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Sample records for abcg2 multidrug transporter

  1. The multidrug transporter ABCG2: still more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Horsey, Aaron J; Cox, Megan H; Sarwat, Sunehera; Kerr, Ian D

    2016-06-15

    ABCG2 is one of at least three human ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters which can facilitate the export from cells of a wide range of chemically unrelated drug molecules. This capacity for multidrug transport is not only a confounding factor in chemotherapy, but is also one of the more perplexing phenomena in transporter biochemistry. Since its discovery in the last decade of the 20th century much has been revealed about ABCG2's localization, physiological function and its broad substrate range. There have also been many investigations of its structure and molecular mechanism. In this mini review article we take a Rumsfeldian approach to ABCG2 and essentially ask what we do know about this transporter, and what we will need to know about this transporter if we wish to use modulation of ABCG2 activity as a therapeutic approach. PMID:27284047

  2. The multidrug transporter ABCG2: still more questions than answers

    PubMed Central

    Horsey, Aaron J.; Cox, Megan H.; Sarwat, Sunehera; Kerr, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    ABCG2 is one of at least three human ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters which can facilitate the export from cells of a wide range of chemically unrelated drug molecules. This capacity for multidrug transport is not only a confounding factor in chemotherapy, but is also one of the more perplexing phenomena in transporter biochemistry. Since its discovery in the last decade of the 20th century much has been revealed about ABCG2’s localization, physiological function and its broad substrate range. There have also been many investigations of its structure and molecular mechanism. In this mini review article we take a Rumsfeldian approach to ABCG2 and essentially ask what we do know about this transporter, and what we will need to know about this transporter if we wish to use modulation of ABCG2 activity as a therapeutic approach. PMID:27284047

  3. Telatinib reverses chemotherapeutic multidrug resistance mediated by ABCG2 efflux transporter in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sodani, Kamlesh; Patel, Atish; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Singh, Satyakam; Yang, Dong-Hua; Kathawala, Rishil J; Kumar, Priyank; Talele, Tanaji T; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon where cancer cells become simultaneously resistant to anticancer drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action. MDR has been shown to be associated with overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Here, we report that telatinib, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhances the anticancer activity of ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs by inhibiting ABCG2 efflux transporter activity. Co-incubation of ABCG2-overexpressing drug resistant cell lines with telatinib and ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs significantly reduced cellular viability, whereas telatinib alone did not significantly affect drug sensitive and drug resistant cell lines. Telatinib at 1 μM did not significantly alter the expression of ABCG2 in ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. Telatinib at 1 μM significantly enhanced the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-mitoxantrone (MX) in ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. In addition, telatinib at 1 μM significantly reduced the rate of [3H]-MX efflux from ABCG2-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, telatinib significantly inhibited ABCG2-mediated transport of [3H]-E217βG in ABCG2 overexpressing membrane vesicles. Telatinib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCG2 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that telatinib might be a substrate of ABCG2. Binding interactions of telatinib were found to be in transmembrane region of homology modeled human ABCG2. In addition, telatinib (15 mg/kg) with doxorubicin (1.8 mg/kg) significantly decreased the growth rate and tumor size of ABCG2 overexpressing tumors in a xenograft nude mouse model. These results, provided that they can be translated to humans, suggesting that telatinib, in combination with specific ABCG2 substrate drugs may be useful in treating tumors that overexpress ABCG2. PMID:24565910

  4. Flavonoids from Eight Tropical Plant Species That Inhibit the Multidrug Resistance Transporter ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Versiani, Muhammad Ali; Diyabalanage, Thushara; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Henrich, Curtis J.; Bates, Susan E.; McMahon, James B.; Gustafson, Kirk R.

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCG2, a membrane-bound multidrug transporter, can make tumor cells resistant to treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic agents. A high-throughput screening effort with the NCI repository of natural product extracts revealed that eight tropical plant extracts significantly inhibited the function of ABCG2. This activity was tracked throughout the extract fractionation process to a series of ABCG2 inhibitory flavonoids (1–13). Their structures were identified by a combination of NMR, mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism studies, and this resulted in the elucidation of (2S)-5,7,3′-trihydroxy-4′-methoxy-8-(3″-methylbut-2″-enyl)-flavonone (1), (2S)-5,7,3′,5′-tetrahydroxy-8-[3″,8″ -dimethylocta-2″(E),7″-dienyl]flavonone (3), and 5,7,3′-trihydroxy-3,5′-dimethoxy-2′-(3′-methylbut-2-enyl)flavone (12) as new compounds. PMID:21275386

  5. Bafetinib (INNO-406) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Patel, Bhargav A; Talele, Tanaji T; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters are involved in the efflux of xenobiotic compounds and are responsible for decreasing drug accumulation in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. Discovered by structure-based virtual screening algorithms, bafetinib, a Bcr-Abl/Lyn tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to have inhibitory effects on both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR in this in-vitro investigation. Bafetinib significantly sensitized ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing MDR cells to their anticancer substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of anticancer drugs, particularly doxorubicin and [(3)H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells; mitoxantrone and [(3)H]-mitoxantrone in ABCG2 overexpressing cells, respectively. Bafetinib stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activities while inhibited ABCG2 ATPase activities. There were no significant changes in the expression level or the subcellular distribution of ABCB1 and ABCG2 in the cells exposed to 3 μM of bafetinib. Overall, our study indicated that bafetinib reversed ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR by blocking the drug efflux function of these transporters. These findings might be useful in developing combination therapy for MDR cancer treatment. PMID:27157787

  6. Bafetinib (INNO-406) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Patel, Bhargav A.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters are involved in the efflux of xenobiotic compounds and are responsible for decreasing drug accumulation in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. Discovered by structure-based virtual screening algorithms, bafetinib, a Bcr-Abl/Lyn tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to have inhibitory effects on both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR in this in-vitro investigation. Bafetinib significantly sensitized ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing MDR cells to their anticancer substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of anticancer drugs, particularly doxorubicin and [3H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells; mitoxantrone and [3H]-mitoxantrone in ABCG2 overexpressing cells, respectively. Bafetinib stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activities while inhibited ABCG2 ATPase activities. There were no significant changes in the expression level or the subcellular distribution of ABCB1 and ABCG2 in the cells exposed to 3 μM of bafetinib. Overall, our study indicated that bafetinib reversed ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR by blocking the drug efflux function of these transporters. These findings might be useful in developing combination therapy for MDR cancer treatment. PMID:27157787

  7. The naphthoquinones, vitamin K3 and its structural analog plumbagin, are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ABC drug transporter ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Wu, Chung-Pu; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin K3 (Menadione; 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a structural precursor of vitamins K1 and K2 which are essential for blood clotting. The naturally occurring structural analog of this vitamin, plumbagin (5-hydroxy-menadione), is known to modulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, and radioresistance. We, here, report that both vitamin K3 and plumbagin are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter, ABCG2. Vitamin K3 and plumbagin specifically inhibited the ABCG2-mediated efflux of mitoxantrone, but did not have any effect on the ABCB1-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123. This inhibition of ABCG2 function was due to their interaction at the substrate-binding site(s). They inhibited the binding of [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP), a substrate of ABCG2, to this transporter in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 7.3 and 22.6 μM, respectively, but had no effect on the binding of this photoaffinity analog to ABCB1. Both compounds stimulated ABCG2-mediated ATP hydrolysis and also inhibited the mitoxantrone-stimulated ATPase activity of this transporter, but did not have any significant effect on the ATPase activity of ABCB1. In a cytotoxicity assay, ABCG2-expressing HEK cells were 2.8- and 2.3-fold resistant to plumbagin and vitamin K3, respectively, compared to the control cells, suggesting that they are substrates of this transporter. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time that vitamin K3 is a substrate of the ABCG2 transporter. Thus, ABCG2 may have a role in the regulation of vitamin K3 levels in the body. In addition, vitamin K3 and its structural derivative, plumbagin, could potentially be used to modulate ABCG2 function. PMID:18065489

  8. A combination of curcumin with either gramicidin or ouabain selectively kills cells that express the multidrug resistance-linked ABCG2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Rao, Divya K; Liu, Haiyan; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Mayer, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces a strategy to kill selectively multidrug-resistant cells that express the ABCG2 transporter (also called breast cancer resistance protein, or BCRP). The approach is based on specific stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by ABCG2 transporters with subtoxic doses of curcumin combined with stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with subtoxic doses of gramicidin A or ouabain. After 72 h of incubation with the drug combinations, the resulting overconsumption of ATP by both pathways inhibits the efflux activity of ABCG2 transporters, leads to depletion of intracellular ATP levels below the viability threshold, and kills resistant cells selectively over cells that lack ABCG2 transporters. This strategy, which was also tested on a clinically relevant human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7/FLV1), exploits the overexpression of ABCG2 transporters and induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death selectively in resistant cells. This work thus introduces a novel strategy to exploit collateral sensitivity (CS) with a combination of two clinically used compounds that individually do not exert CS. Collectively, this work expands the current knowledge on ABCG2-mediated CS and provides a potential strategy for discovery of CS drugs against drug-resistant cancer cells. PMID:25253691

  9. Evidence for dual mode of action of a thiosemicarbazone, NSC73306: A potent substrate of the multidrug resistance-linked ABCG2 transporter

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Shukla, Suneet; Calcagno, Anna Maria; Hall, Matthew D.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug resistance due to reduced drug accumulation is a phenomenon predominantly caused by the overexpression of members of the ATP-binding cassette transporters, including ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein), ABCG2 and several ABCC family members (MRPs). We previously reported that a thiosemicarbazone derivative, NSC73306, is cytotoxic to carcinoma cells that overexpress functional P-glycoprotein and it re-sensitizes these cells to chemotherapeutics. In this study, we investigated the effect of NSC73306 on cells overexpressing other ABC drug transporters, including ABCG2, MRP1, MRP4 and MRP5. Our findings demonstrated that NSC73306 is not more toxic to cells that overexpress these transporters compared to their respective parental cells, and these transporters do not confer resistance to NSC73306 either. In spite of this, we observed that NSC73306 is a transport substrate for ABCG2 that can effectively inhibit ABCG2-mediated drug transport and reverse resistance to both mitoxantrone and topotecan in ABCG2-expressing cells. Interactions between NSC73306 and the ABCG2 drug-binding site(s) were confirmed by its stimulatory effect on ATPase activity (140–150 nM concentration required for 50% stimulation) and by inhibition of [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin photolabeling (50% inhibition at 250–400 nM) of the substrate-binding site(s). Overall, NSC73306 appears to be a potent modulator of ABCG2 that does not interact with MRP1, MRP4 or MRP5. Collectively, these data suggest that NSC73306 can potentially be used, due to its dual mode of action, as an effective agent to overcome drug resistance by eliminating P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cells, and by acting as a potent modulator that re-sensitizes ABCG2-expressing cancer cells to chemotherapeutics. PMID:18089722

  10. Human ABCG2: structure, function, and its role in multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Human ABCG2 is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily and is known to contribute to multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer chemotherapy. Among ABC transporters that are known to cause MDR, ABCG2 is particularly interesting for its potential role in protecting cancer stem cells and its complex oligomeric structure. Recent studies have also revealed that the biogenesis of ABCG2 could be modulated by small molecule compounds. These modulators, upon binding to ABCG2, accelerate the endocytosis and trafficking to lysosome for degradation and effectively reduce the half-life of ABCG2. Hence, targeting ABCG2 stability could be a new venue for therapeutic discovery to sensitize drug resistant human cancers. In this report, we review recent progress on understanding the structure, function, biogenesis, as well as physiological and pathophysiological functions of ABCG2. PMID:22509477

  11. ABCG2 inhibition as a therapeutic approach for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hasanabady, Maryam Hosseini; Kalalinia, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCP or MXR)/ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was characterized as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998. ABCG2 physiologically acts as a part of a selfdefence mechanism for the organism; it enhances eliminating of toxic xenobiotic substances and harmful agents in the intestine, as well as through the blood-brain barrier and placenta. ABCG2 recognizes and transports numerous anticancer drugs including conventional chemotherapeutic and new targeted small therapeutic molecules in clinical usage. Development of ABCG2 inhibitors for clinical usage may allow increased penetration of therapeutic agents into sanctuary sites and increases their intestinal absorption. Here we review the mechanisms that modulate MDR mediated by the ABC transporter ABCG2 in normal and cancer cells by different levels including, epigenetic modifications, transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translation and post-translational regulation. Some clinical applications of ABCG2 inhibitors are also explained. PMID:27240991

  12. A role for ABCG2 beyond drug transport: Regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Rui; Jin, Shengkan; Pabon, Kirk; Scotto, Kathleen W

    2016-05-01

    The ABC drug transporters, including ABCG2, are well known for their ability to efflux a wide spectrum of chemotherapeutic agents, thereby conferring a multidrug-resistant phenotype. However, studies over the past several years suggest that the ABC transporters may play additional role(s) in cell survival in the face of stress inducers that are not ABCG2 substrates (i.e., nutrient deprivation, ionizing radiation, rapamycin). The mechanism by which this occurs is largely unknown. In the present study, using several cancer cell lines and their ABCG2-overexpressing sublines, we show that cells overexpressing ABCG2 were more resistant to these stressors. This resistance was associated with an elevated level of autophagy flux, as measured by a higher rate of SQSTM1/p62 degradation and greater accumulation of LC3-II when compared to parental cells. Knockdown of ABCG2 reduced autophagic activity in resistant cells to a level similar to that observed in parental cells, confirming that the enhanced autophagy was ABCG2-dependent. Moreover, using cell viability, apoptosis, and clonogenic assays, we demonstrated that the ABCG2-expressing cells were more resistant to amino acid starvation and radiation-induced cell death. Importantly, knockdown of the critical autophagy factors ATG5 and ATG7 greatly reduced cell survival, verifying that enhanced autophagy was critical for this effect. Taken together, these data indicate that autophagy induced by various stressors is enhanced/accelerated in the presence of ABCG2, resulting in delayed cell death and enhanced cell survival. This defines a new role for this transporter, one with potential clinical significance. PMID:26983466

  13. The ABCG2 efflux transporter from rabbit placenta: Cloning and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Halwachs, Sandra; Kneuer, Carsten; Gohlsch, Katrin; Müller, Marian; Ritz, Vera; Honscha, Walther

    2016-02-01

    In human placenta, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 is highly expressed in syncytiotrophoblast cells and mediates cellular excretion of various drugs and toxins. Hence, physiological ABCG2 activity substantially contributes to the fetoprotective placenta barrier function during gestation. Developmental toxicity studies are often performed in rabbit. However, despite its toxicological relevance, there is no data so far on functional ABCG2 expression in this species. Therefore, we cloned ABCG2 from placenta tissues of chinchilla rabbit. Sequencing showed 84-86% amino acid sequence identity to the orthologues from man, rat and mouse. We transduced the rabbit ABCG2 clone (rbABCG2) in MDCKII cells and stable rbABCG2 gene and protein expression was shown by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The rbABCG2 efflux activity was demonstrated with the Hoechst H33342 assay using the specific ABCG2 inhibitor Ko143. We further tested the effect of established human ABCG2 (hABCG2) drug substrates including the antibiotic danofloxacin or the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine on H33342 accumulation in MDCKII-rbABCG2 or -hABCG2 cells. Human therapeutic plasma concentrations of all tested drugs caused a comparable competitive inhibition of H33342 excretion in both ABCG2 clones. Altogether, we first showed functional expression of the ABCG2 efflux transporter in rabbit placenta. Moreover, our data suggest a similar drug substrate spectrum of the rabbit and the human ABCG2 efflux transporter. PMID:26907376

  14. A functional study on polymorphism of the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2: critical role of arginine-482 in methotrexate transport.

    PubMed Central

    Mitomo, Hideyuki; Kato, Ryo; Ito, Akiko; Kasamatsu, Shiho; Ikegami, Yoji; Kii, Isao; Kudo, Akira; Kobatake, Eiry; Sumino, Yasuhiro; Ishikawa, Toshihisa

    2003-01-01

    Overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 reportedly causes multidrug resistance, whereas altered drug-resistance profiles and substrate specificity are implicated for certain variant forms of ABCG2. At least three variant forms of ABCG2 have been hitherto documented on the basis of their amino acid moieties (i.e., arginine, glycine and threonine) at position 482. In the present study we have generated those ABCG2 variants by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed them in HEK-293 cells. Exogenous expression of the Arg(482), Gly(482), and Thr(482) variant forms of ABCG2 conferred HEK-293 cell resistance toward mitoxantrone 15-, 47- and 54-fold, respectively, as compared with mock-transfected HEK-293 cells. The transport activity of those variants was examined by using plasma-membrane vesicles prepared from ABCG2-overexpressing HEK-293 cells. [Arg(482)]ABCG2 transports [(3)H]methotrexate in an ATP-dependent manner; however, no transport activity was observed with the other variants (Gly(482) and Thr(482)). Transport of methotrexate by [Arg(482)]ABCG2 was significantly inhibited by mitoxantrone, doxorubicin and rhodamine 123, but not by S -octylglutathione. Furthermore, ABCG2 was found to exist in the plasma membrane as a homodimer bound via cysteinyl disulphide bond(s). Treatment with mercaptoethanol decreased its apparent molecular mass from 140 to 70 kDa. Nevertheless, ATP-dependent transport of methotrexate by [Arg(482)]ABCG2 was little affected by such mercaptoethanol treatment. It is concluded that Arg(482) is a critical amino acid moiety in the substrate specificity and transport of ABCG2 for certain drugs, such as methotrexate. PMID:12741957

  15. ABCG2 Transporter Identifies a Population of Clonogenic Human Limbal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Paiva, Cintia S.; Chen, Zhuo; Corrales, Rosa M.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan

    2010-01-01

    ABCG2, a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, has been identified as a molecular determinant for bone marrow stem cells and proposed as a universal marker for stem cells. This study investigates ABCG2 expression and its potential as a marker that identifies human limbal epithelial stem cells. ABCG2 expression was evaluated by immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical staining, laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Cells selected from primary limbal epithelial cultures by flow cytometry with ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or Hoechst 33342 dye staining were evaluated for their gene expression and colony-forming efficiency (CFE). ABCG2 protein was mainly located in the basal cells of limbal epithelia but not in the limbal suprabasal and corneal epithelia. ABCG2 staining was also observed in primary limbal epithelial cultures. Limbal epithelia express higher levels of ABCG2 and ΔNp63 mRNAs than corneal epithelia. Labeling with ABCG2 mAb yielded 2.5%–3.0% positive cells by flow cytometry. The ABCG2-positive cells exhibited greater CFE on a 3T3 fibroblast feeder layer than ABCG2-negative cells. A side population (SP) was detected by the Hoechst 33342 exclusion assay. SP cells displayed stronger expression of ABCG2 and ΔNp63 mRNA and greater CFE than the non-SP cells. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that ABCG2 transporter was exclusively expressed by limbal basal cells and that the ABCG2-positive and SP cells possess enriched stem cell properties, suggesting for the first time that ABCG2 could serve as a marker to identify the putative limbal epithelial stem cells. PMID:15625123

  16. Silencing of ABCG2 by MicroRNA-3163 Inhibits Multidrug Resistance in Retinoblastoma Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ming; Wei, Zhenhua; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the function and regulation mechanism of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) in retinoblastoma cancer stem cells (RCSCs), a long-term culture of RCSCs from WERI-Rb1 cell line was successfully established based on the high expression level of ABCG2 on the surface of RCSCs. To further explore the molecular mechanism of ABCG2 on RCSCs, a microRNA that specifically targets ABCG2 was predicted. Subsequently, miR-3163 was selected and confirmed as the ABCG2-regulating microRNA. Overexpression of miR-3163 led to a significant decrease in ABCG2 expression. Additionally, ABCG2 loss-of-function induced anti-proliferation and apoptosis-promoting functions in RCSCs, and multidrug resistance to cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide was greatly improved in these cells. Our data suggest that miR-3163 has a significant impact on ABCG2 expression and can influence proliferation, apoptosis, and drug resistance in RCSCs. This work may provide new therapeutic targets for retinoblastoma. PMID:27247490

  17. Silencing of ABCG2 by MicroRNA-3163 Inhibits Multidrug Resistance in Retinoblastoma Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhenhua; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the function and regulation mechanism of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) in retinoblastoma cancer stem cells (RCSCs), a long-term culture of RCSCs from WERI-Rb1 cell line was successfully established based on the high expression level of ABCG2 on the surface of RCSCs. To further explore the molecular mechanism of ABCG2 on RCSCs, a microRNA that specifically targets ABCG2 was predicted. Subsequently, miR-3163 was selected and confirmed as the ABCG2-regulating microRNA. Overexpression of miR-3163 led to a significant decrease in ABCG2 expression. Additionally, ABCG2 loss-of-function induced anti-proliferation and apoptosis-promoting functions in RCSCs, and multidrug resistance to cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine, doxorubicin, and etoposide was greatly improved in these cells. Our data suggest that miR-3163 has a significant impact on ABCG2 expression and can influence proliferation, apoptosis, and drug resistance in RCSCs. This work may provide new therapeutic targets for retinoblastoma. PMID:27247490

  18. Identification of residues in ABCG2 affecting protein trafficking and drug transport, using co-evolutionary analysis of ABCG sequences

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Ameena J.; Cox, Megan H.; Jones, Natalie; Goode, Alice J.; Bridge, Katherine S.; Wong, Kelvin; Briggs, Deborah; Kerr, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    ABCG2 is an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter with a physiological role in urate transport in the kidney and is also implicated in multi-drug efflux from a number of organs in the body. The trafficking of the protein and the mechanism by which it recognizes and transports diverse drugs are important areas of research. In the current study, we have made a series of single amino acid mutations in ABCG2 on the basis of sequence analysis. Mutant isoforms were characterized for cell surface expression and function. One mutant (I573A) showed disrupted glycosylation and reduced trafficking kinetics. In contrast with many ABC transporter folding mutations which appear to be ‘rescued’ by chemical chaperones or low temperature incubation, the I573A mutation was not enriched at the cell surface by either treatment, with the majority of the protein being retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Two other mutations (P485A and M549A) showed distinct effects on transport of ABCG2 substrates reinforcing the role of TM helix 3 in drug recognition and transport and indicating the presence of intracellular coupling regions in ABCG2. PMID:26294421

  19. Multidrug resistance proteins: role of P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, and BCRP (ABCG2) in tissue defense

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, Elaine M.; Deeley, Roger G.; Cole, Susan P.C. . E-mail: coles@post.queensu.ca

    2005-05-01

    In tumor cell lines, multidrug resistance is often associated with an ATP-dependent decrease in cellular drug accumulation which is attributed to the overexpression of certain ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins. ABC proteins that confer drug resistance include (but are not limited to) P-glycoprotein (gene symbol ABCB1), the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, gene symbol ABCC1), MRP2 (gene symbol ABCC2), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, gene symbol ABCG2). In addition to their role in drug resistance, there is substantial evidence that these efflux pumps have overlapping functions in tissue defense. Collectively, these proteins are capable of transporting a vast and chemically diverse array of toxicants including bulky lipophilic cationic, anionic, and neutrally charged drugs and toxins as well as conjugated organic anions that encompass dietary and environmental carcinogens, pesticides, metals, metalloids, and lipid peroxidation products. P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, and BCRP/ABCG2 are expressed in tissues important for absorption (e.g., lung and gut) and metabolism and elimination (liver and kidney). In addition, these transporters have an important role in maintaining the barrier function of sanctuary site tissues (e.g., blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebral spinal fluid barrier, blood-testis barrier and the maternal-fetal barrier or placenta). Thus, these ABC transporters are increasingly recognized for their ability to modulate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity of xenobiotics. In this review, the role of these four ABC transporter proteins in protecting tissues from a variety of toxicants is discussed. Species variations in substrate specificity and tissue distribution of these transporters are also addressed since these properties have implications for in vivo models of toxicity used for drug discovery and development.

  20. Characterization of the role of ABCG2 as a bile acid transporter in liver and placenta.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, Alba G; Briz, Oscar; Romero, Marta R; Rosales, Ruben; Monte, Maria J; Vaquero, Javier; Macias, Rocio I R; Cassio, Doris; Marin, Jose J G

    2012-02-01

    ABCG2 is involved in epithelial transport/barrier functions. Here, we have investigated its ability to transport bile acids in liver and placenta. Cholylglycylamido fluorescein (CGamF) was exported by WIF-B9/R cells, which do not express the bile salt export pump (BSEP). Sensitivity to typical inhibitors suggested that CGamF export was mainly mediated by ABCG2. In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells), coexpression of rat Oatp1a1 and human ABCG2 enhanced the uptake and efflux, respectively, of CGamF, cholic acid (CA), glycoCA (GCA), tauroCA, and taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate. The ability of ABCG2 to export these bile acids was confirmed by microinjecting them together with inulin in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing this pump. ABCG2-mediated bile acid transport was inhibited by estradiol 17β-d-glucuronide and fumitremorgin C. Placental barrier for bile acids accounted for <2-fold increase in fetal cholanemia despite >14-fold increased maternal cholanemia induced by obstructive cholestasis in pregnant rats. In rat placenta, the expression of Abcg2, which was much higher than that of Bsep, was not affected by short-term cholestasis. In pregnant rats, fumitremorgin C did not affect uptake/secretion of GCA by the liver but inhibited its fetal-maternal transfer. Compared with wild-type mice, obstructive cholestasis in pregnant Abcg2(-/-) knockout mice induced similar bile acid accumulation in maternal serum but higher accumulation in placenta, fetal serum, and liver. In conclusion, ABCG2 is able to transport bile acids. The importance of this function depends on the relative expression in the same epithelium of other bile acid exporters. Thus, ABCG2 may play a key role in bile acid transport in placenta, as BSEP does in liver. PMID:22096226

  1. Assessment of ABCG2-mediated transport of pesticides across the rabbit placenta barrier using a novel MDCKII in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Halwachs, Sandra; Schäfer, Ingo; Kneuer, Carsten; Seibel, Peter; Honscha, Walther

    2016-08-15

    In humans, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 contributes to the fetoprotective barrier function of the placenta, potentially limiting the toxicity of transporter substrates to the fetus. During testing of chemicals including pesticides, developmental toxicity studies are performed in rabbit. Despite its toxicological relevance, ABCG2-mediated transport of pesticides in rabbit placenta has not been yet elucidated. We therefore generated polarized MDCK II cells expressing the ABCG2 transporter from rabbit placenta (rbABCG2) and evaluated interaction of the efflux transporter with selected insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides. The Hoechst H33342 accumulation assay indicated that 13 widely used pesticidal active substances including azoxystrobin, carbendazim, chlorpyrifos, chlormequat, diflufenican, dimethoate, dimethomorph, dithianon, ioxynil, methiocarb, propamocarb, rimsulfuron and toclofos-methyl may be rbABCG2 inhibitors and/or substrates. No such evidence was obtained for chlorpyrifos-methyl, epoxiconazole, glyphosate, imazalil and thiacloprid. Moreover, chlorpyrifos (CPF), dimethomorph, tolclofos-methyl and rimsulfuron showed concentration-dependent inhibition of H33342 excretion in rbABCG2-transduced MDCKII cells. To further evaluate the role of rbABCG2 in pesticide transport across the placenta barrier, we generated polarized MDCKII-rbABCG2 monolayers. Confocal microscopy confirmed correct localization of rbABCG2 protein in the apical plasma membrane. In transepithelial flux studies, we showed the time-dependent preferential basolateral to apical (B>A) directed transport of [(14)C] CPF across polarized MDCKII-rbABCG2 monolayers which was significantly inhibited by the ABCG2 inhibitor fumitremorgin C (FTC). Using this novel in vitro cell culture model, we altogether showed functional secretory activity of the ABCG2 transporter from rabbit placenta and identified several pesticides like the insecticide CPF as potential rbABCG2 substrates

  2. Doxorubicin transport by RALBP1 and ABCG2 in lung and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sharad S; Singhal, Jyotsana; Nair, Maya P; Lacko, A G; Awasthi, Yogesh C; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2007-03-01

    RALBP1 (RLIP76) is the major transporter of doxorubicin (DOX) in lung cancer cells, and that the difference in sensitivity of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells to DOX is due to differential phosphorylation by PKCalpha. Our recent studies have suggested that RALBP1 present in MCF-7 breast cancer cells has significantly lower specific activity for transport of DOX than wild-type recombinant protein, and its level of expression is significantly lower than that in lung cancer cells. In the present study, we have explored whether or not this is a generalized phenomenon for breast cancer, and have compared the relative contributions of RALBP1 and the ABC-family transporter, ABCG2 to total DOX transport activities in two SCLC (H1417 and H1618), two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (H358 and H520), and three breast cancer (T-47D, MDA-MB231, and MCF-7) cell lines. Results of these studies show lower protein expression and specific activity of RALBP1 in all three breast cancer cell lines as compared with lung cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RALBP1 contributes only a minor fraction of DOX transport activity in breast cancer cell lines, suggesting that greater DOX sensitivity of breast cancer may be related to lower RALBP1 transporter activity and that the transport mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance of lung and breast cancer are distinct. PMID:17273774

  3. ABCG2 Transporter Expression Impacts Group 3 Medulloblastoma Response to Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Morfouace, Marie; Cheepala, Satish; Jackson, Sadhana; Fukuda, Yu; Patel, Yogesh T; Fatima, Soghra; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shelat, Anang A; Stewart, Clinton F; Sorrentino, Brian P; Schuetz, John D; Roussel, Martine F

    2015-09-15

    While a small number of plasma membrane ABC transporters can export chemotherapeutic drugs and confer drug resistance, it is unknown whether these transporters are expressed or functional in less therapeutically tractable cancers such as Group 3 (G3) medulloblastoma. Herein we show that among this class of drug transporters, only ABCG2 was expressed at highly increased levels in human G3 medulloblastoma and a mouse model of this disease. In the mouse model, Abcg2 protein was expressed at the plasma membrane where it functioned as expected on the basis of export of prototypical substrates. By screening ABC substrates against mouse G3 medulloblastoma tumorspheres in vitro, we found that Abcg2 inhibition could potentiate responses to the clinically used drug topotecan, producing a more than 9-fold suppression of cell proliferation. Extended studies in vivo in this model confirmed that Abcg2 inhibition was sufficient to enhance antiproliferative responses to topotecan, producing a significant survival advantage compared with subjects treated with topotecan alone. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for blockade of ABCG2 transporter activity as a strategy to empower chemotherapeutic responses in G3 medulloblastoma. PMID:26199091

  4. Pharmacogenomics of the human ABC transporter ABCG2: from functional evaluation to drug molecular design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Tamura, Ai; Saito, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    In the post-genome-sequencing era, emerging genomic technologies are shifting the paradigm for drug discovery and development. Nevertheless, drug discovery and development still remain high-risk and high-stakes ventures with long and costly timelines. Indeed, the attrition of drug candidates in preclinical and development stages is a major problem in drug design. For at least 30% of the candidates, this attrition is due to poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Thus, pharmaceutical companies have begun to seriously re-evaluate their current strategies of drug discovery and development. In that light, we propose that a transport mechanism-based design might help to create new, pharmacokinetically advantageous drugs, and as such should be considered an important component of drug design strategy. Performing enzyme- and/or cell-based drug transporter, interaction tests may greatly facilitate drug development and allow the prediction of drug-drug interactions. We recently developed methods for high-speed functional screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to study the substrate specificity of ABC transporters and to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms on their function. These methods would provide a practical tool to screen synthetic and natural compounds, and these data can be applied to the molecular design of new drugs. In this review article, we present an overview on the genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and new camptothecin analogues that can circumvent AGCG2-associated multidrug resistance of cancer.

  5. ABCG2 Transports and Transfers Heme to Albumin through Its Large Extracellular Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Desuzinges-Mandon, Elodie; Arnaud, Ophélie; Martinez, Lorena; Huché, Frédéric; Di Pietro, Attilio; Falson, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    ABCG2 is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter preferentially expressed by immature human hematopoietic progenitors. Due to its role in drug resistance, its expression has been correlated with a protection role against protoporhyrin IX (PPIX) accumulation in stem cells under hypoxic conditions. We show here that zinc mesoporphyrin, a validated fluorescent heme analog, is transported by ABCG2. We also show that the ABCG2 large extracellular loop ECL3 constitutes a porphyrin-binding domain, which strongly interacts with heme, hemin, PPIX, ZnPPIX, CoPPIX, and much less efficiently with pheophorbide a, but not with vitamin B12. Kd values are in the range 0.5–3.5 μm, with heme displaying the highest affinity. Nonporphyrin substrates of ABCG2, such as mitoxantrone, doxo/daunorubicin, and riboflavin, do not bind to ECL3. Single-point mutations H583A and C603A inside ECL3 prevent the binding of hemin but hardly affect that of iron-free PPIX. The extracellular location of ECL3 downstream from the transport sites suggests that, after membrane translocation, hemin is transferred to ECL3, which is strategically positioned to release the bound porphyrin to extracellular partners. We show here that human serum albumin could be one of these possible partners as it removes hemin bound to ECL3 and interacts with ABCG2, with a Kd of about 3 μm. PMID:20705604

  6. The nature of amino acid 482 of human ABCG2 affects substrate transport and ATP hydrolysis but not substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Ejendal, Karin F.K.; Diop, Ndeye Khady; Schweiger, Linda C.; Hrycyna, Christine A.

    2006-01-01

    Several members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, including P-glycoprotein and the half-transporter ABCG2, can confer multidrug resistance to cancer cells in culture by functioning as ATP-dependent efflux pumps. ABCG2 variants harboring a mutation at arginine 482 have been cloned from several drug-resistant cell lines, and these variants differ in their substrate transport phenotype. In this study, we changed the wild-type arginine 482 in human ABCG2 to each one of the 19 other standard amino acids and expressed each one transiently in HeLa cells. Using the 5D3 antibody that recognizes a cell surface epitope of ABCG2, we observed that all the mutants were expressed at the cell surface. However, the mutant ABCG2 proteins differed markedly in transport activity. All of the variants were capable of transporting one or more of the substrates used in this study, with the exception of the R482K mutant, which is completely devoid of transport ability. Six of the mutants (R482G, R482H, R482K, R482P, R482T, and R482Y) and the wild-type protein (R482wt) were selected for studies of basal and stimulated ATPase activity and photoaffinity labeling with the substrate analog [125I]iodoarylazidoprazosin. Whereas these seven ABCG2 variants differed markedly in ATPase activity, all were able to specifically bind the substrate analog [125I]iodoarylazidoprazosin. These data suggest that residue 482 plays an important role in substrate transport and ATP turnover, but that the nature of this amino acid may not be important for substrate recognition and binding. PMID:16815914

  7. Role of ABCB1, ABCG2, ABCC2 and ABCC5 transporters in placental passage of zidovudine.

    PubMed

    Neumanova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is one of the most frequently used antiretroviral drugs in prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV. However, safety concerns on AZT use in pregnancy still persist as severe side effects are associated with AZT exposure in children. In our study we aimed to contribute to current knowledge on AZT transplacental transport and to evaluate potential involvement of the main human drug efflux ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, p-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 and 5 (ABCC2 and ABCC5) in the disposition of AZT between mother and fetus. In order to elucidate this issue we investigated the effect of selected ABC transporters on AZT transepithelial transport across MDCKII cell monolayers. In addition we used the in situ method of dually perfused rat term placenta to further study the role of ABC transporters in AZT transplacental transport. In vitro studies revealed significant effect of ABCB1 and ABCG2 on AZT transport which was subsequently confirmed also on organ level. Lamivudine, an antiretroviral agent commonly co-administered with AZT, did not affect ABC transporter-mediated AZT transfer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26390406

  8. Vatalanib sensitizes ABCB1 and ABCG2-overexpressing multidrug resistant colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Li-wu

    2015-09-01

    Cancer microenvironment is characterized by significantly lower oxygen concentration. This hypoxic condition is known to reduce drug responsiveness to cancer chemotherapy via multiple mechanisms, among which the upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters confers resistance to a wide variety of structurally unrelated anticancer drugs. Vatalanib (PTK787/ZK22584) is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor for all isoforms of VEGFR, PDGFR and c-Kit, which exhibit potent anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the potentiation effect of vatalanib on the anticancer activity of conventional cytotoxic drugs in colon cancer cell lines under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Mechanistically, vatalanib was found to inhibit ABCG2 and ABCB1 efflux activity, presumably by acting as a competitive inhibitor and interfering with their ATPase activity. Under hypoxic growth condition, ABCG2 and ABCB1-overexpressing cells sorted out by FACS technique as side population (SP) were found to be significantly more responsive to SN-38 (ABCG2 and ABCB1 substrate anticancer drug) in the presence of vatalanib. The anchorage independent soft agar colony formation capacity of the SP cells was remarkably reduced upon treatment with a combination of SN-38 and vatalanib, compared to SN-38 alone. However, vatalanib, at concentrations that produced the circumvention of the transporters-mediated resistance, did not appreciably alter ABCG2/ABCB1 mRNA or protein expression levels or the phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Our study thus advocates the further investigation of vatalanib for use in combination chemotherapy to eradicate drug-resistant cancer cells under hypoxia. PMID:26206183

  9. Enhanced therapeutic effect of Adriamycin on multidrug resistant breast cancer by the ABCG2-siRNA loaded polymeric nanoparticles assisted with ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yanwei; Sun, Ying; Li, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyu; Xu, Yuanyuan; Duan, Yourong; Du, Lianfang

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of the breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) confers resistance to Adriamycin (ADR) in breast cancer. The silencing of ABCG2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) could be a promising approach to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. To deliver ABCG2-siRNA effectively into breast cancer cells, we used mPEG-PLGA-PLL (PEAL) nanoparticles (NPs) with ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD). PEAL NPs were prepared with an emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The NPs size was about 131.5 ± 6.5 nm. The siRNA stability in serum was enhanced. The intracellular ADR concentration increased after the introduction of siRNA-loaded NPs. After intravenous injection of PEAL NPs in tumor-bearing mice, the ABCG2-siRNA-loaded NPs with UTMD efficiently silenced the ABCG2 gene and enhanced the ADR susceptibility of MCF-7/ADR (ADR resistant human breast cancer cells). The siRNA-loaded NPs with UTMD + ADR showed better tumor inhibition effect and good safety in vivo. These results indicate that ADR-chemotherapy in combination with ABCG2-siRNA is an attractive strategy to treat breast cancer. PMID:26575421

  10. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2): its role in multidrug resistance and regulation of its gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Takeo; Ross, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)/ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter identified as a molecular cause of multidrug resistance (MDR) in diverse cancer cells. BCRP physiologically functions as a part of a self-defense mechanism for the organism; it enhances elimination of toxic xenobiotic substances and harmful agents in the gut and biliary tract, as well as through the blood-brain, placental, and possibly blood-testis barriers. BCRP recognizes and transports numerous anticancer drugs including conventional chemotherapeutic and targeted small therapeutic molecules relatively new in clinical use. Thus, BCRP expression in cancer cells directly causes MDR by active efflux of anticancer drugs. Because BCRP is also known to be a stem cell marker, its expression in cancer cells could be a manifestation of metabolic and signaling pathways that confer multiple mechanisms of drug resistance, self-renewal (sternness), and invasiveness (aggressiveness), and thereby impart a poor prognosis. Therefore, blocking BCRP-mediated active efflux may provide a therapeutic benefit for cancers. Delineating the precise molecular mechanisms for BCRP gene expression may lead to identification of a novel molecular target to modulate BCRP-mediated MDR. Current evidence suggests that BCRP gene transcription is regulated by a number of trans-acting elements including hypoxia inducible factor 1α, estrogen receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor. Furthermore, alternative promoter usage, demethylation of the BCRP promoter, and histone modification are likely associated with drug-induced BCRP overexpression in cancer cells. Finally, PI3K/AKT signaling may play a critical role in modulating BCRP function under a variety of conditions. These biological events seem involved in a complicated manner. Untangling the events would be an essential first step to developing a method to modulate BCRP function to aid patients with

  11. ABCG2: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Robert W.; To, Kenneth K. K.; Polgar, Orsolya; Dohse, Marius; Fetsch, Patricia; Dean, Michael; Bates, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    ABCG2, or Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP), is an ABC transporter that has been the subject of intense study since its discovery a decade ago. With high normal tissue expression in the brain endothelium, gastrointestinal tract, and placenta, ABCG2 is believed to be important in protection from xenobiotics, regulating oral bioavailability, forming part of the blood-brain barrier, the blood-testis barrier, and the maternal-fetal barrier. Notably, ABCG2 is often expressed in stem cell populations, where it likely plays a role in xenobiotic protection. However, clues to its epigenetic regulation in various cell populations are only beginning to emerge. While ABCG2 overexpression has been demonstrated in cancer cells after in vitro drug treatment, endogenous ABCG2 expression in certain cancers is likely a reflection of the differentiated phenotype of the cell of origin and likely contributes to intrinsic drug resistance. Notably, research into the transporter’s role in cancer drug resistance and its development as a therapeutic target in cancer has lagged. Substrates and inhibitors of the transporter have been described, among them chemotherapy drugs, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, antivirals, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, carcinogens, and flavonoids. This broad range of substrates complements the efficiency of ABCG2 as a transporter in laboratory studies and suggests that, while there are redundant mechanisms of xenobiotic protection, the protein is important in normal physiology. Indeed, emerging studies in pharmacology and toxicology assessing polymorphic variants in man, in combination with murine knockout models have confirmed its dynamic role. Work in pharmacology may eventually lead us to a greater understanding of the physiologic role of ABCG2. PMID:19135109

  12. Role of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in drug transport--an update.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qingcheng; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2015-01-01

    The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, gene symbol ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporter. It was so named because it was initially cloned from a multidrug-resistant breast cancer cell line where it was found to confer resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as mitoxantrone and topotecan. Since its discovery in 1998, the substrates of BCRP have been rapidly expanding to include not only therapeutic agents but also physiological substances such as estrone-3-sulfate, 17β-estradiol 17-(β-D-glucuronide) and uric acid. Likewise, at least hundreds of BCRP inhibitors have been identified. Among normal human tissues, BCRP is highly expressed on the apical membranes of the placental syncytiotrophoblasts, the intestinal epithelium, the liver hepatocytes, the endothelial cells of brain microvessels, and the renal proximal tubular cells, contributing to the absorption, distribution, and elimination of drugs and endogenous compounds as well as tissue protection against xenobiotic exposure. As a result, BCRP has now been recognized by the FDA to be one of the key drug transporters involved in clinically relevant drug disposition. We published a highly-accessed review article on BCRP in 2005, and much progress has been made since then. In this review, we provide an update of current knowledge on basic biochemistry and pharmacological functions of BCRP as well as its relevance to drug resistance and drug disposition. PMID:25236865

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Is Determinant for ABCB1 and ABCG2 Drug-Efflux Transporters Function

    PubMed Central

    Atisha-Fregoso, Yemil; Lima, Guadalupe; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Baños-Peláez, Miguel; Fragoso-Loyo, Hilda; Jakez-Ocampo, Juan; Contreras-Yáñez, Irazú; Llorente, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare drug efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with active disease and in remission. Methods Twenty two active RA patients (DAS28 ≥3.2) and 22 patients in remission (DAS28<2.6) were selected from an early RA clinic. All patients were evaluated at study inclusion and six months later. ABCB1 and ABCG2 functional activity was measured in peripheral lymphocytes by flow cytometry. The percentage of cells able to extrude substrates for ABCB1 and ABCG2 was recorded. Results Active patients had higher ABCB1 and ABCG2 activity compared with patients in remission (median [interquartile range]): 3.9% (1.4–22.2) vs (1.3% (0.6–3.2), p = 0.003 and 3.9% (1.1–13.3) vs 0.9% (0.5–1.9) p = 0.006 respectively. Both transporters correlated with disease activity assessed by DAS28, rho = 0.45, p = 0.002 and rho = 0.47, p = 0.001 respectively. Correlation was observed between the time from the beginning of treatment and transporter activity: rho = 0.34, p = 0.025 for ABCB1 and rho = 0.35, p = 0.018 for ABCG2. The linear regression model showed that DAS28 and the time from the onset of treatment are predictors of ABCB1 and ABCG2 functional activity, even after adjustment for treatment. After six months we calculated the correlation between change in DAS28 and change in the functional activity in both transporters and found a moderate and significant correlation for ABCG2 (rho = 0.28, p = 0.04) and a non-significant correlation for ABCB1 (rho = 0.22, p = 0.11). Conclusions Patients with active RA have an increased function of ABCB1 and ABCG2, and disease activity is the main determinant of this phenomena. PMID:27442114

  14. Overexpression of lncRNA NEAT1 mitigates multidrug resistance by inhibiting ABCG2 in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Caihua; Zhang, Jianying; Wang, Qingyan; Ren, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is a heterogeneous clonal disorder in which early hematopoietic cells fail to differentiate and do not undergo programmed cell death or apoptosis. Less than one-third of adult patients with leukemia are managed using current therapies due to the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR), emphasizing the need for newer and more robust approaches. Recent reports have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) contribute to selective gene expression and, hence, could be manipulated effectively to halt the progression of cancer. However, little is known regarding the role of lncRNA in leukemia. Nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1) is a nuclear-restricted lncRNA involved in the pathogenesis of certain types of cancer. Deregulated expression of NEAT1 has been reported in a number of human malignancies, including leukemia and other solid tumors. The present study aimed to characterize the role of NEAT1 in the regulation of MDR in leukemia. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was demonstrated that NEAT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels were significantly downregulated in leukemia patient samples compared with those from healthy donors. Furthermore, NEAT1 mRNA expression was repressed in a number of leukemia cell lines, including K562, THP-1, HL-60 and Jurkat cells, compared with peripheral white blood control cells, consistent with the expression observed in patients with leukemia. In addition, the transfection of a NEAT1 overexpression plasmid into K562 and THP-1 leukemia cell lines alleviated MDR induced by cytotoxic agents, such as Alisertib and Bortezomib, through inhibition of ATP-binding cassette G2. Although more robust studies are warranted, the current findings provide the basis for the use of NEAT1 as a novel promising target in the treatment of leukemia. PMID:27446393

  15. The emerging pharmacotherapeutic significance of the breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2)

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, L J A; Velamakanni, S; van Veen, H W

    2007-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (also termed ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette transporter, which mediates the extrusion of toxic compounds from the cell, and which was originally identified in relation to the development of multidrug resistance of cancer cells. ABCG2 interacts with a range of substrates including clinical drugs but also substances such as sterols, porphyrins and a variety of dietary compounds. Physiological functions of ABCG2 at both cellular and systemic levels are reviewed. For example, ABCG2 expression in erythrocytes may function in porphyrin homeostasis. In addition, ABCG2 expression at apical membranes of cells such as hepatocytes, enterocytes, endothelial and syncytiotrophoblast cells may correlate to protective barrier or secretory functions against environmental or clinically administered substances. ABCG2 also appears influential in the inter-patient variation and generally poor oral bioavailability of certain chemotherapeutic drugs such as topotecan. As this often precludes an oral drug administration strategy, genotypic and environmental factors altering ABCG2 expression and activity are considered. Finally, clinical modulation of ABCG2 activity is discussed. Some of the more recent strategies include co-administered modulating agents, hammerhead ribozymes or antisense oligonucleotides, and with specificity in cell targeting, these may be used to reduce drug resistance and increase drug bioavailability to improve the profile of chemotherapeutic efficacy versus toxicity. While many such strategies remain in relative infancy at present, increased knowledge of modulators of ABCG2 could hold the key to novel approaches in medical treatment. PMID:17375082

  16. Placental passage of olomoucine II, but not purvalanol A, is affected by p-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (ABCCs).

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jakub; Kučera, Radim; Neumanova, Zuzana; Klimes, Jiri; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    1. Purine cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors have recently been recognised as promising candidates for the treatment of various cancers. While pharmacodynamic properties of these compounds are relatively well understood, their pharmacokinetics including possible interactions with placental transport systems have not been characterised to date. 2. In this study, we investigated transplacental passage of olomoucine II and purvalanol A in rat focusing on possible role of p-glycoprotein (ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) and/or multidrug resistance-associated proteins (ABCCs). Employing the in situ method of dually perfused rat term placenta, we demonstrate transplacental passage of both olomoucine II and purvalanol A against the concentration gradient in foetus-to-mother direction. Using several ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter inhibitors, we confirm the participation of ABCB1, ABCG2 and ABCCs transporters in the placental passage of olomoucine II, but not purvalanol A. 3. Transplacental passage of olomoucine II and purvalanol A from mother to foetus is significantly reduced by active transporters, restricting thereby foetal exposure and providing protection against harmful effects of these xenobiotics. Importantly, we demonstrate that in spite of their considerable structural similarity, the two molecules utilise distinct placental transport systems. These facts should be kept in mind when introducing these prospective anticancer candidates and/or their analogues into the clinical area. PMID:26364927

  17. The ABCG2 Efflux Transporter in the Mammary Gland Mediates Veterinary Drug Secretion across the Blood-Milk Barrier into Milk of Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Mahnke, Hanna; Ballent, Mariana; Baumann, Sven; Imperiale, Fernanda; von Bergen, Martin; Lanusse, Carlos; Lifschitz, Adrian L; Honscha, Walther; Halwachs, Sandra

    2016-05-01

    In human and mice ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 represents the main route for active drug transport into milk. However, there is no detailed information on the role of ABCG2 in drug secretion and accumulation in milk of dairy animals. We therefore examined ABCG2-mediated drug transport in the bovine mammary gland by parallel pharmacokinetic studies in lactating Jersey cows and in vitro flux studies using the anthelmintic drug monepantel (MNP) as representative bovine ABCG2 (bABCG2) drug substrate. Animals received MNP (Zolvix, Novartis Animal Health Inc.) once (2.5 mg/kg per os) and the concentrations of MNP and the active MNP metabolite MNPSO2were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Compared with the parent drug MNP, we detected higher MNPSO2plasma concentrations (expressed as area under the concentration-versus-time curve). Moreover, we observed MNPSO2excretion into milk of dairy cows with a high milk-to-plasma ratio of 6.75. In mechanistic flux assays, we determined a preferential time-dependent basolateral-to-apical (B > A) MNPSO2transport across polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells-bABCG2 monolayers using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The B > A MNPSO2transport was significantly inhibited by the ABCG2 inhibitor fumitremorgin C in bABCG2- but not in mock-transduced MDCKII cells. Additionally, the antibiotic drug enrofloxacin, the benzimidazole anthelmintic oxfendazole and the macrocyclic lactone anthelmintic moxidectin caused a reduction in the MNPSO2(B > A) net efflux. Altogether, this study indicated that therapeutically relevant drugs like the anthelmintic MNP represent substrates of the bovine mammary ABCG2 transporter and may thereby be actively concentrated in dairy milk. PMID:26956640

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies ABCG2 (BCRP) as an allopurinol transporter and a determinant of drug response

    PubMed Central

    Wen, CC; Yee, SW; Liang, X; Hoffmann, TJ; Kvale, MN; Banda, Y; Jorgenson, E; Schaefer, C; Risch, N; Giacomini, KM

    2015-01-01

    The first-line treatment of hyperuricemia, which causes gout, is allopurinol. The allopurinol response is highly variable, with many users failing to achieve target serum uric acid (SUA) levels. No genome-wide association study (GWAS) has examined the genetic factors affecting allopurinol effectiveness. Using 2,027 subjects in Kaiser Permanente’s Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort, we conducted a GWAS of allopurinol-related SUA reduction, first in the largest ethnic group, non-Hispanic white (NHW) subjects, and then in a stratified transethnic meta-analysis. ABCG2, encoding the efflux pump BCRP, was associated with SUA reduction in NHW subjects (P = 2 × 10−8), and a missense allele (rs2231142) was associated with a reduced response (P = 3 × 10−7) in the meta-analysis. Isotopic uptake studies in cells demonstrated that BCRP transports allopurinol and genetic variants in ABCG2 affect this transport. Collectively, this first GWAS of allopurinol response demonstrates that ABCG2 is a key determinant of response to the drug. PMID:25676789

  19. The linker region of breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2 is critical for coupling of ATP-dependent drug transport.

    PubMed

    Macalou, S; Robey, R W; Jabor Gozzi, G; Shukla, S; Grosjean, I; Hegedus, T; Ambudkar, S V; Bates, S E; Di Pietro, A

    2016-05-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of class G display a different domain organisation than P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 and bacterial homologues with a nucleotide-binding domain preceding the transmembrane domain. The linker region connecting these domains is unique and its function and structure cannot be predicted. Sequence analysis revealed that the human ABCG2 linker contains a LSGGE sequence, homologous to the canonical C-motif/ABC signature present in all ABC nucleotide-binding domains. Predictions of disorder and of secondary structures indicated that this C2-sequence was highly mobile and located between an α-helix and a loop similarly to the C-motif. Point mutations of the two first residues of the C2-sequence fully abolished the transport-coupled ATPase activity, and led to the complete loss of cell resistance to mitoxantrone. The interaction with potent, selective and non-competitive, ABCG2 inhibitors was also significantly altered upon mutation. These results suggest an important mechanistic role for the C2-sequence of the ABCG2 linker region in ATP binding and/or hydrolysis coupled to drug efflux. PMID:26708291

  20. Endocytosis of ABCG2 drug transporter caused by binding of 5D3 antibody: trafficking mechanisms and intracellular fate.

    PubMed

    Studzian, Maciej; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Pulaski, Lukasz

    2015-08-01

    ABCG2, a metabolite and xenobiotic transporter located at the plasma membrane (predominantly in barrier tissues and progenitor cells), undergoes a direct progressive endocytosis process from plasma membrane to intracellular compartments upon binding of 5D3 monoclonal antibody. This antibody is specific to an external epitope on the protein molecule and locks it in a discrete conformation within its activity cycle, presumably providing a structural trigger for the observed internalization phenomenon. Using routine and novel assays, we show that ABCG2 is endocytosed by a mixed mechanism: partially via a rapid, clathrin-dependent pathway and partially in a cholesterol-dependent, caveolin-independent manner. While the internalization process is entirely dynamin-dependent and converges initially at the early endosome, subsequent intracellular fate of ABCG2 is again twofold: endocytosis leads to only partial lysosomal degradation, while a significant fraction of the protein is retained in a post-endosomal compartment with the possibility of at least partial recycling back to the cell surface. This externally triggered, conformation-related trafficking pathway may serve as a general regulatory paradigm for membrane transporters, and its discovery was made possible thanks to consistent application of quantitative methods. PMID:25918011

  1. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Knudsen, Lina Almind; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Holmskov, Uffe; Stensballe, Allan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in colonic pathophysiology as they had recently been related to colorectal cancer (CRC) development. METHODS: Literature search was conducted on PubMed using combinations of the following terms: ABC transporters, ATP binding cassette transporter proteins, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative, colitis, Crohns disease, colorectal cancer, colitis, intestinal inflammation, intestinal carcinogenesis, ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp/CD243/MDR1), ABCC2/multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), Abcb1/Mdr1a, abcc2/Mrp2, abcg2/Bcrp, knock-out mice, tight junction, membrane lipid function. RESULTS: Recently, human studies reported that changes in the levels of ABC transporters were early events in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence leading to CRC. A link between ABCB1, high fat diet and gut microbes in relation to colitis was suggested by the animal studies. The finding that colitis was preceded by altered gut bacterial composition suggests that deletion of Abcb1 leads to fundamental changes of host-microbiota interaction. Also, high fat diet increases the frequency and severity of colitis in specific pathogen-free Abcb1 KO mice. The Abcb1 KO mice might thus serve as a model in which diet/environmental factors and microbes may be controlled and investigated in relation to intestinal inflammation. Potential molecular mechanisms include defective transport of inflammatory mediators and/or phospholipid translocation from one side to the other of the cell membrane lipid bilayer by ABC transporters affecting inflammatory response and/or function of tight junctions, phagocytosis and vesicle trafficking. Also, diet and microbes give rise to molecules which are potential substrates for the ABC transporters and which may additionally affect ABC transporter function through nuclear receptors and transcriptional regulation. Another critical role of ABCB1 was suggested by the finding that

  2. A-803467, a tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel blocker, modulates ABCG2-mediated MDR in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Anreddy, Nagaraju; Patel, Atish; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Shukla, Suneet; Kathawala, Rishil J; Kumar, Priyank; Gupta, Pranav; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Wurpel, John N D; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Guo, Huiqin

    2015-11-17

    ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily proteins, which has been implicated in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer, apart from its physiological role to remove toxic substances out of the cells. The diverse range of substrates of ABCG2 includes many antineoplastic agents such as topotecan, doxorubicin and mitoxantrone. ABCG2 expression has been reported to be significantly increased in some solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, correlated to poor clinical outcomes. In addition, ABCG2 expression is a distinguishing feature of cancer stem cells, whereby this membrane transporter facilitates resistance to the chemotherapeutic drugs. To enhance the chemosensitivity of cancer cells, attention has been focused on MDR modulators. In this study, we investigated the effect of a tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel blocker, A-803467 on ABCG2-overexpressing drug selected and transfected cell lines. We found that at non-toxic concentrations, A-803467 could significantly increase the cellular sensitivity to ABCG2 substrates in drug-resistant cells overexpressing either wild-type or mutant ABCG2. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that A-803467 (7.5 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [(3)H]-mitoxantrone by inhibiting the transport activity of ABCG2, without altering its expression levels. In addition, A-803467 stimulated the ATPase activity in membranes overexpressed with ABCG2. In a murine model system, combination treatment of A-803467 (35 mg/kg) and topotecan (3 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the tumor growth in mice xenografted with ABCG2-overexpressing cancer cells. Our findings indicate that a combination of A-803467 and ABCG2 substrates may potentially be a novel therapeutic treatment in ABCG2-positive drug resistant cancers. PMID:26515463

  3. A-803467, a tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel blocker, modulates ABCG2-mediated MDR in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Atish; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Shukla, Suneet; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Kumar, Priyank; Gupta, Pranav; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Wurpel, John N. D.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily proteins, which has been implicated in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer, apart from its physiological role to remove toxic substances out of the cells. The diverse range of substrates of ABCG2 includes many antineoplastic agents such as topotecan, doxorubicin and mitoxantrone. ABCG2 expression has been reported to be significantly increased in some solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, correlated to poor clinical outcomes. In addition, ABCG2 expression is a distinguishing feature of cancer stem cells, whereby this membrane transporter facilitates resistance to the chemotherapeutic drugs. To enhance the chemosensitivity of cancer cells, attention has been focused on MDR modulators. In this study, we investigated the effect of a tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel blocker, A-803467 on ABCG2-overexpressing drug selected and transfected cell lines. We found that at non-toxic concentrations, A-803467 could significantly increase the cellular sensitivity to ABCG2 substrates in drug-resistant cells overexpressing either wild-type or mutant ABCG2. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that A-803467 (7.5 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-mitoxantrone by inhibiting the transport activity of ABCG2, without altering its expression levels. In addition, A-803467 stimulated the ATPase activity in membranes overexpressed with ABCG2. In a murine model system, combination treatment of A-803467 (35 mg/kg) and topotecan (3 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the tumor growth in mice xenografted with ABCG2-overexpressing cancer cells. Our findings indicate that a combination of A-803467 and ABCG2 substrates may potentially be a novel therapeutic treatment in ABCG2-positive drug resistant cancers. PMID:26515463

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase and ATP binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) functional assays isolate different populations of prostate stem cells where ABCG2 function selects for cells with increased stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction High expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase1A1 (ALDH1A1) is observed in many organs and tumors and may identify benign and cancer stem cell populations. Methods In the current study, the stem cell characteristics were determined in cells isolated from human prostate cell lines and clinical prostate specimens based upon the ALDEFLUOR™ assay. Cells isolated based on the ALDEFLUOR™ assay were compared to cells isolated based on ATP binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) activity using the side population assay. To test for stem cell characteristics of self-renewal and multipotency, cells with high and low ALDH1A1 activity, based on the ALDEFLUOR™ assay (ALDHHi and ALDHLow), were isolated from prostate clinical specimens and were recombined with rat urogenital sinus mesenchyme to induce prostate gland formation. Results The percentage of ALDHHi cells in prostate cell lines (RWPE-1, RWPE-2, CWR-R1, and DU-145) was 0.5 to 6%, similarly in non-tumor and tumor clinical specimens the percentage of ALDHHi cells was 0.6 to 4%. Recombinants using ALDHHi cells serially generated prostate tissue up to three generations with as few as 250 starting cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of the recombinants using ALDHHi cells contained prostatic glands frequently expressing androgen receptor (AR), p63, chromogranin A, ALDH1A1, ABCG2, and prostate specific antigen (PSA), compared to their ALDHLow counterparts. Inhibition of ALDH resulted in the reduction of sphere formation capabilities in the CWR-R1, but not in the RWPE-2 and DU-145, prostate cell lines. ABCG2 inhibition resulted in a more robust decrease of sphere formation in androgen sensitive cell lines, CWR-R1 and RWPE-2, but not androgen insensitive DU-145. ALDH1A1 expression was enriched in ALDHHi cells and non-side population cells. ABCG2 expression was only enriched in side population cells. Conclusions The percentage of ALDHHi cells in prostate cell lines and prostate tissue was consistently higher compared

  5. The xenoestrogens, bisphenol A and para-nonylphenol, decrease the expression of the ABCG2 transporter protein in human term placental explant cultures.

    PubMed

    Sieppi, E; Vähäkangas, K; Rautio, A; Ietta, F; Paulesu, L; Myllynen, P

    2016-07-01

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic compounds are substrates and regulators of human placental ABC transporters. ABCG2 is protecting fetus against foreign chemicals. Environmental xenoestrogens, like bisphenol A (BPA) and p-nonylphenol (p-NP), mimic natural estrogens and can affect hormonal systems. Effects of BPA, p-NP, DES (diethylstilbestrol) and estradiol (E2), on ABCG2 expression were studied using human first trimester and term placental explants. Role of estrogen receptors (ER) in the effects of chemicals was studied by ER antagonist. Term placenta expressed less ABCG2 protein. In term placentas BPA (p < 0.05), p-NP (p < 0.01) and E2 (p < 0.05) decreased the ABCG2 protein expression after 48 h exposure while after 24 h exposure, only E2 decreased the expression (p < 0.05). The chemicals did not affect ABCG2 in first trimester placentas. The ER antagonist affected differently the responses of chemicals. In conclusion, environmental xenoestrogens downregulate placental ABCG2 protein expression depending on gestational age. PMID:27036933

  6. Dual properties of hispidulin: antiproliferative effects on HepG2 cancer cells and selective inhibition of ABCG2 transport activity.

    PubMed

    Scoparo, Carina T; Valdameri, Glaucio; Worfel, Paulo R; Guterres, Fernanda A L B; Martinez, Glaucia R; Winnischofer, Sheila M B; Di Pietro, Attilio; Rocha, Maria E M

    2015-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Furthermore, the existing pharmacological-based treatments are insufficiently effective and generate many side effects. Hispidulin (6-methoxy-5,7,4'-trihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid found in various medicinal herbs that present antineoplastic properties. Here we evaluated how modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and alterations of antioxidant defenses could be associated to the antiproliferative effects of hispidulin in HepG2 cells. In addition, we studied the inhibitory activity of hispidulin on the efflux of drugs mediated by ABC transporters involved in multidrug resistance. In order to understand the increase of intracellular ROS promoted by hispidulin, we investigated the mRNA expression levels and activities of antioxidant enzymes, and the GSH/GSSG ratio. We showed that hispidulin significantly down-regulated the transcription levels of catalase, leading to reduction of enzyme activity and decrease of the GSH content. We also observed that, in the presence of N-acetylcysteine or exogenous catalase, the proliferation was lowered back to the control levels. These data clearly indicate a strong involvement of intracellular ROS levels for triggering the antiproliferative effects. We also demonstrated that the inhibition produced by hispidulin on drug efflux was specific for ABCG2, since no effects were observed with ABCB1 and ABCC1. Furthermore, HepG2 cells were more sensitive to hispidulin-mediated cell death than immortalized L929 fibroblasts, suggesting a differential toxicity of this compound between tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Our results suggest that hispidulin constitutes a promising candidate to sensitize chemoresistant cancer cells overexpressing ABCG2. PMID:26209062

  7. Pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinolines: Novel compounds that reverse ABCG2-mediated resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Malla, Ritu; Ashby, Charles R; Amawi, Haneen; Abbott, Kodye L; Moore, Joshua; Chen, Joel; Balch, Curt; Lee, Crystal; Flannery, Patrick C; Trivedi, Piyush; Faridi, Jesika S; Pondugula, Satyanarayana R; Tiwari, Amit K

    2016-06-28

    Overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) subfamily G2 in cancer cells is known to elicit a MDR phenotype, ultimately resulting in cancer chemotherapy failure. Here, we report, for the first time, the effect of eight novel pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline (IND) derivatives that inhibit ABCG2 transporter restoring cancer cell chemosensitivity. IND -4, -5, -6, -7, and -8, at 10 µM, and nilotinib at 5 µM, significantly potentiated (8-10 fold) the cytotoxicity of the ABCG2 substrates mitoxantrone (MX) and doxorubicin in HEK293 cells overexpressing ABCG2 transporter, MX (~14 fold) in MX-resistant NCI-H460/MX-20 small cell lung cancer, and of topotecan (~7 fold) in S1-M1-80 colon cancer cells which all stably expressing ABCG2. In contrast, cytotoxicity of cisplatin, which is not an ABCG2 substrate, was not altered. IND-5,-6,-7, and -8 significantly increased the accumulation of rhodamine-123 in multidrug resistant NCI-H460/MX-20 cells overexpressing ABCG2. Both IND-7 and -8, the most potent ABCG2 inhibitors, had the highest affinities for the binding sites of ABCG2 in modeling studies. In conclusion, the beneficial actions of new class of agents warrant further development as potential MDR reversal agents for clinical anticancer agents that suffer from ABCG2-mediated MDR insensitivity. PMID:27012188

  8. Effect of ABCG2/BCRP Expression on Efflux and Uptake of Gefitinib in NSCLC Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Galetti, Maricla; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Fumarola, Claudia; Cretella, Daniele; La Monica, Silvia; Bonelli, Mara; Cavazzoni, Andrea; Saccani, Francesca; Caffarra, Cristina; Andreoli, Roberta; Mutti, Antonio; Tiseo, Marcello; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Alfieri, Roberta R.

    2015-01-01

    Background BCRP/ABCG2 emerged as an important multidrug resistance protein, because it confers resistance to several classes of cancer chemotherapeutic agents and to a number of novel molecularly-targeted therapeutics such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Gefitinib is an orally active, selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) carrying activating EGFR mutations. Membrane transporters may affect the distribution and accumulation of gefitinib in tumour cells; in particular a reduced intracellular level of the drug may result from poor uptake, enhanced efflux or increased metabolism. Aim The present study, performed in a panel of NSCLC cell lines expressing different ABCG2 plasma membrane levels, was designed to investigate the effect of the efflux transporter ABCG2 on intracellular gefitinib accumulation, by dissecting the contribution of uptake and efflux processes. Methods and Results Our findings indicate that gefitinib, in lung cancer cells, inhibits ABCG2 activity, as previously reported. In addition, we suggest that ABCG2 silencing or overexpression affects intracellular gefitinib content by modulating the uptake rather than the efflux. Similarly, overexpression of ABCG2 affected the expression of a number of drug transporters, altering the functional activities of nutrient and drug transport systems, in particular inhibiting MPP, glucose and glutamine uptake. Conclusions Therefore, we conclude that gefitinib is an inhibitor but not a substrate for ABCG2 and that ABCG2 overexpression may modulate the expression and activity of other transporters involved in the uptake of different substrates into the cells. PMID:26536031

  9. Interaction of Isoflavones with the BCRP/ABCG2 Drug Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Bircsak, Kristin M; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2015-01-01

    This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the interactions between dietary isoflavones and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) G2 efflux transporter, which is also named the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Expressed in a variety of organs including the liver, kidneys, intestine, and placenta, BCRP mediates the disposition and excretion of numerous endogenous chemicals and xenobiotics. Isoflavones are a class of naturally-occurring compounds that are found at high concentrations in commonly consumed foods and dietary supplements. A number of isoflavones, including genistein and daidzein and their metabolites, interact with BCRP as substrates, inhibitors, and/or modulators of gene expression. To date, a variety of model systems have been employed to study the ability of isoflavones to serve as substrates and inhibitors of BCRP; these include whole cells, inverted plasma membrane vesicles, in situ organ perfusion, as well as in vivo rodent and sheep models. Evidence suggests that BCRP plays a role in mediating the disposition of isoflavones and in particular, their conjugated forms. Furthermore, as inhibitors, these compounds may aid in reversing multidrug resistance and sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. This review will also highlight the consequences of altered BCRP expression and/or function on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of chemicals following isoflavone exposure. PMID:26179608

  10. Interaction of Isoflavones with the BCRP/ABCG2 Drug Transporter.

    PubMed

    Bircsak, Kristin M; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2015-01-01

    This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the interactions between dietary isoflavones and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) G2 efflux transporter, which is also named the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Expressed in a variety of organs including the liver, kidneys, intestine, and placenta, BCRP mediates the disposition and excretion of numerous endogenous chemicals and xenobiotics. Isoflavones are a class of naturallyoccurring compounds that are found at high concentrations in commonly consumed foods and dietary supplements. A number of isoflavones, including genistein and daidzein and their metabolites, interact with BCRP as substrates, inhibitors, and/or modulators of gene expression. To date, a variety of model systems have been employed to study the ability of isoflavones to serve as substrates and inhibitors of BCRP; these include whole cells, inverted plasma membrane vesicles, in situ organ perfusion, as well as in vivo rodent and sheep models. Evidence suggests that BCRP plays a role in mediating the disposition of isoflavones and in particular, their conjugated forms. Furthermore, as inhibitors, these compounds may aid in reversing multidrug resistance and sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. This review will also highlight the consequences of altered BCRP expression and/or function on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of chemicals following isoflavone exposure. PMID:26179608

  11. Enhanced exposure of phosphatidylserine in human gastric carcinoma cells overexpressing the half-size ABC transporter BCRP (ABCG2).

    PubMed Central

    Woehlecke, Holger; Pohl, Antje; Alder-Baerens, Nele; Lage, Hermann; Herrmann, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Members of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter super-family are emerging to be involved in lipid transport. In the present study, we studied the organization of phospholipids in the plasma membrane of EPG85-257 human gastric carcinoma cells overexpressing BCRP (breast cancer resistance protein, ABCG-2), a half-size transporter belonging to the ABCG subfamily. A significantly increased plasma membrane association of the PS (phosphatidylserine)-binding probe FITC-Annexin V in comparison with control cells was observed. Treatment of BCRP -overexpressing cells with the inhibitor Tryprostatin A decreased FITC-Annexin V binding almost to the control level. This suggests an enhanced exposure of PS in BCRP -overexpressing cells, which is dependent on functional BCRP. A role of BCRP in the transverse distribution of lipids in the plasma membrane is supported by the increased outward transport of the lipid analogue C6- N -(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-PS in BCRP -overexpressing EPG85-257 cells and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. As shown for BCRP -overexpressing EPG85-257 cells, enhanced outward redistribution of the lipid analogue is inhibited by Tryprostatin A as well as by reduction of BCRP expression on transfection with an anti- BCRP -ribozyme. We also observed an enhanced outward transport of C6- N -(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-phosphatidylcholine in BCRP -overexpressing EPG85-257 cells, suggesting that the influence of BCRP on transverse lipid organization is not highly specific. PMID:12946267

  12. Solid phase synthesis of tariquidar-related modulators of ABC transporters preferring breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Puentes, Cristian Ochoa; Höcherl, Peter; Kühnle, Matthias; Bauer, Stefanie; Bürger, Kira; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; König, Burkhard

    2011-06-15

    Aiming at structural optimization of potent and selective ABCG2 inhibitors, such as UR-ME22-1, from our laboratory, an efficient solid phase synthesis was developed to get convenient access to this class of compounds. 7-Carboxyisatoic anhydride was attached to Wang resin to give resin bound 2-aminoterephthalic acid. Acylation with quinoline-2- or -6-carbonyl chlorides, coupling with tetrahydroisoquinolinylethylphenylamine derivatives, cleavage of the carboxylic acids from solid support and treatment with trimethylsilydiazomethane gave the corresponding methyl esters. Among these esters highly potent and selective ABCG2 modulators were identified (inhibition of ABCB1 and ABCG2 determined in the calcein-AM and the Hoechst 33342 microplate assay, respectively). Interestingly, compounds bearing triethyleneglycol ether groups at the tetrahydroisoquinoline moiety (UR-COP77, UR-COP78) were comparable to UR-ME22-1 in potency but considerably more efficient (max inhibition 83% and 88% vs 60%, rel. to fumitremorgin c, 100%) These results support the hypothesis that solubility of the new ABCG2 modulators and of the reference compounds tariquidar and elacridar in aqueous media is the efficacy-limiting factor. PMID:21570282

  13. Analysis of ABCG2 and other urate transporters in uric acid homeostasis in chronic kidney disease: potential role of remote sensing and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Vibha; Richard, Erin L.; Wu, Wei; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Jeff, Janina; Maihofer, Adam X.; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD), altered extra-renal urate handling may be necessary to regulate plasma uric acid. The Remote Sensing and Signaling Hypothesis (Nigam S. What do drug transporters really do? Nat Rev Drug Discov 2015; 14: 29–44) suggests that multispecific solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters in different tissues are part of an inter-organ communication system that maintains levels of urate and other metabolites after organ injury. Methods Data from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC; n = 3598) were used to study associations between serum uric acid and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the following uric acid transporters: ABCG2 (BRCP), SLC22A6 (OAT1), SLC22A8 (OAT3), SLC22A10 (OAT5), SLC22A11 (OAT4), SLC22A12 (URAT1), SLC22A13 (OAT10), SLC17A1-A3 (NPTs), SLC2A9 (GLUT9), ABCC2 (MRP2) and ABCC4 (MRP4). Regression models, controlling for principal components age, gender and renal function, were run separately for those of European (EA) and African ancestry (AA), and P-values corrected for multiple comparisons. A twin cohort with participants of EA and normal renal function was used for comparison. Results Among those of EA in CRIC, statistically significant signals were observed for SNPs in ABCG2 (rs4148157; beta-coefficient = 0.68; P = 4.78E-13) and SNPs in SLC2A9 (rs13125646; beta-coefficient = −0.30; P = 1.06E-5). Among those of AA, the strongest (but not statistically significant) signals were observed for SNPs in SLC2A9, followed by SNPs in ABCG2. In the twin study (normal renal function), only SNPs in SLC2A9 were significant (rs4481233; beta-coefficient=−0.45; P = 7.0E-6). In CRIC, weaker associations were also found for SLC17A3 (NPT4) and gender-specific associations found for SLC22A8 (OAT3), SLC22A11 (OAT4), and ABCC4 (MRP4). Conclusions In patients of EA with CKD (CRIC cohort), we found striking associations between uric acid and SNPs on ABCG2, a key transporter

  14. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors influence ABCG2 expression in EGFR-positive MDCK BCRP cells via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pick, Anne; Wiese, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Multidrug resistance observed in cancer chemotherapy is commonly attributed to overexpression of efflux transporter proteins. These proteins act as ATP-dependent drug efflux pumps, actively extruding chemotherapeutic agents from cells and causing a decrease in intracellular drug accumulation. Besides the well-recognized role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) is becoming increasingly accepted as playing an important role in multidrug resistance. In contrast to P-glycoprotein, only a few inhibitors of ABCG2 are known. According to the literature, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) can be considered to be broad-spectrum inhibitors, interacting with ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2. Here, we investigated seven different TKIs, gefitinib, erlotinib, AG1478, PD158780, PD153035, nilotinib and imatinib, for their potential to restore ABCG2 sensitivity to cells. Furthermore, we analyzed the alteration of ABCG2 expression caused by TKIs and demonstrated that EGFR inhibitors such as gefitinib and PD158780 reduced both total and surface expression of ABCG2 in EGRF-positive MDCK BCRP cells by interaction with the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. The reduced ABCG2 content led to an increased effect of XR9577, a well-known ABCG2 modulator, lowering the concentration required for half maximal inhibition. On the other hand, BCR-ABL inhibitors had no influence on ABCG2 expression and modulator activity. Interestingly, a combination of an EGFR inhibitor with the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 led to a significant reduction of ABCG2 expression at low concentrations of the drugs. Based on our results, we assume that EGFR exerts a post-transcriptional enhancing effect on ABCG2 expression via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, which can be attenuated by EGFR inhibitors. Blocking the key signaling pathway regulating ABCG2 expression with EGFR inhibitors, combined with the inhibition of ABCG2 with potent modulators might be a promising approach to circumvent MDR

  15. Generation of an ABCG2{sup GFPn-puro} transgenic line - A tool to study ABCG2 expression in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Orford, Michael; Mean, Richard; Lapathitis, George; Genethliou, Nicholas; Panayiotou, Elena; Panayi, Helen; Malas, Stavros

    2009-06-26

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter 2 (ABCG2) is expressed by stem cells in many organs and in stem cells of solid tumors. These cells are isolated based on the side population (SP) phenotype, a Hoechst 3342 dye efflux property believed to be conferred by ABCG2. Because of the limitations of this approach we generated transgenic mice that express Nuclear GFP (GFPn) coupled to the Puromycin-resistance gene, under the control of ABCG2 promoter/enhancer sequences. We show that ABCG2 is expressed in neural progenitors of the developing forebrain and spinal cord and in embryonic and adult endothelial cells of the brain. Using the neurosphere assay, we isolated tripotent ABCG2-expressing neural stem cells from embryonic mouse brain. This transgenic line is a powerful tool for studying the expression of ABCG2 in many tissues and for performing functional studies in different experimental settings.

  16. Osimertinib (AZD9291) Enhanced the Efficacy of Chemotherapeutic Agents in ABCB1- and ABCG2-Overexpressing Cells In Vitro, In Vivo, and Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Chen, Yifan; Xu, Meng; Chen, Likun; Zhang, Xu; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Zhao, Hongyun; Wang, Fang; Xia, Zhongjun; Chen, Xiaoqin; Fu, Liwu

    2016-08-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters has been proved to be a major trigger for multidrug resistance (MDR) in certain types of cancer. In our study, we investigated whether osimertinib (AZD9291), a third-generation irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both activating EGFR mutations and resistance-associated T790M point mutation, could reverse MDR induced by ABCB1 and ABCG2 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo Our results showed that osimertinib significantly increased the sensitivity of ABCB1- and ABCG2-overexpressing cells to their substrate chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in the model of ABCB1-overexpressing KBv200 cell xenograft in nude mice. Mechanistically, osimertinib increased the intracellular accumulations of doxorubicin (DOX) and Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) by inhibiting the efflux function of the transporters in ABCB1- or ABCG2-overexpressing cells but not in their parental sensitive cells. Furthermore, osimertinib stimulated the ATPase activity of both ABCB1 and ABCG2 and competed with the [(125)I] iodoarylazidoprazosin photolabeling bound to ABCB1 or ABCG2, but did not alter the localization and expression of ABCB1 or ABCG2 in mRNA and protein levels nor the phosphorylations of EGFR, AKT, and ERK. Importantly, osimertinib also enhanced the cytotoxicity of DOX and intracellular accumulation of Rho 123 in ABCB1-overexpressing primary leukemia cells. Overall, these findings suggest osimertinib reverses ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR via inhibiting ABCB1 and ABCG2 from pumping out chemotherapeutic agents and provide possibility for cancer combinational therapy with osimertinib in the clinic. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1845-58. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196753

  17. The bovine ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 Tyr581Ser single-nucleotide polymorphism increases milk secretion of the fluoroquinolone danofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Otero, Jon A; Real, Rebeca; de la Fuente, Álvaro; Prieto, Julio G; Marqués, Margarita; Álvarez, Ana I; Merino, Gracia

    2013-03-01

    The bovine adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein) polymorphism Tyr581Ser (Y581S) has recently been shown to increase in vitro transepithelial transport of antibiotics. Since this transporter has been extensively related to the active secretion of drugs into milk, the potential in vivo effect of this polymorphism on secretion of xenobiotics in livestock could have striking consequences for milk production, the dairy industry, and public health. Our purpose was to study the in vivo effect of this polymorphism on the secretion of danofloxacin, a widely used veterinary antibiotic, into milk. Danofloxacin (1.25 mg/kg) was administered to six Y/Y 581 homozygous and six Y/S 581 heterozygous lactating cows, and plasma and milk samples were collected and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. No differences were found in the pharmacokinetic parameters of danofloxacin in plasma between the two groups of animals. In contrast, Y/S heterozygous cows showed a 2-fold increase in danofloxacin levels in milk. In addition, the pharmacokinetic elimination parameters, mean residence time and elimination half-life, were significantly lower in the milk of the animals carrying the Y/S polymorphism. These in vivo results are in agreement with our previously published in vitro data, which showed a greater capacity of the S581 variant in accumulation assays, and demonstrate, for the first time, an important effect of the Y581S single-nucleotide polymorphism on antibiotic secretion into cow milk. These findings could be extended to other ABCG2 substrates, and may be relevant for the treatment of mastitis and for the design of accurate and novel strategies to handle milk residues. PMID:23230133

  18. Inhibition of ABCG2/BCRP transporter by soy isoflavones genistein and daidzein: effect on plasma and milk levels of danofloxacin in sheep.

    PubMed

    Perez, Miriam; Otero, Jon A; Barrera, Borja; Prieto, Julio G; Merino, Gracia; Alvarez, Ana I

    2013-05-01

    Danofloxacin is a synthetic fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent and a substrate for ATP-binding cassette transporter G2/breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP). This protein actively extrudes drugs from cells in the intestine, liver, kidney, and other organs, such as the mammary gland. The purpose of this study was to determine whether genistein and daidzein, isoflavones present in soy and known inhibitors of ABCG2, could diminish danofloxacin secretion into milk. The results obtained from BCRP-transduced MDCK-II cells (Mardin-Darby canine kidney) showed that both isoflavones efficiently inhibited the in vitro transport of the drug. In addition, danofloxacin transport into milk was studied in Assaf sheep. The experimental design with ewes (n = 18) included ewes fed with standard forage, soy-enriched forage for 15 days prior to the experiment or standard forage paired with orally administered exogenous genistein and daidzein. The danofloxacin levels in the milk of ewes in the soy-enriched diet group were decreased. The area under concentration-time curve AUC (0-24 h) was 9.3 ± 4.6 vs. 16.58 ± 4.44 μgh/mL in the standard forage or control group. The plasma levels of danofloxacin were unmodified. The AUC (0-24 h) milk/plasma ratio decreased by over 50% in the soy-enriched diet group, compared to the control group (4.90 ± 2.65 vs. 9.58 ± 2.17). Exogenous administration of isoflavones did not modify danofloxacin secretion into milk. This study showed that milk excretion of a specific substrate of BCRP, such as danofloxacin, can be diminished by the presence of isoflavones in the diet. PMID:23083838

  19. The Full-Size ABCG Transporters Nb-ABCG1 and Nb-ABCG2 Function in Pre- and Postinvasion Defense against Phytophthora infestans in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yusuke; Ojika, Makoto; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Jones, David A; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Takemoto, Daigo

    2016-05-01

    The sesquiterpenoid capsidiol is the major phytoalexin produced by Nicotiana and Capsicum species. Capsidiol is produced in plant tissues attacked by pathogens and plays a major role in postinvasion defense by inhibiting pathogen growth. Using virus-induced gene silencing-based screening, we identified two Nicotiana benthamiana (wild tobacco) genes encoding functionally redundant full-size ABCG (PDR-type) transporters, Nb-ABCG1/PDR1 and Nb-ABCG2/PDR2, which are essential for resistance to the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans Silencing of Nb-ABCG1/2 compromised secretion of capsidiol, revealing Nb-ABCG1/2 as probable exporters of capsidiol. Accumulation of plasma membrane-localized Nb-ABCG1 and Nb-ABCG2 was observed at the site of pathogen penetration. Silencing of EAS (encoding 5-epi-aristolochene synthase), a gene for capsidiol biosynthesis, reduced resistance to P. infestans, but penetration by P. infestans was not affected. By contrast, Nb-ABCG1/2-silenced plants showed reduced penetration defense, indicating that Nb-ABCG1/2 are involved in preinvasion defense against P. infestans Plastidic GGPPS1 (geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase) was also found to be required for preinvasion defense, thereby suggesting that plastid-produced diterpene(s) are the antimicrobial compounds active in preinvasion defense. These findings suggest that N. benthamiana ABCG1/2 are involved in the export of both antimicrobial diterpene(s) for preinvasion defense and capsidiol for postinvasion defense against P. infestans. PMID:27102667

  20. Effect of ceritinib (LDK378) on enhancement of chemotherapeutic agents in ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Ke; Xu, Meng; To, Kenneth K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the leading cause of treatment failure in cancer chemotherapy. The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, particularly ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2, play a key role in mediating MDR by pumping anticancer drugs out from cancer cells. Ceritinib (LDK378) is a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) currently in phase III clinical trial for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Here, we found that ceritinib remarkably enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in ABCB1 or ABCG2 over-expressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Ceritinib significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin (DOX) by inhibiting ABCB1 or ABCG2-mediated drug efflux in the transporters-overexpressing cells. Mechanistically, ceritinib is likely a competitive inhibitor of ABCB1 and ABCG2 because it competed with [125I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin for photo affinity labeling of the transporters. On the other hand, at the transporters-inhibiting concentrations, ceritinib did not alter the expression level of ABCB1 and ABCG2, and phosphorylation status of AKT and ERK1/2. Thus the findings advocate further clinical investigation of combination chemotherapy of ceritinib and other conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in chemo-refractory cancer patients. PMID:26556876

  1. Bacterial multidrug efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Delmar, Jared A; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by bacteria are a leading cause of death worldwide. Although antibiotics remain a key clinical therapy, their effectiveness has been severely compromised by the development of drug resistance in bacterial pathogens. Multidrug efflux transporters--a common and powerful resistance mechanism--are capable of extruding a number of structurally unrelated antimicrobials from the bacterial cell, including antibiotics and toxic heavy metal ions, facilitating their survival in noxious environments. Transporters of the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux complexes spanning the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex, which mediates resistance to copper(I) and silver(I) ions, is the only known RND transporter specific to heavy metals. Here, we describe the current knowledge of individual pump components of the Cus system, a paradigm for efflux machinery, and speculate on how RND pumps assemble to fight diverse antimicrobials. PMID:24702006

  2. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances multidrug resistance in breast cancer cell lines by translational regulation of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Theile, Dirk; Ruiz, María Laura; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-06-28

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women. Multidrug resistance due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a common cause of chemotherapy failure and disease recurrence. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen present in soybeans and hormone supplements. We investigated the effect of GNT on the expression and function of ABC transporters in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Results demonstrated an induction at the protein level of ABCC1 and ABCG2 and of ABCC1 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. MCF-7 cells showed a concomitant increase in doxorubicin and mitoxantrone efflux and resistance, dependent on ABCG2 activity. ABCC1 induction by GNT in MDA-MB-231 cells modified neither drug efflux nor chemoresistance due to simultaneous acute inhibition of the transporter activity by GNT. All inductions took place at the translational level, as no increment in mRNA was observed and protein increase was prevented by cycloheximide. miR-181a, already demonstrated to inhibit ABCG2 translation, was down-regulated by GNT, explaining translational induction. Effects were independent of classical estrogen receptors. Results suggest potential nutrient-drug interactions that could threaten chemotherapy efficacy, especially in ABCG2-expressing tumors treated with substrates of this transporter. PMID:27033456

  3. ABCG2 deficiency in skin impairs re-epithelialization in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Min; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Huang, Wei-Chao; Shen, Chia-Rui; Mao, Wan-Yu; Shen, Chia-Ning

    2016-05-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 is expressed in the interfollicular epidermis and mediates the side-population phenotype in skin cells. However, the role of ABCG2 in skin is unclear. Increased expression levels of ABCG2 were found at the basal layer of transitional epidermis adjacent to cutaneous wounds in human patients, indicating that ABCG2 may be involved in regulating the wound healing process. To investigate the role of ABCG2 in cutaneous wound healing, full-thickness skin wounds were created in ABCG2 knockout (ABCG2-KO) and wild-type mice. The healing process was analysed and revealed that ABCG2 deficiency in skin results in delays in wound closure and impairments in re-epithelialization, as evidenced by reductions in both suprabasal differentiation and in p63-expressing keratinocytes migrating from transitional epidermis to epithelial tongues. The reduction in p63-expressing cells may be due to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species in ABCG2-KO epidermis, which can cause DNA damage and lead to proliferation arrest. To determine whether ABCG2 deficiency affects the potency of epidermal stem/progenitor cells (EPCs), transplantation studies were carried out, which demonstrated that ABCG2-KO EPCs display higher levels of γH2AX and lose the capacity to differentiate into suprabasal keratinocytes. A competitive repopulation assay confirmed that ABCG2 expression is critical for the proper expansion and differentiation of EPCs in cutaneous wounds. As EPCs are known to contribute to the healing of larger wounds, the current findings imply a functional role for ABCG2 in the expansion and differentiation of p63-expressing EPCs. Thus, ABCG2 deficiency in skin impairs re-epithelialization in cutaneous wound healing. PMID:26739701

  4. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 4-Anilino-quinazolines and -quinolines as Inhibitors of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Krapf, Michael K; Wiese, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer often fails due to overexpression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins, like ABCG2, triggering active efflux of various structurally unrelated drugs. This so-called multidrug resistance (MDR) may be reversed by selective, potent, and nontoxic inhibitors of ABCG2. As only a few potent inhibitors are known, new compounds based on a 4-substituted-2-phenylquinazoline scaffold were investigated. Substitution with hydroxy, cyano, nitro, acetamido, and fluoro led to high inhibitory activities toward ABCG2. The ability to reverse MDR of the most active compounds was confirmed in a MTT efficacy assay. Moreover, a negligibly low intrinsic cytotoxicity was found resulting in a high therapeutic ratio. Investigations of the inhibitory activity toward ABCB1 and ABCC1 yielded a high selectivity toward ABCG2 for the quinazoline compounds. Quinoline-based analogues showed lower inhibitory activity and selectivity. The study yielded a variety of promising compounds, some with superior properties compared to those of the standard inhibitor Ko143. PMID:27148793

  5. Modulation of ABCC1 and ABCG2 proteins by ouabain in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    DA Silva, Vanessa Amil; DA Silva, Karla Andreza Elizeu Pereira; Delou, João Marcos Azevedo; DA Fonseca, Leonardo Marques; Lopes, Anibal Gil; Capella, Márcia Alves Marques

    2014-03-01

    ABCC1 and ABCG2 are two transporters associated with multi-drug resistance to cancer chemotherapy. Ouabain is a cardiotonic steroid, currently considered as a hormone associated with arterial hypertension. Previous studies have suggested that ouabain can modulate ABCB1 and ABCC1 expression in cancer and renal cell lines. The present study investigated the effects of physiological concentrations of ouabain on the expression and activity of ABCC1 and ABCG2 in two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231, the first known to be responsive to estrogens. Cell viability and proliferation assays showed that 1 μM ouabain reduced proliferation of MCF7, but not if MDA-MB-231 cells. On the other hand, 10 nM ouabain increased proliferation of MDA-MB-231, but not of MCF7 cells. Ouabain (10 nM) prevented the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin in MCF7 cells, but not in MDA-MB-231 cells. Treatment of cells under different ouabain concentrations for 24 h did not cause any significant effects in the expression of ABCG2 or ABCC1 in either cell line. However, the activity of ABCC1 was increased when MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with 10 mM and 1 nM ouabain respectively. These results claim attention to the possibility that breast cancer patients with high levels of endogenous ouabain may have different responses to chemotherapy. PMID:24596392

  6. The Inhibitor Ko143 Is Not Specific for ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Zoghbi, Sami S.; Lu, Shuiyu; Shukla, Suneet; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Pike, Victor W.; Mulder, Jan; Gottesman, Michael M.; Innis, Robert B.; Hall, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter activity in vivo with positron emission tomography requires both a substrate and a transporter inhibitor. However, for ABCG2, there is no inhibitor proven to be specific to that transporter alone at the blood-brain barrier. Ko143 [[(3S,6S,12aS)-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydro-9-methoxy-6-(2-methylpropyl)-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1′,2′:1,6]pyrido[3,4- b]indole-3-propanoic acid 1,1-dimethylethyl ester], a nontoxic analog of fungal toxin fumitremorgin C, is a potent inhibitor of ABCG2, although its specificity in mouse and human systems is unclear. This study examined the selectivity of Ko143 using human embryonic kidney cell lines transfected with ABCG2, ABCB1, or ABCC1 in several in vitro assays. The stability of Ko143 in rat plasma was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Our results show that, in addition to being a potent inhibitor of ABCG2, at higher concentrations (≥1 μM) Ko143 also has an effect on the transport activity of both ABCB1 and ABCC1. Furthermore, Ko143 was found to be unstable in rat plasma. These findings indicate that Ko143 lacks specificity for ABCG2 and this should be taken into consideration when using Ko143 for both in vitro and in vivo experiments. PMID:26148857

  7. The Inhibitor Ko143 Is Not Specific for ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Lora D; Zoghbi, Sami S; Lu, Shuiyu; Shukla, Suneet; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Pike, Victor W; Mulder, Jan; Gottesman, Michael M; Innis, Robert B; Hall, Matthew D

    2015-09-01

    Imaging ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter activity in vivo with positron emission tomography requires both a substrate and a transporter inhibitor. However, for ABCG2, there is no inhibitor proven to be specific to that transporter alone at the blood-brain barrier. Ko143 [[(3S,6S,12aS)-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydro-9-methoxy-6-(2-methylpropyl)-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4- b]indole-3-propanoic acid 1,1-dimethylethyl ester], a nontoxic analog of fungal toxin fumitremorgin C, is a potent inhibitor of ABCG2, although its specificity in mouse and human systems is unclear. This study examined the selectivity of Ko143 using human embryonic kidney cell lines transfected with ABCG2, ABCB1, or ABCC1 in several in vitro assays. The stability of Ko143 in rat plasma was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Our results show that, in addition to being a potent inhibitor of ABCG2, at higher concentrations (≥1 μM) Ko143 also has an effect on the transport activity of both ABCB1 and ABCC1. Furthermore, Ko143 was found to be unstable in rat plasma. These findings indicate that Ko143 lacks specificity for ABCG2 and this should be taken into consideration when using Ko143 for both in vitro and in vivo experiments. PMID:26148857

  8. Functional characterization of the ABCG2 5' non-coding exon variants: Stem cell specificity, translation efficiency and the influence of drug selection.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Sára; Jordanidisz, Theodora; Schamberger, Anita; Várady, György; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Apáti, Ágota; Sarkadi, Balázs; Orbán, Tamás I

    2016-07-01

    ABCG2 is a multidrug transporter with wide substrate specificity, and is believed to protect several cell types from various xenobiotics and endobiotics. This "guardian" function is important in numerous cell types and tissue barriers but becomes disadvantageous by being responsible for the multidrug resistance phenotype in certain tumor cells. ABCG2 regulation at the protein level has already been extensively studied, however, regulation at the mRNA level, especially the functional role of the various 5' untranslated exon variants (5' UTRs) has been elusive. In the present work, we describe a comprehensive characterization of four ABCG2 mRNA variants with different exon 1 sequences, investigate drug inducibility, stem cell specificity, mRNA stability, and translation efficiency. Although certain variants (E1B and E1C) are considered as "constitutive" mRNA isoforms, we show that chemotoxic drugs significantly alter the expression pattern of distinct ABCG2 mRNA isoforms. When examining human embryonic stem cell lines, we provide evidence that variant E1A has an expression pattern coupled to undifferentiated stem cell stage, as its transcript level is regulated parallel to mRNAs of Oct4 and Nanog pluripotency marker genes. When characterizing the four exon 1 variants we found no significant differences in terms of mRNA stabilities and half-lives of the isoforms. In contrast, variant E1U showed markedly lower translation efficiency both at the total protein level or regarding the functional presence in the plasma membrane. Taken together, these results indicate that the different 5' UTR variants play an important role in cell type specific regulation and fine tuning of ABCG2 expression. PMID:27191194

  9. Trametinib modulates cancer multidrug resistance by targeting ABCB1 transporter

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Li, Yong; Zhao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Mei, Xiao-Long; Xue, You-Qiu; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Wei, Meng-Ning; Shi, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of adenine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is one of the main reasons of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. Trametinib, a novel specific small-molecule mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor, is currently used for the treatment of melanoma in clinic. In this study, we investigated the effect of trametinib on MDR mediated by ABC transporters. Trametinib significantly potentiated the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells overexpressed ABCB1, but not ABCC1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, trametinib did not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, trametinib potently blocked the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. Importantly, trametinib remarkably enhanced the effect of vincristine against the xenografts of ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells in nude mice. The predicted binding mode showed the hydrophobic interactions of trametinib within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. Consequently, our findings may have important implications for use of trametinib in combination therapy for cancer treatment. PMID:25915534

  10. ARRY-334543 reverses multidrug resistance by antagonizing the activity of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, De-Shen; Patel, Atish; Sim, Hong-May; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Zhang, Hui; Talele, Tanaji T.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Xu, Rui-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background ARRY-334543 is a small molecule inhibitor of ErbB1 and ErbB2 tyrosine kinases. We conducted this study to determine whether ARRY-334543 can enhance the efficacy of conventional anticancer drugs through interaction with ABC transporters. Methods Lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 and its ABCG2-overexpressing NCI-H460/MX20, as well as the ABCG2-, ABCB1-, and ABCC10-overexpressing transfected cell lines were used for the reversal study. Results Our results demonstrate that ARRY-334543 (1.0 μM) significantly reversed ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) by directly inhibiting the drug efflux function of ABCG2, resulting in the elevated intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs in the ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. In addition, in isolated membranes, ARRY-334543 stimulated ATPase activity and inhibited photolabeling of ABCG2 with [125I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin in a concentration-dependent manner indicating that this drug directly interacts at the drug-binding pocket of this transporter. ARRY-334543 (1.0 μM) only slightly reversed ABCB1- and partially reversed ABCC10-mediated MDR suggesting that it exhibits high affinity towards ABCG2. Moreover, homology modeling predicted the binding conformation of ARRY-334543 at Arg482 centroid-based grid of ABCG2. However, ARRY-334543 at reversal concentration did not affect the expression level of ABCG2, AKT and ERK1/2 and regulate the re-localization of ABCG2. Conclusion We conclude that ARRY-334543 significantly reverses drug resistance mediated by ABCG2. PMID:24939447

  11. Sildenafil reverses ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated chemotherapeutic drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhi; Tiwari, Amit K; Shukla, Suneet; Robey, Robert W.; Singh, Satyakam; Kim, In-Wha; Bates, Susan E.; Peng, Xingxiang; Abraham, Ioana; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Sildenafil is a potent and selective inhibitor of the type 5 cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase that is used clinically to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Here we report that sildenafil has differential effects on cell surface ABC transporters such as ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2 that modulate intracompartmental and intracellular concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs. In ABCB1-overexpressing cells, non-toxic doses of sildenafil inhibited resistance and increased the effective intracellular concentration of ABCB1 substrate drugs, such as paclitaxel. Similarly, in ABCG2-overexpressing cells, sildenafil inhibited resistance to ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs, for example, increasing the effective intracellular concentration of mitoxantrone or the fluorescent compound BODIPY-prazosin. Sildenafil also moderately inhibited the transport of E217βG and methotrexate by the ABCG2 transporter. Mechanistic investigations revealed that sildenafil stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activity and inhibited photolabeling of ABCB1 with [125I]-IAAP, whereas it only slightly stimulated ABCG2 ATPase activity and inhibited photolabeling of ABCG2 with [125I]-IAAP. In contrast, Sildenafil did not alter the sensitivity of parental, ABCB1- or ABCG2-overexpressing cells to non-ABCB1 and non-ABCG2 substrate drugs, nor did sildenafil affect the function of another ABC drug transporter ABCC1. Homology modeling predicted the binding conformation of sildenafil within the large cavity of the transmembrane region of ABCB1. Overall, we found that sildenafil inhibits the transporter function of ABCB1 and ABCG2, with a stronger effect on ABCB1. Our findings suggest a possible strategy to enhance the distribution and potentially the activity of anti-cancer drugs by jointly using a clinically approved drug with known side effects and drug-drug interactions. PMID:21402712

  12. Sildenafil reverses ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi; Tiwari, Amit K; Shukla, Suneet; Robey, Robert W; Singh, Satyakam; Kim, In-Wha; Bates, Susan E; Peng, Xingxiang; Abraham, Ioana; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Talele, Tanaji T; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-04-15

    Sildenafil is a potent and selective inhibitor of the type 5 cGMP (cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate)-specific phosphodiesterase that is used clinically to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Here, we report that sildenafil has differential effects on cell surface ABC transporters such as ABCB1, ABCC1, and ABCG2 that modulate intracompartmental and intracellular concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs. In ABCB1-overexpressing cells, nontoxic doses of sildenafil inhibited resistance and increased the effective intracellular concentration of ABCB1 substrate drugs such as paclitaxel. Similarly, in ABCG2-overexpressing cells, sildenafil inhibited resistance to ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs, for example, increasing the effective intracellular concentration of mitoxantrone or the fluorescent compound BODIPY-prazosin. Sildenafil also moderately inhibited the transport of E(2)17βG and methotrexate by the ABCG2 transporter. Mechanistic investigations revealed that sildenafil stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activity and inhibited photolabeling of ABCB1 with [(125)I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin (IAAP), whereas it only slightly stimulated ABCG2 ATPase activity and inhibited photolabeling of ABCG2 with [(125)I]-IAAP. In contrast, sildenafil did not alter the sensitivity of parental, ABCB1-, or ABCG2-overexpressing cells to non-ABCB1 and non-ABCG2 substrate drugs, nor did sildenafil affect the function of another ABC drug transporter, ABCC1. Homology modeling predicted the binding conformation of sildenafil within the large cavity of the transmembrane region of ABCB1. Overall, we found that sildenafil inhibits the transporter function of ABCB1 and ABCG2, with a stronger effect on ABCB1. Our findings suggest a possible strategy to enhance the distribution and potentially the activity of anticancer drugs by jointly using a clinically approved drug with known side effects and drug-drug interactions. PMID:21402712

  13. Masitinib antagonizes ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2-mediated multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    KATHAWALA, RISHIL J.; CHEN, JUN-JIANG; ZHANG, YUN-KAI; WANG, YI-JUN; PATEL, ATISH; WANG, DE-SHEN; TALELE, TANAJI T.; ASHBY, CHARLES R.; CHEN, ZHE-SHENG

    2014-01-01

    In this in vitro study, we determined whether masitinib could reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in cells overexpressing the ATP binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) transporter. Masitinib (1.25 and 2.5 μM) significantly decreases the resistance to mitoxantrone (MX), SN38 and doxorubicin in HEK293 and H460 cells overexpressing the ABCG2 transporter. In addition, masitinib (2.5 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-MX, a substrate for ABCG2, by inhibiting the function of ABCG2 and significantly decreased the efflux of [3H]-MX. However, masitinib (2.5 μM) did not significantly alter the expression of the ABCG2 protein. In addition, a docking model suggested that masitinib binds within the transmembrane region of a homology-modeled human ABCG2 transporter. Overall, our in vitro findings suggest that masitinib reverses MDR to various anti-neoplastic drugs in HEK293 and H460 cells overexpressing ABCG2 by inhibiting their transport activity as opposed to altering their levels of expression. PMID:24626598

  14. Antibody validation and scoring guidelines for ABCG2 immunohistochemical staining in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded colon cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cederbye, Camilla Natasha; Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Hansen, Tine Plato; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Linnemann, Dorte; Stenvang, Jan; Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Brünner, Nils; Viuff, Birgitte Martine

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the ATP-dependent drug efflux pump ABCG2 is a major molecular mechanism of multidrug resistance in cancer and might be a predictive biomarker for drug response. Contradictory results have been reported for immunohistochemical studies of ABCG2 protein expression in colorectal cancer (CRC), probably because of the use of different antibodies and scoring approaches. In this study, we systematically studied six commercially available anti-ABCG2 antibodies, using cell lines with up-regulation of ABCG2, and selected one antibody for validation in CRC tissue. Furthermore, we established scoring guidelines for ABCG2 expression based on the clinically used guidelines for HER2 immunohistochemistry assessment in gastric cancer. The guidelines provide a semi-quantitative measure of the basolateral membrane staining of ABCG2 and disregard the apical membrane staining and the cytoplasmic signal. Intra-tumor heterogeneity in ABCG2 immunoreactivity was observed; however, statistical analyses of tissue microarrays (TMAs) and the corresponding whole sections from primary tumors of 57 metastatic CRC patients revealed a strong positive correlation between maximum TMA scores and whole sections, especially when more than one core was used. In conclusion, here, we provide validated results to guide future studies on the associations between ABCG2 immunoreactivity in tumor cells and the benefits of chemotherapeutic treatment in patients with CRC. PMID:27257141

  15. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  16. Beta amyloid effects on expression of multidrug efflux transporters in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kania, Katarzyna D; Wijesuriya, Hasini C; Hladky, Stephen B; Barrand, Margery A

    2011-10-18

    ABC (ATP Binding Cassette) efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier, P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), multidrug resistance associated protein 4 (ABCC4) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), are important for protecting the brain from circulating xenobiotics. Their expression is regulated by signals from surrounding brain tissue that may alter in CNS pathologies. Differences have been reported in transporter expression on brain vasculature of Alzheimer's subjects where raised levels of β-amyloid (Aβ) occur. The present study examines in vitro the effects of Aβ using immortalised brain endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). Significantly lower expression of ABCB1 but not ABCC4 or ABCG2 was found following exposure to Aβ(1-42) peptide but not its scrambled equivalent. This was evident at both protein and transcript level and was reflected in lower transcriptional activity of the ABCB1 promoter as judged from the luciferase reporter gene assay and in decreases in ABCB1-mediated efflux of rhodamine 123. Aβ exposure also affected Wnt/β-catenin signalling, decreasing levels of β-catenin protein, reducing activation of TOPFLASH and increasing transcript levels of endogenous inhibitor, Dkk-1. Application of Wnt3a reversed the Aβ-induced changes to ABCB1 protein. These results suggest that Aβ may impair Wnt/β-catenin signalling at the blood-brain barrier but that activation of this pathway may restore ABCB1. PMID:21920506

  17. Ferrocenyl 2,5-Piperazinediones as Tubulin-Binding Organometallic ABCB1 and ABCG2 Inhibitors Active against MDR Cells.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Anna; Błauż, Andrzej; Zakrzewski, Janusz; Rychlik, Błażej; Plażuk, Damian

    2016-06-01

    The tubulin-microtubule system is a common target of many anticancer drugs. However, the use of chemotherapeutics frequently leads to the development of a clinically relevant phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR). One of the basic mechanisms involved in MDR involves elevated expression and/or activity of several ATP-binding cassette superfamily members (ABC transporters) which are normally responsible for the efflux of xenobiotics or secondary metabolites outside the cell. Here we present the synthesis and biological characteristics of ferrocenyl analogues of plinabulin, i.e. one of the so-called "spindle poisons". We found that replacement of the phenyl group of plinabulin by the ferrocenyl moiety turns this compound into a potent inhibitor of ABCB1 and ABCG2, thus making it possible to overcome the multidrug resistance phenomenon. We also demonstrated that the alkyl group attached to the imidazole moiety of ferrocenyl analogues of plinabulin strongly affects their potency to inhibit tubulin polymerization. PMID:27326336

  18. Brief Report: High Peak Level of Plasma Raltegravir Concentration in Patients With ABCB1 and ABCG2 Genetic Variants.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Hayashida, Tsunefusa; Hamada, Akinobu; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Raltegravir was recently identified to be a substrate of ATP-binding cassette transporter B1 (ABCB1) and G2 (ABCG2), which are efflux transporters and expressed in the intestines. We analyzed the relations between plasma raltegravir concentrations and single nucleotide polymorphism of ABCB1 and ABCG2 genes. The peak plasma concentration of raltegravir was significantly higher in the patients with ABCB1 4036 AG/GG and ABCG2 421 CA/AA than in other genotype holders (P = 0.0052), though no difference was identified in trough raltegravir concentrations, which may be explained by reduced expression of efflux transporters in intestine by these genetic variants. PMID:27097364

  19. The Effect of ABCG2 and ABCC4 on the Pharmacokinetics of Methotrexate in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sane, Ramola; Wu, Shu-Pei; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the cornerstone of chemotherapy for primary central nervous system lymphoma, yet how the blood-brain barrier (BBB) efflux transporters ABCG2 and ABCC4 influence the required high-dose therapy is unknown. To evaluate their role, we used four mouse strains, C57BL/6 (wild-type; WT), Abcg2−/−, Abcc4−/−, and Abcg2−/−;Abcc4−/− (double knockout; DKO) to conduct brain microdialysis studies after single intravenous MTX doses of 50 mg/kg. When the area under the concentration-time curve for plasma (AUCplasma) was used to assess systemic exposure to MTX, the rank order was Abcc4−/− < WT < Abcg2−/− < Abcg2−/−Abcc4−/−. Only the DKO exposure was significantly higher than that of the WT group (P < 0.01), a reflection of the role of Abcg2 in biliary excretion and Abcc4 in renal excretion. MTX brain interstitial fluid concentrations obtained by microdialysis were used to calculate the area under the concentration-time curve for the brain (AUCbrain), which found the rank order of exposure to be WT < Abcc4−/− < Abcg2−/− < Abcg2−/−Abcc4−/− with the largest difference being 4-fold: 286.13 ± 130 μg*min/ml (DKO) versus 66.85 ± 26 (WT). Because the transporters affected the systemic disposition of MTX, particularly in the DKO group, the ratio of the AUCbrain/AUCplasma or the brain/plasma partition coefficient Kp was calculated, revealing that the DKO strain had a significantly higher value (0.23 ± 0.09) than the WT strain (0.11 ± 0.05). Both Abcg2 and Abcc4 limited BBB penetration of MTX; however, only when both drug efflux pumps were negated did the brain accumulation of MTX significantly increase. These findings indicate a contributory role of both ABCG2 and ABCC4 to limiting MTX distribution in patients. PMID:24464805

  20. Activity of ABCG2 Is Regulated by Its Expression and Localization in DHT and Cyclopamine-Treated Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chua, Vivian Y L; Larma, Irma; Harvey, Jennet; Thomas, Marc A; Bentel, Jacqueline M

    2016-10-01

    Elevated expression of the efflux transporter, ATP-binding cassette subfamily G isoform 2 (ABCG2) on the plasma membrane of cancer cells contributes to the development of drug resistance and is a key characteristic of cancer stem cells. In this study, gene expression analysis identified that treatment of the MCF-7 and T-47D breast cancer cell lines with the androgen, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and the Hedgehog signaling inhibitor, cyclopamine downregulated ABCG2 mRNA levels. In MCF-7 cells, and in Hoechst 33342(lo) /CD44(hi) /CD24(lo) breast cancer stem-like cells isolated from MCF-7 cultures, ABCG2 was accumulated in cell-to-cell junction complexes and in large cytoplasmic aggresome-like vesicles. DHT treatments, which decreased cellular ABCG2 protein levels, led to diminished ABCG2 localization in both cell-to-cell junction complexes and in cytoplasmic vesicles. In contrast, cyclopamine, which did not alter ABCG2 protein levels, induced accumulation of ABCG2 in cytoplasmic vesicles, reducing its localization in cell-to-cell junction complexes. The reduced localization of ABCG2 at the plasma membrane of MCF-7 cells was associated with decreased efflux of the ABCG2 substrate, mitoxantrone, and increased sensitivity of cyclopamine-treated cultures to the cytotoxic effects of mitoxantrone. Together, these findings indicate that DHT and cyclopamine reduce ABCG2 activity in breast cancer cells by distinct mechanisms, providing evidence to advocate the adjunct use of analogous pharmaceutics to increase or prolong the efficacy of breast cancer treatments. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2249-2259, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917208

  1. Anti-ABCG2 scFv antibody of lung adenocarcinoma increases chemosensitivity and induces apoptosis through the activation of mitochondrial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wen-Si; Luo, Yi; Li, Bo-Yi; Zhou, Han-Jing; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    ABCG2 is a multidrug resistance efflux pump expressed in many diverse tumors. The overexpression of ABCG2 is associated with resistance to a wide variety of anticancer agents, providing a noticeable setback to successful cancer therapy. Therapies targeting ABCG2 may therefore be a promising candidate for reversal of chemoresistance. The anti-ABCG2 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody was constructed by phage display peptide library technology. Immunoblotting, ELISA and immunocytochemistry were used to evaluate the soluble expression and immunoreactivity of the scFv. The effects of scFv on cell function and chemosensitization were confirmed by colony formation, cell migration and CCK-8 assays. Flow cytometry was used to analyse the cell cycle and apoptosis. Radioimmunoimaging and nude mouse tumorigenicity assays were taken to determine the biodistribution and antitumor capacity of the scFv antibody. We have successfully screened out the candidate scFv antibody with an apparent molecular weight of 34 kDa. The scFv demonstrated favourable binding ability to lung adenocarcinoma cells and ABCG2 antigen, and the radioactivity was specifically aggregated at the tumor location. Furthermore, the internalized scFv resulted in antibody-mediated downregulation of ABCG2, proliferation inhibition, apoptosis and cisplatin (DDP) sensitivity. The anti-ABCG2 scFv antibody possesses good tumoraffin and antitumor activity and may therefore be an effective therapeutic agent for lung adenocarcinoma that is dependent on ABCG2 for drug resistance and survival. PMID:27293996

  2. Epigenetic modulation of the drug resistance genes MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance of the highly aggressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) to drug therapy is a major clinical problem resulting in a poor patient’s prognosis. Beside promoter methylation of the O 6 -methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene the efflux transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 have been suggested as pivotal factors contributing to drug resistance, but the methylation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 has not been assessed before in GBM. Methods Therefore, we evaluated the proportion and prognostic significance of promoter methylation of MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 in 64 GBM patient samples using pyrosequencing technology. Further, the single nucleotide polymorphisms MGMT C-56 T (rs16906252), ABCB1 C3435T (rs1045642) and ABCG2 C421A (rs2231142) were determined using the restriction fragment length polymorphism method (RFLP). To study a correlation between promoter methylation and gene expression, we analyzed MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 expression in 20 glioblastoma and 7 non-neoplastic brain samples. Results Despite a significantly increased MGMT and ABCB1 promoter methylation in GBM tissue, multivariate regression analysis revealed no significant association between overall survival of glioblastoma patients and MGMT or ABCB1 promoter methylation. However, a significant negative correlation between promoter methylation and expression could be identified for MGMT but not for ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, MGMT promoter methylation was significantly associated with the genotypes of the MGMT C-56 T polymorphism showing a higher methylation level in the T allele bearing GBM. Conclusions In summary, the data of this study confirm the previous published relation of MGMT promoter methylation and gene expression, but argue for no pivotal role of MGMT, ABCB1 and ABCG2 promoter methylation in GBM patients’ survival. PMID:24380367

  3. Role of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Karthika; Xie, Yi; Baer, Maria R.; Ross, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    Since cloning of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) and its characterization as a multidrug resistance efflux transporter in 1998, BCRP has been the subject of more than two thousand scholarly articles. In normal tissues, BCRP functions as a defense mechanism against toxins and xenobiotics, with expression in the gut, bile canaliculi, placenta, blood-testis and blood-brain barriers facilitating excretion and limiting absorption of potentially toxic substrate molecules, including many cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. BCRP also plays a key role in heme and folate homeostasis, which may help normal cells survive under conditions of hypoxia. BCRP expression appears to be a characteristic of certain normal tissue stem cells termed “side population cells,” which are identified on flow cytometric analysis by their ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, a BCRP substrate fluorescent dye. Hence, BCRP expression may contribute to the natural resistance and longevity of these normal stem cells. Malignant tissues can exploit the properties of BCRP to survive hypoxia and to evade exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs. Evidence is mounting that many cancers display subpopulations of stem cells that are responsible for tumor self-renewal. Such stem cells frequently manifest the “side population” phenotype characterized by expression of BCRP and other ABC transporters. Along with other factors, these transporters may contribute to the inherent resistance of these neoplasms and their failure to be cured. PMID:22248732

  4. ABCG2 regulates self-renewal and stem cell marker expression but not tumorigenicity or radiation resistance of glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Boyoung; Pietras, Alexander; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Bazzoli, Elena; Podlaha, Ondrej; Antczak, Christophe; Westermark, Bengt; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Djaballah, Hakim; Michor, Franziska; Holland, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma cells with stem cell traits are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance and therapeutic failure. Such cells can be enriched based on their inherent drug efflux capability mediated by the ABC transporter ABCG2 using the side population assay, and their characteristics include increased self-renewal, high stem cell marker expression and high tumorigenic capacity in vivo. Here, we show that ABCG2 can actively drive expression of stem cell markers and self-renewal in glioma cells. Stem cell markers and self-renewal was enriched in cells with high ABCG2 activity, and could be specifically inhibited by pharmacological and genetic ABCG2 inhibition. Importantly, despite regulating these key characteristics of stem-like tumor cells, ABCG2 activity did not affect radiation resistance or tumorigenicity in vivo. ABCG2 effects were Notch-independent and mediated by diverse mechanisms including the transcription factor Mef. Our data demonstrate that characteristics of tumor stem cells are separable, and highlight ABCG2 as a potential driver of glioma stemness. PMID:27456282

  5. Localization and Substrate Selectivity of Sea Urchin Multidrug (MDR) Efflux Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Gökirmak, Tufan; Campanale, Joseph P.; Shipp, Lauren E.; Moy, Gary W.; Tao, Houchao; Hamdoun, Amro

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized Stronglycentrotus purpuratus (Sp) ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. This screen identified three multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters with functional homology to the major types of MDR transporters found in humans. When overexpressed in embryos, the apical transporters Sp-ABCB1a, ABCB4a, and ABCG2a can account for as much as 87% of the observed efflux activity, providing a robust assay for their substrate selectivity. Using this assay, we found that sea urchin MDR transporters export canonical MDR susbtrates such as calcein-AM, bodipy-verapamil, bodipy-vinblastine, and mitoxantrone. In addition, we characterized the impact of nonconservative substitutions in the primary sequences of drug binding domains of sea urchin versus murine ABCB1 by mutation of Sp-ABCB1a and treatment of embryos with stereoisomeric cyclic peptide inhibitors (QZ59 compounds). The results indicated that two substitutions in transmembrane helix 6 reverse stereoselectivity of Sp-ABCB1a for QZ59 enantiomers compared with mouse ABCB1a. This suggests that subtle changes in the primary sequence of transporter drug binding domains could fine-tune substrate specificity through evolution. PMID:23124201

  6. Bioluminescent imaging of ABCG2 efflux activity at the blood-placenta barrier.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jeyan S; Wei, Bih-Rong; Madigan, James P; Simpson, R Mark; Hall, Matthew D; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Physiologic barriers such as the blood placenta barrier (BPB) and the blood brain barrier protect the underlying parenchyma from pathogens and toxins. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins found at these barriers, and function to efflux xenobiotics and maintain chemical homeostasis. Despite the plethora of ex vivo and in vitro data showing the function and expression of ABC transporters, no imaging modality exists to study ABC transporter activity in vivo at the BPB. In the present study, we show that in vitro models of the placenta possess ABCG2 activity and can specifically transport D-luciferin, the endogenous substrate of firefly luciferase. To test ABCG2 transport activity at the BPB, we devised a breeding strategy to generate a bioluminescent pregnant mouse model to demonstrate transporter function in vivo. We found that coadministering the ABCG2 inhibitors Ko143 and gefitinib with D-luciferin increased bioluminescent signal from fetuses and placentae, whereas the control P-gp inhibitor DCPQ had no effect. We believe that our bioluminescent pregnant mouse model will facilitate greater understanding of the BPB and ABCG2 activity in health and disease. PMID:26853103

  7. Bioluminescent imaging of ABCG2 efflux activity at the blood-placenta barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jeyan S.; Wei, Bih-Rong; Madigan, James P.; Simpson, R. Mark; Hall, Matthew D.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Physiologic barriers such as the blood placenta barrier (BPB) and the blood brain barrier protect the underlying parenchyma from pathogens and toxins. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are transmembrane proteins found at these barriers, and function to efflux xenobiotics and maintain chemical homeostasis. Despite the plethora of ex vivo and in vitro data showing the function and expression of ABC transporters, no imaging modality exists to study ABC transporter activity in vivo at the BPB. In the present study, we show that in vitro models of the placenta possess ABCG2 activity and can specifically transport D-luciferin, the endogenous substrate of firefly luciferase. To test ABCG2 transport activity at the BPB, we devised a breeding strategy to generate a bioluminescent pregnant mouse model to demonstrate transporter function in vivo. We found that coadministering the ABCG2 inhibitors Ko143 and gefitinib with D-luciferin increased bioluminescent signal from fetuses and placentae, whereas the control P-gp inhibitor DCPQ had no effect. We believe that our bioluminescent pregnant mouse model will facilitate greater understanding of the BPB and ABCG2 activity in health and disease. PMID:26853103

  8. ABCG2 is up-regulated in Alzheimer's brain with cerebral amyloid angiopathy and may act as a gatekeeper at the blood-brain barrier for Aβ1-40 peptides

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Huaqi; Callaghan, Debbie; Jones, Aimee; Bai, Jianying; Rasquinha, Ingrid; Smith, Catherine; Pei, Ke; Walker, Douglas; Lue, Lih-Fen; Stanimirovic, Danica; Zhang, Wandong

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation and deposition of Aβ peptides in the brain. Aβ deposition in cerebrovessels occurs in many AD patients and results in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (AD/CAA). Since Aβ can be transported across blood-brain barrier (BBB), aberrant Aβ trafficking across BBB may contribute to Aβ accumulation in the brain and CAA development. Expression analyses of 273 BBB-related genes performed in this study showed that the drug transporter, ABCG2, was significantly up-regulated in the brains of AD/CAA compared to age-matched controls. Increased ABCG2 expression was confirmed by Q-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Abcg2 was also increased in mouse AD models, Tg-SwDI and 3XTg. Aβ alone or in combination with hypoxia/ischemia failed to stimulate ABCG2 expression in BBB endothelial cells; however, conditioned media from Aβ-activated microglia strongly induced ABCG2 expression. ABCG2 protein in AD/CAA brains interacted and co-immunoprecipitated with Aβ. Overexpression of hABCG2 reduced drug uptake in cells; however, interaction of Aβ1-40 with ABCG2 impaired ABCG2-mediated drug efflux. The role of Abcg2 in Aβ transport at the BBB was investigated in Abcg2-null and wild-type mice after intravenous injection of Cy5.5-labeled Aβ1-40 or scrambled Aβ40-1. Optical imaging analyses of live animals and their brains showed that Abcg2-null mice accumulated significantly more Aβ in their brains than wt mice. The finding was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that ABCG2 may act as a gatekeeper at the BBB to prevent blood Aβ from entering into brain. ABCG2 up-regulation may serve as a biomarker of CAA vascular pathology in AD patients. PMID:19403814

  9. MBL-II-141, a chromone derivative, enhances irinotecan (CPT-11) anticancer efficiency in ABCG2-positive xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Honorat, Mylène; Guitton, Jérôme; Gauthier, Charlotte; Bouard, Charlotte; Lecerf-Schmidt, Florine; Peres, Basile; Terreux, Raphaël; Gervot, Héloïse; Rioufol, Catherine; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Puisieux, Alain; Di Pietro, Attilio; Payen, Léa

    2014-01-01

    ABCG2 is responsible for the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, and strongly modulates cancer outcomes. Its high expression at a number of physiological barriers, including blood-brain and intestinal barriers, impacts on drug pharmacokinetics parameters. We characterized MBL-II-141, a specific and potent ABCG2 inhibitor. Combination of 10 mg/kg MBL-II-141 with the anticancer agent CPT-11 completely blocked the growth of 90% freshly implanted ABCG2-positive tumors. Moreover, the same combination slowed the growth of already established tumors. As required for preclinical development, we defined the main pharmacokinetics parameters of MBL-II-141 and its influence on the kinetics of CPT-11 and its active metabolite SN-38 in mice. MBL-II-141 distribution into the brain occurred at a low, but detectable, level. Interestingly, preliminary data suggested that MBL-II-141 is well tolerated (at 50 mg/kg) and absorbed upon force-feeding. MBL-II-141 induced a potent sensitization of ABCG2-positive xenografts to CPT-11 through in vivo ABCG2 inhibition. MBL-II-141 strongly increased CPT-11 levels in the brain, and therefore would be a valuable agent to improve drug distribution into the brain to efficiently treat aggressive gliomas. Safety and other pharmacological data strongly support the reglementary preclinical development of MBL-II-141. PMID:25474134

  10. A High-Content Assay Strategy for the Identification and Profiling of ABCG2 Modulators in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Antczak, Christophe; Wee, Boyoung; Radu, Constantin; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Holland, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract ABCG2 is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters, the overexpression of which has been implicated in resistance to various chemotherapeutic agents. Though a number of cell-based assays to screen for inhibitors have been reported, they do not provide a content-rich platform to discriminate toxic and autofluorescent compounds. To fill this gap, we developed a live high-content cell-based assay to identify inhibitors of ABCG2-mediated transport and, at the same time, assess their cytotoxic effect and potential optical interference. We used a pair of isogenic U87MG human glioblastoma cell lines, with one stably overexpressing the ABCG2 transporter. JC-1 (J-aggregate–forming lipophilic cation 5,5′,6,6′-tetrachloro-1,1′,3,3′-tetraethylbenzimidazol carbocyanine iodide) was selected as the optimal reporter substrate for ABCG2 activity, and the resulting assay was characterized by a Z′ value of 0.50 and a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 14 in a pilot screen of ∼7,000 diverse chemicals. The screen led to the identification of 64 unique nontoxic positives, yielding an initial hit rate of 1%, with 58 of them being confirmed activity. In addition, treatment with two selected confirmed positives suppressed the side population of U87MG-ABCG2 cells that was able to efflux the Hoechst dye as measured by flow cytometry, confirming that they constitute potent new ABCG2 transporter inhibitors. Our results demonstrate that our live cell and content-rich platform enables the rapid identification and profiling of ABCG2 modulators, and this new strategy opens the door to the discovery of compounds targeting the expression and/or trafficking of ABC transporters as an alternative to functional inhibitors that failed in the clinic. PMID:23992118

  11. Benzanilide–Biphenyl Replacement: A Bioisosteric Approach to Quinoline Carboxamide-Type ABCG2 Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recently reported compounds such as UR-COP78 (6) are among the most potent and selective ABCG2 modulators known so far but are prone to rapid enzymatic cleavage at the central benzanilide moiety. In search for more stable analogues, according to a bioisosteric approach, a series of N-(biphenyl-3-yl)quinoline carboxamides was prepared by solid phase and solution phase synthesis. The biphenyl moiety was constructed by Suzuki coupling. Inhibition of ABCB1 and ABCG2 was determined in a calcein-AM and a Hoechst 33342 microplate assay, respectively. Most synthesized compounds selectively inhibited the ABCG2 transporter at submicromolar concentrations with a maximal inhibitory effect (Imax) over 90% (e.g., UR-COP228 (22a), IC50 591 nM, Imax 109%; UR-COP258 (31), IC50 544 nM, Imax 112%), though with lower potency and selectivity than 6. The biphenyl analogues are considerably more stable and demonstrate that the benzanilide core is not a crucial structural feature of quinoline carboxamide-type ABCG2 modulators. PMID:24900683

  12. SIRT1 prevents hyperuricemia via the PGC-1α/PPARγ-ABCG2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Zhu, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Lei; Xue, Yu; Yang, Xue; Zou, He-Jian

    2016-08-01

    Silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) plays several key roles in the regulation of lipid and glucose homoeostasis. In this study, we investigated the potential role of SIRT1 in hyperuricemia and explored possible mechanisms. Significant hyperuricemia was detected in C57BL/6 mice treated with oxonate and yeast polysaccharide. Resveratrol (RSV), a specific SIRT1 activator, was administered to the mice. SIRT1 suppressed the increased serum uric acid level but up-regulated the expression of urate transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) in the ileum of hyperuricemic mice. In a human colon carcinoma cell line, SIRT1 promoted ABCG2 production through the deacetylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), which then activated the effectors of PPARγ. Interestingly, the SIRT1-induced up-regulation of ABCG2 was significantly inhibited when PGC-1α or PPARγ was blocked by siRNA transfection. Our data demonstrated that SIRT1 and its activator, RSV, have clear anti-hyperuricemia functions in this mouse model. One possible mechanism is the activation of ABCG2 in the ileum through the PGC-1α/PPARγ pathway. PMID:27022940

  13. Effect of bovine ABCG2 polymorphism Y581S SNP on secretion into milk of enterolactone, riboflavin and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Otero, J A; Miguel, V; González-Lobato, L; García-Villalba, R; Espín, J C; Prieto, J G; Merino, G; Álvarez, A I

    2016-02-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter G2/breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP) is an efflux protein involved in the bioavailability and milk secretion of endogenous and exogenous compounds, actively affecting milk composition. A limited number of physiological substrates have been identified. However, no studies have reported the specific effect of this polymorphism on the secretion into milk of compounds implicated in milk quality such as vitamins or endogenous compounds. The bovine ABCG2 Y581S polymorphism is described as a gain-of-function polymorphism that increases milk secretion and decreases plasma levels of its substrates. This work aims to study the impact of Y581S polymorphism on plasma disposition and milk secretion of compounds such as riboflavin (vitamin B2), enterolactone, a microbiota-derived metabolite from the dietary lignan secoisolariciresinol and uric acid. In vitro transport of these compounds was assessed in MDCK-II cells overexpressing the bovine ABCG2 (WT-bABCG2) and its Y581S variant (Y581S-bABCG2). Plasma and milk levels were obtained from Y/Y homozygous and Y/S heterozygous cows. The results show that riboflavin was more efficiently transported in vitro by the Y581S variant, although no differences were noted in vivo. Both uric acid and enterolactone were substrates in vitro of the bovine ABCG2 variants and were actively secreted into milk with a two-fold increase in the milk/plasma ratio for Y/S with respect to Y/Y cows. The in vitro ABCG2-mediated transport of the drug mitoxantrone, as a model substrate, was inhibited by enterolactone in both variants, suggesting the possible in vivo use of this enterolignan to reduce ABCG2-mediated milk drug transfer in cows. The Y581S variant was inhibited to a lesser extent probably due to its higher transport capacity. All these findings point to a significant role of the ABCG2 Y581S polymorphism in the milk disposition of enterolactone and the endogenous molecules riboflavin and uric acid

  14. Phenolic indeno[1,2-b]indoles as ABCG2-selective potent and non-toxic inhibitors stimulating basal ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Gozzi, Gustavo Jabor; Bouaziz, Zouhair; Winter, Evelyn; Daflon-Yunes, Nathalia; Honorat, Mylène; Guragossian, Nathalie; Marminon, Christelle; Valdameri, Glaucio; Bollacke, Andre; Guillon, Jean; Pinaud, Noël; Marchivie, Mathieu; Cadena, Silvia M; Jose, Joachim; Le Borgne, Marc; Di Pietro, Attilio

    2015-01-01

    Ketonic indeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione derivatives, initially designed as human casein kinase II (CK2) inhibitors, were recently shown to be converted into efficient inhibitors of drug efflux by the breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2 upon suited substitutions including a N5-phenethyl on C-ring and hydrophobic groups on D-ring. A series of ten phenolic and seven p-quinonic derivatives were synthesized and screened for inhibition of both CK2 and ABCG2 activities. The best phenolic inhibitors were about threefold more potent against ABCG2 than the corresponding ketonic derivatives, and showed low cytotoxicity. They were selective for ABCG2 over both P-glycoprotein and MRP1 (multidrug resistance protein 1), whereas the ketonic derivatives also interacted with MRP1, and they additionally displayed a lower interaction with CK2. Quite interestingly, they strongly stimulated ABCG2 ATPase activity, in contrast to ketonic derivatives, suggesting distinct binding sites. In contrast, the p-quinonic indenoindoles were cytotoxic and poor ABCG2 inhibitors, whereas a partial inhibition recovery could be reached upon hydrophobic substitutions on D-ring, similarly to the ketonic derivatives. PMID:26170632

  15. ABCG2-overexpressing S1-M1-80 cell xenografts in nude mice keep original biochemistry and cell biological properties

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Liang, Yong-Ju; Wu, Xing-Ping; Su, Xiao-Dong; Fu, Li-Wu

    2012-01-01

    S1-M1-80 cells, derived from human colon carcinoma S1 cells, are mitoxantrone-selected ABCG2-overexpressing cells and are widely used in in vitro studies of multidrug resistance (MDR). In this study, S1-M1-80 cell xenografts were established to investigate whether the MDR phenotype and cell biological properties were maintained in vivo. Our results showed that the proliferation, cell cycle, and ABCG2 expression level in S1-M1-80 cells were similar to those in cells isolated from S1-M1-80 cell xenografts (named xS1-M1-80 cells). Consistently, xS1-M1-80 cells exhibited high levels of resistance to ABCG2 substrates such as mitoxantrone and topotecan, but remained sensitive to the non-ABCG2 substrate cisplatin. Furthermore, the specific ABCG2 inhibitor Ko143 potently sensitized xS1-M1-80 cells to mitoxantrone and topotecan. These results suggest that S1-M1-80 cell xenografts in nude mice retain their original cytological characteristics at 9 weeks. Thus, this model could serve as a good system for further investigation of ABCG2-mediated MDR. PMID:22360854

  16. Association of ABCB1 and ABCG2 single nucleotide polymorphisms with clinical findings and response to chemotherapy treatments in Kurdish patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri, Houshiyar; Ghaderi, Bayazid; Amini, Sabrieh; Nikkhoo, Bahram; Abdi, Mohammad; Hoseini, Abdolhakim

    2016-06-01

    The possible interaction between gene polymorphisms and risk of cancer progression is very interesting. Polymorphisms in multi-drug resistance genes have an important role in response to anti-cancer drugs. The present study was aimed to evaluate the possible effects of ABCB1 C3435T and ABCG2 C421A single nucleotide polymorphisms on clinical and pathological outcomes of Kurdish patients with breast cancer. One hundred breast cancer patients and 200 healthy controls were enrolled in this case-control study. Clinical and pathological findings of all individuals were reported, and immunohistochemistry staining was used to assess the tissue expression of specific breast cancer proteins. The ABCB1 C3435T and ABCG2 C421 genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP). The distribution of different genotypes between patient and control groups was only significant for ABCG2 C421A. A allele of ABCG2 C421A polymorphisms were significantly higher in patients than in controls. Patients with AA genotype of ABCG2 C421A were at higher risk of progressing breast cancer. Patients with A allele of ABCG2 had complete response to chemotherapeutic agents. There was no statistically significant association between ABCB1 C3435T and ABCG2 C421A polymorphisms and tissue expression of ER, PR, Her2/neu, and Ki67. The ABCB1 C3435T has no correlation with clinical findings and treatment with chemotherapy drugs. The A allele of ABCG2 C421A may be a risk factor for progression of breast cancer in Kurdish patients. In addition, breast cancer patients with C allele of this polymorphism have weaker response to treatments with anthracyclines and Paclitaxol. PMID:26700668

  17. Structural determinants of peripheral O-arylcarbamate FAAH inhibitors render them dual substrates for Abcb1 and Abcg2 and restrict their access to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Barrera, Borja; Armirotti, Andrea; Bertozzi, Sine M.; Scarpelli, Rita; Bandiera, Tiziano; Prieto, Julio G.; Duranti, Andrea; Tarzia, Giorgio; Merino, Gracia

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main entry route for chemicals into the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Two transmembrane transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family – Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2 in humans, Abcg2 in rodents) and P-glycoprotein (ABCB1 in humans, Abcb1 in rodents) – play a key role in mediating this process. Pharmacological and genetic evidence suggests that Abcg2 prevents CNS access to a group of highly potent and selective O-arylcarbamate fatty-acid amidohydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors, which include the compound URB937 (cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3′-carbamoyl-6-hydroxybiphenyl-3-yl ester). To define structure-activity relationships of the interaction of these molecules with Abcg2, in the present study we tested various peripherally restricted and non-restricted O-arylcarbamate FAAH inhibitors for their ability to serve as transport substrates in monolayer cultures of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney-II (MDCKII) cells over-expressing Abcg2. Surprisingly, we found that the majority of compounds tested – even those able to enter the CNS in vivo – were substrates for Abcg2 in vitro. Additional experiments in MDCKII cells overexpressing ABCB1 revealed that only those compounds that were dual substrates for ABCB1 and Abcg2 in vitro were also peripherally restricted in vivo. The extent of such restriction seems to depend upon other physicochemical features of the compounds, in particular the polar surface area. Consistent with these in vitro results, we found that URB937 readily enters the brain in dual knockout mice lacking both Abcg2 and Abcb1, whereas it is either partially or completely excluded from the brain of mice lacking either transporter alone. The results suggest that Abcg2 and Abcb1 act together to restrict the access of URB937 to the CNS. PMID:24993496

  18. Bacterial multi-drug efflux transporters

    PubMed Central

    Delmar, Jared A.; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by bacteria remain a leading cause of death worldwide. While antibiotics remain a key clinical therapy, their effectiveness has been severely compromised by the development of drug resistance in these pathogens. A common and powerful resistance mechanism, multi-drug efflux transporters are capable of extruding a number of structurally unrelated antimicrobials from the bacterial cell, including antibiotics and toxic heavy metal ions, facilitating their survival in noxious environments. Those transporters belonging to the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux complexes, spanning the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex, which mediates resistance to copper(I) and silver(I) ions, is the only known RND transporter with a specificity for heavy metals. Herein, we describe the current knowledge of individual pump components of the Cus system, a paradigm for efflux machinery, and speculate on how RND pumps assemble to fight diverse antimicrobials. PMID:24702006

  19. The combination of quinazoline and chalcone moieties leads to novel potent heterodimeric modulators of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Kraege, Stefanie; Stefan, Katja; Juvale, Kapil; Ross, Thomas; Willmes, Thomas; Wiese, Michael

    2016-07-19

    During the last decade it has been found that chalcones and quinazolines are promising inhibitors of ABCG2. The combination of these two scaffolds offers a new class of heterocyclic compounds with potentially high inhibitory activity against ABCG2. For this purpose we investigated 22 different heterodimeric derivatives. In this series only methoxy groups were used as substituents as these had been proven superior for inhibitory activity of chalcones. All compounds were tested for their inhibitory activity, specificity and cytotoxicity. The most potent ABCG2 inhibitor in this series showed an IC50 value of 0.19 μM. It possesses low cytotoxicity (GI50 = 93 μM), the ability to reverse MDR and is nearly selective toward ABCG2. Most compounds containing dimethoxy groups showed slight activity against ABCB1 too. Among these three compounds (17, 19 and 24) showed even higher activity toward ABCB1 than ABCG2. All inhibitors were further screened for their effect on basal ATPase activity. Although the basal ATPase activity was partially stimulated, the compounds were not transported by ABCG2. Thus, quinazoline-chalcones are a new class of effective ABCG2 inhibitors. PMID:27100033

  20. Involvement of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in the biliary excretion mechanism of fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tomohiro; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Merino, Gracia; Alvarez, Ana I; Schinkel, Alfred H; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2007-10-01

    Fluoroquinolones are effective antibiotics for the treatment of bile duct infections. It has been shown that the biliary excretion of grepafloxacin is partly accounted for by multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2), whereas neither MRP2 nor P-glycoprotein is involved in the biliary excretion of ulifloxacin. In the present study, we examined the involvement of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in the biliary excretion of fluoroquinolones (grepafloxacin, ulifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin). In Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells expressing human BCRP or mouse Bcrp, the basal-to-apical transport of grepafloxacin and ulifloxacin was greater than that of the mock control, which was inhibited by a BCRP inhibitor, 3-(6-isobutyl-9-methoxy-1,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydropyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indol-3-yl)-propionic acid tert-butyl ester (Ko143). Plasma and bile concentrations of fluoroquinolones were determined in wild-type and Bcrp(-/-) mice after i.v. bolus injection. The cumulative biliary excretion of fluoroquinolones was significantly reduced in Bcrp(-/-) mice, resulting in a reduction of the biliary excretion clearances to 86, 50, 40, and 16 of the control values, for ciprofloxacin, grepafloxacin, ofloxacin, and ulifloxacin, respectively. Preinfusion of sulfobromophthalein significantly inhibited the biliary excretion of grepafloxacin in Bcrp(-/-) mice. There was no change in the tissue/plasma concentration ratios of fluoroquinolones in the liver or brain, whereas those in the kidney were increased 3.6- and 1.5-fold for ciprofloxacin and grepafloxacin, respectively, in Bcrp(-/-) mice but were unchanged for ofloxacin and ulifloxacin. The present study shows that BCRP mediates the biliary excretion of fluoroquinolones and suggests that it is also involved in the tubular secretion of ciprofloxacin and grepafloxacin. PMID:17639028

  1. Genistein and Glyceollin Effects on ABCC2 (MRP2) and ABCG2 (BCRP) in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schexnayder, Chandler; Stratford, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of glyceollins on intestinal ABCC2 (ATP Binding Cassette C2, multidrug resistance protein 2, MRP2) and ABCG2 (ATP Binding Cassette G2, breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP) function using the Caco-2 cell intestinal epithelial cell model. Glyceollins are soy-derived phytoestrogens that demonstrate anti-proliferative activity in several sources of cancer cells. 5 (and 6)-carboxy-2′,7′-dichloroflourescein (CDF) was used as a prototypical MRP2 substrate; whereas BODIPY-prazosin provided an indication of BCRP function. Comparison studies were conducted with genistein. Glyceollins were shown to inhibit MRP2-mediated CDF transport, with activity similar to the MRP2 inhibitor, MK-571. They also demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition BCRP-mediated efflux of BODIPY-prazosin, with a potency similar to that of the recognized BCRP inhibitor, Ko143. In contrast, genistein did not appear to alter MRP2 activity and even provided a modest increase in BCRP efflux of BODIPY-prazosin. In particular, glyceollin inhibition of these two important intestinal efflux transporters suggests the potential for glyceollin to alter the absorption of other phytochemicals with which it might be co-administered as a dietary supplement, as well as alteration of the absorption of pharmaceuticals that may be administered concomitantly. PMID:26703673

  2. Genistein and Glyceollin Effects on ABCC2 (MRP2) and ABCG2 (BCRP) in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Schexnayder, Chandler; Stratford, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of glyceollins on intestinal ABCC2 (ATP Binding Cassette C2, multidrug resistance protein 2, MRP2) and ABCG2 (ATP Binding Cassette G2, breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP) function using the Caco-2 cell intestinal epithelial cell model. Glyceollins are soy-derived phytoestrogens that demonstrate anti-proliferative activity in several sources of cancer cells. 5 (and 6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichloroflourescein (CDF) was used as a prototypical MRP2 substrate; whereas BODIPY-prazosin provided an indication of BCRP function. Comparison studies were conducted with genistein. Glyceollins were shown to inhibit MRP2-mediated CDF transport, with activity similar to the MRP2 inhibitor, MK-571. They also demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition BCRP-mediated efflux of BODIPY-prazosin, with a potency similar to that of the recognized BCRP inhibitor, Ko143. In contrast, genistein did not appear to alter MRP2 activity and even provided a modest increase in BCRP efflux of BODIPY-prazosin. In particular, glyceollin inhibition of these two important intestinal efflux transporters suggests the potential for glyceollin to alter the absorption of other phytochemicals with which it might be co-administered as a dietary supplement, as well as alteration of the absorption of pharmaceuticals that may be administered concomitantly. PMID:26703673

  3. ABCG2 Is a Selectable Marker for Enhanced Multilineage Differentiation Potential in Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Szepesi, Áron; Matula, Zsolt; Szigeti, Anna; Várady, György; Szabó, Gyula; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) provide an important source for tissue regeneration and may become especially useful in the formation of osteogenic seeds. PDLSCs can be cultured, expanded, and differentiated in vitro; thus, they may be applied in the long-term treatment of the defects in the dental regions. Here we studied numerous potential markers allowing the selection of human PDLSCs with a maximum differentiation potential. We followed the expression of the ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) membrane transporter protein and isolated ABCG2-expressing cells by using a monoclonal antibody, recognizing the transporter at the cell surface in intact cells. The expression of the ABCG2 protein, corresponding to the so-called side-population phenotype in various tissue-derived stem cells, was found to be a useful marker for the selection of PDLSCs with enhanced osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic differentiation. These findings may have important applications in achieving efficient dental tissue regeneration by using stem cells from extracted teeth. PMID:25101689

  4. Three-dimensional structure of the human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in an inward-facing conformation.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Mark F; Bikadi, Zsolt; Hazai, Eszter; Starborg, Tobias; Kelley, Lawrence; Chayen, Naomi E; Ford, Robert C; Mao, Qingcheng

    2015-08-01

    ABCG2 is an efflux drug transporter that plays an important role in drug resistance and drug disposition. In this study, the first three-dimensional structure of human full-length ABCG2 analysed by electron crystallography from two-dimensional crystals in the absence of nucleotides and transported substrates is reported at 2 nm resolution. In this state, ABCG2 forms a symmetric homodimer with a noncrystallographic twofold axis perpendicular to the two-dimensional crystal plane, as confirmed by subtomogram averaging. This configuration suggests an inward-facing configuration similar to murine ABCB1, with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) widely separated from each other. In the three-dimensional map, densities representing the long cytoplasmic extensions from the transmembrane domains that connect the NBDs are clearly visible. The structural data have allowed the atomic model of ABCG2 to be refined, in which the two arms of the V-shaped ABCG2 homodimeric complex are in a more closed and narrower conformation. The structural data and the refined model of ABCG2 are compatible with the biochemical analysis of the previously published mutagenesis studies, providing novel insight into the structure and function of the transporter. PMID:26249353

  5. Three-dimensional structure of the human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in an inward-facing conformation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Mark F.; Bikadi, Zsolt; Hazai, Eszter; Starborg, Tobias; Kelley, Lawrence; Chayen, Naomi E.; Ford, Robert C.; Mao, Qingcheng

    2015-01-01

    ABCG2 is an efflux drug transporter that plays an important role in drug resistance and drug disposition. In this study, the first three-dimensional structure of human full-length ABCG2 analysed by electron crystallography from two-dimensional crystals in the absence of nucleotides and transported substrates is reported at 2 nm resolution. In this state, ABCG2 forms a symmetric homodimer with a noncrystallographic twofold axis perpendicular to the two-dimensional crystal plane, as confirmed by subtomogram averaging. This configuration suggests an inward-facing configuration similar to murine ABCB1, with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) widely separated from each other. In the three-dimensional map, densities representing the long cytoplasmic extensions from the transmembrane domains that connect the NBDs are clearly visible. The structural data have allowed the atomic model of ABCG2 to be refined, in which the two arms of the V-shaped ABCG2 homodimeric complex are in a more closed and narrower conformation. The structural data and the refined model of ABCG2 are compatible with the biochemical analysis of the previously published mutagenesis studies, providing novel insight into the structure and function of the transporter. PMID:26249353

  6. Effect of Prostaglandin E2 on Multidrug Resistance Transporters In Human Placental Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gene T.; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen; He, Lily; Weiner, Carl P.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2, a major product of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, acts as an immunomodulator at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. It exerts biologic function through interaction with E-prostanoid (EP) receptors localized to the placenta. The activation of the COX-2/PGE2/EP signal pathway can alter the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, multidrug resistance protein 1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp); gene: ABCB1], and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; gene: ABCG2), which function to extrude drugs and xenobiotics from cells. In the placenta, PGE2-mediated changes in ABC transporter expression could impact fetal drug exposure. Furthermore, understanding the signaling cascades involved could lead to strategies for the control of Pgp and BCRP expression levels. We sought to determine the impact of PGE2 signaling mechanisms on Pgp and BCRP in human placental cells. The treatment of placental cells with PGE2 up-regulated BCRP expression and resulted in decreased cellular accumulation of the fluorescent substrate Hoechst 33342. Inhibiting the EP1 and EP3 receptors with specific antagonists attenuated the increase in BCRP. EP receptor signaling results in activation of transcription factors, which can affect BCRP expression. Although PGE2 decreased nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B activation and increased activator protein 1, chemical inhibition of these inflammatory transcription factors did not blunt BCRP up-regulation by PGE2. Though PGE2 decreased Pgp mRNA, Pgp expression and function were not significantly altered. Overall, these findings suggest a possible role for PGE2 in the up-regulation of placental BCRP expression via EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling cascades. PMID:25261564

  7. Effect of prostaglandin E2 on multidrug resistance transporters in human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, Clifford W; Lee, Gene T; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen; He, Lily; Weiner, Carl P

    2014-12-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2, a major product of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, acts as an immunomodulator at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. It exerts biologic function through interaction with E-prostanoid (EP) receptors localized to the placenta. The activation of the COX-2/PGE2/EP signal pathway can alter the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, multidrug resistance protein 1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp); gene: ABCB1], and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; gene: ABCG2), which function to extrude drugs and xenobiotics from cells. In the placenta, PGE2-mediated changes in ABC transporter expression could impact fetal drug exposure. Furthermore, understanding the signaling cascades involved could lead to strategies for the control of Pgp and BCRP expression levels. We sought to determine the impact of PGE2 signaling mechanisms on Pgp and BCRP in human placental cells. The treatment of placental cells with PGE2 up-regulated BCRP expression and resulted in decreased cellular accumulation of the fluorescent substrate Hoechst 33342. Inhibiting the EP1 and EP3 receptors with specific antagonists attenuated the increase in BCRP. EP receptor signaling results in activation of transcription factors, which can affect BCRP expression. Although PGE2 decreased nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B activation and increased activator protein 1, chemical inhibition of these inflammatory transcription factors did not blunt BCRP up-regulation by PGE2. Though PGE2 decreased Pgp mRNA, Pgp expression and function were not significantly altered. Overall, these findings suggest a possible role for PGE2 in the up-regulation of placental BCRP expression via EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling cascades. PMID:25261564

  8. ABCG2 in peptic ulcer: gene expression and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Salagacka-Kubiak, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta; Wosiak, Agnieszka; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek; Balcerczak, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of polymorphism at position C421A and mRNA expression of the ABCG2 gene in the development of peptic ulcers, which is a very common and severe disease. ABCG2, encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found inter alia in the gastrointestinal tract, where it plays a protective role eliminating xenobiotics from cells into the extracellular environment. The materials for the study were biopsies of gastric mucosa taken during a routine endoscopy. For genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at position C421A, DNA was isolated from 201 samples, while for the mRNA expression level by real-time PCR, RNA was isolated from 60 patients. The control group of healthy individuals consisted of 97 blood donors. The dominant genotype in the group of peptic ulcer patients and healthy individuals was homozygous CC. No statistically significant differences between healthy individuals and the whole group of peptic ulcer patients and, likewise, between the subgroups of peptic ulcer patients (infected and uninfected with Helicobacter pylori) were found. ABCG2 expression relative to GAPDH expression was found in 38 of the 60 gastric mucosa samples. The expression level of the gene varies greatly among cases. The statistically significant differences between the intensity (p = 0.0375) of H. pylori infection and ABCG2 gene expression have been shown. It was observed that the more intense the infection, the higher the level of ABCG2 expression. PMID:26578453

  9. Effect of bovine ABCG2 Y581S polymorphism on concentrations in milk of enrofloxacin and its active metabolite ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Otero, J A; García-Mateos, D; de la Fuente, A; Prieto, J G; Álvarez, A I; Merino, G

    2016-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) is involved in the secretion of several drugs into milk. The bovine Y581S ABCG2 polymorphism increases the secretion into milk of the fluoroquinolone danofloxacin in Holstein cows. Danofloxacin and enrofloxacin are the fluoroquinolones most widely used in veterinary medicine. Both enrofloxacin (ENRO) and its active metabolite ciprofloxacin (CIPRO) reach milk at relatively high concentrations. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the bovine Y581S ABCG2 polymorphism on in vitro transport as well as on concentrations in plasma and in milk of ENRO and CIPRO. Experiments using cells overexpressing bovine ABCG2 showed the effects of ABCG2 on the transport of CIPRO, demonstrating more efficient in vitro transport of this antimicrobial by the S581 variant as compared with the Y581 variant. Animal studies administering 2.5mg/kg of ENRO subcutaneously to Y/Y 581 and Y/S 581 cows revealed that concentrations in plasma of ENRO and CIPRO were significantly lower in Y/S animals. Regardless of the genotype, the antimicrobial profile in milk after the administration of ENRO was predominantly of CIPRO. With respect to the genotype effects on the amounts of drugs present in milk, AUC0-24 values were more than 1.2 times higher in Y/S cows for ENRO and 2.2 times for CIPRO, indicating a greater capacity of Y581S to transfer these drugs into milk. These results emphasize the clinical relevance of this polymorphism as a factor affecting the concentrations in plasma and in milk of drugs of importance in veterinary medicine. PMID:27157572

  10. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients. PMID:24253450

  11. Effect of LEPR, ABCG2 and SCD1 gene polymorphisms on reproductive traits in the Iranian Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Asadollahpour Nanaei, H; Ansari Mahyari, S; Edriss, M-A

    2014-10-01

    During the last decades, genetic selection for milk production traits has led to increased fertility and health problems in dairy cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of three polymorphisms located in the ATP-binding cassette superfamily G member 2 transporter (ABCG2), stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes on reproductive traits and somatic cell count (SCC). The analysis was conducted on 408 randomly selected cows. The SNPs within the genes (LEPR, ABCG2 and SCD1) were genotyped using the PCR-RFLP method. All three possible genotypes were observed for SCD1-T878C and LEPR-T945M SNPs, but not for ABCG2-Y581S SNP. LEPR-T945M and ABCG2-Y581S SNPs had no statistically significant effect on the studied reproductive traits and SCC. However, SCD1-T878C SNP were negatively and significantly related to pregnancy length, dry days and open days (p < 0.05), which lead to decreased profitability in dairy herds. The results suggest that the T878C SNP of SCD1 might be useful as a DNA marker to decrease reproductive problems and improve production traits in Iranian Holstein dairy cows. PMID:25130486

  12. A model of secreting murine mammary epithelial HC11 cells comprising endogenous Bcrp/Abcg2 expression and function.

    PubMed

    Tallkvist, Jonas; Yagdiran, Yagmur; Danielsson, Louise; Oskarsson, Agneta

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp/Abcg2) and multidrug transporter 1 (Mdr1/Abcb1) are efflux proteins located in the apical membrane of mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Bcrp is induced in MEC during gestation and lactation, while Mdr1 is down-regulated during lactation. Numerous drugs and toxic compounds are known to be actively secreted into milk by Bcrp, but most chemicals have not been investigated in this respect, emphasizing the need for functional Bcrp studies in an established cell line with secreting mammary epithelial cells. The present study was undertaken to examine expressions of Bcrp and Mdr1 in mammary epithelial HC11 cells, derived from a mid-gestational murine mammary gland. In addition, Bcrp function was assessed by transport experiments with mitoxantrone (MX) in undifferentiated HC11 cells, in HC11 cells subjected to Bcrp RNA interference (RNAi), as well as in HC11 cells stimulated to differentiate by treatment with lactogenic hormones. Differentiated HC11 cells organized into alveolar-resembling structures and gene expression of the major milk protein β-casein was induced, whereas undifferentiated cells formed monolayers with lower β-casein expression. Bcrp and Mdr1 gene and protein were expressed in both undifferentiated and differentiated HC11 cells. Differentiation of HC11 cells resulted in increased Bcrp protein expression, while Mdr1 gene and protein expressions were reduced. The Bcrp inhibitor elacridar (GF120918) reduced secretion and increased accumulation of MX in both undifferentiated and differentiated HC11 cells. Silencing of the Bcrp gene caused an increased accumulation of MX. The results indicate that the HC11 cell model provides a promising tool to investigate transport of potential Bcrp substrates in mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25791223

  13. Gemcitabine upregulates ABCG2/BCRP and modulates the intracellular pharmacokinetic profiles of bioluminescence in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Gu, Mancang; Zhu, Lixin; Liu, Junying; Xiong, Yang; Wei, Yinghui; Li, Fanzhu

    2016-03-01

    A lack of methods capable of exploring real-time intracellular drug deposition has since limited the investigation of gemcitabine-induced multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, resistance induced by D-luciferin, a substrate of the breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP), has recently attracted clinical attention, but further investigation has been limited. Herein, the intracellular pharmacokinetic behavior of D-luciferin was investigated in pancreatic cancer cell lines in real time by using bioluminescence imaging. To achieve this feat, BxPC3 and Panc1 pancreatic cancer cells overexpressing firefly luciferase were treated with gemcitabine in a dose and time gradient manner in vitro. The intracellular pharmacokinetic profiles of each group were then determined through the acquisition of bioluminescent signal intensity of D-luciferin in cells. Simultaneously, key pharmacokinetic parameters including area under the curve, elimination rate constant (K), and mean resident time were calculated according to the noncompartment model. ABCG2 protein levels following gemcitabine treatment were detected through western blot, and gemcitabine showed no significant effect on luciferase activity over dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a control (P>0.05). However, gemcitabine significantly increased K values while suppressing area under the curve and mean resident time compared with DMSO (P<0.05) and increased ABCG2 expression over DMSO-treated cells. In addition, gemcitabine increased the elimination rate of the ABCG2 substrate, D-luciferin, and decreased D-luciferin accumulation in BxPC3 and Panc1 cells in a dose-response manner. Advances made herein illustrate the versatility of the in-vitro bioluminescent model and its capability to observe the onset of chemoresistance in real time. PMID:26556627

  14. ABC multidrug transporters in schistosomes and other parasitic flatworms

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease affecting hundreds of millions, is caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. Treatment and control of schistosomiasis relies almost exclusively on a single drug, praziquantel (PZQ), a dangerous situation for a disease of this magnitude. Though PZQ is highly effective overall, it has drawbacks, and reports of worms showing PZQ resistance, either induced in the laboratory or isolated from the field, are disconcerting. Multidrug transporters underlie multidrug resistance (MDR), a phenomenon in which resistance to a single drug is accompanied by unexpected cross-resistance to several structurally unrelated compounds. Some of the best studied multidrug transporters are members of the ancient and very large ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of efflux transporters. ABC multidrug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1) are also associated with drug resistance in parasites, including helminths such as schistosomes. In addition to their association with drug resistance, however, ABC transporters also function in a wide variety of physiological processes in metazoans. In this review, we examine recent studies that help define the role of schistosome ABC transporters in regulating drug susceptibility, and in normal schistosome physiology, including reproduction and excretory activity. We postulate that schistosome ABC transporters could be useful targets for compounds that enhance the effectiveness of current therapeutics as well as for agents that act as antischistosomals on their own. PMID:23474413

  15. [The Role of ABCG2 Protein in Maintenance of Viability and Proliferative Activity of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Under Hypoxic Conditions].

    PubMed

    Poleshko, A G; Volotovski, I D

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that hypoxia (5% 02) and fibroblast growth factor bFGF reduce the doubling time of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells under their cultivation in vitro that indicates an increase in cell culture proliferation. It has been found out that low concentrations of O2 and factor bFGF added to the cell culture medium increase an expression of abcg2 gene and its gene protein, ABCG2 transport gene, in mesenchymal stem cells. These events potentiate the effects of hypoxia observed in mesenchymal stem cells. We revealed that blocking of ABCG2 protein functional activity led to increased generation of reactive oxygen species in mesenchymal stem cells. The effect of hypoxia and/or bFGF on protein profile of mesenchymal stem cells was studied. The results represented in this work together with previous data proved a link between ABCG2 protein expression, its activity and maintenance of viability and proliferative activity of mesenchymal stem cells cultivated under hypoxia. ABCG2 acts as protector. PMID:27192835

  16. Converting potent indeno[1,2-b]indole inhibitors of protein kinase CK2 into selective inhibitors of the breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Jabor Gozzi, Gustavo; Bouaziz, Zouhair; Winter, Evelyn; Daflon-Yunes, Nathalia; Aichele, Dagmar; Nacereddine, Abdelhamid; Marminon, Christelle; Valdameri, Glaucio; Zeinyeh, Waël; Bollacke, Andre; Guillon, Jean; Lacoudre, Aline; Pinaud, Noël; Cadena, Silvia M; Jose, Joachim; Le Borgne, Marc; Di Pietro, Attilio

    2015-01-01

    A series of indeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione derivatives were synthesized as human casein kinase II (CK2) inhibitors. The most potent inhibitors contained a N(5)-isopropyl substituent on the C-ring. The same series of compounds was found to also inhibit the breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2 but with totally different structure-activity relationships: a N(5)-phenethyl substituent was critical, and additional hydrophobic substituents at position 7 or 8 of the D-ring or a methoxy at phenethyl position ortho or meta also contributed to inhibition. The best ABCG2 inhibitors, such as 4c, 4h, 4i, 4j, and 4k, behaved as very weak inhibitors of CK2, whereas the most potent CK2 inhibitors, such as 4a, 4p, and 4e, displayed limited interaction with ABCG2. It was therefore possible to convert, through suitable substitutions of the indeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione scaffold, potent CK2 inhibitors into selective ABCG2 inhibitors and vice versa. In addition, some of the best ABCG2 inhibitors, which displayed a very low cytotoxicity, thus giving a high therapeutic ratio, and appeared not to be transported, constitute promising candidates for further investigations. PMID:25272055

  17. Pelitinib (EKB-569) targets the up-regulation of ABCB1 and ABCG2 induced by hyperthermia to eradicate lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pelitinib is a potent irreversible EGFR TK inhibitor currently in clinical trials for the treatment of lung cancer. Hyperthermia has been applied concomitantly with chemotherapy and radiotherapy to enhance treatment outcome. In this study, we investigated the ability of the combination of pelitinib with other conventional anticancer drugs to specifically target cancer cells with up-regulated efflux transporters ABCB1/ABCG2 after hyperthermia as a novel way to eradicate the cancer stem-like cells responsible for cancer recurrence. Experimental Approach Alterations in intracellular topotecan accumulation, the efflux of fluorescent probe substrates, expression and ATPase activity of ABCB1/ABCG2 and tumoursphere formation capacity of side population (SP) cells sorted after hyperthermia were examined to elucidate the mechanism of pelitinib-induced chemosensitization. Key Results While pelitinib did not modulate ABCB1/ABCG2 expressions, the combination of pelitinib with transporter substrate anticancer drugs induced more marked apoptosis, specifically in cells exposed to hyperthermia. The flow cytometric assay showed that both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated drug effluxes were significantly inhibited by pelitinib in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition kinetics suggested that pelitinib is a competitive inhibitor of ABCB1/ABCG2, which is consistent with its ability to stimulate their ATPase activity. SP cells sorted after hyperthermia were found to be more resistant to anticancer drugs, presumably due to the up-regulation of ABCB1 and ABCG2. Importantly, pelitinib specifically enhanced the chemosensitivity but reduced the tumoursphere formation capacity of these SP cells. Conclusions and Implications This study demonstrated a novel approach, exploiting drug resistance, to selectively kill cancer stem-like cells after hyperthermia. PMID:25988710

  18. Disulfide Cross-linking of a Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion Transporter Impacts Multidrug Efflux.

    PubMed

    Radchenko, Martha; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2016-04-29

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters contribute to multidrug resistance by extruding different drugs across cell membranes. The MATE transporters alternate between their extracellular and intracellular facing conformations to propel drug export, but how these structural changes occur is unclear. Here we combine site-specific cross-linking and functional studies to probe the movement of transmembrane helices in NorM from Neiserria gonorrheae (NorM-NG), a MATE transporter with known extracellular facing structure. We generated an active, cysteine-less NorM-NG and conducted pairwise cysteine mutagenesis on this variant. We found that copper phenanthroline catalyzed disulfide bond formation within five cysteine pairs and increased the electrophoretic mobility of the corresponding mutants. Furthermore, copper phenanthroline abolished the activity of the five paired cysteine mutants, suggesting that these substituted amino acids come in spatial proximity during transport, and the proximity changes are functionally indispensable. Our data also implied that the substrate-binding transmembrane helices move up to 10 Å in NorM-NG during transport and afforded distance restraints for modeling the intracellular facing transporter, thereby casting new light on the underlying mechanism. PMID:26975373

  19. Caveolin-1 mediates chemoresistance in breast cancer stem cells via β-catenin/ABCG2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyu; Wang, Neng; Li, Wenping; Liu, Pengxi; Chen, Qianjun; Situ, Honglin; Zhong, Shaowen; Guo, Li; Lin, Yi; Shen, Jiangang; Chen, Jianping

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are at the root of drug resistance, and recent studies have indicated that caveolin-1, a membrane transporter protein, is involved in the regulation of cancer chemoresistance and stem cell signaling. However, the current understanding of the role of caveolin-1 in breast cancer development remains controversial. Herein, we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression was upregulated after breast cancer chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by co-overexpression of β-catenin and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) signaling. Additionally, breast CSCs were enriched for caveolin-1 expression. Caveolin-1 silencing sensitized breast CSCs by limiting their self-renewal ability but promoting the differentiation process. β-catenin silencing prevented the enhanced chemoresistance of CSCs induced by caveolin-1 overexpression, indicating that β-catenin is an essential molecule responsible for caveolin-1-mediated action. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that caveolin-1 silencing could downregulate the β-catenin/ABCG2 pathway through glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta activation and Akt inhibition, resulting in increased β-catenin phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. Clinical investigation also revealed a close correlation between caveolin-1 and β-catenin/ABCG2 signaling in breast cancer samples. Notably, caveolin-1 was highly elevated in triple-negative breast cancer, and caveolin-1 silencing significantly impaired the tumorigenicity and chemoresistance of breast CSCs in in vivo models. Overall, our study not only highlights the role of caveolin-1 in mediating the chemoresistance of breast CSCs via β-catenin/ABCG2 regulation but also provides novel approaches for future therapies targeting CSCs. PMID:25085904

  20. Hyperuricemia in acute gastroenteritis is caused by decreased urate excretion via ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Ooyama, Keiko; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Nakashima, Akio; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Higashino, Toshihide; Wakai, Kenji; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Hokari, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Fujimori, Shin; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the physiological and pathophysiological roles of intestinal urate excretion via ABCG2 in humans, we genotyped ABCG2 dysfunctional common variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142), in end-stage renal disease (hemodialysis) and acute gastroenteritis patients, respectively. ABCG2 dysfunction markedly increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 106 hemodialysis patients (P = 1.1 × 10(-4)), which demonstrated the physiological role of ABCG2 for intestinal urate excretion because their urate excretion almost depends on intestinal excretion via ABCG2. Also, ABCG2 dysfunction significantly elevated SUA in 67 acute gastroenteritis patients (P = 6.3 × 10(-3)) regardless of the degree of dehydration, which demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ABCG2 in acute gastroenteritis. These findings for the first time show ABCG2-mediated intestinal urate excretion in humans, and indicates the physiological and pathophysiological importance of intestinal epithelium as an excretion pathway besides an absorption pathway. Furthermore, increased SUA could be a useful marker not only for dehydration but also epithelial impairment of intestine. PMID:27571712

  1. Hyperuricemia in acute gastroenteritis is caused by decreased urate excretion via ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Ooyama, Keiko; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Nakashima, Akio; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Higashino, Toshihide; Wakai, Kenji; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Hokari, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Fujimori, Shin; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the physiological and pathophysiological roles of intestinal urate excretion via ABCG2 in humans, we genotyped ABCG2 dysfunctional common variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142), in end-stage renal disease (hemodialysis) and acute gastroenteritis patients, respectively. ABCG2 dysfunction markedly increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 106 hemodialysis patients (P = 1.1 × 10−4), which demonstrated the physiological role of ABCG2 for intestinal urate excretion because their urate excretion almost depends on intestinal excretion via ABCG2. Also, ABCG2 dysfunction significantly elevated SUA in 67 acute gastroenteritis patients (P = 6.3 × 10−3) regardless of the degree of dehydration, which demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ABCG2 in acute gastroenteritis. These findings for the first time show ABCG2-mediated intestinal urate excretion in humans, and indicates the physiological and pathophysiological importance of intestinal epithelium as an excretion pathway besides an absorption pathway. Furthermore, increased SUA could be a useful marker not only for dehydration but also epithelial impairment of intestine. PMID:27571712

  2. The ABCs of Candida albicans Multidrug Transporter Cdr1

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Atanu; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni

    2015-01-01

    In the light of multidrug resistance (MDR) among pathogenic microbes and cancer cells, membrane transporters have gained profound clinical significance. Chemotherapeutic failure, by far, has been attributed mainly to the robust and diverse array of these proteins, which are omnipresent in every stratum of the living world. Candida albicans, one of the major fungal pathogens affecting immunocompromised patients, also develops MDR during the course of chemotherapy. The pivotal membrane transporters that C. albicans has exploited as one of the strategies to develop MDR belongs to either the ATP binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) class of proteins. The ABC transporter Candida drug resistance 1 protein (Cdr1p) is a major player among these transporters that enables the pathogen to outplay the battery of antifungals encountered by it. The promiscuous Cdr1 protein fulfills the quintessential need of a model to study molecular mechanisms of multidrug transporter regulation and structure-function analyses of asymmetric ABC transporters. In this review, we cover the highlights of two decades of research on Cdr1p that has provided a platform to study its structure-function relationships and regulatory circuitry for a better understanding of MDR not only in yeast but also in other organisms. PMID:26407965

  3. The ABCs of Candida albicans Multidrug Transporter Cdr1.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Banerjee, Atanu; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni

    2015-12-01

    In the light of multidrug resistance (MDR) among pathogenic microbes and cancer cells, membrane transporters have gained profound clinical significance. Chemotherapeutic failure, by far, has been attributed mainly to the robust and diverse array of these proteins, which are omnipresent in every stratum of the living world. Candida albicans, one of the major fungal pathogens affecting immunocompromised patients, also develops MDR during the course of chemotherapy. The pivotal membrane transporters that C. albicans has exploited as one of the strategies to develop MDR belongs to either the ATP binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) class of proteins. The ABC transporter Candida drug resistance 1 protein (Cdr1p) is a major player among these transporters that enables the pathogen to outplay the battery of antifungals encountered by it. The promiscuous Cdr1 protein fulfills the quintessential need of a model to study molecular mechanisms of multidrug transporter regulation and structure-function analyses of asymmetric ABC transporters. In this review, we cover the highlights of two decades of research on Cdr1p that has provided a platform to study its structure-function relationships and regulatory circuitry for a better understanding of MDR not only in yeast but also in other organisms. PMID:26407965

  4. Multidrug resistance ABC transporter structure predictions by homology modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Honorat, Mylène; Falson, Pierre; Terreux, Raphael; Di Pietro, Attilio; Dumontet, Charles; Payen, Léa

    2011-03-01

    Human multidrug resistance ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane proteins responsible for the efflux of multiple, endogenous or exogenous, compounds out of the cells, and therefore they are involved in multi-drug resistance phenotype (MDR). They thus deeply impact the pharmacokinetic parameters and toxicity properties of drugs. A great pressure to develop inhibitors of these pumps is carried out, by either ligand-based drug design or (more ideally) structure-based drug design. In that goal, many biochemical studies have been carried out to characterize their transport functions, and many efforts have been spent to get high-resolution structures. Currently, beside the 3D-structures of bacterial ABC transporters Sav1866 and MsbA, only the mouse ABCB1 complete structure has been published at high-resolution, illustrating the tremendous difficulty in getting such information, taking into account that the human genome accounts for 48 ABC transporters encoding genes. Homology modeling is consequently a reasonable approach to overcome this obstacle. The present review describes, in the first part, the different approaches which have been published to set up human ABC pump 3D-homology models allowing the localization of binding sites for drug candidates, and the identification of critical residues therein. In a second part, the review proposes a more accurate strategy and practical keys to use such biological tools for initiating structure-based drug design. PMID:21470105

  5. Schistosome ABC multidrug transporters: From pharmacology to physiology

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Praziquantel (PZQ) is essentially the only drug currently available for treatment and control of schistosomiasis, a disease affecting hundreds of millions worldwide. Though highly effective overall, PZQ has limitations, most notably its significant lack of activity against immature schistosomes. Furthermore, the availability of only a single drug for a disease of this magnitude makes reports of PZQ-resistant isolates particularly troubling. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1) are efflux transporters that underlie multidrug resistance (MDR); changes in their expression or structure are also associated with drug resistance in parasites, including helminths. This review will discuss the role these transporters might play in modulating schistosome susceptibility to PZQ, and the implications for developing new or repurposed treatments that enhance the efficacy of PZQ. However, in addition to influencing drug susceptibility, ABC transporters play important roles in several critical physiological functions such as excretion and maintenance of permeability barriers. They also transport signaling molecules with high affinity, and several lines of evidence implicate mammalian transporters in a diverse array of physiological functions, including regulation of immune responses. Like their mammalian counterparts, schistosome ABC transporters appear to be involved in functions critical to the parasite, including excretory activity and reproduction, and we hypothesize that they underlie at least some aspects of parasite–host interactions. Thus, in addition to their potential as targets for enhancers of PZQ susceptibility, these transporters might also serve as candidate targets for agents that disrupt the parasite life cycle and act as antischistosomals on their own. PMID:25516841

  6. Purification of a Multidrug Resistance Transporter for Crystallization Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Kamela O.; Law, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization of integral membrane proteins is a challenging field and much effort has been invested in optimizing the overexpression and purification steps needed to obtain milligram amounts of pure, stable, monodisperse protein sample for crystallography studies. Our current work involves the structural and functional characterization of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance transporter MdtM, a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Here we present a protocol for isolation of MdtM to increase yields of recombinant protein to the milligram quantities necessary for pursuit of structural studies using X-ray crystallography. Purification of MdtM was enhanced by introduction of an elongated His-tag, followed by identification and subsequent removal of chaperonin contamination. For crystallization trials of MdtM, detergent screening using size exclusion chromatography determined that decylmaltoside (DM) was the shortest-chain detergent that maintained the protein in a stable, monodispersed state. Crystallization trials of MdtM performed using the hanging-drop diffusion method with commercially available crystallization screens yielded 3D protein crystals under several different conditions. We contend that the purification protocol described here may be employed for production of high-quality protein of other multidrug efflux members of the MFS, a ubiquitous, physiologically and clinically important class of membrane transporters. PMID:27025617

  7. Purification of a Multidrug Resistance Transporter for Crystallization Studies.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Kamela O; Law, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization of integral membrane proteins is a challenging field and much effort has been invested in optimizing the overexpression and purification steps needed to obtain milligram amounts of pure, stable, monodisperse protein sample for crystallography studies. Our current work involves the structural and functional characterization of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance transporter MdtM, a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Here we present a protocol for isolation of MdtM to increase yields of recombinant protein to the milligram quantities necessary for pursuit of structural studies using X-ray crystallography. Purification of MdtM was enhanced by introduction of an elongated His-tag, followed by identification and subsequent removal of chaperonin contamination. For crystallization trials of MdtM, detergent screening using size exclusion chromatography determined that decylmaltoside (DM) was the shortest-chain detergent that maintained the protein in a stable, monodispersed state. Crystallization trials of MdtM performed using the hanging-drop diffusion method with commercially available crystallization screens yielded 3D protein crystals under several different conditions. We contend that the purification protocol described here may be employed for production of high-quality protein of other multidrug efflux members of the MFS, a ubiquitous, physiologically and clinically important class of membrane transporters. PMID:27025617

  8. Method to Screen Multidrug Transport Inhibitors Using Yeast Overexpressing a Human MDR Transporter.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Laura; Mus-Veteau, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance has appeared to mitigate the efficiency of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. The Hedgehog receptor Patched is a multidrug transporter expressed in several cancers and as such it represents a new target to circumvent chemotherapy resistance. In this chapter, we describe the screening test developed to identify molecules able to inhibit the drug efflux activity of Patched. This screening test uses yeast overexpressing functional human Patched that have been shown to resist to chemotherapeutic agents. This test can be adapted to other MDR transporters. PMID:27485344

  9. Synthesis and ABCG2 inhibitory evaluation of 5-N-acetylardeemin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Daigo; Tsukioka, Naoki; Inoue, Yutaka; Matsubayashi, Yoshiki; Iizuka, Toshimasa; Higuchi, Kazuhiro; Ikegami, Yoji; Kawasaki, Tomomi

    2015-05-01

    An efficient and versatile synthesis of 5-N-acetylardeemin (1a) and sixteen 2-, 3- and 13-substituted derivatives 1b-q was achieved through Ugi three-component reaction of 3,3a,8,8a-tetrahydropyrrolo[2,3-b]indole and cyclization/epimerization. Their inhibitory activity on the drug efflux of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) was evaluated by flow cytometric analysis of accumulation of Hoechst 33342 stain in Flp-In-293/ABCG2 cells. Most of the derivatives exhibited a stronger ABCG2 inhibitory effect compared with natural product 1a. The derivative 1m with a 4-tolyl substituent at the C-13 position exhibited the most potent ABCG2 inhibition. This preliminary structure-activity relationship study indicates that an electron-rich aryl moiety as the 13-substituent is key to increasing the inhibitory activity. PMID:25835358

  10. Expression of the human multidrug transporter in insect cells by a recombinant baculovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Germann, U.A.; Willingham, M.C.; Pastan, I.; Gottesman, M.M. )

    1990-03-06

    The plasma membrane associated human multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene product, known as the 170-kDa P-glycoprotein or the multidrug transporter, acts as an ATP-dependent efflux pump for various cytotoxic agents. The authors expressed recombinant human multidrug transporter in a baculovirus expression system to obtain large quantities and further investigate its structure and mechanism of action. MDR1 cDNA was inserted into the genome of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells synthesized high levels of recombinant multidrug transporter 2-3 days after infection. The transporter was localized by immunocytochemical methods on the external surface of the plasma membranes, in the Golgi apparatus, and within the nuclear envelope. The human multidrug transporter expressed in insect cells is not susceptible to endoglycosidase F treatment and has a lower apparent molecular weight of 140,000, corresponding to the nonglycosylated precursor of its authentic counterpart expressed in multidrug-resistant cells. Labeling experiments showed that the recombinant multidrug transporter is phosphorylated and can be photoaffinity labeled by ({sup 3}H)azidopine, presumably at the same two sites as the native protein. Various drugs and reversing agents compete with the ({sup 3}H)azidopine binding reaction when added in excess, indicating that the recombinant human multidrug transporter expressed in insect cells is functionally similar to its authentic counterpart.

  11. Combining ABCG2 Inhibitors with IMMU-132, an Anti-Trop-2 Antibody Conjugate of SN-38, Overcomes Resistance to SN-38 in Breast and Gastric Cancers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Hsing; Wang, Yang; Zalath, Maria; Liu, Donglin; Cardillo, Thomas M; Goldenberg, David M

    2016-08-01

    Sacituzumab govitecan (IMMU-132), an SN-38-conjugated antibody-drug conjugate, is showing promising therapeutic results in a phase I/II trial of patients with advanced Trop-2-expressing, metastatic, solid cancers. As members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters confer chemotherapy resistance by active drug efflux, which is a frequent cause of treatment failure, we explored the use of known inhibitors of ABC transporters for improving the therapeutic efficacy of IMMU-132 by overcoming SN-38 resistance. Two human tumor cell lines made resistant to SN-38, MDA-MB-231-S120 (human breast cancer) and NCI-N87-S120 (human gastric cancer), were established by continuous exposure of the parental cells to stepwise increased concentrations of SN-38 and analyzed by flow cytometry for functional activities of ABCG2 and ABCB1, immunoblotting and qRT-PCR for the expression of ABCG2 at both protein and mRNA levels, and MTS assays for the potency of SN-38 alone or in combination with a modulator of ABC transporters. MDA-MB-231-S120 and NCI-N87-S120 displayed reduced sensitivity to SN-38 in vitro, with IC50 values approximately 50-fold higher than parental MDA-MB-231 and NCI-N87 cells. The increase in drug resistance of both S120 cell populations is associated with the expression of functional ABCG2, but not ABCB1. Importantly, treatment of both S120 sublines with known ABCG2 inhibitors (fumitremorgin C, Ko143, and YHO-13351) restored toxicity of SN-38, and the combination of YHO-13351 with IMMU-132 increased the median survival of mice bearing NCI-N87-S120 xenografts. These results provide a rationale for combination therapy of IMMU-132 and inhibitors of ABC transporters, such as YHO-13351. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1910-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27207776

  12. ABCG2 is a potential marker of tumor-initiating cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sicchieri, Renata Danielle; da Silveira, Willian Abraham; Mandarano, Larissa Raquel Mouro; de Oliveira, Tatiane Mendes Gonçalves; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; Tiezzi, Daniel Guimarães

    2015-12-01

    The existence of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) within solid tumors has been hypothesized to explain tumor heterogeneity and resistance to cancer therapy. In breast cancer, the expression of CD44 and CD24 and the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) can be used to selectively isolate a cell population enriched in TICs. However, the ideal marker to identify TICs has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of novel potential markers for TIC in breast carcinoma. We prospectively analyzed the expression of CD44, CD24, ABCG2, and CXCR4, and the activity of ALDH1 by using flow cytometry in 48 invasive ductal carcinomas from locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer patients who were administered primary chemotherapy. A mammosphere assay was employed in 30 samples. The relationship among flow cytometric analyses, ABCG2 gene expression, and clinical and pathological responses to therapy was analyzed. The GSE32646 database was analyzed in silico to identify genes associated with tumors with low and high ABCG2 expression. We observed that the presence of ABCG2(+) cells within the primary tumor was the only marker to predict the formation of mammospheres in vitro (R (2) = 0.15, p = 0.029). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed a positive correlation between ABCG2 expression and the presence of ABCG2(+) cells within the primary tumor. The expression of ABCG2 was predictive of the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our experiments and in the GSE32646 dataset (p = 0.04 and p = 0.002, respectively). The in silico analysis demonstrated that ABCG2(Up) breast cancer samples have a slower cell cycle and a higher expression of membrane proteins but a greater potential for chromosomal instability, metastasis, immune evasion, and resistance to hypoxia. Such genetic characteristics are compatible with highly aggressive and resistant tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that the presence of ABCG2

  13. [Structural and Pharmacological Studies of an ABC Multidrug Transporter].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    A drug's effectiveness against a disease depends not only on its interaction with receptors but also its pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and extrusion; ADME). ATP binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters are important proteins that influence the ADME properties of a drug, especially the ABC transporter subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1). Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of ABCB1 will contribute to our understanding of the molecular basis of ADME. Human ABCB1 is expressed in many organelles, and exports various substrates from cells using energy generated by its ATP hydrolase (ATPase) activity. The ATPase activity depends on the concentration of the transport substrates, and the characteristic behavior of the substrate-dependent ATPase activity can be related to the molecular mechanism of ABCB1. Recently, we have revealed the molecular mechanisms of a eukaryotic ABCB1 homolog, CmABCB1, based on structural and functional studies. In this review, I discuss the relationship between key structural features and the behavior of transport substrate-dependent ATPase activity of CmABCB1, including its role in determining the molecular basis of ADME. PMID:26831793

  14. Genetic Variations in ABCG2 Gene Predict Breast Carcinoma Susceptibility and Clinical Outcomes after Treatment with Anthracycline-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huizhe; Liu, Yong; Kang, Hui; Xiao, Qinghuan; Yao, Weifan; Zhao, Haishan; Wang, Enhua; Wei, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    The genetic variants of the ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) are known to be involved in developing cancer risk and interindividual differences in chemotherapeutic response. The polymorphisms in ABCG2 gene were genotyped by using PCR-RFLP assays. We found that ABCG2 G34A GA/AA genotype, C421A AA genotype, and haplotypes 34A-421C and 34G-421A were significantly associated with increased risk for developing breast carcinoma. Furthermore, ABCG2 C421A AA homozygote had a significant enhanced therapeutic response in patients with neoadjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Moreover, ABCG2 G34A AA genotype carriers displayed a longer OS in ER positive patients or PR positive patients after postoperative anthracycline-based chemotherapy. These results suggested that the ABCG2 polymorphisms might be a candidate pharmacogenomic factor to assess susceptibility and prognosis for breast carcinoma patients. PMID:26634205

  15. Curcumin Improves the Tumoricidal Effect of Mitomycin C by Suppressing ABCG2 Expression in Stem Cell-Like Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qianmei; Ye, Meina; Lu, Yiyu; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Qilong; Huang, Shuang; Su, Shibing

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells with stem cell–like properties contribute to the development of resistance to chemotherapy and eventually to tumor relapses. The current study investigated the potential of curcumin to reduce breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) population for sensitizing breast cancer cells to mitomycin C (MMC) both in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin improved the sensitivity of paclitaxel, cisplatin, and doxorubicin in breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, as shown by the more than 2-fold decrease in the half-maximal inhibitory concentration of these chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, curcumin sensitized the BCSCs of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 to MMC by 5- and 15-fold, respectively. The BCSCs could not grow to the fifth generation in the presence of curcumin and MMC. MMC or curcumin alone only marginally reduced the BCSC population in the mammospheres; however, together, they reduced the BCSC population in CD44+CD24−/low cells by more than 75% (29.34% to 6.86%). Curcumin sensitized BCSCs through a reduction in the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCG2 and ABCC1. We demonstrated that fumitremorgin C, a selective ABCG2 inhibitor, reduced BCSC survival to a similar degree as curcumin did. Curcumin sensitized breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs by reducing the BCSC population mainly through a reduction in the expression of ABCG2. PMID:26305906

  16. Interaction of the P-Glycoprotein Multidrug Transporter with Sterols.

    PubMed

    Clay, Adam T; Lu, Peihua; Sharom, Frances J

    2015-11-01

    The ABC transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) actively exports structurally diverse substrates from within the lipid bilayer, leading to multidrug resistance. Many aspects of Pgp function are altered by the phospholipid environment, but its interactions with sterols remain enigmatic. In this work, the functional interaction between purified Pgp and various sterols was investigated in detergent solution and proteoliposomes. Fluorescence studies showed that dehydroergosterol, cholestatrienol, and NBD-cholesterol interact intimately with Pgp, resulting in both quenching of protein Trp fluorescence and enhancement of sterol fluorescence. Kd values indicated binding affinities in the range of 3-9 μM. Collisional quenching experiments showed that Pgp-bound NBD-cholesterol was protected from the external milieu, resonance energy transfer was observed between Pgp Trp residues and the sterol, and the fluorescence emission of bound sterol was enhanced. These observations suggested an intimate interaction of bound sterols with the transporter at a protected nonpolar site. Cholesterol hemisuccinate altered the thermal unfolding of Pgp and greatly stabilized its basal ATPase activity in both a detergent solution and reconstituted proteoliposomes of certain phospholipids. Other sterols, including dehydroergosterol, did not stabilize the basal ATPase activity of detergent-solubilized Pgp, which suggests that this is not a generalized sterol effect. The phospholipid composition and cholesterol hemisuccinate content of Pgp proteoliposomes altered the basal ATPase and drug transport cycles differently. Sterols may interact with Pgp and modulate its structure and function by occupying part of the drug-binding pocket or by binding to putative consensus cholesterol-binding (CRAC/CARC) motifs located within the transmembrane domains. PMID:26484739

  17. ATP-dependent transport of vinblastine in vesicles from human multidrug-resistant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horio, M.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I. )

    1988-05-01

    Resistance of human cancer cells to multiple cytotoxic hydrophobic agents (multidrug resistance) is due to overexpression of the MDR1 gene, whose product is the plasma membrane P-glycoprotein. Plasma membrane vesicles partially purified from multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells, but not from drug-sensitive cells, accumulate ({sup 3}H)vinblastine in an ATP-dependent manner. This transport is osmotically sensitive, with an apparent K{sub m} of 38 {mu}M for ATP and of {approx} 2 {mu}M for vinblastine. The nonhydrolyzable analog adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate does not substitute for ATP but is a competitive inhibitor of ATP for the transport process. Vanadate, and ATPase inhibitor, is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of transport. These results indicate that hydrolysis of ATP is probably required for active transport vinblastine. Several other drugs to which multidrug-resistant cell lines are resistant inhibit transport, with relative potencies as follows: vincristine > actinomycin D > daunomycin > colchicine = puromycin. Verapamil and quinidine, which reverse the multidrug-resistance phenotype, are good inhibitors of the transport process. These results confirm that multidrug-resistant cells express an energy-dependent plasma membrane transporter for hydrophobic drugs, and establish a system for the detailed biochemical analysis of this transport process.

  18. The multidrug transporters belonging to major facilitator superfamily in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Edda; Arrigo, Patrizio; Bellinzoni, Marco; Silva, Pedro A. E.; Martín, Carlos; Aínsa, José A.; Guglierame, Paola; Riccardi, Giovanna

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance play an important role in the insurgence of tuberculosis. Detailed knowledge of the molecular basis of drug recognition and transport by multidrug transport systems is required for the development of new antibiotics that are not extruded or of inhibitors that block the multidrug transporter and allow traditional antibiotics to be effective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have undertaken the inventory of the drug transporters subfamily, included in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), encoded by the complete genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). These proteins were identified on the basis of their characteristic stretches of amino acids and transmembrane segments (TMS) number. CONCLUSIONS: Genome analysis and searches of homology between the identified transporters and proteins characterized in other organisms revealed 16 open reading frames encoding putative drug efflux pumps belonging to MFS. In the case of two of them, we also have demonstrated that they function as drug efflux proteins. PMID:12520088

  19. Insight into determinants of substrate binding and transport in a multidrug efflux protein

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Kamela O.; Paul, Stephanie; Labarbuta, Paola; Law, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance arising from the activity of integral membrane transporter proteins presents a global public health threat. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, transporter proteins belonging to the major facilitator superfamily make a considerable contribution to multidrug resistance by catalysing efflux of myriad structurally and chemically different antimicrobial compounds. Despite their clinical relevance, questions pertaining to mechanistic details of how these promiscuous proteins function remain outstanding, and the role(s) played by individual amino acid residues in recognition, binding and subsequent transport of different antimicrobial substrates by multidrug efflux members of the major facilitator superfamily requires illumination. Using in silico homology modelling, molecular docking and mutagenesis studies in combination with substrate binding and transport assays, we identified several amino acid residues that play important roles in antimicrobial substrate recognition, binding and transport by Escherichia coli MdtM, a representative multidrug efflux protein of the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, our studies suggested that ‘aromatic clamps’ formed by tyrosine and phenylalanine residues located within the substrate binding pocket of MdtM may be important for antimicrobial substrate recognition and transport by the protein. Such ‘clamps’ may be a structurally and functionally important feature of all major facilitator multidrug efflux proteins. PMID:26961153

  20. Insight into determinants of substrate binding and transport in a multidrug efflux protein.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Kamela O; Paul, Stephanie; Labarbuta, Paola; Law, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance arising from the activity of integral membrane transporter proteins presents a global public health threat. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, transporter proteins belonging to the major facilitator superfamily make a considerable contribution to multidrug resistance by catalysing efflux of myriad structurally and chemically different antimicrobial compounds. Despite their clinical relevance, questions pertaining to mechanistic details of how these promiscuous proteins function remain outstanding, and the role(s) played by individual amino acid residues in recognition, binding and subsequent transport of different antimicrobial substrates by multidrug efflux members of the major facilitator superfamily requires illumination. Using in silico homology modelling, molecular docking and mutagenesis studies in combination with substrate binding and transport assays, we identified several amino acid residues that play important roles in antimicrobial substrate recognition, binding and transport by Escherichia coli MdtM, a representative multidrug efflux protein of the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, our studies suggested that 'aromatic clamps' formed by tyrosine and phenylalanine residues located within the substrate binding pocket of MdtM may be important for antimicrobial substrate recognition and transport by the protein. Such 'clamps' may be a structurally and functionally important feature of all major facilitator multidrug efflux proteins. PMID:26961153

  1. Structures of a Na+-coupled, substrate-bound MATE multidrug transporter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Symersky, Jindrich; Radchenko, Martha; Koide, Akiko; Guo, Yi; Nie, Rongxin; Koide, Shohei

    2013-02-01

    Multidrug transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family expel dissimilar lipophilic and cationic drugs across cell membranes by dissipating a preexisting Na(+) or H(+) gradient. Despite its clinical relevance, the transport mechanism of MATE proteins remains poorly understood, largely owing to a lack of structural information on the substrate-bound transporter. Here we report crystal structures of a Na(+)-coupled MATE transporter NorM from Neisseria gonorrheae in complexes with three distinct translocation substrates (ethidium, rhodamine 6G, and tetraphenylphosphonium), as well as Cs(+) (a Na(+) congener), all captured in extracellular-facing and drug-bound states. The structures revealed a multidrug-binding cavity festooned with four negatively charged amino acids and surprisingly limited hydrophobic moieties, in stark contrast to the general belief that aromatic amino acids play a prominent role in multidrug recognition. Furthermore, we discovered an uncommon cation-π interaction in the Na(+)-binding site located outside the drug-binding cavity and validated the biological relevance of both the substrate- and cation-binding sites by conducting drug resistance and transport assays. Additionally, we uncovered potential rearrangement of at least two transmembrane helices upon Na(+)-induced drug export. Based on our structural and functional analyses, we suggest that Na(+) triggers multidrug extrusion by inducing protein conformational changes rather than by directly competing for the substrate-binding amino acids. This scenario is distinct from the canonical antiport mechanism, in which both substrate and counterion compete for a shared binding site in the transporter. Collectively, our findings provide an important step toward a detailed and mechanistic understanding of multidrug transport. PMID:23341609

  2. Identification and characterization of Candida utilis multidrug efflux transporter CuCdr1p.

    PubMed

    Watanasrisin, Wittawan; Iwatani, Shun; Oura, Takahiro; Tomita, Yasuyuki; Ikushima, Shigehiro; Chindamporn, Ariya; Niimi, Masakazu; Niimi, Kyoko; Lamping, Erwin; Cannon, Richard D; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    The edible, nitrate assimilating, yeast Candida utilis is a commercial food additive, and it is a potentially useful host for heterologous protein expression. A number of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are multidrug efflux pumps that can cause multidrug resistance in opportunistic pathogens. In order to develop optimal novel antimicrobial agents it is imperative to understand the structure, function and expression of these transporters. With the ultimate aim of developing an alternative yeast host for the heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane transporters, and to identify ABC transporters potentially associated with C. utilis multidrug resistance, we classified the entire repertoire of 30 C. utilis ABC proteins. We named the open reading frame most similar to the archetype multidrug efflux pump gene C. albicans CDR1 as CuCDR1 Overexpression of CuCDR1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADΔ caused multidrug resistance similar to that of cells overexpressing CaCDR1 Unlike CaCdr1p, however, the C-terminally green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged CuCdr1p-GFP was functionally impaired and did not properly localize to the plasma membrane. CuCdr1p function could be recovered however by adding a 15 amino acid linker -GAGGSAGGSGGAGAG- between CuCdr1p and the C-terminal GFP tag. PMID:27188883

  3. The ABCG family of membrane-associated transporters: you don't have to be big to be mighty.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian D; Haider, Ameena J; Gelissen, Ingrid C

    2011-12-01

    Along with many other mammalian ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, members of the ABCG group are involved in the regulated transport of hydrophobic compounds across cellular membranes. In humans, five ABCG family members have been identified, encoding proteins ranging from 638 to 678 amino acids in length. All five have been the subject of intensive investigation to better understand their physiological roles, expression patterns, interactions with substrates and inhibitors, and regulation at both the transcript and protein level. The principal substrates for at least four of the ABCG proteins are endogenous and dietary lipids, with ABCG1 implicated in particular in the export of cholesterol, and ABCG5 and G8 forming a functional heterodimer responsible for plant sterol elimination from the body. ABCG2 has a much broader substrate specificity and its ability to transport numerous diverse pharmaceuticals has implications for the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMETOx) profile of these compounds. ABCG2 is one of at least three so-called multidrug resistant ABC transporters expressed in humans, and its activity is associated with decreased efficacy of anti-cancer agents in several carcinomas. In addition to its role in cancer, ABCG2 also plays a role in the normal physiological transport of urate and haem, the implications of which are described. We summarize here data on all five human ABCG transporters and provide a current perspective on their roles in human health and disease. PMID:21175590

  4. Polymorphisms in ABCG2, ABCC3 and CNT1 genes and their possible impact on chemotherapy outcome of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Müller, Phillip J; Dally, Heike; Klappenecker, Cornelia N; Edler, Lutz; Jäger, Birgit; Gerst, Martina; Spiegelhalder, Bertold; Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Fischer, Jürgen R; Drings, Peter; Bartsch, Helmut; Risch, Angela

    2009-04-01

    The prognosis of lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapy is poor, motivating the search for predictive factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in membrane transporter genes could influence the pharmacokinetics of cytostatic drugs and therefore affect treatment outcome. We examined 6 SNPs with known or suspected phenotypic effect: ABCG2 G34A, C421A; ABCC3 C-211T, G3890A, C3942T and CNT1 G565A. For 349 Caucasian patients with primary lung cancer [161 small cell lung cancer (SCLC), 187 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 1 mixed] receiving first-line chemotherapy 3 different endpoints were analyzed: response after the 2nd cycle (R), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The prognostic value of the SNPs was analyzed using multivariable logistic regression, calculating odds ratios (ORs) when comparing genotype frequencies in responders and nonresponders after the 2nd cycle. Hazard ratios (HRs) for PFS and for OS were calculated using Cox regression methods. In all lung cancer patients, none of the investigated polymorphisms modified response statistically significant. The only significant result in the histological subpopulations was in SCLC patients carrying the ABCC3 -211T allele who showed significantly worsened PFS (HR: 1.79; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-2.82). In an exploratory subgroup analysis significantly worse OS was seen for carriers of the ABCG2 421A-allele treated with platinum-based drugs (HR: 1.60; 95% CI 1.04-2.47; n = 256). In conclusion, this study prioritizes ABCC3 C-211T and ABCG2 C421A as candidate transporter SNPs to be further investigated as possible predictors of the clinical outcome of chemotherapy in lung cancer patients. PMID:19107936

  5. Regulation of drug transporter expression by oncostatin M in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2011-08-01

    The cytokine oncostatin M (OSM) is a member of the interleukin (IL)-6 family, known to down-regulate expression of drug metabolizing cytochromes P-450 in human hepatocytes. The present study was designed to determine whether OSM may also impair expression of sinusoidal and canalicular drug transporters, which constitute important determinants of drug hepatic clearance. Exposure of primary human hepatocytes to OSM down-regulated mRNA levels of major sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC) influx transporters, including sodium-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, OATP1B3, OATP2B1, organic cation transporter 1 and organic anion transporter 2. OSM also repressed mRNA expressions of ATP binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 2/ABCC2 and breast cancer resistance protein/ABCG2, without however impairing those of multidrug resistance gene 1/P-glycoprotein/ABCB1, MRP3/ABCC3, MRP4/ABCC4 and bile salt export pump/ABCB11. The cytokine concomitantly reduced NTCP, OATP1B1, OATP2B1 and ABCG2 protein expression and NTCP and OATP transport activities. OSM effects towards transporters were found to be dose-dependent and highly correlated with those of IL-6, but not with those of other inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α or interferon-γ. In addition, OSM-mediated repression of some transporters such as NTCP, OATP1B1 and OATP2B1, was counteracted by knocking-down expression of the type II OSM receptor subunits through siRNA transfection. This OSM-mediated down-regulation of drug SLC transporters and ABCG2 in human hepatocytes may contribute to alterations of pharmacokinetics in patients suffering from diseases associated with increased production of OSM. PMID:21570956

  6. Structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters and their mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug resistance poses grand challenges to the effective treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. Integral membrane proteins from the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family contribute to multidrug resistance by exporting a wide variety of therapeutic drugs across cell membranes. MATE proteins are conserved from bacteria to humans and can be categorized into the NorM, DinF and eukaryotic subfamilies. MATE transporters hold great appeal as potential therapeutic targets for curbing multidrug resistance, yet their transport mechanism remains elusive. During the past 5 years, X-ray structures of 4 NorM and DinF transporters have been reported and guided biochemical studies to reveal how MATE transporters extrude different drugs. Such advances, although substantial, have yet to be discussed collectively. Herein I review these structures and the unprecedented mechanistic insights that have been garnered from those structure-inspired studies, as well as lay out the outstanding questions that present exciting opportunities for future work. PMID:26488689

  7. Structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters and their mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug resistance poses grand challenges to the effective treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. Integral membrane proteins from the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family contribute to multidrug resistance by exporting a wide variety of therapeutic drugs across cell membranes. MATE proteins are conserved from bacteria to humans and can be categorized into the NorM, DinF and eukaryotic subfamilies. MATE transporters hold great appeal as potential therapeutic targets for curbing multidrug resistance, yet their transport mechanism remains elusive. During the past 5 years, X-ray structures of 4 NorM and DinF transporters have been reported and guided biochemical studies to reveal how MATE transporters extrude different drugs. Such advances, although substantial, have yet to be discussed collectively. Herein I review these structures and the unprecedented mechanistic insights that have been garnered from those structure-inspired studies, as well as lay out the outstanding questions that present exciting opportunities for future work. PMID:26488689

  8. The antiepileptic drug lamotrigine is a substrate of mouse and human breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Römermann, Kerstin; Helmer, Renate; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the major problem in the treatment of epilepsy. One hypothesis to explain AED resistance suggests that seizure-induced overexpression of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts AEDs to reach their brain targets. Various studies examined whether AEDs are substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp; MDR1; ABCB1), whereas information about the potential role of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) is scanty. We used a highly sensitive in vitro assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) with MDCKII cells transduced with murine Bcrp1 or human BCRP to evaluate whether AEDs are substrates of this major efflux transporter. Six of 7 AEDs examined, namely phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, levetiracetam, topiramate, and valproate, were not transported by Bcrp at therapeutic concentrations, whereas lamotrigine exhibited a marked asymmetric, Bcrp-mediated transport in the CETA, which could be almost completely inhibited with the Bcrp inhibitor Ko143. Significant but less marked transport of lamotrigine was determined in MDCK cells transfected with human BCRP. Lamotrigine is also a substrate of human Pgp, so that this drug is the first AED that has been identified as a dual substrate of the two major human efflux transporters at the BBB. Previous in vivo studies have demonstrated a synergistic or cooperative role of Pgp and Bcrp in the efflux of dual substrates at the BBB, so that transport of lamotrigine by Pgp and BCRP may be an important mechanism of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy patients in whom both transporters are overexpressed. PMID:25645391

  9. Switch-Loop Flexibility Affects Transport of Large Drugs by the Promiscuous AcrB Multidrug Efflux Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hi-jea; Müller, Reinke T.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug efflux transporters recognize a variety of structurally unrelated compounds for which the molecular basis is poorly understood. For the resistance nodulation and cell division (RND) inner membrane component AcrB of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux system from Escherichia coli, drug binding occurs at the access and deep binding pockets. These two binding areas are separated by an 11-amino-acid-residue-containing switch loop whose conformational flexibility is speculated to be essential for drug binding and transport. A G616N substitution in the switch loop has a distinct and local effect on the orientation of the loop and on the ability to transport larger drugs. Here, we report a distinct phenotypical pattern of drug recognition and transport for the G616N variant, indicating that drug substrates with minimal projection areas of >70 Å2 are less well transported than other substrates. PMID:24914123

  10. Multidrug resistance in parasites: ABC transporters, P-glycoproteins and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Jones, P M; George, A M

    2005-04-30

    Parasitic diseases, caused by protozoa, helminths and arthropods, rank among the most important problems in human and veterinary medicine, and in agriculture, leading to debilitating sicknesses and loss of life. In the absence of vaccines and with the general failure of vector eradication programs, drugs are the main line of defence, but the newest drugs are being tracked by the emergence of resistance in parasites, sharing ominous parallels with multidrug resistance in bacterial pathogens. Any of a number of mechanisms will elicit a drug resistance phenotype in parasites, including: active efflux, reduced uptake, target modification, drug modification, drug sequestration, by-pass shunting, or substrate competition. The role of ABC transporters in parasitic multidrug resistance mechanisms is being subjected to more scrutiny, due in part to the established roles of certain ABC transporters in human diseases, and also to an increasing portfolio of ABC transporters from parasite genome sequencing projects. For example, over 100 ABC transporters have been identified in the Escherichia coli genome, but to date only about 65 in all parasitic genomes. Long established laboratory investigations are now being assisted by molecular biology, bioinformatics, and computational modelling, and it is in these areas that the role of ABC transporters in parasitic multidrug resistance mechanisms may be defined and put in perspective with that of other proteins. We discuss ABC transporters in parasites, and conclude with an example of molecular modelling that identifies a new interaction between the structural domains of a parasite P-glycoprotein. PMID:15826647

  11. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induced cell-specific drug transporters with acquired cisplatin resistance in cisplatin sensitive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gotovdorj, Tuvshinjargal; Lee, Eunil; Lim, Yongchul; Cha, Eun Jeong; Kwon, Daeho; Hong, Eunyoung; Kim, YunJeong; Oh, Min-Yeong

    2014-09-01

    2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) can induce drug transporter genes such as the ATP-binding cassette G member 2 (ABCG2), which contributes to multidrug resistance. We investigated the effect of TCDD pretreatment on drug transporters induction from cancer cells of various origins. Cell viabilities after treatment of cisplatin were measured to evaluate acquiring cisplatin resistance by TCDD. Acquring cisplatin resistance was found only in cisplatin senstivie cancer cells including gastric SNU601, colon LS180, brain CRT-MG and lymphoma Jurkat cells which showed a significant increase in cell viability after combined treatment with TCDD and cisplatin. High increase of ABCG2 gene expression was found in SNU601 and LS180 cells with a mild increase in the expression of the ABCC3, ABCC5,and SLC29A2 genes in SNU601 cells, and of major vault protein (MVP) in LS180 cells. The AhR inhibitor kaempferol suppressed the upregulation of ABCG2 expression and reversed the TCDD-induced increase in cell viability in LS180 cells. However, in CRT-MG cells, other transporter genes including ABCC1, ABCC5, ABCA3, ABCA2, ABCB4, ABCG1, and SLC29A1 were up-regulated. These findings suggested the acquiring cisplatin resistance by TCDD associated with cancer cell-type-specific induction of drug transporters. PMID:25246735

  12. Common dysfunctional variants of ABCG2 have stronger impact on hyperuricemia progression than typical environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Takada, Yuzo; Oikawa, Yuji; Takada, Tappei; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Shimizu, Seiko; Kawamura, Yusuke; Chiba, Toshinori; Abe, Junko; Wakai, Kenji; Kawai, Sayo; Okada, Rieko; Tamura, Takashi; Shichijo, Yuka; Akashi, Airi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Sakurai, Yutaka; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gout/hyperuricemia is a common multifactorial disease having typical environmental risks. Recently, common dysfunctional variants of ABCG2, a urate exporter gene also known as BCRP, are revealed to be a major cause of gout/hyperuricemia. Here, we compared the influence of ABCG2 dysfunction on serum uric acid (SUA) levels with other typical risk factors in a cohort of 5,005 Japanese participants. ABCG2 dysfunction was observed in 53.3% of the population investigated, and its population-attributable risk percent (PAR%) for hyperuricemia was 29.2%, much higher than those of the other typical environmental risks, i.e. overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25.0; PAR% = 18.7%), heavy drinking (>196 g/week (male) or >98 g/week (female) of pure alcohol; PAR% = 15.4%), and aging (≥60 years old; PAR% = 5.74%). SUA significantly increased as the ABCG2 function decreased (P = 5.99 × 10(-19)). A regression analysis revealed that ABCG2 dysfunction had a stronger effect than other factors; a 25% decrease in ABCG2 function was equivalent to "an increase of BMI by 1.97-point" or "552.1 g/week alcohol intake as pure ethanol" in terms of ability to increase SUA. Therefore, ABCG2 dysfunction originating from common genetic variants has a much stronger impact on the progression of hyperuricemia than other familiar risks. Our study provides a better understanding of common genetic factors for common diseases. PMID:24909660

  13. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol-Hee

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:16202168

  14. A New Endogenous Overexpression System of Multidrug Transporters of Candida albicans Suitable for Structural and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Atanu; Khandelwal, Nitesh K.; Sanglard, Dominique; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Fungal pathogens have a robust array of multidrug transporters which aid in active expulsion of drugs and xenobiotics to help them evade toxic effects of drugs. Thus, these transporters impose a major impediment to effective chemotherapy. Although the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain AD1-8u− has catered well to the need of an overexpression system to study drug transport by multidrug transporters of Candida albicans, artifacts associated with a heterologous system could not be excluded. To avoid the issue, we exploited a azole-resistant clinical isolate of C. albicans to develop a new system devoid of three major multidrug transporters (Cdr1p, Cdr2p, and Mdr1p) for the overexpression of multidrug transporters under native hyperactive CDR1 promoter due to gain of function (GOF) mutation in TAC1. The study deals with overexpression and functional characterization of representatives of two major classes of multidrug transporters, Cdr1p and Mdr1p, to prove the functionality of this newly developed endogenous expression system. Expression of native Cdr1 and Mdr1 protein in C. albicans cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy and immunodetection and resulted in increased resistance to the putative substrates as compared to control. The system was further validated by overexpressing a few key mutant variants of Cdr1p and Mdr1p. Together, our data confirms the utility of new endogenous overexpression system which is devoid of artifactual factors as most suited for functional characterization of multidrug transporter proteins of C. albicans. PMID:26973635

  15. Pilot PET Study to Assess the Functional Interplay Between ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the Human Blood–Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, M; Römermann, K; Karch, R; Wulkersdorfer, B; Stanek, J; Philippe, C; Maier‐Salamon, A; Haslacher, H; Jungbauer, C; Wadsak, W; Jäger, W; Löscher, W; Hacker, M; Zeitlinger, M

    2016-01-01

    ABCB1 and ABCG2 work together at the blood–brain barrier (BBB) to limit brain distribution of dual ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates. In this pilot study we used positron emission tomography (PET) to assess brain distribution of two model ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates ([11C]elacridar and [11C]tariquidar) in healthy subjects without (c.421CC) or with (c.421CA) the ABCG2 single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.421C>A. Subjects underwent PET scans under conditions when ABCB1 and ABCG2 were functional and during ABCB1 inhibition with high‐dose tariquidar. In contrast to the ABCB1‐selective substrate (R)‐[11C]verapamil, [11C]elacridar and [11C]tariquidar showed only moderate increases in brain distribution during ABCB1 inhibition. This provides evidence for a functional interplay between ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the human BBB and suggests that both ABCB1 and ABCG2 need to be inhibited to achieve substantial increases in brain distribution of dual ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates. During ABCB1 inhibition c.421CA subjects had significantly higher increases in [11C]tariquidar brain distribution than c.421CC subjects, pointing to impaired cerebral ABCG2 function. PMID:26940368

  16. Pilot PET Study to Assess the Functional Interplay Between ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the Human Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; Römermann, K; Karch, R; Wulkersdorfer, B; Stanek, J; Philippe, C; Maier-Salamon, A; Haslacher, H; Jungbauer, C; Wadsak, W; Jäger, W; Löscher, W; Hacker, M; Zeitlinger, M; Langer, O

    2016-08-01

    ABCB1 and ABCG2 work together at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to limit brain distribution of dual ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates. In this pilot study we used positron emission tomography (PET) to assess brain distribution of two model ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates ([(11) C]elacridar and [(11) C]tariquidar) in healthy subjects without (c.421CC) or with (c.421CA) the ABCG2 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.421C>A. Subjects underwent PET scans under conditions when ABCB1 and ABCG2 were functional and during ABCB1 inhibition with high-dose tariquidar. In contrast to the ABCB1-selective substrate (R)-[(11) C]verapamil, [(11) C]elacridar and [(11) C]tariquidar showed only moderate increases in brain distribution during ABCB1 inhibition. This provides evidence for a functional interplay between ABCB1 and ABCG2 at the human BBB and suggests that both ABCB1 and ABCG2 need to be inhibited to achieve substantial increases in brain distribution of dual ABCB1/ABCG2 substrates. During ABCB1 inhibition c.421CA subjects had significantly higher increases in [(11) C]tariquidar brain distribution than c.421CC subjects, pointing to impaired cerebral ABCG2 function. PMID:26940368

  17. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Lea M.; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis. In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis. Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  18. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Hürlimann, Lea M; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V; Tieleman, D Peter; Seeger, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  19. Expression of ABCG2 and Bmi-1 in oral potentially malignant lesions and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dalley, Andrew J; Pitty, Luke P; Major, Aidan G; Abdulmajeed, Ahmad A; Farah, Camile S

    2014-04-01

    Early diagnosis is vital for effective treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The optimal time for clinical intervention is prior to malignancy when patients present with oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia or erythroplakia. Transformation rates for oral dysplasia vary greatly and more rigorous methods are needed to predict the malignant potential of oral lesions. We hypothesized that the expression of two putative stem cell markers, ABCG2 and Bmi-1, would correlate with disease severity for non diseased, potentially malignant and OSCC specimens and cell lines derived from an equivalent range of tissues. We compared immunoreactive protein and relative gene expression of ABCG2 and Bmi-1 in eight cell lines derived from source tissues ranging in disease severity from normal (OKF6-TERT2) through mild and moderate/severe dysplasia (DOK, POE-9n) to OSCC (PE/CA-PJ15, SCC04, SCC25, SCC09, SCC15). We also analyzed immunoreactive protein expression of ABCG2 and Bmi-1 in 189 tissue samples with the same range of disease severity. A trend between oral lesion severity to ABCG2 and Bmi-1 immunostain intensity was observed. Flow cytometry of oral cell lines confirmed this trend and gave good correlation with RT-PCR results for ABCG2 (r = 0.919, P = 0.001; Pearson) but not Bmi-1 (r = -0.311). The results provide evidence of increased density of ABCG2 and Bmi-1-positive populations in malignant and oral potentially malignant lesions and derived cell lines, but that intragroup variability within IHC, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR results compromise the diagnostic potential of these techniques for discriminating oral dysplasia from normal tissue or OSCC. PMID:24415717

  20. Photosensitized labeling of a functional multidrug transporter in living drug-resistant tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raviv, Y.; Pollard, H.B.; Bruggemann, E.P.; Pastan, I.; Gottesman, M.M. )

    1990-03-05

    A 170,000-Da glycoprotein (P170 multidrug transporter) becomes specifically labeled in multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells by the photolabile lipophilic membrane probe 5-(125I)iodonaphthalene-1-azide ((125I)INA) when photoactivation of the probe is triggered by energy transfer from intracellular doxorubicin or rhodamine 123. In contrast, in drug-sensitive cells, drug-induced specific labeling of membrane proteins with (125I)INA was not observed. Instead, multiple membrane proteins became labeled in a nonspecific manner. This phenomenon of drug-induced specific labeling of P170 by (125I)INA is observed only in living cells, but not in purified membrane vesicles or lysed cells. It is generated by doxorubicin and rhodamine 123, drugs that are chromophores and to which the cells exhibit resistance; but it is not observed with other drugs or dyes. Verapamil, a calcium channel blocker which reverses resistance to doxorubicin, also abolishes doxorubicin-induced specific (125I)INA labeling of P170. These results reveal that a specific interaction between P170 and doxorubicin takes place in living cells and demonstrate that P170 is directly involved in the mechanism of drug resistance in vivo. They also provide a possible means to label functional domains in the multidrug transporter. The results demonstrate that photosensitized (125I)INA labeling is a technique which provides sufficient spatial and time resolution to detect specific intracellular interactions between chromophores and proteins in vivo.

  1. Dynamic interplay of multidrug transporters with TolC for isoprenol tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chonglong; Yang, Liyang; Shah, Asad Ali; Choi, Eui-Sung; Kim, Seon-Won

    2015-01-01

    Engineering of efflux pumps is a promising way to improve host’s tolerance to biofuels such as medium-chain alcohols (CmOHs); however, this strategy is restricted by poor understanding of the efflux pumps engaged in extrusion of solvents. In this study, several Escherichia coli mutants of multidrug transporters were evaluated for isoprenol tolerance. Susceptible phenotypes were observed in the mutants with individual deletion of six transporters, AcrD, EmrAB, MacAB, MdtBC, MdtJI and YdiM, whereas inactivation of AcrAB transporter resulted in an improved tolerance to isoprenol and other CmOHs. AcrAB is the major transporter forming tripartite transperiplasmic complex with outer membrane channel TolC for direct extrusion of toxic molecules in E. coli. The AcrAB inactivation enables to enhance TolC availability for the multidrug transporters associated with extrusion of CmOHs and increase the tolerance to CmOHs including isoprenol. It is assumed that outer membrane channel TolC plays an important role in extrusion of isoprenol and other CmOHs. PMID:26563610

  2. A meta-analysis of the associations between the Q141K and Q126X ABCG2 gene variants and gout risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Miao, Lei; Qin, Liyan; Xiang, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojin; Peng, Hui; Mailamuguli; Sun, Yuping; Yao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gout is an inflammatory disease in which genetic factors play a role. ABCG2 is a urate transporter, and the Q141K and Q126X variants of ABCG2 have been associated with a risk of developing gout, though previous studies of these associations have been inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore the relationship between these genetic variants and gout. Methods: We examined 8 electronic literature databases. In total, 9 eligible articles on the associations between the Q141K (rs2231142) and Q126X (rs72552713) variants and gout risk, including 11 case-control studies were selected. We used odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to assess the strength of these relationships in dominant, recessive, and co-dominant models. Results: This study included 6652 participants (2499 gout patients and 4153 controls). The Q141K variant was found to significantly increase the risk of gout in Asians (dominant model: OR=2.64, 95% CI=2.04-3.43, P=0.02 for heterogeneity; recessive model: OR=3.19, 95% CI=2.56-3.97, P=0.28 for heterogeneity; co-dominant model: OR=1.37, 95% CI=1.18-1.59, P=0.09 for heterogeneity) and other populations (dominant model: OR=1.85, 95% CI=1.20-2.85, P<0.0001 for heterogeneity; recessive model: OR=3.78, 95% CI=2.28-6.27, P=0.19 for heterogeneity; co-dominant model: OR=1.48, 95% CI=1.26-1.74, P=0.19 for heterogeneity). The Q126X variant also significantly increased the risk of gout in Asians (dominant model: OR=3.87, 95% CI=2.07-7.24, P=0.06 for heterogeneity). Conclusions: These results suggest associations between the rs2231142 and rs72552713 ABCG2 gene polymorphisms and gout risk, which led to unfavorable outcomes. However, studies with larger sample sizes and homogeneous populations should be performed to confirm these results. PMID:26617691

  3. PDK2 and ABCG2 genes polymorphisms are correlated with blood glucose levels and uric acid in Tibetan gout patients.

    PubMed

    Ren, Y C; Jin, T B; Sun, X D; Geng, T T; Zhang, M X; Wang, L; Feng, T; Kang, L L; Chen, C

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the PDK2 and ABCG2 genes play important roles in many aspects of gout development in European populations. However, a detailed genotype-phenotype analysis was not performed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential association between variants in these two genes and metabolism-related quantitative phenotypes relevant to gout in a Chinese Tibetan population. In total, 316 Chinese Tibetan gout patients were recruited from rheumatology outpatient clinics and 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms in PDK2 and ABCG2 were genotyped, which were possible etiologic variants as identified in the HapMap Chinese Han Beijing population. A significant difference in blood glucose levels was detected between different genotypes of rs2728109 (P = 0.005) in the PDK2 gene. We also detected a significant difference in the mean serum uric levels between different genotypes of rs3114018 (P = 0.004) in the ABCG2 gene. All P values remained significant after Bonferroni's correction for multiple testing. Our data demonstrate potential roles for PDK2 and ABCG2 polymorphisms in the metabolic phenotypes of Tibetan gout patients, which may provide new insights into the etiology of gout. Further studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:26909964

  4. Autophagy and Transporter-Based Multi-Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyank; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Degenhardt, Kurt; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    All the therapeutic strategies for treating cancers aim at killing the cancer cells via apoptosis (programmed cell death type I). Defective apoptosis endow tumor cells with survival. The cell can respond to such defects with autophagy. Autophagy is a cellular process by which cytoplasmic material is either degraded to maintain homeostasis or recycled for energy and nutrients in starvation. A plethora of evidence has shown that the role of autophagy in tumors is complex. A lot of effort is needed to underline the functional status of autophagy in tumor progression and treatment, and elucidate how to tweak autophagy to treat cancer. Furthermore, during the treatment of cancer, the limitation for the cure rate and survival is the phenomenon of multi drug resistance (MDR). The development of MDR is an intricate process that could be regulated by drug transporters, enzymes, anti-apoptotic genes or DNA repair mechanisms. Reports have shown that autophagy has a dual role in MDR. Furthermore, it has been reported that activation of a death pathway may overcome MDR, thus pointing the importance of other death pathways to regulate tumor cell progression and growth. Therefore, in this review we will discuss the role of autophagy in MDR tumors and a possible link amongst these phenomena. PMID:24710490

  5. Genetic analysis of ABCG2 and SLC2A9 gene polymorphisms in gouty arthritis in a Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Sung; Kim, Yunsuek; Park, Geon; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Park, Byung Lae; Kim, Hyun Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Gout is a common inf lammatory arthritis triggered by the crystallization of uric acid in the joints. Serum uric acid levels are highly heritable, suggesting a strong genetic component. Independent studies to confirm the genetic associations with gout in various ethnic populations are warranted. We investigated the association of polymorphisms in the ABCG2 and SLC2A9 genes with gout in Korean patients and healthy individuals. Methods: We consecutively enrolled 109 patients with gout and 102 healthy controls. The diagnosis of gout was based on the preliminary criteria of the America College of Rheumatology. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood samples. We identified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) changes in the ABCG2 and SLC2A9 genes using a direct sequencing technique. rs2231142 in ABCG2 and rs6449213 and rs16890979 in SLC2A9 and nearby regions were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Results: Patients with gout had significantly higher A/A genotype (29.3% vs. 4.9%, respectively) and A allele (52.8% vs. 26.5%, respectively) frequencies of rs2231142 in ABCG2 than did controls (χ2 = 29.42, p < 0.001; odds ratio, 3.32; 95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 5.20). We found novel polymorphisms (c.881A>G and c.1002+78G>A) in the SLC2A9 gene. The univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the c.881A>G and c.1002+78G>A SNPs were significantly higher in patients than in controls. Conclusions: We demonstrated a significant association between rs2231142 in the ABCG2 gene and gout and identified novel SNPs, c.881A>G and c.1002+78G>A, in the SLC2A9 gene that may be associated with gout in a Korean population. PMID:26552468

  6. ABCG2, Cytogenetics, and Age Predict Relapse after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Daniela; Tiribelli, Mario; Geromin, Antonella; Cerno, Michela; Zanini, Francesca; Michelutti, Angela; Fanin, Renato

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that ABGG2 protein overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may be associated with poor response to therapy and increased relapse risk. Few data are available in patients with AML undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), particularly when in complete remission (CR). We analyzed 105 patients with AML who underwent allogeneic SCT in CR evaluating the role of ABCG2 and other pretransplantation features on subsequent transplantation outcomes. Factors negatively associated with leukemia-free survival (LFS) were unfavorable cytogenetics (3-year LFS 48% versus 80%, P = .0035) and ABCG2 positivity (65% versus 80%, P = .045). Three-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) in the whole population was 20%; a higher incidence of relapse was associated with adverse cytogenetics (41% versus 16%, P = .018), ABCG2 overexpression (29% versus 15%, P = .04), and, marginally, age > 50 years (30% versus 14%, P = .06). We grouped patients according to the combination of these 3 risk factors: no patient relapsed within 3 years from SCT in the group without risk factors, whereas the 3-year CIR was 12% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2% to 25%) in the group with 1 risk factor and 47% (95% CI, 31% to 70%) in patients with 2 or 3 risk factors (P = .00005). In conclusion, allogeneic SCT does not seem to abrogate the negative prognosis associated with ABCG2 overexpression at diagnosis, specifically in terms of a higher relapse risk. ABCG2, age, and cytogenetics can predict AML relapse after SCT in patients who undergo transplantation while in CR. PMID:27178373

  7. Structure of a cation-bound multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporter

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiao; Szewczyk, Paul; Karyakin, Andrey; Evin, Mariah; Hong, Wen-Xu; Zhang, Qinghai; Chang, Geoffrey

    2010-10-26

    Transporter proteins from the MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) family are vital in metabolite transport in plants, directly affecting crop yields worldwide. MATE transporters also mediate multiple-drug resistance (MDR) in bacteria and mammals, modulating the efficacy of many pharmaceutical drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. MATE transporters couple substrate transport to electrochemical gradients and are the only remaining class of MDR transporters whose structure has not been determined. Here we report the X-ray structure of the MATE transporter NorM from Vibrio cholerae determined to 3.65 {angstrom}, revealing an outward-facing conformation with two portals open to the outer leaflet of the membrane and a unique topology of the predicted 12 transmembrane helices distinct from any other known MDR transporter. We also report a cation-binding site in close proximity to residues previously deemed critical for transport. This conformation probably represents a stage of the transport cycle with high affinity for monovalent cations and low affinity for substrates.

  8. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. PMID:27449595

  9. ABCG2/BCRP decreases the transfer of a food-born chemical carcinogen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in perfused term human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, Paeivi Kummu, Maria; Kangas, Tiina; Ilves, Mika; Immonen, Elina; Rysae, Jaana; Pirilae, Rauna; Lastumaeki, Anni; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi H.

    2008-10-15

    We have studied the role of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters in fetal exposure to carcinogens using 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) a known substrate for ABC transporters as a model compound. In perfusion of human term placenta, transfer of {sup 14}C-PhIP (2 {mu}M) through the placenta resulted in fetal-to-maternal concentration ratio (FM ratio) of 0.72 {+-} 0.09 at 6 h. The specific ABCG2 inhibitor KO143 increased the transfer of {sup 14}C-PhIP from maternal to fetal circulation (FM ratio 0.90 {+-} 0.08 at 6 h, p < 0.05) while the ABCC1/ABCC2 inhibitor probenecid had no effect (FM ratio at 6 h 0.75 {+-} 0.10, p = 0.84). There was a negative correlation between the expression of ABCG2 protein in perfused tissue and the FM ratio of {sup 14}C-PhIP (R = - 0.81, p < 0.01) at the end of the perfusion. The expression of ABCC2 protein did not correlate with FM ratio of PhIP (R: - 0.11, p = 0.76). In addition, PhIP induced the expression of ABC transporters in BeWo cells at mRNA level. In conclusion, our data indicates that ABCG2 decreases placental transfer of {sup 14}C-PhIP in perfused human placenta. Also, PhIP may modify ABC transporter expression in choriocarinoma cells.

  10. Association Study of a Functional Variant on ABCG2 Gene with Sunitinib-Induced Severe Adverse Drug Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Low, Siew-Kee; Fukunaga, Koya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Matsuda, Koichi; Hongo, Fumiya; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takamitsu; Kato, Yoichiro; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Fukasawa, Satoshi; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Nishimura, Kazuo; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Hara, Isao; Fujisawa, Masato; Matsuyama, Hideyasu; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Enokida, Hideki; Kubo, Michiaki; Miki, Tsuneharu; Mushiroda, Taisei

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and used as the first-line treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Nevertheless, inter-individual variability of drug’s toxicity was often observed among patients who received sunitinib treatment. This study is to investigate the association of a functional germline variant on ABCG2 that affects the pharmacokinetics of sunitinib with sunitinib-induced toxicity of RCC patients in the Japanese population. A total of 219 RCC patients were recruited to this pharmacogenetic study. ABCG2 421C>A (Q141K) was genotyped by using PCR-Invader assay. The associations of both clinical and genetic variables were evaluated with logistic regression analysis and subsequently receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted. About 43% (92/216) of RCC patients that received sunitinib treatment developed severe grade 3 or grade 4 thrombocytopenia according to the National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, the most common sunitinib-induced adverse reaction in this study. In the univariate analysis, both age (P = 7.77x10-3, odds ratio (OR) = 1.04, 95%CI = 1.01–1.07) and ABCG2 421C>A (P = 1.87x10-2, OR = 1.71, 95%CI = 1.09–2.68) showed association with sunitinib-induced severe thrombocytopenia. Multivariate analysis indicated that the variant ABCG2 421C>A is suggestively associated with severe thrombocytopenia (P = 8.41x10-3, OR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.17–2.94) after adjustment of age as a confounding factor. The area under curve (AUC) of the risk prediction model that utilized age and ABCG2 421C>A was 0.648 with sensitivity of 0.859 and specificity of 0.415. Severe thrombocytopenia is the most common adverse reaction of sunitinib treatment in Japanese RCC patients. ABCG2 421C>A could explain part of the inter-individual variability of sunitinib-induced severe thrombocytopenia. PMID:26914831

  11. Intestinal ciprofloxacin efflux: the role of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Haslam, I S; Wright, J A; O'Reilly, D A; Sherlock, D J; Coleman, T; Simmons, N L

    2011-12-01

    Intestinal secretory movement of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ciprofloxacin, may limit its oral bioavailability. Active ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters such as breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) have been implicated in ciprofloxacin transport. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that BCRP alone mediates intestinal ciprofloxacin secretion. The involvement of ABC transport proteins in ciprofloxacin secretory flux was investigated with the combined use of transfected cell lines [bcrp1/BCRP-Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) and multidrug resistance-related protein 4 (MRP4)-human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293] and human intestinal Caco-2 cells, combined with pharmacological inhibition using 3-(6-isobutyl-9-methoxy-1,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4,6, 7,12,12a-octahydropyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indol-3-yl)-propionic acid tert-butyl ester (Ko143), cyclosporine, 3-[[3-[2-(7-chloroquinolin-2-yl)vinyl]phenyl]-(2-dimethylcarbamoylethylsulfanyl)methylsulfanyl] propionic acid (MK571), and verapamil as ABC-selective inhibitors. In addition, the regional variation in secretory capacity was investigated using male Han Wistar rat intestine mounted in Ussing chambers, and the first indicative measurements of ciprofloxacin transport by ex vivo human jejunum were made. Active, Ko143-sensitive ciprofloxacin secretion was observed in bcrp1-MDCKII cell layers, but in low-passage (BCRP-expressing) Caco-2 cell layers only a 54% fraction was Ko143-sensitive. Ciprofloxacin accumulation was lower in MRP4-HEK293 cells than in the parent line, indicating that ciprofloxacin is also a substrate for this transporter. Ciprofloxacin secretion by Caco-2 cell layers was not inhibited by MK571. Secretory flux showed marked regional variability in the rat intestine, increasing from the duodenum to peak in the ileum. Ciprofloxacin secretion was present in human jejunum and was reduced by Ko143 but showed marked interindividual variability. Ciprofloxacin is a substrate for human and

  12. The enriched fraction of Elephantopus scaber Triggers apoptosis and inhibits multi-drug resistance transporters in human epithelial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beeran, Asmy Appadath; Maliyakkal, Naseer; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medicinal plants have played an important role in the development of clinically useful anticancer agents. Elephantopus scaber (Asteraceae) (ES) is widely used in Indian traditional system of medicine for the treatment of various ailments including cancer. Objective: To investigate anticancer effects of ES in human epithelial cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxicity of ethanolic extract of ES (ES-ET) and its fractions, such as ES Petroleum ether fraction (ES-PET), ES Dichloromethane fraction (ES DCM), n Butyl alcohol fraction (ES-BT), and ES-Rest (ES-R) were assessed in human epithelial cancer cell lines using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide assay and Hoechst 33342 assays were used to gauge induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis and micronuclei assay were used to assess cell cycle specific pharmacological effects and drug induced genotoxicty. Further, the ability of ES to inhibit multi drug resistant (MDR) transporters (ABC-B1 and ABC-G2) was determined by Rhodamine (Rho) and Mitoxantrone (MXR) efflux assays. Results: The enriched fraction of ES (ES DCM) possessed dose-dependent potent cytotoxicity in human epithelial cancer cells. Further, treatment of cancer cells (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, and Caco-2) with ES DCM showed hall mark properties of apoptosis (membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation etc.). Similarly, ES DCM caused enhanced sub G0 content and micronuclei formation indicating the induction of apoptosis and drug induced genotoxicity in cancer cells, respectively. Interestingly, ES DCM inhibited MDR transporters (ABC B1 and ABC G2) in cancer cells. Conclusion: The enriched fraction of ES imparted cytotoxic effects, triggered apoptosis, induced genotoxicity, and inhibited MDR transporters in human epithelial cancer cells. Thus, ES appears to be potential anticancer agent. PMID:25829763

  13. BC4707 Is a Major Facilitator Superfamily Multidrug Resistance Transport Protein from Bacillus cereus Implicated in Fluoroquinolone Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Roger; Vörös, Aniko; Ekman, Jaakko V.; Sødring, Marianne; Nes, Ingerid; Kroeger, Jasmin K.; Saidijam, Massoud; Bettaney, Kim E.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling highlighted a subset of genes encoding putative multidrug transporters in the pathogen Bacillus cereus that were up-regulated during stress produced by bile salts. One of these multidrug transporters (BC4707) was selected for investigation. Functional characterization of the BC4707 protein in Escherichia coli revealed a role in the energized efflux of xenobiotics. Phenotypic analyses after inactivation of the gene bc4707 in Bacillus cereus ATCC14579 suggested a more specific, but modest role in the efflux of norfloxacin. In addition to this, transcriptional analyses showed that BC4707 is also expressed during growth of B. cereus under non-stressful conditions where it may have a role in the normal physiology of the bacteria. Altogether, the results indicate that bc4707, which is part of the core genome of the B. cereus group of bacteria, encodes a multidrug resistance efflux protein that is likely involved in maintaining intracellular homeostasis during growth of the bacteria. PMID:22615800

  14. Multidrug efflux transporter activity in sea urchin embryos:Does localization provide a diffusive advantage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xianfeng; Setayeshgar, Sima; Cole, Bryan; Hamdoun, Amro; Epel, David

    2008-03-01

    Experiments have shown upregulation of multidrug efflux transporter activity approximately 30 min after fertilization in the sea urchin embryo [1]. These ATP-hydrolyzing transporter proteins pump moderately hydrophobic molecules out of the cell and represent the cell's first line of defense againstexogenous toxins. It has also been shown that transporters are moved in vesicles along microfilaments and localized to tips of microvilli prior to activation. We have constructed a geometrically realistic model of the embryo, including microvilli, to explore the functional role of this localization in the efficient elimination of toxins from the standpoint of diffusion. We compute diffusion of toxins in extracellular, membrane and intracellular spaces coupled with transporter activity, using experimentally derived values for physical parameters. For transporters uniformly distributed along microvilli and tip-localized transporters we compare regions in parameter space where each distribution provides diffusive advantage, and comment on the physically expected conditions. [1] A. M. Hamdoun, G. N. Cherr, T. A. Roepke and D. Epel, Developmental Biology 276 452 (2004).

  15. Distribution and Physiology of ABC-Type Transporters Contributing to Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lubelski, Jacek; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Membrane proteins responsible for the active efflux of structurally and functionally unrelated drugs were first characterized in higher eukaryotes. To date, a vast number of transporters contributing to multidrug resistance (MDR transporters) have been reported for a large variety of organisms. Predictions about the functions of genes in the growing number of sequenced genomes indicate that MDR transporters are ubiquitous in nature. The majority of described MDR transporters in bacteria use ion motive force, while only a few systems have been shown to rely on ATP hydrolysis. However, recent reports on MDR proteins from gram-positive organisms, as well as genome analysis, indicate that the role of ABC-type MDR transporters in bacterial drug resistance might be underestimated. Detailed structural and mechanistic analyses of these proteins can help to understand their molecular mode of action and may eventually lead to the development of new strategies to counteract their actions, thereby increasing the effectiveness of drug-based therapies. This review focuses on recent advances in the analysis of ABC-type MDR transporters in bacteria. PMID:17804667

  16. The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) shows conformational changes with mitoxantrone.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Mark F; Bikadi, Zsolt; Chan, Janice; Liu, Xiaoping; Ni, Zhanglin; Cai, Xiaokun; Ford, Robert C; Mao, Qingcheng

    2010-03-14

    BCRP/ABCG2 mediates efflux of drugs and xenobiotics. BCRP was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified to > 90% homogeneity, and subjected to two-dimensional (2D) crystallization. The 2D crystals showed a p12(1) symmetry and projection maps were determined at 5 A resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. Two crystal forms with and without mitoxantrone were observed with unit cell dimensions of a = 55.4 A, b = 81.4 A, gamma = 89.8 degrees , and a = 57.3 A, b = 88.0 A, gamma = 89.7 degrees , respectively. The projection map without mitoxantrone revealed an asymmetric structure with ring-shaped density features probably corresponding to a bundle of transmembrane alpha helices, and appeared more open and less symmetric than the map with mitroxantrone. The open and closed inward-facing forms of BCRP were generated by homology modeling, representing the substrate-free and substrate-bound conformations in the absence of nucleotide, respectively. These models are consistent with the experimentally observed conformational change upon substrate binding. PMID:20399185

  17. Target therapy of multiple myeloma by PTX-NPs and ABCG2 antibody in a mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jun; Zhan, Xi; Shi, Fangfang; Li, Miao; Wu, Songyan; Luo, Shouhua; Zhang, Tianzhu; Zhang, Yu; Ming, Ji; Gu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains to be an incurable disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (McAb) combined with paclitaxel (PTX) conjugated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) on MM progressed from cancer stem cells (CSCs)in non-obese-diabetic/severe-combined-immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse model. Mice were injected with MM CSCs as marked by CD138−CD34− phenotypes through tail veins. The developed MM mice were examined by micro-computer tomography scanning, ultrasonography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis. These mice were then intravenously treated with different combinations of NPs, PTX, McAb, PTX-NPs and melphalan/prednisone once a week for four weeks. The injected mice developed characteristic MM-associated syndromes, including lytic bone lesions, renal damages and proteinuria. All the treated mice showed decrease in bone lesions, renal damages and anemia but increase in apoptosis compared with the mice treated with NPs only. In particular, the treatment with ABCG2 McAb plus PTX-NPs induced the strongest therapeutic response and had an efficacy even better than that of melphalan/prednisone, a conventional regimen for MM patients. These data suggest that PTX-NPs with ABCG2 McAb can be developed into potential treatment regimens for patients with relapsed/refractory MM. PMID:26314844

  18. Protonation-dependent conformational dynamics of the multidrug transporter EmrE

    PubMed Central

    Dastvan, Reza; Mishra, Smriti; Meiler, Jens; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2016-01-01

    The small multidrug transporter from Escherichia coli, EmrE, couples the energetically uphill extrusion of hydrophobic cations out of the cell to the transport of two protons down their electrochemical gradient. Although principal mechanistic elements of proton/substrate antiport have been described, the structural record is limited to the conformation of the substrate-bound state, which has been shown to undergo isoenergetic alternating access. A central but missing link in the structure/mechanism relationship is a description of the proton-bound state, which is an obligatory intermediate in the transport cycle. Here we report a systematic spin labeling and double electron electron resonance (DEER) study that uncovers the conformational changes of EmrE subsequent to protonation of critical acidic residues in the context of a global description of ligand-induced structural rearrangements. We find that protonation of E14 leads to extensive rotation and tilt of transmembrane helices 1–3 in conjunction with repacking of loops, conformational changes that alter the coordination of the bound substrate and modulate its access to the binding site from the lipid bilayer. The transport model that emerges from our data posits a proton-bound, but occluded, resting state. Substrate binding from the inner leaflet of the bilayer releases the protons and triggers alternating access between inward- and outward-facing conformations of the substrate-loaded transporter, thus enabling antiport without dissipation of the proton gradient. PMID:26787875

  19. Multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporters are essential for hepatic development of Plasmodium sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Rijpma, Sanna R; van der Velden, Maarten; González-Pons, Maria; Annoura, Takeshi; van Schaijk, Ben C L; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Ramesar, Jai; Chevalley-Maurel, Severine; Ploemen, Ivo H; Khan, Shahid M; Franetich, Jean-Francois; Mazier, Dominique; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Serrano, Adelfa E; Russel, Frans G M; Janse, Chris J; Sauerwein, Robert W; Koenderink, Jan B; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) belong to the C-family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins and are known to transport a variety of physiologically important compounds and to be involved in the extrusion of pharmaceuticals. Rodent malaria parasites encode a single ABC transporter subfamily C protein, whereas human parasites encode two: MRP1 and MRP2. Although associated with drug resistance, their biological function and substrates remain unknown. To elucidate the role of MRP throughout the parasite life cycle, Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium falciparum mutants lacking MRP expression were generated. P. berghei mutants lacking expression of the single MRP as well as P. falciparum mutants lacking MRP1, MRP2 or both proteins have similar blood stage growth kinetics and drug-sensitivity profiles as wild type parasites. We show that MRP1-deficient parasites readily invade primary human hepatocytes and develop into mature liver stages. In contrast, both P. falciparum MRP2-deficient parasites and P. berghei mutants lacking MRP protein expression abort in mid to late liver stage development, failing to produce mature liver stages. The combined P. berghei and P. falciparum data are the first demonstration of a critical role of an ABC transporter during Plasmodium liver stage development. PMID:26332724

  20. Tangeretin, a citrus pentamethoxyflavone, antagonizes ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance by inhibiting its transport function.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sen-Ling; Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhong-Qiu; Xie, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and tumor metastasis are the main causes of chemotherapeutic treatment failure and mortality in cancer patients. In this study, at achievable nontoxic plasma concentrations, citrus flavonoid tangeretin has been shown to reverse ABCB1-mediated cancer resistance to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents effectively. Co-treatment of cells with tangeretin and paclitaxel activated apoptosis as well as arrested cell cycle at G2/M-phase. Tangeretin profoundly inhibited the ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin, and flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the expression of ABCB1. Moreover, it stimulated the ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. The molecular docking results indicated a favorable binding of tangeretin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled ABCB1 transporter. The overall results demonstrated that tangeretin could sensitize ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to chemotherapeutical agents by directly inhibiting ABCB1 transporter function, which encouraged further animal and clinical studies in the treatment of resistant cancers. PMID:27058921

  1. Interaction of enrofloxacin with breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2): influence of flavonoids and role in milk secretion in sheep.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Mivis M; Molina, Antonio J; Merino, Gracia; Mendoza, Gracia; Prieto, Julio G; Alvarez, Ana I

    2006-08-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)/ABCG2 is a high-capacity efflux transporter with wide substrate specificity located in apical membranes of epithelia, which is involved in drug availability. BCRP is responsible for the active secretion of clinically and toxicologically important substrates to milk. The present study shows BCRP expression in sheep and cow by immunoblotting with MAb (BXP-53). Vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity with specific BCRP substrates and inhibitors was measured in bovine mammary gland homogenates. To assess the role of BCRP in ruminant mammary gland we tested the fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin (ENRO). In polarized cell lines, ENRO was transported by Bcrp1/BCRP with secretory/absorptive ratios of 6.5 and 2 respectively. The efflux was blocked by the BCRP inhibitor Ko143. ENRO pharmacokinetics in plasma and milk was studied in sheep after co-administration of drug (2.5 mg/kg, i.v.) and genistein (0.8 mg/kg, i.m.) or albendazole sulfoxide (2 mg/kg, i.v) as BCRP inhibitors. Concomitant administration of BCRP inhibitors with ENRO had no significant effect on the plasma disposition kinetics of ENRO but decreased ENRO concentrations in milk. PMID:16846465

  2. Pyrrolopyrimidine Derivatives as Novel Inhibitors of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sven Marcel; Stefan, Katja; Wiese, Michael

    2016-04-14

    Five series of pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidines were synthesized and evaluated with respect to potency and selectivity toward multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1). This transport protein is a major target to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer patients. We investigated differently substituted pyrrolopyrimidines using the doxorubicin selected and MRP1 overexpressing small cell lung cancer cell line H69 AR in a calcein AM and daunorubicin cell accumulation assay. New compounds with high potency and selectivity were identified. Piperazine residues at position 4 bearing large phenylalkyl side chains proved to be beneficial for MRP1 inhibition. Its replacement by an amino group led to decreased activity. Aliphatic and aliphatic-aromatic variations at position 5 and 6 revealed compounds with IC50 values in high nanomolar range. All investigated compounds had low affinity toward P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1). Pyrrolopyrimidines with small substituents showed moderate inhibition against breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2). PMID:26943020

  3. Folate deprivation induces BCRP (ABCG2) expression and mitoxantrone resistance in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Clara; Kathmann, Ietje; Giovannetti, Elisa; Dekker, Henk; Scheffer, George L; Calhau, Conceição; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J

    2008-10-01

    Folates can induce the expression and activity of the breast-cancer-resistance-protein (BCRP) and the multidrug-resistance-protein-1 (MRP1). Our aim was to study the time-dependent effect of folate deprivation/supplementation on (i) BCRP and MRP expression and (ii) on drug resistance mediated by these transporters. Therefore Caco-2 colon cancer cells usually grown in standard RPMI-medium containing supraphysiological folic acid (FA) concentrations (2.3 muM; high-folate, HF) were gradually adapted to more physiological folate concentrations (1 nM leucovorin (LV) or 1 nM FA; low-folate, LF), resulting in the sublines Caco-2-LF/LV and Caco-2-LF/FA. Caco-2-LF/LV and LF/FA cells exhibited a maximal increase of 5.2- and 9.6-fold for BCRP-mRNA and 3.9- and 5.7-fold for BCRP protein expression, respectively, but no major changes on MRP expression. Overexpression of BCRP in the LF-cells resulted in 3.6- to 6.3-fold resistance to mitoxantrone (MR), which was completely reverted by the BCRP inhibitor Ko143. On the other hand, LF-adapted cells were markedly more sensitive to methotrexate than the HF-counterpart, both after 4-hr (9,870- and 23,923-fold for Caco-2-LF/LV and LF/FA, respectively) and 72-hr (11- and 22-fold for Caco-2-LF/LV and LF/FA, respectively) exposure. Immunofluorescent staining observed with a confocal-laser-scan-microscope revealed that in Caco-2 cells (both HF and LF), BCRP is mainly located in the cytoplasm. In conclusion, folate deprivation induces BCRP expression associated with MR resistance in Caco-2 cells. The intracellular localization of BCRP in these cells suggests that this transporter is not primarily extruding its substrates out of the cell, but rather to an intracellular compartment where folates can be kept as storage. PMID:18623116

  4. Functional Evidence of Multidrug Resistance Transporters (MDR) in Rodent Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Molinas, Adrien; Sicard, Gilles; Jakob, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Background P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) are membrane transporter proteins which function as efflux pumps at cell membranes and are considered to exert a protective function against the entry of xenobiotics. While evidence for Pgp and MRP transporter activity is reported for olfactory tissue, their possible interaction and participation in the olfactory response has not been investigated. Principal Findings Functional activity of putative MDR transporters was assessed by means of the fluorometric calcein acetoxymethyl ester (calcein-AM) accumulation assay on acute rat and mouse olfactory tissue slices. Calcein-AM uptake was measured as fluorescence intensity changes in the presence of Pgp or MRP specific inhibitors. Epifluorescence microscopy measured time course analysis in the olfactory epithelium revealed significant inhibitor-dependent calcein uptake in the presence of each of the selected inhibitors. Furthermore, intracellular calcein accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons was also significantly increased in the presence of either one of the Pgp or MRP inhibitors. The presence of Pgp or MRP1 encoding genes in the olfactory mucosa of rat and mouse was confirmed by RT-PCR with appropriate pairs of species-specific primers. Both transporters were expressed in both newborn and adult olfactory mucosa of both species. To assess a possible involvement of MDR transporters in the olfactory response, we examined the electrophysiological response to odorants in the presence of the selected MDR inhibitors by recording electroolfactograms (EOG). In both animal species, MRPs inhibitors induced a marked reduction of the EOG magnitude, while Pgp inhibitors had only a minor or no measurable effect. Conclusions The findings suggest that both Pgp and MRP transporters are functional in the olfactory mucosa and in olfactory receptor neurons. Pgp and MRPs may be cellular constituents of olfactory receptor neurons and represent potential

  5. Substrate-dependent dynamics of the multidrug efflux transporter AcrB of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tamai, Rei; Yamazaki, Megumi; Inaba, Takehiko; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    The resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type xenobiotic efflux system plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of gram-negative bacteria. The only constitutively expressed RND system of Escherichia coli consists of the inner membrane transporter AcrB, the membrane fusion protein AcrA, and the outer membrane channel TolC. The latter two components are shared with another RND-type transporter AcrD, whose expression is induced by environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate how RND-type ternary complexes, which span two membranes and the cell wall, form in vivo. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy revealed that most fluorescent foci formed by AcrB fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) were stationary in the presence of TolC but showed lateral displacements when tolC was deleted. The fraction of stationary AcrB-GFP foci decreased with increasing levels of AcrD. We propose that the AcrB-containing complex becomes unstable upon the induction of AcrD, which presumably replaces AcrB, a process we call "transporter exchange." This instability is suppressed by AcrB-specific substrates, suggesting that the ternary complex is stabilised when it is in action. These results suggest that the assembly of the RND-type efflux system is dynamically regulated in response to external stimuli, shedding new light on the adaptive antibiotic resistance of bacteria. PMID:26916090

  6. Characterization of multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein transport function with an organotechnetium cation

    SciTech Connect

    Piwnica-Worms, D.; Vallabhaneni, V.R.; Kronauge, J.F.

    1995-09-26

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in mammalian cells and tumors is associated with overexpression of an {approximately}170 integral membrane efflux transporter, the MDR1 P-glycoprotein. Hexakis(2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile) technetium(I) (Tc-SESTAMIBI), a {gamma}-emitting lipophilic cationic metallopharmaceutical, has recently been shown to be a P-glycoprotein transport substrate. Exploiting the negligible lipid membrane adsorption properties of this organometallic substrate, we studied the transport kinetics, pharmacology, drug binding, and modulation of P-glycoprotein in cell preparations derived from a variety of species and selection strategies, including SW-1573, V79, Alex, and CHO drug-sensitive cells and in 77A, LZ-8, and Alex/A.5 MDR cells. Rapid cell accumulation (T{sub 1/2} {approx} 6 min) of the agent to a steady state was observed which was inversely proportional to immunodetectable levels of P-glycoprotein. Many MDR cytotoxic agents inhibited P-glycoprotein-mediated Tc-SESTAMIBI efflux, thereby enhancing organometallic cation accumulation. 70 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Substrate-dependent dynamics of the multidrug efflux transporter AcrB of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tamai, Rei; Yamazaki, Megumi; Inaba, Takehiko; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    The resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type xenobiotic efflux system plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of gram-negative bacteria. The only constitutively expressed RND system of Escherichia coli consists of the inner membrane transporter AcrB, the membrane fusion protein AcrA, and the outer membrane channel TolC. The latter two components are shared with another RND-type transporter AcrD, whose expression is induced by environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate how RND-type ternary complexes, which span two membranes and the cell wall, form in vivo. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy revealed that most fluorescent foci formed by AcrB fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) were stationary in the presence of TolC but showed lateral displacements when tolC was deleted. The fraction of stationary AcrB-GFP foci decreased with increasing levels of AcrD. We propose that the AcrB-containing complex becomes unstable upon the induction of AcrD, which presumably replaces AcrB, a process we call “transporter exchange.” This instability is suppressed by AcrB-specific substrates, suggesting that the ternary complex is stabilised when it is in action. These results suggest that the assembly of the RND-type efflux system is dynamically regulated in response to external stimuli, shedding new light on the adaptive antibiotic resistance of bacteria. PMID:26916090

  8. Prediction of multi-drug resistance transporters using a novel sequence analysis method

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Jason E.; Bruillard, Paul; Overall, Christopher C.; Gosink, Luke; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    There are many examples of groups of proteins that have similar function, but the determinants of functional specificity may be hidden by lack of sequence similarity, or by large groups of similar sequences with different functions. Transporters are one such protein group in that the general function, transport, can be easily inferred from the sequence, but the substrate specificity can be impossible to predict from sequence with current methods. In this paper we describe a linguistic-based approach to identify functional patterns from groups of unaligned protein sequences and its application to predict multi-drug resistance transporters (MDRs) from bacteria. We first show that our method can recreate known patterns from PROSITE for several motifs from unaligned sequences. We then show that the method, MDRpred, can predict MDRs with greater accuracy and positive predictive value than a collection of currently available family-based models from the Pfam database. Finally, we apply MDRpred to a large collection of protein sequences from an environmental microbiome study to make novel predictions about drug resistance in a potential environmental reservoir. PMID:26913187

  9. The reconstituted P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter is a flippase for glucosylceramide and other simple glycosphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The Pgp (P-glycoprotein) multidrug transporter, which is linked to multidrug resistance in human cancers, functions as an efflux pump for non-polar drugs, powered by the hydrolysis of ATP at its nucleotide binding domains. The drug binding sites of Pgp appear to be located within the cytoplasmic leaflet of the membrane bilayer, suggesting that Pgp may function as a ‘flippase’ for hydrophobic compounds. Pgp has been shown to translocate fluorescent phospholipids, and it has been suggested that it may also interact with GlcCer (glucosylceramide). Here we use a dithionite fluorescence quenching technique to show that reconstituted Pgp can flip several NBD (nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole)-labelled simple glycosphingolipids, including NBD–GlcCer, from one leaflet of the bilayer to the other in an ATP-dependent, vanadate-sensitive fashion. The rate of NBD–GlcCer flipping was similar to that observed for NBD-labelled PC (phosphatidylcholine). NBD–GlcCer flipping was inhibited in a concentration-dependent, saturable fashion by various Pgp substrates and modulators, and inhibition correlated well with the Kd for binding to the protein. The addition of a second sugar to the headgroup of the glycolipid to form NBD–lactosylceramide drastically reduced the rate of flipping compared with NBD–PC, probably because of the increased size and polarity contributed by the additional sugar residue. We conclude that Pgp functions as a broad-specificity outwardly-directed flippase for simple glycosphingolipids and membrane phospholipids. PMID:15799713

  10. Multidrug Efflux Transporters Limit Accumulation of Inorganic, but Not Organic, Mercury in Sea Urchin Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Bošnjak, Ivana; Uhlinger, Kevin R.; Heim, Wesley; Smital, Tvrtko; Franekić-Čolić, Jasna; Coale, Kenneth; Epel, David; Hamdoun, Amro

    2011-01-01

    Mercuric compounds are persistent global pollutants that accumulate in marine organisms and in humans who consume them. While the chemical cycles and speciation of mercury in the oceans are relatively well described, the cellular mechanisms that govern which forms of mercury accumulate in cells and why they persist are less understood. In this study we examined the role of multidrug efflux transport in the differential accumulation of inorganic (HgCl2) and organic (CH3HgCl) mercury in sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos. We found that inhibition of MRP/ABCC-type transporters increases intracellular accumulation of inorganic mercury but had no effect on accumulation of organic mercury. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of metal conjugating enzymes by ligands GST/GSH significantly increases this antimitotic potency of inorganic mercury, but had no effect on the potency of organic mercury. Our results point to MRP-mediated elimination of inorganic mercury conjugates as a cellular basis for differences in the accumulation and potency of the two major forms of mercury found in marine environments. PMID:19924972

  11. MULTIDRUG RESISTANT TRANSPORT ACTIVITY PROTECTS OOCYTES FROM CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS AND CHANGES DURING OOCYTE MATURATION

    PubMed Central

    Brayboy, Lynae M.; Oulhen, Nathalie; Witmyer, Jeannine; Robins, Jared; Carson, Sandra; Wessel, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the multidrug resistant (MDR) transporter activity in oocytes and their potential role in oocyte susceptibility to chemotherapy. Design Experimental laboratory study Setting University and Academic Center for reproductive medicine. Patients/Animals Women with eggs retrieved for ICSI cycles and adult female FVBN and B6C3F1 mouse strains. Intervention Inhibition of MDR activity in oocytes. Main Outcome measure(s) Efflux activity of MDRs using quantitative fluorescent dye efflux and oocyte cell death when exposed to chemotherapy. Results Oocytes effluxed fluorescent reporters and this activity was significantly reduced in the presence of the MDR inhibitor PSC 833. GV oocytes are more efficient at efflux compared to M2 oocytes. Human oocytes exposed to cyclophosphamide and PSC 833 showed cell death using two different viability assays compared to controls and those exposed to cyclophosphamide alone. Immunoblots detected MDR-1 in all oocytes with the greatest accumulation in the GV stage. Conclusions Oocytes have a vast repertoire of active MDRs. The implications of this study are that these protective mechanisms are important during oogenesis, and these activities change with maturation, increasing susceptibility to toxicants. Future directions may exploit the up regulation of these transporters during gonadotoxic therapy. PMID:23953328

  12. Substrate binding accelerates the conformational transitions and substrate dissociation in multidrug efflux transporter AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Beibei; Weng, Jingwei; Wang, Wenning

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite efflux pump assembly AcrAB-TolC is the major multidrug resistance transporter in E. coli. The inner membrane transporter AcrB is a homotrimer, energized by the proton movement down the transmembrane electrochemical gradient. The asymmetric crystal structures of AcrB with three monomers in distinct conformational states [access (A), binding (B) and extrusion (E)] support a functional rotating mechanism, in which each monomer of AcrB cycles among the three states in a concerted way. However, the relationship between the conformational changes during functional rotation and drug translocation has not been totally understood. Here, we explored the conformational changes of the AcrB homotrimer during the ABE to BEA transition in different substrate-binding states using targeted MD simulations. It was found that the dissociation of substrate from the distal binding pocket of B monomer is closely related to the concerted conformational changes in the translocation pathway, especially the side chain reorientation of Phe628 and Tyr327. A second substrate binding at the proximal binding pocket of A monomer evidently accelerates the conformational transitions as well as substrate dissociation in B monomer. The acceleration effect of the multi-substrate binding mode provides a molecular explanation for the positive cooperativity observed in the kinetic studies of substrate efflux and deepens our understanding of the functional rotating mechanism of AcrB. PMID:25918513

  13. Multidrug Transport Protein NorM from Vibrio cholerae Simultaneously Couples to Sodium- and Proton-Motive Force*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yoonhee; Nair, Asha; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family mediate the efflux of unrelated pharmaceuticals from the interior of the cell in organisms ranging from bacteria to human. These proteins are thought to fall into two classes that couple substrate efflux to the influx of either Na+ or H+. We studied the energetics of drug extrusion by NorM from Vibrio cholerae in proteoliposomes in which purified NorM protein was functionally reconstituted in an inside-out orientation. We establish that NorM simultaneously couples to the sodium-motive force and proton-motive force, and biochemically identify protein regions and residues that play important roles in Na+ or H+ binding. As the positions of protons are not available in current medium and high-resolution crystal structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters, our findings add a previously unrecognized parameter to mechanistic models based of these structures. PMID:24711447

  14. Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), a “Multitasking” ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Susan P. C.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) encoded by ABCC1 was originally discovered as a cause of multidrug resistance in tumor cells. However, it is now clear that MRP1 serves a broader role than simply mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of drugs from cells. The antioxidant GSH and the pro-inflammatory cysteinyl leukotriene C4 have been identified as key physiological organic anions effluxed by MRP1, and an ever growing body of evidence indicates that additional lipid-derived mediators are also substrates of this transporter. As such, MRP1 is a multitasking transporter that likely influences the etiology and progression of a host of human diseases. PMID:25281745

  15. In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter-Mediated Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Wei, Bih-Rong; Hall, Matthew D; Simpson, R Mark; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed protocol for imaging ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) function at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of transgenic mice. D-Luciferin is specifically transported by ABCG2 found on the apical side of endothelial cells at the BBB. The luciferase-luciferin enzymatic reaction produces bioluminescence, which allows a direct measurement of ABCG2 function at the BBB. Therefore bioluminescence imaging (BLI) correlates with ABCG2 function at the BBB and this can be measured by administering luciferin in a mouse model that expresses luciferase in the brain parenchyma. BLI allows for a relatively low-cost alternative for studying transporter function in vivo compared to other strategies such as positron emission tomography. This method for imaging ABCG2 function at the BBB can be used to investigate pharmacokinetic inhibition of the transporter. PMID:27424909

  16. Role of multi-drug resistance-associated protein-1 transporter in statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Dorajoo, Rajkumar s o; Pereira, Barry P; Yu, Zou; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Leong, Cheng Chee; Wee, Aileen; Lee, Edmund

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of probenecid to inhibit the multi-drug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1) in mediating the efflux and myotoxicity in rat skeletal muscles, with administration of rosuvastatin. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered daily, for 15 days, with either rosuvastatin (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) or probenecid (100 mg/kg) alone, or with a combination of rosuvastatin (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) and probenecid (100 mg/kg). Skeletal muscle toxicity was elevated with probenecid administered with 200 mg/kg/day of rosuvastatin, with the elevation of creatine kinase by 12-fold, alanine aminotrasferase by 10-fold and creatinine by 9-fold at day 15, with no adverse effects observed when probenecid was given alone. Mitochondria ultrastructural damage with enlargement, disruption, cristolysis and vaculation was seen in the soleus and plantaris of animals administered with probenecid and high dosages of statin. These muscles were also expressing more succinic dehydrogenase (SDH)-positive and cytochrome oxidase (CyOX)-positive fibers. Although generally well-tolerated, statins produce a variety of adverse skeletal muscle events. Hydrophilic statins, with reduced levels of non-specific passive diffusion rates into extra-hepatic tissues, are still seen to produce myopathy. This highlights the important roles of transport mechanisms in statin transport at the skeletal muscles. Excessive influx, reduced efflux or the combination of the two could result in elevated cellular levels of statins at the skeletal muscles, resulting in toxicity. This study provides preliminary evidence that the MRP-1 transporter and efflux at skeletal muscles possibly play significant roles in statin-induced myopathy. PMID:18509883

  17. A Silent ABC Transporter Isolated from Streptomyces rochei F20 Induces Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.; Carbó, Lázaro; Cuesta, Trinidad; Vallín, Carlos; Malpartida, Francisco

    1998-01-01

    In the search for heterologous activators for actinorhodin production in Streptomyces lividans, 3.4 kb of DNA from Streptomyces rochei F20 (a streptothricin producer) were characterized. Subcloning experiments showed that the minimal DNA fragment required for activation was 0.4 kb in size. The activation is mediated by increasing the levels of transcription of the actII-ORF4 gene. Sequencing of the minimal activating fragment did not reveal any clues about its mechanism; nevertheless, it was shown to overlap the 3′ end of two convergent genes, one of whose translated products (ORF2) strongly resembles that of other genes belonging to the ABC transporter superfamily. Computer-assisted analysis of the 3.4-kb DNA sequence showed the 3′ terminus of an open reading frame (ORF), i.e., ORFA, and three complete ORFs (ORF1, ORF2, and ORFB). Searches in the databases with their respective gene products revealed similarities for ORF1 and ORF2 with ATP-binding proteins and transmembrane proteins, respectively, which are found in members of the ABC transporter superfamily. No similarities for ORFA and ORFB were found in the databases. Insertional inactivation of ORF1 and ORF2, their transcription analysis, and their cloning in heterologous hosts suggested that these genes were not expressed under our experimental conditions; however, cloning of ORF1 and ORF2 together (but not separately) under the control of an expressing promoter induced resistance to several chemically different drugs: oleandomycin, erythromycin, spiramycin, doxorubicin, and tetracycline. Thus, this genetic system, named msr, is a new bacterial multidrug ABC transporter. PMID:9696745

  18. Homologs of the Acinetobacter baumannii AceI Transporter Represent a New Family of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Henderson, Peter J. F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug efflux systems are a major cause of resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria, including those pathogenic to humans, animals, and plants. These proteins are ubiquitous in these pathogens, and five families of bacterial multidrug efflux systems have been identified to date. By using transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, we recently identified the novel AceI (Acinetobacter chlorhexidine efflux) protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that conferred resistance to the biocide chlorhexidine, via an active efflux mechanism. Proteins homologous to AceI are encoded in the genomes of many other bacterial species and are particularly prominent within proteobacterial lineages. In this study, we expressed 23 homologs of AceI and examined their resistance and/or transport profiles. MIC analyses demonstrated that, like AceI, many of the homologs conferred resistance to chlorhexidine. Many of the AceI homologs conferred resistance to additional biocides, including benzalkonium, dequalinium, proflavine, and acriflavine. We conducted fluorimetric transport assays using the AceI homolog from Vibrio parahaemolyticus and confirmed that resistance to both proflavine and acriflavine was mediated by an active efflux mechanism. These results show that this group of AceI homologs represent a new family of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps, which we have designated the proteobacterial antimicrobial compound efflux (PACE) family of transport proteins. PMID:25670776

  19. Vital and dispensable roles of Plasmodium multidrug resistance transporters during blood- and mosquito-stage development.

    PubMed

    Rijpma, Sanna R; van der Velden, Maarten; Annoura, Takeshi; Matz, Joachim M; Kenthirapalan, Sanketha; Kooij, Taco W A; Matuschewski, Kai; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Siebelink-Stoter, Rianne; Graumans, Wouter; Ramesar, Jai; Klop, Onny; Russel, Frans G M; Sauerwein, Robert W; Janse, Chris J; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M; Koenderink, Jan B

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins belong to the B subfamily of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters, which export a wide range of compounds including pharmaceuticals. In this study, we used reverse genetics to study the role of all seven Plasmodium MDR proteins during the life cycle of malaria parasites. Four P. berghei genes (encoding MDR1, 4, 6 and 7) were refractory to deletion, indicating a vital role during blood stage multiplication and validating them as potential targets for antimalarial drugs. Mutants lacking expression of MDR2, MDR3 and MDR5 were generated in both P. berghei and P. falciparum, indicating a dispensable role for blood stage development. Whereas P. berghei mutants lacking MDR3 and MDR5 had a reduced blood stage multiplication in vivo, blood stage growth of P. falciparum mutants in vitro was not significantly different. Oocyst maturation and sporozoite formation in Plasmodium mutants lacking MDR2 or MDR5 was reduced. Sporozoites of these P. berghei mutants were capable of infecting mice and life cycle completion, indicating the absence of vital roles during liver stage development. Our results demonstrate vital and dispensable roles of MDR proteins during blood stages and an important function in sporogony for MDR2 and MDR5 in both Plasmodium species. PMID:26991313

  20. Exploring the binding domain of EmrE, the smallest multidrug transporter.

    PubMed

    Sharoni, Michal; Steiner-Mordoch, Sonia; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2005-09-23

    EmrE is a small multidrug transporter in Escherichia coli that extrudes various positively charged drugs across the plasma membrane in exchange with protons, thereby rendering cells resistant to these compounds. Biochemical experiments indicate that the basic functional unit of EmrE is a dimer where the common binding site for protons and substrate is formed by the interaction of an essential charged residue (Glu14) from both EmrE monomers. Previous studies implied that other residues in the vicinity of Glu14 are part of the binding domain. Alkylation of Cys replacements in the same transmembrane domain inhibits the activity of the protein and this inhibition is fully prevented by substrates of EmrE. To monitor directly the reaction we tested also the extent of modification using fluorescein-5-maleimide. While most residues are not accessible or only partially accessible, four, Y4C, I5C, L7C, and A10C, were modified at least 80%. Furthermore, preincubation with tetraphenylphosphonium reduces the reaction of two of these residues by up to 80%. To study other essential residues we generated functional hetero-oligomers and challenged them with various methane thiosulfonates. Taken together the findings imply the existence of a binding cavity accessible to alkylating reagents where at least three residues from TM1, Tyr40 from TM2, and Trp63 in TM3 are involved in substrate binding. PMID:16049002

  1. Tumorigenic lung tumorospheres exhibit stem-like features with significantly increased expression of CD133 and ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wensi; Luo, Yi; Li, Boyi; Zhang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human tumors, and the successful certification of CSCs may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets, which are more effective for the treatment of cancer. The use of spherical cancer models has increased in popularity in cancer stem cell investigations. Tumorospheres, which are used as a model of CSCs and are established in serum‑free medium supplemented with growth factors under non‑adherent conditions, are one of the most commonly used cancer spherical models and are a valuable method for enriching the CSC fraction. To investigate whether this model is applicable in lung cancer (LC), the identification of lung CSCs and their capacities is essential. In the present study, lung CSCs were enriched by sphere-forming culturing and their stem‑like properties were assessed. The results indicated that the lung tumorospheres had enhanced proliferation, clonality, invasion and cisplatin‑resistance, and showed significantly increased expression levels of CD133 and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2). These results, together with findings previously reported in literature, indicated that the sphere‑forming culturing of LC cells induced the enrichment of CSCs and that the tumorospheres exhibited stem cell characteristics. In addition, the higher expression levels of CD133 and ABCG2 in the tumorospheres may provide a rationale for therapeutic targets for LC. PMID:27432082

  2. Tumorigenic lung tumorospheres exhibit stem-like features with significantly increased expression of CD133 and ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wensi; Luo, Yi; Li, Boyi; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human tumors, and the successful certification of CSCs may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets, which are more effective for the treatment of cancer. The use of spherical cancer models has increased in popularity in cancer stem cell investigations. Tumorospheres, which are used as a model of CSCs and are established in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors under non-adherent conditions, are one of the most commonly used cancer spherical models and are a valuable method for enriching the CSC fraction. To investigate whether this model is applicable in lung cancer (LC), the identification of lung CSCs and their capacities is essential. In the present study, lung CSCs were enriched by sphere-forming culturing and their stem-like properties were assessed. The results indicated that the lung tumorospheres had enhanced proliferation, clonality, invasion and cisplatin-resistance, and showed significantly increased expression levels of CD133 and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2). These results, together with findings previously reported in literature, indicated that the sphere-forming culturing of LC cells induced the enrichment of CSCs and that the tumorospheres exhibited stem cell characteristics. In addition, the higher expression levels of CD133 and ABCG2 in the tumorospheres may provide a rationale for therapeutic targets for LC. PMID:27432082

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the multidrug efflux transporter NorM from Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih-Chia; Long, Feng; McDermott, Gerry; Shafer, William M.; Yu, Edward W.

    2008-04-01

    The multidrug efflux transporter NorM from N. gonorrhoeae has been crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to a resolution of 6.5 Å. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of the NorM multidrug efflux pump produced by Neisseria gonorrhoeae are reported. NorM is a cytoplasmic membrane protein that consists of 459 amino-acid residues. It is a member of the recently classified multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of transporters and recognizes a number of cationic toxic compounds such as ethidium bromide, acriflavin, 2-N-methylellipticinium and ciprofloxacin. Recombinant NorM protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal-affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. The protein was crystallized using hanging-drop vapor diffusion. X-ray diffraction data were collected from cryocooled crystals at a synchrotron light source. The best crystal diffracted anisotropically to 3.8 Å and diffraction data were complete to 6.5 Å resolution. The space group was determined to be C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.5, b = 164.4, c = 111.5 Å.

  4. Canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter/multidrug resistance protein 2 mediates low-affinity transport of reduced glutathione.

    PubMed Central

    Paulusma, C C; van Geer, M A; Evers, R; Heijn, M; Ottenhoff, R; Borst, P; Oude Elferink, R P

    1999-01-01

    The canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT), a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family, mediates the transport of a broad range of non-bile salt organic anions from liver into bile. cMOAT-deficient Wistar rats (TR-) are mutated in the gene encoding cMOAT, leading to defective hepatobiliary transport of a whole range of substrates, including bilirubin glucuronide. These mutants also have impaired hepatobiliary excretion of GSH and, as a result, the bile flow in these animals is reduced. In the present work we demonstrate a role for cMOAT in the excretion of GSH both in vivo and in vitro. Biliary GSH excretion in rats heterozygous for the cMOAT mutation (TR/tr) was decreased to 63% of controls (TR/TR) (114+/-24 versus 181+/-20 nmol/min per kg body weight). Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) II cells stably expressing the human cMOAT protein displayed >10-fold increase in apical GSH excretion compared with wild-type MDCKII cells (141+/-6.1 pmol/min per mg of protein versus 13.2+/-1.3 pmol/min per mg of protein in wild-type MDCKII cells). Similarly, MDCKII cells expressing the human multidrug resistance protein 1 showed a 4-fold increase in GSH excretion across the basolateral membrane. In several independent cMOAT-transfectants, the level of GSH excretion correlated with the expression level of the protein. Furthermore, we have shown, in cMOAT-transfected cells, that GSH is a low-affinity substrate for the transporter and that its excretion is reduced upon ATP depletion. In membrane vesicles isolated from cMOAT-expressing MDCKII cells, ATP-dependent S-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)glutathione uptake is competitively inhibited by high concentrations of GSH (Ki approximately 20 mM). We concluded that cMOAT mediates low-affinity transport of GSH. However, since hepatocellular GSH concentrations are high (5-10 mM), cMOAT might serve an important physiological function in maintenance of bile flow in addition to hepatic GSH turnover. PMID:10024515

  5. Probenecid-resistant J774 cell expression of enhanced organic anion transport by a mechanism distinct from multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cao, C; Steinberg, T H; Neu, H C; Cohen, D; Horwitz, S B; Hickman, S; Silverstein, S C

    1993-08-01

    Macrophages possess organic anion transporters that carry membrane-impermeant fluorescent dyes, such as lucifer yellow (LY) and carboxy-fluorescein, from the cytoplasm into endosomes and out of the cells. Probenecid, an organic anion transport inhibitor, blocks these processes. Prolonged incubation of J774 cells in medium containing 2.5 mM probenecid eventually kills most of these cells. To identify J774 variants that express increased organic anion transport activity, we selected probenecid-resistant (PBR) J774 cells by growing them in medium containing increasing concentrations of probenecid. When PBR and unselected J774 cells were loaded with LY by ATP4- permeabilization, the amount of LY accumulated by the PBR cells was about half that in the unselected cells. This difference was abolished by adding 10 mM probenecid to the medium in which the cells were loaded, suggesting that the diminished LY accumulation in PBR cells was due to enhanced LY secretion and that the PBR cells expressed increased organic anion transport activity. Direct comparison of LY efflux from J774 and PBR J774 cells showed a faster initial rate of secretion of LY from PBR J774 cells than from unselected J774 cells. To determine whether LY efflux is mediated by P-glycoprotein, we compared LY efflux in unselected J774 cells, PBR J774 cells, and multidrug-resistant J774 cells (J7.C1). LY efflux from J7.C1 cells was not sensitive to verapamil, which inhibits multidrug-resistance transporters, and reverses the multidrug-resistant phenotype of J7.C1 cells. The rates of LY efflux from unselected J774 and J7.C1 cells were virtually identical.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7909709

  6. ABCC Multidrug Transporters in Childhood Neuroblastoma: Clinical and Biological Effects Independent of Cytotoxic Drug Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Michelle J.; Porro, Antonio; Munoz, Marcia A.; Iraci, Nunzio; Xue, Chengyuan; Murray, Jayne; Flemming, Claudia L.; Smith, Janice; Fletcher, Jamie I.; Gherardi, Samuele; Kwek, Chin-Kiat; Russell, Amanda J.; Valli, Emanuele; London, Wendy B.; Buxton, Allen B.; Ashton, Lesley J.; Sartorelli, Alan C.; Cohn, Susan L.; Schwab, Manfred; Marshall, Glenn M.; Norris, Murray D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the prognostic value of the ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C (ABCC) transporters in childhood neuroblastoma is usually attributed to their role in cytotoxic drug efflux, certain observations have suggested that these multidrug transporters might contribute to the malignant phenotype independent of cytotoxic drug efflux. Methods A v-myc myelocytomatosis viral related oncogene, neuroblastoma derived (MYCN)–driven transgenic mouse neuroblastoma model was crossed with an Abcc1-deficient mouse strain (658 hMYCN1/−, 205 hMYCN+/1 mice) or, alternatively, treated with the ABCC1 inhibitor, Reversan (n = 20). ABCC genes were suppressed using short interfering RNA or overexpressed by stable transfection in neuroblastoma cell lines BE(2)-C, SH-EP, and SH-SY5Y, which were then assessed for wound closure ability, clonogenic capacity, morphological differentiation, and cell growth. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to examine the clinical significance of ABCC family gene expression in a large prospectively accrued cohort of patients (n = 209) with primary neuroblastomas. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox regression were used to test for associations with event-free and overall survival. Except where noted, all statistical tests were two-sided. Results Inhibition of ABCC1 statistically significantly inhibited neuroblastoma development in hMYCN transgenic mice (mean age for palpable tumor: treated mice, 47.2 days; control mice, 41.9 days; hazard ratio [HR] = 9.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.65 to 32; P < .001). Suppression of ABCC1 in vitro inhibited wound closure (P < .001) and clonogenicity (P = .006); suppression of ABCC4 enhanced morphological differentiation (P < .001) and inhibited cell growth (P < .001). Analysis of 209 neuroblastoma patient tumors revealed that, in contrast with ABCC1 and ABCC4, low rather than high ABCC3 expression was associated with reduced event-free survival (HR of recurrence or death = 2

  7. Stubborn Contaminants: Influence of Detergents on the Purity of the Multidrug ABC Transporter BmrA

    PubMed Central

    Chaptal, Vincent; Reyes-Mejia, Gina Catalina; Sarwan, Jonathan; Falson, Pierre; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in membrane proteins, their crystallization remains a major challenge. In the course of a crystallographic study on the multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporter BmrA, mass spectral analyses on samples purified with six selected detergents revealed unexpected protein contamination visible for the most part on overloaded SDS-PAGE. A major contamination from the outer membrane protein OmpF was detected in purifications with Foscholine 12 (FC12) but not with Lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO) or any of the maltose-based detergents. Consequently, in the FC12 purified BmrA, OmpF easily crystallized over BmrA in a new space group, and whose structure is reported here. We therefore devised an optimized protocol to eliminate OmpF during the FC12 purification of BmrA. On the other hand, an additional band visible at ∼110 kDa was detected in all samples purified with the maltose-based detergents. It contained AcrB that crystallized over BmrA despite its trace amounts. Highly pure BmrA preparations could be obtained using either a ΔacrAB E. coli strain and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside, or a classical E. coli strain and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol for the overexpression and purification, respectively. Overall our results urge to incorporate a proteomics-based purity analysis into quality control checks prior to commencing crystallization assays of membrane proteins that are notoriously arduous to crystallize. Moreover, the strategies developed here to selectively eliminate obstinate contaminants should be applicable to the purification of other membrane proteins overexpressed in E. coli. PMID:25517996

  8. Stubborn contaminants: influence of detergents on the purity of the multidrug ABC transporter BmrA.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Benjamin; Kilburg, Arnaud; Chaptal, Vincent; Reyes-Mejia, Gina Catalina; Sarwan, Jonathan; Falson, Pierre; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing interest in membrane proteins, their crystallization remains a major challenge. In the course of a crystallographic study on the multidrug ATP-binding cassette transporter BmrA, mass spectral analyses on samples purified with six selected detergents revealed unexpected protein contamination visible for the most part on overloaded SDS-PAGE. A major contamination from the outer membrane protein OmpF was detected in purifications with Foscholine 12 (FC12) but not with Lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO) or any of the maltose-based detergents. Consequently, in the FC12 purified BmrA, OmpF easily crystallized over BmrA in a new space group, and whose structure is reported here. We therefore devised an optimized protocol to eliminate OmpF during the FC12 purification of BmrA. On the other hand, an additional band visible at ∼110 kDa was detected in all samples purified with the maltose-based detergents. It contained AcrB that crystallized over BmrA despite its trace amounts. Highly pure BmrA preparations could be obtained using either a ΔacrAB E. coli strain and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside, or a classical E. coli strain and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol for the overexpression and purification, respectively. Overall our results urge to incorporate a proteomics-based purity analysis into quality control checks prior to commencing crystallization assays of membrane proteins that are notoriously arduous to crystallize. Moreover, the strategies developed here to selectively eliminate obstinate contaminants should be applicable to the purification of other membrane proteins overexpressed in E. coli. PMID:25517996

  9. mRNA expression profile of multidrug-resistant genes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children, a prognostic value for ABCA3 and ABCA2.

    PubMed

    Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Abedi, Marjan; Entezar-E-Ghaem, Mansureh; Moshtaghian, Jamal; Ghaedi, Kamran; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Montazeri, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is an important cause of treatment failure in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ABC family of membrane transporters is proposed, albeit with controversy, to be involved in this process. The present study aims to investigate the mRNA expression profile of several genes of this family, including ABCA2, ABCA3, ABCB1/MDR1, MRP1/ABCC1, MRP3/ABCC3, ABCG2/BCRP, and the intracellular transporter MVP/LRP, in childhood ALL, and to evaluate their association with response to therapy. Some genes in the present research are being studied for the first time in Iran. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we evaluated 27 children with ALL at diagnosis and 15 children with normal bone marrow. The status of response to therapy was assessed one year after the onset of therapy through investigating the IgH/TCRγ gene rearrangements. Our findings indicate a considerable and direct relationship between mRNA expression levels of ABCA2, ABCA3, MDR1, and MRP1 genes and positive minimal residual disease (MRD) measured after one year of treatment. Statistical analysis revealed that expression of these genes higher than the cutoff point will raise the risk of MRD by 15-, 6.25-, 12-, and 9-fold, respectively. No relationship was found between of MVP/LRP, MRP3 and ABCG2 genes expression and ALL prognoses. Considering the direct and significant relationship between the increased expression of ABCA2, ABCA3, MDR1, and MRP1 genes and positive risk of MRD in children with ALL, evaluating the expression profile of these genes on diagnosis may identify high risk individuals and help plan a more efficient treatment strategy. PMID:24145140

  10. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions: practical recommendations for clinical victim and perpetrator drug-drug interaction study design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Caroline A; O'Connor, Meeghan A; Ritchie, Tasha K; Galetin, Aleksandra; Cook, Jack A; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Ellens, Harma; Feng, Bo; Taub, Mitchell E; Paine, Mary F; Polli, Joseph W; Ware, Joseph A; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) limits intestinal absorption of low-permeability substrate drugs and mediates biliary excretion of drugs and metabolites. Based on clinical evidence of BCRP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and the c.421C>A functional polymorphism affecting drug efficacy and safety, both the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency recommend preclinical evaluation and, when appropriate, clinical assessment of BCRP-mediated DDIs. Although many BCRP substrates and inhibitors have been identified in vitro, clinical translation has been confounded by overlap with other transporters and metabolic enzymes. Regulatory recommendations for BCRP-mediated clinical DDI studies are challenging, as consensus is lacking on the choice of the most robust and specific human BCRP substrates and inhibitors and optimal study design. This review proposes a path forward based on a comprehensive analysis of available data. Oral sulfasalazine (1000 mg, immediate-release tablet) is the best available clinical substrate for intestinal BCRP, oral rosuvastatin (20 mg) for both intestinal and hepatic BCRP, and intravenous rosuvastatin (4 mg) for hepatic BCRP. Oral curcumin (2000 mg) and lapatinib (250 mg) are the best available clinical BCRP inhibitors. To interrogate the worst-case clinical BCRP DDI scenario, study subjects harboring the BCRP c.421C/C reference genotype are recommended. In addition, if sulfasalazine is selected as the substrate, subjects having the rapid acetylator phenotype are recommended. In the case of rosuvastatin, subjects with the organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 c.521T/T genotype are recommended, together with monitoring of rosuvastatin's cholesterol-lowering effect at baseline and DDI phase. A proof-of-concept clinical study is being planned by a collaborative consortium to evaluate the proposed BCRP DDI study design. PMID:25587128

  11. UMMS-4 enhanced sensitivity of chemotherapeutic agents to ABCB1-overexpressing cells via inhibiting function of ABCB1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongjuan; Tang, Shangjun; Aslam, Sana; Ahmad, Matloob; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Wang, Fang; Huang, Zhencong; Cai, Jiye; Fu, Liwu

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters through efflux of antineoplastic agents from cancer cells is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. The inhibition of these ABC transporters is thus a logical approach to circumvent MDR. There has been intensive research effort to design and develop novel inhibitors for the ABC transporters to achieve this goal. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of UMMS-4 to modulate P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1)-, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2)- and multidrug resistance protein (MRP1/ABCC1)-mediated MDR in cancer cells. Our findings showed that UMMS-4, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, apparently circumvents resistance to ABCB1 substrate anticancer drugs in ABCB1-overexpressing cells. When used at a concentration of 20 μmol/L, UMMS-4 produced a 17.53-fold reversal of MDR, but showed no effect on the sensitivity of drug-sensitive parental cells. UMMS-4, however, did not significantly alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrates in all cells and was unable to reverse ABCG2- and ABCC1-mediated MDR. Additionally, UMMS-4 profoundly inhibited the transport of rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) and doxorubicin (Dox) by the ABCB1 transporter. Furthermore, UMMS-4 did not alter the expression of ABCB1 at the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the results of ATPase assays showed that UMMS-4 stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCB1. Taken together, we conclude that UMMS-4 antagonizes ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer cells through direct inhibition of the drug efflux function of ABCB1. These findings may be useful for the development of safer and more effective MDR modulator. PMID:24660104

  12. Nuclear receptors in the multidrug resistance through the regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Yakun; TANG, Yong; GUO, Changxiong; WANG, Jiuhui; BORAL, Debasish; NIE, Daotai

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the three most common treatment modalities for cancer. However, its efficacy is limited by multidrug resistant cancer cells. Drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and efflux transporters promote the metabolism, elimination, and detoxification of chemotherapeutic agents. Consequently, elevated levels of DMEs and efflux transporters reduce the therapeutic effectiveness of chemotheraputics and, often, lead to treatment failure. Nuclear receptors, especially pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) and constitutive androstane activated receptor (CAR, NR1I3), are increasingly recognized for their role in xenobiotic metabolism and clearance as well as their role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) during chemotherapy. Promiscuous xenobiotic receptors, including PXR and CAR, govern the inducible expressions of a broad spectrum of target genes that encode phase I DMEs, phase II DMEs, and efflux transporters. Recent studies conducted by a number of groups, including ours, have revealed that PXR and CAR play pivotal roles in the development of MDR in various human carcinomas, including prostate, colon, ovarian, and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas. Accordingly, PXR/CAR expression levels and/or activation statuses may predict prognosis and identify the risk of drug resistance in patients subjected to chemotherapy. Further, PXR/CAR antagonists, when used in combination with existing chemotherapeutics that activate PXR/CAR, are feasible and promising options that could be utilized to overcome or, at least, attenuate MDR in cancer cells. PMID:22326308

  13. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  14. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  15. The multidrug transporter Pdr5 on the 25th anniversary of its discovery: an important model for the study of asymmetric ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Golin, John; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters make up a significant proportion of this important superfamily of integral membrane proteins. These proteins contain one canonical (catalytic) ATP-binding site and a second atypical site with little enzymatic capability. The baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Pdr5 multidrug transporter is the founding member of the Pdr subfamily of asymmetric ABC transporters, which exist only in fungi and slime moulds. Because these organisms are of considerable medical and agricultural significance, Pdr5 has been studied extensively, as has its medically important homologue Cdr1 from Candida albicans. Genetic and biochemical analyses of Pdr5 have contributed important observations that are likely to be applicable to mammalian asymmetric ABC multidrug transporter proteins, including the basis of transporter promiscuity, the function of the non-catalytic deviant ATP-binding site, the most complete description of an in vivo transmission interface, and the recent discovery that Pdr5 is a molecular diode (one-way gate). In the present review, we discuss the observations made with Pdr5 and compare them with findings from clinically important asymmetric ABC transporters, such as CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), Cdr1 and Tap1/Tap2. PMID:25886173

  16. The multidrug transporter Pdr5 on the 25th anniversary of its discovery: an important model for the study of asymmetric ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Golin, John; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetric ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters make up a significant proportion of this important superfamily of integral membrane proteins. These proteins contain one canonical (catalytic) ATP-binding site and a second atypical site with little enzymatic capability. The baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Pdr5 multidrug transporter is the founding member of the Pdr subfamily of asymmetric ABC transporters, which exist only in fungi and slime moulds. Because these organisms are of considerable medical and agricultural significance, Pdr5 has been studied extensively, as has its medically important homologue Cdr1 from Candida albicans. Genetic and biochemical analyses of Pdr5 have contributed important observations that are likely to be applicable to mammalian asymmetric ABC multidrug transporter proteins, including the basis of transporter promiscuity, the function of the non-catalytic deviant ATP-binding site, the most complete description of an in vivo transmission interface, and the recent discovery that Pdr5 is a molecular diode (one-way gate). In the present review, we discuss the observations made with Pdr5 and compare them with findings from clinically important asymmetric ABC transporters, such as CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), Cdr1 and Tap1/Tap2. PMID:25886173

  17. Research Advances: Less Expensive and More Convenient Gaucher's Disease Treatment; Structural Loop Regions: Key to Multidrug-Resistance Transporters?; New Method Identifies Proteins in Old Artwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray structure of EmrD, a multidrug transporter protein from Escherichia coli, common bacteria known to cause several food-borne illnesses was determined by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute. The hydrophobic residues in the EmrD internal cavity are likely to contribute to the general mechanism transporting various compounds through…

  18. Interaction Potential of the Multitargeted Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Dovitinib with Drug Transporters and Drug Metabolising Enzymes Assessed in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Johanna; Theile, Dirk; Dvorak, Zdenek; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2014-01-01

    Dovitinib (TKI-258) is under development for the treatment of diverse cancer entities. No published information on its pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential is available. Thus, we assessed its interaction with important drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters and its efficacy in multidrug resistant cells in vitro. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1) inhibition was evaluated by calcein assay, inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) by pheophorbide A efflux, and inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) by 8-fluorescein-cAMP uptake. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4, 2C19, and 2D6 was assessed by using commercial kits. Induction of transporters and enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Possible aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activating properties were assessed by a reporter gene assay. Substrate characteristics were evaluated by growth inhibition assays in cells over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Dovitinib weakly inhibited CYP2C19, CYP3A4, P-gp and OATPs. The strongest inhibition was observed for BCRP (IC50 = 10.3 ± 4.5 μM). Among the genes investigated, dovitinib only induced mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, ABCC3 (coding for multidrug resistance-associated protein 3), and ABCG2 and suppressed mRNA expression of some transporters and drug metabolising enzymes. AhR reporter gene assay demonstrated that dovitinib is an activator of this nuclear receptor. Dovitinib retained its efficacy in cell lines over-expressing P-gp or BCRP. Our analysis indicates that dovitinib will most likely retain its efficacy in tumours over-expressing P-gp or BCRP and gives first evidence that dovitinib might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions. PMID:25521244

  19. Imidazoacridinone-dependent lysosomal photodestruction: a pharmacological Trojan horse approach to eradicate multidrug-resistant cancers.

    PubMed

    Adar, Y; Stark, M; Bram, E E; Nowak-Sliwinska, P; van den Bergh, H; Szewczyk, G; Sarna, T; Skladanowski, A; Griffioen, A W; Assaraf, Y G

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a primary hindrance to curative cancer therapy. Thus, introduction of novel strategies to overcome MDR is of paramount therapeutic significance. Sequestration of chemotherapeutics in lysosomes is an established mechanism of drug resistance. Here, we show that MDR cells display a marked increase in lysosome number. We further demonstrate that imidazoacridinones (IAs), which are cytotoxic fluorochromes, undergo a dramatic compartmentalization in lysosomes because of their hydrophobic weak base nature. We hence developed a novel photoactivation-based pharmacological Trojan horse approach to target and eradicate MDR cancer cells based on photo-rupture of IA-loaded lysosomes and tumor cell lysis via formation of reactive oxygen species. Illumination of IA-loaded cells resulted in lysosomal photodestruction and restoration of parental cell drug sensitivity. Lysosomal photodestruction of MDR cells overexpressing the key MDR efflux transporters ABCG2, ABCB1 or ABCC1 resulted in 10- to 52-fold lower IC(50) values of various IAs, thereby restoring parental cell sensitivity. Finally, in vivo application of this photodynamic therapy strategy after i.v. injection of IAs in human ovarian tumor xenografts in the chorioallantoic membrane model revealed selective destruction of tumors and their associated vasculature. These findings identify lysosomal sequestration of IAs as an Achilles heel of MDR cells that can be harnessed to eradicate MDR tumor cells via lysosomal photodestruction. PMID:22476101

  20. Export of salicylic acid from the chloroplast requires the multidrug and toxin extrusion-like transporter EDS5.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Mario; Wang, Bangjun; Aryal, Bibek; Garcion, Christophe; Abou-Mansour, Eliane; Heck, Silvia; Geisler, Markus; Mauch, Felix; Nawrath, Christiane; Métraux, Jean-Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is central for the defense of plants to pathogens and abiotic stress. SA is synthesized in chloroplasts from chorismic acid by an isochorismate synthase (ICS1); SA biosynthesis is negatively regulated by autoinhibitory feedback at ICS1. Genetic studies indicated that the multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY5 (EDS5) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is necessary for SA accumulation after biotic and abiotic stress, but so far it is not understood how EDS5 controls the biosynthesis of SA. Here, we show that EDS5 colocalizes with a marker of the chloroplast envelope and that EDS5 functions as a multidrug and toxin extrusion-like transporter in the export of SA from the chloroplast to the cytoplasm in Arabidopsis, where it controls the innate immune response. The location at the chloroplast envelope supports a model of the effect of EDS5 on SA biosynthesis: in the eds5 mutant, stress-induced SA is trapped in the chloroplast and inhibits its own accumulation by autoinhibitory feedback. PMID:23757404

  1. Pilocarpine-induced convulsive activity is limited by multidrug transporters at the rodent blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Römermann, K; Bankstahl, J P; Löscher, W; Bankstahl, M

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the growing availability of genetically engineered mouse lines, the pilocarpine post-status epilepticus (SE) model of temporal lobe epilepsy is increasingly used in mice. A discrepancy in pilocarpine sensitivity in FVB/N wild-type versus P-glycoprotein (PGP)-deficient mice precipitated the investigation of the interaction between pilocarpine and two major multidrug transporters at the blood-brain barrier. Doses of pilocarpine necessary for SE induction were determined in male and female wild-type and PGP-deficient mice. Brain and plasma concentrations were measured following low (30-50 mg⋅kg(-1) i.p.) and/or high (200 mg⋅kg(-1) i.p.) doses of pilocarpine in wild-type mice, and mice lacking PGP, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), or both transporters, as well as in rats with or without pretreatment with lithium chloride or tariquidar. Concentration equilibrium transport assays (CETA) were performed using cells overexpressing murine PGP or BCRP. Lower pilocarpine doses were necessary for SE induction in PGP-deficient mice. Brain-plasma ratios were higher in mice lacking PGP or PGP and BCRP, which was also observed after pretreatment with tariquidar in mice and in rats. Lithium chloride did not change brain penetration of pilocarpine. CETA confirmed transport of pilocarpine by PGP and BCRP. Pilocarpine is a substrate of PGP and BCRP at the rodent blood-brain barrier, which restricts its convulsive action. Future studies to reveal whether strain differences in pilocarpine sensitivity derive from differences in multidrug transporter expression levels are warranted. PMID:25755207

  2. 8-Prenylnaringenin is an inhibitor of multidrug resistance-associated transporters, P-glycoprotein and MRP1.

    PubMed

    Wesołowska, Olga; Wiśniewski, Jerzy; Sroda, Kamila; Krawczenko, Agnieszka; Bielawska-Pohl, Aleksandra; Paprocka, Maria; Duś, Danuta; Michalak, Krystyna

    2010-10-10

    Flavonoids with hydrophobic e.g. prenyl substituents might constitute the promising candidates for multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal agents. The interaction of 8-prenylnaringenin (8-isopentenylnaringenin), a potent phytoestrogen isolated from common hop (Humulus lupulus), with two multidrug resistance-associated ABC transporters of cancer cells, P-glycoprotein and MRP1, has been studied for the first time. Functional test based on the transport of fluorescent substrate BCECF revealed that the flavonoid strongly inhibited MRP1 transport activity in human erythrocytes (IC(50)=5.76+/-1.80muM). Expression of MDR-related transporters in drug-sensitive (LoVo) and doxorubicin-resistant (LoVo/Dx) human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines was characterized by RT-PCR and immunochemical methods and elevated expression of P-glycoprotein in resistant cells was found to be the main difference between these two cell lines. By means of flow cytometry it was shown that 8-prenylnaringenin significantly increased the accumulation of rhodamine 123 in LoVo/Dx cells. Doxorubicin accumulation in both LoVo and LoVo/Dx cells observed by confocal microscopy was also altered in the presence of 8-prenylnaringenin. However, the presence of the studied compound did not increase doxorubicin cytotoxicity to LoVo/Dx cells. It was concluded that 8-prenylnaringenin was not able to modulate MDR in human adenocarcinoma cell line in spite of the ability to inhibit both P-glycoprotein and MRP1 activities. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of 8-prenylnaringenin interaction with clinically important ABC transporters. PMID:20633549

  3. In vitro synthesis of fully functional EmrE, a multidrug transporter, and study of its oligomeric state

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Yael; Steiner-Mordoch, Sonia; Danieli, Tsafi; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2004-01-01

    EmrE is a small multidrug transporter from Escherichia coli that provides a unique model for the study of polytopic membrane proteins. Here, we show its synthesis in a cell-free system in a fully functional form. The detergent-solubilized protein binds substrates with high affinity and, when reconstituted into proteoliposomes, transports substrate in a Δμ̃H+-dependent fashion. Here, we used the cell-free system to study the oligomeric properties of EmrE. EmrE functions as an oligomer, but the size of the functional oligomer has not been established unequivocally. Coexpression of two plasmids in the cell-free system allowed demonstration of functional complementation and pull-down experiments confirmed that the basic functional unit is the dimer. An additional interaction between dimers has been detected by using crosslinking between unique Cys residues. This finding implies the existence of a dimer of dimers. PMID:14755055

  4. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression and localization in sea urchin development

    PubMed Central

    Shipp, Lauren E.; Hamdoun, Amro

    2012-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane proteins that regulate intracellular concentrations of myriad compounds and ions. There are >100 ABC transporter predictions in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, including 40 annotated ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG “multidrug efflux” transporters. Despite the importance of multidrug transporters for protection and signaling, their expression patterns have not been characterized in deuterostome embryos. Results Sea urchin embryos expressed 20 ABCB, ABCC, and ABCG transporter genes in the first 58 hours of development, from unfertilized egg to early prism. We quantified transcripts of ABCB1a, ABCB4a, ABCC1, ABCC5a, ABCC9a, and ABCG2b, and found that ABCB1a mRNA was 10–100 times more abundant than other transporter mRNAs. In situ hybridization showed ABCB1a was expressed ubiquitously in embryos, while ABCC5a was restricted to secondary mesenchyme cells and their precursors. Fluorescent protein fusions showed localization of ABCB1a on apical cell surfaces, and ABCC5a on basolateral surfaces. Conclusions Embryos utilize many ABC transporters with predicted functions in cell signaling, lysosomal and mitochondrial homeostasis, potassium channel regulation, pigmentation, and xenobiotic efflux. Detailed characterization of ABCB1a and ABCC5a revealed that they have different temporal and spatial gene expression profiles and protein localization patterns that correlate to their predicted functions in protection and development, respectively. PMID:22473856

  5. Interactions of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors with Organic Cation Transporters, OCTs, and Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion Proteins, MATEs

    PubMed Central

    Minematsu, Tsuyoshi; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    The drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) as interacting drugs via transporter inhibition has not been fully assessed. Here, we estimated the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for eight small-molecule TKIs (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, gefitinib, erlotinib, sunitinib, lapatinib, and sorafenib) on [14C]metformin transport by human organic cation transporters (OCT1, OCT2, and OCT3), and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion proteins (MATE1 and MATE2-K), using HEK293 cells stably expressing these transporters. We then compared the estimated IC50 values to the maximum clinical concentrations of unbound TKIs in plasma (unbound Cmax,sys,p). Results showed that imatinib, nilotinib, gefitinib, and erlotinib exerted selectively potent inhibitory effects, with unbound Cmax,sys,p/IC50 values ≥ 0.1, on MATE1, OCT3, MATE2-K and OCT1, respectively. In comparison to the common form of OCT1, the OCT1 polymorphism, M420del was more sensitive to drug inhibition by erlotinib. Major metabolites of several TKIs showed IC50 values similar to those for unchanged TKIs. Taken together, these findings suggest the potential of clinical transporter-mediated DDIs between specific TKIs and OCTs and MATEs, which may affect the disposition, efficacy and toxicity of metformin and other drugs that are substrates of these transporters. The study provides the basis for further clinical DDI studies with TKIs. PMID:21252289

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the multidrug efflux transporter NorM from Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    SciTech Connect

    Su, C.C.; Long, F.; McDermott, G.; Shafer, W.M.; Yu, E.W.

    2008-06-03

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of the NorM multidrug efflux pump produced by Neisseria gonorrhoeae are reported. NorM is a cytoplasmic membrane protein that consists of 459 amino-acid residues. It is a member of the recently classified multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of transporters and recognizes a number of cationic toxic compounds such as ethidium bromide, acriflavin, 2-N-methylellipticinium and ciprofloxacin. Recombinant NorM protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by metal-affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. The protein was crystallized using hanging-drop vapor diffusion. X-ray diffraction data were collected from cryocooled crystals at a synchrotron light source. The best crystal diffracted anisotropically to 3.8 {angstrom} and diffraction data were complete to 6.5 {angstrom} resolution. The space group was determined to be C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.5, b = 164.4, c = 111.5 {angstrom}.

  7. The modulation of ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance in cancer: a review of the past decade.

    PubMed

    Kathawala, Rishil J; Gupta, Pranav; Ashby, Charles R; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent one of the largest and oldest families of membrane proteins in all extant phyla from prokaryotes to humans, which couple the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis essentially to translocate, among various substrates, toxic compounds across the membrane. The fundamental functions of these multiple transporter proteins include: (1) conserved mechanisms related to nutrition and pathogenesis in bacteria, (2) spore formation in fungi, and (3) signal transduction, protein secretion and antigen presentation in eukaryotes. Moreover, one of the major causes of multidrug resistance (MDR) and chemotherapeutic failure in cancer therapy is believed to be the ABC transporter-mediated active efflux of a multitude of structurally and mechanistically distinct cytotoxic compounds across membranes. It has been postulated that ABC transporter inhibitors known as chemosensitizers may be used in combination with standard chemotherapeutic agents to enhance their therapeutic efficacy. The current paper reviews the advance in the past decade in this important domain of cancer chemoresistance and summarizes the development of new compounds and the re-evaluation of compounds originally designed for other targets as transport inhibitors of ATP-dependent drug efflux pumps. PMID:25554624

  8. Lapatinib and erlotinib are potent reversal agents for MRP7 (ABCC10)-mediated multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ye-Hong; Shen, Tong; Chen, Xiang; Sodani, Kamlesh; Hopper-Borge, Elizabeth; Tiwari, Amit K; Lee, Jeferson W K K; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, a number of TKIs (tyrosine kinase inhibitors) targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family have been synthesized and some have been approved for clinical treatment of cancer by the FDA. We recently reported a new pharmacological action of the 4-anilinoquinazoline derived EGFR TKIs, such as lapatinib (Tykerb) and erlotinib (Tarceva), which significantly affect the drug resistance patterns in cells expressing the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. Previously, we showed that lapatinib and erlotinib could inhibit the drug efflux function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and ABCG2 transporters. In this study, we determined if these TKIs have the potential to reverse MDR due to the presence of the multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10). Our results showed that lapatinib and erlotinib dose-dependently enhanced the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to several established MRP7 substrates, specifically docetaxel, paclitaxel, vinblastine and vinorelbine, whereas there was no or a less effect on the control vector transfected HEK293 cells. [(3)H]-paclitaxel accumulation and efflux studies demonstrated that lapatinib and erlotinib increased the intracellular accumulation of [(3)H]-paclitaxel and inhibited the efflux of [(3)H]-paclitaxel from MRP7-transfected cells but not in the control cell line. Lapatinib is a more potent inhibitor of MRP7 than erlotinib. In addition, the Western blot analysis revealed that both lapatinib and erlotinib did not significantly affect MRP7 expression. We conclude that the EGFR TKIs, lapatinib and erlotinib reverse MRP7-mediated MDR through inhibition of the drug efflux function, suggesting that an EGFR TKI based combinational therapy may be applicable for chemotherapeutic practice clinically. PMID:19720054

  9. A Small Multidrug Resistance-like Transporter Involved in the Arabinosylation of Arabinogalactan and Lipoarabinomannan in Mycobacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Škovierová, Henrieta; Dhouib, Rabeb; Angala, Shiva Kumar; Zuberogoitia, Sophie; Pham, Ha; Villela, Anne Drumond; Mikušová, Katarina; Noguera, Audrey; Gilleron, Martine; Valentínová, Lucia; Korduláková, Jana; Brennan, Patrick. J.; Puzo, Germain; Nigou, Jérôme; Jackson, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the major cell envelope glycoconjugates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is topologically split across the plasma membrane, yet nothing is known of the transporters required for the translocation of lipid-linked sugar donors and oligosaccharide intermediates from the cytoplasmic to the periplasmic side of the membrane in mycobacteria. One of the mechanisms used by prokaryotes to translocate lipid-linked phosphate sugars across the plasma membrane relies on translocases that share resemblance with small multidrug resistance transporters. The presence of an small multidrug resistance-like gene, Rv3789, located immediately upstream from dprE1/dprE2 responsible for the formation of decaprenyl-monophosphoryl-β-d-arabinose (DPA) in the genome of M. tuberculosis led us to investigate its potential involvement in the formation of the major arabinosylated glycopolymers, lipoarabinomannan (LAM) and arabinogalactan (AG). Disruption of the ortholog of Rv3789 in Mycobacterium smegmatis resulted in a reduction of the arabinose content of both AG and LAM that accompanied the accumulation of DPA in the mutant cells. Interestingly, AG and LAM synthesis was restored in the mutant not only upon expression of Rv3789 but also upon that of the undecaprenyl phosphate aminoarabinose flippase arnE/F genes from Escherichia coli. A bacterial two-hybrid system further indicated that Rv3789 interacts in vivo with the galactosyltransferase that initiates the elongation of the galactan domain of AG. Biochemical and genetic evidence is thus consistent with Rv3789 belonging to an AG biosynthetic complex, where its role is to reorient DPA to the periplasm, allowing this arabinose donor to then be used in the buildup of the arabinan domains of AG and LAM. PMID:23038254

  10. A conserved interdomain communication pathway of pseudosymmetrically distributed residues affects substrate specificity of the fungal multidrug transporter Cdr1p.

    PubMed

    Kolaczkowski, Marcin; Sroda-Pomianek, Kamila; Kolaczkowska, Anna; Michalak, Krystyna

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the communication pathways between remote sites in proteins is of key importance for understanding their function and mechanism of action. These remain largely unexplored among the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) representatives of the ubiquitous superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. To identify functionally coupled residues important for the polyspecific transport by the fungal ABC multidrug transporter Cdr1p a new selection strategy, towards increased resistance to a preferred substrate of the homologous Snq2p, was applied to a library of randomly generated mutants. The single amino acid substitutions, located pseudosymmetrically in each domain of the internally duplicated protein: the H-loop of the N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) (C363R) and in the C-terminal NBD2 region preceding Walker A (V885G). The central regions of the first transmembrane helices 1 and 7 of both transmembrane domains were also affected by the G521S/D and A1208V substitutions respectively. Although the mutants were expressed at a similar level and located correctly to the plasma membrane, they selectively affected transport of multiple drugs, including azole antifungals. The synergistic effects of combined mutations on drug resistance, drug dependent ATPase activity and transport support the view inferred from the statistical coupling analysis (SCA) of aminoacid coevolution and mutational analysis of other ABC transporter families that these residues are an important part of the conserved, allosterically coupled interdomain communication network. Our results shed new light on the communication between the pseudosymmetrically arranged domains in a fungal PDR ABC transporter and reveal its profound influence on substrate specificity. PMID:23122779

  11. In Silico Prediction of Inhibition of Promiscuous Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2)

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi-Lung; Shih, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Fu-Yuan; Leong, Max K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer resistant protein has an essential role in active transport of endogenous substances and xenobiotics across extracellular and intracellular membranes along with P-glycoprotein. It also plays a major role in multiple drug resistance and permeation of blood-brain barrier. Therefore, it is of great importance to derive theoretical models to predict the inhibition of both transporters in the process of drug discovery and development. Hitherto, very limited BCRP inhibition predictive models have been proposed as compared with its P-gp counterpart. Methodology/Principal Findings An in silico BCRP inhibition model was developed in this study using the pharmacophore ensemble/support vector machine scheme to take into account the promiscuous nature of BCRP. The predictions by the PhE/SVM model were found to be in good agreement with the observed values for those molecules in the training set (n = 22, r2 = 0.82,  = 0.73, RMSE  =  0.40, s = 0.24), test set (n = 97, q2 = 0.75–0.89, RMSE  = 0.31, s = 0.21), and outlier set (n = 16, q2 = 0.72–0.91, RMSE  =  0.29, s = 0.17). When subjected to a variety of statistical validations, the developed PhE/SVM model consistently met the most stringent criteria. A mock test by HIV protease inhibitors also asserted its predictivity. Conclusions/Significance It was found that this accurate, fast, and robust PhE/SVM model can be employed to predict the BCRP inhibition of structurally diverse molecules that otherwise cannot be carried out by any other methods in a high-throughput fashion to design therapeutic agents with insignificant drug toxicity and unfavorable drug–drug interactions mediated by BCRP to enhance clinical efficacy and/or circumvent drug resistance. PMID:24614353

  12. Identification of the High-affinity Substrate-binding Site of the Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) Family Transporter from Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Nie, Laiyin; Grell, Ernst; Malviya, Viveka Nand; Xie, Hao; Wang, Jingkang; Michel, Hartmut

    2016-07-22

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters exist in all three domains of life. They confer multidrug resistance by utilizing H(+) or Na(+) electrochemical gradients to extrude various drugs across the cell membranes. The substrate binding and the transport mechanism of MATE transporters is a fundamental process but so far not fully understood. Here we report a detailed substrate binding study of NorM_PS, a representative MATE transporter from Pseudomonas stutzeri Our results indicate that NorM_PS is a proton-dependent multidrug efflux transporter. Detailed binding studies between NorM_PS and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) were performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and spectrofluorometry. Two exothermic binding events were observed from ITC data, and the high-affinity event was directly correlated with the extrusion of DAPI. The affinities are about 1 μm and 0.1 mm for the high and low affinity binding, respectively. Based on our homology model of NorM_PS, variants with mutations of amino acids that are potentially involved in substrate binding, were constructed. By carrying out the functional characterization of these variants, the critical amino acid residues (Glu-257 and Asp-373) for high-affinity DAPI binding were determined. Taken together, our results suggest a new substrate-binding site for MATE transporters. PMID:27235402

  13. The multidrug resistance pumps are inhibited by silibinin and apoptosis induced in K562 and KCL22 leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza; Saffari, Mojtaba; Raoofian, Reza; Yekaninejad, Mirsaeed; Dinehkabodi, Orkideh Saydi; Noori-Daloii, Ali Reza

    2014-05-01

    Silibinin have been introduced for several years as a potent antioxidant in the field of nutraceuticals. Based on wide persuasive effects of this drug, we have decided to investigate the effects of silibinin on chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in vitro models, K562 and KCL22 cell lines. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, microculture tetrazolium test (MTT assay) and real-time PCR were employed to evaluate the effects of silibinin on cell cytotoxicity, cell proliferation and expression of various multidrug resistance genes in these cell lines, respectively. Our results have shown that presence of silibinin has inhibitory effects on cell proliferation of K562 and KCL22 cell lines. Also, our data indicated that silibinin, in a dose-dependent manner with applying no cytotoxic effects, inhibited cell proliferation and reduced mRNA expression levels of some transporter genes e.g. MDR1, MRP3, MRP2, MRP1, MRP5, MRP4, ABCG2, ABCB11, MRP6 and MRP7. The multifarious in vitro inhibitory effects of silibinin are in agreement with growing body of evidence that silibinin would be an efficient anticancer agent in order to be used in multi-target therapy to prevail the therapeutic hold backs against CML. PMID:24522246

  14. Impaired renal secretion of substrates for the multidrug resistance protein 2 in mutant transport-deficient (TR-) rats.

    PubMed

    Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Notenboom, Sylvia; Smeets, Pascal H E; Wouterse, Alfons C; Russel, Frans G M

    2003-11-01

    Previous studies with mutant transport-deficient rats (TR(-)), in which the multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2) is lacking, have emphasized the importance of this transport protein in the biliary excretion of a wide variety of glutathione conjugates, glucuronides, and other organic anions. Mrp2 is also present in the luminal membrane of proximal tubule cells of the kidney, but little information is available on its role in the renal excretion of xenobiotics. The authors compared renal transport of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrates calcein, fluo-3, and lucifer yellow (LY) between perfused kidneys isolated from Wistar Hannover (WH) and TR(-) rats. Isolated rat kidneys were perfused with 100 nM of the nonfluorescent calcein-AM or 500 nM fluo3-AM, which enter the tubular cells by diffusion and are hydrolyzed intracellularly into the fluorescent anion. The urinary excretion rates of calcein and fluo-3 were 3 to 4 times lower in perfused kidneys from TR(-) rats compared with WH rats. In contrast, the renal excretion of LY (10 micro M, free anion) was somewhat delayed but appeared unimpaired in TR(-) rats. Membrane vesicles from Sf9 cells expressing human MRP2 or human MRP4 indicated that MRP2 exhibits a preferential affinity for calcein and fluo-3, whereas LY is a better substrate for MRP4. We conclude that the renal clearance of the Mrp2 substrates calcein and fluo-3 is significantly reduced in TR(-) rat; for LY, the absence of the transporter may be compensated for by (an)other organic anion transporter(s). PMID:14569083

  15. Combinatorial Pharmacophore Modeling of Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion Transporter 1 Inhibitors: a Theoretical Perspective for Understanding Multiple Inhibitory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuan; Liu, Xian; Wang, Yulan; Zhou, Nannan; Peng, Jianlong; Gong, Likun; Ren, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Luo, Xiaomin; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian; Zheng, Mingyue

    2015-01-01

    A combinatorial pharmacophore (CP) model for Multidrug and toxin extrusion 1 (MATE1/SLC47A1) inhibitors was developed based on a data set including 881 compounds. The CP model comprises four individual pharmacophore hypotheses, HHR1, DRR, HHR2 and AAAP, which can successfully identify the MATE1 inhibitors with an overall accuracy around 75%. The model emphasizes the importance of aromatic ring and hydrophobicity as two important structural determinants for MATE1 inhibition. Compared with the pharmacophore model of Organic Cation Transporter 2 (OCT2/ SLC22A2), a functional related transporter of MATE1, the hypotheses of AAAP and PRR5 are suggested to be responsible for their ligand selectivity, while HHR a common recognition pattern for their dual inhibition. A series of analysis including molecular sizes of inhibitors matching different hypotheses, matching of representative MATE1 inhibitors and molecular docking indicated that the small inhibitors matching HHR1 and DRR involve in competitive inhibition, while the relatively large inhibitors matching AAAP are responsible for the noncompetitive inhibition by locking the conformation changing of MATE1. In light of the results, a hypothetical model for inhibiting transporting mediated by MATE1 was proposed. PMID:26330298

  16. Prediction of multi-drug resistance transporters using a novel sequence analysis method [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McDermott, Jason E.; Bruillard, Paul; Overall, Christopher C.; Gosink, Luke; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2015-03-09

    There are many examples of groups of proteins that have similar function, but the determinants of functional specificity may be hidden by lack of sequencesimilarity, or by large groups of similar sequences with different functions. Transporters are one such protein group in that the general function, transport, can be easily inferred from the sequence, but the substrate specificity can be impossible to predict from sequence with current methods. In this paper we describe a linguistic-based approach to identify functional patterns from groups of unaligned protein sequences and its application to predict multi-drug resistance transporters (MDRs) from bacteria. We first showmore » that our method can recreate known patterns from PROSITE for several motifs from unaligned sequences. We then show that the method, MDRpred, can predict MDRs with greater accuracy and positive predictive value than a collection of currently available family-based models from the Pfam database. Finally, we apply MDRpred to a large collection of protein sequences from an environmental microbiome study to make novel predictions about drug resistance in a potential environmental reservoir.« less

  17. Prediction of multi-drug resistance transporters using a novel sequence analysis method [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Bruillard, Paul; Overall, Christopher C.; Gosink, Luke; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2015-03-09

    There are many examples of groups of proteins that have similar function, but the determinants of functional specificity may be hidden by lack of sequencesimilarity, or by large groups of similar sequences with different functions. Transporters are one such protein group in that the general function, transport, can be easily inferred from the sequence, but the substrate specificity can be impossible to predict from sequence with current methods. In this paper we describe a linguistic-based approach to identify functional patterns from groups of unaligned protein sequences and its application to predict multi-drug resistance transporters (MDRs) from bacteria. We first show that our method can recreate known patterns from PROSITE for several motifs from unaligned sequences. We then show that the method, MDRpred, can predict MDRs with greater accuracy and positive predictive value than a collection of currently available family-based models from the Pfam database. Finally, we apply MDRpred to a large collection of protein sequences from an environmental microbiome study to make novel predictions about drug resistance in a potential environmental reservoir.

  18. Multidrug efflux pumps: the structures of prokaryotic ATP-binding cassette transporter efflux pumps and implications for our understanding of eukaryotic P-glycoproteins and homologues.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian D; Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2010-02-01

    One of the Holy Grails of ATP-binding cassette transporter research is a structural understanding of drug binding and transport in a eukaryotic multidrug resistance pump. These transporters are front-line mediators of drug resistance in cancers and represent an important therapeutic target in future chemotherapy. Although there has been intensive biochemical research into the human multidrug pumps, their 3D structure at atomic resolution remains unknown. The recent determination of the structure of a mouse P-glycoprotein at subatomic resolution is complemented by structures for a number of prokaryotic homologues. These structures have provided advances into our knowledge of the ATP-binding cassette exporter structure and mechanism, and have provided the template data for a number of homology modelling studies designed to reconcile biochemical data on these clinically important proteins. PMID:19961540

  19. Drug-protein hydrogen bonds govern the inhibition of the ATP hydrolysis of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chufan, Eduardo E; Kapoor, Khyati; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. This multidrug transporter utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of a variety of hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Most of the substrates and modulators of P-gp stimulate its basal ATPase activity, although some inhibit it. The molecular mechanisms that are in play in either case are unknown. In this report, mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies of P-gp led to the identification of a pair of phenylalanine-tyrosine structural motifs in the transmembrane region that mediate the inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by certain drugs (zosuquidar, elacridar and tariquidar), with high affinity (IC50's ranging from 10 to 30nM). Upon mutation of any of these residues, drugs that inhibit the ATPase activity of P-gp switch to stimulation of the activity. Molecular modeling revealed that the phenylalanine residues F978 and F728 interact with tyrosine residues Y953 and Y310, respectively, in an edge-to-face conformation, which orients the tyrosines in such a way that they establish hydrogen-bond contacts with the inhibitor. Biochemical investigations along with transport studies in intact cells showed that the inhibitors bind at a high affinity site to produce inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and transport function. Upon mutation, they bind at lower affinity sites, stimulating ATP hydrolysis and only poorly inhibiting transport. These results also reveal that screening chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the basal ATP hydrolysis can be a reliable tool to identify modulators with high affinity for P-gp. PMID:26686578

  20. HG-829 is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of the ATP-binding cassette multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Gisela; Robey, Robert W; Sokol, Lubomir; McGraw, Kathy L; Clark, Justine; Lawrence, Nicholas J; Sebti, Said M; Wiese, Michael; List, Alan F

    2012-08-15

    Transmembrane drug export mediated by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein contributes to clinical resistance to antineoplastics. In this study, we identified the substituted quinoline HG-829 as a novel, noncompetitive, and potent P-glycoprotein inhibitor that overcomes in vitro and in vivo drug resistance. We found that nontoxic concentrations of HG-829 restored sensitivity to P-glycoprotein oncolytic substrates. In ABCB1-overexpressing cell lines, HG-829 significantly enhanced cytotoxicity to daunorubicin, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, and etoposide. Coadministration of HG-829 fully restored in vivo antitumor activity of daunorubicin in mice without added toxicity. Functional assays showed that HG-829 is not a Pgp substrate or competitive inhibitor of Pgp-mediated drug efflux but rather acts as a noncompetitive modulator of P-glycoprotein transport function. Taken together, our findings indicate that HG-829 is a potent, long-acting, and noncompetitive modulator of P-glycoprotein export function that may offer therapeutic promise for multidrug-resistant malignancies. PMID:22761337

  1. Coupling of remote alternating-access transport mechanisms for protons and substrates in the multidrug efflux pump AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, Thomas; Seeger, Markus A; Anselmi, Claudio; Zhou, Wenchang; Brandstätter, Lorenz; Verrey, François; Diederichs, Kay; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Pos, Klaas M

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters of the RND superfamily confer multidrug resistance to pathogenic bacteria, and are essential for cholesterol metabolism and embryonic development in humans. We use high-resolution X-ray crystallography and computational methods to delineate the mechanism of the homotrimeric RND-type proton/drug antiporter AcrB, the active component of the major efflux system AcrAB-TolC in Escherichia coli, and one most complex and intriguing membrane transporters known to date. Analysis of wildtype AcrB and four functionally-inactive variants reveals an unprecedented mechanism that involves two remote alternating-access conformational cycles within each protomer, namely one for protons in the transmembrane region and another for drugs in the periplasmic domain, 50 Å apart. Each of these cycles entails two distinct types of collective motions of two structural repeats, coupled by flanking α-helices that project from the membrane. Moreover, we rationalize how the cross-talk among protomers across the trimerization interface might lead to a more kinetically efficient efflux system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03145.001 PMID:25248080

  2. Urinary Dopamine as a Potential Index of the Transport Activity of Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kajiwara, Moto; Ban, Tsuyoshi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is a cationic natriuretic catecholamine synthesized in proximal tubular cells (PTCs) of the kidney before secretion into the lumen, a key site of its action. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying dopamine secretion into the lumen remain unclear. Multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) is a H+/organic cation antiporter that is highly expressed in the brush border membrane of PTCs and mediates the efflux of organic cations, including metformin and cisplatin, from the epithelial cells into the urine. Therefore, we hypothesized that MATE mediates dopamine secretion, a cationic catecholamine, into the tubule lumen, thereby regulating natriuresis. Here, we show that [3H]dopamine uptake in human (h) MATE1-, hMATE-2K- and mouse (m) MATE-expressing cells exhibited saturable kinetics. Fluid retention and decreased urinary excretion of dopamine and Na+ were observed in Mate1-knockout mice compared to that in wild-type mice. Imatinib, a MATE inhibitor, inhibited [3H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1-, hMATE2-K- and mMATE1-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. At clinically-relevant concentrations, imatinib inhibited [3H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1- and hMATE2-K-expressing cells. The urinary excretion of dopamine and Na+ decreased and fluid retention occurred in imatinib-treated mice. In conclusion, MATE transporters secrete renally-synthesized dopamine, and therefore, urinary dopamine has the potential to be an index of the MATE transporter activity. PMID:27483254

  3. Fungicide efflux and the MgMFS1 transporter contribute to the multidrug resistance phenotype in Zymoseptoria tritici field isolates.

    PubMed

    Omrane, Selim; Sghyer, Hind; Audéon, Colette; Lanen, Catherine; Duplaix, Clémentine; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Fillinger, Sabine

    2015-08-01

    Septoria leaf blotch is mainly controlled by fungicides. Zymoseptoria tritici, which is responsible for this disease, displays strong adaptive capacity to fungicide challenge. It developed resistance to most fungicides due to target site modifications. Recently, isolated strains showed cross-resistance to fungicides with unrelated modes of action, suggesting a resistance mechanism known as multidrug resistance (MDR). We show enhanced prochloraz efflux, sensitive to the modulators amitryptiline and chlorpromazine, for two Z. tritici strains, displaying an MDR phenotype in addition to the genotypes CYP51(I381V Y461H) or CYP51(I381V ΔY459/) (G460) , respectively, hereafter named MDR6 and MDR7. Efflux was also inhibited by verapamil in the MDR7 strain. RNA sequencing lead to the identification of several transporter genes overexpressed in both MDR strains. The expression of the MgMFS1 gene was the strongest and constitutively high in MDR field strains. Its inactivation in the MDR6 strain abolished resistance to fungicides with different modes of action supporting its involvement in MDR in Z. tritici. A 519 bp insert in the MgMFS1 promoter was detected in half of the tested MDR field strains, but absent from sensitive field strains, suggesting that the insert is correlated with the observed MDR phenotype. Besides MgMfs1, other transporters and mutations may be involved in MDR in Z. tritici. PMID:25627815

  4. Bacillus cereus efflux protein BC3310 – a multidrug transporter of the unknown major facilitator family, UMF-2

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Jasmin K.; Hassan, Karl; Vörös, Aniko; Simm, Roger; Saidijam, Massoud; Bettaney, Kim E.; Bechthold, Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic classification divides the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) into 82 families, including 25 families that are comprised of transporters with no characterized functions. This study describes functional data for BC3310 from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, a member of the “unknown major facilitator family-2” (UMF-2). BC3310 was shown to be a multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to ethidium bromide, SDS and silver nitrate when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α ΔacrAB. A conserved aspartate residue (D105) in putative transmembrane helix 4 was identified, which was essential for the energy dependent ethidium bromide efflux by BC3310. Transport proteins of the MFS comprise specific sequence motifs. Sequence analysis of UMF-2 proteins revealed that they carry a variant of the MFS motif A, which may be used as a marker to distinguish easily between this family and other MFS proteins. Genes orthologous to bc3310 are highly conserved within the B. cereus group of organisms and thus belong to the core genome, suggesting an important conserved functional role in the normal physiology of these bacteria. PMID:26528249

  5. Identification of ABC Transporter Interaction of a Novel Cyanoquinoline Radiotracer and Implications for Tumour Imaging by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Rozanna L.; Pisaneschi, Federica; Nguyen, Quang-De; Smith, Graham; Carroll, Laurence; Beckley, Alice; Kaliszczak, Maciej A.; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in many cancers including lung, ovarian, breast, head and neck and brain. Mutation of this receptor has been shown to play a crucial role in the response of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) to EGFR-targeted therapies. It is envisaged that imaging of EGFR using positron emission tomography (PET) could aid in selection of patients for treatment with novel inhibitors. We recognised multi-drug resistant phenotype as a threat to development of successful imaging agents. In this report, we describe discovery of a novel cyanoquinoline radiotracer that lacks ABC transporter activity. Methods Cellular retention of the prototype cyanoquinoline [18F](2E)-N-{4-[(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)amino]-3-cyano-7-ethoxyquinolin-6-yl}-4-({[1-(2-fluoroethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl]methyl}amino)-but-2-enamide ([18F]FED6) and [18F](2E)-N-{4-[(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)amino]-3-cyano-7-ethoxyquinolin-6-yl}-4-[({1-[(2R,5S)-3-fluoro-4,5-dihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxan-2-yl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl}methyl)amino]but-2-enamide ([18F]FED20) were evaluated to establish potential for imaging specificity. The substrate specificity of a number of cyanoquinolines towards ABC transporters was investigated in cell lines proficient or deficient in ABCB1 or ABCG2. Results FED6 demonstrated substrate specificity for both ABCG2 and ABCB1, a property that was not observed for all cyanoquinolines tested, suggesting scope for designing novel probes. ABC transporter activity was confirmed by attenuating the activity of transporters with drug inhibitors or siRNA. We synthesized a more hydrophilic compound [18F]FED20 to overcome ABC transporter activity. FED20 lacked substrate specificity for both ABCB1 and ABCG2, and maintained a strong affinity for EGFR. Furthermore, FED20 showed higher inhibitory affinity for active mutant EGFR versus wild-type or resistant mutant EGFR; this property resulted in higher [18F]FED20 cellular retention in active

  6. The ABC transporter gene family of Caenorhabditis elegans has implications for the evolutionary dynamics of multidrug resistance in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Sheps, Jonathan A; Ralph, Steven; Zhao, Zhongying; Baillie, David L; Ling, Victor

    2004-01-01

    Background Many drugs of natural origin are hydrophobic and can pass through cell membranes. Hydrophobic molecules must be susceptible to active efflux systems if they are to be maintained at lower concentrations in cells than in their environment. Multi-drug resistance (MDR), often mediated by intrinsic membrane proteins that couple energy to drug efflux, provides this function. All eukaryotic genomes encode several gene families capable of encoding MDR functions, among which the ABC transporters are the largest. The number of candidate MDR genes means that study of the drug-resistance properties of an organism cannot be effectively carried out without taking a genomic perspective. Results We have annotated sequences for all 60 ABC transporters from the Caenorhabditis elegans genome, and performed a phylogenetic analysis of these along with the 49 human, 30 yeast, and 57 fly ABC transporters currently available in GenBank. Classification according to a unified nomenclature is presented. Comparison between genomes reveals much gene duplication and loss, and surprisingly little orthology among analogous genes. Proteins capable of conferring MDR are found in several distinct subfamilies and are likely to have arisen independently multiple times. Conclusions ABC transporter evolution fits a pattern expected from a process termed 'dynamic-coherence'. This is an unusual result for such a highly conserved gene family as this one, present in all domains of cellular life. Mechanistically, this may result from the broad substrate specificity of some ABC proteins, which both reduces selection against gene loss, and leads to the facile sorting of functions among paralogs following gene duplication. PMID:15003118

  7. Population Pharmacokinetics of Oral Topotecan in Infants and Very Young Children with Brain Tumors Demonstrates a Role of ABCG2 rs4148157 on the Absorption Rate Constant.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jessica K; Birg, Anna V; Lin, Tong; Daryani, Vinay M; Panetta, John C; Broniscer, Alberto; Robinson, Giles W; Gajjar, Amar J; Stewart, Clinton F

    2016-07-01

    For infants and very young children with brain tumors, chemotherapy after surgical resection is the main treatment due to neurologic and neuroendocrine adverse effects from whole brain irradiation. Topotecan, an anticancer drug with antitumor activity against pediatric brain tumors, can be given intravenous or orally. However, high interpatient variability in oral drug bioavailability is common in children less than 3 years old. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the population pharmacokinetics of oral topotecan in infants and very young children, specifically evaluating the effects of age and ABCG2 and ABCB1 on the absorption rate constant (Ka), as well as other covariate effects on all pharmacokinetic parameters. A nonlinear mixed effects model was implemented in Monolix 4.3.2 (Lixoft, Orsay, France). A one-compartment model with first-order input and first-order elimination was found to adequately characterize topotecan lactone concentrations with population estimates as [mean (S.E.)]; Ka = 0.61 (0.11) h(-1), apparent volume of distribution (V/F) = 40.2 (7.0) l, and apparent clearance (CL/F) = 40.0 (2.9) l/h. After including the body surface area in the V/F and CL/F as a power model centered on the population median, the ABCG2 rs4148157 allele was found to play a significant role in the value of Ka Patients homozygous or heterozygous for G>A demonstrated a Ka value 2-fold higher than their GG counterparts, complemented with a 2-fold higher maximal concentration as well. These results demonstrate a possible role for the ABCG2 rs4148157 allele in the pharmacokinetics of oral topotecan in infants and very young children, and warrants further investigation. PMID:27052877

  8. Characterization of all RND-type multidrug efflux transporters in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Taira; Nakamura, Koji; Kodama, Toshio; Mikami, Taro; Hiyoshi, Hirotaka; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa; Ogawa, Wakano; Kuroda, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Resistance nodulation cell division (RND)-type efflux transporters play the main role in intrinsic resistance to various antimicrobial agents in many gram-negative bacteria. Here, we estimated 12 RND-type efflux transporter genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Because VmeAB has already been characterized, we cloned the other 11 RND-type efflux transporter genes and characterized them in Escherichia coli KAM33 cells, a drug hypersusceptible strain. KAM33 expressing either VmeCD, VmeEF, or VmeYZ showed increased minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for several antimicrobial agents. Additional four RND-type transporters were functional as efflux pumps only when co-expressed with VpoC, an outer membrane component in V. parahaemolyticus. Furthermore, VmeCD, VmeEF, and VmeYZ co-expressed with VpoC exhibited a broader substrate specificity and conferred higher resistance than that with TolC of E. coli. Deletion mutants of these transporter genes were constructed in V. parahaemolyticus. TM32 (ΔvmeAB and ΔvmeCD) had significantly decreased MICs for many antimicrobial agents and the number of viable cells after exposure to deoxycholate were markedly reduced. Strains in which 12 operons were all disrupted had very low MICs and much lower fluid accumulation in rabbit ileal loops. These results indicate that resistance nodulation cell division-type efflux transporters contribute not only to intrinsic resistance but also to exerting the virulence of V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:23894076

  9. Stepwise substrate translocation mechanism revealed by free energy calculations of doxorubicin in the multidrug transporter AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zhicheng; Weng, Jingwei; Wang, Wenning

    2015-01-01

    AcrB is the inner membrane transporter of the tripartite multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC in E. coli, which poses a major obstacle to the treatment of bacterial infections. X-ray structures have identified two types of substrate-binding pockets in the porter domains of AcrB trimer: the proximal binding pocket (PBP) and the distal binding pocket (DBP), and suggest a functional rotating mechanism in which each protomer cycles consecutively through three distinct conformational states (access, binding and extrusion). However, the details of substrate binding and translocation between the binding pockets remain elusive. In this work, we performed atomic simulations to obtain the free energy profile of the translocation of an antibiotic drug doxorubicin (DOX) inside AcrB. Our simulation indicates that DOX binds at the PBP and DBP with comparable affinities in the binding state protomer, and overcomes a 3 kcal/mol energy barrier to transit between them. Obvious conformational changes including closing of the PC1/PC2 cleft and shrinking of the DBP were observed upon DOX binding in the PBP, resulting in an intermediate state between the access and binding states. Taken together, the simulation results reveal a detailed stepwise substrate binding and translocation process in the framework of functional rotating mechanism. PMID:26365278

  10. The multidrug-resistance transporter Abcc3 protects NK cells from chemotherapy in a murine model of malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Sara; Cantini, Gabriele; Kapetis, Dimos; Cazzato, Emanuela; Di Ianni, Natalia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Pellegatta, Serena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abcc3, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily, plays a role in multidrug resistance. Here, we found that Abcc3 is highly expressed in blood-derived NK cells but not in CD8+ T cells. In GL261 glioma-bearing mice treated with the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) for 5 d, an early increased frequency of NK cells was observed. We also found that Abcc3 is strongly upregulated and functionally active in NK cells from mice treated with TMZ compared to controls. We demonstrate that Abcc3 is critical for NK cell survival during TMZ administration; more importantly, Akt, involved in lymphocyte survival, is phosphorylated only in NK cells expressing Abcc3. The resistance of NK cells to chemotherapy was accompanied by increased migration and homing in the brain at early time points. Cytotoxicity, evaluated by IFNγ production and specific lytic activity against GL261 cells, increased peripherally in the later phases, after conclusion of TMZ treatment. Intra-tumor increase of the NK effector subset as well as in IFNγ, granzymes and perforin-1 expression, were found early and persisted over time, correlating with a profound modulation on glioma microenvironment induced by TMZ. Our findings reveal an important involvement of Abcc3 in NK cell resistance to chemotherapy and have important clinical implications for patients treated with chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:27467914

  11. Expression of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein is inversely related to that of apoptosis-associated endogenous TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Souza, Paloma S; Madigan, James P; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Kapoor, Khyati; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Maia, Raquel C; Gottesman, Michael M; Fung, King Leung

    2015-08-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) has been associated with expression of ABC transporter genes including P-glycoprotein (Pgp, MDR1, ABCB1). However, deregulation of apoptotic pathways also renders cells resistant to chemotherapy. To discover apoptosis-related genes affected by Pgp expression, we used the HeLa MDR-off system. We found that using doxycycline to control Pgp expression has a significant advantage over tetracycline, in that doxycycline caused less endogenous gene expression modification/perturbation, and was more potent than tetracycline in suppressing Pgp expression. Cells overexpressing Pgp have lower TNFSF10 (TRAIL) expression than their parental cells. Controlled downregulation of Pgp increased endogenous TRAIL protein expression. Also, ectopic overexpression of TRAIL in Pgp-positive cells was associated with a reduction in Pgp levels. However, cells expressing a functionally defective mutant Pgp showed an increase in TRAIL expression, suggesting that Pgp function is required for TRAIL suppression. Cells in which Pgp is knocked down by upregulation of TRAIL expression are less susceptible to TRAIL ligand (sTRAIL)-induced apoptosis. Our findings reveal an inverse correlation between functional Pgp and endogenous TRAIL expression. Pgp function plays an important role in the TRAIL-mediated apoptosis pathway by regulating endogenous TRAIL expression and the TRAIL-mediated apoptosis pathway in MDR cancer cells. PMID:26101157

  12. Identification of Aspergillus fumigatus multidrug transporter genes and their potential involvement in antifungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Meneau, Isabelle; Coste, Alix T; Sanglard, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus can cause severe fatal invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients but is also found in the environment. A. fumigatus infections can be treated with antifungals agents among which azole and echinocandins. Resistance to the class of azoles has been reported not only from patient samples but also from environmental samples. Azole resistance mechanisms involve for most isolates alterations at the site of the azole target (cyp51A); however, a substantial number of isolates can also exhibit non-cyp51A-mediated mechanisms.We aimed here to identify novel A. fumigatus genes involved in azole resistance. For this purpose, we designed a functional complementation system of A. fumigatus cDNAs expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolate lacking the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter PDR5 and that was therefore more azole-susceptible than the parent wild type. Several genes were recovered including two distinct ABC transporters (atrF, atrI) and a Major Facilitator transporter (mdrA), from which atrI (Afu3g07300) and mdrA (Afu1g13800) were not yet described. atrI mediated resistance to itraconazole and voriconazole, while atrF only to voriconazole in S. cerevisiae Gene inactivation of each transporter in A. fumigatus indicated that the transporters were involved in the basal level of azole susceptibility. The expression of the transporters was addressed in clinical and environmental isolates with several azole resistance profiles. Our results show that atrI and mdrA tended to be expressed at higher levels than atrF in normal growth conditions. atrF was upregulated in 2/4 of azole-resistant environmental isolates and was the only gene with a significant association between transporter expression and azole resistance. In conclusion, this work showed the potential of complementation to identify functional transporters. The identified transporters were suggested to participate in azole resistance of A. fumigatus; however, this hypothesis will

  13. RLIP76: A novel glutathione-conjugate and multi-drug transporter

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sharad S.; Yadav, Sushma; Roth, Cherice; Singhal, Jyotsana

    2009-01-01

    RLIP76, a stress-responsive, multi-functional protein with multi-specific transport activity towards glutathione-conjugates (GS-E) and chemotherapeutic agents, is frequently over-expressed in malignant cells. Our recent studies suggest that it plays a prominent anti-apoptotic role selectively in cancer cells. We have previously shown that RLIP76 accounts for up to 80% of the transport of GS-E and blocking the RLIP76-mediated transport of GS-E in cells results in the accumulation of pro-apoptotic endogenous electrophiles and on-set of apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that when RLIP76 mediate transport of GS-E is abrogated either by anti-RLIP76 IgG or accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and its GSH-conjugate (GS-HNE) occurs and a massive apoptosis is observed in cells, indicate that the inhibition of RLIP76 transport activity at the cell surface is sufficient for observed anti-tumor activity. RLIP76 is linked with certain cellular functions including membrane plasticity and movement (as a primary `effector' in the Ral pathway, perhaps functioning as a GTPase activating protein, or GAP), and as a component of clathrin-coated pit-mediated receptor-ligand endocytosis—a process that mediates movement of membrane vesicles. PMID:18983828

  14. Osimertinib (AZD9291) Attenuates the Function of Multidrug Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB1 in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sung-Han; Lu, Yu-Jen; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Wu, Chung-Pu

    2016-06-01

    The effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy is often circumvented by multidrug resistance (MDR) caused by the overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 (MDR1, P-glycoprotein). Several epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been shown previously capable of modulating the function of ABCB1 and reversing ABCB1-mediated MDR in human cancer cells. Furthermore, some TKIs are transported by ABCB1, which results in low oral bioavailability, reduced distribution, and the development of acquired resistance to these TKIs. In this study, we investigated the interaction between ABCB1 and osimertinib, a novel selective, irreversible third-generation EGFR TKI that has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We also evaluated the potential impact of ABCB1 on the efficacy of osimertinib in cancer cells, which can present a therapeutic challenge to clinicians in the future. We revealed that although osimertinib stimulates the ATPase activity of ABCB1, overexpression of ABCB1 does not confer resistance to osimertinib. Our results suggest that it is unlikely that the overexpression of ABCB1 can be a major contributor to the development of osimertinib resistance in cancer patients. More significantly, we revealed an additional action of osimertinib that directly inhibits the function of ABCB1 without affecting the expression level of ABCB1, enhances drug-induced apoptosis, and reverses the MDR phenotype in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. Considering that osimertinib is a clinically approved third-generation EGFR TKI, our findings suggest that a combination therapy with osimertinib and conventional anticancer drugs may be beneficial to patients with MDR tumors. PMID:27169328

  15. Urinary Dopamine as a Potential Index of the Transport Activity of Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Moto; Ban, Tsuyoshi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is a cationic natriuretic catecholamine synthesized in proximal tubular cells (PTCs) of the kidney before secretion into the lumen, a key site of its action. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying dopamine secretion into the lumen remain unclear. Multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) is a H⁺/organic cation antiporter that is highly expressed in the brush border membrane of PTCs and mediates the efflux of organic cations, including metformin and cisplatin, from the epithelial cells into the urine. Therefore, we hypothesized that MATE mediates dopamine secretion, a cationic catecholamine, into the tubule lumen, thereby regulating natriuresis. Here, we show that [³H]dopamine uptake in human (h) MATE1-, hMATE-2K- and mouse (m) MATE-expressing cells exhibited saturable kinetics. Fluid retention and decreased urinary excretion of dopamine and Na⁺ were observed in Mate1-knockout mice compared to that in wild-type mice. Imatinib, a MATE inhibitor, inhibited [³H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1-, hMATE2-K- and mMATE1-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. At clinically-relevant concentrations, imatinib inhibited [³H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1- and hMATE2-K-expressing cells. The urinary excretion of dopamine and Na⁺ decreased and fluid retention occurred in imatinib-treated mice. In conclusion, MATE transporters secrete renally-synthesized dopamine, and therefore, urinary dopamine has the potential to be an index of the MATE transporter activity. PMID:27483254

  16. P-glycoproteins and other multidrug resistance transporters in the pharmacology of anthelmintics: Prospects for reversing transport-dependent anthelmintic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lespine, Anne; Ménez, Cécile; Bourguinat, Catherine; Prichard, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic helminths cause significant disease in animals and humans. In the absence of alternative treatments, anthelmintics remain the principal agents for their control. Resistance extends to the most important class of anthelmintics, the macrocyclic lactone endectocides (MLs), such as ivermectin, and presents serious problems for the livestock industries and threatens to severely limit current parasite control strategies in humans. Understanding drug resistance is important for optimizing and monitoring control, and reducing further selection for resistance. Multidrug resistance (MDR) ABC transporters have been implicated in ML resistance and contribute to resistance to a number of other anthelmintics. MDR transporters, such as P-glycoproteins, are essential for many cellular processes that require the transport of substrates across cell membranes. Being overexpressed in response to chemotherapy in tumour cells and to ML-based treatment in nematodes, they lead to therapy failure by decreasing drug concentration at the target. Several anthelmintics are inhibitors of these efflux pumps and appropriate combinations can result in higher treatment efficacy against parasites and reversal of resistance. However, this needs to be balanced against possible increased toxicity to the host, or the components of the combination selecting on the same genes involved in the resistance. Increased efficacy could result from modifying anthelmintic pharmacokinetics in the host or by blocking parasite transporters involved in resistance. Combination of anthelmintics can be beneficial for delaying selection for resistance. However, it should be based on knowledge of resistance mechanisms and not simply on mode of action classes, and is best started before resistance has been selected to any member of the combination. Increasing knowledge of the MDR transporters involved in anthelmintic resistance in helminths will play an important role in allowing for the identification of markers

  17. Proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems.

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, I T; Brown, M H; Skurray, R A

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug efflux systems display the ability to transport a variety of structurally unrelated drugs from a cell and consequently are capable of conferring resistance to a diverse range of chemotherapeutic agents. This review examines multidrug efflux systems which use the proton motive force to drive drug transport. These proteins are likely to operate as multidrug/proton antiporters and have been identified in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Such proton-dependent multidrug efflux proteins belong to three distinct families or superfamilies of transport proteins: the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family, and the resistance/ nodulation/cell division (RND) family. The MFS consists of symporters, antiporters, and uniporters with either 12 or 14 transmembrane-spanning segments (TMS), and we show that within the MFS, three separate families include various multidrug/proton antiport proteins. The SMR family consists of proteins with four TMS, and the multidrug efflux proteins within this family are the smallest known secondary transporters. The RND family consists of 12-TMS transport proteins and includes a number of multidrug efflux proteins with particularly broad substrate specificity. In gram-negative bacteria, some multidrug efflux systems require two auxiliary constituents, which might enable drug transport to occur across both membranes of the cell envelope. These auxiliary constituents belong to the membrane fusion protein and the outer membrane factor families, respectively. This review examines in detail each of the characterized proton-linked multidrug efflux systems. The molecular basis of the broad substrate specificity of these transporters is discussed. The surprisingly wide distribution of multidrug efflux systems and their multiplicity in single organisms, with Escherichia coli, for instance, possessing at least nine proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems with overlapping specificities, is examined. We also

  18. Performance of Four Transport and Storage Systems for Molecular Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rabodoarivelo, Marie Sylvianne; Imperiale, Bélen; andrianiavomikotroka, Rina; Brandao, Angela; Kumar, Parveen; Singh, Sarman; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine; Morcillo, Nora; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Vandamme, Peter; Martin, Anandi

    2015-01-01

    Background Detection of drug-resistant tuberculosis is essential for the control of the disease but it is often hampered by the limitation of transport and storage of samples from remote locations to the reference laboratory. We performed a retrospective field study to evaluate the performance of four supports enabling the transport and storage of samples to be used for molecular detection of drug resistance using the GenoType MTBDRplus. Methods Two hundred Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were selected and spotted on slides, FTA cards, GenoCards, and in ethanol. GenoType MTBDRplus was subsequently performed with the DNA extracted from these supports. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared to the results obtained by drug susceptibility testing. Results For all supports, the overall sensitivity and specificity for detection of resistance to RIF was between 95% and 100%, and for INH between 95% and 98%. Conclusion The four transport and storage supports showed a good sensitivity and specificity for the detection of resistance to RIF and INH in M. tuberculosis strains using the GenoType MTBDRplus. These supports can be maintained at room temperature and could represent an important alternative cost-effective method useful for rapid molecular detection of drug-resistant TB in low-resource settings. PMID:26431352

  19. The quorum-sensing molecule farnesol is a modulator of drug efflux mediated by ABC multidrug transporters and synergizes with drugs in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-10-01

    Overexpression of the CaCDR1-encoded multidrug efflux pump protein CaCdr1p (Candida drug resistance protein 1), belonging to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters, is one of the most prominent contributors of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Candida albicans. Thus, blocking or modulating the function of the drug efflux pumps represents an attractive approach in combating MDR. In the present study, we provide first evidence that the quorum-sensing molecule farnesol (FAR) is a specific modulator of efflux mediated by ABC multidrug transporters, such as CaCdr1p and CaCdr2p of C. albicans and ScPdr5p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, FAR did not modulate the efflux mediated by the multidrug extrusion pump protein CaMdr1p, belonging to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Kinetic data revealed that FAR competitively inhibited rhodamine 6G efflux in CaCdr1p-overexpressing cells, with a simultaneous increase in an apparent K(m) without affecting the V(max) values and the ATPase activity. We also observed that when used in combination, FAR at a nontoxic concentration synergized with the drugs at their respective nonlethal concentrations, as was evident from their <0.5 fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) values and from the drop of 14- to 64-fold in the MIC(80) values in the wild-type strain and in azole-resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Our biochemical experiments revealed that the synergistic interaction of FAR with the drugs led to reactive oxygen species accumulation, which triggered early apoptosis, and that both could be partly reversed by the addition of an antioxidant. Collectively, FAR modulates drug extrusion mediated exclusively by ABC proteins and is synergistic to fluconazole (FLC), ketoconazole (KTC), miconazole (MCZ), and amphotericin (AMB). PMID:21768514

  20. PDE5 inhibitors, sildenafil and vardenafil, reverse multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of multidrug resistance protein 7 (ATP-binding Cassette C10) transporter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Jiang; Sun, Yue-Li; Tiwari, Amit K; Xiao, Zhi-Jie; Sodani, Kamlesh; Yang, Dong-Hua; Vispute, Saraubh G; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Chen, Si-Dong; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-08-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of male erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. Recently, several groups have evaluated the ability of PDE5 inhibitors for their anticancer activities. Previously, we had shown that sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil could reverse P-glycoprotein (ATP-binding cassette B1)-mediated MDR. In the present study, we determined whether these PDE5 inhibitors have the potential to reverse multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7; ATP-binding cassette C10)-mediated MDR. We found that sildenafil and vardenafil dose-dependently enhanced the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to paclitaxel, docetaxel and vinblastine, while tadalafil had only a minimal effect. Accumulation and efflux experiments demonstrated that sildenafil and vardenafil increased the intracellular accumulation of [(3)H]-paclitaxel by inhibiting the efflux of [(3 H]-paclitaxel in HEK/MRP7 cells. In addition, immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses indicated that no significant alterations of MRP7 protein expression and localization in plasma membranes were found after treatment with sildenafil, vardenafil or tadalafil. These results demonstrate that sildenafil and vardenafil reverse MRP7-mediated a MDR through inhibition of the drug efflux function of MRP7. Our findings indicate a potentially novel use of PDE5 inhibitors as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent in clinical practice. PMID:22578167

  1. Ursolic acid inhibits proliferation and reverses drug resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells by downregulating ABCG2 through suppressing the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Sui, Hua; Qi, Cong; Li, Qi; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Shao-Fei; Mei, Ming-Zhu; Lu, Ying-Yu; Wan, Yi-Ting; Chang, Hannah; Guo, Piao-Ting

    2016-07-01

    Hypoxia in tumors is closely related to drug resistance. It has not been verified whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) or ABCG2 is related to hypoxia-induced resistance. Ursolic acid (UA), when used in combination with cisplatin can significantly increase the sensitivity of ovarian cancer stem cells (CSCs) to cisplatin, but the exact mechanism is unknown. The cell growth inhibitory rate of cisplatin under different conditions was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) in adherence and sphere cells (SKOV3, A2780, and HEY). The expression of HIF-1α and ABCG2 was tested using quantitative PCR, western blotting, and immuno-fluorescence under different culture conditions and treated with UA. Knockdown of HIF-1α by shRNA and LY294002 was used to inhibit the activity of PI3K/Akt pathway. Ovarian CSCs express stemness-related genes and drug resistance significantly higher than normal adherent cells. Under hypoxic conditions, the ovarian CSCs grew faster and were more drug resistant than under normoxia. UA could inhibit proliferation and reverse the drug resistance of ovarian CSC by suppressing ABCG2 and HIF-1α under different culture conditions. HIF-1α inhibitor YC-1 combined with UA suppressed the stemness genes and ABCG2 under hypoxic condition. The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation plays an important functional role in UA-induced downregulation of HIF-1α and reduction of ABCG2. UA inhibits the proliferation and reversal of drug resistance in ovarian CSCs by suppressing the expression of downregulation of HIF-1α and ABCG2. PMID:27221674

  2. Multidrug Transporters and Alterations in Sterol Biosynthesis Contribute to Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Elizabeth L; Manigaba, Kayihura; Parker, Josie E; Barker, Katherine S; Kelly, Stephen L; Rogers, P David

    2015-10-01

    While much is known concerning azole resistance in Candida albicans, considerably less is understood about Candida parapsilosis, an emerging species of Candida with clinical relevance. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of azole resistance in a collection of resistant C. parapsilosis clinical isolates in order to determine which genes might play a role in this process within this species. We examined the relative expression of the putative drug transporter genes CDR1 and MDR1 and that of ERG11. In isolates overexpressing these genes, we sequenced the genes encoding their presumed transcriptional regulators, TAC1, MRR1, and UPC2, respectively. We also sequenced the sterol biosynthesis genes ERG3 and ERG11 in these isolates to find mutations that might contribute to this phenotype in this Candida species. Our findings demonstrate that the putative drug transporters Cdr1 and Mdr1 contribute directly to azole resistance and suggest that their overexpression is due to activating mutations in the genes encoding their transcriptional regulators. We also observed that the Y132F substitution in ERG11 is the only substitution occurring exclusively among azole-resistant isolates, and we correlated this with specific changes in sterol biosynthesis. Finally, sterol analysis of these isolates suggests that other changes in sterol biosynthesis may contribute to azole resistance in C. parapsilosis. PMID:26169412

  3. Multidrug Transporters and Alterations in Sterol Biosynthesis Contribute to Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Manigaba, Kayihura; Parker, Josie E.; Barker, Katherine S.; Kelly, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    While much is known concerning azole resistance in Candida albicans, considerably less is understood about Candida parapsilosis, an emerging species of Candida with clinical relevance. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of azole resistance in a collection of resistant C. parapsilosis clinical isolates in order to determine which genes might play a role in this process within this species. We examined the relative expression of the putative drug transporter genes CDR1 and MDR1 and that of ERG11. In isolates overexpressing these genes, we sequenced the genes encoding their presumed transcriptional regulators, TAC1, MRR1, and UPC2, respectively. We also sequenced the sterol biosynthesis genes ERG3 and ERG11 in these isolates to find mutations that might contribute to this phenotype in this Candida species. Our findings demonstrate that the putative drug transporters Cdr1 and Mdr1 contribute directly to azole resistance and suggest that their overexpression is due to activating mutations in the genes encoding their transcriptional regulators. We also observed that the Y132F substitution in ERG11 is the only substitution occurring exclusively among azole-resistant isolates, and we correlated this with specific changes in sterol biosynthesis. Finally, sterol analysis of these isolates suggests that other changes in sterol biosynthesis may contribute to azole resistance in C. parapsilosis. PMID:26169412

  4. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor 1/2 Antagonists Nonselectively Modulate Organic Anion Transport by Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRP1-4).

    PubMed

    Csandl, Mark A; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Cole, Susan P C

    2016-06-01

    Active efflux of both drugs and organic anion metabolites is mediated by the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs). MRP1 (ABCC1), MRP2 (ABCC2), MRP3 (ABCC3), and MRP4 (ABCC4) have partially overlapping substrate specificities and all transport 17β-estradiol 17-(β-d-glucuronide) (E217βG). The cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1R) antagonist MK-571 inhibits all four MRP homologs, but little is known about the modulatory effects of newer leukotriene modifiers (LTMs). Here we examined the effects of seven CysLT1R- and CysLT2R-selective LTMs on E217βG uptake into MRP1-4-enriched inside-out membrane vesicles. Their effects on uptake of an additional physiologic solute were also measured for MRP1 [leukotriene C4 (LTC4)] and MRP4 [prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)]. The two CysLT2R-selective LTMs studied were generally more potent inhibitors than CysLT1R-selective LTMs, but neither class of antagonists showed any MRP selectivity. For E217βG uptake, LTM IC50s ranged from 1.2 to 26.9 μM and were most comparable for MRP1 and MRP4. The LTM rank order inhibitory potencies for E217βG versus LTC4 uptake by MRP1, and E217βG versus PGE2 uptake by MRP4, were also similar. Three of four CysLT1R-selective LTMs also stimulated MRP2 (but not MRP3) transport and thus exerted a concentration-dependent biphasic effect on MRP2. The fourth CysLT1R antagonist, LY171883, only stimulated MRP2 (and MRP3) transport but none of the MRPs were stimulated by either CysLT2R-selective LTM. We conclude that, in contrast to their CysLTR selectivity, CysLTR antagonists show no MRP homolog selectivity, and data should be interpreted cautiously if obtained from LTMs in systems in which more than one MRP is present. PMID:27068271

  5. The oncogenic receptor ErbB2 modulates gemcitabine and irinotecan/SN-38 chemoresistance of human pancreatic cancer cells via hCNT1 transporter and multidrug-resistance associated protein MRP-2

    PubMed Central

    Skrypek, Nicolas; Vasseur, Romain; Vincent, Audrey; Duchêne, Bélinda; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Jonckheere, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most deadly cancers because of a lack of early diagnotic markers and efficient therapeutics. The fluorinated analog of deoxycytidine, gemcitabine and emerging FOLFIRINOX protocol (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan/SN-38, oxaliplatin and leucovorin) are the main chemotherapies to treat PDAC. The ErbB2/HER2 oncogenic receptor is commonly overexpressed in PDAC. In this context, we aimed to decipher the ErbB2-mediated mechanisms of chemoresistance to the two main chemotherapy protocols used to treat PDAC. ErbB2 knocking down (KD) in CAPAN-1 and CAPAN-2 cells led to an increased sensitivity to gemcitabine and an increased resistance to irinotecan/SN-38 both in vitro and in vivo (subcuteanous xenografts) This was correlated to an increase of hCNT1 and hCNT3 transporters and ABCG2, MRP1 and MRP2 ATP-binding cassette transporters expression and resistance to cell death. We also show that MRP2 is repressed following activation of JNK, Erk1/2 and NF-κB pathways by ErbB2. Finally, in datasets of human PDAC samples, ErbB2 and MRP2 expression was conversely correlated. Altogether, we propose that ErbB2 mediates several intracellular mechanisms linked to PDAC cell chemoresistance that may represent potential targets in order to ameliorate chemotherapy response and allow stratification of patients eligible for either gemcitabine or FOLFIRINOX treatment. PMID:25890497

  6. The oncogenic receptor ErbB2 modulates gemcitabine and irinotecan/SN-38 chemoresistance of human pancreatic cancer cells via hCNT1 transporter and multidrug-resistance associated protein MRP-2.

    PubMed

    Skrypek, Nicolas; Vasseur, Romain; Vincent, Audrey; Duchêne, Bélinda; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Jonckheere, Nicolas

    2015-05-10

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most deadly cancers because of a lack of early diagnostic markers and efficient therapeutics. The fluorinated analog of deoxycytidine, gemcitabine and emerging FOLFIRINOX protocol (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan/SN-38, oxaliplatin and leucovorin) are the main chemotherapies to treat PDAC. The ErbB2/HER2 oncogenic receptor is commonly overexpressed in PDAC. In this context, we aimed to decipher the ErbB2-mediated mechanisms of chemoresistance to the two main chemotherapy protocols used to treat PDAC.ErbB2 knocking down (KD) in CAPAN-1 and CAPAN-2 cells led to an increased sensitivity to gemcitabine and an increased resistance to irinotecan/SN-38 both in vitro and in vivo (subcutaneous xenografts) This was correlated to an increase of hCNT1 and hCNT3 transporters and ABCG2, MRP1 and MRP2 ATP-binding cassette transporters expression and resistance to cell death. We also show that MRP2 is repressed following activation of JNK, Erk1/2 and NF-κB pathways by ErbB2. Finally, in datasets of human PDAC samples, ErbB2 and MRP2 expression was conversely correlated. Altogether, we propose that ErbB2 mediates several intracellular mechanisms linked to PDAC cell chemoresistance that may represent potential targets in order to ameliorate chemotherapy response and allow stratification of patients eligible for either gemcitabine or FOLFIRINOX treatment. PMID:25890497

  7. Characterization of multidrug transporter-mediated efflux of avermectins in human and mouse neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Abigail M; Mistry, Pratibha; Wright, Jayne; Williams, Faith M; Brown, Colin D A

    2015-06-15

    ABC transporters play an important role in the disposition of avermectins in several animal species. In this study the interactions of three key avermectins, abamectin, emamectin and ivermectin, with human and mouse homologues of MDR1 (ABCB1/Abcb1a) and MRP (ABCC/Abcc), transporters endogenously expressed by human SH-SY5Y and mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells were investigated. In both cell lines, retention of the fluorescent dye H33342 was found to be significantly increased in the presence of avermectins and cyclosporin A. These effects were shown to be unresponsive to the BCRP inhibitor Ko-143 and therefore MDR1/Mdr1-dependent. Avermectins inhibited MDR1/Mdr1a-mediated H33342 dye efflux, with apparent Ki values of 0.24±0.08 and 0.18±0.02μM (ivermectin); 0.60±0.07 and 0.56±0.02μM (emamectin) and 0.95±0.08 and 0.77±0.25μM (abamectin) in SH-SY5Y and N2a cells, respectively. There were some apparent affinity differences for MDR1 and Mdr1a within each cell line (affinity for ivermectin>emamectin≥abamectin, P<0.05 by One-Way ANOVA), but importantly, the Ki values for individual avermectins for human MDR1 or mouse Mdr1a were not significantly different. MK571-sensitive retention of GSMF confirmed the expression of MRP/Mrp efflux transporters in both cell lines. Avermectins inhibited MRP/Mrp-mediated dye efflux with IC50 values of 1.58±0.51 and 1.94±0.72μM (ivermectin); 1.87±0.57 and 2.74±1.01μM (emamectin) and 2.25±0.01 and 1.68±0.63μM (abamectin) in SH-SY5Y and N2a cells, respectively. There were no significant differences in IC50 values between individual avermectins or between human MRP and mouse Mrp. Kinetic data for endogenous human MDR1/MRP isoforms in SH-SY5Y cells and mouse Mdr1a/b/Mrp isoforms in N2a cells are comparable for the selected avermectins. All are effluxed at concentrations well above 0.05-0.1μM ivermectin detected in plasma (Ottesen and Campbell, 1994; Ottesen and Campbell, 1994) This is an important finding in the light of

  8. Compromised in vitro dissolution and membrane transport of multidrug amorphous formulations.

    PubMed

    Alhalaweh, Amjad; Bergström, Christel A S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2016-05-10

    Herein, the thermodynamic properties of solutions evolving from the non-sink dissolution of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) containing two or more drugs have been evaluated, focusing on the maximum achievable supersaturation and tendency of the system to undergo liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Ritonavir (RTV) and atazanavir (ATV) were co-formulated with polyvinylpyrrolidone to produce ASDs with different molar ratios of each drug, and the dissolution profile of each drug was studied under non-sink conditions. The phase behavior of the supersaturated solutions generated by ASD dissolution was compared to that of supersaturated solutions generated by antisolvent addition. Dissolution of an ASD containing RTV, ATV and lopinavir (LPV) was also investigated. A thermodynamic model was used to predict the maximum achievable supersaturation for ASDs containing two and three drugs. In addition, a transport study with Caco-2 cells was conducted to evaluate the impact of co-addition of drugs on membrane transport. It was found that the formulation containing a 1:1 molar ratio of RTV and ATV achieved only 50% of the supersaturation attained by dissolution of the single drug systems. The maximum achievable concentration of ATV decreased linearly as the mole fraction of ATV in the formulation decreased and a similar trend was observed for RTV. For the dispersion containing a 1:1:1 molar ratio of RTV, ATV and LPV, the maximum concentration of each drug was only one third of that achieved for the single drug formulations. The decrease in the achievable supersaturation was well-predicted by the thermodynamic model for both the binary and ternary drug combinations. These observations can be explained by a decrease in the concentration at which the drugs undergo LLPS in the presence of other miscible drugs, thereby reducing the maximum achievable supersaturation of each drug. The reduced free drug concentration was reflected by a decreased flux across Caco-2 cells for the

  9. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Dominik; Daniel, Volker; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Opelz, Gerhard; Naujokat, Cord

    2010-04-16

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  10. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients. PMID:24253450

  11. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor regulates CYP1B1 but not ABCB1 and ABCG2 in hCMEC/D3 human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells after TCDD exposure.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Aude; Potin, Sophie; Chapy, Hélène; Crete, Dominique; Glacial, Fabienne; Ganeshamoorthy, Kayathiri; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Declèves, Xavier

    2015-07-10

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor activated by a variety of widespread persistent environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). It can transactivate the expression of several target genes. Recently AhR transcripts were detected in isolated human brain microvessels and in the hCMEC/D3 human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line, an in vitro model of the human cerebral endothelium. To date AhR implication in the co-regulation of ABCB1, ABCG2 and CYP1B1 at human cerebral endothelium has not been addressed. Here we investigated whether AhR could co-regulate ABCB1, ABCG2 and CYP1B1 expressions in the hCMEC/D3 cell line. Exposure to TCDD induced a concentration-dependent increase in CYP1B1 expression. We demonstrated AhR involvement in the TCDD-mediated increase in CYP1B1 expression by using small interfering RNA against AhR. Western blotting analysis also revealed an increase in CYP1B1 protein expression following TCDD exposure in hCMEC/D3. Regarding ABCB1 and ABCG2, exposure to TCDD had no effect on their protein expressions and functional activities. In conclusion our data indicated a differential modulation of CYP1B1 and ABCB1/ABCG2 expressions in hCMEC/D3 cells following TCDD exposure. PMID:25858487

  12. Antitubercular Agent Delamanid and Metabolites as Substrates and Inhibitors of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Masakazu; Hashizume, Kenta; Hamasako, Yusuke; Ohzone, Yoshihiro; Kashiyama, Eiji; Umehara, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Delamanid (Deltyba, OPC-67683) is the first approved drug in a novel class of nitro-dihydro-imidazooxazoles developed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis require treatment with multiple drugs, several of which have known drug-drug interactions. Transporters regulate drug absorption, distribution, and excretion; therefore, the inhibition of transport by one agent may alter the pharmacokinetics of another, leading to unexpected adverse events. Therefore, it is important to understand how delamanid affects transport activity. In the present study, the potencies of delamanid and its main metabolites as the substrates and inhibitors of various transporters were evaluated in vitro Delamanid was not transported by the efflux ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), solute carrier (SLC) transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides, or organic cation transporter 1. Similarly, metabolite 1 (M1) was not a substrate for any of these transporters except P-gp. Delamanid showed no inhibitory effect on ABC transporters MDR1, BCRP, and bile salt export pump (BSEP; ABCB11), SLC transporters, or organic anion transporters. M1 and M2 inhibited P-gp- and BCRP-mediated transport but did so only at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (M1, 4.65 and 5.71 μmol/liter, respectively; M2, 7.80 and 6.02 μmol/liter, respectively), well above the corresponding maximum concentration in plasma values observed following the administration of multiple doses in clinical trials. M3 and M4 did not affect the activities of any of the transporters tested. These in vitro data suggest that delamanid is unlikely to have clinically relevant interactions with drugs for which absorption and disposition are mediated by this group of transporters. PMID:27021329

  13. Transport of N-acetyl-S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, a metabolite of trichloroethylene, by mouse multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (Mrp2)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Koag, Myong-Chul; Newman, Debra; Bondar, Galyna; Zhu Quansheng; Dekant, Wolfgang; Faull, Kym; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-04-15

    N-acetyl-S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (Ac-DCVC) and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) are the glutathione conjugation pathway metabolites of a common industrial contaminant and potent nephrotoxicant trichloroethylene (TCE). Ac-DCVC and DCVC are accumulated in the renal proximal tubule where they may be secreted into the urine by an unknown apical transporter(s). In this study, we explored the hypothesis that the apical transport of Ac-DCVC and/or DCVC may be mediated by the multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (Mrp2, ABCC2), which is known to mediate proximal tubular apical ATP-dependent transport of glutathione and numerous xenobiotics and endogenous substances conjugated with glutathione. Transport experiments using membrane vesicles prepared from mouse proximal tubule derived cells expressing mouse Mrp2 utilizing ATPase assay and direct measurements of Ac-DCVC/DCVC using liquid chromatography/tandem mass-spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) demonstrated that mouse Mrp2 mediates ATP-dependent transport of Ac-DCVC. Expression of mouse Mrp2 antisense mRNA significantly inhibited the vectorial basolateral to apical transport of Ac-DCVC but not DCVC in mouse proximal tubule derived cells endogenously expressing mouse Mrp2. The results suggest that Mrp2 may be involved in the renal secretion of Ac-DCVC.

  14. Overcoming the heterologous bias: An in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika; Sanglard, Dominique; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} First report to demonstrate an in vivo expression system of an ABC multidrug transporter CgCdr1p of C. glabrata. {yields} First report on the structure and functional characterization of CgCdr1p. {yields} Functional conservation of divergent but typical residues of CgCdr1p. {yields} CgCdr1p elicits promiscuity towards substrates and has a large drug binding pocket with overlapping specificities. -- Abstract: We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplished by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the arte-factual concerns

  15. ABC-Transporter Expression Does Not Correlate with Response to Irinotecan in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trumpi, K.; Emmink, B.L.; Prins, A.M.; van Oijen, M.G.H.; van Diest, P.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Koopman, M.; Kranenburg, O.; Rinkes, I.H.M. Borel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Active efflux of irinotecan by ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporters, in particular ABCB1 and ABCG2, is a well-established drug resistance mechanism in vitro and in pre-clinical mouse models, but its relevance in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unknown. Therefore, we assessed the association between ABC-transporter expression and tumour response to irinotecan in patients with metastatic CRC. Methods: Tissue microarrays of a large cohort of metastatic CRC patients treated with irinotecan in a prospective study (CAIRO study; n=566) were analysed for expression of ABCB1 and ABCG2 by immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed to assess the association of ABC transporter expression with irinotecan response. Gene expression profiles of 17 paired tumours were used to assess the concordance of ABCB1/ABCG2 expression in primary CRC and corresponding metastases. Results: The response to irinotecan was not significantly different between primary tumours with positive versus negative expression of ABCB1 (5.8 vs 5.7 months, p=0.696) or ABCG2 (5.7 vs 6.1 months, p=0.811). Multivariate analysis showed neither ABCB1 nor ABCG2 were independent predictors for progression free survival. There was a mediocre to poor concordance between ABC-transporter expression in paired tumours. Conclusion: In metastatic CRC, ABC-transporter expression in the primary tumour does not predict irinotecan response. PMID:26516354

  16. Evidence for a molecular diode-based mechanism in a multispecific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) exporter: SER-1368 as a gatekeeping residue in the yeast multidrug transporter Pdr5.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Jitender; Ernst, Robert; Moore, Rachel; Wakschlag, Adina; Marquis, Mary Kate; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Golin, John

    2014-09-19

    ATP-binding cassette multidrug efflux pumps transport a wide range of substrates. Current models suggest that a drug binds relatively tightly to a transport site in the transmembrane domains when the protein is in the closed inward facing conformation. Upon binding of ATP, the transporter can switch to an outward facing (drug off or drug releasing) structure of lower affinity. ATP hydrolysis is critically important for remodeling the drug-binding site to facilitate drug release and to reset the transporter for a new transport cycle. We characterized the novel phenotype of an S1368A mutant that lies in the putative drug-binding pocket of the yeast multidrug transporter Pdr5. This substitution created broad, severe drug hypersensitivity, although drug binding, ATP hydrolysis, and intradomain signaling were indistinguishable from the wild-type control. Several different rhodamine 6G efflux and accumulation assays yielded evidence consistent with the possibility that Ser-1368 prevents reentry of the excluded drug. PMID:25112867

  17. Listeria monocytogenes multidrug resistance transporters and cyclic di-AMP, which contribute to type I interferon induction, play a role in cell wall stress.

    PubMed

    Kaplan Zeevi, Millie; Shafir, Nirit S; Shaham, Shira; Friedman, Sivan; Sigal, Nadejda; Nir Paz, Ran; Boneca, Ivo G; Herskovits, Anat A

    2013-12-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes activates a robust type I interferon response upon infection. This response is partially dependent on the multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter MdrM and relies on cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP) secretion, yet the functions of MdrM and cyclic-di-AMP that lead to this response are unknown. Here we report that it is not MdrM alone but a cohort of MDR transporters that together contribute to type I interferon induction during infection. In a search for a physiological function of these transporters, we revealed that they play a role in cell wall stress responses. A mutant with deletion of four transporter genes (ΔmdrMTAC) was found to be sensitive to sublethal concentrations of vancomycin due to an inability to produce and shed peptidoglycan under this stress. Remarkably, c-di-AMP is involved in this phenotype, as overexpression of the c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase (PdeA) resulted in increased susceptibility of the ΔmdrMTAC mutant to vancomycin, whereas overexpression of the c-di-AMP diadenylate cyclase (DacA) reduced susceptibility to this drug. These observations suggest a physiological association between c-di-AMP and the MDR transporters and support the model that MDR transporters mediate c-di-AMP secretion to regulate peptidoglycan synthesis in response to cell wall stress. PMID:24056102

  18. Basic residues R260 and K357 affect the conformational dynamics of the major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2012-01-01

    Secondary-active multidrug transporters can confer resistance on cells to pharmaceuticals by mediating their extrusion away from intracellular targets via substrate/H(+)(Na(+)) antiport. While the interactions of catalytic carboxylates in these transporters with coupling ions and substrates (drugs) have been studied in some detail, the functional importance of basic residues has received much less attention. The only two basic residues R260 and K357 in transmembrane helices in the Major Facilitator Superfamily transporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis are present on the outer surface of the protein, where they are exposed to the phospholipid head group region of the outer leaflet (R260) and inner leaflet (K357) of the cytoplasmic membrane. Although our observations on the proton-motive force dependence and kinetics of substrate transport, and substrate-dependent proton transport demonstrate that K357A and R260A mutants are affected in ethidium-proton and benzalkonium-proton antiport compared to wildtype LmrP, our findings suggest that R260 and K357 are not directly involved in the binding of substrates or the translocation of protons. Secondary-active multidrug transporters are thought to operate by a mechanism in which binding sites for substrates are alternately exposed to each face of the membrane. Disulfide crosslinking experiments were performed with a double cysteine mutant of LmrP that reports the substrate-stimulated transition from the outward-facing state to the inward-facing state with high substrate-binding affinity. In the experiments, the R260A and K357A mutations were found to influence the dynamics of these major protein conformations in the transport cycle, potentially by removing the interactions of R260 and K357 with phospholipids and/or other residues in LmrP. The R260A and K357A mutations therefore modify the maximum rate at which the transport cycle can operate and, as the transitions between conformational states are differently affected by

  19. Molecular-weight-dependent, anionic-substrate-preferential transport of β-lactam antibiotics via multidrug resistance-associated protein 4.

    PubMed

    Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Kamiie, Jun-ichi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics have cerebral and peripheral adverse effects. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) has been reported to transport several β-lactam antibiotics, and its expression at the blood-brain barrier also serves to limit their distribution to the brain. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to clarify the structure-activity relationship of MRP4-mediated transport of β-lactam antibiotics using MRP4-expressing Sf9 membrane vesicles. The transport activity was evaluated as MRP4-mediated transport per MRP4 protein [nL/(min·fmol MRP4 protein)] based on measurement of MRP4 protein expression by means of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Cefotiam showed the greatest MRP4-mediated transport activity [8.90 nL/(min·fmol MRP4 protein)] among the β-lactam antibiotics examined in this study. Measurements of differential transport activity of MRP4 for various β-lactam antibiotics indicated that (i) cephalosporins were transported via MRP4 at a greater rate than were penams, β-lactamase inhibitors, penems, or monobactams; (ii) MRP4-mediated transport activity of anionic cephalosporins was greater than that of zwitterionic cephalosporins; and (iii) higher-molecular-weight anionic β-lactam antibiotics showed greater MRP4-mediated transport activity than lower-molecular-weight ones, whereas zwitterionic β-lactam antibiotics did not show molecular weight dependency of MRP4-mediated transport. These quantitative data should prove useful for understanding MRP-related adverse effects of β-lactam antibiotics and their derivatives. PMID:21897051

  20. A single-component multidrug transporter of the major facilitator superfamily is part of a network that protects E scherichia coli from bile salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Stephanie; Alegre, Kamela O; Holdsworth, Scarlett R; Rice, Matthew; Brown, James A; McVeigh, Paul; Kelly, Sharon M; Law, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to high concentrations of bile salts in the human intestinal tract is vital for the survival of enteric bacteria such as E scherichia coli. Although the tripartite AcrAB–TolC efflux system plays a significant role in this resistance, it is purported that other efflux pumps must also be involved. We provide evidence from a comprehensive suite of experiments performed at two different pH values (7.2 and 6.0) that reflect pH conditions that E . coli may encounter in human gut that MdtM, a single-component multidrug resistance transporter of the major facilitator superfamily, functions in bile salt resistance in E . coli by catalysing secondary active transport of bile salts out of the cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, assays performed on a chromosomal ΔacrB mutant transformed with multicopy plasmid encoding MdtM suggested a functional synergism between the single-component MdtM transporter and the tripartite AcrAB–TolC system that results in a multiplicative effect on resistance. Substrate binding experiments performed on purified MdtM demonstrated that the transporter binds to cholate and deoxycholate with micromolar affinity, and transport assays performed on inverted vesicles confirmed the capacity of MdtM to catalyse electrogenic bile salt/H+ antiport. PMID:24684269

  1. MFS transporters required for multidrug/multixenobiotic (MD/MX) resistance in the model yeast: understanding their physiological function through post-genomic approaches

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Sandra C.; Teixeira, Miguel C.; Dias, Paulo J.; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug/Multixenobiotic resistance (MDR/MXR) is a widespread phenomenon with clinical, agricultural and biotechnological implications, where MDR/MXR transporters that are presumably able to catalyze the efflux of multiple cytotoxic compounds play a key role in the acquisition of resistance. However, although these proteins have been traditionally considered drug exporters, the physiological function of MDR/MXR transporters and the exact mechanism of their involvement in resistance to cytotoxic compounds are still open to debate. In fact, the wide range of structurally and functionally unrelated substrates that these transporters are presumably able to export has puzzled researchers for years. The discussion has now shifted toward the possibility of at least some MDR/MXR transporters exerting their effect as the result of a natural physiological role in the cell, rather than through the direct export of cytotoxic compounds, while the hypothesis that MDR/MXR transporters may have evolved in nature for other purposes than conferring chemoprotection has been gaining momentum in recent years. This review focuses on the drug transporters of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS; drug:H+ antiporters) in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. New insights into the natural roles of these transporters are described and discussed, focusing on the knowledge obtained or suggested by post-genomic research. The new information reviewed here provides clues into the unexpectedly complex roles of these transporters, including a proposed indirect regulation of the stress response machinery and control of membrane potential and/or internal pH, with a special emphasis on a genome-wide view of the regulation and evolution of MDR/MXR-MFS transporters. PMID:24847282

  2. Membrane transporter proteins: a challenge for CNS drug development

    PubMed Central

    Girardin, François

    2006-01-01

    Drug transporters are membrane proteins present in various tissues such as the lymphocytes, intestine, liver, kidney, testis, placenta, and central nervous system. These transporters play a significant role in drug absorption and distribution to organic systems, particularly if the organs are protected by blood-organ barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier or the maternal-fetal barrier. In contrast to neurotransmitters and receptor-coupled transporters or other modes of interneuronal transmission, drug transporters are not directly involved in specific neuronal functions, but provide global protection to the central nervous system. The lack of capillary fenestration, the low pinocytic activity, and the tight junctions between brain capillary and choroid plexus endothelial cells represent further gatekeepers limiting the entrance of endogenous and exogenous compounds into the central nervous system. Drug transport is a result of the concerted action of efflux and influx pumps (transporters) located both in the basolateral and apical membranes of brain capillary and choroid plexus endothelial cells. By regulating efflux and influx of endogenous or exogenous substances, the blood-brain barrier and, to a lesser extent, the blood-cerebrospinal barrier in the ventricles, represents the main interface between the central nervous system and the blood, ie, the rest of the body. As drug distribution to organs is dependent on the affinity of a substrate for a specific transport system, membrane transporter proteins are increasingly recognized as a key determinant of drug disposition. Many drug transporters are members of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily or the solute-linked carrier (SLC) class. The multidrug resistance protein MDR1 (ABCB1), also called P-glycoprotein, the multidrug resistance-associated proteins MRP1 (ABCC1) and MRP2 (ABCC2), and the breast cancer-resistance protein BCRP (ABCG2) are ATP-dependent efflux

  3. Evaluation of transport of common antiepileptic drugs by human multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, 2 and 5) that are overexpressed in pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Fedrowitz, Maren; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is one of the most serious problems in the treatment of epilepsy. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that increased expression of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) at the blood-brain barrier may be involved in the mechanisms leading to AED resistance. In addition to Pgp, increased expression of several multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) has been determined in epileptogenic brain regions of patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, it is not known whether AEDs are substrates for MRPs. In the present experiments, we evaluated whether common AEDs are transported by human MRPs (MRP1, 2 and 5) that are overexpressed in AED resistant epilepsy. For this purpose, we used a highly sensitive assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) in polarized kidney cell lines (LLC, MDCKII) transfected with human MRPs. The assay was validated by known MRP substrates, including calcein-AM (MRP1), vinblastine (MRP2) and chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA; MRP5). The directional transport determined with these drugs in MRP-transfected cell lines could be blocked with the MRP inhibitor MK571. However, in contrast to transport of known MRP substrates, none of the common AEDs (carbamazepine, valproate, levetiracetam, phenytoin, lamotrigine and phenobarbital) used in this study was transported by MRP1, MRP2 or MRP5. A basolateral-to-apical transport of valproate, which could be inhibited by MK571 and probenecid, was determined in LLC cells (both wildtype and transfected), but the specific transporter involved was not identified. The data indicate that common AEDs are not substrates for human MRP1, MRP2 or MRP5, at least in the in vitro models used in this study. PMID:20080116

  4. Involvement of CjMDR1, a plant multidrug-resistance-type ATP-binding cassette protein, in alkaloid transport in Coptis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Shitan, Nobukazu; Bazin, Ingrid; Dan, Kazuyuki; Obata, Kazuaki; Kigawa, Koji; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Sato, Fumihiko; Forestier, Cyrille; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2003-01-01

    Alkaloids comprise one of the largest groups of plant secondary metabolites. Berberine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, is preferentially accumulated in the rhizome of Coptis japonica, a ranunculaceous plant, whereas gene expression for berberine biosynthetic enzymes has been observed specifically in root tissues, which suggests that berberine synthesized in the root is transported to the rhizome, where there is high accumulation. We recently isolated a cDNA encoding a multidrug-resistance protein (MDR)-type ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (Cjmdr1) from berberine-producing cultured C. japonica cells, which is highly expressed in the rhizome. Functional analysis of Cjmdr1 by using a Xenopus oocyte expression system showed that CjMDR1 transported berberine in an inward direction, resulting in a higher accumulation of berberine in Cjmdr1-injected oocytes than in the control. Typical inhibitors of ABC proteins, such as vanadate, nifedipine, and glibenclamide, as well as ATP depletion, clearly inhibited this CjMDR1-dependent berberine uptake, suggesting that CjMDR1 functioned as an ABC transporter. Conventional membrane separation methods showed that CjMDR1 was localized in the plasma membrane of C. japonica cells. In situ hybridization indicated that Cjmdr1 mRNA was expressed preferentially in xylem tissues of the rhizome. These findings strongly suggest that CjMDR1 is involved in the translocation of berberine from the root to the rhizome. PMID:12524452

  5. Increased expression of the yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter Pdr18 leads to increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production in high gravity alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The understanding of the molecular basis of yeast tolerance to ethanol may guide the design of rational strategies to increase process performance in industrial alcoholic fermentations. A set of 21 genes encoding multidrug transporters from the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Superfamily and Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) in S. cerevisiae were scrutinized for a role in ethanol stress resistance. Results A yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter encoded by the PDR18 gene, proposed to play a role in the incorporation of ergosterol in the yeast plasma membrane, was found to confer resistance to growth inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 expression was seen to contribute to decreased 3 H-ethanol intracellular concentrations and decreased plasma membrane permeabilization of yeast cells challenged with inhibitory ethanol concentrations. Given the increased tolerance to ethanol of cells expressing PDR18, the final concentration of ethanol produced during high gravity alcoholic fermentation by yeast cells devoid of PDR18 was lower than the final ethanol concentration produced by the corresponding parental strain. Moreover, an engineered yeast strain in which the PDR18 promoter was replaced in the genome by the stronger PDR5 promoter, leading to increased PDR18 mRNA levels during alcoholic fermentation, was able to attain a 6 % higher ethanol concentration and a 17 % higher ethanol production yield than the parental strain. The improved fermentative performance of yeast cells over-expressing PDR18 was found to correlate with their increased ethanol tolerance and ability to restrain plasma membrane permeabilization induced throughout high gravity fermentation. Conclusions PDR18 gene over-expression increases yeast ethanol tolerance and fermentation performance leading to the production of highly inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 overexpression in industrial yeast strains appears to be a promising approach to improve alcoholic

  6. Preclinical and clinical evidence for the collaborative transport and renal secretion of an oxazolidinone antibiotic by organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3/SLC22A8) and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1/SLC47A1).

    PubMed

    Lai, Yurong; Sampson, Kathleen E; Balogh, Larissa M; Brayman, Timothy G; Cox, Steven R; Adams, Wade J; Kumar, Vikas; Stevens, Jeffrey C

    2010-09-01

    N-({(5S)-3-[4-(1,1-dioxidothiomorpholin-4-yl)-3,5-difluorophenyl]-2-oxo-1,3-oxazolidin-5-yl}methyl)acetamide (PNU-288034), an oxazolidinone antibiotic, was terminated in phase I clinical development because of insufficient exposure. Analysis of the drug pharmacokinetic and elimination profiles suggested that PNU-288034 undergoes extensive renal secretion in humans. The compound was well absorbed and exhibited approximately linear pharmacokinetics in the oral dose range of 100 to 1000 mg in human. PNU-288034 was metabolically stable in liver microsomes across species, and unchanged drug was cleared in the urine by an apparent active renal secretion process in rat and monkey (two to four times glomerular filtration rate) but not dog. In vitro studies conducted to characterize the transporters involved demonstrated PNU-288034 uptake by human organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3; K(m) = 44 +/- 5 microM) and human multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (hMATE1; K(m) = 340 +/- 55 microM). The compound was also transported by multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein. In contrast, human organic cation transporter 2, human OAT1, and hMATE2-K did not transport PNU-288034. Coadministration of PNU-288034 and the OAT3 inhibitor probenecid significantly increased PNU-288034 plasma area under the curve (170%) and reduced both plasma and renal clearance in monkey. Coadministration of PNU-288034 and cimetidine, a MATE1 inhibitor, also reduced plasma clearance in rat to a rate comparable with probenecid coadministration. Collectively, our results demonstrated a strong in vitro-in vivo correlation for active renal secretion coordinated through the vectorial transport process of OAT3 and MATE1, which ultimately resulted in limiting the systemic exposure of PNU-288034. PMID:20519552

  7. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein-mediated transport by S-adenosylmethionine and cynarin in multidrug-resistant human uterine sarcoma MES-SA/Dx5 cells.

    PubMed

    Angelini, A; Di Pietro, R; Centurione, L; Castellani, M L; Conti, P; Porreca, E; Cuccurullo, F

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer chemotherapy is often mediated by the overexpression of the plasma membrane drug transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) encoded by multidrug resistance gene (MDR1). Various chemosensitizing agents are able to inhibit Pgp activity but their clinical application is limited by their toxicity. Furthermore, hepatotoxicity related to chemotherapy causes delays of treatment in cancer patients and often requires supplementation of anti-tumour therapy with hepatoprotective agents. In this in vitro study, we investigated the effectiveness of an endogenous hepatoprotective agent, S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), and a natural hepatoprotective compound, Cynarin (Cyn), to inhibit Pgp activity in order to evaluate their potential use as chemosensitizing agents. Human doxorubicin (doxo) resistant uterine sarcoma cells (MES-SA/Dx5) expressing high levels of Pgp were treated with two hepatoprotectors at various concentrations (1, 5 and 10 microM) that are clinically achievable, in the presence or absence of three different concentrations of doxo (2, 4 and 8 microM). In order to evaluate the effects of both hepatoprotectors, we measured the intracellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of doxo, the cellular GSH level, ROS production and catalase (CAT) activity. We found that treatment with 2, 4 and 8 microM doxo in the presence of SAMe or Cyn significantly increased the doxo accumulation and cytotoxicity on MES-SA/Dx5 cells, when compared to control cells receiving doxo alone. Moreover, treatment with SAMe or Cyn significantly increased GSH content, greater than 80 percent and 60 percent, respectively) and CAT activity greater than 60 and 150 percent, respectively) in resistant cancer cells, while ROS production was below the values of corresponding untreated control cells. Our in vitro findings provide a rationale for the potential clinical use of these hepatoprotectors both as chemosensitizing agents, to reverse Pgp-mediated MDR, and as antioxidants to

  8. Tandutinib (MLN518/CT53518) targeted to stem-like cells by inhibiting the function of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-qin; Dai, Chun-ling; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Liang, Yong-ju; Deng, Wen; Chen, Jun-Jiang; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Fu, Li-Wu

    2013-06-14

    Tandutinib is a novel inhibitor of tyrosine kinases FLT3, PDGFR and KIT. Our study was to explore the capability of tandutinib to reverse ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance. Tandutinib reversed ABCG2-mediated drug resistance in ABCG2-482-R2, ABCG2-482-G2, ABCG2-482-T7 and S1-M1-80 cells and increased the accumulation of doxorubicin, rhodamine 123 and [H(3)] mitoxantrone in ABCG2-overexpressing cells. Importantly, tandutinib selectively sensitized side population cells to mitoxantrone. Taken together, our results advocate the potency of tandutinib as an ABCG2 modulator and stem-like cells targeted agent to increase efficiency of anticancer drugs. PMID:23619284

  9. Absolute immunoquantification of the expression of ABC transporters P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in human liver and duodenum.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Theodora G H A; Milne, Alison M; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Fenner, Katherine S; Coughtrie, Michael W H

    2012-01-15

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) are important in the distribution and elimination of many drugs and endogenous metabolites. Due to their membrane location and hydrophobicity it is difficult to generate purified protein standards to quantify these transporters in human tissues. The present study generated transporter proteins fused with the S-peptide of ribonuclease for use as standards in immunoquantification in human liver and small intestine. Quantification of the S•tag™, a 15 amino acid peptide, is based on the formation of a functional ribonuclease activity upon its high affinity reconstitution with ribonuclease S-protein. S-tagged transporters were used as full-length protein standards in the immunoquantification of endogenous BCRP, MRP2, and Pgp levels in 14 duodenum and 13 liver human tissue samples. Expression levels in the duodenum were 305±248 (BCRP), 66±70 (MRP2), and 275±205 (Pgp) fmoles per cm(2). Hepatic levels were 2.6±0.9 (BCRP), 19.8±10.5 (MRP2), and 26.1±10.1 (total Pgp) pmoles per g of liver. The mean hepatic scaling factor was 35.8mg crude membrane per g of liver, and the mean duodenal scaling factor was 1.3mg crude membrane per cm(2) mucosal lining. Interindividual variability was greater in duodenal samples than liver samples. It is hoped that this innovative method of quantifying these transporters (and other membrane proteins) will improve in vivo-in vitro extrapolation and in silico prediction of drug absorption and elimination, thus supporting drug development. PMID:22062654

  10. Hernandezine, a Bisbenzylisoquinoline Alkaloid with Selective Inhibitory Activity against Multidrug-Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Drug Transporter ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sung-Han; Lu, Yu-Jen; Yang, Chun-Chiao; Tuo, Wei-Cherng; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Hung, Tai-Ho; Wu, Chung-Pu

    2016-08-26

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, MDR1) is the most studied mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR), which remains a major obstacle in clinical cancer chemotherapy. Consequently, resensitizing MDR cancer cells by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 has been considered as a potential strategy to overcome ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer patients. However, the task of developing a suitable modulator of ABCB1 has been hindered mostly by the lack of selectivity and high intrinsic toxicity of candidate compounds. Considering the wide range of diversity and relatively nontoxic nature of natural products, developing a potential modulator of ABCB1 from natural sources is particularly valuable. Through screening of a large collection of purified bioactive natural products, hernandezine was identified as a potent and selective reversing agent for ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer cells. Experimental data demonstrated that the bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid hernandezine is selective for ABCB1, effectively inhibits the transport function of ABCB1, and enhances drug-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. More importantly, hernandezine significantly resensitizes ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs at nontoxic, nanomolar concentrations. Collectively, these findings reveal that hernandezine has great potential to be further developed into a novel reversal agent for combination therapy in MDR cancer patients. PMID:27504669

  11. Increased Systemic Exposure of Methotrexate by a Polyphenol-Rich Herb via Modulation on Efflux Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Ping; Hsieh, Yun-Chung; Shia, Chi-Sheng; Hsu, Pei-Wen; Chen, Jen-Yuan; Hou, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Yo-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Scutellariae radix (SR, roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi), a popular Chinese medicine, contains plenty of flavonoids such as baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, and wogonin. Methotrexate (MTX), an important immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic index, is a substrate of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). This study investigated the effect of SR on MTX pharmacokinetics and the underlying mechanisms. Rats were orally administered MTX alone and with 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg of SR. The serum concentrations of MTX were determined by a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Cell models were used to explore the involvement of MRP2 and BCRP in the interaction. The results showed that 1.0 g/kg of SR significantly increased Cmax, AUC(0-30), AUC(0-2880), and mean residence time (MRT) of MTX by 50%, 45%, 501%, and 347%, respectively, and 2.0 g/kg of SR significantly enhanced the AUC(0-2880) and MRT by 242% and 293%, respectively, but decreased AUC(0-30) by 41%. Cell line studies indicated that SR activated the BCRP-mediated efflux transport, whereas the serum metabolites of SR inhibited both the BCRP- and MRP2-mediated efflux transports. In conclusion, SR ingestion increased the systemic exposure and MRT of MTX via modulation on MRP2 and BCRP. PMID:26852865

  12. Mutations of charged amino acids at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 2 affect transport activity of the budding yeast multidrug resistance protein Pdr5p.

    PubMed

    Dou, Weiwang; Zhu, Jianhua; Wang, Tanjun; Wang, Wei; Li, Han; Chen, Xin; Guan, Wenjun

    2016-06-01

    Pdr5p is a major ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It displays a sequence and functional homology to the pathogenic Candida albicans multidrug resistance protein Cdr1p. The transmembrane helices of Pdr5p act in substrate recognition, binding, translocation and eventual removal of toxic substances out of the plasma membrane via the formation of a binding pocket. In this study, we identify two novel Pdr5 mutants (E574K and E580K), which exhibit impaired substrate efflux functions. Both mutants remained hypersensitive to all tested Pdr5p substrates without affecting their protein expression levels, localization or ATPase activities. As E574 and E580 are both located adjacent to the predicted cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 2, this implies that such charged residues are functionally essential for Pdr5p. Molecular docking studies suggest the possibility that oppositely charged substitution at residue E574 may disturb the interaction between the substrates and Pdr5p, resulting in impaired transport activity. Our results present new evidence, suggesting that transmembrane helix 2 plays an important role for the efflux function of Pdr5p. PMID:27189366

  13. The antiepileptic drug mephobarbital is not transported by P-glycoprotein or multidrug resistance protein 1 at the blood-brain barrier: a positron emission tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Mairinger, Severin; Bankstahl, Jens P.; Kuntner, Claudia; Römermann, Kerstin; Bankstahl, Marion; Wanek, Thomas; Stanek, Johann; Löscher, Wolfgang; Müller, Markus; Erker, Thomas; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim of this study was to determine whether the carbon-11-labelled antiepileptic drug [11C]mephobarbital is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and can be used to assess Pgp function at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with positron emission tomography (PET). We performed paired PET scans in rats, wild-type (FVB) and Mdr1a/b(−/−) mice, before and after intravenous administration of the Pgp inhibitor tariquidar (15 mg/kg). Brain-to-blood AUC0-60 ratios in rats and brain AUC0-60 values of [11C]mephobarbital in wild-type and Mdr1a/b(−/−) mice were similar in scan 1 and scan 2, respectively, suggesting that in vivo brain distribution of [11C]mephobarbital is not influenced by Pgp efflux. Absence of Pgp transport was confirmed in vitro by performing concentration equilibrium transport assay in cell lines transfected with MDR1 or Mdr1a. PET experiments in wild-type mice, with and without pretreatment with the multidrug resistance protein (MRP) inhibitor MK571 (20 mg/kg), and in Mrp1(−/−) mice suggested that [11C]mephobarbital is also not transported by MRPs at the murine BBB, which was also supported by in vitro transport experiments using human MRP1-transfected cells. Our results are surprising as phenobarbital, the N-desmethyl derivative of mephobarbital, has been shown to be a substrate of Pgp, which suggests that N-methylation abolishes Pgp affinity of barbiturates. PMID:22342565

  14. Drug membrane transporters and CYP3A4 are affected by hypericin, hyperforin or aristoforin in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Šemeláková, M; Jendželovský, R; Fedoročko, P

    2016-07-01

    Our previous results have shown that the combination of hypericin-mediated photodynamic therapy (HY-PDT) at sub-optimal dose with hyperforin (HP) (compounds of Hypericum sp.), or its stable derivative aristoforin (AR) stimulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to antitumour activity. This enhanced oxidative stress evoked the need for an explanation for HY accumulation in colon cancer cells pretreated with HP or AR. Generally, the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutics is limited by drug resistance related to the overexpression of drug efflux transporters in tumour cells. Therefore, the impact of non-activated hypericin (HY), HY-PDT, HP and AR on cell membrane transporter systems (Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1-MRP1/ABCC1, Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2-MRP2/ABCC2, Breast cancer resistance protein - BCRP/ABCG2, P-glycoprotein-P-gp/ABCC1) and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) was evaluated. The different effects of the three compounds on their expression, protein level and activity was determined under specific PDT light (T0+, T6+) or dark conditions (T0- T6-). We found that HP or AR treatment affected the protein levels of MRP2 and P-gp, whereas HP decreased MRP2 and P-gp expression mostly in the T0+ and T6+ conditions, while AR decreased MRP2 in T0- and T6+. Moreover, HY-PDT treatment induced the expression of MRP1. Our data demonstrate that HP or AR treatment in light or dark PDT conditions had an inhibitory effect on the activity of individual membrane transport proteins and significantly decreased CYP3A4 activity in HT-29 cells. We found that HP or AR significantly affected intracellular accumulation of HY in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. These results suggest that HY, HP and AR might affect the efficiency of anti-cancer drugs, through interaction with membrane transporters and CYP3A4. PMID:27261575

  15. Correlation of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter 1 and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 Transport Activities With Protein Expression Levels in Primary Cultured Human Tracheal, Bronchial, and Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Suzuki, Shinobu; Matsumaru, Takehisa; Yamamura, Norio; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how transporters contribute to the distribution of inhaled drugs in the lung is important for the discovery and development of such drugs. Protein expression levels may be useful to predict and understand drug distribution. As previously reported, organic cation/carnitine transporter 1 (OCTN1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) have higher levels of protein expression among transporters in primary cultured human lung cells. Nevertheless, it is unclear to what extent transport activity correlates with transporter protein expression. The purpose is to evaluate whether differences in OCTN1 and MRP1 protein expression govern the respective transport activity in primary cultured human lung cells. The model substrates of 4-[4-(dimethylamino) styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) and carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (CDF) for OCTN1 and MRP1, respectively, were used in the lung cells from five donors. Significant correlation was found between the kinetic parameter Vmax for ASP(+) and OCTN1 protein expression in plasma membrane of tracheal, bronchial, and alveolar cells (r(2) = 0.965, 0.834, and 0.877, respectively), and between the efflux of CDF and MRP1 protein expression in plasma membrane of tracheal, bronchial, and alveolar cells (r(2) = 0.800, 0.904, and 0.790, respectively). These findings suggest that OCTN1 and MRP1 protein concentrations are determinants for drug distribution in the lung. PMID:26429295

  16. Use of Baculovirus BacMam Vectors for Expression of ABC Drug Transporters in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Schwartz, Candice; Kapoor, Khyati; Kouanda, Abdul

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters ABCB1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp)] and ABCG2 are expressed in many tissues including those of the intestines, the liver, the kidney and the brain and are known to influence the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of therapeutic drugs. In vitro studies involving their functional characteristics provide important information that allows improvements in drug delivery or drug design. In this study, we report use of the BacMam (baculovirus-based expression in mammalian cells) expression system to express and characterize the function of Pgp and ABCG2 in mammalian cell lines. BacMam-Pgp and BacMam-ABCG2 baculovirus-transduced cell lines showed similar cell surface expression (as detected by monoclonal antibodies with an external epitope) and transport function of these transporters compared to drug-resistant cell lines that overexpress the two transporters. Transient expression of Pgp was maintained in HeLa cells for up to 72 h after transduction (48 h after removal of the BacMam virus). These BacMam-baculovirus-transduced mammalian cells expressing Pgp or ABCG2 were used for assessing the functional activity of these transporters. Crude membranes isolated from these cells were further used to study the activity of these transporters by biochemical techniques such as photo-cross-linking with transport substrate and adenosine triphosphatase assays. In addition, we show that the BacMam expression system can be exploited to coexpress both Pgp and ABCG2 in mammalian cells to determine their contribution to the transport of a common anticancer drug substrate. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the BacMam-baculovirus-based expression system can be used to simultaneously study the transport function and biochemical properties of ABC transporters. PMID:22041108

  17. Use of baculovirus BacMam vectors for expression of ABC drug transporters in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Suneet; Schwartz, Candice; Kapoor, Khyati; Kouanda, Abdul; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2012-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters ABCB1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp)] and ABCG2 are expressed in many tissues including those of the intestines, the liver, the kidney and the brain and are known to influence the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of therapeutic drugs. In vitro studies involving their functional characteristics provide important information that allows improvements in drug delivery or drug design. In this study, we report use of the BacMam (baculovirus-based expression in mammalian cells) expression system to express and characterize the function of Pgp and ABCG2 in mammalian cell lines. BacMam-Pgp and BacMam-ABCG2 baculovirus-transduced cell lines showed similar cell surface expression (as detected by monoclonal antibodies with an external epitope) and transport function of these transporters compared to drug-resistant cell lines that overexpress the two transporters. Transient expression of Pgp was maintained in HeLa cells for up to 72 h after transduction (48 h after removal of the BacMam virus). These BacMam-baculovirus-transduced mammalian cells expressing Pgp or ABCG2 were used for assessing the functional activity of these transporters. Crude membranes isolated from these cells were further used to study the activity of these transporters by biochemical techniques such as photo-cross-linking with transport substrate and adenosine triphosphatase assays. In addition, we show that the BacMam expression system can be exploited to coexpress both Pgp and ABCG2 in mammalian cells to determine their contribution to the transport of a common anticancer drug substrate. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the BacMam-baculovirus-based expression system can be used to simultaneously study the transport function and biochemical properties of ABC transporters. PMID:22041108

  18. Investigating the Role of the Host Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein Transporter Family in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Pathogenicity Using a Caenorhabditis elegans Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, Pietro; Visone, Marco; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Perrin, Elena; Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato; Ballestriero, Francesco; Santos, Radleigh; Pinilla, Clemencia; Di Schiavi, Elia; Tegos, George; de Pascale, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between host efflux system of the non-vertebrate nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) strain virulence. This is the first comprehensive effort to profile host-transporters within the context of Bcc infection. With this aim, two different toxicity tests were performed: a slow killing assay that monitors mortality of the host by intestinal colonization and a fast killing assay that assesses production of toxins. A Virulence Ranking scheme was defined, that expressed the toxicity of the Bcc panel members, based on the percentage of surviving worms. According to this ranking the 18 Bcc strains were divided in 4 distinct groups. Only the Cystic Fibrosis isolated strains possessed profound nematode killing ability to accumulate in worms’ intestines. For the transporter analysis a complete set of isogenic nematode single Multidrug Resistance associated Protein (MRP) efflux mutants and a number of efflux inhibitors were interrogated in the host toxicity assays. The Bcc pathogenicity profile of the 7 isogenic C. elegans MRP knock-out strains functionality was classified in two distinct groups. Disabling host transporters enhanced nematode mortality more than 50% in 5 out of 7 mutants when compared to wild type. In particular mrp-2 was the most susceptible phenotype with increased mortality for 13 out 18 Bcc strains, whereas mrp-3 and mrp-4 knock-outs had lower mortality rates, suggesting a different role in toxin-substrate recognition. The use of MRP efflux inhibitors in the assays resulted in substantially increased (>40% on average) mortality of wild-type worms. PMID:26587842

  19. Investigating the Role of the Host Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein Transporter Family in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Pathogenicity Using a Caenorhabditis elegans Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Pietro; Visone, Marco; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Perrin, Elena; Maida, Isabel; Fani, Renato; Ballestriero, Francesco; Santos, Radleigh; Pinilla, Clemencia; Di Schiavi, Elia; Tegos, George; de Pascale, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between host efflux system of the non-vertebrate nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) strain virulence. This is the first comprehensive effort to profile host-transporters within the context of Bcc infection. With this aim, two different toxicity tests were performed: a slow killing assay that monitors mortality of the host by intestinal colonization and a fast killing assay that assesses production of toxins. A Virulence Ranking scheme was defined, that expressed the toxicity of the Bcc panel members, based on the percentage of surviving worms. According to this ranking the 18 Bcc strains were divided in 4 distinct groups. Only the Cystic Fibrosis isolated strains possessed profound nematode killing ability to accumulate in worms' intestines. For the transporter analysis a complete set of isogenic nematode single Multidrug Resistance associated Protein (MRP) efflux mutants and a number of efflux inhibitors were interrogated in the host toxicity assays. The Bcc pathogenicity profile of the 7 isogenic C. elegans MRP knock-out strains functionality was classified in two distinct groups. Disabling host transporters enhanced nematode mortality more than 50% in 5 out of 7 mutants when compared to wild type. In particular mrp-2 was the most susceptible phenotype with increased mortality for 13 out 18 Bcc strains, whereas mrp-3 and mrp-4 knock-outs had lower mortality rates, suggesting a different role in toxin-substrate recognition. The use of MRP efflux inhibitors in the assays resulted in substantially increased (>40% on average) mortality of wild-type worms. PMID:26587842

  20. 3D cryo-electron reconstruction of BmrA, a bacterial multidrug ABC transporter in an inward-facing conformation and in a lipidic environment.

    PubMed

    Fribourg, Pierre Frederic; Chami, Mohamed; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Gubellini, Francesca; Marabini, Roberto; Marco, Sergio; Jault, Jean-Michel; Lévy, Daniel

    2014-05-15

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) membrane exporters are efflux transporters of a wide diversity of molecule across the membrane at the expense of ATP. A key issue regarding their catalytic cycle is whether or not their nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) are physically disengaged in the resting state. To settle this controversy, we obtained structural data on BmrA, a bacterial multidrug homodimeric ABC transporter, in a membrane-embedded state. BmrA in the apostate was reconstituted in lipid bilayers forming a mixture of ring-shaped structures of 24 or 39 homodimers. Three-dimensional models of the ring-shaped structures of 24 or 39 homodimers were calculated at 2.3 nm and 2.5 nm resolution from cryo-electron microscopy, respectively. In these structures, BmrA adopts an inward-facing open conformation similar to that found in mouse P-glycoprotein structure with the NBDs separated by 3 nm. Both lipidic leaflets delimiting the transmembrane domains of BmrA were clearly resolved. In planar membrane sheets, the NBDs were even more separated. BmrA in an ATP-bound conformation was determined from two-dimensional crystals grown in the presence of ATP and vanadate. A projection map calculated at 1.6 nm resolution shows an open outward-facing conformation. Overall, the data are consistent with a mechanism of drug transport involving large conformational changes of BmrA and show that a bacterial ABC exporter can adopt at least two open inward conformations in lipid membrane. PMID:24630999

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors Interact with ATP Binding Cassette Transporter 4/Multidrug Resistance Protein 4: A Basis for Unanticipated Enhanced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yu; Takenaka, Kazumasa; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheepala, Satish B.; Wu, Chung-Pu; Ekins, Sean; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pharmacotherapy, by combining different drug classes such as nucleoside analogs and HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), has increased HIV-patient life expectancy. Consequently, among these patients, an increase in non-HIV–associated cancers has produced a patient cohort requiring both HIV and cancer chemotherapy. We hypothesized that multidrug resistance protein 4/ATP binding cassette transporter 4 (MRP4/ABCC4), a widely expressed transporter of nucleoside-based antiviral medications as well as cancer therapeutics might interact with PIs. Among the PIs evaluated (nelfinavir, ritonavir, amprenavir, saquinavir, and indinavir), only nelfinavir both effectively stimulated MRP4 ATPase activity and inhibited substrate-stimulated ATPase activity. Saos2 and human embryonic kidney 293 cells engineered to overexpress MRP4 were then used to assess transport and cytotoxicity. MRP4 expression reduced intracellular accumulation of nelfinavir and consequently conferred survival advantage to nelfinavir cytotoxicity. Nelfinavir blocked Mrp4-mediated export, which is consistent with its ability to increase the sensitivity of MRP4-expressing cells to methotrexate. In contrast, targeted inactivation of Abcc4/Mrp4 in mouse cells specifically enhanced nelfinavir and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl) adenine cytotoxicity. These results suggest that nelfinavir is both an inhibitor and substrate of MRP4. Because nelfinavir is a new MRP4/ABCC4 substrate, we developed a MRP4/ABCC4 pharmacophore model, which showed that the nelfinavir binding site is shared with chemotherapeutic substrates such as adefovir and methotrexate. Our studies reveal, for the first time, that nelfinavir, a potent and cytotoxic PI, is both a substrate and inhibitor of MRP4. These findings suggest that HIV-infected cancer patients receiving nelfinavir might experience both enhanced antitumor efficacy and unexpected adverse toxicity given the role of MRP4/ABCC4 in exporting nucleoside

  2. Functional characterization of protein variants of the human multidrug transporter ABCC2 by a novel targeted expression system in fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Arlanov, Rudolf; Porter, Andrew; Strand, Dennis; Brough, Rachel; Karpova, Darja; Kerb, Reinhold; Wojnowski, Leszek; Schwab, Matthias; Lang, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2) is involved in the efflux of endogenous and xenobiotic substrates, including several anticancer and antiviral drugs. The functional consequences of ABCC2 protein variants remain inconsistent, which may be due to shortcomings of the in vitro assays used. To study systematically the functional consequences of nonsynonymous ABCC2 variants, we used a novel "Screen and Insert" (ScIn) technology to achieve stable and highly reproducible expression of 13 ABCC2 variants in HT1080 cells. Western blotting revealed lower (30-65%) ABCC2 expression for D333G, R1174H, and R1181L as compared with wild type (WT; 100%), whereas the linked variant V1188E/C1515Y resulted in higher expression (150%). R1174H caused mislocalization of ABCC2 to the cytoplasm with an endoplasmic reticulum-like distribution. Variants N1244K and R1174H decreased transport of glutathione-methylfluorescein (GS-MF) and glutathione-monochlorobimane (GS-MCB) by 80% and 50%, respectively, whereas R1181L and P1291L reduced only GS-MCB transport by 50% as compared with WT. Contrary to protein data, the double variant V1188E/C1515Y decreased specific transport activity for GS-MF and GS-MCB by 40%. The ScIn approach is a feasible and reliable method to functionally characterize systematically ABCC2 variants. D333G, R1174H, R1181L, N1244K, P1291L, and double variant V1188E/C1515Y have been identified as most promising for further clinical evaluation. PMID:22290738

  3. Multi-Drug Resistance Transporters and a Mechanism-Based Strategy for Assessing Risks of Pesticide Combinations to Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Guseman, Alex J; Miller, Kaliah; Kunkle, Grace; Dively, Galen P; Pettis, Jeffrey S; Evans, Jay D; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Hawthorne, David J

    2016-01-01

    Annual losses of honey bee colonies remain high and pesticide exposure is one possible cause. Dangerous combinations of pesticides, plant-produced compounds and antibiotics added to hives may cause or contribute to losses, but it is very difficult to test the many combinations of those compounds that bees encounter. We propose a mechanism-based strategy for simplifying the assessment of combinations of compounds, focusing here on compounds that interact with xenobiotic handling ABC transporters. We evaluate the use of ivermectin as a model substrate for these transporters. Compounds that increase sensitivity of bees to ivermectin may be inhibiting key transporters. We show that several compounds commonly encountered by honey bees (fumagillin, Pristine, quercetin) significantly increased honey bee mortality due to ivermectin and significantly reduced the LC50 of ivermectin suggesting that they may interfere with transporter function. These inhibitors also significantly increased honey bees sensitivity to the neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid. This mechanism-based strategy may dramatically reduce the number of tests needed to assess the possibility of adverse combinations among pesticides. We also demonstrate an in vivo transporter assay that provides physical evidence of transporter inhibition by tracking the dynamics of a fluorescent substrate of these transporters (Rhodamine B) in bee tissues. Significantly more Rhodamine B remains in the head and hemolymph of bees pretreated with higher concentrations of the transporter inhibitor verapamil. Mechanism-based strategies for simplifying the assessment of adverse chemical interactions such as described here could improve our ability to identify those combinations that pose significantly greater risk to bees and perhaps improve the risk assessment protocols for honey bees and similar sensitive species. PMID:26840460

  4. Multi-Drug Resistance Transporters and a Mechanism-Based Strategy for Assessing Risks of Pesticide Combinations to Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Guseman, Alex J.; Miller, Kaliah; Kunkle, Grace; Dively, Galen P.; Pettis, Jeffrey S.; Evans, Jay D.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Hawthorne, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Annual losses of honey bee colonies remain high and pesticide exposure is one possible cause. Dangerous combinations of pesticides, plant-produced compounds and antibiotics added to hives may cause or contribute to losses, but it is very difficult to test the many combinations of those compounds that bees encounter. We propose a mechanism-based strategy for simplifying the assessment of combinations of compounds, focusing here on compounds that interact with xenobiotic handling ABC transporters. We evaluate the use of ivermectin as a model substrate for these transporters. Compounds that increase sensitivity of bees to ivermectin may be inhibiting key transporters. We show that several compounds commonly encountered by honey bees (fumagillin, Pristine, quercetin) significantly increased honey bee mortality due to ivermectin and significantly reduced the LC50 of ivermectin suggesting that they may interfere with transporter function. These inhibitors also significantly increased honey bees sensitivity to the neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid. This mechanism-based strategy may dramatically reduce the number of tests needed to assess the possibility of adverse combinations among pesticides. We also demonstrate an in vivo transporter assay that provides physical evidence of transporter inhibition by tracking the dynamics of a fluorescent substrate of these transporters (Rhodamine B) in bee tissues. Significantly more Rhodamine B remains in the head and hemolymph of bees pretreated with higher concentrations of the transporter inhibitor verapamil. Mechanism-based strategies for simplifying the assessment of adverse chemical interactions such as described here could improve our ability to identify those combinations that pose significantly greater risk to bees and perhaps improve the risk assessment protocols for honey bees and similar sensitive species. PMID:26840460

  5. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Activates Human Multidrug Resistance Transporter 3/ATP-Binding Cassette Protein Subfamily B4 Transcription and Increases Rat Biliary Phosphatidylcholine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ghonem, Nisanne S.; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshisundaram; Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance transporter 3/ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily B4 (MDR3/ABCB4) is a critical determinant of biliary phosphatidylcholine (PC) secretion. Clinically, mutations and partial deficiencies in MDR3 result in cholestatic liver injury. Thus, MDR3 is a potential therapeutic target for cholestatic liver disease. Fenofibrate is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α ligand that has antiinflammatory actions and regulates bile acid detoxification. Here we examined the mechanism by which fenofibrate regulates MDR3 gene expression. Fenofibrate significantly up-regulated MDR3 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in primary cultured human hepatocytes, and stimulated MDR3 promoter activity in HepG2 cells. In silico analysis of 5′-upstream region of human MDR3 gene revealed a number of PPARα response elements (PPRE). Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated specific binding of PPARα to the human MDR3 promoter. Targeted mutagenesis of three novel PPREs reduced inducibility of the MDR3 promoter by fenofibrate. In collagen sandwich cultured rat hepatocytes, treatment with fenofibrate increased secretion of fluorescent PC into bile canaliculi. Conclusion Fenofibrate transactivates MDR3 gene transcription by way of the binding of PPARα to three novel and functionally critical PPREs in the MDR3 promoter. Fenofibrate treatment further stimulates biliary phosphatidylcholine secretion in rat hepatocytes, thereby providing a functional correlate. We have established a molecular mechanism that may contribute to the beneficial use of fenofibrate therapy in human cholestatic liver disease. PMID:24122873

  6. A 20(S)-protopanoxadiol derivative overcomes multi-drug resistance by antagonizing ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wantao; Xu, Qin; Xiao, Meng; Hu, Lihong; Mao, Li; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, failure of chemotherapy is often caused by the ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1), and few drugs have been successfully developed to overcome ABCB1-mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR). To suppress ABCB1 activity, we previously designed and synthesized a new series of derivatives based on 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD). In the present study, we investigated the role of PPD derivatives in the function of ABC transporters. Non-toxic concentrations of the PPD derivative PPD12 sensitized ABCB1-overexpressing cells to their anti-cancer substrates better than either the parental PPD or inactive PPD11. PPD12 increased intracellular accumulation of adriamycin and rhodamine123 in resistant cancer cells. Although PPD12 did not suppress the expression of ABCB1 mRNA or protein, it stimulated the activity of ABCB1 ATPase. Because PPD12 is a competitive inhibitor, it was predicted to bind to the large hydrophobic cavity of homology-modeled human ABCB1. PPD12 also enhanced the efficacy of adriamycin against ABCB1-overexpressing KB/VCR xenografts in nude mice. In conclusion, PPD12 enhances the efficacy of substrate drugs in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. These findings suggest that a combination therapy consisting of PPD12 with conventional chemotherapeutic agents may be an effective treatment for ABCB1-mediated MDR cancer patients. PMID:26824187

  7. CES2, ABCG2, TS and Topo-I Primary and Synchronous Metastasis Expression and Clinical Outcome in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Treated with First-Line FOLFIRI Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Silvestris, Nicola; Simone, Giovanni; Partipilo, Giulia; Scarpi, Emanuela; Lorusso, Vito; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Maiello, Evaristo; Paradiso, Angelo; Mangia, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic activation of irinotecan (CPT-11) is due to carboxylesterase (CES), and its pharmacological behavior is influenced by drug resistance-related proteins. We previously reported that the clinical response and prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients did not differ in tumors with different thymidylate synthase (TS) or topoisomerase-I (Topo-I) expression. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we evaluated the biological role of CES2 and the expression of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in 58 consecutive mCRC patients, who had undergone a first-line CPT-11/5-FU/leucovirin (FOLFIRI) regimen. The expression of these proteins was also examined in a group of synchronous lymph nodes and liver metastases. Furthermore, all samples were revaluated for TS and Topo-I expression. High expression of CES2, ABCG2, TS and Topo-I was observed in 55%, 56%, 38% and 49% of patients, respectively. There was a significant association between high TS and high ABCG2 expression (p = 0.049). Univariate analysis showed that only TS expression significantly impacted on time to progression (p = 0.005). Moreover, Cox’ multivariate analysis revealed that TS expression was significantly associated with overall survival (p = 0.01). No significant correlation was found between investigated markers expression and clinical response. Topo-I expression resulted in being significantly higher in liver metastases with respect to the corresponding primary tumors (p < 0.0001), emphasizing the role of Topo-I expression in metastatic cancer biology. In primary tumor tissues, CES2 expression tended to be higher than that observed in liver metastasis tissues (p = 0.05). These preliminary data may suggest CES2 over-expression as a potential marker of malignant phenotype. In light of these findings, we suggest that Topo-I expression together with TS expression could be associated with metastatic progression of CRC. Further studies are warranted with the aim of evaluating the

  8. Raltegravir permeability across blood-tissue barriers and the potential role of drug efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M Tozammel; Kis, Olena; De Rosa, María F; Bendayan, Reina

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate raltegravir transport across several blood-tissue barrier models and the potential interactions with drug efflux transporters. Raltegravir uptake, accumulation, and permeability were evaluated in vitro in (i) P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), or MRP4-overexpressing MDA-MDR1 (P-gp), HEK-ABCG2, HeLa-MRP1, or HEK-MRP4 cells, respectively; (ii) cell culture systems of the human blood-brain (hCMEC/D3), mouse blood-testicular (TM4), and human blood-intestinal (Caco-2) barriers; and (iii) rat jejunum and ileum segments using an in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion model. [(3)H]Raltegravir accumulation by MDA-MDR1 (P-gp) and HEK-ABCG2-overexpressing cells was significantly enhanced in the presence of PSC833 {6-[(2S,4R,6E)-4-methyl-2-(methylamino)-3-oxo-6-octenoic acid]-7-L-valine-cyclosporine}, a P-gp inhibitor, or Ko143 [(3S,6S,12aS)-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydro-9-methoxy-6-(2-methylpropyl)-1,4-dioxopyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-propanoic acid 1,1-dimethylethyl ester], a BCRP inhibitor, suggesting the inhibition of a P-gp- or BCRP-mediated efflux process, respectively. Furthermore, [(3)H]raltegravir accumulation by human cerebral microvessel endothelial hCMEC/D3 and mouse Sertoli TM4 cells was significantly increased by PSC833 and Ko143. In human intestinal Caco-2 cells grown on Transwell filters, PSC833, but not Ko143, significantly decreased the [(3)H]raltegravir efflux ratios. In rat intestinal segments, [(3)H]raltegravir in situ permeability was significantly enhanced by the concurrent administration of PSC833 and Ko143. In contrast, in the transporter inhibition assays, raltegravir (10 to 500 μM) did not increase the accumulation of substrate for P-gp (rhodamine-6G), BCRP ([(3)H]mitoxantrone), or MRP1 [2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF)] by MDA-MDR1 (P-gp)-, HEK-ABCG2-, or HeLa-MRP1-overexpressing

  9. Rational Mutational Analysis of a Multidrug MFS Transporter CaMdr1p of Candida albicans by Employing a Membrane Environment Based Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaushiki, Ajeeta; Pasrija, Ritu; Lynn, Andrew M.; Prasad, Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    CaMdr1p is a multidrug MFS transporter of pathogenic Candida albicans. An over-expression of the gene encoding this protein is linked to clinically encountered azole resistance. In-depth knowledge of the structure and function of CaMdr1p is necessary for an effective design of modulators or inhibitors of this efflux transporter. Towards this goal, in this study, we have employed a membrane environment based computational approach to predict the functionally critical residues of CaMdr1p. For this, information theoretic scores which are variants of Relative Entropy (Modified Relative Entropy REM) were calculated from Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) by separately considering distinct physico-chemical properties of transmembrane (TM) and inter-TM regions. The residues of CaMdr1p with high REM which were predicted to be significantly important were subjected to site-directed mutational analysis. Interestingly, heterologous host Saccharomyces cerevisiae, over-expressing these mutant variants of CaMdr1p wherein these high REM residues were replaced by either alanine or leucine, demonstrated increased susceptibility to tested drugs. The hypersensitivity to drugs was supported by abrogated substrate efflux mediated by mutant variant proteins and was not attributed to their poor expression or surface localization. Additionally, by employing a distance plot from a 3D deduced model of CaMdr1p, we could also predict the role of these functionally critical residues in maintaining apparent inter-helical interactions to provide the desired fold for the proper functioning of CaMdr1p. Residues predicted to be critical for function across the family were also found to be vital from other previously published studies, implying its wider application to other membrane protein families. PMID:20041202

  10. Risk Factors for Development of Cholestatic Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Inhibition of Hepatic Basolateral Bile Acid Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins 3 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Köck, Kathleen; Ferslew, Brian C.; Netterberg, Ida; Yang, Kyunghee; Urban, Thomas J.; Swaan, Peter W.; Stewart, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired hepatic bile acid export may contribute to development of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 3 and 4 are postulated to be compensatory hepatic basolateral bile acid efflux transporters when biliary excretion by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) is impaired. BSEP inhibition is a risk factor for cholestatic DILI. This study aimed to characterize the relationship between MRP3, MRP4, and BSEP inhibition and cholestatic potential of drugs. The inhibitory effect of 88 drugs (100 μM) on MRP3- and MRP4-mediated substrate transport was measured in membrane vesicles. Drugs selected for investigation included 50 BSEP non-inhibitors (24 non-cholestatic; 26 cholestatic) and 38 BSEP inhibitors (16 non-cholestatic; 22 cholestatic). MRP4 inhibition was associated with an increased risk of cholestatic potential among BSEP non-inhibitors. In this group, for each 1% increase in MRP4 inhibition, the odds of the drug being cholestatic increased by 3.1%. Using an inhibition cutoff of 21%, which predicted a 50% chance of cholestasis, 62% of cholestatic drugs inhibited MRP4 (P < 0.05); in contrast, only 17% of non-cholestatic drugs were MRP4 inhibitors. Among BSEP inhibitors, MRP4 inhibition did not provide additional predictive value of cholestatic potential; almost all BSEP inhibitors were also MRP4 inhibitors. Inclusion of pharmacokinetic predictor variables (e.g., maximal unbound concentration in plasma) in addition to percent MRP4 inhibition in logistic regression models did not improve cholestasis prediction. Association of cholestasis with percent MRP3 inhibition was not statistically significant, regardless of BSEP-inhibition status. Inhibition of MRP4, in addition to BSEP, may be a risk factor for the development of cholestatic DILI. PMID:24154606

  11. Toward Understanding the Mechanism of Action of the Yeast Multidrug Resistance Transporter Pdr5p: A Molecular Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Robert M.; Esser, Lothar; Ma, Jichun; Xia, Di

    2010-01-01

    Pleotropic drug resistant protein 5 (Pdr5p) is a plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter and the major drug efflux pump in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Pdr5p family of fungal transporters possesses a number of structural features significantly different from other modeled or crystallized ABC transporters, which include a reverse topology, an atypical ATP-binding site, a very low sequence similarity in the transmembrane section and long linkers between domains. These features present a considerable hurdle in molecular modeling studies of these important transporters. Here, we report the creation of an atomic model of Pdr5p based on a combination of homology modeling and ab initio methods, incorporating information from consensus transmembrane segment prediction, residue lipophilicity, and sequence entropy. Reported mutations in the transmembrane substrate-binding pocket that altered drug-resistance were used to validate the model, and one mutation that changed the communication pattern between transmembrane and nucleotide-binding domains was used in model improvement. The predictive power of the model was demonstrated experimentally by the increased sensitivity of yeast mutants to clotrimazole having alanine substitutions for Thr1213 and Gln1253, which are predicted to be in the substrate-binding pocket, without reducing the amount of Pdr5p in the plasma membrane. The quality and reliability of our model are discussed in the context of various approaches used for modeling different parts of the structure. PMID:21034832

  12. Reporter Dyes Demonstrate Functional Expression of Multidrug Resistance Proteins in the Marine Flatworm Macrostomum lignano: The Sponge-Derived Dye Ageladine A Is Not a Substrate of These Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Tietje, Kristin; Rivera-Ingraham, Georgina; Petters, Charlotte; Abele, Doris; Dringen, Ralf; Bickmeyer, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    The marine plathyhelminth Macrostomum lignano was recently isolated from Adriatic shore sediments where it experiences a wide variety of environmental challenges, ranging from hypoxia and reoxygenation, feeding on toxic algae, to exposure to anthropogenic contaminants. As multidrug resistance transporters constitute the first line of defense against toxins and toxicants we have studied the presence of such transporters in M. lignano in living animals by applying optical methods and pharmacological inhibitors that had been developed for mammalian cells. Application of the MDR1 inhibitor Verapamil or of the MRP1 inhibitors MK571 or Probenecid increased the intracellular fluorescence of the reporter dyes Fura-2 am, Calcein am, Fluo-3 am in the worms, but did not affect their staining with the dyes Rhodamine B, CMFDA or Ageladine A. The marine sponge alkaloid Ageladine A remained intracellularly trapped for several days in the worms, suggesting that it does not serve as substrate of multidrug resistance exporters. In addition, Ageladine A did not affect multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)-mediated dye export from M. lignano or the MRP1-mediated glutathione (GSH) export from cultured rat brain astrocytes. The data obtained demonstrate that life-imaging is a useful tool to address physiological drug export from intact marine transparent flatworms by using multiphoton scanning microscopy. PMID:24135911

  13. Roles of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein in transporting para-aminosalicylic acid and its N-acetylated metabolite in mice brain

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lan; Xu, Cong; O'Neal, Stefanie; Bi, Hui-chang; Huang, Min; Zheng, Wei; Zeng, Su

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) is effective in the treatment of manganism-induced neurotoxicity (manganism). In this study we investigated the roles of P-glycoprotein (MDR1a) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in transporting PAS and its N-acetylated metabolite AcPAS through blood-brain barrier. Methods: MDR1a-null or wild-type mice were intravenously injected with PAS (200 mg/kg). Thirty minutes after the injection, blood samples and brains were collected, and the concentrations of PAS and AcPAS in brain capillaries and parenchyma were measured using HPLC. Both MDCK-MDR1 and MDCK-MRP1 cells that overexpressed P-gp and MRP1, respectively, were used in two-chamber Transwell transport studies in vitro. Results: After injection of PAS, the brain concentration of PAS was substantially higher in MDR1a-null mice than in wild-type mice, but the brain concentration of AcPAS had no significant difference between MDR1a-null mice and wild-type mice. Concomitant injection of PAS with the MRP-specific inhibitor MK-571 (50 mg/kg) further increased the brain concentration of PAS in MDR1a-null mice, and increased the brain concentration of AcPAS in both MDR1a-null mice and wild-type mice. Two-chamber Transwell studies with MDCK-MDR1 cells demonstrated that PAS was not only a substrate but also a competitive inhibitor of P-gp, while AcPAS was not a substrate of P-gp. Two-chamber Transwell studies with the MDCK-MRP1 cells showed that MRP1 had the ability to transport both PAS and AcPAS across the BBB. Conclusion: P-gp plays a major role in the efflux of PAS from brain parenchyma into blood in mice, while MRP1 is involved in both PAS and AcPAS transport in the brain. PMID:25418377

  14. Role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in interactions between natural products and drugs.

    PubMed

    Aszalos, Adorjan

    2008-12-01

    Medicinal use of natural products such as extracts of plants has existed for many years in China and in other countries and they are now available worldwide. Citrus fruit juices are consumed on a daily basis around the world. Modern medicine provides well-tested compounds or drugs for most sicknesses. However, the simultaneous consumption of plant extracts, food supplements, and fruit juices with drugs can create metabolic aberrations in humans. Interactions between drugs used simultaneously are regulated by government agencies. Not regulated, but warned against in drug inserts are potential interactions between drugs and food and food-additives containing certain compounds with potential side effects. Summarized here are the results of investigations that point out possible interactions at the level of transporter molecules by drugs and compounds of natural origin. These transporter molecules play important roles in absorption in the intestines, at the blood brain barrier, in the liver, the kidney and in some other parts of the human body. Drugs and metabolites pass through these pumps and may compete with compounds from food supplements. The most studied natural compounds that are potential modulators of these transport molecules are flavonoids, found in fruit juices, vegetables, flowers and tea. Mycotoxins found in cereal grains are also shown to modulate transporter proteins. We detail here how such constituents of natural origin were shown to modulate three types of the major transporter molecules, P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), multidrug resistance proteins (ABCCs) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2). Interference of these natural compounds with drugs at the transporter level is also discussed. PMID:19075617

  15. The synthesis and biodistribution of [(11)C]metformin as a PET probe to study hepatobiliary transport mediated by the multi-drug and toxin extrusion transporter 1 (MATE1) in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hume, W Ewan; Shingaki, Tomotaka; Takashima, Tadayuki; Hashizume, Yoshinobu; Okauchi, Takashi; Katayama, Yumiko; Hayashinaka, Emi; Wada, Yasuhiro; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    In order to develop a new positron emission tomography (PET) probe to study hepatobiliary transport mediated by the multi-drug and toxin extrusion transporter 1 (MATE1), (11)C-labelled metformin was synthesized and then evaluated as a PET probe. [(11)C]Metformin ([(11)C]4) was synthesized in three steps, from [(11)C]methyl iodide. Evaluation by small animal PET of [(11)C]4 showed that there was increased concentrations of [(11)C]4 in the livers of mice pre-treated with pyrimethamine, a potential inhibitor of MATEs, inhibiting the hepatobiliary excretion of metformin. Radiometabolite analysis showed that [(11)C]4 was not degraded in vivo during the PET scan. Biodistribution studies were undertaken and the organ distributions were extrapolated into a standard human model. In conclusion, [(11)C]4 may be useful as a PET probe to non-invasively study the in vivo function of hepatobiliary transport and drug-drug interactions, mediated by MATE1 in future clinical investigations. PMID:24238901

  16. Are transporter genes other than the chloroquine resistance locus (pfcrt) and multidrug resistance gene (pfmdr) associated with antimalarial drug resistance?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Timothy J C; Nair, Shalini; Qin, Huang; Singlam, Sittaporn; Brockman, Alan; Paiphun, Lucy; Nosten, François

    2005-06-01

    Mu et al. (Mu, J., M. T. Ferdig, X. Feng, D. A. Joy, J. Duan, T. Furuya, G. Subramanian, L. Aravind, R. A. Cooper, J. C. Wootton, M. Xiong, and X. Z. Su, Mol. Microbiol. 49:977-989, 2003) recently reported exciting associations between nine new candidate transporter genes and in vitro resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and quinine (QN), with six of these loci showing association with CQ or QN in a southeast Asian population sample. We replicated and extended this work by examining polymorphisms in these genes and in vitro resistance to eight drugs in parasites collected from the Thailand-Burma border. To minimize problems of multiple testing, we used a two-phase study design, while to minimize problems caused by population structure, we analyzed parasite isolates collected from a single clinic. We first examined associations between genotype and drug response in 108 unique single-clone parasite isolates. We found strong associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in pfmdr and mefloquine (MFQ), artesunate (AS), and lumefantrine (LUM) response. We also observed associations between an ABC transporter (G7) and response to QN and AS and between another ABC transporter (G49) and response to dihydro-artemisinin (DHA). We reexamined significant associations in an independent sample of 199 unique single-clone infections from the same location. The significant associations with pfmdr-1042 detected in the first survey remained. However, with the exception of the G7-artesunate association, all other associations observed with the nine new candidate transporters disappeared. We also examined linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers and phenotypic correlations between drug responses. We found minimal LD between genes. Furthermore, we found no correlation between chloroquine and quinine responses, although we did find expected strong correlations between MFQ, QN, AS, DHA, and LUM. To conclude, we found no evidence for an association between 8/9 candidate genes and

  17. Lack of Contribution of Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein and Organic Anion-transporting Polypeptide to Pharmacokinetics of Regorafenib, a Novel Multi-Kinase Inhibitor, in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kazuo; Ueyama, Jun; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Sugiura, Yuka; Saito, Hiroko; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Hasegawa, Takaaki

    2015-09-01

    We investigated whether hepatic multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (ABCC2) is involved in the hepatobiliary excretion of regorafenib, a novel multi-kinase inhibitor, using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats (EHBR) lacking the efflux transporter ABCC2. The involvement of organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1 (OATP1; OATP in humans) and OATP2 in the hepatic uptake of regorafenib and their protein levels in the liver were also investigated in the two rat groups. When regorafenib (5 mg/kg) was administered intravenously, the plasma concentrations of regorafenib were higher in EHBR than those in SD rats. However, the slope of the plasma concentration-time curves was the same for the two groups. Although the apparent biliary clearance of regorafenib in EHBR was lower than that of SD rats, no significant difference in the biliary excretion rate was observed between them, suggesting that regorafenib is not a substrate for ABCC2 and is not excreted into bile by ABCC2. It was also found that the contribution of biliary excretion to the systemic elimination of regorafenib is small. The protein-binding profiles of regorafenib were found to be linear in both rat groups. The binding potency, which was very high in both rat groups (>99.5%), was significantly higher in EHBR than that in SD rats. No significant differences in the plasma concentrations of unbound regorafenib were observed between the two rat groups, suggesting that the differences observed in the pharmacokinetic behaviors of regorafenib between the two rat groups were due to differences in protein-binding. When the protein levels of hepatic OATP1 and OATP2 were measured by immunoblot analysis, the expression of both transporters in EHBR was less than 40% of that in SD rats. The present results suggest that regorafenib is not a substrate for OATP1 and OATP2. These findings suggest the possibility that ABCC2-mediated hepatobiliary excretion and OATP1/OATP2-mediated hepatic uptake do

  18. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  19. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  20. The interaction of bortezomib with multidrug transporters: implications for therapeutic applications in advanced multiple myeloma and other neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Robert; Meiller, Justine; Jakubikova, Jana; Klippel, Steffen; Delmore, Jake; Richardson, Paul; Anderson, Kenneth; Clynes, Martin; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; O’Gorman, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bortezomib is an important agent in multiple myeloma treatment, but resistance in cell lines and patients has been described. The main mechanisms of resistance described in cancer fall into one of two categories, pharmacokinetic resistance (PK), e.g. over expression of drug efflux pumps and pharmacodynamic resistance, e.g. apoptosis resistance or altered survival pathways, where the agent reaches an appropriate concentration, but this fails to propagate an appropriate cell death response. Of the known pump mechanisms, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is the best studied and considered to be the most important in contributing to general PK drug resistance. Resistance to bortezomib is multifactorial and there are conflicting indications that cellular overexpression of P-gp may contribute to resistance agent. Hence, better characterization of the interactions of this drug with classical resistance mechanisms should identify improved treatment applications. Methods Cell lines with different P-gp expression levels were used to determine the relationship between bortezomib and P-gp. Coculture system with stromal cells was used to determine the effect of the local microenvironment on the bortezomib–elacridar combination. To further assess P-gp function, intracellular accumulation of P-gp probe rhodamine-123 was utilised. Results In the present study, we show that bortezomib is a substrate for P-gp, but not for the other drug efflux transporters. Bortezomib activity is affected by P-gp expression and conversely, the expression of P-gp affect bortezomib’s ability to act as a P-gp substrate. The local microenvironment did not alter the cellular response to bortezomib. We also demonstrate that bortezomib directly affects the expression and function of P-gp. Conclusions Our findings strongly support a role for P-gp in bortezomib resistance and, therefore, suggest that combination of a P-gp inhibitor and bortezomib in P-gp positive myeloma would be a reasonable treatment

  1. Dielectrophoretic Microfluidic Chip Enables Single-Cell Measurements for Multidrug Resistance in Heterogeneous Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Khamenehfar, Avid; Gandhi, Maher K; Chen, Yuchun; Hogge, Donna E; Li, Paul C H

    2016-06-01

    The front-line treatment for adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is anthracycline-based combination chemotherapy. However, treatment outcomes remain suboptimal with relapses frequently observed. Among the mechanisms of treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the ABCB1, ABCC1, and ABCG2 drug-efflux transporters. Although genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity between leukemic blast cells is a well-recognized phenomenon, there remains minimal data on differences in MDR activity at the individual cell level. Specifically, functional assays that can distinguish the variability in MDR activity between individual leukemic blasts are lacking. Here, we outline a new dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip-based assay. This assay permits measurement of drug accumulation in single cells, termed same-single-cell analysis in the accumulation mode (SASCA-A). Initially, the assay was optimized in pretherapy samples from 20 adults with AML whose leukemic blasts had MDR activity against the anthracyline daunorubicin (DNR) tested using multiple MDR inhibitors. Parameters tested were initial drug accumulation, time to achieve signal saturation, fold-increase of DNR accumulation with MDR inhibition, ease of cell trapping, and ease of maintaining the trapped cells stationary. This enabled categorization into leukemic blast cells with MDR activity (MDR(+)) and leukemic blast cells without MDR activity (MDR(-ve)). Leukemic blasts could also be distinguished from benign white blood cells (notably these also lacked MDR activity). MDR(-ve) blasts were observed to be enriched in samples taken from patients who went on to enter complete remission (CR), whereas MDR(+) blasts were frequently observed in patients who failed to achieve CR following front-line chemotherapy. However, pronounced variability in functional MDR activity between leukemic blasts was observed, with MDR(+) cells not infrequently seen in some patients that went on to achieve CR. Next, we tested MDR activity in two

  2. HIV-1 Alters Intestinal Expression of Drug Transporters and Metabolic Enzymes: Implications for Antiretroviral Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Kis, Olena; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Hoque, M Tozammel; Walmsley, Sharon L; Dandekar, Satya; Bendayan, Reina

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the expression of intestinal drug efflux transporters, i.e., P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome P450s (CYPs), in the human upper intestinal tract. Intestinal biopsy specimens were obtained from HIV-negative healthy volunteers, ART-naive HIV-positive (HIV(+)) subjects, and HIV(+) subjects receiving ART (10 in each group). Intestinal tissue expression of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes was examined by microarray, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry analyses. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly lower expression of CYP3A4 and ABCC2/MRP2 in the HIV(+) ART-naive group than in uninfected subjects. qPCR analysis confirmed significantly lower expression of ABCC2/MRP2 in ART-naive subjects than in the control group, while CYP3A4 and ABCG2/BCRP showed a trend toward decreased expression. Protein expression of MRP2 and BCRP was also significantly lower in the HIV(+) naive group than in the control group and was partially restored to baseline levels in HIV(+) subjects receiving ART. In contrast, gene and protein expression of ABCB1/Pgp was significantly increased in HIV(+) subjects on ART relative to HIV(+) ART-naive subjects. These data demonstrate that the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters is significantly altered in therapy-naive HIV(+) subjects and in those receiving ART. Since CYP3A4, Pgp, MRPs, and BCRP metabolize or transport many antiretroviral drugs, their altered expression with HIV infection may negatively impact drug pharmacokinetics in HIV(+) subjects. This has clinical implications when using data from healthy volunteers to guide ART. PMID:26902756

  3. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS. PMID:25750934

  4. Hydroxylated Dimeric Naphthoquinones Increase the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species, Induce Apoptosis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells and Are Not Substrates of the Multidrug Resistance Proteins ABCB1 and ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Rena G.; Carter-Cooper, Brandon A.; Sadowska, Mariola; Choi, Eun Yong; Wonodi, Omasiri; Muvarak, Nidal; Natarajan, Karthika; Pidugu, Lakshmi S.; Jaiswal, Anil; Toth, Eric A.; Rassool, Feyruz V.; Etemadi, Arash; Sausville, Edward A.; Baer, Maria R.; Emadi, Ashkan

    2016-01-01

    Selective targeting of the oxidative state, which is a tightly balanced fundamental cellular property, is an attractive strategy for developing novel anti-leukemic chemotherapeutics with potential applications in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a molecularly heterogeneous disease. Dimeric naphthoquinones (BiQs) with the ability to undergo redox cycling and to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells are a novel class of compounds with unique characteristics that make them excellent candidates to be tested against AML cells. We evaluated the effect of two BiQ analogues and one monomeric naphthoquinone in AML cell lines and primary cells from patients. All compounds possess one halogen and one hydroxyl group on the quinone cores. Dimeric, but not monomeric, naphthoquinones demonstrated significant anti-AML activity in the cell lines and primary cells from patients with favorable therapeutic index compared to normal hematopoietic cells. BiQ-1 effectively inhibited clonogenicity and induced apoptosis as measured by Western blotting and Annexin V staining and mitochondrial membrane depolarization by flow cytometry. BiQ-1 significantly enhances intracellular ROS levels in AML cells and upregulates expression of key anti-oxidant protein, Nrf2. Notably, systemic exposure to BiQ-1 was well tolerated in mice. In conclusion, we propose that BiQ-induced therapeutic augmentation of ROS in AML cells with dysregulation of antioxidants kill leukemic cells while normal cells remain relatively intact. Further studies are warranted to better understand this class of potential chemotherapeutics. PMID:26797621

  5. Expression and significance of glucose transporter-1, P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein and glutathione S-transferase-π in laryngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    MAO, ZHONG-PING; ZHAO, LI-JUN; ZHOU, SHUI-HONG; LIU, MENG-QIN; TAN, WEI-FENG; YAO, HONG-TIAN

    2015-01-01

    Increasing glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) activity is one of the most important ways to increase the cellular influx of glucose. We previously demonstrated that increased GLUT-1 expression was an independent predictor of survival in patients with laryngeal carcinoma. Thus, GLUT-1 may present a novel therapeutic target in laryngeal carcinoma. In this study, the expression of GLUT-1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and glutathione S-transferase-π (GST-π) in laryngeal carcinomas was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Additionally, possible correlations between GLUT-1 and P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π and various clinicopathological parameters were analyzed. In this study, 52.9% (18/34), 58.8% (20/34), 20.6% (7/34) and 58.8% (20/34) of the laryngeal carcinomas were positive for GLUT-1, P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π, respectively. The expression of GLUT-1, P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π was higher in laryngeal carcinoma specimens when compared with laryngeal precancerous lesions (P<0.05). Pearson’s correlation analysis showed correlations between GLUT-1 and P-gp (r=0.364; P=0.034), GLUT-1 and MRP1 (r=0.359; P=0.037) and P-gp and GST-π (r=0.426; P=0.012). GLUT-1 expression was found to significantly correlate with tumor-node-metastasis classification (P=0.02) and clinical stage (P=0.037). Furthermore, P-gp was found to significantly correlate with clinical stage (P=0.026). Univariate analysis showed that MRP1 expression was significantly associated with poor survival (c2=5.16; P=0.023). Multivariate analysis revealed that lymph node metastasis (P=0.009) and MRP1 overexpression (P=0.023) were significant predictors of poor survival. In the present study, the expression of GLUT-1, P-gp, MRP1 and GST-π in laryngeal carcinomas was investigated, as well as the correlations between these proteins. P-gp was found to significantly correlate with clinical stage, while MRP1 overexpression was significantly associated with poor survival. PMID:25621055

  6. The multidrug transporter MATE1 sequesters OCs within an intracellular compartment that has no influence on OC secretion in renal proximal tubules.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guerrero, L J; Evans, K K; Dantzler, W H; Wright, S H

    2016-01-01

    Secretion of organic cations (OCs) across renal proximal tubules (RPTs) involves basolateral OC transporter (OCT)2-mediated uptake from the blood followed by apical multidrug and toxin extruder (MATE)1/2-mediated efflux into the tubule filtrate. Whereas OCT2 supports electrogenic OC uniport, MATE is an OC/H(+) exchanger. As assessed by epifluorescence microscopy, cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that stably expressed human MATE1 accumulated the fluorescent OC N,N,N-trimethyl-2-[methyl(7-nitrobenzo[c][l,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)amino]ethanaminium (NBD-MTMA) in the cytoplasm and in a smaller, punctate compartment; accumulation in human OCT2-expressing cells was largely restricted to the cytoplasm. A second intracellular compartment was also evident in the multicompartmental kinetics of efflux of the prototypic OC [(3)H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP) from MATE1-expressing CHO cells. Punctate accumulation of NBD-MTMA was markedly reduced by coexposure of MATE1-expressing cells with 5 μM bafilomycin (BAF), an inhibitor of V-type H(+)-ATPase, and accumulation of [(3)H]MPP and [(3)H]NBD-MTMA was reduced by >30% by coexposure with 5 μM BAF. BAF had no effect on the initial rate of MATE1-mediated uptake of NBD-MTMA, suggesting that the influence of BAF was a secondary effect involving inhibition of V-type H(+)-ATPase. The accumulation of [(3)H]MPP by isolated single nonperfused rabbit RPTs was also reduced >30% by coexposure to 5 μM BAF, suggesting that the native expression in RPTs of MATE protein within endosomes can increase steady-state OC accumulation. However, the rate of [(3)H]MPP secretion by isolated single perfused rabbit RPTs was not affected by 5 μM BAF, suggesting that vesicles loaded with OCs(+) are not likely to recycle into the apical plasma membrane at a rate sufficient to provide a parallel pathway for OC secretion. PMID:26538438

  7. Involvement of EGFR in the promotion of malignant properties in multidrug resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Wen; Li, Qing-Quan; Tao, Li-Li; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Juan; Chen, Qi; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Xu, Zu-De

    2011-12-01

    Multidrug resistance is the most predominant phenomenon leading to chemotherapy treatment failure in breast cancer patients. Despite many studies having suggested that overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a potent predictor of malignancy in cancers, systematic research of EGFR in multidrug resistant (MDR) breast cancer cells is lacking. In order to clarify the role of EGFR in MDR breast cancer cells, MCF7/Adr expressing relatively higher EGFR, and its parental cell line MCF7 expressing relatively lower EGFR, were chosen for this study. Knockdown of EGFR by siRNA in MCF7/Adr cells showed that EGFR siRNA inhibits cell migration, invasion and proliferation in vitro; converse effects were observed in MCF7 cells transfected with pcDNA3.0-EGFR plasmid. Moreover, we found that EGFR upregulated migration and invasion via EMMPRIN, MMP2 and MMP9 in addition to promoting cell cycle passage via elevation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 in MDR breast cancer cells. Interestingly, MCF7/Adr cells not expressing EGFR showed significant decrease of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and ABCG2 expression levels, and became more sensitive to treatment of adriamycin (ADR) and paclitaxel (Taxol); the above results indicated that MDR of cancer cells is related to S-phase arrest. In conclusion, EGFR is an important factor enhancing the malignancy of MDR breast cancer cells, partially, inducing MDR. Anti-EGFR therapy may improve outcome in chemorefractory breast cancer patients. PMID:21805028

  8. Mycophenolic acid glucuronide is transported by multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and this transport is not inhibited by cyclosporine, tacrolimus or sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag G; Ogasawara, Ken; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh

    2013-03-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of MRP2 to the efflux of mycophenolic acid (MPA), and its phenyl glucuronide (MPAG) and acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG) metabolites, using Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells stably transfected with human MRP2 gene (MDCKII/MRP2 cells). 2. Compared to parental MDCKII cells, MPAG was significantly translocated from basolateral (BL) to apical (AP) side in MDCKII/MRP2 cells, indicating MPAG is a substrate for MRP2. AcMPAG is highly translocated from BL to AP side in both cells, suggesting that AcMPAG is actively secreted possibly through an efflux transporter other than MRP2. Appreciable translocation of MPA was not observed in MDCKII/MRP2 cells. 3. Furthermore, using MRP2-expressing Sf9 membrane vesicles, the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) value for MRP2-mediated MPAG transport was calculated at 224.2 ± 42.7 µM. In the vesicle system, cyclosporine, tacrolimus and sirolimus did not inhibit the uptake of MPAG via MRP2. 4. These findings indicate that only MPAG not MPA and AcMPAG is a substrate for MRP2 and that the interaction between MPAG and concomitantly administered immunosuppressive agents does not occur at MRP2 level. PMID:22934787

  9. Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Large amounts of antibiotics used for human therapy, as well as for farm animals and even for fish in aquaculture, resulted in the selection of pathogenic bacteria resistant to multiple drugs. Multidrug resistance in bacteria may be generated by one of two mechanisms. First, these bacteria may accumulate multiple genes, each coding for resistance to a single drug, within a single cell. This accumulation occurs typically on resistance (R) plasmids. Second, multidrug resistance may also occur by the increased expression of genes that code for multidrug efflux pumps, extruding a wide range of drugs. This review discusses our current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in both types of resistance. PMID:19231985

  10. Evodiamine Suppresses ABCG2 Mediated Drug Resistance by Inhibiting p50/p65 NF-κB Pathway in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sui, Hua; Zhou, Li-Hong; Zhang, Ya-Li; Huang, Jian-Ping; Liu, Xuan; Ji, Qing; Fu, Xiao-Ling; Wen, Hao-Tian; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Deng, Wan-Li; Zhu, Hui-Rong; Li, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Evodiamine (Evo), extracted from the Chinese herbal medicine Evodia rutaecarpa, has cytotoxic effects on different types of human cancer cells. However, its effects on drug resistance and their molecular mechanism and therapeutic target in colorectal cancer are not well understood. In the present study, we observed that Evo inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in adose-and time-dependent manner in HCT-116/L-OHP cells. Moreover, Evo treatment reduced Rhodamine 123 accumulation and ATPase activity in HCT-116/L-OHP cells, indicating that Evo decreased the efflux function in HCT-116/L-OHP cells. Interestingly, phosphorylation of NF-κB pathway, particularly p50/p65, was also inhibited by Evo treatment. Furthermore the effect of Evo in reversing drug resistance and suppressing phosphorylation of NF-κB pathway were attenuated after treatment with the NF-κB activator (LPS). Additionally, Evo inhibited the tumor growth in a colorectal MDR cancer xenograft model and down regulated p-NF-κB level in vivo. Our study provided the first direct evidence that Evo can attenuate multidrug resistance by blocking p-NF-κB signaling pathway in human colorectal cancer. Evo could be a potential candidate for cancer chemotherapy. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1471-1481, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26590365

  11. Interaction of BDE-47 and its Hydroxylated Metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and BCRP: Considerations for Human Exposure and Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including P-glycoprotein (P-gp; also known as MDR1, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; also known as ABCG2), are membrane-bound proteins that mediate the cellular efflux of xenobiotics as an important defense against chemic...

  12. The Nucleotide-Free State of the Multidrug Resistance ABC Transporter LmrA: Sulfhydryl Cross-Linking Supports a Constant Contact, Head-to-Tail Configuration of the Nucleotide-Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    ABC transporters are integral membrane pumps that are responsible for the import or export of a diverse range of molecules across cell membranes. ABC transporters have been implicated in many phenomena of medical importance, including cystic fibrosis and multidrug resistance in humans. The molecular architecture of ABC transporters comprises two transmembrane domains and two ATP-binding cassettes, or nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), which are highly conserved and contain motifs that are crucial to ATP binding and hydrolysis. Despite the improved clarity of recent structural, biophysical, and biochemical data, the seemingly simple process of ATP binding and hydrolysis remains controversial, with a major unresolved issue being whether the NBD protomers separate during the catalytic cycle. Here chemical cross-linking data is presented for the bacterial ABC multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter LmrA. These indicate that in the absence of nucleotide or substrate, the NBDs come into contact to a significant extent, even at 4°C, where ATPase activity is abrogated. The data are clearly not in accord with an inward-closed conformation akin to that observed in a crystal structure of V. cholerae MsbA. Rather, they suggest a head-to-tail configuration ‘sandwich’ dimer similar to that observed in crystal structures of nucleotide-bound ABC NBDs. We argue the data are more readily reconciled with the notion that the NBDs are in proximity while undergoing intra-domain motions, than with an NBD ‘Switch’ mechanism in which the NBD monomers separate in between ATP hydrolysis cycles. PMID:26120849

  13. Interaction of drugs of abuse and maintenance treatments with human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Tournier, Nicolas; Chevillard, Lucie; Megarbane, Bruno; Pirnay, Stéphane; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Declèves, Xavier

    2010-08-01

    Drug interaction with P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) may influence its tissue disposition including blood-brain barrier transport and result in potent drug-drug interactions. The limited data obtained using in-vitro models indicate that methadone, buprenorphine, and cannabinoids may interact with human P-gp; but almost nothing is known about drugs of abuse and BCRP. We used in vitro P-gp and BCRP inhibition flow cytometric assays with hMDR1- and hBCRP-transfected HEK293 cells to test 14 compounds or metabolites frequently involved in addiction, including buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, methadone, ibogaine, cocaine, cocaethylene, amphetamine, N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, nicotine, ketamine, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), naloxone, and morphine. Drugs that in vitro inhibited P-gp or BCRP were tested in hMDR1- and hBCRP-MDCKII bidirectional transport studies. Human P-gp was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by norbuprenorphine>buprenorphine>methadone>ibogaine and THC. Similarly, BCRP was inhibited by buprenorphine>norbuprenorphine>ibogaine and THC. None of the other tested compounds inhibited either transporter, even at high concentration (100 microm). Norbuprenorphine (transport efflux ratio approoximately 11) and methadone (transport efflux ratio approoximately 1.9) transport was P-gp-mediated; however, with no significant stereo-selectivity regarding methadone enantiomers. BCRP did not transport any of the tested compounds. However, the clinical significance of the interaction of norbuprenorphine with P-gp remains to be evaluated. PMID:19887017

  14. BRCA2-deficient sarcomatoid mammary tumors exhibit multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Janneke E; Sol, Wendy; Kersbergen, Ariena; Schlicker, Andreas; Guyader, Charlotte; Xu, Guotai; Wessels, Lodewyk; Borst, Piet; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven

    2015-02-15

    Pan- or multidrug resistance is a central problem in clinical oncology. Here, we use a genetically engineered mouse model of BRCA2-associated hereditary breast cancer to study drug resistance to several types of chemotherapy and PARP inhibition. We found that multidrug resistance was strongly associated with an EMT-like sarcomatoid phenotype and high expression of the Abcb1b gene, which encodes the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein could partly resensitize sarcomatoid tumors to the PARP inhibitor olaparib, docetaxel, and doxorubicin. We propose that multidrug resistance is a multifactorial process and that mouse models are useful to unravel this. PMID:25511378

  15. [Proteins in cancer multidrug resistance].

    PubMed

    Popęda, Marta; Płuciennik, Elżbieta; Bednarek, Andrzej K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug Resistance (MDR) is defined as insensitivity to administered medicines that are structurally unrelated and have different molecular targets. Cancers possess numerous mechanisms of drug resistance, involving various aspects of cell biology. A pivotal role in this phenomenon is played by proteins--enzymatic or structural parts of the cell. Membrane transporters, including the main members of ABC protein family--P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP, as well as LRP, which builds structure of vaults, determine the multidrug-resistant phenotype by decreasing drug concentration within the cell or modifying its distribution to intracellular compartments. The π isoform of protein enzyme--glutathione S-transferase (GSTP-1), is responsible for excessive intensity of detoxification of cytostatics. A common example of altered drug target site that does not respond to chemotherapy is topoisomerase II α (TopoIIa). Alterations of programmed cell death result from expression of metallothionein (MT)--inhibitor of the process, and cytokeratin 18 (CK18), which, if in high concentration, also prevents apoptosis of cells. Several methods of decreasing activity of these proteins have been developed, aiming to overcome MDR in cancer cells. However, for a variety of reasons, their clinical suitability is still very low, leading to continuous increase in death rate among patients. This paper presents current state of knowledge on the most important examples of proteins responsible for MDR of cancer cells and molecular mechanisms of their action. PMID:24864112

  16. Breast cancer resistance protein BCRP (ABCG2)-mediated transepithelial nitrofurantoin secretion and its regulation in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) layers.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jamie A; Haslam, Iain S; Coleman, Tanya; Simmons, Nicholas L

    2011-12-15

    In order to determine the capacity and regulation of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)-mediated transport in intact human intestinal epithelial monolayers (Caco-2) in which multiple ABC transporters are expressed, nitrofurantoin has been used as a selective transported substrate. Nitrofurantoin transepithelial secretion was confirmed in both human BCRP and mouse bcrp-transfected MDCKII epithelia, whereas no net transepithelial secretion was observed in native or human MDR1-MDCKII epithelia. Furthermore, nitrofurantoin transepithelial secretion by BCRP-MDCKII monolayers was inhibited by Ko143 (10 μM), but not verapamil (100 μM). In Caco-2 cells grown upon permeable supports, nitrofurantoin displayed a dose-dependent transepithelial secretion with an apparent Km=69.41 ± 22.3 μM and Vmax=14.03 ± 2.27 nmol/(cm(2).h). Net nitrofurantoin transepithelial secretion by Caco-2 epithelia was inhibited 92% by 10 μM Ko143. Regulation of expression and function of BCRP in Caco-2 epithelial monolayers was determined after 72-h pre-exposure of the monolayers to a number of potential inducing agents. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to correlate induction of BCRP transcript and protein levels with transport activity. 72-h pre-treatment with β-napthoflavone and rosiglitazone up-regulates BCRP mRNA and protein expression and transport of nitrofurantoin. Ko143-sensitive transepithelial secretion of the bi-substrate (MDR1/BCRP) prazosin was also increased in the presence of rosiglitazone. We conclude that nitrofurantoin may be used to unambiguously measure BCRP-mediated fluxes in Caco-2 epithelial layers. Since dynamic regulation of BCRP expression and function is retained, the Caco-2 cell-line is useful as a screen for drug-drug and drug-diet interactions mediated by BCRP. PMID:22004608

  17. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-08-06

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystalmore » structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.« less

  18. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-08-06

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.

  19. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.

  20. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance. PMID:26246409

  1. Analysis of the effect of the bovine adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 single nucleotide polymorphism Y581S on transcellular transport of veterinary drugs using new cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Real, R; González-Lobato, L; Baro, M F; Valbuena, S; de la Fuente, A; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I; Marques, M M; Merino, G

    2011-12-01

    In commercial dairy production, the risk of drug residues and environmental pollutants in milk from ruminants has become an outstanding problem. One of the main determinants of active drug secretion into milk is the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2/breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP). It is located in several organs associated with drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion, and its expression is highly induced during lactation in the mammary gland of ruminants, mice, and humans. As a consequence, potential contamination of milk could expose suckling infants to xenotoxins. In cows, a SNP for this protein affecting quality and quantity of milk production has been described previously (Y581S). In this study, our main purpose was to determine whether this polymorphism has an effect on transcellular transport of veterinary drugs because this could alter substrate pharmacokinetics and milk residues. We stably expressed the wild-type bovine ABCG2 and the Y581S variant in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells (MDCKII) and MEF3.8 cell lines generating cell models in which the functionality of the bovine transporter could be addressed. Functional studies confirmed the greater functional activity in mitoxantrone accumulation assays for the Y581S variant with a greater relative V(MAX) value (P = 0.040) and showed for the first time that the Y581S variant presents greater transcellular transport of the model ABCG2 substrate nitrofurantoin (P = 0.024) and of 3 veterinary antibiotics, the fluoroquinolone agents enrofloxacin (P = 0.035), danofloxacin (P = 0.001), and difloxacin (P = 0.008), identified as new substrates of the bovine ABCG2. In addition, the inhibitory effect of the macrocyclic lactone ivermectin on the activity of wild-type bovine ABCG2 and the Y581S variant was also confirmed, showing a greater inhibitory potency on the wild-type protein at all the concentrations tested (5 μM, P = 0.017; 10 μM, P = 0.001; 25 μM, P = 0.008; and 50 μM, P = 0

  2. A Mutation in the 5′ Untranslated Region Increases Stability of norA mRNA, Encoding a Multidrug Resistance Transporter of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Bénédicte; Truong-Bolduc, Que Chi; Zhang, Xiamei; Hooper, David C.

    2001-01-01

    NorA, a multidrug efflux pump in Staphylococcus aureus, protects the cell from multiple drugs, including quinolones. The flqB mutation (T→G) in the 5′ untranslated region upstream of norA causes norA overexpression of 4.9-fold in cis, as measured in norA::blaZ fusions. The transcriptional initiation site of norA was unchanged in mutant and wild-type strains, but the half-life of norA mRNA was increased 4.8-fold in the flqB mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Computer-generated folding of the first 68 nucleotides of the norA transcript predicts an additional stem-loop and changes in a putative RNase III cleavage site in the flqB mutant. PMID:11244079

  3. Structure–Activity Relationships, Ligand Efficiency, and Lipophilic Efficiency Profiles of Benzophenone-Type Inhibitors of the Multidrug Transporter P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The drug efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been shown to promote multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors as well as to influence ADME properties of drug candidates. Here we synthesized and tested a series of benzophenone derivatives structurally analogous to propafenone-type inhibitors of P-gp. Some of the compounds showed ligand efficiency and lipophilic efficiency (LipE) values in the range of compounds which entered clinical trials as MDR modulators. Interestingly, although lipophilicity plays a dominant role for P-gp inhibitors, all compounds investigated showed LipE values below the threshold for promising drug candidates. Docking studies of selected analogues into a homology model of P-glycoprotein suggest that benzophenones show an interaction pattern similar to that previously identified for propafenone-type inhibitors. PMID:22452412

  4. An H+-Coupled Multidrug Efflux Pump, PmpM, a Member of the MATE Family of Transporters, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    He, Gui-Xin; Kuroda, Teruo; Mima, Takehiko; Morita, Yuji; Mizushima, Tohru; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2004-01-01

    We cloned the gene PA1361 (we designated the gene pmpM), which seemed to encode a multidrug efflux pump belonging to the MATE family, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the PCR method using the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli KAM32 strain as a host. Cells of E. coli possessing the pmpM gene showed elevated resistance to several antimicrobial agents. We observed energy-dependent efflux of ethidium from cells possessing the pmpM gene. We found that PmpM is an H+-drug antiporter, and this finding is the first reported case of an H+-coupled efflux pump in the MATE family. Disruption and reintroduction of the pmpM gene in P. aeruginosa revealed that PmpM is functional and that benzalkonium chloride, fluoroquinolones, ethidium bromide, acriflavine, and tetraphenylphosphonium chloride are substrates for PmpM in this microorganism. PMID:14679249

  5. Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) and Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Gupta, Pranav; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are members of a protein superfamily that are known to translocate various substrates across membranes, including metabolic products, lipids and sterols, and xenobiotic drugs. Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) belong to the subfamily C in the ABC transporter superfamily. MRPs have been implicated in mediating multidrug resistance by actively extruding chemotherapeutic substrates. Moreover, some MRPs are known to be essential in physiological excretory or regulatory pathways. The importance of MRPs in cancer therapy is also implied by their clinical insights. Modulating the function of MRPs to re-sensitize chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy shows great promise in cancer therapy; thus, multiple MRP inhibitors have been developed recently. This review article summarizes the structure, distribution, and physiological as well as pharmacological function of MRP1-MRP9 in cancer chemotherapy. Several novel modulators targeting MRPs in cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:25840885

  6. Benzyl [(11)C]Hippurate as an Agent for Measuring the Activities of Organic Anion Transporter 3 in the Brain and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 in the Heart of Mice.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Okamura, Toshimitsu; Okada, Maki; Ogawa, Masanao; Suzuki, Chie; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Yui, Joji; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Gee, Antony D; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2016-06-23

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) and organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3) mediate the efflux of organic anions from the brain and heart. In this study, we have developed a probe for estimating the activity of these transporters in these tissues using positron emission tomography. Several (11)C-labeled hippuric acid ester derivatives were screened with the expectation that they would be hydrolyzed in situ to form the corresponding (11)C-labeled organic acids in target tissues. Among the compounds screened, benzyl [(11)C]hippurate showed favorable hydrolysis rates and uptake properties in the target tissues of mice. Subsequent evaluation using transporter knockout mice revealed that radioactivity was retained in the brain and heart of Oat3(-/-) and Mrp4(-/-) mice, respectively, compared with that of control mice after the intravenous administration of benzyl [(11)C]hippurate. Benzyl [(11)C]hippurate could therefore be used as a probe for estimating the activities of OAT3 and MRP4 in mouse brain and heart, respectively. PMID:27232368

  7. Efflux Transport Characterization of Resveratrol Glucuronides in UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 Transfected HeLa Cells: Application of a Cellular Pharmacokinetic Model to Decipher the Contribution of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Li, Feng; Quan, Enxi; Dong, Dong; Wu, Baojian

    2016-04-01

    Resveratrol undergoes extensive metabolism to form biologically active glucuronides in humans. However, the transport mechanisms for resveratrol glucuronides are not fully established. Here, we aimed to characterize the efflux transport of resveratrol glucuronides using UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells (HeLa1A1 cells), and to determine the contribution of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 4 to cellular excretion of the glucuronides. Two glucuronide isomers [i.e., resveratrol 3-O-glucuronide (R3G) and resveratrol 4'-O-glucuronide (R4'G)] were excreted into the extracellular compartment after incubation of resveratrol (1-100 μM) with HeLa1A1 cells. The excretion rate was linearly related to the level of intracellular glucuronide, indicating that glucuronide efflux was a nonsaturable process. MK-571 (a dual inhibitor of UGT1A1 and MRPs) significantly decreased the excretion rates of R3G and R4'G while increasing their intracellular levels. Likewise, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated silencing of MRP4 caused a significant reduction in glucuronide excretion but an elevation in glucuronide accumulation. Furthermore, β-glucuronidase expressed in the cells catalyzed the hydrolysis of the glucuronides back to the parent compound. A cellular pharmacokinetic model integrating resveratrol transport/metabolism with glucuronide hydrolysis/excretion was well fitted to the experimental data, allowing derivation of the efflux rate constant values in the absence or presence of shRNA targeting MRP4. It was found that a large percentage of glucuronide excretion (43%-46%) was attributed to MRP4. In conclusion, MRP4 participated in cellular excretion of R3G and R4'G. Integration of mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling with transporter knockdown was a useful method to derive the contribution percentage of an exporter to overall glucuronide excretion. PMID:26758854

  8. Arsenic Triglutathione [As(GS)3] Transport by Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) Is Selectively Modified by Phosphorylation of Tyr920/Ser921 and Glycosylation of Asn19/Asn23.

    PubMed

    Shukalek, Caley B; Swanlund, Diane P; Rousseau, Rodney K; Weigl, Kevin E; Marensi, Vanessa; Cole, Susan P C; Leslie, Elaine M

    2016-08-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is responsible for the cellular export of a chemically diverse array of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. Arsenic, a human carcinogen, is a high-affinity MRP1 substrate as arsenic triglutathione [As(GS)3]. In this study, marked differences in As(GS)3 transport kinetics were observed between MRP1-enriched membrane vesicles prepared from human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK) (Km 3.8 µM and Vmax 307 pmol/mg per minute) and HeLa (Km 0.32 µM and Vmax 42 pmol/mg per minute) cells. Mutant MRP1 lacking N-linked glycosylation [Asn19/23/1006Gln; sugar-free (SF)-MRP1] expressed in either HEK293 or HeLa cells had low Km and Vmax values for As(GS)3, similar to HeLa wild-type (WT) MRP1. When prepared in the presence of phosphatase inhibitors, both WT- and SF-MRP1-enriched membrane vesicles had a high Km value for As(GS)3 (3-6 µM), regardless of the cell line. Kinetic parameters of As(GS)3 for HEK-Asn19/23Gln-MRP1 were similar to those of HeLa/HEK-SF-MRP1 and HeLa-WT-MRP1, whereas those of single glycosylation mutants were like those of HEK-WT-MRP1. Mutation of 19 potential MRP1 phosphorylation sites revealed that HEK-Tyr920Phe/Ser921Ala-MRP1 transported As(GS)3 like HeLa-WT-MRP1, whereas individual HEK-Tyr920Phe- and -Ser921Ala-MRP1 mutants were similar to HEK-WT-MRP1. Together, these results suggest that Asn19/Asn23 glycosylation and Tyr920/Ser921 phosphorylation are responsible for altering the kinetics of MRP1-mediated As(GS)3 transport. The kinetics of As(GS)3 transport by HEK-Asn19/23Gln/Tyr920Glu/Ser921Glu were similar to HEK-WT-MRP1, indicating that the phosphorylation-mimicking substitutions abrogated the influence of Asn19/23Gln glycosylation. Overall, these data suggest that cross-talk between MRP1 glycosylation and phosphorylation occurs and that phosphorylation of Tyr920 and Ser921 can switch MRP1 to a lower-affinity, higher-capacity As(GS)3 transporter, allowing arsenic

  9. Expression of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), but not human canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT), genes correlates with exposure of human lung cancers to platinum drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, T.; Fujiwara, Y.; Isobe, T.; Katoh, O.; Watanabe, H.; Yamakido, M.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the steady-state levels of mRNA for gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and human canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT) in human lung cancer specimens to elucidate their roles in relation to platinum drug resistance in vivo. Seventy-six autopsy samples (38 primary tumours and their corresponding normal lung tissues) obtained from 38 patients were analysed using the quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Both subunits (heavy and light subunits) of gamma-GCS expression levels of normal lung and tumour tissues exposed to platinum drugs during life were significantly higher than those of non-exposed tissues, whereas only the MRP expression levels of tumours were elevated in association with ante-mortem platinum drug exposure. The gamma-GCS and MRP expression levels correlated significantly. The cMOAT expression levels did not correlate with ante-mortem platinum drug exposure. Next, we monitored gamma-GCS heavy subunit expression levels in peripheral mononuclear cells of eight previously untreated lung cancer patients after platinum drug administration, which revealed that these drugs induced gamma-GCS expression in vivo. These results suggest that gamma-GCS expression is induced by platinum drugs in vivo and/or the physiological stress response to xenobiotics. PMID:9569044

  10. Multidrug transporter proteins and cellular factors involved in free and mAb linked calicheamicin-gamma1 (gentuzumab ozogamicin, GO) resistance and in the selection of GO resistant variants of the HL60 AML cell line.

    PubMed

    Cianfriglia, Maurizio; Mallano, Alessandra; Ascione, Alessandro; Dupuis, Maria Luisa

    2010-06-01

    In this study we elucidated the role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multi-drug transporter proteins and cellular factors such as Bcl-2 expression and CD33 down-modulation contributing to free and hP67.6 mAb linked calicheamicin-gamma1 (CalC-gamma1) resistance. We analyzed in a well designed HL60 cell system the relationship between the expression of ABC proteins, Bcl-2 and CD33 modulation with the activity of free and mAb-linked CalC-gamma1. The results herein reported and discussed, strongly suggest that both MDR1-Pgp and MRP1 efflux systems are engaged by CalC-gamma1, but only MDR1-Pgp over-expression efficiently abrogates drug cytotoxicity in MDR cells. Paradoxically, Bcl-2 expression, as observed for other anticancer compounds belonging to the enediyne family of drugs, confers CalC-gamma1 susceptibility rather than resistance in HL60 cells. Further, the isolation of a resistant HL60 subline (HL60AL) that was developed by exposing the parental sensitive cells to sub-effective doses of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) over an extended period of time shows a reduced level of CD33 expression that represents an important escape mechanism of HL60 MDR cells to the cytotoxic effect of GO. PMID:20428776

  11. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter and Multidrug Resistance 1 Genes: Parasite Risk Factors that Affect Treatment Outcomes for P. falciparum Malaria after Artemether-Lumefantrine and Artesunate-Amodiaquine

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B.; Stepniewska, Kasia; Dahal, Prabin; Nsanzabana, Christian; Moriera, Clarissa; Price, Ric N.; Mårtensson, Andreas; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Dorsey, Grant; Sutherland, Colin J.; Guérin, Philippe; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Ménard, Didier; Adam, Ishag; Ademowo, George; Arze, Cesar; Baliraine, Frederick N.; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Björkman, Anders; Borrmann, Steffen; Checchi, Francesco; Desai, Meghna; Dhorda, Mehul; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A.; El-Sayed, Badria B.; Eshetu, Teferi; Eyase, Frederick; Falade, Catherine; Faucher, Jean-François; Fröberg, Gabrielle; Grivoyannis, Anastasia; Hamour, Sally; Houzé, Sandrine; Johnson, Jacob; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Kariuki, Simon; Kiechel, Jean-René; Kironde, Fred; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; LeBras, Jacques; Malmberg, Maja; Mwai, Leah; Ngasala, Billy; Nosten, Francois; Nsobya, Samuel L.; Nzila, Alexis; Oguike, Mary; Otienoburu, Sabina Dahlström; Ogutu, Bernhards; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Piola, Patrice; Rombo, Lars; Schramm, Birgit; Somé, A. Fabrice; Thwing, Julie; Ursing, Johan; Wong, Rina P. M.; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Zongo, Issaka; Plowe, Christopher V.; Sibley, Carol Hopkins

    2014-01-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated with decreased sensitivity to amodiaquine and lumefantrine, but effects of these polymorphisms on therapeutic responses to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) have not been clearly defined. Individual patient data from 31 clinical trials were harmonized and pooled by using standardized methods from the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network. Data for more than 7,000 patients were analyzed to assess relationships between parasite polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1 and clinically relevant outcomes after treatment with AL or ASAQ. Presence of the pfmdr1 gene N86 (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.74, 95% confidence interval = 2.29 – 9.78, P < 0.001) and increased pfmdr1 copy number (adjusted hazards ratio = 6.52, 95% confidence interval = 2.36–17.97, P < 0.001) were significant independent risk factors for recrudescence in patients treated with AL. AL and ASAQ exerted opposing selective effects on single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1. Monitoring selection and responding to emerging signs of drug resistance are critical tools for preserving efficacy of artemisinin combination therapies; determination of the prevalence of at least pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y should now be routine. PMID:25048375

  12. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and multidrug resistance 1 genes: parasite risk factors that affect treatment outcomes for P. falciparum malaria after artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia; Dahal, Prabin; Nsanzabana, Christian; Moriera, Clarissa; Price, Ric N; Mårtensson, Andreas; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Sutherland, Colin J; Guérin, Philippe; Davis, Timothy M E; Ménard, Didier; Adam, Ishag; Ademowo, George; Arze, Cesar; Baliraine, Frederick N; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Björkman, Anders; Borrmann, Steffen; Checchi, Francesco; Desai, Meghna; Dhorda, Mehul; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A; El-Sayed, Badria B; Eshetu, Teferi; Eyase, Frederick; Falade, Catherine; Faucher, Jean-François; Fröberg, Gabrielle; Grivoyannis, Anastasia; Hamour, Sally; Houzé, Sandrine; Johnson, Jacob; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Kariuki, Simon; Kiechel, Jean-René; Kironde, Fred; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; LeBras, Jacques; Malmberg, Maja; Mwai, Leah; Ngasala, Billy; Nosten, Francois; Nsobya, Samuel L; Nzila, Alexis; Oguike, Mary; Otienoburu, Sabina Dahlström; Ogutu, Bernhards; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Piola, Patrice; Rombo, Lars; Schramm, Birgit; Somé, A Fabrice; Thwing, Julie; Ursing, Johan; Wong, Rina P M; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Zongo, Issaka; Plowe, Christopher V; Sibley, Carol Hopkins

    2014-10-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated with decreased sensitivity to amodiaquine and lumefantrine, but effects of these polymorphisms on therapeutic responses to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) have not been clearly defined. Individual patient data from 31 clinical trials were harmonized and pooled by using standardized methods from the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network. Data for more than 7,000 patients were analyzed to assess relationships between parasite polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1 and clinically relevant outcomes after treatment with AL or ASAQ. Presence of the pfmdr1 gene N86 (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.74, 95% confidence interval = 2.29 - 9.78, P < 0.001) and increased pfmdr1 copy number (adjusted hazards ratio = 6.52, 95% confidence interval = 2.36-17.97, P < 0.001 : were significant independent risk factors for recrudescence in patients treated with AL. AL and ASAQ exerted opposing selective effects on single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1. Monitoring selection and responding to emerging signs of drug resistance are critical tools for preserving efficacy of artemisinin combination therapies; determination of the prevalence of at least pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y should now be routine. PMID:25048375

  13. Caught in the act: ATP hydrolysis of an ABC-multidrug transporter followed by real-time magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Ute A; Haase, Winfried; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2008-10-15

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis transports cytotoxic molecules at the expense of ATP. Molecular and kinetic details of LmrA can be assessed by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), if functional reconstitution at a high protein-lipid ratio can be achieved and the kinetic rate constants are small enough. In order to follow ATP hydrolysis directly by 31P-magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we generated such conditions by reconstituting LmrA-dK388, a mutant with slower ATP turnover rate, at a protein-lipid ration of 1:150. By analysing time-resolved 31P spectra, protein activity has been directly assessed. These data demonstrate the general possibility to perform ssNMR studies on a fully active full length ABC transporter and also form the foundation for further kinetic studies on LmrA by NMR. PMID:18817774

  14. Intestinal absorption mechanisms of MTBH, a novel hesperetin derivative, in Caco-2 cells, and potential involvement of monocarboxylate transporter 1 and multidrug resistance protein 2.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenlin; Chen, Ruonan; Qian, Zhengyue; Meng, Xiaoming; Hu, Tingting; Li, Yangyang; Chen, Zhaolin; Huang, Cheng; Hu, Chaojie; Li, Jun

    2015-10-12

    Hesperetin, the aglycone of hesperidin, occurs naturally in citrus fruits. It exerts extensive pharmacological activities. However, hesperetin's poor solubility and low bioavailability limit its wide application. In order to overcome these limitations, recently a series of novel hesperitin derivatives containing Mannich base moieties were synthesized and the anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated, among which MTBH (8-methylene-tert-butylamine-3',5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone) showed a significantly improved water solubility, and promising anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo compared with hesperitin. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the permeability and transport mechanisms of MTBH, using Caco-2 cell monolayer. MTBH was effectively absorbed by Caco-2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner in both directions at 7.5-480 μM. Moreover, MTBH showed pH dependent and TEER values independent transport in both directions. Transport of MTBH was obviously decreased in the presence of sodium azide (an ATP inhibitor) or CCCP (a proton-ionophore). MTBH transport was markedly reduced by MCT inhibitors quercetin or phloretin, and the substrate analogs l-lactate or benzoic acid. We verified MCT1, MCT3, MCT4, MCT5, and MCT6 were expressed in Caco-2 cells by western blot. Silence MCT1 with siRNA resulted in significant inhibition of MTBH uptake. The verapamil, a P-gp inhibitor, and Ko143, a BCRP inhibitor, had no effect on the transport of MTBH. However, MK-571 or probenecid, MRP2 inhibitors, led to an apparently decrease in the efflux of MTBH. In summary, MTBH was absorbed by transcellular passive diffusion and a pH dependent mechanism mediated by MCT1. MRP2 but P-gp or BCRP may be involved in the transport of MTBH. PMID:26231439

  15. Uptake of Compounds That Selectively Kill Multidrug-Resistant Cells: The Copper Transporter SLC31A1 (CTR1) Increases Cellular Accumulation of the Thiosemicarbazone NSC73306

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance in cancer continues to be a challenge in cancer therapy, in part due to overexpression of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1). NSC73306 is a thiosemicarbazone compound that displays greater toxicity against cells expressing functional P-gp than against other cells. Here, we investigate the cellular uptake of NSC73306, and examine its interaction with P-gp and copper transporter 1 (CTR1, SLC31A1). Overexpression of P-gp sensitizes LLC-PK1 cells to NSC73306. Cisplatin (IC50 = 77 μM), cyclosporin A (IC50 = 500 μM), and verapamil (IC50 = 700 μM) inhibited cellular accumulation of [3H]NSC73306. Cellular hypertoxicity of NSC73306 to P-gp-expressing cells was inhibited by cisplatin in a dose-dependent manner. Cells transiently expressing the cisplatin uptake transporter CTR1 (SLC31A1) showed increased [3H]NSC73306 accumulation. In contrast, CTR1 knockdown decreased [3H]NSC73306 accumulation. The presence of NSC73306 reduced CTR1 levels, similar to the negative feedback of CTR1 levels by copper or cisplatin. Surprisingly, although cisplatin is a substrate of CTR1, we found that CTR1 protein was overexpressed in high-level cisplatin-resistant KB-CP20 and BEL7404-CP20 cell lines. We confirmed that the CTR1 protein was functional, as uptake of NSC73306 was increased in KB-CP20 cells compared to their drug-sensitive parental cells, and downregulation of CTR1 in KB-CP20 cells reduced [3H]NSC73306 accumulation. These results suggest that NSC73306 is a transport substrate of CTR1. PMID:24800945

  16. Uptake of compounds that selectively kill multidrug-resistant cells: the copper transporter SLC31A1 (CTR1) increases cellular accumulation of the thiosemicarbazone NSC73306.

    PubMed

    Fung, King Leung; Tepede, Abisola K; Pluchino, Kristen M; Pouliot, Lynn M; Pixley, Jessica N; Hall, Matthew D; Gottesman, Michael M

    2014-08-01

    Acquired drug resistance in cancer continues to be a challenge in cancer therapy, in part due to overexpression of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1). NSC73306 is a thiosemicarbazone compound that displays greater toxicity against cells expressing functional P-gp than against other cells. Here, we investigate the cellular uptake of NSC73306, and examine its interaction with P-gp and copper transporter 1 (CTR1, SLC31A1). Overexpression of P-gp sensitizes LLC-PK1 cells to NSC73306. Cisplatin (IC50 = 77 μM), cyclosporin A (IC50 = 500 μM), and verapamil (IC50 = 700 μM) inhibited cellular accumulation of [(3)H]NSC73306. Cellular hypertoxicity of NSC73306 to P-gp-expressing cells was inhibited by cisplatin in a dose-dependent manner. Cells transiently expressing the cisplatin uptake transporter CTR1 (SLC31A1) showed increased [(3)H]NSC73306 accumulation. In contrast, CTR1 knockdown decreased [(3)H]NSC73306 accumulation. The presence of NSC73306 reduced CTR1 levels, similar to the negative feedback of CTR1 levels by copper or cisplatin. Surprisingly, although cisplatin is a substrate of CTR1, we found that CTR1 protein was overexpressed in high-level cisplatin-resistant KB-CP20 and BEL7404-CP20 cell lines. We confirmed that the CTR1 protein was functional, as uptake of NSC73306 was increased in KB-CP20 cells compared to their drug-sensitive parental cells, and downregulation of CTR1 in KB-CP20 cells reduced [(3)H]NSC73306 accumulation. These results suggest that NSC73306 is a transport substrate of CTR1. PMID:24800945

  17. Yu Ping Feng San reverses cisplatin-induced multi-drug resistance in lung cancer cells via regulating drug transporters and p62/TRAF6 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jian-Shu; Yan, Lu; Bi, Cathy W. C.; Chan, Gallant K. L.; Wu, Qi-Yun; Liu, Yun-Le; Huang, Yun; Yao, Ping; Du, Crystal Y. Q.; Dong, Tina T. X.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Yu Ping Feng San (YPFS), an ancient Chinese herbal decoction composed of Astragali Radix, Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma and Saposhnikoviae Radix, has been used in the clinic for treating immune deficiency. In cancer therapy, YPFS is being combined with chemotherapy drugs to achieve improved efficacy; however, scientific evidence to illustrate this combination effect is lacking. The present study aims to demonstrate the anti-drug resistance of YPFS in cisplatin (DDP)-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549/DDP). The application of YPFS exhibited a synergistic enhancement of DDP-induced cytotoxicity as well as of the apoptotic signalling molecules. DDP-induced expression of the multi-drug-resistance efflux transporters was markedly reduced in the presence of YPFS, resulting in a higher intracellular concentration of DDP. In addition, the application of YPFS increased DDP-induced ROS accumulation and MMP depletion, decreased p62/TRAF6 signalling in DDP-treated A549/DDP cells. The co-treatment of DDP and YPFS in tumour-bearing mice reduced the tumour size robustly (by more than 80%), which was much better than the effect of DDP alone. These results indicate that YPFS can notably improve the DDP-suppressed cancer effect, which may be a consequence of the elevation of intracellular DDP via the drug transporters as well as the down regulation of p62/TRAF6 signalling. PMID:27558312

  18. Yeast ABC proteins involved in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Obłąk, Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance is a complex phenomenon that involves many proteins that together create a network. One of the common mechanisms of multidrug resistance in eukaryotic cells is the active efflux of a broad range of xenobiotics through ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often used as a model to study such activity because of the functional and structural similarities of its ABC transporters to mammalian ones. Numerous ABC transporters are found in humans and some are associated with the resistance of tumors to chemotherapeutics. Efflux pump modulators that change the activity of ABC proteins are the most promising candidate drugs to overcome such resistance. These modulators can be chemically synthesized or isolated from natural sources (e.g., plant alkaloids) and might also be used in the treatment of fungal infections. There are several generations of synthetic modulators that differ in specificity, toxicity and effectiveness, and are often used for other clinical effects. PMID:24297686

  19. Astrocytes drive upregulation of the multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1 (P-Glycoprotein) in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier in mutant superoxide dismutase 1-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; Lichter, Jessica; Sarlo, Mark; Markandaiah, Shashirekha S; McAvoy, Kevin; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Jablonski, Michael R; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2016-08-01

    The efficacy of drugs targeting the CNS is influenced by their limited brain access, which can lead to complete pharmacoresistance. Recently a tissue-specific and selective upregulation of the multidrug efflux transporter ABCB1 or P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the spinal cord of both patients and the mutant SOD1-G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease that prevalently kills motor neurons has been reported. Here, we extended the analysis of P-gp expression in the SOD1-G93A ALS mouse model and found that P-gp upregulation was restricted to endothelial cells of the capillaries, while P-gp expression was not detected in other cells of the spinal cord parenchyma such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons. Using both in vitro human and mouse models of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we found that mutant SOD1 astrocytes were driving P-gp upregulation in endothelial cells. In addition, a significant increase in reactive oxygen species production, Nrf2 and NFκB activation in endothelial cells exposed to mutant SOD1 astrocytes in both human and murine BBB models were observed. Most interestingly, astrocytes expressing FUS-H517Q, a different familial ALS-linked mutated gene, also drove NFκB-dependent upregulation of P-gp. However, the pathway was not dependent on oxidative stress but rather involved TNF-α release. Overall, these findings indicated that nuclear translocation of NFκB was a converging mechanism used by endothelial cells of the BBB to upregulate P-gp expression in mutant SOD1-linked ALS and possibly other forms of familial ALS. GLIA 2016 GLIA 2016;64:1298-1313. PMID:27158936

  20. The skin cancer chemotherapeutic agent ingenol-3-angelate (PEP005) is a substrate for the epidermal multidrug transporter (ABCB1) and targets tumor vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luowei; Shukla, Suneet; Lee, Andrew; Garfield, Susan H.; Maloney, David J.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    2010-01-01

    Ingenol-3-angelate (Ing3A), extracted from Euphorbia peplus, is currently in clinical trials for eradicating basal cell carcinoma (BCC), actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ by topical application. Although structurally related to phorbol esters and a PKC activator, topical Ing3A, but not phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), inhibited the growth of subcutaneous tumors derived from PAM212 (mouse SCC) and B16 (mouse melanoma). Ing3A and PMA both induced acute neutrophilic inflammation on mouse skin, but only Ing3A caused subcutaneous hemorrhage and vascular damage. Both Ing3A and PMA activated Erk1/2 in epidermis, but Ing3A also activated Erk1/2 in skin dermal fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Pretreatment with topical cyclosporin A (CsA), verapamil or XR9576, modulators of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), prevented Ing3A-induced hemorrhage but not neutrophil infiltration. CsA also impaired Ing3A’s anti-cancer activity while the anti-inflammatory dexamethasone did not. Ing3A, but not PMA, blocked photoaffinity labeling of human P-gp with [125I]-Iodoaryazidoprazosin and inhibited P-gp mediated drug resistance to HCT-15 cells. The intracellular levels of Ing3A were significantly lower in P-gp expressing cells and treatment with XR9576 increased the levels to those of cells that do not express P-gp, demonstrating that Ing3A binds to and is transported by P-gp. Taken together, our results suggest that P-gp mediated absorptive transport, dermal penetration and vascular damage contribute to the anti-cancer activity of Ing3A in vivo. PMID:20460505

  1. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  2. IND2, a pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline derivative, circumvents multi-drug resistance and causes apoptosis in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Lee, Crystal; Moore, Joshua; Mittal, Roopali; Suswam, Esther A.; Abbott, Kodye L; Pondugula, Satyanarayana R.; Manne, Upender; Narayanan, Narayanan K.; Trivedi, Piyush; Tiwari, Amit K.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring condensed quinolines have anticancer properties. In efforts to find active analogues, we designed and synthesized eight polycyclic heterocycles with a pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline framework (IND series). The compounds were evaluated for activity against colon (HCT-116 and S1-MI-80), prostate (PC3 and DU-145), breast (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231), ovarian (ov2008 and A2780), and hepatocellular (HepG2) cancer cells and against non-cancerous Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK), mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). IND-2, a 4-chloro-2-methyl pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline, exhibited more than tenfold selectivity and potent cytotoxic activity against colon cancer cells relative to the other cancer and non-cancer cells. With five additional colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT-15, LS-180, LS-174, and LoVo), IND-2 had similar cytotoxicity and selectivity, and submicromolar concentrations caused changes in the morphology of HCT-116 and HCT-15 cells. IND-2 did not activate the transactivating function of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), indicating that it does not induce PXR-regulated ABCB1 or ABCG2 transporters. Indeed, IND-2 was not a substrate of ABCB1 or ABCG2, and it induced cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells overexpressing ABCB1 or ABCG2 to the same extent as in normal HEK293 cells. IND-2 was cytotoxic to resistant colon carcinoma S1-MI-80 cells, approximately three- and fivefold more than SN-38 and topotecan, respectively. In HCT-116 colon cancer cells, IND-2 produced concentration-dependent changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to apoptosis, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused chromosomal DNA fragmentation. These findings suggest that, by increasing apoptosis, IND-2 has potential therapeutic efficacy for colorectal cancer. PMID:25537531

  3. IND-2, a pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline derivative, circumvents multi-drug resistance and causes apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Lee, Crystal; Moore, Joshua; Mittal, Roopali; Suswam, Esther A; Abbott, Kodye L; Pondugula, Satyanarayana R; Manne, Upender; Narayanan, Narayanan K; Trivedi, Piyush; Tiwari, Amit K

    2015-02-01

    Naturally occurring condensed quinolines have anticancer properties. In efforts to find active analogues, we designed and synthesized eight polycyclic heterocycles with a pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline framework (IND series). The compounds were evaluated for activity against colon (HCT-116 and S1-MI-80), prostate (PC3 and DU-145), breast (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231), ovarian (ov2008 and A2780), and hepatocellular (HepG2) cancer cells and against non-cancerous Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK), mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). IND-2, a 4-chloro-2-methyl pyrimido[1″,2″:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline, exhibited more than ten-fold selectivity and potent cytotoxic activity against colon cancer cells relative to the other cancer and non-cancer cells. With five additional colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT-15, LS-180, LS-174, and LoVo), IND-2 had similar cytotoxicity and selectivity, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused changes in the morphology of HCT-116 and HCT-15 cells. IND-2 did not activate the transactivating function of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), indicating that it does not induce PXR-regulated ABCB1 or ABCG2 transporters. Indeed, IND-2 was not a substrate of ABCB1 or ABCG2, and it induced cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells overexpressing ABCB1 or ABCG2 to the same extent as in normal HEK293 cells. IND-2 was cytotoxic to resistant colon carcinoma S1-MI-80 cells, approximately three- and five-fold more than SN-38 and topotecan, respectively. In HCT-116 colon cancer cells, IND-2 produced concentration-dependent changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to apoptosis, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused chromosomal DNA fragmentation. These findings suggest that, by increasing apoptosis, IND-2 has potential therapeutic efficacy for colorectal cancer. PMID:25537531

  4. Recent advances in mammalian haem transport.

    PubMed

    Latunde-Dada, Gladys O; Simpson, Robert J; McKie, Andrew T

    2006-03-01

    Haem is a structural component of numerous cellular proteins and contributes greatly to iron metabolic processes in mammals. Haem-carrier protein 1 (HCP1) has recently been cloned and characterized as a putative transporter in the apical region of the duodenum, and is responsible for uptake of haem into the gut cells. Its expression is regulated pre- and post-translationally in hypoxic and iron-deficient mice, respectively. The identification of HCP1 has revealed the long-sought mechanism by which haem--an important source of dietary iron--is absorbed from the diet by the gut. Feline leukaemic virus receptor (FLCVR) and ABC transporter ABCG2, characterized in haematopoietic cells, have also recently been shown to export haem, particularly under stress. FLVCR protects developing erythroid cells from haem toxicity during the early stages of differentiation, and ABCG2 averts protoporphyrin accumulation (particularly under hypoxic conditions). These haem-efflux proteins are expressed in other cells and tissues including the intestine where they might function as apical haem exporters to prevent toxicity in the enterocytes. PMID:16487711

  5. Alternative Splicing of a Multi-Drug Transporter from Pseudoperonospora cubensis Generates an RXLR Effector Protein That Elicits a Rapid Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Elizabeth A.; Zou, Cheng; Adhikari, Bishwo N.; Hamilton, John P.; Buell, C. Robin; Shiu, Shin-Han; Day, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoperonospora cubensis, an obligate oomycete pathogen, is the causal agent of cucurbit downy mildew, a foliar disease of global economic importance. Similar to other oomycete plant pathogens, Ps. cubensis has a suite of RXLR and RXLR-like effector proteins, which likely function as virulence or avirulence determinants during the course of host infection. Using in silico analyses, we identified 271 candidate effector proteins within the Ps. cubensis genome with variable RXLR motifs. In extending this analysis, we present the functional characterization of one Ps. cubensis effector protein, RXLR protein 1 (PscRXLR1), and its closest Phytophthora infestans ortholog, PITG_17484, a member of the Drug/Metabolite Transporter (DMT) superfamily. To assess if such effector-non-effector pairs are common among oomycete plant pathogens, we examined the relationship(s) among putative ortholog pairs in Ps. cubensis and P. infestans. Of 271 predicted Ps. cubensis effector proteins, only 109 (41%) had a putative ortholog in P. infestans and evolutionary rate analysis of these orthologs shows that they are evolving significantly faster than most other genes. We found that PscRXLR1 was up-regulated during the early stages of infection of plants, and, moreover, that heterologous expression of PscRXLR1 in Nicotiana benthamiana elicits a rapid necrosis. More interestingly, we also demonstrate that PscRXLR1 arises as a product of alternative splicing, making this the first example of an alternative splicing event in plant pathogenic oomycetes transforming a non-effector gene to a functional effector protein. Taken together, these data suggest a role for PscRXLR1 in pathogenicity, and, in total, our data provide a basis for comparative analysis of candidate effector proteins and their non-effector orthologs as a means of understanding function and evolutionary history of pathogen effectors. PMID:22496844

  6. Alternative splicing of a multi-drug transporter from Pseudoperonospora cubensis generates an RXLR effector protein that elicits a rapid cell death.

    PubMed

    Savory, Elizabeth A; Zou, Cheng; Adhikari, Bishwo N; Hamilton, John P; Buell, C Robin; Shiu, Shin-Han; Day, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoperonospora cubensis, an obligate oomycete pathogen, is the causal agent of cucurbit downy mildew, a foliar disease of global economic importance. Similar to other oomycete plant pathogens, Ps. cubensis has a suite of RXLR and RXLR-like effector proteins, which likely function as virulence or avirulence determinants during the course of host infection. Using in silico analyses, we identified 271 candidate effector proteins within the Ps. cubensis genome with variable RXLR motifs. In extending this analysis, we present the functional characterization of one Ps. cubensis effector protein, RXLR protein 1 (PscRXLR1), and its closest Phytophthora infestans ortholog, PITG_17484, a member of the Drug/Metabolite Transporter (DMT) superfamily. To assess if such effector-non-effector pairs are common among oomycete plant pathogens, we examined the relationship(s) among putative ortholog pairs in Ps. cubensis and P. infestans. Of 271 predicted Ps. cubensis effector proteins, only 109 (41%) had a putative ortholog in P. infestans and evolutionary rate analysis of these orthologs shows that they are evolving significantly faster than most other genes. We found that PscRXLR1 was up-regulated during the early stages of infection of plants, and, moreover, that heterologous expression of PscRXLR1 in Nicotiana benthamiana elicits a rapid necrosis. More interestingly, we also demonstrate that PscRXLR1 arises as a product of alternative splicing, making this the first example of an alternative splicing event in plant pathogenic oomycetes transforming a non-effector gene to a functional effector protein. Taken together, these data suggest a role for PscRXLR1 in pathogenicity, and, in total, our data provide a basis for comparative analysis of candidate effector proteins and their non-effector orthologs as a means of understanding function and evolutionary history of pathogen effectors. PMID:22496844

  7. Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Vikas; Sanchaita, Sinha; Singh, NP

    2010-01-01

    Emergence and spread of Acinetobacter species, resistant to most of the available antimicrobial agents, is an area of great concern. It is now being frequently associated with healthcare associated infections. Literature was searched at PUBMED, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library, using the terms ‘Acinetobacter Resistance, multidrug resistant (MDR), Antimicrobial Therapy, Outbreak, Colistin, Tigecycline, AmpC enzymes, and carbapenemases in various combinations. The terms such as MDR, Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR), and Pan Drug Resistant (PDR) have been used in published literature with varied definitions, leading to confusion in the correlation of data from various studies. In this review various mechanisms of resistance in the Acinetobacter species have been discussed. The review also probes upon the current therapeutic options, including combination therapies available to treat infections due to resistant Acinetobacter species in adults as well as children. There is an urgent need to enforce infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship programs to prevent the further spread of these resistant Acinetobacter species and to delay the emergence of increased resistance in the bacteria. PMID:20927292

  8. Redox Regulation of Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Chemotherapy: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The development of multidrug resistance to cancer chemotherapy is a major obstacle to the effective treatment of human malignancies. It has been established that membrane proteins, notably multidrug resistance (MDR), multidrug resistance protein (MRP), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family encoding efflux pumps, play important roles in the development of multidrug resistance. Overexpression of these transporters has been observed frequently in many types of human malignancies and correlated with poor responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Evidence has accumulated showing that redox signals are activated in response to drug treatments that affect the expression and activity of these transporters by multiple mechanisms, including (a) conformational changes in the transporters, (b) regulation of the biosynthesis cofactors required for the transporter's function, (c) regulation of the expression of transporters at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, and (d) amplification of the copy number of genes encoding these transporters. This review describes various specific factors and their relevant signaling pathways that are involved in the regulation. Finally, the roles of redox signaling in the maintenance and evolution of cancer stem cells and their implications in the development of intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy are discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 99–133. PMID:18699730

  9. Multidrug toxicity involving sumatriptan.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Jessica L; Vorce, Shawn P; Levine, Barry; Hughes, Rhome L; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2015-01-01

    A multidrug fatality involving sumatriptan is reported. Sumatriptan is a tryptamine derivative that acts at 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors and is used for the treatment of migraines. The decedent was a 21-year-old white female found dead in bed by her spouse. No signs of physical trauma were observed and a large number of prescription medications were discovered at the scene. Toxicological analysis of the central blood revealed sumatriptan at a concentration of 1.03 mg/L. Following therapeutic dosing guidelines, sumatriptan concentrations do not exceed 0.095 mg/L. Sumatriptan was isolated by solid-phase extraction and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode. A tissue distribution study was completed with the following concentrations measured: 0.61 mg/L in femoral blood, 0.56 mg/L in iliac blood, 5.01 mg/L in urine, 0.51 mg/kg in liver, 3.66 mg/kg in kidney, 0.09 mg/kg in heart, 0.32 mg/kg in spleen, 0.01 mg/kg in brain, 15.99 mg/kg in lung and 78.54 mg/45 mL in the stomach contents. Carisoprodol, meprobamate, fluoxetine, doxylamine, orphenadrine, dextromethorphan and hydroxyzine were also present in the blood at the following concentrations: 3.35, 2.36, 0.63, 0.19, 0.06, 0.55 and 0.16 mg/L. The medical examiner ruled the cause of death as acute mixed drug toxicity and the manner of death as accident. PMID:25324526

  10. NANOPREPARATIONS TO OVERCOME MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Niravkumar R.; Pattni, Bhushan S.; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is the most widely exploited phenomenon by which cancer eludes chemotherapy. Broad variety of factors, ranging from the cellular ones, such as over-expression of efflux transporters, defective apoptotic machineries, and altered molecular targets, to the physiological factors such as higher interstitial fluid pressure, low extracellular pH, and formation of irregular tumor vasculature are responsible for multidrug resistance. A combination of various undesirable factors associated with biological surroundings together with poor solubility and instability of many potential therapeutic small & large molecules within the biological systems and systemic toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents has necessitated the need for nano-preparations to optimize drug delivery. The physiology of solid tumors presents numerous challenges for successful therapy. However, it also offers unique opportunities for the use of nanotechnology. Nanoparticles, up to 400 nm in size, have shown great promise for carrying, protecting and delivering potential therapeutic molecules with diverse physiological properties. In this review, various factors responsible for the MDR and the use of nanotechnology to overcome the MDR, the use of spheroid culture as well as the current technique of producing micro tumor tissues in vitro are discussed in detail. PMID:23973912

  11. Multidrug efflux pumps of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Bryan D; Kaatz, Glenn W

    2016-07-01

    Gram-positive organisms are responsible for some of the most serious of human infections. Resistance to front-line antimicrobial agents can complicate otherwise curative therapy. These organisms possess multiple drug resistance mechanisms, with drug efflux being a significant contributing factor. Efflux proteins belonging to all five transporter families are involved, and frequently can transport multiple structurally unrelated compounds resulting in a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. In addition to clinically relevant antimicrobial agents, MDR efflux proteins can transport environmental biocides and disinfectants which may allow persistence in the healthcare environment and subsequent acquisition by patients or staff. Intensive research on MDR efflux proteins and the regulation of expression of their genes is ongoing, providing some insight into the mechanisms of multidrug recognition and transport. Inhibitors of many of these proteins have been identified, including drugs currently being used for other indications. Structural modifications guided by structure-activity studies have resulted in the identification of potent compounds. However, lack of broad-spectrum pump inhibition combined with potential toxicity has hampered progress. Further work is required to gain a detailed understanding of the multidrug recognition process, followed by application of this knowledge in the design of safer and more highly potent inhibitors. PMID:27449594

  12. ABC Transporters and the Alzheimer's Disease Enigma.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Andrea; Bauer, Björn; Hartz, Anika M S

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is considered the "disease of the twenty-first century." With a 10-fold increase in global incidence over the past 100 years, AD is now reaching epidemic proportions and by all projections, AD patient numbers will continue to rise. Despite intense research efforts, AD remains a mystery and effective therapies are still unavailable. This represents an unmet need resulting in clinical, social, and economic problems. Over the last decade, a new AD research focus has emerged: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. In this article, we provide an overview of the ABC transporters ABCA1, ABCA2, P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), MRP1 (ABCC1), and BCRP (ABCG2), all of which are expressed in the brain and have been implicated in AD. We summarize recent findings on the role of these five transporters in AD, and discuss their potential to serve as therapeutic targets. PMID:22675311

  13. Biochemistry of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Varela, Manuel F.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens that are multi-drug resistant compromise the effectiveness of treatment when they are the causative agents of infectious disease. These multi-drug resistance mechanisms allow bacteria to survive in the presence of clinically useful antimicrobial agents, thus reducing the efficacy of chemotherapy towards infectious disease. Importantly, active multi-drug efflux is a major mechanism for bacterial pathogen drug resistance. Therefore, because of their overwhelming presence in bacterial pathogens, these active multi-drug efflux mechanisms remain a major area of intense study, so that ultimately measures may be discovered to inhibit these active multi-drug efflux pumps. PMID:22605991

  14. Mammalian multidrug-resistance proteins (MRPs).

    PubMed

    Slot, Andrew J; Molinski, Steven V; Cole, Susan P C

    2011-09-01

    Subfamily C of the human ABC (ATP-binding cassette) superfamily contains nine proteins that are often referred to as the MRPs (multidrug-resistance proteins). The 'short' MRP/ABCC transporters (MRP4, MRP5, MRP8 and ABCC12) have a typical ABC structure with four domains comprising two membrane-spanning domains (MSD1 and MSD2) each followed by a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1 and NBD2). The 'long' MRP/ABCCs (MRP1, MRP2, MRP3, ABCC6 and MRP7) have five domains with the extra domain, MSD0, at the N-terminus. The proteins encoded by the ABCC6 and ABCC12 genes are not known to transport drugs and are therefore referred to as ABCC6 and ABCC12 (rather than MRP6 and MRP9) respectively. A large number of molecules are transported across the plasma membrane by the MRPs. Many are organic anions derived from exogenous sources such as conjugated drug metabolites. Others are endogenous metabolites such as the cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandins which have important signalling functions in the cell. Some MRPs share a degree of overlap in substrate specificity (at least in vitro), but differences in transport kinetics are often substantial. In some cases, the in vivo substrates for some MRPs have been discovered aided by studies in gene-knockout mice. However, the molecules that are transported in vivo by others, including MRP5, MRP7, ABCC6 and ABCC12, still remain unknown. Important differences in the tissue distribution of the MRPs and their membrane localization (apical in contrast with basolateral) in polarized cells also exist. Together, these differences are responsible for the unique pharmacological and physiological functions of each of the nine ABCC transporters known as the MRPs. PMID:21967058

  15. Role of multidrug resistance in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diddens, Heyke C.

    1992-06-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy is a well established phenomenon. One of the most common phenotypical changes in acquired or intrinsic multidrug resistance in human tumor cells is the overexpression of the mdrl gene product P-glycoprotein, which acts as an active efflux pump. Increased levels of P-glycoprotein are associated with resistance to a variety of anticancer drugs commonly used in tumor chemotherapy like anthracyclins, vinca- alcaloids, epipodophyllotoxins or actinomycin D. We investigated the efficacy or photodynamic therapy in the treatment of tumor cells expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype. Our data show that multidrug resistant cells are highly cross resistant to the phototoxic stain rhodamine 123 but exhibit only low degrees of cross resistance (2 - 3 -folds) to the photosensitizers Photosan-3, Clorin-2, methylene blue and meso-tetra (4- sulfonatophenyl) porphine (TPPS4). Resistance is associated with a decrease in intracellular accumulation of the photosensitizer. Verapamil, a membrane active compound known to enhance drug sensitivity in multidrug resistant cells by inhibition of P-glycoprotein, also increases phototoxicity in multidrug resistant cells. Our results imply that tumors expressing the multidrug resistance phenotype might fail to respond to photochemotherapy with rhodamine 123. On the other hand, multidrug resistance may not play an important role in photodynamic therapy with Photosan-3, Chlorin-2, methylene blue or TPPS4.

  16. [Multidrug resistance (MDR) in oncology].

    PubMed

    Souvirón Rodríguez, A; Ruiz Gómez, M J; Morales Moreno, J A; Martínez Morillo, M

    1997-03-01

    Multidrug resistance or mdr is a frequent phenomenon for which tumor cells can develop, in only one step, cross-resistance to a different anticancer drugs such as antibiotics, vinca alkaloids and podophylotoxins. This is due to an extrusion of drugs out of the cells, since it is interrelated with the decrease of the intracellular concentration of the drug, compared to sensitive cells. This phenomeno of multidrug resistance (mdr) is considered one of the principal causes of failure in quimiotherapic treatment of cancer, and is associated in many cases to an hyperexpression of mdr-I gene, that codifies for a high molecular weight glycoprotein (p-170) (170-180 Kdaltons), also called p-glycoprotein (pgp). Locadet it in the cellular membrane extracts, like a pump, the quimiotherapic drugs with consumption of ATP. In humans, there are two principal genes that codify for pgp: mdr-I and mdr2/3; being the most important the mdr-I gene. The structure of p-glycoprotein consists in two symmetrical halves anchored in the cellular membrane that includes three extracellular dominances each one, and on intracellular portion with the ATP binding site. Also, has got an for extracellular carbohydrates chain. It is specially important to find drugs that reverse the multidrug resistance. Chemicals such as verapamil, nifedine, quinidine and calmodulin inhibitors are joined to pgp inhibiting it. A Cyclosporine and its non-immunosuppressors derivateds such as SDZ 280-125 and SDZ PSC 833 reverse mdr. At present it is being advancing in clinical trials, but the results are not satisfactory. Most useful chemicals are verapamil, better R-verapamil and A-cyclosporine or its non-immunosuppressors derivates. Futures possibilities are grateful. From diagnostic point of view the mains are: 1. Detection of mdr-I gene. 2. Recognition of the presence of mRNA for pgp. 3. Detection of pgp by flow cytometry or western blot. 4. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies to pgp. 5. Rhodamine 123 to

  17. Using the BacMam Baculovirus System to Study Expression and Function of Recombinant Efflux Drug Transporters in Polarized Epithelial Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Fung, King Leung; Kapoor, Khyati; Pixley, Jessica N.; Talbert, Darrell J.; Kwit, Alexandra D.T.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily includes several membrane-bound proteins that are critical to drug pharmacokinetics and disposition. Pharmacologic evaluation of these proteins in vitro remains a challenge. In this study, human ABC transporters were expressed in polarized epithelial cell monolayers transduced using the BacMam baculovirus gene transfer system. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of BacMam baculovirus to transduce cells grown in monolayers. In a porcine kidney cell line, LLC-PK1 cells, baculoviral transduction is successful only via the apical side of a polarized monolayer. We observed that recombinant ABC transporters were expressed on the cell surface with post-translational modification. Furthermore, sodium butyrate played a critical role in recombinant protein expression, and preincubation in the presence of tunicamycin or thapsigargin enhanced protein expression. Cells overexpressing human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) showed vectorial basolateral-to-apical transport of [3H]-paclitaxel, which could be reversed by the inhibitor tariquidar. Similarly, coexpression of human P-gp and ABCG2 in LLC-PK1 cells resulted in higher transport of mitoxantrone, which is a substrate for both transporters, than in either P-gp– or ABCG2-expressing cells alone. Taken together, our results indicate that a high level of expression of efflux transporters in a polarized cell monolayer is technically feasible with the BacMam baculovirus system PMID:26622052

  18. A new role for a classical gene: white transports cyclic GMP.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jennifer M; Day, Jonathan P; Cabrero, Pablo; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-Anne

    2008-03-01

    Guanosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and adenosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) are important regulators of cell and tissue function. However, cGMP and cAMP transport have received relatively limited attention, especially in model organisms where such studies can be conducted in vivo. The Drosophila Malpighian (renal) tubule transports cGMP and cAMP and utilises these as signalling molecules. We show here via substrate competition and drug inhibition studies that cAMP transport - but not cGMP transport - requires the presence of di- or tri-carboxylates; and that transport of both cyclic nucleotides occurs via ATP binding cassette sub-family G2 (ABCG2), but not via ABC sub-family C (ABCC), transporters. In Drosophila, the white (w) gene is known for the classic eye colour mutation. However, gene expression data show that of all adult tissues, w is most highly expressed in Malpighian tubules. Furthermore, as White is a member of the ABCG2 transporter class, it is a potential candidate for a tubule cGMP transporter. Assay of cGMP transport in w(-) (mutant) tubules shows that w is required for cGMP transport but not cAMP transport. Targeted over-expression of w in w(-) tubule principal cells significantly increases cGMP transport compared with that in w(-) controls. Conversely, treatment of wild-type tubules with cGMP increases w mRNA expression levels, implying that cGMP is a physiologically relevant substrate for White. Immunocytochemical localisation reveals that White is expressed in intracellular vesicles in tubule principal cells, suggesting that White participates in vesicular transepithelial transport of cGMP. PMID:18310115

  19. Co-administration strategy to enhance brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-glycoprotein (P-gp/Abcb1) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) mediated efflux with m-TOR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Mukul; Khurana, Varun; Qin, Bin; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-09-15

    The objectives of this study were (i) to characterize the interaction of vandetanib with P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1) in vitro and in vivo (ii) to study the modulation of P-gp and BCRP mediated efflux of vandetanib with specific transport inhibitors and m-TOR inhibitors, everolimus and temsirolimus. Cellular accumulation and bi-directional transport studies in MDCKII cell monolayers were conducted to delineate the role of efflux transporters on disposition of vandetanib. Brain distribution studies were conducted in male FVB wild-type mice with vandetanib administered intravenously either alone or in the presence of specific inhibitors and m-TOR inhibitors. In vitro studies suggested that vandetanib is a high affinity substrate of Bcrp1 but is not transported by P-gp. Interestingly, in vivo brain distribution studies in FVB wild type mice indicated that vandetanib penetration into the brain is restricted by both Bcrp1 and P-gp mediated active efflux at the blood brain barrier (BBB). Co-administration of elacridar, a dual P-gp/BCRP inhibitor increased the brain to plasma concentration ratio of vandetanib upto 5 fold. Of the two m-TOR pathway inhibitors examined; everolimus showed potent effect on modulating vandetanib brain penetration whereas no significant affect on vandetanib brain uptake was observed following temsirolimus co-administration. This finding could be clinically relevant as everolimus can provide synergistic pharmacological effect in addition to primary role of vandetanib efflux modulation at BBB for the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:22633931

  20. Tripartite assembly of RND multidrug efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Daury, Laetitia; Orange, François; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Verchère, Alice; Monlezun, Laura; Gounou, Céline; Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle; Pos, Klaas M.; Lambert, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Tripartite multidrug efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria are composed of an inner membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and a periplasmic adaptor protein. They are assumed to form ducts inside the periplasm facilitating drug exit across the outer membrane. Here we present the reconstitution of native Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB–OprM and Escherichia coli AcrAB–TolC tripartite Resistance Nodulation and cell Division (RND) efflux systems in a lipid nanodisc system. Single-particle analysis by electron microscopy reveals the inner and outer membrane protein components linked together via the periplasmic adaptor protein. This intrinsic ability of the native components to self-assemble also leads to the formation of a stable interspecies AcrA–MexB–TolC complex suggesting a common mechanism of tripartite assembly. Projection structures of all three complexes emphasize the role of the periplasmic adaptor protein as part of the exit duct with no physical interaction between the inner and outer membrane components. PMID:26867482

  1. Tripartite assembly of RND multidrug efflux pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daury, Laetitia; Orange, François; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Verchère, Alice; Monlezun, Laura; Gounou, Céline; Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle; Pos, Klaas M.; Lambert, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Tripartite multidrug efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria are composed of an inner membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and a periplasmic adaptor protein. They are assumed to form ducts inside the periplasm facilitating drug exit across the outer membrane. Here we present the reconstitution of native Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM and Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC tripartite Resistance Nodulation and cell Division (RND) efflux systems in a lipid nanodisc system. Single-particle analysis by electron microscopy reveals the inner and outer membrane protein components linked together via the periplasmic adaptor protein. This intrinsic ability of the native components to self-assemble also leads to the formation of a stable interspecies AcrA-MexB-TolC complex suggesting a common mechanism of tripartite assembly. Projection structures of all three complexes emphasize the role of the periplasmic adaptor protein as part of the exit duct with no physical interaction between the inner and outer membrane components.

  2. ABCG Transporters Are Required for Suberin and Pollen Wall Extracellular Barriers in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vandana; Molina, Isabel; Ranathunge, Kosala; Castillo, Indira Queralta; Rothstein, Steven J.; Reed, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    Effective regulation of water balance in plants requires localized extracellular barriers that control water and solute movement. We describe a clade of five Arabidopsis thaliana ABCG half-transporters that are required for synthesis of an effective suberin barrier in roots and seed coats (ABCG2, ABCG6, and ABCG20) and for synthesis of an intact pollen wall (ABCG1 and ABCG16). Seed coats of abcg2 abcg6 abcg20 triple mutant plants had increased permeability to tetrazolium red and decreased suberin content. The root system of triple mutant plants was more permeable to water and salts in a zone complementary to that affected by the Casparian strip. Suberin of mutant roots and seed coats had distorted lamellar structure and reduced proportions of aliphatic components. Root wax from the mutant was deficient in alkylhydroxycinnamate esters. These mutant plants also had few lateral roots and precocious secondary growth in primary roots. abcg1 abcg16 double mutants defective in the other two members of the clade had pollen with defects in the nexine layer of the tapetum-derived exine pollen wall and in the pollen-derived intine layer. Mutant pollen collapsed at the time of anther desiccation. These mutants reveal transport requirements for barrier synthesis as well as physiological and developmental consequences of barrier deficiency. PMID:25217507

  3. Revisiting the ABCs of multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Amit K; Sodani, Kamlesh; Dai, Chun-Ling; Ashby, Charles R; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-04-01

    The adenosine tri-phosphate binding cassette (ABC) transporters are one of the largest transmembrane gene families in humans. The ABC transporters are present in a number of tissues, providing protection against xenobiotics and certain endogenous molecules. Unfortunately, their presence produces suboptimal chemotherapeutic outcomes in cancer patient tumor cells. It is well established that they actively efflux antineoplastic agents from cancer cells, producing the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The inadequate response to chemotherapy and subsequent poor prognosis in cancer patients can be in part the result of the clinical overexpression of ABC transporters. In fact, one of the targeted approaches for overcoming MDR in cancer cells is that directed towards blocking or inhibiting ABC transporters. Indeed, for almost three decades, research has been conducted to overcome MDR through pharmacological inhibition of ABC transporters with limited clinical success. Therefore, contemporary strategies to identify or to synthesize selective "resensitizers" of ABC transporters with limited nonspecific toxicity have been undertaken. Innovative approaches en route to understanding specific biochemical role of ABC transporters in MDR and tumorigenesis will prove essential to direct our knowledge towards more effective targeted therapies. This review briefly discusses the current knowledge regarding the clinical involvement of ABC transporters in MDR to antineoplastic drugs and highlights approaches undertaken so far to overcome ABC transporter-mediated MDR in cancer. PMID:21118094

  4. Pharmacotherapy for multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Naveen; Aseri, M. L.; Dixit, Ramakant; Gaur, S.

    2012-01-01

    The current global concern in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is the emergence of resistance to the two most potent drugs namely, isoniazid and rifampicin. Emergence of multidrug resistance tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is now a health problem faced by most of the developing countries as well as developed countries across the globe. MDR-TB is a man-made disease that is caused by improper treatment, inadequate drug supplies, and poor patient supervision. HIV infection and AIDS have been implicated as important cause for this. The review of a published literature suggests that the most powerful predictor of treatment of MDR-TB is a history of treatment of TB. Although the treatment is efficacious, there are also a number of adverse effects caused by drugs used in the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:22629081

  5. Computer simulations suggest direct and stable tip to tip interaction between the outer membrane channel TolC and the isolated docking domain of the multidrug RND efflux transporter AcrB.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas H; Raunest, Martin; Fischer, Nadine; Reith, Dirk; Kandt, Christian

    2016-07-01

    One way by which bacteria achieve antibiotics resistance is preventing drug access to its target molecule for example through an overproduction of multi-drug efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division (RND) protein super family of which AcrAB-TolC in Escherichia coli is a prominent example. Although representing one of the best studied efflux systems, the question of how AcrB and TolC interact is still unclear as the available experimental data suggest that either both proteins interact in a tip to tip manner or do not interact at all but are instead connected by a hexamer of AcrA molecules. Addressing the question of TolC-AcrB interaction, we performed a series of 100 ns - 1 µs-molecular dynamics simulations of membrane-embedded TolC in presence of the isolated AcrB docking domain (AcrB(DD)). In 5/6 simulations we observe direct TolC-AcrB(DD) interaction that is only stable on the simulated time scale when both proteins engage in a tip to tip manner. At the same time we find TolC opening and closing freely on extracellular side while remaining closed at the inner periplasmic bottleneck region, suggesting that either the simulated time is too short or additional components are required to unlock TolC. PMID:27045078

  6. Increased multi-drug resistance and reduced apoptosis in osteosarcoma side population cells are crucial factors for tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANG; TENG, JIA-SONG

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the characteristic features of cancer stem cells (CSCs) using an aggressive human osteosarcoma cell line OS-65. Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion was used to distinguish the cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells from OS-65 cells. Furthermore, the SP cells were characterized via chemoresistance and cell death assays, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence. The present study identified ~3.3% of cancer stem-like SP cells from OS-65 cells whose prevalence is reduced significantly (0.9%) following treatment with verapamil. It was demonstrated that osteosarcoma SP cells are highly efficient at generating additional sarcospheres as transcriptional regulation of stemness genes, including SOX2, OCT-4 and NANOG, is highly upregulated. Notably, these SP cells demonstrated high resistance against chemotherapeutic drugs and apoptosis via elevated transcriptional regulation of several ATPase binding cassette (ABC) transporter and anti-apoptotic proteins, including ABCG2, ABCB1/MDR1 ABCB5, B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2 associated X protein, respectively. The results of the present study suggested that CSCs may be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of tumor relapse. PMID:27347020

  7. [Significance of efflux pumps in multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wiercińska, Olga; Chojecka, Agnieszka; Kanclerski, Krzysztof; Rőhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Jakimiak, Bożenna

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug. resistance of bacteria is a serious problem of modern medicine. This resistance largely is a consequence of abuse and improper use of antibacterial substances, especially antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in hospital settings. Multidrug resistance is caused by a number of interacting mechanisms of resistance. Recent studies have indicated that efflux pumps and systems of efflux pumps are an important determinant of this phenomenon. Contribute to this particular RND efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria, which possess a wide range of substrates such as antibiotics, dyes, detergents, toxins and active substances of disinfectants and antiseptics. These transporters are usually encoded on bacterial chromosomes. Genes encoding efflux pumps' proteins may also be carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Such pumps are usually specific to a small group of substrates, but as an additional mechanism of resistance may contribute to the multidrug resistance. PMID:26084076

  8. Molecular modeling of the human multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1)

    SciTech Connect

    DeGorter, Marianne K.; Conseil, Gwenaelle; Deeley, Roger G.; Campbell, Robert L.; Cole, Susan P.C.

    2008-01-04

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a 190 kDa member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transmembrane transporters that is clinically relevant for its ability to confer multidrug resistance by actively effluxing anticancer drugs. Knowledge of the atomic structure of MRP1 is needed to elucidate its transport mechanism, but only low resolution structural data are currently available. Consequently, comparative modeling has been used to generate models of human MRP1 based on the crystal structure of the ABC transporter Sav1866 from Staphylococcus aureus. In these Sav1866-based models, the arrangement of transmembrane helices differs strikingly from earlier models of MRP1 based on the structure of the bacterial lipid transporter MsbA, both with respect to packing of the twelve helices and their interactions with the nucleotide binding domains. The functional importance of Tyr{sup 324} in transmembrane helix 6 predicted to project into the substrate translocation pathway was investigated.

  9. Transgenic Mice that Express the Human Multidrug-Resistance Gene in Bone Marrow Enable a Rapid Identification of Agents that Reverse Drug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickisch, Gerald H.; Merlino, Glenn T.; Galski, Hanan; Gottesman, Michael M.; Pastan, Ira

    1991-01-01

    The development of preclinical models for the rapid testing of agents that circumvent multidrug resistance in cancer is a high priority of research on drug resistance. A common form of multidrug resistance in human cancer results from expression of the MDR1 gene, which encodes a M_r 170,000 glycoprotein that functions as a plasma membrane energy-dependent multidrug efflux pump. We have engineered transgenic mice that express this multidrug transporter in their bone marrow and demonstrated that these animals are resistant to leukopenia by a panel of anticancer drugs including anthracyclines, vinca alkaloids, etoposide, taxol, and actinomycin D. Differential leukocyte counts indicate that both neutrophils and lymphocytes are protected. Drugs such as cisplatin, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil, which are not handled by the multidrug transporter, produce bone marrow suppression in both normal and transgenic mice. The resistance conferred by the MDR1 gene can be circumvented in a dose-dependent manner by simultaneous administration of agents previously shown to be inhibitors of the multidrug transporter in vitro, including verapamil isomers, quinidine, and quinine. Verapamil and quinine, both at levels suitable for human trials that produced only partial sensitization of the MDR1-transgenic mice, were fully sensitizing when used in combination. We conclude that MDR1-transgenic mice provide a rapid and reliable system to determine the bioactivity of agents that reverse multidrug resistance in animals.

  10. Transgenic mice that express the human multidrug-resistance gene in bone marrow enable a rapid identification of agents that reverse drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Mickisch, G.H.; Merlino, G.T.; Galski, H.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I. )

    1991-01-15

    The development of preclinical models for the rapid testing of agents that circumvent multidrug resistance in cancer is a high priority of research on drug resistance. A common form of multidrug resistance in human cancer results from expression of the MDR1 gene, which encodes a M{sub r} 170,000 glycoprotein that functions as a plasma membrane energy-dependent multidrug efflux pump. The authors have engineered transgenic mice that express this multidrug transporter in their bone marrow and demonstrated that these animals are resistant to leukopenia by a panel of anticancer drugs including anthracyclines, vinca alkaloids, etoposide, taxol, and actinomycin D. Differential leukocyte counts indicate that both neutrophils and lympohcytes are pretected. Drugs such as cisplatin, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil, which are not handled by the multidrug transporter, produce bone marrow suppression in both normal and transgenic mice. The resistance conferred by the MDR1 gene can be circumvented in a dose-dependent manner by simultaneous administration of agents previously shown to be inhibitors of the multidrug transporter in vitro, including verapamil isomers, quinidine, and quinine. They conclude that MDR1-transgenic mice provide a rapid and reliable system to determine the bioactivity of agents that reverse multidrug resistance in animals.

  11. The involvement of sphingolipids in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sietsma, H; Veldman, R J; Kok, J W

    2001-06-01

    Administration of most chemotherapeutic agents eventually results in the onset of apoptosis, despite the agents' variety in structure and molecular targets. Ceramide, the central molecule in cellular glycosphingolipid metabolism, has recently been identified as an important mediator of this process. Indeed, one of the events elicited by application of many cytotoxic drugs is an accumulation of this lipid. Treatment failure in cancer chemotherapy is largely attributable to multidrug resistance, in which tumor cells are typically cross-resistant to multiple chemotherapeutic agents. Different cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have been described. Of these the drug efflux pump activity of P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated proteins are the most extensively studied examples. Recently, an increased cellular capacity for ceramide glycosylation has been recognized as a novel multidrug resistance mechanism. Indeed, virtually all multidrug-resistant cells exhibit a deviating sphingolipid composition, most typically, increased levels of glucosylceramide. On the other hand, several direct molecular interactions between sphingolipids and drug efflux proteins have been described. Therefore, in addition to a role in the multidrug resistance phenotype by which ceramide accumulation and, thus, the onset of apoptosis are prevented, an indirect role for sphingolipids might be envisaged, by which the activity of these efflux proteins is modulated. In this review, we present an overview of the current understanding of the interesting relations that exist between sphingolipid metabolism and multidrug resistance. PMID:11420602

  12. Multidrug-resistance P-glycoprotein (MDR1) secretes platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Raggers, R J; Vogels, I; van Meer, G

    2001-01-01

    The human multidrug-resistance (MDR1) P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter (ABCB1) that is ubiquitously expressed. Often its concentration is high in the plasma membrane of cancer cells, where it causes multidrug resistance by pumping lipophilic drugs out of the cell. In addition, MDR1 Pgp can transport analogues of membrane lipids with shortened acyl chains across the plasma membrane. We studied a role for MDR1 Pgp in transport to the cell surface of the signal-transduction molecule platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF is the natural short-chain phospholipid 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. [(14)C]PAF synthesized intracellularly from exogenous alkylacetylglycerol and [(14)C]choline became accessible to albumin in the extracellular medium of pig kidney epithelial LLC-PK1 cells in the absence of vesicular transport. Its translocation across the apical membrane was greatly stimulated by the expression of MDR1 Pgp, and inhibited by the MDR1 inhibitors PSC833 and cyclosporin A. Basolateral translocation was not stimulated by expression of the basolateral drug transporter MRP1 (ABCC1). It was insensitive to the MRP1 inhibitor indomethacin and to depletion of GSH which is required for MRP1 activity. While efficient transport of PAF across the apical plasma membrane may be physiologically relevant in MDR1-expressing epithelia, PAF secretion in multidrug-resistant tumours may stimulate angiogenesis and thereby tumour growth. PMID:11463358

  13. Deletions of multidrug resistance gene loci in breast cancer leads to the down-regulation of its expression and predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Litviakov, Nikolai V.; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V.; Tsyganov, Matvey M.; Slonimskaya, Elena M.; Ibragimova, Marina K.; Kazantseva, Polina V.; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Choinzonov, Eugeniy L.

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is intensively used for the treatment of primary breast cancer. In our previous studies, we reported that clinical tumor response to NAC is associated with the change of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expression in tumors after chemotherapy. In this study we performed a combined analysis of MDR gene locus deletions in tumor DNA, MDR gene expression and clinical response to NAC in 73 BC patients. Copy number variations (CNVs) in biopsy specimens were tested using high-density microarray platform CytoScanTM HD Array (Affymetrix, USA). 75%–100% persons having deletions of MDR gene loci demonstrated the down-regulation of MDR gene expression. Expression of MDR genes was 2–8 times lower in patients with deletion than in patients having no deletion only in post-NAC tumors samples but not in tumor tissue before chemotherapy. All patients with deletions of ABCB1 ABCB 3 ABCC5 gene loci – 7q21.1, 6p21.32, 3q27 correspondingly, and most patients having deletions in ABCC1 (16p13.1), ABCC2 (10q24), ABCG1 (21q22.3), ABCG2 (4q22.1), responded favorably to NAC. The analysis of all CNVs, including both amplification and deletion showed that the frequency of 13q14.2 deletion was 85% among patients bearing tumor with the deletion at least in one MDR gene locus versus 9% in patients with no deletions. Differences in the frequency of 13q14.2 deletions between the two groups were statistically significant (p = 2.03 ×10−11, Fisher test, Bonferroni-adjusted p = 1.73 × 10−8). In conclusion, our study for the first time demonstrates that deletion MDR gene loci can be used as predictive marker for tumor response to NAC. PMID:26799285

  14. Biomimetic RNA Silencing Nanocomplexes Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cells**

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongliang; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Dingbin; Yan, Xuefeng; Wang, Fu; Niu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an RNA-dependent gene silencing approach controlled by RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Here we represent a synthetic RISC-mimic nanocomplex, which can actively cleave its target RNA in a sequence-specific manner. With high enzymatic stability and efficient self-delivery to target cells, the designed nanocomplex can selectively and potently induce gene silencing without cytokine activation. The nanocomplexes targeting to multidrug resistance are able to not only bypass P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter due to their nano-size effect, but also effectively suppress the Pgp expression, thus resulting in successful restoration of drug sensitivity of OVCAR8/ADR cells to Pgp-transportable cytotoxic agents. This nanocomplex approach has the potential for both functional genomics and cancer therapy. PMID:24446433

  15. Poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated multi-walled carbon nanotubes as an efficient drug carrier for overcoming multidrug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Jinping; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Sun Yaping; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2011-01-15

    The acquisition of multidrug resistance poses a serious problem in chemotherapy, and new types of transporters have been actively sought to overcome it. In the present study, poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated (PEGylated) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared and explored as drug carrier to overcome multidrug resistance. The prepared PEGylated MWCNTs penetrated into mammalian cells without damage plasma membrane, and its accumulation did not affect cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution. More importantly, PEGylated MWCNTs accumulated in the multidrug-resistant cancer cells as efficient as in the sensitive cancer cells. Intracellular translocation of PEGylated MWCNTs was visualized in both multidrug-resistant HepG2-DR cells and sensitive HepG2 cells, as judged by both fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy. PEGylated MWCNTs targeted cancer cells efficiently and multidrug-resistant cells failed to remove the intracellular MWCNTs. However, if used in combination with drugs without conjugation, PEGylated MWCNTs prompted drug efflux in MDR cells by stimulating the ATPase activity of P-glycoprotein. This study suggests that PEGylated MWCNTs can be developed as an efficient drug carrier to conjugate drugs for overcoming multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy.

  16. Effect of curcumin on human colon cancer multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei-Dong; Qin, Yong; Yang, Chuang; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether curcumin reverses the multidrug resistance of human colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: In a vincristine-resistant cell line of human colon cancer, the cell viability of curcumin-treated cells was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Rhodamine123 efflux was evaluated to detect P-glycoprotein transporter activity, and expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1 and survivin genes was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. In addition, xenograft mouse tumors were grown and treated with curcumin. The morphology of the xenografts was investigated by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The in vivo expression of the multidrug resistance gene and P-glycoprotein and survivin genes and proteins was observed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. RESULTS: Curcumin was not obviously toxic to the vincristine-resistant human colon cancer cells at concentrations less than 25 μM, but the growth of cells was significantly inhibited. At concentrations greater than 25 μM, curcumin was toxic in a concentration-dependent manner. The sensitivity of cells to vincristine, cisplatin, fluorouracil, and hydroxycamptothecin was enhanced, intracellular Rhodamine123 accumulation was increased (p<0.05), and the expression of the multidrug resistance gene and P-glycoprotein were significantly suppressed (p<0.05). The combination of curcumin and vincristine significantly inhibited xenograft growth. The expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1 and survivin genes was significantly reduced in xenografts of curcumin-treated mice and mice treated with both curcumin and vincristine relative to control mice. CONCLUSION: Curcumin has strong reversal effects on the multidrug resistance of human colon carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23778405

  17. Interplay of phase II enzymes and transporters in futile cycling: influence of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2-mediated excretion of estradiol 17beta-D-glucuronide and its 3-sulfate metabolite on net sulfation in perfused TR(-) and Wistar rat liver preparations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huadong; Zeng, Ying-Ying; Pang, K Sandy

    2010-05-01

    The hepatic disposition of estradiol 17beta-D-glucuronide (E(2)17G), a substrate of the organic anion-transporting polypeptides Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, and Oatp1b2, was investigated in Wistar and TR(-) [multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp) 2-mutant] rats to elucidate how absence of Mrp2, the major excretory transporter for both E(2)17G and its 3-sulfate metabolite (E(2)3S17G), affected the net sulfation. With absence of Mrp2, lower microsomal desulfation activity and higher Mrp3 but unchanged immunoreactive protein expression of other transporters (Oatps and Mrp4) and estrogen sulfotransferase were found in TR(-) rats. In recirculating, perfused liver preparations, the rapid decay of E(2)17G and sluggish appearance of low levels of E(2)3S17G in perfusate for Wistar livers were replaced by a protracted, biexponential decay of E(2)17G and greater accumulation of E(2)3S17G, whose levels reached plateaus upon the almost complete obliteration of biliary excretion of E(2)17G and E(2)3S17G in the TR(-) liver. Much higher amounts of E(2)17G (28x) and E(2)3S17G (11x) in liver and reduced net sulfation (40 +/- 6 from 77 +/- 6% dose, P < 0.05) were observed at 2 h for the TR(-) versus the Wistar rats. With use of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model, analytical solutions for the areas under the curve for the precursor and metabolite were obtained to reveal how enzyme- and transporter-mediated processes affected the hepatic disposition of the precursor and metabolite in futile cycling. The analytical solutions were useful to explain transporter-enzyme interplay in futile cycling and predicted that a shutdown of Mrp2 function led to decreased net sulfation of E(2)17G by raising the intracellular concentration of the metabolite, E(2)3S17G, which readily refurnished E(2)17G via desulfation. PMID:20124397

  18. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  19. Efflux transport of chrysin and apigenin sulfates in HEK293 cells overexpressing SULT1A3: The role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4).

    PubMed

    Li, Wan; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Xingwang; Wang, Huan; Wu, Baojian

    2015-11-01

    Efflux transport is a critical determinant to the pharmacokinetics of sulfate conjugates. Here we aimed to establish SULT1A3 stably transfected HEK293 cells, and to determine the contributions of BCRP and MRP transporters to excretion of chrysin and apigenin sulfates. The cDNA of SULT1A3 was stably introduced into HEK293 cells using a lentiviral vector, generating a sulfonation active cell line (i.e., SULT293 cells). Identification of sulfate transporters was achieved through chemical inhibition (using chemical inhibitors) and biological inhibition (using short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs)) methods. Sulfated metabolites were rapidly generated and excreted upon incubation of SULT293 cells with chrysin and apigenin. Ko143 (a selective BCRP inhibitor) did not show inhibitory effects on sulfate disposition, whereas the pan-MRP inhibitor MK-571 caused significant reductions (38.5-64.3%, p<0.001) in sulfate excretion and marked elevations (160-243%, p<0.05) in sulfate accumulation. Further, two efflux transporters (BCRP and MRP4) expressed in the cells were knocked-down by shRNA-mediated silencing. Neither sulfate excretion nor sulfate accumulation was altered in BCRP knocked-down cells as compared to scramble cells. By contrast, MRP4 knock-down led to moderate decreases (17.1-20.6%, p<0.05) in sulfate excretion and increases (125-135%, p<0.05) in sulfate accumulation. In conclusion, MRP4 was identified as an exporter for chrysin and apigenin sulfates. The SULT1A3 modified HEK293 cells were an appropriate tool to study SULT1A3-mediated sulfonation and to characterize BCRP/MRP4-mediated sulfate transport. PMID:26291395

  20. Phytoestrogen Suppresses Efflux of the Diagnostic Marker Protoporphyrin IX in Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hirofumi; Nagakawa, Keisuke; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Ogino, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yoichi; Inoue, Keiji; Shuin, Taro; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Utsumi, Kozo; Sasaki, Junzo; Ohuchi, Hideyo

    2016-04-01

    One promising method to visualize cancer cells is based on the detection of the fluorescent photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) synthesized from 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), but this method cannot be used in cancers that exhibit poor PpIX accumulation. PpIX appears to be pumped out of cancer cells by the ABC transporter G2 (ABCG2), which is associated with multidrug resistance. Genistein is a phytoestrogen that appears to competitively inhibit ABCG2 activity. Therefore, we investigated whether genistein can promote PpIX accumulation in human lung carcinoma cells. Here we report that treatment of A549 lung carcinoma cells with genistein or a specific ABCG2 inhibitor promoted ALA-mediated accumulation of PpIX by approximately 2-fold. ABCG2 depletion and overexpression studies further revealed that genistein promoted PpIX accumulation via functional repression of ABCG2. After an extended period of genistein treatment, a significant increase in PpIX accumulation was observed in A549 cells (3.7-fold) and in other cell lines. Systemic preconditioning with genistein in a mouse xenograft model of lung carcinoma resulted in a 1.8-fold increase in accumulated PpIX. Long-term genistein treatment stimulated the expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in PpIX synthesis, such as porphobilinogen deaminase, uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, and protoporphyrinogen oxidase. Accordingly, the rate of PpIX synthesis was also accelerated by genistein pretreatment. Thus, our results suggest that genistein treatment effectively enhances ALA-induced PpIX accumulation by preventing the ABCG2-mediated efflux of PpIX from lung cancer cells and may represent a promising strategy to improve ALA-based diagnostic approaches in a broader set of malignancies. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1837-46. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26837765

  1. Current Advances in Developing Inhibitors of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Hannah Y; Jamshidi, Shirin; Sutton, J Mark; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance represents a significant challenge to future healthcare provision. An acronym ESKAPEE has been derived from the names of the organisms recognised as the major threats although there are a number of other organisms, notably Neisseria gonorrhoeae, that have become equally challenging to treat in the clinic. These pathogens are characterised by the ability to rapidly develop and/or acquire resistance mechanisms in response to exposure to different antimicrobial agents. A key part of the armoury of these pathogens is a series of efflux pumps, which effectively exclude or reduce the intracellular concentration of a large number of antibiotics, making the pathogens significantly more resistant. These efflux pumps are the topic of considerable interest, both from the perspective of basic understanding of efflux pump function, and its role in drug resistance but also as targets for the development of novel adjunct therapies. The necessity to overcome antimicrobial resistance has encouraged investigations into the characterisation of resistance-modifying efflux pump inhibitors to block the mechanisms of drug extrusion, thereby restoring antibacterial susceptibility and returning existing antibiotics into the clinic. A greater understanding of drug recognition and transport by multidrug efflux pumps is needed to develop clinically useful inhibitors, given the breadth of molecules that can be effluxed by these systems. This review discusses different bacterial EPIs originating from both natural source and chemical synthesis and examines the challenges to designing successful EPIs that can be useful against multidrug resistant bacteria. PMID:26947776

  2. ABC transporters and xenobiotic defense systems in early life stages of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kropf, Christian; Segner, Helmut; Fent, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of oviparous fish, in contrast to (ovo) viviparous species, develop in the aquatic environment, and therefore need solute transport systems at their body surfaces for maintaining internal homeostasis and defending against potentially harmful substances. We hypothesized that solute transporters undergo changes in tissue distribution from the embryo to the larval stage. We therefore studied the mRNA profiles of eight ABC transporters (abcb1a, abcb1b, abcc1, abcc2, abcc3, abcc4, abcc5, abcg2) and three solute carriers (oatp1d, putative oatp2 putative, mate1) in different body regions (head, yolk sac epithelium, abdominal viscera, skin/muscles) of developing rainbow trout. Additionally, we investigated mRNA levels of phase I (cyp1a, cyp3a) and phase II (gstp, putative ugt1, putative ugt2) biotransformation enzymes. The study covered the developmental period from the eleuthero-embryo stage to the first-feeding larval stage (1-20days post-hatch, dph). At 1dph, transcripts of abcc2, abcc4, abcg2, cyp3a, gstp, putative mate1, and putative oatp2 occurred primarily in the yolk sac epithelium, whereas at later stages expression of these genes was predominantly observed in the abdominal viscera. The functional activity of ABC transporters in fish early life stages was assessed by rhodamine B accumulation assays. Finally, we investigated the potential impact of xenobiotics (clotrimazole, clofibric acid) on the ABC and biotransformation systems of trout early life stages. While clofibric acid had no effect, clotrimazole lead to an increased rhodamine B accumulation. The results provide evidence that the transition from the eleuthero-embryo to the larval stage is accompanied by a major alteration in tissue expression of ABC transporters. PMID:26945521

  3. Ascites Increases Expression/Function of Multidrug Resistance Proteins in Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lihong; Pospichalova, Vendula; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K; Payne, Sturgis; Wang, Fang; Kennedy, Margaret; Cianciolo, George J; Bryja, Vitezslav; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Bachelder, Robin E

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy resistance is the major reason for the failure of ovarian cancer treatment. One mechanism behind chemo-resistance involves the upregulation of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes (ABC transporters) that effectively transport (efflux) drugs out of the tumor cells. As a common symptom in stage III/IV ovarian cancer patients, ascites is associated with cancer progression. However, whether ascites drives multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer cells awaits elucidation. Here, we demonstrate that when cultured with ascites derived from ovarian cancer-bearing mice, a murine ovarian cancer cell line became less sensitive to paclitaxel, a first line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer patients. Moreover, incubation of murine ovarian cancer cells in vitro with ascites drives efflux function in these cells. Functional studies show ascites-driven efflux is suppressible by specific inhibitors of either of two ABC transporters [Multidrug Related Protein (MRP1); Breast Cancer Related Protein (BCRP)]. To demonstrate relevance of our findings to ovarian cancer patients, we studied relative efflux in human ovarian cancer cells obtained from either patient ascites or from primary tumor. Immortalized cell lines developed from human ascites show increased susceptibility to efflux inhibitors (MRP1, BCRP) compared to a cell line derived from a primary ovarian cancer, suggesting an association between ascites and efflux function in human ovarian cancer. Efflux in ascites-derived human ovarian cancer cells is associated with increased expression of ABC transporters compared to that in primary tumor-derived human ovarian cancer cells. Collectively, our findings identify a novel activity for ascites in promoting ovarian cancer multidrug resistance. PMID:26148191

  4. Nanomedicinal strategies to treat multidrug-resistant tumors: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaowei; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. P-glycoprotein is an important and the best-known membrane transporter involved in MDR. Several strategies have been used to address MDR, especially P-glycoprotein-mediated drug resistance in tumors. However, clinical success has been limited, largely due to issues regarding lack of efficacy and/or safety. Nanoparticles have shown the ability to target tumors based on their unique physical and biological properties. To date, nanoparticles have been investigated primarily to address P-glycoprotein and the observed improved anticancer efficacy suggests that nanomedicinal strategies provide a new opportunity to overcome MDR. This article focuses on nanotechnology-based formulations and current nanomedicine approaches to address MDR in tumors and discusses the proposed mechanisms of action. PMID:20528455

  5. Nanodrug delivery in reversing multidrug resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kapse-Mistry, Sonali; Govender, Thirumala; Srivastava, Rohit; Yergeri, Mayur

    2014-01-01

    Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance (MDR) which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective, and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells, or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses, and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading, or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1α gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-κB. "Theragnostics" combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent, and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome MDR in

  6. Nanodrug delivery in reversing multidrug resistance in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapse-Mistry, Sonali; Govender, Thirumala; Srivastava, Rohit; Yergeri, Mayur

    2014-01-01

    Different mechanisms in cancer cells become resistant to one or more chemotherapeutics is known as multidrug resistance (MDR) which hinders chemotherapy efficacy. Potential factors for MDR includes enhanced drug detoxification, decreased drug uptake, increased intracellular nucleophiles levels, enhanced repair of drug induced DNA damage, overexpression of drug transporter such as P-glycoprotein(P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, MRP2), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Currently nanoassemblies such as polymeric/solid lipid/inorganic/metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, dendrimers, liposomes, micelles has emerged as an innovative, effective, and promising platforms for treatment of drug resistant cancer cells. Nanocarriers have potential to improve drug therapeutic index, ability for multifunctionality, divert ABC-transporter mediated drug efflux mechanism and selective targeting to tumor cells, cancer stem cells, tumor initiating cells, or cancer microenvironment. Selective nanocarrier targeting to tumor overcomes dose-limiting side effects, lack of selectivity, tissue toxicity, limited drug access to tumor tissues, high drug doses, and emergence of multiple drug resistance with conventional or combination chemotherapy. Current review highlights various nanodrug delivery systems to overcome mechanism of MDR by neutralizing, evading, or exploiting the drug efflux pumps and those independent of drug efflux pump mechanism by silencing Bcl-2 and HIF1α gene expressions by siRNA and miRNA, modulating ceramide levels and targeting NF-κB. “Theragnostics” combining a cytotoxic agent, targeting moiety, chemosensitizing agent, and diagnostic imaging aid are highlighted as effective and innovative systems for tumor localization and overcoming MDR. Physical approaches such as combination of drug with thermal/ultrasound/photodynamic therapies to overcome MDR are focused. The review focuses on newer drug delivery systems developed to overcome

  7. Membrane transport of antineoplastic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, I.D. )

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Methods for Quantifying the Transport of Drugs Across Brain Barrier Systems; Liposomes as Drug Carriers in Cancer Chemotherapy; Genetic and Bioochemical Characterization of Multidrug Resistance; Membrane Transport of Anthracyclines; and The Cellular Pharmacology of Methotrexate.

  8. Inhibition of tumor cells multidrug resistance by cucumarioside A2-2, frondoside A and their complexes with cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Menchinskaya, Ekaterina S; Aminin, Dmitry L; Avilov, Sergey A; Silchenko, Aleksandra S; Andryjashchenko, Pelageya V; Kalinin, Vladimir I; Stonik, Valentin A

    2013-10-01

    In non-cytotoxic concentrations, frondoside A (1) from the sea cucumber Cucumaria okhotensis and cucumarioside A2-2 (2) from C. japonica, as well as their complexes with cholesterol block the activity of membrane transport P-glycoprotein in cells of the ascite form of mouse Ehrlich carcinoma. They prevent in this way an efflux of fluorescent probe Calcein from the cells. Since the blocking of P-glycoprotein activity results in decrease of multidrug resistance, these glycosides and their complexes with cholesterol may be considered as potential inhibitors of multidrug resistance of tumor cells. PMID:24354179

  9. Lack of Influence of Substrate on Ligand Interaction with the Human Multidrug and Toxin Extruder, MATE1.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guerrero, Lucy J; Morales, Mark; Ekins, Sean; Wright, Stephen H

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug and toxin extruder (MATE) 1 plays a central role in mediating renal secretion of organic cations, a structurally diverse collection of compounds that includes ∼40% of prescribed drugs. Because inhibition of transport activity of other multidrug transporters, including the organic cation transporter (OCT) 2, is influenced by the structure of the transported substrate, the present study screened over 400 drugs as inhibitors of the MATE1-mediated transport of four structurally distinct organic cation substrates: the commonly used drugs: 1) metformin and 2) cimetidine; and two prototypic cationic substrates, 3) 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP), and 4) the novel fluorescent probe, N,N,N-trimethyl-2-[methyl(7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)amino]ethanaminium iodide. Transport was measured in Chinese hamster ovary cells that stably expressed the human ortholog of MATE1. Comparison of the resulting inhibition profiles revealed no systematic influence of substrate structure on inhibitory efficacy. Similarly, IC50 values for 26 structurally diverse compounds revealed no significant influence of substrate structure on the kinetic interaction of inhibitor with MATE1. The IC50 data were used to generate three-dimensional quantitative pharmacophores that identified hydrophobic regions, H-bond acceptor sites, and an ionizable (cationic) feature as key determinants for ligand binding to MATE1. In summary, in contrast to the behavior observed with some other multidrug transporters, including OCT2, the results suggest that substrate identity exerts comparatively little influence on ligand interaction with MATE1. PMID:27418674

  10. Intracellular targeted co-delivery of shMDR1 and gefitinib with chitosan nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiwei; Yang, Guang; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Liu, Ming; Feng, Bo; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, multidrug resistance and side effects of drugs limit the effectiveness of chemotherapies in clinics. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (MDR1), as a member of the ATP-binding cassette family, acts on transporting drugs into cell plasma across the membrane of cancer cells and leads to the occurrence of multidrug resistance, thus resulting in the failure of chemotherapy in cancer. The main aims of this research were to design a nanodelivery system for accomplishing the effective co-delivery of gene and antitumor drug and overcoming multidrug resistance effect. In this study, shMDR1 and gefitinib-encapsulating chitosan nanoparticles with sustained release, small particle size, and high encapsulation efficiency were prepared. The serum stability, protection from nuclease, and transfection efficiency of gene in vitro were investigated. The effects of co-delivery of shMDR1 and gefitinib in nanoparticles on reversing multidrug resistance were also evaluated by investigating the cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanism, and cell apoptosis on established gefitinib-resistant cells. The results demonstrated that chitosan nanoparticles entrapping gefitinib and shMDR1 had the potential to overcome the multidrug resistance and improve cancer treatment efficacy, especially toward resistant cells. PMID:26648717

  11. In silico identified targeted inhibitors of P-glycoprotein overcome multidrug resistance in human cancer cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Follit, Courtney A; Brewer, Frances K; Wise, John G; Vogel, Pia D

    2015-01-01

    Failure of cancer chemotherapies is often linked to the over expression of ABC efflux transporters like the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp expression in cells leads to the elimination of a variety of chemically unrelated, mostly cytotoxic compounds. Administration of chemotherapeutics during therapy frequently selects for cells that over express P-gp and are therefore capable of robustly exporting diverse compounds, including chemotherapeutics, from the cells. P-gp thus confers multidrug resistance to a majority of drugs currently available for the treatment of cancers and diseases like HIV/AIDS. The search for P-gp inhibitors for use as co-therapeutics to combat multidrug resistances has had little success to date. In a previous study (Brewer et al., Mol Pharmacol 86: 716–726, 2014), we described how ultrahigh throughput computational searches led to the identification of four drug-like molecules that specifically interfere with the energy harvesting steps of substrate transport and inhibit P-gp catalyzed ATP hydrolysis in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that three of these compounds reversed P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance of cultured prostate cancer cells to restore sensitivity comparable to naïve prostate cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic drug, paclitaxel. Potentiation concentrations of the inhibitors were <3 μmol/L. The inhibitors did not exhibit significant toxicity to noncancerous cells at concentrations where they reversed multidrug resistance in cancerous cells. Our results indicate that these compounds with novel mechanisms of P-gp inhibition are excellent leads for the development of co-therapeutics for the treatment of multidrug resistances. PMID:26516582

  12. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins: Export pumps for conjugates with glutathione, glucuronate or sulfate.

    PubMed

    Homolya, László; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2003-01-01

    Many endogenous or xenobiotic lipophilic substances are eliminated from the cells by the sequence of oxidation, conjugation to an anionic group (glutathione, glucuronate or sulfate) and transport across the plasma membrane into the extracellular space. The latter step is mediated by integral membrane glycoproteins belonging to the superfamily of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters. A subfamily, referred as ABCC, includes the famous/infamous cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), the sulfonylurea receptors (SUR 1 and 2), and the multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs). The name of the MRPs refers to their potential role in clinical multidrug resistance, a phenomenon that hinders the effective chemotherapy of tumors. The MRPs that have been functionally characterized so far share the property of ATP-dependent export pumps for conjugates with glutathione (GSH), glucuronate or sulfate. MRP1 and MRP2 are also mediating the cotransport of unconjugated amphiphilic compounds together with free GSH. MRP3 preferentially transports glucuronides but not glutathione S-conjugates or free GSH. MRP1 and MRP2 also contribute to the control of the intracellular glutathione disulfide (GSSG) level. Although these proteins are low affinity GSSG transporters, they can play essential role in response to oxidative stress when the activity of GSSG reductase becomes rate limiting. The human MRP4, MRP5 and MRP6 have only partially been characterized. However, it has been revealed that MRP4 can function as an efflux pump for cyclic nucleotides and nucleoside analogues, used as anti-HIV drugs. MRP5 also transports GSH conjugates, nucleoside analogues, and possibly heavy metal complexes. Transport of glutathione S-conjugates mediated by MRP6, the mutation of which causes pseudoxantoma elasticum, has recently been shown. In summary, numerous members of the multidrug resistance-associated protein family serve as export pumps that prevent the accumulation of anionic conjugates

  13. Assessment of multidrug resistance on cell coculture patterns using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Sabine; Polcari, David; Geissler, Matthias; Brassard, Daniel; Mauzeroll, Janine

    2013-06-01

    The emergence of resistance to multiple unrelated chemotherapeutic drugs impedes the treatment of several cancers. Although the involvement of ATP-binding cassette transporters has long been known, there is no in situ method capable of tracking this transporter-related resistance at the single-cell level without interfering with the cell's environment or metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can quantitatively and noninvasively track multidrug resistance-related protein 1-dependent multidrug resistance in patterned adenocarcinoma cervical cancer cells. Nonresistant human cancer cells and their multidrug resistant variants are arranged in a side-by-side format using a stencil-based patterning scheme, allowing for precise positioning of target cells underneath the SECM sensor. SECM measurements of the patterned cells, performed with ferrocenemethanol and [Ru(NH3)6](3+) serving as electrochemical indicators, are used to establish a kinetic "map" of constant-height SECM scans, free of topography contributions. The concept underlying the work described herein may help evaluate the effectiveness of treatment administration strategies targeting reduced drug efflux. PMID:23686580

  14. Assessment of multidrug resistance on cell coculture patterns using scanning electrochemical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuss, Sabine; Polcari, David; Geissler, Matthias; Brassard, Daniel; Mauzeroll, Janine

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to multiple unrelated chemotherapeutic drugs impedes the treatment of several cancers. Although the involvement of ATP-binding cassette transporters has long been known, there is no in situ method capable of tracking this transporter-related resistance at the single-cell level without interfering with the cell’s environment or metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) can quantitatively and noninvasively track multidrug resistance-related protein 1–dependent multidrug resistance in patterned adenocarcinoma cervical cancer cells. Nonresistant human cancer cells and their multidrug resistant variants are arranged in a side-by-side format using a stencil-based patterning scheme, allowing for precise positioning of target cells underneath the SECM sensor. SECM measurements of the patterned cells, performed with ferrocenemethanol and [Ru(NH3)6]3+ serving as electrochemical indicators, are used to establish a kinetic “map” of constant-height SECM scans, free of topography contributions. The concept underlying the work described herein may help evaluate the effectiveness of treatment administration strategies targeting reduced drug efflux. PMID:23686580

  15. Facing multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Giovanni; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-06-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to at least two of the most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs (i.e., isoniazid and rifampicin). Therapeutic regimens based on second- and third-line anti-tuberculosis medicines showed poor efficacy, safety, and tolerability profiles. It was estimated that in 2012 the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis incidence ranged from 300,000 to 600,000 cases, mainly diagnosed in the Eastern European and Central Asian countries. The highest proportion of cases is among individuals previously exposed to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Three main conditions can favour the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis: the poor implementation of the DOTS strategy, the shortage or the poor quality of the anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the poor therapeutic adherence of the patients to the prescribed regimens. Consultation with tuberculosis experts (e.g., consilium) is crucial to tailor the best anti-tuberculosis therapy. New therapeutic options are necessary: bedaquiline and delamanid seem promising drugs; in particular, during the development phase they demonstrated a protective effect against the emergence of further resistances towards the backbone drugs. In the recent past, other antibiotics have been administered off-label: the most relevant efficacy, safety, and tolerability profile was proved in linezolid-, meropenem/clavulanate-, cotrimoxazole-containing regimens. New research and development activities are needed in the diagnostic, therapeutic, preventive fields. PMID:24792579

  16. Trps1 is associated with the multidrug resistance of osteosarcoma by regulating MDR1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ming; Hu, Jing; Li, Weiwei; Su, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhou, Gengyin

    2014-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a significant clinical problem in the chemotherapy of osteosarcoma and has been linked to the cellular expression of several multidrug-efflux transporters such as MDR1/P-gp. Our inhibition of the transcription factor Trps1 led to repression of MDR1/P-gp while its overexpression resulted in upregulation of MDR1/P-gp. Flow cytometric analysis suggested Trps1 increased the release of several anti-cancer drugs, thus decreasing their accumulation. Immunohistochemical analysis of clinical samples indicated that the expression of Trps1 directly correlated with MDR1/P-gp. Trps1 inhibited TGFbeta-1 and directly bound to the MDR1 promoter. Our data demonstrate a role for Trps1 in the regulation of MDR1 expression in osteosarcoma. PMID:24491996

  17. Role of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters in the Placental Transport of Lamivudine.

    PubMed

    Ceckova, Martina; Reznicek, Josef; Ptackova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Müller, Fabian; Kacerovsky, Marian; Fromm, Martin F; Glazier, Jocelyn D; Staud, Frantisek

    2016-09-01

    Lamivudine is one of the antiretroviral drugs of choice for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) in HIV-positive women. In this study, we investigated the relevance of drug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (MDR1 [ABCB1]), BCRP (ABCG2), MRP2 (ABCC2), and MATE1 (SLC47A1) for the transmembrane transport and transplacental transfer of lamivudine. We employed in vitro accumulation and transport experiments on MDCK cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters, in situ-perfused rat term placenta, and vesicular uptake in microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles isolated from human term placenta. MATE1 significantly accelerated lamivudine transport in MATE1-expressing MDCK cells, whereas no transporter-driven efflux of lamivudine was observed in MDCK-MDR1, MDCK-MRP2, and MDCK-BCRP monolayers. MATE1-mediated efflux of lamivudine appeared to be a low-affinity process (apparent Km of 4.21 mM and Vmax of 5.18 nmol/mg protein/min in MDCK-MATE1 cells). Consistent with in vitro transport studies, the transplacental clearance of lamivudine was not affected by P-gp, BCRP, or MRP2. However, lamivudine transfer across dually perfused rat placenta and the uptake of lamivudine into human placental MVM vesicles revealed pH dependency, indicating possible involvement of MATE1 in the fetal-to-maternal efflux of the drug. To conclude, placental transport of lamivudine does not seem to be affected by P-gp, MRP2, or BCRP, but a pH-dependent mechanism mediates transport of lamivudine in the fetal-to-maternal direction. We suggest that MATE1 might be, at least partly, responsible for this transport. PMID:27401571

  18. Immunohistochemical analysis of transporters related to clearance of amyloid-β peptides through blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in human brain.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Chiba, Yoichi; Fujihara, Ryuji; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Haruhiko; Ueno, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    A large number of previous reports have focused on the transport of amyloid-β peptides through cerebral endothelial cells via the blood-brain barrier, while fewer reports have mentioned the transport through the choroid plexus epithelium via the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Concrete roles of these two pathways remain to be clarified. In this study, we immunohistochemically examined the expression of transporters/receptors that are supposed to be related to the clearance of amyloid-β peptides in the choroid plexus epithelium, the ventricular ependymal cells and the brain microvessels, using seven autopsied human brains. In the choroid plexus epithelium, immunoreactivity for low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1), LRP2, formylpeptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-A1 (ABCA1), ABCC1 and ABCG4 was seen in 7 of 7 brains, while that for ABCB1, ABCG2, RAGE and CD36 was seen in 0-2 brains. In the ventricular ependymal cells, immunoreactivity for CD36, LDLR, LRP1, LRP2, FPRL1, ABCA1, ABCC1 and ABCG4 was seen in 6-7 brains, while that for ABCB1, ABCG2 and RAGE was seen in 0-1 brain. Immunoreactivity for insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was seen in three and four brains in the choroid plexus epithelium and the ventricular ependymal cells, respectively. In addition, immunoreactivity for LDLR, ABCB1 and ABCG2 was seen in over 40 % of the microvessels (all seven brains), and that for FPRL1, ABCA1, ABCC1 and RAGE was seen in over 5 % of the microvessels (4-6 brains), while that for CD36, IDE, LRP1, LRP2 and ABCG4 was seen in less than 5 % of the microvessels (0-2 brains). These findings may suggest that these multiple transporters/receptors and IDE expressed on the choroid plexus epithelium, ventricular ependymal cells and brain microvessels complementarily or cooperatively contribute to the clearance of amyloid-β peptides from the brain. PMID:26449856

  19. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds. PMID:27399665

  20. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-)), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2 (-∕-)), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b (-∕-) Abcg2 (-∕-)) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders. PMID:27257556

  1. ABC transporters P-gp and Bcrp do not limit the brain uptake of the novel antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drug cannabidiol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brzozowska, Natalia; Li, Kong M.; Wang, Xiao Suo; Booth, Jessica; Stuart, Jordyn; McGregor, Iain S.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of CNS disorders like schizophrenia and epilepsy. ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) mediate pharmacoresistance in these disorders. P-gp and Bcrp are expressed at the blood brain barrier (BBB) and reduce the brain uptake of substrate drugs including various antipsychotics and anticonvulsants. It is therefore important to assess whether CBD is prone to treatment resistance mediated by P-gp and Bcrp. Moreover, it has become common practice in the drug development of CNS agents to screen against ABC transporters to help isolate lead compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties. The current study aimed to assess whether P-gp and Bcrp impacts the brain transport of CBD by comparing CBD tissue concentrations in wild-type (WT) mice versus mice devoid of ABC transporter genes. P-gp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−), Bcrp knockout (Abcg2−∕−), combined P-gp/Bcrp knockout (Abcb1a/b−∕−Abcg2−∕−) and WT mice were injected with CBD, before brain and plasma samples were collected at various time-points. CBD results were compared with the positive control risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone, antipsychotic drugs that are established ABC transporter substrates. Brain and plasma concentrations of CBD were not greater in P-gp, Bcrp or P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice than WT mice. In comparison, the brain/plasma concentration ratios of risperidone and 9-hydroxy risperidone were profoundly higher in P-gp knockout mice than WT mice. These results suggest that CBD is not a substrate of P-gp or Bcrp and may be free from the complication of reduced brain uptake by these transporters. Such findings provide favorable evidence for the therapeutic development of CBD in the treatment of various CNS disorders. PMID:27257556

  2. Hoechst 33342 Is a Hidden “Janus” amongst Substrates for the Multidrug Efflux Pump LmrP

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, Arthur; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug transporters mediate the active extrusion of antibiotics and toxic ions from the cell. This reaction is thought to be based on a switch of the transporter between two conformational states, one in which the interior substrate binding cavity is available for substrate binding at the inside of the cell, and another in which the cavity is exposed to the outside of the cell to enable substrate release. Consistent with this model, cysteine cross-linking studies with the Major Facilitator Superfamily drug/proton antiporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis demonstrated binding of transported benzalkonium to LmrP in its inward-facing state. The fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342 is a substrate for many multidrug transporters and is extruded by efflux pumps in microbial and mammalian cells. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other multidrug transporters, LmrP was found to actively accumulate, rather than extrude, Hoechst 33342 in lacto