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Sample records for abcd ring system

  1. Keratoconus: The ABCD Grading System.

    PubMed

    Belin, M W; Duncan, J K

    2016-06-01

    To propose a new keratoconus classification/staging system that utilises current tomographic data and better reflects the anatomical and functional changes seen in keratoconus. A previously published normative database was reanalysed to generate both anterior and posterior average radii of curvature (ARC and PRC) taken from a 3.0 mm optical zone centred on the thinnest point of the cornea. Mean and standard deviations were recorded and anterior data were compared to the existing Amsler-Krumeich (AK) Classification. ARC, PRC, thinnest pachymetry and distance visual acuity were then used to construct a keratoconus classification. 672 eyes of 336 patients were analysed. Anterior and posterior values were 7.65 ± 0.236 mm and 6.26 ± 0.214 mm, respectively, and thinnest pachymetry values were 534.2 ± 30.36 µm. The ARC values were 2.63, 5.47 and 6.44 standard deviations from the mean values of stages 1-3 in the AK classification, respectively. PRC staging uses the same standard deviation gates. The pachymetric values differed by 4.42 and 7.72 standard deviations for stages 2 and 3, respectively. A new keratoconus staging incorporates anterior and posterior curvature, thinnest pachymetric values, and distance visual acuity and consists of stages 0-4 (5 stages). The proposed system closely matches the existing AK classification stages 1-4 on anterior curvature. As it incorporates posterior curvature and thickness measurements based on the thinnest point, rather than apical measurements, the new staging system better reflects the anatomical changes seen in keratoconus. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. The Value of ABCD2F Scoring System (ABCD2 Combined with Atrial Fibrillation) to Predict 90-Day Recurrent Brain Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Almasi, Mostafa; Ghasemi, Faeze; Chardoli, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background. The ABCD2 score is now identified as a useful clinical prediction rule to determine the risk for stroke in the days following brain ischemic attacks. Aim. The present study aimed to introduce a new scoring system named “ABCD2F” and compare its value with the previous ABCD2 system to predict recurrent ischemic stroke within 90 days of the initial cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Methods. 138 consecutive patients with the final diagnosis of ischemic CVA or TIAs who referred to emergency ward of Rasoul-e-Akram general hospital in Tehran from September 2012 to December 2013 were eligible. By adding a new score in the presence of atrial fibrillation to ABCD2 system, the new scoring system as ABCD2F was introduced and the risk stratification was done again on this new system. Results. The area under the curve for ABCD2 was 0.434 and for ABCD2F it was 0.452 indicating low value of both systems for assessing recurrence of stroke within 90 days of primary event. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that none of the baseline factors could predict 90-day recurrent stroke. Conclusion. ABCD2 and/or atrial fibrillation are not good scoring candidates for assessing the risk of recurrent stroke within first 90 days. PMID:27642521

  3. Propagation of various dark hollow beams through an apertured paraxial ABCD optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yangjian; Ge, Di

    2006-08-01

    Propagation of a dark hollow beam (DHB) of circular, elliptical or rectangular symmetry through an apertured paraxial ABCD optical system is investigated. Approximate analytical formulas for various DHBs propagating through an apertured paraxial optical system are derived by expanding the hard-aperture function into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions in terms of a tensor method. Some numerical results are given. Our formulas provide a convenient way for studying the propagation of various DHBs through an apertured paraxial optical system.

  4. Neptune - full ring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This pair of Voyager 2 images (FDS 11446.21 and 11448.10), two 591-s exposures obtained through the clear filter of the wide angle camera, show the full ring system with the highest sensitivity. Visible in this figure are the bright, narrow N53 and N63 rings, the diffuse N42 ring, and (faintly) the plateau outside of the N53 ring (with its slight brightening near 57,500 km).

  5. Propagation of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoquan; Cai, Yangjian; Chu, Xiuxiang

    2012-04-23

    The propagation of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system in turbulent atmosphere has been investigated. The analytical expressions for the average intensity and the degree of the polarization of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam through a paraxial ABCD optical system are derived in turbulent atmosphere, respectively. The average intensity distribution and the degree of the polarization of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere are numerically demonstrated. The influences of the beam parameters, the topological charge, the transverse coherent lengths, and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a partially coherent hollow vortex Gaussian beam in turbulent atmosphere are also examined in detail. This research is beneficial to the practical applications in free-space optical communications and the remote sensing of the dark hollow beams. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  6. Special Features of the Advanced Loans Module of the ABCD Integrated Library System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Smet, Egbert

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The "advanced loans" module of the relatively new library software, ABCD, is an addition to the normal loans module and it offers a "generic transaction decision-making engine" functionality. The module requires extra installation effort and parameterisation, so this article aims to explain to the many potentially interested libraries,…

  7. ABCD classification system: a novel classification for subaxial cervical spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Shousha, Mootaz

    2014-04-20

    The classification system was derived through a retrospective analysis of 73 consecutive cases of subaxial cervical spine injury as well as thorough literature review. To define a new classification system for subaxial cervical spine injuries. There exist several methods to classify subaxial cervical spine injuries but no single system has emerged as clearly superior to the others. On the basis of a 2-column anatomical model, the first part of the proposed classification is an anatomical description of the injury. It delivers the information whether the injury is bony, ligamentous, or a combined one. The first 4 alphabetical letters have been used for simplicity. Each column is represented by an alphabetical letter from A to D. Each letter has a radiological meaning (A = Absent injury, B = Bony lesion, C = Combined bony and ligamentous, D = Disc or ligamentous injury).The second part of the classification is represented by 3 modifiers. These are the neurological status of the patient (N), the degree of spinal canal stenosis (S), and the degree of instability (I). For simplicity, each modifier was graded in an ascending pattern of severity from zero to 2. The last part is optional and denotes which radiological examination has been used to define the injury type. The new ABCD classification was applicable for all patients. The most common type was anterior ligamentous and posterior combined injury "DC" (37.9%), followed by "DD" injury in 12% of the cases. Through this work a new classification for cervical spine injuries is proposed. The aim is to establish criteria for a common language in description of cervical injuries aiming for simplification, especially for junior residents. Each letter and each sign has a meaning to deliver the largest amount of information. Both the radiological as well as the clinical data are represented in this scheme. However, further evaluation of this classification is needed. 3.

  8. Uranus Ring System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    This image captured by NASA's Voyager 2 in 1986 revealed a continuous distribution of small particles throughout the Uranus ring system. This unique geometry, the highest phase angle at which Voyager imaged the rings, allowed us to see lanes of fine dust. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00142

  9. Propagation of partially coherent Lorentz and Lorentz-Gauss beams through a paraxial ABCD optical system in a turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chengliang; Cai, Yangjian

    2011-05-01

    Based on the generalized Huygens-Fresnel integral, propagation of partially coherent Lorentz and Lorentz-Gauss beams through a paraxial ABCD optical system in a turbulent atmosphere was investigated. Analytical propagation formulae were derived for the cross-spectral densities of partially coherent Lorentz and Lorentz-Gauss beams. As an application example, the focusing properties of partially coherent Gaussian, Lorentz and Lorentz-Gauss beams in a turbulent atmosphere and in free space were studied numerically and comparatively. It is found that the focusing properties of such beams are closely related to the initial coherence length and the structure constant of turbulence. By choosing a suitable initial coherence length, a partially coherent Lorentz beam can be focused more tightly than a Gaussian or Lorentz-Gauss beam in free space or in a turbulent atmosphere with small structure constant at the geometrical focal plane.

  10. An optical system with aberrations on diffraction integrals written in terms of a generalized ABCD matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chaoying; Tan, Weihan

    2008-12-01

    : In this paper, we consider the transformation of a ray beam as it passes through an optical system containing a glass plate with parallel surfaces inclined to the optical axis at the Brewster’s angle, by investigating the effects of the optical system on amplitude and phase distributions. By applying generalized matrix optics and diffraction integrals and considering the influence of a quarter of a wavelength of aberration on the transmitted amplitude and phase distributions at the focus of a de-collimating lens, we find that the central peak amplitude descends from 1.0 to 0.8 and the phase distortion is less than π/2. The general feature of the amplitude distribution shows an elongation along the y-axis perpendicular to the optical axis in the direction of tilt of the inclined plate, and conforms to the inclination direction of the glass plate.

  11. Effect of ABCD transformations on beam paraxiality.

    PubMed

    Vaveliuk, Pablo; Martinez-Matos, Oscar

    2011-12-19

    The limits of the paraxial approximation for a laser beam under ABCD transformations is established through the relationship between a parameter concerning the beam paraxiality, the paraxial estimator, and the beam second-order moments. The applicability of such an estimator is extended to an optical system composed by optical elements as mirrors and lenses and sections of free space, what completes the analysis early performed for free-space propagation solely. As an example, the paraxiality of a system composed by free space and a spherical thin lens under the propagation of Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss modes is established. The results show that the the paraxial approximation fails for a certain feasible range of values of main parameters. In this sense, the paraxial estimator is an useful tool to monitor the limits of the paraxial optics theory under ABCD transformations.

  12. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  13. Open Source Solutions for Libraries: ABCD vs Koha

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macan, Bojan; Fernandez, Gladys Vanesa; Stojanovski, Jadranka

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present an overview of the two open source (OS) integrated library systems (ILS)--Koha and ABCD (ISIS family), to compare their "next-generation library catalog" functionalities, and to give comparison of other important features available through ILS modules. Design/methodology/approach: Two open source…

  14. A UNIMARC Bibliographic Format Database for ABCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megnigbeto, Eustache

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: ABCD is a web-based open and free software suite for library management derived from the UNESCO CDS/ISIS software technology. The first version was launched officially in December 2009 with a MARC 21 bibliographic format database. This paper aims to detail the building of the UNIMARC bibliographic format database for ABCD.…

  15. Lectures on algebraic system theory: Linear systems over rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamen, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    The presentation centers on four classes of systems that can be treated as linear systems over a ring. These are: (1) discrete-time systems over a ring of scalars such as the integers; (2) continuous-time systems containing time delays; (3) large-scale discrete-time systems; and (4) time-varying discrete-time systems.

  16. A Pauson-Khand and ring-expansion approach to the aquariane ring system.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Paul D; Burnell, D Jean

    2006-07-20

    [Structure: see text] The carbocyclic ring system of the aquariolide diterpenes has been synthesized by two routes involving a diastereoselective Pauson-Khand reaction and subsequent ring expansion. In one route, a tetracyclic enone was elaborated to generate the nine-membered ring by Grob fragmentation. In the second approach, a spirocyclic tricycle underwent a facile anionic oxy-Cope rearrangement to complete the synthesis of the desired ring system.

  17. Cooling system for three hook ring segment

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Christian X.; Eng, Darryl; Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-08-26

    A triple hook ring segment including forward, midsection and aft mounting hooks for engagement with respective hangers formed on a ring segment carrier for supporting a ring segment panel, and defining a forward high pressure chamber and an aft low pressure chamber on opposing sides of the midsection mounting hook. An isolation plate is provided on the aft side of the midsection mounting hook to form an isolation chamber between the aft low pressure chamber and the ring segment panel. High pressure air is supplied to the forward chamber and flows to the isolation chamber through crossover passages in themore » midsection hook. The isolation chamber provides convection cooling air to an aft portion of the ring segment panel and enables a reduction of air pressure in the aft low pressure chamber to reduce leakage flow of cooling air from the ring segment.« less

  18. Dynamical Evolution of Ring-Satellite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtsuki, Keiji

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this research was to understand dynamical processes related to the evolution of size distribution of particles in planetary rings and application of theoretical results to explain features in the present rings of giant planets. We studied velocity evolution and accretion rates of ring particles in the Roche zone. We developed a new numerical code for the evolution of ring particle size distribution, which takes into account the above results for particle velocity evolution and accretion rates. We also studied radial diffusion rate of ring particles due to inelastic collisions and gravitational encounters. Many of these results can be also applied to dynamical evolution of a planetesimal disk. Finally, we studied rotation rates of moonlets and particles in planetary rings, which would influence the accretional evolution of these bodies. We describe our key accomplishments during the past three years in more detail in the following.

  19. [Design and Analysis of CT High-speed Data Transmission Rotating Connector Ring System Retaining Ring].

    PubMed

    Pan, Li; Cao, Jujiang; Liu, Min; Fu, Weiwei

    2017-11-30

    High speed data transmission rotating connector system for signal high-speed transmission used in the fixed end and rotating end, it is one of the core component in the CT system. This paper involves structure design and analysis of the retaining ring in the CT high speed data transmission rotating connector system based on the principle of off-axis free space optical transmission. According to the problem of the actual engineering application of space limitations, optical fiber fixed and collimator installation location, we designed the structure of the retaining ring. Using the static analysis function of ANSYS Workbench, it verifies rationality and safety of the strength of retaining ring structure. And based on modal analysis function of ANSYS Workbench, it evaluates the effect of the retaining ring on the stability of the system date transmission, and provides theoretical basis for the feasibility of the structure in practical application.

  20. Jupiter's ring system - New results on structure and particle properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Burns, Joseph A.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Pollack, James B.

    1987-01-01

    Jupiter's diffuse ring system is upon reexamination of Voyager images noted to be composed of a relatively bright narrow ring and an inner toroidal halo as well as the 'gossamer' exterior ring, while the previously suspected inner disk is missing. Several narrow, bright features are visible in the main ring, and are suggested to be related in some way to Adrastea and Metis. The smallest ring particles and the dark, rough, red largest bodies both have total optical depths of 1-6 x 10 to the -6th. After arising at the bright ring's inner boundary, the halo rapidly expands inward to a 20,000-km thickness, and disappears at a radius of 90,000 km halfway between the main ring and the planet's cloudtops.

  1. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Preface: a personal view of planetary rings; 1. Introduction: the allure of the ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2013; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Uranus' rings and moons; 13. Neptune's partial rings; 14. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo and New Horizons; 15. Ring photometry; 16. Dusty rings; 17. Concluding remarks; Afterword; Glossary; References; Index.

  2. Melanoma recognition framework based on expert definition of ABCD for dermoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Qaisar; Emre Celebi, M; Garcia, Irene Fondón; Ahmad, Waqar

    2013-02-01

    Melanoma Recognition based on clinical ABCD rule is widely used for clinical diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions in dermoscopy images. However, the current computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) systems for classification between malignant and nevus lesions using the ABCD criteria are imperfect due to use of ineffective computerized techniques. In this study, a novel melanoma recognition system (MRS) is presented by focusing more on extracting features from the lesions using ABCD criteria. The complete MRS system consists of the following six major steps: transformation to the CIEL*a*b* color space, preprocessing to enhance the tumor region, black-frame and hair artifacts removal, tumor-area segmentation, quantification of feature using ABCD criteria and normalization, and finally feature selection and classification. The MRS system for melanoma-nevus lesions is tested on a total of 120 dermoscopic images. To test the performance of the MRS diagnostic classifier, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) is utilized. The proposed classifier achieved a sensitivity of 88.2%, specificity of 91.3%, and AUC of 0.880. The experimental results show that the proposed MRS system can accurately distinguish between malignant and benign lesions. The MRS technique is fully automatic and can easily integrate to an existing CAD system. To increase the classification accuracy of MRS, the CASH pattern recognition technique, visual inspection of dermatologist, contextual information from the patients, and the histopathological tests can be included to investigate the impact with this system. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Wind turbine ring/shroud drive system

    DOEpatents

    Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-10-04

    A wind turbine capable of driving multiple electric generators having a ring or shroud structure for reducing blade root bending moments, hub loads, blade fastener loads and pitch bearing loads. The shroud may further incorporate a ring gear for driving an electric generator. In one embodiment, the electric generator may be cantilevered from the nacelle such that the gear on the generator drive shaft is contacted by the ring gear of the shroud. The shroud also provides protection for the gearing and aids in preventing gear lubricant contamination.

  4. Ring-laser gyroscope system using dispersive element(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A ring-laser gyroscope system includes a ring-laser gyroscope (RLG) and at least one dispersive element optically coupled to the RLG's ring-shaped optical path. Each dispersive element has a resonant frequency that is approximately equal to the RLG's lasing frequency. A group index of refraction defined collectively by the dispersive element(s) has (i) a real portion that is greater than zero and less than one, and (ii) an imaginary portion that is less than zero.

  5. Superfluid qubit systems with ring shaped optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Amico, Luigi; Aghamalyan, Davit; Auksztol, Filip; Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    We study an experimentally feasible qubit system employing neutral atomic currents. Our system is based on bosonic cold atoms trapped in ring-shaped optical lattice potentials. The lattice makes the system strictly one dimensional and it provides the infrastructure to realize a tunable ring-ring interaction. Our implementation combines the low decoherence rates of neutral cold atoms systems, overcoming single site addressing, with the robustness of topologically protected solid state Josephson flux qubits. Characteristic fluctuations in the magnetic fields affecting Josephson junction based flux qubits are expected to be minimized employing neutral atoms as flux carriers. By breaking the Galilean invariance we demonstrate how atomic currents through the lattice provide an implementation of a qubit. This is realized either by artificially creating a phase slip in a single ring, or by tunnel coupling of two homogeneous ring lattices. The single qubit infrastructure is experimentally investigated with tailored optical potentials. Indeed, we have experimentally realized scaled ring-lattice potentials that could host, in principle, n ~ 10 of such ring-qubits, arranged in a stack configuration, along the laser beam propagation axis. An experimentally viable scheme of the two-ring-qubit is discussed, as well. Based on our analysis, we provide protocols to initialize, address, and read-out the qubit. PMID:24599096

  6. Annular ring zoom system using two positive axicons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Fred M.; Conner, Jacob D.

    2011-10-01

    The production of an annular ring of light with a variable diameter has applications in laser material processing and machining, particle manipulation, and corneal surgery. This can readily be accomplished using a positive and negative axicon pair. However, negative axicons are very expensive and difficult to obtain with small diameters. In this paper, we present a design of an annular ring zoom system using two positive axicons. One axicon is placed a distance before a primary lens that is greater than some prescribed minimum, and the second axicon is placed after the primary lens. The position of the second axicon determines the ring diameter. The ring diameter can be zoomed from some maximum design size to a zero diameter ring (spot). Experimental results from a developmental system will be presented.

  7. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2011-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the allure of ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2004; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-Body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Neptune's partial rings; 13. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo; 14. Ring photometry; 15. Dusty rings; 16. Cassini observations; 17. Summary: the big questions; Glossary; References; Index.

  8. ABCD2 score and BNP level in patients with TIA and cerebral stroke.

    PubMed

    Mortezabeigi, H R; Taghizadeh, A; Talebi, M; Amini, K; Goldust, M

    2013-11-01

    Scoring systems have been designed to help physicians in early prediction of cerebral stroke following Transitional Ischemic Attack (TIA). ABCD2 system is one of these scoring systems. Considering increase of brain natriuretic peptide following cerebral ischemic stroke, BNP level may be associated with incidence of ischemic stroke following TIA. The present study evaluates ABCD2 score, BNP level in patients with TIA and incidence of cerebral stroke. This cross sectional-analytical study evaluated 78 patients with TIA. ABCD2 score was calculated for all patients based on some criteria including age, blood pressure, clinical manifestations (speech/motor disorder), symptoms duration and diabetes. BNP level was measured at the reference laboratory when the patient referred to the treatment center. The patients were followed up for 6 months considering incidence of cerebral stroke and TIA. Mean age of the patients was 66.53 +/- 13.08 years and the sample was consisted of 62.8% male and 37.2% female patients. Mean BNP level and mean ABCD2 score was 611.31 +/- 125.61 and 4.61 +/- 10.99 in all patients, respectively. During follow-up period, TIA recurrence and cerebral stroke were, respectively seen in 11.5 and 3.8% of cases. Mortality was reported in 5.1% of the patients. BNP was significantly higher in cases with recursive TIA (p = 0.03). But, there was not any difference considering ABCD2 score (p = 0.38). BNP is capable of predicting TIA recurrence following first TIA and it can be used in this case.

  9. Virtual Exploration of the Ring Systems Chemical Universe.

    PubMed

    Visini, Ricardo; Arús-Pous, Josep; Awale, Mahendra; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2017-11-27

    Here, we explore the chemical space of all virtually possible organic molecules focusing on ring systems, which represent the cyclic cores of organic molecules obtained by removing all acyclic bonds and converting all remaining atoms to carbon. This approach circumvents the combinatorial explosion encountered when enumerating the molecules themselves. We report the chemical universe database GDB4c containing 916 130 ring systems up to four saturated or aromatic rings and maximum ring size of 14 atoms and GDB4c3D containing the corresponding 6 555 929 stereoisomers. Almost all (98.6%) of these ring systems are unknown and represent chiral 3D-shaped macrocycles containing small rings and quaternary centers reminiscent of polycyclic natural products. We envision that GDB4c can serve to select new ring systems from which to design analogs of such natural products. The database is available for download at www.gdb.unibe.ch together with interactive visualization and search tools as a resource for molecular design.

  10. Design of illumination system in ring field capsule endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Wei-De; Mang, Ou-Yang; Chen, Yu-Ta; Wu, Ying-Yi

    2011-03-01

    This paper is researching about the illumination system in ring field capsule endoscope. It is difficult to obtain the uniform illumination on the observed object because the light intensity of LED will be changed along its angular displacement and same as luminous intensity distribution curve. So we use the optical design software which is Advanced Systems Analysis Program (ASAP) to build a photometric model for the optimal design of LED illumination system in ring field capsule endoscope. In this paper, the optimal design of illumination uniformity in the ring field capsule endoscope is from origin 0.128 up to optimum 0.603 and it would advance the image quality of ring field capsule endoscope greatly.

  11. A ring system detected around the Centaur (10199) Chariklo.

    PubMed

    Braga-Ribas, F; Sicardy, B; Ortiz, J L; Snodgrass, C; Roques, F; Vieira-Martins, R; Camargo, J I B; Assafin, M; Duffard, R; Jehin, E; Pollock, J; Leiva, R; Emilio, M; Machado, D I; Colazo, C; Lellouch, E; Skottfelt, J; Gillon, M; Ligier, N; Maquet, L; Benedetti-Rossi, G; Ramos Gomes, A; Kervella, P; Monteiro, H; Sfair, R; El Moutamid, M; Tancredi, G; Spagnotto, J; Maury, A; Morales, N; Gil-Hutton, R; Roland, S; Ceretta, A; Gu, S-h; Wang, X-b; Harpsøe, K; Rabus, M; Manfroid, J; Opitom, C; Vanzi, L; Mehret, L; Lorenzini, L; Schneiter, E M; Melia, R; Lecacheux, J; Colas, F; Vachier, F; Widemann, T; Almenares, L; Sandness, R G; Char, F; Perez, V; Lemos, P; Martinez, N; Jørgensen, U G; Dominik, M; Roig, F; Reichart, D E; LaCluyze, A P; Haislip, J B; Ivarsen, K M; Moore, J P; Frank, N R; Lambas, D G

    2014-04-03

    Hitherto, rings have been found exclusively around the four giant planets in the Solar System. Rings are natural laboratories in which to study dynamical processes analogous to those that take place during the formation of planetary systems and galaxies. Their presence also tells us about the origin and evolution of the body they encircle. Here we report observations of a multichord stellar occultation that revealed the presence of a ring system around (10199) Chariklo, which is a Centaur--that is, one of a class of small objects orbiting primarily between Jupiter and Neptune--with an equivalent radius of 124 ±  9 kilometres (ref. 2). There are two dense rings, with respective widths of about 7 and 3 kilometres, optical depths of 0.4 and 0.06, and orbital radii of 391 and 405 kilometres. The present orientation of the ring is consistent with an edge-on geometry in 2008, which provides a simple explanation for the dimming of the Chariklo system between 1997 and 2008, and for the gradual disappearance of ice and other absorption features in its spectrum over the same period. This implies that the rings are partly composed of water ice. They may be the remnants of a debris disk, possibly confined by embedded, kilometre-sized satellites.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source II storage ring vacuum systems

    DOE PAGES

    Hseuh, Hsiao-Chaun; Hetzel, Charles; Leng, Shuwei; ...

    2016-04-05

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II, completed in 2014, is a 3-GeV synchrotron radiation (SR) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory and has been in steady operation since. With a design electron current of 500 mA and subnanometer radians horizontal emittance, this 792-m circumference storage ring is providing the highest flux and brightness x-ray beam for SR users. Also, the majority of the storage ring vacuum chambers are made of extruded aluminium. Chamber sections are interconnected using low-impedance radiofrequency shielded bellows. SR from the bending magnets is intercepted by water-cooled compact photon absorbers resided in the storage ring chambers. Finally, thismore » paper presents the design of the storage ring vacuum system, the fabrication of vacuum chambers and other hardware, the installation, the commissioning, and the continuing beam conditioning of the vacuum systems.« less

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source II storage ring vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, Hsiao-Chaun, E-mail: hseuh@bnl.gov; Hetzel, Charles; Leng, Shuwei

    2016-05-15

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II, completed in 2014, is a 3-GeV synchrotron radiation (SR) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory and has been in steady operation since. With a design electron current of 500 mA and subnanometer radians horizontal emittance, this 792-m circumference storage ring is providing the highest flux and brightness x-ray beam for SR users. The majority of the storage ring vacuum chambers are made of extruded aluminium. Chamber sections are interconnected using low-impedance radiofrequency shielded bellows. SR from the bending magnets is intercepted by water-cooled compact photon absorbers resided in the storage ring chambers. This paper presents themore » design of the storage ring vacuum system, the fabrication of vacuum chambers and other hardware, the installation, the commissioning, and the continuing beam conditioning of the vacuum systems.« less

  14. The association of birth weight and infant growth with childhood autonomic nervous system activity and its mediating effects on energy-balance-related behaviours-the ABCD study.

    PubMed

    van Deutekom, Arend W; Chinapaw, Mai Jm; Gademan, Maaike Gj; Twisk, Jos Wr; Gemke, Reinoud Jbj; Vrijkotte, Tanja Gm

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of birth weight and infant growth with childhood autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity and to assess whether ANS activity mediates the associations of birth weight and infant growth with energy-balance-related behaviours, including energy intake, satiety response, physical activity and screen time. In 2089 children, we prospectively collected birth weight, infant growth defined as conditional weight and height gain between birth and 12 months and-at 5 years-indices of cardiac ANS activity and parent-reported energy-balance-related behaviours. A mediation analysis was conducted, based on MacKinnon's multivariate extension of the product-of-coefficients strategy. Birth weight and infant height gain were inversely associated with sympathetic, but not parasympathetic, activity at age 5. Infant weight gain was not associated with childhood ANS activity. Infant weight gain was predictive of increased childhood screen time and infant height gain of diminished childhood energy intake, but sympathetic activity did not mediate these associations. Low-birth-weight children have higher sympathetic activity, which is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Height gain in infancy seems to be beneficial for childhood sympathetic activity. However, sympathetic activity was no mediator of the associations of infant growth with childhood energy-balance-related behaviours. As individual differences in ANS activity predict increased risk of cardiovascular disease, these differences may offer insight into the early-life origins of chronic diseases and provide further basis for public health strategies to optimize birth weight and infant growth. © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  15. Clump detections and limits on moons in Jupiter's ring system.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Mark R; Cheng, Andrew F; Weaver, Harold A; Stern, S Alan; Spencer, John R; Throop, Henry B; Birath, Emma M; Rose, Debi; Moore, Jeffrey M

    2007-10-12

    The dusty jovian ring system must be replenished continuously from embedded source bodies. The New Horizons spacecraft has performed a comprehensive search for kilometer-sized moons within the system, which might have revealed the larger members of this population. No new moons were found, however, indicating a sharp cutoff in the population of jovian bodies smaller than 8-kilometer-radius Adrastea. However, the search revealed two families of clumps in the main ring: one close pair and one cluster of three to five. All orbit within a brighter ringlet just interior to Adrastea. Their properties are very different from those of the few other clumpy rings known; the origin and nonrandom distribution of these features remain unexplained, but resonant confinement by Metis may play a role.

  16. A design multifunctional plasmonic optical device by micro ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pornsuwancharoen, N.; Youplao, P.; Amiri, I. S.; Ali, J.; Yupapin, P.

    2018-03-01

    A multi-function electronic device based on the plasmonic circuit is designed and simulated by using the micro-ring system. From which a nonlinear micro-ring resonator is employed and the selected electronic devices such as rectifier, amplifier, regulator and filter are investigated. A system consists of a nonlinear micro-ring resonator, which is known as a modified add-drop filter and made of an InGaAsP/InP material. The stacked waveguide of an InGaAsP/InP - graphene -gold/silver is formed as a part of the device, the required output signals are formed by the specific control of input signals via the input and add ports. The material and device aspects are reviewed. The simulation results are obtained using the Opti-wave and MATLAB software programs, all device parameters are based on the fabrication technology capability.

  17. Advanced biological and chemical discovery (ABCD): centralizing discovery knowledge in an inherently decentralized world.

    PubMed

    Agrafiotis, Dimitris K; Alex, Simson; Dai, Heng; Derkinderen, An; Farnum, Michael; Gates, Peter; Izrailev, Sergei; Jaeger, Edward P; Konstant, Paul; Leung, Albert; Lobanov, Victor S; Marichal, Patrick; Martin, Douglas; Rassokhin, Dmitrii N; Shemanarev, Maxim; Skalkin, Andrew; Stong, John; Tabruyn, Tom; Vermeiren, Marleen; Wan, Jackson; Xu, Xiang Yang; Yao, Xiang

    2007-01-01

    We present ABCD, an integrated drug discovery informatics platform developed at Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C. ABCD is an attempt to bridge multiple continents, data systems, and cultures using modern information technology and to provide scientists with tools that allow them to analyze multifactorial SAR and make informed, data-driven decisions. The system consists of three major components: (1) a data warehouse, which combines data from multiple chemical and pharmacological transactional databases, designed for supreme query performance; (2) a state-of-the-art application suite, which facilitates data upload, retrieval, mining, and reporting, and (3) a workspace, which facilitates collaboration and data sharing by allowing users to share queries, templates, results, and reports across project teams, campuses, and other organizational units. Chemical intelligence, performance, and analytical sophistication lie at the heart of the new system, which was developed entirely in-house. ABCD is used routinely by more than 1000 scientists around the world and is rapidly expanding into other functional areas within the J&J organization.

  18. The fine structure of the Saturnian ring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpis, H. L. F.; Mendis, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A dust disk within a planetary magnetosphere constitutes a novel type of dust-ring current. Such an azimuthal current carrying dust disk is subject to the dusty plasma analog of the well known finite-resistivity 'tearing' mode instability in regular plasma current sheets, at long wavelengths. It is proposed that the presently observed fine ringlet of the Saturnian ring system is a relic of this process operating at cosmogonic times and breaking up the initial proto-ring (which may be regarded as an admixture of fine dust and plasma) into an ensemble of thin ringlets. It is shown that this instability develops at a rate that is many orders of magnitude faster than any other known instability, when the disk thickness reaches a value that is comparable to its present observed value.

  19. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for type 2 diabetes mellitus: predicting the success by ABCD score.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Almulaifi, Abdullah; Tsou, Ju Juin; Ser, Kong-Han; Lee, Yi-Chih; Chen, Shu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is becoming a primary bariatric surgery for obesity and related diseases. This study presents the outcome of LSG with regard to the remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2 DM) and the usefulness of a grading system to categorize and predict outcome of T2 DM remission. A total of 157 patients with T2 DM (82 women and 75 men) with morbid obesity (mean body mass index 39.0±7.4 kg/m(2)) who underwent LSG from 2006 to 2013 were selected for the present study. The ABCD score is composed of the patient's age, body mass index, C-peptide level, and duration of T2 DM (yr). The remission of T2 DM after LSG was evaluated using the ABCD score. At 12 months after surgery, 85 of the patients had complete follow-up data. The weight loss was 26.5% and the mean HbA1c decreased from 8.1% to 6.1%. A significant number of patients had improvement in their glycemic control, including 45 (52.9%) patients who had complete remission (HbA1c<6.0%), another 18 (21.2%) who had partial remission (HbA1c<6.5%), and 9 (10.6%) who improved (HbA1c<7%). Patients who had T2 DM remission after surgery had a higher ABCD score than those who did not (7.3±1.7 versus 5.2±2.1, P<.05). Patients with a higher ABCD score were also at a higher rate of success in T2 DM remission (from 0% in score 0 to 100% in score 10). LSG is an effective and well-tolerated procedure for achieving weight loss and T2 DM remission. The ABCD score, a simple multidimensional grading system, can predict the success of T2 DM treatment by LSG. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A ring transducer system for medical ultrasound research.

    PubMed

    Waag, Robert C; Fedewa, Russell J

    2006-10-01

    An ultrasonic ring transducer system has been developed for experimental studies of scattering and imaging. The transducer consists of 2048 rectangular elements with a 2.5-MHz center frequency, a 67% -6 dB bandwidth, and a 0.23-mm pitch arranged in a 150-mm-diameter ring with a 25-mm elevation. At the center frequency, the element size is 0.30lambda x 42lambda and the pitch is 0.38lambda. The system has 128 parallel transmit channels, 16 parallel receive channels, a 2048:128 transmit multiplexer, a 2048:16 receive multiplexer, independently programmable transmit waveforms with 8-bit resolution, and receive amplifiers with time variable gain independently programmable over a 40-dB range. Receive signals are sampled at 20 MHz with 12-bit resolution. Arbitrary transmit and receive apertures can be synthesized. Calibration software minimizes system nonidealities caused by noncircularity of the ring and element-to-element response differences. Application software enables the system to be used by specification of high-level parameters in control files from which low-level hardware-dependent parameters are derived by specialized code. Use of the system is illustrated by producing focused and steered beams, synthesizing a spatially limited plane wave, measuring angular scattering, and forming b-scan images.

  1. Global ring satellite communications system for future broadband network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Takashi; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Arimoto, Yoshinori; Akaishi, Akira

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine a cost model of a global ring satellite communications system as a 2G-satellite (second generation Internet satellite) for the future Internet satellite, whose capacity is around 120 Gbps. The authors proposed the future needs of research and development of communications satellite for the next 30 years and also proposed the approach of three generations for the future Internet satellites. First, the paper reviews and updates the original proposal for the future needs of communications satellite, considering the recent development of the quantum communication technology. It also examines the communications satellite applicability for bridging the digital divide in the Asia-Oceania as an example. The paper clarifies this possibility of communications satellite by showing various relationships among Internet penetration, land area, population growth, etc. Second, the cost of the global ring satellite is examined. The user terminal is considered as a combination of an earth terminal and wireless local area network for a user community. This paper shows that the global ring satellite has a possibility of a good cost-competitiveness to the terrestrial system because of the global communications system can be configured only by satellite system.

  2. A description of the ABCD organizational structure and communication framework.

    PubMed

    Auchter, Allison M; Hernandez Mejia, Margie; Heyser, Charles J; Shilling, Paul D; Jernigan, Terry L; Brown, Sandra A; Tapert, Susan F; Dowling, Gayathri J

    2018-04-16

    The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study is designed to be the largest study of brain development and child health in the United States, performing comprehensive assessments of 11,500 children repeatedly for 10 years. An endeavor of this magnitude requires an organized framework of governance and communication that promotes collaborative decision-making and dissemination of information. The ABCD consortium structure, built upon the Matrix Management approach of organizational theory, facilitates the integration of input from all institutions, numerous internal workgroups and committees, federal partners, and external advisory groups to make use of a broad range of expertise to ensure the study's success. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Beam vacuum system of Brookhaven`s muon storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuth, H.C.; Snydstrup, L.; Mapes, M.

    1995-11-01

    A storage ring with a circumference of 45 m is being built at Brookhaven to measure the g-2 value of the muons to an accuracy of 0.35 ppm.. The beam vacuum system of the storage ring will operate at 10{sup -7} Torr and has to be completely non-magnetic. It consists of twelve sector chambers. The chambers are constructed of aluminum and are approximately 3.5 m in length with a rectangular cross-section of 16.5 cm high by 45 cm at the widest point. The design features, fabrication techniques and cleaning methods for these chambers are described. The beam vacuum system willmore » be pumped by forty eight non-magnetic distributed ion pumps with a total pumping speed of over 2000 {ell}/sec. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure distribution in the muon storage region are presented.« less

  4. Evolution of ring-field systems in microlithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David M.

    1998-09-01

    Offner's ring-field all-reflecting triplet was the first successful projection system used in microlithography. It evolved over several generations, increasing NA and field size, reducing the feature sizes printed from three down to one micron. Because of its relative simplicity, large field size and broad spectral bandwidth it became the dominant optical design used in microlithography until the early 1980's, when the demise of optical lithography was predicted. Rumours of the death of optics turned out to be exaggerated; what happened instead was a metamorphosis to more complex optical designs. A reduction ring-field system was developed, but the inevitable loss of concentricity led to a dramatic increase in complexity. Higher NA reduction projection optics have therefore been full-field, either all-refracting or catadioptric using a beamsplitter and a single mirror. At the present time, the terminal illness of optical lithography is once again being prognosed, but now at 0.1 micro feature sizes early in the next millenium. If optics has a future beyond that, it lies at wavelengths below the practical transmission cut-off of all refracting materials. Scanning all-reflecting ring-field systems are therefore poised for a resurgence, based on their well-established advantage of rotational symmetry and consequent small aberration variations over a small, annular field. This paper explores some such designs that potentially could take optical lithography down to the region of 0.025 micron features.

  5. Saturn Rings Origin: Quantum Trapping of Superconducting Iced Particles and Meissner Effect Lead to the Stable Rings System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorovich Tchernyi, Vladimir

    2018-06-01

    Saturn Rings Origin: Quantum Trapping of Superconducting Iced Particles and Meissner Effect Lead to the Stable Rings System Vladimir V. Tchernyi (Cherny), Andrew Yu. Pospelov Modern Science Institute, SAIBR, Moscow, Russia. E-mail: chernyv@bk.ruAbstractIt is demonstrated how superconducting iced particles of the protoplanetary cloud of Saturn are coming to magnetic equator plane and create the stable enough rings disk. There are two steps. First, after appearance of the Saturn magnetic field due to Meissner phenomenon all particles orbits are moving to the magnetic equator plane. Finally they become distributed as rings and gaps like iron particles around magnet on laboratory table. And they are separated from each other by the magnetic field expelled from them. It takes up to few tens of thousands years with ten meters rings disk thickness. Second, due to their quantum trapping all particles become to be trapped within magnetic well at the magnetic equator plane due to Abrikosov vortex for superconductor. It works even when particles have small fraction of superconductor. During the rings evolution some contribution to the disk also could come from the collision-generated debris of the current moon and from the geysers like it happened due to magnetic coupling of Saturn and Enceladus. The rings are relict of the early days of the magnetic field of Saturn system.

  6. East Indian Families Raising ABCD Adolescents: Cultural and Generational Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulsen, Shruti S.

    2009-01-01

    Immigration is a process fraught with both challenges and opportunities for families. In particular, East Indian families with U.S.-born adolescents experience the challenges of bridging cultures across generational divides; they are perceived by others as confused, identity less, and conflicted or as American-Born, Confused Desis (ABCDs). This…

  7. BPM System for Electron Cooling in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Joireman, Paul W.; Cai, Jerry; Chase, Brian E.

    2004-11-10

    We report a VXI based system used to acquire and process BPM data for the electron cooling system in the Fermilab Recycler ring. The BPM system supports acquisition of data from 19 BPM locations in five different sections of the electron cooling apparatus. Beam positions for both electrons and anti-protons can be detected simultaneously with a resolution of {+-}50 {mu}m. We calibrate the system independently for each beam type at each BPM location. We describe the system components, signal processing and modes of operation used in support of the electron-cooling project and present experimental results of system performance for themore » developmental electron cooling installation at Fermilab.« less

  8. High resolution upgrade of the ATF damping ring BPM system

    SciTech Connect

    Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2008-05-01

    A beam position monitor (BPM) upgrade at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring has been accomplished in its first stage, carried out by a KEK/FNAL/SLAC collaboration under the umbrella of the global ILC R&D effort. The upgrade consists of a high resolution, high reproducibility read-out system, based on analog and digital downconversion techniques, digital signal processing, and also tests a new automatic gain error correction schema. The technical concept and realization, as well as preliminary results of beam studies are presented.

  9. Status of NSLS-II Storage Ring Vacuum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doom,L.; Hseuh,H.; Ferreira, M.

    2009-05-04

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), being constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is a 3-GeV, high-flux and high- brightness synchrotron radiation facility with a nominal current of 500 mA. The storage ring vacuum system will have extruded aluminium chambers with ante-chamber for photon fans and distributed NEG strip pumping. Discrete photon absorbers will be used to intercept the un-used bending magnet radiation. In-situ bakeout will be implemented to achieve fast conditioning during initial commissioning and after interventions.

  10. O-Ring sealing arrangements for ultra-high vacuum systems

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chang-Kyo; Flaherty, Robert

    1981-01-01

    An all metal reusable O-ring sealing arrangement for sealing two concentric tubes in an ultra-high vacuum system. An O-ring of a heat recoverable alloy such as Nitinol is concentrically positioned between protruding sealing rings of the concentric tubes. The O-ring is installed between the tubes while in a stressed martensitic state and is made to undergo a thermally induced transformation to an austenitic state. During the transformation the O-ring expands outwardly and contracts inwardly toward a previously sized austenitic configuration, thereby sealing against the protruding sealing rings of the concentric tubes.

  11. Feline leukaemia. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Hans; Addie, Diane; Belák, Sándor; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hartmann, Katrin; Hosie, Margaret J; Lloret, Albert; Marsilio, Fulvio; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Horzinek, Marian C

    2009-07-01

    Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus that may induce depression of the immune system, anaemia and/or lymphoma. Over the past 25 years, the prevalence of FeLV infection has decreased considerably, thanks both to reliable tests for the identification of viraemic carriers and to effective vaccines. Transmission between cats occurs mainly through friendly contacts, but also through biting. In large groups of non-vaccinated cats, around 30-40% will develop persistent viraemia, 30-40% show transient viraemia and 20-30% seroconvert. Young kittens are especially susceptible to FeLV infection. The most common signs of persistent FeLV viraemia are immune suppression, anaemia and lymphoma. Less common signs are immune-mediated disease, chronic enteritis, reproductive disorders and peripheral neuropathies. Most persistently viraemic cats die within 2-3 years. In low-prevalence areas there may be a risk of false-positive results; a doubtful positive test result in a healthy cat should therefore be confirmed, preferably by PCR for provirus. Asymptomatic FeLV-positive cats should be retested. Supportive therapy and good nursing care are required. Secondary infections should be treated promptly. Cats infected with FeLV should remain indoors. Vaccination against common pathogens should be maintained. Inactivated vaccines are recommended. The virus does not survive for long outside the host. All cats with an uncertain FeLV status should be tested prior to vaccination. All healthy cats at potential risk of exposure should be vaccinated against FeLV. Kittens should be vaccinated at 8-9 weeks of age, with a second vaccination at 12 weeks, followed by a booster 1 year later. The ABCD suggests that, in cats older than 3-4 years of age, a booster every 2-3 years suffices, in view of the significantly lower susceptibility of older cats.

  12. Construction of vacuum system for Tristan accumulation ring

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, H.; Horikoshi, G.; Kobayashi, M.

    1983-08-01

    An all aluminum-alloy vacuum system for the TRISTAN accumulation ring is now under construction. Aluminum and aluminum alloys are preferred materials for ultrahigh vacuum systems of large electron storage rings because of their good thermal conductivity, extremely low outgassing rate, and low residual radioactivity. Vacuum beam chambers for the dipole and quadrupole magnets are extruded using porthole dies. The aluminum alloy 6063-T6 provides superior performance in extrusion. For ultrahigh vacuum performance, a special extrusion technique is applied which, along with the outgassing procedure used, is described in detail. Aluminum alloy 3004 seamless elliptical bellows are inserted between the dipole andmore » quadrupole magnet chambers. These bellows are produced by the hydraulic forming of a seamless tube. The seamless bellows and the beam chambers are joined by fully automatic welding. The ceramic chambers for the kicker magnets, the fast bump magnets, and the slow beam intensity monitor are inserted in the aluminum alloy beam chambers. The ceramic chamber (98% alumina) and elliptical bellows are brazed with brazing sheets (4003-3003-4003) in a vacuum furnace. The brazing technique is described. The inner surface of the ceramic chamber is coated with a TiMo alloy by vacuum evaporation to permit a smooth flow of the RF wall current. Other suitable aluminum alloy components, including fittings, feedthroughs, gauges, optical windows, sputter ion pumps, turbomolecular pumps, and valves have been developed; their fabrication is described.« less

  13. TRANSIT MODEL OF PLANETS WITH MOON AND RING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Tusnski, Luis Ricardo M.; Valio, Adriana, E-mail: lrtusnski@das.inpe.br, E-mail: avalio@craam.mackenzie.br

    2011-12-10

    Since the discovery of the first exoplanets, those most adequate for life to begin and evolve have been sought. Due to observational bias, however, most of the discovered planets so far are gas giants, precluding their habitability. However, if these hot Jupiters are located in the habitable zones of their host stars, and if rocky moons orbit them, then these moons may be habitable. In this work, we present a model for planetary transit simulation considering the presence of moons and planetary rings around a planet. The moon's orbit is considered to be circular and coplanar with the planetary orbit.more » The other physical and orbital parameters of the star, planet, moon, and rings can be adjusted in each simulation. It is possible to simulate as many successive transits as desired. Since the presence of spots on the surface of the star may produce a signal similar to that of the presence of a moon, our model also allows for the inclusion of starspots. The result of the simulation is a light curve with a planetary transit. White noise may also be added to the light curves to produce curves similar to those obtained by the CoRoT and Kepler space telescopes. The goal is to determine the criteria for detectability of moons and/or ring systems using photometry. The results show that it is possible to detect moons with radii as little as 1.3 R{sub Circled-Plus} with CoRoT and 0.3 R{sub Circled-Plus} with Kepler.« less

  14. Androgynous, Reconfigurable Closed Loop Feedback Controlled Low Impact Docking System With Load Sensing Electromagnetic Capture Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L. (Inventor); Carroll, Monty B. (Inventor); Morales, Ray H. (Inventor); Le, Thang D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a fully androgynous, reconfigurable closed loop feedback controlled low impact docking system with load sensing electromagnetic capture ring. The docking system of the present invention preferably comprises two Docking- assemblies, each docking assembly comprising a load sensing ring having an outer face, one of more electromagnets, one or more load cells coupled to said load sensing ring. The docking assembly further comprises a plurality of actuator arms coupled to said load sensing ring and capable of dynamically adjusting the orientation of said load sensing ring and a reconfigurable closed loop control system capable of analyzing signals originating from said plurality of load cells and of outputting real time control for each of the actuators. The docking assembly of the present invention incorporates an active load sensing system to automatically dynamically adjust the load sensing ring during capture instead of requiring significant force to push and realign the ring.

  15. Impact of an ABCDE team triage process combined with public guidance on the division of work in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Kantonen, Jarmo; Lloyd, Robert; Mattila, Juho; Kauppila, Timo; Menezes, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    To study the effects of applying an emergency department (ED) triage system, combined with extensive publicity in local media about the "right" use of emergency services, on the division of work between ED nurses and general practitioners (GPs). An observational and quasi-experimental study based on before-after comparisons. Implementation of the ABCDE triage system in a Finnish combined ED where secondary care is adjacent, and in a traditional primary care ED where secondary care is located elsewhere. GPs and nurses from two different primary care EDs. Numbers of monthly visits to different professional groups before and after intervention in the studied primary care EDs and numbers of monthly visits to doctors in the local secondary care ED. The beginning of the triage process increased temporarily the number of independent consultations and patient record entries by ED nurses in both types of studied primary care EDs and reduced the number of patient visits to a doctor compared with previous years but had no effect on doctor visits in the adjacent secondary care ED. No further decrease in the number of nurse or GP visits was observed by inhibiting the entrance of non-urgent patients. The ABCDE triage system combined with public guidance may reduce non-urgent patient visits to doctors in different kinds of primary care EDs without increasing visits in the secondary care ED. However, the additional work to implement the ABCDE system is mainly directed to nurses, which may pose a challenge for staffing.

  16. Photometric Analysis of the Jovian Ring System and Modeling of Ring Origin and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully completed the work described in our proposal. The work supported by this grant resulted in the publication of the following paper: Brooks, S. M., L. W. Esposito, M. R. Showalter, and H. B. Throop. 2002. The size distribution of Jupiter's main ring from Galileo imaging and spectroscopy. Icarus, in press. This was also the major part of Dr. Shawn Brooks PhD dissertation. Dr. Brooks gave oral presentations on this work at the Lunar and Planetary Conference, the annual meetings of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, the annual meetings of the European Geophysical Society, the international Jupiter Conference in Boulder, the Jupiter after Galileo and Cassini Conference in Lisbon and to the Working Group in Non-Linear Dynamics in Potsdam, Germany. This work was reviewed in: Esposito, L. W. 2002. Planetary rings. Rep. hog. Phys. 65, 1741-1783. Planetary rings. LASP reprint 874. Online at http://stacks.iop.org/RoPP/65/1741. Dr. Esposito gave presentations at schools and over the internet on the results of this work. Dr. Brooks lectured in undergraduate and graduate classes on Jupiter's rings, and on the meaning of his research. In August 2003, Dr. Shawn Brooks received the Phd degree from the University of Colorado in Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences.

  17. Results from a survey of the dynamics shaping Uranus' Mab/μ-ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kartik; de Pater, Imke; Showalter, Mark R.

    2014-11-01

    Based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, Showalter and Lissauer (2006) reported the discovery of two faint rings beyond Uranus’ main rings: the ν- and μ- rings. They constitute Uranus' outer ring system and are located beyond the ɛ-ring but interior to the large classical moons. After co-adding a series of HST images, Showalter and Lissauer (2006) obtained radial profiles for both new rings. They discovered that the peak radial intensity of the μ-ring aligns closely with the orbit of Mab. Along with numerous other observations, this points to the fact that the Mab/μ-ring system is highly coupled.The discovery of the μ-ring has led to open questions about dust dynamics beyond Uranus' main rings. Like Saturn's E-ring, observations reveal that the μ-ring is blue, indicative of a pre-dominance of sub-micron-sized particles (de Pater et al., 2006). The E-ring results from plumes on Enceladus' south pole, however the origin of the μ-ring remains a mystery. The latter is likely fed by ejecta from micro-meteorite impacts with Mab, much like Jupiter's faint rings are regenerated by companion (small) moons (Burns et al., 1999). The μ-ring's steep size-distribution suggests that there is an unknown mechanism at play that hides or removes large dust particles. We present results from an investigation into the forces shaping the μ-ring. To simulate the motion of dust in the Mab/μ-ring system, we developed a numerical toolbox (Dustsim; Kumar et al., 2015) that uses Tudat (Kumar et al., 2012). We performed integrations using Dustsim that included the effects of Uranus' gravity field, titled magnetic moment, solar radiation pressure, and collisions with a putative suite of large μ-ring bodies, hypothesized as the cause of Mab's anomalous orbital motion (Kumar et al., 2014). Following on from previous studies (e.g., Sfair and Giuliatti Winter, 2009; Sfair and Giuliatti Winter, 2012), we present a survey of the expected lifetime of μ-ring dust, as a function of

  18. Arrayed Micro-Ring Spectrometer System and Method of Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spectrometer system includes an array of micro-zone plates (MZP) each having coaxially-aligned ring gratings, a sample plate for supporting and illuminating a sample, and an array of photon detectors for measuring a spectral characteristic of the predetermined wavelength. The sample plate emits an evanescent wave in response to incident light, which excites molecules of the sample to thereby cause an emission of secondary photons. A method of detecting the intensity of a selected wavelength of incident light includes directing the incident light onto an array of MZP, diffracting a selected wavelength of the incident light onto a target focal point using the array of MZP, and detecting the intensity of the selected portion using an array of photon detectors. An electro-optic layer positioned adjacent to the array of MZP may be excited via an applied voltage to select the wavelength of the incident light.

  19. Development of an Acoustic Levitation Linear Transportation System Based on a Ring-Type Structure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gilles P L; Andrade, Marco A B; Adamowski, Julio Cezar; Silva, Emilio Carlos Nelli

    2017-05-01

    A linear acoustic levitation transportation system based on a ring-type vibrator is presented. The system is composed by two 21-kHz Langevin transducers connected to a ring-shaped structure formed by two semicircular sections and two flat plates. In this system, a flexural standing wave is generated along the ring structure, producing an acoustic standing wave between the vibrating ring and a plane reflector located at a distance of approximately a half wavelength from the ring. The acoustic standing wave in air has a series of pressure nodes, where small particles can be levitated and transported. The ring-type transportation system was designed and analyzed by using the finite element method. Additionally, a prototype was built and the acoustic levitation and transport of a small polystyrene particle was demonstrated.

  20. IR spectra of Saturn's ring spokes and multiple shines in the Saturn-rings system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aversa, Emiliano; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Filacchione, Gianrico; Cerroni, Priscilla; Nicholson, Phil D.; Carrozzo, Filippo G.; Altieri, Francesca; Oliva, Fabrizio; Geminale, Anna; Sindoni, Giuseppe; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2017-04-01

    During the last Saturn equinox, in 2009 August, spokes on the Saturn's B ring have been observed for the first time spectroscopically, at visible and infrared wavelengths. Measurements were obtained by Cassini-VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instrument in the 0.35-5.1 micron range. Spokes are either dark or bright features appearing on the B ring straddling the equinoxes, round to elongated in shape, lasting for minutes to hours, and moving partially pushed by Saturn's magnetic field. Previous spokes observations date back to the Voyager (1980 equinox,[1]), followed by a HST campaign (1995 equinox,[2]), and more recently Cassini-ISS images (2009 equinox,[3]). Theoretical models of spoke formation and evolution have been developed based on those observations, but there is not unanimous consensus on them. The most spread model considers the spoke as a cloud of very fine particles electrostatically levitating from the regolith of ring's boulders, and hovering on the ring plane while interacting with the ambient plasma until complete charge neutralization. The process triggering the grain charging is not yet clear (meteoroid bombardment, impacts of Saturn's lightnings electrons, etc.) but in any case a very small grain mass (high charge-to-mass ratio) is needed to allow electrostatic repulsion. From the observational point of view, small grain sizes (0.3-0.5 micron) have been retrieved by modeling the spoke reflectance in the visible spectral range (both Voyager, HST, and Cassini were equipped with multispectral imaging cameras). However, a first VIMS spoke observation ([4]) inferred a more spread size distribution (0.3 to 2.5 microns) to explain the high spoke contrast measured in the infrared. Here we will report about an analysis of two selected sets of spokes observed by VIMS. This selection aimed to include both high and low phase angle observations, and to take advantage from the highest spatial resolution data achieved in the infrared. We will

  1. A pilot investigation to constrain the presence of ring systems around transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatchett, W. Timothy; Barnes, Jason W.; Ahlers, John P.; MacKenzie, Shannon M.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate a process by which to evaluate the presence of large, Saturn-like ring systems around transiting extrasolar giant planets. We use extrasolar planet candidate KOI-422.01 as an example around which to establish limits on the presence of ring systems. We find that the spherical-planet (no-rings) fit matches the lightcurve of KOI-422.01 better than a lightcurve with a planet having obliquity angles 90°, 60°, 45°, or 20°. Hence we find no evidence for rings around KOI-422.01, but the methods that we have developed can be used for more comprehensive ring searches in the future. If the Hedman (2015) low-temperature rings hypothesis is correct, then the first positive detection of exorings might require transits of very long period ( ≳ 10 yr) giant planets outside their stars' ice lines.

  2. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  3. Ongoing Dynamics and Evolution of Neptune's Ring-Moon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; de Pater, Imke; Lissauer, Jack J.; French, Robert S.

    2017-06-01

    We report results derived from observations of the Neptune system using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during August 2016. These observations entail repeated, extremely long exposures through the broadest available filter on the WFC3/UVIS instrument to reveal details of Neptune's faint rings and small, inner moons. The work complements similar observations performed by HST in 2004-2005 and 2009. A principal goal was the recovery of the small moon S/2004 N 1 (henceforth N14), which was first reported in 2009. New images show the moon clearly and make it possible to obtain accurate orbital elements for the first time. A complete analysis of all data 2004-2016 reveals that the mean motion n = 378.90616 +/- 0.00003 degrees per day, corresponding to a semimajor axis a = 105,283 km. Eccentricity and inclination are quite small, with e < 0.001 and i < 0.1 degrees. (This result accounts for the local Laplace Plane tilt of ~ 0.4 degrees). N14 has a physical radius R = 13-15 km, assuming its albedo is 0.09 +/- 0.01, which is the range of Neptune's other inner moons. It orbits interior to the much larger moon Proteus (a = 117,647 km; R = 210 km). Tides are believed to have caused Proteus to spiral outward significantly since its origin, and we find that N14 orbits within the radial zone likely crossed by Proteus. We suggest that N14 may have originated as debris ejected from an impact into Proteus; Proteus subsequently continued to evolve outward but the debris accreted into N14 and remains at its original point of origin. Naiad, the innermost of Neptune's moons, is now orbiting ~ 120 degrees ahead of its published orbital elements. This represents only a 1-sigma correction from its mean motion as derived from Voyager data, but it indicates that later, purported detections of Naiad with the Keck telescope were almost certainly misidentifications. The arcs in the Adams ring show that trends reported previously have continued: the two leading arcs are no longer visible

  4. "Now I Know My ABCDs": Asset-Based Community Development with School Children in Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson Butterfield, Alice K.; Yeneabat, Mulu; Moxley, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Asset-based community development (ABCD) is a promising practice for communities to engage in self-determination through the efforts residents invest in identifying community assets, framing and documenting the issues communities face, and taking action to advance quality of life. The ABCD literature does not report on the application of ABCD…

  5. Multiple internal seal ring micro-electro-mechanical system vacuum packaging method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Peay, Chris S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A Multiple Internal Seal Ring (MISR) Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) vacuum packaging method that hermetically seals MEMS devices using MISR. The method bonds a capping plate having metal seal rings to a base plate having metal seal rings by wafer bonding the capping plate wafer to the base plate wafer. Bulk electrodes may be used to provide conductive paths between the seal rings on the base plate and the capping plate. All seals are made using only metal-to-metal seal rings deposited on the polished surfaces of the base plate and capping plate wafers. However, multiple electrical feed-through metal traces are provided by fabricating via holes through the capping plate for electrical connection from the outside of the package through the via-holes to the inside of the package. Each metal seal ring serves the dual purposes of hermetic sealing and providing the electrical feed-through metal trace.

  6. Ring lens focusing and push-pull tracking scheme for optical disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, R.; Zambuto, J.; Erwin, J. K.; Mansuripur, M.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental comparison of the ring lens and the astigmatic techniques of generating focus-error-signal (FES) in optical disk systems reveals that the ring lens generates a FES over two times steeper than that produced by the astigmat. Partly due to this large slope and, in part, because of its diffraction-limited behavior, the ring lens scheme exhibits superior performance characteristics. In particular the undesirable signal known as 'feedthrough' (induced on the FES by track-crossings during the seek operation) is lower by a factor of six compared to that observed with the astigmatic method. The ring lens is easy to align and has reasonable tolerance for positioning errors.

  7. Voyager Saturnian ring measurements and the early history of the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.; Axnaes, I.; Brenning, N.; Lindquist, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    The mass distribution in the Saturnian ring system is investigated and compared with predictions from plasma cosmogony. According to this theory, the matter in the rings was once a magnetized plasma, in which gravitation is balanced by the centrifugal and electromagnetic forces. As the plasma is neutralized, the electromagnetic forces disappear and the matter falls in to 2/3 of the original saturnocentric distance. This causes the cosmogonic shadow effect, demonstrated for the large scale structure of the Saturnian ring system. It is shown that many structures of the present ring system can be understood as shadows and antishadows of cosmogonic origin. These appear in the form of double rings centered around a position a factor 0.64 (slightly 2/3) closer to Saturn than the causing feature. Voyager data agree with an accuracy 1%.

  8. Gaseous toroid around Saturn. [Saturnian ring system for atomic hydrogen trapping in Titan atmospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    The trapping of Titan's escaping atmosphere in the Saturnian system by a toroidal ring is discussed. The radius of the toroid is comparable to Titan's orbit, or about ten times larger than the visible rings. Theoretical atmospheric models are formulated that consider Saturn's gravitational attraction and magnetospheric properties in forming this toroid and in protecting toroid particles from direct ionization by solar wind particles.

  9. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-01

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  10. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignmentmore » and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.« less

  11. Synthetic approach to the AB ring system of ouabain.

    PubMed

    Jung, Michael E; Piizzi, Grazia

    2003-04-04

    Several novel hydroxylated cis-decalin derivatives, potential intermediates for the synthesis of the AB ring system of the important cardiotonic steroid ouabain, have been synthesized from commercially available starting materials. The first step in the preparation of these highly functionalized intermediates is a Robinson annulation of the beta-keto ester 6 and the 4-silyl-3-buten-2-one 5 to furnish the octalone 4 with good diastereoselectivity in fair yield (due to competition with a novel silicon-to-carbon phenyl migration). Reduction of the epoxy alcohol 3 (derived from 4 in two high-yielding steps) with LiAlH(4) gave a mixture of the desired triol 11 along with the product of an unusual reductive opening at the tertiary carbon, namely the triol 12. A plausible mechanism for this unusual reduction is presented as are possible methods for avoiding it. In particular, reduction of the corrresponding epoxy ketone 15 with aluminum amalgam proceeded in good yield to give the hydroxy ketone 16. Also reduction of the epoxide ester having the inverted stereochemistry at C3 afforded the desired tertiary alcohol 33 in good yield. Another approach using the beta,gamma-unsaturated ketal 38 permitted the formation of the tertiary alcohol 40. Fleming oxidation of the related, very functionalized silane 39 afforded the desired 1beta-alcohol 41 in fair yield. Finally a novel rearrangement was observed when the epoxy alcohol 24 was treated with DIBAL to effect loss of the angular hydroxymethyl group to produce the tetrasubstitued alkene 29 in high yield.

  12. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M. K.; Araki, S.; Black, G. J.; Bosh, A. S.; Brahic, A.; Brooks, S. M.; Charnoz, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Dones, L.; Durisen, R. H.; Esposito, L. W.; Ferrari, C.; Festou, M.; French, R. G.; Giuliatti-Winter, S. M.; Graps, A. L.; Hamilton, D. P.; Horanyi, M.; Karjalainen, R. M.; Krivov, A. V.; Krueger, H.; Larson, S. M.; Levison, H. F.; Lewis, M. C.; Lissauer, J. J.; Murray, C. D.; Namouni, F.; Nicholson, P. D.; Olkin, C. B.; Poulet, F.; Rappaport, N. J.; Salo, H. J.; Schmidt, J.; Showalter, M. R.; Spahn, F.; Spilker, L. J.; Srama, R.; Stewart, G. R.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.

    2002-08-01

    The past two decades have witnessed dramatic changes in our view and understanding of planetary rings. We now know that each of the giant planets in the Solar System possesses a complex and unique ring system. Recent studies have identified complex gravitational interactions between the rings and their retinues of attendant satellites. Among the four known ring systems, we see elegant examples of Lindblad and corotation resonances (first invoked in the context of galactic disks), electromagnetic resonances, spiral density waves and bending waves, narrow ringlets which exhibit internal modes due to collective instabilities, sharp-edged gaps maintained via tidal torques from embedded moonlets, and tenuous dust belts created by meteoroid impact onto, or collisions between, parent bodies. Yet, as far as we have come, our understanding is far from complete. The fundamental questions confronting ring scientists at the beginning of the twenty-first century are those regarding the origin, age and evolution of the various ring systems, in the broadest context. Understanding the origin and age requires us to know the current ring properties, and to understand the dominant evolutionary processes and how they influence ring properties. Here we discuss a prioritized list of the key questions, the answers to which would provide the greatest improvement in our understanding of planetary rings. We then outline the initiatives, missions, and other supporting activities needed to address those questions, and recommend priorities for the coming decade in planetary ring science.

  13. Improved power steering with double and triple ring waveguide systems: the impact of the operating frequency.

    PubMed

    Kok, H P; de Greef, M; Borsboom, P P; Bel, A; Crezee, J

    2011-01-01

    Regional hyperthermia systems with 3D power steering have been introduced to improve tumour temperatures. The 3D 70-MHz AMC-8 system has two rings of four waveguides. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether T(90) will improve by using a higher operating frequency and whether further improvement is possible by adding a third ring. Optimised specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions were evaluated for a centrally located target in tissue-equivalent phantoms, and temperature optimisation was performed for five cervical carcinoma patients with constraints to normal tissue temperatures. The resulting T(90) and the thermal iso-effect dose (i.e. the number of equivalent min at 43°C) were evaluated and compared to the 2D 70-MHz AMC-4 system with a single ring of four waveguides. FDTD simulations were performed at 2.5 × 2.5 × 5 mm(3) resolution. The applied frequencies were 70, 100, 120, 130, 140 and 150 MHz. Optimised SAR distributions in phantoms showed an optimal SAR distribution at 140 MHz. For the patient simulations, an optimal increase in T(90) was observed at 130 MHz. For a two-ring system at 70 MHz the gain in T(90) was about 0.5°C compared to the AMC-4 system, averaged over the five patients. At 130 MHz the average gain in T(90) was ~1.5°C and ~2°C for a two and three-ring system, respectively. This implies an improvement of the thermal iso-effect dose with a factor ~12 and ~30, respectively. Simulations showed that a 130-MHz two-ring waveguide system yields significantly higher tumour temperatures compared to 70-MHz single-ring and double-ring waveguide systems. Temperatures were further improved with a 130-MHz triple-ring system.

  14. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft (especially the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn). Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 10- 7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close range and in real time in planetary rings.We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The A, B, and C rings of Saturn, plus the Cassini Division, comprise our solar system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are found both at Uranus (where they comprise the main rings entirely) and at Saturn (where they are embedded in the broad disk) and are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty rings, likely generated by embedded source bodies, are surprisingly found to sport azimuthally confined arcs at Neptune, Saturn, and Jupiter. Finally, every known ring system includes a substantial component of diffuse dusty rings.Planetary rings have shown themselves to be useful as detectors of planetary processes around them, including the planetary magnetic field and interplanetary impactors as well as the gravity of nearby perturbing moons. Experimental rings science has made great progress in recent decades, especially numerical simulations of self-gravity wakes and other processes but also laboratory investigations of coefficient of restitution and spectroscopic ground truth. The age of self-sustained ring systems is a matter of

  15. Real-time track-less Cherenkov ring fitting trigger system based on Graphics Processing Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cretaro, P.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Di Lorenzo, S.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Gianoli, A.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Piandani, R.; Piccini, M.; Pontisso, L.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2017-12-01

    The parallel computing power of commercial Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) is exploited to perform real-time ring fitting at the lowest trigger level using information coming from the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector of the NA62 experiment at CERN. To this purpose, direct GPU communication with a custom FPGA-based board has been used to reduce the data transmission latency. The GPU-based trigger system is currently integrated in the experimental setup of the RICH detector of the NA62 experiment, in order to reconstruct ring-shaped hit patterns. The ring-fitting algorithm running on GPU is fed with raw RICH data only, with no information coming from other detectors, and is able to provide more complex trigger primitives with respect to the simple photodetector hit multiplicity, resulting in a higher selection efficiency. The performance of the system for multi-ring Cherenkov online reconstruction obtained during the NA62 physics run is presented.

  16. The Age of Saturn's Rings Constrained by the Meteoroid Flux Into the System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, S.; Altobelli, N.; Srama, R.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Estrada, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    The origin of Saturn's ring is still not known. There is an ongoing argument whether Saturn's ring are rather young or have been formed shortly after Saturn together with its satellites. The water-ice rings contain about 5% rocky material resulting from continuous meteoroid bombardment of the ring material with interplanetary micrometeoroids. Knowledge of the incoming mass flux would allow to estimate the ring's exposure time. Model calculations suggest exposure times of 108 years implying a late ring formation. This scenario is problematic because the tidal disruption of a Mimas-sized moon or of a comet within the planet's Roche zone would lead to a much larger rock content as observed today. Here we report on the measurement of the meteoroid mass flux into the Saturnian system obtained by the charge-sensitive entrance grid system (QP) of the Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) on the Cassini spacecraft. Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) entering Saturn's sphere of gravitational influence are identified through the measurements of their speed vectors. We analyzed the full CDA data set acquired after Cassini's arrival at Saturn in 2004, identified the impact speed vectors of 128 extrinsic micrometeoroids ≥ 2 μm, and determined their orbital elements. On the basis of these measurements we determined the mass flux into the Saturnian system. Our preliminary findings are in support of an old ring. The knowledge of the meteoroids orbital elements allows us for the first time to characterize the meteoroid environment in the outer solar system based on direct measurements.

  17. Single-pass BPM system of the Photon Factory storage ring.

    PubMed

    Honda, T; Katoh, M; Mitsuhashi, T; Ueda, A; Tadano, M; Kobayashi, Y

    1998-05-01

    At the 2.5 GeV ring of the Photon Factory, a single-pass beam-position monitor (BPM) system is being prepared for the storage ring and the beam transport line. In the storage ring, the injected beam position during the first several turns can be measured with a single injection pulse. The BPM system has an adequate performance, useful for the commissioning of the new low-emittance lattice. Several stripline BPMs are being installed in the beam transport line. The continuous monitoring of the orbit in the beam transport line will be useful for the stabilization of the injection energy as well as the injection beam orbit.

  18. Synthesis of a new class of fused cyclotetraphosphazene ring systems.

    PubMed

    Beşli, Serap; Mutlu, Ceylan; İbişoğlu, Hanife; Yuksel, Fatma; Allen, Christopher W

    2015-01-05

    Octachlorocyclotetraphosphazene (1) was reacted with butylamines [n-butyl, i-butyl, sec-butyl, and t-butyl] in a 1:0.8 mol ratio in THF to obtain cyclotetraphosphazenes bearing a P-NH group, N4P4Cl7(NHR) [R = n-butyl (2a), i-butyl (2b), sec-butyl (2c), t-butyl (2d)](2a-d). The cyclotetraphosphazene derivatives 2a, 2b, and 2c were treated with sodium hydride giving rise to a new type of cyclophosphazene compounds (P8N8 ring) consisting of three fused tetramer rings (3a-c). Whereas reaction of sodium hydride with the t-butylaminocyclophosphazene derivative (2d) gave a P-O-P bridged compound (4) presumably as a result of hydrolysis reaction associated with moisture in the solvent. It is likely that the 16-membered cyclooctaphosphazene derivatives (3a-c) are formed by a proton abstraction/chloride ion elimination, intramolecular nucleophilic attack, ring opening and intermolecular condensation processes, respectively.

  19. The Abort Kicker System for the PEP-II Storage Rings at SLAC.

    SciTech Connect

    Delamare, Jeffrey E

    2003-06-20

    The PEP-II project has two storage rings. The HER (High Energy Ring) has up to 1.48 A of election beam at 9 GeV, and the LER (Low Energy Ring) has up to 2.14 A of positron beam at 3.1 GeV. To protect the HER and LER beam lines in the event of a ring component failure, each ring has an abort kicker system which directs the beam into a dump when a failure is detected. Due to the high current of the beams, the beam kick is tapered from 100% to 80% in 7.33 {micro}S (the beam transit time aroundmore » the ring). This taper distributes the energy evenly across the window which separates the ring from the beam dump such that the window is not damaged. The abort kicker trigger is synchronized with the ion clearing gap of the beam allowing for the kicker field to rise from 0-80% while there is no beam in the kicker magnet. Originally the kicker system was designed for a rise time of 370nS [1], but because the ion clearing gap was reduced in half, so was the rise time requirement for the kicker. This report discusses the design of the system interlocks, diagnostics, and modulator with the modifications necessary to accommodate an ion clearing gap of 185nS.« less

  20. The structure of Jupiter’s main ring from New Horizons: A comparison with other ring-moon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancia, Robert; Hedman, Matthew

    2018-04-01

    During New Horizon’s Jupiter flyby in 2007, the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took several images of the planet’s main ring. The data set contains two extended image-movies of the main ring, along with several brief observations at varying ring azimuths, and a small set of high phase angle images. Thus far, the only published work on the New Horizons Jupiter rings data set found seven bright clumps with sub-km equivalent radii embedded in the main ring (Showalter et al. 2007 Science). In this work, we searched the inner region of the main ring for any structures that might be perturbed at the 3:2 resonances with the rotation of Jupiter’s magnetic field or massive storms. We also examined the structure of the outer main ring in order to assess how it is shaped by the small moons Metis and Adrastea. Some of the features seen in Jupiter’s main ring are similar to those found in other dusty rings around Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. By comparing these different rings, we can gain a better understanding of how small moons sculpt tenuous rings.

  1. Central circuitry in the jellyfish Aglantha. II: The ring giant and carrier systems

    PubMed

    Mackie; Meech

    1995-01-01

    1. The ring giant axon in the outer nerve ring of the jellyfish Aglantha digitale is a multinucleate syncytium 85 % of which is occupied by an electron-dense fluid-filled vacuole apparently in a Gibbs­Donnan equilibrium with the surrounding band of cytoplasmic cortex. Micropipette recordings show small (-15 to -25 mV) and large (-62 to -66 mV) resting potentials. Low values, obtained with a high proportion of the micropipette penetrations, are assumed to be from the central vacuole; high values from the cytoplasmic cortex. Background electrical activity includes rhythmic oscillations and synaptic potentials representing hair cell input caused by vibration. 2. After the ring giant axon has been cut, propagating action potentials evoked by stimulation are conducted past the cut and re-enter the axon on the far side. The system responsible (the carrier system) through-conducts at a velocity approximately 25 % of that of the ring giant axon and is probably composed of small neurones running in parallel with it. Numerous small neurones are seen by electron microscopy, some making one-way and some two-way synapses with the ring giant. 3. Despite their different conduction velocities, the two systems normally appear to fire in synchrony and at the velocity of the ring giant axon. We suggest that, once initiated, ring giant spikes propagate rapidly around the margin, firing the carrier neurones through serial synapses and giving them, in effect, the same high conduction velocity. Initiation of ring giant spikes can, however, require input from the carrier system. The spikes are frequently seen to be mounted on slow positive potentials representing summed carrier postsynaptic potentials. 4. The carrier system fires one-for-one with the giant axons of the tentacles and may mediate impulse traffic between the latter and the ring giant axon. We suggest that the carrier system may also provide the pathways from the ring giant to the motor giant axons used in escape swimming

  2. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  3. Analysis of a Triple Star System Occulted By Saturn’s Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratcher, Allison; Colwell, J. E.; Bolin, B.

    2012-10-01

    On January 4, 2012, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Cassini Spacecraft observed Saturn’s rings as they occulted the triple star system, Iota Orionis. Remarkably, the brightest star was occulted by the moon Prometheus, and we provide the timing information of first and last contact for navigation purposes and a chord across the moon. The large separation of the individual stars projected in the ring plane makes it possible to measure the profiles of narrow features in the rings as they were occulted by each of the three stars. This occultation thus provides a unique opportunity to measure short-scale longitudinal variations in narrow ringlets with stellar occultation data that usually provide only a single longitudinal sample. Iota Orionis has a low elevation angle (B=1.4 degrees) above the plane of the rings, enhancing the sensitivity of the occultation (by a factor of 1/sin(B)=41) to the optically thin regions of the rings such as the C Ring and the Cassini Division as well as faint ringlets in the Encke gap. We distinguished the three signals by creating a model triple star signal using data from another occultation. We were able to identify several faint, narrow ringlets, including two in the Encke gap, occulted by two of the three stars and more prominent ringlets, such as the Huygens ringlet, in all three stellar light curves. We present the equivalent widths of these ringlets in the data from this triple star system and limits on ring variability over the azimuthal separation of the stars that ranges from 6000 km at the inner C ring to 200 km at the outer A ring.

  4. Solar system history as recorded in the Saturnian ring structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1983-01-01

    Holberg's analysis of the Voyager Saturn photographs in reflected and transparent light, and occultation data of stars seen through the rings are discussed. A hyperfine structure with 10,000 ringlets can be explained by the Baxter-Thompson negative diffusion. This gives the ringlets a stability which makes it possible to interpret them as fossils which originated at cosmogonic times. It is shown that the bulk structure can be explained by the combined cosmogonic shadows of the satellites Mimas and Janus and the Shepherd satellites. This structure originated at the transition from the plasma phase to the planetesimal phase. The shadows are not simple void regions but exhibit a characteristic signature. Parts of the fine structure, explained by Holberg as resonances with satellites, are interpreted as cosmogonic shadow effects. However, there are a number of ringlets which can neither be explained by cosmogonic nor by resonance effects. Analysis of ring data can reconstruct the plasma-planetesimal transition with an accuracy of a few percent. Previously announced in STAR as N84-12013

  5. Solar system history as recorded in the Saturnian ring structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1983-01-01

    Holberg's analysis of the Voyager Saturn photographs in reflected and transparent light, and occultation data of stars seen through the rings are discussed. A hyperfine structure, with 10,000 ringlets can be explained by the Baxter-Thompson negative diffusion. This gives the ringlets a stability which makes it possible to interpret them as fossils, which originated at cosmogonic times. It is shown that the bulk structure can be explained by the combined cosmogonic shadows of the satellites Mimas, Janus and the Shepherd satellites. This structure originated at the transition from the plasma phase to the planetesimal phase. The shadows are not simple void regions but exhibit a characteristic signature. Parts of the fine structure, explained by Holberg as resonances with satellites, are interpreted as cosmogonic shadow effects. However, there are a number of ringlets which can neither be explained by cosmogonic nor by resonance effects. Analysis of ring data can reconstruct the plasma-planetesimal transition with an accuracy of a few percent.

  6. Numerical study on the lubrication performance of compression ring-cylinder liner system with spherical dimples

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Yong-Fang; Li, Sha; Müller, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    The effects of surface texture on the lubrication performance of a compression ring-cylinder liner system are studied in this paper. By considering the surface roughness of the compression ring and cylinder liner, a mixed lubrication model is presented to investigate the tribological behaviors of a barrel-shaped compression ring-cylinder liner system with spherical dimples on the liner. In order to determine the rupture and reformulation positions of fluid film accurately, the Jacoboson-Floberg-Olsson (JFO) cavitation boundary condition is applied to the mixed lubrication model for ensuring the mass-conservative law. On this basis, the minimum oil film thickness and average friction forces in the compression ring-cylinder liner system are investigated under the engine-like conditions by changing the dimple area density, radius, and depth. The wear load, average friction forces, and power loss of the compression ring-cylinder liner system with and without dimples are also compared for different compression ring face profiles. The results show that the spherical dimples can produce a larger reduction of friction in mixed lubrication region, and reduce power loss significantly in the middle of the strokes. In addition, higher reduction percentages of average friction forces and wear are obtained for smaller crown height or larger axial width. PMID:28732042

  7. An Alternative Derivation of the Energy Levels of the "Particle on a Ring" System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Alan

    1996-10-01

    All acceptable wave functions must be continuous mathematical functions. This criterion limits the acceptable functions for a particle in a linear 1-dimensional box to sine functions. If, however, the linear box is bent round into a ring, acceptable wave functions are those which are continuous at the 'join'. On this model some acceptable linear functions become unacceptable for the ring and some unacceptable cosine functions become acceptable. This approach can be used to produce a straightforward derivation of the energy levels and wave functions of the particle on a ring. These simple wave mechanical systems can be used as models of linear and cyclic delocalised systems such as conjugated hydrocarbons or the benzene ring. The promotion energy of an electron can then be used to calculate the wavelength of absorption of uv light. The simple model gives results of the correct order of magnitude and shows that, as the chain length increases, the uv maximum moves to longer wavelengths, as found experimentally.

  8. The two nerve rings of the hypostomal nervous system of Hydra vulgaris-an immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, L A; Kass-Simon, G

    2016-11-01

    In Hydra vulgaris, physiological and pharmacological evidence exists for a hypostomal circumferential neuro-effector pathway that initiates ectodermal pacemaker activity at tentacular-hypostomal loci coordinating body and tentacle contractions. Here, we describe an ectodermal nerve ring that runs below and between the tentacles, and an anti-GABA B receptor antibody-labeled ring coincident with it. The location of this ring is consistent with the physiology of the hypostomal pacemaker systems of hydra. We also describe a distally located, ectodermal ring of nerve fibers that is not associated with anti-GABA B receptor antibody labeling. The neurites and cell bodies of sensory cells contribute to both rings. The location of the distal ring and its sensory cell neurites suggests an involvement in the behavior of the mouth. Between the two rings is a network of anastomosing sensory and ganglion cell bodies and their neurites. Phase contrast, darkfield, and antibody-labeled images reveal that the mouth of hydra comprises five or six epithelial folds whose endoderm extensively labels with anti-GABA B receptor antibody, suggesting that endodermal metabotrobic GABA receptors are also involved in regulating mouth behavior.

  9. The Centaur Chariklo and its rings system from stellar occultations in 2017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, Rodrigo; Sicardy, Bruno; Camargo, Julio; Ortiz, Jose Luis; Berard, Diane; Desmars, Josselin; Chariklo Occultations Team; Rio Group; Lucky Star Occultation Team; Granada Occultation Team

    2017-10-01

    A stellar occultation in June 3, 2013 revealed the presence of a dense ring system around the Centaur object (10199) Chariklo (Braga-Ribas et al., Nature 2014). Subsequent analysis of occultation data and long-term photometric variations indicate that Chariklo's body is elongated (Leiva et al. 2017, submitted) and that the main ring exhibits significant longitudinal variations of the radial width (Bérard et al. 2017, in press). We report three multi-chord high-quality stellar occultation by Chariklo on April 9, 2017 and June 22, 2017 from Namibia, and July 23 2017 from South America. The analysis of this new data set is underway, but preliminary results are consistent with triaxial ellipsoidal models. From this analysis we will:-present refined models for the size and shape of Chariklo's main body andevaluate the heights and slopes of its topographic features.-give constraints on the longitudinal width variations of Chariklo's rings andexplore the possibility to obtain the rings apsidal precession rate.Chariklo's shape and topography have strong consequences on the dynamics of the rings through Lindblad-type resonances between mean motion of the ring particles and the spin of the main body, while the rings precession rate gives constraints on the dynamical oblateness of the main body.**Part of the research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community’s H2020 (2014-2020/ ERC Grant Agreement n 669416 ”LUCKY STAR”).

  10. Concise copper-catalyzed synthesis of tricyclic biaryl ether-linked aza-heterocyclic ring systems.

    PubMed

    Mestichelli, Paola; Scott, Matthew J; Galloway, Warren R J D; Selwyn, Jamie; Parker, Jeremy S; Spring, David R

    2013-11-01

    A new method for the synthesis of tricyclic biaryl ether-linked ring systems incorporating seven-, eight-, and nine-membered ring amines is presented. In the presence of catalytic quantities of copper(I), readily accessible acyclic precursors undergo an intramolecular carbon-oxygen bond-forming reaction facilitated by a "templating" chelating nitrogen atom. The methodology displays a broad substrate scope, is practical, and generates rare and biologically interesting tricyclic heteroaromatic products that are difficult to access by other means.

  11. The utility of twins in developmental cognitive neuroscience research: How twins strengthen the ABCD research design.

    PubMed

    Iacono, William G; Heath, Andrew C; Hewitt, John K; Neale, Michael C; Banich, Marie T; Luciana, Monica M; Madden, Pamela A; Barch, Deanna M; Bjork, James M

    2018-08-01

    The ABCD twin study will elucidate the genetic and environmental contributions to a wide range of mental and physical health outcomes in children, including substance use, brain and behavioral development, and their interrelationship. Comparisons within and between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs, further powered by multiple assessments, provide information about genetic and environmental contributions to developmental associations, and enable stronger tests of causal hypotheses, than do comparisons involving unrelated children. Thus a sub-study of 800 pairs of same-sex twins was embedded within the overall Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) design. The ABCD Twin Hub comprises four leading centers for twin research in Minnesota, Colorado, Virginia, and Missouri. Each site is enrolling 200 twin pairs, as well as singletons. The twins are recruited from registries of all twin births in each State during 2006-2008. Singletons at each site are recruited following the same school-based procedures as the rest of the ABCD study. This paper describes the background and rationale for the ABCD twin study, the ascertainment of twin pairs and implementation strategy at each site, and the details of the proposed analytic strategies to quantify genetic and environmental influences and test hypotheses critical to the aims of the ABCD study. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Study protocol: Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease Extension (ABCDE) Project.

    PubMed

    Bailie, Ross; Si, Damin; Connors, Christine; Weeramanthri, Tarun; Clark, Louise; Dowden, Michelle; O'Donohue, Lynette; Condon, John; Thompson, Sandra; Clelland, Nikki; Nagel, Tricia; Gardner, Karen; Brown, Alex

    2008-09-17

    A growing body of international literature points to the importance of a system approach to improve the quality of care in primary health care settings. Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) concepts and techniques provide a theoretically coherent and practical way for primary care organisations to identify, address, and overcome the barriers to improvements. The Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease (ABCD) study, a CQI-based quality improvement project conducted in Australia's Northern Territory, has demonstrated significant improvements in primary care service systems, in the quality of clinical service delivery and in patient outcomes related to chronic illness care. The aims of the extension phase of this study are to examine factors that influence uptake and sustainability of this type of CQI activity in a variety of Indigenous primary health care organisations in Australia, and to assess the impact of collaborative CQI approaches on prevention and management of chronic illness and health outcomes in Indigenous communities. The study will be conducted in 40-50 Indigenous community health centres from 4 States/Territories (Northern Territory, Western Australia, New South Wales and Queensland) over a five year period. The project will adopt a participatory, quality improvement approach that features annual cycles of: 1) organisational system assessment and audits of clinical records; 2) feedback to and interpretation of results with participating health centre staff; 3) action planning and goal setting by health centre staff to achieve system changes; and 4) implementation of strategies for change. System assessment will be carried out using a System Assessment Tool and in-depth interviews of key informants. Clinical audit tools include two essential tools that focus on diabetes care audit and preventive service audit, and several optional tools focusing on audits of hypertension, heart disease, renal disease, primary mental health care and health promotion

  13. Study protocol: Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease Extension (ABCDE) Project

    PubMed Central

    Bailie, Ross; Si, Damin; Connors, Christine; Weeramanthri, Tarun; Clark, Louise; Dowden, Michelle; O'Donohue, Lynette; Condon, John; Thompson, Sandra; Clelland, Nikki; Nagel, Tricia; Gardner, Karen; Brown, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Background A growing body of international literature points to the importance of a system approach to improve the quality of care in primary health care settings. Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) concepts and techniques provide a theoretically coherent and practical way for primary care organisations to identify, address, and overcome the barriers to improvements. The Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease (ABCD) study, a CQI-based quality improvement project conducted in Australia's Northern Territory, has demonstrated significant improvements in primary care service systems, in the quality of clinical service delivery and in patient outcomes related to chronic illness care. The aims of the extension phase of this study are to examine factors that influence uptake and sustainability of this type of CQI activity in a variety of Indigenous primary health care organisations in Australia, and to assess the impact of collaborative CQI approaches on prevention and management of chronic illness and health outcomes in Indigenous communities. Methods/design The study will be conducted in 40–50 Indigenous community health centres from 4 States/Territories (Northern Territory, Western Australia, New South Wales and Queensland) over a five year period. The project will adopt a participatory, quality improvement approach that features annual cycles of: 1) organisational system assessment and audits of clinical records; 2) feedback to and interpretation of results with participating health centre staff; 3) action planning and goal setting by health centre staff to achieve system changes; and 4) implementation of strategies for change. System assessment will be carried out using a System Assessment Tool and in-depth interviews of key informants. Clinical audit tools include two essential tools that focus on diabetes care audit and preventive service audit, and several optional tools focusing on audits of hypertension, heart disease, renal disease, primary mental

  14. Architecture for an advanced biomedical collaboration domain for the European paediatric cancer research community (ABCD-4-E).

    PubMed

    Nitzlnader, Michael; Falgenhauer, Markus; Gossy, Christian; Schreier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Today, progress in biomedical research often depends on large, interdisciplinary research projects and tailored information and communication technology (ICT) support. In the context of the European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) project the exchange of data between data source (Source Domain) and data consumer (Consumer Domain) systems in a distributed computing environment needs to be facilitated. This work presents the requirements and the corresponding solution architecture of the Advanced Biomedical Collaboration Domain for Europe (ABCD-4-E). The proposed concept utilises public as well as private cloud systems, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) framework and web-based applications to provide the core capabilities in accordance with privacy and security needs. The utility of crucial parts of the concept was evaluated by prototypic implementation. A discussion of the design indicates that the requirements of ENCCA are fully met. A whole system demonstration is currently being prepared to verify that ABCD-4-E has the potential to evolve into a domain-bridging collaboration platform in the future.

  15. The stability of the oscillation motion of charged grains in the Saturnian ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, R.-L.; Houpis, L. F.

    1985-02-01

    A perturbation approach for the gravitoelectrodynamic forces encountered in the corotating plasma environment of Saturn is used to determine the stability of charged grains, given a random initial velocity. Attention is given to the implications of the Northrop and Hill (1982) and Mendis et al. (1982) results for the formation of the Saturnian ring system, and it is suggested that the marginal z stability radius at 1.5245 Saturn radii for Kepler-launched particles is due to an erosion process with ejecta of the order 0.05-0.5 microns, rather than that of the previously suggested plasma. The diffuseness of the Saturnian rings beyond the F ring is also explained in terms of instability, while a new critical radius for r instability is suggestd for the optical depth feature at 1.72 Saturn radii. The F ring is analyzed in detail.

  16. Capture, acceleration and bunching rf systems for the MEIC booster and storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan; Lin, Fanglei

    2015-09-01

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC), proposed by Jefferson Lab, consists of a series of accelerators. The electron collider ring accepts electrons from CEBAF at energies from 3 to 12 GeV. Protons and ions are delivered to a booster and captured in a long bunch before being ramped and transferred to the ion collider ring. The ion collider ring accelerates a small number of long ion bunches to colliding energy before they are re-bunched into a high frequency train of very short bunches for colliding. Two sets of low frequency RF systems are needed for the long ion bunch energymore » ramping in the booster and ion collider ring. Another two sets of high frequency RF cavities are needed for re-bunching in the ion collider ring and compensating synchrotron radiation energy loss in the electron collider ring. The requirements from energy ramping, ion beam bunching, electron beam energy compensation, collective effects, beam loading and feedback capability, RF power capability, etc. are presented. The preliminary designs of these RF systems are presented. Concepts for the baseline cavity and RF station configurations are described, as well as some options that may allow more flexible injection and acceleration schemes.« less

  17. Current, future and potential use of mobile and wearable technologies and social media data in the ABCD study to increase understanding of contributors to child health.

    PubMed

    Bagot, K S; Matthews, S A; Mason, M; Squeglia, Lindsay M; Fowler, J; Gray, K; Herting, M; May, A; Colrain, I; Godino, J; Tapert, S; Brown, S; Patrick, K

    2018-08-01

    Mobile and wearable technologies and novel methods of data collection are innovating health-related research. These technologies and methods allow for multi-system level capture of data across environmental, physiological, behavioral, and psychological domains. In the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study, there is great potential for harnessing the acceptability, accessibility, and functionality of mobile and social technologies for in-vivo data capture to precisely measure factors, and interactions between factors, that contribute to childhood and adolescent neurodevelopment and psychosocial and health outcomes. Here we discuss advances in mobile and wearable technologies and methods of analysis of geospatial, ecologic, social network and behavioral data. Incorporating these technologies into the ABCD study will allow for interdisciplinary research on the effects of place, social interactions, environment, and substance use on health and developmental outcomes in children and adolescents. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Proxy system modeling of tree-ring isotope chronologies over the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchukaitis, K. J.; LeGrande, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    The Asian monsoon can be characterized in terms of both precipitation variability and atmospheric circulation across a range of spatial and temporal scales. While multicentury time series of tree-ring widths at hundreds of sites across Asia provide estimates of past rainfall, the oxygen isotope ratios of annual rings may reveal broader regional hydroclimate and atmosphere-ocean dynamics. Tree-ring oxygen isotope chronologies from Monsoon Asia have been interpreted to reflect a local 'amount effect', relative humidity, source water and seasonality, and winter snowfall. Here, we use an isotope-enabled general circulation model simulation from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Science (GISS) Model E and a proxy system model of the oxygen isotope composition of tree-ring cellulose to interpret the large-scale and local climate controls on δ 18O chronologies. Broad-scale dominant signals are associated with a suite of covarying hydroclimate variables including growing season rainfall amounts, relative humidity, and vapor pressure deficit. Temperature and source water influences are region-dependent, as are the simulated tree-ring isotope signals associated with the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and large-scale indices of the Asian monsoon circulation. At some locations, including southern coastal Viet Nam, local precipitation isotope ratios and the resulting simulated δ 18O tree-ring chronologies reflect upstream rainfall amounts and atmospheric circulation associated with monsoon strength and wind anomalies.

  19. Auto-production of biosurfactants reverses the coffee ring effect in a bacterial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempels, Wouter; de Dier, Raf; Mizuno, Hideaki; Hofkens, Johan; Vermant, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The deposition of material at the edge of evaporating droplets, known as the ‘coffee ring effect’, is caused by a radially outward capillary flow. This phenomenon is common to a wide array of systems including colloidal and bacterial systems. The role of surfactants in counteracting these coffee ring depositions is related to the occurrence of local vortices known as Marangoni eddies. Here we show that these swirling flows are universal, and not only lead to a uniform deposition of colloids but also occur in living bacterial systems. Experiments on Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggest that the auto-production of biosurfactants has an essential role in creating a homogeneous deposition of the bacteria upon drying. Moreover, at biologically relevant conditions, intricate time-dependent flows are observed in addition to the vortex regime, which are also effective in reversing the coffee ring effect at even lower surfactant concentrations.

  20. From nodal-ring topological superfluids to spiral Majorana modes in cold atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wen-Yu; Xu, Dong-Hui; Zhou, Benjamin T.; Zhou, Qi; Law, K. T.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we consider a three-dimensional (3D) cubic optical lattice composed of coupled 1D wires with 1D spin-orbit coupling. When the s -wave pairing is induced through Feshbach resonance, the system becomes a topological superfluid with ring nodes, which are the ring nodal degeneracies in the bulk, and supports a large number of surface Majorana zero-energy modes. The large number of surface Majorana modes remain at zero energy even in the presence of disorder due to the protection from a chiral symmetry. When the chiral symmetry is broken, the system becomes a Weyl topological superfluid with Majorana arcs. With 3D spin-orbit coupling, the Weyl superfluid becomes a gapless phase with spiral Majorana modes on the surface. A spatial-resolved radio-frequency spectroscopy is suggested to detect this nodal-ring topological superfluid phase.

  1. The structure and stability of orbits in Hoag-like ring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikova, Elena Yu

    2018-05-01

    Ring galaxies are amazing objects exemplified by the famous case of Hoag's Object. Here the mass of the central galaxy may be comparable to the mass of the ring, making it a difficult case to model mechanically. In a previous paper, it was shown that the outer potential of a torus (ring) can be represented with good accuracy by the potential of a massive circle with the same mass. This approach allows us to simplify the problem of the particle motion in the gravitational field of a torus associated with a central mass by replacing the torus with a massive circle. In such a system, there is a circle of unstable equilibrium that we call `Lagrangian circle' (LC). Stable circular orbits exist only in some region limited by the last possible circular orbit related to the disappearance of the extrema of the effective potential. We call this orbit `the outermost stable circular orbit' (OSCO) by analogy with the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) in the relativistic case of a black hole. Under these conditions, there is a region between OSCO and LC where the circular motion is not possible due to the competition between the gravitational forces by the central mass and the ring. As a result, a gap in the matter distribution can form in Hoag-like system with massive rings.

  2. Configuration maintaining control of three-body ring tethered system based on thrust compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Panfeng; Liu, Binbin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Space multi-tethered systems have shown broad prospects in remote observation missions. This paper mainly focuses on the dynamics and configuration maintaining control of space spinning three-body ring tethered system for such mission. Firstly, we establish the spinning dynamic model of the three-body ring tethered system considering the elasticity of the tether using Newton-Euler method, and then validate the suitability of this model by numerical simulation. Subsequently, LP (Likins-Pringle) initial equilibrium conditions for the tethered system are derived based on rigid body's equilibrium theory. Simulation results show that tether slack, snapping and interaction between the tethers exist in the three-body ring system, and its' configuration can not be maintained without control. Finally, a control strategy based on thrust compensation, namely thrust to simulate tether compression under LP initial equilibrium conditions is designed to solve the configuration maintaining control problem. Control effects are verified by numerical simulation compared with uncontrolled situation. Simulation results show that the configuration of the three-body ring tethered system could maintain under this active control strategy.

  3. ICU team composition and its association with ABCDE implementation in a quality collaborative.

    PubMed

    Costa, Deena Kelly; Valley, Thomas S; Miller, Melissa A; Manojlovich, Milisa; Watson, Sam R; McLellan, Phyllis; Pope, Corine; Hyzy, Robert C; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2018-04-01

    Awakening, Breathing Coordination, Delirium, and Early Mobility bundle (ABCDE) should involve an interprofessional team, yet no studies describe what team composition supports implementation. We administered a survey at MHA Keystone Center ICU 2015 workshop. We measured team composition by the frequency of nurse, respiratory therapist, physician, physical therapist, nurse practitioner/physician assistant or nursing assistant involvement in 1) spontaneous awakening trials (SATs), 2) spontaneous breathing trials, 3) delirium and 4) early mobility. We assessed ABCDE implementation using a 5-point Likert ("routine part of every patient's care" - "no plans to implement"). We used ordinal logistic regression to examine team composition and ABCDE implementation, adjusting for confounders and clustering. From 293 surveys (75% response rate), we found that frequent nurse [OR 6.1 (1.1-34.9)] and physician involvement [OR 4.2 (1.3-13.4)] in SATs, nurse [OR 4.7 (1.6-13.4)] and nursing assistant's involvement [OR 3.9 (1.2-13.5)] in delirium and nurse [OR 2.8 (1.2-6.7)], physician [OR (3.6 (1.2-10.3)], and nursing assistants' involvement [OR 2.3 (1.1-4.8)] in early mobility were significantly associated with higher odds of routine ABCDE implementation. ABCDE implementation was associated with frequent involvement of team members, suggesting a need for role articulation and coordination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Model of the Human Eye Based on ABCD Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, G. Díaz; Castillo, M. David Iturbe

    2008-04-01

    At the moment several models of the human eye exist, nevertheless the gradient index models of the human lens (crystalline) have received little attention in optometry and vision sciences, although they consider how the refractive index and the refracting power can change with the accommodation. On the other hand, in study fields like ophthalmology and optometry, exist cases where there is a lack of information about the factors that influence the change of refractive power and therefore the focal length of the eye. By such reason, in this paper we present a model of the human eye based on the ABCD matrix in order to describe the propagation of light rays, that can be understood by professional people in optics, ophthalmology and optometry, and the dispersions of the different ocular mediums are taken into account,. The aim of the model is to obtain data about the refractive power of the eye under different considerations, such as: changes in wavelength, radius of curvature and thicknesses of the ocular mediums. We present results of simulations in Matlab of our model, assuming that the object is punctual and is placed to a certain distance of the eye, and considering at the beginning to the crystalline like a medium with fixed refractive index, and after like a gradient lens. By means of graphs, we show the total refractive power of the eye and its form and type of dependence with respect to variations in radius of curvature and thicknesses of the cornea and crystalline, as well as variations in the thickness of the previous and later cameras.

  5. An analog RF gap voltage regulation system for the Advanced Photon Source storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.

    1999-04-13

    An analog rf gap voltage regulation system has been designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory to maintain constant total storage ring rf gap voltage, independent of beam loading and cavity tuning effects. The design uses feedback control of the klystron mod-anode voltage to vary the amount of rf power fed to the storage ring cavities. The system consists of two independent feedback loops, each regulating the combined rf gap voltages of eight storage ring cavities by varying the output power of either one or two rf stations, depending on the mode of operation. It provides full operator control andmore » permissive logic to permit feedback control of the rf system output power only if proper conditions are met. The feedback system uses envelope-detected cavity field probe outputs as the feedback signal. Two different methods of combining the individual field probe signals were used to generate a relative DC level representing one-half of the total storage ring rf voltage, an envelope-detected vector sum of the field probe rf signals, and the DC sum of individual field probe envelope detector outputs. The merits of both methods are discussed. The klystron high-voltage power supply (HVPS) units are fitted with an analog interface for external control of the mod-anode voltage level, using a four-quadrant analog multiplier to modulate the HVPS mod-anode voltage regulator set-point in response to feedback system commands.« less

  6. Embedding the dynamics of a single delay system into a feed-forward ring.

    PubMed

    Klinshov, Vladimir; Shchapin, Dmitry; Yanchuk, Serhiy; Wolfrum, Matthias; D'Huys, Otti; Nekorkin, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the relation between the dynamics of a single oscillator with delayed self-feedback and a feed-forward ring of such oscillators, where each unit is coupled to its next neighbor in the same way as in the self-feedback case. We show that periodic solutions of the delayed oscillator give rise to families of rotating waves with different wave numbers in the corresponding ring. In particular, if for the single oscillator the periodic solution is resonant to the delay, it can be embedded into a ring with instantaneous couplings. We discover several cases where the stability of a periodic solution for the single unit can be related to the stability of the corresponding rotating wave in the ring. As a specific example, we demonstrate how the complex bifurcation scenario of simultaneously emerging multijittering solutions can be transferred from a single oscillator with delayed pulse feedback to multijittering rotating waves in a sufficiently large ring of oscillators with instantaneous pulse coupling. Finally, we present an experimental realization of this dynamical phenomenon in a system of coupled electronic circuits of FitzHugh-Nagumo type.

  7. Tunable optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in graphene-ring resonators system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghua; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Zengxing; Zheng, Hua; Zhang, Wendong; Yan, Shubin

    2016-12-12

    The analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in optical ways has shown great potential in optical delay and quantum-information technology due to its flexible design and easy implementation. The chief drawback for these devices is the bad tunability. Here we demonstrate a tunable optical transparency system formed by graphene-silicon microrings which could control the transparent window by electro-optical means. The device consists of cascaded coupled ring resonators and a graphene/graphene capacitor which integrated on one of the rings. By tuning the Fermi level of the graphene sheets, we can modulate the round-trip ring loss so that the transparency window can be dynamically tuned. The results provide a new method for the manipulation and transmission of light in highly integrated optical circuits and quantum information storage devices.

  8. Tunable optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in graphene-ring resonators system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonghua; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Zengxing; Zheng, Hua; Zhang, Wendong; Yan, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    The analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in optical ways has shown great potential in optical delay and quantum-information technology due to its flexible design and easy implementation. The chief drawback for these devices is the bad tunability. Here we demonstrate a tunable optical transparency system formed by graphene-silicon microrings which could control the transparent window by electro-optical means. The device consists of cascaded coupled ring resonators and a graphene/graphene capacitor which integrated on one of the rings. By tuning the Fermi level of the graphene sheets, we can modulate the round-trip ring loss so that the transparency window can be dynamically tuned. The results provide a new method for the manipulation and transmission of light in highly integrated optical circuits and quantum information storage devices. PMID:27941895

  9. Developments in Geometric Metadata and Tools at the PDS Ring-Moon Systems Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, M. R.; Ballard, L.; French, R. S.; Gordon, M. K.; Tiscareno, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    Object-Oriented Python/SPICE (OOPS) is an overlay on the SPICE toolkit that vastly simplifies and speeds up geometry calculations for planetary data products. This toolkit is the basis for much of the development at the PDS Ring-Moon Systems Node.

  10. Characterization and reactions of a Salix extractive with a unique ring system

    Treesearch

    Lawrence Landucci; Sally Ralph; Kolby Hirth

    2003-01-01

    An extractive compound with a novel ring system was isolated from the wood of Salix alba and was given the name Salucci. The compound was primarily identified from the 1D NMR, 2D NMR and LC-MSMS data and the structure investigated through reactions and derivatizations.

  11. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene.

    PubMed

    Verheij, Joke B G M; Kunze, Jürgen; Osinga, Jan; van Essen, Anthonie J; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2002-03-15

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural deafness; hypopigmentation of skin, hair, and irides; and HSCR. Therefore, we screened DNA of the index patient of the ABCD syndrome family for mutations in the endothelin B receptor (EDNRB) gene, a gene known to be involved in Shah-Waardenburg syndrome. A homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 3 (R201X) of the EDNRB gene was found. We therefore suggest that ABCD syndrome is not a separate entity, but an expression of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome.

  12. A mathematical analysis of the ABCD criteria for diagnosing malignant melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunju; Kwon, Kiwoon

    2017-03-01

    The medical community currently employs the ABCD (asymmetry, border irregularity, color variegation, and diameter of the lesion) criteria in the early diagnosis of a malignant melanoma. Although many image segmentation and classification methods are used to analyze the ABCD criteria, it is rare to see a study containing mathematical justification of the parameters that are used to quantify the ABCD criteria. In this paper, we suggest new parameters to assess asymmetry, border irregularity, and color variegation, and explain the mathematical meaning of the parameters. The suggested parameters are then tested with 24 skin samples. The parameters suggested for the 24 skin samples are displayed in three-dimensional coordinates and are compared to those presented in other studies (Ercal et al 1994 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 41 837-45, Cheerla and Frazier 2014 Int. J. Innovative Res. Sci., Eng. Technol. 3 9164-83) in terms of Pearson correlation coefficient and classification accuracy in determining the malignancy of the lesions.

  13. Photometric and spectroscopic evidence for a dense ring system around Centaur Chariklo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Sicardy, B.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Morales, N.; Colazo, C.; Fernández-Valenzuela, E.; Braga-Ribas, F.

    2014-08-01

    Context. A stellar occultation observed on 3rd June 2013 revealed the presence of two dense and narrow rings separated by a small gap around the Centaur object (10 199) Chariklo. The composition of these rings is not known. We suspect that water ice is present in the rings, as is the case for Saturn and other rings around the giant planets. Aims: In this work, we aim to determine if the variability in the absolute magnitude of Chariklo and the temporal variation of the spectral ice feature, even when it disappeared in 2007, can be explained by an icy ring system whose aspect angle changes with time. Methods: We explained the variations on the absolute magnitude of Chariklo and its ring by modeling the light reflected by a system as the one described above. Using X-shooter at VLT, we obtained a new reflectance spectra. We compared this new set of data with the ones available in the literature. We showed how the water ice feature is visible in 2013 in accordance with the ring configuration, which had an opening angle of nearly 34° in 2013. Finally, we also used models of light scattering to fit the visible and near-infrared spectra that shows different characteristics to obtain information on the composition of Chariklo and its rings. Results: We showed that absolute photometry of Chariklo from the literature and new photometric data that we obtained in 2013 can be explained by a ring of particles whose opening angle changes as a function of time. We used the two possible pole solutions for the ring system and found that only one of them, α = 151.30 ± 0.5, δ = 41.48 ± 0.2° (λ = 137.9 ± 0.5, β = 27.7 ± 0.2°), provides the right variation of the aspect angle with time to explain the photometry, whereas the other possible pole solution fails to explain the photometry. From spectral modeling, we derived the composition of the Chariklo surface and that of the rings using the result on the pole solution. Chariklo surface is composed with about 60% of amorphous

  14. High ABCD2 Scores and In-Hospital Interventions following Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, Shawna; Regan, Elizabeth; Lee, Vivien H.; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Following transient ischemic attack (TIA), there is increased risk for ischemic stroke. The American Heart Association recommends admission of patients with ABCD2 scores ≥3 for observation, rapid performance of diagnostic tests, and potential acute intervention. We aimed to determine if there is a relationship between ABCD2 scores, in-hospital ischemic events, and in-hospital treatments after TIA admission. Methods We reviewed consecutive patients admitted between 2006 and 2011 following a TIA, defined as transient focal neurological symptoms attributed to a specific vascular distribution and lasting <24 h. Three interventions were prespecified: anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, carotid or intracranial revascularization, and intravenous or intra-arterial reperfusion therapies. We compared rates of in-hospital recurrent TIA or ischemic stroke and the receipt of interventions among patients with low (<3) versus high (≥3) ABCD2 scores. Results Of 249 patients, 11 patients (4.4%) had recurrent TIAs or strokes during their stay (8 TIAs, 3 strokes). All 11 had ABCD2 scores ≥3, and no neurological events occurred in patients with lower scores (5.1 vs. 0%; p = 0.37). Twelve patients (4.8%) underwent revascularization for large artery stenosis, 16 (6.4%) were started on anticoagulants, and no patient received intravenous or intra-arterial reperfusion therapy. The ABCD2 score was not associated with anticoagulation (p = 0.59) or revascularization (p = 0.20). Conclusions Higher ABCD2 scores may predict early ischemic events after TIA but do not predict the need for intervention. Outpatient evaluation for those with scores <3 would potentially have delayed revascularization or anticoagulant treatment in nearly one-fifth of ‘low-risk’ patients. PMID:27721312

  15. Ring King

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-18

    Saturn reigns supreme, encircled by its retinue of rings. Although all four giant planets have ring systems, Saturn's is by far the most massive and impressive. Scientists are trying to understand why by studying how the rings have formed and how they have evolved over time. Also seen in this image is Saturn's famous north polar vortex and hexagon. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 37 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on May 4, 2014 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 2 million miles (3 million kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is 110 miles (180 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18278

  16. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.

    2001-11-01

    A revolution in the studies in planetary rings studies occurred in the period 1977--1981, with the serendipitous discovery of the narrow, dark rings of Uranus, the first Voyager images of the tenuous jovian ring system, and the many spectacular images returned during the twin Voyager flybys of Saturn. In subsequent years, ground-based stellar occultations, HST observations, and the Voyager flybys of Uranus (1986) and Neptune (1989), as well as a handful of Galileo images, provided much additional information. Along with the completely unsuspected wealth of detail these observations revealed came an unwelcome problem: are the rings ancient or are we privileged to live at a special time in history? The answer to this still-vexing question may lie in the complex gravitational interactions recent studies have revealed between the rings and their retinues of attendant satellites. Among the four known ring systems, we see elegant examples of Lindblad and corotation resonances (first invoked in the context of galactic disks), electromagnetic resonances, spiral density waves and bending waves, narrow ringlets which exhibit internal modes due to collective instabilities, sharp-edged gaps maintained via tidal torques from embedded moonlets, and tenuous dust belts created by meteoroid impact onto parent bodies. Perhaps most puzzling is Saturn's multi-stranded, clumpy F ring, which continues to defy a simple explanation 20 years after it was first glimpsed in grainy images taken by Pioneer 11. Voyager and HST images reveal a complex, probably chaotic, dynamical interaction between unseen parent bodies within this ring and its two shepherd satellites, Pandora and Prometheus. The work described here reflects contributions by Joe Burns, Jeff Cuzzi, Luke Dones, Dick French, Peter Goldreich, Colleen McGhee, Carolyn Porco, Mark Showalter, and Bruno Sicardy, as well as those of the author. This research has been supported by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics program and the

  17. An innovative seismic bracing system based on a superelastic shape memory alloy ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nan; Jeon, Jong-Su; Hodgson, Darel E.; DesRoches, Reginald

    2016-05-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have great potential in seismic applications because of their remarkable superelasticity. Seismic bracing systems based on SMAs can mitigate the damage caused by earthquakes. The current study investigates a bracing system based on an SMA ring which is capable of both re-centering and energy dissipation. This lateral force resisting system is a cross-braced system consisting of an SMA ring and four tension-only cable assemblies, which can be applied to both new construction and seismic retrofit. The performance of this bracing system is examined through a quasi-static cyclic loading test and finite element (FE) analysis. This paper describes the experimental design in detail, discusses the experimental results, compares the performance with other bracing systems based on SMAs, and presents an Abaqus FE model calibrated on the basis of experimental results to simulate the superelastic behavior of the SMA ring. The experimental results indicate that the seismic performance of this system is promising in terms of damping and re-centering. The FE model can be used in the simulation of building structures using the proposed bracing system.

  18. Impact of fiber ring laser configuration on detection capabilities in FBG based sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuch, Tomasz; Kossek, Tomasz; Markowski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    In this paper fiber ring lasers (FRL) as interrogation units for distributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensor networks are studied. In particular, two configurations of the fiber laser with erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) as gain medium were analyzed. In the case of EDFA-based fiber interrogation systems, CW as well as active-mode locking operation were taken into account. The influence of spectral overlapping of FBGs spectra on detection capabilities of examined FRLs are presented. Experimental results show that the SOA-based fiber laser interrogation unit can operate as a multi-parametric sensing system. In turn, using an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser with an EDFA, an electronically switchable FBG based sensing system can be realized.

  19. A new systematic calibration method of ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guo; Gao, Chunfeng; Wang, Qi; Wang, Qun; Xiong, Zhenyu; Long, Xingwu

    2016-10-01

    Inertial navigation system has been the core component of both military and civil navigation systems. Before the INS is put into application, it is supposed to be calibrated in the laboratory in order to compensate repeatability error caused by manufacturing. Discrete calibration method cannot fulfill requirements of high-accurate calibration of the mechanically dithered ring laser gyroscope navigation system with shock absorbers. This paper has analyzed theories of error inspiration and separation in detail and presented a new systematic calibration method for ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system. Error models and equations of calibrated Inertial Measurement Unit are given. Then proper rotation arrangement orders are depicted in order to establish the linear relationships between the change of velocity errors and calibrated parameter errors. Experiments have been set up to compare the systematic errors calculated by filtering calibration result with those obtained by discrete calibration result. The largest position error and velocity error of filtering calibration result are only 0.18 miles and 0.26m/s compared with 2 miles and 1.46m/s of discrete calibration result. These results have validated the new systematic calibration method and proved its importance for optimal design and accuracy improvement of calibration of mechanically dithered ring laser gyroscope inertial navigation system.

  20. Saturn Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-12

    Like Earth, Saturn has an invisible ring of energetic ions trapped in its magnetic field. This feature is known as a "ring current." This ring current has been imaged with a special camera on Cassini sensitive to energetic neutral atoms. This is a false color map of the intensity of the energetic neutral atoms emitted from the ring current through a processed called charged exchange. In this process a trapped energetic ion steals and electron from cold gas atoms and becomes neutral and escapes the magnetic field. The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument's ion and neutral camera records the intensity of the escaping particles, which provides a map of the ring current. In this image, the colors represent the intensity of the neutral emission, which is a reflection of the trapped ions. This "ring" is much farther from Saturn (roughly five times farther) than Saturn's famous icy rings. Red in the image represents the higher intensity of the particles, while blue is less intense. Saturn's ring current had not been mapped before on a global scale, only "snippets" or areas were mapped previously but not in this detail. This instrument allows scientists to produce movies (see PIA10083) that show how this ring changes over time. These movies reveal a dynamic system, which is usually not as uniform as depicted in this image. The ring current is doughnut shaped but in some instances it appears as if someone took a bite out of it. This image was obtained on March 19, 2007, at a latitude of about 54.5 degrees and radial distance 1.5 million kilometres (920,000 miles). Saturn is at the center, and the dotted circles represent the orbits of the moon's Rhea and Titan. The Z axis points parallel to Saturn's spin axis, the X axis points roughly sunward in the sun-spin axis plane, and the Y axis completes the system, pointing roughly toward dusk. The ion and neutral camera's field of view is marked by the white line and accounts for the cut-off of the image on the left. The

  1. Promoting Protective Factors for Young Adolescents: ABCD Parenting Young Adolescents Program Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Kylie; Brennan, Leah; Cann, Warren

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of a program for parents of young adolescents combining behavioral family intervention with acceptance-based strategies. 180 parents were randomly allocated to a 6-session group ABCD Parenting Young Adolescent Program or wait-list condition. Completer analysis indicated parents in the intervention reported…

  2. The HR 4796A Debris System: Discovery of Extensive Exo-ring Dust Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn; Debes, John H.; Grady, Carol A.; Gáspár, Andras; Henning, Thomas; Hines, Dean C.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Perrin, Marshall; Wisniewski, John P.

    2018-02-01

    The optically and IR-bright and starlight-scattering HR 4796A ringlike debris disk is one of the most- (and best-) studied exoplanetary debris systems. The presence of a yet-undetected planet has been inferred (or suggested) from the narrow width and inner/outer truncation radii of its r = 1.″05 (77 au) debris ring. We present new, highly sensitive Hubble Space Telescope (HST) visible-light images of the HR 4796A circumstellar debris system and its environment over a very wide range of stellocentric angles from 0.″32 (23 au) to ≈15″ (1100 au). These very high-contrast images were obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using six-roll PSF template–subtracted coronagraphy suppressing the primary light of HR 4796A, with three image-plane occulters, and simultaneously subtracting the background light from its close angular proximity M2.5V companion. The resulting images unambiguously reveal the debris ring embedded within a much larger, morphologically complex, and biaxially asymmetric exo-ring scattering structure. These images at visible wavelengths are sensitive to and map the spatial distribution, brightness, and radial surface density of micron-size particles over 5 dex in surface brightness. These particles in the exo-ring environment may be unbound from the system and interacting with the local ISM. Herein, we present a new morphological and photometric view of the larger-than-prior-seen HR 4796A exoplanetary debris system with sensitivity to small particles at stellocentric distances an order of magnitude greater than has previously been observed.

  3. The Dynamical History of 2060 Chiron and Its Proposed Ring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Jeremy; Horner, Jonti; Hinse, Tobias C.; Marsden, Stephen C.

    2018-01-01

    The surprising discovery of a ring system around the Centaur 10199 Chariklo in 2013 led to a reanalysis of archival stellar occultation data for the Centaur 2060 Chiron by Ortiz et al. One possible interpretation of that data is that a system of rings exists around Chiron. In this work, we study the dynamical history of the proposed Chiron ring system by integrating nearly 36,000 clones of the Centaur backward in time for 100 Myr under the influence of the Sun and the four giant planets. The severity of all close encounters between the clones and planets while the clones are in the Centaur region is recorded, along with the mean time between close encounters. We find that severe and extreme close encounters are very rare, making it possible that the Chiron ring system has remained intact since its injection into the Centaur region, which we find likely occurred within the past 8.5 Myr. Our simulations yield a backward dynamical half-life for Chiron of 0.7 Myr. The dynamical classes of a sample of clones are found. It is found that, on average, the Centaur lifetimes of resonance hopping clones are twice those of random-walk clones because of resonance sticking in mean motion resonances. In addition, we present MEGNO and chaotic lifetime maps of the region bound by 13 au ≤slant a≤slant 14 au and e≤slant 0.5. We confirm that the current mean orbital parameters of Chiron are located in a highly chaotic region of a - e phase space.

  4. Detection of Lyman-alpha emission from the Saturnian disk and from the ring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, H.; Vitz, R. C.; Moos, H. W.

    1977-01-01

    A rocket-borne spectrograph detected H I Lyman-alpha emission from the disk of Saturn and from the vicinity of the planet. The signal is consistent with an emission brightness of 700 rayleighs for the disk and 200 rayleighs for the vicinity of Saturn. The emission from the vicinity of the planet may be due to a hydrogen atmosphere associated with the Saturnian ring system.

  5. An Ionosphere/Magnetosphere Coupling Current System Located in the Gap Between Saturn and its Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, K. K.; Dougherty, M. K.; Cao, H.; Hunt, G. J.; Provan, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Grand Finale Orbits of the Cassini spacecraft traversed through Saturn's D ring and brought the spacecraft to within 3000 km of Saturn's cloud tops. The closest approaches (CA) were near the equatorial plane of Saturn and were distributed narrowly around the local noon. The difference field (observations - internal field - magnetospheric ring current field) obtained from the Grand Finale orbits show persistent residual fields centered around the CA which diminish at higher latitudes on field lines that connect to the ring. Modeling of this perturbation in terms of internal harmonics shows that the perturbation is not of internal origin but is produced by external currents that couple the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. The sense of the current system suggests that the southern feet of the field lines in the ionosphere lead their northern footprints. We show that the observed field perturbations are consistent with a meridional Pedersen current whose strength is 1 MA/radian, i.e. comparable in strength to the Planetary-period-oscillation related current systems observed in the auroral zone. We show that the implied Lorentz force in the ionosphere extracts momentum from the faster moving southern ionosphere and passes it on to the northern ionosphere. We discuss several ideas for generating this current system. In particular, we highlight a mechanism that involves shears in the neutral winds in the thermospheric region to generate the observed magnetic field.

  6. A search for minor bodies in the Jovian tenuous ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinnikova Bang, A.; Joergensen, J. L.; Connerney, J. E.; Benn, M.; Denver, T.; Oliversen, R. J.; Lawton, P.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetometer experiment on the Juno spacecraft, is equipped with four fully autonomous star trackers, which apart from delivering highly accurate attitude information for the magnetometer sensors, and the inherent imaging capabilities of a low light camera system, also can detect and track luminous objects that exhibit an apparent motion rate relative to the background. The Juno magnetometer star trackers are pointed 13deg of the spacecraft anti-spin vector, each having a field of view of 13 by 18 degrees and operated at 4Hz. As the spacecraft spin, each camera will cover an annulus shaped disk with an inner radius of 7.5 degrees, and an outer radius of 20.5deg. When in science orbit, the Juno trajectory near peri-jove, will result in the anti-spin vector scanning across the tenuous rings. The combination of this scanning motion with the rotation of the camera field of view results in a near perfect opportunity to detect and track minor bodies in the inner part of the rings. The operations of this mode, is first tested in flight during the Juno Earth Flyby 9th October 2013, where the Moon is used as a known target. We present a few results of this test, and based on scale laws we will discuss the systems capability of detecting minor bodies in the Jovian ring system in terms of distance, velocity, albedo and range. Also, because the magnetometer star trackers are offset from the spin axis, the distance to a detected object can be derived by simple triangulation of the apparent direction as observed before, under and after passage under the rings. We discuss how this technique may be used to determine the orbit, size and albedo, of minor bodies thus detected and tracked.

  7. Conditioning of the vacuum system of the TPS storage ring without baking in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. K.; Chang, C. C.; Shueh, C.; Yang, I. C.; Wu, L. H.; Chen, B. Y.; Cheng, C. M.; Huang, Y. T.; Chuang, J. Y.; Cheng, Y. T.; Hsiao, Y. M.; Sheng, Albert

    2017-04-01

    To shorten the machine downtime, a maintenance procedure without baking in situ has been developed and applied to maintain and to upgrade the vacuum system of the TPS storage ring. The data of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) reveal no obvious discrepancy between baking and not baking the vacuum system in situ. A beam-conditioning dose of extent only 11.8 A h is required to recover quickly the dynamic pressure of an unbaked vacuum system to its pre-intervention value according to the TPS maintenance experience.

  8. Stable optical soliton in the ring-cavity fiber system with carbon nanotube as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bang-Qing; Ma, Yu-Lan; Yang, Tie-Mei

    2018-01-01

    Main attention focuses on the theoretical study of the ring-cavity fiber laser system with carbon nanotubes (CNT) as saturable absorber (SA). The system is modelled as a non-standard Schrödinger equation with the coefficients blended real and imaginary numbers. New stable exact soliton solution is constructed by the bilinear transformation method for the system. The influences of the key parameters related to CNTs and SA on the optical pulse soliton are discussed in simulation. The soliton amplitude and phase can be tuned by choosing suitable parameters.

  9. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  10. James Webb Space Telescope Observations of Stellar Occultations by Solar System Bodies and Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; French, R. G.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Stansberry, J.; Lin, Z-Y.; Zhang, Z-W.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, Th.; Ortiz, J. L.; Braga-Ribas, F.; hide

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of Solar System bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun–Earth Lagrange point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a byproduct of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.

  11. Regulation of Split Linear Systems Over Rings: Coefficient-Assignment and Observers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-22

    we give for the first time , a method to obtain an observer for a finite -free strongly observable The K-linear map irQ is defined as system 5" ( F. G...NAME a ADORESS~if dif!ttrent from Controlling Office) IS1 SECURITY CLASS . (of this report) SIS.. DE CL ASSI ’I CATION/ODOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 16...Entered) IEEE rRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL . VOL. Ac-27 . No. 1. FEaRUAay 1982 Regutlation of Split Linear Systems Over Rings: Coefficient

  12. The terminal Eocene event - Formation of a ring system around the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that the formation of a ring system about the earth by particles and debris related to the North American strewn tektite field is responsible for the terminal Eocene event of 34 million years ago, in which severe climatic changes accompanied by widespread biological extinctions occurred. Botanical data is cited which implies a 20-C decrease in winter temperature with no change in summer temperature, and evidence of the correlation of the North American tektite fall, which is estimated to have a total mass of 10 to the 9th to 10 to the 10th tons, with the disappearance of five of the most abundant species of radiolaria is presented. The possible connection between the tektites and climatic change is argued to result from the screening of sunlight by an equatorial ring of trapped particles of extraterrestrial origin in geocentric orbit which would cut off sunlight only in the winter months. Such a ring, located at a distance of between 1.5 and 2.5 earth radii (the Roche limit) is estimated to have a lifetime of a few million years.

  13. Digital Low Level RF Systems for Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, B.; Barnes, B.; Meisner, K.

    1997-05-01

    At Fermilab, a new Low Level RF system is successfully installed and operating in the Main Ring. Installation is proceeding for a Tevatron system. This upgrade replaces aging CAMAC/NIM components for an increase in accuracy, reliability, and flexibility. These VXI systems are based on a custom three channel direct digital synthesizer(DDS) module. Each synthesizer channel is capable of independent or ganged operation for both frequency and phase modulation. New frequency and phase values are computed at a 100kHz rate on the module's Analog Devices ADSP21062 (SHARC) digital signal processor. The DSP concurrently handles feedforward, feedback, and beam manipulations. Higher level state machines and the control system interface are handled at the crate level using the VxWorks operating system. This paper discusses the hardware, software and operational aspects of these LLRF systems.

  14. ALMA unveils rings and gaps in the protoplanetary system HD 169142: signatures of two giant protoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, D.; Carney, M.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Walsh, C.; Miotello, A.; Klaassen, P.; Bruderer, S.; Henning, Th.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2017-04-01

    The protoplanetary system HD 169142 is one of the few cases where a potential candidate protoplanet has recently been detected by direct imaging in the near-infrared. To study the interaction between the protoplanet and the disk itself, observations of the gas and dust surface density structure are needed. This paper reports new ALMA observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm, 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 2-1 emission from the system HD 169142 (which is observed almost face-on) at an angular resolution of 0.3 arcsec × 0.2 arcsec ( 35 × 20 au). The dust continuum emission reveals a double-ring structure with an inner ring between 0.17 arcsec{-0.28 arcsec} ( 20-35 au) and an outer ring between 0.48 arcsec{-0.64 arcsec} ( 56-83 au). The size and position of the inner ring is in good agreement with previous polarimetric observations in the near-infrared and is consistent with dust trapping by a massive planet. No dust emission is detected inside the inner dust cavity (R ≲ 20 au) or within the dust gap ( 35-56 au) down to the noise level. In contrast, the channel maps of the J = 2-1 line of the three CO isotopologs reveal gas inside the dust cavity and dust gap. The gaseous disk is also much larger than the compact dust emission; it extends to 1.5 arcsec ( 180 au) in radius. This difference and the sharp drop of the continuum emission at large radii point to radial drift of large dust grains (>μm size). Using the thermo-chemical disk code dali, we modeled the continuum and the CO isotopolog emission to quantitatively measure the gas and dust surface densities. The resulting gas surface density is reduced by a factor of 30-40 inward of the dust gap. The gas and dust distribution indicate that two giant planets shape the disk structure through dynamical clearing (dust cavity and gap) and dust trapping (double-ring dust distribution).

  15. Functional, Anatomical, and Molecular Investigation of the Cardiac Conduction System and Arrhythmogenic Atrioventricular Ring Tissue in the Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Andrew J.; Logantha, Sunil Jit R. J.; Hao, Guoliang; Yanni, Joseph; Fedorenko, Olga; Sinha, Aditi; Gilbert, Stephen H.; Benson, Alan P.; Buckley, David L.; Anderson, Robert H.; Boyett, Mark R.; Dobrzynski, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Background The cardiac conduction system consists of the sinus node, nodal extensions, atrioventricular (AV) node, penetrating bundle, bundle branches, and Purkinje fibers. Node‐like AV ring tissue also exists at the AV junctions, and the right and left rings unite at the retroaortic node. The study aims were to (1) construct a 3‐dimensional anatomical model of the AV rings and retroaortic node, (2) map electrical activation in the right ring and study its action potential characteristics, and (3) examine gene expression in the right ring and retroaortic node. Methods and Results Three‐dimensional reconstruction (based on magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and immunohistochemistry) showed the extent and organization of the specialized tissues (eg, how the AV rings form the right and left nodal extensions into the AV node). Multiextracellular electrode array and microelectrode mapping of isolated right ring preparations revealed robust spontaneous activity with characteristic diastolic depolarization. Using laser microdissection gene expression measured at the mRNA level (using quantitative PCR) and protein level (using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting) showed that the right ring and retroaortic node, like the sinus node and AV node but, unlike ventricular muscle, had statistically significant higher expression of key transcription factors (including Tbx3, Msx2, and Id2) and ion channels (including HCN4, Cav3.1, Cav3.2, Kv1.5, SK1, Kir3.1, and Kir3.4) and lower expression of other key ion channels (Nav1.5 and Kir2.1). Conclusions The AV rings and retroaortic node possess gene expression profiles similar to that of the AV node. Ion channel expression and electrophysiological recordings show the AV rings could act as ectopic pacemakers and a source of atrial tachycardia. PMID:24356527

  16. New beam-position monitor system for upgraded Photon Factory storage ring.

    PubMed

    Haga, K; Honda, T; Tadano, M; Obina, T; Kasuga, T

    1998-05-01

    Accompanying the brilliance-upgrading project at the Photon Factory storage ring, the beam-position monitor (BPM) system has been renovated. The new system was designed to enable precise and fast measurements to correct the closed-orbit distortion (COD), as well as to feed back the orbit position during user runs. There are 42 BPMs newly installed, amounting to a total of 65 BPMs. All of the BPMs are calibrated on the test bench using a coaxially strung metallic wire. The measured electrical offsets are typically 200 micro m in both directions, which is 1/2-1/3 of those of the old-type BPMs. In the signal-processing system, PIN diode switches are employed in order to improve reliability. In the fastest mode, this system is capable of measuring COD within about 10 ms; this fast acquisition will allow fast suppression of the beam movement for frequencies up to 50 Hz using a global feedback system.

  17. LOCATING THE TRAILING EDGE OF THE CIRCUMBINARY RING IN THE KH 15D SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Capelo, Holly L.; Herbst, William; Leggett, S. K.

    2012-09-20

    Following two years of complete occultation of both stars in the binary T Tauri star KH 15D by its opaque circumbinary ring, KH 15D has abruptly brightened again during apastron phases, reaching I = 15 mag. Here, we show that the brightening is accompanied by a change in spectral class from K6/K7 (the spectral class of star A) to {approx}K1, and a bluing of the system in V - I by about 0.3 mag. A radial velocity measurement confirms that, at apastron, we are now seeing direct light from star B, which is more luminous and of earlier spectral classmore » than star A. Evidently, the trailing edge of the occulting screen has just become tangent to one anse of star B's projected orbit. This confirms a prediction of the precession models, supports the view that the tilted ring is self-gravitating, and ushers in a new era of the system's evolution that should be accompanied by the same kind of dramatic phenomena observed from 1995 to 2009. It also promotes KH 15D from a single-lined to a double-lined eclipsing binary, greatly enhancing its value for testing pre-main-sequence models. The results of our study strengthen the case for truncation of the outer ring at around 4 AU by a sub-stellar object such as an extremely young giant planet. The system is currently at an optimal configuration for detecting the putative planet and we urge expedient follow-up observations.« less

  18. Optical Properties of a Quantum Dot-Ring System Grown Using Droplet Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Linares-García, Gabriel; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Stinaff, Eric; Alsolamy, S M; Ware, M E; Mazur, Y I; Wang, Z M; Lee, Jihoon; Salamo, G J

    2016-12-01

    Electronic and optical properties of InAs/GaAs nanostructures grown by the droplet epitaxy method are studied. Carrier states were determined by k · p theory including effects of strain and In gradient concentration for a model geometry. Wavefunctions are highly localized in the dots. Coulomb and exchange interactions are studied and we found the system is in the strong confinement regime. Microphotoluminescence spectra and lifetimes were calculated and compared with measurements performed on a set of quantum rings in a single sample. Some features of spectra are in good agreement.

  19. A wavelength scannable XeCl oscillator-ring amplifier laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacala, T. J.; Mcdermid, I. S.; Laudenslager, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A holographic grating at grazing angle of incidence was used to achieve tunable, narrow bandwidth (0.005 nm) operation of a XeCl oscillator for injection locking of a ring amplifier. The amplifier's narrow bandwidth output energy was constant and equal to the untuned, broadband output (approximately 15 mJ) in regions where injection locking was achieved. Scanning was provided by use of a stepping motor-driven differential micrometer on the tuning mirror. This system was used to produce a laser excitation spectrum of hydroxyl radicals (OH) in a flame.

  20. Marginal Accuracy of Castings Fabricated with Ringless Casting Investment System and Metal Ring Casting Investment System: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kalavathi, M; Sachin, Bhuvana; Prasanna, B G; Shreeharsha, T V; Praveen, B; Ragher, Mallikarjuna

    2016-02-01

    The thermal expansion of the investment can be restricted by the metal casting ring because the thermal expansion of the ring is less than that of the investment. The ringless casting procedure is in use in clinical dentistry, though there is little scientific data to support its use in fixed partial dentures. In this study, marginal discrepancy of castings produced with the ringless casting technique and the conventional technique using the metal rings were compared. A total of 30 wax patterns were fabricated directly on a metal die. Optical stereomicroscope was used to measure the marginal discrepancy between the metal die and wax patterns. A total of 15 castings were invested using Bellavest T phosphate-bonded investment with the ringless technique and 15 were invested with the same investment with a metal ring; 30 castings were produced using a nickel-chromium ceramo-metal alloy. The internal surface of the castings was not modified and seated with finger pressure. The vertical marginal discrepancy was measured using an optical stereomicroscope at a magnification of 100x. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using students t-test (paired t-test and unpaired t-test). The castings of the ringless technique provided less vertical marginal discrepancy (240.56 ± 45.81 μ) than the castings produced with the conventional metal ring technique (281.98± 53.05 μ). The difference was statistically significant. The ringless casting technique had produced better marginal accuracy compared with conventional casting technique. Ringless casting system can be used routinely for clinical purpose.

  1. The ABCD matrix for parabolic reflectors and its application to astigmatism free four-mirror cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, K.; Cassou, K.; Martens, A.; Zomer, F.

    2015-10-01

    The ABCD matrix for parabolic reflectors is derived for any incident angles. It is used in numerical studies of four-mirror cavities composed of two flat and two parabolic mirrors. Constraints related to laser beam injection efficiency, optical stability, cavity-mode, beam-waist size and high stacking power are satisfied. A dedicated alignment procedure leading to stigmatic cavity-modes is employed to overcome issues related to the optical alignment of parabolic reflectors.

  2. Introduction to the magnet and vacuum systems of an electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    An accelerator or storage ring complex is a concerted interplay of various functional systems. For the convenience of discussion we can divide it into the following systems: injector, magnet, RF, vacuum, instrumentation and control. In addition, the conventional construction of the building and radiation safety consideration are also needed and finally the beam lines, detector, data acquisition and analysis set-ups for research programs. Dr. L. Teng has given a comprehensive review of the whole complex and the operation of such a facility. I concentrate on the description of magnet and vacuum systems. Only the general function of each system andmore » the basic design concepts will be introduced, no detailed engineering practice will be given which will be best done after a machine design is produced. For further understanding and references a table of bibliography is provided at the end of the paper.« less

  3. POWER SUPPLY CONTROL AND MONITORING FOR THE SNS RING AND TRANSPORT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LAMBIASE,R.; OERTER,B.; PENG,S.

    2001-06-28

    There are approximately 300 magnet power supplies in the SNS accumulator ring and transport lines. Control and monitoring of the these converters will be primarily accomplished with a new Power Supply Interface and Controller (PSI/PSC) system developed for the SNS project. This PSI/PSC system provides all analog and digital commands and status readbacks in one fiber isolated module. With a maximum rate of 10KHz, the PSI/PSC must be supplemented with higher speed systems for the wide bandwidth pulsed injection supplies, and the even wider bandwidth extraction kickers. This paper describes the implementation of this PSI/PSC system, which was developed throughmore » an industry/laboratory collaboration, and the supplementary equipment used to support the wider bandwidth pulsed supplies.« less

  4. Development of photoacoustic imaging system of finger vasculature using ring-shaped ultrasound transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Misaki; Namita, Takeshi; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2018-02-01

    For early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), it is important to visualize its potential marker, vascularization in the synovial membrane of the finger joints. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which can image blood vessels at high contrast and resolution is expected to be a potential modality for earlier diagnosis of RA. In previous studies of PA finger imaging, different acoustic schemes such as linear or arc-shaped arrays have been utilized, but these have limited detection views, rendering inaccurate reconstruction, and most of them require rotational detection. We are developing a photoacoustic system for finger vascular imaging using a ring-shaped array ultrasound transducer. By designing the ring-array based on simulations and phantom experiments, we have created a system that can image multiple objects of different diameters and has the potential to image small objects 0.1-0.5mm in diameter at accurate positions by providing PA and ultrasound echo images simultaneously. In addition, we determined that full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the slice direction corresponded to that of the simulation. In the future, this system may visualize the 3-D vascularization of RA patients' fingers.

  5. From clinical to tissue-based dual TIA: Validation and refinement of ABCD3-I score.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qiliang; Sun, Wen; Xiong, Yunyun; Hankey, Graeme J; Xiao, Lulu; Zhu, Wusheng; Ma, Minmin; Liu, Wenhua; Liu, Dezhi; Cai, Qiankun; Han, Yunfei; Duan, Lihui; Chen, Xiangliang; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2015-04-07

    To investigate whether dual tissue-defined ischemic attacks, defined as multiple diffusion-weighted imaging lesions of different age and/or arterial territory (dual DWI), are an independent and stronger predictor of 90-day stroke than dual clinical TIAs (dual TIA). Consecutive patients with clinically defined TIA were enrolled and assessed clinically and by MRI within 3 days. The predictive ability of the ABCD clinical factors, dual TIA, and dual DWI was evaluated by means of multivariate logistic regression. Among 658 patients who were included in the study and completed 90 days of follow-up, a total of 70 patients (10.6%) experienced subsequent stroke by 90 days. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that dual DWI was an independent predictor for subsequent stroke (odds ratio 4.64, 95% confidence interval 2.15-10.01), while dual TIA was not (odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 0.69-2.01). C statistics was higher when the item of dual TIA in ABCD3-I score was replaced by dual DWI (0.759 vs 0.729, p = 0.035). The net reclassification value for 90-day stroke risk was also improved (continuous net reclassification improvement 0.301, p = 0.017). Dual DWI independently predicted future stroke in patients with TIA. A new ABCD3-I score with dual DWI instead of dual clinical TIA may improve risk stratification for early stroke risk after TIA. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Completion of the LANSCE Proton Storage Ring Control System Upgrade -- A Successful Integration of EPICS Into a Running Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, S. C.; Bjorklund, E. A.; Carr, G. P.; Faucett, J. A.; Oothoudt, M. A.

    1997-05-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) Proton Storage Ring (PSR) control system upgrade was completed in 1996. In previous work, much of a PDP-11-based control system was replaced with Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) controls. Several parts of the old control system which used a VAX for operator displays and direct access to a CAMAC serial highway still remained. The old system was preserved as a "fallback" if the new EPICS-based system had problems. The control system upgrade completion included conversion of several application programs to EPICS-based operator interfaces, moving some data acquisition hardware to EPICS Input-Output Controllers (IOCs), and the implementation of new gateway software to complete the overall control system interoperability. Many operator interface (OPI) screens, written by LANSCE operators, have been incorporated in the new system. The old PSR control system hardware was removed. The robustness and reliability of the new controls obviated the need for a fallback capability.

  7. Molecular structure, interatomic interactions and vibrational analysis of 1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane parent ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britvin, Sergey N.; Rumyantsev, Andrey M.; Zobnina, Anastasia E.; Padkina, Marina V.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular structure of 1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, a parent ring of TAN1251 family of alkaloids, is herein characterized for the first time in comparison with the structure of nortropane (8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane), the parent framework of tropane ring system. The methods of study involve X-ray structural analysis, DFT geometry optimizations with infrared frequency calculations followed by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, and vibrational analysis of infrared spectrum.

  8. The New Horizons and Hubble Space Telescope search for rings, dust, and debris in the Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Tod R.; Throop, Henry B.; Showalter, Mark R.; Weaver, Harold A.; Stern, S. Alan; Spencer, John R.; Buie, Marc W.; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Porter, Simon B.; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Young, Leslie A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ennico, Kimberly; New Horizons Science Team

    2018-02-01

    We conducted an extensive search for dust or debris rings in the Pluto-Charon system before, during, and after the New Horizons encounter in July 2015. Methodologies included attempting to detect features by back-scattered light during the approach to Pluto (phase angle α ∼ 15°), in situ detection of impacting particles, a search for stellar occultations near the time of closest approach, and by forward-scattered light imaging during departure (α ∼ 165°). An extensive search using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) prior to the encounter also contributed to the final ring limits. No rings, debris, or dust features were observed, but our new detection limits provide a substantially improved picture of the environment throughout the Pluto-Charon system. Searches for rings in back-scattered light covered the range 35,000-250,000 km from the system barycenter, a zone that starts interior to the orbit of Styx, the innermost minor satellite, and extends out to four times the orbital radius of Hydra, the outermost known satellite. We obtained our firmest limits using data from the New Horizons LORRI camera in the inner half of this region. Our limits on the normal I/F of an unseen ring depends on the radial scale of the rings: 2 ×10-8 (3σ) for 1500 km wide rings, 1 ×10-8 for 6000 km rings, and 7 ×10-9 for 12,000 km rings. Beyond ∼ 100, 000 km from Pluto, HST observations limit normal I/F to ∼ 8 ×10-8 . Searches for dust features from forward-scattered light extended from the surface of Pluto to the Pluto-Charon Hill sphere (rHill = 6.4 ×106 km). No evidence for rings or dust clouds was detected to normal I/F limits of ∼ 8.9 ×10-7 on ∼ 104 km scales. Four stellar occulation observations also probed the space interior to Hydra, but again no dust or debris was detected. The Student Dust Counter detected one particle impact 3.6 × 106 km from Pluto, but this is consistent with the interplanetary space environment established during the cruise of New

  9. Ring system-based chemical graph generation for de novo molecular design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyao, Tomoyuki; Kaneko, Hiromasa; Funatsu, Kimito

    2016-05-01

    Generating chemical graphs in silico by combining building blocks is important and fundamental in virtual combinatorial chemistry. A premise in this area is that generated structures should be irredundant as well as exhaustive. In this study, we develop structure generation algorithms regarding combining ring systems as well as atom fragments. The proposed algorithms consist of three parts. First, chemical structures are generated through a canonical construction path. During structure generation, ring systems can be treated as reduced graphs having fewer vertices than those in the original ones. Second, diversified structures are generated by a simple rule-based generation algorithm. Third, the number of structures to be generated can be estimated with adequate accuracy without actual exhaustive generation. The proposed algorithms were implemented in structure generator Molgilla. As a practical application, Molgilla generated chemical structures mimicking rosiglitazone in terms of a two dimensional pharmacophore pattern. The strength of the algorithms lies in simplicity and flexibility. Therefore, they may be applied to various computer programs regarding structure generation by combining building blocks.

  10. The trigger system for the external target experiment in the HIRFL cooling storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jin-Xin; Lu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-08-01

    A trigger system was designed for the external target experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Considering that different detectors are scattered over a large area, the trigger system is designed based on a master-slave structure and fiber-based serial data transmission technique. The trigger logic is organized in hierarchies, and flexible reconfiguration of the trigger function is achieved based on command register access or overall field-programmable gate array (FPGA) logic on-line reconfiguration controlled by remote computers. We also conducted tests to confirm the function of the trigger electronics, and the results indicate that this trigger system works well. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079003), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP).

  11. Characterizing exo-ring systems around fast-rotating stars using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Watson, Christopher A.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.

    2017-12-01

    Planetary rings produce a distinct shape distortion in transit light curves. However, to accurately model such light curves the observations need to cover the entire transit, especially ingress and egress, as well as an out-of-transit baseline. Such observations can be challenging for long period planets, where the transits may last for over a day. Planetary rings will also impact the shape of absorption lines in the stellar spectrum, as the planet and rings cover different parts of the rotating star (the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect). These line-profile distortions depend on the size, structure, opacity, obliquity and sky-projected angle of the ring system. For slow-rotating stars, this mainly impacts the amplitude of the induced velocity shift; however, for fast-rotating stars the large velocity gradient across the star allows the line distortion to be resolved, enabling direct determination of the ring parameters. We demonstrate that by modelling these distortions we can recover ring system parameters (sky-projected angle, obliquity and size) using only a small part of the transit. Substructure in the rings, e.g. gaps, can be recovered if the width of the features (δW) relative to the size of the star is similar to the intrinsic velocity resolution (set by the width of the local stellar profile, γ) relative to the stellar rotation velocity (v sini, i.e. δW/R* ≳ vsini/γ). This opens up a new way to study the ring systems around planets with long orbital periods, where observations of the full transit, covering the ingress and egress, are not always feasible.

  12. Vibration characteristics of two-stage planetary transmission system with thin-walled ring gear on elastic supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, JianYing; Hu, QingChun; Zong, ChangFu; Zhu, TianJun; Zhang, ZeXing

    2018-03-01

    A dual-clutch and dual-speed planetary gears mechanism of a hybrid car coupled-system is taken as research subject, in which the ring gear of planet set II is a thin-walled structure and the clutch friction plates of planet set II are used as its elastic supports. Based on the lumped parameter-rigid elastic coupled dynamic model of two-stage planetary transmission system with thin-walled ring gear on elastic supports, the motion differential equations are established and the dynamic responses are solved by the Runge-Kutta method considering each stage internal and external time-varying mesh stiffness. The vibration displacements of each stage ring gear have been affected differently in time-domain, the translational vibration displacement of the ring gear of planet set I are obviously more than the torsional vibration displacement, but it is opposite for the ring gear of planet set II; The translational and torsional vibration responses of each stage ring gear arrive the peak in low-frequency. The analysis results of this paper can enrich the theoretical research of multistage planetary transmission and provide guidance for dynamic design.

  13. A Performance Comparison of Tree and Ring Topologies in Distributed System

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min

    A distributed system is a collection of computers that are connected via a communication network. Distributed systems have become commonplace due to the wide availability of low-cost, high performance computers and network devices. However, the management infrastructure often does not scale well when distributed systems get very large. Some of the considerations in building a distributed system are the choice of the network topology and the method used to construct the distributed system so as to optimize the scalability and reliability of the system, lower the cost of linking nodes together and minimize the message delay in transmission, and simplifymore » system resource management. We have developed a new distributed management system that is able to handle the dynamic increase of system size, detect and recover the unexpected failure of system services, and manage system resources. The topologies used in the system are the tree-structured network and the ring-structured network. This thesis presents the research background, system components, design, implementation, experiment results and the conclusions of our work. The thesis is organized as follows: the research background is presented in chapter 1. Chapter 2 describes the system components, including the different node types and different connection types used in the system. In chapter 3, we describe the message types and message formats in the system. We discuss the system design and implementation in chapter 4. In chapter 5, we present the test environment and results, Finally, we conclude with a summary and describe our future work in chapter 6.« less

  14. Optical Analog to Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Cascaded Ring-Resonator Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghua; Zheng, Hua; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-07-25

    The analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in optical methods has shown great potential in slow light and sensing applications. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a coupled resonator induced transparency system with three cascaded ring coupled resonators in a silicon chip. The structure was modeled by using the transfer matrix method. Influences of various parameters including coupling ratio of couplers, waveguide loss and additional loss of couplers on transmission characteristic and group index have been investigated theoretically and numerically in detail. The transmission character of the system was measured by the vertical grating coupling method. The enhanced quality factor reached 1.22 × 10⁵. In addition, we further test the temperature performance of the device. The results provide a new method for the manipulation of light in highly integrated optical circuits and sensing applications.

  15. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2015-09-01

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well.

  16. Characteristics of plasma ring, surrounding the Earth at geocentric distances ˜7-10RE, and magnetospheric current systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, E. E.; Kirpichev, I. P.; Vovchenko, V. V.; Stepanova, M. V.; Riazantseva, M. O.; Pulinets, M. S.; Ovchinnikov, I. L.; Znatkova, S. S.

    2013-07-01

    There are strong experimental evidences of the existence of plasma domain forming a closed plasma ring around the Earth at geocentric distances ∼7-10RE. In this work, we analyze the main properties of this ring, using the data of the THEMIS satellite mission, acquired between April 2007 and September 2011. We also analyze the contribution of this ring to the storm dynamics. In particular, it is shown that the distribution of plasma pressure at ∼7-10RE is nearly azimuthally symmetric. However, the daytime compression of the magnetic field lines and the shift of the minimal value of the magnetic field to higher latitudes lead to the spreading of the transverse current along field lines and splitting of the daytime integral transverse current into two branches in Z direction. The CRC is the high latitude continuation of the ordinary ring current (RC), generated by plasma pressure gradients, directed to the Earth. We evaluated the contribution of the azimuthally symmetric part of the plasma ring to the Dst index for strong geomagnetic storms using the AMPTE/CCE radial profiles of plasma pressure published before, and showed that the contribution of the ring current including both RC and CRC is sufficient to obtain the observed Dst variation without the necessity to include the tail current system.

  17. Electromagnetic Calculation of Combined Earthing System with Ring Earth Electrode and Vertical Rods for Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Toshiaki; Yasuda, Yoh; Ueda, Toshiaki

    With the worldwide spread of wind turbine installations, various problems such as landscape issues, bird strikes and grid connections have arisen. Protection of wind turbines from lightning is cited as one of the main problems. Wind turbines are often struck by lightning because of their open-air locations, such as in mountainous areas, and their special configuration and very-high construction. Especially, low-voltage and control circuits can fail or suffer burnout while blades can incur serious damage if struck by lightning. Wind turbine failures caused by lightning strikes account for approximately 25% of all failures. The problem is regarded as a global one that needs immediate resolution. It is important to understand the impedance characteristics of wind turbine earthing systems from the viewpoint of lightning protection. A report from IEC TR61400-24 recommends a “ring earth electrode”. This was originally defined in IEC 61024 (currently revised and re-numbered as IEC 62305), where such an electrode is recommended to reduce touch and step voltages in households and buildings. IEC TR61400-24 also recommended additional electrodes of vertical or horizontal rods. However, these concepts have not been fully discussed from the viewpoint of its application to wind turbines. To confirm the effect of a combination of a ring earth electrode and additional vertical rods for protection of a wind turbine, this report uses the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method to present an electromagnetic transient analysis on such a wind turbine earthing system. The results show that an optimal combination can be arranged from viewpoints of lightning protection and construction cost. Thus, this report discusses how to establish a quantitative design methodology of the wind turbine earthing system to provide effective lightning protection.

  18. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  19. New data acquisition system for beam loss monitor used in J-PARC main ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, K.; Toyama, T.; Kamikubota, N.; Yoshida, S.; Matsushita, J.; Wakita, T.; Sugiyama, M.; Morino, T.

    2018-04-01

    A new data acquisition system has been developed continually as a part of the development of a new beam loss monitor (BLM) system for the J-PARC main ring. This development includes a newly designed front-end isolation amp that uses photo-couplers and a VME-based new analog-to-digital converter (ADC) system. Compared to the old amp, the new amp has a 10 times higher conversion impedance for the input current to the output voltage; this value is 1 M Ω. Moreover, the bandwidth was improved to from DC to 50 kHz, which is about two orders of magnitude greater than the previously used bandwidth. The theoretical estimations made in this study roughly agree with the frequency response obtained for the new system. The new ADC system uses an on-board field-programmable gate array chip for signal processing. By replacing the firmware of this chip, changes pertaining to future accelerator upgrade plans may be introduced into the new ADC system; in addition, the ADC system can be used in other applications. The sampling speed of the system is 1 MS/s, and it exhibits a 95 dBc spurious-free dynamic range and 16.5 effective number of bits. The obtained waveform and integrated charge data are compared with two reference levels in the ADC system. If the data exceeds the reference level, the system generates an alarm to dump the beams. By using the new data acquisition system, it was proved that the new BLM system shows a wide dynamic range of 160 dB. In this study, the details of the new data acquisition system are described.

  20. A wireless fatigue monitoring system utilizing a bio-inspired tree ring data tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shi; Li, Xuan; Xie, Zhaohui; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2014-03-05

    Fatigue, a hot scientific research topic for centuries, can trigger sudden failure of critical structures such as aircraft and railway systems, resulting in enormous casualties as well as economic losses. The fatigue life of certain structures is intrinsically random and few monitoring techniques are capable of tracking the full life-cycle fatigue damage. In this paper, a novel in-situ wireless real-time fatigue monitoring system using a bio-inspired tree ring data tracking technique is proposed. The general framework, methodology, and verification of this intelligent system are discussed in details. The rain-flow counting (RFC) method is adopted as the core algorithm which quantifies fatigue damages, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) is introduced as the core module for data collection and analysis. Laboratory test results based on strain gauges and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensors have shown that the developed intelligent system can provide a reliable quick feedback and early warning of fatigue failure. With the merits of low cost, high accuracy and great reliability, the developed wireless fatigue sensing system can be further applied to mechanical engineering, civil infrastructures, transportation systems, aerospace engineering, etc.

  1. A Wireless Fatigue Monitoring System Utilizing a Bio-Inspired Tree Ring Data Tracking Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shi; Li, Xuan; Xie, Zhaohui; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue, a hot scientific research topic for centuries, can trigger sudden failure of critical structures such as aircraft and railway systems, resulting in enormous casualties as well as economic losses. The fatigue life of certain structures is intrinsically random and few monitoring techniques are capable of tracking the full life-cycle fatigue damage. In this paper, a novel in-situ wireless real-time fatigue monitoring system using a bio-inspired tree ring data tracking technique is proposed. The general framework, methodology, and verification of this intelligent system are discussed in details. The rain-flow counting (RFC) method is adopted as the core algorithm which quantifies fatigue damages, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) is introduced as the core module for data collection and analysis. Laboratory test results based on strain gauges and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensors have shown that the developed intelligent system can provide a reliable quick feedback and early warning of fatigue failure. With the merits of low cost, high accuracy and great reliability, the developed wireless fatigue sensing system can be further applied to mechanical engineering, civil infrastructures, transportation systems, aerospace engineering, etc. PMID:24603635

  2. Simulating the Librational Behaviour of Propeller Moons In The Saturnian Ring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Michael; Seiss, Martin; Hoffmann, Holger; Spahn, Frank

    2016-10-01

    The propeller structure Blériot orbiting in the outer A ring of the Saturnian ring system has been one of the tremendous discoveries of the spacecraft Cassini [Tiscareno et al., 2010, ApJL]. The reconstruction of the orbital evolution of Blériot from recurrent observations in the ISS images yielded a systematic offset motion from the expected Keplerian orbit. This offset motion can be well described by three sinusoidal harmonics with amplitudes and periods of 1845, 152, 58 km and 11.1, 3.7 and 2.2 years, respectively [Sremčević et al., 2014, EPSC]. Oscillatory deviations from the Keplerian orbit are a known phenomenon for the Saturnian moons, which can be explained by resonant interactions with other moons [Spitale et al., 2006, AJ] and which look similar to the observation of Blériot.In this work we present our results from N-Body simulations, where we integrated the orbital evolution of a test particle, orbiting at the radial position of the propeller Blériot and 15 other moons of Saturn. Our simulation yield, that gravitational interactions with the larger moons result in reasonable and observable frequencies, but the resulting amplitudes of the librations are by far too small to explain the observations. Further mechanisms are needed, to amplify the amplitudes of the forced librations -- as e.g. by moonlet-ring interactions. Inspired by the recent work of Pan and Chiang [2010, ApJL; 2012, AJ] we introduce an alternative, physically more reasonable model. In our model, the moonlet is allowed to be slightly displaced with respect to its created gaps, resulting in a repulsive force. As a result, the moonlet's longitude starts to oscillate. In the presence of the additional external forcing by the outer moons the libration amplitude gets amplified, if the forcing frequency is close to the eigenfrequency of the system. Applying our model to Blériot, we can indeed reproduce a libration period of 13 years with an amplitude of about 2000 km.

  3. Translocation of the ABC transporter ABCD4 from the endoplasmic reticulum to lysosomes requires the escort protein LMBD1.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Okamoto, Takumi; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2016-07-26

    We previously demonstrated that ABCD4 does not localize to peroxisomes but rather, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), because it lacks the NH2-terminal hydrophilic region required for peroxisomal targeting. It was recently reported that mutations in ABCD4 result in a failure to release vitamin B12 from lysosomes. A similar phenotype is caused by mutations in LMBRD1, which encodes the lysosomal membrane protein LMBD1. These findings suggested to us that ABCD4 translocated from the ER to lysosomes in association with LMBD1. In this report, it is demonstrated that ABCD4 interacts with LMBD1 and then localizes to lysosomes, and this translocation depends on the lysosomal targeting ability of LMBD1. Furthermore, endogenous ABCD4 was localized to both lysosomes and the ER, and its lysosomal localization was disturbed by knockout of LMBRD1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the subcellular localization of the ABC transporter is determined by its association with an adaptor protein.

  4. Research and Development on the Storage Ring Vacuum System for the APS Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Stillwell, B.; Brajuskovic, B.; Carter, J.

    A number of research and development activities are underway at Argonne National Laboratory to build confidence in the designs for the storage ring vacuum system required for the Advanced Photon Source Up-grade project (APS-U) [1]. The predominant technical risks are: excessive residual gas pressures during operation; insufficient beam position monitor stability; excessive beam impedance; excessive heating by induced electrical surface currents; and insufficient operational reliability. Present efforts to mitigate these risks include: building and evaluating mockup assemblies; performing mechanical testing of chamber weld joints; developing computational tools; investigating design alternatives; and performing electrical bench measurements. Status of these activities andmore » some of what has been learned to date will be shared.« less

  5. Robust Electrical Transfer System (RETS) for Solar Array Drive Mechanism SlipRing Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommottet, Daniel; Bossoney, Luc; Schnyder, Ralph; Howling, Alan; Hollenstein, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Demands for robust and reliable power transmission systems for sliprings for SADM (Solar Array Drive Mechanism) are increasing steadily. As a consequence, it is required to know their performances regarding the voltage breakdown limit.An understanding of the overall shape of the breakdown voltage versus pressure curve is established, based on experimental measurements of DC (Direct Current) gas breakdown in complex geometries compared with a numerical simulation model.In addition a detailed study was made of the functional behaviour of an entire wing of satellite in a like- operational mode, comprising the solar cells, the power transmission lines, the SRA (SlipRing Assembly), the power S3R (Sequential Serial/shunt Switching Regulators) and the satellite load to simulate the electrical power consumption.A test bench able to measure automatically the: a)breakdown voltage versus pressure curve and b)the functional switching performances, was developed and validated.

  6. Rotating machinery dynamics simulation. I. Rigid systems with ball bearing nonlinearities and outer ring ovality under rotating unbalance excitation

    PubMed

    el-Saeidy

    2000-02-01

    The radial clearance in rolling bearing systems, required to compensate for dimensional changes associated with thermal expansion of the various parts during operation, may cause dimensional attrition and comprise bearing life, if unloaded operation occurs and balls skid [D. Childs and D. Moyer, ASME J. Eng. Gas Turb. Power 107, 152-159 (1985)]. Also, it can cause jumps in the response to unbalance excitation. These undesirable effects may be eliminated by introducing two or more loops into one of the bearing races so that at least two points of the ring circumference provide a positive zero clearance [D. Childs, Handbook of Rotordynamics, edited by F. Ehrich (McGraw-Hill, NY, 1992)]. The deviation of the outer ring with two loops, known as ovality, is one of the bearing distributed defects. Although this class of imperfections has received much work, none of the available studies has simulated the effect of the outer ring ovality on the dynamic behavior of rotating machinery under rotating unbalance with consideration of ball bearing nonlinearities, shaft elasticity, and speed of rotation. To fill this gap, the equations of motion of a rotor-ball bearing system are formulated using finite-elements (FE) discretization and Lagrange's equations. The analyses are specialized to a rigid-rotor system, by retaining the rigid body modes only in the FE solution. Samples of the results are presented in both time domain and frequency domain for a system with and without outer ring ovality. It is found that with ideal bearings (no ovality), the vibration spectrum is qualitatively and quantitatively the same in both the horizontal and vertical directions. When the ring ovality is introduced, however, the spectrum in both orthogonal planes is no longer similar. And magnitude of the bearing load has increased in the form of repeated random impacts, between balls and rings, in the horizontal direction (direction of maximum clearance) compared to a continuous contact along the

  7. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  8. Ring dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borderies, Nicole

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models of planetary-ring dynamics are discussed in a detailed analytical review and illustrated with graphs and diagrams. The streamline concept is introduced, and the phenomena associated with the transport of angular momentum are described. Particular attention is then given to (1) broad rings like those of Saturn (shepherding, density-wave excitation, gaps, bending-wave excitation, multiringlet structures, inner-edge shepherding, and the possibility of polar rings around Neptune), (2) narrow rings like those of Uranus (shepherding, ring shapes, and a self-gravity model of rigid precession), and (3) ring arcs like those seen in stellar-occultation observations of Neptune.

  9. Nonlinear effects of unbalance in the rotor-floating ring bearing system of turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L.; Wang, W. J.; Peng, Z. J.

    2013-01-01

    Turbocharger (TC) rotor-floating ring bearing (FRB) system is characterised by high speed as well as high non-linearity. Using the run-up and run-down simulation method, this paper systematically investigates the influence of unbalance on the rotordynamic characteristics of a real TC-FRB system over the speed range from 0 Hz to 3500 Hz. The rotor is discretized by the finite element method, and the desired oil film forces at each simulation step are calculated by an efficient analytical method. The imposed unbalance amount and distribution are the variables considered in the performed non-stationary simulations. The newly obtained results evidently show the distinct phenomena brought about by the variations of the unbalance offset, which confirms that the unbalance level is a critical parameter for the system response. In the meantime, the variations of unbalance distribution, i.e. out-of-phase and in-phase unbalance, can lead to entirely different simulation results as well, which proves the distribution of unbalance is not negligible during the dynamic analysis of the rotor-FRB system. Additionally, considerable effort has been placed on the description as well as discussion of a unique phenomenon termed Critical Limit Cycle Oscillation (CLC Oscillation), which is of great importance and interest to the TC research and development.

  10. The ABCD's of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Weidling, Ian; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2016-07-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Singh and coworkers in the current issue of Journal of Neurochemistry, in which the authors present additional evidence that AMPKα1 is reduced in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). They make a case for increasing AMPKα1 activity for therapeutic purposes in this disease, and indicate how this goal may be achieved. Read the highlighted article 'Metformin-induced mitochondrial function and ABCD2 up regulation in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy involves AMP activated protein kinase' on page 86. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Intravaginal rings as delivery systems for microbicides and multipurpose prevention technologies

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Andrea Ries; Clark, Meredith R; Hurlburt, Jennifer A; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2013-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in delivering pharmaceutical products via intravaginal rings (IVRs). IVRs are flexible torus-shaped drug delivery systems that can be easily inserted and removed by the woman and that provide both sustained and controlled drug release, lasting for several weeks to several months. In terms of women’s health care products, it has been established that IVRs effectively deliver contraceptive steroids and steroids for the treatment of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy. A novel application for IVRs is the delivery of antiretroviral drugs for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genital infection. Microbicides are antiviral drugs delivered topically for HIV prevention. Recent reviews of microbicide IVRs have focused on technologies in development and optimizing ring design. IVRs have several advantages, including the ability to deliver sustained drug doses for long periods of time while bypassing first pass metabolism in the gut. IVRs are discreet, woman-controlled, and do not require a trained provider for placement or fitting. Previous data support that women and their male sexual partners find IVRs highly acceptable. Multipurpose prevention technology (MPT) products provide protection against unintended/mistimed pregnancy and reproductive tract infections, including HIV. Several MPT IVRs are currently in development. Early clinical testing of new microbicide and MPT IVRs will require a focus on safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Specifically, IVRs will have to deliver tissue concentrations of drugs that are pharmacodynamically active, do not cause mucosal alterations or inflammation, and do not change the resident microbiota. The emergence of resistance to antiretrovirals will need to be investigated. IVRs should not disrupt intercourse or have high rates of expulsion. Herein, we reviewed the microbicide and MPT IVRs currently in development, with a focus on the clinical aspects of IVR assessment and the challenges

  12. Development of a circular shape Si-PM-based detector ring for breast-dedicated PET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Abe, Shinji; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kato, Katsuhiko

    2018-02-01

    In clinical situations, various breast-dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) systems have been used. However, clinical breast-dedicated PET systems have polygonal detector ring. Polygonal detector ring sometimes causes image artifact, so complicated reconstruction algorithm is needed to reduce artifact. Consequently, we developed a circular detector ring for breast-dedicated PET to obtain images without artifact using a simple reconstruction algorithm. We used Lu1.9Gd0.1SiO5 (LGSO) scintillator block which was made of 1.5 x 1.9 x 15 mm pixels that were arranged in an 8 x 24 matrix. As photodetectors, we used silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) arrays whose channel size was 3 x 3 mm. A detector unit was composed of four scintillator blocks, 16 Si-PM arrays and a light guide. The developed detector unit had angled configuration since the light guide was bending. A detector unit had three gaps with an angle of 5.625° between scintillator blocks. With these configurations, we could arrange 64 scintillator blocks in nearly circular shape (regular 64-sided polygon) using 16 detector units. The use of the smaller number of detector units could reduce the size of the front-end electronics circuits. The inner diameter of the developed detector ring was 260 mm. This size was similar to those of brain PET systems, so our breast-dedicated PET detector ring can measure not only breast but also brain. Measured radial, tangential and axial spatial resolution of the detector ring reconstructed by the filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm were 2.1 mm FWHM, 2.0 mm FWHM and 1.7 mm FWHM at center of field of view (FOV), respectively. The sensitivity was 2.0% at center of the axial FOV. With the developed detector ring, we could obtain high resolution image of the breast phantom and the brain phantom. We conclude that our developed Si-PM-based detector ring is promising for a high resolution breast-dedicated PET system that can also be used for brain PET system.

  13. Flight test results of the strapdown ring laser gyro tetrad inertial navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carestia, R. A.; Hruby, R. J.; Bjorkman, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    A helicopter flight test program undertaken to evaluate the performance of Tetrad (a strap down, laser gyro, inertial navigation system) is described. The results of 34 flights show a mean final navigational velocity error of 5.06 knots, with a standard deviation of 3.84 knots; a corresponding mean final position error of 2.66 n. mi., with a standard deviation of 1.48 n. mi.; and a modeled mean position error growth rate for the 34 tests of 1.96 knots, with a standard deviation of 1.09 knots. No laser gyro or accelerometer failures were detected during the flight tests. Off line parity residual studies used simulated failures with the prerecorded flight test and laboratory test data. The airborne Tetrad system's failure--detection logic, exercised during the tests, successfully demonstrated the detection of simulated ""hard'' failures and the system's ability to continue successfully to navigate by removing the simulated faulted sensor from the computations. Tetrad's four ring laser gyros provided reliable and accurate angular rate sensing during the 4 yr of the test program, and no sensor failures were detected during the evaluation of free inertial navigation performance.

  14. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  15. Ring World

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-01

    Our robotic emissary, flying high above Saturn, captured this view of an alien copper-colored ring world. The overexposed planet has deliberately been removed to show the unlit rings alone, seen from an elevation of 60 degrees

  16. Biocompatibility and Systemic Safety of a Novel Implantable Annuloplasty Ring for the Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation in a Minipig Model.

    PubMed

    Ramot, Yuval; Rousselle, Serge D; Yellin, Nadav; Willenz, Udi; Sabag, Itai; Avner, Avi; Nyska, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    Prosthetic annuloplasty rings are a common treatment modality for mitral regurgitation, and recently, percutaneous implantation techniques have gained popularity due to their favorable safety profile. Although in common use, biocompatibility of annuloplasty rings has been reported only sparsely in the literature, and none of these reports used the percutaneous technique of implantation. We report on the biocompatibility and the systemic safety of a novel transcatheter mitral valve annuloplasty ring (AMEND™) in 6 minipigs. This device is composed of a nitinol tube surrounded by a braided polyethylene terephthalate fabric tube. The device produced no adverse inflammatory response, showing gradual integration between the metal ring and the fabric by normal host fibrocellular response, leading to complete neoendocardium coverage. There was no evidence for adverse reactions, rejection, or intolerance in the valvular structure. In 2 animals, hemopericardium resulted from the implantation procedure, leading to right-sided cardiac insufficiency with pulmonary edema and liver congestion. The findings reported herein can serve as a case study for the expected healing pathology reactions after implantation of transcatheter mitral valve annuloplasty rings. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Sporotrichosis in cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Lloret, Albert; Hartmann, Katrin; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Ferrer, Lluis; Addie, Diane; Belák, Sándor; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hosie, Margaret J; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Möstl, Karin; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Horzinek, Marian C

    2013-07-01

    Sporotrichosis is an important subcutaneous fungal infection of humans and animals in some endemic tropical and subtropical areas. Among domestic species, cats are the most frequently infected. The primary mode of transmission is traumatic inoculation of fungal conidia from plants and soil. Contact with infected cats is the major mode of transmission to humans, especially in endemic areas like Brazil, where a large epidemic has occurred in the past decade. Most cases in cats are cutaneous, presenting as multiple ulcerated nodules and draining tracts in the skin. Lymphadenopathy, respiratory signs and systemic dissemination may also occur. Diagnosis is based on fungal detection by cytology and/or histology, and confirmation by culture. Treatment consists of at least 2 months' systemic antifungal therapy, with itraconazole as the first-choice agent. The prognosis is favourable provided there is good owner compliance and adverse drug effects do not occur. Contact with infected cats carries a high zoonotic risk. Cat owners travelling to endemic areas should be warned and advised to keep their cats indoors to prevent infection. Professionals must wear gloves when handling cats with skin nodules and ulcers and dealing with diagnostic samples.

  18. The aerogel Ring Imaging Cherenkov system at the Belle II spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestotnik, R.; Adachi, I.; Dolenec, R.; Hataya, K.; Iori, S.; Iwata, S.; Kakuno, H.; Kataura, R.; Kawai, H.; Kindo, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kumita, T.; Mrvar, M.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, K.; Ogawa, S.; Šantelj, L.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Yonenaga, M.; Yusa, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In the forward end-cap of the Belle II spectrometer, a proximity focusing Ring Imaging Cherenkov counter with an aerogel radiator will be installed. The detector will occupy a limited space inside solenoid magnet with longitudinal field of 1.5 T. It will consist of a double layer aerogel radiator, an expansion volume and a photon detector. 420 Hamamatsu hybrid avalanche photo sensors with 144 channels each will be used to read out single Cherenkov photons with high efficiency. More than 60,000 analog signals will be digitized and processed in the front end electronics and send to the unified experiment data acquisition system. The detector components have been successfully produced and are now being installed in the spectrometer. Tested before on the bench, they are currently being installed in the mechanical frame. Part of the detector have been commissioned and connected to the acquisition system to register the cosmic ray particles. The first preliminary results are in accordance with previous expectations. We expect an excellent performance of the device which will allow at least a 4σ separation of pions from kaons in the experiment kinematic region from 0.5 GeV/c to 4 GeV/c.

  19. Adolescent brain cognitive development (ABCD) study: Overview of substance use assessment methods.

    PubMed

    Lisdahl, Krista M; Sher, Kenneth J; Conway, Kevin P; Gonzalez, Raul; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W; Nixon, Sara Jo; Tapert, Susan; Bartsch, Hauke; Goldstein, Rita Z; Heitzeg, Mary

    2018-08-01

    One of the objectives of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study (https://abcdstudy.org/) is to establish a national longitudinal cohort of 9 and 10 year olds that will be followed for 10 years in order to prospectively study the risk and protective factors influencing substance use and its consequences, examine the impact of substance use on neurocognitive, health and psychosocial outcomes, and to understand the relationship between substance use and psychopathology. This article provides an overview of the ABCD Study Substance Use Workgroup, provides the goals for the workgroup, rationale for the substance use battery, and includes details on the substance use module methods and measurement tools used during baseline, 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessment time-points. Prospective, longitudinal assessment of these substance use domains over a period of ten years in a nationwide sample of youth presents an unprecedented opportunity to further understand the timing and interactive relationships between substance use and neurocognitive, health, and psychopathology outcomes in youth living in the United States. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental Observation of Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Recurrence in a Nonlinear Feedback Ring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mingzhong; Patton, Carl E.

    2007-01-01

    Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence through soliton dynamics has been realized. The experiment used a magnetic film strip-based active feedback ring. At some ring gain level, a wide spin wave pulse is self-generated in the ring. As the pulse circulates, it separates into two envelop solitons with different speeds. When the fast soliton catches up and collides with the slow soliton, the initial wide pulse is perfectly reconstructed. The repetition of this process leads to periodic recurrences of the initial pulse.

  1. Warden’s Five-Ring System Theory: Legitimate Wartime Military Targeting or an Increased Potential to Violate the Law and Norms of Expected Behavior?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    the five-ring system theory that dramatically improves the warfighters ability to systematically identify wartime targets. However, for all of its...acclaim, little has been written about Warden’s five-ring system theory . Even less has been written about the legal and moral implications of using Warden’s theory to identify wartime targets.

  2. Application of ring tectonic theory to Mercury and other solar system bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnon, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that multiringed structures, by their presence or absence, provide a powerful tool for deciphering the thermal histories of the solid planets. The theory of ring tectonics considered by Melosh and McKinnon (1978) and Melosh et al. (1980) establishes the framework of that undertaking. The present investigation has the objective to apply this conceptualization in detail to the multiringed basins on Mercury, taking into account also a brief review concerning the current state of understanding of ring tectonics on the moon, Mars, earth, Ganymede, and Callisto. The small, icy satellites of Saturn are also discussed. The mechanics of multiple ring formation are related to the collapse of the transient basin cavity when the excavation depth and lithosphere thickness are comparable. Attention is given to the Caloris Basin on Mercury, the peak ring basins on Mercury, and the Argyre Basin on Mars.

  3. The Ring System of Saturn as Seen by Cassini-VIMS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.

    2015-08-01

    Since 2004 the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard Cassini has acquired numerous hyperspectral mosaics in the 0.35-5.1 μm spectral range of Saturn's main rings in very different illumination and viewing geometries. These observations have allowed us to infer the ring particles physical properties and composition: water ice abundance is estimated through the 1.25-1.5-2.0 μm band depths, chromophores distribution is derived from visible spectral slopes while organic material is traced by the aliphatic compounds signature at 3.42 μm which appears stronger on CD and C ring than on A-B rings (Filacchione et al., 2014). Observed reflectance spectra are fitted with a spectrophotometric model based on Montecarlo ray-tracing with the scope to infer particles composition while disentangling photometric effects (caused by multiple scattering, opposition surge and forward scattering) which depend on illumination/viewing geometries. Spectral bond albedo for different regions of the rings has been best-fitted using Hapke's radiative transfer modeling (Ciarniello et al, 2011) by choosing different mixtures of water ice, tholin, and amorphous carbon particles populations. While tholin distribution seems to be fairly constant across the rings, the amorphous carbon appears anti-correlated with optical depth. Moreover, dark material contamination is less effective on densest regions, where the more intense rejuvenation processes occur, in agreement with the ballistic transport theory (Cuzzi and Estrada,1998). Finally, the 3.6 μm continuum peak wavelength is used to infer particles temperature, which is anti-correlated with the albedo and the optical depth (tau): low-albedo/low-tau C ring and CD have higher temperatures than A-B rings where albedo and tau are high. This trend matches direct temperature measurements by CIRS (Spilker et al., 2013).

  4. A novel system for commissioning brachytherapy applicators: example of a ring applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Van den Bosch, Michiel R.; Voncken, Robert; Podesta, Mark; Verhaegen, Frank

    2017-11-01

    A novel system was developed to improve commissioning and quality assurance of brachytherapy applicators used in high dose rate (HDR). It employs an imaging panel to create reference images and to measure dwell times and dwell positions. As an example: two ring applicators of the same model were evaluated. An applicator was placed on the surface of an imaging panel and a HDR 192Ir source was positioned in an imaging channel above the panel to generate an image of the applicator, using the gamma photons of the brachytherapy source. The applicator projection image was overlaid with the images acquired by capturing the gamma photons emitted by the source dwelling inside the applicator. We verified 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 cm interdwell distances for different offsets, applicator inclinations and transfer tube curvatures. The data analysis was performed using in-house developed software capable of processing the data in real time, defining catheters and creating movies recording the irradiation procedure. One applicator showed up to 0.3 cm difference from the expected position for a specific dwell position. The problem appeared intermittently. The standard deviations of the remaining dwell positions (40 measurements) were less than 0.05 cm. The second ring applicator had a similar reproducibility with absolute coordinate differences from expected values ranging from  -0.10 up to 0.18 cm. The curvature of the transfer tube can lead to differences larger than 0.1 cm whilst the inclination of the applicator showed a negligible effect. The proposed method allows the verification of all steps of the irradiation, providing accurate information about dwell positions and dwell times. It allows the verification of small interdwell positions (⩽0.1 cm) and reduces measurement time. In addition, no additional radiation source is necessary since the HDR 192Ir source is used to generate an image of the applicator.

  5. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  6. Jupiter Ring Halo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-03-26

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age. Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal "halo" is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest being

  7. Voyager 2 radio science observations of the Uranian system Atmosphere, rings, and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, G. L.; Eshleman, V. R.; Hinson, D. P.; Marouf, E. A.; Simpson, R. A.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Anderson, J. D.; Campbell, J. K.; Levy, G. S.; Lindal, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    The results of preliminary analyses of radio occultation data obtained by Voyager 2 as it passed Uranus are described. The occultations took place between 2-7 deg S latitude and yielded atmospheric temperature profiles between pressure levels of 10-900 mbar, an altitude range of 100 km. The mole fractions of hydrogen and helium in the tropopause were estimated, in conjunction with IR data, to about 0.85 and 0.10-0.20, respectively. Radio signal intensity data indicated the presence of a cloud deck of CH4 ice at a pressure level of 1300 mbar and a temperature of 81 K, implying a CH4 mole fraction of 0.02 at very low altitudes. The ionosphere extended upward, in two levels, to more than 10,000 km altitude. The ring system was different than the one around Saturn and possessed cylindrical substructures. The radio data also permitted mass density estimates for the five major moons, i.e., about 1.40 gr/cu cm, a value which rules out cometary origins.

  8. Quantum Dynamics Scattering Study of AB+CDE Reactions: A Seven Dimensional Treatment for the H2+C2H Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou

    2003-01-01

    A time-dependent wave-packet approach is presented for the quantum dynamics study of the AB+CDE reaction system for zero total angular momentum. A seven-degree-of-freedom calculation is employed to study the chemical reaction of H2+C2H yields H + C2H2 by treating C2H as a linear molecule. Initial state selected reaction probabilities are presented for various initial ro-vibrational states. This study shows that vibrational excitation of H2 enhances the reaction probability, whereas the excitation of C2H has only a small effect on the reactivity. An integral cross section is also reported for the initial ground states of H2 and C2H. The theoretical and experimental results agree with each other very well when the calculated seven dimensional results are adjusted to account for the lower transition state barrier heights found in recent ab initio calculations.

  9. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2004-01-01

    The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by the seasonal Yarkovsky effect and the Yarkovsky-Schach effect; the two effects confine the rings between approximately 1.68 and approximately 2.23 Saturn radii, in reasonable agreement with the observed values of 1.525 and 2.267. The C ring may be sparsely populated because its particles are transients on their way to Saturn; the infall may create a luminous Ring of Fire around Saturn's equator. The ring system may be young: in the past heat flow from Saturn's interior much above its present value would not permit rings to exist.

  10. Triaging TIA/minor stroke patients using the ABCD2 score does not predict those with significant carotid disease.

    PubMed

    Walker, J; Isherwood, J; Eveson, D; Naylor, A R

    2012-05-01

    'Rapid Access' TIA Clinics use the ABCD(2) score to triage patients as it is not possible to see everyone with a suspected TIA <24 h. Those scoring 0-3 are seen within seven days, while patients scoring 4-7 are seen as soon as possible (preferably <24 h). It was hypothesized that patients scoring 4-7 would have a higher yield of significant carotid disease. Prospective study of correlation between Family Doctor (FD) or Emergency Department (ED) ABCD(2) score and specialist consultant Stroke Physician measured ABCD(2) score and prevalence of ≥50% ipsilateral carotid stenosis or occlusion in patients presenting with 'any territory' TIA/minor stroke or 'carotid territory' TIA/minor stroke. Between 1.10.2008 and 31.04.2011, 2452 patients were referred to the Leicester Rapid Access TIA Service. After Stroke Physician review, 1273 (52%) were thought to have suffered a minor stroke/TIA. Of these, both FD/ED referrer and Specialist Stroke Consultant ABCD(2) scores and carotid Duplex ultrasound studies were available for 843 (66%). The yield for identifying a ≥50% stenosis or carotid occlusion was 109/843 (12.9%) in patients with 'any territory' TIA/minor stroke and 101/740 (13.6%) in those with a clinical diagnosis of 'carotid territory' TIA/minor stroke. There was no association between ABCD(2) score and the likelihood of encountering significant carotid disease and analyses of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for FD/ED referrer and stroke specialist ABCD(2) scores showed no prediction of carotid stenosis (FD/ED: AUC 0.50 (95%CI 0.44-0.55, p = 0.9), Specialist: AUC 0.51 (95%CI 0.45-0.57, p = 0.78). The ABCD(2) score was unable to identify TIA/minor stroke patients with a higher prevalence of clinically important ipsilateral carotid disease. Copyright © 2012 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative investigation of the energetic ion spectra comprising the magnetospheric ring currents of the solar system

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, B H

    2014-01-01

    Investigated here are factors that control the intensities and shapes of energetic ion spectra that make up the ring current populations of the strongly magnetized planets of the solar system, specifically those of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Following a previous and similar comparative investigation of radiation belt electrons, we here turn our attention to ions. Specifically, we examine the possible role of the differential ion Kennel-Petschek limit, as moderated by Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, as a standard for comparing the most intense ion spectra within the strongly magnetized planetary magnetospheres. In carrying out this investigation, the substantial complexities engendered by the very different ion composition distributions of these diverse magnetospheres must be addressed, given that the dispersion properties of the EMIC waves are strongly determined by the ion composition of the plasmas within which the waves propagate. Chosen for comparison are the ion spectra within these systems that are the most intense observed, specifically at 100 keV and 1 MeV. We find that Earth and Jupiter are unique in having their most intense ion spectra likely limited and sculpted by the Kennel-Petschek process. The ion spectra of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune reside far below their respective limits and are likely limited by interactions with gas and dust (Saturn) and by the absence of robust ion acceleration processes (Uranus and Neptune). Suggestions are provided for further testing the efficacy of the differential Kennel-Petschek limit for ions using the Van Allen Probes. PMID:26167438

  12. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  13. Double-bosonization and Majid's conjecture, (I): Rank-inductions of ABCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongmei; Hu, Naihong

    2015-11-01

    Majid developed in [S. Majid, Math. Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 125, 151-192 (1999)] the double-bosonization theory to construct Uq(𝔤) and expected to generate inductively not just a line but a tree of quantum groups starting from a node. In this paper, the authors confirm Majid's first expectation (see p. 178 [S. Majid, Math. Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 125, 151-192 (1999)]) through giving and verifying the full details of the inductive constructions of Uq(𝔤) for the classical types, i.e., the ABCD series. Some examples in low ranks are given to elucidate that any quantum group of classical type can be constructed from the node corresponding to Uq(𝔰𝔩2).

  14. Redesign of solid rocket booster/external tank attachment ring for the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, Harvey G., Jr. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    An improved design concept is presented for the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB)/external tank (ET) attachment ring structural component. This component picks up three struts which attach the aft end of each SRB to the ET. The concept is a partial ring with carefully tapered ends to distribute fastener loads safely into the SRB. Extensive design studies and analyses were performed to arrive at the concept. Experiments on structural elements were performed to determine material strength and stiffness characteristics. Materials and fabrication studies were conducted to determine acceptable tolerances for the design concept. An overview is provided of the work along with conclusions and major recommendations.

  15. Merging tree ring chronologies and climate system model simulated temperature by optimal interpolation algorithm in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Xing, Pei; Luo, Yong; Zhao, Zongci; Nie, Suping; Huang, Jianbin; Wang, Shaowu; Tian, Qinhua

    2015-04-01

    A new dataset of annual mean surface temperature has been constructed over North America in recent 500 years by performing optimal interpolation (OI) algorithm. Totally, 149 series totally were screened out including 69 tree ring width (MXD) and 80 tree ring width (TRW) chronologies are screened from International Tree Ring Data Bank (ITRDB). The simulated annual mean surface temperature derives from the past1000 experiment results of Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4). Different from existing research that applying data assimilation approach to (General Circulation Models) GCMs simulation, the errors of both the climate model simulation and tree ring reconstruction were considered, with a view to combining the two parts in an optimal way. Variance matching (VM) was employed to calibrate tree ring chronologies on CRUTEM4v, and corresponding errors were estimated through leave-one-out process. Background error covariance matrix was estimated from samples of simulation results in a running 30-year window in a statistical way. Actually, the background error covariance matrix was calculated locally within the scanning range (2000km in this research). Thus, the merging process continued with a time-varying local gain matrix. The merging method (MM) was tested by two kinds of experiments, and the results indicated standard deviation of errors can be reduced by about 0.3 degree centigrade lower than tree ring reconstructions and 0.5 degree centigrade lower than model simulation. During the recent Obvious decadal variability can be identified in MM results including the evident cooling (0.10 degree per decade) in 1940-60s, wherein the model simulation exhibit a weak increasing trend (0.05 degree per decade) instead. MM results revealed a compromised spatial pattern of the linear trend of surface temperature during a typical period (1601-1800 AD) in Little Ice Age, which basically accorded with the phase transitions of the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) and

  16. Simulating the Smallest Ring World of Chariklo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2017-03-01

    A ring system consisting of two dense narrow rings has been discovered around Centaur Chariklo. The existence of these rings around a small object poses various questions about their origin, stability, and lifetime. In order to understand the nature of Chariklo’s rings, we perform global N-body simulations of the self-gravitating collisional particle rings for the first time. We find that Chariklo should be denser than the ring material in order to avoid the rapid diffusion of the rings. If Chariklo is denser than the ring material, fine spiral structures called self-gravity wakes occur in the inner ring. These wakes accelerate the viscous spreading of the ring significantly and typically occur on timescales of about 100 {years} for m-sized ring particles, which is considerably shorter than the timescales suggested in previous studies. The existence of these narrow rings implies smaller ring particles or the existence of shepherding satellites.

  17. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  18. Jupiter's Main Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa. A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic.

    Jupiter's main ring is a thin strand of material encircling the planet. The diffuse innermost boundary begins at approximately 123,000 km. The main ring's outer radius is found to be

  19. Planetary rings: Structure and history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L.

    The composition and structure of planetary rings provide the key evidence to understand their origin and evolution. Before the first space observations, we were able to maintain an idealized view of the rings around Saturn, the only known ring system at that time. Rings were then discovered around Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune. Saturn's F ring was discovered by Pioneer 11. Our ideal view of circular, planar, symmetric and unchanging rings was shattered by observations of inclined, eccentric rings, waves and wavy edges, and numerous processes acting at rates that give timescales much younger than the solar system. Moons within and near the rings sculpt them and are the likely progenitors of future rings. The moonlet lifetimes are much less than Saturn's age. The old idea of ancient rings gave rise to youthful rings, that are recently created by erosion and destruction of small nearby moons. Although this explanation may work well for most rings, Saturn's massive ring system provides a problem. It is extremely improbable that Saturn's rings were recently created by the destruction of a moon as large as Mimas, or even by the breakup of a large comet that passed too close to Saturn. The history of Saturn's rings has been a difficult problem, now made even more challenging by the close-up Cassini measurements. Cassini observations show unexpected ring variability in time and space. Time variations are seen in ring edges, in the thinner D and F rings, and in the neutral oxygen cloud, which outweighs the E ring in the same region around Saturn. The rings are inhomogeneous, with structures on all scales, sharp gradients and edges. Compositional gradients are sharper than expected, but nonetheless cross structural boundaries. This is evidence for ballistic transport that has not gone to completion. The autocovariance maximizes in the middle of the A ring, with smaller structure near the main rings' outer edge. Density wave locations have a fresher ice composition. The

  20. The formation of rings and gaps in magnetically coupled disc-wind systems: ambipolar diffusion and reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Scott S.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien

    2018-06-01

    Radial substructures in circumstellar discs are now routinely observed by Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. There is also growing evidence that disc winds drive accretion in such discs. We show through 2D (axisymmetric) simulations that rings and gaps develop naturally in magnetically coupled disc-wind systems on the scale of tens of au, where ambipolar diffusion (AD) is the dominant non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effect. In simulations where the magnetic field and matter are moderately coupled, the disc remains relatively laminar with the radial electric current steepened by AD into a thin layer near the mid-plane. The toroidal magnetic field sharply reverses polarity in this layer, generating a large magnetic torque that drives fast accretion, which drags the poloidal field into a highly pinched radial configuration. The reconnection of this pinched field creates magnetic loops where the net poloidal magnetic flux (and thus the accretion rate) is reduced, yielding dense rings. Neighbouring regions with stronger poloidal magnetic fields accrete faster, forming gaps. In better magnetically coupled simulations, the so-called avalanche accretion streams develop continuously near the disc surface, rendering the disc-wind system more chaotic. Nevertheless, prominent rings and gaps are still produced, at least in part, by reconnection, which again enables the segregation of the poloidal field and the disc material similar to the more diffusive discs. However, the reconnection is now driven by the non-linear growth of magnetorotational instability channel flows. The formation of rings and gaps in rapidly accreting yet laminar discs has interesting implications for dust settling and trapping, grain growth, and planet formation.

  1. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  2. Progress on the Design of the Storage Ring Vacuum System for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Stillwell, B.; Billett, B.; Brajuskovic, B.

    2017-06-20

    Recent work on the design of the storage ring vacuum system for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project (APS-U) includes: revising the vacuum system design to accommodate a new lattice with reverse bend magnets, modifying the designs of vacuum chambers in the FODO sections for more intense incident synchrotron radiation power, modifying the design of rf-shielding bellows liners for better performance and reliability, modifying photon absorber designs to make better use of available space, and integrated planning of components needed in the injection, extraction and rf cavity straight sections. An overview of progress in these areas is presented.

  3. Variable diameter CO2 laser ring-cutting system adapted to a zoom microscope for applications on polymer tapes.

    PubMed

    Förster, Erik; Bohnert, Patrick; Kraus, Matthias; Kilper, Roland; Müller, Ute; Buchmann, Martin; Brunner, Robert

    2016-11-20

    This paper presents the conception and implementation of a variable diameter ring-cutting system for a CO2 laser with a working wavelength of 10.6 μm. The laser-cutting system is adapted to an observation zoom microscope for combined use and is applicable for the extraction of small circular areas from polymer films, such as forensic adhesive tapes in a single shot. As an important characteristic for our application, the variable diameter ring-cutting system provides telecentricity in the target area. Ring diameters are continuously tunable between 500 μm and 2 mm. A minimum width of less than 20 μm was found for the ring profile edge. The basic characteristics of the system, including telecentricity, were experimentally evaluated and demonstrated by cutting experiments on different polymer tapes and further exemplary samples.

  4. Dusty plasma (Yukawa) rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, T. E.; Gallagher, James C.

    2016-11-01

    One-dimensional and quasi-one-dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasma rings have been created experimentally. Longitudinal (acoustic) and transverse (optical) dispersion relations for the one-ring are measured and found to be in excellent agreement with the theory for an unbounded straight chain of particles interacting through a Yukawa (i.e., screened Coulomb or Debye-Hückel) potential. These rings provide a new experimental system to directly study one-dimensional and quasi-one-dimensional linear and nonlinear phenomena.

  5. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025870 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  6. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025868 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  7. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025866 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  8. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025872 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  9. Hopkins with SPHERES RINGS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025879 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  10. The Abcd Formula of Phase Definition in Optical Interferometry: Combined Effect of Air Dispersion and Broad Passband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathar, Richard J.

    Long-baseline interferometry detects fringes created by superposition of two beams of light collected by two telescopes pointing into a common direction. The external path difference is commonly compensated by adding a variable optical path length (delay) through air for one beam such that the optical path difference between the beams remains close to zero near the detector. The ABCD formula assigns a (wrapped) phase to the signals A to D of an interference pattern shifted by multiples of 90 degrees in phase. We study the interplay between a broad spectral passband of the optics and the dispersion of the air in the compensating delay, which leads to small deviations between the ABCD phase and the reduced, monochromatic group-delay representation of the wave packets. This adds dispersion to the effects that have been discussed for evacuated interferometers before (Milman 2005).

  11. Research on propagation properties of controllable hollow flat-topped beams in turbulent atmosphere based on ABCD matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huilong; Lü, Yanfei; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Jing; Pu, Xiaoyun; Dong, Yuan; Li, Shutao; Fu, Xihong; Zhang, Angfeng; Wang, Changjia; Tan, Yong; Zhang, Xihe

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the propagation properties of controllable hollow flat-topped beams (CHFBs) in turbulent atmosphere based on ABCD matrix, sets up a propagation model and obtains an analytical expression for the propagation. With the help of numerical simulation, the propagation properties of CHFBs in different parameters are studied. Results indicate that in turbulent atmosphere, with the increase of propagation distance, the darkness of CHFBs gradually annihilate, and eventually evolve into Gaussian beams. Compared with the propagation properties in free space, the turbulent atmosphere enhances the diffraction effect of CHFBs and reduces the propagation distance for CHFBs to evolve into Gaussian beams. In strong turbulence atmospheric propagation, Airy disk phenomenon will disappear. The study on the propagation properties of CHFBs in turbulence atmosphere by using ABCD matrix is simple and convenient. This method can also be applied to study the propagation properties of other hollow laser beams in turbulent atmosphere.

  12. Jupiter's ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    First evidence of a ring around the planet Jupiter is seen in this photograph taken by Voyager 1 on March 4, 1979. The multiple exposure of the extremely thin faint ring appears as a broad light band crossing the center of the picture. The edge of the ring is 1,212,000 km from the spacecraft and 57,000 km from the visible cloud deck of Jupiter. The background stars look like broken hair pins because of spacecraft motion during the 11 minute 12 second exposure. The wavy motion of the star trails is due to the ultra-slow natural oscillation of the spacecraft (with a period of 78 seconds). The black dots are geometric calibration points in the camera. The ring thickness is estimated to be 30 km or less. The photograph was part of a sequence planned to search for such rings in Jupiter's equatorial plane. The ring has been invisible from Earth because of its thinness and its transparency when viewed at any angle except straight on. JPL manages and controls the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  13. Jupiter Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-23

    First evidence of a ring around the planet Jupiter is seen in this photograph taken by Voyager 1 on March 4, 1979. The multiple exposure of the extremely thin faint ring appears as a broad light band crossing the center of the picture. The edge of the ring is 1,212,000 km from the spacecraft and 57,000 km from the visible cloud deck of Jupiter. The background stars look like broken hair pins because of spacecraft motion during the 11 minute 12 second exposure. The wavy motion of the star trails is due to the ultra-slow natural oscillation of the spacecraft (with a period of 78 seconds). The black dots are geometric calibration points in the camera. The ring thickness is estimated to be 30 km or less. The photograph was part of a sequence planned to search for such rings in Jupiter's equatorial plane. The ring has been invisible from Earth because of its thinness and its transparency when viewed at any angle except straight on. JPL manages and controls the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02251

  14. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  15. Design and system integration of the superconducting wiggler magnets for the Compact Linear Collider damping rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoerling, Daniel; Antoniou, Fanouria; Bernhard, Axel; Bragin, Alexey; Karppinen, Mikko; Maccaferri, Remo; Mezentsev, Nikolay; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Peiffer, Peter; Rossmanith, Robert; Rumolo, Giovanni; Russenschuck, Stephan; Vobly, Pavel; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    To achieve high luminosity at the collision point of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), the normalized horizontal and vertical emittances of the electron and positron beams must be reduced to 500 and 4 nm before the beams enter the 1.5 TeV linear accelerators. An effective way to accomplish ultralow emittances with only small effects on the electron polarization is using damping rings operating at 2.86 GeV equipped with superconducting wiggler magnets. This paper describes a technical design concept for the CLIC damping wigglers.

  16. Design and performance of an astigmatism-compensated self-mode-locked ring-cavity Ti:sapphire laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.; Dai, J.; Wang, Q.

    1996-12-31

    Based on the nonlinear ABCD matrix and the renormalized q-parameter for Gaussian-beam propagation, self-focusing in conjunction with a spatial gain profile for self-mode locking in a ring-cavity Ti:sapphire laser is analyzed. In the experiment, an astigmatism-compensated self-mode-locked ring-cavity Ti:sapphire laser is demonstrated, and self-mode-locked operation is achieved in both bidirection and unidirection with pulse durations as short as 36 fs and 32 fs, respectively. The experimental observations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  17. Toward a noninvasive automatic seizure control system in rats with transcranial focal stimulations via tripolar concentric ring electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mucio-Ramirez, Samuel; Liu, Yuhong; Sun, Yan L.; Kay, Steven M.; Besio, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We are developing a noninvasive, or minimally invasive, transcranial focal electrical stimulation system through our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes to control seizures. In this study we demonstrate feasibility of an automatic seizure control system in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures through single and multiple stimulations. These stimulations are automatically triggered by a real-time electrographic seizure activity detector based on a disjunctive combination of detections from a cumulative sum algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. An average seizure onset detection accuracy of 76.14% was obtained for the test set (n = 13). Detection of electrographic seizure activity was accomplished in advance of the early behavioral seizure activity in 76.92% of the cases. Automatically triggered stimulation significantly (p = 0.001) reduced the electrographic seizure activity power in the once stimulated group compared to controls in 70% of the cases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first closed-loop automatic seizure control system based on noninvasive electrical brain stimulation using tripolar concentric ring electrode electrographic seizure activity as feedback. PMID:22772373

  18. Toward a noninvasive automatic seizure control system in rats with transcranial focal stimulations via tripolar concentric ring electrodes.

    PubMed

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mucio-Ramirez, Samuel; Liu, Yuhong; Sun, Yan L; Kay, Steven M; Besio, Walter G

    2012-07-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We are developing a noninvasive, or minimally invasive, transcranial focal electrical stimulation system through our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes to control seizures. In this study, we demonstrate feasibility of an automatic seizure control system in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures through single and multiple stimulations. These stimulations are automatically triggered by a real-time electrographic seizure activity detector based on a disjunctive combination of detections from a cumulative sum algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. An average seizure onset detection accuracy of 76.14% was obtained for the test set (n = 13). Detection of electrographic seizure activity was accomplished in advance of the early behavioral seizure activity in 76.92% of the cases. Automatically triggered stimulation significantly (p = 0.001) reduced the electrographic seizure activity power in the once stimulated group compared to controls in 70% of the cases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first closed-loop automatic seizure control system based on noninvasive electrical brain stimulation using tripolar concentric ring electrode electrographic seizure activity as feedback.

  19. Effectiveness and Safety of the Awakening and Breathing Coordination, Delirium Monitoring/Management, and Early Exercise/Mobility (ABCDE) Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Balas, Michele C.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Olsen, Keith M.; Schmid, Kendra K.; Shostrom, Valerie; Cohen, Marlene Z.; Peitz, Gregory; Gannon, David E.; Sisson, Joseph; Sullivan, James; Stothert, Joseph C.; Lazure, Julie; Nuss, Suzanne L.; Jawa, Randeep S.; Freihaut, Frank; Ely, E. Wesley; Burke, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The debilitating and persistent effects of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired delirium and weakness warrant testing of prevention strategies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of implementing the Awakening and Breathing Coordination, Delirium monitoring/management, and Early exercise/mobility (ABCDE) bundle into everyday practice. Design Eighteen-month, prospective, cohort, before-after study conducted between November 2010 and May 2012. Setting Five adult ICUs, one step-down unit, and one oncology/hematology special care unit located in a 624-bed tertiary medical center. Patients Two hundred ninety-six patients (146 pre- and 150 post-bundle implementation), age ≥ 19 years, managed by the institutions’ medical or surgical critical care service. Interventions ABCDE bundle. Measurements For mechanically ventilated patients (n = 187), we examined the association between bundle implementation and ventilator-free days. For all patients, we used regression models to quantify the relationship between ABCDE bundle implementation and the prevalence/duration of delirium and coma, early mobilization, mortality, time to discharge, and change in residence. Safety outcomes and bundle adherence were monitored. Main Results Patients in the post-implementation period spent three more days breathing without mechanical assistance than did those in the pre-implementation period (median [IQR], 24 [7 to 26] vs. 21 [0 to 25]; p = 0.04). After adjusting for age, sex, severity of illness, comorbidity, and mechanical ventilation status, patients managed with the ABCDE bundle experienced a near halving of the odds of delirium (odds ratio [OR], 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33–0.93; p = 0.03) and increased odds of mobilizing out of bed at least once during an ICU stay (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.29–3.45; p = 0.003). No significant differences were noted in self-extubation or reintubation rates. Conclusions Critically ill patients managed

  20. Comparing the predictive value of the pelvic ring injury classification systems by Tile and by Young and Burgess.

    PubMed

    Osterhoff, Georg; Scheyerer, Max J; Fritz, Yannick; Bouaicha, Samy; Wanner, Guido A; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Werner, Clément M L

    2014-04-01

    Radiology-based classifications of pelvic ring injuries and their relevance for the prognosis of morbidity and mortality are disputed in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential differences between the pelvic ring injury classification systems by Tile and by Young and Burgess with regard to their predictive value on mortality, transfusion/infusion requirement and concomitant injuries. Two-hundred-and-eighty-five consecutive patients with pelvic ring fractures were analyzed for mortality within 30 days after admission, number of blood units and total volume of fluid infused during the first 24h after trauma, the Abbreviated Injury Severity (AIS) scores for head, chest, spine, abdomen and extremities as a function of the Tile and the Young-Burgess classifications. There was no significant relationship between occurrence of death and fracture pattern but a significant relationship between fracture pattern and need for blood units/total fluid volume for Tile (p<.001/p<.001) and Young-Burgess (p<.001/p<.001). In both classifications, open book fractures were associated with more fluid requirement and more severe injuries of the abdomen, spine and extremities (p<.05). When divided into the larger subgroups "partially stable" and "unstable", unstable fractures were associated with a higher mortality rate in the Young-Burgess system (p=.036). In both classifications, patients with unstable fractures required significantly more blood transfusions (p<.001) and total fluid infusion (p<.001) and higher AIS scores. In this first direct comparison of both classifications, we found no clinical relevant differences with regard to their predictive value on mortality, transfusion/infusion requirement and concomitant injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Computer-automated ABCD versus dermatologists with different degrees of experience in dermoscopy.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Domenico; Crisman, Giuliana; Schoinas, Spyridon; Altamura, Davide; Peris, Ketty

    2014-01-01

    Dermoscopy is a very useful and non-invasive technique for in vivo observation and preoperative diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions (PSLs) inasmuch as it enables analysis of surface and subsurface structures that are not discernible to the naked eye. The authors used the ABCD rule of dermoscopy to test the accuracy of melanoma diagnosis with respect to a panel of 165 PSLs and the intra- and inter-observer diagnostic agreement obtained between three dermatologists with different degrees of experience, one General Practitioner and a DDA for computer-assisted diagnosis (Nevuscreen(®), Arkè s.a.s., Avezzano, Italy). 165 Pigmented Skin Lesions from 165 patients were selected. Histopathological examination revealed 132 benign melanocytic skin lesions and 33 melanomas. The kappa statistic, sensitivity, specificity and predictive positive and negative values were calculated to measure agreement between all the human observers and in comparison with the automated DDA. Our results revealed poor reproducibility of the semi-quantitative algorithm devised by Stolz et al. independently of observers' experience in dermoscopy. Nevuscreen(®) (Arkè s.a.s., Avezzano, Italy) proved to be 'user friendly' to all observers, thus enabling a more critical evaluation of each lesion and representing a helpful tool for clinicians without significant experience in dermoscopy in improving and achieving more accurate diagnosis of PSLs.

  2. The addition of E (Empowerment and Economics) to the ABCD algorithm in diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Khazrai, Yeganeh Manon; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Del Prato, Stefano; Cahn, Avivit; Raz, Itamar; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The ABCD (Age, Body weight, Complications, Duration of disease) algorithm was proposed as a simple and practical tool to manage patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes treatment, as for all chronic diseases, relies on patients' ability to cope with daily problems concerning the management of their disease in accordance with medical recommendations. Thus, it is important that patients learn to manage and cope with their disease and gain greater control over actions and decisions affecting their health. Healthcare professionals should aim to encourage and increase patients' perception about their ability to take informed decisions about disease management and to improve patient self-esteem and feeling of self-efficacy to become agents of their own health. E for Empowerment is therefore an additional factor to take into account in the management of patients with type 2 diabetes. E stands also for Economics to be considered in diabetes care. Attention should be paid to public health policies as well as to the physician faced with the dilemma of delivering the best possible care within the problem of limited resources. The financial impact of the new treatment modalities for diabetes represents an issue that needs to be addressed at multiple strata both globally and nationally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Luminescent Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view shows the unlit face of Saturn's rings, visible via scattered and transmitted light. In these views, dark regions represent gaps and areas of higher particle densities, while brighter regions are filled with less dense concentrations of ring particles.

    The dim right side of the image contains nearly the entire C ring. The brighter region in the middle is the inner B ring, while the darkest part represents the dense outer B Ring. The Cassini Division and the innermost part of the A ring are at the upper-left.

    Saturn's shadow carves a dark triangle out of the lower right corner of this image.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 8, 2005, at a distance of approximately 433,000 kilometers (269,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 22 kilometers (14 miles) per pixel.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

    For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

  4. Metabolic Flux Analysis of the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 ΔnrtABCD Mutant Reveals a Mechanism for Metabolic Adaptation to Nitrogen-Limited Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsubasa; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Toya, Yoshihiro; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Metabolic flux redirection during nitrogen-limited growth was investigated in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 glucose-tolerant (GT) strain under photoautotrophic conditions by isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis (INST-MFA). A ΔnrtABCD mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was constructed to reproduce phenotypes arising during nitrogen starvation. The ΔnrtABCD mutant and the wild-type GT strain were cultured under photoautotrophic conditions by a photobioreactor. Intracellular metabolites were labeled over a time course using NaH13CO3 as a carbon source. Based on these data, the metabolic flux distributions in the wild-type and ΔnrtABCD cells were estimated by INST-MFA. The wild-type GT and ΔnrtABCD strains displayed similar distribution patterns, although the absolute levels of metabolic flux were lower in ΔnrtABCD. Furthermore, the relative flux levels for glycogen metabolism, anaplerotic reactions and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were increased in ΔnrtABCD. This was probably due to the increased expression of enzyme genes that respond to nitrogen depletion. Additionally, we found that the ratio of ATP/NADPH demand increased slightly in the ΔnrtABCD mutant. These results indicated that futile ATP consumption increases under nitrogen-limited conditions because the Calvin-Benson cycle and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway form a metabolic futile cycle that consumes ATP without CO2 fixation and NADPH regeneration. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Reagent-based DOS: developing a diastereoselective methodology to access spirocyclic- and fused heterocyclic ring systems.

    PubMed

    Damerla, V Surendra Babu; Tulluri, Chiranjeevi; Gundla, Rambabu; Naviri, Lava; Adepally, Uma; Iyer, Pravin S; Murthy, Y L N; Prabhakar, Nampally; Sen, Subhabrata

    2012-10-01

    Herein, we report a diversity-oriented-synthesis (DOS) approach for the synthesis of biologically relevant molecular scaffolds. Our methodology enables the facile synthesis of fused N-heterocycles, spirooxoindolones, tetrahydroquinolines, and fused N-heterocycles. The two-step sequence starts with a chiral-bicyclic-lactam-directed enolate-addition/substitution step. This step is followed by a ring-closure onto the built-in scaffold electrophile, thereby leading to stereoselective carbocycle- and spirocycle-formation. We used in silico tools to calibrate our compounds with respect to chemical diversity and selected drug-like properties. We evaluated the biological significance of our scaffolds by screening them in two cancer cell-lines. In summary, our DOS methodology affords new, diverse scaffolds, thereby resulting in compounds that may have significance in medicinal chemistry. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A Librational Model for the Propeller Blériot in the Saturnian Ring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, M.; Sremčević, M.; Seiß, M.; Hoffmann, H.; Spahn, F.

    2017-05-01

    The reconstruction of the orbital evolution of the propeller structure Blériot orbiting in Saturn’s A ring from recurrent observations in Cassini ISS images yielded a considerable offset motion from the expected Keplerian orbit. This offset motion can be composed by three sinusoidal harmonics with amplitudes and periods of 1845, 152, 58 km and 11.1, 3.7, and 2.2 years, respectively. In this paper we present results from N-body simulations, where we integrated the orbital evolution of a moonlet, which is placed at the radial position of Blériot under the gravitational action of the Saturnian satellites. Our simulations yield that, especially the gravitational interactions with Prometheus, Pandora, and Mimas are forcing the moonlet to librate with the right frequencies, but the libration amplitudes are too small to explain the observations. Thus, further mechanisms are needed to explain the amplitudes of the forced librations—e.g., moonlet-ring interactions. Here, we develop a model, where the moonlet is allowed to be slightly displaced with respect to its created gaps breaking the point symmetry and causing a repulsive force in this way. As a result, the evolution of the moonlet’s longitude can be described by a harmonic oscillator. In the presence of external forcing by the outer moons, the libration amplitudes get the more amplified the closer the forcing frequency is to the eigenfrequency of the disturbed propeller oscillator. Applying our model to Blériot, it is possible to reproduce a libration period of 13 years with an amplitude of about 2000 km.

  7. Gravitational resonance: Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Perhaps no one thought much more would need to be known about Saturn's rings 100 or so years ago, when Daniel Kirkwood explained the various features. The main rings, within the three so-called Cassini divisions, were due to gravitational resonance conditions between small orbiting particles and the satellite Mimas. Now, after several spacecraft—especially Voyager—have shown the rings' close-up characteristics, there has been a great deal of activity in the planetary geophysics community to try to explain the origin of the numerous features of the rings of solar system bodies that were far beyond the resolution of telescopes in Kirkwood s day. A pretty good sample of that activity was reported recently by R.A. Kerr (Science, Oct. 8, 1982), who stated ‘Resonance theory still stands after the onslaught of spacecraft observations, but its new applications have yielded a greater variety of ring features than Kirkwood ever dreamed.’ One has only to have an inkling of the levels of gravitational mechanics to appreciate the complexities of the theories that have yielded resonance variations such as spiral density waves and bending waves in the past few years. As theories unfold, however, and are tested against Voyager's results, it has become evident that most of the actually observed ring structure of the major planets remains unexplained.

  8. Barely Bisected Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-12

    Saturn's shadow stretched beyond the edge of its rings for many years after Cassini first arrived at Saturn, casting an ever-lengthening shadow that reached its maximum extent at the planet's 2009 equinox. This image captured the moment in 2015 when the shrinking shadow just barely reached across the entire main ring system. The shadow will continue to shrink until the planet's northern summer solstice, at which point it will once again start lengthening across the rings, reaching across them in 2019. Like Earth, Saturn is tilted on its axis. And, just as on Earth, as the sun climbs higher in the sky, shadows get shorter. The projection of the planet's shadow onto the rings shrinks and grows over the course of its 29-year-long orbit, as the angle of the sun changes with respect to Saturn's equator. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 11 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Jan. 16, 2015. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.6 million miles (2.5 million kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is about 90 miles (150 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20498

  9. The orbits of the uranian satellites and rings, the gravity field of the uranian system, and the orientation of the pole of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, R. A., E-mail: robert.jacobson@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-11-01

    French et al. determined the orbits of the Uranian rings, the orientation of the pole of Uranus, and the gravity harmonics of Uranus from Earth-based and Voyager ring occultations. Jacobson et al. determined the orbits of the Uranian satellites and the masses of Uranus and its satellites from Earth-based astrometry and observations acquired with the Voyager 2 spacecraft; they used the gravity harmonics and pole from French et al. Jacobson and Rush reconstructed the Voyager 2 trajectory and redetermined the Uranian system gravity parameters, satellite orbits, and ring orbits in a combined analysis of the data used previously augmented withmore » additional Earth-based astrometry. Here we report on an extension of that work that incorporates additional astrometry and ring occultations together with improved data processing techniques.« less

  10. Experimental investigation of thermal processes in the multi-ring Couette system with counter rotation of cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamonov, V. N.; Nazarov, A. D.; Serov, A. F.; Terekhov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of parameters of the multi-ring Couette system with counter rotating coaxial cylinders on the process of thermal energy release in a viscous liquid filling this system is considered with regard to the problem of determining the possibility of creating the high-performance wind heat generator. The multi-cylinder rotor design allows directly conversion of the mechanical power of a device consisting of two "rotor" wind turbines with a common axis normal to the air flow into the thermal energy in a wide range of rotational speed of the cylinders. Experimental results on the measurement of thermal power released in the pilot heat generator at different relative angular speeds of cylinder rotation are presented.

  11. A mechanical mechanism for translocation of ring-shaped helicases on DNA and its demonstration in a macroscopic simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Y. C.

    2018-04-01

    The asymmetry in the two-layered ring structure of helicases and the random thermal fluctuations of the helicase and DNA molecules are considered as the bases for the generation of the force required for translocation of the ring-shaped helicase on DNA. The helicase comprises a channel at its center with two unequal ends, through which strands of DNA can pass. The random collisions between the portion of the DNA strand in the central channel and the wall of the channel generate an impulsive force toward the small end. This impulsive force is the starting point for the helicase to translocate along the DNA with the small end in front. Such a physical mechanism may serve as a complementary for the chemomechanical mechanism of the translocation of helicase on DNA. When the helicase arrives at the junction of ssDNA and dsDNA (a fork), the collision between the helicase and the closest base pair may produce a sufficient impulsive force to break the weak hydrogen bond of the base pair. Thus, the helicase may advance and repeat the process of unwinding the dsDNA strand. This mechanism was tested in a macroscopic simulation system where the helicase was simulated using a truncated-cone structure and DNA was simulated with bead chains. Many features of translocation and unwinding such as translocation on ssDNA and dsDNA, unwinding of dsDNA, rewinding, strand switching, and Holliday junction resolution were reproduced.

  12. The composition and structure of planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of planetary ring systems are summarized herein; emphasis is given to the available evidence on their compositions and to their dynamical attributes. Somewhat contaminated water ice makes up the vast expanse of Saturn's rings. Modified methane ice may comprise Uranus' rings while silicates are the likely material of the Jovian ring. Saturn's rings form an elaborate system whose characteristics are still being documented and whose nature is being unravelled following the Voyager flybys. Uranus' nine narrow bands display an intriguing dynamical structure thought to be caused by unseen shephard satellites. Jupiter's ring system is a mere wisp, probably derived as ejecta off hidden parent bodies.

  13. ABCD2 identifies a subclass of peroxisomes in mouse adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaoxi, E-mail: xiaoxi.liu@uky.edu; Liu, Jingjing, E-mail: jingjing.liu0@gmail.com; Lester, Joshua D., E-mail: joshua.lester@uky.edu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We examined the D2 localization and the proteome of D2-containing compartment in mouse adipose tissue. • We confirmed the presence of D2 on a subcellular compartment that has typical structure as a microperoxisome. • We demonstrated the scarcity of peroxisome markers on D2-containing compartment. • The D2-containing compartment may be a subpopulation of peroxisome in mouse adipose tissue. • Proteomic data suggests potential association between D2-containing compartment and mitochondria and ER. - Abstract: ATP-binding cassette transporter D2 (D2) is an ABC half transporter that is thought to promote the transport of very long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs into peroxisomes. Bothmore » D2 and peroxisomes increase during adipogenesis. Although peroxisomes are essential to both catabolic and anabolic lipid metabolism, their function, and that of D2, in adipose tissues remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the D2 localization and the proteome of D2-containing organelles, in adipose tissue. Centrifugation of mouse adipose homogenates generated a fraction enriched with D2, but deficient in peroxisome markers including catalase, PEX19, and ABCD3 (D3). Electron microscopic imaging of this fraction confirmed the presence of D2 protein on an organelle with a dense matrix and a diameter of ∼200 nm, the typical structure and size of a microperoxisome. D2 and PEX19 antibodies recognized distinct structures in mouse adipose. Immunoisolation of the D2-containing compartment confirmed the scarcity of PEX19 and proteomic profiling revealed the presence of proteins associated with peroxisome, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and mitochondria. D2 is localized to a distinct class of peroxisomes that lack many peroxisome proteins, and may associate physically with mitochondria and the ER.« less

  14. Flexure-Ring for Centering a Concave Lens in a Bore of a Housing for an Optical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Virginia G. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A flexure-ring is provided for centering a lens in a bore of a housing with 3N lens contacting stubs, where N is an integer equal to or greater than one. The stubs are formed by increasing the inside diameter of the ring made to fit tightly around a lens except at 3N locations for the aforesaid stubs, and said ring having an outside diameter made to fit tightly inside the housing bore locations. Behind each stub, a segment of the ring is removed down to a chord perpendicular to a ring diameter passing through the center of each stub. That chord is selected to have a length greater than the lens contacting surface of the stub, thereby to produce a reduced cross section of the ring on both sides of the stub to serve as flexures in relieving stresses due to different coefficients of thermal expansion of the three parts involved due to changes in temperature while in use.

  15. The ABCD2 score is better for stroke risk prediction after anterior circulation TIA compared to posterior circulation TIA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjun; Wu, Jimin; Liu, Rongyi; Gao, Feng; Hu, Haitao; Yin, Xinzhen

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) are divided into anterior and posterior circulation types (AC-TIA, PC-TIA, respectively). In the present study, we sought to evaluate the ABCD2 score for predicting stroke in either AC-TIA or PC-TIA. We prospectively studied 369 consecutive patients who presented with TIA between June 2009 and December 2012. The 7 d occurrence of stroke after TIA was recorded and correlated with the ABCD2 score with regards to AC-TIA or PC-TIA. Overall, 273 AC-TIA and 96 PC-TIA patients were recruited. Twenty-one patients with AC-TIA and seven with PC-TIA developed a stroke within the subsequent 7 d (7.7% vs. 7.3%, p = 0.899). The ABCD2 score had a higher predictive value of stroke occurrence in AC-TIA (the AUC was 0.790; 95% CI, 0.677-0.903) than in PC-TIA (the AUC was 0.535; 95% CI, 0.350-0.727) and the z-value of two receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 2.24 (p = 0.025). AC-TIA resulted in a higher incidence of both unilateral weakness and speech disturbance and longer durations of the symptoms. Inversely, PC-TIA was associated with a higher incidence of diabetes mellitus (19.8% vs. 10.6%, p = 0.022). Evaluating each component of scores, age ≥ 60 yr (OR = 7.010, 95% CI 1.599-30.743), unilateral weakness (OR = 3.455, 95% CI 1.131-10.559), and blood pressure (OR = 9.652, 95% CI 2.202-42.308) were associated with stroke in AC-TIA, while in PC-TIA, diabetes mellitus (OR = 9.990, 95% CI 1.895-52.650) was associated with stroke. In our study, the ABCD2 score could predict the short-term risk of stroke after AC-TIA, but might have limitation for PC-TIA.

  16. Decadal Survey: Planetary Rings Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M. K.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Lissauer, J. J.; Poulet, F.; Brahic, A.; Charnoz, S.; Ferrari, C.; Burns, J. A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Durisen, R. H.; Rappaport, N. J.; Spilker, L. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Bosh, A. S.; Olkin, C.; Larson, S. M.; Graps, A. L.; Krueger, H.; Black, G. J.; Festou, M.; Karjalainen, R.; Salo, H. J.; Murray, C. D.; Showalter, M. R.; Dones, L.; Levison, H. F.; Namouni, F.; Araki, S.; Lewis, M. C.; Brooks, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Horanyi, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Krivov, A.; Schmidt, J.; Spahn, F.; Hamilton, D. P.; Giuliatti-Winter, S.; French, R. G.

    2001-11-01

    The National Research Council's Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration(COMPLEX) met earlier this year to begin the organization of a major activity, "A New Strategy for Solar System Exploration." Several members of the planetary rings community formed an ad hoc panel to discuss the current state and future prospects for the study of planetary rings. In this paper we summarize fundamental questions of ring science, list the key science questions expected to occupy the planetary rings community for the decade 2003-2013, outline the initiatives, missions, and other supporting activities needed to address those questions, and recommend priorities.

  17. Synthesis of novel chromenones linked to 1,2,3-triazole ring system: Investigation of biological activities against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Mina; Safavi, Maliheh; Karimpour-Razkenari, Elahe; Mahdavi, Mohammad; Edraki, Najmeh; Moghadam, Farshad Homayouni; Khanavi, Mahnaz; Akbarzadeh, Tahmineh

    2017-02-01

    In this work, novel chromenones linked to 1,2,3-triazole ring system were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-ChE activity. Among them, N-((1-(2-chlorobenzyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)methyl)-8-methoxy-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide (6m) showed good anti-acetylcholinesterase activity (IC 50 =15.42μM). Also, compound 6m demonstrated neuroprotective effect against H 2 O 2 -induced cell death in PC12 neurons, however, it showed no beta-secretase (BACE1) inhibitory activity. Docking and kinetic studies separately confirmed dual binding activity of compound 6m since it targeted both the catalytic active site (CAS) and the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Saturn's rings and associated ring plasma cavity: Evidence for slow ring erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2017-08-01

    We re-examine the radio and plasma wave observations obtained during the Cassini Saturn orbit insertion period, as the spacecraft flew over the northern ring surface into a radial distance of 1.3 Rs (over the C-ring). Voyager era studies suggest the rings are a source of micro-meteoroid generated plasma and dust, with theorized peak impact-created plasma outflows over the densest portion of the rings (central B-ring). In sharp contrast, the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave System (RPWS) observations identify the presence of a ring-plasma cavity located in the central portion of the B-ring, with little evidence of impact-related plasma. While previous Voyager era studies have predicted unstable ion orbits over the C-ring, leading to field-aligned plasma transport to Saturn's ionosphere, the Cassini RPWS observations do not reveal evidence for such instability-created plasma 'fountains'. Given the passive ring loss processes observed by Cassini, we find that the ring lifetimes should extend >109 years, and that there is limited evidence for prompt destruction (loss in <100 Myrs).

  19. Saturn's Rings and Associated Ring Plasma Cavity: Evidence for Slow Ring Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    We re-examine the radio and plasma wave observations obtained during the Cassini Saturn orbit insertion period, as the spacecraft flew over the northern ring surface into a radial distance of 1.3 Rs (over the C-ring). Voyager era studies suggest the rings are a source of micro-meteoroid generated plasma and dust, with theorized peak impact-created plasma outflows over the densest portion of the rings (central B-ring). In sharp contrast, the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave System (RPWS) observations identify the presence of a ring-plasma cavity located in the central portion of the B-ring, with little evidence of impact-related plasma. While previous Voyager era studies have predicted unstable ion orbits over the C- ring, leading to field-aligned plasma transport to Saturns ionosphere, the Cassini RPWS observations do not reveal evidence for such instability-created plasma fountains. Given the passive ring loss processes observed by Cassini, we find that the ring lifetimes should extend >10(exp 9) years, and that there is limited evidence for prompt destruction (loss in <100 Myrs).

  20. Removal of copper and iron by polyurethane foam column in FIA system for the determination of nickel in pierced ring.

    PubMed

    Vongboot, Monnapat; Suesoonthon, Monrudee

    2015-01-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) mini-column was used to eliminate copper and iron for the determination of nickel in pierced rings. The PUF mini-column was connected to FIA system for on-line sorption of copper and iron in complexes form of CuSCN(+) and FeSCN(2+). For this season, the acid solution containing a mixture of Ni(II), Fe(III), Cu(II) and SCN(-) ions was firstly flew into the PUF column. Then, the percolated solution which Fe(III) and Cu(II) ions is separated from analysis was injected into FIA system to react with 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) reagent in basic condition which this method is called pH gradient technique. The Ni-PAR complexes obtained were measured theirs absorbance at 500 nm by UV visible spectrophotometer. In this study, it was found that Cu(II) and Fe(III) were completely to form complexes with 400 mmol/L KSCN and entirely to eliminate in acidic condition at pH 3.0. In the optimum condition of these experiments, the method provided the linear relationship between absorbance and the concentration of Ni(II) in the range from 5.00 to 30.00 mg/L. Linear equation is y=0.0134x+0.0033 (R(2)=0.9948). Precision, assessed in the term of the relative standard deviation, RSD, and accuracy for multiple determinations obtained in values of 0.77-1.73% and 97.4%, respectively. The level of an average amount of Ni(II) in six piercing rings was evaluated to be 14.78 mg/g. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Image processing and analysis of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagi, G. M.; Jepsen, P. L.; Garneau, G. W.; Mosher, J. A.; Doyle, L. R.; Lorre, J. J.; Avis, C. C.; Korsmo, E. P.

    1981-01-01

    Processing of Voyager image data of Saturn's rings at JPL's Image Processing Laboratory is described. A software system to navigate the flight images, facilitate feature tracking, and to project the rings has been developed. This system has been used to make measurements of ring radii and to measure the velocities of the spoke features in the B-Ring. A projected ring movie to study the development of these spoke features has been generated. Finally, processing to facilitate comparison of the photometric properties of Saturn's rings at various phase angles is described.

  2. How Jupiter's Ring Was Discovered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, James; Kerr, Richard

    1985-01-01

    "Rings" (by astronomer James Elliot and science writer Richard Kerr) is a nontechnical book about the discovery and exploration of ring systems from the time of Galileo to the era of the Voyager spacecraft. One of this book's chapters is presented. (JN)

  3. Investigation of a L1-optimized choke ring ground plane for a low-cost GPS receiver-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Schwieger, Volker

    2018-01-01

    Besides the geodetic dual-frequency GNSS receivers-systems (receiver and antenna), there are also low-cost single-frequency GPS receiver-systems. The multipath effect is a limiting factor of accuracy for both geodetic dual-frequency and low-cost single-frequency GPS receivers. And the multipath effect is for the short baselines dominating error (typical for the monitoring in Engineering Geodesy). So accuracy and reliability of GPS measurement for monitoring can be improved by reducing the multipath signal. In this paper, the self-constructed L1-optimized choke ring ground plane (CR-GP) is applied to reduce the multipath signal. Its design will be described and its performance will be investigated. The results show that the introduced low-cost single-frequency GPS receiver-system, which contains the Ublox LEA-6T single-frequency GPS receiver and Trimble Bullet III antenna with a self-constructed L1-optimized CR-GP, can reach standard deviations of 3 mm in east, 5 mm in north and 9 mm in height in the test field which has many reflectors. This accuracy is comparable with the geodetic dual-frequency GNSS receiver-system. The improvement of the standard deviation of the measurement using the CR-GP is about 50 % and 35 % compared to the used antenna without shielding and with flat ground plane respectively.

  4. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  5. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  6. Maternal lipid profile during early pregnancy and pregnancy complications and outcomes: the ABCD study.

    PubMed

    Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; Krukziener, Náthalie; Hutten, Barbara A; Vollebregt, Karlijn C; van Eijsden, Manon; Twickler, Marcel B

    2012-11-01

    Elevated lipid levels during late pregnancy are associated with complications and adverse outcome for both mother and newborn. However, it is inconclusive whether a disturbed lipid profile during early pregnancy has similar negative associations. Our objective was to investigate whether nonfasting maternal total cholesterol and triglyceride levels during early pregnancy are associated with six major adverse pregnancy outcomes. Data were derived from the Amsterdam Born Children and Their Development (ABCD) cohort study. Random blood samples of nonfasting total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were determined during early gestation (median = 13, interquartile range = 12-14 wk). Outcome measures were pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), preeclampsia, preterm birth, small/large for gestational age (SGA/LGA), and child loss. Only nondiabetic women with singleton deliveries were included; the baseline sample consisted of 4008 women. Analysis for PIH and preeclampsia were performed in nulliparous women only (n = 2037). Mean (sd) triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were 1.33 (0.55) and 4.98 (0.87) mmol/liter, respectively. The incidence of pregnancy complications and perinatal outcomes were as follows: PIH, 4.9%; preeclampsia, 3.7%; preterm birth, 5.3%; SGA, 9.3%; LGA, 9.3%; and child loss, 1.4%. After adjustments, every unit increase in triglycerides was linearly associated with an increased risk of PIH [odds ratio (OR) = 1.60, P = 0.021], preeclampsia (OR = 1.69, P = 0.018), LGA (OR = 1.48, P < 0.001), and induced preterm delivery (OR = 1.69, P = 0.006). No associations were found for SGA or child loss. Total cholesterol was not associated with any of the outcome measures. Elevated maternal triglyceride levels measured during early pregnancy are associated with pregnancy complications and adverse pregnancy outcomes. These results suggest that future lifestyle programs in women of reproductive age with a focus on lowering triglyceride levels (i.e. diet, weight

  7. Interobserver reliability of the young-burgess and tile classification systems for fractures of the pelvic ring.

    PubMed

    Koo, Henry; Leveridge, Mike; Thompson, Charles; Zdero, Rad; Bhandari, Mohit; Kreder, Hans J; Stephen, David; McKee, Michael D; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure interobserver reliability of 2 classification systems of pelvic ring fractures and to determine whether computed tomography (CT) improves reliability. The reliability of several radiographic findings was also tested. Thirty patients taken from a database at a Level I trauma facility were reviewed. For each patient, 3 radiographs (AP pelvis, inlet, and outlet) and CT scans were available. Six different reviewers (pelvic and acetabular specialist, orthopaedic traumatologist, or orthopaedic trainee) classified the injury according to Young-Burgess and Tile classification systems after reviewing plain radiographs and then after CT scans. The Kappa coefficient was used to determine interobserver reliability of these classification systems before and after CT scan. For plain radiographs, overall Kappa values for the Young-Burgess and Tile classification systems were 0.72 and 0.30, respectively. For CT scan and plain radiographs, the overall Kappa values for the Young-Burgess and Tile classification systems were 0.63 and 0.33, respectively. The pelvis/acetabular surgeons demonstrated the highest level of agreement using both classification systems. For individual questions, the addition of CT did significantly improve reviewer interpretation of fracture stability. The pre-CT and post-CT Kappa values for fracture stability were 0.59 and 0.93, respectively. The CT scan can improve the reliability of assessment of pelvic stability because of its ability to identify anatomical features of injury. The Young-Burgess system may be optimal for the learning surgeon. The Tile classification system is more beneficial for specialists in pelvic and acetabular surgery.

  8. Fractional conductance oscillations in quantum rings: wave packet picture of transport in a few-electron system.

    PubMed

    Chwiej, T; Szafran, B

    2013-04-17

    We study electron transfer across a two-terminal quantum ring using a time-dependent description of the scattering process. For the considered scattering event the quantum ring is initially charged with one or two electrons, with another electron incident to the ring from the input channel. We study the electron transfer probability (T) as a function of the external magnetic field. We determine the periodicity of T for a varied number of electrons confined within the ring. For that purpose we develop a method to describe the wave packet dynamics for a few electrons participating in the scattering process, taking into full account the electron-electron correlations. We find that electron transfer across the quantum ring initially charged by a single electron acquires a distinct periodicity of half of the magnetic flux quantum (Φ0/2), corresponding to the formation of a transient two-electron state inside the ring. In the case of a three-electron scattering problem with two electrons initially occupying the ring, a period of Φ0/3 for T is formed in the limit of thin channels. The effect of disorder present in the confinement potential of the ring is also discussed.

  9. The pgaABCD Locus of Escherichia coli Promotes the Synthesis of a Polysaccharide Adhesin Required for Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Preston, James F.; Romeo, Tony

    2004-01-01

    Production of a polysaccharide matrix is a hallmark of bacterial biofilms, but the composition of matrix polysaccharides and their functions are not widely understood. Previous studies of the regulation of Escherichia coli biofilm formation suggested the involvement of an unknown adhesin. We now establish that the pgaABCD (formerly ycdSRQP) locus affects biofilm development by promoting abiotic surface binding and intercellular adhesion. All of the pga genes are required for optimal biofilm formation under a variety of growth conditions. A pga-dependent cell-bound polysaccharide was isolated and determined by nuclear magnetic resonance analyses to consist of unbranched β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, a polymer previously unknown from the gram-negative bacteria but involved in adhesion by staphylococci. The pga genes are predicted to encode envelope proteins involved in synthesis, translocation, and possibly surface docking of this polysaccharide. As predicted, if poly-β-1,6-GlcNAc (PGA) mediates cohesion, metaperiodate caused biofilm dispersal and the release of intact cells, whereas treatment with protease or other lytic enzymes had no effect. The pgaABCD operon exhibits features of a horizontally transferred locus and is present in a variety of eubacteria. Therefore, we propose that PGA serves as an adhesin that stabilizes biofilms of E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:15090514

  10. Lactose metabolism by Staphylococcus aureus: characterization of lacABCD, the structural genes of the tagatose 6-phosphate pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Rosey, E L; Oskouian, B; Stewart, G C

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the lacA and lacB genes of the Staphylococcus aureus lactose operon (lacABCDFEG) are presented. The primary translation products are polypeptides of 142 (Mr = 15,425) and 171 (Mr = 18,953) amino acids, respectively. The lacABCD loci were shown to encode enzymes of the tagatose 6-phosphate pathway through both in vitro studies and complementation analysis in Escherichia coli. A serum aldolase assay, modified to allow detection of the tagatose 6-phosphate pathway enzymes utilizing galactose 6-phosphate or fructose phosphate analogs as substrate, is described. Expression of both lacA and lacB was required for galactose 6-phosphate isomerase activity. LacC (34 kDa) demonstrated tagatose 6-phosphate kinase activity and was found to share significant homology with LacC from Lactococcus lactis and with both the minor 6-phosphofructokinase (PfkB) and 1-phosphofructokinase (FruK) from E. coli. Detection of tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase activity was dependent on expression of the 36-kDa protein specified by lacD. The LacD protein is highly homologous with LacD of L. lactis. Thus, the lacABCD genes comprise the tagatose 6-phosphate pathway and are cotranscribed with genes lacFEG, which specify proteins for transport and cleavage of lactose in S. aureus. PMID:1655695

  11. The Search for Ringed Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Are planetary rings as common in our galaxy as they are in our solar system? A new study demonstrates how we might search for ringed exoplanets and then possibly finds one!Saturns Elsewhere?Artists illustration of the super ring system around exoplanet J1407b. This is the only exoplanet weve found with rings, but its not at all like Saturn. [Ron Miller]Our solar system is filled with moons and planetary rings, so it stands to reason that exoplanetary systems should exhibit the same features. But though weve been in the planet-hunting game for decades, weve only found one exoplanet thats surrounded by a ring system. Whats more, that system J1407b has enormous rings that are vastly different from the modest, Saturn-like rings that we might expect to be more commonplace.Have we not discovered ringed exoplanets just because theyre hard to identify? Or is it because theyre not out there? A team of scientists led by Masataka Aizawa (University of Tokyo) has set out to answer this question by conducting a systematic search for rings around long-period planet candidates.The transit light curve of KIC 10403228, shown with three models: the best-fitting planet-only model (blue) and the two best-fitting planet+ring models (green and red). [Aizawa et al. 2017]The Hunt BeginsWhy long-period planets? Rings are expected to be unstable as the planet gets closer to the central star. Whats more, the planet needs to be far enough away from the stars warmth for the icy rings to exist. The authors therefore select from the collection of candidate transiting planets 89 long-period candidates that might be able to host rings.Aizawa and collaborators then fit single-planet models (with no rings) to the light curves of these planets and search for anomalies curves that arent fit well by these standard models. Particularly suspicious characteristics include a long ingress/egress as the planet moves across the face of the star, and asymmetry of the transit shape.After applying a series of

  12. Accuracy of screw fixation using the O-arm® and StealthStation® navigation system for unstable pelvic ring fractures.

    PubMed

    Takeba, Jun; Umakoshi, Kensuke; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Hironori; Annen, Suguru; Moriyama, Naoki; Nakabayashi, Yuki; Sato, Norio; Aibiki, Mayuki

    2018-04-01

    Screw fixation for unstable pelvic ring fractures is generally performed using the C-arm. However, some studies reported erroneous piercing with screws, nerve injuries, and vessel injuries. Recent studies have reported the efficacy of screw fixations using navigation systems. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the accuracy of screw fixation using the O-arm ® imaging system and StealthStation ® navigation system for unstable pelvic ring fractures. The participants were 10 patients with unstable pelvic ring fractures, who underwent screw fixations using the O-arm StealthStation navigation system (nine cases with iliosacral screw and one case with lateral compression screw). We investigated operation duration, bleeding during operation, the presence of complications during operation, and the presence of cortical bone perforation by the screws based on postoperative CT scan images. We also measured the difference in screw tip positions between intraoperative navigation screen shot images and postoperative CT scan images. The average operation duration was 71 min, average bleeding was 12 ml, and there were no nerve or vessel injuries during the operation. There was no cortical bone perforation by the screws. The average difference between intraoperative navigation images and postoperative CT images was 2.5 ± 0.9 mm, for all 18 screws used in this study. Our results suggest that the O-arm StealthStation navigation system provides accurate screw fixation for unstable pelvic ring fractures.

  13. The LEO Archipelago: A system of earth-rings for communications, mass-transport to space, solar power, and control of global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenberg, Andrew; Karthik Balaji, P. S.

    2011-06-01

    Man's quest to get into space is hindered by major problems (e.g., system-development and capital costs, expense of putting mass into orbit, trapped-radiation belts, and environmental impact of a large increase in rocket launches). A multi-purpose low-earth-orbit system of rings circling the earth - the "LEO ARCHIPELAGO TM" - is proposed as a means of solving or bypassing many of them. A fiber-optic ring about the earth would be an initial testing and developmental stage for the Ring Systems, while providing cash-flow through a LEO-based, high-band-width, world-wide communication system. A low-earth-orbit-based space-elevator system, "Sling-on-a-Ring TM", is proposed as the crucial developmental stage of the LEO Archipelago. Being a LEO-based heavy-mass lifter, rather than earth- or GEO-based, it is much less massive and therefore less costly than other proposed space-elevators. With the advent of lower-cost, higher-mass transport to orbit, the options for further space development (e.g., space solar power, radiation, and space-debris dampers, sun shades, and permanent LEO habitation) are greatly expanded. This paper provides an update of the Sling-on-a-Ring concept in terms of new materials, potential applications, and trade-offs associated with an earlier model. The impact of Colossal Carbon Tubes, CCT, a new material with high tensile strength, extremely-low density, and other favorable properties, and other new technologies (e.g., solar-powered lasers, power beaming to near-space and earth, and thermal-control systems) on the development of associated LEO-Ring systems is also explored. The material's effect on the timeline for the system development indicates the feasibility of near-term implementation of the system (possibly within the decade). The Sling-on-a-Ring can provide a less-expensive, environment-friendly mode of access to space. This would pave the way (via eventual operation at >1000 t per day by 2050) for large scale development of space

  14. The TubR-centromere complex adopts a double-ring segrosome structure in Type III partition systems.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Bárbara; Martín-González, Alejandro; Carrasco, Carolina; Hernández-Arriaga, Ana M; Ruíz-Quero, Rubén; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Oliva, María A

    2018-05-14

    In prokaryotes, the centromere is a specialized segment of DNA that promotes the assembly of the segrosome upon binding of the Centromere Binding Protein (CBP). The segrosome structure exposes a specific surface for the interaction of the CBP with the motor protein that mediates DNA movement during cell division. Additionally, the CBP usually controls the transcriptional regulation of the segregation system as a cell cycle checkpoint. Correct segrosome functioning is therefore indispensable for accurate DNA segregation. Here, we combine biochemical reconstruction and structural and biophysical analysis to bring light to the architecture of the segrosome complex in Type III partition systems. We present the particular features of the centromere site, tubC, of the model system encoded in Clostridium botulinum prophage c-st. We find that the split centromere site contains two different iterons involved in the binding and spreading of the CBP, TubR. The resulting nucleoprotein complex consists of a novel double-ring structure that covers part of the predicted promoter. Single molecule data provides a mechanism for the formation of the segrosome structure based on DNA bending and unwinding upon TubR binding.

  15. A microcomputer-based data acquisition and control system for the direct shear, ring shear, triaxial shear, and consolidation tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Philip S.

    1983-01-01

    This report is intended to provide internal documentation for the U.S. Geological Survey laboratory's automatic data acquisition system. The operating procedures for each type of test are designed to independently lead a first-time user through the various stages of using the computer to control the test. Continuing advances in computer technology and the availability of desktop microcomputers with a wide variety of peripheral equipment at a reasonable cost can create an efficient automated geotechnical testing environment. A geotechnical testing environment is shown in figure 1. Using an automatic data acquisition system, laboratory test data from a variety of sensors can be collected, and manually or automatically recorded on a magnetic device at the same apparent time. The responses of a test can be displayed graphically on a CRT in a matter of seconds, giving the investigator an opportunity to evaluate the test data, and to make timely, informed decisions on such matters as whether to continue testing, abandon a test, or modify procedures. Data can be retrieved and results reported in tabular form, or graphic plots, suitable for publication. Thermistors, thermocouples, load cells, pressure transducers, and linear variable differential transformers are typical sensors which are incorporated in automated systems. The geotechnical tests which are most practical to automate are the long-term tests which often require readings to be recorded outside normal work hours and on weekends. Automation applications include incremental load consolidation tests, constant-rate-of-strain consolidation tests, direct shear tests, ring shear tests, and triaxial shear tests.

  16. Castro ring zone: a 4,500-km2 fossil hydrothermal system in the Challis volcanic field, central Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, R.E.; Ekren, E.B.; Hardyman, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The largest fossil hydrothermal system occupying a 4500 km2 area in central Idaho is revealed by delta 18O studies. The remains of this meteoric-hydrothermal system are preserved within a sharply bounded, 15 km wide, 70-km-diameter annulus of low delta 18O rock (+2.0 to -8.8per mille) termed the Castro ring zone. The zone is centred on a less depleted (+4.5) core zone consisting of granitic rocks of the Castro pluton. This 700-km2 Eocene subvolcanic batholith has intruded, domed, and hydrothermally metamorphosed a thick sequence of Challis Volcanics, the stratigraphically low rocks in the 2000-km2 Van Horn Peak and the 1000-km2 Thunder Mountain cauldron complexes being most strongly altered. Less extreme 18O depletions occur in the youngest major ash-flow sheets of these complexes, indicating a vertical 18O gradient. Water/rock ratios of geothermal systems are surprisingly insensitive to the circulation scale.-L.-di H.

  17. Cavity-locked ring down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Harb, Charles C.; Spence, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Distinct locking and sampling light beams are used in a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system to perform multiple ring-down measurements while the laser and ring-down cavity are continuously locked. The sampling and locking light beams have different frequencies, to ensure that the sampling and locking light are decoupled within the cavity. Preferably, the ring-down cavity is ring-shaped, the sampling light is s-polarized, and the locking light is p-polarized. Transmitted sampling light is used for ring-down measurements, while reflected locking light is used for locking in a Pound-Drever scheme.

  18. Structural, energetic, spectroscopic and QTAIM analyses of cation-π interactions involving mono- and bi-cyclic ring fused benzene systems.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ayorinde; Dinadayalane, Tandabany C; Grabowski, Sławomir J; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-12-28

    The effect of increasing the number of monocyclic six-membered rings or bicyclic rings of bicyclo[2.1.1]hexenyl fused to benzene on cation-π interactions involving alkali metal ions (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+)) has been investigated. The binding energy data at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level clearly indicate that the binding affinity of the metal ion with benzene is enhanced by increasing the number of rings fused irrespective of a monocyclic or a bicyclic ring. Calculated binding energies are in good agreement with the available experimental results. The binding strength of cations with ligands decreases in the order Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+). Our study establishes that trisannelation of bicyclo[2.1.1]hexene to benzene facilitates a very strong interaction between benzene and cations. Infrared (IR) frequencies and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts are shown to be valuable in characterizing cation-π interactions. The C-C bonds of the central six-membered rings are weakened due to metal ion binding. Based on the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM), we have observed the presence of stabilizing H∙∙∙H interactions in two of the considered systems as opposed to the frequent description of these interactions as non-bonded repulsive interactions. Alkali metal ion binding with those two ligands slightly reduces the strength of such H∙∙∙H interactions.

  19. Experiments with a New, Unique Large-Scale Rig Investigating the Effects of Background System Rotation on Vortex Rings in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brend, Mark A.; Verzicco, Roberto

    2005-11-01

    We introduce our unique, new large-scale experimental facility [1] designed for our long-term research program investigating the effects of background system rotation on the stability and the dynamics of vortex rings. The new rig constitutes a large water-filled tank positioned on a rotating turntable and its overall height and diameter are 5.7m and 1.4 m, respectively. First experimental and computational results of our program are summarized. We will show various videos of flow visualizations that illustrate some major, qualitative differences between rings propagating in rotating and non-rotating flows. Some of the investigated characteristics of the vortex rings include their translation velocity, the velocity field inside and surrounding the rings, and, in particular, their stability. We will briefly outline experiments employing the relatively new Ultrasonic-Velocity-Profiler technique (UVP). This technique appears to be particularly suited for some of our measurements and it was, as far as we are aware, not previously used in the context of vortex-ring studies. [1] http://www.eng.warwick.ac.uk/staff/pjt/turntabpics/voriskt.html

  20. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  1. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell

    2000-01-01

    An all-refelctive optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six refelecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  2. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David R.

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receive a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  3. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  4. In-situ calibration: migrating control system IP module calibration from the bench to the storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Jonah M.; Chin, Michael

    2002-04-30

    The Control System for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) uses in-house designed IndustryPack(registered trademark) (IP) modules contained in compact PCI (cPCI) crates with 16-bit analog I/O to control instrumentation. To make the IP modules interchangeable, each module is calibrated for gain and offset compensation. We initially developed a method of verifying and calibrating the IP modules in a lab bench test environment using a PC with LabVIEW. The subsequent discovery that the ADCs have significant drift characteristics over periods of days of installed operation prompted development of an ''in-situ'' calibration process--one in which themore » IP modules can be calibrated without removing them from the cPCI crates in the storage ring. This paper discusses the original LabVIEW PC calibration and the migration to the proposed in-situ EPICS control system calibration.« less

  5. A free-flowing soap film combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy as a detection system for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Markus; Welsch, Thomas; Jones, Harold

    2010-05-07

    We have shown that a free-flowing soap film has sufficiently high-quality optical properties to allow it to be used in the cavity of a ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). The flow rates required to maintain a stable soap film were similar to those used in liquid chromatography and thus allowed interfacing with an HPLC system for use as an optical detector. We have investigated the properties of the system in a relevant analytical application. The soap film/CRDS combination was used at 355 nm as a detector for the separation of a mixture of nitroarenes. These compounds play a role in the residue analysis of areas contaminated with explosives and their decomposition products. In spite of the short absorption path length (9 microm) obtained by the soap film, the high-sensitivity of CRDS allowed a limit of detection of 4 x 10(-6) in absorption units (AU) or less than 17 fmol in the detection volume to be achieved. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A survey of candidate missions to explore Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. C.; Price, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    The ring system around Saturn is discussed. Exploration of the rings is required for an understanding of their origin and the hazard they represent to spacecraft near Saturn. In addition the rings may provide useful clues to the origin of the solar system. This study examines the problem of ring system exploration and recommends a sequence of missions which will collect the data required.

  7. Integrally Closed Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuganbaev, A. A.

    1982-04-01

    This paper studies integrally closed rings. It is shown that a semiprime integrally closed Goldie ring is the direct product of a semisimple artinian ring and a finite number of integrally closed invariant domains that are classically integrally closed in their (division) rings of fractions. It is shown also that an integrally closed ring has a classical ring of fractions and is classically integrally closed in it.Next, integrally closed noetherian rings are considered. It is shown that an integrally closed noetherian ring all of whose nonzero prime ideals are maximal is either a quasi-Frobenius ring or a hereditary invariant domain.Finally, those noetherian rings all of whose factor rings are invariant are described, and the connection between integrally closed rings and distributive rings is examined.Bibliography: 13 titles.

  8. The Ring of Fire: The Effects of Slope upon Pattern Formation in Simulated Forest Fire Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillo, Robin; Manz, Niklas

    We report about spreading fire fronts under sloped conditions using the general cellular automaton model and data from physical scaled-down experiments. Punckt et al. published experimental and computational results for planar systems and our preliminary results confirmed the expected speed-slope dependence of fire fronts propagating up or down the hill with a cut-off slope value above which no fire front can exist. Here we focus on two fascinating structures in reaction-diffusion systems: circular expanding target pattern and rotating spirals. We investigated the behaviors of both structures with varied values for the slope of the forest and the homogeneity of the trees. For both variables, a range of values was found for which target pattern or spiral formation was possible.

  9. A Diastereoselective Intramolecular Pauson-Khand Approach to the Construction of the BC Ring System in Tuberostemoninol

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiangna; Williams, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Herein we describe an asymmetric approach to the synthesis of a BC-ring synthon in tuberostemoninol via an intramolecular Pauson-Khand reaction stereocontrolled by a commercially available chiral glycinate. PMID:19779590

  10. A Diastereoselective Intramolecular Pauson-Khand Approach to the Construction of the BC Ring System in Tuberostemoninol.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangna; Williams, Robert M

    2008-12-12

    Herein we describe an asymmetric approach to the synthesis of a BC-ring synthon in tuberostemoninol via an intramolecular Pauson-Khand reaction stereocontrolled by a commercially available chiral glycinate.

  11. Epimetheus Above the Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-09

    Although Epimetheus appears to be lurking above the rings here, it's actually just an illusion resulting from the viewing angle. In reality, Epimetheus and the rings both orbit in Saturn's equatorial plane. Inner moons and rings orbit very near the equatorial plane of each of the four giant planets in our solar system, but more distant moons can have orbits wildly out of the equatorial plane. It has been theorized that the highly inclined orbits of the outer, distant moons are remnants of the random directions from which they approached the planets they orbit. This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about -0.3 degrees below the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 26, 2015. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 500,000 miles (800,000 kilometers) from Epimetheus and at a Sun-Epimetheus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 62 degrees. Image scale is 3 miles (5 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18342

  12. Uranus and the shape of elliptical rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucke, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    It is reported that when the star SAO158687 passed behind the Uranus system, its light was occulted twice by the epsilon (fifth) ring of the planet. The first part of the ring to occult was about 100 km wide and the second part was about 40 km wide. The variable width of the ring is accounted for by differences in the orbital eccentricities of the individual particles composing the ring.

  13. Propagation of hollow Gaussian beam through a misaligned first-order optical system and its propagation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cheng Liang; Lu, Xuan Hui

    2007-06-01

    Propagation properties of hollow Gaussian beam through a misaligned first-order ABCD system is studied using the generalized Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral, augmented matrix. It is shown that, as a hollow Gaussian beam passes through the misaligned first-order ABCD system, the beam shape is not preserved, the out-put beams have differences when passing different misaligned optical systems. We can adjust the size of dark region through adjusting the misaligned transverse vector E.

  14. Exciton interference revealed by energy dependent exciton transfer rate for ring-structured molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yun-An

    2016-01-14

    The quantum interference is an intrinsic phenomenon in quantum physics for photon and massive quantum particles. In principle, the quantum interference may also occur with quasi-particles, such as the exciton. In this study, we show how the exciton quantum interference can be significant in aggregates through theoretical simulations with hierarchical equations of motion. The systems under investigation are generalized donor-bridge-acceptor model aggregates with the donor consisting of six homogeneous sites assuming the nearest neighbor coupling. For the models with single-path bridge, the exciton transfer time only shows a weak excitation energy dependence. But models with double-path bridge have a new short transfer time scale and the excitation energy dependence of the exciton transfer time assumes clear peak structure which is detectable with today's nonlinear spectroscopy. This abnormality is attributed to the exciton quantum interference and the condition for a clear observation in experiment is also explored.

  15. Exciton interference revealed by energy dependent exciton transfer rate for ring-structured molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yun-An, E-mail: yunan@gznc.edu.cn

    2016-01-14

    The quantum interference is an intrinsic phenomenon in quantum physics for photon and massive quantum particles. In principle, the quantum interference may also occur with quasi-particles, such as the exciton. In this study, we show how the exciton quantum interference can be significant in aggregates through theoretical simulations with hierarchical equations of motion. The systems under investigation are generalized donor-bridge-acceptor model aggregates with the donor consisting of six homogeneous sites assuming the nearest neighbor coupling. For the models with single-path bridge, the exciton transfer time only shows a weak excitation energy dependence. But models with double-path bridge have a newmore » short transfer time scale and the excitation energy dependence of the exciton transfer time assumes clear peak structure which is detectable with today’s nonlinear spectroscopy. This abnormality is attributed to the exciton quantum interference and the condition for a clear observation in experiment is also explored.« less

  16. The Ring Sculptor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-08

    Prometheus zooms across the Cassini spacecraft field of view, attended by faint streamers and deep gores in the F ring. This movie sequence of five images shows the F ring shepherd moon shaping the ring inner edge

  17. The Saturn Ring Observer: In situ studies of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Spilker, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    targets of observation by the SRO will include “propellers” (thought to be the signature of sub-km moonlets embedded in the rings), the “ropy” and “straw” structure seen in images of strong density waves and gap edges, and km-scale radial oscillations which may be signatures of “viscous overstabilities” in high-optical depth regions. Most of the science goals identified above could be accomplished by high-resolution nadir imaging of the rings from a platform that co-orbits with the ring particles, i.e., from a spacecraft in circular orbit a few km above the rings. The vertical displacement of the spacecraft is maintained by a continuous low-thrust ion engine, which can be tilted to provide a slow inward radial drift across the rings. Chemical thrusters permit the craft to `hop' over vertical obstacles in the rings (e.g., bending waves and inclined ringlets). In addition to an imaging system with a resolution of at least 10 cm (with 1 cm a desirable goal), other instrumentat ion might include a laser altimeter/range-finder to measure the effective thickness of the rings, as well as the vertical component of particle motions, aswell as in situ instruments to measure the density and composition of the neutral and ionized ring atmosphere, meteoritic and secondary dust fluxes, and local electric fields (especially in spoke regions).

  18. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  19. Belt-hierarchic structure of th ring, satellite and planet systems: prediction S/2001 U1 and others objects in Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2003-04-01

    BELT-HIERARCHIC STRUCTURE OF THE RING, SATELLITE AND PLANET SYSTEMS: PREDICTION S/2001 U1 AND OTHERS OBJECTS IN SOLAR SYSTEM Yu.V.Barkin Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow, Russia, barkin@sai.msu.ru Structure regularities of the planet and satellite systems have been studied. Statistic analysis of the distribution of the major semi-axes of the orbits of the planets, comets and centaurs of the Solar system, satellite and ring systems of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Uran, exoplanet systems of the pulsars PSR 1257+12, PSR 1828-11 and of the main consequence star Ups And was fulfilled. The following empirical regularities were described [1]: 1) the bodies of systems are combined into hierarchic groups and main from them combine 5 companions; 2) differences of the major semi-axes of the neighboring orbits for bodies of every group are constant; 4) for main neighboring hierarchic group these distances are distinguished in 6 times increasing to external grope; 5) the filling of the gropes and some present changes in their structure are caused by the past catastrophes in corresponding systems. The special method of reconstruction of the catastrophes which had place in the life of the Solar system (SS) was developed. Suggested method has let us to explain uniformly observed values of the major semi-axes and average values of eccentricities of the planets. In particular the Pancul’s hypothesis about Jupiter formation from two giant protoplanets (Jupiter I and Jupiter II) was confirmed. The new empirical law of the filling of the orbits of the regular groups of the planets or satellites (or rings structures) of the hierarchic ordered systems of celestial bodies was established. It was shown that sum number of bodies is proportional to the value of catastrophic value of the eccentricities which are same for first, second ,.... and fifth orbits of all gropes. The theoretical numbers of bodies for pointed orbits practically coincide with their observed numbers in main

  20. GPU-based low-level trigger system for the standalone reconstruction of the ring-shaped hit patterns in the RICH Cherenkov detector of NA62 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Biagioni, A.; Chiozzi, S.; Cretaro, P.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Di Lorenzo, S.; Fantechi, R.; Fiorini, M.; Frezza, O.; Gianoli, A.; Lamanna, G.; Lo Cicero, F.; Lonardo, A.; Martinelli, M.; Neri, I.; Paolucci, P. S.; Pastorelli, E.; Piandani, R.; Piccini, M.; Pontisso, L.; Rossetti, D.; Simula, F.; Sozzi, M.; Vicini, P.

    2017-03-01

    This project aims to exploit the parallel computing power of a commercial Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to implement fast pattern matching in the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for the level 0 (L0) trigger of the NA62 experiment. In this approach, the ring-fitting algorithm is seedless, being fed with raw RICH data, with no previous information on the ring position from other detectors. Moreover, since the L0 trigger is provided with a more elaborated information than a simple multiplicity number, it results in a higher selection power. Two methods have been studied in order to reduce the data transfer latency from the readout boards of the detector to the GPU, i.e., the use of a dedicated NIC device driver with very low latency and a direct data transfer protocol from a custom FPGA-based NIC to the GPU. The performance of the system, developed through the FPGA approach, for multi-ring Cherenkov online reconstruction obtained during the NA62 physics runs is presented.

  1. SPHERES-RINGS Time Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-10

    ISS040-E-059344 (10 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station’s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman (left) and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, conduct a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  2. SPHERES-RINGS Time Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-10

    ISS040-E-059467 (10 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman (mostly obscured), both Expedition 40 flight engineers, conduct a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  3. SPHERES-RINGS Time Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-10

    ISS040-E-059478 (10 July 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (left) and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, conduct a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  4. From the Icy Satellites to Small Moons and Rings: Spectral Indicators by Cassini-VIMS Unveil Compositional Trends in the Saturnian System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Buratti, B. B.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Brown, R. H.

    2017-01-01

    flat reflectance in the visible, making them remarkably different with respect to the other small moons. Moreover, we have observed that the two Tethys' lagrangian moons appear spectrally different, with Calypso characterized by more intense water ice bands than Telesto. Conversely, at visible wavelengths Polydeuces, Telesto and Methone are in absolute the more blue objects in the Saturn's system. The red slopes measured in the visible range on disk-integrated spectral data, showing varying degrees on all of the satellites, could be caused more by exogenic processes than by geologic and endogenic events which are operating on more localized scales. The principal exogenic processes active in the Saturn's system [11] which alter the satellites and rings surfaces are the E ring particles bombardment, the interaction with corotating plasma and energetic particles, the bombardment of exogenic dark material [12] and the water ice photolysis. A discussion about the correlations between these processes and the o bserved spectral classes is given. With the approaching of the Cassini "Gran Finale" orbits, VIMS will unveil with unprecedented spatial resolution the spectral properties of many small moons and rings. These data will be extremely valuable to improve our classification of the Saturn's satellites and rings.

  5. Latitudinal Gradients in Tree Ring Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes Reveal Differential Climate Influences of the North American Monsoon System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szejner, P.; Wright, W. E.; Babst, F.; Belmecheri, S.; Trouet, V.; Leavitt, S. W.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Monson, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    The arrival of the North American Monsoon System (NAMS) terminates a presummer hyperarid period in the southwestern United States (U.S.), providing summer moisture that is favorable for forest growth. Montane forests in this region rely on winter snowpack to drive much of their growth; the extent to which they use NAMS moisture is uncertain. We addressed this by studying stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in earlywood and latewood from 11 sites along a latitudinal gradient extending from Arizona and New Mexico to Utah. This study provides the first regional perspective on the relative roles of winter versus summer precipitation as an ecophysiological resource. Here we present evidence that Ponderosa pine uses NAMS moisture differentially across this gradient. 13C/12C ratios suggest that photosynthetic water use efficiency during latewood formation is more sensitive to summer precipitation at the northern than at the southern sites. This is likely due to the fact that NAMS moisture provides sufficiently favorable conditions for tree photosynthesis and growth during most years in the southern sites, whereas the northern sites experience larger summer moisture variability, which in some years is limiting growth. Cellulose δ18O and δ13C values revealed that photoassimilates in the southern sites were produced under higher vapor pressure deficit conditions during spring compared to summer, demonstrating a previously underappreciated effect of seasonal differences in atmospheric humidity on tree ring isotope ratios. Our findings suggest that future changes in NAMS will potentially alter productivity and photosynthetic water use dynamics differentially along latitudinal gradients in southwestern U.S. montane forests.

  6. Latitudinal gradients in tree ring stable carbon and oxygen isotopes reveal differential climate influences of the North American Monsoon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szejner, Paul; Wright, William E.; Babst, Flurin; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Trouet, Valerie; Leavitt, Steven W.; Ehleringer, James R.; Monson, Russell K.

    2016-07-01

    The arrival of the North American Monsoon System (NAMS) terminates a presummer hyperarid period in the southwestern United States (U.S.), providing summer moisture that is favorable for forest growth. Montane forests in this region rely on winter snowpack to drive much of their growth; the extent to which they use NAMS moisture is uncertain. We addressed this by studying stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in earlywood and latewood from 11 sites along a latitudinal gradient extending from Arizona and New Mexico to Utah. This study provides the first regional perspective on the relative roles of winter versus summer precipitation as an ecophysiological resource. Here we present evidence that Ponderosa pine uses NAMS moisture differentially across this gradient. 13C/12C ratios suggest that photosynthetic water use efficiency during latewood formation is more sensitive to summer precipitation at the northern than at the southern sites. This is likely due to the fact that NAMS moisture provides sufficiently favorable conditions for tree photosynthesis and growth during most years in the southern sites, whereas the northern sites experience larger summer moisture variability, which in some years is limiting growth. Cellulose δ18O and δ13C values revealed that photoassimilates in the southern sites were produced under higher vapor pressure deficit conditions during spring compared to summer, demonstrating a previously underappreciated effect of seasonal differences in atmospheric humidity on tree ring isotope ratios. Our findings suggest that future changes in NAMS will potentially alter productivity and photosynthetic water use dynamics differentially along latitudinal gradients in southwestern U.S. montane forests.

  7. Synthetic studies on schisandra nortriterpenoids. Stereocontrolled synthesis of enantiopure C-5-epi ABC ring systems of micrandilactone A and lancifodilactone G using RCM.

    PubMed

    Maity, Soumitra; Matcha, Kiran; Ghosh, Subrata

    2010-06-18

    A stereocontrolled approach for the construction of ABC ring systems of micrandilactone A and lancifodilactone G has been developed. The synthesis involves construction of an enantiopure functionalized cycloheptene derivative 17 through RCM of the dienol 14 prepared from the known D-mannitol-derived unsaturated ester 12. A remarkable regioselectivity during hydroboration of the cycloheptene derivative 17 was observed during its transformation to the cycloheptanone 20. RCM of the diene 24 prepared stereoselectively from 20 gave the spiro-dihydrofuran 25. The ketal unit in 25 was then converted into the carbinols 28 and 36. A bromonium ion initiated highly stereocontrolled intramolecular etherification in 28 and 37 led to the tricyclic ethers 29 and 38, respectively. Reductive removal of bromine from 29 and 38 followed by RuO(4) oxidation led to the furo-furanone derivatives 31 and 40, the C-5-epi ABC ring systems of the schisandra nortriterpenoids 1 and 2.

  8. Recent Developments of Versatile Photoinitiating Systems for Cationic Ring Opening Polymerization Operating at Any Wavelengths and under Low Light Intensity Sources.

    PubMed

    Lalevée, Jacques; Mokbel, Haifaa; Fouassier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-20

    Photoinitiators (PI) or photoinitiating systems (PIS) usable in light induced cationic polymerization (CP) and free radical promoted cationic polymerization (FRPCP) reactions (more specifically for cationic ring opening polymerization (ROP)) together with the involved mechanisms are briefly reviewed. The recent developments of novel two- and three-component PISs for CP and FRPCP upon exposure to low intensity blue to red lights is emphasized in details. Examples of such reactions under various experimental conditions are provided.

  9. Uranus Tenth Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    On Jan. 23, 1986, NASA Voyager 2 discovered a tenth ring orbiting Uranus. The tenth ring is about midway between the bright, outermost epsilon ring and the next ring down, called delta. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00035

  10. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  11. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Birth Control Ring KidsHealth / For Teens / Birth Control Ring What's in this article? What Is It? ... Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  12. Dynamical Systems Analysis Of Transport In Flows Defined As Data Sets: Contaminant Control On The Coast Of Florida And Criteria For Warm Rings In The North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekien, F.; Coulliette, C.

    In this talk we will briefly describe the dynamical systems framework for Lagrangian transport. In particular, we will show how dynamical systems theory can now be uti- lized in the context of "real" problems, such as those derived from remote sensing observations or the input of a large scale numerical model. We will illustrate these ideas by two examples. Study of fluid transport near the Atlantic coast of Florida us- ing a velocity field observed experimentally from high frequency radar measurements reveals that dynamical systems theory can be used to reduce contaminant density in coastal areas. We also study intergyre transport in a quasigeostrophic model of the North Atlantic. We investigate the structure of eddies detaching from the Gulf Stream and prove that in a double gyre structure cyclonic rings cannot contain fluid from the other gyre. Only anticyclonic rings can contain "foreign" fluid coming from another gyre. This explains many phenomenons, such as why counter-clockwise rings South of the Gulf Stream contain colder fluid advected directly from the northern gyre, which has been illustrated in many observational studies.

  13. Long-distance fiber Bragg grating sensor system with a high optical signal-to-noise ratio based on a tunable fiber ring laser configuration.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yun-Jiang; Ran, Zeng-Ling; Chen, Rong-Rui

    2006-09-15

    A novel tunable fiber ring laser configuration with a combination of bidirectional Raman amplification and dual erbium-doped fiber (EDF) amplification is proposed for realizing high optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), long-distance, quasi-distributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing systems with large capacities and low cost. The hybrid Raman-EDF amplification configuration arranged in the ring laser can enhance the optical SNR of FBG sensor signals significantly owing to the good combination of the high gain of the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and the low noise of the Raman amplification. Such a sensing system can support a large number of FBG sensors because of the use of a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter located within the ring laser and spatial division multiplexing for expansion of sensor channels. Experimental results show that an excellent optical SNR of approximately 60 dB has been achieved for a 50 km transmission distance with a low Raman pump power of approximately 170 mW at a wavelength of 1455 nm and a low EDFA pump power of approximately 40 mW at a wavelength of 980 nm, which is the highest optical SNR achieved so far for a 50 km long FBG sensor system, to our knowledge.

  14. Intra- and inter-tester reliability and validity of normal finger size measurement using the Japanese ring gauge system.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Sato, Y; Sotome, S; Arai, H; Arai, A; Yoshida, H

    2017-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the reliability and validity of measurements of finger diameters with a ring gauge. A reliability study enrolled two independent samples (50 participants and seven examiners in Study I; 26 participants and 26 examiners in Study II). The sizes of each participant's little fingers were measured twice with a ring gauge by each examiner. To investigate the validity of the measurements, five hand therapists compared the finger size and hand volume of 30 participants with the ring gauge and with a figure-of-eight technique (Study III). The intra-class correlation coefficient for intra-observer reliability ranged from 0.97 to 0.99 in Study I, and 0.90 to 0.97 in Study II. The intra-class correlation coefficient for inter-observer reliability was 0.95 in Study I and 0.94 in Study II. The validity study showed a Pearson product moment correlation coefficient of 0.75. The ring gauge showed high reliability and validity for measurement of finger size. III, diagnostic.

  15. Novel stereocontrolled approach to syn- and anti-oxepene-cyclogeranyl trans-fused polycyclic systems: asymmetric total synthesis of (-)-Aplysistatin, (+)-Palisadin A, (+)-Palisadin B, (+)-12-hydroxy-palisadin B, and the AB ring system of adociasulfate-2 and toxicol A.

    PubMed

    Couladouros, Elias A; Vidali, Veroniki P

    2004-08-06

    A new stereocontrolled method for the formation of trans-anti cyclogeranyl-oxepene systems is described. The demanding stereochemistry is secured by stereoselective coupling of a cyclogeranyl tertiary alcohol with a 1,2-unsymmetrically substituted epoxide, while the formation of the highly strained oxepene is achieved employing ring-closing metathesis. Since the stereochemistry of the trans-fused 6,7-ring system is determined by the epoxide, the method also allows the construction of trans-syn 6,7-ring systems. This approach leads to the synthesis of the AB fragment of Adociasulfate-2 and Toxicol A, for the first time. The flexibility and efficiency of the presented strategy is demonstrated by the total asymmetric synthesis of (-)-Aplysistatin, (+)-Palisadin A, (+)-12-hydroxy-Palisadin B, and (+)-Palisadin B, employing two similar key intermediates.

  16. NMR measurement system including two synchronized ring buffers, with 128 rf coils for in situ water monitoring in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kuniyasu; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Aoki, Masaru; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Morisaka, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Seitaro

    2017-01-01

    A small radio-frequency (rf) coil inserted into a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) can be used to acquire nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from the water in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) or in oxygen gas channels in the PEFC. Measuring the spatial distribution of the water in a large PEFC requires using many rf probes, so an NMR measurement system which acquires NMR signals from 128 rf probes at intervals of 0.5 s was manufactured. The system has eight rf transceiver units with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for modulation of the excitation pulse and quadrature phase detection of the NMR signal, and one control unit with two ring buffers for data control. The sequence data required for the NMR measurement were written into one ring buffer. The acquired NMR signal data were then written temporarily into the other ring buffer and then were transmitted to a personal computer (PC). A total of 98 rf probes were inserted into the PEFC that had an electrical generation area of 16 cm × 14 cm, and the water generated in the PEFC was measured when the PEFC operated at 100 A. As a result, time-dependent changes in the spatial distribution of the water content in the MEA and the water in the oxygen gas channels were obtained.

  17. Does the position of the electron-donating nitrogen atom in the ring system influence the efficiency of a dye-sensitized solar cell? A computational study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abul Kalam; Barik, Sunirmal; Das, Amitava; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2016-06-01

    We have reported a number of new metal-free organic dyes (2-6) that have cyclic asymmetric benzotripyrrole derivatives as donor groups with peripheral nitrogen atoms in the ring, fluorine and thiophene groups as π-spacers, and a cyanoacrylic acid acceptor group. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations were employed to examine the influence of the position of the donor nitrogen atom and π-conjugation on solar cell performance. The calculated electron-injection driving force (ΔG inject), electron-regeneration driving force (ΔG regen), light-harvesting efficiency (LHE), dipole moment (μ normal), and number of electrons transferred (∆q) indicate that dyes 3, 4, and 6 have significantly higher efficiencies than reference dye 1, which exhibits high efficiency. We also extended our comparison to some other reported dyes, 7-9, which have a donor nitrogen atom in the middle of the ring system. The computed results suggest that dye 6 possesses a higher incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) than reported dyes 7-9. Thus, the use of donor groups with peripheral nitrogen atoms appears to lead to more efficient dyes than those in which the nitrogen atom is present in the middle of the donor ring system. Graphical Abstract The locations of the nitrogen atoms in the donor groups in the designed dye molecules have an important influence on DSSC efficiency.

  18. A novel conversion of C(19)-diterpenoid alkaloids into aconane-type diterpenes with eight-membered ring system via skeletal rearrangement of corresponding diazonium derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Chen, Qiao-Hong; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2009-03-01

    A new and efficient approach toward the conversion of C(19)-diterpenoid alkaloids into diterpenes with [6+8+5+6] ring system is reported. Treatment of imines 5, 14, and 24 derived from the C(19)-diterpenoid alkaloids with NaNO(2)-NaOAc-HOAc afforded a series of novel rearrangement diterpenes 6-8, 15-19, and 25-27, respectively. The lactone 11 was obtained in 41% yield by treating 5 with NaNO(2)-HBr-Br(2). The formation of diazonium intermediate is postulated, which was subsequently subjected to skeletal rearrangement, leading to the enlargement of B ring. All the new compounds were isolated and fully characterized.

  19. ABCD3-I score and the risk of early or 3-month stroke recurrence in tissue- and time-based definitions of TIA and minor stroke.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Lukas; Ferrari, Julia; Krebs, Stefan; Boehme, Christian; Toell, Thomas; Matosevic, Benjamin; Tinchon, Alexander; Brainin, Michael; Gattringer, Thomas; Sommer, Peter; Thun, Peter; Willeit, Johann; Lang, Wilfried; Kiechl, Stefan; Knoflach, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Changing definition of TIA from time to a tissue basis questions the validity of the well-established ABCD3-I risk score for recurrent ischemic cerebrovascular events. We analyzed patients with ischemic stroke with mild neurological symptoms arriving < 24 h after symptom onset in a phase where it is unclear, if the event turns out to be a TIA or minor stroke, in the prospective multi-center Austrian Stroke Unit Registry. Patients were retrospectively categorized according to a time-based (symptom duration below/above 24 h) and tissue-based (without/with corresponding brain lesion on CT or MRI) definition of TIA or minor stroke. Outcome parameters were early stroke during stroke unit stay and 3-month ischemic stroke. Of the 5237 TIA and minor stroke patients with prospectively documented ABCD3-I score, 2755 (52.6%) had a TIA by the time-based and 2183 (41.7%) by the tissue-based definition. Of the 2457 (46.9%) patients with complete 3-month followup, corresponding numbers were 1195 (48.3%) for the time- and 971 (39.5%) for the tissue-based definition of TIA. Early and 3-month ischemic stroke occurred in 1.1 and 2.5% of time-based TIA, 3.8 and 5.9% of time-based minor stroke, 1.2 and 2.3% of tissue-based TIA as well as in 3.1 and 5.5% of tissue-based minor stroke patients. Irrespective of the definition of TIA and minor stroke, the risk of early and 3-month ischemic stroke steadily increased with increasing ABCD3-I score points. The ABCD3-I score performs equally in TIA patients in tissue- as well as time-based definition and the same is true for minor stroke patients.

  20. Natural bond orbital approach to the transmission of substituent effect through the fulvene and benzene ring systems.

    PubMed

    Oziminski, Wojciech P; Krygowski, Tadeusz M

    2011-03-01

    Electronic structure of 22 monosubstituted derivatives of benzene and exocyclically substituted fulvene with substituents: B(OH)(2), BH(2), CCH, CF(3), CH(3), CHCH(2), CHO, Cl, CMe(3), CN, COCH(3), CONH(2), COOH, F, NH(2), NMe(2), NO, NO(2), OCH(3), OH, SiH(3), SiMe(3) were studied theoretically by means of Natural Bond Orbital analysis. It is shown, that sum of π-electron population of carbon atoms of the fulvene and benzene rings, pEDA(F) and pEDA(B), respectively correlate well with Hammett substituent constants [Formula in text] and aromaticity index NICS. The substituent effect acting on pi-electron occupation at carbon atoms of the fulvene ring is significantly stronger than in the case of benzene. Electron occupations of ring carbon atoms (except C1) in fulvene plotted against each other give linear regressions with high correlation coefficients. The same is true for ortho- and para-carbon atoms in benzene. Positive slopes of the regressions indicate similar for fulvene and benzene kind of substituent effect - mostly resonance in nature. Only the regressions of occupation at the carbon atom in meta- position of benzene against ortho- and para-positions gives negative slopes and low correlation coefficients.

  1. Classifying Saturn's F Ring Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole; Sremcevic, M.; Esposito, L. W.; Colwell, J. E.

    2009-09-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) has recorded more than 113 stellar occultations by Saturn's F ring providing measurements with ring plane resolutions of a few dozen meters and better. Inner and outer F ring strands have been seen throughout the Cassini mission where they revealed themselves as non-continuous, azimuthally and temporally highly variable structures. In the light of a more accurate orbit description of the F ring core we find evidence for a ring that becomes dynamically more active as the system approaches anti-apse alignment with Prometheus. This is consistent with the observed increased strand activity. A recent strand that morphologically resembles the core is the strongest seen to date and points to the intricate relation between core and strands indicating the strands' violent creation. Using more than 150 identifications of various strands, we trace their kinematics and infer dynamical timescales and photometric properties. Implications for the dynamical evolution of the F ring will be discussed. This research was supported by the Cassini Project.

  2. Energy spectra of quantum rings.

    PubMed

    Fuhrer, A; Lüscher, S; Ihn, T; Heinzel, T; Ensslin, K; Wegscheider, W; Bichler, M

    2001-10-25

    Quantum mechanical experiments in ring geometries have long fascinated physicists. Open rings connected to leads, for example, allow the observation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, one of the best examples of quantum mechanical phase coherence. The phase coherence of electrons travelling through a quantum dot embedded in one arm of an open ring has also been demonstrated. The energy spectra of closed rings have only recently been studied by optical spectroscopy. The prediction that they allow persistent current has been explored in various experiments. Here we report magnetotransport experiments on closed rings in the Coulomb blockade regime. Our experiments show that a microscopic understanding of energy levels, so far limited to few-electron quantum dots, can be extended to a many-electron system. A semiclassical interpretation of our results indicates that electron motion in the rings is governed by regular rather than chaotic motion, an unexplored regime in many-electron quantum dots. This opens a way to experiments where even more complex structures can be investigated at a quantum mechanical level.

  3. Self-Assembly of MinE on the Membrane Underlies Formation of the MinE Ring to Sustain Function of the Escherichia coli Min System*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Min; Chiang, Ya-Ling; Lee, Hsiao-Lin; Kong, Lih-Ren; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Rothfield, Lawrence I.; Shih, Yu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The pole-to-pole oscillation of the Min proteins in Escherichia coli results in the inhibition of aberrant polar division, thus facilitating placement of the division septum at the midcell. MinE of the Min system forms a ring-like structure that plays a critical role in triggering the oscillation cycle. However, the mechanism underlying the formation of the MinE ring remains unclear. This study demonstrates that MinE self-assembles into fibrillar structures on the supported lipid bilayer. The MinD-interacting domain of MinE shows amyloidogenic properties, providing a possible mechanism for self-assembly of MinE. Supporting the idea, mutations in residues Ile-24 and Ile-25 of the MinD-interacting domain affect fibril formation, membrane binding ability of MinE and MinD, and subcellular localization of three Min proteins. Additional mutations in residues Ile-72 and Ile-74 suggest a role of the C-terminal domain of MinE in regulating the folding propensity of the MinD-interacting domain for different molecular interactions. The study suggests a self-assembly mechanism that may underlie the ring-like structure formed by MinE-GFP observed in vivo. PMID:24914211

  4. Oxygen Abundances in the Rings of Polar-Ring Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, I. R.; Eskridge, P. B.; Pogge, R. W.

    2003-05-01

    Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are typically early-type (S0 or E) galaxies surrounded by rings of gas, dust, and stars orbiting nearly perpendicular to the principle plane of the host galaxy (Whitmore et al. 1990 AJ 100 1489). Given that PRGs have two separate, perpendicular axes of rotation, it is clear on dynamical grounds that PRGs are the products of merger events between two galaxies, but are observed in a state where two distinct kinematic and morphological structures are still apparent. As such, they present a unique opportunity to study merger events in systems where the debris is not confused with material from the host. Our understanding of the relative importance of polar ring systems in the overall process of galaxy evolution is confounded by our lack of knowledge regarding the typical lifetimes and evolutionary histories of polar rings. A crucial factor for understanding the formation and evolution of PRGs is information regarding the elemental abundances of the ring material. Polar rings are typically rich in {\\protectH 2} regions. Optical spectroscopy of these {\\protectH 2} regions can tell us their density, temperature, and oxygen abundance. Our earlier work (Eskridge & Pogge 1997 ApJ 486 259) revealed roughly Solar oxygen abundances for {\\protectH 2} regions in the polar ring of NGC 2685. We have extended this project, and now have spectra for six PRGs. Analysis of the data for II Zw 73 and UGC 7576 reveal the polar rings of these galaxies to have {\\protectH 2} region oxygen abundances in the range 0.3 to 0.6 Solar, substantially less than found for NGC 2685. Abundances in this range are much easier to explain with conventional models of chemical enrichment and polar ring formation. We shall present results for our full sample. Taken as a whole, this sample will provide a clear foundation for the typical chemical enrichment patterns in polar rings, and thus provide a clearer understanding of the formation and evolution of these curious objects. We

  5. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    Deegan et. al in [3], and shown to be the result of a combination of contact line pinning and non-uniform evaporation flux. If the contact line of a...who expanded on Deegan et al.[3] to find an exact form for the evaporation flux over a sessile drop. It turns out that solving 179 for the flux is...and precipita- tion in geologically relevant situations of karst areas. 1. open system, Chemical Geology, 48 (1985), pp. 189–211. [3] R. D. Deegan , O

  6. No evidence of rings around Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Mink, D. J.; Baron, R. L.; Dunham, E.; Pingree, J. E.; French, R. G.; Elias, J. H.; Liller, W.; Nicholson, P. D.; Jones, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of two observations of stellar occultations of Neptune to determine if the planet has a ring system are reported. The sightings were made from Mt. Stromlo, Mauna Kea, and Cerro Tololo, noting that an equatorial ring would subtend only two arcsec of view. An upper accretion limit was defined to set the region around Neptune where rings, rather than satellites, could form. The intensities of the starlight from the two selected stars were recorded by photometers on magnetic tape during the occultation period. One of the stars did not occult, but passed through the entire region where a ring system might be present. No definitive evidence for rings was found, although an optical depth for a Neptunian ring was calculated at 0.07, with a width of more than 5 km and a radius of 31,400 km.

  7. Implementing the ABCDE Bundle into Everyday Care: Opportunities, Challenges and Lessons Learned for Implementing the ICU Pain, Agitation and Delirium (PAD) Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Balas, Michele C.; Burke, William J.; Gannon, David; Cohen, Marlene Z.; Colburn, Lois; Bevil, Catherine; Franz, Doug; Olsen, Keith M.; Ely, E. Wesley; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Awakening and Breathing Coordination, Delirium monitoring/management and Early exercise/mobility (ABCDE) bundle is an evidence-based, interprofessional, multicomponent strategy for minimizing sedative exposure, reducing duration of mechanical ventilation and managing intensive care unit (ICU) acquired delirium and weakness. The purpose of this study was to identify facilitators and barriers to ABCDE bundle adoption and to evaluate the extent to which bundle implementation was effective, sustainable, and conducive to dissemination. Design Prospective, before-after, mixed-methods study. Setting Five adult ICUs, 1 step-down unit, and a special care unit located in a 624 bed, academic medical center Subjects Interprofessional ICU team members at participating institution. Interventions and Measurements In collaboration with the participating institution, we developed, implemented, and refined an ABCDE bundle policy. Over the course of an 18 month period, all ICU team members were offered the opportunity to participate in numerous, multimodal educational efforts. Three focus group sessions, 3 online surveys, and 1 educational evaluation were administered in an attempt to identify facilitators and barriers to bundle adoption. Main Results Factors believed to facilitate bundle implementation included: 1) the performance of daily, interdisciplinary, rounds, 2) engagement of key implementation leaders, 3) sustained and diverse educational efforts, and 4) the bundle's quality and strength. Barriers identified included: 1) intervention related issues (e.g. timing of trials, fear of adverse events), 2) communication and care coordination challenges, 3) knowledge deficits, 4) workload concerns, and 5) documentation burden. Despite these challenges, participants believed implementation ultimately benefited patients, improved interdisciplinary communication, and empowered nurses and other ICU team members. Conclusions In this study of the implementation of the ABCDE

  8. Unfocused F Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-02

    The F ring dissolves into a fuzzy stream of particles -- rather different from its usual appearance of a narrow, bright core flanked by dimmer ringlets. Also notable here is the bright clump of material that flanks the ring core

  9. Rings Through Atmosphere

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-26

    NASA Cassini spacecraft looks toward the limb of Saturn and, on the right of this image, views part of the rings through the planet atmosphere. Saturn atmosphere can distort the view of the rings from some angles.

  10. Frailty and geography: should these two factors be added to the ABCDE contemporary guide to diabetes therapy?

    PubMed

    Maddaloni, Ernesto; D'Onofrio, Luca; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    On the road towards personalized treatments for type 2 diabetes, we suggest here that two parameters could be added to the ABCDE algorithm, 'F' for frailty and 'G' for geography. Indeed, the progressive ageing of population is causing a simultaneous increase of frailty worldwide. The identification of the optimal therapeutic approach is often difficult in frail subjects because of the complexity of 'frailty syndrome'. Nevertheless, given the relevance of diabetes in the development and progression of frailty, a safe and effective cure of diabetes is extremely important to guarantee a good medical outcome. There are few data about diabetes treatment in this delicate category of patients, and the choice of the appropriate therapy mostly remains a challenge. Moreover, type 2 diabetes affects more than 382 million people of different countries, races and ethnicities. To face the lack of solid evidence-based medicine for the treatment of diabetes in different ethnic groups, it is extremely important to increase knowledge about the different pathophysiology of diabetes according to ethnicity. In this way, a tailored approach to treatment of various ethnic groups living in the same or different regions can eventually be developed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  12. Dusty D Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-24

    Saturn D ring is easy to overlook since it trapped between the brighter C ring and the planet itself. In this view from NASA Cassini spacecraft, all that can be seen of the D ring is the faint and narrow arc as it stretches from top right of the ima

  13. Eyeing the E Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-24

    NASA Cassini spacecraft takes a look at Saturn diffuse E ring which is formed from icy material spewing out of the south pole of the moon Enceladus. The E ring is seen nearly edge-on from slightly above the northern side of Saturn ring plane.

  14. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  15. So Long, C Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-11-13

    Saturn's C ring is home to a surprisingly rich array of structures and textures. Much of the structure seen in the outer portions of Saturn's rings is the result of gravitational perturbations on ring particles by moons of Saturn. Such interactions are called resonances. However, scientists are not clear as to the origin of the structures seen in this image which has captured an inner ring region sparsely populated with particles, making interactions between ring particles rare, and with few satellite resonances. In this image, a bright and narrow ringlet located toward the outer edge of the C ring is flanked by two broader features called plateaus, each about 100 miles (160 kilometers) wide. Plateaus are unique to the C ring. Cassini data indicates that the plateaus do not necessarily contain more ring material than the C ring at large, but the ring particles in the plateaus may be smaller, enhancing their brightness. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 53 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in green light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Aug. 14, 2017. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 117,000 miles (189,000 kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 74 degrees. Image scale is 3,000 feet (1 kilometer) per pixel. The Cassini spacecraft ended its mission on Sept. 15, 2017. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21356

  16. Feasibility, acceptance and long-term exercise behaviour in cancer patients: an exercise intervention by using a swinging-ring system.

    PubMed

    Crevenna, Richard; Cenik, Fadime; Galle, Anton; Komanadj, Tanya Sedghi; Keilani, Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this pilot study was to describe feasibility and acceptance of an exercise intervention by using an unique swinging-ring system with the goal to promote long-term exercise behaviour in cancer patients. The included cancer patients (n = 13, male:f emale (m:f) = 7:6, age = 56 ± 11, range 38-74a) were invited to perform a home-based exercise intervention. All participants of this pilot study were instructed how to use the smovey® Vibroswing. They could choose how to use the swinging-ring system, for example only indoor or only outdoor (single or in a group) or both. Feasibility and acceptance were assessed after 12 months (T2). Handgrip strength (Jamar hand dynamometer) and health-related quality of life (QOL, SF-36 Health survey) were assessed at baseline (T1) and after 12 months (T2). A total of 10 (77%) patients (m:f = 5:5, 59 ± 9 years, range = 46-74) could be assessed at baseline and after 12 months. The exercise intervention showed no adverse events and was well accepted. Approximately 77% of patients of the study population have been exercising for more than 12 months. Furthermore, this intervention was able to increase handgrip strength in the participants. QOL improved as well in all domains. The results of this small pilot study indicate that regular physical exercise with this swinging-ring system seems to be safe, and to promote long-term exercise behaviour of the included patients. Furthermore, this study population showed benefits in terms of increased handgrip strength and of improved QOL.

  17. A summary of laboratory testing performed to characterize and select an elastomeric O-ring material to be used in the redesigned solid rocket motors of the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    An elastomeric O-ring material is used in the joints of the redesigned solid motors (RSRM's) of the National Space Transportation System (NSTS). The selection of the O-ring material used in the RSRM's was a very thorough process that included efforts by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the Langley Research Center, and the Thiokol Corporation. One of the efforts performed at MSFC was an extensive in-house laboratory test regime to screen potential O-ring materials and ultimately to characterize the elastomeric material that was chosen to be used in the RSRM's. The laboratory tests performed at MSFC are summarized.

  18. Archiving of Planetary Ring Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Stellar occultation data provide our only Earth-based means of probing planetary rings at kilometer spatial resolution. The occultation data archive at MIT contains original data and analysis products of stellar occultations by the ring systems of the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune observed by members of the group (and other groups) from 1977 to the present. During this time period, several media have been used to record and store the original and processed data: (1) chart records; (2) printed output, (3) audio reel tape; (4) audio cassette tape; (5) 7-track, 1/2-inch computer tape; (6) 9-track, 1/2-inch computer tape at 800, 1600, and 6250 bpi; (7) NOVA disk platters (2.5 and 5.0 Mbyte); (8) write once optical disks; (9) punched cards; and (10) read-write optical disks. With the rapid change of computer technology over this time period, some of these media have become not only obsolete, but nearly extinct. In particular, it has become nearly impossible to find any facilities that can still read 800 bpi tapes, which contain the only copies of several important data sets for the ring system of Uranus. In particular, we have an extensive ring data collection that includes data sets for the following Uranian ring occultations: U0, U11, U12, U13, U14, U25, U17, and U36.

  19. Clumps in the F Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-12

    Scientists have only a rough idea of the lifetime of clumps in Saturn's rings - a mystery that Cassini may help answer. The latest images taken by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft show clumps seemingly embedded within Saturn's narrow, outermost F ring. The narrow angle camera took the images on Feb. 23, 2004, from a distance of 62.9 million kilometers (39 million miles). The two images taken nearly two hours apart show these clumps as they revolve about the planet. The small dot at center right in the second image is one of Saturn's small moons, Janus, which is 181 kilometers, (112 miles) across. Like all particles in Saturn's ring system, these clump features orbit the planet in the same direction in which the planet rotates. This direction is clockwise as seen from Cassini's southern vantage point below the ring plane. Two clumps in particular, one of them extended, is visible in the upper part of the F ring in the image on the left, and in the lower part of the ring in the image on the right. Other knot-like irregularities in the ring's brightness are visible in the image on the right. The core of the F ring is about 50 kilometers (31miles) wide, and from Cassini's current distance, is not fully visible. The imaging team enhanced the contrast of the images and magnified them to aid visibility of the F ring and the clump features. The camera took the images with the green filter, which is centered at 568 nanometers. The image scale is 377 kilometers (234 miles) per pixel. NASA's two Voyager spacecraft that flew past Saturn in 1980 and 1981 were the first to see these clumps. The Voyager data suggest that the clumps change very little and can be tracked as they orbit for 30 days or more. No clump survived from the time of the first Voyager flyby to the Voyager 2 flyby nine months later. Scientists are not certain of the cause of these features. Among the theories proposed are meteoroid bombardments and inter-particle collisions in the F ring. http

  20. Reduction and temporary stabilization of Tile C pelvic ring injuries using a posteriorly based external fixation system.

    PubMed

    Martin, Murphy P; Rojas, David; Mauffrey, Cyril

    2018-07-01

    Tile C pelvic ring injuries are challenging to manage even in the most experienced hands. The majority of such injuries can be managed using percutaneous reduction techniques, and the posterior ring can be stabilized using percutaneous transiliac-transsacral screw fixation. However, a subgroup of patients present with inadequate bony corridors, significant sacral zone 2 comminution or significant lateral/vertical displacement of the hemipelvis through a complete sacral fracture. Percutaneous strategies in such circumstances can be dangerous. Those patients may benefit from prone positioning and open reduction of the sacral fracture with fixation through tension band plating or lumbo-pelvic fixation. Soft tissue handling is critical, and direct reduction techniques around the sacrum can be difficult due to the complex anatomy and the fragile nature of the sacrum making clamp placement and tightening a challenge. In this paper, we propose a mini-invasive technique of indirect reduction and temporary stabilization, which is soft tissue friendly and permits maintenance of reduction during definitive fixation surgical.

  1. Accretion in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, G.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn's F ring is the solar system's principal natural laboratory for direct observation of accretion and disruption processes. The ring resides in the Roche zone, where tidal disruption competes with self-gravity, which allows us to observe the lifecycle of moonlets. Just as nearby moons create structure at the B ring edge (Esposito et al. 2012) and the Keeler gap (Murray 2007), the F ring "shepherding" moons Prometheus and Pandora stir up ring material and create observably changing structures on timescales of days to decades. In fact, Beurle et al (2010) show that Prometheus makes it possible for "distended, yet gravitationally coherent clumps" to form in the F ring, and Barbara and Esposito (2002) predicted a population of ~1 km bodies in the ring. In addition to the observations over the last three decades, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has detected 27 statistically significant features in 101 occultations by Saturn's F ring since July 2004. Seventeen of those 27 features are associated with clumps of ring material. Two features are opaque in occultation, which makes them candidates for solid objects, which we refer to as Moonlets. The 15 other features partially block stellar signal for 22 m to just over 3.7 km along the radial expanse of the occultation. Upon visual inspection of the occultation profile, these features resemble Icicles, thus we will refer to them as such here. The density enhancements responsible for such signal attenuations are likely due to transient clumping of material, evidence that aggregations of material are ubiquitous in the F ring. Our lengthy observing campaign reveals that Icicles are likely transient clumps, while Moonlets are possible solid objects. Optical depth is an indicator of clumping because more-densely aggregated material blocks more light; therefore, it is natural to imagine moonlets as later evolutionary stage of icicle, when looser clumps of material compact to form a feature that appears

  2. Dirac electrons in quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioia, L.; Zülicke, U.; Governale, M.; Winkler, R.

    2018-05-01

    We consider quantum rings realized in materials where the dynamics of charge carriers mimics that of two-dimensional (2D) Dirac electrons. A general theoretical description of the ring-subband structure is developed that applies to a range of currently available 2D systems, including graphene, transition-metal dichalcogenides, and narrow-gap semiconductor quantum wells. We employ the scattering-matrix approach to calculate the electronic two-terminal conductance through the ring and investigate how it is affected by Dirac-electron interference. The interplay of pseudospin chirality and hard-wall confinement is found to distinctly affect the geometric phase that is experimentally accessible in mesoscopic-conductance measurements. We derive an effective Hamiltonian for the azimuthal motion of charge carriers in the ring that yields deeper insight into the physical origin of the observed transport effects, including the unique behavior exhibited by the lowest ring subband in the normal and topological (i.e., band-inverted) regimes. Our paper provides a unified approach to characterizing confined Dirac electrons, which can be used to explore the design of valley- and spintronic devices based on quantum interference and the confinement-tunable geometric phase.

  3. The FlxABCD-HdrABC proteins correspond to a novel NADH dehydrogenase/heterodisulfide reductase widespread in anaerobic bacteria and involved in ethanol metabolism in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Ana Raquel; Grein, Fabian; Oliveira, Gonçalo P; Venceslau, Sofia S; Keller, Kimberly L; Wall, Judy D; Pereira, Inês A C

    2015-07-01

    Flavin-based electron bifurcation (FBEB) is an important mechanism for the energy metabolism of anaerobes. A new family of NADH dehydrogenases, the flavin oxidoreductase (FlxABCD, previously called FloxABCD), was proposed to perform FBEB in sulphate-reducing organisms coupled with heterodisulfide reductase (HdrABC). We found that the hdrABC-flxABCD gene cluster is widespread among anaerobic bacteria, pointing to a general and important role in their bioenergetics. In this work, we studied FlxABCD of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. The hdr-flx genes are part of the same transcriptional unit and are increased in transcription during growth in ethanol-sulfate, and to a less extent during pyruvate fermentation. Two mutant strains were generated: one where expression of the hdr-flx genes was interrupted and another lacking the flxA gene. Both strains were unable to grow with ethanol-sulfate, whereas growth was restored in a flxA-complemented strain. The mutant strains also produced very reduced amounts of ethanol compared with the wild type during pyruvate fermentation. Our results show that in D. vulgaris, the FlxABCD-HdrABC proteins are essential for NADH oxidation during growth on ethanol, probably involving a FBEB mechanism that leads to reduction of ferredoxin and the small protein DsrC, while in fermentation they operate in reverse, reducing NAD(+) for ethanol production. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Galactic rings revisited - I. CVRHS classifications of 3962 ringed galaxies from the Galaxy Zoo 2 Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, Ronald J.

    2017-11-01

    Rings are important and characteristic features of disc-shaped galaxies. This paper is the first in a series that re-visits galactic rings with the goals of further understanding the nature of the features and for examining their role in the secular evolution of galaxy structure. The series begins with a new sample of 3962 galaxies drawn from the Galaxy Zoo 2 citizen science data base, selected because zoo volunteers recognized a ring-shaped pattern in the morphology as seen in Sloan Digital Sky Survey colour images. The galaxies are classified within the framework of the Comprehensive de Vaucouleurs revised Hubble-Sandage system. It is found that zoo volunteers cued on the same kinds of ring-like features that were recognized in the 1995 Catalogue of Southern Ringed Galaxies. This paper presents the full catalogue of morphological classifications, comparisons with other sources of classifications and some histograms designed mainly to highlight the content of the catalogue. The advantages of the sample are its large size and the generally good quality of the images; the main disadvantage is the low physical resolution that limits the detectability of linearly small rings such as nuclear rings. The catalogue includes mainly inner and outer disc rings and lenses. Cataclysmic (`encounter-driven') rings (such as ring and polar ring galaxies) are recognized in less than 1 per cent of the sample.

  5. Clinical risk factors predicting genital fungal infections with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor treatment: The ABCD nationwide dapagliflozin audit.

    PubMed

    Thong, Ken Yan; Yadagiri, Mahender; Barnes, Dennis Joseph; Morris, David Stuart; Chowdhury, Tahseen Ahmad; Chuah, Ling Ling; Robinson, Anthony Michael; Bain, Stephen Charles; Adamson, Karen Ann; Ryder, Robert Elford John

    2018-02-01

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors may result in genital fungal infections. We investigated possible risk factors for developing such infections among patients treated with the SGLT2 inhibitor dapagliflozin. The Association of British Clinical Diabetologists (ABCD) collected data on patients treated with dapagliflozin in routine clinical practice from 59 diabetes centres. We assessed possible associations of patient's age, diabetes duration, body mass index, glycated haemoglobin, renal function, patient sex, ethnicity and prior genital fungal infection, urinary tract infection, urinary incontinence or nocturia, with the occurrence of ≥1 genital fungal infection within 26 weeks of treatment. 1049 out of 1116 patients (476 women, 573 men) were analysed. Baseline characteristics were, mean±SD, age 56.7±10.2years, BMI 35.5±6.9kg/m 2 and HbA 1c 9.4±1.5%. Only patient sex (13.2% women vs 3.3% men) and prior history of genital fungal infection (21.6% vs 7.3%) were found to be associated with occurrence of genital fungal infections after dapagliflozin treatment, adjusted OR 4.22 [95%CI 2.48,7.19], P<0.001 and adjusted OR 2.41 [95% CI 1.04,5.57], P=0.039, respectively. Women and patients with previous genital fungal infections had higher risks of developing genital fungal infections with dapagliflozin treatment. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. All rights reserved.

  6. A randomised controlled trial of the efficacy of the ABCD Parenting Young Adolescents Program: rationale and methodology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The transition to adolescence is a time of increased vulnerability for risk taking and poor health, social and academic outcomes. Parents have an important role in protecting their children from these potential harms. While the effectiveness of parenting programs in reducing problem behavior has been demonstrated, it is not known if parenting programs that target families prior to the onset of significant behavioral difficulties in early adolescence (9-14 years) improve the wellbeing of adolescents and their parents. This paper describes the rationale and methodology of a randomised controlled trial testing the efficacy of a parenting program for the promotion of factors known to be associated with positive adolescent outcomes, such as positive parenting practices, parent-adolescent relationships and adolescent behavior. Methods/Design One hundred and eighty parents were randomly allocated to an intervention or wait list control group. Parents in the intervention group participated in the ABCD Parenting Young Adolescents Program, a 6-session behavioral family intervention program which also incorporates acceptance-based strategies. Participants in the Wait List control group did not receive the intervention during a six month waiting period. The study was designed to comply with recommendations of the CONSORT statement. The primary outcome measures were reduction in parent-adolescent conflict and improvements in parent-adolescent relationships. Secondary outcomes included improvements in parent psychosocial wellbeing, parenting self-efficacy and perceived effectiveness, parent-adolescent communication and adolescent behavior. Conclusions Despite the effectiveness of parenting programs in reducing child behavioral difficulties, very few parenting programs for preventing problems in adolescents have been described in the peer reviewed literature. This study will provide data which can be used to examine the efficacy of a universal parenting interventions

  7. Rings Research in the Next Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Albers, N.; Brahic, A.; Brooks, S. M.; Burns, J. A.; Chavez, C.; Colwell, J. E.; Cuzzi, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Dones, L.; Durisen, R. H.; Filacchione, G.; Giuliatti Winter, S. M.; Gordon, M. K.; Graps, A.; Hamilton, D. P.; Hedman, M. M.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.; Lewis, M. C.; Lissauer, J. J.; Murray, C. D.; Nicholson, P. D.; Olkin, C. B.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Salo, H.; Schmidt, J.; Showalter, M. R.; Spahn, F.; Spilker, L. J.; Srama, R.; Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.

    2009-12-01

    The study of planetary ring systems is a key component of planetary science for several reasons: 1) The evolution and current states of planets and their satellites are affected in many ways by rings, while 2) conversely, properties of planets and moons and other solar system populations are revealed by their effects on rings; 3) highly structured and apparently delicate ring systems may be bellwethers, constraining various theories of the origin and evolution of their entire planetary system; and finally, 4) planetary rings provide an easily observable analogue to other astrophysical disk systems, enabling real "ground truth” results applicable to disks much more remote in space and/or time, including proto-planetary disks, circum-stellar disks, and even galaxies. Significant advances have been made in rings science in the past decade. The highest-priority rings research recommendations of the last Planetary Science Decadal Survey were to operate and extend the Cassini orbiter mission at Saturn; this has been done with tremendous success, accounting for much of the progress made on key science questions, as we will describe. Important progress in understanding the rings of Saturn and other planets has also come from Earth-based observational and theoretical work, again as prioritized by the last Decadal Survey. However, much important work remains to be done. At Saturn, the Cassini Solstice Mission must be brought to a successful completion. Priority should also be placed on sending spacecraft to Neptune and/or Uranus, now unvisited for more than 20 years. At Jupiter and Pluto, opportunities afforded by visiting spacecraft capable of studying rings should be exploited. On Earth, the need for continued research and analysis remains strong, including in-depth analysis of rings data already obtained, numerical and theoretical modeling work, laboratory analysis of materials and processes analogous to those found in the outer solar system, and continued Earth

  8. Whole brain CT perfusion deficits using 320-detector-row CT scanner in TIA patients are associated with ABCD2 score.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bijal K; Mustafa, Ghulam; McMurtray, Aaron; Masud, Mohammed W; Gunukula, Sameer K; Kamal, Haris; Kandel, Amit; Beltagy, Abdelrahman; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) are cerebral ischemic events without infarction. The uses of CT perfusion (CTP) techniques such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), time to peak (TTP), mean transit time (MTT) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) provide real time data about ischemia. It has been shown that CTP changes occur in less sensitive CTP scanners in patients with TIA. Larger detector row CTP (whole brain perfusion studies) may show that CTP abnormalities are more prevalent than previously noted. It is also unclear if these changes are associated with TIA severity. To demonstrate that TIA patients are associated with perfusion deficits using whole brain 320-detector-row CT perfusion, and to determine an association between ABCD2 score and perfusion deficit using whole brain perfusion. We retrospectively reviewed all TIA patients for CTP deficits from 2008-2010. Perfusion imaging was reviewed at admission; and it was determined if a perfusion deficit was present along with vascular territory involved. Of 364 TIA patients, 62 patients had CTP deficits. The largest group of patients had MCA territory involved with 48 of 62 patients (77.42%). The most common perfusion abnormality was increased TTP with 46 patients (74.19%). The ABCD2 score was reviewed in association with perfusion deficit. Increased age >60, severe hypertension (>180/100 mmHg), patients with speech abnormalities, and duration of symptoms >10 min were associated with a perfusion deficit but history of diabetes or minimal/moderate hypertension (140/90-179/99 mmHg) was not. There was no association between motor deficit and perfusion abnormality. Perfusion deficits are found in TIA patients using whole brain CTP and associated with components of the ABCD2 score.

  9. Tiny Mimas, Huge Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-28

    Saturn's icy moon Mimas is dwarfed by the planet's enormous rings. Because Mimas (near lower left) appears tiny by comparison, it might seem that the rings would be far more massive, but this is not the case. Scientists think the rings are no more than a few times as massive as Mimas, or perhaps just a fraction of Mimas' mass. Cassini is expected to determine the mass of Saturn's rings to within just a few hundredths of Mimas' mass as the mission winds down by tracking radio signals from the spacecraft as it flies close to the rings. The rings, which are made of small, icy particles spread over a vast area, are extremely thin -- generally no thicker than the height of a house. Thus, despite their giant proportions, the rings contain a surprisingly small amount of material. Mimas is 246 miles (396 kilometers) wide. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 6 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in red light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on July 21, 2016. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 564,000 miles (907,000 kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 31 degrees. Image scale is 34 miles (54 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20509

  10. Edge-on View of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    TOP - This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshot of Saturn with its rings barely visible. Normally, astronomers see Saturn with its rings tilted. Earth was almost in the plane of Saturn's rings, thus the rings appear edge-on.

    In this view, Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is casting a shadow on Saturn. Titan's atmosphere is a dark brown haze. The other moons appear white because of their bright, icy surfaces. Four moons - from left to right, Mimas, Tethys, Janus, and Enceladus - are clustered around the edge of Saturn's rings on the right. Two other moons appear in front of the ring plane. Prometheus is on the right edge; Pandora, on the left. The rings also are casting a shadow on Saturn because the Sun was above the ring plane.

    BOTTOM - This photograph shows Saturn with its rings slightly tilted. The moon called Dione, on the lower right, is casting a long, thin shadow across the whole ring system due to the setting Sun on the ring plane. The moon on the upper left of Saturn is Tethys.

    Astronomers also are studying the unusual appearance of Saturn's rings. The bottom image displays a faint, narrow ring, the F-ring just outside the main ring, which normally is invisible from Earth. Close to the edge of Saturn's disk, the front section of rings seem brighter and more yellow than the back due to the additional lumination by yellowish Saturn.

    The color images were assembled from separate exposures taken August 6 (top) and November 17 (bottom), 1995 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  11. Electro-optical hybrid slip ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, En

    2005-11-01

    The slip ring is a rotary electrical interface, collector, swivel or rotary joint. It is a physical system that can perform continuous data transfer and data exchange between a stationary and a rotating structure. A slip ring is generally used to transfer data or power from an unrestrained, continuously rotating electro-mechanical system in real-time, thereby simplifying operations and eliminating damage-prone wires dangling from moving joints. Slip rings are widely used for testing, evaluating, developing and improving various technical equipment and facilities with rotating parts. They are widely used in industry, especially in manufacturing industries employing turbo machinery, as in aviation, shipbuilding, aerospace, defense, and in precise facilities having rotating parts such as medical Computerized Tomography (CT) and MRI scanners and so forth. Therefore, any improvement in slip ring technology can impact large markets. Research and development in this field will have broad prospects long into the future. The goal in developing the current slip ring technology is to improve and increase the reliability, stability, anti-interference, and high data fidelity between rotating and stationary structures. Up to now, there have been numerous approaches used for signal and data transfer utilizing a slip ring such as metal contacts, wires, radio transmission, and even liquid media. However, all suffer from drawbacks such as data transfer speed limitations, reliability, stability, electro-magnetic interference and durability. The purpose of the current research is to break through these basic limitations using an optical solution, thereby improving performance in current slip ring applications. This dissertation introduces a novel Electro-Optical Hybrid Slip Ring technology, which makes "through the air" digital-optical communication between stationary and rotating systems a reality with high data transfer speed, better reliability and low interference susceptibility

  12. Slowing down of ring polymer diffusion caused by inter-ring threading.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsang; Kim, Soree; Jung, YounJoon

    2015-06-01

    Diffusion of long ring polymers in a melt is much slower than the reorganization of their internal structures. While direct evidence for entanglements has not been observed in the long ring polymers unlike linear polymer melts, threading between the rings is suspected to be the main reason for slowing down of ring polymer diffusion. It is, however, difficult to define the threading configuration between two rings because the rings have no chain end. In this work, evidence for threading dynamics of ring polymers is presented by using molecular dynamics simulation and applying a novel analysis method. The simulation results are analyzed in terms of the statistics of persistence and exchange times that have proved useful in studying heterogeneous dynamics of glassy systems. It is found that the threading time of ring polymer melts increases more rapidly with the degree of polymerization than that of linear polymer melts. This indicates that threaded ring polymers cannot diffuse until an unthreading event occurs, which results in the slowing down of ring polymer diffusion. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. West Nile virus infection in cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Egberink, Herman; Addie, Diane D; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hartmann, Katrin; Horzinek, Marian C; Hosie, Margaret J; Marsilio, Fulvio; Lloret, Albert; Lutz, Hans; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Möstl, Karin

    2015-07-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a zoonotic mosquito-borne virus with a broad host range that infects mainly birds and mosquitos, but also mammals (including humans), reptiles, amphibians and ticks. It is maintained in a bird-mosquito-bird transmission cycle. The most important vectors are bird-feeding mosquitos of the Culex genus; maintenance and amplification mainly involve passerine birds. WNV can cause disease in humans, horses and several species of birds following infection of the central nervous system. Cats can also be infected through mosquito bites, and by eating infected small mammals and probably also birds. Although seroprevalence in cats can be high in endemic areas, clinical disease and mortality are rarely reported. If a cat is suspected of clinical signs due to an acute WNV infection, symptomatic treatment is indicated. © Published by SAGE on behalf of ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  14. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  15. A-ring Propeller

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-26

    A propeller-shaped structure, created by an unseen moon, can be seen in Saturn A ring and looks like a small, dark line interrupting the bright surrounding ring material in the upper left of this image taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft.

  16. Lower esophageal ring (Schatzki)

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrowed area to stretch the ring. Sometimes, a balloon is placed in the area and inflated, to help widen the ring. Outlook (Prognosis) Swallowing problems may return. You may need repeat treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you ...

  17. Splinters of Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-28

    Saturn shadow interrupts the planet rings, leaving just thin slivers of the rings visible in this image, which shows a pair of the planet small moons. Helene is in the center top of the image, Epimetheus is in the lower right.

  18. Planetary rings - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borderies, Nicole

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models of planetary-ring dynamics are examined in a brief analytical review. The mathematical description of streamlines and streamline interactions is outlined; the redistribution of angular momentum due to collisions between particles is explained; and problems in the modeling of broad, narrow, and arc rings are discussed.

  19. Pair Past the Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-04

    Two of Saturn moons orbit beyond four of the planet rings in this image from NASA Cassini spacecraft. From the top right of the picture are the C, B , A, and thin F rings, the small moon Pandora and, near the middle of the image, the moon Enceladus.

  20. Mysteries of the ringed planets. [colloquium review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    An assessment is presented of the recent progress in the theory of planetary rings which was in evidence at the IAU's recent, 75th Colloquium. Observational material was dominated by spacecraft data, and theoretical consideration of the problems posed comes predominantly from gravitational mechanics. An understanding of collective effects, in light of both fluid mechanical and statistical mechanical methodologies, is being approached, and the importance of electromagnetic phenomena studies is noted. Voyager observations of Saturn's rings, and accumulating data from stellar occultations by the rings of Uranus, provided most of the observational material. Jupiter's faint ring was closely examined by the 1979 Voyager flight. These three known ring systems are found to exhibit such family resemblances as their proximity to the parent planet and magnetospheric environment.

  1. An evolving view of Saturn's dynamic rings.

    PubMed

    Cuzzi, J N; Burns, J A; Charnoz, S; Clark, R N; Colwell, J E; Dones, L; Esposito, L W; Filacchione, G; French, R G; Hedman, M M; Kempf, S; Marouf, E A; Murray, C D; Nicholson, P D; Porco, C C; Schmidt, J; Showalter, M R; Spilker, L J; Spitale, J N; Srama, R; Sremcević, M; Tiscareno, M S; Weiss, J

    2010-03-19

    We review our understanding of Saturn's rings after nearly 6 years of observations by the Cassini spacecraft. Saturn's rings are composed mostly of water ice but also contain an undetermined reddish contaminant. The rings exhibit a range of structure across many spatial scales; some of this involves the interplay of the fluid nature and the self-gravity of innumerable orbiting centimeter- to meter-sized particles, and the effects of several peripheral and embedded moonlets, but much remains unexplained. A few aspects of ring structure change on time scales as short as days. It remains unclear whether the vigorous evolutionary processes to which the rings are subject imply a much younger age than that of the solar system. Processes on view at Saturn have parallels in circumstellar disks.

  2. Physical studies of the planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.

    1980-01-01

    In this review paper, the physical properties of the Saturnian and Uranian rings as derived from ground-based observations are first discussed. Focus is then shifted to the study of the orbital dynamics of the ring particles. Numerical simulations of the evolutionary history of a system of colliding particles in differential rotation together with theoretical modeling of the inelastic collision processes are surveyed. In anticipation of the information returned from in situ measurements by space probes, interactions of the planetary rings with the interplanetary meteoroids and planetary magnetospheres are briefly considered. Finally, models of planetary ring origin are examined. In this connection, some recent work on the satellite resonant perturbation effects on the ring structure are also touched upon.

  3. Dichloro-Cycloazatriphosphane: The Missing Link between N2 P2 and P4 Ring Systems in the Systematic Development of NP Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bresien, Jonas; Hinz, Alexander; Schulz, Axel; Suhrbier, Tim; Thomas, Max; Villinger, Alexander

    2017-10-20

    A dichloro-cycloazatriphosphane that incorporates a cyclic NP 3 backbone could be synthesized using knowledge gained from the chemistry of N 2 P 2 and P 4 ring systems. It fills the gap between the congeneric compounds [ClP(μ-NR)] 2 and [ClP(μ-PR)] 2 (R=sterically demanding substituent), and thus contributes to the systematic development of nitrogen-phosphorus chemistry in general. The title compound was studied with respect to its formation via a labile aminodiphosphene, which readily underwent different rearrangement reactions depending on the solvent. All compounds were fully characterized by experimental and computational methods. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Technique distribuee de gestion de la charge sur le reseau electrique et ring-tree: Un nouveau systeme de communication P2P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, Simon

    Le reseau de distribution et de transport de l'electricite se modernise dans plusieurs pays dont le Canada. La nouvelle generation de ce reseau que l'on appelle smart grid, permet entre autre l'automatisation de la production, de la distribution et de la gestion de la charge chez les clients. D'un autre cote, des appareils domestiques intelligents munis d'une interface de communication pour des applications du smart grid commencent a apparaitre sur le marche. Ces appareils intelligents pourraient creer une communaute virtuelle pour optimiser leurs consommations d'une facon distribuee. La gestion distribuee de ces charges intelligentes necessite la communication entre un grand nombre d'equipements electriques. Ceci represente un defi important a relever surtout si on ne veut pas augmenter le cout de l'infrastructure et de la maintenance. Lors de cette these deux systemes distincts ont ete concus : un systeme de communication peer-to-peer, appele Ring-Tree, permettant la communication entre un nombre important de noeuds (jusqu'a de l'ordre de grandeur du million) tel que des appareils electriques communicants et une technique distribuee de gestion de la charge sur le reseau electrique. Le systeme de communication Ring-Tree inclut une nouvelle topologie reseau qui n'a jamais ete definie ou exploitee auparavant. Il inclut egalement des algorithmes pour la creation, l'exploitation et la maintenance de ce reseau. Il est suffisamment simple pour etre mis en oeuvre sur des controleurs associes aux dispositifs tels que des chauffe-eaux, chauffage a accumulation, bornes de recharges electriques, etc. Il n'utilise pas un serveur centralise (ou tres peu, seulement lorsqu'un noeud veut rejoindre le reseau). Il offre une solution distribuee qui peut etre mise en oeuvre sans deploiement d'une infrastructure autre que les controleurs sur les dispositifs vises. Finalement, un temps de reponse de quelques secondes pour atteindre 1'ensemble du reseau peut etre obtenu, ce qui est

  5. Maternal early pregnancy lipid profile and offspring's lipids and glycaemic control at age 5-6 years: The ABCD study.

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, Noekie; Oostvogels, Adriëtte J J M; Gademan, Maaike G J; Vrijkotte, Tanja G M

    2017-12-01

    Maternal early pregnancy lipid profile might influence offspring's lipids and glycaemic control, through an increased offspring's fat percentage. This explorative study investigates whether maternal early pregnancy lipid profile is associated with offspring's lipids and glycaemic control independently of offspring's fat percentage and if these associations are mediated by offspring's fat percentage. Possible sex differences in these associations are also examined. 1133 mother-child pairs of the prospective ABCD-study were included. Maternal non-fasting lipids were collected in early pregnancy: triglycerides, total cholesterol (TC), Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and free fatty acids (FFA). Fasting triglycerides, TC, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), glucose and C-peptide were assessed in offspring aged 5-6 years and HOMA2-IR was calculated. After adjustment for covariates, strongest associations were found between maternal TC and offspring's TC (boys β(95%CI) = 0.141 (0.074-0.207); girls β(95%CI) = 0.268 (0.200; 0.336)) and LDL (boys β(95%CI) = 0.114 (0.052; 0.176); girls β(95%CI) = 0.247 (0.181-0.312)), maternal ApoB and offspring's TC (boys β(95%CI) = 0.638 (0.311-0.965); girls β(95%CI) = 1.121 (0.766-1.475)) and LDL (boys β(95%CI) = 0.699 (0.393-1.005); girls β(95%CI) = 1.198 (0.868-1.529)), and maternal ApoA1 and offspring's HDL (only boys β(95%CI) = 0.221 (0.101-0.341)). No significant association was found between maternal lipids and offspring's glycaemic control, and offspring's fat percentage played no mediating role. Maternal early pregnancy lipid profile is associated with offspring's lipid profile in childhood, with overall stronger associations in girls. This study provides further evidence that lowering lipid levels during pregnancy might be beneficial for the long term health of the offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and

  6. Autonomous bio-chemical decontaminator (ABCD) against weapons of mass destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyacinthe, Berg P.

    2006-05-01

    The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and the use of such elements pose an eminent asymmetric threat with disastrous consequences to the national security of any nation. In particular, the use of biochemical warfare agents against civilians and unprotected troops in international conflicts or by terrorists against civilians is considered as a very peculiar threat. Accordingly, taking a quarantine-before-inhalation approach to biochemical warfare, the author introduces the notion of autonomous biochemical decontamination against WMD. In the unfortunate event of a biochemical attack, the apparatus proposed herein is intended to automatically detect, identify, and more importantly neutralize a biochemical threat. Along with warnings concerning a cyber-WMD nexus, various sections cover discussions on human senses and computer sensors, corroborating evidence related to detection and neutralization of chemical toxins, and cyber-assisted olfaction in stand alone, peer-to-peer, and network settings. In essence, the apparatus can be used in aviation and mass transit security to initiate mass decontamination by dispersing a decontaminant aerosol or to protect the public water supply against a potential bioterrorist attack. Future effort may involve a system-on-chip (SoC) embodiment of this apparatus that allows a safer environment for the emerging phenomenon of cyber-assisted olfaction and morph cell phones into ubiquitous sensors/decontaminators. Although this paper covers mechanisms and protocols to avail a neutralizing substance, further research will need to explore the substance's various pharmacological profiles and potential side effects.

  7. The "Good, Bad and Ugly" pin site grading system: A reliable and memorable method for documenting and monitoring ring fixator pin sites.

    PubMed

    Clint, S A; Eastwood, D M; Chasseaud, M; Calder, P R; Marsh, D R

    2010-02-01

    Although there is much in the literature regarding pin site infections, there is no accepted, validated method for documenting their state. We present a system for reliably labelling pin sites on any ring fixator construct and an easy-to-remember grading system to document the state of each pin site. Each site is graded in terms of erythema, pain and discharge to give a 3-point scale, named "Good", "Bad" and "Ugly" for ease of recall. This system was tested for intra- and inter-observer reproducibility. 15 patients undergoing elective limb reconstruction were recruited. A total of 218 pin sites were independently scored by 2 examiners. 82 were then re-examined later by the same examiners. 514 pin sites were felt to be "Good", 80 "Bad" and 6 "Ugly". The reproducibility of the system was found to be excellent. We feel our system gives a quick, reliable and reproducible method to monitor individual pin sites and their response to treatment. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic Search for Rings around Kepler Planet Candidates: Constraints on Ring Size and Occurrence Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Masataka; Masuda, Kento; Kawahara, Hajime; Suto, Yasushi

    2018-05-01

    We perform a systematic search for rings around 168 Kepler planet candidates with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios that are selected from all of the short-cadence data. We fit ringed and ringless models to their light curves and compare the fitting results to search for the signatures of planetary rings. First, we identify 29 tentative systems, for which the ringed models exhibit statistically significant improvement over the ringless models. The light curves of those systems are individually examined, but we are not able to identify any candidate that indicates evidence for rings. In turn, we find several mechanisms of false positives that would produce ringlike signals, and the null detection enables us to place upper limits on the size of the rings. Furthermore, assuming the tidal alignment between axes of the planetary rings and orbits, we conclude that the occurrence rate of rings larger than twice the planetary radius is less than 15%. Even though the majority of our targets are short-period planets, our null detection provides statistical and quantitative constraints on largely uncertain theoretical models of the origin, formation, and evolution of planetary rings.

  9. Ring-Resonator/Sol-Gel Interferometric Immunosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory; Cohen, David

    2007-01-01

    A proposed biosensing system would be based on a combination of (1) a sensing volume containing antibodies immobilized in a sol-gel matrix and (2) an optical interferometer having a ring resonator configuration. The antibodies would be specific to an antigen species that one seeks to detect. In the ring resonator of the proposed system, light would make multiple passes through the sensing volume, affording greater interaction length and, hence, greater antibody- detection sensitivity.

  10. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  11. Seal ring installation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, L. Haynes (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A seal ring tool that allows an installer to position a primary seal ring between hub ends of pipe flanges that are being assembled together. The tool includes a pivoting handle member and extension arms attached to the pivoting handle member. The ends of the arms have side indentation type longitudinal grooves angled toward one another for holding the primary seal ring in place between the hubs of respective pipes that are to be attached together. The arms of the tool can also have flat sides that can be used to abut against an optional second larger seal that is supported within a groove in one of the hub ends so that the second hub end can then be moved against the other side of the primary seal ring. Once the seal ring is positioned between the pipe hubs, the pipe hubs can be moved about the seal ring due to the flat sides of the arms of the tool. The tool eliminates the chances of damaging and contaminating seal rings being installed within pipe hubs that are being attached to one another.

  12. Behavioral Mapless Navigation Using Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Randall P.; Miller, Samuel A.; Bradley, Arthur T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents work on the development and implementation of a novel approach to robotic navigation. In this system, map-building and localization for obstacle avoidance are discarded in favor of moment-by-moment behavioral processing of the sonar sensor data. To accomplish this, we developed a network of behaviors that communicate through the passing of rings, data structures that are similar in form to the sonar data itself and express the decisions of each behavior. Through the use of these rings, behaviors can moderate each other, conflicting impulses can be mediated, and designers can easily connect modules to create complex emergent navigational techniques. We discuss the development of a number of these modules and their successful use as a navigation system in the Trinity omnidirectional robot.

  13. Saturn's Ring: Pre-Cassini Status and Mission Goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeff N.

    1999-01-01

    In November 1980, and again in August 1981, identical Voyager spacecraft flew through the Saturn system, changing forever the way we think about planetary rings. Although Saturn's rings had been the only known ring system for three centuries, a ring system around Uranus had been discovered by stellar occultations from Earth in 1977, and the nearly transparent ring of Jupiter was imaged by Voyager in 1979 (the presence of material there had been inferred from charged particle experiments on Pioneer 10 and 11 several years earlier). While Saturn had thus temporarily lost its uniqueness as having the only ring system, with Voyager it handily recaptured the role of having the most fascinating one. The Voyager breakthroughs included spiral density and bending waves such as cause galactic structure; ubiquitous fine-scale radial 'irregular' structure, with the appearance of record-grooves; regional and local variations in particle color; complex, azimuthally variable ring structure; empty gaps in the rings, some containing very regular, sharp-edged, elliptical rings and one containing both a small moonlet and incomplete arcs of dusty material; and shadowy 'spokes' that flicker across the main rings. One of the paradigm shifts of this period was the realization that many aspects of planetary rings, and even the ring systems themselves, could be 'recent' on geological timescales. These early results are reviewed and summarized in the Arizona Space Science series volumes 'Saturn'. (An excellent review of ring dynamics at a formative stage is by Goldreich and Tremaine.) From the mid 1980's to the time of this writing, progress has been steady, while at a less heady pace, and some of the novel ring properties revealed by Voyager 1 and 2 are beginning to be better understood. It is clearly impossible to cite, much less review, every advance over the last decade; however, below we summarize the main advances in understanding of Saturn's rings since the mid 1980's, in the context

  14. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  15. Dynamics of planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Araki, Suguru

    1991-01-01

    The modeling of the dynamics of particle collisions within planetary rings is discussed. Particles in the rings collide with one another because they have small random motions in addition to their orbital velocity. The orbital speed is roughly 10 km/s, while the random motions have an average speed of about a tenth of a millimeter per second. As a result, the particle collisions are very gentle. Numerical analysis and simulation of the ring dynamics, performed with the aid of a supercomputer, is outlined.

  16. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  17. EXPERIMENTS WITH PLASMA RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Alfven, H.; Lindberg, L.; Mitlid, P.

    1960-03-01

    The construction of a coaxial plasma gun is described. At its output end the gun is provided with a radial magnetic field, which is trapped by the plasma. The plasma from the gun is studied by photographic and magnetic methods. It is demonstrated that the gun produces magnetized plasma rings with the same basic structure as the rings obtained in toroidal pinch experiments. When the plasma rings are formed, the magnetic field lines from the gun break, a result which is of interest from a theoretical point of view. (auth)

  18. High-Speed Ring Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocky, Terry; Kopf, Edward, Jr.; Katanyoutananti, Sunant; Steiner, Carl; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    is no centralized arbitration or bus granting. The JPL design provides for autonomous synchronization of the nodes on the ring bus. An address-synchronous latency adjust buffer (LAB) has been designed that cannot get out of synchronization and needs no external input. Also, a priority-driven cable selection behavior has been programmed into each unit on the ring bus. This makes the bus able to connect itself up, according to a maximum redundancy priority system, without the need for computer intervention at startup. Switching around a failed or switched-off unit is also autonomous. The JPL bus provides a map of all the active units for the host computer to read and use for fault management. With regard to timing, this enhanced bus recognizes coordinated timing on a spacecraft as critical and addresses this with a single source of absolute and relative time, which is broadcast to all units on the bus with synchronization maintained to the tens of nanoseconds. Each BIU consists of up to five programmable triggers, which may be programmed for synchronization of events within the spacecraft of instrument. All JPL-formatted data transmitted on the ring bus are automatically time-stamped.

  19. Ring faults and ring dikes around the Orientale basin on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C; Head, James W; Johnson, Brandon; Keane, James T; Kiefer, Walter S; McGovern, Patrick J; Neumann, Gregory A; Wieczorek, Mark A; Zuber, Maria T

    2018-08-01

    The Orientale basin is the youngest and best-preserved multiring impact basin on the Moon, having experienced only modest modification by subsequent impacts and volcanism. Orientale is often treated as the type example of a multiring basin, with three prominent rings outside of the inner depression: the Inner Rook Montes, the Outer Rook Montes, and the Cordillera. Here we use gravity data from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission to reveal the subsurface structure of Orientale and its ring system. Gradients of the gravity data reveal a continuous ring dike intruded into the Outer Rook along the plane of the fault associated with the ring scarp. The volume of this ring dike is ~18 times greater than the volume of all extrusive mare deposits associated with the basin. The gravity gradient signature of the Cordillera ring indicates an offset along the fault across a shallow density interface, interpreted to be the base of the low-density ejecta blanket. Both gravity gradients and crustal thickness models indicate that the edge of the central cavity is shifted inward relative to the equivalent Inner Rook ring at the surface. Models of the deep basin structure show inflections along the crust-mantle interface at both the Outer Rook and Cordillera rings, indicating that the basin ring faults extend from the surface to at least the base of the crust. Fault dips range from 13-22° for the Cordillera fault in the northeastern quadrant, to 90° for the Outer Rook in the northwestern quadrant. The fault dips for both outer rings are lowest in the northeast, possibly due to the effects of either the direction of projectile motion or regional gradients in pre-impact crustal thickness. Similar ring dikes and ring faults are observed around the majority of lunar basins.

  20. Topological ring currents in the "empty" ring of benzo-annelated perylenes.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Timothy K; Mallion, Roger B

    2011-01-27

    Cyclic conjugation in benzo-annelated perylenes is examined by means of the topological π-electron ring currents calculated for each of their constituent rings, in a study that is an exact analogy of a recent investigation by Gutman et al. based on energy-effect values for the corresponding rings in each of these structures. "Classical" approaches, such as Kekulé structures, Clar "sextet" formulas, and circuits of conjugation, predict that the central ring in perylene is "empty" and thus contributes negligibly to cyclic conjugation. However, conclusions from the present calculations of topological ring currents agree remarkably with those arising from the earlier study involving energy-effect values in that, contrary to what would be predicted from the classical approaches, rings annelated in an angular fashion relative to the central ring of these perylene structures materially increase the extent of that ring's involvement in cyclic conjugation. It is suggested that such close quantitative agreement between the predictions of these two superficially very different indices (energy effect and topological ring current) might be due to the fact that, ultimately, both depend, albeit in ostensibly quite different ways, only on an adjacency matrix that contains information about the carbon-carbon connectivity of the conjugated system in question.

  1. DOD SPHERES-RINGS Test Session

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-04

    ISS037-E-025915 (4 Nov. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, conducts a session with a pair of bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites known as Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. Surrounding the two SPHERES mini-satellites is ring-shaped hardware known as the Resonant Inductive Near-field Generation System, or RINGS. SPHERES-RINGS seeks to demonstrate wireless power transfer between satellites at a distance for enhanced operations.

  2. HST Observations of the Uranian Ring Plane Crossing: Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Lissauer, J. J.; French, R. G.; Hamilton, D. P.; Nicholson, P. D.; de Pater, I.

    2007-10-01

    Between early May and mid-August 2007, Earth was on the north side of the Uranian ring plane while the Sun was still shining on the rings’ southern face. This has provided an exceedingly rare opportunity to view the ring system via transmitted light. The ɛ ring, which typically out-shines every other component of the inner ring-moon system, has been rendered essentially invisible. We have been conducting regular imaging of the Uranian system throughout this period with the Wide Field/Planetary Camera on HST to address numerous scientific goals. (1) To search the inner Uranian system for the "shepherding” moons long believed to confine the narrow rings; (2) to study the packing density of the main rings via direct observations of their vertical thickness; (3) to search for the inner dust rings that appeared in a few Voyager images; (4) to determine the vertical thickness of the faint outer rings μ and ν (5) to obtain the most sensitive determinations of the outer rings’ colors and try to understand why ring ν is red but ring μ is blue; (6) to search for additional outer dust rings under optimal viewing geometry; and (7) to continue monitoring the seemingly chaotic orbital variations of the inner Uranian moons, particularly Mab. HST observations span mid-May to mid-September. We will present our initial results from this observing program.

  3. Comparison of dermatoscopic diagnostic algorithms based on calculation: The ABCD rule of dermatoscopy, the seven-point checklist, the three-point checklist and the CASH algorithm in dermatoscopic evaluation of melanocytic lesions.

    PubMed

    Unlu, Ezgi; Akay, Bengu N; Erdem, Cengizhan

    2014-07-01

    Dermatoscopic analysis of melanocytic lesions using the CASH algorithm has rarely been described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy rates of the ABCD rule of dermatoscopy, the seven-point checklist, the three-point checklist, and the CASH algorithm in the diagnosis and dermatoscopic evaluation of melanocytic lesions on the hairy skin. One hundred and fifteen melanocytic lesions of 115 patients were examined retrospectively using dermatoscopic images and compared with the histopathologic diagnosis. Four dermatoscopic algorithms were carried out for all lesions. The ABCD rule of dermatoscopy showed sensitivity of 91.6%, specificity of 60.4%, and diagnostic accuracy of 66.9%. The seven-point checklist showed sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of 87.5, 65.9, and 70.4%, respectively; the three-point checklist 79.1, 62.6, 66%; and the CASH algorithm 91.6, 64.8, and 70.4%, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study that compares the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of the ABCD rule of dermatoscopy, the three-point checklist, the seven-point checklist, and the CASH algorithm for the diagnosis of melanocytic lesions on the hairy skin. In our study, the ABCD rule of dermatoscopy and the CASH algorithm showed the highest sensitivity for the diagnosis of melanoma. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  4. Scintillating C Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-01-16

    Both luminous and translucent, the C ring sweeps out of the darkness of Saturn's shadow and obscures the planet at lower left. The ring is characterized by broad, isolated bright areas, or "plateaus," surrounded by fainter material. This view looks toward the unlit side of the rings from about 19 degrees above the ringplane. North on Saturn is up. The dark, inner B ring is seen at lower right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Dec. 15, 2006 at a distance of approximately 632,000 kilometers (393,000 miles) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 56 degrees. Image scale is 34 kilometers (21 miles) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08855

  5. Ring of Stellar Fire

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-22

    This image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows where the action is taking place in galaxy NGC 1291. The outer ring, colored red, is filled with new stars that are igniting and heating up dust that glows with infrared light.

  6. Dusty plasma ring model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    A model of a dusty plasma (Yukawa) ring is presented. We consider n identical particles confined in a two-dimensional (2D) annular potential well and interacting through a Debye (i.e. Yukawa or screened Coulomb) potential. Equilibrium configurations are computed versus n, the Debye shielding parameter and the trap radius. When the particle separation exceeds a critical value the particles form a 1D chain with a ring topology. Below the critical separation the zigzag instability gives a 2D configuration. Computed critical separations are shown to agree well with a theoretical prediction for the zigzag threshold. Normal mode spectra for 1D rings are computed and found to be in excellent agreement with the longitudinal and transverse dispersion relations for unbounded straight chains. When the longitudinal and transverse dispersion relations intersect we observe a resonance due to the finite curvature of the ring.

  7. Faint Ring, Bright Arc

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-12

    In this image taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft, the bright arc in Saturn faint G ring contains a little something special. Although it cant be seen here, the tiny moonlet Aegaeon orbits within the bright arc.

  8. Argonne - Ring Resonators

    Science.gov Websites

    -- Link6 -- Integrated Photonic Spectrographs for Astronomy Optical Multi-Mode Interference Devices Dual Guiding, Modulating, and Emitting Light on Silicon Scope1 -- Scope 2 -- Lamp1 -- optical Ring Resonators

  9. Rings and Waves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-30

    Saturn A ring is decorated with several kinds of waves. NASA Cassini spacecraft has captured a host of density waves, a bending wave, and the edge waves on the edge of the Keeler gap caused by the small moon Daphnis.

  10. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Liesegang's rings resembling helminthiasis].

    PubMed

    Zámecník, M; Riedl, I

    1996-12-01

    So called Liesegang's rings are lamellar corpuscles which develop after periodical precipitation of oversaturated solutions in gel medium. They can occur in cysts, closed cavities, inflammatory exudates and necroses. They resemble parasitic eggs, larvae or adult forms. A case of 28-year-old woman is presented with many Liesegang's rings in a stuff from dilated renal calyx. Their preliminary evaluation considered helminths, especially Dioctophyma renale.

  12. The rings of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; Dunham, E.; Mink, D.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the observation of five brief occultations of the star SAO 158687 which occurred both before and after its occultation by Uranus on March 10, 1977. The events were observed with a three-channel occultation photometer, attached to a 91-cm telescope. The observations indicate that at least five rings encircle the planet Uranus. Possible reasons for the narrowness of the Uranus rings are discussed.

  13. The postman always rings twice: two cases of shotgun deaths associated with an unconventional home security alarm system.

    PubMed

    Asirdizer, Mahmut; Turkmen, Nursel; Akan, Okan; Yavuz, Mehmet Sunay

    2014-06-01

    Injury and death cases caused by booby traps are not common in forensic medicine practice. Besides, installation of booby traps including firearms is generally for suicidal and rarely for homicidal purposes. Although few patents were described about home security alarm system that were created by firearms in the United States, 1 sample of injury with a similar unconventional mechanism of home safety system was reported by Asirdizer and Yavuz in 2009. In the published case report, the story of an electrical technician who was invited to a summer house by the homeowner to check the home security alarm system was reported. In the so-called report, he was stated to be injured by the shotgun attached to the unconventional home security alarm system while checking the system. As a result, the homeowner was convicted of a possible intent to cause a life-threatening injury to the technician.The so-called homeowner and his wife died by the same shotgun attached to the same unconventional home security alarm system 4 years on from the first event. In the present case report, we have aimed to present the findings of the crime scene and the autopsies of these unusual 2 deaths and to discuss individual and legal factors in paving the way for the deaths of 2 people.

  14. Nardo Ring, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Nardo Ring is a striking visual feature from space, and astronauts have photographed it several times. The Ring is a race car test track; it is 12.5 kilometers long and steeply banked to reduce the amount of active steering needed by drivers. The Nardo Ring lies in a remote area on the heel of Italy's 'boot,' 50 kilometers east of the naval port of Taranto. The Ring encompasses a number of active (green) and fallow (brown to dark brown) agricultural fields. In this zone of intensive agriculture, farmers gain access to their fields through the Ring via a series of underpasses. Winding features within the southern section of the Ring appear to be smaller, unused race tracks.

    The image covers an area of 18.8 x 16.4 km, was acquired on August 17. 2007, and is located at 49.3 degrees north latitude, 17.8 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  15. Dynamics and structure of planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Recent research efforts were directed towards sharpening the understanding of kinematical and dynamical properties of the Uranian rings, with the combination of Earth-based and Voyager observations, and in obtaining and interpreting new observations of the Saturn system from the remarkable stellar occultation of 3 Jul. 1989. Some of the highlights studied include: (1) a detailed comparison of structure and dynamics of the Uranus rings from joint analysis of high quality Earth-based data and the complete set of Voyager occultation measurements; (2) a comprehensive search for weak normal modes excited in the Uranian rings, analogous to the m = 2 and m = 0 normal modes previously identified for the delta and gamma rings; (3) an ongoing search for faint rings and ring arcs of Uranus, using both Voyager images of the rings and Earth-based and spacecraft stellar occultation data; (4) a comparison of upper stratospheric temperatures of Uranus inferred from Voyager ultraviolet occultations with results of ground-based occultation observations; and (5) observations of the 3 Jul. 1989 Saturn occultation of 28 Sgr.

  16. Optical heterodyne detection for cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, Marc D.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Zare, Richard N.

    2000-07-25

    A cavity ring-down system for performing cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) using optical heterodyne detection of a ring-down wave E.sub.RD during a ring-down phase or a ring-up wave E.sub.RU during a ring up phase. The system sends a local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and a signal wave E.sub.SIGNAL to the cavity, preferably a ring resonator, and derives an interference signal from the combined local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD (or ring-up wave E.sub.RU). The local oscillator wave E.sub.LO has a first polarization and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD has a second polarization different from the first polarization. The system has a combining arrangement for combining or overlapping local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD at a photodetector, which receives the interference signal and generates a heterodyne current I.sub.H therefrom. Frequency and phase differences between the waves are adjustable.

  17. Ring correlations in random networks.

    PubMed

    Sadjadi, Mahdi; Thorpe, M F

    2016-12-01

    We examine the correlations between rings in random network glasses in two dimensions as a function of their separation. Initially, we use the topological separation (measured by the number of intervening rings), but this leads to pseudo-long-range correlations due to a lack of topological charge neutrality in the shells surrounding a central ring. This effect is associated with the noncircular nature of the shells. It is, therefore, necessary to use the geometrical distance between ring centers. Hence we find a generalization of the Aboav-Weaire law out to larger distances, with the correlations between rings decaying away when two rings are more than about three rings apart.

  18. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2016-02-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant differences from the AC case. In particular, the ring does not fly off the core but rises a short distance and then falls back. If the ring jumps high enough, the rising and the falling motion of the ring does not follow simple vertical motion of a projectile. This indicates that there are additional forces on the ring in each part of its motion. Four possible stages of the motion of the ring with DC are identified, which result from the ring current changing directions during the jump in response to a changing magnetic flux through the moving ring.

  19. The Crossings of Saturn Ring Plane by the Earth in 1995: Ring Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, François; Sicardy, Bruno; Dumas, Christophe; Jorda, Laurent; Tiphène, Didier

    2000-05-01

    The crossings of Saturn's ring plane by Earth were observed in the near infrared on May 22 and August 10, 1995, from the 2.2-m telescope of the University of Hawaii, the 2-m telescope at Pic du Midi, France, and with the Adonis adaptive optics camera at the 3.6-m telescope of the European Southern Observatory in Chile. Images from the Hubble Space Telescope, obtained in August 1995, are also reanalyzed. The radial brightness profiles of the rings indicate that the outer and usually faint F ring dominates the edge-on brightness of the system, thus hiding the vertical structure of the main rings within a few hours around the ring plane crossing. The photometric behaviors of the A, B, and C rings and of the Cassini Division are analyzed, using a radiative transfer code which includes the illuminations by the Sun and by the planet. The F ring is modeled as a physically thick ribbon of height H, composed of large particles embedded in dust of fractional optical depth f. The observed profiles, combined with previous results, can be explained if the F ring is both optically thick ( radial optical depth ˜0.20) and physically thick ( H=21±4 km). We suggest that this vertical distribution results from the interactions between ring particles and shepherding satellites and/or from gravitational stirring by large bodies. The dust particles dominate the F ring's photometric behavior even in backscattered light ( f>0.80). Constraints on the particle properties of the other rings are also derived.

  20. Mapping Ring Particle Cooling across Saturn's Rings with Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Shawn M.; Spilker, L. J.; Edgington, S. G.; Pilorz, S. H.; Deau, E.

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the rings' thermal inertia, a measure of their response to changes in the thermal environment, varies from ring to ring. Thermal inertia can provide insight into the physical structure of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths. Low thermal inertia and quick temperature responses are suggestive of ring particles that have more porous or fluffy regoliths or that are riddled with cracks. Solid, coherent particles can be expected to have higher thermal inertias (Ferrari et al. 2005). Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded millions of spectra of Saturn's rings since its arrival at Saturn in 2004 (personal communication, M. Segura). CIRS records far infrared radiation between 10 and 600 cm-1 (16.7 and 1000 µm) at focal plane 1 (FP1), which has a field of view of 3.9 mrad. Thermal emission from Saturn's rings peaks in this wavelength range. FP1 spectra can be used to infer ring temperatures. By tracking how ring temperatures vary, we can determine the thermal inertia of the rings. In this work we focus on CIRS observations of the shadowed portion of Saturn's rings. The thermal budget of the rings is dominated by the solar radiation absorbed by its constituent particles. When ring particles enter Saturn's shadow this source of energy is abruptly cut off. As a result, ring particles cool as they traverse Saturn's shadow. From these shadow observations we can create cooling curves at specific locations across the rings. We will show that the rings' cooling curves and thus their thermal inertia vary not only from ring to ring, but by location within the individual rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2010 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  1. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~<500m in size) have been indirectly identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring. In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We show evidence that B ring seems to harbor two distinct populations of propellers: "big" propellers covering tens of degrees in azimuth situated in the densest part of B ring, and "small" propellers in less dense inner B ring that are similar in size and shape to known A ring propellers. The population of "big" propellers is exemplified with a single object which is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe this feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at r=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B

  2. The Rings of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Filacchione, G.; Marouf, E. A.

    2018-03-01

    One could become an expert on Saturn's iconic rings pretty easily in the early 1970s, as very little was known about them beyond the distinction between the A, B, and C rings, and the Cassini Division or "gap" between rings A and B (Alexander, 1962; Bobrov, 1970). Water ice was discovered spectroscopically on the ring particle surfaces, and radar and microwave emission observations proved that the particles must be centimeters to meters in size, consisting primarily, not just superficially, of water ice (Pollack, 1975). While a 2:1 orbital resonance with Mimas had long been suspected of having something to do with the Cassini Division, computers of the time were unable to model the subtle dynamical effects that we now know to dominate ring structure. This innocent state of affairs was exploded by the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters in 1980 and 1981. Spectacular images revealed filigree structure and odd regional color variations, and exquisitely detailed radial profiles of fluctuating particle abundance were obtained from the first stellar and radio occultations, having resolution almost at the scale of single particles. Voyager-era understanding was reviewed by Cuzzi et al. (1984) and Esposito et al. (1984). While the Voyager data kept ring scientists busy for decades, planning which led to the monumentally successful NASA-ESA-ASI Cassini mission, which arrived in 2004, had been under way even before Voyager got to Saturn. A review of pre-Cassini knowledge of Saturn's Rings can be found in Orton et al. (2009). This chapter will build on recent topical and process-specific reviews that treat the gamut of ring phenomena and its underlying physics in considerable detail (Colwell et al., 2009; Cuzzi et al., 2009; Horányi et al., 2009; Schmidt et al., 2009; Esposito, 2010; Tiscareno, 2013b; Esposito, 2014). We will follow and extend the general organization of Cuzzi et al. (2010), the most recent general discussion of Saturn's rings. For brevity and the benefit of the

  3. Two F Ring Views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    These views, taken two hours apart, demonstrate the dramatic variability in the structure of Saturn's intriguing F ring.

    In the image at the left, ringlets in the F ring and Encke Gap display distinctive kinks, and there is a bright patch of material on the F ring's inner edge. Saturn's moon Janus (181 kilometers, or 113 miles across) is shown here, partly illuminated by reflected light from the planet.

    At the right, Prometheus (102 kilometers, or 63 miles across) orbits ahead of the radial striations in the F ring, called 'drapes' by scientists. The drapes appear to be caused by successive passes of Prometheus as it reaches the greatest distance (apoapse) in its orbit of Saturn. Also in this image, the outermost ringlet visible in the Encke Gap displays distinctive bright patches.

    These views were obtained from about three degrees below the ring plane.

    The images were taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 29, 2005, when Cassini was about 1.5 million kilometers (900,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is about 9 kilometers (6 miles) per pixel.

  4. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  5. Stacked Corrugated Horn Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief describes a method of machining and assembly when the depth of corrugations far exceeds the width and conventional machining is not practical. The horn is divided into easily machined, individual rings with shoulders to control the depth. In this specific instance, each of the corrugations is identical in profile, and only differs in diameter and outer profile. The horn is segmented into rings that are cut with an interference fit (zero clearance with all machining errors biased toward contact). The interference faces can be cut with a reverse taper to increase the holding strength of the joint. The taper is a compromise between the interference fit and the clearance of the two faces during assembly. Each internal ring is dipped in liquid nitrogen, then nested in the previous, larger ring. The ring is rotated in the nest until the temperature of the two parts equalizes and the pieces lock together. The resulting assay is stable, strong, and has an internal finish that cannot be achieved through other methods.

  6. Compressible Vortex Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elavarasan, Ramasamy; Arakeri, Jayawant; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of a high-speed vortex ring with a shock wave is one of the fundamental issues as it is a source of sound in supersonic jets. The complex flow field induced by the vortex alters the propagation of the shock wave greatly. In order to understand the process, a compressible vortex ring is studied in detail using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and shadowgraphic techniques. The high-speed vortex ring is generated from a shock tube and the shock wave, which precedes the vortex, is reflected back by a plate and made to interact with the vortex. The shadowgraph images indicate that the reflected shock front is influenced by the non-uniform flow induced by the vortex and is decelerated while passing through the vortex. It appears that after the interaction the shock is "split" into two. The PIV measurements provided clear picture about the evolution of the vortex at different time interval. The centerline velocity traces show the maximum velocity to be around 350 m/s. The velocity field, unlike in incompressible rings, contains contributions from both the shock and the vortex ring. The velocity distribution across the vortex core, core diameter and circulation are also calculated from the PIV data.

  7. Further explorations of cosmogonic shadow effects in the Saturnian rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.; Axnaes, I.; Brenning, N.; Lindqvist, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    The mass distribution in the Saturnian ring system is compared with predictions from the cosmogonic theory of Alfven and Arrhenius (1975) in which matter in the rings was once a magnetized plasma, with gravitation balanced by centrifugal force and by the magnetic field. As the plasma is neutralized, the magnetic force disappears and the matter can be shown to fall in to a distance 2/3 of the original. This supports the cosmogonic shadow effect, also demonstrated for the astroidal belt and in the large scale structure of the Saturnian ring system. The relevance of the comogonic shadow effect for parts of the finer structures of the Saturnian ring system is investigated. It is shown that many structures of the present ring system can be understood as shadows and antishadows of cosmogonic origin. These appear in the form of double rings centered around a position a factor 0.64 (slightly 2/3) closer to Saturn than the causing feature.

  8. Low thermal expansion seal ring support

    DOEpatents

    Dewis, David W.; Glezer, Boris

    2000-01-01

    Today, the trend is to increase the temperature of operation of gas turbine engines. To cool the components with compressor discharge air, robs air which could otherwise be used for combustion and creates a less efficient gas turbine engine. The present low thermal expansion sealing ring support system reduces the quantity of cooling air required while maintaining life and longevity of the components. Additionally, the low thermal expansion sealing ring reduces the clearance "C","C'" demanded between the interface between the sealing surface and the tip of the plurality of turbine blades. The sealing ring is supported by a plurality of support members in a manner in which the sealing ring and the plurality of support members independently expand and contract relative to each other and to other gas turbine engine components.

  9. The cyclohexene ring system as a furanose mimic: synthesis and antiviral activity of both enantiomers of cyclohexenylguanine.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Froeyen, M; Hendrix, C; Andrei, G; Snoeck, R; De Clercq, E; Herdewijn, P

    2000-02-24

    Both enantiomers of cyclohexenylguanine were synthesized in a stereospecific way starting from the same starting material: R-(-)-carvone. Both compounds showed potent and selective anti-herpesvirus activity (HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, CMV). The binding of both cyclohexene nucleosides in the active site of HSV-1 thymidine kinase was investigated, and a model for the binding of both enantiomers is proposed. The amino acids involved in binding of the optical antipodes are the same, but the interaction energy of both enantiomers is slightly different. This may be attributed to the interaction of the secondary hydroxyl function of the nucleoside analogues with Glu-225. Structural analysis has demonstrated the flexibility of the cyclohexenyl system, and this may be considered as an important conformational characteristic explaining the potent antiviral activity.

  10. Investigation of 2D photonic crystal structure based channel drop filter using quad shaped photonic crystal ring resonator for CWDM system

    SciTech Connect

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar, E-mail: mayurchhipa1@gmail.com; Dusad, Lalit Kumar; Rajasthan Technical University, Kota, Rajasthan

    In this paper, the design & performance of two dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal structure based channel drop filter is investigated using quad shaped photonic crystal ring resonator. In this paper, Photonic Crystal (PhC) based on square lattice periodic arrays of Gallium Indium Phosphide (GaInP) rods in air structure have been investigated using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and photonic band gap is being calculated using Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method. The PhC designs have been optimized for telecommunication wavelength λ= 1571 nm by varying the rods lattice constant. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 andmore » 20, with lattice constant 0.540 nm it illustrates that the arrangement of Gallium Indium Phosphide (GaInP) rods in the structure which gives the overall size of the device around 11.4 µm × 10.8 µm. The designed filter gives good dropping efficiency using 3.298, refractive index. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm{sup 2}.« less

  11. Degradation of the stress-responsive enzyme formate dehydrogenase by the RING-type E3 ligase Keep on Going and the ubiquitin 26S proteasome system.

    PubMed

    McNeilly, Daryl; Schofield, Andrew; Stone, Sophia L

    2018-02-01

    KEG is involved in mediating the proteasome-dependent degradation of FDH, a stress-responsive enzyme. The UPS may function to suppress FDH mediated stress responses under favorable growth conditions. Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) has been studied in bacteria and yeasts for the purpose of industrial application of NADH co-factor regeneration. In plants, FDH is regarded as a universal stress protein involved in responses to various abiotic and biotic stresses. Here we show that FDH abundance is regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). FDH is ubiquitinated in planta and degraded by the 26S proteasome. Interaction assays identified FDH as a potential substrate for the RING-type ubiquitin ligase Keep on Going (KEG). KEG is capable of attaching ubiquitin to FDH in in vitro assays and the turnover of FDH was increased when co-expressed with a functional KEG in planta, suggesting that KEG contributes to FDH degradation. Consistent with a role in regulating FDH abundance, transgenic plants overexpressing KEG were more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of formate. In addition, FDH is a phosphoprotein and dephosphorylation was found to increase the stability of FDH in degradation assays. Based on results from this and previous studies, we propose a model where KEG mediates the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of phosphorylated FDH and, in response to unfavourable growth conditions, reduction in FDH phosphorylation levels may prohibit turnover allowing the stabilized FDH to facilitate stress responses.

  12. Actin turnover maintains actin filament homeostasis during cytokinetic ring contraction

    PubMed Central

    Palani, Saravanan; Sommese, Ruth; Kamnev, Anton; Hatano, Tomoyuki; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2017-01-01

    Cytokinesis in many eukaryotes involves a tension-generating actomyosin-based contractile ring. Many components of actomyosin rings turn over during contraction, although the significance of this turnover has remained enigmatic. Here, using Schizosaccharomyces japonicus, we investigate the role of turnover of actin and myosin II in its contraction. Actomyosin ring components self-organize into ∼1-µm-spaced clusters instead of undergoing full-ring contraction in the absence of continuous actin polymerization. This effect is reversed when actin filaments are stabilized. We tested the idea that the function of turnover is to ensure actin filament homeostasis in a synthetic system, in which we abolished turnover by fixing rings in cell ghosts with formaldehyde. We found that these rings contracted fully upon exogenous addition of a vertebrate myosin. We conclude that actin turnover is required to maintain actin filament homeostasis during ring contraction and that the requirement for turnover can be bypassed if homeostasis is achieved artificially. PMID:28655757

  13. Surging Across the Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-07-26

    A surge in brightness appears on the rings directly opposite the Sun from the Cassini spacecraft. This "opposition surge" travels across the rings as the spacecraft watches. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 9 degrees below the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 12, 2007 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 853 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 524,374 kilometers (325,830 miles) from Saturn. Image scale is 31 kilometers (19 miles) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08992

  14. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  15. Child sex rings.

    PubMed

    Wild, N J; Wynne, J M

    1986-07-19

    Details of 11 child sex rings identified in one working class community were obtained by interviewing investigating police officers and examining health and social services records. The rings contained 14 adult male perpetrators and 175 children aged 6-15 years. Most perpetrators used child ringleaders to recruit victims; others became a "family friend" or obtained a position of authority over children. Secrecy was encouraged and bribery, threats, and peer pressure used to induce participation in sexual activities. Offences reported included fondling, masturbation, pornography, and oral, vaginal, and anal intercourse. Eleven perpetrators were successfully prosecuted; all but one received a sentence of three years or less. Behavioural problems were common among those children who had participated for a long time. Child sex rings are difficult to detect and may be common. Many children are seriously abused as a consequence of them.

  16. Child sex rings.

    PubMed Central

    Wild, N J; Wynne, J M

    1986-01-01

    Details of 11 child sex rings identified in one working class community were obtained by interviewing investigating police officers and examining health and social services records. The rings contained 14 adult male perpetrators and 175 children aged 6-15 years. Most perpetrators used child ringleaders to recruit victims; others became a "family friend" or obtained a position of authority over children. Secrecy was encouraged and bribery, threats, and peer pressure used to induce participation in sexual activities. Offences reported included fondling, masturbation, pornography, and oral, vaginal, and anal intercourse. Eleven perpetrators were successfully prosecuted; all but one received a sentence of three years or less. Behavioural problems were common among those children who had participated for a long time. Child sex rings are difficult to detect and may be common. Many children are seriously abused as a consequence of them. PMID:3730803

  17. Oligomeric ferrocene rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkpen, Michael S.; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J. P.; Winter, Rainer F.; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J.

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category—differently sized rings comprising only 1,1‧-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5-7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp-Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e- waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (˜107 s-1), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ˜1-2 nm).

  18. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction.

  19. Satellite Rings Movie

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-30

    This brief movie clip (of which the release image is a still frame), taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft as it approached Jupiter, shows the motions, over a 16 hour-period, of two satellites embedded in Jupiter's ring. The moon Adrastea is the fainter of the two, and Metis the brighter. Images such as these will be used to refine the orbits of the two bodies. The movie was made from images taken during a 40-hour sequence of the Jovian ring on December 11, 2000. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02872

  20. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  1. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1994-09-20

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity is disclosed. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction. 21 figs.

  2. Mechanical evaluation of aluminum alloy ring fixator.

    PubMed

    Tosborvorn, Somboon; Cheechareon, Sukrom; Ruttanuchun, Kittiput; Sirivedin, Suparerk; Rhienumporn, Chaitawat

    2006-11-01

    To test the homemade ring fixator as a tool for correction of bony deformity. The authors developed an aluminum alloy ring fixator and tested it to find out the accuracy of manufacturing and strength of the ring systems under axial load with the Roundness Testing Machine and Lloyd Universal Testing Machine. The mean diameter of the twenty five-drill holes was 6.5843872 +/- 0.0521594 mm (mean +/- SD). Distance between particular drill holes, which reflected the precision of drilling, had a high accuracy with standard deviation from 0.1138 to 0.1870 mm. The roundness of the rings was 0.2421376 +/- 0.12437977 mm (mean +/- SD). The system structure had minimal permanent deformity at breaking point, mean yield strength of the system was 4786.9 +/- 14.353 N (mean +/- SD). This was caused by the failure of the wire. Mean stiffness of the system was 127 N./mm. The aluminum alloy ring fixator was strong enough and well tolerated for clinical usage

  3. Biotransformation of two β-secretase inhibitors including ring opening and contraction of a pyrimidine ring.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Anders; Eklund, Göran; Turek, Dominika; Malmquist, Jonas; Swahn, Britt-Marie; Holenz, Jörg; von Berg, Stefan; Karlström, Sofia; Bueters, Tjerk

    2013-05-01

    Recently, the discovery of the aminoisoindoles as potent and selective inhibitors of β-secretase was reported, including the close structural analogs compound (S)-1-pyridin-4-yl-4-fluoro-1-(3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)phenyl)-1H-isoindol-3-amine [(S)-25] and (S)-1-(2-(difluoromethyl)pyridin-4-yl)-4-fluoro-1-(3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)phenyl)-1H-isoindol-3-amine hemifumarate (AZD3839), the latter being recently progressed to the clinic. The biotransformation of (S)-25 was investigated in vitro and in vivo in rat, rabbit, and human and compared with AZD3839 to further understand the metabolic fate of these compounds. In vitro, CYP3A4 was the major responsible enzyme and metabolized both compounds to a large extent in the commonly shared pyridine and pyrimidine rings. The main proposed metabolic pathways in various in vitro systems were N-oxidation of the pyridine and/or pyrimidine ring and conversion to 4-pyrimidone and pyrimidine-2,4-dione. Both compounds were extensively metabolized, and more than 90% was excreted in feces after intravenous administration of radiolabeled compound to the rat. Here, the main pathways were N-oxidation of the pyridine and/or pyrimidine ring and a ring contraction of the pyrimidine ring into an imidazole ring. Ring-contracted metabolites accounted for 25% of the total metabolism in the rat for (S)-25, whereas the contribution was much smaller for AZD3839. This metabolic pathway was not foreseen on the basis of the obtained in vitro data. In conclusion, we discovered an unusual metabolic pathway of aryl-pyrimidine-containing compounds by a ring-opening reaction followed by elimination of a carbon atom and a ring closure to form an imidazole ring.

  4. Cassini imaging observations of Jupiter's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, H. B.; Porco, C. C.; West, R. A.; Burns, J. A.; Showalter, M. R.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2003-05-01

    Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument took nearly 1200 images of the Jupiter ring system during the spacecraft's 6-month encounter with Jupiter. These observations constitute the most complete dataset of the ring taken by a single instrument, both in phase angle (0.5 - 120° at seven angles) and wavelength (0.45 - 0.93 μ {m} through eight filters). The main ring was detected in all targeted exposures; the halo and gossamer rings were too faint to be observed above the planet's stray light. The optical depth and radial profile of the main ring are unchanged from that of previous studies. No evidence for broad asymmetries within the ring were found; we did identify possible evidence for 1000 km-scale clumps within the ring. Cassini observations at a phase angle of 64° place an upper limit on the ring's full thickness of 80 km. We have combined the Cassini ISS and VIMS observations with those from Voyager, HST, Keck, Galileo, Palomar, and IRTF. We have fit the entire suite of data using a photometric model that includes microscopic silicate dust grains as well as larger, long-lived `parent bodies' that engender this dust. Our dust grain model considers a range of spheroidal particle shapes computed using the T-matrix method (Mishchenko & Travis 1998). Our best-fit model to all the data indicates an optical depth of small particles of τ s = 4.7x 10-6 and large bodies τ l = 1.3x 10-6. The dust is concentrated about a radius of 15 μ {m}. The data are fit significantly better using non-spherical rather than spherical dust grains. The parent bodies themselves must be very red from 0.4--2.5 μ {m} and may have absorption features near 0.9 μ {m} and 2.2 μ {m}.

  5. PSSC Turbo Ring Flinger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlexander, Aaron

    2005-12-01

    This is a description of an inexpensive version of the Thompson's jumping ring demonstration apparatus, which provides for a spectacular demonstration of Lenz's law. The device has the additional capability of being used to demonstrate the opposing nature of inductive and capacitive reactance.

  6. Reading, Writing, and Rings!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pamela; Li, Erika; Hammon, Art

    2008-01-01

    "Reading, Writing, and Rings!" was created by a team of elementary teachers, literacy experts, and scientists in order to integrate science and literacy. These free units bring students inside NASA's Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn. The authors--a science teacher and education outreach specialist and two evaluators of educational programs--have…

  7. Ring laser scatterometer

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-28

    A scatterometer utilizes the dead zone resulting from lockup caused by scatter from a sample located in the optical path of a ring laser at a location where counter-rotating pulses cross. The frequency of one pulse relative to the other is varied across the lockup dead zone.

  8. Ring Flame Stabilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Ring Flame Stabilizer has been developed in conjunction with Lewis Research Center. This device can lower pollutant emissions (which contribute to smog and air pollution) from natural-gas appliances such as furnaces and water heaters by 90 percent while improving energy efficiency by 2 percent.

  9. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  10. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  11. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  12. Small-Scale Structure in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehnberg, Morgan

    2017-08-01

    The rings of Saturn are the largest and most complex in the Solar System. Decades of observation from ground- and space-based observatories and spacecraft missions have revealed the broad structure of the rings and the intricate interactions between the planet's moons and its rings. Stellar occultations observed by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph's High Speed Photometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft now enable the direct study of the small-scale structure that results from these interactions. In this dissertation, I present three distinct phenomena resulting from the small-scale physics of the rings. Many resonance locations with Saturn's external satellites lie within the main (A and B) rings. Two of these satellites, Janus and Epimetheus, have a unique co-orbital relationship and move radially to switch positions every 4.0 years. This motion also moves the resonance locations within the rings. As the spiral density waves created at these resonances interact, they launch an enormous solitary wave every eight years. I provide the first-ever observations of this never-predicted phenomenon and detail a possible formation mechanism. Previous studies have reported a population of kilometer-scale aggregates in Saturn's F ring, which likely form as a result of self-gravitation between ring particles in Saturn's Roche zone. I expand the known catalog of features in UVIS occultations and provide the first estimates of their density derived from comparisons with the A ring. These features are orders of magnitude less dense than previously believed, a fact which reconciles them with detections made by other means. Theory and indirect observations indicate that the smallest regular structures in the rings are wavelike aggregates called self-gravity wakes. Using the highest-resolution occulta- tions, I provide the first-ever direct detection of these features by identifying the gaps that represent the minima of the wakes. I demonstrate that the distribution of these gaps

  13. Reinterpreting the Sharp Edges of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimlinger, Thomas; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Hahn, Joseph M.

    2016-10-01

    Narrow ringlets are found throughout the Solar System and are typically 1-100 km wide. Angular momentum, L, is the key to understanding how narrow rings remain confined; L2 ∝ a(1 - e2) for semimajor axis a and eccentricity e. In a circular ring, L conservation demands that the ring quickly spread apart when some colliding particles lose energy while others gain it. By contrast, in an eccentric ring, energy loss and the associated decay of the average semi-major axes can be offset by a decrease in the average eccentricity. We argue that a ring's lifetime can be greatly extended if particles arrange themselves in this way (Borderies et al. 1984). The key difference of our model, however, is that rings need not be shepherded and can confine themselves provided they are sufficiently eccentric. Satellites merely extend the rings' lifespans by pumping up their eccentricities.This confinement mechanism can explain the existence and longevity of narrow ringlets in a variety of contexts. Saturn's Titan ringlet, which is quite circular, may nevertheless be able to confine itself indefinitely if its eccentricity decay is balanced by the increase from the resonance with Titan. Preliminary simulations presented by Rimlinger et al. at this year's DDA Conference have verified that this ring can self-confine even in the absence of any satellite; we update these findings with new results that include the effects of Titan. Furthermore, Mimas' resonance with the edge of the B ring may excite its higher order modes to similar effect. We update the findings of Hahn and Spitale (2013), who used artificial forces to confine the B ring's edge, and suggest that with a suitable viscosity and density, no such forces will be needed to keep the edge sharp. Finally, a ring that is "born" with a sufficiently high eccentricity may live for hundreds of millions or even billions of years in isolation if the rate of decay is slow enough. We present simulations exploring such a scenario.

  14. Smoke ring for a halo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-26

    Two stars shine through the centre of a ring of cascading dust in this image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The star system is named DI Cha, and while only two stars are apparent, it is actually a quadruple system containing two sets of binary stars. As this is a relatively young star system it is surrounded by dust. The young stars are moulding the dust into a wispy wrap. The host of this alluring interaction between dust and star is the Chamaeleon I dark cloud — one of three such clouds that comprise a large star-forming region known as the Chamaeleon Complex. DI Cha's juvenility is not remarkable within this region. In fact, the entire system is among not only the youngest but also the closest collections of newly formed stars to be found and so provides an ideal target for studies of star formation.

  15. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David

    2004-01-01

    Saturn's icy ring particles, with their low thermal conductivity, are almost ideal for the operation of the Yarkovsky effects. The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by a near balancing of the seasonal Yarkovsky effect with the Yarkovsky- Schach effect. The two effects, which are photon thrust due to temperature gradients, may confine the A and B rings to within their observed dimensions. The C ring may be sparsely populated with icy particles because Yarkovsky drag has pulled them into Saturn, leaving the more slowly orbitally decaying rocky particles. Icy ring particles ejected from the B ring and passing through the C ring, as well as some of the slower rocky particles, should fall on Saturn's equator, where they may create a luminous "Ring of Fire" around Saturn's equator. This predicted Ring of Fire may be visible to Cassini's camera. Curiously, the speed of outwards Yarkovsky orbital evolution appears to peak near the Cassini Division. The connection between the two is not clear. D. Nesvorny has speculated that the resonance at the outer edge of the B ring may impede particles from evolving via Yarkovsky across the Division. If supply from the B ring is largely cut off, then Yarkovsky may push icy particles outward, away from the inner edge of the A ring, leaving only the rocky ones in the Division. The above scenarios depend delicately on the properties of the icy particles.

  16. Dual-component system dimethyl sulfoxide/LiCl as a solvent and catalyst for homogeneous ring-opening grafted polymerization of ε-caprolactone onto xylan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Qin; Chen, Ming-Jie; Liu, Chuan-Fu; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-01-22

    The preparation of xylan-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) (xylan-g-PCL) copolymers was investigated by homogeneous ring-opening polymerization (ROP) in a dual-component system containing Lewis base LiCl and strong polar aprotic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). DMSO/LiCl acted as solvent, base, and catalyst for the ROP reaction. The effects of the parameters, including the reaction temperature, molar ratio of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) to anhydroxylose units (AXU) in xylan, and reaction time, on the degree of substitution (DS) and weight percent of PCL side chain (WPCL) were investigated. The results showed that xylan-g-PCL copolymers with low DS in the range of 0.03-0.39 were obtained under the given conditions. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H correlation spectroscopy (COSY), and (1)H-(13)C correlation two-dimensional (2D) NMR [heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] characterization provided more evidence of the attachment of side chains onto xylan. Only one ε-CL was confirmed to be attached onto xylan with each side chain. Integration of resonances assigned to the substituted C2 and C3 in the HSQC spectrum also indicated 69.23 and 30.77% of PCL side chains attached to AXU at C3 and C2 positions, respectively. Although the attachment of PCL onto xylan led to the decreased thermal stability of xylan, the loss of unrecovered xylan fractions with low molecular weight because of the high solubility of xylan in DMSO/LiCl resulted in the increased thermal stability of the samples. This kind of xylan derivative has potential application in environmentally friendly and biodegradable materials considering the good biodegradability of xylan and PCL.

  17. The use of time-averaged 3JHH restrained molecular dynamics (tar-MD) simulations for the conformational analysis of five-membered ring systems: methodology and applications.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Pieter M S; Corzana, Francisco; Depraetere, Stefaan; Tourwé, Dirk A; Augustyns, Koen; Martins, José C

    2010-02-01

    Because of its presence in many molecules of biological relevance, the conformational analysis of five-membered rings using (3)J(HH) scalar coupling data from NMR is a topic of considerable interest. Typically, conformational analysis involves the use of a well-established mathematical procedure, originally developed by de Leeuw et al., that fits two rigid conformations to the available experimental data. This so-called pseudorotation analysis approach is not without problems, however, as chemically unrealistic conformations are sometimes generated from the data. Here, we present our investigations in the use of time-averaged restrained molecular dynamics simulations as a generic tool to determine the conformations that agree with experimental (3)J(HH) scalar coupling data. For this purpose, a set of six ribose-based molecules has been used as model compounds. The influence of several modeling parameters is assessed and optimized values are proposed. The results obtained with the tar-MD approach are compared to those obtained from the two conformer fitting procedure. Interpretation of the latter is facilitated by the introduction of a fitting error analysis that allows mapping the solution space of the fitting procedure. The relative merits of both methods and the advantages that result from the use of a force field and a time-averaged restraint potential for the experimental data are discussed. When combined, both techniques allow an enhanced understanding of the molecules' conformational behavior and prevent possible overinterpretation. In view of the very reasonable computational burden of a tar-MD simulation for the systems investigated here, the approach should be generally applicable. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Quantifying regional cerebral blood flow by N-isopropyl-P-[I-123]iodoamphetamine (IMP) using a ring type single-photon emission computed tomography system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N.; Odano, I.; Ohkubo, M.

    1994-05-01

    We developed a more accurate quantitative measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with the microsphere model using N-isopropyl-p-[I-123] iodoamphetamine (IMP) and a ring type single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system. SPECT studies were performed in 17 patients with brain diseases. A dose of 222 MBq (6 mCi) of [I-123]IMP was injected i.v., at the same time a 5 min period of arterial blood withdrawal was begun. SPECT data were acquired from 25 min to 60 min after tracer injection. For obtaining the brain activity concentration at 5 min after IMP injection, total brain counts collections and one minutemore » period short time SPECT studies were performed at 5, 20, and 60 min. Measurement of the values of rCBF was calculated using short time SPECT images at 5 min (rCBF), static SPECT images corrected with total cerebral counts (rCBF{sub Ct}.) and those corrected with reconstructed counts on short time SPECT images (rCBF{sub Cb}). There was a good relationship (r=0.69) between rCBF and rCBF{sub Ct}, however, rCBF{sub Ct} tends to be underestimated in high flow areas and overestimated in low flow areas. There was better relationship between rCBF and rCBF{sub Cb}(r=0.92). The overestimation and underestimation shown in rCBF{sub Ct} was considered to be due to the correction of reconstructed counts using a total cerebral time activity curve, because of the kinetic behavior of [I-123]IMP was different in each region. We concluded that more accurate rCBF values could be obtained using the regional time activity curves.« less

  19. The Synthesis of Methyl-Substituted Spirocyclic Piperidine-Azetidine (2,7-Diazaspiro[3.5]nonane) and Spirocyclic Piperidine-Pyrrolidine (2,8-Diazaspiro[4.5]decane) Ring Systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron C; Cabral, Shawn; Kung, Daniel W; Rose, Colin R; Southers, James A; García-Irizarry, Carmen N; Damon, David B; Bagley, Scott W; Griffith, David A

    2016-05-06

    The synthesis of a series of pharmaceutically important N-protected methyl-substituted spirocyclic piperidine-azetidine (2,7-diazaspiro[3.5]nonane) and spirocyclic piperidine-pyrrolidine (2,8-diazaspiro[4.5]decane) ring systems was developed. These motifs contain two differentiated sites (protected secondary amines) to allow for further functionalization via reductive amination, amidation, or other chemistry. The methyl-substituted spiroazetidine ring systems were accessed using nitrile lithiation/alkylation chemistry while the methyl-substituted spiropyrrolidines were synthesized by 1,4-addition reactions with nitroalkanes, followed by reduction and cyclization. These conditions were then scaled for the synthesis of 1-methyl spirocyclic piperidine-pyrrolidine with a classical resolution of the product using a tartaric acid derivative to isolate a single enantiomer.

  20. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  1. Oscillations at B Ring Edge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-01

    This image obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft of the outer edge of Saturn?s B ring, reveals the combined effects of a tugging moon and oscillations that can naturally occur in disks like Saturn rings and spiral galaxies.

  2. Electronic properties of superlattices on quantum rings.

    PubMed

    da Costa, D R; Chaves, A; Ferreira, W P; Farias, G A; Ferreira, R

    2017-04-26

    We present a theoretical study of the one-electron states of a semiconductor-made quantum ring (QR) containing a series of piecewise-constant wells and barriers distributed along the ring circumference. The single quantum well and the superlattice cases are considered in detail. We also investigate how such confining potentials affect the Aharonov-Bohm like oscillations of the energy spectrum and current in the presence of a magnetic field. The model is simple enough so as to allow obtaining various analytical or quasi-analytical results. We show that the well-in-a-ring structure presents enhanced localization features, as well as specific geometrical resonances in its above-barrier spectrum. We stress that the superlattice-in-a-ring structure allows giving a physical meaning to the often used but usually artificial Born-von-Karman periodic conditions, and discuss in detail the formation of energy minibands and minigaps for the circumferential motion, as well as several properties of the superlattice eigenstates in the presence of the magnetic field. We obtain that the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of below-barrier miniband states are reinforced, owing to the important tunnel coupling between neighbour wells of the superlattice, which permits the electron to move in the ring. Additionally, we analysis a superlattice-like structure made of a regular distribution of ionized impurities placed around the QR, a system that may implement the superlattice in a ring idea. Finally, we consider several random disorder models, in order to study roughness disorder and to tackle the robustness of some results against deviations from the ideally nanostructured ring system.

  3. Electronic properties of superlattices on quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Ferreira, W. P.; Farias, G. A.; Ferreira, R.

    2017-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the one-electron states of a semiconductor-made quantum ring (QR) containing a series of piecewise-constant wells and barriers distributed along the ring circumference. The single quantum well and the superlattice cases are considered in detail. We also investigate how such confining potentials affect the Aharonov-Bohm like oscillations of the energy spectrum and current in the presence of a magnetic field. The model is simple enough so as to allow obtaining various analytical or quasi-analytical results. We show that the well-in-a-ring structure presents enhanced localization features, as well as specific geometrical resonances in its above-barrier spectrum. We stress that the superlattice-in-a-ring structure allows giving a physical meaning to the often used but usually artificial Born-von-Karman periodic conditions, and discuss in detail the formation of energy minibands and minigaps for the circumferential motion, as well as several properties of the superlattice eigenstates in the presence of the magnetic field. We obtain that the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations of below-barrier miniband states are reinforced, owing to the important tunnel coupling between neighbour wells of the superlattice, which permits the electron to move in the ring. Additionally, we analysis a superlattice-like structure made of a regular distribution of ionized impurities placed around the QR, a system that may implement the superlattice in a ring idea. Finally, we consider several random disorder models, in order to study roughness disorder and to tackle the robustness of some results against deviations from the ideally nanostructured ring system.

  4. AFTER: Batch jobs on the Apollo ring

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstadler, P.

    1987-07-01

    This document describes AFTER, a system that allows users of an Apollo ring to submit batch jobs to run without leaving themselves logged in to the ring. Jobs may be submitted to run at a later time or on a different node. Results from the batch job are mailed to the user through some designated mail system. AFTER features an understandable user interface, good on line help, and site customization. This manual serves primarily as a user's guide to AFTER although administration and installation are covered for completeness.

  5. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA) , Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (LAOG) and the DESPA and DASGAL laboratories of the Observatoire de Paris in France, in collaboration with ESO. The CONICA infra-red camera was built, under an ESO contract, by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) (Heidelberg) and the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) (Garching) in Germany, in collaboration with ESO. Saturn - Lord of the rings ESO PR Photo 04a/02 ESO PR Photo 04a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 460 x 400 pix - 54k] [Normal - JPEG: 1034 x 800 pix - 200k] Caption : PR Photo 04a/02 shows the giant planet Saturn, as observed with the VLT NAOS-CONICA Adaptive Optics instrument on December 8, 2001; the distance was 1209 million km. It is a composite of exposures in two near-infrared wavebands (H and K) and displays well the intricate, banded structure of the planetary atmosphere and the rings. Note also the dark spot at the south pole at the bottom of the image. One of the moons, Tethys, is visible as a small point of light below the planet. It was used to guide the telescope and to perform the adaptive optics "refocussing" for this observation. More details in the text. Technical information about this photo is available below. This NAOS/CONICA image of Saturn ( PR Photo 04a/02 ), the second-largest planet in the solar system, was obtained at a time when Saturn was close to summer solstice in the southern hemisphere. At this moment, the tilt of the rings was about as large as it can be, allowing the best possible view of the planet's South Pole. That area was on Saturn's night side in 1982 and could therefore not be photographed during the Voyager encounter. The dark spot close to the South Pole is a remarkable structure that measures approximately 300 km across. It was only recently observed in visible light from the ground with a telescope at the Pic du Midi Observatory in the Pyrenees (France) - this is the first infrared image to

  6. Assessing appearance-related disturbances in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM): psychometrics of the body change and distress questionnaire-short form (ABCD-SF).

    PubMed

    Blashill, Aaron J; Wilson, Johannes M; Baker, Joshua S; Mayer, Kenneth H; Safren, Steven A

    2014-06-01

    Appearance-related disturbances are common among HIV-infected MSM; however, to date, there have been limited options in the valid assessment of this construct. The aim of the current study was to assess the structural, internal, and convergent validity of the assessment of body change distress questionnaire (ABCD) and its short version. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated that both versions fit the data well. Four subfactors were revealed measuring the following body disturbance constructs: (1) negative affect about appearance, (2) HIV health-related outcomes and stigma, (3) eating and exercise confusion, and (4) ART non-adherence. The subfactors and total scores revealed bivariate associations with salient health outcomes, including depressive symptoms, HIV sexual transmission risk behaviors, and ART non-adherence. The ABCD and its short form, offer valid means to assess varied aspects of body image disturbance among HIV-infected MSM, and require modest participant burden.

  7. Uranus Rings and Two Moons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-19

    Voyager 2 has discovered two hepherd satellites associated with the rings of Uranus. The two moons, designated 1986U7 and 1986U8, are seen here on either side of the bright epsilon ring; all nine of the known Uranian rings are visible.

  8. Investigations of planetary ring phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Joseph A.

    1987-01-01

    Faint planetary rings, their dynamical behavior and physical properties, were the main focus of the research efforts. The motion of weakly-charged dust through the gravitational and magnetic fields of Jupiter were examined. Several topics concerning features of Saturn's rings were addressed. The origin and fate of the Uranian ring dust is presently being studied.

  9. Electrostatic forces in planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Shan, Linhua; Havnes, O.

    1988-01-01

    The average charge on a particle in a particle-plasma cloud, the plasma potential inside the cloud, and the Coulomb force acting on the particle are calculated. The net repulsive electrostatic force on a particle depends on the plasma density, temperature, density of particles, particle size, and the gradient of the particle density. In a uniformly dense ring the electrostatic repulsion is zero. It is also shown that the electrostatic force acts like a pressure force, that even a collisionless ring can be stable against gravitational collapse, and that a finite ring thickness does not necessarily imply a finite velocity dispersion. A simple criterion for the importance of electrostatic forces in planetary rings is derived which involves the calculation of the vertical ring thickness which would result if only electrostatic repulsion were responsible for the finite ring thickness. Electrostatic forces are entirely negligible in the main rings of Saturn and the E and G rings. They may also be negligible in the F ring. However, the Uranian rings and Jupiter's ring seem to be very much influenced by electrostatic repulsion. In fact, electrostatic forces could support a Jovian ring which is an order of magnitude more dense than observed.

  10. Fan in the F Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-20

    This mosaic of images from NASA Cassini spacecraft depicts fan-like structures in Saturn tenuous F ring. Bright features are also visible near the core of the ring. Such features suggest the existence of additional objects in the F ring.

  11. F Ring Bright Core Clumps

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-20

    Bright clumps of ring material and a fan-like structure appear near the core of Saturn tenuous F ring in this mosaic of images from NASA Cassini spacecraft. Such features suggest the existence of additional objects in the F ring.

  12. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  13. Saturn's E, G, and F rings - Modulated by the plasma sheet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Gruen, E.; Johnson, T. V.

    1983-01-01

    Saturn's broad E ring, the narrow G ring, and the structured and apparently time-variable F ring(s) contain many micron and submicron-sized particles, which make up the 'visible' component. These rings (or ring systems) are in direct contact with magnetospheric plasma. Fluctuations in the plasma density and/or mean energy, due to magnetospheric and solar wind processes, may induce stochastic charge variations on the dust particles, which in turn lead to an orbit perturbation and spatial diffusion. In addition, Coulomb drag forces may be important, in particular for the E ring. The possibility that electromagnetic effects may play a role in determining the F ring structure and its possible time variations is critically examined. Sputtering of micron-sized dust particles in the E ring by magnetospheric ions yields lifetimes of 100 to 10,000 years. This effect as well as the plasma induced transport processes require an active source for the E ring, probably Enceladus.

  14. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  15. The cryogenic storage ring CSR.

    PubMed

    von Hahn, R; Becker, A; Berg, F; Blaum, K; Breitenfeldt, C; Fadil, H; Fellenberger, F; Froese, M; George, S; Göck, J; Grieser, M; Grussie, F; Guerin, E A; Heber, O; Herwig, P; Karthein, J; Krantz, C; Kreckel, H; Lange, M; Laux, F; Lohmann, S; Menk, S; Meyer, C; Mishra, P M; Novotný, O; O'Connor, A P; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Saurabh, S; Schippers, S; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Schweikhard, L; Sieber, T; Shornikov, A; Spruck, K; Sunil Kumar, S; Ullrich, J; Urbain, X; Vogel, S; Wilhelm, P; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm(-3) is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10(-14) mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  16. Satellite Rings Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie clip (of which the release image is a still frame), taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft as it approached Jupiter, shows the motions, over a 16 hour-period, of two satellites embedded in Jupiter's ring. The moon Adrastea is the fainter of the two, and Metis the brighter. Images such as these will be used to refine the orbits of the two bodies.

    The movie was made from images taken during a 40-hour sequence of the Jovian ring on December 11, 2000.

    Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  17. Mimas Against the Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-05

    During its close flyby of Saturn's moon Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, Cassini caught a glimpse of Mimas against the broad expanse of Saturn's rings. The Keeler Gap in the outer A ring, in which Cassini spied a never-before-seen small moon (see PIA06237), is at the upper right. The ancient, almost asteroid-like surface of Mimas is evident in its crater-upon-crater appearance. Even the material which has slumped down into the bottom of some of its craters bears the marks of later impacts. This image was taken through the clear filter of the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera at a distance of 68,000 kilometers (42,500 miles) from Mimas and very near closest approach. The smallest features seen on the moon are about 400 meters wide (440 yards); the Sun-Mimas-Cassini angle is 44 degrees. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06412

  18. The narrow rings of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.; Murray, C. D.; Sinclair, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    The origin of the newly discovered narrow ring systems around Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus is considered. It is pointed out that both the Uranian and Jovian ring systems have mean orbital radii of 1.8 planetary radii and lie within the Roche zones of their respective planets, and it is suggested that the Jovian ring is the product of the disintegration of a satellite that entered the Roche zone, and that large numbers of small particles are now in horseshoe orbits about the Lagrangian equilibrium points of the remnant chunks. Analysis of the path of a ring particle in a horseshoe orbit is shown to result in ring structures in agreement with those observed for the circular rings of Jupiter and the highly eccentric ring of Uranus. The stability of these ring systems is then considered, and it is suggested that the F ring of Saturn, which lies outside the Roche zone, represents primordial matter not yet accreted by small satellites just inside the Mimas first-order resonances.

  19. Experiments with Plasma Rings

    SciTech Connect

    LINDBERG, L.; WITALIS, E.; JACOBSEN, C. T.

    1960-02-13

    A coaxial plasma gun with radial magnetic field was used for the production of magnetized plasma rings. A cross section of the apparatus is presented. The plasma was studied by means of high-speed photography, using Kerr- cell cameras, and by magnetic measurements. The magnetic flux carried by the plasma was measured by loops around the glass tube connected to integrating resistance-capacity circuits. (C.H.)

  20. Possible ring material around centaur (2060) Chiron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, J. L.; Duffard, R.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Morales, N.; Fernández-Valenzuela, E.; Licandro, J.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Thirouin, A.

    2015-04-01

    We propose that several short-duration events observed in past stellar occultations by Chiron were produced by ring material. Some similarities between these events and the characteristics of Chariklo's rings could indicate common mechanisms around centaurs. From a reanalysis of the stellar occultation data in the literature, we determined two possible orientations of the pole of Chiron's rings, with ecliptic coordinates λ = (352 ± 10)°, β = (37 ± 10)° or λ = (144 ± 10)°, β = (24 ± 10)°. The mean radius of the rings is (324 ± 10) km. One can use the rotational lightcurve amplitude of Chiron at different epochs to distinguish between the two solutions for the pole. Both solutions imply a lower lightcurve amplitude in 2013 than in 1988, when the rotational lightcurve was first determined. We derived Chiron's rotational lightcurve in 2013 from observations at the 1.23 m CAHA telescope, and indeed its amplitude was smaller than in 1988. We also present a rotational lightcurve in 2000 from images taken at the CASLEO 2.15 m telescope that is consistent with our predictions. Out of the two poles, the λ = (144 ± 10)°, β = (24 ± 10)° solution provides a better match to a compilation of rotational lightcurve amplitudes from the literature and those presented here. We also show that using this preferred pole orientation, Chiron's long-term brightness variations are compatible with a simple model that incorporates the changing brightness of the rings while the tilt angle with respect to the Earth is changing with time. Also, the variability of the water ice band in Chiron's spectra as seen in the literature can be explained to a large degree by an icy ring system whose tilt angle changes with time and whose composition includes water ice, analogously to the case of Chariklo. We present several possible formation scenarios for the rings from qualitative points of view and speculate on why rings might be common in centaurs. We also speculate on whether the

  1. Earth Rings for Planetary Environment Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Oldson, John; Levin, Eugene; Carroll, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    For most of its past, large parts of the Earth have experienced subtropical climates, with high sea levels and no polar icecaps. This warmer environment was punctuated 570, 280, and 3 million years ago with periods of glaciation that covered temperate regions with thick ice for millions of years. At the end of the current ice age, a warmer climate could flood coastal cities, even without human-caused global warming. In addition, asteroids bombard the Earth periodically, with impacts large enough to destroy most life on Earth, and the sun is warming inexorably. This paper proposes a concept to solve these problems simultaneously, by creating an artificial planetary ring about the Earth to shade it. Past proposals for space climate control have depended on gigantic engineering structures launched from Earth and placed in Earth orbit or at the Earth-Sun L1 libration point, requiring fabrication, large launch masses and expense, constant control, and repair. Our solution is to begin by using lunar material, and then mine and remove Earth-orbit-crossing asteroids and discard the tailings into Earth orbit, to form a broad, flat ring like those of Saturn. This solution is evaluated and compared with other alternatives. Such ring systems can persist for thousands of years, and can be maintained by shepherding satellites or by continual replenishment from new asteroids to replace the edges of the ring lost by diffusion. An Earth ring at R = 1.3-1.83 RE would shade only the equatorial regions, moderating climate extremes, and could reverse a century of global warming. It could also absorb particles from the radiation belts, making trips to high Earth orbit and GEO safer for humans and for electronics. It would also light the night many times as bright as the full moon. A preliminary design of the ring is developed, including its location, mass, composition, stability, and timescale required. A one-dimensional climate model is used to evaluate the Earth ring performance

  2. Orbital Perturbations Due to Massive Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, L.

    2012-06-01

    We analytically work out the long-term orbital perturbations induced by a homogeneous circular ring of radius R r and mass m r on the motion of a test particle in the cases (I): r > R r and (II): r < R r. In order to extend the validity of our analysis to the orbital configurations of, e.g., some proposed spacecraft-based mission for fundamental physics like LISA and ASTROD, of possible annuli around the supermassive black hole in Sgr A* coming from tidal disruptions of incoming gas clouds, and to the effect of artificial space debris belts around the Earth, we do not restrict ourselves to the case in which the ring and the orbit of the perturbed particle lie just in the same plane. From the corrections Updeltadot\\varpi^{(meas)} to the standard secular perihelion precessions, recently determined by a team of astronomers for some planets of the Solar System, we infer upper bounds on m r for various putative and known annular matter distributions of natural origin (close circumsolar ring with R r = 0.02 - 0.13 au, dust ring with R r = 1 au, minor asteroids, Trans-Neptunian Objects). We find m_r≤ 1.4× 10^{-4} m_{oplus} (circumsolar ring with R r = 0.02 au), m_r≤ 2.6× 10^{-6} m_{oplus} (circumsolar ring with R r = 0.13 au), m_r≤ 8.8× 10^{-7} m_{oplus} (ring with R r = 1 au), m_r≤ 7.3× 10^{-12} M_{odot} (asteroidal ring with R r = 2.80 au), m_r≤ 1.1× 10^{-11} M_{odot} (asteroidal ring with R r = 3.14 au), m_r≤ 2.0× 10^{-8} M_{odot} (TNOs ring with R r = 43 au). In principle, our analysis is valid both for baryonic and non-baryonic Dark Matter distributions.

  3. One ring or two? Determination of ring number in carotenoids by lycopene epsilon-cyclases.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F X; Gantt, E

    2001-02-27

    Carotenoids in the photosynthetic membranes of plants typically contain two beta-rings (e.g., beta-carotene and zeaxanthin) or one epsilon- and one beta-ring (e.g., lutein). Carotenoids with two epsilon-rings are uncommon. We reported earlier that the Arabidopsis thaliana lycopene epsilon-cyclase (LCYe) adds one epsilon-ring to the symmetrical linear substrate lycopene, whereas the structurally related lycopene beta-cyclase (LCYb) adds two beta-rings. Here we describe a cDNA encoding LCYe in romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. romaine), one of the few plant species known to accumulate substantial quantities of a carotenoid with two epsilon-rings: lactucaxanthin. The product of the lettuce cDNA, similar in sequence to the Arabidopsis LCYe (77% amino acid identity), efficiently converted lycopene into the bicyclic epsilon-carotene in a heterologous Escherichia coli system. Regions of the lettuce and Arabidopsis epsilon-cyclases involved in the determination of ring number were mapped by analysis of chimeric epsilon-cyclases constructed by using an inverse PCR approach. A single amino acid was found to act as a molecular switch: lettuce LCYe mutant H457L added only one epsilon-ring to lycopene, whereas the complementary Arabidopsis LCYe mutant, L448H, added two epsilon-rings. An R residue in this position also yields a bi-epsilon-cyclase for both the lettuce and Arabidopsis enzymes. Construction and analysis of chimera of related enzymes with differing catalytic activities provide an informative approach that may be of particular utility for studying membrane-associated enzymes that cannot easily be crystallized or modeled to existing crystal structures.

  4. One ring or two? Determination of ring number in carotenoids by lycopene ɛ-cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Francis X.; Gantt, Elisabeth

    2001-01-01

    Carotenoids in the photosynthetic membranes of plants typically contain two β-rings (e.g., β-carotene and zeaxanthin) or one ɛ- and one β-ring (e.g., lutein). Carotenoids with two ɛ-rings are uncommon. We reported earlier that the Arabidopsis thaliana lycopene ɛ-cyclase (LCYe) adds one ɛ-ring to the symmetrical linear substrate lycopene, whereas the structurally related lycopene β-cyclase (LCYb) adds two β-rings. Here we describe a cDNA encoding LCYe in romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. romaine), one of the few plant species known to accumulate substantial quantities of a carotenoid with two ɛ-rings: lactucaxanthin. The product of the lettuce cDNA, similar in sequence to the Arabidopsis LCYe (77% amino acid identity), efficiently converted lycopene into the bicyclic ɛ-carotene in a heterologous Escherichia coli system. Regions of the lettuce and Arabidopsis ɛ-cyclases involved in the determination of ring number were mapped by analysis of chimeric ɛ-cyclases constructed by using an inverse PCR approach. A single amino acid was found to act as a molecular switch: lettuce LCYe mutant H457L added only one ɛ-ring to lycopene, whereas the complementary Arabidopsis LCYe mutant, L448H, added two ɛ-rings. An R residue in this position also yields a bi-ɛ-cyclase for both the lettuce and Arabidopsis enzymes. Construction and analysis of chimera of related enzymes with differing catalytic activities provide an informative approach that may be of particular utility for studying membrane-associated enzymes that cannot easily be crystallized or modeled to existing crystal structures. PMID:11226339

  5. Uranus rings and two moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Voyager 2 has discovered two 'shepherd' satellites associated with the rings of Uranus. The two moons -- designated 1986U7 and 1986U8 -- are seen here on either side of the bright epsilon ring; all nine of the known Uranian rings are visible. The image was taken Jan. 21, 1986, at a distance of 4.1 million kilometers (2.5 million miles) and resolution of about 36 km (22 mi). The image was processed to enhance narrow features. The epsilon ring appears surrounded by a dark halo as a result of this processing; occasional blips seen on the ring are also artifacts. Lying inward from the epsilon ring are the delta, gamma and eta rings; then the beta and alpha rings; and finally the barely visible 4, 5 and 6 rings. The rings have been studied since their discovery in 1977, through observations of how they diminish the light of stars they pass in front of. This image is the first direct observation of all nine rings in reflected sunlight. They range in width from about 100 km (60 mi) at the widest part of the epsilon ring to only a few kilometers for most of the others. The discovery of the two ring moons 1986U7 and 1986U8 is a major advance in our understanding of the structure of the Uranian rings and is in good agreement with theoretical predictions of how these narrow rings are kept from spreading out. Based on likely surface brightness properties, the moons are of roughly 2O- and 3O-km diameter, respectively. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  6. O-Ring-Testing Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, James E.; Mccluney, D. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Fixture tests O-rings for sealing ability under dynamic conditions after extended periods of compression. Hydraulic cylinder moves plug in housing. Taper of 15 degrees on plug and cavity of housing ensures that gap created between O-ring under test and wall of cavity. Secondary O-rings above and below test ring maintain pressure applied to test ring. Evaluates effects of variety of parameters, including temperature, pressure, rate of pressurization, rate and magnitude of radial gap movement, and pretest compression time.

  7. Helmet latching and attaching ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, E. W.; Viikinsalo, S. J. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A neck ring releasably secured to a pressurized garment carries an open-ended ring normally in the engagement position fitted into an annular groove and adapted to fit into a complementary annular groove formed in a helmet. Camming means formed on the inner surface at the end of the helmet engages the open-ended ring to retract the same and allow for one motion donning even when the garment is pressurized. A projection on the end of the split ring is engageable to physically retract the split ring.

  8. Dynamics of Clumps in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, M. R.

    1997-07-01

    An exhaustive analysis of the Voyager image data sets reveals the F Ring to be the most dynamic ring in the solar system. Principal properties are as follows. (1) At any given time, the ring holds 2--3 extremely bright clumps (each several times brighter than the local average for the ring) and perhaps 20--40 identifiable smaller clumps. In practice, the closer one looks at the rings, the finer detail one finds. (2) No major clumps persist for the nine months between the Voyager encounters, but most survive for the ~ 6 weeks they can be detected during a single encounter. (3) A few major clumps are seen to appear or disappear very quickly, on time scales as brief as days. One clump appears to spread longitudinally after it first appears, but other clumps stay roughly fixed in longitudinal extend. The processes behind clump formation and destruction are unknown. (4) Clumps propagate at different mean motions; there is no evidence for a discrete set of rates that might correspond to the individual ``strands'' described in some models. Motions range from 581.81(deg) /day to 582.41(deg) /day, implying that the F Ring's clumps span a semimajor axis range of ~ 80 km. (5) Some sections of the ring show a distinct 3.2(deg) periodicity in clump spacing, as expected from the gravitational perturbations by Prometheus. Others do not. (6) In the Voyager 2 images, a single prominent clump seems to eject smaller clumps behind it on time scales of ~ 2 weeks. However, nothing analogous is observed in Voyager 1 data.

  9. Linking heterometallic rings for quantum information processing and amusement.

    PubMed

    Timco, Grigore A; Faust, Thomas B; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2011-06-01

    Linking polymetallic cages can be a method for creating new structures and new properties. In this tutorial review we use heterometallic anti-ferromagnetically coupled rings (AF-rings) as exemplars for three approaches that can be used to link cage compounds. The first of three routes involves an ion-pair interaction supported by hydrogen-bonding interactions, which allows the synthesis of hybrid rotaxanes among other materials. The second route involves functionalising the exterior of the AF-ring so that it will act as a Lewis base; complexes involving coordination of pyridine to bridging monometallic and dimetallic fragments are discussed. The third route involves creating a vacancy on one site of the AF-ring, and then using the ring as a Lewis acid. Di-imine ligands can then be used to link the AF-rings into dimers. A brief discussion of the physical properties of these systems is also included.

  10. Ring-through-ring molecular shuttling in a saturated [3]rotaxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kelong; Baggi, Giorgio; Loeb, Stephen J.

    2018-06-01

    Mechanically interlocked molecules such as rotaxanes and catenanes comprise two or more components whose motion relative to each other can be controlled. A [2]rotaxane molecular shuttle, for example, consists of an axle bearing two recognition sites and a single macrocyclic wheel that can undergo a to-and-fro motion along the axle—shuttling between the recognition sites. The ability of mechanically interlocked molecules to undergo this type of large-amplitude change is the core mechanism behind almost every interlocked molecular switch or machine, including sophisticated mechanical systems such as a molecular elevator and a peptide synthesizer. Here, as a way to expand the scope of dynamics possible at the molecular level, we have developed a molecular shuttling mechanism involving the exchange of rings between two recognition sites in a saturated [3]rotaxane (one with no empty recognition sites). This was accomplished by passing a smaller ring through a larger one, thus achieving ring-through-ring molecular shuttling.

  11. The Vibration Ring. Phase 1; [Seedling Fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Krantz, Timothy L.; Delap, Damon C.; Stringer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    The vibration ring was conceived as a driveline damping device to prevent structure-borne noise in machines. It has the appearance of a metal ring, and can be installed between any two driveline components like an ordinary mechanical spacer. Damping is achieved using a ring-shaped piezoelectric stack that is poled in the axial direction and connected to an electrical shunt circuit. Surrounding the stack is a metal structure, called the compression cage, which squeezes the stack along its poled axis when excited by radial driveline forces. The stack in turn generates electrical energy, which is either dissipated or harvested using the shunt circuit. Removing energy from the system creates a net damping effect. The vibration ring is much stiffer than traditional damping devices, which allows it to be used in a driveline without disrupting normal operation. In phase 1 of this NASA Seedling Fund project, a combination of design and analysis was used to examine the feasibility of this concept. Several designs were evaluated using solid modeling, finite element analysis, and by creating prototype hardware. Then an analytical model representing the coupled electromechanical response was formulated in closed form. The model was exercised parametrically to examine the stiffness and loss factor spectra of the vibration ring, as well as simulate its damping effect in the context of a simplified driveline model. The results of this work showed that this is a viable mechanism for driveline damping, and provided several lessons for continued development.

  12. Tree Rings: Timekeepers of the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, R. L.; McGowan, J.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science issues, this booklet describes the uses of tree rings in historical and biological recordkeeping. Separate sections cover the following topics: dating of tree rings, dating with tree rings, tree ring formation, tree ring identification, sample collections, tree ring cross dating, tree…

  13. Multiple components in narrow planetary rings.

    PubMed

    Benet, L; Merlo, O

    2008-01-11

    The phase-space volume of regions of regular or trapped motion, for bounded or scattering systems with 2 degrees of freedom, respectively, displays universal properties. In particular, drastic reductions in the volume (gaps) are observed at specific values of a control parameter. Using the stability resonances we show that they, and not the mean-motion resonances, account for the position of these gaps. For more degrees of freedom, exciting these resonances divides the regions of trapped motion. For planetary rings, we demonstrate that this mechanism yields rings with multiple components.

  14. Planetary rings as relics of plasma proto-rings rotating in the magnetic field of a central body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, B.

    2007-08-01

    A possibility is discussed in accordance to hypothesis by H. Alfven, that the rings of large planets are relics of some plasma proto-rings rotating in the magnetic fields of central bodies. A finite-dimensional mathematical model of the system is synthesized using the solution of the boundary-value problem by the Boubnov - Galerkin method. The dipole magnetic field of the central body is assumed to have a small eccentricity, and the dipole axis - to be inclined at a small angle to the central body's axis of rotation which coincides with the ring's rotation axis. The proto-ring is supposed to be thin and narrow and having the same rotating axis as the central body. A medium forming the ring is cold rarefied plasma with high electron density, so that electric conductivity of the medium tends to infinity, as well as the magnetic Reynolds number. The original mathematical model is reduced to a system of finite-difference equations whose asymptotic analytical solution is obtained. Emphasis is placed on the problems of stability of the ring's steady state rotation and quantization of the eigenvalues of nondimensional sector velocity of the ring with respect to the central body. The solutions corresponding to magneto-gravitational and to magneto-gyroscopic waves are considered It is demonstrated that some rings characterized by integral quantum numbers are stable and long-living, while the rings which are associated with half-integer quantum numbers (rings>) are unstable and short-living. As a result, an evolutionally rife rotating plasma ring turns out to be stratified into a large number of narrow elite rings separated by gaps whose position correspond to anti-rings. The regions of possible existence of elite rings in near-central body space are determined. The main result of eigenvalue spectrum's analysis is as follows. Quantum numbers determining elite eigenvalues of the sector velocity of a ring (normalized in a certain manner) coincide with the quantum

  15. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    PubMed Central

    Petković, I.; Lollo, A.; Glazman, L. I.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter's free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg–Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. We also demonstrate that phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity. PMID:27882924

  16. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings.

    PubMed

    Petković, I; Lollo, A; Glazman, L I; Harris, J G E

    2016-11-24

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter's free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg-Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. We also demonstrate that phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity.

  17. Large transient fault current test of an electrical roll ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yenni, Edward J.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    1992-01-01

    The space station uses precision rotary gimbals to provide for sun tracking of its photoelectric arrays. Electrical power, command signals and data are transferred across the gimbals by roll rings. Roll rings have been shown to be capable of highly efficient electrical transmission and long life, through tests conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center and Honeywell's Satellite and Space Systems Division in Phoenix, AZ. Large potential fault currents inherent to the power system's DC distribution architecture, have brought about the need to evaluate the effects of large transient fault currents on roll rings. A test recently conducted at Lewis subjected a roll ring to a simulated worst case space station electrical fault. The system model used to obtain the fault profile is described, along with details of the reduced order circuit that was used to simulate the fault. Test results comparing roll ring performance before and after the fault are also presented.

  18. A Modified ABCDE Model of Flowering in Orchids Based on Gene Expression Profiling Studies of the Moth Orchid Phalaenopsis aphrodite

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ann-Ying; Chen, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yao-Chien Alex; Chao, Ya-Ting; Shih, Ming-Che

    2013-01-01

    Previously we developed genomic resources for orchids, including transcriptomic analyses using next-generation sequencing techniques and construction of a web-based orchid genomic database. Here, we report a modified molecular model of flower development in the Orchidaceae based on functional analysis of gene expression profiles in Phalaenopsis aphrodite (a moth orchid) that revealed novel roles for the transcription factors involved in floral organ pattern formation. Phalaenopsis orchid floral organ-specific genes were identified by microarray analysis. Several critical transcription factors including AP3, PI, AP1 and AGL6, displayed distinct spatial distribution patterns. Phylogenetic analysis of orchid MADS box genes was conducted to infer the evolutionary relationship among floral organ-specific genes. The results suggest that gene duplication MADS box genes in orchid may have resulted in their gaining novel functions during evolution. Based on these analyses, a modified model of orchid flowering was proposed. Comparison of the expression profiles of flowers of a peloric mutant and wild-type Phalaenopsis orchid further identified genes associated with lip morphology and peloric effects. Large scale investigation of gene expression profiles revealed that homeotic genes from the ABCDE model of flower development classes A and B in the Phalaenopsis orchid have novel functions due to evolutionary diversification, and display differential expression patterns. PMID:24265826

  19. A novel ABCD1 mutation detected by next generation sequencing in presumed hereditary spastic paraplegia: A 30-year diagnostic delay caused by misleading biochemical findings.

    PubMed

    Koutsis, Georgios; Lynch, David S; Tucci, Arianna; Houlden, Henry; Karadima, Georgia; Panas, Marios

    2015-08-15

    To present a Greek family in which 5 male and 2 female members developed progressive spastic paraplegia. Plasma very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) were reportedly normal at first testing in an affected male and for over 30 years the presumed diagnosis was hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). Targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) was used as a further diagnostic tool. Targeted exome sequencing in the proband, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation; mutation segregation testing in multiple family members and plasma VLCFA measurement in the proband. NGS of the proband revealed a novel frameshift mutation in ABCD1 (c.1174_1178del, p.Leu392Serfs*7), bringing an end to diagnostic uncertainty by establishing the diagnosis of adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), the myelopathic phenotype of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). The mutation segregated in all family members and the diagnosis of AMN/ALD was confirmed by plasma VLCFA measurement. Confounding factors that delayed the diagnosis are presented. This report highlights the diagnostic utility of NGS in patients with undiagnosed spastic paraplegia, establishing a molecular diagnosis of AMN, allowing proper genetic counseling and management, and overcoming the diagnostic delay that can be rarely caused by false negative VLCFA analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Planetary rings as relics of plasma pre-rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, B. I.

    2007-02-01

    A possibility is discussed that the rings of large planets observed in the modern epoch are relics of some pre-rings consisting of magnetized plasma (according to a hypothesis by H. Alfven). The solution to a model problem published in [36, 37] is used. Its main result is a mechanism of stratification of an evolutionally mature plasma pre-ring into a large number of narrow elite rings separated by anti-rings (gaps). Another result is the theoretical substantiation of the presence in the near-planetary space of a region of existence and stability (in what follows it is referred to as ES-region) of plasma rings. The data obtained in the course of the Voyager, Galileo, and Cassini missions are used below for verification of the model on which the solutions presented in [36, 37] are based.

  1. Uranus Rings in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This false-color view of the rings of Uranus was made from images taken by Voyager 2 on Jan. 21, 1986, from a distance of 4.17 million kilometers (2.59 million miles). All nine known rings are visible here; the somewhat fainter, pastel lines seen between them are contributed by the computer enhancement. Six 15-second narrow-angle images were used to extract color information from the extremely dark and faint rings. Two images each in the green, clear and violet filters were added together and averaged to find the proper color differences between the rings. The final image was made from these three color averages and represents an enhanced, false-color view. The image shows that the brightest, or epsilon, ring at top is neutral in color, with the fainter eight other rings showing color differences between them. Moving down, toward Uranus, we see the delta, gamma and eta rings in shades of blue and green; the beta and alpha rings in somewhat lighter tones; and then a final set of three, known simply as the 4, 5 and 6 rings, in faint off-white tones. Scientists will use this color information to try to understand the nature and origin of the ring material. The resolution of this image is approximately 40 km (25 mi). The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  2. Rings Research in the Next Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.; Tiscareno, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    The study of planetary ring systems forms a key component of planetary science for several reasons: 1) The evolution and current states of planets and their satellites are affected in many ways by rings, while 2) conversely, properties of planets and moons and other solar system populations are revealed by their effects on rings; 3) highly structured and apparently delicate ring systems may be bellwethers, constraining various theories of the origin and evolution of their entire planetary system; and finally, 4) planetary rings provide an easily observable analogue to other astrophysical disk systems, enabling real “ground truth” results applicable to disks much more remote in space and/or time, including proto-planetary disks, circum-stellar disks, and even galaxies. Significant advances have been made in rings science in the past decade. The highest-priority rings research recommendations of the last Planetary Science Decadal Survey were to operate and extend the Cassini orbiter mission at Saturn; this has been done with tremendous success, accounting for much of the progress made on key science questions, as we will describe. Important progress in understanding the rings of Saturn and other planets has also come from Earth-based observational and theoretical work, again as prioritized by the last Decadal Survey. However, much important work remains to be done. At Saturn, the Cassini Solstice Mission must be brought to a successful completion. Priority should also be placed on sending spacecraft to Neptune and/or Uranus, now unvisited for more than 20 years. At Jupiter and Pluto, opportunities afforded by visiting spacecraft capable of studying rings should be exploited. On Earth, the need for continued research and analysis remains strong, including in-depth analysis of rings data already obtained, numerical and theoretical modeling work, laboratory analysis of materials and processes analogous to those found in the outer solar system, and continued Earth

  3. Water impact test of aft skirt end ring, and mid ring segments of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of water impact loads tests using aft skirt end ring, and mid ring segments of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) are examined. Dynamic structural response data is developed and an evaluation of the model in various configurations is presented. Impact velocities are determined for the SRB with the larger main chute system. Various failure modes are also investigated.

  4. On the tidal environment of an outwardly migrating F ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Phil J.

    2018-07-01

    Saturn's F ring is a unique narrow ring that lies (radially) close to the tidally disruptive Roche limit of water ice for Saturn. Significant work has been done that shows it to be one of the most dynamic places in the Solar system. Aggregates that are fortunate enough to form constantly battle against the strong tidal forces of Saturn and the nearby moons Prometheus and Pandora, which act to gravitationally stir up ring material. Planetary rings are also known to radially spread. Therefore, as the F ring lies at the edge of the main rings, we investigate the effect of an outwardly migrated F ring and its interaction with Prometheus. An increase in the maximum number density of particles at the channel edges is observed with decreasing local tidal environment. Radial velocity dispersions are also observed to fall below the typical escape velocity of a 150 m icy moonlet (<10 cm s^{-1}) where density is enhanced, and are gravitationally unstable with Toomre parameters Q < 2. Additionally, in locations of the ring where Q < 2 is observed, more particles are seen to fall below or close to the critical Toomre parameter as the radial location of the ring increases.

  5. The Structure of Chariklo’s Rings from Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérard, D.; Sicardy, B.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Desmars, J.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Ortiz, J.-L.; Duffard, R.; Morales, N.; Meza, E.; Leiva, R.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Gomes Júnior, A.-R.; Assafin, M.; Colas, F.; Dauvergne, J.-L.; Kervella, P.; Lecacheux, J.; Maquet, L.; Vachier, F.; Renner, S.; Monard, B.; Sickafoose, A. A.; Breytenbach, H.; Genade, A.; Beisker, W.; Bath, K.-L.; Bode, H.-J.; Backes, M.; Ivanov, V. D.; Jehin, E.; Gillon, M.; Manfroid, J.; Pollock, J.; Tancredi, G.; Roland, S.; Salvo, R.; Vanzi, L.; Herald, D.; Gault, D.; Kerr, S.; Pavlov, H.; Hill, K. M.; Bradshaw, J.; Barry, M. A.; Cool, A.; Lade, B.; Cole, A.; Broughton, J.; Newman, J.; Horvat, R.; Maybour, D.; Giles, D.; Davis, L.; Paton, R. A.; Loader, B.; Pennell, A.; Jaquiery, P.-D.; Brillant, S.; Selman, F.; Dumas, C.; Herrera, C.; Carraro, G.; Monaco, L.; Maury, A.; Peyrot, A.; Teng-Chuen-Yu, J.-P.; Richichi, A.; Irawati, P.; De Witt, C.; Schoenau, P.; Prager, R.; Colazo, C.; Melia, R.; Spagnotto, J.; Blain, A.; Alonso, S.; Román, A.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Rizos, J.-L.; Maestre, J.-L.; Dunham, D.

    2017-10-01

    Two narrow and dense rings (called C1R and C2R) were discovered around the Centaur object (10199) Chariklo during a stellar occultation observed on 2013 June 3. Following this discovery, we planned observations of several occultations by Chariklo’s system in order to better characterize the physical properties of the ring and main body. Here, we use 12 successful occulations by Chariklo observed between 2014 and 2016. They provide ring profiles (physical width, opacity, edge structure) and constraints on the radii and pole position. Our new observations are currently consistent with the circular ring solution and pole position, to within the ±3.3 km formal uncertainty for the ring radii derived by Braga-Ribas et al. The six resolved C1R profiles reveal significant width variations from ˜5 to 7.5 km. The width of the fainter ring C2R is less constrained, and may vary between 0.1 and 1 km. The inner and outer edges of C1R are consistent with infinitely sharp boundaries, with typical upper limits of one kilometer for the transition zone between the ring and empty space. No constraint on the sharpness of C2R’s edges is available. A 1σ upper limit of ˜20 m is derived for the equivalent width of narrow (physical width < 4 km) rings up to distances of 12,000 km, counted in the ring plane.

  6. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2016-12-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Ring systems differ from simple linear systems in two significant ways: 1. They are systems of granular material: where particle-to-particle collisions dominate; thus a kinetic, not a fluid description needed. Stresses are strikingly inhomogeneous and fluctuations are large compared to equilibrium. 2. They are strongly forced by resonances: which drive a non-linear response, that push the system across thresholds that lead to persistent states. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average. Summary of Halo Results: A predator-prey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like `straw' that can explain the halo morphology and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; this requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km).Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing.Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon-triggered clumping explains both small and large particles at resonances. We calculate the stationary size distribution using a cell-to-cell mapping procedure that converts the phase-plane trajectories to a Markov chain. Approximating it as an asymmetric random walk with reflecting boundaries

  7. High-resolution imaging of Saturn's main rings during the Cassini Ring-Grazing Orbits and Grand Finale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Cassini is ending its spectacular 13-year mission at Saturn with a two-part farewell, during which it has obtained the sharpest and highest-fidelity images ever taken of Saturn's rings. From December 2016 to April 2017, the spacecraft executed 20 near-polar orbits that passed just outside the outer edge of the main rings; these "Ring-Grazing Orbits" provided the mission's best viewing of the A and F rings and the outer B ring. From April to September 2017, the spacecraft is executing 22 near-polar orbits that pass between the innermost D ring and the planet's clouds; this "Grand Finale" provides the mission's best viewing of the C and D rings and the inner B ring. 1) Clumpy BeltsClumpy structure called "straw" was previously observed in parts of the main rings [Porco et al. 2005, Science]. New images show this structure with greater clarity. More surprisingly, new images reveal strong radial variations in the degree and character of clumpiness, which are probably an index for particle properties and interactions. Belts with different clumpiness characteristics are often adjacent to each other and not easily correlated with other ring characteristics. 2) PropellersA "propeller" is a local disturbance in the ring created by an embedded moon [Tiscareno et al. 2006, Nature; 2010, ApJL]. Cassini has observed two classes of propellers: small propellers that swarm in the "Propeller Belts" of the mid-A ring, and "Giant Propellers" whose individual orbits can be tracked in the outer A ring. Both are shown in unprecedented detail in new images. Targeted flybys of Giant Propellers were executed on both the lit and unlit sides of the ring (see figure), yielding enhanced ability to convert brightness to optical depth and surface density. 3) Impact Ejecta CloudsBeing a large and delicate system, Saturn's rings function as a detector of their planetary environment. Cassini images of impact ejecta clouds in the rings previously constrained the population of decimeter

  8. Vortex and Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-07

    NASA Cassini spacecraft captures three magnificent sights at once: Saturn north polar vortex and hexagon along with its expansive rings. The hexagon, which is wider than two Earths, owes its appearance to the jet stream that forms its perimeter. The jet stream forms a six-lobed, stationary wave which wraps around the north polar regions at a latitude of roughly 77 degrees North. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 37 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on April 2, 2014 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.4 million miles (2.2 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 43 degrees. Image scale is 81 miles (131 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18274

  9. Ring Image Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Ring Image Analyzer software analyzes images to recognize elliptical patterns. It determines the ellipse parameters (axes ratio, centroid coordinate, tilt angle). The program attempts to recognize elliptical fringes (e.g., Newton Rings) on a photograph and determine their centroid position, the short-to-long-axis ratio, and the angle of rotation of the long axis relative to the horizontal direction on the photograph. These capabilities are important in interferometric imaging and control of surfaces. In particular, this program has been developed and applied for determining the rim shape of precision-machined optical whispering gallery mode resonators. The program relies on a unique image recognition algorithm aimed at recognizing elliptical shapes, but can be easily adapted to other geometric shapes. It is robust against non-elliptical details of the image and against noise. Interferometric analysis of precision-machined surfaces remains an important technological instrument in hardware development and quality analysis. This software automates and increases the accuracy of this technique. The software has been developed for the needs of an R&TD-funded project and has become an important asset for the future research proposal to NASA as well as other agencies.

  10. In vitro contraction of cytokinetic ring depends on myosin II but not on actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Mithilesh; Kashiwazaki, Jun; Takagi, Tomoko; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Huang, Yinyi; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Mabuchi, Issei

    2013-07-01

    Cytokinesis in many eukaryotes involves the contraction of an actomyosin-based contractile ring. However, the detailed mechanism of contractile ring contraction is not fully understood. Here, we establish an experimental system to study contraction of the ring to completion in vitro. We show that the contractile ring of permeabilized fission yeast cells undergoes rapid contraction in an ATP- and myosin-II-dependent manner in the absence of other cytoplasmic constituents. Surprisingly, neither actin polymerization nor its disassembly is required for contraction of the contractile ring, although addition of exogenous actin-crosslinking proteins blocks ring contraction. Using contractile rings generated from fission yeast cytokinesis mutants, we show that not all proteins required for assembly of the ring are required for its contraction in vitro. Our work provides the beginnings of the definition of a minimal contraction-competent cytokinetic ring apparatus.

  11. Compositional Evolution of Saturn's Rings Due to Meteoroid Bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J.; Estrada, P.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we address the question of compositional evolution in planetary ring systems subsequent to meteoroid bombardment. The huge surface area to mass ratio of planetary rings ensures that this is an important process, even with current uncertainties on the meteoroid flux. We develop a new model which includes both direct deposition of extrinsic meteoritic "pollutants", and ballistic transport of the increasingly polluted ring material as impact ejecta. Our study includes detailed radiative transfer modeling of ring particle spectral reflectivities based on refractive indices of realistic constituents. Voyager data have shown that the lower optical depth regions in Saturn's rings (the C ring and Cassini Division) have darker and less red particles than the optically thicken A and B rings. These coupled structural-compositional groupings have never been explained; we present and explore the hypothesis that global scale color and compositional differences in the main rings of Saturn arise naturally from extrinsic meteoroid bombardment of a ring system which was initially composed primarily, but not entirely, of water ice. We find that the regional color and albedo differences can be understood if all ring material was initially identical (primarily water ice, based on other data, but colored by tiny amounts of intrinsic reddish, plausibly organic, absorber) and then evolved entirely by addition and mixing of extrinsic, nearly neutrally colored. plausibly carbonaceous material. We further demonstrate that the detailed radial profile of color across the abrupt B ring - C ring boundary can.constrain key unknown parameters in the model. Using new alternates of parameter values, we estimate the duration of the exposure to extrinsic meteoroid flux of this part of the rings, at least, to be on the order of 10(exp 8) years. This conclusion is easily extended by inference to the Cassini Division and its surroundings as well. This geologically young "age" is compatible

  12. Non-Linear Dynamics of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Non-linear processes can explain why Saturn's rings are so active and dynamic. Some of this non-linearity is captured in a simple Predator-Prey Model: Periodic forcing from the moon causes streamline crowding; This damps the relative velocity, and allows aggregates to grow. About a quarter phase later, the aggregates stir the system to higher relative velocity and the limit cycle repeats each orbit, with relative velocity ranging from nearly zero to a multiple of the orbit average: 2-10x is possible. Summary of Halo Results: A predator-prey model for ring dynamics produces transient structures like 'straw' that can explain the halo structure and spectroscopy: Cyclic velocity changes cause perturbed regions to reach higher collision speeds at some orbital phases, which preferentially removes small regolith particles; Surrounding particles diffuse back too slowly to erase the effect: this gives the halo morphology; This requires energetic collisions (v ≈ 10m/sec, with throw distances about 200km, implying objects of scale R ≈ 20km); We propose 'straw', as observed ny Cassini cameras. Transform to Duffing Eqn : With the coordinate transformation, z = M2/3, the Predator-Prey equations can be combined to form a single second-order differential equation with harmonic resonance forcing. Ring dynamics and history implications: Moon-triggered clumping at perturbed regions in Saturn's rings creates both high velocity dispersion and large aggregates at these distances, explaining both small and large particles observed there. This confirms the triple architecture of ring particles: a broad size distribution of particles; these aggregate into temporary rubble piles; coated by a regolith of dust. We calculate the stationary size distribution using a cell-to-cell mapping procedure that converts the phase-plane trajectories to a Markov chain. Approximating the Markov chain as an asymmetric random walk with reflecting boundaries allows us to determine the power law index from

  13. Radar imaging of Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; French, Richard G.; Campbell, Donald B.; Margot, Jean-Luc; Nolan, Michael C.; Black, Gregory J.; Salo, Heikki J.

    2005-09-01

    We present delay-Doppler images of Saturn's rings based on radar observations made at Arecibo Observatory between 1999 and 2003, at a wavelength of 12.6 cm and at ring opening angles of 20.1°⩽|B|⩽26.7°. The average radar cross-section of the A ring is ˜77% relative to that of the B ring, while a stringent upper limit of 3% is placed on the cross-section of the C ring and 9% on that of the Cassini Division. These results are consistent with those obtained by Ostro et al. [1982, Icarus 49, 367-381] from radar observations at |B|=21.4°, but provide higher resolution maps of the rings' reflectivity profile. The average cross-section of the A and B rings, normalized by their projected unblocked area, is found to have decreased from 1.25±0.31 to 0.74±0.19 as the rings have opened up, while the circular polarization ratio has increased from 0.64±0.06 to 0.77±0.06. The steep decrease in cross-section is at variance with previous radar measurements [Ostro et al., 1980, Icarus 41, 381-388], and neither this nor the polarization variations are easily understood within the framework of either classical, many-particle-thick or monolayer ring models. One possible explanation involves vertical size segregation in the rings, whereby observations at larger elevation angles which see deeper into the rings preferentially see the larger particles concentrated near the rings' mid-plane. These larger particles may be less reflective and/or rougher and thus more depolarizing than the smaller ones. Images from all four years show a strong m=2 azimuthal asymmetry in the reflectivity of the A ring, with an amplitude of ±20% and minima at longitudes of 67±4° and 247±4° from the sub-Earth point. We attribute the asymmetry to the presence of gravitational wakes in the A ring as invoked by Colombo et al. [1976, Nature 264, 344-345] to explain the similar asymmetry long seen at optical wavelengths. A simple radiative transfer model suggests that the enhancement of the azimuthal

  14. Formation of lunar basin rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, C.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the multiple concentric rings that characterize lunar impact basins, and the probable depth and diameter of the transient crater have been widely debated. As an alternative to prevailing "megaterrace" hypotheses, we propose that the outer scarps or mountain rings that delineate the topographic rims of basins-the Cordilleran at Orientale, the Apennine at Imbrium, and the Altai at Nectaris-define the transient cavities, enlarged relatively little by slumping, and thus are analogous to the rim crests of craters like Copernicus; inner rings are uplifted rims of craters nested within the transient cavity. The magnitude of slumping that occurs on all scarps is insufficient to produce major inner rings from the outer. These conclusions are based largely on the observed gradational sequence in lunar central uplifts:. from simple peaks through somewhat annular clusters of peaks, peak and ring combinations and double ring basins, culminating in multiring structures that may also include peaks. In contrast, belts of slump terraces are not gradational with inner rings. Terrestrial analogs suggest two possible mechanisms for producing rings. In some cases, peaks may expand into rings as material is ejected from their cores, as apparently occurred at Gosses Bluff, Australia. A second process, differential excavation of lithologically diverse layers, has produced nested experimental craters and is, we suspect, instrumental in the formation of terrestrial ringed impact craters. Peak expansion could produce double-ring structures in homogeneous materials, but differential excavation is probably required to produce multiring and peak-in-ring configurations in large lunar impact structures. Our interpretation of the representative lunar multiring basin Orientale is consistent with formation of three rings in three layers detected seismically in part of the Moon-the Cordillera (basin-bounding) ring in the upper crust, the composite Montes Rook ring in the underlying

  15. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOEpatents

    Sammel, Alfred G.

    1996-01-01

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  16. Smoke Ring for a Halo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Two stars shine through the center of a ring of cascading dust in this image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The star system is named DI Cha, and while only two stars are apparent, it is actually a quadruple system containing two sets of binary stars. As this is a relatively young star system it is surrounded by dust. The young stars are molding the dust into a wispy wrap. The host of this alluring interaction between dust and star is the Chamaeleon I dark cloud — one of three such clouds that comprise a large star-forming region known as the Chamaeleon Complex. DI Cha's juvenility is not remarkable within this region. In fact, the entire system is among not only the youngest but also the closest collections of newly formed stars to be found and so provides an ideal target for studies of star formation. Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  17. Embryonic ring closure: Actomyosin rings do the two-step

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Actomyosin rings drive numerous closure processes, but the mechanisms by which they contract are still poorly understood. In this issue, Xue and Sokac (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201608025) show that actomyosin ring closure during Drosophila melanogaster cellularization uses two steps, only one of which involves Myosin-2. PMID:27799371

  18. AXAF VETA-I mirror ring focus measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H. D.; Zhao, P.

    1994-01-01

    The AXAF VETA-I mirror ring focus measurements were made with an HRI (microchannel plate) X-ray detector. The ring focus is a sharply focused ring formed by X-rays before they reach the VEAT-I focal plane. It is caused by spherical aberrations due to the finite source distance and the despace in the VETA-I test. The ring focus test reveals some aspects fo the test system distortions and the mirror surface figure which are difficult or impossible to detect at the focal plane. The test results show periodic modulations of the ring radius and width which could be caused by gravity, thermal, and/or epoxy shrinkage distortions. The strongest component of the modulation had a 12-fold symmetry, because these distortions were exerted on the mirror through 12 flexures of the VETA-I mount. Ring focus models were developed to simulate the ring image. The models were compared with the data to understand the test system distortions and the mirror glass imperfection. Further studies will be done to complete this work. The ring focus measurement is a very powerful test. We expect that a similar test for the finally assembled mirror of AXAD-I will be highly valuable.

  19. A pulsed jumping ring apparatus for demonstration of Lenz's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Paul; Loebach, Jeff; Cook, James; Hallen, H. D.

    2001-08-01

    Lenz's law is often demonstrated in classrooms by the use of Elihu Thomson's jumping ring. However, it is ironic that a thorough analysis of the physics of the ac jumping ring reveals that the operation is due mainly to a phase difference, not Lenz's law. A complete analysis of the physics behind the ac jumping ring is difficult for the introductory student. We present a design for a pulsed jumping ring which can be fully described by the application of Lenz's law. Other advantages of this system are that it lends itself to a rigorous analysis of the force balances and energy flow. The simple jumping ring apparatus closely resembles Thomson's, but is powered by a capacitor bank. The jump heights were measured for several rings as a function of energy stored in the capacitors. A simple model describes the data well. Currents in both the drive coil and ring are measured and that of the drive coil modeled to illuminate some properties of the capacitors. An analysis of the energy flow in the system explains the higher jump heights, to 2 m, when the ring is cooled.

  20. An Arctic predator-prey system in flux: climate change impacts on coastal space use by polar bears and ringed seals.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Charmain D; Kovacs, Kit M; Ims, Rolf A; Aars, Jon; Lydersen, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Climate change is impacting different species at different rates, leading to alterations in biological interactions with ramifications for wider ecosystem functioning. Understanding these alterations can help improve predictive capacity and inform management efforts designed to mitigate against negative impacts. We investigated how the movement and space use patterns of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in coastal areas in Svalbard, Norway, have been altered by a sudden decline in sea ice that occurred in 2006. We also investigated whether the spatial overlap between polar bears and their traditionally most important prey, ringed seals (Pusa hispida), has been affected by the sea-ice decline, as polar bears are dependent on a sea-ice platform for hunting seals. We attached biotelemetry devices to ringed seals (n = 60, both sexes) and polar bears (n = 67, all females) before (2002-2004) and after (2010-2013) a sudden decline in sea ice in Svalbard. We used linear mixed-effects models to evaluate the association of these species to environmental features and an approach based on Time Spent in Area to investigate changes in spatial overlap between the two species. Following the sea-ice reduction, polar bears spent the same amount of time close to tidal glacier fronts in the spring but less time in these areas during the summer and autumn. However, ringed seals did not alter their association with glacier fronts during summer, leading to a major decrease in spatial overlap values between these species in Svalbard's coastal areas. Polar bears now move greater distances daily and spend more time close to ground-nesting bird colonies, where bear predation can have substantial local effects. Our results indicate that sea-ice declines have impacted the degree of spatial overlap and hence the strength of the predator-prey relationship between polar bears and ringed seals, with consequences for the wider Arctic marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Shifts in ecological

  1. Rings Around the Pole

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-01-20

    Atmospheric features in Saturn's north polar region are revealed in spectacular detail in this Cassini image, taken in the near infrared spectral region, where methane gas is not very absorbing. The dark shadows of Saturn's rings drape across the planet, creating the illusion of atmospheric bands. Dots of bright clouds give the appearance that this is an active place. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide angle camera on Dec. 14, 2004, at a distance of 717,800 kilometers (446,100 miles) from Saturn through a filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 939 nanometers. The image scale is about 43 kilometers (27 miles) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06567

  2. Rheology modification with ring polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    It is now established that experimental unconcatenated ring polymers can be purified effectively by means of fractionation at the critical condition. For molecular weights well above the entanglement threshold, purified rings relax stress via power-law (with an exponent of about -0.4), sharply departing from their linear counterparts. Experimental results are in harmony with modeling predictions and simulations. Here, we present results from recent interdisciplinary efforts and discuss two challenges: (i) the nonlinear shear rheology of purified ring melts is also very different from that of unlinked chains. Whereas the latter exhibit features that can be explained, to a first approach, in the framework in the tube model, the former behave akin to unentangled chains with finite extensibility and exhibit much small deformation at steady state. (ii) blends of rings and linear polymers exhibit unique features in different regimes: The addition of minute amounts of linear chains drastically affects ring dynamics. This relates to ring purity and the ability of unlinked linear chains to thread rings. With the help of simulations, it is possible to rationalize the observed surprisingly slow viscoelastic relaxation, which is attributed to ring-linear and ring-ring penetrations. On the other hand, adding small amounts of rings to linear polymers of different molecular weights influences their linear and nonlinear rheology in an unprecedented way. The blend viscosity exceeds that of the slower component (linear) in this non-interacting mixture, and its dependencies on composition and molecular weight ratio are examined, whereas the role of molecular architecture is also addressed. Consequently, closing the ends of a linear chain can serve as a powerful means for molecular manipulation of its rheology. This presentation reflects collaborative efforts with S. Costanzo, Z-C. Yan, R. Pasquino, M. Kaliva, S. Kamble, Y. Jeong, P. Lutz, J. Allgaier, T. Chang, D. Talikis, V

  3. Diastereoselective intramolecular Ritter reaction: generation of a cis-fused hexahydro-4aH-indeno[1,2-b]pyridine ring system with 4a,9b-diangular substituents.

    PubMed

    Van Emelen, K; De Wit, T; Hoornaert, G J; Compernolle, F

    2000-10-05

    Indanol intermediates 5, prepared via Michael addition of 1-indanone beta-ketoester and acrylonitrile followed by reduction or Grignard reaction of the ketone group, were submitted to intramolecular Ritter reaction using various acid reaction conditions to produce tricyclic lactams 4. This cis-fused hexahydro-4aH-indeno[1,2-b]pyridine ring system, substituted at both angular positions 4a and 9b, provides access to constrained analogues of non-peptide NK(1)-antagonists with monocyclic piperidine structure.

  4. Composite correlation filter for O-ring detection in stationary colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassebrook, Laurence G.

    2009-04-01

    O-rings are regularly replaced in aircraft and if they are not replaced or if they are installed improperly, they can result in catastrophic failure of the aircraft. It is critical that the o-rings be packaged correctly to avoid mistakes made by technicians during routine maintenance. For this reason, fines may be imposed on the o-ring manufacturer if the o-rings are packaged incorrectly. That is, a single o-ring must be packaged and labeled properly. No o-rings or more than one o-ring per package is not acceptable. We present an industrial inspection system based on real-time composite correlation filtering that has successfully solved this problem in spite of opaque paper o-ring packages. We present the system design including the composite filter design.

  5. Application of MCD spectroscopy and TD-DFT to a highly non-planar porphyrinoid ring system. New insights on red-shifted porphyrinoid spectral bands.

    PubMed

    Mack, John; Asano, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Nagao; Stillman, Martin J

    2005-12-21

    The first magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra are reported for tetraphenyltetraacenaphthoporphyrin (TPTANP). The impact on the electronic structure of steric interactions between the fused acenaphthalene rings and the meso-tetraphenyl substituents is explored based on an analysis of the optical spectra of the Zn(II) complex (ZnTPTANP) and the free base dication species ([H4TPTANP]2+). In the case of ZnTPTANP, significant folding of the porphyrinoid ligand induces a highly unusual MCD-sign reversal providing the first direct spectroscopic evidence of ligand nonplanarity. Density functional theory (DFT) geometry optimizations for a wide range of Zn(II) porphyrinoids based on the B3LYP functional and TD-DFT calculations of the associated UV-visible absorption spectra are reported, allowing a complete assessment of the MCD data. TPTANP complexes are found to fall into a class of cyclic polyenes, termed as soft MCD chromophores by Michl (J. Pure Appl. Chem. 1980, 52, 1549.), since the signs of the Faraday A1 terms observed in the MCD spectrum are highly sensitive to slight structural changes. The origin of an unusually large red shift of the main B (or Soret) band of MTPTANP (the most red shifted ever reported for fused-ring-expanded metal porphines) and of similar red shifts observed in the spectra of other peripherally crowded porphyrinoid complexes is also explored and explained on this basis.

  6. Rerouting the Pathway for the Biosynthesis of the Side Ring System of Nosiheptide: The Roles of NosI, NosJ, and NosK

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Nosiheptide (NOS) is a highly modified thiopeptide antibiotic that displays formidable in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to a central hydroxypyridine ring, NOS contains several other modifications, including multiple thiazole rings, dehydro-amino acids, and a 3,4-dimethylindolic acid (DMIA) moiety. The DMIA moiety is required for NOS efficacy and is synthesized from l-tryptophan in a series of reactions that have not been fully elucidated. Herein, we describe the role of NosJ, the product of an unannotated gene in the biosynthetic operon for NOS, as an acyl carrier protein that delivers 3-methylindolic acid (MIA) to NosK. We also reassign the role of NosI as the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the ATP-dependent activation of MIA and MIA’s attachment to the phosphopantetheine moiety of NosJ. Lastly, NosK catalyzes the transfer of the MIA group from NosJ-MIA to a conserved serine residue (Ser102) on NosK. The X-ray crystal structure of NosK, solved to 2.3 Å resolution, reveals that the protein is an α/β-fold hydrolase. Ser102 interacts with Glu210 and His234 to form a catalytic triad located at the bottom of an open cleft that is large enough to accommodate the thiopeptide framework. PMID:28343381

  7. The relation of maternal job strain and cortisol levels during early pregnancy with body composition later in the 5-year-old child: the ABCD study.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, Aimée E; Van Eijsden, Manon; Stronks, Karien; Gemke, Reinoud J B J; Vrijkotte, Tanja G M

    2012-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to maternal stress may program the fetal HPA axis, potentially leading to altered metabolism in later life, associated with adiposity and diabetes. This association is little studied in humans, and thus we explore whether high maternal job strain during early pregnancy, as well as maternal cortisol levels are associated with increased body mass index (BMI), central adiposity or body fat mass in the offspring at age five. Additionally, we explore whether these associations are modified by gender or mediated by gestational age and fetal growth restriction. 2939 pregnant women (ABCD cohort study) completed a questionnaire around gestational week 16 including the Job Content Questionnaire, assessing job strain. Serum total cortisol was assessed in a subsample (n=1320). Gestational age (≥37 weeks), standardized birth weight and information on many covariates were available. At the age five health check, height, weight (BMI, kg/m(2)), waist circumference (waist-to-height ratio, WHtR) and Fat Mass Index (FMI, kg/m(2)) were assessed. Job strain was not associated with higher BMI, WHtR or FMI. Higher maternal cortisol was independently associated with marginally higher FMI in girls, but marginally lower FMI in boys (β 0.09 and β -0.10 per 100 unit increase in serum cortisol, respectively. p<0.01). This association was not mediated by gestational age or fetal growth restriction. Results show that prenatal maternal job strain and cortisol may not program obesity and adiposity in the next generation in humans, but gender differences should always be considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The 1995 Saturn Ring-Plane Crossings: Ring Thickness and Small Inner Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, F.; Sicardy, B.

    1996-09-01

    The May 22() th and August 10() th, 1995, Saturn ring-plane crossings by the Earth were observed from the 2-m and 1-m telescopes at Pic du Midi, the 2.2-m telescope of the University of Hawaii, and with the Adonis adaptive optics camera at the 3.6-m telescope of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). Observations were made with either a 0.9 mu m or 2.2 mu m (short K) methane band filter. The radial brightness profiles of the rings indicate that the outer F ring dominates the apparent edge-on thickness of the system, with a vertically integrated equivalent width of 0.8-1.0 km near a radius of 130,000 km. The photometric behaviors of the A, B, and C rings and of the Cassini Division have been analyzed using a classical radiative transfer code which includes illumination by the Sun and by the planet. The F ring is modelled as a physically thick ribbon (thickness h) composed of large particles embedded in dust. The observed profiles can be explained if the F ring is both optically thick (tau ~ 0.15-0.25), and physically thick (h at least ~ 1.5 km). The large particles dominate the F ring's photometric behavior in backscattered light. Constraints on the particle properties in the other rings have been derived. The dimming of the rings around August 10, 1995 provided ideal conditions to study the small inner satellites. Besides Janus, Epimetheus and Pandora, two unresolved objects were detected in the ESO frames. They have been identified with the objects 1995S5 and 1995S6, detected several hours later by the Hubble Space Telescope (Nicholson et al. 1996, Science 272, 509--515). Combining the ESO and HST data, we derive orbital and photometric parameters for these objects. In particular, we improve the orbital parameters of 1995S5, whose orbital radius is now close to that of the F ring.

  9. Running Rings Around the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Irene E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development and current status of WebRing, a service that links related Web sites into a central hub. Discusses it as a viable alternative to other search engines and examines issues of free speech, use by the business sector, and implications for WebRing after its purchase by Yahoo! (LRW)

  10. Nardò Ring, Italy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-04-08

    The Nardò Ring is a striking visual feature from space, and astronauts have photographed it several times. The Ring is a race car test track in Italy. This image was acquired by NASA Terra satellite on August 17. 2007.

  11. Particle–hole ring diagrams for fermions in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, N., E-mail: nkaiser@ph.tum.de

    2014-11-15

    The set of particle–hole ring diagrams for a many-fermion system in two dimensions is studied. The complex-valued polarization function is derived in detail and shown to be expressible in terms of square-root functions. For a contact-interaction the perturbative contributions to the energy per particle Ē(k{sub f}) are calculated in a closed analytical form from third up to twelfth order. The resummation of the particle–hole ring diagrams to all orders is studied and a pronounced dependence on the dimensionless coupling parameter α is found. There is a substantial difference between the complete ring-sum with all exchange-type diagrams included and the standardmore » resummation of the leading n-ring diagrams only. The spin factor S{sub n}(g) associated to the nth order ring diagrams is derived for arbitrary spin-degeneracy g.« less

  12. Memory characteristics of ring-shaped ceramic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Takeoka, A.; Hasunuma, M.; Sakaiya, S.

    1989-03-01

    For the practical application of ceramic superconductors, the authors investigated the residual magnetic field characteristics of ring-shaped ceramic superconductors in a Y-Ba-Cu-O system with high Tc. The residual magnetic field of a ring with asymmetric current paths, supplied by external currents, appeared when one of the branch currents was above the critical current. The residual magnetic field saturated when both brach currents exceeded the critical current of the ring and showed hysteresis-like characteristics. The saturated magnetic field is subject to the critical current of the ring. A superconducting ring with asymmetric current paths suggests a simple and quite new persistent-currentmore » type memory device.« less

  13. An evolving view of Saturn’s dynamic rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuzzi, J.N.; Burns, J.A.; Charnoz, S.; Clark, Roger N.; Colwell, J.E.; Dones, L.; Esposito, L.W.; Filacchione, G.; French, R.G.; Hedman, M.M.; Kempf, S.; Marouf, E.A.; Murray, C.D.; Nicholson, P.D.; Porco, C.C.; Schmidt, J.; Showalter, M.R.; Spilker, L.J.; Spitale, J.; Srama, R.; Srem evi, M.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Weiss, J.

    2010-01-01

    We review our understanding of Saturn’s rings after nearly 6 years of observations by the Cassini spacecraft. Saturn’s rings are composed mostly of water ice but also contain an undetermined reddish contaminant. The rings exhibit a range of structure across many spatial scales; some of this involves the interplay of the fluid nature and the self-gravity of innumerable orbiting centimeter- to meter-sized particles, and the effects of several peripheral and embedded moonlets, but much remains unexplained. A few aspects of ring structure change on time scales as short as days. It remains unclear whether the vigorous evolutionary processes to which the rings are subject imply a much younger age than that of the solar system. Processes on view at Saturn have parallels in circumstellar disks.

  14. Postcard from the Ring Plane

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-05-07

    On March 13, 2006 Cassini's narrow-angle camera captured this look at Saturn and its rings, seen here nearly edge on. The frame also features Mimas and tiny Janus (above the rings), and Tethys (below the rings). "Above" and "below" the rings is mostly a matter of perspective here. All three moons and the rings orbit Saturn in roughly the same plane. The night side of Mimas is gently illuminated by "Saturnshine," sunlight reflected from the planet's cloud tops. Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this natural color view, taken at a distance of approximately 1.7 million miles (2.7 million kilometers) from Saturn. The Cassini spacecraft ended its mission on Sept. 15, 2017. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18323

  15. Persistent pattern speeds in Saturn's D ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancia, Robert; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-05-01

    Saturn's D ring is the innermost part of Saturn's ring system. Due to its close proximity to the planet, it is sensitive to perturbing forces caused by asymmetries in Saturn's interior and magnetic field. Using high-phase-angle images obtained by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) over the course of the entire Cassini mission we investigate the region between 71000-73000 km from Saturn's center. Previous studies have shown that this region contains azimuthal brightness variations generated by periodic perturbing forces with frequencies close to Saturn's rotation rate (nearly twice the local orbital period). These structures are not due to a single resonance, but instead involve a complex network of patterns drifting past one another over time. Some of these could be caused by asymmetries in Saturn's magnetosphere, which have rotation rates that have been observed to change over the course of the Cassini mission. However, some patterns may be generated by perturbations from long-lived gravitational anomalies inside the planet that move at speeds comparable to Saturn's winds. By comparing observations taken over several years we can distinguish the patterns caused by each phenomenon. We identify multiple structures with nearly constant pattern speeds that would appear to be due to persistent structures inside the planet. Strangely, the rotation rates required to produce these D ring structures are different from those responsible for generating waves in the C ring (where the local orbital rate is roughly 3/2 Saturn's rotation rate).

  16. Orbital evolution of Neptune's ring arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliatti-Winter, Silvia; Madeira, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    Voyager 2 spacecraft sent several images of the Neptune's ring system in 1989. These images show a set of arcs (Courage, Liberté, Egalité and Fraternité), previously detected by stellar occultation in 1984, embedded in the tenuous Adams ring. In order to maintain the confinement of the arcs against the spreading, Renner et al. (2015) proposeda model which the Adams ring has a collection of small coorbital satellites placed in specific positions. These coorbitals would be responsible for maintaining the arcs particles. In this work we analyse the orbital evolution of the particles coorbital to the satellites by adding the effects of the solar radiation force. Our numerical results show that due to this dissipative effect the smallest particles, 1μm in size, leave the arc in less than 10years. Larger particles leave the arc, but can stay confined between the coorbital satellites. De Pater et al. (2005) suggested that a small moonlet embedded in the arc Fraternité can be the source of the arcs and even theAdams ring through an erosion mechanism. Our preliminary results showed that a moonlet up to 200m in radius can stay in the arc without causing any significant variation in the eccentricities of the coorbitals and the particles.

  17. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peng; Han, Xiaole; Xia, Dong; Liu, Taolin; Lang, Hao

    2018-01-13

    Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments.

  18. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaole; Xia, Dong; Liu, Taolin; Lang, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments. PMID:29342858

  19. Coherence resonance and stochastic resonance in directionally coupled rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Johannes Peter; Benner, Hartmut; Florio, Brendan James; Stemler, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    In coupled systems, symmetry plays an important role for the collective dynamics. We investigate the dynamical response to noise with and without weak periodic modulation for two classes of ring systems. Each ring system consists of unidirectionally coupled bistable elements but in one class, the number of elements is even while in the other class the number is odd. Consequently, the rings without forcing show at a certain coupling strength, either ordering (similar to anti-ferromagnetic chains) or auto-oscillations. Analysing the bifurcations and fixed points of the two ring classes enables us to explain the dynamical response measured to noise and weak modulation. Moreover, by analysing a simplified model, we demonstrate that the response is universal for systems having a directional component in their stochastic dynamics in phase space around the origin.

  20. PLANETARY CONSTRUCTION ZONES IN OCCULTATION: DISCOVERY OF AN EXTRASOLAR RING SYSTEM TRANSITING A YOUNG SUN-LIKE STAR AND FUTURE PROSPECTS FOR DETECTING ECLIPSES BY CIRCUMSECONDARY AND CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Mamajek, Eric E.; Quillen, Alice C.; Pecaut, Mark J.

    2012-03-15

    .33-200 yr, the estimated total ring mass is {approx}8-0.4 M{sub Moon} (if the rings have optical opacity similar to Saturn's rings), and the edge of the outermost detected ring has orbital radius {approx}0.4-0.09 AU. In the new era of time-domain astronomy opened by surveys like SuperWASP, ASAS, etc., and soon to be revolutionized by Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, discovering and characterizing eclipses by circumplanetary and circumsecondary disks will provide us with observational constraints on the conditions that spawn satellite systems around gas giant planets and planetary systems around stars.« less