peaks were still seen at a sample size of 273 cells, which is our current average sample size with 3D CLSM DNA cytometry. Conclusions: For unambiguous interpretation of DNA histograms obtained using 3D CLSM, a CV of at most 15% is tolerable at currently achievable sample sizes. To resolve smaller near diploid stemlines, a CV of 10% or better should be aimed at. With currently available 3D imaging technology, this CV is achievable. PMID:15371645

  17. Correlated variation and population differentiation in satellite DNA abundance among lines of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kevin H-C; Grenier, Jennifer K; Barbash, Daniel A; Clark, Andrew G

    2014-12-30

    Tandemly repeating satellite DNA elements in heterochromatin occupy a substantial portion of many eukaryotic genomes. Although often characterized as genomic parasites deleterious to the host, they also can be crucial for essential processes such as chromosome segregation. Adding to their interest, satellite DNA elements evolve at high rates; among Drosophila, closely related species often differ drastically in both the types and abundances of satellite repeats. However, due to technical challenges, the evolutionary mechanisms driving this rapid turnover remain unclear. Here we characterize natural variation in simple-sequence repeats of 2-10 bp from inbred Drosophila melanogaster lines derived from multiple populations, using a method we developed called k-Seek that analyzes unassembled Illumina sequence reads. In addition to quantifying all previously described satellite repeats, we identified many novel repeats of low to medium abundance. Many of the repeats show population differentiation, including two that are present in only some populations. Interestingly, the population structure inferred from overall satellite quantities does not recapitulate the expected population relationships based on the demographic history of D. melanogaster. We also find that some satellites of similar sequence composition are correlated across lines, revealing concerted evolution. Moreover, correlated satellites tend to be interspersed with each other, further suggesting that concerted change is partially driven by higher order structure. Surprisingly, we identified negative correlations among some satellites, suggesting antagonistic interactions. Our study demonstrates that current genome assemblies vastly underestimate the complexity, abundance, and variation of highly repetitive satellite DNA and presents approaches to understand their rapid evolutionary divergence.

  18. Role of promoter DNA sequence variations on the binding of EGR1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Mikles, David C; Schuchardt, Brett J; Bhat, Vikas; McDonald, Caleb B; Farooq, Amjad

    2014-05-01

    In response to a wide variety of stimuli such as growth factors and hormones, EGR1 transcription factor is rapidly induced and immediately exerts downstream effects central to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Herein, our biophysical analysis reveals that DNA sequence variations within the target gene promoters tightly modulate the energetics of binding of EGR1 and that nucleotide substitutions at certain positions are much more detrimental to EGR1-DNA interaction than others. Importantly, the reduction in binding affinity poorly correlates with the loss of enthalpy and gain of entropy-a trend indicative of a complex interplay between underlying thermodynamic factors due to the differential role of water solvent upon nucleotide substitution. We also provide a rationale for the physical basis of the effect of nucleotide substitutions on the EGR1-DNA interaction at atomic level. Taken together, our study bears important implications on understanding the molecular determinants of a key protein-DNA interaction at the cross-roads of human health and disease.

  19. Detection of single-nucleotide variations by monitoring the blinking of fluorescence induced by charge transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Majima, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2013-08-19

    Charge transfer dynamics in DNA: Photo-induced charge separation and charge-recombination dynamics in DNA was assessed by monitoring the blinking of fluorescence. Single nucleotide variations, mismatch and one base deletion, were differentiated based on the length of the off-time of the blinking, which corresponds to the lifetime of the charge-separated state. PMID:23846860

  20. Associations between DNA Sequence Variation and Variation in Expression of the Adh Gene in Natural Populations of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, C. C.; Bridgham, J. T.; Choudhary, M.

    1991-01-01

    A large part of the genetic variation in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity level in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster is associated with segregation of an amino acid replacement polymorphism at nucleotide 1490, which generates a difference in electrophoretic mobility. Part of the allozymic difference in activity level is due to a catalytic efficiency difference, which is also caused by the amino acid replacement, and part is due to a difference in the concentration of ADH protein. A previous site-directed in vitro mutagenesis experiment clearly demonstrated that the amino acid replacement has no effect on the concentration of ADH protein, nor does a strongly associated silent polymorphism at nucleotide 1443. Here we analyze associations between polymorphisms within the Adh gene and variation in ADH protein level for a number of chromosomes derived from natural populations. A sequence length polymorphism within the first intron of the distal (adult) transcript, &1, is in strong linkage disequilibrium with the amino acid replacement. Among a sample of 46 isochromosomal lines analyzed, all but one of the 14 Fast lines have &1 and all but one of the 32 Slow lines lack &1. The exceptional Fast line has an unusually low level of ADH protein (typical of Slow lines) and the exceptional Slow line has an unusually high level (typical of Fast lines). These results suggest that the &1 polymorphism may be responsible for the average difference in ADH protein between the allozymic classes. A previous experiment localized the effect on ADH protein to a 2.3-kb restriction fragment. DNA sequences of this fragment from several alleles of each allozymic type indicate that no other polymorphisms within this region are as closely associated with the ADH protein level difference as the &1 polymorphism. PMID:1683848

  1. Genetic Variation in DNA Repair Pathways and Risk of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rendleman, Justin; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Adaniel, Christina; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Dutra-Clarke, Ana; Hansen, Nichole; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety; Borsu, Laetitia; Paltiel, Ora; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Brown, Jennifer R.; Freedman, Arnold S.; Sander, Chris; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J.; Shao, Yongzhao; Lacher, Mortimer; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Molecular and genetic evidence suggests that DNA repair pathways may contribute to lymphoma susceptibility. Several studies have examined the association of DNA repair genes with lymphoma risk, but the findings from these reports have been inconsistent. Here we provide the results of a focused analysis of genetic variation in DNA repair genes and their association with the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). With a population of 1,297 NHL cases and 1,946 controls, we have performed a two-stage case/control association analysis of 446 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the genetic variation in 81 DNA repair genes. We found the most significant association with NHL risk in the ATM locus for rs227060 (OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.13–1.43, p = 6.77×10−5), which remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing. In a subtype-specific analysis, associations were also observed for the ATM locus among both diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) and small lymphocytic lymphomas (SLL), however there was no association observed among follicular lymphomas (FL). In addition, our study provides suggestive evidence of an interaction between SNPs in MRE11A and NBS1 associated with NHL risk (OR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.34–0.77, p = 0.0002). Finally, an imputation analysis using the 1,000 Genomes Project data combined with a functional prediction analysis revealed the presence of biologically relevant variants that correlate with the observed association signals. While the findings generated here warrant independent validation, the results of our large study suggest that ATM may be a novel locus associated with the risk of multiple subtypes of NHL. PMID:25010664

  2. DNA variation in the wild plant Arabidopsis thaliana revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, N T; Kawabe, A; Innan, H

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the level and pattern of DNA variation of Arabidopsis thaliana at the entire genome level, AFLP analysis was conducted for 38 ecotypes distributed throughout the world. Ten pairs of selective primers were used to detect a total of 472 bands, of which 374 (79. 2%) were polymorphic. The frequency distribution of polymorphic bands was skewed toward an excess of singleton variation. On the basis of AFLP variation, nucleotide diversity for the entire genome was estimated to be 0.0106, which was within the range reported previously for specific nuclear genes. The frequency distribution of pairwise distance was bimodal because of an ecotype (Fl-3) with a large number of unique bands. Linkage disequilibrium between polymorphic AFLPs was tested. The proportion of significant linkage disequilibria was close to random expectation after neglecting the ecotype Fl-3. This result indicates that the effect of recombination could not be ignored in this selfing species. A neighbor-joining tree was constructed on the basis of the AFLP variation. This tree has a star-like topology and shows no clear association between ecotype and geographic origin, suggesting a recent spread of this plant species and limited migration between its habitats. PMID:10430596

  3. Bridging near and remote Oceania: mtDNA and NRY variation in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Delfin, Frederick; Myles, Sean; Choi, Ying; Hughes, David; Illek, Robert; van Oven, Mannis; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Kayser, Manfred; Stoneking, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Although genetic studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of the colonization of Near and Remote Oceania, important gaps still exist. One such gap is the Solomon Islands, which extend between Bougainville and Vanuatu, thereby bridging Near and Remote Oceania, and include both Austronesian-speaking and Papuan-speaking groups. Here, we describe patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nonrecombining Y chromosome (NRY) variation in over 700 individuals from 18 populations in the Solomons, including 11 Austronesian-speaking groups, 3 Papuan-speaking groups, and 4 Polynesian Outliers (descended via back migration from Polynesia). We find evidence for ancient (pre-Lapita) colonization of the Solomons in old NRY paragroups as well as from M2-M353, which probably arose in the Solomons ∼9,200 years ago and is the most frequent NRY haplogroup there. There are no consistent genetic differences between Austronesian-speaking and Papuan-speaking groups, suggesting extensive genetic contact between them. Santa Cruz, which is located in Remote Oceania, shows unusually low frequencies of mtDNA and NRY haplogroups of recent Asian ancestry. This is in apparent contradiction with expectations based on archaeological and linguistic evidence for an early (∼3,200 years ago), direct colonization of Santa Cruz by Lapita people from the Bismarck Archipelago, via a migration that "leapfrogged" over the rest of the Solomons. Polynesian Outliers show dramatic island-specific founder events involving various NRY haplogroups. We also find that NRY, but not mtDNA, genetic distance is correlated with the geographic distance between Solomons groups and that historically attested spheres of cultural interaction are associated with the recent genetic structure of Solomons groups, as revealed by mtDNA HV1 sequence and Y-STR haplotype diversity. Our results fill an important lacuna in human genetic studies of Oceania and aid in understanding the colonization and genetic history of

  4. Regional Variation in mtDNA of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagen, Christian A.; Pitman, James C.; Sandercock, Brett K.; Wolfe, Don H.; Robel, Robel J.; Applegate, Roger D.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.

    2010-01-01

    Cumulative loss of habitat and long-term decline in the populations of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) have led to concerns for the species' viability throughout its range in the southern Great Plains. For more efficient conservation past and present distributions of genetic variation need to be understood. We examined the distribution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in the Lesser Prairie-Chicken across Kansas, Colorado, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. Throughout the range we found little genetic differentiation except for the population in New Mexico, which was significantly different from most other publications. We did, however, find significant isolation by distance at the rangewide scale (r=0.698). We found no relationship between haplotype phylogeny and geography, and our analyses provide evidence for a post-glacial population expansion within the species that is consistent with the idea that speciation within Tympanuchus is recent. Conservation actions that increase the likelihood of genetically viable populations in the future should be evaluated for implementation.

  5. Interspecific and intrapopulation variation in mitochondrial ribosomal DNA sequences of Mytilus spp. (Bivalvia: Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Geller, J B; Carlton, J T; Powers, D A

    1993-02-01

    A 560-base pair portion of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA (16S rDNA) from three morphologically similar mussels, Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and M. trossulus, was amplified with the polymerase chain reaction, and 349 base pairs were sequenced. These data showed that this gene in M. edulis and M. galloprovincialis has not diverged; however, the north Pacific mussel, M. trossulus, showed fixed differences from M. edulis and M. galloprovincialis at 5 nucleotide positions. Furthermore, the population of M. trossulus at Tillamook Bay, Oregon, was found to contain two very divergent 16S rDNA genotypes that differ at 37 nucleotide positions. Thus, intraspecific variation in this gene in M. trossulus is greater than that seen interspecifically in M. edulis and M. galloprovincialis. Despite this large difference, in the absence of evidence of genetic isolation between these groups of M. trossulus, no taxonomic changes are proposed. These data are consistent with a north Pacific origin of the genus with subsequent dispersal to the Atlantic Ocean across the Artic Sea, giving rise to M. edulis in northern Europe and subsequently M. galloprovincialis in southern Europe and the Mediterranean Sea.

  6. Peopling of Sahul: mtDNA variation in aboriginal Australian and Papua New Guinean populations.

    PubMed Central

    Redd, A J; Stoneking, M

    1999-01-01

    We examined genetic affinities of Aboriginal Australian and New Guinean populations by using nucleotide variation in the two hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region (CR). A total of 318 individuals from highland Papua New Guinea (PNG), coastal PNG, and Aboriginal Australian populations were typed with a panel of 29 sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes. The SSO-probe panel included five new probes that were used to type an additional 1,037 individuals from several Asian populations. The SSO-type data guided the selection of 78 individuals from Australia and east Indonesia for CR sequencing. A gene tree of these CR sequences, combined with published sequences from worldwide populations, contains two previously identified highland PNG clusters that do not include any Aboriginal Australians; the highland PNG clusters have coalescent time estimates of approximately 80,000 and 122,000 years ago, suggesting ancient isolation and genetic drift. SSO-type data indicate that 84% of the sample of PNG highlander mtDNA belong to these two clusters. In contrast, the Aboriginal Australian sequences are intermingled throughout the tree and cluster with sequences from multiple populations. Phylogenetic and multidimensional-scaling analyses of CR sequences and SSO types split PNG highland and Aboriginal Australian populations and link Aboriginal Australian populations with populations from the subcontinent of India. These mtDNA results do not support a close relationship between Aboriginal Australian and PNG populations but instead suggest multiple migrations in the peopling of Sahul. PMID:10441589

  7. Phylogeographical structure revealed by chloroplast DNA variation in Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume).

    PubMed

    Okaura, T; Harada, K

    2002-04-01

    Intraspecific genetic variation in three non-coding chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) regions (trnT-L and trnL-F spacers, and trnL intron) of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume) was investigated. This species is a major constituent of the typical cool-temperate deciduous forests in Japan. Twenty-one F. crenata populations from throughout Japan, and four F. japonica populations, a close relative of F. crenata, were examined. Seven haplotypes were distinguishable in F. crenata based on nucleotide substitutions and indels. Pairwise nucleotide diversities among haplotypes ranged from 0.0000 to 0.0042 for F. crenata, including F. japonica. The geographical distribution of cpDNA haplotypes was found to be highly structured in F. crenata. Four haplotypes predominated: haplotypes FC1 and FC4 are prevalent on the Pacific Ocean coast, haplotype FC6 is prevalent on the Japan sea coast from the San-in district to Hokkaido, whilst haplotype FC3 is restricted to northern Kyushu and the western-most part of Honshu. Two haplotypes (FC5 and FC7) are restricted to single populations and one haplotype (FC2) is a derivative of FC1. Each of these haplotypes, except FC2, are thought to be derived from different glacial refugia. Phylogenetic analysis showed that neither F. crenata nor F. japonica was monophyletic for the haplotypes, suggesting either ancestral polymorphism or ancient introgression between the lineages of these two Fagus species.

  8. Effects of geographic origin on captive Macaca mulatta mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Smith, David Glenn

    2004-04-01

    Partial sequences from mitochondrial (mt) 12S and 16S rRNA genes were analyzed to characterize diversity among captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) originating from various geographic regions. Several nested clades, defined by closely related haplotypes, were identified, suggesting considerable genetic subdivision, probably relics from heterogeneous origins, founder effects, and genetic drift, followed by breeding isolation. The rhesus matrilineages from India differed discretely and markedly from Chinese matrilineages; approximately 90% of the genetic heterogeneity among the combined samples of Indian and Chinese rhesus macaques studied here was due to country of origin. In addition, mtDNA sequences from macaques of China were more diverse than those from rhesus macaques of India, an outcome consistent with China's greater subspecies diversity and with nuclear genotype distributions. Otherwise, the distribution of mtDNA variation within rhesus macaques of China, and especially within those of India, exhibited far less structure and did not conform to a simple isolation-by-distance model. As the demand for genetically heterogeneous and well-characterized rhesus macaques for biomedical-based research increases, mtDNA haplotypes can be useful for genetically defining, preserving maximal levels of genetic diversity within, and confirming the geographic origin of captive breeding groups of rhesus macaques.

  9. Population structure of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation among humpback whales in the North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Baker, C S; Medrano-Gonzalez, L; Calambokidis, J; Perry, A; Pichler, F; Rosenbaum, H; Straley, J M; Urban-Ramirez, J; Yamaguchi, M; von Ziegesar, O

    1998-06-01

    The population structure of variation in a nuclear actin intron and the control region of mitochondrial DNA is described for humpback whales from eight regions in the North Pacific Ocean: central California, Baja Peninsula, nearshore Mexico (Bahia Banderas), offshore Mexico (Socorro Island), southeastern Alaska, central Alaska (Prince Williams Sound), Hawaii and Japan (Ogasawara Islands). Primary mtDNA haplotypes and intron alleles were identified using selected restriction fragment length polymorphisms of target sequences amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR-RFLP). There was little evidence of heterogeneity in the frequencies of mtDNA haplotypes or actin intron alleles due to the year or sex composition of the sample. However, frequencies of four mtDNA haplotypes showed marked regional differences in their distributions (phi ST = 0.277; P < 0.001; n = 205 individuals) while the two alleles showed significant, but less marked, regional differences (phi ST = 0.033; P < 0.013; n = 400 chromosomes). An hierarchical analysis of variance in frequencies of haplotypes and alleles supported the grouping of six regions into a central and eastern stock with further partitioning of variance among regions within stocks for haplotypes but not for alleles. Based on available genetic and demographic evidence, the southeastern Alaska and central California feeding grounds were selected for additional analyses of nuclear differentiation using allelic variation at four microsatellite loci. All four loci showed significant differences in allele frequencies (overall FST = 0.043; P < 0.001; average n = 139 chromosomes per locus), indicating at least partial reproductive isolation between the two regions as well as the segregation of mtDNA lineages. Although the two feeding grounds were not panmictic for nuclear or mitochondrial loci, estimates of long-term migration rates suggested that male-mediated gene flow was several-fold greater than female gene flow. These results

  10. Age-Related and Heteroplasmy-Related Variation in Human mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkun; Madea, Burkhard; Stoneking, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome is present in many copies in human cells, and intra-individual variation in mtDNA sequences is known as heteroplasmy. Recent studies found that heteroplasmies are highly tissue-specific, site-specific, and allele-specific, however the functional implications have not been explored. This study investigates variation in mtDNA copy numbers (mtCN) in 12 different tissues obtained at autopsy from 152 individuals (ranging in age from 3 days to 96 years). Three different methods to estimate mtCN were compared: shotgun sequencing (in 4 tissues), capture-enriched sequencing (in 12 tissues) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR, in 2 tissues). The highest precision in mtCN estimation was achieved using shotgun sequencing data. However, capture-enrichment data provide reliable estimates of relative (albeit not absolute) mtCNs. Comparisons of mtCN from different tissues of the same individual revealed that mtCNs in different tissues are, with few exceptions, uncorrelated. Hence, each tissue of an individual seems to regulate mtCN in a tissue-related rather than an individual-dependent manner. Skeletal muscle (SM) samples showed an age-related decrease in mtCN that was especially pronounced in males, while there was an age-related increase in mtCN for liver (LIV) samples. MtCN in SM samples was significantly negatively correlated with both the total number of heteroplasmic sites and with minor allele frequency (MAF) at two heteroplasmic sites, 408 and 16327. Heteroplasmies at both sites are highly specific for SM, accumulate with aging and are part of functional elements that regulate mtDNA replication. These data support the hypothesis that selection acting on these heteroplasmic sites is reducing mtCN in SM of older individuals. PMID:26978189

  11. Genetic Variation Among Vegetative Compatibility Groups of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Analyzed by DNA Fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Bentley, S; Pegg, K G; Moore, N Y; Davis, R D; Buddenhagen, I W

    1998-12-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic variation within a worldwide collection of 208 isolates of Fu-sarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, representing physiological races 1, 2, 3, and 4 and the 20 reported vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs), was analyzed using modified DNA amplification fingerprinting. Also characterized were 133 isolates that did not belong to any of the reported VCGs of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense including race 3 isolates from a Heliconia species and isolates from a symptomatic wild banana species growing in the jungle in peninsular Malaysia. The DNA fingerprint patterns were generally VCG specific, irrespective of geographic or host origin. A total of 33 different genotypes were identified within F. oxysporum f. sp. cu-bense; 19 genotypes were distinguished among the isolates that belonged to the 20 reported VCGs, and 14 new genotypes were identified among the isolates that did not belong to any of the existing VCGs. DNA fingerprinting analysis also allowed differentiation of nine clonal lineages within F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense. Five of these lineages each contained numerous closely related VCGs and genotypes, and the remaining four lineages each contained a single genotype. The genetic diversity and geographic distribution of several of these lineages of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense suggests that they have coevolved with edible bananas and their wild diploid progenitors in Asia. DNA fingerprinting analysis of isolates from the wild pathosystem provides further evidence for the coevolution hypothesis. The genetic isolation and limited geographic distribution of four of the lineages of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense suggests that the pathogen has also arisen independently, both within and outside of the center of origin of the host.

  12. Tissue-specific and cation/anion-specific DNA methylation variations occurred in C. virgata in response to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Cao, Donghui; Liu, Jie; Wang, Xiaoping; Geng, Shujuan; Liu, Bao; Shi, Decheng

    2013-01-01

    Salinity is a widespread environmental problem limiting productivity and growth of plants. Halophytes which can adapt and resist certain salt stress have various mechanisms to defend the higher salinity and alkalinity, and epigenetic mechanisms especially DNA methylation may play important roles in plant adaptability and plasticity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the different influences of various single salts (NaCl, Na2SO4, NaHCO3, Na2CO3) and their mixed salts on halophyte Chloris. virgata from the DNA methylation prospective, and discover the underlying relationships between specific DNA methylation variations and specific cations/anions through the methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis. The results showed that the effects on DNA methylation variations of single salts were ranked as follows: Na2CO3> NaHCO3> Na2SO4> NaCl, and their mixed salts exerted tissue-specific effects on C. virgata seedlings. Eight types of DNA methylation variations were detected and defined in C. virgata according to the specific cations/anions existed in stressful solutions; in addition, mix-specific and higher pH-specific bands were the main type in leaves and roots independently. These findings suggested that mixed salts were not the simple combination of single salts. Furthermore, not only single salts but also mixed salts showed tissue-specific and cations/anions-specific DNA methylation variations. PMID:24223802

  13. Human demographic processes and genetic variation as revealed by mtDNA simulations.

    PubMed

    Miró-Herrans, Aida T; Mulligan, Connie J

    2013-02-01

    Humans' ability for rapid dispersal and adaptation has allowed us to colonize diverse geographic and climatic regions of the planet, creating a complex evolutionary history. This complexity can be understood, at least partially, by modeling the underlying demographic parameters in the evolutionary process. In this study, we analyze a model of human evolution in which population size, gene flow (GF), and time are varied. Specifically, we simulate mitochondrial DNA for 42 demographic scenarios, represented by 42 parameter combinations, to describe the initial dispersal of modern humans out of Africa. The analyses include three values for colonization size (CS; 1%, 10%, and 30% of the African population), seven values for rate of GF (10(-6)-0.5), and two values for time of colonization (50,000 and 100,000 years ago). We then estimate summary statistics for the simulated data sets to calculate the percent of explained variation by each parameter and to identify which parameter combinations generate distinct differences in genetic variation, that is, which demographic scenarios can be distinguished from each other. On the basis of these results, we make recommendations about which summary statistics to use according to the parameter of interest. Our results show that CS, GF, and their interaction have the largest effect on genetic variation under our model of human evolution. Comparison with empirical data suggests that 1% of the existing African mitochondrial genetic variation left and colonized the rest of the world (i.e., CS = 1%) and bidirectional GF continued at a level of ∼10 individuals per generation (i.e., GF = 10(-3)) after the initial colonization. Our study serves as a model to bridge the gap between the use of simulations for theoretical population genetics and empirical data analysis such as approximate bayesian computation approaches and is, thus, applicable to the study of molecular evolution in any organism.

  14. BSSV: Bayesian based somatic structural variation identification with whole genome DNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Shi, Xu; Shajahan, Ayesha N; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert; Xuan, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    High coverage whole genome DNA-sequencing enables identification of somatic structural variation (SSV) more evident in paired tumor and normal samples. Recent studies show that simultaneous analysis of paired samples provides a better resolution of SSV detection than subtracting shared SVs. However, available tools can neither identify all types of SSVs nor provide any rank information regarding their somatic features. In this paper, we have developed a Bayesian framework, by integrating read alignment information from both tumor and normal samples, called BSSV, to calculate the significance of each SSV. Tested by simulated data, the precision of BSSV is comparable to that of available tools and the false negative rate is significantly lowered. We have also applied this approach to The Cancer Genome Atlas breast cancer data for SSV detection. Many known breast cancer specific mutated genes like RAD51, BRIP1, ER, PGR and PTPRD have been successfully identified.

  15. Chloroplast DNA variation of Quercus rubra L. in North America and comparison with other Fagaceae.

    PubMed

    Magni, C R; Ducousso, A; Caron, H; Petit, R J; Kremer, A

    2005-02-01

    Quercus rubra is one of the most important timber and ornamental tree species from eastern North America. It is a widespread species growing under variable ecological conditions. Chloroplast DNA variation was studied by PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism) in 290 individuals from 66 populations sampled throughout the natural range. A total of 12 haplotypes were detected, with one found in 75% of the trees. Population differentiation is relatively low (G(ST) = 0.46), even when similarities between haplotypes are taken into account (N(ST) = 0.50), pointing to a weak phylogeographical structure. Furthermore, no spatial structure of genetic diversity could be detected. The genetic differentiation increased northwards, reflecting the postglacial history of Q. rubra. The unusual aspect of this study was the low level of chloroplast DNA genetic differentiation in Q. rubra compared to that typically observed in other oak species. Palynological evidence indicates that during the last glacial maximum, Q. rubra had one major distribution range with populations located relatively far to the north, resulting in only modest movement northwards when climate improved, whereas European white oaks were largely restricted to the southern European peninsulas and experienced extensive movements during the postglacial period. The contrasted geographical features and levels of tree species richness of both continents might further explain why congeneric species sharing similar life history traits have genetic structures that are so different. PMID:15660942

  16. Capturing genomic signatures of DNA sequence variation using a standard anonymous microarray platform

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, C. H.; Kua, C. S.; Lobenhofer, E. K.; Hurban, P.

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genomics, using the model organism approach, has provided powerful insights into the structure and evolution of whole genomes. Unfortunately, only a small fraction of Earth's biodiversity will have its genome sequenced in the foreseeable future. Most wild organisms have radically different life histories and evolutionary genomics than current model systems. A novel technique is needed to expand comparative genomics to a wider range of organisms. Here, we describe a novel approach using an anonymous DNA microarray platform that gathers genomic samples of sequence variation from any organism. Oligonucleotide probe sequences placed on a custom 44 K array were 25 bp long and designed using a simple set of criteria to maximize their complexity and dispersion in sequence probability space. Using whole genomic samples from three known genomes (mouse, rat and human) and one unknown (Gonystylus bancanus), we demonstrate and validate its power, reliability, transitivity and sensitivity. Using two separate statistical analyses, a large numbers of genomic ‘indicator’ probes were discovered. The construction of a genomic signature database based upon this technique would allow virtual comparisons and simple queries could generate optimal subsets of markers to be used in large-scale assays, using simple downstream techniques. Biologists from a wide range of fields, studying almost any organism, could efficiently perform genomic comparisons, at potentially any phylogenetic level after performing a small number of standardized DNA microarray hybridizations. Possibilities for refining and expanding the approach are discussed. PMID:17000641

  17. mtDNA variation in Inuit populations of Greenland and Canada: migration history and population structure.

    PubMed

    Helgason, Agnar; Pálsson, Gísli; Pedersen, Henning Sloth; Angulalik, Emily; Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen Dröfn; Yngvadóttir, Bryndís; Stefánsson, Kári

    2006-05-01

    We examined 395 mtDNA control-region sequences from Greenlandic Inuit and Canadian Kitikmeot Inuit with the aim of shedding light on the migration history that underlies the present geographic patterns of genetic variation at this locus in the Arctic. In line with previous studies, we found that Inuit populations carry only sequences belonging to haplotype clusters A2 and D3. However, a comparison of Arctic populations from Siberia, Canada, and Greenland revealed considerable differences in the frequencies of these haplotypes. Moreover, large sample sizes and regional information about birthplaces of maternal grandmothers permitted the detection of notable differences in the distribution of haplotypes among subpopulations within Greenland. Our results cast doubt on the prevailing hypothesis that contemporary Inuit trace their all of their ancestry to so-called Thule groups that expanded from Alaska about 800-1,000 years ago. In particular, discrepancies in mutational divergence between the Inuit populations and their putative source mtDNA pool in Siberia/Alaska for the two predominant haplotype clusters, A2a and A2b, are more consistent with the possibility that expanding Thule groups encountered and interbred with existing Dorset populations in Canada and Greenland.

  18. Ribosomal DNA variations in Erianthus, a wild sugarcane relative (Andropogoneae-Saccharinae).

    PubMed

    Besse, P; McIntyre, C L; Berding, N

    1996-05-01

    Variation at the 18S+26S and 5S ribosomal DNA loci was assessed on 62 Erianthus Michx. clones, representing 11 species, and 15 clones from two Saccharum L. species used as a reference. Genus-specific markers for Erianthus Michx. sect. Ripidium Henrard (Old World species) were identified. Ribosomal DNA units in Erianthus sect. Ripidium exhibited an additional BamHI site compared to Saccharum, and 5S units showed length and restriction-site differences between Erianthus and Saccharum. These markers will be useful to follow introgression in Saccharum x Erianthus hybrids. Six ribosomal units (for 18+26S genes) were revealed in Erianthus sect. Ripidium, differing by restriction-site positions and/or length. These results provided new information on species relationships and evolution within the genus Erianthus. The Indonesian and Indian forms of E. arundinaceus (Retz.) Jeswiet gave different restriction patterns, which were similar to those of E. bengalense (Retz.) R. C. Bharadwaja and E. procerus (Roxb.) Raizade, respectively. The two 2n=20 species, E. ele-phantinus Hook.f. and E. ravennae (L.) P. Beauv., could also be differentiated at this locus. Two of the New World Erianthus species studied, E. rufipilus (Steud.) Griseb. and E. longisetosus Andersson, appeared more like Erianthus sect. Ripidium, whereas E. trinii Hack, and E. brevibardis Michx. showed patterns consistent with Miscanthus sinensis Andersson and S. spontaneum L., respectively. Finally, the comparison of rDNA restriction maps among Erianthus sect. Ripidium, Saccharum, sorghum and maize, led to unexpected conclusions concerning the relationships between the different genera and the position of Erianthus in the "Saccharum complex".

  19. Intraspecific sequence variation of chloroplast DNA among the component species of deciduous broad-leaved forests in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takaya; Aoki, Kyoko; Seo, Akihiro; Murakami, Noriaki

    2006-09-01

    To select appropriate plant materials for a phylogeography of deciduous broad-leaved forests in Japan, we surveyed intraspecific chloroplast DNA variation in 34 species found in these forests. A relatively large number of intraspecific cpDNA variations were detected in ten species: Carpinus japonica (nucleotide diversity pi=0.00083), C. laxiflora (pi=0.00221), Magnolia obovata (pi=0.00134), Lindera triloba (pi=0.00255), L. obtusiloba (pi=0.00289), Pourthiaea villosa var. leavis (pi=0.00263), Acer japonicum (pi=0.00170), A. micranthum (pi=0.00237), Euonymus oxyphyllus (pi=0.00322) and Styrax obassia (pi=0.00100).

  20. Ribosomal DNA locus variation and REMAP analysis of the diploid and triploid complexes of Lilium lancifolium.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Truong Xuan; Lee, Sung-Il; Rai, Rameshwar; Kim, Nam-Soo; Kim, Jong Hwa

    2016-08-01

    Lilium lancifolium Thunb. (2n = 2x = 24) is a cytologically conspicuous species with both diploids and triploids in nature. Cytological and molecular genetic analyses were carried out in both diploids and triploids that were collected from 55 geographical locations in Korea, Japan, and China. While the 5S rRNA gene loci were located at duplicated loci on the long arm of chromosome 2, the 45S rRNA gene loci were present in chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, and 11. While the loci on chromosomes 1 and 7 were constant, the loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 6, 7, and 11 were variable in some plants so that the L. lancifolium accessions were grouped into 7 cytotypes in diploids and 12 cytotypes in triploids. REMAP marker analysis revealed that the diploids were classified into seven clusters, and the triploids were classified into a large cluster. Geographic, cytological, and genetic differentiations were not related in both the diploid and triploid accessions of L. lancifolium. Thus, current genetic variations occurred prior to the geographic differentiation in both diploids and triploids, and the 45S rDNA cytotype variations occurred after geographic differentiation in the current habitats of L. lancifolium. PMID:27458741

  1. Absence of geographical structure of chloroplast DNA variation in sallow, Salix caprea L.

    PubMed

    Palmé, A E; Semerikov, V; Lascoux, M

    2003-11-01

    In the present study, we have used PCR-RFLP markers to investigate the chloroplast DNA variation in 24 European populations of Salix caprea L. A subset of these populations has also been analysed with chloroplast microsatellites. The main feature of both markers is the absence of a clear geographic structure (G(ST(PCR-RFLP))=0.090, G(ST(microsatellites))=-0.017) and high levels of variation within populations. This lack of phylogeographic structure in S. caprea is suggested to be the consequence of the joint action of several factors: (i) presence of intermediate latitude refugia with large population sizes during the last glacial maximum, (ii) a high speed of recolonisation and dispersal ability, (iii) a high mutation rate and (iv) extensive hybridisation with other willow species. In addition to the S. caprea samples, a limited number of individuals from several other Salix species were also analysed with PCR-RFLP: S. cinerea, S. aurita, S. purpurea, S. atrocinerea, S. appendiculata, S. elaeagnos, S. fragilis and S. alba. Many of the haplotypes found in Salix caprea were also detected in S. cinerea, S. aurita, S. purpurea, S. atrocinerea and/ or S. appendiculata but not in S. alba, S. elaeagnos or S. fragilis. Our data suggest that hybridisation and gene flow have occurred within these two groups but not between them.

  2. Methylation interactions in Arabidopsis hybrids require RNA-directed DNA methylation and are influenced by genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Dong; Lang, Zhaobo; He, Li; Yang, Lan; Zeng, Liang; Li, Yanqiang; Zhao, Cheng; Huang, Huan; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Huiming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-07-19

    DNA methylation is a conserved epigenetic mark in plants and many animals. How parental alleles interact in progeny to influence the epigenome is poorly understood. We analyzed the DNA methylomes of Arabidopsis Col and C24 ecotypes, and their hybrid progeny. Hybrids displayed nonadditive DNA methylation levels, termed methylation interactions, throughout the genome. Approximately 2,500 methylation interactions occurred at regions where parental DNA methylation levels are similar, whereas almost 1,000 were at differentially methylated regions in parents. Methylation interactions were characterized by an abundance of 24-nt small interfering RNAs. Furthermore, dysfunction of the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway abolished methylation interactions but did not affect the increased biomass observed in hybrid progeny. Methylation interactions correlated with altered genetic variation within the genome, suggesting that they may play a role in genome evolution. PMID:27382183

  3. Effects of Twelve Germline Missense Variations on DNA Lesion and G-Quadruplex Bypass Activities of Human DNA Polymerase REV1.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Mina; Kim, In-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Kwon; Kang, KyeongJin; Eoff, Robert L; Guengerich, F Peter; Choi, Jeong-Yun

    2016-03-21

    The Y-family DNA polymerase REV1 is involved in replicative bypass of damaged DNA and G-quadruplex (G4) DNA. In addition to a scaffolding role in the replicative bypass, REV1 acts in a catalytic role as a deoxycytidyl transferase opposite some replication stall sites, e.g., apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, N(2)-guanyl lesions, and G4 sites. We characterized the biochemical properties of 12 reported germline missense variants of human REV1, including the N373S variant associated with high risk of cervical cancer, using the recombinant REV1 (residues 330-833) proteins and DNA templates containing a G, AP site, N(2)-CH2(2-naphthyl)G (N(2)-NaphG), or G4. In steady-state kinetic analyses, the F427L, R434Q, M656V, D700N, R704Q, and P831L variants displayed 2- to 8-fold decreases in kcat/Km for dCTP insertion opposite all four templates, compared to that of wild-type, while the N373S, M407L, and N497S showed 2- to 3-fold increases with all four and the former three or two templates, respectively. The F427L, R434Q, M656V, and R704Q variants also had 2- to 3-fold lower binding affinities to DNA substrates containing G, an AP site, and/or N(2)-NaphG than wild-type. Distinctively, the N373S variant had a 3-fold higher binding affinity to G4 DNA than the wild-type, as well as a 2-fold higher catalytic activity opposite the first tetrad G, suggesting a facilitating effect of this variation on replication of G4 DNA sequences in certain human papillomavirus genomes. Our results suggest that the catalytic function of REV1 is moderately or slightly altered by at least nine genetic variations, and the G4 DNA processing function of REV1 is slightly enhanced by the N373S variation, which might provide the possibility that certain germline missense REV1 variations affect the individual susceptibility to carcinogenesis by modifying the capability of REV1 for replicative bypass past DNA lesions and G4 motifs derived from chemical and viral carcinogens.

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of Pan-African Mitochondrial DNA Variation Provides New Insights into Continental Variation and Demography.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, María; Gusmão, Leonor; Černý, Viktor; Uddin, Nabeel; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Göbel, Tanja; Schneider, Peter M; Salas, Antonio

    2016-03-20

    Africa is the cradle of all human beings, and although it has been the focus of a number of genetic studies, there are many questions that remain unresolved. We have performed one of the largest and most comprehensive meta-analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages carried out in the African continent to date. We generated high-throughput mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data (230 SNPs) from 2024 Africans, where more than 500 of them were additionally genotyped for the control region. These data were analyzed together with over 12,700 control region profiles collected from the literature, representing more than 300 population samples from Africa. Insights into the African homeland of humans are discussed. Phylogeographic patterns for the African continent are shown at a high phylogeographic resolution as well as at the population and regional levels. The deepest branch of the mtDNA tree, haplogroup L0, shows the highest sub-haplogroup diversity in Southeast and East Africa, suggesting this region as the homeland for modern humans. Several demographic estimates point to the coast as a facilitator of human migration in Africa, but the data indicate complex patterns, perhaps mirroring the effect of recent continental-scaled demographic events in re-shaping African mtDNA variability.

  5. Comprehensive Analysis of Pan-African Mitochondrial DNA Variation Provides New Insights into Continental Variation and Demography.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, María; Gusmão, Leonor; Černý, Viktor; Uddin, Nabeel; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Göbel, Tanja; Schneider, Peter M; Salas, Antonio

    2016-03-20

    Africa is the cradle of all human beings, and although it has been the focus of a number of genetic studies, there are many questions that remain unresolved. We have performed one of the largest and most comprehensive meta-analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages carried out in the African continent to date. We generated high-throughput mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data (230 SNPs) from 2024 Africans, where more than 500 of them were additionally genotyped for the control region. These data were analyzed together with over 12,700 control region profiles collected from the literature, representing more than 300 population samples from Africa. Insights into the African homeland of humans are discussed. Phylogeographic patterns for the African continent are shown at a high phylogeographic resolution as well as at the population and regional levels. The deepest branch of the mtDNA tree, haplogroup L0, shows the highest sub-haplogroup diversity in Southeast and East Africa, suggesting this region as the homeland for modern humans. Several demographic estimates point to the coast as a facilitator of human migration in Africa, but the data indicate complex patterns, perhaps mirroring the effect of recent continental-scaled demographic events in re-shaping African mtDNA variability. PMID:27020033

  6. Population structure of North American beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) based on nuclear DNA microsatellite variation and contrasted with the population structure revealed by mitochondrial DNA variation

    PubMed

    Gladden; Ferguson; Friesen; Clayton

    1999-03-01

    Beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in North American waters migrate seasonally between wintering areas in broken pack ice and summering locations in estuaries and other open water areas in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. Results from our previous investigation of beluga whale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) revealed genetic heterogeneity among beluga from different summering locations that was interpreted as representing a high degree of summering site philopatry. However, mtDNA is maternally inherited and does not reflect mating that may occur among beluga from different summering locations in wintering areas or during annual migrations. To test the possibility that breeding occurs among beluga from different summering locations, genetic variability at five nuclear DNA (nDNA) microsatellite loci was examined in the same animals tested in the mtDNA study. Beluga samples (n = 640) were collected between 1984 and 1994 from 24 sites across North America, mostly during the summer. Whales from the various sites were categorized into eight summering locations as identified by mtDNA analysis, as well as four hypothesized wintering areas: Bering Sea, Hudson Strait (Hudson Strait, Labrador Sea, southwest Davis Strait), Baffin Bay (North Water, east Davis Strait), and St Lawrence River. Microsatellite allele frequencies indicated genetic homogeneity among animals from summering sites believed to winter together but differentiation among whales from some of the wintering areas. In particular, beluga from western North America (Bering Sea) were clearly distinguished from beluga from eastern North America (Hudson Strait, Baffin Bay, and St Lawrence River). Based upon the combined data set, the population of North American beluga whales was divided into two evolutionarily significant units. However, the population may be further subdivided into management units to reflect distinct groups of beluga at summering locations. PMID:10199005

  7. Sheep mitochondrial DNA variation in European, Caucasian, and Central Asian areas.

    PubMed

    Tapio, Miika; Marzanov, Nurbiy; Ozerov, Mikhail; Cinkulov, Mirjana; Gonzarenko, Galina; Kiselyova, Tatyana; Murawski, Maciej; Viinalass, Haldja; Kantanen, Juha

    2006-09-01

    Three distinct mitochondrial maternal lineages (haplotype Groups A, B, and C) have been found in the domestic sheep. Group B has been observed primarily in European domestic sheep. The European mouflon carries this haplotype group. This could suggest that European mouflon was independently domesticated in Europe, although archaeological evidence supports sheep domestication in the central part of the Fertile Crescent. To investigate this question, we sequenced a highly variable segment of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in 406 unrelated animals from 48 breeds or local varieties. They originated from a wide area spanning northern Europe and the Balkans to the Altay Mountains in south Siberia. The sample included a representative cross-section of sheep breeds from areas close to the postulated Near Eastern domestication center and breeds from more distant northern areas. Four (A, B, C, and D) highly diverged sheep lineages were observed in Caucasus, 3 (A, B and C) in Central Asia, and 2 (A and B) in the eastern fringe of Europe, which included the area north and west of the Black Sea and the Ural Mountains. Only one example of Group D was detected. The other haplotype groups demonstrated signs of population expansion. Sequence variation within the lineages implied Group A to have expanded first. This group was the most frequent type only in Caucasian and Central Asian breeds. Expansion of Group C appeared most recently. The expansion of Group B involving Caucasian sheep took place at nearly the same time as the expansion of Group A. Group B expansion for the eastern European area started approximately 3,000 years after the earliest inferred expansion. An independent European domestication of sheep is unlikely. The distribution of Group A variation as well as other results are compatible with the Near East being the domestication site. Groups C and D may have been introgressed later into a domestic stock, but larger samples are needed to infer their geographical origin. The

  8. Sheep mitochondrial DNA variation in European, Caucasian, and Central Asian areas.

    PubMed

    Tapio, Miika; Marzanov, Nurbiy; Ozerov, Mikhail; Cinkulov, Mirjana; Gonzarenko, Galina; Kiselyova, Tatyana; Murawski, Maciej; Viinalass, Haldja; Kantanen, Juha

    2006-09-01

    Three distinct mitochondrial maternal lineages (haplotype Groups A, B, and C) have been found in the domestic sheep. Group B has been observed primarily in European domestic sheep. The European mouflon carries this haplotype group. This could suggest that European mouflon was independently domesticated in Europe, although archaeological evidence supports sheep domestication in the central part of the Fertile Crescent. To investigate this question, we sequenced a highly variable segment of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in 406 unrelated animals from 48 breeds or local varieties. They originated from a wide area spanning northern Europe and the Balkans to the Altay Mountains in south Siberia. The sample included a representative cross-section of sheep breeds from areas close to the postulated Near Eastern domestication center and breeds from more distant northern areas. Four (A, B, C, and D) highly diverged sheep lineages were observed in Caucasus, 3 (A, B and C) in Central Asia, and 2 (A and B) in the eastern fringe of Europe, which included the area north and west of the Black Sea and the Ural Mountains. Only one example of Group D was detected. The other haplotype groups demonstrated signs of population expansion. Sequence variation within the lineages implied Group A to have expanded first. This group was the most frequent type only in Caucasian and Central Asian breeds. Expansion of Group C appeared most recently. The expansion of Group B involving Caucasian sheep took place at nearly the same time as the expansion of Group A. Group B expansion for the eastern European area started approximately 3,000 years after the earliest inferred expansion. An independent European domestication of sheep is unlikely. The distribution of Group A variation as well as other results are compatible with the Near East being the domestication site. Groups C and D may have been introgressed later into a domestic stock, but larger samples are needed to infer their geographical origin. The

  9. Worldwide DNA sequence variation in a 10-kilobase noncoding region on human chromosome 22.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Jin, L; Fu, Y X; Ramsay, M; Jenkins, T; Leskinen, E; Pamilo, P; Trexler, M; Patthy, L; Jorde, L B; Ramos-Onsins, S; Yu, N; Li, W H

    2000-10-10

    Human DNA sequence variation data are useful for studying the origin, evolution, and demographic history of modern humans and the mechanisms of maintenance of genetic variability in human populations, and for detecting linkage association of disease. Here, we report worldwide variation data from a approximately 10-kilobase noncoding autosomal region. We identified 75 variant sites in 64 humans (128 sequences) and 463 variant sites among the human, chimpanzee, and orangutan sequences. Statistical tests suggested that the region is selectively neutral. The average nucleotide diversity (pi) across the region was 0.088% among all of the human sequences obtained, 0.085% among African sequences, and 0.082% among non-African sequences, supporting the view of a low nucleotide diversity ( approximately 0.1%) in humans. The comparable pi value in non-Africans to that in Africans indicates no severe bottleneck during the evolution of modern non-Africans; however, the possibility of a mild bottleneck cannot be excluded because non-Africans showed considerably fewer variants than Africans. The present and two previous large data sets all show a strong excess of low frequency variants in comparison to that expected from an equilibrium population, indicating a relatively recent population expansion. The mutation rate was estimated to be 1.15 x 10(-9) per nucleotide per year. Estimates of the long-term effective population size N(e) by various statistical methods were similar to those in other studies. The age of the most recent common ancestor was estimated to be approximately 1.29 million years ago among all of the sequences obtained and approximately 634,000 years ago among the non-African sequences, providing the first evidence from a noncoding autosomal region for ancient human histories, even among non-Africans.

  10. A High-Resolution Map of Segmental DNA Copy Number Variation in the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Graubert, Timothy A; Selzer, Rebecca R; Richmond, Todd A; Eis, Peggy S; Shannon, William D; Li, Xia; McLeod, Howard L; Cheverud, James M; Ley, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Submicroscopic (less than 2 Mb) segmental DNA copy number changes are a recently recognized source of genetic variability between individuals. The biological consequences of copy number variants (CNVs) are largely undefined. In some cases, CNVs that cause gene dosage effects have been implicated in phenotypic variation. CNVs have been detected in diverse species, including mice and humans. Published studies in mice have been limited by resolution and strain selection. We chose to study 21 well-characterized inbred mouse strains that are the focus of an international effort to measure, catalog, and disseminate phenotype data. We performed comparative genomic hybridization using long oligomer arrays to characterize CNVs in these strains. This technique increased the resolution of CNV detection by more than an order of magnitude over previous methodologies. The CNVs range in size from 21 to 2,002 kb. Clustering strains by CNV profile recapitulates aspects of the known ancestry of these strains. Most of the CNVs (77.5%) contain annotated genes, and many (47.5%) colocalize with previously mapped segmental duplications in the mouse genome. We demonstrate that this technique can identify copy number differences associated with known polymorphic traits. The phenotype of previously uncharacterized strains can be predicted based on their copy number at these loci. Annotation of CNVs in the mouse genome combined with sequence-based analysis provides an important resource that will help define the genetic basis of complex traits. PMID:17206864

  11. Glacial survival of the Norwegian lemming (Lemmus lemmus) in Scandinavia: inference from mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, V B; Stenseth, N C

    2001-04-22

    In order to evaluate the biogeographical hypothesis that the Norwegian lemming (Lemmus lemmus) survived the last glacial period in some Scandinavian refugia, we examined variation in the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial control region (402 base pairs (bp)) and the cytochrome b (cyt b) region (633 bp) in Norwegian and Siberian (Lemmus sibiricus) lemmings. The phylogenetic distinction and cyt b divergence estimate of 1.8% between the Norwegian and Siberian lemmings suggest that their separation pre-dated the last glaciation and imply that the Norwegian lemming is probably a relic of the Pleistocene populations from Western Europe. The star-like control region phylogeny and low mitochondrial DNA diversity in the Norwegian lemming indicate a reduction in its historical effective size followed by population expansion. The average estimate of post-bottleneck time (19-21 kyr) is close to the last glacial maximum (18-22 kyr BP). Taking these findings and the fossil records into consideration, it seems likely that, after colonization of Scandinavia in the Late Pleistocene, the Norwegian lemming suffered a reduction in its population effective size and survived the last glacial maximum in some local Scandinavian refugia, as suggested by early biogeographical work.

  12. Interactions among Trypanosoma brucei RAD51 paralogues in DNA repair and antigenic variation

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Rachel; Stockdale, Christopher; Lapsley, Craig; Wilkes, Jonathan; McCulloch, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei is used for moving variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes into expression sites during immune evasion by antigenic variation. A major route for such VSG switching is gene conversion reactions in which RAD51, a universally conserved recombinase, catalyses homology-directed strand exchange. In any eukaryote, RAD51-directed strand exchange in vivo is mediated by further factors, including RAD51-related proteins termed Rad51 paralogues. These appear to be ubiquitously conserved, although their detailed roles in recombination remain unclear. In T. brucei, four putative RAD51 paralogue genes have been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that all four RAD51 paralogues act in DNA repair, recombination and RAD51 subnuclear dynamics, though not equivalently, while mutation of only one RAD51 paralogue gene significantly impedes VSG switching. We also show that the T. brucei RAD51 paralogues interact, and that the complexes they form may explain the distinct phenotypes of the mutants as well as observed expression interdependency. Finally, we document the Rad51 paralogues that are encoded by a wide range of protists, demonstrating that the Rad51 paralogue repertoire in T. brucei is unusually large among microbial eukaryotes and that one member of the protein family corresponds with a key, conserved eukaryotic Rad51 paralogue. PMID:21615552

  13. Genetic architecture of trout from Albania as revealed by mtDNA control region variation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    To determine the genetic architecture of trout in Albania, 87 individuals were collected from 19 riverine and lacustrine sites in Albania, FYROM and Greece. All individuals were analyzed for sequence variation in the mtDNA control region. Among fourteen haplotypes detected, four previously unpublished haplotypes, bearing a close relationship to haplotypes of the Adriatic and marmoratus lineages of Salmo trutta, were revealed. Ten previously described haplotypes, characteristic of S. ohridanus, S. letnica and the Adriatic and Mediterranean lineages of S. trutta, were also detected. Haplotypes detected in this study were placed in a well supported branch of S. ohridanus, and a cluster of Mediterranean – Adriatic – marmoratus haplotypes, which were further delimited into three subdivisions of Mediterranean, marmoratus, and a previously non-described formation of four Adriatic haplotypes (Balkan cluster). Haplotypes of the Balkan cluster and the other Adriatic haplotypes, do not represent a contiguous haplotype lineage and appear not to be closely related, indicating independent arrivals into the Adriatic drainage and suggesting successive colonization events. Despite the presence of marmoratus haplotypes in Albania, no marbled phenotype was found, confirming previously reported findings that there is no association between this phenotype and marmoratus haplotypes. PMID:19284692

  14. Chloroplast DNA variation and geographical structure of the Aristolochia kaempferi group (Aristolochiaceae).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kana; Kajita, Tadashi; Murata, Jin

    2006-03-01

    The present study documents cpDNA variation in the Aristolochia kaempferi group (Aristolochiaceae), which consists of one Chinese and all Japanese and Taiwanese species of the subgenus Siphisia. In a phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of the matK gene, and the atpB-rbcL and trnS-trnG intergenic spacer regions, 38 haplotypes were recognized in the A. kaempferi group and as many as 24 within A. kaempferi. This is the most haplotypes reported for a single species to date. Although six highly significant major clades were identified in the phylogenetic analysis, they were not congruent with previous classifications. This might be attributed to the specific speciation process, such as convergent evolution, incomplete lineage sorting, and/or reticulate evolution. The six major clades had a clear geographical distribution pattern and were significantly associated with geographical distribution of haplotypes in a nested clade analysis and AMOVA. The results allow us to deduce a scenario in which multiple contractions and expansions of the geographical ranges brought about by Quaternary climatic oscillations affected the patterns of genetic diversity. The present geographic patterns of haplotype distribution within the A. kaempferi group can be explained by the last postglacial range expansion from different refugia, and the boundaries may be suture zones. PMID:21646203

  15. Interactions among Trypanosoma brucei RAD51 paralogues in DNA repair and antigenic variation.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Rachel; Stockdale, Christopher; Lapsley, Craig; Wilkes, Jonathan; McCulloch, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei is used for moving variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes into expression sites during immune evasion by antigenic variation. A major route for such VSG switching is gene conversion reactions in which RAD51, a universally conserved recombinase, catalyses homology-directed strand exchange. In any eukaryote, RAD51-directed strand exchange in vivo is mediated by further factors, including RAD51-related proteins termed Rad51 paralogues. These appear to be ubiquitously conserved, although their detailed roles in recombination remain unclear. In T. brucei, four putative RAD51 paralogue genes have been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that all four RAD51 paralogues act in DNA repair, recombination and RAD51 subnuclear dynamics, though not equivalently, while mutation of only one RAD51 paralogue gene significantly impedes VSG switching. We also show that the T. brucei RAD51 paralogues interact, and that the complexes they form may explain the distinct phenotypes of the mutants as well as observed expression interdependency. Finally, we document the Rad51 paralogues that are encoded by a wide range of protists, demonstrating that the Rad51 paralogue repertoire in T. brucei is unusually large among microbial eukaryotes and that one member of the protein family corresponds with a key, conserved eukaryotic Rad51 paralogue.

  16. Jagged1 DNA Copy Number Variation Is Associated with Poor Outcome in Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Honda, Masao; Yamashita, Taro; Okada, Hikari; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Nishikawa, Masashi; Nio, Kouki; Arai, Kuniaki; Sakai, Yoshio; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2016-08-01

    Notch signaling abnormalities are reported to be involved in the acceleration of malignancy in solid tumors and stem cell formation or regeneration in various organs. We analyzed specific genes for DNA copy number variations in liver cancer cells and investigated whether these factors relate to clinical outcome. Chromosome 20p, which includes the ligand for Notch pathways, Jagged1, was found to be amplified in several types of hepatoma cells, and its mRNA was up-regulated according to α-fetoprotein gene expression levels. Notch inhibition using Jagged1 shRNA and γ-secretase inhibitors produced significant suppression of cell growth in α-fetoprotein-producing cells with suppression of downstream genes. Using in vivo hepatoma models, the administration of γ-secretase inhibitors resulted in reduced tumor sizes and effective Notch inhibition with widespread apoptosis and necrosis of viable tumor cells. The γ-secretase inhibitors suppressed cell growth of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule-positive fraction in hepatoma cells, indicating that Notch inhibitors could suppress the stem cell features of liver cancer cells. Even in clinical liver cancer samples, the expression of α-fetoprotein and Jagged1 showed significant correlation, and amplification of the copy number of Jagged1 was associated with Jagged1 mRNA expression and poor survival after liver cancer surgical resection. In conclusion, amplification of Jagged1 contributed to mRNA expression that activates the Jagged1-Notch signaling pathway in liver cancer and led to poor outcome.

  17. Limited Contribution of DNA Methylation Variation to Expression Regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dazhe; Dubin, Manu; Zhang, Pei; Osborne, Edward J; Stegle, Oliver; Clark, Richard M; Nordborg, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The extent to which epigenetic variation affects complex traits in natural populations is not known. We addressed this question using transcriptome and DNA methylation data from a sample of 135 sequenced A. thaliana accessions. Across individuals, expression was significantly associated with cis-methylation for hundreds of genes, and many of these associations remained significant after taking SNP effects into account. The pattern of correlations differed markedly between gene body methylation and transposable element methylation. The former was usually positively correlated with expression, and the latter usually negatively correlated, although exceptions were found in both cases. Finally, we developed graphical models of causality that adapt to a sample with heavy population structure, and used them to show that while methylation appears to affect gene expression more often than expression affects methylation, there is also strong support for both being independently controlled. In conclusion, although we find clear evidence for epigenetic regulation, both the number of loci affected and the magnitude of the effects appear to be small compared to the effect of SNPs. PMID:27398721

  18. Limited Contribution of DNA Methylation Variation to Expression Regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Osborne, Edward J.; Stegle, Oliver; Clark, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which epigenetic variation affects complex traits in natural populations is not known. We addressed this question using transcriptome and DNA methylation data from a sample of 135 sequenced A. thaliana accessions. Across individuals, expression was significantly associated with cis-methylation for hundreds of genes, and many of these associations remained significant after taking SNP effects into account. The pattern of correlations differed markedly between gene body methylation and transposable element methylation. The former was usually positively correlated with expression, and the latter usually negatively correlated, although exceptions were found in both cases. Finally, we developed graphical models of causality that adapt to a sample with heavy population structure, and used them to show that while methylation appears to affect gene expression more often than expression affects methylation, there is also strong support for both being independently controlled. In conclusion, although we find clear evidence for epigenetic regulation, both the number of loci affected and the magnitude of the effects appear to be small compared to the effect of SNPs. PMID:27398721

  19. Genetic architecture of trout from Albania as revealed by mtDNA control region variation.

    PubMed

    Snoj, Ales; Marić, Sasa; Berrebi, Patrick; Crivelli, Alain J; Shumka, Spase; Susnik, Simona

    2009-02-02

    To determine the genetic architecture of trout in Albania, 87 individuals were collected from 19 riverine and lacustrine sites in Albania, FYROM and Greece. All individuals were analyzed for sequence variation in the mtDNA control region. Among fourteen haplotypes detected, four previously unpublished haplotypes, bearing a close relationship to haplotypes of the Adriatic and marmoratus lineages of Salmo trutta, were revealed. Ten previously described haplotypes, characteristic of S. ohridanus, S. letnica and the Adriatic and Mediterranean lineages of S. trutta, were also detected. Haplotypes detected in this study were placed in a well supported branch of S. ohridanus, and a cluster of Mediterranean-Adriatic-marmoratus haplotypes, which were further delimited into three subdivisions of Mediterranean, marmoratus, and a previously non-described formation of four Adriatic haplotypes (Balkan cluster). Haplotypes of the Balkan cluster and the other Adriatic haplotypes, do not represent a contiguous haplotype lineage and appear not to be closely related, indicating independent arrivals into the Adriatic drainage and suggesting successive colonization events. Despite the presence of marmoratus haplotypes in Albania, no marbled phenotype was found, confirming previously reported findings that there is no association between this phenotype and marmoratus haplotypes.

  20. Phylogenetic Relationships and Genetic Variation in Longidorus and Xiphinema Species (Nematoda: Longidoridae) Using ITS1 Sequences of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weimin; Szalanski, Allen L; Robbins, R T

    2004-03-01

    Genetic analyses using DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS1 were conducted to determine the extent of genetic variation within and among Longidorus and Xiphinema species. DNA sequences were obtained from samples collected from Arkansas, California and Australia as well as 4 Xiphinema DNA sequences from GenBank. The sequences of the ITS1 region including the 3' end of the 18S rDNA gene and the 5' end of the 5.8S rDNA gene ranged from 1020 bp to 1244 bp for the 9 Longidorus species, and from 870 bp to 1354 bp for the 7 Xiphinema species. Nucleotide frequencies were: A = 25.5%, C = 21.0%, G = 26.4%, and T = 27.1%. Genetic variation between the two genera had a maximum divergence of 38.6% between X. chambersi and L. crassus. Genetic variation among Xiphinema species ranged from 3.8% between X. diversicaudatum and X. bakeri to 29.9% between X. chambersi and X. italiae. Within Longidorus, genetic variation ranged from 8.9% between L. crassus and L. grandis to 32.4% between L. fragilis and L. diadecturus. Intraspecific genetic variation in X. americanum sensu lato ranged from 0.3% to 1.9%, while genetic variation in L. diadecturus had 0.8% and L. biformis ranged from 0.6% to 10.9%. Identical sequences were obtained between the two populations of L. grandis, and between the two populations of X. bakeri. Phylogenetic analyses based on the ITS1 DNA sequence data were conducted on each genus separately using both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analysis. Among the Longidorus taxa, 4 subgroups are supported: L. grandis, L. crassus, and L. elongatus are in one cluster; L. biformis and L. paralongicaudatus are in a second cluster; L. fragilis and L. breviannulatus are in a third cluster; and L. diadecturus is in a fourth cluster. Among the Xiphinema taxa, 3 subgroups are supported: X. americanum with X. chambersi, X. bakeri with X. diversicaudatum, and X. italiae and X. vuittenezi forming a sister group with X. index. The relationships observed in this study

  1. Genetic variation and population differentiation of Michelia formosana (Magnoliaceae) based on cpDNA variation and RAPD fingerprints: relevance to post-Pleistocene recolonization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng-You; Hong, Kuo-Hsiang; Liu, Show-Ling; Cheng, Yu-Pin; Wu, Wen-Luan; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh

    2002-06-01

    We used sequence variation of the atpB- rbcL intergenic spacer of cpDNA and nested clade analysis to assess the phylogeographic pattern of Michelia formosana, a species restricted to Taiwan and the Ryukyus. In total, 31 haplotypes were identified and clustered into four major chlorotypes. Genetic composition of nearly all populations was heterogeneous and paraphyletic phylogenetically. Although the apportionment of cpDNA variation hardly revealed a geographic pattern due to the coancestry of dominant sequences, some chlorotypes were restrictedly distributed. According to the patterns of clade dispersion and displacement, a reconstructed minimum spanning network revealed that historical events of past fragmentation and range expansion, associated with glaciation, may have shaped the phylogeographic patterns of M. formosana. Four possible refugia were identified: the Iriomote and Ishigaki Islands (the southern Ryukyus), Wulai (northern Taiwan), and Nanjen (southern Taiwan), on the basis of the interior positions of their haplotypes in the network and the high level of nucleotide diversity. Given insufficient time for coalescence at the cpDNA locus since the late Pleistocene recolonization, lineage sorting led to low levels of genetic differentiation among populations. In contrast, hierarchical examination of the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) data scored from six populations across three geographical regions, using an analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), indicated high genetic differentiation both among populations (Phi(ST) = 0.471) and among regions (Phi(CT) = 0.368). An unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) tree of the RAPD fingerprints revealed that populations of two offshore islands of eastern Taiwan ( M. formosana var. kotoensis) were clustered with geographically remote populations of the Ryukyus instead of those in southern Taiwan, suggesting some historical division due to geographic barriers of the central mountain range. In

  2. Linearisation of λDNA molecules by instantaneous variation of the trapping electrode voltage inside a micro-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Yukimoto, Naoya; Uehara, Satoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Because long DNA molecules usually exist in random coil states due to the entropic effect, linearisation is required for devices equipped with nanopores where electrical sequencing is necessary during single-file translocation. We present a novel technique for linearising DNA molecules in a micro-channel. In our device, electrodes are embedded in the bottom surface of the channel. The application of a voltage induces the trapping of λDNA molecules on the positive electrode. An instantaneous voltage drop is used to put the λDNA molecules in a partly released state and the hydrodynamic force of the solution induces linearisation. Phenomena were directly observed using an optical microscopy system equipped with a high-speed camera and the linearisation principle was explored in detail. Furthermore, we estimate the tensile characteristics produced by the flow of the solution through a numerical model of a tethered polymer subject to a Poiseuille flow. The mean tensile force is in the range of 0.1-1 pN. This is sufficiently smaller than the structural transition point of λDNA but counterbalances the entropic elasticity that causes the random coil shape of λDNA molecules in solution. We show the important role of thermal fluctuation in the manipulation of molecules in solution and clarify the tensile conditions required for DNA linearisation using a combination of solution flow and voltage variation in a microchannel.

  3. Contrasting patterns of Y chromosome and mtDNA variation in Africa: evidence for sex-biased demographic processes.

    PubMed

    Wood, Elizabeth T; Stover, Daryn A; Ehret, Christopher; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Spedini, Gabriella; McLeod, Howard; Louie, Leslie; Bamshad, Mike; Strassmann, Beverly I; Soodyall, Himla; Hammer, Michael F

    2005-07-01

    To investigate associations between genetic, linguistic, and geographic variation in Africa, we type 50 Y chromosome SNPs in 1122 individuals from 40 populations representing African geographic and linguistic diversity. We compare these patterns of variation with those that emerge from a similar analysis of published mtDNA HVS1 sequences from 1918 individuals from 39 African populations. For the Y chromosome, Mantel tests reveal a strong partial correlation between genetic and linguistic distances (r=0.33, P=0.001) and no correlation between genetic and geographic distances (r=-0.08, P>0.10). In contrast, mtDNA variation is weakly correlated with both language (r=0.16, P=0.046) and geography (r=0.17, P=0.035). AMOVA indicates that the amount of paternal among-group variation is much higher when populations are grouped by linguistics (Phi(CT)=0.21) than by geography (Phi(CT)=0.06). Levels of maternal genetic among-group variation are low for both linguistics and geography (Phi(CT)=0.03 and 0.04, respectively). When Bantu speakers are removed from these analyses, the correlation with linguistic variation disappears for the Y chromosome and strengthens for mtDNA. These data suggest that patterns of differentiation and gene flow in Africa have differed for men and women in the recent evolutionary past. We infer that sex-biased rates of admixture and/or language borrowing between expanding Bantu farmers and local hunter-gatherers played an important role in influencing patterns of genetic variation during the spread of African agriculture in the last 4000 years.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA variation and phylogenetic relationships among five tuna species based on sequencing of D-loop region.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Girish; Kocour, Martin; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan

    2016-05-01

    In order to assess the DNA sequence variation and phylogenetic relationship among five tuna species (Auxis thazard, Euthynnus affinis, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus tonggol, and T. albacares) out of all four tuna genera, partial sequences of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region were analyzed. The estimate of intra-specific sequence variation in studied species was low, ranging from 0.027 to 0.080 [Kimura's two parameter distance (K2P)], whereas values of inter-specific variation ranged from 0.049 to 0.491. The longtail tuna (T. tonggol) and yellowfin tuna (T. albacares) were found to share a close relationship (K2P = 0.049) while skipjack tuna (K. pelamis) was most divergent studied species. Phylogenetic analysis using Maximum-Likelihood (ML) and Neighbor-Joining (NJ) methods supported the monophyletic origin of Thunnus species. Similarly, phylogeny of Auxis and Euthynnus species substantiate the monophyly. However, results showed a distinct origin of K. pelamis from genus Thunnus as well as Auxis and Euthynnus. Thus, the mtDNA D-loop region sequence data supports the polyphyletic origin of tuna species. PMID:25329285

  5. Anthocyanin Inhibits Propidium Iodide DNA Fluorescence in Euphorbia pulcherrima: Implications for Genome Size Variation and Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael D.; Price, H. James; Johnston, J. Spencer

    2008-01-01

    Background Measuring genome size by flow cytometry assumes direct proportionality between nuclear DNA staining and DNA amount. By 1997 it was recognized that secondary metabolites may affect DNA staining, thereby causing inaccuracy. Here experiments are reported with poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) with green leaves and red bracts rich in phenolics. Methods DNA content was estimated as fluorescence of propidium iodide (PI)-stained nuclei of poinsettia and/or pea (Pisum sativum) using flow cytometry. Tissue was chopped, or two tissues co-chopped, in Galbraith buffer alone or with six concentrations of cyanidin-3-rutinoside (a cyanidin-3-rhamnoglucoside contributing to red coloration in poinsettia). Key Results There were large differences in PI staining (35–70 %) between 2C nuclei from green leaf and red bract tissue in poinsettia. These largely disappeared when pea leaflets were co-chopped with poinsettia tissue as an internal standard. However, smaller (2·8–6·9 %) differences remained, and red bracts gave significantly lower 1C genome size estimates (1·69–1·76 pg) than green leaves (1·81 pg). Chopping pea or poinsettia tissue in buffer with 0–200 µm cyanidin-3-rutinoside showed that the effects of natural inhibitors in red bracts of poinsettia on PI staining were largely reproduced in a dose-dependent way by this anthocyanin. Conclusions Given their near-ubiquitous distribution, many suspected roles and known affects on DNA staining, anthocyanins are a potent, potential cause of significant error variation in genome size estimations for many plant tissues and taxa. This has important implications of wide practical and theoretical significance. When choosing genome size calibration standards it seems prudent to select materials producing little or no anthocyanin. Reviewing the literature identifies clear examples in which claims of intraspecific variation in genome size are probably artefacts caused by natural variation in anthocyanin levels or

  6. Loss of Genetic Variation in Laboratory Colonies of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Revealed by Mitochondrial and Microsatellite DNA Markers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yudi; Han, Lanzhi; Hou, Maolin

    2015-02-01

    The Asiatic rice borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is an important insect pest of rice in China. The genetic variation of a set of laboratory colonies of C. suppressalis was compared with their source populations in the wild (laboratory colonies BJCK, BJ1AB, and BJ1AC versus wild population BJW; laboratory colonies FZCK and FZ1CA versus wild population FZW) and was analyzed using eight microsatellite markers and two partial mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) regions (COI and COII). Results from both analyses revealed similar patterns. Microsatellite DNA analysis showed that the two wild populations (BJW and FZW) harbored more private alleles and had higher levels of gene diversity, and observed and expected heterozygosity, compared with the laboratory colonies. Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed that the two wild populations (BJW and FZW) had higher numbers of haplotypes compared with the five laboratory colonies. The three Beijing laboratory-reared colonies (BJ1CK, BJ1AB, and BJ1AC) had one fixed haplotype (H04). Most of the pairwise FST values based on mtDNA were high and all pairwise FST comparisons based on microsatellite DNA were significant, which indicated that the significant differences between these colonies and populations. Genetic drift caused by several factors, such as founder effect, small effective population size, rearing protocols, and inbreeding, can contribute to the rapid loss of genetic variation and affect the distribution of alleles and haplotypes. Therefore, it is necessary to increase the sample size of source populations to prevent the loss of genetic variation and genetic differentiation between different colonies. PMID:26308808

  7. Transgenerational Variations in DNA Methylation Induced by Drought Stress in Two Rice Varieties with Distinguished Difference to Drought Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingshou; Lou, Qiaojun; Xia, Hui; Wang, Pei; Li, Tiemei; Liu, Hongyan; Luo, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Adverse environmental conditions have large impacts on plant growth and crop production. One of the crucial mechanisms that plants use in variable and stressful natural environments is gene expression modulation through epigenetic modification. In this study, two rice varieties with different drought resistance levels were cultivated under drought stress from tilling stage to seed filling stage for six successive generations. The variations in DNA methylation of the original generation (G0) and the sixth generation (G6) of these two varieties in normal condition (CK) and under drought stress (DT) at seedling stage were assessed by using Methylation Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism (MSAP) method. The results revealed that drought stress had a cumulative effect on the DNA methylation pattern of both varieties, but these two varieties had different responses to drought stress in DNA methylation. The DNA methylation levels of II-32B (sensitive) and Huhan-3 (resistant) were around 39% and 32%, respectively. Genome-wide DNA methylation variations among generations or treatments accounted for around 13.1% of total MSAP loci in II-32B, but was only approximately 1.3% in Huhan-3. In II-32B, 27.6% of total differentially methylated loci (DML) were directly induced by drought stress and 3.2% of total DML stably transmitted their changed DNA methylation status to the next generation. In Huhan-3, the numbers were 48.8% and 29.8%, respectively. Therefore, entrainment had greater effect on Huhan-3 than on II-32B. Sequence analysis revealed that the DML were widely distributed on all 12 rice chromosomes and that it mainly occurred on the gene’s promoter and exon region. Some genes with DML respond to environmental stresses. The inheritance of epigenetic variations induced by drought stress may provide a new way to develop drought resistant rice varieties. PMID:24244664

  8. Fin whale MDH-1 and MPI allozyme variation is not reflected in the corresponding DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Morten Tange; Pampoulie, Christophe; Daníelsdóttir, Anna K; Lidh, Emmelie; Bérubé, Martine; Víkingsson, Gísli A; Palsbøll, Per J

    2014-01-01

    The appeal of genetic inference methods to assess population genetic structure and guide management efforts is grounded in the correlation between the genetic similarity and gene flow among populations. Effects of such gene flow are typically genomewide; however, some loci may appear as outliers, displaying above or below average genetic divergence relative to the genomewide level. Above average population, genetic divergence may be due to divergent selection as a result of local adaptation. Consequently, substantial efforts have been directed toward such outlying loci in order to identify traits subject to local adaptation. Here, we report the results of an investigation into the molecular basis of the substantial degree of genetic divergence previously reported at allozyme loci among North Atlantic fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) populations. We sequenced the exons encoding for the two most divergent allozyme loci (MDH-1 and MPI) and failed to detect any nonsynonymous substitutions. Following extensive error checking and analysis of additional bioinformatic and morphological data, we hypothesize that the observed allozyme polymorphisms may reflect phenotypic plasticity at the cellular level, perhaps as a response to nutritional stress. While such plasticity is intriguing in itself, and of fundamental evolutionary interest, our key finding is that the observed allozyme variation does not appear to be a result of genetic drift, migration, or selection on the MDH-1 and MPI exons themselves, stressing the importance of interpreting allozyme data with caution. As for North Atlantic fin whale population structure, our findings support the low levels of differentiation found in previous analyses of DNA nucleotide loci. PMID:24963377

  9. Mitochondrial DNA variation of the common hippopotamus: evidence for a recent population expansion.

    PubMed

    Okello, J B A; Nyakaana, S; Masembe, C; Siegismund, H R; Arctander, P

    2005-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA control region sequence variation was obtained and the population history of the common hippopotamus was inferred from 109 individuals from 13 localities covering six populations in sub-Saharan Africa. In all, 100 haplotypes were defined, of which 98 were locality specific. A relatively low overall nucleotide diversity was observed (pi = 1.9%), as compared to other large mammals so far studied from the same region. Within populations, nucleotide diversity varied from 1.52% in Zambia to 1.92% in Queen Elizabeth and Masai Mara. Overall, low but significant genetic differentiation was observed in the total data set (F(ST) = 0.138; P = 0.001), and at the population level, patterns of differentiation support previously suggested hippopotamus subspecies designations (F(CT) = 0.103; P = 0.015). Evidence that the common hippopotamus recently expanded were revealed by: (i) lack of clear geographical structure among haplotypes, (ii) mismatch distributions of pairwise differences (r = 0.0053; P = 0.012) and site-frequency spectra, (iii) Fu's neutrality statistics (F(S) = -155.409; P < 0.00001) and (iv) Fu and Li's statistical tests (D* = -3.191; P < 0.01, F* = -2.668; P = 0.01). Mismatch distributions, site-frequency spectra and neutrality statistics performed at subspecies level also supported expansion of Hippopotamus amphibius across Africa. We interpret observed common hippopotamus population history in terms of Pleistocene drainage overflow and suggest recognising the three subspecies that were sampled in this study as separate management units in future conservation planning.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA variation of the common hippopotamus: evidence for a recent population expansion.

    PubMed

    Okello, J B A; Nyakaana, S; Masembe, C; Siegismund, H R; Arctander, P

    2005-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA control region sequence variation was obtained and the population history of the common hippopotamus was inferred from 109 individuals from 13 localities covering six populations in sub-Saharan Africa. In all, 100 haplotypes were defined, of which 98 were locality specific. A relatively low overall nucleotide diversity was observed (pi = 1.9%), as compared to other large mammals so far studied from the same region. Within populations, nucleotide diversity varied from 1.52% in Zambia to 1.92% in Queen Elizabeth and Masai Mara. Overall, low but significant genetic differentiation was observed in the total data set (F(ST) = 0.138; P = 0.001), and at the population level, patterns of differentiation support previously suggested hippopotamus subspecies designations (F(CT) = 0.103; P = 0.015). Evidence that the common hippopotamus recently expanded were revealed by: (i) lack of clear geographical structure among haplotypes, (ii) mismatch distributions of pairwise differences (r = 0.0053; P = 0.012) and site-frequency spectra, (iii) Fu's neutrality statistics (F(S) = -155.409; P < 0.00001) and (iv) Fu and Li's statistical tests (D* = -3.191; P < 0.01, F* = -2.668; P = 0.01). Mismatch distributions, site-frequency spectra and neutrality statistics performed at subspecies level also supported expansion of Hippopotamus amphibius across Africa. We interpret observed common hippopotamus population history in terms of Pleistocene drainage overflow and suggest recognising the three subspecies that were sampled in this study as separate management units in future conservation planning. PMID:16030528

  11. Cryptic intercontinental colonization in water fleas Daphnia pulicaria inferred from phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Marková, Silvia; Dufresne, France; Rees, David J; Cerný, Martin; Kotlík, Petr

    2007-07-01

    The water fleas of the Daphnia pulex complex play a key role in freshwater ecosystems throughout the northern hemisphere. Despite the fact that they have been the subject of study for numerous biological disciplines, their phylogeny and species delimitation remain controversial. We used DNA sequence variation of the mitochondrial ND5 gene to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of D. pulicaria Forbes, a widespread member of this complex from North America and Europe. Populations from the two continents respectively split into two evolutionary lineages, Eastern Nearctic and European, which each belong to another main clade within the D. pulex complex (the pulicaria and tenebrosa groups, respectively). Unexpectedly, melanin and carotenoid pigmented D. pulicaria populations from European high-mountain lakes were not allied with the transparent populations inhabiting the same lakes and the lowland ponds and reservoirs throughout Europe, but were included with the samples from Canada and Greenland in the Eastern Nearctic lineage. Until now populations belonging to this lineage were known only from Canada and North Atlantic islands, but not from mainland Europe. Independent data from microsatellite markers supported the genetic distinctiveness of the sympatric carotenoid pigmented and transparent populations and suggested that they may have undergone transition to obligate parthenogenesis, possibly as a consequence of past introgressive hybridization. Two different taxa are therefore confused under the name D. pulicaria in Europe. The close phylogenetic relationships of European populations with those from Canada and Greenland suggest that the Nearctic lineage is of recent origin in Europe via intercontinental dispersal from the North America. It has evolved melanin and carotenoid pigmentation as adaptations against the UV light stress, which enable it to share habitat occupied by the transparent European species. The Nearctic D. pulicaria thus provides a new model

  12. Jagged1 DNA Copy Number Variation Is Associated with Poor Outcome in Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Honda, Masao; Yamashita, Taro; Okada, Hikari; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Nishikawa, Masashi; Nio, Kouki; Arai, Kuniaki; Sakai, Yoshio; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2016-08-01

    Notch signaling abnormalities are reported to be involved in the acceleration of malignancy in solid tumors and stem cell formation or regeneration in various organs. We analyzed specific genes for DNA copy number variations in liver cancer cells and investigated whether these factors relate to clinical outcome. Chromosome 20p, which includes the ligand for Notch pathways, Jagged1, was found to be amplified in several types of hepatoma cells, and its mRNA was up-regulated according to α-fetoprotein gene expression levels. Notch inhibition using Jagged1 shRNA and γ-secretase inhibitors produced significant suppression of cell growth in α-fetoprotein-producing cells with suppression of downstream genes. Using in vivo hepatoma models, the administration of γ-secretase inhibitors resulted in reduced tumor sizes and effective Notch inhibition with widespread apoptosis and necrosis of viable tumor cells. The γ-secretase inhibitors suppressed cell growth of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule-positive fraction in hepatoma cells, indicating that Notch inhibitors could suppress the stem cell features of liver cancer cells. Even in clinical liver cancer samples, the expression of α-fetoprotein and Jagged1 showed significant correlation, and amplification of the copy number of Jagged1 was associated with Jagged1 mRNA expression and poor survival after liver cancer surgical resection. In conclusion, amplification of Jagged1 contributed to mRNA expression that activates the Jagged1-Notch signaling pathway in liver cancer and led to poor outcome. PMID:27315779

  13. Genetic variation at mtDNA and microsatellite loci in Chinese longsnout catfish (Leiocassis longirostris).

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Xiao, Mingsong; Yu, Yanyan; Xu, Shixia

    2012-04-01

    Genetic variability and population structure of the Chinese longsnout catfish Leiocassis longirostris Günther in the Yangtze River was examined with mitochondrial control region sequences and nuclear microsatellite markers. A 705-bp segment of the mitochondrial DNA control region was sequenced from 132 samples, which identified a total of 61 haplotypes. The Chinese longsnout catfish in the Yangtze River was characterized with high haplotype diversity (h = 0.9770 ± 0.0041) but low nucleotide diversity (π = 0.0081 ± 0.0043). Median-joining network analysis revealed a star-shaped pattern and mismatch distribution analysis found a smooth unimodal distribution, which suggested that this species in the Yangtze River underwent a population expansion following bottlenecks and/or they originated from a small size of founding population. It was estimated that the possible time of population expansion was 139,000-435,000 years before present, a time period in the middle Pleistocene. The analysis of molecular variance and phylogenetic reconstructions did not detect significant geographic structure between different river sections. This pattern of genetic variation was further evidenced with nuclear microsatellite markers. The genetic differentiation between above and below the Gezhouba Dam and Three Gorges Dam is very small at mitochondrial and nuclear levels, which suggested that these recently developed dams might have not significantly resulted in population genetic fragmentation in the Chinese longsnout catfish. However, the potential exacerbation of genetic structuring by the dams should not be overlooked in the future. PMID:21947845

  14. Taiwan Y-chromosomal DNA variation and its relationship with Island Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Much of the data resolution of the haploid non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) haplogroup O in East Asia are still rudimentary and could be an explanatory factor for current debates on the settlement history of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA). Here, 81 slowly evolving markers (mostly SNPs) and 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats were used to achieve higher level molecular resolution. Our aim is to investigate if the distribution of NRY DNA variation in Taiwan and ISEA is consistent with a single pre-Neolithic expansion scenario from Southeast China to all ISEA, or if it better fits an expansion model from Taiwan (the OOT model), or whether a more complex history of settlement and dispersals throughout ISEA should be envisioned. Results We examined DNA samples from 1658 individuals from Vietnam, Thailand, Fujian, Taiwan (Han, plain tribes and 14 indigenous groups), the Philippines and Indonesia. While haplogroups O1a*-M119, O1a1*-P203, O1a2-M50 and O3a2-P201 follow a decreasing cline from Taiwan towards Western Indonesia, O2a1-M95/M88, O3a*-M324, O3a1c-IMS-JST002611 and O3a2c1a-M133 decline northward from Western Indonesia towards Taiwan. Compared to the Taiwan plain tribe minority groups the Taiwanese Austronesian speaking groups show little genetic paternal contribution from Han. They are also characterized by low Y-chromosome diversity, thus testifying for fast drift in these populations. However, in contrast to data provided from other regions of the genome, Y-chromosome gene diversity in Taiwan mountain tribes significantly increases from North to South. Conclusion The geographic distribution and the diversity accumulated in the O1a*-M119, O1a1*-P203, O1a2-M50 and O3a2-P201 haplogroups on one hand, and in the O2a1-M95/M88, O3a*-M324, O3a1c-IMS-JST002611 and O3a2c1a-M133 haplogroups on the other, support a pincer model of dispersals and gene flow from the mainland to the islands which likely started during the late upper Paleolithic, 18,000 to 15

  15. Population and forensic genetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA control region variation from six major provinces in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Beom; Kim, Ki Cheol; Kim, Wook

    2015-07-01

    We generated complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 704 unrelated individuals residing in six major provinces in Korea. In addition to our earlier survey of the distribution of mtDNA haplogroup variation, a total of 560 different haplotypes characterized by 271 polymorphic sites were identified, of which 473 haplotypes were unique. The gene diversity and random match probability were 0.9989 and 0.0025, respectively. According to the pairwise comparison of the 704 control region sequences, the mean number of pairwise differences between individuals was 13.47±6.06. Based on the result of mtDNA control region sequences, pairwise FST genetic distances revealed genetic homogeneity of the Korean provinces on a peninsular level, except in samples from Jeju Island. This result indicates there may be a need to formulate a local mtDNA database for Jeju Island, to avoid bias in forensic parameter estimates caused by genetic heterogeneity of the population. Thus, the present data may help not only in personal identification but also in determining maternal lineages to provide an expanded and reliable Korean mtDNA database. These data will be available on the EMPOP database via accession number EMP00661.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA variation in chinook salmon and chum salmon detected by restriction enzyme analysis of polymerase chain reaction products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, M.; Spearman, R.; Wilmot, R.; Patton, J.; Bickman, J.

    1993-01-01

    We analyze intraspecific mitochondrial DNA variation in chinook salmon from drainages in the Yukon River, the Kenai River, and Oregon and California rivers; and chum salmon from the Yukon River and vancouver Island, and Washington rivers. For each species, three different portions of the mtDNA molecule were amplified seperately using the polymerase chain reaction and then digested with at least 19 restrictions enzymes. Intraspecific sequence divergences between haplotypes were less than 0.01 base subsitution per nucleotide. Nine chum salmon haplotypes were identified. Yukon River chum salmon stocks displayed more haplotypes (8) occurred in all areas. Seven chinook salmon haplotypes were identified. Four haplotypes occurred in the Yukon and Kenai rviers and four occured in the Oregon/California, with only one haplotype shared between the regions. Sample sizes were too small to quantify the degree of stock seperation among drainages, but the patterns of variation that we observed suggest utility of the technique in genetic stock identification.

  17. Variation in nuclear DNA content in Malus species and cultivated apples.

    PubMed

    Tatum, Tatiana C; Stepanovic, Svetlana; Biradar, D P; Rayburn, A Lane; Korban, Schuyler S

    2005-10-01

    The nuclear DNA content for a group of 40 Malus species and hybrids has been estimated using flow cytometry. Estimates of nuclear DNA content for this germplasm collection range from 1.45 pg for Malus fusca (diploid) to 2.57 pg for Malus ioensis (triploid). Among diploids, the nuclear (2C) DNA ranges from 1.45 pg for M. fusca to 1.68 pg for Malus transitoria. Among triploids, the nuclear (3C) DNA content ranges from 2.37 pg / 3C for Malus sikkimensis to 2.57 pg / 3C for M. ioensis. Given the complexity of the apple genome and its suggested allopolyploid origin, the results obtained in this study confirm earlier reports that polyploids can easily withstand the loss of a certain amount of DNA, and that there is a slight tendency towards diminished haploid nuclear DNA content with increased polyploidy.

  18. Nuclear Ribosomal DNA Variation and Pathogenic Specialization in Alternaria Fungi Known To Produce Host-Specific Toxins †

    PubMed Central

    Kusaba, Motoaki; Tsuge, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    A total of 99 strains of 11 Alternaria species, including 68 strains of seven fungi known to produce host-specific toxins, were subjected to analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Total DNA was digested with XbaI, and the Southern blots were probed with a nuclear rDNA clone of Alternaria kikuchiana. The hybridization gave 17 different RFLPs from the 99 strains. On the basis of these RFLPs, populations of host-specific toxin-producing fungi could not be differentiated from one another nor from nonpathogenic A. alternata. Each population of the toxin-producing fungi carried rDNA variants. Nine different types, named A1 to A6 and B1 to B3, were detected among the toxin-producing fungi and nonpathogenic A. alternata. All of the populations contained the type A4 variant, and the other rDNA types were also shared by different toxin-producing fungi and A. alternata. In contrast, Alternaria species that are morphologically distinguishable from A. alternata could be differentiated from A. alternata on the basis of the rDNA RFLPs. Polymorphisms in rDNA digested with HaeIII and MspI were also evaluated in 61 Alternaria strains. These restriction enzymes produced 31 variations among all of the samples. The seven toxin-producing fungi and nonpathogenic A. alternata could not be resolved by phylogenetic analysis based on the RFLPs, although they could be differentiated from the other Alternaria species studied. These results provide support for the hypothesis that Alternaria fungi known to produce host-specific toxins are intraspecific variants of A. alternata specialized in pathogenicity. Images PMID:16349367

  19. The use of high-throughput DNA sequencing in the investigation of antigenic variation: application to Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Davies, John K; Harrison, Paul F; Lin, Ya-Hsun; Bartley, Stephanie; Khoo, Chen Ai; Seemann, Torsten; Ryan, Catherine S; Kahler, Charlene M; Hill, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Antigenic variation occurs in a broad range of species. This process resembles gene conversion in that variant DNA is unidirectionally transferred from partial gene copies (or silent loci) into an expression locus. Previous studies of antigenic variation have involved the amplification and sequencing of individual genes from hundreds of colonies. Using the pilE gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae we have demonstrated that it is possible to use PCR amplification, followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing and a novel assembly process, to detect individual antigenic variation events. The ability to detect these events was much greater than has previously been possible. In N. gonorrhoeae most silent loci contain multiple partial gene copies. Here we show that there is a bias towards using the copy at the 3' end of the silent loci (copy 1) as the donor sequence. The pilE gene of N. gonorrhoeae and some strains of Neisseria meningitidis encode class I pilin, but strains of N. meningitidis from clonal complexes 8 and 11 encode a class II pilin. We have confirmed that the class II pili of meningococcal strain FAM18 (clonal complex 11) are non-variable, and this is also true for the class II pili of strain NMB from clonal complex 8. In addition when a gene encoding class I pilin was moved into the meningococcal strain NMB background there was no evidence of antigenic variation. Finally we investigated several members of the opa gene family of N. gonorrhoeae, where it has been suggested that limited variation occurs. Variation was detected in the opaK gene that is located close to pilE, but not at the opaJ gene located elsewhere on the genome. The approach described here promises to dramatically improve studies of the extent and nature of antigenic variation systems in a variety of species.

  20. Evidence from pyrosequencing indicates that natural variation in animal personality is associated with DRD4 DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Verhulst, Eveline C; Mateman, A Christa; Zwier, Mathijs V; Caro, Samuel P; Verhoeven, Koen J F; van Oers, Kees

    2016-04-01

    Personality traits are heritable and respond to natural selection, but are at the same time influenced by the ontogenetic environment. Epigenetic effects, such as DNA methylation, have been proposed as a key mechanism to control personality variation. However, to date little is known about the contribution of epigenetic effects to natural variation in behaviour. Here, we show that great tit (Parus major) lines artificially selected for divergent exploratory behaviour for four generations differ in their DNA methylation levels at the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene. This D4 receptor is statistically associated with personality traits in both humans and nonhuman animals, including the great tit. Previous work in this songbird failed to detect functional genetic polymorphisms within DRD4 that could account for the gene-trait association. However, our observation supports the idea that DRD4 is functionally involved in exploratory behaviour but that its effects are mediated by DNA methylation. While the exact mechanism underlying the transgenerational consistency of DRD4 methylation remains to be elucidated, this study shows that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in shaping natural variation in personality traits. We outline how this first finding provides a basis for investigating the epigenetic contribution to personality traits in natural systems and its subsequent role for understanding the ecology and evolution of behavioural consistency.

  1. Global Patterns in Human Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Variation Caused by Spatial Instability of the Local Cultural Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikrant; Langstieh, Banrida T; Madhavi, Komal V; Naidu, Vegi M; Singh, Hardeep Pal; Biswas, Silpak; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Singh, Lalji; Reddy, B. Mohan

    2006-01-01

    Because of the widespread phenomenon of patrilocality, it is hypothesized that Y-chromosome variants tend to be more localized geographically than those of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Empirical evidence confirmatory to this hypothesis was subsequently provided among certain patrilocal and matrilocal groups of Thailand, which conforms to the isolation by distance mode of gene diffusion. However, we expect intuitively that the patterns of genetic variability may not be consistent with the above hypothesis among populations with different social norms governing the institution of marriage, particularly among those that adhere to strict endogamy rules. We test the universality of this hypothesis by analyzing Y-chromosome and mtDNA data in three different sets of Indian populations that follow endogamy rules to varying degrees. Our analysis of the Indian patrilocal and the matrilocal groups is not confirmatory to the sex-specific variation observed among the tribes of Thailand. Our results indicate spatial instability of the impact of different cultural processes on the genetic variability, resulting in the lack of universality of the hypothesized pattern of greater Y-chromosome variation when compared to that of mtDNA among the patrilocal populations. PMID:16617372

  2. Comparative phylogeography of four component species of deciduous broad-leaved forests in Japan based on chloroplast DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takaya; Aoki, Kyoko; Seo, Akihiro; Murakami, Noriaki

    2012-03-01

    A phylogeographic study of four tree species (Padus grayana, Euonymus oxyphyllus, Magnolia hypoleuca, and Carpinus laxiflora) growing in Japanese deciduous broad-leaved forests was conducted based on chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variations. Using nucleotide sequences of 702-1,059 bp of intergenic spacers of cpDNA, 20, 27, eight, and eight haplotypes were detected among 251, 251, 226, and 262 individuals sampled from 67, 79, 75, and 71 populations of the above species, respectively. The geographical pattern of the cpDNA variations was highly structured in each species, and the following three regional populations were genetically highly differentiated among all four species: (1) the Sea of Japan-side area, (2) the Kanto region, and (3) southwestern Japan. Based on some interspecific similarities among the phylogeographic patterns, the following migration scenario of Japanese deciduous broad-leaved forests was postulated. During the last glacial maximum (LGM), the forests were separately distributed in six regions. After LGM, as the climate warmed, the forests in eastern Japan separately expanded from each of the refugia along the Sea of Japan-side or along the Pacific Ocean-side. In contrast, those in southwestern Japan retreated and moved to high altitudes from each of the continuous forests.

  3. Chloroplast and Mitochondrial DNA Variation in HORDEUM VULGARE and HORDEUM SPONTANEUM

    PubMed Central

    Holwerda, Barry C.; Jana, Sakti; Crosby, William L.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of restriction fragment polymorphism in Hordeum vulgare and Hordeum spontaneum was made using 17 and 16 hexanucleotide restriction endonucleases on chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA, respectively. The plant accessions originated from various places throughout the Fertile Cresent and Mediterranean. The types of changes in cpDNA consisted of nucleotide substitutions and insertions and deletions on the order of 100 base pairs. In contrast, mtDNA has most likely undergone larger insertions and deletions of up to 20 kilobase pairs in addition to rearrangements. Grouping of mtDNA fragment data showed that in some cases geographical affinities existed between the two species, whereas in others there were no clear affinities. Nucleotide diversity estimates derived from the restriction fragment data were used in a number of comparisons of variability. Comparisons of overall mtDNA variability (nucleotide diversity = 9.68 x 10-4) with cpDNA variability (nucleotide diversity = 6.38 x 10-4 ) indicated that the former are somewhat more variable. Furthermore, there was no indication that the wild H. spontaneum (cpDNA diversity = 5.57 x 10-4; mtDNA diversity = 6.04 x 10 -4) was more variable than the land races of H. vulgare (cpDNA diversity = 5.88 x 10-4; mtDNA diversity = 9.79 x 10-4). In fact, on the basis of mtDNA diversity, H. vulgare was the more variable species. Comparison of organelle nucleotide diversity estimates with an estimate of nuclear nucleotide diversity derived from existing isozyme data provided evidence that both organelle genomes are evolving at a slower rate than the nuclear genome. PMID:17246361

  4. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-02-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable 'UU172 element' from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses.

  5. Variation in ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences demonstrates the existence of intraspecific groups in Paramecium multimicronucleatum (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea).

    PubMed

    Tarcz, Sebastian; Potekhin, Alexey; Rautian, Maria; Przyboś, Ewa

    2012-05-01

    This is the first phylogenetic study of the intraspecific variability within Paramecium multimicronucleatum with the application of two-loci analysis (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-5'LSU rDNA and COI mtDNA) carried out on numerous strains originated from different continents. The species has been shown to have a complex structure of several sibling species within taxonomic species. Our analysis revealed the existence of 10 haplotypes for the rDNA fragment and 15 haplotypes for the COI fragment in the studied material. The mean distance for all of the studied P. multimicronucleatum sequence pairs was p=0.025/0.082 (rDNA/COI). Despite the greater variation of the COI fragment, the COI-derived tree topology is similar to the tree topology constructed on the basis of the rDNA fragment. P. multimicronucleatum strains are divided into three main clades. The tree based on COI fragment analysis presents a greater resolution of the studied P. multimicronucleatum strains. Our results indicate that the strains of P. multimicronucleatum that appear in different clades on the trees could belong to different syngens.

  6. Analysis of sequence variations in several human genes using phosphoramidite bond DNA fragmentation and chip-based MALDI-TOF.

    PubMed

    Smylie, Kevin J; Cantor, Charles R; Denissenko, Mikhail F

    2004-01-01

    The challenge in the postgenome era is to measure sequence variations over large genomic regions in numerous patient samples. This massive amount of work can only be completed if more accurate, cost-effective, and high-throughput solutions become available. Here we describe a novel DNA fragmentation approach for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and sequence validation. The base-specific cleavage is achieved by creating primer extension products, in which acid-labile phosphoramidite (P-N) bonds replace the 5' phosphodiester bonds of newly incorporated pyrimidine nucleotides. Sequence variations are detected by hydrolysis of this acid-labile bond and MALDI-TOF analysis of the resulting fragments. In this study, we developed a robust protocol for P-N-bond fragmentation and investigated additional ways to improve its sensitivity and reproducibility. We also present the analysis of several human genomic targets ranging from 100-450 bp in length. By using a semiautomated sample processing protocol, we investigated an array of SNPs within a 240-bp segment of the NFKBIA gene in 48 human DNA samples. We identified and measured frequencies for the two common SNPs in the 3'UTR of NFKBIA (separated by 123 bp) and then confirmed these values in an independent genotyping experiment. The calculated allele frequencies in white and African American groups differed significantly, yet both fit Hardy-Weinberg expectations. This demonstrates the utility and effectiveness of PN-bond DNA fragmentation and subsequent MALDI-TOF MS analysis for the high-throughput discovery and measurement of sequence variations in fragments up to 0.5 kb in length in multiple human blood DNA samples.

  7. Structure and variation of human ribosomal DNA: the external transcribed spacer and adjacent regions.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G N; Szura, L L; Rushford, C; Jackson, D; Erickson, J

    1982-01-01

    A group of human ribosomal DNA (rDNA) recombinants that include the probable site for initiation of transcription have been examined for sequence polymorphism. A detailed restriction map of one rDNA insert was constructed using plasmid subclones and end-labeled segments. Comparison of 16 similar rDNA inserts by restriction and heteroduplex analysis demonstrated striking conservation of the external transcribed spacer and 18S gene regions, but defined a region where restriction sites for the enzymes Sma I, Hpa II, and Hha I become frequent or variable. This region extends for about 400--800 base pairs (bp) at the left end of the rDNA insert and is postulated to contain nontranscribed spacer sequences. The use of cloned rDNA segments as probes for the restriction analysis of genomic rDNA has demonstrated certain fixed sites in the nontranscribed spacer that do not vary significantly among different individuals or tumor cell lines. In contrast, restriction with the enzyme Sal I reveals several variable fragments, one of which has been found only in a retinoblastoma cell line. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6282117

  8. [18S-25S rDNA variation in tissue culture of some Gentiana L. species].

    PubMed

    Mel'nyk, V M; Andrieiev, I O; Spiridonova, K V; Strashniuk, N M; Kunakh, V A

    2007-01-01

    18S-25S rDNA of intact plants and tissue cultures of G. acaulis, G. punctata and G. lutea have been investigated by using blot-hybridization. The decrease of rDNA amount was found in the callus cultures as compared with the plants. In contrast to other species, G. lutea showed intragenome heterogeneity of rRNA genes as well as qualitative rDNA changes in tissue culture, in particular appearance of altered repeats. The relationship between the peculiarities of rRNA gene structure and their rearrangements in in vitro culture was suggested.

  9. Measuring rDNA diversity in eukaryotic microbial systems: how intragenomic variation, pseudogenes, and PCR artifacts confound biodiversity estimates.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, Daniel J; Lajeunesse, Todd C; Santos, Scott R

    2007-12-01

    Molecular approaches have revolutionized our ability to study the ecology and evolution of micro-organisms. Among the most widely used genetic markers for these studies are genes and spacers of the rDNA operon. However, the presence of intragenomic rDNA variation, especially among eukaryotes, can potentially confound estimates of microbial diversity. To test this hypothesis, bacterially cloned PCR products of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from clonal isolates of Symbiodinium, a large genus of dinoflagellates that live in symbiosis with many marine protists and invertebrate metazoa, were sequenced and analysed. We found widely differing levels of intragenomic sequence variation and divergence in representatives of Symbiodinium clades A to E, with only a small number of variants attributed to Taq polymerase/bacterial cloning error or PCR chimeras. Analyses of 5.8S-rDNA and ITS2 secondary structure revealed that some variants possessed base substitutions and/or indels that destabilized the folded form of these molecules; given the vital nature of secondary structure to the function of these molecules, these likely represent pseudogenes. When similar controls were applied to bacterially cloned ITS sequences from a recent survey of Symbiodinium diversity in Hawaiian Porites spp., most variants (approximately 87.5%) possessed unstable secondary structures, had unprecedented mutations, and/or were PCR chimeras. Thus, data obtained from sequencing of bacterially cloned rDNA genes can substantially exaggerate the level of eukaryotic microbial diversity inferred from natural samples if appropriate controls are not applied. These considerations must be taken into account when interpreting sequence data generated by bacterial cloning of multicopy genes such as rDNA.

  10. Persistent variations in neuronal DNA methylation following cocaine self-administration and protracted abstinence in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiongyi; Li, Xiang; Jupp, Bianca; Chesworth, Rose; Lawrence, Andrew J.; Bredy, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Continued vulnerability to relapse during abstinence is characteristic of cocaine addiction and suggests that drug-induced neuroadaptations persist during abstinence. However, the precise cellular and molecular attributes of these adaptations remain equivocal. One possibility is that cocaine self-administration leads to enduring changes in DNA methylation. To address this possibility, we isolated neurons from medial prefrontal cortex and performed high throughput DNA sequencing to examine changes in DNA methylation following cocaine self-administration. Twenty-nine genomic regions became persistently differentially methylated during cocaine self-administration, and an additional 28 regions became selectively differentially methylated during abstinence. Altered DNA methylation was associated with isoform-specific changes in the expression of co-localizing genes. These results provide the first neuron-specific, genome-wide profile of changes in DNA methylation induced by cocaine self-administration and protracted abstinence. Moreover, our findings suggest that altered DNA methylation facilitates long-term behavioral adaptation in a manner that extends beyond the perpetuation of altered transcriptional states. PMID:27213137

  11. Occupational solvent exposure, genetic variation of DNA repair genes, and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jie; Zheng, Tongzhang; Lan, Qing; Chen, Yingtai; Deng, Qian; Bi, Xiaofeng; Kim, Christopher; Holford, Theodore; Leaderer, Brian; Boyle, Peter; Ba, Yue; Xia, Zhaolin; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Yawei

    2012-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that genetic variations in DNA repair genes may modify the association between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). A population-based case-control study was conducted on Connecticut women including 518 histologically confirmed incident NHL cases and 597 controls. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios and effect modification from the 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 16 DNA repair genes of the association between solvent exposure and the risk of NHL overall and subtypes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in MGMT (rs12917) and NBS1 (rs1805794) significantly modified the association between exposure to chlorinated solvents and the risk of NHL (Pfor interaction=0.0003 and 0.0048, respectively). After stratification by major NHL histological subtypes, MGMT (rs12917) modified the association between chlorinated solvents and the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (Pfor interaction=0.0027) and follicular lymphoma (Pfor interaction=0.0024). A significant interaction was also observed between occupational exposure to benzene and BRCA2 (rs144848) for NHL overall (Pfor interaction=0.0042). Our study results suggest that genetic variations in DNA repair genes modify the association between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk of NHL. PMID:22430443

  12. Population structure of African buffalo inferred from mtDNA sequences and microsatellite loci: high variation but low differentiation.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, B T; Siegismund, H R; Arctander, P

    1998-02-01

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is widespread throughout sub-Saharan Africa and is found in most major vegetation types, wherever permanent sources of water are available, making it physically able to disperse through a wide range of habitats. Despite this, the buffalo has been assumed to be strongly philopatric and to form large aggregations that remain within separate home ranges with little interchange between units, but the level of differentiation within the species is unknown. Genetic differences between populations were assessed using mitochondrial DNA (control region) sequence data and analysis of variation at six microsatellite loci among 11 localities in eastern and southern Africa. High levels of genetic variability were found, suggesting that reported severe population bottlenecks due to outbreak of rinderpest during the last century did not strongly reduce the genetic variability within the species. The high level of genetic variation within the species was found to be evenly distributed among populations and only at the continental level were we able to consistently detect significant differentiation, contrasting with the assumed philopatric behaviour of the buffalo. Results of mtDNA and microsatellite data were found to be congruent, disagreeing with the alleged male-biased dispersal. We propose that the observed pattern of the distribution of genetic variation between buffalo populations at the regional level can be caused by fragmentation of a previous panmictic population due to human activity, and at the continental level, reflects an effect of geographical distance between populations.

  13. Hybridization between multiple fence lizard lineages in an ecotone: locally discordant variation in mitochondrial DNA, chromosomes, and morphology.

    PubMed

    Leaché, Adam D; Cole, Charles J

    2007-03-01

    We investigated a hybrid zone between two major lineages of fence lizards (Sceloporus cowlesi and Sceloporus tristichus) in the Sceloporus undulatus species complex in eastern Arizona. This zone occurs in an ecotone between Great Basin Grassland and Conifer Woodland habitats. We analysed spatial variation in mtDNA (N=401; 969 bp), chromosomes (N=217), and morphology (N=312; 11 characters) to characterize the hybrid zone and assess species limits. A fine-scale population level phylogenetic analysis refined the boundaries between these species and indicated that four nonsister mtDNA clades (three belonging to S. tristichus and one to S. cowlesi) are sympatric at the centre of the zone. Estimates of cytonuclear disequilibria in the population closest to the centre of the hybrid zone suggest that the S. tristichus clades are randomly mating, but that the S. cowlesi haplotype has a significant nonrandom association with nuclear alleles. Maximum-likelihood cline-fitting analyses suggest that the karyotype, morphology, and dorsal colour pattern clines are all coincident, but the mtDNA cline is skewed significantly to the south. A temporal comparison of cline centres utilizing karyotype data collected in the early 1970s and in 2002 suggests that the cline may have shifted by approximately 1.5 km to the north over a 30-year period. The recent northward expansion of juniper trees into the Little Colorado River Basin resulting from intense cattle overgrazing provides a plausible mechanism for a shifting hybrid zone and the introgression of the mtDNA haplotypes, which appear to be selectively neutral. It is clear that complex interactions are operating simultaneously in this contact zone, including the formation of hybrids between populations within S. tristichus having diagnostic mtDNA, morphology, karyotypes, and dorsal colour patterns, and secondary contact between these and a distantly related yet morphologically cryptic mtDNA lineage (S. cowlesi). PMID:17305859

  14. The hidden history of the snowshoe hare, Lepus americanus: extensive mitochondrial DNA introgression inferred from multilocus genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Melo-Ferreira, José; Seixas, Fernando A; Cheng, Ellen; Mills, L Scott; Alves, Paulo C

    2014-09-01

    Hybridization drives the evolutionary trajectory of many species or local populations, and assessing the geographic extent and genetic impact of interspecific gene flow may provide invaluable clues to understand population divergence or the adaptive relevance of admixture. In North America, hares (Lepus spp.) are key species for ecosystem dynamics and their evolutionary history may have been affected by hybridization. Here we reconstructed the speciation history of the three most widespread hares in North America - the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), the white-tailed jackrabbit (L. townsendii) and the black-tailed jackrabbit (L. californicus) - by analysing sequence variation at eight nuclear markers and one mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) locus (6240 bp; 94 specimens). A multilocus-multispecies coalescent-based phylogeny suggests that L. americanus diverged ~2.7 Ma and that L. californicus and L. townsendii split more recently (~1.2 Ma). Within L. americanus, a deep history of cryptic divergence (~2.0 Ma) was inferred, which coincides with major speciation events in other North American species. While the isolation-with-migration model suggested that nuclear gene flow was generally rare or absent among species or major genetic groups, coalescent simulations of mtDNA divergence revealed historical mtDNA introgression from L. californicus into the Pacific Northwest populations of L. americanus. This finding marks a history of past reticulation between these species, which may have affected other parts of the genome and influence the adaptive potential of hares during climate change.

  15. [Mitochondrial DNA variation in populations of the chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta (Walbaum) from rivers of the Prymorye and Sakhalin].

    PubMed

    Brykov, V A; Kirillova, O N; Kukhlevskiĭ, A D; Poliakova, N E; Skurikhina, L A

    2000-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation was studied using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in chum salmon populations from three rivers in southern Primorye and one river in Sakhalin Island. Significant differences were detected between the samples from Primorye and Sakhalin Island. No differences were found between the samples from the rivers of Primorye, which can be explained by a high rate of gene flow due to transplantation of spawn from one river to another. The effect of fish breeding on the chum salmon populations correlated with the indices of haplotype and nucleotide diversity (h and pi, respectively). The lowest diversity was found in the completely artificial population from the Ryazanovka River; the highest, in natural populations from the Narva and Naiba rivers. Frequencies of haplotypes in consecutive generations were significantly different, which confirms the effects of genetic drift on the small-size chum salmon populations of Primorye.

  16. Multiple origins of cultivated radishes as evidenced by a comparison of the structural variations in mitochondrial DNA of Raphanus.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Terachi, Toru

    2003-02-01

    Configurations of mitochondrial coxI and orfB gene regions were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in three wild and one cultivated species of Raphanus. A total of 207 individual plants from 60 accessions were used. PCR with five combinations of primers identified five different amplification patterns both in wild and cultivated radishes. While the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) type of Ogura male-sterile cytoplasm was distinguishable from the normal type, the mtDNAs of normal radishes were further classified into four types. The variations were common to wild and cultivated radishes, although contrasting features were found depending on the region of cultivation. These results provide evidence that cultivated radishes have multiple origins from various wild plants of Raphanus.

  17. The dynamic nature of DNA methylation: a role in response to social and seasonal variation.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Sebastian; Fernald, Russell D; Storey, Kenneth B; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-07-01

    An organism's ability to adapt to its environment depends on its ability to regulate and maintain tissue specific, temporal patterns of gene transcription in response to specific environmental cues. Epigenetic mechanisms are responsible for many of the intricacies of a gene's regulation that alter expression patterns without affecting the genetic sequence. In particular, DNA methylation has been shown to have an important role in regulating early development and in some human diseases. Within these domains, DNA methylation has been extensively characterized over the past 60 years, but the discovery of its role in regulating behavioral outcomes has led to renewed interest in its potential roles in animal behavior and phenotypic plasticity. The conservation of DNA methylation across the animal kingdom suggests a possible role in the plasticity of genomic responses to environmental cues in natural environments. Here, we review the historical context for the study of DNA methylation, its function and mechanisms, and provide examples of gene/environment interactions in response to social and seasonal cues. Finally, we discuss useful tools to interrogate and dissect the function of DNA methylation in non-model organisms. PMID:24813708

  18. Nuclear DNA Content Variation in Life History Phases of the Bonnemasoniaceae (Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Salvador Soler, Noemi; Gómez Garreta, Amelia; Ribera Siguan, Mª Antonia; Kapraun, Donald F.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear DNA content in gametophytes and sporophytes or the prostrate phases of the following species of Bonnemaisoniaceae (Asparagopsis armata, Asparagopsis taxiformis, Bonnemaisonia asparagoides, Bonnemaisonia clavata and Bonnemaisonia hamifera) were estimated by image analysis and static microspectrophotometry using the DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, dilactate) and the chicken erythrocytes standard. These estimates expand on the Kew database of DNA nuclear content. DNA content values for 1C nuclei in the gametophytes (spermatia and vegetative cells) range from 0.5 pg to 0.8 pg, and for 2C nuclei in the sporophytes or the prostrate phases range from 1.15–1.7 pg. Although only the 2C and 4C values were observed in the sporophyte or the prostrate phase, in the vegetative cells of the gametophyte the values oscillated from 1C to 4C, showing the possible start of endopolyploidy. The results confirm the alternation of nuclear phases in these Bonnemaisoniaceae species, in those that have tetrasporogenesis, as well as those that have somatic meiosis. The availability of a consensus phylogenetic tree for Bonnemaisoniaceae has opened the way to determine evolutionary trends in DNA contents. Both the estimated genome sizes and the published chromosome numbers for Bonnemaisoniaceae suggest a narrow range of values consistent with the conservation of an ancestral genome. PMID:24465835

  19. Nuclear DNA content variation in life history phases of the Bonnemasoniaceae (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Salvador Soler, Noemi; Gómez Garreta, Amelia; Ribera Siguan, Ma Antonia; Kapraun, Donald F

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear DNA content in gametophytes and sporophytes or the prostrate phases of the following species of Bonnemaisoniaceae (Asparagopsis armata, Asparagopsis taxiformis, Bonnemaisonia asparagoides, Bonnemaisonia clavata and Bonnemaisonia hamifera) were estimated by image analysis and static microspectrophotometry using the DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, dilactate) and the chicken erythrocytes standard. These estimates expand on the Kew database of DNA nuclear content. DNA content values for 1C nuclei in the gametophytes (spermatia and vegetative cells) range from 0.5 pg to 0.8 pg, and for 2C nuclei in the sporophytes or the prostrate phases range from 1.15-1.7 pg. Although only the 2C and 4C values were observed in the sporophyte or the prostrate phase, in the vegetative cells of the gametophyte the values oscillated from 1C to 4C, showing the possible start of endopolyploidy. The results confirm the alternation of nuclear phases in these Bonnemaisoniaceae species, in those that have tetrasporogenesis, as well as those that have somatic meiosis. The availability of a consensus phylogenetic tree for Bonnemaisoniaceae has opened the way to determine evolutionary trends in DNA contents. Both the estimated genome sizes and the published chromosome numbers for Bonnemaisoniaceae suggest a narrow range of values consistent with the conservation of an ancestral genome.

  20. The dynamic nature of DNA methylation: a role in response to social and seasonal variation.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Sebastian; Fernald, Russell D; Storey, Kenneth B; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-07-01

    An organism's ability to adapt to its environment depends on its ability to regulate and maintain tissue specific, temporal patterns of gene transcription in response to specific environmental cues. Epigenetic mechanisms are responsible for many of the intricacies of a gene's regulation that alter expression patterns without affecting the genetic sequence. In particular, DNA methylation has been shown to have an important role in regulating early development and in some human diseases. Within these domains, DNA methylation has been extensively characterized over the past 60 years, but the discovery of its role in regulating behavioral outcomes has led to renewed interest in its potential roles in animal behavior and phenotypic plasticity. The conservation of DNA methylation across the animal kingdom suggests a possible role in the plasticity of genomic responses to environmental cues in natural environments. Here, we review the historical context for the study of DNA methylation, its function and mechanisms, and provide examples of gene/environment interactions in response to social and seasonal cues. Finally, we discuss useful tools to interrogate and dissect the function of DNA methylation in non-model organisms.

  1. Extensive Pyrosequencing Reveals Frequent Intra-Genomic Variations of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dezhu; Sun, Yongzhen; Niu, Yunyun; Chen, Zhiduan; Luo, Hongmei; Pang, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhiying; Liu, Chang; Lv, Aiping; Deng, Youping; Larson-Rabin, Zachary; Wilkinson, Mike; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background Internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) is already one of the most popular phylogenetic and DNA barcoding markers. However, the existence of its multiple copies has complicated such usage and a detailed characterization of intra-genomic variations is critical to address such concerns. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used sequence-tagged pyrosequencing and genome-wide analyses to characterize intra-genomic variations of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions from 178 plant species. We discovered that mutation of ITS2 is frequent, with a mean of 35 variants per species. And on average, three of the most abundant variants make up 91% of all ITS2 copies. Moreover, we found different congeneric species share identical variants in 13 genera. Interestingly, different species across different genera also share identical variants. In particular, one minor variant of ITS2 in Eleutherococcus giraldii was found identical to the ITS2 major variant of Panax ginseng, both from Araliaceae family. In addition, DNA barcoding gap analysis showed that the intra-genomic distances were markedly smaller than those of the intra-specific or inter-specific variants. When each of 5543 variants were examined for its species discrimination efficiency, a 97% success rate was obtained at the species level. Conclusions Identification of identical ITS2 variants across intra-generic or inter-generic species revealed complex species evolutionary history, possibly, horizontal gene transfer and ancestral hybridization. Although intra-genomic multiple variants are frequently found within each genome, the usage of the major variants alone is sufficient for phylogeny construction and species determination in most cases. Furthermore, the inclusion of minor variants further improves the resolution of species identification. PMID:22952830

  2. Associations between genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism and LINE-1 DNA methylation in histologically normal breast tissues

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Adana A M; Marian, Catalin; Brasky, Theodore M; Dumitrescu, Ramona G; Liu, Zhenhua; Mason, Joel B; Makambi, Kepher H; Spear, Scott L; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation is an early event in the carcinogenic process. Percent methylation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is a biomarker of genome-wide methylation and is a potential biomarker for breast cancer. Understanding factors associated with percent LINE-1 DNA methylation in histologically normal tissues could provide insight into early stages of carcinogenesis. In a cross-sectional study of 121 healthy women with no prior history of cancer who underwent reduction mammoplasty, we examined associations between plasma and breast folate, genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism, and percent LINE-1 methylation using multivariable regression models (adjusting for race, oral contraceptive use, and alcohol use). Results are expressed as the ratio of LINE-1 methylation relative to that of the referent group, with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). We found no significant associations between plasma or breast folate and percent LINE-1 methylation. Variation in MTHFR, MTR, and MTRR were significantly associated with percent LINE-1 methylation. Variant allele carriers of MTHFR A1289C had 4% lower LINE-1 methylation (Ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.93–0.98), while variant allele carriers of MTR A2756G (Ratio 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.06) and MTRR A66G (Ratio 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.06) had 3% higher LINE-1 methylation, compared to those carrying the more common genotypes of these SNPs. DNA methylation of LINE-1 elements in histologically normal breast tissues is influenced by polymorphisms in genes in the one-carbon metabolism pathway. Future studies are needed to investigate the sociodemographic, environmental and additional genetic determinants of DNA methylation in breast tissues and the impact on breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:26090795

  3. On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Margarida; Sequeira, Fernando; Luiselli, Donata; Beleza, Sandra; Rocha, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Background Current information about the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples is hampered by the scarcity of genetic data from well identified populations from southern Africa. Here, we fill an important gap in the analysis of the western edge of the Bantu migrations by studying for the first time the patterns of Y-chromosome, mtDNA and lactase persistence genetic variation in four representative groups living around the Namib Desert in southwestern Angola (Ovimbundu, Ganguela, Nyaneka-Nkumbi and Kuvale). We assessed the differentiation between these populations and their levels of admixture with Khoe-San groups, and examined their relationship with other sub-Saharan populations. We further combined our dataset with previously published data on Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation to explore a general isolation with migration model and infer the demographic parameters underlying current genetic diversity in Bantu populations. Results Correspondence analysis, lineage sharing patterns and admixture estimates indicate that the gene pool from southwestern Angola is predominantly derived from West-Central Africa. The pastoralist Herero-speaking Kuvale people were additionally characterized by relatively high frequencies of Y-chromosome (12%) and mtDNA (22%) Khoe-San lineages, as well as by the presence of the -14010C lactase persistence mutation (6%), which likely originated in non-Bantu pastoralists from East Africa. Inferred demographic parameters show that both male and female populations underwent significant size growth after the split between the western and eastern branches of Bantu expansions occurring 4000 years ago. However, males had lower population sizes and migration rates than females throughout the Bantu dispersals. Conclusion Genetic variation in southwestern Angola essentially results from the encounter of an offshoot of West-Central Africa with autochthonous Khoisan-speaking peoples from the south. Interactions between the Bantus and the Khoe-San likely

  4. Phylogeography of mitochondrial DNA variation in brown bears and polar bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shields, Gerald F.; Adams, Deborah; Garner, Gerald; Labelle, Martine; Pietsch, Jacy; Ramsay, Malcolm; Schwartz, Charles; Titus, Kimberly; Williamson, Scott

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed 286 nucleotides of the middle portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of 61 brown bears from three locations in Alaska and 55 polar bears from Arctic Canada and Arctic Siberia to test our earlier observations of paraphyly between polar bears and brown bears as well as to test the extreme uniqueness of mitochondrial DNA types of brown bears on Admiralty, Baranof, and Chichagof (ABC) islands of southeastern Alaska. We also investigated the phylogeography of brown bears of Alaska's Kenai Peninsula in relation to other Alaskan brown bears because the former are being threatened by increased human development. We predicted that: (1) mtDNA paraphyly between brown bears and polar bears would be upheld, (2) the mtDNA uniqueness of brown bears of the ABC islands would be upheld, and (3) brown bears of the Kenai Peninsula would belong to either clade II or clade III of brown bears of our earlier studies of mtDNA. All of our predictions were upheld through the analysis of these additional samples.

  5. Validation and Estimation of Additive Genetic Variation Associated with DNA Tests for Quantitative Beef Cattle Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. National Beef Cattle Evaluation Consortium (NBCEC) has been involved in the validation of commercial DNA tests for quantitative beef quality traits since their first appearance on the U.S. market in the early 2000s. The NBCEC Advisory Council initially requested that the NBCEC set up a syst...

  6. AFLP and DNA sequence variation in an Andean domesticate, pepino (Solanum muricatum, Solanaceae): implications for evolution and domestication.

    PubMed

    Blanca, José M; Prohens, Jaime; Anderson, Gregory J; Zuriaga, Elena; Cañizares, Joaquín; Nuez, Fernando

    2007-07-01

    The pepino (Solanum muricatum) is a vegetatively propagated, domesticated native of the Andes, where it grows with wild relatives. We used AFLPs and a 1-kb sequence of the 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase gene to study variation of 27 accessions of S. muricatum and 35 collections of 10 species of wild relatives (Solanum section Basarthrum). A total of 298 AFLP fragments and 29 DNA sequence haplotypes were detected. Cluster and principal coordinate analyses and other genetic parameters estimated from both types of markers, show that S. muricatum is closely related to the species from one of the series (Caripensia) of section Basarthrum and that >90% of the variation of the cultigen is also represented in that series. Pepino is highly diverse, either because it is not monophyletic or it has been subjected to regular introgression with wild species, or both. Although a continuous distribution of the genetic variation occurred within the cultivated species, three genetic clusters were recognized. Cluster 1 is mostly centered in Ecuador, cluster 2 in Ecuador and Peru, and cluster 3 in Colombia and Ecuador. Cluster 3 also includes all modern cultivars studied. These results and other evidence suggest that northern Ecuador/southern Colombia is the main center of pepino diversity and the center of origin. The high genetic variation of this cultigen indicates that domestication does not always produce a genetic bottleneck.

  7. Relationships in Ananas and other related genera using chloroplast DNA restriction site variation.

    PubMed

    Duval, M F; Buso, G S C; Ferreira, F R; Noyer, J L; Coppens d'Eeckenbrugge, G; Hamon, P; Ferreira, M E

    2003-12-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) diversity was examined using PCR-RFLP to study phylogenetic relationships in Ananas and related genera. One hundred fifteen accessions representing the seven Ananas species and seven other Bromelioideae including the neighboring monospecific genus Pseudananas, two Pitcairnioideae, and one Tillandsioideae were included in the study. Eight primers designed from cpDNA were used for generating fragments. Restriction by 18 endonucleases generated 255 variable fragments. Dissimilarities were calculated from the resulting matrix using the Sokal and Michener index and the neighbor-joining method was used to reconstruct the diversity tree. Phylogenetic reconstruction was attempted using Wagner parsimony. Phenetic and cladistic analyses gave consistent results. They confirm the basal position of Bromelia in the Bromelioideae. Ananas and Pseudananas form a monophyletic group, with three strongly supported sub-groups, two of which are geographically consistent. The majority of Ananas parguazensis accessions constitute a northern group restricted to the Rio Negro and Orinoco basins in Brazil. The tetraploid Pseudananas sagenarius joins the diploid Ananas fritzmuelleri to constitute a southern group. The third and largest group, which includes all remaining species plus some accessions of A. parguazensis and intermediate phenotypes, is the most widespread and its distribution overlaps those of the northern and southern groups. Ananas ananassoides is dominant in this sub-group and highly variable. Its close relationship to all cultivated species supports the hypothesis that this species is the wild ancestor of the domesticated pineapple. The data indicate that gene flow is common within this group and scarcer with both the first and second groups. Comparison of cpDNA data with published genomic DNA data point to the hybrid origin of Ananas bracteatus and support the autopolyploidy of Pseudananas. The Ananas-Pseudananas group structure and distribution are

  8. Phylogeography of East Asian Lespedeza buergeri (Fabaceae) based on chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence variations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dong-Pil; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Xu, Bo; Choi, Byoung-Hee

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic changes in land configuration during the Quaternary that were accompanied by climatic oscillations have significantly influenced the current distribution and genetic structure of warm-temperate forests in East Asia. Although recent surveys have been conducted, the historical migration of forest species via land bridges and, especially, the origins of Korean populations remains conjectural. Here, we reveal the genetic structure of Lespedeza buergeri, a warm-temperate shrub that is disjunctively distributed around the East China Sea (ECS) at China, Korea, and Japan. Two non-coding regions (rpl32-trnL, psbA-trnH) of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and the internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrITS) were analyzed for 188 individuals from 16 populations, which covered almost all of its distribution. The nrITS data demonstrated a genetic structure that followed geographic boundaries. This examination utilized AMOVA, comparisons of genetic differentiation based on haplotype frequency/genetic mutations among haplotypes, and Mantel tests. However, the cpDNA data showed contrasting genetic pattern, implying that this difference was due to a slower mutation rate in cpDNA than in nrITS. These results indicated frequent migration by this species via an ECS land bridge during the early Pleistocene that then tapered gradually toward the late Pleistocene. A genetic isolation between western and eastern Japan coincided with broad consensus that was suggested by the presence of other warm-temperate plants in that country. For Korean populations, high genetic diversity indicated the existence of refugia during the Last Glacial Maximum on the Korean Peninsula. However, their closeness with western Japanese populations at the level of haplotype clade implied that gene flow from western Japanese refugia was possible until post-glacial processing occurred through the Korea/Tsushima Strait land bridge. PMID:27206725

  9. Maternal gestational diabetes is associated with genome-wide DNA methylation variation in placenta and cord blood of exposed offspring.

    PubMed

    Finer, Sarah; Mathews, Chris; Lowe, Rob; Smart, Melissa; Hillman, Sara; Foo, Lin; Sinha, Ajay; Williams, David; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hitman, Graham A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure of a developing foetus to maternal gestational diabetes (GDM) has been shown to programme future risk of diabetes and obesity. Epigenetic variation in foetal tissue may have a mechanistic role in metabolic disease programming through interaction of the pregnancy environment with gene function. We aimed to identify genome-wide DNA methylation variation in cord blood and placenta from offspring born to mothers with and without GDM. Pregnant women of South Asian origin were studied and foetal tissues sampled at term delivery. The Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip was used to assay genome-wide DNA methylation in placenta and cord blood from 27 GDM exposed and 21 unexposed offspring. We identified 1485 cord blood and 1708 placenta methylation variable positions (MVPs) achieving genome-wide significance (adjusted P-value <0.05) with methylation differences of >5%. MVPs were disproportionately located within first exons. A bioinformatic co-methylation algorithm was used to detect consistent directionality of methylation in 1000 bp window around each MVP was observed at 74% of placenta and 59% of cord blood MVPs. KEGG pathway analysis showed enrichment of pathways involved in endocytosis, MAPK signalling and extracellular triggers to intracellular metabolic processes. Replication studies should integrate genomics and transcriptomics with longitudinal sampling to elucidate stability, determine causality for translation into biomarker and prevention studies. PMID:25634562

  10. Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationship analysis of Jatropha curcas L. inferred from nrDNA ITS sequences.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guo-Ye; Chen, Fang; Shi, Xiao-Dong; Tian, Yin-Shuai; Yu, Mao-Qun; Han, Xue-Qin; Yuan, Li-Chun; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships among 102 Jatropha curcas accessions from Asia, Africa, and the Americas were assessed using the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA ITS). The average G+C content (65.04%) was considerably higher than the A+T (34.96%) content. The estimated genetic diversity revealed moderate genetic variation. The pairwise genetic divergences (GD) between haplotypes were evaluated and ranged from 0.000 to 0.017, suggesting a higher level of genetic differentiation in Mexican accessions than those of other regions. Phylogenetic relationships and intraspecific divergence were inferred by Bayesian inference (BI), maximum parsimony (MP), and median joining (MJ) network analysis and were generally resolved. The J. curcas accessions were consistently divided into three lineages, groups A, B, and C, which demonstrated distant geographical isolation and genetic divergence between American accessions and those from other regions. The MJ network analysis confirmed that Central America was the possible center of origin. The putative migration route suggested that J. curcas was distributed from Mexico or Brazil, via Cape Verde and then split into two routes. One route was dispersed to Spain, then migrated to China, eventually spreading to southeastern Asia, while the other route was dispersed to Africa, via Madagascar and migrated to China, later spreading to southeastern Asia. PMID:27461559

  11. Molecular population genetics of the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus): mtDNA variation.

    PubMed

    Clegg, S M; Hale, P; Moritz, C

    1998-06-01

    The genetic population structure of a large, wide-ranging marsupial, the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was assessed using sequence and haplotype frequency data of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from locations across the species range in Australia. Results from sequence data revealed extensive haplotype diversity within the red kangaroo (32/34 sequences were unique). Sequence diversity was distributed within rather than between geographical regions across the species range. Genetic connectivity across the range of the species has therefore been maintained over the long term. On a smaller within-region scale, significant genetic structuring was evident from heterogeneity of haplotype frequencies amongst sampling sites. The geographical scale of panmictic populations differed across the continent with more restricted genetic populations occurring in areas with greater topographic and habitat complexity. We propose that these differences in area of genetic populations are the result of population responses to limiting ecological factors during drought.

  12. Lactase nonpersistence is directed by DNA-variation-dependent epigenetic aging.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Viviane; Buske, Orion J; Oh, Edward; Jeremian, Richie; Ptak, Carolyn; Gasiūnas, Giedrius; Maleckas, Almantas; Petereit, Rūta; Žvirbliene, Aida; Adamonis, Kęstutis; Kriukienė, Edita; Koncevičius, Karolis; Gordevičius, Juozas; Nair, Akhil; Zhang, Aiping; Ebrahimi, Sasha; Oh, Gabriel; Šikšnys, Virginijus; Kupčinskas, Limas; Brudno, Michael; Petronis, Arturas

    2016-06-01

    The inability to digest lactose, due to lactase nonpersistence, is a common trait in adult mammals, except in certain human populations that exhibit lactase persistence. It is not known how the lactase gene is dramatically downregulated with age in most individuals but remains active in some individuals. We performed a comprehensive epigenetic study of human and mouse small intestines, by using chromosome-wide DNA-modification profiling and targeted bisulfite sequencing. Epigenetically controlled regulatory elements accounted for the differences in lactase mRNA levels among individuals, intestinal cell types and species. We confirmed the importance of these regulatory elements in modulating lactase mRNA levels by using CRISPR-Cas9-induced deletions. Genetic factors contribute to epigenetic changes occurring with age at the regulatory elements, because lactase-persistence and lactase-nonpersistence DNA haplotypes demonstrated markedly different epigenetic aging. Thus, genetic factors enable a gradual accumulation of epigenetic changes with age, thereby influencing phenotypic outcome. PMID:27159559

  13. Lactase nonpersistence is directed by DNA-variation-dependent epigenetic aging.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Viviane; Buske, Orion J; Oh, Edward; Jeremian, Richie; Ptak, Carolyn; Gasiūnas, Giedrius; Maleckas, Almantas; Petereit, Rūta; Žvirbliene, Aida; Adamonis, Kęstutis; Kriukienė, Edita; Koncevičius, Karolis; Gordevičius, Juozas; Nair, Akhil; Zhang, Aiping; Ebrahimi, Sasha; Oh, Gabriel; Šikšnys, Virginijus; Kupčinskas, Limas; Brudno, Michael; Petronis, Arturas

    2016-06-01

    The inability to digest lactose, due to lactase nonpersistence, is a common trait in adult mammals, except in certain human populations that exhibit lactase persistence. It is not known how the lactase gene is dramatically downregulated with age in most individuals but remains active in some individuals. We performed a comprehensive epigenetic study of human and mouse small intestines, by using chromosome-wide DNA-modification profiling and targeted bisulfite sequencing. Epigenetically controlled regulatory elements accounted for the differences in lactase mRNA levels among individuals, intestinal cell types and species. We confirmed the importance of these regulatory elements in modulating lactase mRNA levels by using CRISPR-Cas9-induced deletions. Genetic factors contribute to epigenetic changes occurring with age at the regulatory elements, because lactase-persistence and lactase-nonpersistence DNA haplotypes demonstrated markedly different epigenetic aging. Thus, genetic factors enable a gradual accumulation of epigenetic changes with age, thereby influencing phenotypic outcome.

  14. Searching for the Optimal Sampling Solution: Variation in Invertebrate Communities, Sample Condition and DNA Quality

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Martin M.; Struwe, Jan-Frederic; Sturm, Sarah; Max, Simeon; McCutcheon, Michelle; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Zytynska, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    There is a great demand for standardising biodiversity assessments in order to allow optimal comparison across research groups. For invertebrates, pitfall or flight-interception traps are commonly used, but sampling solution differs widely between studies, which could influence the communities collected and affect sample processing (morphological or genetic). We assessed arthropod communities with flight-interception traps using three commonly used sampling solutions across two forest types and two vertical strata. We first considered the effect of sampling solution and its interaction with forest type, vertical stratum, and position of sampling jar at the trap on sample condition and community composition. We found that samples collected in copper sulphate were more mouldy and fragmented relative to other solutions which might impair morphological identification, but condition depended on forest type, trap type and the position of the jar. Community composition, based on order-level identification, did not differ across sampling solutions and only varied with forest type and vertical stratum. Species richness and species-level community composition, however, differed greatly among sampling solutions. Renner solution was highly attractant for beetles and repellent for true bugs. Secondly, we tested whether sampling solution affects subsequent molecular analyses and found that DNA barcoding success was species-specific. Samples from copper sulphate produced the fewest successful DNA sequences for genetic identification, and since DNA yield or quality was not particularly reduced in these samples additional interactions between the solution and DNA must also be occurring. Our results show that the choice of sampling solution should be an important consideration in biodiversity studies. Due to the potential bias towards or against certain species by Ethanol-containing sampling solution we suggest ethylene glycol as a suitable sampling solution when genetic analysis

  15. Searching for the Optimal Sampling Solution: Variation in Invertebrate Communities, Sample Condition and DNA Quality.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Martin M; Struwe, Jan-Frederic; Sturm, Sarah; Max, Simeon; McCutcheon, Michelle; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Zytynska, Sharon E

    2016-01-01

    There is a great demand for standardising biodiversity assessments in order to allow optimal comparison across research groups. For invertebrates, pitfall or flight-interception traps are commonly used, but sampling solution differs widely between studies, which could influence the communities collected and affect sample processing (morphological or genetic). We assessed arthropod communities with flight-interception traps using three commonly used sampling solutions across two forest types and two vertical strata. We first considered the effect of sampling solution and its interaction with forest type, vertical stratum, and position of sampling jar at the trap on sample condition and community composition. We found that samples collected in copper sulphate were more mouldy and fragmented relative to other solutions which might impair morphological identification, but condition depended on forest type, trap type and the position of the jar. Community composition, based on order-level identification, did not differ across sampling solutions and only varied with forest type and vertical stratum. Species richness and species-level community composition, however, differed greatly among sampling solutions. Renner solution was highly attractant for beetles and repellent for true bugs. Secondly, we tested whether sampling solution affects subsequent molecular analyses and found that DNA barcoding success was species-specific. Samples from copper sulphate produced the fewest successful DNA sequences for genetic identification, and since DNA yield or quality was not particularly reduced in these samples additional interactions between the solution and DNA must also be occurring. Our results show that the choice of sampling solution should be an important consideration in biodiversity studies. Due to the potential bias towards or against certain species by Ethanol-containing sampling solution we suggest ethylene glycol as a suitable sampling solution when genetic analysis

  16. Variation of karyotype and nuclear DNA content among four species of Plectranthus L' Héritier, 1788 (Lamiaceae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nani, Thaís Furtado; Mesquita, Amanda Teixeira; Bustamante, Fernanda de Oliveira; Barbosa, Sandro; Barbosa, João Vítor Calvelli; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2015-01-01

    Plectranthus is a genus which includes species of ornamental and medicinal potential. It faces taxonomic problems due to aggregating species previously belonging to the genus Coleus, a fact that has contributed to the existence of various synonymies. The species Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus barbatus, Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus neochilus are included in this context. Some authors consider Plectranthus barbatus and Plectranthus grandis as synonyms. The present work was carried out with the aim of comparing plants of the above-mentioned species, originating from different localities in Brazil, with regards to chromosome number and karyotypic morphology, correlated to the nuclear DNA content. There was no variation in chromosome number among plants of the same species. Plectranthus amboinicus was the only species to exhibit 2n=34, whereas the others had 2n=30. No karyotypic differences were found among the plants of each species, except for Plectranthus barbatus. The plants of the Plectranthus species revealed little coincidence between chromosome pairs. The nuclear DNA content allowed grouping Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus, with the highest mean values, and Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus barbatus with the lowest ones. Differences in DNA amount among the plants were identified only for Plectranthus barbatus. These results allow the inference that the populations of Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus present coincident karyotypes among their plants, and Plectranthus grandis is probably a synonym of Plectranthus barbatus. PMID:26753074

  17. Variation of karyotype and nuclear DNA content among four species of Plectranthus L’ Héritier, 1788 (Lamiaceae) from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nani, Thaís Furtado; Mesquita, Amanda Teixeira; Bustamante, Fernanda de Oliveira; Barbosa, Sandro; Barbosa, João Vítor Calvelli; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plectranthus is a genus which includes species of ornamental and medicinal potential. It faces taxonomic problems due to aggregating species previously belonging to the genus Coleus, a fact that has contributed to the existence of various synonymies. The species Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus barbatus, Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus neochilus are included in this context. Some authors consider Plectranthus barbatus and Plectranthus grandis as synonyms. The present work was carried out with the aim of comparing plants of the above-mentioned species, originating from different localities in Brazil, with regards to chromosome number and karyotypic morphology, correlated to the nuclear DNA content. There was no variation in chromosome number among plants of the same species. Plectranthus amboinicus was the only species to exhibit 2n=34, whereas the others had 2n=30. No karyotypic differences were found among the plants of each species, except for Plectranthus barbatus. The plants of the Plectranthus species revealed little coincidence between chromosome pairs. The nuclear DNA content allowed grouping Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus, with the highest mean values, and Plectranthus grandis and Plectranthus barbatus with the lowest ones. Differences in DNA amount among the plants were identified only for Plectranthus barbatus. These results allow the inference that the populations of Plectranthus amboinicus and Plectranthus neochilus present coincident karyotypes among their plants, and Plectranthus grandis is probably a synonym of Plectranthus barbatus. PMID:26753074

  18. Sequence Variation in Amplification Target Genes and Standards Influences Interlaboratory Comparison of BK Virus DNA Load Measurement.

    PubMed

    Solis, Morgane; Meddeb, Mariam; Sueur, Charlotte; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Soulier, Eric; Chabaud, Angeline; Perrin, Peggy; Moulin, Bruno; Bahram, Seiamak; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Caillard, Sophie; Barth, Heidi; Fafi-Kremer, Samira

    2015-12-01

    International guidelines define a BK virus (BKV) load of ≥4 log10 copies/ml as presumptive of BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVN) and a cutoff for therapeutic intervention. To investigate whether BKV DNA loads (BKVL) are comparable between laboratories, 2 panels of 15 and 8 clinical specimens (urine, whole blood, and plasma) harboring different BKV genotypes were distributed to 20 and 27 French hospital centers in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Although 68% of the reported results fell within the acceptable range of the expected result ±0.5 log10, the interlaboratory variation ranged from 1.32 to 5.55 log10. Polymorphisms specific to BKV genotypes II and IV, namely, the number and position of mutations in amplification target genes and/or deletion in standards, arose as major sources of interlaboratory disagreements. The diversity of DNA purification methods also contributed to the interlaboratory variability, in particular for urine samples. Our data strongly suggest that (i) commercial external quality controls for BKVL assessment should include all major BKV genotypes to allow a correct evaluation of BKV assays, and (ii) the BKV sequence of commercial standards should be provided to users to verify the absence of mismatches with the primers and probes of their BKV assays. Finally, the optimization of primer and probe design and standardization of DNA extraction methods may substantially decrease interlaboratory variability and allow interinstitutional studies to define a universal cutoff for presumptive BKVN and, ultimately, ensure adequate patient care. PMID:26468499

  19. Characterization and Sequence Variation in the rDNA Region of Six Nematode Species of the Genus Longidorus (Nematoda)

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, F.; Reyes, A.; Grunder, J.; Kunz, P.; Agostinelli, A.; De Giorgi, C.; Lamberti, F.

    2004-01-01

    Total DNA was isolated from individual nematodes of the species Longidorus helveticus, L. macrosoma, L. arthensis, L. profundorum, L. elongatus, and L. raskii collected in Switzerland. The ITS region and D1-D2 expansion segments of the 26S rDNA were amplified and cloned. The sequences obtained were aligned in order to investigate sequence diversity and to infer the phylogenetic relationships among the six Longidorus species. D1-D2 sequences were more conserved than the ITS sequences that varied widely in primary structure and length, and no consensus was observed. Phylogenetic analyses using the neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods were performed with three different sequence data sets: ITS1-ITS2, 5.8S-D1-D2, and combining ITS1-ITS2+5.8S-D1-D2 sequences. All multiple alignments yielded similar basic trees supporting the existence of the six species established using morphological characters. These sequence data also provided evidence that the different regions of the rDNA are characterized by different evolution rates and by different factors associated with the generation of extreme size variation. PMID:19262800

  20. A pedigree-based study of mitochondrial D-loop DNA sequence variation among Arabian horses.

    PubMed

    Bowling, A T; Del Valle, A; Bowling, M

    2000-02-01

    Through DNA sequence comparisons of a mitochondrial D-loop hypervariable region, we investigated matrilineal diversity for Arabian horses in the United States. Sixty-two horses were tested. From published pedigrees they traced in the maternal line to 34 mares acquired primarily in the mid to late 19th century from nomadic Bedouin tribes. Compared with the reference sequence (GenBank X79547), these samples showed 27 haplotypes with altogether 31 base substitution sites within 397 bp of sequence. Based on examination of pedigrees from a random sampling of 200 horses in current studbooks of the Arabian Horse Registry of America, we estimated that this study defined the expected mtDNA haplotypes for at least 89% of Arabian horses registered in the US. The reliability of the studbook recorded maternal lineages of Arabian pedigrees was demonstrated by haplotype concordance among multiple samplings in 14 lines. Single base differences observed within two maternal lines were interpreted as representing alternative fixations of past heteroplasmy. The study also demonstrated the utility of mtDNA sequence studies to resolve historical maternity questions without access to biological material from the horses whose relationship was in question, provided that representatives of the relevant female lines were available for comparison. The data call into question the traditional assumption that Arabian horses of the same strain necessarily share a common maternal ancestry.

  1. Chloroplast inheritance and DNA variation in sweet, sour, and ground cherry.

    PubMed

    Brettin, T S; Karle, R; Crowe, E L; Iezzoni, A F

    2000-01-01

    Sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) is an allotetraploid and both sweet cherry (P avium L.) and ground cherry (P. fruticosa Pall.) are the proposed progenitor species. The study investigated the maternal species origin(s) of sour cherry using chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) markers and a diverse set of 22 sweet, 25 sour, and 7 ground cherry selections. Two cpDNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and one polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment length polymorphism were identified among the 54 selections. The three polymorphisms considered together resolved four haplotypes. Analysis of sour cherry progeny indicated that the chloroplast genome is maternally inherited and therefore appropriate to use in determining maternal phylogenetic relationships. Ground cherry was found more likely than sweet cherry to be the maternal progenitor species of sour cherry since 23 of 25 of the sour cherry selections had the most prevalent ground cherry haplotype. However, the other two sour cherry selections tested had the most prevalent sweet cherry haplotype and a wild French sweet cherry selection had the most prevalent ground cherry haplotype. The results underscore the importance of using diverse Prunus germplasm to investigate phylogenetic relationships.

  2. Intraspecific DNA variation in nuclear genes of the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Morlais, I; Severson, D W

    2003-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are an abundant source of genetic variation among individual organisms. To assess the usefulness of SNPs for genome analysis in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, we sequenced 25 nuclear genes in each of three strains and analysed nucleotide diversity. The average frequency of nucleotide variation was 12 SNPs per kilobase, indicating that nucleotide variation in Ae. aegypti is similar to that in other organisms, including Drosophila and the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Transition polymorphisms outnumbered transversion polymorphisms, at a ratio of about 2:1. We examined codon usage and confirmed that mutational bias favours G and C ending codons. Codon bias was most pronounced in highly expressed genes. Nucleotide diversity estimates indicated that substitution rates are positively correlated in coding and non-coding regions. Nucleotide diversity varied from one gene to another. The unequal distribution of SNPs among Ae. aegypti nuclear genes suggests that single base variations are non-neutral and are subject to selective constraints. Our analysis showed that ubiquitously expressed genes have lower polymorphism rates and are likely under strong purifying selection, whereas tissue specific genes and genes with a putative role in parasite defence exhibit higher levels of polymorphism that may be associated with diversifying selection. PMID:14986924

  3. Mitochondrial DNA variation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) across its native range: testing biogeographical hypotheses and their relevance to conservation.

    PubMed

    McCusker, M R; Parkinson, E; Taylor, E B

    2000-12-01

    North-western North America has been repeatedly glaciated over most of the past two million years, with the most recent glaciation occurring between 60 000 and 10 000 years ago. Intraspecific genetic variation in many species has been shaped by where they survived glaciation and what postglacial recolonization routes were used. In this study, molecular techniques were used to investigate biogeographical, taxonomic and conservation issues in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation was assessed using a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, focusing mainly on the previously understudied northern extent of the species' range. Two phylogenetically distinct mitochondrial lineages were found that differed from each other by up to 1.8% in sequence. Although the geographical distributions of the two clades overlap extensively, diversity and distributional analyses strongly suggest that trout survived glaciation in both coastal and inland refugia followed by postglacial gene flow and secondary contact. Postglacial dispersal into British Columbia most likely occurred from the Queen Charlotte Islands and the Columbia River. Although trout most likely also survived glaciation along the coast of Washington, Oregon and California, as well as near the Bering Strait, evidence suggests that dispersal into British Columbia from these areas was limited. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial haplotypes revealed higher diversity in California than in the northern part of the species' range, indicating an ancient presence of the species in the south. Phylogeographic divergence probably predates adaptive variation in the species as suggested by evidence for parallel evolution of life history types across the range of O. mykiss. PMID:11123621

  4. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  5. Analysis of genetic variation within clonal lineages of grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch) using AFLP fingerprinting and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vorwerk, S; Forneck, A

    2007-07-01

    Two AFLP fingerprinting methods were employed to estimate the potential of AFLP fingerprints for the detection of genetic diversity within single founder lineages of grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch). Eight clonal lineages, reared under controlled conditions in a greenhouse and reproducing asexually throughout a minimum of 15 generations, were monitored and mutations were scored as polymorphisms between the founder individual and individuals of succeeding generations. Genetic variation was detected within all lineages, from early generations on. Six to 15 polymorphic loci (from a total of 141 loci) were detected within the lineages, making up 4.3% of the total amount of genetic variation. The presence of contaminating extra-genomic sequences (e.g., viral material, bacteria, or ingested chloroplast DNA) was excluded as a source of intraclonal variation. Sequencing of 37 selected polymorphic bands confirmed their origin in mostly noncoding regions of the grape phylloxera genome. AFLP techniques were revealed to be powerful for the identification of reproducible banding patterns within clonal lineages.

  6. DNA variation of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex reflects genomic diversity and population history.

    PubMed Central

    Yuhki, N; O'Brien, S J

    1990-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a multigene complex of tightly linked homologous genes that encode cell surface antigens that play a key role in immune regulation and response to foreign antigens. In most species, MHC gene products display extreme antigenic polymorphism, and their variability has been interpreted to reflect an adaptive strategy for accommodating rapidly evolving infectious agents that periodically afflict natural populations. Determination of the extent of MHC variation has been limited to populations in which skin grafting is feasible or for which serological reagents have been developed. We present here a quantitative analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of MHC class I genes in several mammalian species (cats, rodents, humans) known to have very different levels of genetic diversity based on functional MHC assays and on allozyme surveys. When homologous class I probes were employed, a notable concordance was observed between the extent of MHC restriction fragment variation and functional MHC variation detected by skin grafts or genome-wide diversity estimated by allozyme screens. These results confirm the genetically depauperate character of the African cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, and the Asiatic lion, Panthera leo persica; further, they support the use of class I MHC molecular reagents in estimating the extent and character of genetic diversity in natural populations. Images PMID:1967831

  7. Intraspecific Variation of Eysarcoris guttigerus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Japanese Southwest Population Based on Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Takuya; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Nomura, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The white-spotted globular bug Eysarcoris guttigerus (Thunberg) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is widely distributed in East Asia and the Pacific region. In Japan, the species is found in grassy or composite weeds in the western area of the main islands and Ryukyu Islands of Japan. One notable characteristic of the Eysarcoris genus is the two white spots on the scutellum. This is not the case with the Ishigaki Island population, however, which sports red spots instead of white, suggesting that intraspecific variation exists in the species. Therefore, we investigated intraspecific variation in E. guttigerus using mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2), cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1), cytochrome b (Cytb), tRNA-Serine (tRNAser), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), and 16S ribosomal RNA (16SrRNA) genes from 13 populations of Japan. The obtained maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree was divided into three groups—Group 1: Mainland, Group 2: Central Ryukyu Islands (Okinawa-Amamioshima Islands), and Group 3: South Ryukyu Islands (Ishigaki Island). The Ishigaki population was significantly separated from the other populations with consistent differences in spot color. The estimated period of divergence between the Ishigaki population and the other populations was consistent with the period of formation of the Kerama Gap in the Ryukyu arc. Thus, the process of formation of the Kerama Gap may have influenced the intraspecific variation of E. guttigerus. PMID:26798143

  8. DNA variation of the mammalian major histocompatibility complex reflects genomic diversity and population history

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhki, Naoya; O'Brien, S.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a multigene complex of tightly linked homologous genes that encode cell surface antigens that play a key role in immune regulation and response to foreign antigens. In most species, MHC gene products display extreme antigenic polymorphism, and their variability has been interpreted to reflect an adaptive strategy for accommodating rapidly evolving infectious agents that periodically afflict natural populations. Determination of the extent of MHC variation has been limited to populations in which skin grafting is feasible or for which serological reagents have been developed. The authors present here a quantitative analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of MHC class I genes in several mammalian species (cats, rodents, humans) known to have very different levels of genetic diversity based on functional MHC assays and on allozyme surveys. When homologous class I probes were employed, a notable concordance was observed between the extent of MHC restriction fragment variation and functional MHC variation detected by skin grafts or genome-wide diversity estimated by allozyme screens. These results confirm the genetically depauperate character of the African cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus, and the Asiatic lion, Panthera leo persica; further, they support the use of class I MHC molecular reagents in estimating the extent and character of genetic diversity in natural populations.

  9. Intraspecific Variation of Eysarcoris guttigerus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Japanese Southwest Population Based on Mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Takuya; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Nomura, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The white-spotted globular bug Eysarcoris guttigerus (Thunberg) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is widely distributed in East Asia and the Pacific region. In Japan, the species is found in grassy or composite weeds in the western area of the main islands and Ryukyu Islands of Japan. One notable characteristic of the Eysarcoris genus is the two white spots on the scutellum. This is not the case with the Ishigaki Island population, however, which sports red spots instead of white, suggesting that intraspecific variation exists in the species. Therefore, we investigated intraspecific variation in E. guttigerus using mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2), cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1), cytochrome b (Cytb), tRNA-Serine (tRNA(ser)), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), and 16S ribosomal RNA (16SrRNA) genes from 13 populations of Japan. The obtained maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree was divided into three groups--Group 1: Mainland, Group 2: Central Ryukyu Islands (Okinawa-Amamioshima Islands), and Group 3: South Ryukyu Islands (Ishigaki Island). The Ishigaki population was significantly separated from the other populations with consistent differences in spot color. The estimated period of divergence between the Ishigaki population and the other populations was consistent with the period of formation of the Kerama Gap in the Ryukyu arc. Thus, the process of formation of the Kerama Gap may have influenced the intraspecific variation of E. guttigerus. PMID:26798143

  10. Intraspecific Variation of Eysarcoris guttigerus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Japanese Southwest Population Based on Mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Takuya; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Nomura, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The white-spotted globular bug Eysarcoris guttigerus (Thunberg) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is widely distributed in East Asia and the Pacific region. In Japan, the species is found in grassy or composite weeds in the western area of the main islands and Ryukyu Islands of Japan. One notable characteristic of the Eysarcoris genus is the two white spots on the scutellum. This is not the case with the Ishigaki Island population, however, which sports red spots instead of white, suggesting that intraspecific variation exists in the species. Therefore, we investigated intraspecific variation in E. guttigerus using mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2), cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1), cytochrome b (Cytb), tRNA-Serine (tRNA(ser)), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), and 16S ribosomal RNA (16SrRNA) genes from 13 populations of Japan. The obtained maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree was divided into three groups--Group 1: Mainland, Group 2: Central Ryukyu Islands (Okinawa-Amamioshima Islands), and Group 3: South Ryukyu Islands (Ishigaki Island). The Ishigaki population was significantly separated from the other populations with consistent differences in spot color. The estimated period of divergence between the Ishigaki population and the other populations was consistent with the period of formation of the Kerama Gap in the Ryukyu arc. Thus, the process of formation of the Kerama Gap may have influenced the intraspecific variation of E. guttigerus.

  11. Genetic structure of Xiphinema pachtaicum and X. index populations based on mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Carlos; Castillo, Pablo; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Carolina; Landa, Blanca B; Derycke, Sofie; Palomares-Rius, Juan E

    2011-10-01

    The dagger nematodes Xiphinema pachtaicum and X. index are two of the most widespread and frequently occurring Xiphinema spp. co-infesting vineyards and other crops and natural habitats worldwide. Sexual reproduction is rare in these species. The primary objective of this study was to determine the genetic structure of X. pachtaicum and X. index populations using eight and seven populations, respectively, from different "wine of denomination of origin (D.O.) zones" in Spain and Sardinia (Italy), by studying mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 or COI) and nuclear (D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S rDNA) markers. Both Xiphinema spp. showed low intraspecific divergence among COI sequences, ranging from 0.2% (1 base substitution) to 2.3% (10 substitutions) in X. pachtaicum and from 0.2% (1 base substitution) to 0.4% (2 substitutions) in X. index. Population genetic structure was strong for both species. Nevertheless, molecular differences among grapevine-growing areas were not significant, and intrapopulation diversity was very low. It is hypothesized that this genetic homogeneity in the nematode populations reflects their predominant parthenogenetic reproduction mode and low dispersal abilities. Our results also show that X. pachtaicum populations in Spain have possibly been established from two different populations of origin. Results also demonstrated that the two DNA regions studied are suitable diagnostic markers for X. index and X. pachtaicum.

  12. Chloroplast DNA Structural Variation, Phylogeny, and Age of Divergence among Diploid Cotton Species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pengbo; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yumei; Xu, Qin; Shang, Mingzhao; Zhou, Zhongli; Cai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xingxing; Wendel, Jonathan F.; Wang, Kunbo

    2016-01-01

    The cotton genus (Gossypium spp.) contains 8 monophyletic diploid genome groups (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, K) and a single allotetraploid clade (AD). To gain insight into the phylogeny of Gossypium and molecular evolution of the chloroplast genome in this group, we performed a comparative analysis of 19 Gossypium chloroplast genomes, six reported here for the first time. Nucleotide distance in non-coding regions was about three times that of coding regions. As expected, distances were smaller within than among genome groups. Phylogenetic topologies based on nucleotide and indel data support for the resolution of the 8 genome groups into 6 clades. Phylogenetic analysis of indel distribution among the 19 genomes demonstrates contrasting evolutionary dynamics in different clades, with a parallel genome downsizing in two genome groups and a biased accumulation of insertions in the clade containing the cultivated cottons leading to large (for Gossypium) chloroplast genomes. Divergence time estimates derived from the cpDNA sequence suggest that the major diploid clades had diverged approximately 10 to 11 million years ago. The complete nucleotide sequences of 6 cpDNA genomes are provided, offering a resource for cytonuclear studies in Gossypium. PMID:27309527

  13. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis and Epigenetic Variations Associated with Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis (AVS)

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishna, Uppala; Albayrak, Samet; Alpay-Savasan, Zeynep; Zeb, Amna; Turkoglu, Onur; Sobolewski, Paul; Bahado-Singh, Ray O.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common cause of death from congenital anomaly. Among several candidate epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation may play an important role in the etiology of CHDs. We conducted a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using an Illumina Infinium 450k human methylation assay in a cohort of 24 newborns who had aortic valve stenosis (AVS), with gestational-age matched controls. The study identified significantly-altered CpG methylation at 59 sites in 52 genes in AVS subjects as compared to controls (either hypermethylated or demethylated). Gene Ontology analysis identified biological processes and functions for these genes including positive regulation of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Consistent with prior clinical data, the molecular function categories as determined using DAVID identified low-density lipoprotein receptor binding, lipoprotein receptor binding and identical protein binding to be over-represented in the AVS group. A significant epigenetic change in the APOA5 and PCSK9 genes known to be involved in AVS was also observed. A large number CpG methylation sites individually demonstrated good to excellent diagnostic accuracy for the prediction of AVS status, thus raising possibility of molecular screening markers for this disorder. Using epigenetic analysis we were able to identify genes significantly involved in the pathogenesis of AVS. PMID:27152866

  14. Chloroplast DNA Structural Variation, Phylogeny, and Age of Divergence among Diploid Cotton Species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwen; Feng, Kun; Grover, Corrinne E; Li, Pengbo; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yumei; Xu, Qin; Shang, Mingzhao; Zhou, Zhongli; Cai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xingxing; Wendel, Jonathan F; Wang, Kunbo; Hua, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    The cotton genus (Gossypium spp.) contains 8 monophyletic diploid genome groups (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, K) and a single allotetraploid clade (AD). To gain insight into the phylogeny of Gossypium and molecular evolution of the chloroplast genome in this group, we performed a comparative analysis of 19 Gossypium chloroplast genomes, six reported here for the first time. Nucleotide distance in non-coding regions was about three times that of coding regions. As expected, distances were smaller within than among genome groups. Phylogenetic topologies based on nucleotide and indel data support for the resolution of the 8 genome groups into 6 clades. Phylogenetic analysis of indel distribution among the 19 genomes demonstrates contrasting evolutionary dynamics in different clades, with a parallel genome downsizing in two genome groups and a biased accumulation of insertions in the clade containing the cultivated cottons leading to large (for Gossypium) chloroplast genomes. Divergence time estimates derived from the cpDNA sequence suggest that the major diploid clades had diverged approximately 10 to 11 million years ago. The complete nucleotide sequences of 6 cpDNA genomes are provided, offering a resource for cytonuclear studies in Gossypium. PMID:27309527

  15. Is the genetic structure of Gran Chaco populations unique? Interregional perspectives on native South American mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Graciela S; Merriwether, D Andrew; Hunley, Keith; Demarchi, Darío A

    2006-09-01

    This study reevaluates the hypothesis in Demarchi et al. (2001 Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 115:199-203) that Gran Chaco peoples demonstrate a unique pattern of genetic diversity due to a distinct regional population history. Specifically, they found populations in the central part of the Gran Chaco, or Central Chaco, to have higher within- and lower between-population mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup frequency variation compared to populations in other South American regions. To test this hypothesis of regional uniqueness, we applied analytical and simulation methods to mtDNA first hypervariable (HVI) region sequence data from a broad set of comparative South and Central American population samples. Contrary to the results of Demarchi et al. (2001 Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 115:199-203), we found that the Gran Chaco's regional within-population diversity is about average among regions, and populations are highly differentiated from each other. When we limited the scale of analysis to the Central Chaco, a more localized subregion of the Gran Chaco, our results fell more in line with the original findings of Demarchi et al. (2001 Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 115:199-203). Still, we conclude that neither the Gran Chaco regional pattern, nor the Central Chaco subregional pattern, is unique within South America. Nonetheless, the Central Chaco pattern accords well with the area's history, including pre-European contact lifeways and the documented historical use of the area as an interregional crossroads. However, we cannot exclude post-European contact disruption of traditional mating networks as an equally plausible explanation for the observed diversity pattern. Finally, these results additionally inform broader models of South American genetic diversity. While other researchers proposed an east-west continental division in patterns of genetic variation (e.g., Fuselli et al. 2003 Mol. Biol. Evol. 20:1682-1691), we found that in the geographically intermediate Central Chaco, a

  16. Is the genetic structure of Gran Chaco populations unique? Interregional perspectives on native South American mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Graciela S; Merriwether, D Andrew; Hunley, Keith; Demarchi, Darío A

    2006-09-01

    This study reevaluates the hypothesis in Demarchi et al. (2001 Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 115:199-203) that Gran Chaco peoples demonstrate a unique pattern of genetic diversity due to a distinct regional population history. Specifically, they found populations in the central part of the Gran Chaco, or Central Chaco, to have higher within- and lower between-population mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup frequency variation compared to populations in other South American regions. To test this hypothesis of regional uniqueness, we applied analytical and simulation methods to mtDNA first hypervariable (HVI) region sequence data from a broad set of comparative South and Central American population samples. Contrary to the results of Demarchi et al. (2001 Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 115:199-203), we found that the Gran Chaco's regional within-population diversity is about average among regions, and populations are highly differentiated from each other. When we limited the scale of analysis to the Central Chaco, a more localized subregion of the Gran Chaco, our results fell more in line with the original findings of Demarchi et al. (2001 Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 115:199-203). Still, we conclude that neither the Gran Chaco regional pattern, nor the Central Chaco subregional pattern, is unique within South America. Nonetheless, the Central Chaco pattern accords well with the area's history, including pre-European contact lifeways and the documented historical use of the area as an interregional crossroads. However, we cannot exclude post-European contact disruption of traditional mating networks as an equally plausible explanation for the observed diversity pattern. Finally, these results additionally inform broader models of South American genetic diversity. While other researchers proposed an east-west continental division in patterns of genetic variation (e.g., Fuselli et al. 2003 Mol. Biol. Evol. 20:1682-1691), we found that in the geographically intermediate Central Chaco, a

  17. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and phylogeography of Neotropic pumas (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Clark, J Alan; Rabinowitz, Salisa; Amato, George

    2014-08-01

    Pumas occupy the largest latitudinal range of any New World terrestrial mammal. Human population growth and associated habitat reduction has reduced their North American range by nearly two-thirds, but the impact of human expansion in Central and South America on puma populations is not clear. We examined mitochondrial DNA diversity of pumas across the majority of their range, with a focus on Central and South America. Four mitochondrial gene regions (1140 base pairs) revealed 16 unique haplotypes differentiating pumas into three geographic groupings: North America, Central America and South America. These groups were highly differentiated as indicated by significant pairwise FST values. North American samples were genetically homogenous compared to Central and South American samples, and South American pumas were the most diverse and ancestral. These findings support an earlier hypothesis that North America was recolonized by founding pumas from Central and South America.

  18. Phylogeography of two East Asian species in Croomia (Stemonaceae) inferred from chloroplast DNA and ISSR fingerprinting variation.

    PubMed

    Li, En-Xiang; Yi, Sun; Qiu, Ying-Xiong; Guo, Jiang-Tao; Comes, Hans Peter; Fu, Cheng-Xin

    2008-12-01

    The genus Croomia (Stemonaceae) comprises three herbaceous perennial species that are distributed in temperate-deciduous forests in Southeastern North America (C.pauciflora) and East Asia (C. japonica, C. heterosepala). The two Asian species have abutting ranges in South Japan, but C. japonica also occurs disjunctively on the adjacent Asiatic mainland in East China. In our phylogenetic analysis of Croomia, based on chloroplast (cp) DNA sequence variation of the trnL-F region, and rooted with Stemona spp., the two Asian species are identified as sister that likely diverged in the Mid-to-Late Pleistocene (0.84-0.13 mya), whereas the divergence of C. pauciflora dates back to the Late Plio-/Pleistocene (<2.6 mya). Phylogeographical analysis of the two East Asian species detected seven cpDNA (trnL-F) haplotypes across 16 populations surveyed, and all of those were fixed for a particular cpDNA haplotype (H(E)=0.0, G(ST)=1). A survey of inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs) markers also detected remarkably low levels of within-population diversity (C. japonica: H(E)=0.085; C. heterosepala: H(E)=0.125), and high levels of inter-population differentiation (C. japonica: Phi(ST)=0.736; C. heterosepala: Phi(ST)=0.550), at least partly due to pronounced regional genetic substructure within both species. Non-overlapping distributions of cpDNA haplotypes and strong genetic (cpDNA/ISSR) differentiation among populations and/or regions accord with findings of a nested clade analysis, which inferred allopatric fragmentation as the major process influencing the spatial haplotype distribution of the two species. Based on mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests, we do not find evidence of population expansion in both species. Overall, we conclude that components of temperate-deciduous forest types in South Japan and East China are particularly sensitive to range fragmentation, isolation, and enhanced (incipient) species formation through climate-induced expansions of other

  19. Repeating pattern of non-RVD variations in DNA-binding modules enhances TALEN activity.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Takehito; Mashimo, Tomoji; Tokumasu, Daisuke; Sakane, Yuto; Suzuki, Ken-ichi; Miyamoto, Tatsuo; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Matsuura, Shinya; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2013-11-29

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nuclease (TALEN) is a site-specific nuclease, which can be freely designed and easily constructed. Numerous methods of constructing TALENs harboring different TALE scaffolds and repeat variants have recently been reported. However, the functionalities of structurally different TALENs have not yet been compared. Here, we report on the functional differences among several types of TALENs targeting the same loci. Using HEK293T cell-based single-strand annealing and Cel-I nuclease assays, we found that TALENs with periodically-patterned repeat variants harboring non-repeat-variable di-residue (non-RVD) variations (Platinum TALENs) showed higher activities than TALENs without non-RVD variations. Furthermore, the efficiencies of gene disruption mediated by Platinum TALENs in frogs and rats were significantly higher than in previous reports. This study therefore demonstrated an efficient system for the construction of these highly active Platinum TALENs (Platinum Gate system), which could establish a new standard in TALEN engineering.

  20. [Genetic variation of Manchurian pheasant (Phasianus colchicus pallasi Rotshild, 1903) inferred from mitochondrial DNA control region sequences].

    PubMed

    Kozyrenko, M M; Fisenko, P V; Zhuravlev, Iu N

    2009-04-01

    Sequence variation of the mitochondrial DNA control region was studied in Manchurian pheasants (Phasianus colchicus pallasi Rotshild, 1903) representing three geographic populations from the southern part of the Russian Far East. Extremely low population genetic differentiation (F(ST) = 0.0003) pointed to a very high gene exchange between the populations. Combination of such characters as high haplotype diversity (0.884 to 0.913), low nucleotide diversity (0.0016 to 0.0022), low R2 values (0.1235 to 0.1337), certain patterns of pairwise-difference distributions, and the absence of phylogenetic structure suggested that the phylogenetic history of Ph. C. pallasi included passing through a bottleneck with further expansion in the postglacial period. According to the data obtained, it was suggested that differentiation between the mitochondrial lineages started approximately 100 000 years ago.

  1. Nuclear DNA Variation, Chromosome Numbers and Polyploidy in the Endemic and Indigenous Grass Flora of New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    MURRAY, B. G.; DE LANGE, P. J.; FERGUSON, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Little information is available on DNA C-values for the New Zealand flora. Nearly 85 % of the named species of the native vascular flora are endemic, including 157 species of Poaceae, the second most species-rich plant family in New Zealand. Few C-values have been published for New Zealand native grasses, and chromosome numbers have previously been reported for fewer than half of the species. The aim of this research was to determine C-values and chromosome numbers for most of the endemic and indigenous Poaceae from New Zealand. • Scope To analyse DNA C-values from 155 species and chromosome numbers from 55 species of the endemic and indigenous grass flora of New Zealand. • Key Results The new C-values increase significantly the number of such measurements for Poaceae worldwide. New chromosome numbers were determined from 55 species. Variation in C-value and percentage polyploidy were analysed in relation to plant distribution. No clear relationship could be demonstrated between these variables. • Conclusions A wide range of C-values was found in the New Zealand endemic and indigenous grasses. This variation can be related to the phylogenetic position of the genera, plants in the BOP (Bambusoideae, Oryzoideae, Pooideae) clade in general having higher C-values than those in the PACC (Panicoideae, Arundinoideae, Chloridoideae + Centothecoideae) clade. Within genera, polyploids typically have smaller genome sizes (C-value divided by ploidy level) than diploids and there is commonly a progressive decrease with increasing ploidy level. The high frequency of polyploidy in the New Zealand grasses was confirmed by our additional counts, with only approximately 10 % being diploid. No clear relationship between C-value, polyploidy and rarity was evident. PMID:16243852

  2. mtDNA variation of aboriginal Siberians reveals distinct genetic affinities with Native Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A; Sukernik, R I; Schurr, T G; Starikorskaya, Y B; Cabell, M F; Crawford, M H; Comuzzie, A G; Wallace, D C

    1993-01-01

    The mtDNA variation of 411 individuals from 10 aboriginal Siberian populations was analyzed in an effort to delineate the relationships between Siberian and Native American populations. All mtDNAs were characterized by PCR amplification and restriction analysis, and a subset of them was characterized by control region sequencing. The resulting data were then compiled with previous mtDNA data from Native Americans and Asians and were used for phylogenetic analyses and sequence divergence estimations. Aboriginal Siberian populations exhibited mtDNAs from three (A, C, and D) of the four haplogroups observed in Native Americans. However, none of the Siberian populations showed mtDNAs from the fourth haplogroup, group B. The presence of group B deletion haplotypes in East Asian and Native American populations but their absence in Siberians raises the possibility that haplogroup B could represent a migratory event distinct from the one(s) which brought group A, C, and D mtDNAs to the Americas. Our findings support the hypothesis that the first humans to move from Siberia to the Americas carried with them a limited number of founding mtDNAs and that the initial migration occurred between 17,000-34,000 years before present. Images Figure 4 PMID:7688933

  3. Gene copy number variations in the leukocyte genome of hepatocellular carcinoma patients with integrated hepatitis B virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guixia; Cheng, Kai; Cao, Guangwen; Wu, Mengchao; Cheng, Shuqun; Liu, Shanrong

    2016-01-01

    Integration of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA into the human liver cell genome is believed to promote HBV-related carcinogenesis. This study aimed to quantify the integration of HBV DNA into the leukocyte genome in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients in order to identify potential biomarkers for HBV-related diseases. Whole-genome comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) chip array analyses were performed to screen gene copy number variations (CNV) in the leukocyte genome, and the results were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The commonly detected regions included chromosome arms 19p, 5q, 1q and 15p, where 200 copy number gain events and 270 copy number loss events were noted. In particular, gains were observed in 5q35.3 (OR4F3) and 19p13.3 (OR4F17) in 90% of the samples. Successful homologous recombination of OR4F3 and the HBV P gene was demonstrated, and the amplification at 5q35.3 is potentially associated with the integration of HBV P gene into natural killer cells isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that the combination of OR4F3 and OR4F17 a novel potential biomarker of HBV-related diseases. PMID:26769853

  4. Natural DNA variation at candidate loci is associated with potato chip color, tuber starch content, yield and starch yield.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Paulo, Maria-João; Strahwald, Josef; Lübeck, Jens; Hofferbert, Hans-Reinhard; Tacke, Eckhart; Junghans, Holger; Wunder, Jörg; Draffehn, Astrid; van Eeuwijk, Fred; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2008-05-01

    Complex characters of plants such as starch and sugar content of seeds, fruits, tubers and roots are controlled by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Understanding their molecular basis will facilitate diagnosis and combination of superior alleles in crop improvement programs ("precision breeding"). Association genetics based on candidate genes is one approach toward this goal. Tetraploid potato varieties and breeding clones related by descent were evaluated for 2 years for chip quality before and after cold storage, tuber starch content, yield and starch yield. Chip quality is inversely correlated with tuber sugar content. A total of 36 loci on 11 potato chromosomes were evaluated for natural DNA variation in 243 individuals. These loci included microsatellites and genes coding for enzymes that function in carbohydrate metabolism or transport (candidate loci). The markers were used to analyze population structure and were tested for association with the tuber quality traits. Highly significant and robust associations of markers with 1-4 traits were identified. Most frequent were associations with chip quality and tuber starch content. Alleles increasing tuber starch content improved chip quality and vice versa. With two exceptions, the most significant and robust associations (q < 0.01) were observed with DNA variants in genes encoding enzymes that function in starch and sugar metabolism or transport. Comparing linkage and linkage disequilibrium between loci provided evidence for the existence of large haplotype blocks in the breeding materials analyzed.

  5. Human genetics of the Kula Ring: Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA variation in the Massim of Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    van Oven, Mannis; Brauer, Silke; Choi, Ying; Ensing, Joe; Schiefenhövel, Wulf; Stoneking, Mark; Kayser, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    The island region at the southeastern-most tip of New Guinea and its inhabitants known as Massim are well known for a unique traditional inter-island trading system, called Kula or Kula Ring. To characterize the Massim genetically, and to evaluate the influence of the Kula Ring on patterns of human genetic variation, we analyzed paternally inherited Y-chromosome (NRY) and maternally inherited mitochondrial (mt) DNA polymorphisms in >400 individuals from this region. We found that the nearly exclusively Austronesian-speaking Massim people harbor genetic ancestry components of both Asian (AS) and Near Oceanian (NO) origin, with a proportionally larger NO NRY component versus a larger AS mtDNA component. This is similar to previous observations in other Austronesian-speaking populations from Near and Remote Oceania and suggests sex-biased genetic admixture between Asians and Near Oceanians before the occupation of Remote Oceania, in line with the Slow Boat from Asia hypothesis on the expansion of Austronesians into the Pacific. Contrary to linguistic expectations, Rossel Islanders, the only Papuan speakers of the Massim, showed a lower amount of NO genetic ancestry than their Austronesian-speaking Massim neighbors. For the islands traditionally involved in the Kula Ring, a significant correlation between inter-island travelling distances and genetic distances was observed for mtDNA, but not for NRY, suggesting more male- than female-mediated gene flow. As traditionally only males take part in the Kula voyages, this finding may indicate a genetic signature of the Kula Ring, serving as another example of how cultural tradition has shaped human genetic diversity. PMID:24619143

  6. Interindividual Variation in DNA Methylation at a Putative POMC Metastable Epiallele Is Associated with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Kühnen, Peter; Handke, Daniela; Waterland, Robert A; Hennig, Branwen J; Silver, Matt; Fulford, Anthony J; Dominguez-Salas, Paula; Moore, Sophie E; Prentice, Andrew M; Spranger, Joachim; Hinney, Anke; Hebebrand, Johannes; Heppner, Frank L; Walzer, Lena; Grötzinger, Carsten; Gromoll, Jörg; Wiegand, Susanna; Grüters, Annette; Krude, Heiko

    2016-09-13

    The estimated heritability of human BMI is close to 75%, but identified genetic variants explain only a small fraction of interindividual body-weight variation. Inherited epigenetic variants identified in mouse models named "metastable epialleles" could in principle explain this "missing heritability." We provide evidence that methylation in a variably methylated region (VMR) in the pro-opiomelanocortin gene (POMC), particularly in postmortem human laser-microdissected melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-positive neurons, is strongly associated with individual BMI. Using cohorts from different ethnic backgrounds, including a Gambian cohort, we found evidence suggesting that methylation of the POMC VMR is established in the early embryo and that offspring methylation correlates with the paternal somatic methylation pattern. Furthermore, it is associated with levels of maternal one-carbon metabolites at conception and stable during postnatal life. Together, these data suggest that the POMC VMR may be a human metastable epiallele that influences body-weight regulation. PMID:27568547

  7. Variation of DNA Fragmentation Levels During Density Gradient Sperm Selection for Assisted Reproduction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Muratori, Monica; Tarozzi, Nicoletta; Cambi, Marta; Boni, Luca; Iorio, Anna Lisa; Passaro, Claudia; Luppino, Benedetta; Nadalini, Marco; Marchiani, Sara; Tamburrino, Lara; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario; Baldi, Elisabetta; Borini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Predicting the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is one main goal of the present research on assisted reproduction. To understand whether density gradient centrifugation (DGC), used to select sperm, can affect sperm DNA integrity and impact pregnancy rate (PR), we prospectively evaluated sperm DNA fragmentation (sDF) by TUNEL/PI, before and after DGC. sDF was studied in a cohort of 90 infertile couples the same day of IVF/ICSI treatment. After DGC, sDF increased in 41 samples (Group A, median sDF value: 29.25% [interquartile range, IQR: 16.01–41.63] in pre- and 60.40% [IQR: 32.92–93.53] in post-DGC) and decreased in 49 (Group B, median sDF value: 18.84% [IQR: 13.70–35.47] in pre- and 8.98% [IQR: 6.24–15.58] in post-DGC). PR was 17.1% and 34.4% in Group A and B, respectively (odds ratio [OR]: 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95–7.04, P = 0.056). After adjustment for female factor, female and male age and female BMI, the estimated OR increased to 3.12 (95% CI: 1.05–9.27, P = 0.041). According to the subgroup analysis for presence/absence of female factor, heterogeneity in the association between the Group A and B and PR emerged (OR: 4.22, 95% CI: 1.16–15.30 and OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.23–10.40, respectively, for couples without, n = 59, and with, n = 31, female factor). This study provides the first evidence that the DGC procedure produces an increase in sDF in about half of the subjects undergoing IVF/ICSI, who then show a much lower probability of pregnancy, raising concerns about the safety of this selection procedure. Evaluation of sDF before and after DGC configures as a possible new prognostic parameter of pregnancy outcome in IVF/ICSI. Alternative sperm selection strategies are recommended for those subjects who undergo the damage after DGC. PMID:27196465

  8. Patterns of Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Indigenous Maize Races of Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Weissinger, A. K.; Timothy, D. H.; Levings, C. S.; Goodman, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) were isolated from 93 diverse races of maize from Latin America. DNAs were examined by agarose gel electrophoresis of undigested DNA and by BamHI and EcoRI cleavage fragment analysis. Eighteen races contained plasmid-like mtDNAs. One race contained the S-1 and S-2 molecules associated with the S cytoplasmic male-sterile, and 17 were found to have the R-1 and R-2 plasmid-like DNAs. BamHI digestion of mtDNAs generated ten distinct electrophoretograms, and Eco RI digestion produced eight different fragment patterns. Races were assigned to one of 18 groups according to EcoRI and BamHI fragment patterns and whether or not they contained plasmid-like DNAs. Eight races produced restriction patterns similar to one of the characterized cytoplasmic male-steriles C, T, or S. Races from Meso-America and some from South America with Meso-American affinities were separated from other South American races. South American races were placed in three general classes of related groups. There was considerable agreement among the groupings here and those based on morphological and cytological affinities. PMID:17246141

  9. Haplogroup Classification of Korean Cattle Breeds Based on Sequence Variations of mtDNA Control Region.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Seong-Su; Kim, Seung Chang; Choi, Seong-Bok; Kim, Su-Hyun; Lee, Chang Woo; Jung, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Eun Sung; Choi, Young-Sun; Kim, Sung-Bok; Kim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Chang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have reported the frequency and distribution of haplogroups among various cattle breeds for verification of their origins and genetic diversity. In this study, 318 complete sequences of the mtDNA control region from four Korean cattle breeds were used for haplogroup classification. 71 polymorphic sites and 66 haplotypes were found in these sequences. Consistent with the genetic patterns in previous reports, four haplogroups (T1, T2, T3, and T4) were identified in Korean cattle breeds. In addition, T1a, T3a, and T3b sub-haplogroups were classified. In the phylogenetic tree, each haplogroup formed an independent cluster. The frequencies of T3, T4, T1 (containing T1a), and T2 were 66%, 16%, 10%, and 8%, respectively. Especially, the T1 haplogroup contained only one haplotype and a sample. All four haplogroups were found in Chikso, Jeju black and Hanwoo. However, only the T3 and T4 haplogroups appeared in Heugu, and most Chikso populations showed a partial of four haplogroups. These results will be useful for stable conservation and efficient management of Korean cattle breeds. PMID:26954229

  10. Variations in DNA subtype, antifungal susceptibility, and slime production among clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Messer, S A; Hollis, R J

    1995-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an important nosocomial pathogen that can proliferate in high concentrations of glucose and form biofilms on prosthetic materials. We investigated the genotypic diversity, slime production, and antifungal susceptibility among 60 isolates of C. parapsilosis from 44 patients and 10 patient care providers from five different medical centers. Molecular typing was performed using macrorestriction digest profiles with BssHII followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (REAG) and by electrophoretic karyotyping (EK). Slime production was evaluated by growing the organisms in Sabouraud broth with 8% glucose and examining the walls of the tubes for the presence of an adherent slime layer. Antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, and itraconazole was determined using National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards proposed standard methods. Overall 28 different DNA types were identified by REAG and EK methods. MIC90 values ranged from 0.12 microgram/ml for itraconazole to 1.0 microgram/ml for fluconazole and amphotericin B. Sixty-five percent of the isolates produced slime: 37% were moderately to strongly positive, 28% were weakly positive, and 35% were negative. Overall, 83% of blood and catheter isolates were slime positive versus 53% of isolates from all other sites (P < 0.05). These data underscore the genetic diversity and susceptibility of C. parapsilosis to antifungal agents. Slime production may be important in enabling C. parapsilosis to cause catheter-related bloodstream infections. PMID:7789100

  11. Effects of genome structure variation, homeologous genes and repetitive DNA on polyploid crop research in the age of genomics.

    PubMed

    Fu, Donghui; Mason, Annaliese S; Xiao, Meili; Yan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Compared to diploid species, allopolyploid crop species possess more complex genomes, higher productivity, and greater adaptability to changing environments. Next generation sequencing techniques have produced high-density genetic maps, whole genome sequences, transcriptomes and epigenomes for important polyploid crops. However, several problems interfere with the full application of next generation sequencing techniques to these crops. Firstly, different types of genomic variation affect sequence assembly and QTL mapping. Secondly, duplicated or homoeologous genes can diverge in function and then lead to emergence of many minor QTL, which increases difficulties in fine mapping, cloning and marker assisted selection. Thirdly, repetitive DNA sequences arising in polyploid crop genomes also impact sequence assembly, and are increasingly being shown to produce small RNAs to regulate gene expression and hence phenotypic traits. We propose that these three key features should be considered together when analyzing polyploid crop genomes. It is apparent that dissection of genomic structural variation, elucidation of the function and mechanism of interaction of homoeologous genes, and investigation of the de novo roles of repeat sequences in agronomic traits are necessary for genomics-based crop breeding in polyploids.

  12. DNA Sequence and Expression Variation of Hop (Humulus lupulus) Valerophenone Synthase (VPS), a Key Gene in Bitter Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Consuelo B.; Whittock, Lucy D.; Whittock, Simon P.; Leggett, Grey; Koutoulis, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Background The hop plant (Humulus lupulus) is a source of many secondary metabolites, with bitter acids essential in the beer brewing industry and others having potential applications for human health. This study investigated variation in DNA sequence and gene expression of valerophenone synthase (VPS), a key gene in the bitter acid biosynthesis pathway of hop. Methods Sequence variation was studied in 12 varieties, and expression was analysed in four of the 12 varieties in a series across the development of the hop cone. Results Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in VPS, seven of which were synonymous. The two non-synonymous polymorphisms did not appear to be related to typical bitter acid profiles of the varieties studied. However, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of VPS expression during hop cone development showed a clear link with the bitter acid content. The highest levels of VPS expression were observed in two triploid varieties, ‘Symphony’ and ‘Ember’, which typically have high bitter acid levels. Conclusions In all hop varieties studied, VPS expression was lowest in the leaves and an increase in expression was consistently observed during the early stages of cone development. PMID:18519445

  13. Identification of staphylococcal species based on variations in protein sequences (mass spectrometry) and DNA sequence (sodA microarray).

    PubMed

    Kooken, Jennifer; Fox, Karen; Fox, Alvin; Altomare, Diego; Creek, Kim; Wunschel, David; Pajares-Merino, Sara; Martínez-Ballesteros, Ilargi; Garaizar, Javier; Oyarzabal, Omar; Samadpour, Mansour

    2014-02-01

    This report is among the first using sequence variation in newly discovered protein markers for staphylococcal (or indeed any other bacterial) speciation. Variation, at the DNA sequence level, in the sodA gene (commonly used for staphylococcal speciation) provided excellent correlation. Relatedness among strains was also assessed using protein profiling using microcapillary electrophoresis and pulsed field electrophoresis. A total of 64 strains were analyzed including reference strains representing the 11 staphylococcal species most commonly isolated from man (Staphylococcus aureus and 10 coagulase negative species [CoNS]). Matrix assisted time of flight ionization/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC ESI MS/MS) were used for peptide analysis of proteins isolated from gel bands. Comparison of experimental spectra of unknowns versus spectra of peptides derived from reference strains allowed bacterial identification after MALDI TOF MS analysis. After LC-MS/MS analysis of gel bands bacterial speciation was performed by comparing experimental spectra versus virtual spectra using the software X!Tandem. Finally LC-MS/MS was performed on whole proteomes and data analysis also employing X!tandem. Aconitate hydratase and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase served as marker proteins on focused analysis after gel separation. Alternatively on full proteomics analysis elongation factor Tu generally provided the highest confidence in staphylococcal speciation.

  14. Phylogeny and chromosomal variations in East Asian Carex, Siderostictae group (Cyperaceae), based on DNA sequences and cytological data.

    PubMed

    Yano, Okihito; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Jin, Xiao-Feng; Hoshino, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    Carex (Cyperaceae) is one of the largest genera of the flowering plants, and comprises more than 2,000 species. In Carex, section Siderostictae with broader leaves distributed in East Asia is thought to be an ancestral group. We aimed to clarify the phylogenetic relationships and chromosomal variations within the section Siderostictae, and to examine the relationship of broad-leaved species of the sections Hemiscaposae and Surculosae from East Asia, inferred from DNA sequences and cytological data. Our results indicate that a monophyletic Siderostictae clade, including the sections Hemiscaposae, Siderostictae and Surculosae, as the earliest diverging group in the tribe Cariceae. Low chromosome numbers, 2n = 12 or 24, with large sizes were observed in these three sections. Our results suggest that the genus Carex might have originated or relictly restricted in the East Asia. Geographical distributions of diploid species are restricted in narrower areas, while those of tetraploid species are wider in East Asia. It is concluded that chromosomal variations in Siderostictae clade may have been caused by polyploidization and that tetraploid species may have been able to exploit their habitats by polyploidization.

  15. Effects of mitochondrial DNA rate variation on reconstruction of Pleistocene demographic history in a social avian species, Pomatostomus superciliosus.

    PubMed

    Norman, Janette A; Blackmore, Caroline J; Rourke, Meaghan; Christidis, Les

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial sequence data is often used to reconstruct the demographic history of Pleistocene populations in an effort to understand how species have responded to past climate change events. However, departures from neutral equilibrium conditions can confound evolutionary inference in species with structured populations or those that have experienced periods of population expansion or decline. Selection can affect patterns of mitochondrial DNA variation and variable mutation rates among mitochondrial genes can compromise inferences drawn from single markers. We investigated the contribution of these factors to patterns of mitochondrial variation and estimates of time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for two clades in a co-operatively breeding avian species, the white-browed babbler Pomatostomus superciliosus. Both the protein-coding ND3 gene and hypervariable domain I control region sequences showed departures from neutral expectations within the superciliosus clade, and a two-fold difference in TMRCA estimates. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis provided evidence of departure from a strict clock model of molecular evolution in domain I, leading to an over-estimation of TMRCA for the superciliosus clade at this marker. Our results suggest mitochondrial studies that attempt to reconstruct Pleistocene demographic histories should rigorously evaluate data for departures from neutral equilibrium expectations, including variation in evolutionary rates across multiple markers. Failure to do so can lead to serious errors in the estimation of evolutionary parameters and subsequent demographic inferences concerning the role of climate as a driver of evolutionary change. These effects may be especially pronounced in species with complex social structures occupying heterogeneous environments. We propose that environmentally driven differences in social structure may explain observed differences in evolutionary rate of domain I sequences, resulting from longer than

  16. Molecular systematics of Brassica and allied genera (Subtribe Brassicinae, Brassiceae) - chloroplast DNA variation in the genus Diplotaxis.

    PubMed

    Warwick, S I; Black, L D; Aguinagalde, I

    1992-04-01

    Chloroplast DNA restriction site variation for 17 endonucleases was surveyed for the large single-copy region of the genome in 26 taxa of the genus Diplotaxis and compared with previously mapped site mutations in other members of the Subtribe Brassicinae (Tribe Brassiceae, Cruciferae). A total of 259 restriction site and length mutations were observed, 206 (80%) of which showed variation at the interspecific level. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a clear division of the genus Diplotaxis into the same two lineages for the Subtribe Brassicinae, described previously by Warwick and Black as Rapa/ Oleracea and Nigra. Levels of genetic divergence and taxon groupings suggested by the restriction site variation were highly consistent with previously recognized cytodemes or crossing groups and the geographical distribution of Diplotaxis taxa. However, the data were inconsistent with the morphologically based taxonomic delimitation of the genus, certain subgeneric circumscriptions, and even species delimitation in the case of D. virgata. Diplotaxis species were separated into three major groups in each of the two lineages. In the Rapa/ Oleracea lineage, Group A included D. erucoides ssp. erucoides and D. cossoniana. Group B included two subgroups: B (i) D. tenuifolia, D. cretacea, and D. simplex and B (ii) D. harra. Group C included D. viminea and D. muralis. Within the Nigra lineage, group D included D. siettiana, D. ibicensis, D. brevisiliqua, and D. gomezcampoi. Group E included D. brachycarpa. Group F included three subgroups: F (i) D. assurgens, D. tenuisiliqua, an accession of D. virgata from southern Morocco (DVA), and D. siifolia; F (ii) D. berthautii and D. virgata f. sahariensis; and F (iii) D. catholica, D. catholica var. rivulorum, D. virgata ssp. virgata. These groups often showed greater genetic closeness to other species from other genera in the Subtribe than to other species of Diplotaxis.

  17. Effects of Mitochondrial DNA Rate Variation on Reconstruction of Pleistocene Demographic History in a Social Avian Species, Pomatostomus superciliosus

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Janette A.; Blackmore, Caroline J.; Rourke, Meaghan; Christidis, Les

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial sequence data is often used to reconstruct the demographic history of Pleistocene populations in an effort to understand how species have responded to past climate change events. However, departures from neutral equilibrium conditions can confound evolutionary inference in species with structured populations or those that have experienced periods of population expansion or decline. Selection can affect patterns of mitochondrial DNA variation and variable mutation rates among mitochondrial genes can compromise inferences drawn from single markers. We investigated the contribution of these factors to patterns of mitochondrial variation and estimates of time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for two clades in a co-operatively breeding avian species, the white-browed babbler Pomatostomus superciliosus. Both the protein-coding ND3 gene and hypervariable domain I control region sequences showed departures from neutral expectations within the superciliosus clade, and a two-fold difference in TMRCA estimates. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis provided evidence of departure from a strict clock model of molecular evolution in domain I, leading to an over-estimation of TMRCA for the superciliosus clade at this marker. Our results suggest mitochondrial studies that attempt to reconstruct Pleistocene demographic histories should rigorously evaluate data for departures from neutral equilibrium expectations, including variation in evolutionary rates across multiple markers. Failure to do so can lead to serious errors in the estimation of evolutionary parameters and subsequent demographic inferences concerning the role of climate as a driver of evolutionary change. These effects may be especially pronounced in species with complex social structures occupying heterogeneous environments. We propose that environmentally driven differences in social structure may explain observed differences in evolutionary rate of domain I sequences, resulting from longer than

  18. [Chloroplast DNA trnQ-rps16 variation and genetic structure of nine wild Chinese cherry (Cerasus pseudocerasus Lindl.) populations].

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Wang, Xiao-Rong; Luo, Hua; Wang, Chun-Tao; Zhang, Jia-Zhi; Luo, Ming-Min

    2012-11-01

    Chinese cherry (Cerasus pseudocerasus Lindl.) is one of the most economically domestic fruit trees in China. The rich variation of wild Chinese cherry is the most important breeding resource for existing cultivars. In order to reveal the levels and distribution of genetic variation within wild Chinese cherry of Sichuan Province, China, where is rich in wild Chinese cherry, the sequence variation of chloroplast DNA trnQ-rps16 intergenic spacer was analyzed in 145 individuals of all nine existing populations (seven from Sichuan, two from Shanxi and Guizhou provinces) of China. The results showed that trnQ-rps16 sequence were aligned with 13 polymorphic sites (1.87%), including 3 substitutions and 10 indels in 145 individuals, which revealed a low level of genetic diversity (h= 0.562, π= 0.00184). Compared to other regions (h= 0.733, π= 0.00243), a rather lower genetic diversity (h= 0.544, π= 0.00203) was found in the populations from Sichuan, and a large scale of genetic diversity among the seven populations was detected (h= 0-0.708; π= 0-0.00298), ranging from EM (h=0.000, π=0.000) to TL (h=0.708, π=0.00298). The low genetic diversity of populations may be strongly affected by founder effect and bottleneck effect because of the marginal nature, recent reduction, and consequent genetic drift of these populations. In addition, a fairly low genetic differentiation (FST= 0.21573) was found among the studied populations. This suggest that gene flow seems to originate from pronounced seed dispersal abilities of the species and it may play a significant role in shaping such a genetic structure. The long generation cycle of the species may also contribute to this structure. Based on these findings, a conservational plan for sampling or preserving fewer populations but more individuals from each population for the species was proposed. PMID:23208145

  19. [Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation, demographic history, and population structure of Amur sturgeon Acipenser schrenckii Brandt, 1869].

    PubMed

    Shedko, S V; Miroshnichenko, I L; Nemkova, G A; Koshelev, V N; Shedko, M B

    2015-02-01

    The variability of the mtDNA control region (D-loop) was examined in Amur sturgeon endemic to the Amur River. This species is also classified as critically endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened species. Sequencing of 796- to 812-bp fragments of the D-loop in 112 sturgeon collected in the Lower Amur revealed 73 different genotypes. The sample was characterized by a high level of haplotypic (0.976) and nucleotide (0.0194) diversity. The identified haplotypes split into two well-defined monophyletic groups, BG (n = 39) and SM (n = 34), differing (HKY distance) on average by 3.41% of nucleotide positions upon an average level of intragroup differences of 0.54 and 1.23%, respectively. Moreover, the haplotypes of the SM groups differed by the presence of a 13-14 bp deletion. Most ofthe samples (66 out of 112) carried BG haplotypes. Overall, the pattern of pairwise nucleotide differences and the results of neutrality tests, as well as the results of tests for compliance with the model of sudden demographic expansion or with the model of exponential growth pointed to a past significant increase in the number of Amur sturgeon, which was most clearly manifested in the analysis of data on the BG haplogroup. The constructed Bayesian skyline plots showed that this growth began about 18 to 16 thousand years ago. At present, the effective size of the strongly reduced (due to overharvesting) population of Amur sturgeon may be equal to or even lower than it was before the beginning of this growth during the Last Glacial Maximum. The presence in the mitochondrial gene pool ofAmur sturgeon of two haplogroups, their unequal evolutionary dynamics, and, judging by scanty data, their unequal representation in the Russian and Chinese parts of the Amur River basin point to the possible existence of at least two distinct populations of Amur sturgeon in the past. PMID:25966586

  20. [Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation, demographic history, and population structure of Amur sturgeon Acipenser schrenckii Brandt, 1869].

    PubMed

    Shedko, S V; Miroshnichenko, I L; Nemkova, G A; Koshelev, V N; Shedko, M B

    2015-02-01

    The variability of the mtDNA control region (D-loop) was examined in Amur sturgeon endemic to the Amur River. This species is also classified as critically endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened species. Sequencing of 796- to 812-bp fragments of the D-loop in 112 sturgeon collected in the Lower Amur revealed 73 different genotypes. The sample was characterized by a high level of haplotypic (0.976) and nucleotide (0.0194) diversity. The identified haplotypes split into two well-defined monophyletic groups, BG (n = 39) and SM (n = 34), differing (HKY distance) on average by 3.41% of nucleotide positions upon an average level of intragroup differences of 0.54 and 1.23%, respectively. Moreover, the haplotypes of the SM groups differed by the presence of a 13-14 bp deletion. Most ofthe samples (66 out of 112) carried BG haplotypes. Overall, the pattern of pairwise nucleotide differences and the results of neutrality tests, as well as the results of tests for compliance with the model of sudden demographic expansion or with the model of exponential growth pointed to a past significant increase in the number of Amur sturgeon, which was most clearly manifested in the analysis of data on the BG haplogroup. The constructed Bayesian skyline plots showed that this growth began about 18 to 16 thousand years ago. At present, the effective size of the strongly reduced (due to overharvesting) population of Amur sturgeon may be equal to or even lower than it was before the beginning of this growth during the Last Glacial Maximum. The presence in the mitochondrial gene pool ofAmur sturgeon of two haplogroups, their unequal evolutionary dynamics, and, judging by scanty data, their unequal representation in the Russian and Chinese parts of the Amur River basin point to the possible existence of at least two distinct populations of Amur sturgeon in the past.

  1. Temporal analysis of mtDNA variation reveals decreased genetic diversity in least terns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draheim, Hope M.; Baird, Patricia; Haig, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Least Tern (Sternula antillarum) has undergone large population declines over the last century as a result of direct and indirect anthropogenic factors. The genetic implications of these declines are unknown. We used historical museum specimens (pre-1960) and contemporary (2001–2005) samples to examine range-wide phylogeographic patterns and investigate potential loss in the species' genetic variation. We obtained sequences (522 bp) of the mitochondrial gene for NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) from 268 individuals from across the species' range. Phylogeographic analysis revealed no association with geography or traditional subspecies designations. However, we detected potential reductions in genetic diversity in contemporary samples from California and the Atlantic coast Least Tern from that in historical samples, suggesting that current genetic diversity in Least Tern populations is lower than in their pre-1960 counterparts. Our results offer unique insights into changes in the Least Tern's genetic diversity over the past century and highlight the importance and utility of museum specimens in studies of conservation genetics.

  2. Nuclear DNA content in Sinningia (Gesneriaceae); intraspecific genome size variation and genome characterization in S. speciosa.

    PubMed

    Zaitlin, David; Pierce, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    The Gesneriaceae (Lamiales) is a family of flowering plants comprising >3000 species of mainly tropical origin, the most familiar of which is the cultivated African violet (Saintpaulia spp.). Species of Gesneriaceae are poorly represented in the lists of taxa sampled for genome size estimation; measurements are available for three species of Ramonda and one each of Haberlea, Saintpaulia, and Streptocarpus, all species of Old World origin. We report here nuclear genome size estimates for 10 species of Sinningia, a neotropical genus largely restricted to Brazil. Flow cytometry of leaf cell nuclei showed that holoploid genome size in Sinningia is very small (approximately two times the size of the Arabidopsis genome), and is small compared to the other six species of Gesneriaceae with genome size estimates. We also documented intraspecific genome size variation of 21%-26% within a group of wild Sinningia speciosa (Lodd.) Hiern collections. In addition, we analyzed 1210 genome survey sequences from S. speciosa to characterize basic features of the nuclear genome such as guanine-cytosine content, types of repetitive elements, numbers of protein-coding sequences, and sequences unique to S. speciosa. We included several other angiosperm species as genome size standards, one of which was the snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.; Veronicaceae, Lamiales). Multiple measurements on three accessions indicated that the genome size of A. majus is ~633 × 10⁶ base pairs, which is approximately 40% of the previously published estimate. PMID:21164539

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Variation Among Populations of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) From Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Muhammad; Rugman-Jones, Paul F; Wakil, Waqas; Stouthamer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Red Palm Weevil (RPW) Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) is a voracious pest of palm species. In recent decades its range has expanded greatly, particularly impacting the date palm industry in the Middle East. This has led to conjecture regarding the origins of invasive RPW populations. For example, in parts of the Middle East, RPW is commonly referred to as the "Pakistani weevil" in the belief that it originated there. We sought evidence to support or refute this belief. First reports of RPW in Pakistan were from the Punjab region in 1918, but it is unknown whether it is native or invasive there. We estimated genetic variation across five populations of RPW from two provinces of Pakistan, using sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene. Four haplotypes were detected; two (H1 and H5) were abundant, accounting for 88% of specimens across the sampled populations, and were previously known from the Middle East. The remaining haplotypes (H51 and H52) were newly detected (in global terms) and there was no geographic overlap in their distribution within Pakistan. Levels of haplotype diversity were much lower than those previously recorded in accepted parts of the native range of RPW, suggesting that the weevil may be invasive in Pakistan. The affinity of Pakistani haplotypes to those reported from India (and the geographical proximity of the two countries), make the latter a likely "native" source. With regards the validity of the name "Pakistani weevil", we found little genetic evidence to justify it. PMID:27651423

  4. Mitochondrial DNA variation of indigenous goats in Narok and Isiolo counties of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kibegwa, F M; Githui, K E; Jung'a, J O; Badamana, M S; Nyamu, M N

    2016-06-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among and genetic variability within 60 goats from two different indigenous breeds in Narok and Isiolo counties in Kenya and 22 published goat samples were analysed using mitochondrial control region sequences. The results showed that there were 54 polymorphic sites in a 481-bp sequence and 29 haplotypes were determined. The mean haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity were 0.981 ± 0.006 and 0.019 ± 0.001, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis in combination with goat haplogroup reference sequences from GenBank showed that all goat sequences were clustered into two haplogroups (A and G), of which haplogroup A was the commonest in the two populations. A very high percentage (99.90%) of the genetic variation was distributed within the regions, and a smaller percentage (0.10%) distributed among regions as revealed by the analysis of molecular variance (amova). This amova results showed that the divergence between regions was not statistically significant. We concluded that the high levels of intrapopulation diversity in Isiolo and Narok goats and the weak phylogeographic structuring suggested that there existed strong gene flow among goat populations probably caused by extensive transportation of goats in history. PMID:26459231

  5. Nuclear DNA content in Sinningia (Gesneriaceae); intraspecific genome size variation and genome characterization in S. speciosa.

    PubMed

    Zaitlin, David; Pierce, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    The Gesneriaceae (Lamiales) is a family of flowering plants comprising >3000 species of mainly tropical origin, the most familiar of which is the cultivated African violet (Saintpaulia spp.). Species of Gesneriaceae are poorly represented in the lists of taxa sampled for genome size estimation; measurements are available for three species of Ramonda and one each of Haberlea, Saintpaulia, and Streptocarpus, all species of Old World origin. We report here nuclear genome size estimates for 10 species of Sinningia, a neotropical genus largely restricted to Brazil. Flow cytometry of leaf cell nuclei showed that holoploid genome size in Sinningia is very small (approximately two times the size of the Arabidopsis genome), and is small compared to the other six species of Gesneriaceae with genome size estimates. We also documented intraspecific genome size variation of 21%-26% within a group of wild Sinningia speciosa (Lodd.) Hiern collections. In addition, we analyzed 1210 genome survey sequences from S. speciosa to characterize basic features of the nuclear genome such as guanine-cytosine content, types of repetitive elements, numbers of protein-coding sequences, and sequences unique to S. speciosa. We included several other angiosperm species as genome size standards, one of which was the snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.; Veronicaceae, Lamiales). Multiple measurements on three accessions indicated that the genome size of A. majus is ~633 × 10⁶ base pairs, which is approximately 40% of the previously published estimate.

  6. DNA variation in the phenotypically-diverse brown alga Saccharina japonica

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Saccharina japonica (Areschoug) Lane, Mayes, Druehl et Saunders is an economically important and highly morphologically variable brown alga inhabiting the northwest Pacific marine waters. On the basis of nuclear (ITS), plastid (rbcLS) and mitochondrial (COI) DNA sequence data, we have analyzed the genetic composition of typical Saccharina japonica (TYP) and its two common morphological varieties, known as the “longipes” (LON) and “shallow-water” (SHA) forms seeking to clarify their taxonomical status and to evaluate the possibility of cryptic species within S. japonica. Results The data show that the TYP and LON forms are very similar genetically in spite of drastic differences in morphology, life history traits, and ecological preferences. Both, however, are genetically quite different from the SHA form. The two Saccharina lineages are distinguished by 109 fixed single nucleotide differences as well as by seven fixed length polymorphisms (based on a 4,286 bp concatenated dataset that includes three gene regions). The GenBank database reveals a close affinity of the TYP and LON forms to S. japonica and the SHA form to S. cichorioides. The three gene markers used in the present work have different sensitivity for the algal species identification. COI gene was the most discriminant gene marker. However, we have detected instances of interspecific COI recombination reflecting putative historical hybridization events between distantly related algal lineages. The recombinant sequences show highly contrasted level of divergence in the 5’- and 3’- regions of the gene, leading to significantly different tree topologies depending on the gene segment (5’- or 3’-) used for tree reconstruction. Consequently, the 5’-COI “barcoding” region (~ 650 bp) can be misleading for identification purposes, at least in the case of algal species that might have experienced historical hybridization events. Conclusion Taking into account the potential

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Variation Among Populations of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) From Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Yasin, Muhammad; Rugman-Jones, Paul F.; Wakil, Waqas; Stouthamer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Red Palm Weevil (RPW) Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) is a voracious pest of palm species. In recent decades its range has expanded greatly, particularly impacting the date palm industry in the Middle East. This has led to conjecture regarding the origins of invasive RPW populations. For example, in parts of the Middle East, RPW is commonly referred to as the “Pakistani weevil” in the belief that it originated there. We sought evidence to support or refute this belief. First reports of RPW in Pakistan were from the Punjab region in 1918, but it is unknown whether it is native or invasive there. We estimated genetic variation across five populations of RPW from two provinces of Pakistan, using sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene. Four haplotypes were detected; two (H1 and H5) were abundant, accounting for 88% of specimens across the sampled populations, and were previously known from the Middle East. The remaining haplotypes (H51 and H52) were newly detected (in global terms) and there was no geographic overlap in their distribution within Pakistan. Levels of haplotype diversity were much lower than those previously recorded in accepted parts of the native range of RPW, suggesting that the weevil may be invasive in Pakistan. The affinity of Pakistani haplotypes to those reported from India (and the geographical proximity of the two countries), make the latter a likely “native” source. With regards the validity of the name “Pakistani weevil”, we found little genetic evidence to justify it. PMID:27651423

  8. Analysis of X chromosome genomic DNA sequence copy number variation associated with premature ovarian failure (POF)

    PubMed Central

    Quilter, C.R.; Karcanias, A.C.; Bagga, M.R.; Duncan, S.; Murray, A.; Conway, G.S.; Sargent, C.A.; Affara, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a heterogeneous disease defined as amenorrhoea for >6 months before age 40, with an FSH serum level >40 mIU/ml (menopausal levels). While there is a strong genetic association with POF, familial studies have also indicated that idiopathic POF may also be genetically linked. Conventional cytogenetic analyses have identified regions of the X chromosome that are strongly associated with ovarian function, as well as several POF candidate genes. Cryptic chromosome abnormalities that have been missed might be detected by array comparative genomic hybridization. METHODS In this study, samples from 42 idiopathic POF patients were subjected to a complete end-to-end X/Y chromosome tiling path array to achieve a detailed copy number variation (CNV) analysis of X chromosome involvement in POF. The arrays also contained a 1 Mb autosomal tiling path as a reference control. Quantitative PCR for selected genes contained within the CNVs was used to confirm the majority of the changes detected. The expression pattern of some of these genes in human tissue RNA was examined by reverse transcription (RT)–PCR. RESULTS A number of CNVs were identified on both Xp and Xq, with several being shared among the POF cases. Some CNVs fall within known polymorphic CNV regions, and others span previously identified POF candidate regions and genes. CONCLUSIONS The new data reported in this study reveal further discrete X chromosome intervals not previously associated with the disease and therefore implicate new clusters of candidate genes. Further studies will be required to elucidate their involvement in POF. PMID:20570974

  9. The Influence of Social Systems on Patterns of Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Baboons.

    PubMed

    Kopp, G H; Ferreira da Silva, M J; Fischer, J; Brito, J C; Regnaut, S; Roos, C; Zinner, D

    2014-01-01

    Behavior is influenced by genes but can also shape the genetic structure of natural populations. Investigating this link is of great importance because behavioral processes can alter the genetic diversity on which selection acts. Gene flow is one of the main determinants of the genetic structure of a population and dispersal is the behavior that mediates gene flow. Baboons (genus Papio) are among the most intensely studied primate species and serve as a model system to investigate the evolution of social systems using a comparative approach. The general mammalian pattern of male dispersal and female philopatry has thus far been found in baboons, with the exception of hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas). As yet, the lack of data on Guinea baboons (Papio papio) creates a taxonomic gap in genus-wide comparative analyses. In our study we investigated the sex-biased dispersal pattern of Guinea baboons in comparison to hamadryas, olive, yellow, and chacma baboons using sequences of the maternally transmitted mitochondrial hypervariable region I. Analyzing whole-range georeferenced samples (N = 777), we found strong evidence for female-biased gene flow in Guinea baboons and confirmed this pattern for hamadryas baboons, as shown by a lack of genetic-geographic structuring. In addition, most genetic variation was found within and not among demes, in sharp contrast to the pattern observed in matrilocal primates including the other baboon taxa. Our results corroborate the notion that the Guinea baboons' social system shares some important features with that of hamadryas baboons, suggesting similar evolutionary forces have acted to distinguish them from all other baboons.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA Variation Among Populations of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) From Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Yasin, Muhammad; Rugman-Jones, Paul F.; Wakil, Waqas; Stouthamer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Red Palm Weevil (RPW) Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) is a voracious pest of palm species. In recent decades its range has expanded greatly, particularly impacting the date palm industry in the Middle East. This has led to conjecture regarding the origins of invasive RPW populations. For example, in parts of the Middle East, RPW is commonly referred to as the “Pakistani weevil” in the belief that it originated there. We sought evidence to support or refute this belief. First reports of RPW in Pakistan were from the Punjab region in 1918, but it is unknown whether it is native or invasive there. We estimated genetic variation across five populations of RPW from two provinces of Pakistan, using sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene. Four haplotypes were detected; two (H1 and H5) were abundant, accounting for 88% of specimens across the sampled populations, and were previously known from the Middle East. The remaining haplotypes (H51 and H52) were newly detected (in global terms) and there was no geographic overlap in their distribution within Pakistan. Levels of haplotype diversity were much lower than those previously recorded in accepted parts of the native range of RPW, suggesting that the weevil may be invasive in Pakistan. The affinity of Pakistani haplotypes to those reported from India (and the geographical proximity of the two countries), make the latter a likely “native” source. With regards the validity of the name “Pakistani weevil”, we found little genetic evidence to justify it.

  11. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  12. GENETIC VARIATION IN RED RASPBERRIES (RUBUS IDAEUS L.; ROSACEAE) FROM SITES DIFFERING IN ORGANIC POLLUTANTS COMPARED WITH SYNTHETIC TANDEM REPEAT DNA PROBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two synthetic tandem repetitive DNA probes were used to compare genetic variation at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci among Rubus idaeus L. var. strigosus (Michx.) Maxim. (Rosaceae) individuals sampled at eight sites contaminated by pollutants (N = 39) and eight adjacent...

  13. Seasonal changes in markers of oxidative damage to lipids and DNA; correlations with seasonal variation in diet.

    PubMed

    Smolková, Bozena; Dusinská, Mária; Raslová, Katarína; McNeill, Geraldine; Spustová, Viera; Blazícek, Pavol; Horská, Alexandra; Collins, Andrew

    2004-07-13

    We have addressed the question whether the relatively high incidence of cardiovascular disease and certain cancers in countries of central/eastern Europe might be associated with nutritional imbalance, in particular a lack of fresh fruit and vegetables in the diet in winter months. Nutritional parameters and markers of oxidative stress were studied in three Slovak population groups: 46 survivors of myocardial infarction (MI group) and 48 healthy, normolipidemic subjects (NL), living in or near Bratislava; and 70 rural controls (RC group) living a more traditional life style in a country town. Data were collected in February/March and September/October of two consecutive years, representing times of minimum and maximum local availability of fresh fruits and vegetables. Oxidative stress was monitored using two biomarkers; plasma malondialdehyde (MDA, a product of lipid peroxidation), and oxidation of lymphocyte DNA. Dietary antioxidants, folic acid, homocysteine, total antioxidant status (FRAP) and uric acid were measured in plasma. Food frequency questionnaires were administered. Vegetable consumption in summer/autumn was twice as high as in winter/spring. DNA damage did not vary consistently across the seasons. Mean plasma MDA levels for the MI and NL groups showed a clear pattern, with high levels in winter/spring and low levels in summer/autumn. Folic acid showed a reciprocal pattern, similar to the pattern of vegetable consumption. The RC group had the smallest seasonal variations in vegetable consumption, folic acid levels, and MDA. High winter MDA levels are seen in those individuals with relatively low folic acid; they never occur in subjects with high plasma folic acid, implying that folic acid might directly protect against lipid oxidation. This study illustrates the value of the molecular epidemiological approach, while emphasising the need for well characterised population groups and valid biomarkers.

  14. DNA-Sequence Variation Among Schistosoma mekongi Populations and Related Taxa; Phylogeography and the Current Distribution of Asian Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Stephen W.; Fatih, Farrah A.; Upatham, E. Suchart

    2008-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis in humans along the lower Mekong River has proven a persistent public health problem in the region. The causative agent is the parasite Schistosoma mekongi (Trematoda: Digenea). A new transmission focus is reported, as well as the first study of genetic variation among S. mekongi populations. The aim is to confirm the identity of the species involved at each known focus of Mekong schistosomiasis transmission, to examine historical relationships among the populations and related taxa, and to provide data for use (a priori) in further studies of the origins, radiation, and future dispersal capabilities of S. mekongi. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA sequence data are presented for four populations of S. mekongi from Cambodia and southern Laos, three of which were distinguishable at the COI (cox1) and 12S (rrnS) mitochondrial loci sampled. A phylogeny was estimated for these populations and the other members of the Schistosoma sinensium group. The study provides new DNA sequence data for three new populations and one new locus/population combination. A Bayesian approach is used to estimate divergence dates for events within the S. sinensium group and among the S. mekongi populations. Conclusions/Significance The date estimates are consistent with phylogeographical hypotheses describing a Pliocene radiation of the S. sinensium group and a mid-Pleistocene invasion of Southeast Asia by S. mekongi. The date estimates also provide Bayesian priors for future work on the evolution of S. mekongi. The public health implications of S. mekongi transmission outside the lower Mekong River are also discussed. PMID:18350111

  15. Genome-wide survey reveals predisposing diabetes type 2-related DNA methylation variations in human peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Toperoff, Gidon; Aran, Dvir; Kark, Jeremy D; Rosenberg, Michael; Dubnikov, Tatyana; Nissan, Batel; Wainstein, Julio; Friedlander, Yechiel; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Glaser, Benjamin; Hellman, Asaf

    2012-01-15

    Inter-individual DNA methylation variations were frequently hypothesized to alter individual susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Sequence-influenced methylations were described in T2DM-associated genomic regions, but evidence for direct, sequence-independent association with disease risk is missing. Here, we explore disease-contributing DNA methylation through a stepwise study design: first, a pool-based, genome-scale screen among 1169 case and control individuals revealed an excess of differentially methylated sites in genomic regions that were previously associated with T2DM through genetic studies. Next, in-depth analyses were performed at selected top-ranking regions. A CpG site in the first intron of the FTO gene showed small (3.35%) but significant (P = 0.000021) hypomethylation of cases relative to controls. The effect was independent of the sequence polymorphism in the region and persists among individuals carrying the sequence-risk alleles. The odds of belonging to the T2DM group increased by 6.1% for every 1% decrease in methylation (OR = 1.061, 95% CI: 1.032-1.090), the odds ratio for decrease of 1 standard deviation of methylation (adjusted to gender) was 1.5856 (95% CI: 1.2824-1.9606) and the sensitivity (area under the curve = 0.638, 95% CI: 0.586-0.690; males = 0.675, females = 0.609) was better than that of the strongest known sequence variant. Furthermore, a prospective study in an independent population cohort revealed significant hypomethylation of young individuals that later progressed to T2DM, relative to the individuals who stayed healthy. Further genomic analysis revealed co-localization with gene enhancers and with binding sites for methylation-sensitive transcriptional regulators. The data showed that low methylation level at the analyzed sites is an early marker of T2DM and suggests a novel mechanism by which early-onset, inter-individual methylation variation at isolated non-promoter genomic sites predisposes to T2DM.

  16. Genetic characterization of Kenai brown bears (Ursus arctos): Microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA control region variation in brown bears of the Kenai Peninsula, south central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, J.V.; Talbot, S.L.; Farley, S.

    2008-01-01

    We collected data from 20 biparentally inherited microsatellite loci, and nucleotide sequence from the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region, to determine levels of genetic variation of the brown bears (Ursus arctos L., 1758) of the Kenai Peninsula, south central Alaska. Nuclear genetic variation was similar to that observed in other Alaskan peninsular populations. We detected no significant inbreeding and found no evidence of population substructuring on the Kenai Peninsula. We observed a genetic signature of a bottleneck under the infinite alleles model (IAM), but not under the stepwise mutation model (SMM) or the two-phase model (TPM) of microsatellite mutation. Kenai brown bears have lower levels of mtDNA haplotypic diversity relative to most other brown bear populations in Alaska. ?? 2008 NRC.

  17. mtDNA variation indicates Mongolia may have been the source for the founding population for the New World.

    PubMed Central

    Merriwether, D. A.; Hall, W. W.; Vahlne, A.; Ferrell, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    mtDNA RFLP variation was analyzed in 42 Mongolians from Ulan Bator. All four founding lineage types (A [4.76%], B [2.38%], C [11.9%], and D [19.04%]) identified by Torroni and colleagues were detected. Seven of the nine founding lineage types proposed by Bailliet and colleagues and Merriwether and Ferrell were detected (A2 [4.76%], B [2.38%], C1 [11.9%], D1 [7.14%], D2 [11.9%], X6 [16.7%], and X7 [9.5%]). Sixty-four percent of these 42 individuals had "Amerindian founding lineage" haplotypes. A survey of 24 restriction sites yielded 16 polymorphic sites and 21 different haplotypes. The presence of all four of the founding lineages identified by the Torroni group (and seven of Merriwether and Ferrell's nine founding lineages), combined with Mongolia's location with respect to the Bering Strait, indicates that Mongolia is a potential location for the origin of the founders of the New World. Since lineage B, which is widely distributed in the New World, is absent in Siberia, we conclude that Mongolia or a geographic location common to both contemporary Mongolians and American aboriginals is the more likely origin of the founders of the New World. PMID:8659526

  18. Genetic variation in scaly hair-fin anchovy Setipinna tenuifilis (Engraulididae) based on the mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengyong; Song, Na; Lu, Zhichuang; Wang, Jun; Cai, Shanshan; Gao, Tianxiang

    2014-06-01

    Scaly hair-fin anchovy (Setipinna tenuifilis) is a small, pelagic and economical species and widely distributed in Chinese coastal water. However, resources of S. tenuifilis have been reduced due to overfishing. For better fishery management, it is necessary to understand the pattern of S. tenuifilis's biogeography. Genetic analyses were taken place to detect their population genetic variation. A total of 153 individuals from 7 locations (Dongying, Yantai, Qingdao, Nantong, Wenzhou, Xiamen and Beibu Bay) were sequenced at the 5' end of mtDNA control region. A 39-bp tandem repeated sequence was found at the 5' end of the segment and a polymorphism of tandem repeated sequence was detected among 7 populations. Both mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests showed S. tenuifilis had experienced a recent population expansion. The topology of neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian evolutionary tree showed no significant genealogical branches or clusters of samples corresponding to sampling locality. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance and conventional pairwise population Fst value at group hierarchical level implied that there might have genetic divergence between southern group (population WZ, XM and BB) and northern group (population DY, YT, QD and NT). We concluded that there might have three different fishery management groups of S. tenuifilis and the late Pleistocene glacial event might have a crucial effect on present-day demography of S. tenuifilis in this region. PMID:24350689

  19. Phylogeography of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L.) and Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) based on mitochondrial DNA variations.

    PubMed

    Mousson, Laurence; Dauga, Catherine; Garrigues, Thomas; Schaffner, Francis; Vazeille, Marie; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2005-08-01

    Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (l.) and Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse) are the most important vectors of the dengue and yellow-fever viruses. Both took advantage of trade developments to spread throughout the tropics from their native area: A. aegypti originated from Africa and a. albopictus from South-East Asia. We investigated the relationships between A. aegypti and A. albopictus mosquitoes based on three mitochondrial-DNA genes (cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase I and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5). Little genetic variation was observed for a. albopictus, probably owing to the recent spreading of the species via human activities. For A. aegypti, most populations from South America were found to be genetically similar to populations from South-East Asia (Thailand and Vietnam), except for one sample from Boa Vista (northern Amazonia), which was more closely related to samples from Africa (Guinea and Ivory Coast). This suggests that African populations of A. aegypti introduced during the slave trade have persisted in Boa Vista, resisting eradication campaigns.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA and Y Chromosome Variation Provides Evidence for a Recent Common Ancestry between Native Americans and Indigenous Altaians

    PubMed Central

    Dulik, Matthew C.; Zhadanov, Sergey I.; Osipova, Ludmila P.; Askapuli, Ayken; Gau, Lydia; Gokcumen, Omer; Rubinstein, Samara; Schurr, Theodore G.

    2012-01-01

    The Altai region of southern Siberia has played a critical role in the peopling of northern Asia as an entry point into Siberia and a possible homeland for ancestral Native Americans. It has an old and rich history because humans have inhabited this area since the Paleolithic. Today, the Altai region is home to numerous Turkic-speaking ethnic groups, which have been divided into northern and southern clusters based on linguistic, cultural, and anthropological traits. To untangle Altaian genetic histories, we analyzed mtDNA and Y chromosome variation in northern and southern Altaian populations. All mtDNAs were assayed by PCR-RFLP analysis and control region sequencing, and the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome was scored for more than 100 biallelic markers and 17 Y-STRs. Based on these data, we noted differences in the origin and population history of Altaian ethnic groups, with northern Altaians appearing more like Yeniseian, Ugric, and Samoyedic speakers to the north, and southern Altaians having greater affinities to other Turkic speaking populations of southern Siberia and Central Asia. Moreover, high-resolution analysis of Y chromosome haplogroup Q has allowed us to reshape the phylogeny of this branch, making connections between populations of the New World and Old World more apparent and demonstrating that southern Altaians and Native Americans share a recent common ancestor. These results greatly enhance our understanding of the peopling of Siberia and the Americas. PMID:22281367

  1. Large variation in mitochondrial DNA of sexual and parthenogenetic Dahlica triquetrella (Lepidoptera: Psychidae) shows multiple origins of parthenogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obligate parthenogenesis is relatively rare in animals. Still, in some groups it is quite common and has evolved and persisted multiple times. These groups may provide important clues to help solve the ‘paradox of sex’. Several species in the Psychidae (Lepidoptera) have obligate parthenogenesis. Dahlica triquetrella is one of those species where multiple transitions to parthenogenesis are postulated based on intensive cytological and behavioural studies. This has led to the hypothesis that multiple transitions from sexuals to diploid parthenogens occurred during and after the last glacial period, followed by transitions from parthenogenetic diploids to parthenogenetic tetraploids. Our study is the first to test these hypotheses using a molecular phylogeny based on mtDNA from multiple sexual and parthenogenetic populations from a wide geographic range. Results Parthenogenetic (and sexual) D. triquetrella are not monophyletic, and considerable sequence variation is present suggesting multiple transitions to parthenogenesis. However, we could not establish ancestral sexual haplotypes from our dataset. Our data suggest that some parthenogenetic clades have evolved, indicating origins of parthenogenesis before the last glacial period. Conclusions Multiple transitions to parthenogenesis have taken place in Dahlica triquetrella, confirming previous hypotheses. The number of different parthenogenetic clades, haplotypes and their apparent evolutionary age, clearly show that parthenogenesis has been a very successful reproductive strategy in this species over a long period. PMID:23622052

  2. Next-Gen phylogeography of rainforest trees: exploring landscape-level cpDNA variation from whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, M; McPherson, H; Siow, J; Rossetto, M

    2014-01-01

    Standardized phylogeographic studies across codistributed taxa can identify important refugia and biogeographic barriers, and potentially uncover how changes in adaptive constraints through space and time impact on the distribution of genetic diversity. The combination of next-generation sequencing and methodologies that enable uncomplicated analysis of the full chloroplast genome may provide an invaluable resource for such studies. Here, we assess the potential of a shotgun-based method across twelve nonmodel rainforest trees sampled from two evolutionary distinct regions. Whole genomic shotgun sequencing libraries consisting of pooled individuals were used to assemble species-specific chloroplast references (in silicio). For each species, the pooled libraries allowed for the detection of variation within and between data sets (each representing a geographic region). The potential use of nuclear rDNA as an additional marker from the NGS libraries was investigated by mapping reads against available references. We successfully obtained phylogeographically informative sequence data from a range of previously unstudied rainforest trees. Greater levels of diversity were found in northern refugial rainforests than in southern expansion areas. The genetic signatures of varying evolutionary histories were detected, and interesting associative patterns between functional characteristics and genetic diversity were identified. This approach can suit a wide range of landscape-level studies. As the key laboratory-based steps do not require prior species-specific knowledge and can be easily outsourced, the techniques described here are even suitable for researchers without access to wet-laboratory facilities, making evolutionary ecology questions increasingly accessible to the research community.

  3. Genetic variation in scaly hair-fin anchovy Setipinna tenuifilis (Engraulididae) based on the mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengyong; Song, Na; Lu, Zhichuang; Wang, Jun; Cai, Shanshan; Gao, Tianxiang

    2014-06-01

    Scaly hair-fin anchovy (Setipinna tenuifilis) is a small, pelagic and economical species and widely distributed in Chinese coastal water. However, resources of S. tenuifilis have been reduced due to overfishing. For better fishery management, it is necessary to understand the pattern of S. tenuifilis's biogeography. Genetic analyses were taken place to detect their population genetic variation. A total of 153 individuals from 7 locations (Dongying, Yantai, Qingdao, Nantong, Wenzhou, Xiamen and Beibu Bay) were sequenced at the 5' end of mtDNA control region. A 39-bp tandem repeated sequence was found at the 5' end of the segment and a polymorphism of tandem repeated sequence was detected among 7 populations. Both mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests showed S. tenuifilis had experienced a recent population expansion. The topology of neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian evolutionary tree showed no significant genealogical branches or clusters of samples corresponding to sampling locality. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance and conventional pairwise population Fst value at group hierarchical level implied that there might have genetic divergence between southern group (population WZ, XM and BB) and northern group (population DY, YT, QD and NT). We concluded that there might have three different fishery management groups of S. tenuifilis and the late Pleistocene glacial event might have a crucial effect on present-day demography of S. tenuifilis in this region.

  4. mtDNA variation indicates Mongolia may have been the source for the founding population for the New World.

    PubMed

    Merriwether, D A; Hall, W W; Vahlne, A; Ferrell, R E

    1996-07-01

    mtDNA RFLP variation was analyzed in 42 Mongolians from Ulan Bator. All four founding lineage types (A [4.76%], B [2.38%], C [11.9%], and D [19.04%]) identified by Torroni and colleagues were detected. Seven of the nine founding lineage types proposed by Bailliet and colleagues and Merriwether and Ferrell were detected (A2 [4.76%], B [2.38%], C1 [11.9%], D1 [7.14%], D2 [11.9%], X6 [16.7%], and X7 [9.5%]). Sixty-four percent of these 42 individuals had "Amerindian founding lineage" haplotypes. A survey of 24 restriction sites yielded 16 polymorphic sites and 21 different haplotypes. The presence of all four of the founding lineages identified by the Torroni group (and seven of Merriwether and Ferrell's nine founding lineages), combined with Mongolia's location with respect to the Bering Strait, indicates that Mongolia is a potential location for the origin of the founders of the New World. Since lineage B, which is widely distributed in the New World, is absent in Siberia, we conclude that Mongolia or a geographic location common to both contemporary Mongolians and American aboriginals is the more likely origin of the founders of the New World. PMID:8659526

  5. Organization and variation analysis of 5S rDNA in different ploidy-level hybrids of red crucian carp × topmouth culter.

    PubMed

    He, Weiguo; Qin, Qinbo; Liu, Shaojun; Li, Tangluo; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Jun; Xie, Lihua; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Through distant crossing, diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., RCC♀, Cyprininae, 2n = 100) × topmouth culter (Erythroculter ilishaeformis Bleeker, TC♂, Cultrinae, 2n = 48) were successfully produced. Diploid hybrids possessed 74 chromosomes with one set from RCC and one set from TC; triploid hybrids harbored 124 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and one set from TC; tetraploid hybrids had 148 chromosomes with two sets from RCC and two sets from TC. The 5S rDNA of the three different ploidy-level hybrids and their parents were sequenced and analyzed. There were three monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class I: 203 bp; class II: 340 bp; and class III: 477 bp) in RCC and two monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class IV: 188 bp, and class V: 286 bp) in TC. In the hybrid offspring, diploid hybrids inherited three 5S rDNA classes from their female parent (RCC) and only class IV from their male parent (TC). Triploid hybrids inherited class II and class III from their female parent (RCC) and class IV from their male parent (TC). Tetraploid hybrids gained class II and class III from their female parent (RCC), and generated a new 5S rDNA sequence (designated class I-N). The specific paternal 5S rDNA sequence of class V was not found in the hybrid offspring. Sequence analysis of 5S rDNA revealed the influence of hybridization and polyploidization on the organization and variation of 5S rDNA in fish. This is the first report on the coexistence in vertebrates of viable diploid, triploid and tetraploid hybrids produced by crossing parents with different chromosome numbers, and these new hybrids are novel specimens for studying the genomic variation in the first generation of interspecific hybrids, which has significance for evolution and fish genetics.

  6. Challenges and complexities in estimating both the functional impact and the disease risk associated with the extensive genetic variation in human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Mohrenweiser, Harvey W; Wilson, David M; Jones, Irene M

    2003-05-15

    Individual risk and the population incidence of disease result from the interaction of genetic susceptibility and exposure. DNA repair is an example of a cellular process where genetic variation in families with extreme predisposition is documented to be associated with high disease likelihood, including syndromes of premature aging and cancer. Although the identification and characterization of new genes or variants in cancer families continues to be important, the focus of this paper is the current status of efforts to define the impact of polymorphic amino acid substitutions in DNA repair genes on individual and population cancer risk. There is increasing evidence that mild reductions in DNA repair capacity, assumed to be the consequence of common genetic variation, affect cancer predisposition. The extensive variation being found in the coding regions of DNA repair genes and the large number of genes in each of the major repair pathways results in complex genotypes with potential to impact cancer risk in the general population. The implications of this complexity for molecular epidemiology studies, as well as concepts that may make these challenges more manageable, are discussed. The concepts include both experimental and computational approaches that could be employed to develop predictors of disease susceptibility based on DNA repair genotype, focusing initially on studies to assess functional impact on individual proteins and pathways and then on molecular epidemiology studies to assess exposure-dependent health risk. In closing, we raise some of the non-technical challenges to the utilization of the full richness of the genetic variation to reduce disease occurrence and ultimately improve health care. PMID:12714187

  7. Variation in PAH-related DNA adduct levels among non-smokers: the role of multiple genetic polymorphisms and nucleotide excision repair phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Arash; Islami, Farhad; Phillips, David H.; Godschalk, Roger; Golozar, Asieh; Kamangar, Farin; Malekshah, Akbar Fazel-Tabar; Pourshams, Akram; Elahi, Seerat; Ghojaghi, Farhad; Strickland, Paul T; Taylor, Philip R; Boffetta, Paolo; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Malekzadeh, Reza; van Schooten, Frederik J.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) likely play a role in many cancers even in never-smokers. We tried to find a model to explain the relationship between variation in PAH-related DNA adduct levels among people with similar exposures, multiple genetic polymorphisms in genes related to metabolic and repair pathways, and nucleotide excision repair (NER) capacity. In 111 randomly-selected female never-smokers from the Golestan Cohort Study in Iran, we evaluated 21 SNPs in 14 genes related to xenobiotic metabolism and 12 SNPs in 8 DNA repair genes. NER capacity was evaluated by a modified comet assay, and aromatic DNA adduct levels were measured in blood by 32P-postlabelling. Multivariable regression models were compared by Akaike’s information criterion (AIC). Aromatic DNA adduct levels ranged between 1.7 and 18.6 per 108 nucleotides (mean: 5.8±3.1). DNA adduct level was significantly lower in homozygotes for NAT2 slow alleles and ERCC5 non risk-allele genotype, and was higher in the MPO homozygote risk-allele genotype. The sum of risk alleles in these genes significantly correlated with the log-adduct level (r=0.4, p<0.001). Compared with the environmental model, adding phase I SNPs and NER capacity provided the best fit, and could explain 17% more of the variation in adduct levels. NER capacity was affected by polymorphisms in the MTHFR and ERCC1 genes. Female non-smokers in this population had PAH-related DNA adduct levels 3-4 times higher than smokers and occupationally-exposed groups in previous studies, with large inter-individual variation which could best be explained by a combination of phase I genes and NER capacity. PMID:23175176

  8. Detecting Sex-Biased Gene Flow in African-Americans through the Analysis of Intra- and Inter-Population Variation at Mitochondrial DNA and Y- Chromosome Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Battaggia, C; Anagnostou, P; Bosch, I; Brisighelli, F; Destro-Bisol, G; Capocasa, M

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on variations at the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) and at seven Y-chromosome microsatellites in an African-American population sample from Chicago, IL, USA. Our results support the hypothesis that the population studied had undergone a European male-biased gene flow. We show that comparisons of intra-and inter-population diversity parameters between African-Americans, Europeans and Africans may help detect sex-biased gene flow, providing a complement to quantitative methods to estimate genetic admixture. PMID:24052726

  9. Evaluation of Interindividual Human Variation in Bioactivation and DNA Adduct Formation of Estragole in Liver Predicted by Physiologically Based Kinetic/Dynamic and Monte Carlo Modeling.

    PubMed

    Punt, Ans; Paini, Alicia; Spenkelink, Albertus; Scholz, Gabriele; Schilter, Benoit; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2016-04-18

    Estragole is a known hepatocarcinogen in rodents at high doses following metabolic conversion to the DNA-reactive metabolite 1'-sulfooxyestragole. The aim of the present study was to model possible levels of DNA adduct formation in (individual) humans upon exposure to estragole. This was done by extending a previously defined PBK model for estragole in humans to include (i) new data on interindividual variation in the kinetics for the major PBK model parameters influencing the formation of 1'-sulfooxyestragole, (ii) an equation describing the relationship between 1'-sulfooxyestragole and DNA adduct formation, (iii) Monte Carlo modeling to simulate interindividual human variation in DNA adduct formation in the population, and (iv) a comparison of the predictions made to human data on DNA adduct formation for the related alkenylbenzene methyleugenol. Adequate model predictions could be made, with the predicted DNA adduct levels at the estimated daily intake of estragole of 0.01 mg/kg bw ranging between 1.6 and 8.8 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides (nts) (50th and 99th percentiles, respectively). This is somewhat lower than values reported in the literature for the related alkenylbenzene methyleugenol in surgical human liver samples. The predicted levels seem to be below DNA adduct levels that are linked with tumor formation by alkenylbenzenes in rodents, which were estimated to amount to 188-500 adducts per 10(8) nts at the BMD10 values of estragole and methyleugenol. Although this does not seem to point to a significant health concern for human dietary exposure, drawing firm conclusions may have to await further validation of the model's predictions. PMID:26952143

  10. High regional genetic diversity and lack of host-specificity in Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) as revealed by mtDNA variation.

    PubMed

    Piwczyński, M; Pabijan, M; Grzywacz, A; Glinkowski, W; Bereś, P K; Buszko, J

    2016-08-01

    The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) infests a wide array of host plants and is considered one of the most serious pests of maize in Europe. Recent studies suggest that individuals feeding on maize in Europe should be referred to O. nubilalis (sensu nov.), while those infesting dicots as Ostrinia scapulalis (sensu nov.). We test if the clear genetic distinctiveness among individuals of O. nubilalis living on maize vs. dicots is tracked by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We used fragments of COI and COII genes of 32 individuals traditionally recognized as O. nubilalis collected on three host plants, maize, mugwort and hop, growing in different parts of Poland. In addition, we reconstructed the mtDNA phylogeny of Ostrinia species based on our data and sequences retrieved from GenBank to assess host and/or biogeographic patterns. We also compared haplotype variation found in Poland (east-central Europe) with other regions (Anatolia, Eastern Europe, Balkans, Far East, North America). Our study showed high mtDNA diversity of O. nubilalis in Poland in comparison with other regions and revealed rare haplotypes likely of Asian origin. We did not find distinct mtDNA haplotypes in larvae feeding on maize vs. dicotyledonous plants. Phylogenetic analyses showed an apparent lack of mtDNA divergence among putatively distinct lineages belonging to the O. nubilalis group as identical haplotypes are shared by Asian and European individuals. We argue that human-mediated dispersal, hybridization and sporadic host jumps are likely responsible for the lack of a geographic pattern in mtDNA variation. PMID:27019346

  11. Next-Gen phylogeography of rainforest trees: exploring landscape-level cpDNA variation from whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, M; McPherson, H; Siow, J; Rossetto, M

    2014-01-01

    Standardized phylogeographic studies across codistributed taxa can identify important refugia and biogeographic barriers, and potentially uncover how changes in adaptive constraints through space and time impact on the distribution of genetic diversity. The combination of next-generation sequencing and methodologies that enable uncomplicated analysis of the full chloroplast genome may provide an invaluable resource for such studies. Here, we assess the potential of a shotgun-based method across twelve nonmodel rainforest trees sampled from two evolutionary distinct regions. Whole genomic shotgun sequencing libraries consisting of pooled individuals were used to assemble species-specific chloroplast references (in silicio). For each species, the pooled libraries allowed for the detection of variation within and between data sets (each representing a geographic region). The potential use of nuclear rDNA as an additional marker from the NGS libraries was investigated by mapping reads against available references. We successfully obtained phylogeographically informative sequence data from a range of previously unstudied rainforest trees. Greater levels of diversity were found in northern refugial rainforests than in southern expansion areas. The genetic signatures of varying evolutionary histories were detected, and interesting associative patterns between functional characteristics and genetic diversity were identified. This approach can suit a wide range of landscape-level studies. As the key laboratory-based steps do not require prior species-specific knowledge and can be easily outsourced, the techniques described here are even suitable for researchers without access to wet-laboratory facilities, making evolutionary ecology questions increasingly accessible to the research community. PMID:24119022

  12. The resolution of aneuploid DNA stem lines by flow cytometry: limitations imposed by the coefficient of variation and the percentage of aneuploid nuclei.

    PubMed

    Cusick, E L; Milton, J I; Ewen, S W

    1990-04-01

    Factors important in the resolution of cell sub-populations with differing DNA contents were investigated using an EPICS C flow cytometer. Software is available for the EPICS C which permits data from any two histograms to be superimposed or added together before display. Samples of fresh and archival thyroid tissue, stained with propidium iodide, were analysed on the flow cytometer and the peak channel number noted. The photomultiplier (PMT) voltage was increased and the sample analysed again producing a second histogram with a higher peak channel number. The two histograms were added together to simulate a cell suspension with two sub-populations with a different DNA content. By systematically altering the PMT voltage and the number of nuclei included in each analysis, it was possible to examine the importance of DNA index and the percentage of tumor cells with an aneuploid DNA content for both fresh and paraffin-embedded thyroid nuclei. The crucial importance of achieving a low coefficient of variation (CV) was demonstrated and consequently the reservations that pertain when archival material is studied, particularly in tumours where DNA aneuploidy is frequently expressed with a low DNA index.

  13. Enhanced detection of DNA sequences using end-point PCR amplification and online gel electrophoresis (GE)-ICP-MS: determination of gene copy number variations.

    PubMed

    González, T Iglesias; Espina, M; Sierra, L M; Bettmer, J; Blanco-González, E; Montes-Bayón, M; Sanz-Medel, A

    2014-11-18

    The design and evaluation of analytical methods that permit quantitative analysis of specific DNA sequences is exponentially increasing. For this purpose, highly sensitive methodologies usually based on labeling protocols with fluorescent dyes or nanoparticles are often explored. Here, the possibility of label-free signal amplification using end-point polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are exploited using on-column agarose gel electrophoresis as separation and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the detection of phosphorus in amplified DNA sequences. The calibration of the separation system with a DNA ladder permits direct estimation of the size of the amplified gene fragment after PCR. With this knowledge, and considering the compound-independent quantification capabilities exhibited by ICP-MS for phosphorus (it is only dependent on the number of P atoms per molecule), the correlation of the P-peak area of the amplified gene fragment, with respect to the gene copy numbers (in the starting DNA), is then established. Such a relationship would permit the determination of copy number variations (CNVs) in genomic DNA using ICP-MS measurements. The method detection limit, in terms of the required amount of starting DNA, is ∼6 ng (or 1000 cells if 100% extraction efficiency is expected). The suitability of the proposed label-free amplification strategy is applied to CNVs monitoring in cells exposed to a chemical agent capable of deletion induction, such as cisplatin. PMID:25312744

  14. Cytogenetic variation of repetitive DNA elements in Hoplias malabaricus (Characiformes - Erythrinidae) from white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fabíola Araújo Dos; Marques, Diego Ferreira; Terencio, Maria Leandra; Feldberg, Eliana; Rodrigues, Luís Reginaldo R

    2016-03-01

    Hoplias malabaricus is a common fish species occurring in white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin. Its large distribution across distinct aquatic environments can pose stressful conditions for dispersal and creates possibilities for the emergence of local adaptive profiles. We investigated the chromosomal localization of repetitive DNA markers (constitutive heterochromatin, rDNA and the transposable element REX-3) in populations from the Amazonas river (white water), the Negro river (black water) and the Tapajós river (clear water), in order to address the variation/association of cytogenomic features and environmental conditions. We found a conserved karyotypic macrostructure with a diploid number of 40 chromosomes (20 metacentrics + 20 submetacentrics) in all the samples. Heteromorphism in pair 14 was detected as evidence for the initial differentiation of an XX/XY system. Minor differences detected in the amount of repetitive DNA markers are interpreted as possible signatures of local adaptations to distinct aquatic environments.

  15. Cytogenetic variation of repetitive DNA elements in Hoplias malabaricus (Characiformes - Erythrinidae) from white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Fabíola Araújo; Marques, Diego Ferreira; Terencio, Maria Leandra; Feldberg, Eliana; Rodrigues, Luís Reginaldo R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hoplias malabaricus is a common fish species occurring in white, black and clear water rivers of the Amazon basin. Its large distribution across distinct aquatic environments can pose stressful conditions for dispersal and creates possibilities for the emergence of local adaptive profiles. We investigated the chromosomal localization of repetitive DNA markers (constitutive heterochromatin, rDNA and the transposable element REX-3) in populations from the Amazonas river (white water), the Negro river (black water) and the Tapajós river (clear water), in order to address the variation/association of cytogenomic features and environmental conditions. We found a conserved karyotypic macrostructure with a diploid number of 40 chromosomes (20 metacentrics + 20 submetacentrics) in all the samples. Heteromorphism in pair 14 was detected as evidence for the initial differentiation of an XX/XY system. Minor differences detected in the amount of repetitive DNA markers are interpreted as possible signatures of local adaptations to distinct aquatic environments. PMID:27007897

  16. A rapidly photo-activatable light-up fluorescent nucleoside and its application in DNA base variation sensing.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyong; Chen, Yuqi; Wang, Yafen; Wang, Jiaqi; Mo, Jing; Fu, Boshi; Wang, Zijing; Du, Yuhao; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-06-30

    A new DNA building block (d(Tet)U) bearing a tetrazole and allyloxy group at N-phenyl ring linked through an aminopropynyl linker to the 5-position of 2'-deoxyuridine was synthesized. The modified DNA can be lit up via a photoinduced intramolecular tetrazole-alkene cycloaddition reaction, but quenched when the fully-matched double strand is formed. This conspicuous difference in fluorescence could open a door for DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing. PMID:27315545

  17. Effect of structure variation of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe on the performance of displacement-based electrochemical aptamer sensors.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jie; Zhang, Ziping; Jin, Haizhu

    2016-03-15

    Electrochemical aptamer-based (E-AB) sensors employing electrode-immobilized, redox-tagged aptamer probes have emerged as a promising platform for the sensitive and quick detection of target analytes ranging from small molecules to proteins. Signal generation in this class of sensor is linked to change in electron transfer efficiency upon binding-induced change in flexibility/conformation of the aptamer probe. Because of this signaling mechanism, signal gains of these sensors can be improved by employing a displacement-based recognition system, which links target binding with a large-scale flexibility/conformation shift from the aptamer-DNA duplex to the single-stranded DNA or the native aptamer. Despite the relatively large number of displacement-based E-AB sensor samples, little attention has been paid to the structure variation of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe. Here we detail the effects of complementary length and position of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe on the performance of a model displacement-based E-AB sensor for ATP. We find that, greater background suppression and signal gain are observed with longer complementary length of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe. However, sensor equilibration time slows monotonically with increasing complementary length; and with too many target binding sites in aptamer sequence being occupied by the complementary DNA, the aptamer-target binding does not occur and no signal gain observed. We also demonstrate that signal gain of the displacement-based E-AB sensor is strongly dependent on the complementary position of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe, with complementary position located at the electrode-attached or redox-tagged end of the duplex probe, larger background suppression and signal increase than that of the middle position are observed. These results highlight the importance of rational structure design of the aptamer-DNA duplex probe and provide new insights into the optimization of displacement-based E-AB sensors.

  18. Congruence of Microsatellite and Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Acrobat Ants (Crematogaster Subgenus Decacrema, Formicidae: Myrmicinae) Inhabiting Macaranga (Euphorbiaceae) Myrmecophytes

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Shouhei; Nagano, Yusuke; Kataoka, Yowsuke; Komatsu, Takashi; Itioka, Takao; Shimizu-kaya, Usun; Inui, Yoko; Itino, Takao

    2015-01-01

    A previously reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogeny of Crematogaster (subgenus Decacrema) ants inhabiting Macaranga myrmecophytes indicated that the partners diversified synchronously and their specific association has been maintained for 20 million years. However, the mtDNA clades did not exactly match morphological species, probably owing to introgressive hybridization among younger species. In this study, we determined the congruence between nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR, also called microsatellite) genotyping and mtDNA phylogeny to confirm the suitability of the mtDNA phylogeny for inferring the evolutionary history of Decacrema ants. Analyses of ant samples from Lambir Hills National park, northeastern Borneo, showed overall congruence between the SSR and mtDNA groupings, indicating that mtDNA markers are useful for delimiting species, at least at the local level. We also found overall high host-plant specificity of the SSR genotypes of Decacrema ants, consistent with the specificity based on the mtDNA phylogeny. Further, we detected cryptic genetic assemblages exhibiting high specificity toward particular plant species within a single mtDNA clade. This finding, which may be evidence for rapid ecological and genetic differentiation following a host shift, is a new insight into the previously suggested long-term codiversification of Decacrema ants and Macaranga plants. PMID:25692953

  19. Congruence of microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA variation in acrobat ants (Crematogaster subgenus Decacrema, Formicidae: Myrmicinae) inhabiting Macaranga (Euphorbiaceae) myrmecophytes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shouhei; Nagano, Yusuke; Kataoka, Yowsuke; Komatsu, Takashi; Itioka, Takao; Shimizu-Kaya, Usun; Inui, Yoko; Itino, Takao

    2015-01-01

    A previously reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogeny of Crematogaster (subgenus Decacrema) ants inhabiting Macaranga myrmecophytes indicated that the partners diversified synchronously and their specific association has been maintained for 20 million years. However, the mtDNA clades did not exactly match morphological species, probably owing to introgressive hybridization among younger species. In this study, we determined the congruence between nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR, also called microsatellite) genotyping and mtDNA phylogeny to confirm the suitability of the mtDNA phylogeny for inferring the evolutionary history of Decacrema ants. Analyses of ant samples from Lambir Hills National park, northeastern Borneo, showed overall congruence between the SSR and mtDNA groupings, indicating that mtDNA markers are useful for delimiting species, at least at the local level. We also found overall high host-plant specificity of the SSR genotypes of Decacrema ants, consistent with the specificity based on the mtDNA phylogeny. Further, we detected cryptic genetic assemblages exhibiting high specificity toward particular plant species within a single mtDNA clade. This finding, which may be evidence for rapid ecological and genetic differentiation following a host shift, is a new insight into the previously suggested long-term codiversification of Decacrema ants and Macaranga plants.

  20. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae.

    PubMed

    Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Pellicer, Jaume; Čížková, Jana; Koblížková, Andrea; Neumann, Pavel; Fuková, Iva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Ilia J

    2015-01-01

    The differential accumulation and elimination of repetitive DNA are key drivers of genome size variation in flowering plants, yet there have been few studies which have analysed how different types of repeats in related species contribute to genome size evolution within a phylogenetic context. This question is addressed here by conducting large-scale comparative analysis of repeats in 23 species from four genera of the monophyletic legume tribe Fabeae, representing a 7.6-fold variation in genome size. Phylogenetic analysis and genome size reconstruction revealed that this diversity arose from genome size expansions and contractions in different lineages during the evolution of Fabeae. Employing a combination of low-pass genome sequencing with novel bioinformatic approaches resulted in identification and quantification of repeats making up 55-83% of the investigated genomes. In turn, this enabled an analysis of how each major repeat type contributed to the genome size variation encountered. Differential accumulation of repetitive DNA was found to account for 85% of the genome size differences between the species, and most (57%) of this variation was found to be driven by a single lineage of Ty3/gypsy LTR-retrotransposons, the Ogre elements. Although the amounts of several other lineages of LTR-retrotransposons and the total amount of satellite DNA were also positively correlated with genome size, their contributions to genome size variation were much smaller (up to 6%). Repeat analysis within a phylogenetic framework also revealed profound differences in the extent of sequence conservation between different repeat types across Fabeae. In addition to these findings, the study has provided a proof of concept for the approach combining recent developments in sequencing and bioinformatics to perform comparative analyses of repetitive DNAs in a large number of non-model species without the need to assemble their genomes. PMID:26606051

  1. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae

    PubMed Central

    Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Pellicer, Jaume; Čížková, Jana; Koblížková, Andrea; Neumann, Pavel; Fuková, Iva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kelly, Laura J.; Leitch, Ilia J.

    2015-01-01

    The differential accumulation and elimination of repetitive DNA are key drivers of genome size variation in flowering plants, yet there have been few studies which have analysed how different types of repeats in related species contribute to genome size evolution within a phylogenetic context. This question is addressed here by conducting large-scale comparative analysis of repeats in 23 species from four genera of the monophyletic legume tribe Fabeae, representing a 7.6-fold variation in genome size. Phylogenetic analysis and genome size reconstruction revealed that this diversity arose from genome size expansions and contractions in different lineages during the evolution of Fabeae. Employing a combination of low-pass genome sequencing with novel bioinformatic approaches resulted in identification and quantification of repeats making up 55–83% of the investigated genomes. In turn, this enabled an analysis of how each major repeat type contributed to the genome size variation encountered. Differential accumulation of repetitive DNA was found to account for 85% of the genome size differences between the species, and most (57%) of this variation was found to be driven by a single lineage of Ty3/gypsy LTR-retrotransposons, the Ogre elements. Although the amounts of several other lineages of LTR-retrotransposons and the total amount of satellite DNA were also positively correlated with genome size, their contributions to genome size variation were much smaller (up to 6%). Repeat analysis within a phylogenetic framework also revealed profound differences in the extent of sequence conservation between different repeat types across Fabeae. In addition to these findings, the study has provided a proof of concept for the approach combining recent developments in sequencing and bioinformatics to perform comparative analyses of repetitive DNAs in a large number of non-model species without the need to assemble their genomes. PMID:26606051

  2. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae.

    PubMed

    Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Pellicer, Jaume; Čížková, Jana; Koblížková, Andrea; Neumann, Pavel; Fuková, Iva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Ilia J

    2015-01-01

    The differential accumulation and elimination of repetitive DNA are key drivers of genome size variation in flowering plants, yet there have been few studies which have analysed how different types of repeats in related species contribute to genome size evolution within a phylogenetic context. This question is addressed here by conducting large-scale comparative analysis of repeats in 23 species from four genera of the monophyletic legume tribe Fabeae, representing a 7.6-fold variation in genome size. Phylogenetic analysis and genome size reconstruction revealed that this diversity arose from genome size expansions and contractions in different lineages during the evolution of Fabeae. Employing a combination of low-pass genome sequencing with novel bioinformatic approaches resulted in identification and quantification of repeats making up 55-83% of the investigated genomes. In turn, this enabled an analysis of how each major repeat type contributed to the genome size variation encountered. Differential accumulation of repetitive DNA was found to account for 85% of the genome size differences between the species, and most (57%) of this variation was found to be driven by a single lineage of Ty3/gypsy LTR-retrotransposons, the Ogre elements. Although the amounts of several other lineages of LTR-retrotransposons and the total amount of satellite DNA were also positively correlated with genome size, their contributions to genome size variation were much smaller (up to 6%). Repeat analysis within a phylogenetic framework also revealed profound differences in the extent of sequence conservation between different repeat types across Fabeae. In addition to these findings, the study has provided a proof of concept for the approach combining recent developments in sequencing and bioinformatics to perform comparative analyses of repetitive DNAs in a large number of non-model species without the need to assemble their genomes.

  3. Analysis of 5S rDNA organization and variation in polyploid hybrids from crosses of different fish subfamilies.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qinbo; He, Weiguo; Liu, Shaojun; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Jun; Liu, Yun

    2010-07-15

    In this article, sequence analysis of the coding region (5S) and adjacent nontranscribed spacer (NTS) were conducted in red crucian carp (RCC), blunt snout bream (BSB), and their polyploid offspring. Three monomeric 5S rDNA classes (designated class I: 203 bp; class II: 340 bp; and class III: 477 bp) of RCC were characterized by distinct NTS types (designated NTS-I, II, and III for the 83, 220, and 357 bp monomers, respectively). In BSB, only one monomeric 5S rDNA was observed (designated class IV: 188 bp), which was characterized by one NTS type (designated NTS-IV: 68 bp). In the polyploid offspring, the tetraploid (4nRB) hybrids partially inherited 5S rDNA classes from their female parent (RCC); however, they also possessed a unique 5S rDNA sequence (designated class I-L: 203 bp) with a novel NTS sequence (designated NTS-I-L: 83 bp). The characteristic paternal 5S rDNA sequences (class IV) were not observed. The 5S rDNA of triploid (3nRB) hybrids was completely inherited from the parental species, and generally preserved the parental 5S rDNA structural organization. These results first revealed the influence of polyploidy on the organization and evolution of the multigene family of 5S rDNA of fish, and are also useful in clarifying aspects of vertebrate genome evolution.

  4. Karyological Features of Achyrocline (Asteraceae, Gnaphalieae): stable karyotypes, low DNA content variation and linkage of rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Mazzella, C; Rodríguez, M; Vaio, M; Gaiero, P; López-Carro, B; Santiñaque, F F; Folle, G A; Guerra, M

    2010-01-01

    Many Achyrocline (Asteraceae, tribe Gnaphalieae) species are widely used in Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay as popular medicinal and aromatic plants. Achyrocline flaccida, A. satureioides, A. alata, and A. crassiuscula are distributed in Uruguay and popularly known as 'marcelas'. In order to characterize them, we performed chromosome counts, compared the karyotypes, mapped the 5S and 45S rDNA sites by fluorescent in situ hybridization, and estimated their DNA content. All species were diploid with 2n = 28 chromosomes, this being the first report for A. flaccida and A. crassiuscula. All species showed symmetrical karyotypes composed exclusively of biarmed chromosomes. DNA content estimated by flow cytometry revealed 2C values ranging from 5.73 to 6.03 pg, the amounts for A. alata and A. crassiuscula being higher than those for the other species. Cytogenetic mapping of 5S and 45S rDNA sequences in three species, A. flaccida, A. satureioides and A. alata, showed that in these species both sites co-localized in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10. This site corresponds to the only DAPI(-) and CMA(+) band of their genomes. Southern blot hybridization of 5S and 45S rDNA on BamHI digested genomic DNA confirmed the tight linkage of these rDNA families into a single unit. Cytological data indicate that Achyrocline species are karyologically poorly differentiated, whereas the uncommon distribution of 5S and 45S rDNA suggests a close relationship with other genera of the Anthemidae tribe.

  5. Heteroplasmy, length and sequence variation in the mtDNA control regions of three percid fish species (Perca fluviatilis, Acerina cernua, Stizostedion lucioperca).

    PubMed Central

    Nesbø, C L; Arab, M O; Jakobsen, K S

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the control region and flanking tRNA genes of perch (Perca fluviatilis) mtDNA was determined. The organization of this region is similar to that of other vertebrates. A tandem array of 10-bp repeats, associated with length variation and heteroplasmy was observed in the 5' end. While the location of the array corresponds to that reported in other species, the length of the repeated unit is shorter than previously observed for tandem repeats in this region. The repeated sequence was highly similar to the Mt5 element which has been shown to specifically bind a putative D-loop DNA termination protein. Of 149 perch analyzed, 74% showed length variation heteroplasmy. Single-cell PCR on oocytes suggested that the high level of heteroplasmy is passively maintained by maternal transmission. The array was also observed in the two other percid species, ruffe (Acerina cernua) and zander (Stizostedion lucioperca). The array and the associated length variation heteroplasmy are therefore likely to be general features of percid mtDNAs. Among the perch repeats, the mutation pattern is consistent with unidirectional slippage, and statistical analyses supported the notion that the various haplotypes are associated with different levels of heteroplasmy. The variation in array length among and within species is ascribed to differences in predicted stability of secondary structures made between repeat units. PMID:9560404

  6. Variation in the number of nucleoli and incomplete homogenization of 18S ribosomal DNA sequences in leaf cells of the cultivated Oriental ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer)

    PubMed Central

    Chelomina, Galina N.; Rozhkovan, Konstantin V.; Voronova, Anastasia N.; Burundukova, Olga L.; Muzarok, Tamara I.; Zhuravlev, Yuri N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Wild ginseng, Panax ginseng Meyer, is an endangered species of medicinal plants. In the present study, we analyzed variations within the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) cluster to gain insight into the genetic diversity of the Oriental ginseng, P. ginseng, at artificial plant cultivation. Methods The roots of wild P. ginseng plants were sampled from a nonprotected natural population of the Russian Far East. The slides were prepared from leaf tissues using the squash technique for cytogenetic analysis. The 18S rDNA sequences were cloned and sequenced. The distribution of nucleotide diversity, recombination events, and interspecific phylogenies for the total 18S rDNA sequence data set was also examined. Results In mesophyll cells, mononucleolar nuclei were estimated to be dominant (75.7%), while the remaining nuclei contained two to four nucleoli. Among the analyzed 18S rDNA clones, 20% were identical to the 18S rDNA sequence of P. ginseng from Japan, and other clones differed in one to six substitutions. The nucleotide polymorphism was more expressed at the positions 440–640 bp, and distributed in variable regions, expansion segments, and conservative elements of core structure. The phylogenetic analysis confirmed conspecificity of ginseng plants cultivated in different regions, with two fixed mutations between P. ginseng and other species. Conclusion This study identified the evidences of the intragenomic nucleotide polymorphism in the 18S rDNA sequences of P. ginseng. These data suggest that, in cultivated plants, the observed genome instability may influence the synthesis of biologically active compounds, which are widely used in traditional medicine. PMID:27158239

  7. Global Analysis of DNA Methylation Variation in Adipose Tissue from Twins Reveals Links to Disease-Associated Variants in Distal Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Grundberg, Elin; Meduri, Eshwar; Sandling, Johanna K.; Hedman, Åsa K.; Keildson, Sarah; Buil, Alfonso; Busche, Stephan; Yuan, Wei; Nisbet, James; Sekowska, Magdalena; Wilk, Alicja; Barrett, Amy; Small, Kerrin S.; Ge, Bing; Caron, Maxime; Shin, So-Youn; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Ainali, Chrysanthi; Barrett, Amy; Bataille, Veronique; Bell, Jordana T.; Buil, Alfonso; Deloukas, Panos; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dimas, Antigone S.; Durbin, Richard; Glass, Daniel; Grundberg, Elin; Hassanali, Neelam; Hedman, Åsa K.; Ingle, Catherine; Knowles, David; Krestyaninova, Maria; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lowe, Christopher E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meduri, Eshwar; di Meglio, Paola; Min, Josine L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Nestle, Frank O.; Nica, Alexandra C.; Nisbet, James; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Parts, Leopold; Potter, Simon; Sandling, Johanna; Sekowska, Magdalena; Shin, So-Youn; Small, Kerrin S.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D.; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Travers, Mary E.; Tsaprouni, Loukia; Tsoka, Sophia; Wilk, Alicja; Yang, Tsun-Po; Zondervan, Krina T.; Lathrop, Mark; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Spector, Timothy D.; Bell, Jordana T.; Deloukas, Panos

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation play a key role in gene regulation and disease susceptibility. However, little is known about the genome-wide frequency, localization, and function of methylation variation and how it is regulated by genetic and environmental factors. We utilized the Multiple Tissue Human Expression Resource (MuTHER) and generated Illumina 450K adipose methylome data from 648 twins. We found that individual CpGs had low variance and that variability was suppressed in promoters. We noted that DNA methylation variation was highly heritable (h2median = 0.34) and that shared environmental effects correlated with metabolic phenotype-associated CpGs. Analysis of methylation quantitative-trait loci (metQTL) revealed that 28% of CpGs were associated with nearby SNPs, and when overlapping them with adipose expression quantitative-trait loci (eQTL) from the same individuals, we found that 6% of the loci played a role in regulating both gene expression and DNA methylation. These associations were bidirectional, but there were pronounced negative associations for promoter CpGs. Integration of metQTL with adipose reference epigenomes and disease associations revealed significant enrichment of metQTL overlapping metabolic-trait or disease loci in enhancers (the strongest effects were for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and body mass index [BMI]). We followed up with the BMI SNP rs713586, a cg01884057 metQTL that overlaps an enhancer upstream of ADCY3, and used bisulphite sequencing to refine this region. Our results showed widespread population invariability yet sequence dependence on adipose DNA methylation but that incorporating maps of regulatory elements aid in linking CpG variation to gene regulation and disease risk in a tissue-dependent manner. PMID:24183450

  8. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the grasshopper Sinipta dalmani: application of long-PCR to the development of a homologous probe.

    PubMed

    Pensel, S M; Vilardi, J C; Remis, M I

    2005-12-01

    RFLP analysis of mtDNA in natural populations is a valuable tool for phylogeographic and population genetic studies. The amplification of long DNA fragments using universal primers may contribute to the development of novel homologous probes in species for which no previous genomic information is available. Here we report how we obtained the complete mtDNA genome of Sinipta dalmani (Orthoptera) in 2 fragments (7 and 9 kb) using primers of conserved regions. The specificity of the PCR reactions was ultimately confirmed by several lines of evidence. These fragments were used as a probe for a mtDNA RFLP study in S. dalmani that analyzed the pattern of haplotype distribution and nucleotide diversity within and among chromosomally differentiated natural populations. Our results suggest that the restriction in gene flow detected at the molecular level may explain the chromosome differentiation detected previously and the maintenance of chromosome polymorphism in some areas of S. dalmani geographic distribution.

  9. Individual variations in the correlation between erythemal threshold, UV-induced DNA damage and sun-burn cell formation.

    PubMed

    Heenen, M; Giacomoni, P U; Golstein, P

    2001-10-01

    A linear correlation between erythema intensity and DNA damage upon exposure to UV has not been firmly established. Many of the deleterious effects of UV exposure do occur after exposure to suberythemal doses. After DNA damage, cells undergo DNA repair. It is commonly accepted that when the burden of damage is beyond the repair capacities, the cell undergoes programmed cell death or apoptosis. The aim of this study is to quantify the amount of UV-induced DNA damage (estimated via the measurement of DNA repair or unscheduled DNA synthesis or UDS) and cellular damage (estimated via the determination of the density of sunburn cells or SBC). If DNA damage and erythema are correlated, similar intensity of UDS and similar density of SBC should be found in volunteers irradiated with a UV dose equal to two minimal erythema doses (MED). Our results show that in 15 different individuals the same relative dose (2 MEDs) provokes UDS values, which vary within a factor of 4. An even larger variability affects SBC counts after the same relative dose. When DNA damage or SBC are plotted versus the absolute dose (i.e. the dose expressed in J/m(2)), there is a rough correlation (with several exceptions) between dose and extent of UDS and SBC counts. It seems possible to divide the volunteers into two subpopulations with different susceptibilities to UV damage. It is well known that UDS and SBC measurements are often affected by large experimental indeterminacy, yet, the analysis of our results makes it plausible to suggest that for the triggering of erythema, a common threshold value for DNA damage or for SBC count are not to be found. In conclusion, the erythema response seems to be loosely correlated with DNA damage. This suggests that the protection offered by the sunscreens against DNA damage, the molecular basis of UV-induced mutagenesis, might not be related to the sun protection factor (SPF) indicated on the label of sunscreens, which is evaluated using the erythema as an

  10. Sequence variation of the rDNA ITS regions within and between anastomosis groups in Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kuninaga, S; Natsuaki, T; Takeuchi, T; Yokosawa, R

    1997-09-01

    Sequence analysis of the rDNA region containing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the 5.8s rDNA coding sequence was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of 45 isolates within and between anastomosis groups (AGs) in Rhizoctonia solani. The 5.8s rDNA sequence was completely conserved across all the AGs examined, whereas the ITS rDNA sequence was found to be highly variable among isolates. The sequence homology in the ITS regions was above 96% for isolates of the same subgroup, 66-100% for isolates of different subgroups within an AG, and 55-96% for isolates of different AGs. In neighbor-joining trees based on distances derived from ITS-5.8s rDNA sequences, subgroups IA, IB and IC within AG-1 and subgroups HG-I and HG-II within AG-4 were placed on statistically significant branches as assessed by bootstrap analysis. These results suggest that sequence analysis of ITS rDNA regions of R. solani may be a valuable tool for identifying AG subgroups of biological significance.

  11. Quantifying male-biased dispersal among social groups in the collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) using analyses based on mtDNA variation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J D; Vitalis, R; Waser, P M; Gopurenko, D; Hellgren, E C; Gabor, T M; DeWoody, J A

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the statistical analysis of microsatellite data permit calculation of sex-specific dispersal rates through sex- and age-specific comparisons of genetic variation. This approach, developed for the analysis of data derived from co-dominant autosomal markers, should be applicable to a sex-specific marker such as mitochondrial DNA. To test this premise, we amplified a 449 bp control region DNA sequence from the mitochondrial genome of the collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), and estimated intra-class correlations among herds sampled from three Texas populations. Analyses on data partitioned by breeding group showed a clear signal of male-biased dispersal; sex-specific fixation indices associated with genetic variation among social groups within populations yielded values for females (F(GP)=0.91), which were significantly larger than values for males (F(GP)=0.24; P=0.0015). The same general pattern emerged when the analyses were conducted on age classes (albeit nonsignificantly), as well as categories of individuals that were predicted a posteriori to be dispersers (adult males) and philopatric (adult females and all immatures). By extending a previously published methodology based on biparentally inherited markers to matrilineally inherited haploid data, we calculated sex-specific rates of contemporary dispersal among social groups within populations (m(male symbol)=0.37). These results support the idea that mitochondrial DNA haplotype frequency data can be used to estimate sex-specific instantaneous dispersal rates in a social species.

  12. B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans are present in all body parts analyzed and show extensive variation for rDNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; López-León, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    B chromosomes in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans are considered to be mitotically stable, because all meiotic (primary spermatocytes and oocytes) or mitotic (embryos, ovarioles, and gastric caecum) cells analyzed within the same individual show the same B chromosome number. Nothing is known, however, about body parts with somatic tissues with no mitotic activity in adult individuals, constituting the immense majority of their body. Therefore, we investigated whether B chromosomes are present in 8 non-mitotically active somatic body parts from both sexes in addition to ovarioles and testes by PCR analysis of 2 B-specific molecular markers. We also elucidated the number of B chromosomes that an individual carried through quantifying the B-located rDNA copy number by qPCR. Our results indicated the amplification of both B-specific markers in all analyzed body parts. However, we found high variation between males for the estimated number of rDNA units in the B chromosomes. These results demonstrate the presence of B chromosomes in all body parts from the same individual and suggest a high variation in the rDNA content of the B chromosomes carried by different individuals from the same population, presumably due to unequal crossovers during meiosis.

  13. RNA/DNA ratios in American glass eels (Anguilla rostrata): evidence for latitudinal variation in physiological status and constraints to oceanic migration?

    PubMed

    Laflamme, Simon; Côté, Caroline; Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre; Castonguay, Martin; Bernatchez, Louis

    2012-05-01

    During their larval leptocephalus phase, newly hatched American eels undergo an extensive oceanic migration from the Sargasso Sea toward coastal and freshwater habitats. Their subsequent metamorphosis into glass eel is accompanied by drastic morphological and physiological changes preceding settlement over a wide geographic range. The main objective of this study was to compare RNA/DNA ratios and condition factor among glass eels in order to test the null hypothesis of no difference in physiological status and metabolic activity of glass eels at the outcome of their oceanic migration. This was achieved by analyzing glass eel samples collected at the mouth of 17 tributaries covering a latitudinal gradient across the species distribution range from Florida to Gaspésie (Québec). Our main observations were (i) a latitudinal increase in mean total length; (ii) a latitudinal variation in mean RNA/DNA ratios, which was best explained by a quadratic model reaching its minimum in the central range of sampling locations; and (iii) a latitudinal variation in Fulton's condition factor, which was best explained by a quadratic model reaching its maximum in the central range of sampling locations. Below we discuss the possible links between latitudinal variation in glass eel physiological status and variable energetic and environmental constraints to oceanic migration as a function of latitudinal distribution.

  14. RNA/DNA ratios in American glass eels (Anguilla rostrata): evidence for latitudinal variation in physiological status and constraints to oceanic migration?

    PubMed

    Laflamme, Simon; Côté, Caroline; Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre; Castonguay, Martin; Bernatchez, Louis

    2012-05-01

    During their larval leptocephalus phase, newly hatched American eels undergo an extensive oceanic migration from the Sargasso Sea toward coastal and freshwater habitats. Their subsequent metamorphosis into glass eel is accompanied by drastic morphological and physiological changes preceding settlement over a wide geographic range. The main objective of this study was to compare RNA/DNA ratios and condition factor among glass eels in order to test the null hypothesis of no difference in physiological status and metabolic activity of glass eels at the outcome of their oceanic migration. This was achieved by analyzing glass eel samples collected at the mouth of 17 tributaries covering a latitudinal gradient across the species distribution range from Florida to Gaspésie (Québec). Our main observations were (i) a latitudinal increase in mean total length; (ii) a latitudinal variation in mean RNA/DNA ratios, which was best explained by a quadratic model reaching its minimum in the central range of sampling locations; and (iii) a latitudinal variation in Fulton's condition factor, which was best explained by a quadratic model reaching its maximum in the central range of sampling locations. Below we discuss the possible links between latitudinal variation in glass eel physiological status and variable energetic and environmental constraints to oceanic migration as a function of latitudinal distribution. PMID:22837833

  15. RNA/DNA ratios in American glass eels (Anguilla rostrata): evidence for latitudinal variation in physiological status and constraints to oceanic migration?

    PubMed Central

    Laflamme, Simon; Côté, Caroline; Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre; Castonguay, Martin; Bernatchez, Louis

    2012-01-01

    During their larval leptocephalus phase, newly hatched American eels undergo an extensive oceanic migration from the Sargasso Sea toward coastal and freshwater habitats. Their subsequent metamorphosis into glass eel is accompanied by drastic morphological and physiological changes preceding settlement over a wide geographic range. The main objective of this study was to compare RNA/DNA ratios and condition factor among glass eels in order to test the null hypothesis of no difference in physiological status and metabolic activity of glass eels at the outcome of their oceanic migration. This was achieved by analyzing glass eel samples collected at the mouth of 17 tributaries covering a latitudinal gradient across the species distribution range from Florida to Gaspésie (Québec). Our main observations were (i) a latitudinal increase in mean total length; (ii) a latitudinal variation in mean RNA/DNA ratios, which was best explained by a quadratic model reaching its minimum in the central range of sampling locations; and (iii) a latitudinal variation in Fulton's condition factor, which was best explained by a quadratic model reaching its maximum in the central range of sampling locations. Below we discuss the possible links between latitudinal variation in glass eel physiological status and variable energetic and environmental constraints to oceanic migration as a function of latitudinal distribution. PMID:22837833

  16. A physiologically based in silico model for trans-2-hexenal detoxification and DNA adduct formation in human including interindividual variation indicates efficient detoxification and a negligible genotoxicity risk.

    PubMed

    Kiwamoto, R; Spenkelink, A; Rietjens, I M C M; Punt, A

    2013-09-01

    A number of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes are present in food both as natural constituents and as flavouring agents. Their reaction with DNA due to their electrophilic α,β-unsaturated aldehyde moiety may result in genotoxicity as observed in some in vitro models, thereby raising a safety concern. A question that remains is whether in vivo detoxification would be efficient enough to prevent DNA adduct formation and genotoxicity. In this study, a human physiologically based kinetic/dynamic (PBK/D) model of trans-2-hexenal (2-hexenal), a selected model α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, was developed to examine dose-dependent detoxification and DNA adduct formation in humans upon dietary exposure. The kinetic model parameters for detoxification were quantified using relevant pooled human tissue fractions as well as tissue fractions from 11 different individual subjects. In addition, a Monte Carlo simulation was performed so that the impact of interindividual variation in 2-hexenal detoxification on the DNA adduct formation in the population as a whole could be examined. The PBK/D model revealed that DNA adduct formation due to 2-hexenal exposure was 0.039 adducts/10⁸ nucleotides (nt) at the estimated average 2-hexenal dietary intake (0.04 mg 2-hexenal/kg bw) and 0.18 adducts/10⁸ nt at the 95th percentile of the dietary intake (0.178 mg 2-hexenal/kg bw) in the most sensitive people. These levels are three orders of magnitude lower than natural background DNA adduct levels that have been reported in disease-free humans (6.8-110 adducts/10⁸ nt), suggesting that the genotoxicity risk for the human population at realistic dietary daily intakes of 2-hexenal may be negligible. PMID:23864024

  17. Paramecium putrinum (Ciliophora, Protozoa): the first insight into the variation of two DNA fragments - molecular support for the existence of cryptic species.

    PubMed

    Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Potekhin, Alexey; Sawka, Natalia; Beliavskaya, Alexandra; Kiselev, Andrey; Nekrasova, Irina; Przyboś, Ewa

    2014-04-01

    Paramecium putrinum (Claparede & Lachmann 1858) is one of the smallest (80-140 μm long) species of the genus Paramecium. Although it commonly occurs in freshwater reservoirs, no molecular studies of P. putrinum have been conducted to date. Herein we present an assessment of molecular variation in 27 strains collected from widely separated populations by using two selected DNA fragments (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-5'LSU rDNA and COI mtDNA). Both the trees and haplotype networks reconstructed for both genome fragments show that the studied strains of P. putrinum form five main haplogroups. The mean distance between the studied strains is p-distance=0.007/0.068 (rDNA/COI) and exhibits similar variability as that between P. bursaria syngens. Based on these data, one could hypothesize that the clusters revealed in the present study may correspond to previously reported syngens and that there are at least five cryptic species within P. putrinum.

  18. Testing the Potential of Proposed DNA Barcoding Markers in Nezara virudula and Nezara antennata When Geographic Variation and Closely Related Species Were Considered

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Liu, Qiang; Xi, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Gengping; Zhao, Yanni; Bu, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    The COI gene as the core of the DNA barcoding system for animals has received significant attention. The observed wide overlap between intra- and interspecific sequence variability has led researchers to envisage the primary COI-based method. The sequences of 16S rDNA, COI, and Cyt b genes of Nezara virudula (L.) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) from 13 countries and the same sequences of N. antennata Scott were chosen as molecular markers to analyze the intra- and interspecific relationships between the closely related species in this study. The results support that Cyt b gene may be a good candidate alongside COI, when the combined factors of geographic variation and closely related species are taken into account. PMID:25373226

  19. Evaluation of Genetic Variations in Maize Seedlings Exposed to Electric Field Based on Protein and DNA Markers.

    PubMed

    Al-Huqail, Asma A; Abdelhaliem, Ekram

    2015-01-01

    The current study analyzed proteins and nuclear DNA of electric fields (ELF) exposed and nonexposed maize seedlings for different exposure periods using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), isozymes, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and comet assay, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed total of 46 polypeptides bands with different molecular weights ranging from 186.20 to 36.00 KDa. It generated distinctive polymorphism value of 84.62%. Leucine-aminopeptidase, peroxidase, and catalase isozymes showed the highest values of polymorphism (100%) based on zymograms number, relative front (Rf ), and optical intensity while esterase isozyme generated polymorphism value of 83.33%. Amino acids were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography, which revealed the presence of 17 amino acids of variable contents ranging from 22.65% to 28.09%. RAPD revealed that 78 amplified DNA products had highly polymorphism value (95.08%) based on band numbers, with variable sizes ranging from 120 to 992 base pairs and band intensity. Comet assay recorded the highest extent of nuclear DNA damage as percentage of tailed DNA (2.38%) and tail moment unit (5.36) at ELF exposure of maize nuclei for 5 days. The current study concluded that the longer ELF exposing periods had genotoxic stress on macromolecules of maize cells and biomarkers used should be augmented for reliable estimates of genotoxicity after exposure of economic plants to ELF stressors.

  20. Evaluation of Genetic Variations in Maize Seedlings Exposed to Electric Field Based on Protein and DNA Markers

    PubMed Central

    AL-Huqail, Asma A.; Abdelhaliem, Ekram

    2015-01-01

    The current study analyzed proteins and nuclear DNA of electric fields (ELF) exposed and nonexposed maize seedlings for different exposure periods using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), isozymes, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and comet assay, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed total of 46 polypeptides bands with different molecular weights ranging from 186.20 to 36.00 KDa. It generated distinctive polymorphism value of 84.62%. Leucine-aminopeptidase, peroxidase, and catalase isozymes showed the highest values of polymorphism (100%) based on zymograms number, relative front (Rf), and optical intensity while esterase isozyme generated polymorphism value of 83.33%. Amino acids were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography, which revealed the presence of 17 amino acids of variable contents ranging from 22.65% to 28.09%. RAPD revealed that 78 amplified DNA products had highly polymorphism value (95.08%) based on band numbers, with variable sizes ranging from 120 to 992 base pairs and band intensity. Comet assay recorded the highest extent of nuclear DNA damage as percentage of tailed DNA (2.38%) and tail moment unit (5.36) at ELF exposure of maize nuclei for 5 days. The current study concluded that the longer ELF exposing periods had genotoxic stress on macromolecules of maize cells and biomarkers used should be augmented for reliable estimates of genotoxicity after exposure of economic plants to ELF stressors. PMID:26180815

  1. Comparison of the heat stress induced variations in DNA methylation between heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive rapeseed seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guizhen; Li, Jun; Li, Hao; Li, Feng; Xu, Kun; Yan, Guixin; Chen, Biyun; Qiao, Jiangwei; Wu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is responsive to various biotic and abiotic stresses. Heat stress is a serious threat to crop growth and development worldwide. Heat stress results in an array of morphological, physiological and biochemical changes in plants. The relationship between DNA methylation and heat stress in crops is relatively unknown. We investigated the differences in methylation levels and changes in the cytosine methylation patterns in seedlings of two rapeseed genotypes (heat-sensitive and heat-tolerant) under heat stress. Our results revealed that the methylation levels were different between a heat-tolerant genotype and a heat-sensitive one under control conditions. Under heat treatment, methylation increased more in the heat-sensitive genotype than in the heat-tolerant genotype. More DNA demethylation events occurred in the heat-tolerant genotype, while more DNA methylation occurred in the heat-sensitive genotype. A large and diverse set of genes were affected by heat stress via cytosine methylation changes, suggesting that these genes likely play important roles in the response and adaption to heat stress in Brassica napus L. This study indicated that the changes in DNA methylation differed between heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive genotypes of B. napus in response to heat stress, which further illuminates the molecular mechanisms of the adaption to heat stress in B. napus. PMID:24987298

  2. Intraspecific differentiation of Paramecium novaurelia strains (Ciliophora, Protozoa) inferred from phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Tarcz, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Paramecium novaurelia Beale and Schneller, 1954, was first found in Scotland and is known to occur mainly in Europe, where it is the most common species of the P. aurelia complex. In recent years, two non-European localities have been described: Turkey and the United States of America. This article presents the analysis of intraspecific variability among 25 strains of P. novaurelia with the application of ribosomal and mitochondrial loci (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, 5' large subunit rDNA (5'LSU rDNA) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) mtDNA). The mean distance observed for all of the studied P. novaurelia sequence pairs was p=0.008/0.016/0.092 (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2/5'LSU rDNA/COI). Phylogenetic trees (NJ/MP/BI) based on a comparison of all of the analysed sequences show that the studied strains of P. novaurelia form a distinct clade, separate from the P. caudatum outgroup, and are divided into two clusters (A and B) and two branches (C and D). The occurrence of substantial genetic differentiation within P. novaurelia, confirmed by the analysed DNA fragments, indicates a rapid evolution of particular species within the Paramecium genus.

  3. An ECVAG inter-laboratory validation study of the comet assay: inter-laboratory and intra-laboratory variations of DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites in human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ersson, Clara; Møller, Peter; Forchhammer, Lykke; Loft, Steffen; Azqueta, Amaya; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan; Jones, George D D; Higgins, Jennifer A; Cooke, Marcus S; Mistry, Vilas; Karbaschi, Mahsa; Phillips, David H; Sozeri, Osman; Routledge, Michael N; Nelson-Smith, Kirsty; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa; Matullo, Giuseppe; Allione, Alessandra; Stepnik, Maciej; Ferlińska, Magdalena; Teixeira, João Paulo; Costa, Solange; Corcuera, Laura-Ana; López de Cerain, Adela; Laffon, Blanca; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Collins, Andrew R; Möller, Lennart

    2013-05-01

    The alkaline comet assay is an established, sensitive method extensively used in biomonitoring studies. This method can be modified to measure a range of different types of DNA damage. However, considerable differences in the protocols used by different research groups affect the inter-laboratory comparisons of results. The aim of this study was to assess the inter-laboratory, intra-laboratory, sample and residual (unexplained) variations in DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites measured by the comet assay by using a balanced Latin square design. Fourteen participating laboratories used their own comet assay protocols to measure the level of DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites in coded samples containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the level of DNA strand breaks in coded calibration curve samples (cells exposed to different doses of ionising radiation) on three different days of analysis. Eleven laboratories found dose-response relationships in the coded calibration curve samples on two or three days of analysis, whereas three laboratories had technical problems in their assay. In the coded calibration curve samples, the dose of ionising radiation, inter-laboratory variation, intra-laboratory variation and residual variation contributed to 60.9, 19.4, 0.1 and 19.5%, respectively, of the total variation. In the coded PBMC samples, the inter-laboratory variation explained the largest fraction of the overall variation of DNA strand breaks (79.2%) and the residual variation (19.9%) was much larger than the intra-laboratory (0.3%) and inter-subject (0.5%) variation. The same partitioning of the overall variation of FPG-sensitive sites in the PBMC samples indicated that the inter-laboratory variation was the strongest contributor (56.7%), whereas the residual (42.9%), intra-laboratory (0.2%) and inter-subject (0.3%) variations again contributed less to the overall variation. The results suggest that the

  4. An ECVAG inter-laboratory validation study of the comet assay: inter-laboratory and intra-laboratory variations of DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites in human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ersson, Clara; Møller, Peter; Forchhammer, Lykke; Loft, Steffen; Azqueta, Amaya; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan; Jones, George D D; Higgins, Jennifer A; Cooke, Marcus S; Mistry, Vilas; Karbaschi, Mahsa; Phillips, David H; Sozeri, Osman; Routledge, Michael N; Nelson-Smith, Kirsty; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa; Matullo, Giuseppe; Allione, Alessandra; Stepnik, Maciej; Ferlińska, Magdalena; Teixeira, João Paulo; Costa, Solange; Corcuera, Laura-Ana; López de Cerain, Adela; Laffon, Blanca; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Collins, Andrew R; Möller, Lennart

    2013-05-01

    The alkaline comet assay is an established, sensitive method extensively used in biomonitoring studies. This method can be modified to measure a range of different types of DNA damage. However, considerable differences in the protocols used by different research groups affect the inter-laboratory comparisons of results. The aim of this study was to assess the inter-laboratory, intra-laboratory, sample and residual (unexplained) variations in DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites measured by the comet assay by using a balanced Latin square design. Fourteen participating laboratories used their own comet assay protocols to measure the level of DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites in coded samples containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the level of DNA strand breaks in coded calibration curve samples (cells exposed to different doses of ionising radiation) on three different days of analysis. Eleven laboratories found dose-response relationships in the coded calibration curve samples on two or three days of analysis, whereas three laboratories had technical problems in their assay. In the coded calibration curve samples, the dose of ionising radiation, inter-laboratory variation, intra-laboratory variation and residual variation contributed to 60.9, 19.4, 0.1 and 19.5%, respectively, of the total variation. In the coded PBMC samples, the inter-laboratory variation explained the largest fraction of the overall variation of DNA strand breaks (79.2%) and the residual variation (19.9%) was much larger than the intra-laboratory (0.3%) and inter-subject (0.5%) variation. The same partitioning of the overall variation of FPG-sensitive sites in the PBMC samples indicated that the inter-laboratory variation was the strongest contributor (56.7%), whereas the residual (42.9%), intra-laboratory (0.2%) and inter-subject (0.3%) variations again contributed less to the overall variation. The results suggest that the

  5. Instability of chromosome number and DNA methylation variation induced by hybridization and amphidiploid formation between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Distant hybridization can result genome duplication and allopolyploid formation which may play a significant role in the origin and evolution of many plant species. It is unclear how the two or more divergent genomes coordinate in one nucleus with a single parental cytoplasm within allopolyploids. We used cytological and molecular methods to investigate the genetic and epigenetic instabilities associated with the process of distant hybridization and allopolyploid formation, measuring changes in chromosome number and DNA methylation across multiple generations. Results F1 plants from intergeneric hybridization between Raphanus sativus L. (2n = 18, RR) and Brassica alboglabra Bailey (2n = 18, CC) were obtained by hand crosses and subsequent embryo rescue. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to identify the F1 hybrid plants. The RAPD data indicated that the hybrids produced specific bands similar to those of parents and new bands that were not present in either parent. Chromosome number variation of somatic cells from allotetraploids in the F4 to F10 generations showed that intensive genetic changes occurred in the early generations of distant hybridization, leading to the formation of mixopolyploids with different chromosome numbers. DNA methylation variation was revealed using MSAP (methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism), which showed that cytosine methylation patterns changed markedly in the process of hybridization and amphidiploid formation. Differences in cytosine methylation levels demonstrated an epigenetic instability of the allopolyploid of Raphanobrassica between the genetically stable and unstable generations. Conclusions Our results showed that chromosome instability occurred in the early generations of allopolyploidy and then the plants were reverted to largely euploidy in later generations. During this process, DNA methylation changed markedly. These results suggest that, epigenetic mechanisms play an

  6. Intra-Monozygotic Twin Pair Discordance and Longitudinal Variation of Whole-Genome Scale DNA Methylation in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Su-Hua; Chen, Jinzhong; Lu, Daru; Shen, Min; Li, Chengtao

    2015-01-01

    Monozygotic twins share identical genomic DNA and are indistinguishable using conventional genetic markers. Increasing evidence indicates that monozygotic twins are epigenetically distinct, suggesting that a comparison between DNA methylation patterns might be useful to approach this forensic problem. However, the extent of epigenetic discordance between healthy adult monozygotic twins and the stability of CpG loci within the same individual over a short time span at the whole-genome scale are not well understood. Here, we used Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchips to compare DNA methylation profiles using blood collected from 10 pairs of monozygotic twins and 8 individuals sampled at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months. Using an effective and unbiased method for calling differentially methylated (DM) CpG sites, we showed that 0.087%–1.530% of the CpG sites exhibit differential methylation in monozygotic twin pairs. We further demonstrated that, on whole-genome level, there has been no significant epigenetic drift within the same individuals for up to 9 months, including one monozygotic twin pair. However, we did identify a subset of CpG sites that vary in DNA methylation over the 9-month period. The magnitude of the intra-pair or longitudinal methylation discordance of the CpG sites inside the CpG islands is greater than those outside the CpG islands. The CpG sites located on shores appear to be more suitable for distinguishing between MZ twins. PMID:26248206

  7. Intra-Monozygotic Twin Pair Discordance and Longitudinal Variation of Whole-Genome Scale DNA Methylation in Adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Zhao, Shumin; Zhang, Su-Hua; Chen, Jinzhong; Lu, Daru; Shen, Min; Li, Chengtao

    2015-01-01

    Monozygotic twins share identical genomic DNA and are indistinguishable using conventional genetic markers. Increasing evidence indicates that monozygotic twins are epigenetically distinct, suggesting that a comparison between DNA methylation patterns might be useful to approach this forensic problem. However, the extent of epigenetic discordance between healthy adult monozygotic twins and the stability of CpG loci within the same individual over a short time span at the whole-genome scale are not well understood. Here, we used Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchips to compare DNA methylation profiles using blood collected from 10 pairs of monozygotic twins and 8 individuals sampled at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months. Using an effective and unbiased method for calling differentially methylated (DM) CpG sites, we showed that 0.087%-1.530% of the CpG sites exhibit differential methylation in monozygotic twin pairs. We further demonstrated that, on whole-genome level, there has been no significant epigenetic drift within the same individuals for up to 9 months, including one monozygotic twin pair. However, we did identify a subset of CpG sites that vary in DNA methylation over the 9-month period. The magnitude of the intra-pair or longitudinal methylation discordance of the CpG sites inside the CpG islands is greater than those outside the CpG islands. The CpG sites located on shores appear to be more suitable for distinguishing between MZ twins. PMID:26248206

  8. Limited DNA methylation variation and the transcription of MET1 and DDM1 in the genus Chrysanthemum (Asteraceae): following the track of polyploidy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibin; Qi, Xiangyu; Chen, Sumei; Fang, Weimin; Guan, Zhiyong; Teng, Nianjun; Liao, Yuan; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy has been recognized as a widespread and common phenomenon among flowering plants. DNA-5'-CCGG site cytosine methylation (C-methylation) is one of the major and immediate epigenetic responses of the plant genome. Elucidating the ways in which altered C-methylation patterns, either at the whole genomic level or at specific sites can affect genome stability in polyploidy will require substantial additional investigation. Methylation sensitive amplification polymorphism profiling was used to evaluate variation in C-methylation among a set of 20 Chrysanthemum species and their close relatives of varying ploidy levels from diploid to decaploid. The range in relative C-methylation level was within 10%, and there was no significant difference neither between different ploidy levels nor between different species in the same ploidy level (U-values < 1.96). The transcript abundances of MET1 and DDM1 genes, which both involved in the regulation of C-methylation at CpG sites, were enhanced with increased ploidy level, but only MET1 was positively correlated with the nuclear DNA content. Considering the key role and efficiency of MET1 in maintaining CpG methylation, the limited variation observed with respect to C-methylation may reflect a balance between the increased activity of MET1 in the higher ploidy genomes and the larger number of CpG dinucleotide sites available for methylation. PMID:26379692

  9. Patterns of variation in the intergenic spacers of ribosomal DNA in Drosophila melanogaster support a model for genetic exchanges during X-Y pairing.

    PubMed

    Polanco, C; González, A I; Dover, G A

    2000-07-01

    Detailed analysis of variation in intergenic spacer (IGS) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA drawn from natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster has revealed contrasting patterns of homogenization although both spacers are located in the same rDNA unit. On the basis of the role of IGS regions in X-Y chromosome pairing, we proposed a mechanism of single-strand exchanges at the IGS regions, which can explain the different evolutionary trajectories followed by the IGS and the ITS regions. Here, we provide data from the chromosomal distribution of selected IGS length variants, as well as the detailed internal structure of a large number of IGS regions obtained from specific X and Y chromosomes. The variability found in the different internal subrepeat regions of IGS regions isolated from X and Y chromosomes supports the proposed mechanism of genetic exchanges and suggests that only the "240" subrepeats are involved. The presence of a putative site for topoisomerase I at the 5' end of the 18S rRNA gene would allow for the exchange between X and Y chromosomes of some 240 subrepeats, the promoter, and the ETS region, leaving the rest of the rDNA unit to evolve along separate chromosomal lineages. The phenomenon of localized units (modules) of homogenization has implications for multigene family evolution in general.

  10. Using next-generation sequencing for high resolution multiplex analysis of copy number variation from nanogram quantities of DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens.

    PubMed

    Wood, Henry M; Belvedere, Ornella; Conway, Caroline; Daly, Catherine; Chalkley, Rebecca; Bickerdike, Melissa; McKinley, Claire; Egan, Phil; Ross, Lisa; Hayward, Bruce; Morgan, Joanne; Davidson, Leslie; MacLennan, Ken; Ong, Thian K; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Cook, Ian; Adams, David J; Taylor, Graham R; Rabbitts, Pamela

    2010-08-01

    The use of next-generation sequencing technologies to produce genomic copy number data has recently been described. Most approaches, however, reply on optimal starting DNA, and are therefore unsuitable for the analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, which largely precludes the analysis of many tumour series. We have sought to challenge the limits of this technique with regards to quality and quantity of starting material and the depth of sequencing required. We confirm that the technique can be used to interrogate DNA from cell lines, fresh frozen material and FFPE samples to assess copy number variation. We show that as little as 5 ng of DNA is needed to generate a copy number karyogram, and follow this up with data from a series of FFPE biopsies and surgical samples. We have used various levels of sample multiplexing to demonstrate the adjustable resolution of the methodology, depending on the number of samples and available resources. We also demonstrate reproducibility by use of replicate samples and comparison with microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and digital PCR. This technique can be valuable in both the analysis of routine diagnostic samples and in examining large repositories of fixed archival material.

  11. [Variation of the mitochondrial DNA control region in the populations of southern form of Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma krascheninnikovi) from Sakhalin].

    PubMed

    Osinov, A G; Miuge, N S

    2008-12-01

    Analysis of a 551-bp segment of the mitochondrial DNA control region in 23 individuals from nine populations of Dolly Varden from Sakhalin and three individuals from the Shikaribetsu Lake (Hokkaido) revealed the presence of seven haplotypes of southern form, along with one haplotype of northern form of Dolly Varden. All seven haplotypes of southern Dolly Varden were earlier described in the populations from Hokkaido. Nested analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) based on the haplotype frequencies, performed using literature data, suggested that, during the glacial epoch, there were three regional population groups of Dolly Varden (from eastern and western coasts of Sakhalin, and from Southern Primorye). Population groups from Sakhalin and Primorye were clearly separated. The differences between two Sakhalin population groups in the mtDNA haplotype frequencies were not statistically significant. However, relative to the earlier obtained data on microsatellite loci, these differences were statistically significant. For the populations of Sakhalin Dolly Varden, the data on mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA variation supplement each other.

  12. A family of differentially amplified repetitive DNA sequences in the genus Beta reveals genetic variation in Beta vulgaris subspecies and cultivars.

    PubMed

    Kubis, S; Heslop-Harrison, J S; Schmidt, T

    1997-03-01

    Members of a highly abundant restriction satellite family have been isolated from the wild beet species Beta nana. The satellite DNA sequence is characterized by a conserved RsaI restriction site and is present in three of four sections of the genus Beta, namely Nanae, Corollinae, and Beta. It was not detected in species of the evolutionary old section Procumbentes, suggesting its amplification after separation of this section. Sequences of eight monomers were aligned revealing a size variation from 209 to 233 bp and an AT content ranging from 56.5% to 60.5%. The similarity between monomers in B. nana varied from 77.7% to 92.2%. Diverged subfamilies were identified by sequence analysis and Southern hybridization. A comparative study of this repetitive DNA element by fluorescent in situ hybridization and Southern analyses in three representative species was performed showing a variable genomic organization and heterogeneous localizations along metaphase chromosomes both within and between species. In B. nana the copy number of this satellite, with some 30,000 per haploid genome, is more than tenfold higher than in Beta lomatogona and up to 200 times higher than in Beta vulgaris, indicating different levels of sequence amplification during evolution in the genus Beta. In sugar beet (B. vulgaris), the large-scale organization of this tandem repeat was examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Southern hybridization to genomic DNA digested with DraI demonstrated that satellite arrays are located in AT-rich regions and the tandem repeat is a useful probe for the detection of genetic variation in closely related B. vulgaris cultivars, accessions, and subspecies.

  13. The Historical Demography and Genetic Variation of the Endangered Cycas multipinnata (Cycadaceae) in the Red River Region, Examined by Chloroplast DNA Sequences and Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yi-Qing; Zhan, Qing-Qing; Nguyen, Khang Sinh; Nguyen, Hiep Tien; Wang, Yue-Hua; Gong, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Cycas multipinnata C.J. Chen & S.Y. Yang is a cycad endemic to the Red River drainage region that occurs under evergreen forest on steep limestone slopes in Southwest China and northern Vietnam. It is listed as endangered due to habitat loss and over-collecting for the ornamental plant trade, and only several populations remain. In this study, we assess the genetic variation, population structure, and phylogeography of C. multipinnata populations to help develop strategies for the conservation of the species. 60 individuals from six populations were used for chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequencing and 100 individuals from five populations were genotyped using 17 nuclear microsatellites. High genetic differentiation among populations was detected, suggesting that pollen or seed dispersal was restricted within populations. Two main genetic clusters were observed in both the cpDNA and microsatellite loci, corresponding to Yunnan China and northern Vietnam. These clusters indicated low levels of gene flow between the regions since their divergence in the late Pleistocene, which was inferred from both Bayesian and coalescent analysis. In addition, the result of a Bayesian skyline plot based on cpDNA portrayed a long history of constant population size followed by a decline in the last 50,000 years of C. multipinnata that was perhaps affected by the Quaternary glaciations, a finding that was also supported by the Garza-Williamson index calculated from the microsatellite data. The genetic consequences produced by climatic oscillations and anthropogenic disturbances are considered key pressures on C. multipinnata. To establish a conservation management plan, each population of C. multipinnata should be recognized as a Management Unit (MU). In situ and ex situ actions, such as controlling overexploitation and creating a germplasm bank with high genetic diversity, should be urgently implemented to preserve this species. PMID:25689828

  14. Pleistocene glaciations and contemporary genetic diversity in a Beringian fish, the broad whitefish, Coregonus nasus (Pallas): inferences from microsatellite DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Harris, L N; Taylor, E B

    2010-01-01

    The contemporary distribution of genetic variation within and among high latitude populations cannot be fully understood without taking into consideration how species responded to the impacts of Pleistocene glaciations. Broad whitefish, Coregonus nasus, a species endemic to northwest North America and the Arctic coast of Russia, was undoubtedly impacted by such events because its geographic distribution suggests that it survived solely within the Beringian refuge from where it dispersed post-glacially to achieve its current range. We used microsatellite DNA to investigate the role of glaciations in promoting intraspecific genetic variation in broad whitefish (N = 14 localities, 664 fish) throughout their North American range and in one Russian sample. Broad whitefish exhibited relatively high intrapopulation variation (average of 11.7 alleles per locus, average H(E) = 0.61) and moderate levels of interpopulation divergence (overall F(ST) = 0.10). The main regions assayed in our study (Russia, Alaska, Mackenzie River and Travaillant Lake systems) were genetically differentiated from each other and there were declines in genetic diversity with distance from putative refugia. Additionally, Mackenzie River system populations showed less developed and more variable patterns of isolation-by-distance than populations occupying former Alaskan portions of Beringia. Finally, our data suggest that broad whitefish dispersed from Beringia using coastal environments and opportunistically via headwater stream connections that once existed between Yukon and Mackenzie River drainages. Our results illustrate the importance of history (e.g. glaciation) and contemporary dispersal ecology in shaping the current genetic population structure of Arctic faunas.

  15. Mitochondrial cytochrome B DNA variation in the high-fecundity atlantic cod: trans-atlantic clines and shallow gene genealogy.

    PubMed Central

    Arnason, Einar

    2004-01-01

    An analysis of sequence variation of 250 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of 1278 Atlantic cod Gadus morhua ranging from Newfoundland to the Baltic shows four high-frequency (>8%) haplotypes and a number of rare and singleton haplotypes. Variation is primarily synonymous mutations. Natural selection acting directly on these variants is either absent or very weak. Common haplotypes show regular trans-Atlantic clines in frequencies and each of them reaches its highest frequency in a particular country. A shallow multifurcating constellation gene genealogy implies young age and recent turnover of polymorphism. Haplotypes characterizing populations at opposite ends of the geographic distribution in Newfoundland and the Baltic are mutationally closest together. The haplotypes are young and have risen rapidly in frequency. Observed differentiation among countries is due primarily to clinal variation. Hypotheses of historical isolation and polymorphisms balanced by local selection and gene flow are unlikely. Instead the results are explained by demic selection of mitochondria carried by highly fit females winning reproductive sweepstakes. By inference the Atlantic cod, a very high-fecundity vertebrate, is characterized by a high variance of offspring number and strong natural selection that leads to very low effective to actual population sizes. PMID:15126405

  16. DNA variation and polymorphism in Tunisian plum species (Prunus spp): contribution of flow cytometry and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Ben Tamarzizt, H; Walker, D; Ben Mustapha, S; Abdallah, D; Baraket, G; Salhi Hannachi, A; Zehdi Azzouzi, S

    2015-12-22

    Plums (Prunus spp) are among the most important stone fruit crops in the world. European (Prunus domestica) and Japanese (Prunus salicina) plums are characterized by different levels of ploidy. Because genetic variability is the prerequisite for any plant-breeding program, we aimed to establish the taxonomic status of Tunisian plums and study their genetic variability. The nuclear DNA content of 45 wild and cultivated Tunisian plums was determined by flow cytometry. Two arbitrary primers (AD10, AD17) were used to elaborate SCAR markers useful to identify plum species. Three wild trees, Zenou 1, Zenou 6, and Zenou 3, which had 2C nuclear DNA contents of 1.99, 2.05, and 2.13 pg, were shown to be hexaploid (2n = 6x = 48), whereas the others were diploid (2n = 2x = 16). These results suggest that the three hexaploid wild plums belong to Prunus insititia, and the others belong to Prunus salicina. No SCAR markers were revealed using the AD10 and AD17 RAPD primers in relation to the ploidy of plums. We note also that AD17 primer appears to be the most informative concerning the genetic diversity. Morphological and pomological traits revealed similarity between introduced and Tunisian plum cultivars. Despite the significant morphological differences found, all the cultivars studied belong to P. salicina. The information obtained in this analysis provided on local plum genetic resources will be helpful to establish a core collection, to evaluate genetic diversity, and to initiate an improvement and selection program.

  17. Genetic variation between two Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) populations in the eastern China based on mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongfang; Zhong, Lijing; Liu, Bofeng; Li, Jiayi; Ni, Qingyong; Xu, Huailiang

    2013-06-01

    Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) is a threatened primate species endemic to China. Population genetic and phylogenetic analyses were conducted in 66 Tibetan individuals from Sichuan (SC), Huangshan (HS), and Fujian (FJ) based on a 477-bp fragment of mitochondrial DNA control region. Four new haplotypes were defined, and a relatively high level of genetic diversity was first observed in FJ populations (Hd = 0.7661). Notably, a continuous approximately 10 bp-fragment deletion was observed near the 5' end of the mtDNA control region of both HS and FJ populations when compared with that of SC population, and a sharing haplotype was found between the two populations, revealing a closer genetic relationship. However, significant genetic differentiation (FST = 0.8700) and more poor gene exchange (Nm < 1) had occurred among three populations. This study mainly provide a further insight into the genetic relationship between HS and FJ Tibetan macaque populations, but it may be necessary to carry out further study with extra samples from other locations in the geographic coverage of the two subspecies (M. thibetana pullus and M. thibetana huangshanensis).

  18. Mutations within Helix I of Twist1 Result in Distinct Limb Defects and Variation of DNA-Binding Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Firulli, Beth A.; Redick, Bradley A.; Conway, Simon J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2008-01-01

    Twist1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor that plays an important role in limb development. Haploinsufficiency of Twist1 results in polydactyly via the inability of Twist1 to antagonistically regulate the related factor Hand2. The mechanism modulating Twist1-Hand2 antagonism is via phosphoregulation of conserved threonine and serine residues in helix I of the bHLH domain. Phosphoregulation alters the dimerization affinities for both proteins. Here we show that the expression of Twist1 and Twist1 phosphoregulation mutants result in distinct limb phenotypes in mice. In addition to dimer regulation, Twist1 phosphoregulation affects the DNA-binding affinities of Twist1 in a partner dependent and cis-element dependent manner. In order to gain a better understanding of the specific Twist1 transcriptional complexes that function during limb morphogensis, we employ a series of Twist1-tethered dimers that include the known Twist1 partners, E12 and Hand2, as well as a tethered Twist1 homodimer. We show that these dimers behave in a manner similar to monomerically expressed bHLH factors and result in distinct limb phenotypes that correlate well with those observed from the limb expression of Twist1 and Twist1 phosphoregulation mutants. Taken together, this study shows that the Twist1 dimer affinity for a given partner can modulate the DNA binding affinity and that Twist1 dimer choice determines phenotypic outcome during limb development. PMID:17652084

  19. Genetic diversity of Asian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): mitochondrial DNA D-loop and cytochrome b sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Lau, C H; Drinkwater, R D; Yusoff, K; Tan, S G; Hetzel, D J; Barker, J S

    1998-08-01

    Swamp and river buffalo mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was sequenced for 303 bp of the cytochrome b gene for 54 animals from 14 populations, and for 158 bp of the D-loop region for 80 animals from 11 populations. Only one cytochrome b haplotype was found in river buffalo. Of the four haplotypes identified in swamp buffalo, one found in all populations is apparently ancestral both to the other swamp haplotypes and to the river haplotype. The phylogenetic relationships among the 33 D-loop haplotypes, with a cluster of 11 found in swamp buffalo only, also support the evolution of domesticated swamp and river buffalo from an ancestral swamp-like animal, most likely represented today by the wild Asian buffalo (Bubalus arnee). The time of divergence of the swamp and river types, estimated from the D-loop data, is 28,000 to 87,000 years ago. We hypothesise that the species originated in mainland south-east Asia, and that it spread north to China and west to the Indian subcontinent, where the rive type evolved and was domesticated. Following domestication in China, the domesticated swamp buffalo spread through two separate routes, through Taiwan and the Philippines to the eastern islands of Borneo and Sulawesi, and south through mainland south-east Asia and then to the western islands of Indonesia.

  20. Types of variation in DNA-A among isolates of East African cassava mosaic virus from Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Robinson, D J; Harrison, B D

    1998-11-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences of the DNA-A-like molecules of three East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV) isolates from Kenya (-K, 2801 nt) and Malawi (-MH and -MK, both 2804 nt) were determined. These sequences were compared with that published for a Tanzanian isolate (-T, 2801 nt) and the partial sequence of a third Malawian isolate. Intergenic region sequences of all isolates, and deduced amino acid sequences of their AC1 (Rep) proteins, each formed a tightly related cluster that was distinct from the comparable components of other begomoviruses. Other complementary-sense genes (AC2, AC3, AC4) differed between EACMV isolates in a way consistent with the accumulation of point mutations. In contrast, virus-sense genes (CP, AV2) of isolates -MH and -MK differed (substantially for AV2) from those of other EACMV isolates but somewhat resembled those of tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Israel, suggesting they had been acquired by recombination with an unidentified begomovirus.

  1. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii’s physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene.

  2. Migration and interaction in a contact zone: mtDNA variation among Bantu-speakers in Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Oliveira, Sandra; Bostoen, Koen; Rocha, Jorge; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Bantu speech communities expanded over large parts of sub-Saharan Africa within the last 4000-5000 years, reaching different parts of southern Africa 1200-2000 years ago. The Bantu languages subdivide in several major branches, with languages belonging to the Eastern and Western Bantu branches spreading over large parts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. There is still debate whether this linguistic divide is correlated with a genetic distinction between Eastern and Western Bantu speakers. During their expansion, Bantu speakers would have come into contact with diverse local populations, such as the Khoisan hunter-gatherers and pastoralists of southern Africa, with whom they may have intermarried. In this study, we analyze complete mtDNA genome sequences from over 900 Bantu-speaking individuals from Angola, Zambia, Namibia, and Botswana to investigate the demographic processes at play during the last stages of the Bantu expansion. Our results show that most of these Bantu-speaking populations are genetically very homogenous, with no genetic division between speakers of Eastern and Western Bantu languages. Most of the mtDNA diversity in our dataset is due to different degrees of admixture with autochthonous populations. Only the pastoralist Himba and Herero stand out due to high frequencies of particular L3f and L3d lineages; the latter are also found in the neighboring Damara, who speak a Khoisan language and were foragers and small-stock herders. In contrast, the close cultural and linguistic relatives of the Herero and Himba, the Kuvale, are genetically similar to other Bantu-speakers. Nevertheless, as demonstrated by resampling tests, the genetic divergence of Herero, Himba, and Kuvale is compatible with a common shared ancestry with high levels of drift, while the similarity of the Herero, Himba, and Damara probably reflects admixture, as also suggested by linguistic analyses.

  3. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii’s physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene. PMID:27672381

  4. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens.

    PubMed

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii's physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene.

  5. Migration and interaction in a contact zone: mtDNA variation among Bantu-speakers in Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Oliveira, Sandra; Bostoen, Koen; Rocha, Jorge; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Bantu speech communities expanded over large parts of sub-Saharan Africa within the last 4000-5000 years, reaching different parts of southern Africa 1200-2000 years ago. The Bantu languages subdivide in several major branches, with languages belonging to the Eastern and Western Bantu branches spreading over large parts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. There is still debate whether this linguistic divide is correlated with a genetic distinction between Eastern and Western Bantu speakers. During their expansion, Bantu speakers would have come into contact with diverse local populations, such as the Khoisan hunter-gatherers and pastoralists of southern Africa, with whom they may have intermarried. In this study, we analyze complete mtDNA genome sequences from over 900 Bantu-speaking individuals from Angola, Zambia, Namibia, and Botswana to investigate the demographic processes at play during the last stages of the Bantu expansion. Our results show that most of these Bantu-speaking populations are genetically very homogenous, with no genetic division between speakers of Eastern and Western Bantu languages. Most of the mtDNA diversity in our dataset is due to different degrees of admixture with autochthonous populations. Only the pastoralist Himba and Herero stand out due to high frequencies of particular L3f and L3d lineages; the latter are also found in the neighboring Damara, who speak a Khoisan language and were foragers and small-stock herders. In contrast, the close cultural and linguistic relatives of the Herero and Himba, the Kuvale, are genetically similar to other Bantu-speakers. Nevertheless, as demonstrated by resampling tests, the genetic divergence of Herero, Himba, and Kuvale is compatible with a common shared ancestry with high levels of drift, while the similarity of the Herero, Himba, and Damara probably reflects admixture, as also suggested by linguistic analyses. PMID:24901532

  6. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens.

    PubMed

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii's physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene. PMID:27672381

  7. Migration and Interaction in a Contact Zone: mtDNA Variation among Bantu-Speakers in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Oliveira, Sandra; Bostoen, Koen; Rocha, Jorge; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Bantu speech communities expanded over large parts of sub-Saharan Africa within the last 4000–5000 years, reaching different parts of southern Africa 1200–2000 years ago. The Bantu languages subdivide in several major branches, with languages belonging to the Eastern and Western Bantu branches spreading over large parts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. There is still debate whether this linguistic divide is correlated with a genetic distinction between Eastern and Western Bantu speakers. During their expansion, Bantu speakers would have come into contact with diverse local populations, such as the Khoisan hunter-gatherers and pastoralists of southern Africa, with whom they may have intermarried. In this study, we analyze complete mtDNA genome sequences from over 900 Bantu-speaking individuals from Angola, Zambia, Namibia, and Botswana to investigate the demographic processes at play during the last stages of the Bantu expansion. Our results show that most of these Bantu-speaking populations are genetically very homogenous, with no genetic division between speakers of Eastern and Western Bantu languages. Most of the mtDNA diversity in our dataset is due to different degrees of admixture with autochthonous populations. Only the pastoralist Himba and Herero stand out due to high frequencies of particular L3f and L3d lineages; the latter are also found in the neighboring Damara, who speak a Khoisan language and were foragers and small-stock herders. In contrast, the close cultural and linguistic relatives of the Herero and Himba, the Kuvale, are genetically similar to other Bantu-speakers. Nevertheless, as demonstrated by resampling tests, the genetic divergence of Herero, Himba, and Kuvale is compatible with a common shared ancestry with high levels of drift, while the similarity of the Herero, Himba, and Damara probably reflects admixture, as also suggested by linguistic analyses. PMID:24901532

  8. Phylogeography of Arabidopsis halleri (Brassicaceae) in mountain regions of Central Europe inferred from cpDNA variation and ecological niche modelling.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, Pawel; Pauwels, Maxime; Pasierbinski, Andrzej; Przedpelska-Wasowicz, Ewa M; Babst-Kostecka, Alicja A; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Rostanski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate phylogeographical patterns present within A. halleri in Central Europe. 1,281 accessions sampled from 52 populations within the investigated area were used in the study of genetic variation based on chloroplast DNA. Over 500 high-quality species occurrence records were used in ecological niche modelling experiments. We evidenced the presence of a clear phylogeographic structure within A. halleri in Central Europe. Our results showed that two genetically different groups of populations are present in western and eastern part of the Carpathians. The hypothesis of the existence of a glacial refugium in the Western Carpathians adn the Bohemian Forest cannot be rejected from our data. It seems, however, that the evidence collected during the present study is not conclusive. The area of Sudetes was colonised after LGM probably by migrants from the Bohemian Forest. PMID:26835186

  9. Phylogeography of Arabidopsis halleri (Brassicaceae) in mountain regions of Central Europe inferred from cpDNA variation and ecological niche modelling

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Maxime; Pasierbinski, Andrzej; Przedpelska-Wasowicz, Ewa M.; Babst-Kostecka, Alicja A.; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Rostanski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate phylogeographical patterns present within A. halleri in Central Europe. 1,281 accessions sampled from 52 populations within the investigated area were used in the study of genetic variation based on chloroplast DNA. Over 500 high-quality species occurrence records were used in ecological niche modelling experiments. We evidenced the presence of a clear phylogeographic structure within A. halleri in Central Europe. Our results showed that two genetically different groups of populations are present in western and eastern part of the Carpathians. The hypothesis of the existence of a glacial refugium in the Western Carpathians adn the Bohemian Forest cannot be rejected from our data. It seems, however, that the evidence collected during the present study is not conclusive. The area of Sudetes was colonised after LGM probably by migrants from the Bohemian Forest. PMID:26835186

  10. Intrageneric phylogenetics based on mitochondrial DNA variation among fifteen harpactorine assassin bugs with four ecotypes and three morphs (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Harpactorinae).

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Dunston P; Lenin, E Arockia; Kiruba, D Angeline

    2014-01-01

    Available mitochondrial DNA sequences viz., 16S, Cyt b, Cyt c oxidase subunit - I, and Cyt c subunit-like - I gene of Rhynocoris (Kolenati) species were subjected to phylogenetic analysis to understand the intrageneric and intraspecific variations and the role of geographical isolation on speciation; using CLUSTAL W in MEGA version 5.1. This analysis includes fifteen species and four ecotypes of R. kumarii Ambrose and Livingstone and three morphs of R. marginatus (Fabricius) from four countries viz., Canada, China, Korea, and South Africa. The pairwise genetic distances were calculated and phylograms were constructed using Maximum Likelihood, Maximum Parsimony, and Neighbor-Joining methods. These preliminary analyses not only demarcated the fifteen species of Rhynocoris, the four ecotypes of R. kumarii, and the three morphs of R. marginatus, but also revealed phylogenetic relationships and the role of geographical isolation and polymorphism on speciation. PMID:24871749

  11. Intragenomic sequence variation at the ITS1 - ITS2 region and at the 18S and 28S nuclear ribosomal DNA genes of the New Zealand mud snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Hydrobiidae: mollusca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoy, Marshal S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis was conducted on two populations of the invasive non-native New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), one from a freshwater ecosystem in Devil's Lake (Oregon, USA) and the other from an ecosystem of higher salinity in the Columbia River estuary (Hammond Harbor, Oregon, USA). To elucidate potential genetic differences between the two populations, three segments of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), the ITS1-ITS2 regions and the 18S and 28S rDNA genes were cloned and sequenced. Variant sequences within each individual were found in all three rDNA segments. Folding models were utilized for secondary structure analysis and results indicated that there were many sequences which contained structure-altering polymorphisms, which suggests they could be nonfunctional pseudogenes. In addition, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) was used for hierarchical analysis of genetic variance to estimate variation within and among populations and within individuals. AMOVA revealed significant variation in the ITS region between the populations and among clones within individuals, while in the 5.8S rDNA significant variation was revealed among individuals within the two populations. High levels of intragenomic variation were found in the ITS regions, which are known to be highly variable in many organisms. More interestingly, intragenomic variation was also found in the 18S and 28S rDNA, which has rarely been observed in animals and is so far unreported in Mollusca. We postulate that in these P. antipodarum populations the effects of concerted evolution are diminished due to the fact that not all of the rDNA genes in their polyploid genome should be essential for sustaining cellular function. This could lead to a lessening of selection pressures, allowing mutations to accumulate in some copies, changing them into variant sequences.                   

  12. Agro-ecological variations of sheath rot disease of rice caused by Sarocladium oryzae and DNA fingerprinting of the pathogen's population structure.

    PubMed

    Tajul Islam Chowdhury, M; Salim Mian, M; Taher Mia, M A; Rafii, M Y; Latif, M A

    2015-12-28

    To examine the impact of regional and seasonal variations on the incidence and severity of sheath rot, a major seed-borne disease of rice caused by Sarocladium oryzae, data on incidence and severity were collected from 27 selected fields in the Gazipur, Rangpur, Bogra, Chittagong, Comilla, Gopalgonj, Jessore, Manikgonj, and Bhola districts of Bangladesh in rain-fed and irrigated conditions. Cultural variability of 29 pathogen isolates obtained from 8 different locations was studied on potato dextrose agar (PDA) and genetic variability was determined by DNA fingerprinting using variable number tandem repeat-polymerase chain reaction markers. Overall, disease incidence and severity were higher in irrigated rice. Disease incidence and severity were highest in the Bhola district in rain-fed rice and lowest in irrigated rice. Mycelial growth of 29 representative isolates was found to vary on PDA and the isolates were divided into 6 groups. The range of the overall size of conidia of the selected isolates was 2.40-7.20 x 1.20-2.40 μm. Analysis of the DNA fingerprint types of the 29 isolates of S. oryzae, obtained from the amplification reactions, revealed 10 fingerprinting types (FPTs) that were 80% similar. FPT-1 was the largest group and included 13 isolates (44.8%), while FPT-2 was the third largest group and included 3 isolates. Each of FPT-3, 4, 5, and 6 included only 1 isolate. We observed no relationship between cultural and genetic groupings.

  13. Evidences for multiple maternal lineages of Caryocar brasiliense populations in the Brazilian Cerrado based on the analysis of chloroplast DNA sequences and microsatellite haplotype variation.

    PubMed

    Collevatti, Rosane G; Grattapaglia, Dario; Hay, John D

    2003-01-01

    In this work we report on the phylogeography of the endangered tree species Caryocar brasiliense based on variability in two classes of maternally inherited chloroplast DNA sequences with different rates of molecular evolution. Eleven sequence haplotypes of a noncoding region between the genes trnT and trnF and 21 distinct 10-locus microsatellite haplotypes could be identified in a total of 160 individuals, collected in 10 widespread populations of C. brasiliense. An amova indicated that most of the variation can be attributed to differences among populations, both for DNA sequence (87.51%) and microsatellites (84.38%). Phylogeography based on a median-joining network analysis of the noncoding region showed a sharp difference from the analysis of microsatellite haplotypes. Nevertheless, both analyses indicated that multiple lineages may have contributed to the origin of C. brasiliense populations in Brazilian Cerrado. Incongruences in the microsatellite haplotypes network suggest that homoplasy, which emerged from recurrent and independent mutations, greatly influenced the evolution of the C. brasiliense chloroplast genome. We hypothesize that our results may show the outcome of the restriction of ancient relic populations to moist refugias during extended droughts coinciding with glaciation in the northern hemisphere. The subsequent spread to favourable areas throughout Central Brazil may have caused contact between different lineages during the interglacial periods. The extinction of megafauna dispersers in the last glaciation may have caused a restriction in seed movement and currently, gene flow has been occurring mainly by pollen movement.

  14. Genetic consequences of population decline in the European otter (Lutra lutra): an assessment of microsatellite DNA variation in Danish otters from 1883 to 1993.

    PubMed

    Pertoldi, C; Hansen, M M; Loeschcke, V; Madsen, A B; Jacobsen, L; Baagoe, H

    2001-09-01

    The European otter (Lutra lutra) was common in Denmark until the 1960s, but its present distribution encompasses only a minor part of the country. The aim of this study was to assess whether the recent population decline has resulted in loss of genetic variability and to gain further insight into the dynamics of the population decline. This was done by analysing microsatellite DNA variation in contemporary and historical samples, the latter encompassing DNA samples extracted from museum specimens covering a time-span from the 1880s to the 1960s. Tests for differences in expected heterozygosity and the numbers of alleles in contemporary versus historical samples and a test for detecting population bottlenecks provided few indications of a recent bottleneck and loss of variability. However, a procedure for detecting population expansions and declines, based on the genealogical history of microsatellite alleles, suggested that a drastic long-term population decline has taken place, which could have started more than 2000 years ago, possibly due to ancient anthropogenic pressure. Finally, assignment tests and pairwise F(ST) values suggested weak but statistically significant genetic differentiation between the extant population and historical samples of otters from other regions in Denmark, more likely reflecting differentiation among original populations rather than recent drift.

  15. Population structure and gene flow of the Atlantic walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) in the eastern Atlantic Arctic based on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite variation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, L W; Born, E W; Gjertz, I; Wiig, O; Holm, L E; Bendixen, C

    1998-10-01

    The population structure of the Atlantic walrus, Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus, was studied using 11 polymorphic microsatellites and restriction fragment length polymorphism detected in the NADH-dehydrogenase ND1, ND2 and ND3/4 segments in mtDNA. A total of 105 walrus samples were analysed from northwest (NW) Greenland, east (E) Greenland, Svalbard and Franz Joseph Land. Two of the 10 haplotypes detected in the four samples were diagnostic for the NW Greenland sample, which implied that the group of walruses in this area is evolutionary distinct from walruses in the other three areas. One individual sampled in E Greenland exhibited a Pacific haplotype, which proved a connection between the Pacific walrus and walruses in eastern Greenland. The Franz Joseph Land, Svalbard and E Greenland samples shared the most common haplotype, indicating very little differentiation at the mtDNA level. Gene flow (Nm) estimates among the four areas indicated a very restricted exchange of female genes between NW Greenland and the more eastern Atlantic Arctic samples, and a closer relationship between the three samples composing the eastern Atlantic Arctic. The genetic variation at 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci grouped individuals into three populations, NW Greenland, E Greenland and a common Franz Joseph Land-Svalbard population, which were connected by moderate gene flow.

  16. Population structure and gene flow of the Atlantic walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) in the eastern Atlantic Arctic based on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite variation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, L W; Born, E W; Gjertz, I; Wiig, O; Holm, L E; Bendixen, C

    1998-10-01

    The population structure of the Atlantic walrus, Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus, was studied using 11 polymorphic microsatellites and restriction fragment length polymorphism detected in the NADH-dehydrogenase ND1, ND2 and ND3/4 segments in mtDNA. A total of 105 walrus samples were analysed from northwest (NW) Greenland, east (E) Greenland, Svalbard and Franz Joseph Land. Two of the 10 haplotypes detected in the four samples were diagnostic for the NW Greenland sample, which implied that the group of walruses in this area is evolutionary distinct from walruses in the other three areas. One individual sampled in E Greenland exhibited a Pacific haplotype, which proved a connection between the Pacific walrus and walruses in eastern Greenland. The Franz Joseph Land, Svalbard and E Greenland samples shared the most common haplotype, indicating very little differentiation at the mtDNA level. Gene flow (Nm) estimates among the four areas indicated a very restricted exchange of female genes between NW Greenland and the more eastern Atlantic Arctic samples, and a closer relationship between the three samples composing the eastern Atlantic Arctic. The genetic variation at 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci grouped individuals into three populations, NW Greenland, E Greenland and a common Franz Joseph Land-Svalbard population, which were connected by moderate gene flow. PMID:9787444

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation, Copy Number Variation, and Gene Expression in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Selmi, Carlo; Cavaciocchi, Francesca; Lleo, Ana; Cheroni, Cristina; De Francesco, Raffaele; Lombardi, Simone A.; De Santis, Maria; Meda, Francesca; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella; Crotti, Chiara; Folci, Marco; Zammataro, Luca; Mayo, Marlyn J.; Bach, Nancy; Shimoda, Shinji; Gordon, Stuart C.; Miozzo, Monica; Invernizzi, Pietro; Podda, Mauro; Scavelli, Rossana; Martin, Michelle R.; Seldin, Michael F.; LaSalle, Janine M.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an uncommon autoimmune disease with a homogeneous clinical phenotype that reflects incomplete disease concordance in monozygotic (MZ) twins. We have taken advantage of a unique collection consisting of genomic DNA and mRNA from peripheral blood cells of female MZ twins (n = 3 sets) and sisters of similar age (n = 8 pairs) discordant for disease. We performed a genome-wide study to investigate differences in (i) DNA methylation (using a custom tiled four-plex array containing tiled 50-mers 19,084 randomly chosen methylation sites), (ii) copy number variation (CNV) (with a chip including markers derived from the 1000 Genomes Project, all three HapMap phases, and recently published studies), and/or (iii) gene expression (by whole-genome expression arrays). Based on the results obtained from these three approaches we utilized quantitative PCR to compare the expression of candidate genes. Importantly, our data support consistent differences in discordant twins and siblings for the (i) methylation profiles of 60 gene regions, (ii) CNV of 10 genes, and (iii) the expression of 2 interferon-dependent genes. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that 17 of these genes are differentially expressed in discordant sibling pairs. In conclusion, we report that MZ twins and sisters discordant for PBC manifest particular epigenetic differences and highlight the value of the epigenetic study of twins. PMID:24734033

  18. DNA methylation analysis of multiple tissues from newborn twins reveals both genetic and intrauterine components to variation in the human neonatal epigenome.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Miina; Smith, Katherine R; Joo, Eric Ji-Hoon; Ng, Hong Kiat; Andronikos, Roberta; Novakovic, Boris; Abdul Aziz, Nur Khairunnisa; Carlin, John B; Morley, Ruth; Saffery, Richard; Craig, Jeffrey M

    2010-11-01

    Mounting evidence from both animal and human studies suggests that the epigenome is in constant drift over the life course in response to stochastic and environmental factors. In humans, this has been highlighted by a small number of studies that have demonstrated discordant DNA methylation patterns in adolescent or adult monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs. However, to date, it remains unclear when such differences emerge, and how prevalent they are across different tissues. To address this, we examined the methylation of four differentially methylated regions associated with the IGF2/H19 locus in multiple birth tissues derived from 91 twin pairs: 56 MZ and 35 dizygotic (DZ). Tissues included cord blood-derived mononuclear cells and granulocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, buccal epithelial cells and placental tissue. Considerable variation in DNA methylation was observed between tissues and between unrelated individuals. Most interestingly, methylation discordance was also present within twin pairs, with DZ pairs showing greater discordance than MZ pairs. These data highlight the variable contribution of both intrauterine environmental exposures and underlying genetic factors to the establishment of the neonatal epigenome of different tissues and confirm the intrauterine period as a sensitive time for the establishment of epigenetic variability in humans. This has implications for the effects of maternal environment on the development of the newborn epigenome and supports an epigenetic mechanism for the previously described phenomenon of 'fetal programming' of disease risk. PMID:20699328

  19. Agro-ecological variations of sheath rot disease of rice caused by Sarocladium oryzae and DNA fingerprinting of the pathogen's population structure.

    PubMed

    Tajul Islam Chowdhury, M; Salim Mian, M; Taher Mia, M A; Rafii, M Y; Latif, M A

    2015-01-01

    To examine the impact of regional and seasonal variations on the incidence and severity of sheath rot, a major seed-borne disease of rice caused by Sarocladium oryzae, data on incidence and severity were collected from 27 selected fields in the Gazipur, Rangpur, Bogra, Chittagong, Comilla, Gopalgonj, Jessore, Manikgonj, and Bhola districts of Bangladesh in rain-fed and irrigated conditions. Cultural variability of 29 pathogen isolates obtained from 8 different locations was studied on potato dextrose agar (PDA) and genetic variability was determined by DNA fingerprinting using variable number tandem repeat-polymerase chain reaction markers. Overall, disease incidence and severity were higher in irrigated rice. Disease incidence and severity were highest in the Bhola district in rain-fed rice and lowest in irrigated rice. Mycelial growth of 29 representative isolates was found to vary on PDA and the isolates were divided into 6 groups. The range of the overall size of conidia of the selected isolates was 2.40-7.20 x 1.20-2.40 μm. Analysis of the DNA fingerprint types of the 29 isolates of S. oryzae, obtained from the amplification reactions, revealed 10 fingerprinting types (FPTs) that were 80% similar. FPT-1 was the largest group and included 13 isolates (44.8%), while FPT-2 was the third largest group and included 3 isolates. Each of FPT-3, 4, 5, and 6 included only 1 isolate. We observed no relationship between cultural and genetic groupings. PMID:26782461

  20. Diurnal variation in bacterioplankton composition and DNA damage in the microbial community from an Andean oligotrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Zenoff, María V; Estévez, María C; Farías, María E

    2014-01-01

    Laguna Azul is an oligotrophic lake situated at 4,560 m above sea level and subject to a high level of solar radiation. Bacterioplankton community composition (BCC) was analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and the impact of solar ultraviolet radiation was assessed by measuring cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). Furthermore, pure cultures of Acinetobacter johnsonii A2 and Rhodococcus sp. A5 were exposed simultaneously and CPD accumulation was studied. Gel analyses generated a total of 7 sequences belonging to Alpha-proteobacteria (1 band), Beta-proteobacteria (1 band), Bacteroidetes (2 bands), Actinobacteria (1 band), and Firmicutes (1 band). DGGE profiles showed minimal changes in BCC and no CPD was detected even though a high level of damage was found in biodosimeters. A. johnsonii A2 showed low level of DNA damage while Rhodococcus sp. A5 exhibited high resistance since no CPD were detected under natural UV-B exposure, suggesting that the bacterial community is well adapted to this highly solar irradiated environment. PMID:25576421

  1. A preliminary report on the genetic variation in pointed gourd (Trichosanthes dioica Roxb.) as assessed by random amplified polymorphic DNA.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, S; Biswas, A; Bandyopadhyay, T K; Ghosh, P D

    2014-06-01

    Pointed gourd (Trichosanthes dioica Roxb.) is an economically important cucurbit and is extensively propagated through vegetative means, viz vine and root cuttings. As the accessions are poorly characterized it is important at the beginning of a breeding programme to discriminate among available genotypes to establish the level of genetic diversity. The genetic diversity of 10 pointed gourd races, referred to as accessions was evaluated. DNA profiling was generated using 10 sequence independent RAPD markers. A total of 58 scorable loci were observed out of which 18 (31.03%) loci were considered polymorphic. Genetic diversity parameters [average and effective number of alleles, Shannon's index, percent polymorphism, Nei's gene diversity, polymorphic information content (PIC)] for RAPD along with UPGMA clustering based on Jaccard's coefficient were estimated. The UPGMA dendogram constructed based on RAPD analysis in 10 pointed gourd accessions were found to be grouped in a single cluster and may represent members of one heterotic group. RAPD analysis showed promise as an effective tool in estimating genetic polymorphism in different accessions of pointed gourd. PMID:24873909

  2. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:27299603

  3. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement.

  4. Diurnal variation in bacterioplankton composition and DNA damage in the microbial community from an Andean oligotrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Zenoff, María V; Estévez, María C; Farías, María E

    2014-01-01

    Laguna Azul is an oligotrophic lake situated at 4,560 m above sea level and subject to a high level of solar radiation. Bacterioplankton community composition (BCC) was analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and the impact of solar ultraviolet radiation was assessed by measuring cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). Furthermore, pure cultures of Acinetobacter johnsonii A2 and Rhodococcus sp. A5 were exposed simultaneously and CPD accumulation was studied. Gel analyses generated a total of 7 sequences belonging to Alpha-proteobacteria (1 band), Beta-proteobacteria (1 band), Bacteroidetes (2 bands), Actinobacteria (1 band), and Firmicutes (1 band). DGGE profiles showed minimal changes in BCC and no CPD was detected even though a high level of damage was found in biodosimeters. A. johnsonii A2 showed low level of DNA damage while Rhodococcus sp. A5 exhibited high resistance since no CPD were detected under natural UV-B exposure, suggesting that the bacterial community is well adapted to this highly solar irradiated environment.

  5. Reprint of "Identification of staphylococcal species based on variations in protein sequences (mass spectrometry) and DNA sequence (sodA microarray)".

    PubMed

    Kooken, Jennifer; Fox, Karen; Fox, Alvin; Altomare, Diego; Creek, Kim; Wunschel, David; Pajares-Merino, Sara; Martínez-Ballesteros, Ilargi; Garaizar, Javier; Oyarzabal, Omar; Samadpour, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    This report is among the first using sequence variation in newly discovered protein markers for staphylococcal (or indeed any other bacterial) speciation. Variation, at the DNA sequence level, in the sodA gene (commonly used for staphylococcal speciation) provided excellent correlation. Relatedness among strains was also assessed using protein profiling using microcapillary electrophoresis and pulsed field electrophoresis. A total of 64 strains were analyzed including reference strains representing the 11 staphylococcal species most commonly isolated from man (Staphylococcus aureus and 10 coagulase negative species [CoNS]). Matrix assisted time of flight ionization/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC ESI MS/MS) were used for peptide analysis of proteins isolated from gel bands. Comparison of experimental spectra of unknowns versus spectra of peptides derived from reference strains allowed bacterial identification after MALDI TOF MS analysis. After LC-MS/MS analysis of gel bands bacterial speciation was performed by comparing experimental spectra versus virtual spectra using the software X!Tandem. Finally LC-MS/MS was performed on whole proteomes and data analysis also employing X!tandem. Aconitate hydratase and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase served as marker proteins on focused analysis after gel separation. Alternatively on full proteomics analysis elongation factor Tu generally provided the highest confidence in staphylococcal speciation.

  6. Longitudinal epigenetic variation of DNA methyltransferase genes associated with vulnerability to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Levent; Wildman, Derek E.; Aiello, Allison E.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Galea, Sandro; Abbas, Asad; Uddin, Monica

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epigenetic differences exist between trauma-exposed individuals with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is unclear whether these epigenetic differences preexist, or arise following, trauma and PTSD onset. METHODS In pre- and post-trauma samples from a subset of Detroit Neighborhood Health Study participants, DNA methylation (DNAm) was measured at DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and DNMT3L. Pre-trauma DNAm differences and changes in DNAm from pre- to post-trauma were assessed between and within PTSD cases (n=30) and age-, gender-, and trauma exposure-matched controls (n=30). Pre-trauma DNAm was tested for association with post-trauma symptom severity (PTSS) change. Potential functional consequences of DNAm differences were explored via bioinformatic search for putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). RESULTS DNMT1 DNAm increased following trauma in PTSD cases (p=0.001), but not controls (p=0.067). DNMT3A and DNMT3B DNAm increased following trauma in both cases (DNMT3A: p=0.009; DNMT3B: p<0.001) and controls (DNMT3A: p=0.002; DNMT3B: p<0.001). In cases only, pre-trauma DNAm was lower at a DNMT3B CpG site that overlaps with a TFBS involved in epigenetic regulation (p=0.001); lower pre-trauma DNMT3B DNAm at this site was predictive of worsening of PTSS post-trauma (p=0.034). Some effects were attenuated following correction for multiple hypothesis testing. CONCLUSIONS DNAm among trauma-exposed individuals shows both longitudinal changes and preexisting epigenetic states that differentiate individuals who are resilient vs. susceptible to PTSD. These distinctive DNAm differences within DNMT loci may contribute to genome-wide epigenetic profiles of PTSD. PMID:25065861

  7. Inferring Multiple Refugia and Phylogeographical Patterns in Pinus massoniana Based on Nucleotide Sequence Variation and DNA Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jian; Huang, Chi-Chung; Huang, Chao-Ching; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh

    2012-01-01

    Background Pinus massoniana, an ecologically and economically important conifer, is widespread across central and southern mainland China and Taiwan. In this study, we tested the central–marginal paradigm that predicts that the marginal populations tend to be less polymorphic than the central ones in their genetic composition, and examined a founders' effect in the island population. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the phylogeography and population structuring of the P. massoniana based on nucleotide sequences of cpDNA atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer, intron regions of the AdhC2 locus, and microsatellite fingerprints. SAMOVA analysis of nucleotide sequences indicated that most genetic variants resided among geographical regions. High levels of genetic diversity in the marginal populations in the south region, a pattern seemingly contradicting the central–marginal paradigm, and the fixation of private haplotypes in most populations indicate that multiple refugia may have existed over the glacial maxima. STRUCTURE analyses on microsatellites revealed that genetic structure of mainland populations was mediated with recent genetic exchanges mostly via pollen flow, and that the genetic composition in east region was intermixed between south and west regions, a pattern likely shaped by gene introgression and maintenance of ancestral polymorphisms. As expected, the small island population in Taiwan was genetically differentiated from mainland populations. Conclusions/Significance The marginal populations in south region possessed divergent gene pools, suggesting that the past glaciations might have low impacts on these populations at low latitudes. Estimates of ancestral population sizes interestingly reflect a recent expansion in mainland from a rather smaller population, a pattern that seemingly agrees with the pollen record. PMID:22952747

  8. Multiple factors have shaped the phylogeography of Chinese spiny loach Cobitis sinensis in Taiwan as inferred from mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, T-Y; Lin, H-D; Shao, K-T; Hsu, K-C

    2010-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b sequences (1140 bp) in 61 specimens of Chinese spiny loach Cobitis sinensis from 12 drainages in Taiwan were identified as two major clades, exhibiting a southern and a northern distribution, north of TzengWen and south of TzengWen (including TzengWen), respectively. The divergence time between these two phylogroups was estimated at 7.34-9.06 million years before present (B.P.), but these two phylogroups were formed c. 3.41-4.23 and 2.22-2.75 M B.P., respectively. Moreover, geological events have been recalculated that Taiwan Island emerged above sea level at an estimate of c. 4-5 M B.P., and quickly became its present shape at c. 2 M B.P. through mountain building. These results suggest that these two major clades of C. sinensis in Taiwan might originate from two different continental populations, since the island's initial isolation in the Pliocene. Within southern Taiwan, the initial colonization was hypothesized to be in KaoPing River, followed by its northward dispersal. The high divergence between KaoPing and TzengWen was influenced by glaciations and landforms. Within north Taiwan, the colonization was from the Miaoli Plateau through western Taiwan to north-eastern and northern Taiwan. This dispersal pattern is concordant with the previously proposed hypothesis. Apparently, both geological and phylogeographic evidence suggested that river capture of the upper Takia River by the LanYang River promoted range expansion in freshwater fishes and also indicated that the Central Range within Taiwan did not act as a barrier to the dispersal of C. sinensis. PMID:20409169

  9. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in Drosophilid species (Diptera: Drosophilidae) along altitudinal gradient from Central Himalayan region of India.

    PubMed

    Sarswat, Manisha; Dewan, Saurabh; Fartyal, Rajendra Singh

    2016-06-01

    Central Himalayan region of India encompasses varied ecological habitats ranging from near tropics to the mid-elevation forests dominated by cool-temperate taxa. In past, we have reported several new records and novel species from Uttarakhand state of India. Here, we assessed genetic variations in three mitochondrial genes, namely, 16S rRNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COI and COII) in 26 drosophilid species collected along altitudinal transect from 550 to 2700 m above mean sea level. In the present study, overall 543 sequences were generated, 82 for 16S rRNA, 238 for COI, 223 for COII with 21, 47 and 45 mitochondrial haplotypes for 16S rRNA, COI and COII genes, respectively. Almost all species were represented by 2-3 unique mitochondrial haplotypes, depicting a significant impact of environmental heterogeneity along altitudinal gradient on genetic diversity. Also for the first time, molecular data of some rare species like Drosophila mukteshwarensis, Liodrosophila nitida, Lordiphosa parantillaria, Lordiphosa ayarpathaensis, Scaptomyza himalayana, Scaptomyza tistai, Zaprionus grandis and Stegana minuta are provided to public domains through this study. PMID:27350680

  10. DNA sequence and haplotype variation in two candidate genes for dilated cardiomyopathy in the turkey Meleagris gallopavo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-chin; Xu, Jun; Kamara, Davida; Geng, Tuoyu; Gyenai, Kwaku; Reed, Kent M; Smith, Edward J

    2007-05-01

    Determining variation in genes is fundamental to understanding their function in the disease state. Cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and phospholamban (PLN) genes have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in human and model species. To investigate the role of these 2 candidate genes in DCM in the turkey Meleagris gallopavo, understanding sequence variants and map position distribution is necessary. To this end, a total of 1854 and 1771 bp of cTnT and PLN gene sequences, respectively, were scanned for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a randomly bred population. A total of 15 SNPs was identified in the cTnT and PLN genomic sequences. Nine haplotypes, 5 in cTnT and 4 in PLN, were identified. Observed heterozygosities (0.02-0.39) in the turkey population were low for both genes. Within each gene, 1 SNP corresponding to a restriction enzyme site was identified and used to develop a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) genotyping assay. The PLN gene was genetically mapped to turkey chromosome 2, equivalent to Gallus gallus chromosome 3, and cTnT mapped to a turkey microchromosome. Although limited because of the relatively small sample size of 55 birds, the data from this SNP analysis of PLN and cTnT provide a foundation from which to evaluate the function of cTnT and PLN in the turkey. Information about the distribution of the SNPs and haplotypes will facilitate future association and linkage studies.

  11. The Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD): a database for DNA variations related to inherited disorders and disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Charoute, Hicham; Nahili, Halima; Abidi, Omar; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2014-01-01

    National and ethnic mutation databases provide comprehensive information about genetic variations reported in a population or an ethnic group. In this paper, we present the Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD), a catalogue of genetic data related to diseases identified in the Moroccan population. We used the PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases to identify available articles published until April 2013. The Database is designed and implemented on a three-tier model using Mysql relational database and the PHP programming language. To date, the database contains 425 mutations and 208 polymorphisms found in 301 genes and 259 diseases. Most Mendelian diseases in the Moroccan population follow autosomal recessive mode of inheritance (74.17%) and affect endocrine, nutritional and metabolic physiology. The MGDD database provides reference information for researchers, clinicians and health professionals through a user-friendly Web interface. Its content should be useful to improve researches in human molecular genetics, disease diagnoses and design of association studies. MGDD can be publicly accessed at http://mgdd.pasteur.ma. PMID:23860041

  12. Nuclear and Chloroplast DNA Variation Provides Insights into Population Structure and Multiple Origin of Native Aromatic Rices of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pritesh Sundar; Rao, Gundimeda Jwala Narasimha; Jena, Sudipta; Samal, Rashmita; Patnaik, Ashok; Patnaik, Sasank Sekhar Chyau; Jambhulkar, Nitiprasad Namdeorao; Sharma, Srigopal; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2016-01-01

    A large number of short grain aromatic rice suited to the agro-climatic conditions and local preferences are grown in niche areas of different parts of India and their diversity is evolved over centuries as a result of selection by traditional farmers. Systematic characterization of these specialty rices has not been attempted. An effort was made to characterize 126 aromatic short grain rice landraces, collected from 19 different districts in the State of Odisha, from eastern India. High level of variation for grain quality and agronomic traits among these aromatic rices was observed and genotypes having desirable phenotypic traits like erect flag leaf, thick culm, compact and dense panicles, short plant stature, early duration, superior yield and grain quality traits were identified. A total of 24 SSR markers corresponding to the hyper variable regions of rice chromosomes were used to understand the genetic diversity and to establish the genetic relationship among the aromatic short grain rice landraces at nuclear genome level. SSR analysis of 126 genotypes from Odisha and 10 genotypes from other states revealed 110 alleles with an average of 4.583 and the Nei's genetic diversity value (He) was in the range of 0.034-0.880 revealing two sub-populations SP 1 (membership percentage-27.1%) and SP 2 (72.9%). At the organelle genomic level for the C/A repeats in PS1D sequence of chloroplasts, eight different plastid sub types and 33 haplotypes were detected. The japonica (Nipponbare) subtype (6C7A) was detected in 100 genotypes followed by O. rufipogon (KF428978) subtype (6C6A) in 13 genotypes while indica (93-11) sub type (8C8A) was seen in 14 genotypes. The tree constructed based on haplotypes suggests that short grain aromatic landraces might have independent origin of these plastid subtypes. Notably a wide range of diversity was observed among these landraces cultivated in different parts confined to the State of Odisha. PMID:27598392

  13. Nuclear and Chloroplast DNA Variation Provides Insights into Population Structure and Multiple Origin of Native Aromatic Rices of Odisha, India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Pritesh Sundar; Rao, Gundimeda Jwala Narasimha; Patnaik, Ashok; Patnaik, Sasank Sekhar Chyau; Jambhulkar, Nitiprasad Namdeorao; Sharma, Srigopal; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2016-01-01

    A large number of short grain aromatic rice suited to the agro-climatic conditions and local preferences are grown in niche areas of different parts of India and their diversity is evolved over centuries as a result of selection by traditional farmers. Systematic characterization of these specialty rices has not been attempted. An effort was made to characterize 126 aromatic short grain rice landraces, collected from 19 different districts in the State of Odisha, from eastern India. High level of variation for grain quality and agronomic traits among these aromatic rices was observed and genotypes having desirable phenotypic traits like erect flag leaf, thick culm, compact and dense panicles, short plant stature, early duration, superior yield and grain quality traits were identified. A total of 24 SSR markers corresponding to the hyper variable regions of rice chromosomes were used to understand the genetic diversity and to establish the genetic relationship among the aromatic short grain rice landraces at nuclear genome level. SSR analysis of 126 genotypes from Odisha and 10 genotypes from other states revealed 110 alleles with an average of 4.583 and the Nei’s genetic diversity value (He) was in the range of 0.034–0.880 revealing two sub-populations SP 1 (membership percentage-27.1%) and SP 2 (72.9%). At the organelle genomic level for the C/A repeats in PS1D sequence of chloroplasts, eight different plastid sub types and 33 haplotypes were detected. The japonica (Nipponbare) subtype (6C7A) was detected in 100 genotypes followed by O. rufipogon (KF428978) subtype (6C6A) in 13 genotypes while indica (93–11) sub type (8C8A) was seen in 14 genotypes. The tree constructed based on haplotypes suggests that short grain aromatic landraces might have independent origin of these plastid subtypes. Notably a wide range of diversity was observed among these landraces cultivated in different parts confined to the State of Odisha. PMID:27598392

  14. Congruence of chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded DNA sequence variations used to assess species boundaries in the soil microalga Heterococcus (Stramenopiles, Xanthophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterococcus is a microalgal genus of Xanthophyceae (Stramenopiles) that is common and widespread in soils, especially from cold regions. Species are characterized by extensively branched filaments produced when grown on agarized culture medium. Despite the large number of species described exclusively using light microscopic morphology, the assessment of species diversity is hampered by extensive morphological plasticity. Results Two independent types of molecular data, the chloroplast-encoded psbA/rbcL spacer complemented by rbcL gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 of the nuclear rDNA cistron (ITS2), congruently recovered a robust phylogenetic structure. With ITS2 considerable sequence and secondary structure divergence existed among the eight species, but a combined sequence and secondary structure phylogenetic analysis confined to helix II of ITS2 corroborated relationships as inferred from the rbcL gene phylogeny. Intra-genomic divergence of ITS2 sequences was revealed in many strains. The ‘monophyletic species concept’, appropriate for microalgae without known sexual reproduction, revealed eight different species. Species boundaries established using the molecular-based monophyletic species concept were more conservative than the traditional morphological species concept. Within a species, almost identical chloroplast marker sequences (genotypes) were repeatedly recovered from strains of different origins. At least two species had widespread geographical distributions; however, within a given species, genotypes recovered from Antarctic strains were distinct from those in temperate habitats. Furthermore, the sequence diversity may correspond to adaptation to different types of habitats or climates. Conclusions We established a method and a reference data base for the unambiguous identification of species of the common soil microalgal genus Heterococcus which uses DNA sequence variation in markers from plastid and nuclear genomes. The

  15. Phylogeographic structure and late Quaternary population history of the Japanese oak Quercus mongolica var. crispula and related species revealed by chloroplast DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Okaura, Takatomi; Quang, Nguyen Duc; Ubukata, Masatoshi; Harada, Ko

    2007-12-01

    Generally, oaks dominate the broadleaf deciduous forests in Japan. The genetic variation in 6 cpDNA regions (trnT-trnL, trnL-trnF, atpB-rbcL, and trnH-psbA speacers, trnL intron, and matK gene) with regard to the Japanese oak (Quercus mongolica var. crispula) and 3 related species in the section Prinus (Q. serrata, Q. dentata and Q. aliena) was investigated in 598 trees belonging to 44 populations distributed throughout the Japanese archipelago. Additional samples were collected from Korea, China, and Russia (Sakhalin). Thirteen haplotypes (I to XIII) were identified on the bases of 15 nucleotide substitutions and 3 indels. Haplotypes I and II were discovered in northeastern Japan, whereas haplotypes III to IX were distributed in southwestern Japan. The boundary distinguishing these 2 groups was located in central Japan coincident with the Itoigawa-Shzuoka tectonic line. Haplotype I was also found in Sakhalin, whereas haplotypes VI, VII, VIII, X, XI, XII, and XIII were found in Korea and China. Four oak species in the same location shared identical haplotypes, suggesting cpDNA introgression by occasional hybridization. Both the values of total haplotype diversity (HT) and haplotype diversity within populations (HS) in Q. mongolica var. crispula were higher in the southwestern populations than in the northeastern populations. A haplotype network indicated that haplotype VI is the ancestral haplotype. The presence of identical haplotypes in Korea, China, and Japan suggested that the haplotypes diversified on the Eurasian continent before the last glacial period. The difference in genetic structure between the northeastern and southwestern regions indicates a difference in the history of migration and recolonization in Japan during the last glacial period.

  16. In search of the genetic footprints of Sumerians: a survey of Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation in the Marsh Arabs of Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background For millennia, the southern part of the Mesopotamia has been a wetland region generated by the Tigris and Euphrates rivers before flowing into the Gulf. This area has been occupied by human communities since ancient times and the present-day inhabitants, the Marsh Arabs, are considered the population with the strongest link to ancient Sumerians. Popular tradition, however, considers the Marsh Arabs as a foreign group, of unknown origin, which arrived in the marshlands when the rearing of water buffalo was introduced to the region. Results To shed some light on the paternal and maternal origin of this population, Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation was surveyed in 143 Marsh Arabs and in a large sample of Iraqi controls. Analyses of the haplogroups and sub-haplogroups observed in the Marsh Arabs revealed a prevalent autochthonous Middle Eastern component for both male and female gene pools, with weak South-West Asian and African contributions, more evident in mtDNA. A higher male than female homogeneity is characteristic of the Marsh Arab gene pool, likely due to a strong male genetic drift determined by socio-cultural factors (patrilocality, polygamy, unequal male and female migration rates). Conclusions Evidence of genetic stratification ascribable to the Sumerian development was provided by the Y-chromosome data where the J1-Page08 branch reveals a local expansion, almost contemporary with the Sumerian City State period that characterized Southern Mesopotamia. On the other hand, a more ancient background shared with Northern Mesopotamia is revealed by the less represented Y-chromosome lineage J1-M267*. Overall our results indicate that the introduction of water buffalo breeding and rice farming, most likely from the Indian sub-continent, only marginally affected the gene pool of autochthonous people of the region. Furthermore, a prevalent Middle Eastern ancestry of the modern population of the marshes of southern Iraq implies that if

  17. Genetic variation in DNA-repair pathways and response to radiochemotherapy in esophageal adenocarcinoma: a retrospective cohort study of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent data in esophageal cancer suggests the variant allele of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in XRCC1 may be associated with resistance to radiochemotherapy. However, this SNP has not been assessed in a histologically homogeneous clinical trial cohort that has been treated with a uniform approach. In addition, whether germline DNA may serve as a surrogate for tumor genotype at this locus is unknown in this disease. Our objective was to assess this SNP in relation to the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate in subjects with esophageal adenocarcinoma who received cisplatin-based preoperative radiochemotherapy in a multicenter clinical trial (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 1201). As a secondary aim, we investigated the rate of allelic imbalance between germline and tumor DNA. Methods Eighty-one eligible treatment-naïve subjects with newly diagnosed resectable esophageal adenocarcinoma received radiotherapy (45 Gy) concurrent with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, with planned subsequent surgical resection. The primary endpoint was pCR, defined as complete absence of tumor in the surgical specimen after radiochemotherapy. Using germline DNA from 60 subjects, we examined the base-excision repair SNP, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and 4 other SNPs in nucleotide excision (XPD Lys751Gln and Asp312Asn, ERCC1 3' flank) and double-stranded break (XRCC2 5' flank) repair pathways, and correlated genotype with pCR rate. Paired tumor tissue was used to estimate the frequency of allelic imbalance at the XRCC1 SNP. Results The variant allele of the XRCC1 SNP (399Gln) was detected in 52% of subjects. Only 6% of subjects with the variant allele experienced a pCR, compared to 28% of subjects without the variant allele (odds ratio 5.37 for failing to achieve pCR, p = 0.062). Allelic imbalance at this locus was found in only 10% of informative subjects, suggesting that germline genotype may reflect tumor genotype at this locus. No significant association with pCR was noted

  18. Variations of SSU rDNA group I introns in different isolates of Cordyceps militaris and the loss of an intron during cross-mating.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Sun, Junde; Guo, Suping; Yang, Huaijun; Dong, Caihong

    2014-08-01

    Cordyceps militaris, the type species of genus Cordyceps, is one of the most popular mushrooms and a nutraceutical in eastern Asia. It is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species because it can complete its life cycle when cultured in vitro. In the present study, the occurrence and sequence variation of SSU rDNA group I introns, Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, among different isolates of C. militaris were analyzed. Based on the secondary structure predictions, the Cmi.S943 intron has been placed in subgroup IC1, and the Cmi.S1199 intron has been placed in subgroup IE. No significant similarity between Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199 suggested different origins. Three genotypes, based on the frequency and distribution of introns, were described to discriminate the 57 surveyed C. militaris strains. It was found that the genotype was related to the stroma characteristics. The stromata of all of the genotype II strains, which possessed only Cmi.S943, could produce perithecium. In contrast, the stromata of all genotype III strains, which had both Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, could not produce perithecium. Cmi.S1199 showed the lowest level of intra-specific variation among the tested strains. Group I introns can be lost during strain cross-mating. Therefore, we presumed that during cross-mating and recombination, intron loss could be driven by positive Darwinian selection due to the energetic cost of transcribing long introns.

  19. Variations of SSU rDNA group I introns in different isolates of Cordyceps militaris and the loss of an intron during cross-mating.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Sun, Junde; Guo, Suping; Yang, Huaijun; Dong, Caihong

    2014-08-01

    Cordyceps militaris, the type species of genus Cordyceps, is one of the most popular mushrooms and a nutraceutical in eastern Asia. It is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species because it can complete its life cycle when cultured in vitro. In the present study, the occurrence and sequence variation of SSU rDNA group I introns, Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, among different isolates of C. militaris were analyzed. Based on the secondary structure predictions, the Cmi.S943 intron has been placed in subgroup IC1, and the Cmi.S1199 intron has been placed in subgroup IE. No significant similarity between Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199 suggested different origins. Three genotypes, based on the frequency and distribution of introns, were described to discriminate the 57 surveyed C. militaris strains. It was found that the genotype was related to the stroma characteristics. The stromata of all of the genotype II strains, which possessed only Cmi.S943, could produce perithecium. In contrast, the stromata of all genotype III strains, which had both Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, could not produce perithecium. Cmi.S1199 showed the lowest level of intra-specific variation among the tested strains. Group I introns can be lost during strain cross-mating. Therefore, we presumed that during cross-mating and recombination, intron loss could be driven by positive Darwinian selection due to the energetic cost of transcribing long introns. PMID:24996897

  20. Mitochondrial DNA-based analysis of genetic variation and relatedness among Sri Lankan indigenous chickens and the Ceylon junglefowl (Gallus lafayetti).

    PubMed

    Silva, P; Guan, X; Ho-Shing, O; Jones, J; Xu, J; Hui, D; Notter, D; Smith, E

    2009-02-01

    Indigenous chickens (IC) in developing countries provide a useful resource to detect novel genes in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Here, we investigated the level of genetic diversity in IC from five distinct regions of Sri Lanka using a PCR-based resequencing method. In addition, we investigated the relatedness of IC to different species of junglefowls including Ceylon (CJF; Gallus lafayetti), a subspecies that is endemic to Sri Lanka, green (Gallus varius), grey (Gallus sonneratii) and red (Gallus gallus) junglefowls. A total of 140 birds including eight CJF were used to screen the control region of the mitochondrial DNA sequence for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and other variants. We detected and validated 44 SNPs, which formed 42 haplotypes and six haplogroups in IC. The SNPs observed in the CJF were distinct and the D-loop appeared to be missing a 62-bp segment found in IC and the red junglefowl. Among the six haplogroups of IC, only one was region-specific. Estimates of haplotype and nucleotide diversities ranged from 0.901 to 0.965 and from 0.011 to 0.013 respectively, and genetic divergence was generally low. Further, variation among individuals within regions accounted for 92% of the total molecular variation among birds. The Sri Lankan IC were more closely related to red and grey junglefowls than to CJF, indicating multiple origins. The molecular information on genetic diversity revealed in our study may be useful in developing genetic improvement and conservation strategies to better utilize indigenous Sri Lankan chicken resources. PMID:18945292

  1. Mitochondrial DNA and Y Chromosome Variation Provides Evidence for a Recent Common Ancestry between Native Americans and Indigenous Altaians

    PubMed Central

    Dulik, Matthew C.; Zhadanov, Sergey I.; Osipova, Ludmila P.; Askapuli, Ayken; Gau, Lydia; Gokcumen, Omer; Rubinstein, Samara; Schurr, Theodore G.

    2012-01-01

    The Altai region of southern Siberia has played a critical role in the peopling of northern Asia as an entry point into Siberia and a possible homeland for ancestral Native Americans. It has an old and rich history because humans have inhabited this area since the Paleolithic. Today, the Altai region is home to numerous Turkic-speaking ethnic groups, which have been divided into northern and southern clusters based on linguistic, cultural, and anthropological traits. To untangle Altaian genetic histories, we analyzed mtDNA and Y chromosome variation in northern and southern Altaian populations. All mtDNAs were assayed by PCR-RFLP analysis and control region sequencing, and the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome was scored for more than 100 biallelic markers and 17 Y-STRs. Based on these data, we noted differences in the origin and population history of Altaian ethnic groups, with northern Altaians appearing more like Yeniseian, Ugric, and Samoyedic speakers to the north, and southern Altaians having greater affinities to other Turkic speaking populations of southern Siberia and Central Asia. Moreover, high-resolution analysis of Y chromosome haplogroup Q has allowed us to reshape the phylogeny of this branch, making connections between populations of the New World and Old World more apparent and demonstrating that southern Altaians and Native Americans share a recent common ancestor. These results greatly enhance our understanding of the peopling of Siberia and the Americas. PMID:22281367

  2. Mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome variation provides evidence for a recent common ancestry between Native Americans and Indigenous Altaians.

    PubMed

    Dulik, Matthew C; Zhadanov, Sergey I; Osipova, Ludmila P; Askapuli, Ayken; Gau, Lydia; Gokcumen, Omer; Rubinstein, Samara; Schurr, Theodore G

    2012-02-10

    The Altai region of southern Siberia has played a critical role in the peopling of northern Asia as an entry point into Siberia and a possible homeland for ancestral Native Americans. It has an old and rich history because humans have inhabited this area since the Paleolithic. Today, the Altai region is home to numerous Turkic-speaking ethnic groups, which have been divided into northern and southern clusters based on linguistic, cultural, and anthropological traits. To untangle Altaian genetic histories, we analyzed mtDNA and Y chromosome variation in northern and southern Altaian populations. All mtDNAs were assayed by PCR-RFLP analysis and control region sequencing, and the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome was scored for more than 100 biallelic markers and 17 Y-STRs. Based on these data, we noted differences in the origin and population history of Altaian ethnic groups, with northern Altaians appearing more like Yeniseian, Ugric, and Samoyedic speakers to the north, and southern Altaians having greater affinities to other Turkic speaking populations of southern Siberia and Central Asia. Moreover, high-resolution analysis of Y chromosome haplogroup Q has allowed us to reshape the phylogeny of this branch, making connections between populations of the New World and Old World more apparent and demonstrating that southern Altaians and Native Americans share a recent common ancestor. These results greatly enhance our understanding of the peopling of Siberia and the Americas. PMID:22281367

  3. DNA variation in the genes of the Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase and its relation with resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, and body fat.

    PubMed Central

    Dériaz, O; Dionne, F; Pérusse, L; Tremblay, A; Vohl, M C; Côté, G; Bouchard, C

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in 261 subjects from 58 families the association between DNA variation at the genes coding for the Na,K-ATPase peptides and resting metabolic rate (RMR), respiratory quotient (RQ), and percent body fat (%FAT). Five restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) at three Na,K-ATPase genes were determined: one at the alpha 1 locus (BglII), and two at the beta locus (beta MspI and beta PvuII). Haplotypes were determined from the two variable sites of the alpha 2 gene (alpha 2 haplotypes) and the beta gene (beta haplotypes). There was a strong trend for %FAT to be related to the RFLP generated by BglII at the alpha 2 exons 21-22 in males (P = 0.06) and females (P = 0.05). RQ was (a) associated with the BglII RFLP at the alpha 2 exon 1 (P = 0.02) and with the alpha 2 8.0 kb/4.3 kb haplotype (P = 0.04) and (b) linked with the beta gene MspI marker (P = 0.04) and with the beta 5.3 kb/5.1 kb haplotype (P = 0.008) based on sib-pair analysis. The present study suggests that the genes encoding Na,K-ATPase may be associated or linked with RQ and perhaps with %FAT but not with RMR. PMID:7509349

  4. Genetic structure of the widespread and common Mediterranean bryophyte Pleurochaete squarrosa (Brid.) Lindb. (Pottiaceae) - evidence from nuclear and plastidic DNA sequence variation and allozymes.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, Michael; Ansell, Stephen W; Russell, Stephen J; Koch, Marcus A; Vogel, Johannes C

    2007-02-01

    The Mediterranean Basin as one the world's most biologically diverse regions provides an interesting area for the study of plant evolution and spatial structure in plant populations. The dioecious moss Pleurochaete squarrosa is a widespread and common bryophyte in the Mediterranean Basin. Thirty populations were sampled for a study on molecular diversity and genetic structure, covering most major islands and mainland populations from Europe and Africa. A significant decline in nuclear and chloroplast sequence and allozyme variation within populations from west to east was observed. While DNA sequence data showed patterns of isolation by distance, allozyme markers did not. Instead, their considerable interpopulation genetic differentiation appeared to be unrelated to geographic distance. Similar high values for coefficients of gene diversity (G(ST)) in all data sets provided evidence of geographic isolation and limited gene flow among populations (i) within islands, (ii) within mainland areas, and (iii) between islands and mainland. Notably, populations in continental Spain are strongly genetically isolated from all other investigated areas. Surprisingly, there was no difference in gene diversity and G(ST) between islands and mainland areas. Thus, we conclude that large Mediterranean islands may function as 'mainland' for bryophytes. This hypothesis and its implication for conservation biology of cryptogamic plants warrant further investigation. While sexually reproducing populations were found all over the Mediterranean Basin, high levels of multilocus linkage disequilibrium provide evidence of mainly vegetative propagation even in populations where sexual reproduction was observed. PMID:17284206

  5. Variation in copy number of the 28S rDNA of Aspergillus fumigatus measured by droplet digital PCR and analog quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Benabou, Marion; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) after DNA digestion yielded a 28S rDNA copy number of 61 to 86 copies/genome when testing 10 unrelated Aspergillus fumigatus isolates, higher than with quantitative PCR. Unfortunately, ddPCR after DNA digestion did not improve the sensitivity of our PCR assay when testing serum patients with invasive aspergillosis. PMID:27316653

  6. Cryptic variation in an ecological indicator organism: mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data confirm distinct lineages of Baetis harrisoni Barnard (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) in southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Baetis harrisoni Barnard is a mayfly frequently encountered in river studies across Africa, but the external morphological features used for identifying nymphs have been observed to vary subtly between different geographic locations. It has been associated with a wide range of ecological conditions, including pH extremes of pH 2.9–10.0 in polluted waters. We present a molecular study of the genetic variation within B. harrisoni across 21 rivers in its distribution range in southern Africa. Results Four gene regions were examined, two mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I [COI] and small subunit ribosomal 16S rDNA [16S]) and two nuclear (elongation factor 1 alpha [EF1α] and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [PEPCK]). Bayesian and parsimony approaches to phylogeny reconstruction resulted in five well-supported major lineages, which were confirmed using a general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model. Results from the EF1α gene were significantly incongruent with both mitochondrial and nuclear (PEPCK) results, possibly due to incomplete lineage sorting of the EF1α gene. Mean between-clade distance estimated using the COI and PEPCK data was found to be an order of magnitude greater than the within-clade distance and comparable to that previously reported for other recognised Baetis species. Analysis of the Isolation by Distance (IBD) between all samples showed a small but significant effect of IBD. Within each lineage the contribution of IBD was minimal. Tentative dating analyses using an uncorrelated log-normal relaxed clock and two published estimates of COI mutation rates suggest that diversification within the group occurred throughout the Pliocene and mid-Miocene (~2.4–11.5 mya). Conclusions The distinct lineages of B. harrisoni correspond to categorical environmental variation, with two lineages comprising samples from streams that flow through acidic Table Mountain Sandstone and three lineages with samples from neutral-to-alkaline streams

  7. Global and New Caledonian patterns of population genetic variation in the deep-sea splendid alfonsino, Beryx splendens, inferred from mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Lévy-Hartmann, Lauriana; Roussel, Valérie; Letourneur, Yves; Sellos, Daniel Y

    2011-12-01

    Splendid alfonsino Beryx splendens is a commercial species in several countries, but is not currently exploited in New Caledonia. Information on species biology and genetics can influence the development of fisheries and assist in their management, but the genetic structuring and diversity of B. splendens populations remain largely unknown. To improve knowledge of genetic parameters, we used mitochondrial DNA sequences to conduct a comparative study of populations from throughout the world. Fragments of 815 bp of cytochrome b gene were sequenced and used to interpret the species history. We analyzed 204 individuals representing 14 geographical populations worldwide. A special focus was put on populations from New Caledonia. Analysis of variation between sequences, based on pairwise F statistics and AMOVA, demonstrated a population subdivision between the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific Oceans (Fst = 0.11-0.32; P < 0.05). Minimum-spanning network analysis revealed a mainly star-shaped pattern, with two lineages that may represent population expansion following a bottleneck/founder event and/or suggest colonization by migratory events over large distances. Our observations demonstrated that the species seems to follow the oceanic currents. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences revealed 122 variable sites, which defined numerous haplotypes, some associated with particular geographical regions. These data suggest an extremely high intra-specific genetic diversity, even at small scales. Focusing on the New Caledonia area, statistical analysis did not reveal sub-structuring among samples, suggesting again that at least a fraction of individuals migrate. No significant isolation by distance pattern was observed in this species (R = -0.22; P = 0.79) among seamount populations in the EEZ.

  8. CRISPR-CAS9 D10A nickase target-specific fluorescent labeling of double strand DNA for whole genome mapping and structural variation analysis.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Jennifer; Sibert, Justin; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Yonggang; Hu, Wenhui; Riethman, Harold; Xiao, Ming

    2016-01-29

    We have developed a new, sequence-specific DNA labeling strategy that will dramatically improve DNA mapping in complex and structurally variant genomic regions, as well as facilitate high-throughput automated whole-genome mapping. The method uses the Cas9 D10A protein, which contains a nuclease disabling mutation in one of the two nuclease domains of Cas9, to create a guide RNA-directed DNA nick in the context of an in vitro-assembled CRISPR-CAS9-DNA complex. Fluorescent nucleotides are then incorporated adjacent to the nicking site with a DNA polymerase to label the guide RNA-determined target sequences. This labeling strategy is very powerful in targeting repetitive sequences as well as in barcoding genomic regions and structural variants not amenable to current labeling methods that rely on uneven distributions of restriction site motifs in the DNA. Importantly, it renders the labeled double-stranded DNA available in long intact stretches for high-throughput analysis in nanochannel arrays as well as for lower throughput targeted analysis of labeled DNA regions using alternative methods for stretching and imaging the labeled long DNA molecules. Thus, this method will dramatically improve both automated high-throughput genome-wide mapping as well as targeted analyses of complex regions containing repetitive and structurally variant DNA.

  9. CRISPR-CAS9 D10A nickase target-specific fluorescent labeling of double strand DNA for whole genome mapping and structural variation analysis

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Jennifer; Sibert, Justin; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Yonggang; Hu, Wenhui; Riethman, Harold; Xiao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new, sequence-specific DNA labeling strategy that will dramatically improve DNA mapping in complex and structurally variant genomic regions, as well as facilitate high-throughput automated whole-genome mapping. The method uses the Cas9 D10A protein, which contains a nuclease disabling mutation in one of the two nuclease domains of Cas9, to create a guide RNA-directed DNA nick in the context of an in vitro-assembled CRISPR-CAS9-DNA complex. Fluorescent nucleotides are then incorporated adjacent to the nicking site with a DNA polymerase to label the guide RNA-determined target sequences. This labeling strategy is very powerful in targeting repetitive sequences as well as in barcoding genomic regions and structural variants not amenable to current labeling methods that rely on uneven distributions of restriction site motifs in the DNA. Importantly, it renders the labeled double-stranded DNA available in long intact stretches for high-throughput analysis in nanochannel arrays as well as for lower throughput targeted analysis of labeled DNA regions using alternative methods for stretching and imaging the labeled long DNA molecules. Thus, this method will dramatically improve both automated high-throughput genome-wide mapping as well as targeted analyses of complex regions containing repetitive and structurally variant DNA. PMID:26481349

  10. The influence of history and contemporary stream hydrology on the evolution of genetic diversity within species: an examination of microsatellite DNA variation in bull trout, Salvelinus confluentus (Pisces: Salmonidae).

    PubMed

    Costello, A B; Down, T E; Pollard, S M; Pacas, C J; Taylor, E B

    2003-02-01

    An understanding of the relative roles of historical and contemporary factors in structuring genetic variation is a fundamental, but understudied aspect of geographic variation. We examined geographic variation in microsatellite DNA allele frequencies in bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus, Salmonidae) to test hypotheses concerning the relative roles of postglacial dispersal (historical) and current landscape features (contemporary) in structuring genetic variability and population differentiation. Bull trout exhibit relatively low intrapopulation microsatellite variation (average of 1.9 alleles per locus, average He = 0.24), but high levels of interpopulation divergence (F(ST) = 0.39). We found evidence of historical influences on microsatellite variation in the form of a decrease in the number of alleles and heterozygosities in populations on the periphery of the range relative to populations closer to putative glacial refugia. In addition, one region of British Columbia that was colonized later during deglaciation and by more indirect watershed connections showed less developed and more variable patterns of isolation by distance than a similar region colonized earlier and more directly from refugia. Current spatial and drainage interconnectedness among sites and the presence of migration barriers (falls and cascades) within individual streams were found to be important contemporary factors influencing historical patterns of genetic variability and interpopulation divergence. Our work illustrates the limited utility of equilibrium models to delineate population structure and patterns of genetic diversity in recently founded populations or those inhabiting highly heterogeneous environments, and it highlights the need for approaches incorporating a landscape context for population divergence. Substantial microsatellite DNA divergence among bull trout populations may also signal divergence in traits important to population persistence in specific environments.

  11. The influence of history and contemporary stream hydrology on the evolution of genetic diversity within species: an examination of microsatellite DNA variation in bull trout, Salvelinus confluentus (Pisces: Salmonidae).

    PubMed

    Costello, A B; Down, T E; Pollard, S M; Pacas, C J; Taylor, E B

    2003-02-01

    An understanding of the relative roles of historical and contemporary factors in structuring genetic variation is a fundamental, but understudied aspect of geographic variation. We examined geographic variation in microsatellite DNA allele frequencies in bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus, Salmonidae) to test hypotheses concerning the relative roles of postglacial dispersal (historical) and current landscape features (contemporary) in structuring genetic variability and population differentiation. Bull trout exhibit relatively low intrapopulation microsatellite variation (average of 1.9 alleles per locus, average He = 0.24), but high levels of interpopulation divergence (F(ST) = 0.39). We found evidence of historical influences on microsatellite variation in the form of a decrease in the number of alleles and heterozygosities in populations on the periphery of the range relative to populations closer to putative glacial refugia. In addition, one region of British Columbia that was colonized later during deglaciation and by more indirect watershed connections showed less developed and more variable patterns of isolation by distance than a similar region colonized earlier and more directly from refugia. Current spatial and drainage interconnectedness among sites and the presence of migration barriers (falls and cascades) within individual streams were found to be important contemporary factors influencing historical patterns of genetic variability and interpopulation divergence. Our work illustrates the limited utility of equilibrium models to delineate population structure and patterns of genetic diversity in recently founded populations or those inhabiting highly heterogeneous environments, and it highlights the need for approaches incorporating a landscape context for population divergence. Substantial microsatellite DNA divergence among bull trout populations may also signal divergence in traits important to population persistence in specific environments. PMID

  12. Variations in mitochondrial DNA and gene transcription in freezing-tolerant larvae of Eurosta solidaginis (Diptera: Tephritidae) and Gynaephora groenlandica (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae).

    PubMed

    Levin, D B; Danks, H V; Barber, S A

    2003-06-01

    Respiration, mitochondrial (mt)DNA content, and mitochondrial-specific RNA expression in fat body cells from active and cold-adapted larvae of the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, and the Arctic woolly bear caterpillar, Gynaephora groenlandica, were compared. Reduced amounts of mtDNA were observed in cold-adapted larvae of both E. solidaginis and G. groenlandica collected in fall or winter, compared with summer-collected larvae. mtDNA increased to levels similar to those of summer-collected larvae after incubation at 10 degrees C or 15 degrees C for 5 h. Mitochondrial-specific RNAs (COI and 16S) were observed in fat body cells of both active and cold-adapted E. solidaginis larvae. Our results suggest that mitochondrial proteins required for respiration may be restored rapidly from stable RNAs present in overwintering larvae.

  13. Variation in DNA binding constants with a change in geometry of ternary copper(II) complexes with N2O donor Schiff base and cyanate or dicyanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Subrata; Santra, Ramesh Chandra; Das, Saurabh; Chattopadhyay, Shouvik

    2014-09-01

    Two new copper(II) complexes, [Cu(L)(OCN)] (1) and [CuL(dca)]n (2), where HL = 2-(-(2-(diethylamino)ethylimino)methyl)naphthalen-1-ol, dca = N(CN)2-, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-VIS spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Complex 1 has square planar and complex 2 square pyramidal geometries in solid state around metal centre. Interactions of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) were studied by UV-VIS spectroscopy. Binding constant and site size of interaction were determined. Binding site size and intrinsic binding constant K revealed complex 1 interacted with calf thymus DNA better than complex 2.

  14. Variation in repeat length and heteroplasmy of the mitochondrial DNA control region along a core-edge gradient in the eastern spadefoot toad (Pelobates syriacus).

    PubMed

    Munwes, Inbar; Geffen, Eli; Friedmann, Adam; Tikochinski, Yaron; Gafny, Sarig

    2011-07-01

    Peripheral populations are those situated at the distribution margins of a species and are often subjected to more extreme abiotic and biotic conditions than those at the core. Here, we hypothesized that shorter repeat length and fewer heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copies, which are associated with more efficient mitochondrial function, may be related to improved survival under extreme environmental conditions. We sampled eastern spadefoot toads (mostly as tadpoles) from 43 rain pools distributed along a 300-km gradient from core to edge of the species' distribution. We show that mean pool tandem repeat length and heteroplasmy increase from edge to core, even after controlling for body size. We evaluate several alternative hypotheses and propose the Fisher hypothesis as the most likely explanation. However, additional sequential sampling and experimental studies are required to determine whether selection under extreme conditions, or alternative mechanisms, could account for the gradient in heteroplasmy and repeat length in the mtDNA control region.

  15. mtDNA control-region sequence variation suggests multiple independent origins of an "Asian-specific" 9-bp deletion in sub-Saharan Africans.

    PubMed Central

    Soodyall, H.; Vigilant, L.; Hill, A. V.; Stoneking, M.; Jenkins, T.

    1996-01-01

    The intergenic COII/tRNA(Lys) 9-bp deletion in human mtDNA, which is found at varying frequencies in Asia, Southeast Asia, Polynesia, and the New World, was also found in 81 of 919 sub-Saharan Africans. Using mtDNA control-region sequence data from a subset of 41 individuals with the deletion, we identified 22 unique mtDNA types associated with the deletion in Africa. A comparison of the unique mtDNA types from sub-Saharan Africans and Asians with the 9-bp deletion revealed that sub-Saharan Africans and Asians have sequence profiles that differ in the locations and frequencies of variant sites. Both phylogenetic and mismatch-distribution analysis suggest that 9-bp deletion arose independently in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia and that the deletion has arisen more than once in Africa. Within Africa, the deletion was not found among Khoisan peoples and was rare to absent in western and southwestern African populations, but it did occur in Pygmy and Negroid populations from central Africa and in Malawi and southern African Bantu-speakers. The distribution of the 9-bp deletion in Africa suggests that the deletion could have arisen in central Africa and was then introduced to southern Africa via the recent "Bantu expansion." PMID:8644719

  16. Species cross-amplification, identification and genetic variation of 17 species of deer (Cervidae) with microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA from antlers.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, G Sebastian; Johannesen, Jes; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2015-06-01

    Strong anthropogenic impact has caused 28 of the currently recognized 55 species of deer (Cervidae) to be listed on the IUCN Red List. Particular threats to vulnerable species include habitat deterioration and hybridization with alien, introduced species. The scarcity of many species has severely hampered genetic analyses of their populations, including the detection of loci for cross-species amplification. Because deer antlers are shed and re-grown annually, antlers offer the possibility for non-invasive genetic sampling of large individual numbers, and may provide material for reference genotyping from historical samples stored in zoos, museums and trophy collections of rare and extinct species/populations. In this paper, we report cross-species amplification of 19 nuclear microsatellite loci and the amplification of 16S mtDNA for barcoding from nearly a third of all deer species worldwide based on high quality DNA extracted from antler bone up to 40 years old. Phylogenetic analysis based on mtDNA of seventeen species and five subspecies corroborate previously published phylogenetic data, thus confirming the specific resolution of the DNA extraction methodology.

  17. Variations in patterns of DNA damage induced in human colorectal tumor cells by 5-fluorodeoxyuridine: implications for mechanisms of resistance and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Canman, C E; Tang, H Y; Normolle, D P; Lawrence, T S; Maybaum, J

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that treatment of the HT29 human colorectal tumor (HCT) cell line with 100 nM 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd) induces DNA fragments ranging from 50 kilobases to 5 megabases. The studies reported here were conducted to characterize the kinetics, concentration dependence, and pharmacologic specificity of this process and to determine if such fragmentation varies among HCT cell lines. HT29 and SW620 cells yielded similar fragment size distributions upon treatment with either FdUrd or CB3717 [a folate analog inhibitor of thymidylate synthase (TS)]. With either of these agents the SW620 line required higher drug concentrations or longer incubation times than HT29 cells to achieve a given level of fragmentation or cytotoxicity, even though the two cell lines are equally sensitive to FdUrd-induced TS inhibition. These data indicate that SW620 resistance is not due to a lesion in the events leading up to TS inhibition but it may be due to a difference in the steps following TS inhibition. Aphidicolin, a DNA polymerase inhibitor, did not cause substantial fragmentation or cytotoxicity in these two cell lines, demonstrating that the fragmentation response to the other two drugs is not a general consequence of DNA synthesis inhibition. A third HCT line, HuTu80, gave rise only to a smaller and more discrete population of DNA fragments, ranging from approximately 50 to 200 kilobases, following exposure to FdUrd. Similar patterns were seen in this line upon treatment with CB3717 or aphidicolin, indicating that this fragmentation pattern is not specific to TS inhibition and may be characteristic of a more general response than that seen in the other two cell lines. DNA fragments induced by FdUrd in HuTu80 cells did not degrade into smaller pieces, demonstrating that the process by which they are formed is distinct from apoptosis. We conclude that the responses of HCT cells to FdUrd-induced TS inhibition vary significantly, that these differences may reflect

  18. Glacial survival east and west of the 'Mekong-Salween Divide' in the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains region as revealed by AFLPs and cpDNA sequence variation in Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Berberidaceae).

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zhai, Sheng-Nan; Qiu, Ying-Xiong; Guo, Yan-Ping; Ge, Xue-Jun; Comes, Hans Peter

    2011-05-01

    Molecular phylogeographic studies have recently begun to elucidate how plant species from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) and adjacent regions responded to the Quaternary climatic oscillations. In this regard, however, far less attention has been paid to the southern and south-eastern declivities of the QTP, i.e. the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains (HHM) region. Here, we report a survey of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequence variation in the HHM endemic Sinopodophyllum hexandrum, a highly selfing alpine perennial herb with mainly gravity-dispersed berries (105 individuals, 19 localities). We specifically aimed to test a vicariant evolutionary hypothesis across the 'Mekong-Salween Divide', a known biogeographic and phytogeographic boundary of north-to-south trending river valleys separating the East Himalayas and Hengduan Mts. Both cpDNA and AFLPs identified two divergent phylogroups largely congruent with these mountain ranges. There was no genetic depauperation in the more strongly glaciated East Himalayas (AFLPs: H(E)=0.031; cpDNA: h(S)=0.133) compared to the mainly ice-free Hengduan Mts. (AFLPs: H(E)=0.037; cpDNA: h(S)=0.082), while population differentiation was consistently higher in the former region (AFLPs: Φ(ST)=0.522 vs. 0.312; cpDNA: Φ(ST)=0.785 vs. 0.417). Our results suggest that East Himalayan and Hengduan populations of S. hexandrum were once fragmented, persisted in situ during glacials in both areas, and have not merged again, except for a major instance of inter-lineage chloroplast capture identified at the MSD boundary. Our coalescent time estimate for all cpDNA haplotypes (c. 0.37-0.48 mya), together with paleogeological evidence, strongly rejects paleo-drainage formation as a mechanism underlying allopatric fragmentation, whereas mountain glaciers following the ridges of the MSD during glacials (and possible interglacials) could have been responsible. This study thus indicates an important role

  19. Intraspecific Genetic Variation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Dirofilaria immitis Samples from Western China Using Complete ND1 and 16S rDNA Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianyu; Liang, Yinan; Zhong, Xiuqin; Wang, Ning; Hu, Dandan; Zhou, Xuan; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2014-01-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) is the causative agent of an important zoonotic disease that is spread by mosquitoes. In this study, molecular and phylogenetic characterization of D. immitis were performed based on complete ND1 and 16S rDNA gene sequences, which provided the foundation for more advanced molecular diagnosis, prevention, and control of heartworm diseases. The mutation rate and evolutionary divergence in adult heartworm samples from seven dogs in western China were analyzed to obtain information on genetic diversity and variability. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using both maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayes methods based on the complete gene sequences. The results suggest that D. immitis formed an independent monophyletic group in which the 16S rDNA gene has mutated more rapidly than has ND1. PMID:24639299

  20. DNA sequences and morphological variation in Lophiodes iwamotoi Ho, Serét & Shao, 2011 based on new material from New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsuan-Ching; Chen, Wei-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Iwamoto's anglerfish Lophiodes iwamotoi is recorded from New Caledonia for the first time. Study of molecular features further support the validity of the species. Moloecular sequence data from the cytochrome c oxidase subunit-I and Rhodopsin loci, along with morphological variation are provided, as well as information on its fresh coloration. PMID:25243316

  1. The effects of structural variations of thiophene-containing Ru(II) complexes on the acid-base and DNA binding properties.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cui-Li; Zhang, An-Guo; Zheng, Ze-Bo; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-03-01

    A phenylthiophenyl-bearing Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hbptip)](PF₆)₂ {bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, Hbptip = 2-(4-phenylthiophen-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ¹H NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The ground- and excited-state acid-base properties of the complex were studied by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations and the negative logarithm values of the ground-state acid ionization constants were derived to be pK(a1) = 1.31 ± 0.09 and pK(a2) = 5.71 ± 0.11 with the pK(a2) associated deprotonation/protonation process occurring over 3 pK(a) units more acidic than thiophenyl-free parent complex of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hpip)]²⁺ {Hpip = 2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline}. The calf thymus DNA-binding properties of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hbptip)]²⁺ in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.1 and 50 mM NaCl) were investigated by DNA viscosities and density functional theoretical calculations as well as UV-visible and emission spectroscopy techniques of UV-visible and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)₆]⁴⁻, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, DNA melting experiments, and reverse salt effects. The complex was evidenced to bind to the DNA intercalatively with binding affinity being greater than those for previously reported analogs of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hip)]²⁺, [Ru(bpy)₂(Htip)]²⁺, and [Ru(bpy)₂(Haptip)]²⁺ {Hip = 1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, Htip = 2-thiophenimidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, Haptip = 2-(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline}.

  2. Identification of two suites of cyclotide precursor genes from metallophyte Viola baoshanensis: cDNA sequence variation, alternative RNA splicing and potential cyclotide diversity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liao, Bin; Craik, David J; Li, Jin-Tian; Hu, Min; Shu, Wen-Sheng

    2009-02-15

    Cyclotides are a novel family of plant-derived defense peptides that are biosynthetically produced via the processing of cyclotide precursor (CP) proteins containing one, two or three cyclotide domains. By screening a cDNA library of Viola baoshanensis roots and using RACE and RT-PCR methods, 23 cDNA clones were identified and then used to deduce full CP proteins containing one (VbCP1S-5), two (VbCP6S), or three (VbCP7S) cyclotide domains. RT-PCR and sequence analyses suggested that VbCP6S were resulted from the alternative splicing of VbCP7S RNA. The significance of VbCP7S RNA splicing is that it provides a mechanism for increasing the diversity of cyclotide expression via the recombination of N-terminal repeat (NTR) regions and cyclotide domains. After analyzing the full endoplasmic reticulum (ER) signals of known and novel CPs associated with RT-PCR tests, three primers encoding the conserved sequence ALVLIATFA, AAFALPA-LA and AAFALPA-AFA were proposed to be more efficient in cloning CP genes than the well-applied primer encoding AAFALPA. Cyclotide sequence analyses indicated that the cDNA clones encoded a variety of Möbius and bracelet cyclotides, which were likely involved in the known bioactivities of cyclotides, and also might play a previously unreported role in mediating the metal tolerance of V. baoshanensis. Overall, this study shows that CP genes are varied in V. baoshanensis and cyclotide expression is subject to transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in this plant.

  3. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Modahl, Cassandra M.; Mackessy, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation of humans by snakes is a complex and continuously evolving medical emergency, and treatment is made that much more difficult by the diverse biochemical composition of many venoms. Venomous snakes and their venoms also provide models for the study of molecular evolutionary processes leading to adaptation and genotype-phenotype relationships. To compare venom complexity and protein sequences, venom gland transcriptomes are assembled, which usually requires the sacrifice of snakes for tissue. However, toxin transcripts are also present in venoms, offering the possibility of obtaining cDNA sequences directly from venom. This study provides evidence that unknown full-length venom protein transcripts can be obtained from the venoms of multiple species from all major venomous snake families. These unknown venom protein cDNAs are obtained by the use of primers designed from conserved signal peptide sequences within each venom protein superfamily. This technique was used to assemble a partial venom gland transcriptome for the Middle American Rattlesnake (Crotalus simus tzabcan) by amplifying sequences for phospholipases A2, serine proteases, C-lectins, and metalloproteinases from within venom. Phospholipase A2 sequences were also recovered from the venoms of several rattlesnakes and an elapid snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus), and three-finger toxin sequences were recovered from multiple rear-fanged snake species, demonstrating that the three major clades of advanced snakes (Elapidae, Viperidae, Colubridae) have stable mRNA present in their venoms. These cDNA sequences from venom were then used to explore potential activities derived from protein sequence similarities and evolutionary histories within these large multigene superfamilies. Venom-derived sequences can also be used to aid in characterizing venoms that lack proteomic profiles and identify sequence characteristics indicating specific envenomation profiles. This approach, requiring only venom, provides

  4. [On the Population Genetic Portrait of Kaluga, Acipenser dauricus Georgi, 1775 Analysis of Sequence Variation in the Mitochondrial DNA Control Region].

    PubMed

    Shedko, S V; Miroshnichenko, I L; Nemkova, G A; Shedko, M B

    2015-09-01

    The variability of the mtDNA D-loop was examined in kaluga endemic to the Amur River, which is classified as critically endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened species. Sequencing of the D-loop fragment (819 bp) in 122 kaluga specimens collected in Lower Amur revealed 27 unique genotypes. The sample was characterized by a relatively low level of haplotypic (0.927) and nucleotide (0.0044) diversity. No considerable deviations from the neutral mutation model of DNA polymorphism were observed. Overall, the mismatch distribution patterns and the results of testing of simple demographic models (sudden demographic expansion and exponential population growth) pointed to a past increase in the number of kaluga sturgeons. According to the Bayesian skyline, the kaluga population doubled over the last two to three thousand years. The number of mature females in the modern kaluga population and the assessment of their long-term effective population size (Nef) are roughly at the same level (about three thousand individuals), which confirms the validity of assigning kaluga to the category of species on the brink of extinction. PMID:26606799

  5. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA Variation Reveals a Sharp Genetic Break within the Distribution of the Blue Land Crab Cardisoma guanhumi in the Western Central Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Maria Rosimere Xavier; Albrecht, Marc; McKinley, Alan Shane; de Carvalho, Adriana Márcia Ferreira; de Sousa Junior, Severino Cavalcante; Diniz, Fabio Mendonça

    2015-01-01

    The blue land crab Cardisoma guanhumi is widely distributed throughout tropical and subtropical estuarine regions in the Western Central Atlantic (WCA). Patterns of population genetic structure and historical demographics of the species were assessed by mtDNA control region sequence analysis to examine the connectivity among five populations (n = 97) within the region for future conservation strategies and decision-making of fishery management. A total of 234 polymorphic nucleotides were revealed within the sequence region, which have defined 93 distinct haplotypes. No dominant mtDNA haplotypes were found but instead a distribution of a few low-frequency recurrent haplotypes with a large number of singletons. A NJ-tree and a median-joining haplotype network revealed two distinct clusters, corresponding to individuals from estuaries located along the Caribbean Sea and Brazilian waters, respectively. AMOVA and FST statistics supported the hypothesis that two main geographic regions exists. Phylogeographical discontinuity was further demonstrated by the Bayesian assignment analysis and a significant pattern of isolation-by-distance. Additionally, tests of neutral evolution and analysis of mismatch distribution indicate a complex demographic history in the WCA, which corresponds to bottleneck and subsequent population growth. Overall, a sharp genetic break between Caribbean and Brazilian populations raised concerns over the conservation status of the blue land crab. PMID:26295384

  7. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains isolated from Argentina based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Landaburu, Fernanda; Cuestas, María Luján; Rubio, Andrea; Elías, Nahuel Alejandro; Daneri, Gabriela Lopez; Veciño, Cecilia; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Mujica, María Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA genes of 49 Histoplasma capsulatum (48 from clinical samples and one from soil) isolates were examined. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity within this region was useful for phylogenetic classification of H. capsulatum and species identification. Thus, in 45 of 49 isolates we observed higher percentages of identity in the nucleotide sequences of ITS regions when the isolates studied herein were compared with those reported in our country in the South America B clade. Phylogenetic analyses of rDNA sequences corresponding to the 537 bp of the ITS region obtained from H. capsulatum isolates assigned South America type B clade (45 isolates), North America type 1 and Asia clade (2 isolates each one). H. capsulatum strains isolated from soil and from patients living in Argentina (45 of 49) clustered together with the H. capsulatum isolates of the South America B clade. The high level of genetic similarity among our isolates suggests that almost one genetic population is present in the microenvironment. Isolates described as H. capsulatum var. capsulatum or var. farciminosum (2 isolates) did not form a monophyletic group and were found in the Asia clade. Subsequent studies are needed to properly identify these isolates. PMID:24299459

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Variation Reveals a Sharp Genetic Break within the Distribution of the Blue Land Crab Cardisoma guanhumi in the Western Central Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Maria Rosimere Xavier; Albrecht, Marc; McKinley, Alan Shane; de Carvalho, Adriana Márcia Ferreira; de Sousa Junior, Severino Cavalcante; Diniz, Fabio Mendonça

    2015-08-19

    The blue land crab Cardisoma guanhumi is widely distributed throughout tropical and subtropical estuarine regions in the Western Central Atlantic (WCA). Patterns of population genetic structure and historical demographics of the species were assessed by mtDNA control region sequence analysis to examine the connectivity among five populations (n = 97) within the region for future conservation strategies and decision-making of fishery management. A total of 234 polymorphic nucleotides were revealed within the sequence region, which have defined 93 distinct haplotypes. No dominant mtDNA haplotypes were found but instead a distribution of a few low-frequency recurrent haplotypes with a large number of singletons. A NJ-tree and a median-joining haplotype network revealed two distinct clusters, corresponding to individuals from estuaries located along the Caribbean Sea and Brazilian waters, respectively. AMOVA and FST statistics supported the hypothesis that two main geographic regions exists. Phylogeographical discontinuity was further demonstrated by the Bayesian assignment analysis and a significant pattern of isolation-by-distance. Additionally, tests of neutral evolution and analysis of mismatch distribution indicate a complex demographic history in the WCA, which corresponds to bottleneck and subsequent population growth. Overall, a sharp genetic break between Caribbean and Brazilian populations raised concerns over the conservation status of the blue land crab.

  9. Variation in mitochondrial DNA control region haplotypes in populations of the bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus, living in the Chernobyl environment, Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Dunina-Barkovskaya, Yelena V; Gaschak, Sergey P; Rodgers, Brenda E; Chesser, Ronald K; Bondarkov, Mikhail; Baker, Robert J

    2006-02-01

    Bank vole, Clethrionomys glareolus, specimens have been annually sampled from the radioactive Chernobyl, Ukraine, environment and nonradioactive reference sites since 1997. Exposed voles continually exhibit increased mitochondrial DNA haplotype (h) and nucleotide diversity (ND), observed in the hypervariable control region (1997-1999). Increased maternal mutation rates, source-sink relationships, or both are proposed as hypotheses for these differences. Samples from additional years (2000 and 2001) have been incorporated into this temporal study. To evaluate the hypothesis that an increased mutation rate is associated with increased h, DNA sequences were examined in a phylogenetic context for novel substitutions not observed in haplotypes from bank voles from outside Ukraine or in other species of Clethrionomys. Such novel substitutions might result from in situ mutation events and, if largely restricted to samples from radioactive environments, support an increased maternal mutation rate in these areas. The only unique substitution meeting this criterion was found in an uncontaminated reference site. All other substitutions are found in other haplotypes of the bank vole or in other species. Increased maternal mutation rates do not appear to explain trends in h and ND observed in northern Ukraine. Studies examining ecological dynamics will clarify the reasons behind, and significance of, increased levels of h in contaminated areas.

  10. The genetic variations in DNA repair genes ERCC2 and XRCC1 were associated with the overall survival of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suhan; Wang, Jianzhong; Bai, Yansen; Wang, Qing; Liu, Li; Zhang, Kai; Hong, Xiaohua; Deng, Qifei; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Wu, Tangchun; Xu, Ping; Guo, Huan

    2016-09-01

    It was reported that DNA repair can confer cancer cell resistance to therapeutic treatments by activating antiapoptotic cellular defense. We hypothesized that genetic variants of DNA repair genes may be associated with lung cancer prognosis. Seventeen tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (tagSNPs) selected from 12 DNA repair genes were genotyped in 280 advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by TaqMan assay. The associations of these SNPs and overall survival of advanced NSCLC patients were investigated. Advanced NSCLC patients carrying ERCC2 rs50872 CT+TT genotypes had significantly longer median survival time (MST) and decreased death risk than patients with rs50872 CC genotype [log-rank P = 0.031; adjusted HR(95% CI) = 0.73 (0.55-0.98), P = 0.033]. These effects were mainly seen among younger patients (≤65 years old) [HR(95% CI) = 0.57 (0.37-0.87), P = 0.010], patients without surgery [HR(95% CI) = 0.68 (0.47-0.98), P = 0.036] but with chemotherapy [HR(95% CI) = 0.64 (0.46-0.91), P = 0.012] or radiotherapy [HR(95% CI) = 0.58 (0.38-0.89), P = 0.013]. Meanwhile, compared to advanced NSCLC patients with rs25487 GG genotype, patients carrying XRCC1 rs25487 GA+AA genotypes had significantly shorter MST (MST = 11.7 vs. 16.7, log-rank P = 0.048). In addition, advanced NSCLC patients carrying the ERCC2 rs50872 CC in combination with XRCC1 rs25487 GA+AA genotype had the shortest MST (11.2 month) and highest death risk [HR(95% CI) = 1.70 (1.15-2.52), P = 0.008] when compared with those carrying rs50872 CT+TT and rs25487 GG genotype (MST = 22.0 month). The ERCC2 rs50872 T allele was associated with favorable but XRCC1 rs25487 A allele with bad survival for advanced NSCLC in Chinese population, which may offer novel biomarkers for predicting clinical outcomes.

  11. Mutation of the RDR1 gene caused genome-wide changes in gene expression, regional variation in small RNA clusters and localized alteration in DNA methylation in rice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endogenous small (sm) RNAs (primarily si- and miRNAs) are important trans/cis-acting regulators involved in diverse cellular functions. In plants, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are essential for smRNA biogenesis. It has been established that RDR2 is involved in the 24 nt siRNA-dependent RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway. Recent studies have suggested that RDR1 is involved in a second RdDM pathway that relies mostly on 21 nt smRNAs and functions to silence a subset of genomic loci that are usually refractory to the normal RdDM pathway in Arabidopsis. Whether and to what extent the homologs of RDR1 may have similar functions in other plants remained unknown. Results We characterized a loss-of-function mutant (Osrdr1) of the OsRDR1 gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.) derived from a retrotransposon Tos17 insertion. Microarray analysis identified 1,175 differentially expressed genes (5.2% of all expressed genes in the shoot-tip tissue of rice) between Osrdr1 and WT, of which 896 and 279 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively, in Osrdr1. smRNA sequencing revealed regional alterations in smRNA clusters across the rice genome. Some of the regions with altered smRNA clusters were associated with changes in DNA methylation. In addition, altered expression of several miRNAs was detected in Osrdr1, and at least some of which were associated with altered expression of predicted miRNA target genes. Despite these changes, no phenotypic difference was identified in Osrdr1 relative to WT under normal condition; however, ephemeral phenotypic fluctuations occurred under some abiotic stress conditions. Conclusions Our results showed that OsRDR1 plays a role in regulating a substantial number of endogenous genes with diverse functions in rice through smRNA-mediated pathways involving DNA methylation, and which participates in abiotic stress response. PMID:24980094

  12. Selenite-induced variation in glutathione peroxidase activity of three mammalian cell lines: no effect on radiation-induced cell killing or DNA strand breakage

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.E.C.; Carlsson, J.; Marklund, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    The selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activities of three mammalian cell lines, HT29, P31, and N-18, cultured in medium with low serum content, increased about 2-, 5-, and 40-fold, respectively, after supplementation with 100 nM selenite. Catalase, CuZn superoxide dismutase, and Mn superoxide dismutase activities were not generally influenced by selenite supplementation, and there was only a minor nonselenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity in the investigated cell lines. Gamma-irradiated control and selenite-supplemented cells showed no changes in the surviving fractions, as estimated by clonogenic survival or (/sup 3/H)-thymidine uptake, nor were there any significant differences between the two groups in the induction of DNA strand breaks after gamma irradiation under repairing (37 degrees C) or nonrepairing (0 degrees C) conditions. The results suggest that selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase does not contribute significantly to the radiation resistance of cultured mammalian cells.

  13. Population structure and variation in red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) from the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coast of Florida as determined from mitochondrial DNA control region sequence.

    PubMed

    Garber, Amber F; Tringali, Michael D; Stuck, Kenneth C

    2004-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA control regions of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) from the Gulf of Mexico (n = 140) and Atlantic coast of Florida (n = 35) were sequenced to generate a prestocking genetic baseline for planned stock enhancement. Intrasample haplotype and nucleotide diversities ranged from 0.94 to 1.00 and 1.8% to 2.5%, respectively. All population analyses were consistent with the hypothesis that red snapper constitute a single, panmictic population over the sampled range. A ubiquitous, predominant haplotype, shared by 23% of the specimens, appeared to be evolutionarily recent, in contrast to previous findings based on restriction fragment length polymorphism data. Tajima's D values were suggestive of a recent bottleneck. Mismatch distributions from Gulf samples were smooth and unimodal, characteristic of recent population expansion. However, the Atlantic sample exhibited a comparatively broader, possibly multimodal distribution, suggestive of a more stable population history. Additional control-region data may clarify potentially disparate demographic histories of Gulf and Atlantic snapper.

  14. Female gene pools of Berber and Arab neighboring communities in central Tunisia: microstructure of mtDNA variation in North Africa.

    PubMed

    Cherni, Lotfi; Loueslati, Besma Yaacoubi; Pereira, Luísa; Ennafaâ, Hajer; Amorim, António; El Gaaied, Amel Ben Ammar

    2005-02-01

    North African populations are considered genetically closer to Eurasians than to sub-Saharans. However, they display a considerably high mtDNA heterogeneity among them, namely in the frequencies of the U6, East African, and sub-Saharan haplogroups. In this study, we describe and compare the female gene pools of two neighboring Tunisian populations, Kesra (Berber) and Zriba (non-Berber), which have contrasting historical backgrounds. Both populations presented lower diversity values than those observed for other North African populations, and they were the only populations not showing significant negative Fu's F(S) values. Kesra displayed a much higher proportion of typical sub-Saharan haplotypes (49%, including 4.2% of M1 haplogroup) than Zriba (8%). With respect to U6 sequences, frequencies were low (2% in Kesra and 8% in Zriba), and all belonged to the subhaplogroup U6a. An analysis of these data in the context of North Africa reveals that the emerging picture is complex, because Zriba would match the profile of a Berber Moroccan population, whereas Kesra, which shows twice the frequency of sub-Saharan lineages normally observed in northern coastal populations, would match a western Saharan population except for the low U6 frequency. The North African patchy mtDNA landscape has no parallel in other regions of the world and increasing the number of sampled populations has not been accompanied by any substantial increase in our understanding of its phylogeography. Available data up to now rely on sampling small, scattered populations, although they are carefully characterized in terms of their ethnic, linguistic, and historical backgrounds. It is therefore doubtful that this picture truly represents the complex historical demography of the region rather than being just the result of the type of samplings performed so far.

  15. Genetic differences between the endangered San Clemente Island loggerhead shrike Lanius ludovicianus mearnsi and two neighbouring subspecies demonstrated by mtDNA control region and cytochrome b sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Mundy, N I; Winchell, C S; Woodruff, D S

    1997-01-01

    We investigated mtDNA sequence variation in five populations of the loggerhead shrike Lanius ludovicianus, representing four subspecies, including the San Clemente logger-head shrike L. l. mearnsi, a critically endangered California Channel Island endemic. Variability in 200 bp of control region and 200 bp of cytochrome b was extremely low, and defined four haplotypes. Strong structure was apparent among all three southern California subspecies, including L. l. mearnsi, with one haplotype predominating in each subspecies. Although potential levels of gene flow between L. l. mearnsi and neighbouring populations are low, mtDNA data support field observations that some shrikes visit the island during winter but do not stay to breed, and suggest that these birds come from the mainland. The similarity in haplotypes between populations from Saskatchewan, Canada and those in southern California suggests post-glacial northern range expansion of the species. Our results confirm the evolutionary distinctiveness of L. l. mearnsi and justify continuing efforts for its conservation.

  16. Seasonal variation in detection of bacterial DNA in arthritic stifle joints of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture using PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Muir, Peter; Fox, Robin; Wu, Qiang; Baker, Theresa A; Zitzer, Nina C; Hudson, Alan P; Manley, Paul A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling

    2010-02-24

    An underappreciated cause and effect relationship between environmental bacteria and arthritis may exist. Previously, we found that stifle arthritis in dogs was associated with the presence of environmental bacteria within synovium. Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) is often associated with stifle arthritis in dogs. We now wished to determine whether seasonal variation in detection of bacterial material may exist in affected dogs, and to also conduct analyses of both synovium and synovial fluid. We also wished to analyze a larger clone library of the 16S rRNA gene to further understanding of the microbial population in the canine stifle. Synovial biopsies were obtained from 117 affected dogs from January to December 2006. Using PCR, synovium and synovial fluid were tested for Borrelia burgdorferi and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia DNA. Broad-ranging 16S rRNA primers were also used and PCR products were cloned and sequenced for bacterial identification. Overall, 41% of arthritic canine stifle joints contained bacterial DNA. Detection of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid samples was increased, when compared with synovium (p<0.01). Detection rates were highest in the winter and spring and lowest in the summer period, suggesting environmental factors influence the risk of translocation to the stifle. Organisms detected were predominately Gram's negative Proteobacteria, particularly the orders Rhizobiales (32.8% of clones) and Burkholderiales (20.0% of clones), usually as part of a polymicrobial population. PCR-positivity was inversely correlated with severity of arthritis assessed radiographically and with dog age. Bacterial translocation to the canine stifle may be associated with changes to the indoor environment. PMID:19758772

  17. Of mice and the 'Age of Discovery': the complex history of colonization of the Azorean archipelago by the house mouse (Mus musculus) as revealed by mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, S I; Mathias, M L; Searle, J B

    2015-01-01

    Humans have introduced many species onto remote oceanic islands. The house mouse (Mus musculus) is a human commensal and has consequently been transported to oceanic islands around the globe as an accidental stowaway. The history of these introductions can tell us not only about the mice themselves but also about the people that transported them. Following a phylogeographic approach, we used mitochondrial D-loop sequence variation (within an 849- to 864-bp fragment) to study house mouse colonization of the Azores. A total of 239 sequences were obtained from all nine islands, and interpretation was helped by previously published Iberian sequences and 66 newly generated Spanish sequences. A Bayesian analysis revealed presence in the Azores of most of the D-loop clades previously described in the domesticus subspecies of the house mouse, suggesting a complex colonization history of the archipelago as a whole from multiple geographical origins, but much less heterogeneity (often single colonization?) within islands. The expected historical link with mainland Portugal was reflected in the pattern of D-loop variation of some of the islands but not all. A more unexpected association with a distant North European source area was also detected in three islands, possibly reflecting human contact with the Azores prior to the 15th century discovery by Portuguese mariners. Widening the scope to colonization of the Macaronesian islands as a whole, human linkages between the Azores, Madeira, the Canaries, Portugal and Spain were revealed through the sharing of mouse sequences between these areas. From these and other data, we suggest mouse studies may help resolve historical uncertainties relating to the 'Age of Discovery'.

  18. Evolution of the polyploid north-west Iberian Leucanthemum pluriflorum clan (Compositae, Anthemideae) based on plastid DNA sequence variation and AFLP fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Roland; Vogt, Robert; Oberprieler, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Leucanthemum is a species-rich polyploid complex from southern and central Europe, comprising 41 species with ploidy ranging from 2x to 22x. The present contribution aims at reconstructing the evolutionary history of a geographically isolated species group (the L. pluriflorum clan) from the north-west Iberian Peninsula comprising the diploid L. pluriflorum, the tetraploids L. ircutianum subsp. pseudosylvaticum and L. × corunnense (a putative hybrid taxon based on crossing between L. pluriflorum and L. merinoi), and the hexaploids L. sylvaticum and L. merinoi. Methods Chromosome number variation (determined flow cytometrically) and sequence variation were analysed for two intergenic spacer regions on the plastid genome (psbA-trnH and trnC-petN) for individuals from 54 populations in combination with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting of 246 representative individuals from these populations. Key Results Plastid sequence data revealed that all surveyed members of the L. pluriflorum clan possess plastid haplotypes that are closely related to each other and distinctly separated from other Leucanthemum species. AFLP fingerprinting resulted in allopolyploid fragment patterns for most of the polyploid populations, except for the tetraploid L. × corunnense and a further tetraploid population in northern Galicia, which cluster with the diploids rather than with the other polyploids. In silico modelling of (auto)tetraploid AFLP genotypes further corroborates the allopolyploid nature of L. ircutianum subsp. pseudosylvaticum, L. sylvaticum and L. merinoi. Conclusions The present study provides evidence for recognizing one diploid (L. pluriflorum), one autotetraploid (L. corunnense), one allotetraploid (L. pseudosylvaticum) and one allohexaploid (L. sylvaticum with the two geographically and ecologically differentiated subspecies subsp. sylvaticum and subsp. merinoi) in the L. pluriflorum clan. It also has implications

  19. Molecular variation analysis of Aspergillus flavus using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region

    PubMed Central

    Zarrin, Majid; Erfaninejad, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is the second most common disease-causing species of Aspergillus in humans. The fungus is frequently associated with life-threatening infections in immunocompromised hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to analyze the genetic variability among different isolates of A. flavus using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). A total of 62 A. flavus isolates were tested in the study. Molecular variability was searched for by analysis of the PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA using restriction enzymes. PCR using primers for ITS1 and ITS4 resulted in a product of ~600 bp. Amplicons were subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, HaeIII and TaqI. Digestion of the PCR products using these restriction enzymes produced different patterns of fragments among the isolates, with different sizes and numbers of fragments, revealing genetic variability. In conclusion, ITS-RFLP is a useful molecular tool in screening for nucleotide polymorphisms among A. flavus isolates. PMID:27588085

  20. Interspecific variation in the repair of UV damaged DNA in the genus Xiphophorus as a factor in the decline of the Rio Grande Platyfish.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David; Paniker, Lakshmi; Lin, Kevin; Fernandez, André

    2015-01-01

    The fish genus Xiphophorus consists of 26 species distributed along the eastern slopes of mountain ranges extending from northern Mexico to Belize and Nicaragua. We analyzed light-dependent repair of UV-induced DNA damage in at least two species from each of the four monophyletic Xiphophorus groups. We found that the northern platyfish had significantly reduced photoenzymatic repair compared to the other three groups, including the northern swordtails, southern platyfish and southern swordtails. All of the species of the northern platyfish, including the Marbled (meyeri), Northern (gordoni) and Monterrey Platyfish (couchianus) are the northernmost species in the genus and are the only three species in the genus that are currently found on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Satellite data from the past 30 years (1979-2008) correlate greater increases in shorter wavelength UVB with higher latitudes within the Xiphophorus range. We suggest that, combined with other consequences of human population growth, anthropogenic deozonation resulting in a disproportionate increase in UVB in temperate latitudes may be a contributing factor in the decline and extirpation of the northern platyfish.

  1. Indole acetic acid production by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. from the rhizosphere of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. and their variation in extragenic repetitive DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sethia, Bedhya; Mustafa, Mariam; Manohar, Sneha; Patil, Savita V; Jayamohan, Nellickal Subramanian; Kumudini, Belur Satyan

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas (FP) is a heterogenous group of growth promoting rhizobacteria that regulate plant growth by releasing secondary metabolic compounds viz., indole acetic acid (IAA), siderophores, ammonia and hydrogen cyanide. In the present study, IAA producing FPs from the rhizosphere of Plectranthus amboinicus were characterized morphologically, biochemically and at the molecular level. Molecular identification of the isolates were carried out using Pseudomonas specific primers. The effect of varying time (24, 48, 72 and 96 h), Trp concentrations (100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μg x ml(-1)), temperature (10, 26, 37 and 50 ± 2 degrees C) and pH (6, 7 and 8) on IAA production by 10 best isolates were studied. Results showed higher IAA production at 72 h incubation, at 300 μg x ml(-1) Trp concentration, temperature 26 ± 2 degrees C and pH 7. TLC with acidified ethyl acetate extract showed that the IAA produced has a similar Rf value to that of the standard IAA. Results of TLC were confirmed by HPLC analysis. Genetic diversity of the isolates was also studied using 40 RAPD and 4 Rep primers. Genetic diversity parameters such as dominance, Shannon index and Simpson index were calculated. Out of 40 RAPD primers tested, 9 (2 OP-D series and 7 OP-E series) were shortlisted for further analysis. Studies using RAPD, ERIC, BOX, REP and GTG5 primers revealed that isolates exhibit significant diversity in repetitive DNA sequences irrespective of the rhizosphere. PMID:26155673

  2. Phylogeographic patterns of mtDNA variation revealed multiple glacial refugia for the frog species Feirana taihangnica endemic to the Qinling Mountains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jiang, Jianping; Xie, Feng; Li, Cheng

    2013-03-01

    Diversification patterns and demography of montane species are affected by Pleistocene climate fluctuations. Empirical cases from the Qinling Mountains (QM) region, which is a major biogeographic divider of East Asia, are few. We used DNA sequence data of the complete mitochondrial ND2 gene to detect effects of the Pleistocene glaciations on phylogeographic profiles of a frog species, Feirana taihangnica, which is endemic to the QM. Four distinct lineages consisting of seven sublineages were revealed. The strongest signal of biogeographical structure (F(ct) = 0.971, P < 0.01) was found when populations were grouped according to these seven sublineages. One narrow secondary contact zone was detected in the middle QM between the lineage from middle QM and the lineage from eastern QM. Coalescent simulations indicated that this species colonized the QM region by a stepping-stone model. Divergences among lineages had likely been influenced by the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau during the late Miocene-to-late Pleistocene, as well as by the Pleistocene climatic cycles. Coalescent simulations also suggested that F. taihangnica populations have persisted through the Pleistocene glacial periods in multiple refugia across the QM region. Demographic analyses indicated that all lineages, except the lineage in the Funiu Mountains, have been experienced postglacial expansion of population size and distribution range. In conclusion, Pleistocene climate fluctuations and tectonic changes during the late Miocene-late Pleistocene have profoundly influenced the phylogeography and historical demography of F. taihangnica.

  3. A case study on the genetic origin of the high oleic acid trait through FAD2-1 DNA sequence variation in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.).

    PubMed

    Rapson, Sara; Wu, Man; Okada, Shoko; Das, Alpana; Shrestha, Pushkar; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Wood, Craig; Green, Allan; Singh, Surinder; Liu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is considered a strongly domesticated species with a long history of cultivation. The hybridization of safflower with its wild relatives has played an important role in the evolution of cultivars and is of particular interest with regards to their production of high quality edible oils. Original safflower varieties were all rich in linoleic acid, while varieties rich in oleic acid have risen to prominence in recent decades. The high oleic acid trait is controlled by a partially recessive allele ol at a single locus OL. The ol allele was found to be a defective microsomal oleate desaturase FAD2-1. Here we present DNA sequence data and Southern blot analysis suggesting that there has been an ancient hybridization and introgression of the FAD2-1 gene into C. tinctorius from its wild relative C. palaestinus. It is from this gene that FAD2-1Δ was derived more recently. Identification and characterization of the genetic origin and diversity of FAD2-1 could aid safflower breeders in reducing population size and generations required for the development of new high oleic acid varieties by using perfect molecular marker-assisted selection.

  4. Diversity within the genus Elymus (Poaceae: Triticeae) as investigated by the analysis of the nr5S rDNA variation in species with St and H haplomes.

    PubMed

    Baum, B R; Edwards, T; Johnson, D A

    2015-02-01

    The genus Elymus ("Ryegrass") is a repository for a range of species with a variety of haplome contents; hence the pejorative name "dustbin" genus. We have analyzed 1,059 sequences from 128 accessions representing 24 species to investigate the relationships among the StH haplomes-containing species described by Yen and Yang (Genus Elymus Beijing 5:58-362, 2013). Sequences were assigned to "unit classes" of orthologous sequences and subjected to a suite of analyses including BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) searches, phylogenetic analysis and population genetic analysis to estimate species diversity. Our results support the genome analyses in Yen and Yang (Genus Elymus Beijing 5:58-362, 2013), i.e., genomic constitution StStHH including variants restricted to Elymus. Population genetic analysis of the 5S nrDNA sequence data revealed that the within-species variance component is roughly ±89 %; thus, we were unable to identify molecular markers capable to separate the 24 species analyzed. Separate phylogenetic analyses of the two unit classes and of all the data exhibit a trend only of the species to cluster on the phylograms. Finally, the analysis provides evidence for the multiple origins of American and Eurasian species. PMID:25248636

  5. Population Structure of mtDNA Variation due to Pleistocene Fluctuations in the South American Maned Wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger, 1815): Management Units for Conservation.

    PubMed

    González, Susana; Cosse, Mariana; Franco, María del Rosario; Emmons, Louise; Vynne, Carly; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti; Beccacesi, Marcelo D; Maldonado, Jesús E

    2015-01-01

    The maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is one of the largest South American canids, and conservation across this charismatic carnivore's large range is presently hampered by a lack of knowledge about possible natural subdivisions which could influence the population's viability. To elucidate the phylogeographic patterns and demographic history of the species, we used 2 mtDNA markers (D-loop and cytochrome b) from 87 individuals collected throughout their range, in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, and Uruguay. We found moderate levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity, and the 14 D-loop haplotypes were closely related. Genetic structure results revealed 4 groups, and when coupled with model inferences from a coalescent analysis, suggested that maned wolves have undergone demographic fluctuations due to changes in climate and habitat during the Pleistocene glaciation period approximately 24000 years before present (YBP). This genetic signature points to an event that occurred within the timing estimated for the start of the contraction of the Cerrado around 50000 YBP. Our results reveal a genetic signature of population size expansion followed by contraction during Pleistocene interglaciations, which had similar impacts on other South American mammals. The 4 groups should for now be considered management units, within which future monitoring efforts should be conducted independently.

  6. Population Structure of mtDNA Variation due to Pleistocene Fluctuations in the South American Maned Wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger, 1815): Management Units for Conservation.

    PubMed

    González, Susana; Cosse, Mariana; Franco, María del Rosario; Emmons, Louise; Vynne, Carly; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti; Beccacesi, Marcelo D; Maldonado, Jesús E

    2015-01-01

    The maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is one of the largest South American canids, and conservation across this charismatic carnivore's large range is presently hampered by a lack of knowledge about possible natural subdivisions which could influence the population's viability. To elucidate the phylogeographic patterns and demographic history of the species, we used 2 mtDNA markers (D-loop and cytochrome b) from 87 individuals collected throughout their range, in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, and Uruguay. We found moderate levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity, and the 14 D-loop haplotypes were closely related. Genetic structure results revealed 4 groups, and when coupled with model inferences from a coalescent analysis, suggested that maned wolves have undergone demographic fluctuations due to changes in climate and habitat during the Pleistocene glaciation period approximately 24000 years before present (YBP). This genetic signature points to an event that occurred within the timing estimated for the start of the contraction of the Cerrado around 50000 YBP. Our results reveal a genetic signature of population size expansion followed by contraction during Pleistocene interglaciations, which had similar impacts on other South American mammals. The 4 groups should for now be considered management units, within which future monitoring efforts should be conducted independently. PMID:26245781

  7. A case study on the genetic origin of the high oleic acid trait through FAD2-1 DNA sequence variation in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rapson, Sara; Wu, Man; Okada, Shoko; Das, Alpana; Shrestha, Pushkar; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Wood, Craig; Green, Allan; Singh, Surinder; Liu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is considered a strongly domesticated species with a long history of cultivation. The hybridization of safflower with its wild relatives has played an important role in the evolution of cultivars and is of particular interest with regards to their production of high quality edible oils. Original safflower varieties were all rich in linoleic acid, while varieties rich in oleic acid have risen to prominence in recent decades. The high oleic acid trait is controlled by a partially recessive allele ol at a single locus OL. The ol allele was found to be a defective microsomal oleate desaturase FAD2-1. Here we present DNA sequence data and Southern blot analysis suggesting that there has been an ancient hybridization and introgression of the FAD2-1 gene into C. tinctorius from its wild relative C. palaestinus. It is from this gene that FAD2-1Δ was derived more recently. Identification and characterization of the genetic origin and diversity of FAD2-1 could aid safflower breeders in reducing population size and generations required for the development of new high oleic acid varieties by using perfect molecular marker-assisted selection. PMID:26442008

  8. A case study on the genetic origin of the high oleic acid trait through FAD2-1 DNA sequence variation in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.).

    PubMed

    Rapson, Sara; Wu, Man; Okada, Shoko; Das, Alpana; Shrestha, Pushkar; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Wood, Craig; Green, Allan; Singh, Surinder; Liu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is considered a strongly domesticated species with a long history of cultivation. The hybridization of safflower with its wild relatives has played an important role in the evolution of cultivars and is of particular interest with regards to their production of high quality edible oils. Original safflower varieties were all rich in linoleic acid, while varieties rich in oleic acid have risen to prominence in recent decades. The high oleic acid trait is controlled by a partially recessive allele ol at a single locus OL. The ol allele was found to be a defective microsomal oleate desaturase FAD2-1. Here we present DNA sequence data and Southern blot analysis suggesting that there has been an ancient hybridization and introgression of the FAD2-1 gene into C. tinctorius from its wild relative C. palaestinus. It is from this gene that FAD2-1Δ was derived more recently. Identification and characterization of the genetic origin and diversity of FAD2-1 could aid safflower breeders in reducing population size and generations required for the development of new high oleic acid varieties by using perfect molecular marker-assisted selection. PMID:26442008

  9. Interspecific variation in the repair of UV damaged DNA in the genus Xiphophorus as a factor in the decline of the Rio Grande Platyfish.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David; Paniker, Lakshmi; Lin, Kevin; Fernandez, André

    2015-01-01

    The fish genus Xiphophorus consists of 26 species distributed along the eastern slopes of mountain ranges extending from northern Mexico to Belize and Nicaragua. We analyzed light-dependent repair of UV-induced DNA damage in at least two species from each of the four monophyletic Xiphophorus groups. We found that the northern platyfish had significantly reduced photoenzymatic repair compared to the other three groups, including the northern swordtails, southern platyfish and southern swordtails. All of the species of the northern platyfish, including the Marbled (meyeri), Northern (gordoni) and Monterrey Platyfish (couchianus) are the northernmost species in the genus and are the only three species in the genus that are currently found on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Satellite data from the past 30 years (1979-2008) correlate greater increases in shorter wavelength UVB with higher latitudes within the Xiphophorus range. We suggest that, combined with other consequences of human population growth, anthropogenic deozonation resulting in a disproportionate increase in UVB in temperate latitudes may be a contributing factor in the decline and extirpation of the northern platyfish. PMID:25298266

  10. Modulation of mutagenic properties in a series of DNA-directed alkylating agents by variation of chain length and alkylator reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Turner, P M; Pogai, H; Denny, W A

    1992-02-01

    Four series of aniline mustards linked to a DNA-affinic acridine chromophore by alkyl chains of varying length (2-5 carbon atoms) have been studied for their mutagenic properties, as estimated in four strains of Salmonella typhimurium and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D5. The four series have very different mustard reactivities, as determined by the aniline link group (-O-, -CH2-, -S- or -SO2-). Some of the derived compounds cause frameshift mutagenesis which can be detected in TA98 and also "petite" mutagenesis activity, neither of which occur to significant extents with the parent mustards or with 9-aminoacridine. None of the derived compounds are as effective as the parent mustards in mitotic crossing-over, nor do they show ability for frameshift mutagenesis in S. typhimurium TA1977 which is typical of acridines. Some of the compounds have comparable frameshift activity to compounds such as ICR-191, but appear to have a different base-pair preference. The results indicate clear structure-activity relationships for the spectrum of mutagenic activity, which relate to both chain length and alkylator reactivity, for these compounds.

  11. DNA barcoding for plants.

    PubMed

    de Vere, Natasha; Rich, Tim C G; Trinder, Sarah A; Long, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding uses specific regions of DNA in order to identify species. Initiatives are taking place around the world to generate DNA barcodes for all groups of living organisms and to make these data publically available in order to help understand, conserve, and utilize the world's biodiversity. For land plants the core DNA barcode markers are two sections of coding regions within the chloroplast, part of the genes, rbcL and matK. In order to create high quality databases, each plant that is DNA barcoded needs to have a herbarium voucher that accompanies the rbcL and matK DNA sequences. The quality of the DNA sequences, the primers used, and trace files should also be accessible to users of the data. Multiple individuals should be DNA barcoded for each species in order to check for errors and allow for intraspecific variation. The world's herbaria provide a rich resource of already preserved and identified material and these can be used for DNA barcoding as well as by collecting fresh samples from the wild. These protocols describe the whole DNA barcoding process, from the collection of plant material from the wild or from the herbarium, how to extract and amplify the DNA, and how to check the quality of the data after sequencing.

  12. Repetitive DNA and Plant Domestication: Variation in Copy Number and Proximity to Genes of LTR-Retrotransposons among Wild and Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Mascagni, Flavia; Barghini, Elena; Giordani, Tommaso; Rieseberg, Loren H; Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) genome contains a very large proportion of transposable elements, especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons. However, knowledge on the retrotransposon-related variability within this species is still limited. We used next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to perform a quantitative and qualitative survey of intraspecific variation of the retrotransposon fraction of the genome across 15 genotypes--7 wild accessions and 8 cultivars--of H. annuus. By mapping the Illumina reads of the 15 genotypes onto a library of sunflower long terminal repeat retrotransposons, we observed considerable variability in redundancy among genotypes, at both superfamily and family levels. In another analysis, we mapped Illumina paired reads to two sets of sequences, that is, long terminal repeat retrotransposons and protein-encoding sequences, and evaluated the extent of retrotransposon proximity to genes in the sunflower genome by counting the number of paired reads in which one read mapped to a retrotransposon and the other to a gene. Large variability among genotypes was also ascertained for retrotransposon proximity to genes. Both long terminal repeat retrotransposon redundancy and proximity to genes varied among retrotransposon families and also between cultivated and wild genotypes. Such differences are discussed in relation to the possible role of long terminal repeat retrotransposons in the domestication of sunflower. PMID:26608057

  13. Repetitive DNA and Plant Domestication: Variation in Copy Number and Proximity to Genes of LTR-Retrotransposons among Wild and Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mascagni, Flavia; Barghini, Elena; Giordani, Tommaso; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) genome contains a very large proportion of transposable elements, especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons. However, knowledge on the retrotransposon-related variability within this species is still limited. We used next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to perform a quantitative and qualitative survey of intraspecific variation of the retrotransposon fraction of the genome across 15 genotypes—7 wild accessions and 8 cultivars—of H. annuus. By mapping the Illumina reads of the 15 genotypes onto a library of sunflower long terminal repeat retrotransposons, we observed considerable variability in redundancy among genotypes, at both superfamily and family levels. In another analysis, we mapped Illumina paired reads to two sets of sequences, that is, long terminal repeat retrotransposons and protein-encoding sequences, and evaluated the extent of retrotransposon proximity to genes in the sunflower genome by counting the number of paired reads in which one read mapped to a retrotransposon and the other to a gene. Large variability among genotypes was also ascertained for retrotransposon proximity to genes. Both long terminal repeat retrotransposon redundancy and proximity to genes varied among retrotransposon families and also between cultivated and wild genotypes. Such differences are discussed in relation to the possible role of long terminal repeat retrotransposons in the domestication of sunflower. PMID:26608057

  14. Male fertility versus sterility, cytotype, and DNA quantitative variation in seed production in diploid and tetraploid sea lavenders (Limonium sp., Plumbaginaceae) reveal diversity in reproduction modes.

    PubMed

    Róis, Ana Sofia; Teixeira, Generosa; Sharbel, Timothy F; Fuchs, Jörg; Martins, Sérgio; Espírito-Santo, Dalila; Caperta, Ana D

    2012-12-01

    were present in each seed. Flow cytometric seed screens using such mature seeds showed quantitative variations in seeds ploidy level. It is concluded that male function seems to play an important role in the reproduction modes of Limonium diploids and tetraploids.

  15. Global Team Taps into DNA Behind Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159810.html Global Team Taps Into DNA Behind Type 2 Diabetes Many common gene variations ... the researchers assessed the influence of rare, "private" DNA differences along with common DNA differences that many ...

  16. [Genetic variation and phylogeography of the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus, Arvicolinae, Rodentia) in Russia with special reference to the introgression of the mtDNA of a closely related species, red-backed vole (C. rutilus)].

    PubMed

    Abramson, N I; Rodchenkova, E N; Kostygov, A Iu

    2009-05-01

    Totally, 294 bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) and 18 red-backed voles (C. rutilus) from 62 sites of European Russia were studied. Incomplete sequences (967 bp) of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were determined for 93 C. glareolus individuals from 56 sites and 18 C. rutilus individuals from the same habitats. Analysis of the cytochrome b gene variation has demonstrated that practically the entire European part of Russia, Ural, and a considerable part of Western Europe are inhabited by bank voles of the same phylogroup, displaying an extremely low genetic differentiation. Our data suggest that C. glareolus very rapidly colonized over the presently occupied territory in the post-Pleistocene period from no more than two (central European and western European) refugia for ancestral populations with a small efficient size. PCR typing of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene allowed us to assess the scale of mtDNA introgression from a closely related species, C. rutilus, and to outline the geographical zone of this introgression. Comparison with the red-backed vole haplotypes in the habitats shared by both species favors the hypothesis of an ancient hybridization event (mid-Holocene) and a subsequent introgression. These results suggest that the hybridization took place in the southern and middle Pre-Ural region. PMID:19534420

  17. [DNA methylation in thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Song, Xianyun; Shang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yutuo

    2015-03-01

    Cancer has become clear that not merely gene variations but also epigenetic modifications may contribute to it. Epigenetic changes refer to stable alterations in gene expression with unrelated to changes in the underlying genetic sequence,resulting in heritable. DNA methylation is one of the common epigenetic changes. It control the gene expression through changing DNA conformation and stability, chromatin structer, DNA-protein interaction. The reversal of dysregulated DNA methylation has emerged as a potential strategy for the treatment of thyroid carcinoma. The artical will provide an overview of how DNA methylation contribute to thyroid carcinoma dissemination,invasion and metastasis and we will summarize the latest epigenetic therapies for thyroid carcinoma.

  18. FROG - Fingerprinting Genomic Variation Ontology.

    PubMed

    Abinaya, E; Narang, Pankaj; Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations play a crucial role in differential phenotypic outcomes. Given the complexity in establishing this correlation and the enormous data available today, it is imperative to design machine-readable, efficient methods to store, label, search and analyze this data. A semantic approach, FROG: "FingeRprinting Ontology of Genomic variations" is implemented to label variation data, based on its location, function and interactions. FROG has six levels to describe the variation annotation, namely, chromosome, DNA, RNA, protein, variations and interactions. Each level is a conceptual aggregation of logically connected attributes each of which comprises of various properties for the variant. For example, in chromosome level, one of the attributes is location of variation and which has two properties, allosomes or autosomes. Another attribute is variation kind which has four properties, namely, indel, deletion, insertion, substitution. Likewise, there are 48 attributes and 278 properties to capture the variation annotation across six levels. Each property is then assigned a bit score which in turn leads to generation of a binary fingerprint based on the combination of these properties (mostly taken from existing variation ontologies). FROG is a novel and unique method designed for the purpose of labeling the entire variation data generated till date for efficient storage, search and analysis. A web-based platform is designed as a test case for users to navigate sample datasets and generate fingerprints. The platform is available at http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/frog.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  20. DNA Banking

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-11-01

    The author is involved in the ethical, legal, and social issues of banking of DNA and data from DNA analysis. In his attempt to determine the extent of DNA banking in the U.S., the author surveyed some commercial companies performing DNA banking services. This article summarizes the results of that survey, with special emphasis on the procedures the companies use to protect the privacy of individuals. 4 refs.

  1. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  2. FROG - Fingerprinting Genomic Variation Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Anshu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations play a crucial role in differential phenotypic outcomes. Given the complexity in establishing this correlation and the enormous data available today, it is imperative to design machine-readable, efficient methods to store, label, search and analyze this data. A semantic approach, FROG: “FingeRprinting Ontology of Genomic variations” is implemented to label variation data, based on its location, function and interactions. FROG has six levels to describe the variation annotation, namely, chromosome, DNA, RNA, protein, variations and interactions. Each level is a conceptual aggregation of logically connected attributes each of which comprises of various properties for the variant. For example, in chromosome level, one of the attributes is location of variation and which has two properties, allosomes or autosomes. Another attribute is variation kind which has four properties, namely, indel, deletion, insertion, substitution. Likewise, there are 48 attributes and 278 properties to capture the variation annotation across six levels. Each property is then assigned a bit score which in turn leads to generation of a binary fingerprint based on the combination of these properties (mostly taken from existing variation ontologies). FROG is a novel and unique method designed for the purpose of labeling the entire variation data generated till date for efficient storage, search and analysis. A web-based platform is designed as a test case for users to navigate sample datasets and generate fingerprints. The platform is available at http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/frog. PMID:26244889

  3. Heritable epigenetic variation among maize inbreds.

    PubMed

    Eichten, Steve R; Swanson-Wagner, Ruth A; Schnable, James C; Waters, Amanda J; Hermanson, Peter J; Liu, Sanzhen; Yeh, Cheng-Ting; Jia, Yi; Gendler, Karla; Freeling, Michael; Schnable, Patrick S; Vaughn, Matthew W; Springer, Nathan M

    2011-11-01

    Epigenetic variation describes heritable differences that are not attributable to changes in DNA sequence. There is the potential for pure epigenetic variation that occurs in the absence of any genetic change or for more complex situations that involve both genetic and epigenetic differences. Methylation of cytosine residues provides one mechanism for the inheritance of epigenetic information. A genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation in two different genotypes of Zea mays (ssp. mays), an organism with a complex genome of interspersed genes and repetitive elements, allowed the identification and characterization of examples of natural epigenetic variation. The distribution of DNA methylation was profiled using immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by hybridization to a high-density tiling microarray. The comparison of the DNA methylation levels in the two genotypes, B73 and Mo17, allowed for the identification of approximately 700 differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Several of these DMRs occur in genomic regions that are apparently identical by descent in B73 and Mo17 suggesting that they may be examples of pure epigenetic variation. The methylation levels of the DMRs were further studied in a panel of near-isogenic lines to evaluate the stable inheritance of the methylation levels and to assess the contribution of cis- and trans- acting information to natural epigenetic variation. The majority of DMRs that occur in genomic regions without genetic variation are controlled by cis-acting differences and exhibit relatively stable inheritance. This study provides evidence for naturally occurring epigenetic variation in maize, including examples of pure epigenetic variation that is not conditioned by genetic differences. The epigenetic differences are variable within maize populations and exhibit relatively stable trans-generational inheritance. The detected examples of epigenetic variation, including some without tightly linked genetic variation, may

  4. Accessing epigenetic variation in the plant methylome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Do; El Baidouri, Moaine; Jackson, Scott A

    2014-07-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation is the addition of a methyl group to the 5' position of a cytosine, which plays a crucial role in plant development and gene silencing. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation is now possible using various techniques and strategies. Using these technologies, we are beginning to elucidate the extent and impact of variation in DNA methylation between individuals and/or tissues. Here, we review the different techniques used to analyze the methylomes at the whole-genome level and their applications to better understand epigenetic variations in plants.

  5. High resolution optical DNA mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baday, Murat

    Many types of diseases including cancer and autism are associated with copy-number variations in the genome. Most of these variations could not be identified with existing sequencing and optical DNA mapping methods. We have developed Multi-color Super-resolution technique, with potential for high throughput and low cost, which can allow us to recognize more of these variations. Our technique has made 10--fold improvement in the resolution of optical DNA mapping. Using a 180 kb BAC clone as a model system, we resolved dense patterns from 108 fluorescent labels of two different colors representing two different sequence-motifs. Overall, a detailed DNA map with 100 bp resolution was achieved, which has the potential to reveal detailed information about genetic variance and to facilitate medical diagnosis of genetic disease.

  6. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  7. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays for Protein–DNA Complexes Involved in DNA Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun; Smider, Vaughn; Hwang, Byung Joon; Chu, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) can be used to study proteins that bind to DNA structures created by DNA-damaging agents. UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB), which is involved in nucleotide excision repair, binds to DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation or the anticancer drug cisplatin. Ku, XRCC4/Ligase IV, and DNA–PKcs, which are involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining, assemble in complexes at DNA ends. This chapter will describe several EMSA protocols for detecting different DNA repair protein–DNA complexes. To obtain additional information, one can apply variations of the EMSA, which include the reverse EMSA to detect binding of 35S-labeled protein to damaged DNA, and the antibody supershift assay to detect the presence of a specific protein in the protein–DNA complex. PMID:22941596

  8. DNA nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2007-05-01

    We are learning to build synthetic molecular machinery from DNA. This research is inspired by biological systems in which individual molecules act, singly and in concert, as specialized machines: our ambition is to create new technologies to perform tasks that are currently beyond our reach. DNA nanomachines are made by self-assembly, using techniques that rely on the sequence-specific interactions that bind complementary oligonucleotides together in a double helix. They can be activated by interactions with specific signalling molecules or by changes in their environment. Devices that change state in response to an external trigger might be used for molecular sensing, intelligent drug delivery or programmable chemical synthesis. Biological molecular motors that carry cargoes within cells have inspired the construction of rudimentary DNA walkers that run along self-assembled tracks. It has even proved possible to create DNA motors that move autonomously, obtaining energy by catalysing the reaction of DNA or RNA fuels.

  9. Structural and Thermodynamic Signatures of DNA Recognition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA

    SciTech Connect

    Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Biswas, Tapan

    2011-09-06

    An essential protein, DnaA, binds to 9-bp DNA sites within the origin of replication oriC. These binding events are prerequisite to forming an enigmatic nucleoprotein scaffold that initiates replication. The number, sequences, positions, and orientations of these short DNA sites, or DnaA boxes, within the oriCs of different bacteria vary considerably. To investigate features of DnaA boxes that are important for binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA (MtDnaA), we have determined the crystal structures of the DNA binding domain (DBD) of MtDnaA bound to a cognate MtDnaA-box (at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution) and to a consensus Escherichia coli DnaA-box (at 2.3 {angstrom}). These structures, complemented by calorimetric equilibrium binding studies of MtDnaA DBD in a series of DnaA-box variants, reveal the main determinants of DNA recognition and establish the [T/C][T/A][G/A]TCCACA sequence as a high-affinity MtDnaA-box. Bioinformatic and calorimetric analyses indicate that DnaA-box sequences in mycobacterial oriCs generally differ from the optimal binding sequence. This sequence variation occurs commonly at the first 2 bp, making an in vivo mycobacterial DnaA-box effectively a 7-mer and not a 9-mer. We demonstrate that the decrease in the affinity of these MtDnaA-box variants for MtDnaA DBD relative to that of the highest-affinity box TTGTCCACA is less than 10-fold. The understanding of DnaA-box recognition by MtDnaA and E. coli DnaA enables one to map DnaA-box sequences in the genomes of M. tuberculosis and other eubacteria.

  10. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  11. Copy number variation and mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Brian; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean numberof genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  12. Epigenetic variation in the Egfr gene generates quantitative variation in a complex trait in ants.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Sebastian; Rajakumar, Rajendhran; Abouheif, Ehab; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-03-11

    Complex quantitative traits, like size and behaviour, are a pervasive feature of natural populations. Quantitative trait variation is the product of both genetic and environmental factors, yet little is known about the mechanisms through which their interaction generates this variation. Epigenetic processes, such as DNA methylation, can mediate gene-by-environment interactions during development to generate discrete phenotypic variation. We therefore investigated the developmental role of DNA methylation in generating continuous size variation of workers in an ant colony, a key trait associated with division of labour. Here we show that, in the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus, global (genome-wide) DNA methylation indirectly regulates quantitative methylation of the conserved cell-signalling gene Epidermal growth factor receptor to generate continuous size variation of workers. DNA methylation can therefore generate quantitative variation in a complex trait by quantitatively r