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Sample records for abdelsalam sumi helal

  1. Sumi-e: A Way of the Brush.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platten, Marvin R.

    1983-01-01

    Describes how the Japanese style of ink painting called sumi-e can be taught to middle school students. After preparation of materials and demonstration of sumi-e by the teacher, students are ready to paint bamboo. In spite of the formalized method of learning stroke order, they often create highly original compositions. (CS)

  2. Polarization Measurements on SUMI's TVLS Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, K.; West, E. A.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of toroidal variable-line-space (TVLS) gratings for the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI), currently being developed at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC). SUMI is a spectro-polarimeter designed to measure magnetic fields in the solar chromosphere by observing two UV emission lines sensitive to magnetic fields, the CIY line at 155nm and the MgII line at 280nm. The instrument uses a pair of TVLS gratings, to observe both linear polarizations simultaneously. Efficiency measurements were done on bare aluminum gratings and aluminum/MgF2 coated gratings, at both linear polarizations.

  3. SUMI - The Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. G.; West, E. A.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Noble, M. W.; Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Uitenbroek, H.

    2003-01-01

    Solar physics has been successful in characterizing the full vector magnetic field in the photosphere, where the ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure (Beta) is >1. However, at higher levels in the atmosphere, where Beta <<1 and flares and CMEs are believed to be triggered, observations are difficult, severely limiting the understanding of these processes. In response to this situation, we are developing SUMI (the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation) a unique instrument designed to measure the circular and linear polarization of upper chromospheric Mg II lines (280 nm) and circular polarization of transition region C IV lines (155 nm). To date the telescope mirrors have been built, tested and coated with dielectric stacks designed to reflect only the wavelengths of interest. We have also developed a unique UV polarimeter and completed the design of a high-resolution spectrograph that uses dual toroidal varied- line-space (TVLS) gratings. Incorporating measurements of those components developed so far, the revised estimate of the system throughput exceeds our original estimate by more than an order of magnitude. A sounding rocket flight is anticipated in 2006. Our objectives and progress are detailed in this presentation.

  4. Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) Component Responses to Payload Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration testing of SUMI was performed at both the experiment and payload levels. No accelerometers were installed inside the experiment during testing, but it is certain that component responses were very high. The environments experienced by optical and electronic components in these tests is an area of ongoing concern. The analysis supporting this presentation included a detailed finite element model of the SUMI experiment section, the dynamic response of which, correlated well with accelerometer measurements from the testing of the experimental section at Marshall Space Flight Center. The relatively short timeframe available to complete the task and the limited design information available was a limitation on the level of detail possible for the non-experiment portion of the model. However, since the locations of interest are buried in the experimental section of the model, the calculated responses should be enlightening both for the development of test criteria and for guidance in design.

  5. The Relationship between Personality Type and Software Usability Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, William H.

    2011-01-01

    The study attempted to determine if there is a relationship between user's psychological personality types, measured by the Myers Briggs Type Indicator[R] (MBTI[R]) and distinct measures of usability measured by the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI). The study was expected to provide an answer to the following basic research…

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Microlensing optical depth & event rates from MOA-II (Sumi+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumi, T.; Penny, M. T.

    2016-11-01

    We use the same data set as Sumi+ (2013, J/ApJ/778/150), which used the data taken in the 2006 and 2007 seasons by the MOA-II survey, with the 1.8m MOA-II telescope located at the Mt. John University Observatory, New Zealand. The centers of the 22 Galactic bulge (GB) fields of the MOA-II survey are listed in Table 1. The images were taken using the custom MOA-Red wide-band filter, which is equivalent to the sum of the standard Kron/Cousins R and I bands. Each field is divided into 80 subfields and each subfield is individually calibrated using the red clump giant (RCG) feature in each subfield CMD more precisely. The number of subfields used in the final analysis is 1536 in total and also given in Table 1 for each field. The coordinates and other properties of the subfields are listed in Table 4. The OGLE (Udalski 2003AcA....53..291U) also conducts a microlensing survey toward the GB with the 1.3m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The median seeing is about 1.3 arcsec. Most observations are taken in the standard Kron-Cousin I band with occasional observations in the Johnson V band. (1 data file).

  7. Innovation for Information: International Contributions to Librarianship. Festschrift in Honour of Dr. Ahmed H. Helal. Publication 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Joachim W., Ed.

    This publication contains the following essays: (1) "Das Bibliothekssystem der Ruhr-Universitat Bochum: hochschul-und stazungsrechtliche Grundlagen" (Bernhard Adams); (2) "On Appropriate Librarianship: The Genesis of the Library of Today, and Its Possible Exodus Tomorrow" (Maurice B. Line); (3) "The Challenge to Library…

  8. [Achromatic watercolor effect: about requirement of formation of sumi painting effect].

    PubMed

    Takashima, Midori

    2008-10-01

    The watercolor effect (Pinna, Brelstaff, & Spillmann, 2001) is a new color spreading phenomenon. Pinna et al. (2001) proposed that the watercolor effect is a new Gestalt factor because it determines figure-ground organization more strongly than classical Gestalt factors. We used achroriatic watercolor patterns and varied the lightness of the background and two border lines to study the relationship between the color spreading effect and figure-ground organization. The results demonstrated (a)a bidirectional color spreading phenomenon when the background lightness was between the two border-lines' lightness, and that (b) some patterns elicit only a color spreading effect without organization of figure-ground, while others elicit only figure-ground organization without a color spreading effect.

  9. Artist Agent: A Reinforcement Learning Approach to Automatic Stroke Generation in Oriental Ink Painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ning; Hachiya, Hirotaka; Sugiyama, Masashi

    Oriental ink painting, called Sumi-e, is one of the most appealing painting styles that has attracted artists around the world. Major challenges in computer-based Sumi-e simulation are to abstract complex scene information and draw smooth and natural brush strokes. To automatically find such strokes, we propose to model the brush as a reinforcement learning agent, and learn desired brush-trajectories by maximizing the sum of rewards in the policy search framework. We also provide elaborate design of actions, states, and rewards tailored for a Sumi-e agent. The effectiveness of our proposed approach is demonstrated through simulated Sumi-e experiments.

  10. EXTENT AND KINEMATICS OF ASWA SHEAR ZONE IN UGANDA AND SOUTH SUDAN USING AIRBORNE GEOPHYSICAL AND REMOTE SENSING DATA. A. Katumwehe. 1, E. A. Atekwana. 1, M.G. Abdelsalam.1 1Oklahoma State University, Boone Pickens School of Geology, Stillwater, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    katumwehe, A. B.; Atekwana, E. A.; Abdel Salam, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Aswa Shear zone (ASZ) is a fundamental Precambrian lithospheric structure playing an important role in the evolution of the Mesozoic South Sudan rifts, the propagation of the Cenozoic East African Rift System (EARS), the eruption of EARS shield volcanoes (Mt Kilimanjaro and Mt Elgon), re-organization of drainage systems (the White Nile), and the distribution of recent seismicity in South Sudan. Traces of the shear zone have been mapped extending in central and east Africa in a NW-SE direction from South Sudan in the northwest through Uganda and Tanzania to the southeast and possibly into Madagascar. Gondwana reconstructions suggest that the ASZ continues further southeast into south India. Nonetheless, the kinematics and extent of the ASZ have not been fully understood because of limited exposure. In areas where it is exposed the shear zone is expressed by narrow dominantly NW-trending outcrops. We use recently acquired high resolution airborne magnetic and radiometric data over Uganda integrated with 90 m spatial resolution Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and 30 m spatial resolution Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) spectral data to elucidate the kinematics and ascertain the significance of the ASZ in the development of the EARS and the tectonic architecture of east and central Africa. Vertical derivative, Euler deconvolution and analytical signal filters were applied to the total field magnetic data to image the shallow subsurface structures associated with the ASZ while upward continuation (5000 m) was applied to assess the ASZ depth continuity. We also used radiometric data to create ternary images while SRTM and Landsat TM data were used to map the surface expression of the shear zone. The geophysical data from Uganda suggest that the ASZ is characterised by a 50-60 km wide corridor of ductile deformation associated with NW-trending strike-slip shearing. It is dominated by three, equally-spaced and discrete sinistral strike-slip shear zones bounding wider belts dominated by splays of secondary shear zones and shear-related folds. These folds become tighter close to discrete shear zones and their axial traces become sub-parallel to the shear zones themselves. A similar pattern is observed on the surface in South Sudan in the SRTM DEM and the Landsat TM images. The evolution of these folds is explained in terms of secondary constructional strain developed in association and nearly perpendicular to the NW-trend of the sinistral strike-slip shearling. There is a remarkable resemblance between the magnetic fabric of the ASZ and that of the Najd fault system; a major sinistral strike-slip shear system in the Arabian-Nubian Shield suggesting that the shear zones may have evolved through similar Neopreterozoic Pan-African tectonic events, possibly associated with the collision between East and West Gondwana. The EARS bifurcates into the Eastern and Western branches -south of the ASZ while the Western branch terminates at the ASZ near the border between Uganda and South Sudan. This implies that the ASZ together with the Tanzanian craton played an important role in strain localization and prorogation during the evolution of the EARS.

  11. MgII Observations Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific goals of our sounding rocket program, the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI). This paper will present a brief description of the optics that were developed to meet SUMI's scientific goals, discuss the spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics of SUMI s optics, describe SUMI's flight which was launched 7/30/2010, and discuss what we have learned from that flight.

  12. Spectral Calibration of the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan; Gary, Allen; Davis, John; Reader, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the scientific goals of a sounding rocket program called the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI), presents a brief description of the optics that were developed to meet those goals and discusses the spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics of SUMI's Toroidal Variable-Line-Space (TVLS) gratings; which are critical to SUMI's measurements of the magnetic field in the Sun's transition region.

  13. 78 FR 31631 - Designation of Three (3) Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13573 of May 18, 2011, “Blocking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Blocked Persons appear as follows: Individuals 1. AL-AHMAD, NAJM HAMAD; DOB 1969; POB Aleppo, Syria; Minister of Justice (individual) [SYRIA]. 2. AL-NAYEF, SA'AD ABDEL-SALAM; DOB 1959; POB Aleppo, Syria; Minister of Health (individual) [SYRIA]. 3. AL-SUKHNI, ADNAN ABDO; DOB 1961; POB Aleppo, Syria; Minister...

  14. 77 FR 51751 - Assessment of Fees for Dairy Import Licenses for the 2013 Tariff-Rate Import Quota Year

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Foreign Agricultural Service Assessment of Fees for Dairy Import Licenses for the 2013 Tariff- Rate Import... person or firm by the Department of Agriculture authorizing the importation of certain dairy articles... States. DATES: August 27, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Abdelsalam El-Farra, Dairy...

  15. 75 FR 53271 - Assessment of Fees for Dairy Import Licenses for the 2011 Tariff-Rate Import Quota Year

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Foreign Agricultural Service Assessment of Fees for Dairy Import Licenses for the... importation of certain dairy articles, which are subject to tariff-rate quotas set forth in the Harmonized... CONTACT: Abdelsalam El-Farra, Dairy Import Licensing Program, Import Policies and Export...

  16. Spectral Calibration of the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific goals of a sounding rocket program called the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI), present a brief description of the optics that were developed to meet those goals and discuss the spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics of SUMI's Toroidal Variable-Line-Space (TVLS) gratings which are critical to SUMI's measurements of the magnetic field in the Sun's transition region.

  17. Exploration of Dose-Response Techniques with Some Applications to a Simulation Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    CONTINUE 706: XTY =0. 707= SUMY z 0. 708: DO06 1 -ID 709= ITY a XTY + II I)* Y (I) 710: 6 SUMY = SUMY + Y (I) 71tz YBAR : SUMY/DBLE(KD) 712: SSP w XTY...proportion of insects (systems) killed (aborted), the analyst applies the probit transfor- mation y =F(p) and he then proceeds to express y linearly in...8241 MFK .8023 tIP .7119 SLU .4527 ART .4284 MPDS .3686 DEK .3617 HUD .1436 INS .6668 DSM’,J .6649 SCU .8736 MTU .8487 -12_ , :.V ’,,.-, Y ,.-..- %.- S

  18. Making Ultraviolet Spectro-Polarimetry Polarization Measurements with the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program. This paper will concentrate on SUMI's VUV optics, and discuss their spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics. While SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria, there are several areas that will be improved for its second and third flights. This paper will emphasize the MgII linear polarization measurements and describe the changes that will be made to the sounding rocket and how those changes will improve the scientific data acquired by SUMI.

  19. Integrate Art! Match Poetry to Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Mary

    1994-01-01

    It is possible to connect art and language arts using traditional Japanese art. After explaining the Japanese art forms of Haiku poetry and sumi-e painting, the article describes a project in which students write haiku on special paper then illustrate their poems with gung and shey strokes. (SM)

  20. Usability Studies of a Remedial Multimedia System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anjaneyulu, K. S. R.; Singer, R. A.; Harding, R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the formative evaluation of a multimedia computer system that provides remedial support for university students learning concepts concerning the structure and function of the human brain and describes usability studies of the system using the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI). Analysis of SUMI items and the student…

  1. Enabling Novel Minimally-Actuated Robotic Capabilities Through Active Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-25

    journals : 1. Ahmed Helal. Society of Rheology Meeting, Feb 2013, "Design of Integrated ER valves" 2. Boston Dynamics Active Fluids Program: IEEE RAS...adhesive climbers. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or published that acknowledge ARO support...from the start of the project to the date of this printing. List the papers, including journal references, in the following categories: Received

  2. Optical Characteristics of the Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Porter, J. G.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Adams, M.; Smith, S.; Hraba, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. In order to test the scientific feasibility of measuring magnetic fields in the UV, a sounding rocket payload is being developed. This paper will discuss: (1) the scientific measurements that will be made by the SUMI sounding rocket program, (2) how the optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic lines CIV (1550 Angstroms) and MgII (2800 Angstroms), and (3) the optical, reflectance, transmission and polarization measurements that have been made on the SUMI telescope mirror and polarimeter.

  3. 75 FR 69158 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Besner Rejean Besson William Thomas Lim Bider Marc Daniel Bignell Carl Black Johanna Marie Blackwell... Douglas Rodd Celia Jane Rogers-Perz Beryl M. Sabukosek Thomas Michael Sakai Sumie Sattler Glenn...

  4. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayahsi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  5. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  6. Nucleate pool boiling of hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sardesai, R.G.; Palen, J.W.; Thome, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Schlunder method can be correctly used to predict boiling heat transfer coefficient of multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures. The method was tested against experimental mixtures containing up to five components. The Stephan-Abdelsalam correlation can be used to calculate a ''pseudo-single component'' boiling heat transfer coefficient for a mixture using weighted properties. The effective temperature driving force term and the high mass flux correction term in the Schlunder formulation are empirically adjusted to improve the accuracy of prediction. Predictions of the Schlunder method are sensitive to the VLE calculations. The UNIFAC method is used in this study for reasons discussed in the paper.

  7. Toroidal Variable-Line-Space Gratings: The Good, the Bad and The Ugly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward A.; Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan; Gary, Allen; Davis, John; Reader, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Toroidal variable-line-space (VLS) gratings are an important factor in the design of an efficient VUV solar telescope that will measure the CIV (155nm) and MgII (280nm) emissions lines in the Sun's transition region. In 1983 Kita and Harada described spherical VLS gratings but the technology to commercially fabricate these devices is a recent development, especially for toroidal surfaces. This paper will describe why this technology is important in the development of the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program (the good), the delays due to the conversion between the TVLS grating design and the optical fabrication (the bad), and finally the optical testing, alignment and tolerancing of the gratings (the ugly). The Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation, SUMI, has been reported in several papers since this program began in 2000. The emphasis of this paper is to describe SUMI's Toroidal Variable-Line-Space (TVLS) gratings. These gratings help SUMI meet its scientific goals which require both high spectral resolution and high optical efficiency for magnetic field measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength band of the solar spectrum (the good). Unfortunately, the technology readiness level of these gratings has made their implementation difficult, especially for a sounding rocket payload (the bad). Therefore, this paper emphasizes the problems and solutions that were developed to use these gratings in SUMI (the ugly). Section 2 contains a short review of the scientific goals of SUMI and why this mission is important in the understanding of the 3D structure of the magnetic field on the Sun. The flight hardware that makes up the SUMI payload is described in Section 3 with emphasis on those components that affect the TVLS gratings. Section 4 emphasizes the alignment, testing and optical modeling that were developed to optimize the performance of these gratings.

  8. Silage to Ella Translation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    of the form (i : lub .. upb ) :: a = b where lwb , upb are integers and a, b expressions. Since Silage is an applicative language it has single...by the following approach for sequences INT lwb = .. , upb = .. , max= TYPE integer = int/( lwb ..upb). VAR sum := [max]( ... ), a := [max]( ... [INT i...2. .rax] CASE it/i LT in OF b’l : sum[i: sum[i-1] - a[i] ESAC; and by the following for non-sequence ELLA INT lwb - .. . upb .. ,max= TYPE integer

  9. The Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation Sounding Rocket Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will describe the objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the unique optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. A sounding rocket payload has been developed to test the feasibility of magnetic field measurements in the Sun's transition region. The optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic sensitive lines formed in the transition region (CIV at 1550 A and MgII at 2800 A). This paper will concentrate on the polarization properties SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space (TVLS) gratings and its system level testing as we prepare to launch in the Summer of 2008.

  10. Design of an Aeroelastic Composite Wing Wind Tunnel Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    140 J-1,NP SUMI-0.0 DO 130 K-I,NP 130 SUMI-SUMIEP(I,K)*EI3(K,J) 140 EE(I,J)- SUKI 150 CONTINUE DO 170 I-1,NP DO 160 J-1,NP 160 EE(I,J)-EE(I,J)*H(J)*(C...MUST PROVIDE THE INVERTED SYMMETRICAL AIC MATRIX [AIS] ’~*" c AND THE WING FLEXIBILITY MATRIX (S] DO 30 1l1,NP DO 20 J-l,NP SUKI -0.0 DO 10 Kml,NP 10

  11. Live Fire Support Services Expansion of Ngas Model to Include Nitrogen Dioxide Effects in the Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-10

    Phannacology, 116, 1-9, 1992. [11] Tsuchiya, Y. and Sumi, K ., "Evaluation of the Toxicity of Combustion Products", Journal of Fire and Flammability, 3, 46-50...COL, MC ,, CONSULTING VETERINARIAN: P. Schultheiss, MAJ, VC (.... 0 , CONTRACTING OFFICE REPRESENTATIVE (COR): A. Januszkiewicz , PhD PROTOCOL NUMBER

  12. Reflections on Urban Science Teacher-Student Self-Efficacy Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagiwara, Sumi; Maulucci, Maria S. Rivera; Ramos, S. Lizette

    2011-01-01

    This forum article consists of commentaries--authored by Sumi Hagiwara, Maria S. Rivera Maulucci and Lizette Ramos--on the feature article by Virginia Jennings Bolshakova, Carla C. Johnson, and Charlene M. Czerniak. We reflect on a series of questions that take retrospective, introspective, and prospective views of self-efficacy in science…

  13. Usability Evaluation of the City University of New York CUNY+ Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oulanov, Alexei; Pajarillo, Edmund J. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a usability evaluation of the wide area networked database used in the library system of the City University of New York (CUNY). Describes use of the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI) criteria in student surveys and interviews that considered affect, efficiency, learnability, control, and helpfulness. Survey is appended.…

  14. Approach to Dynamic Assembling of Individualized Learning Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubchak, Vladimir; Kupenko, Olena; Kuzikov, Borys

    2012-01-01

    E-learning students are generally heterogeneous and have different capabilities knowledge base and needs. The aim of the Sumy State University (SSU) e-learning system project is to cater to these individual needs by assembling individual learning path. This paper shows current situation with e-learning in Ukraine, state-of-art of development of…

  15. Tarnished Armor Erosion of Military Ethics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-23

    Will ............................. 11 Army Differentiation ......................................... 2 The Army Ethic... equation which su-m:i:ed to societal disapproval of the military. The problem was exacerbated by the advent of an allegedly inferior all volunteer...rules solved equations , men wearing green eye shades balanced budgets and manipulated sto:k markets, and Sputnik was the new boy on the block

  16. Realization of Combined Diagnosis/Treatment System By Ultrasound Strain Measurement-Based Shear Modulus Reconstruction/Imaging Technique Examples With Application on The New Type Interstitial RF Electromagnetic Wave Thermal Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    wave thermal therapy, tion I. INTRODUCTION ll known that the pathological stage of living human soft highly correlates with the static...demonstration on in vitro pork ribs and in vivo human breast tissues,” Phys. Med. Biol., vol. 45, pp. 1511-1520, 2000. [6] C. Sumi, “Toward 3D

  17. Feasibility of Epidemiologic Research on Nonauditory Health Effects of Residential Aircraft Noise Exposure. Volume 3. Summary of Literature on Cardiovascular Effects on Noise Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Sum.y ofEpi oIc Svgn - csdwlied Bias and Potential Strength of Summary of Findings Comments Bias Due to Confounding Association(s) as Reported by... Strength of Summary of Findings Comments Bias Due to Associaon(s) as Reported by Author Confounding and Statistical Tests Hearing thresholds No effect...Table 2-3: continued. $um~w𔄃 of Epideulgic StuWds - coniaued Bias and Potential Strength of Summary of Findings Comments Bias Due to Confounding

  18. The Role of Ukraine’s Communists in the Ukrainian Independence Movement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. 12a. DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION...the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL June 1993 Author: Approved by: n ~aThes1.~1o Donald AbenheiniC5cond Reader Thomas C. Bruneau, Chairman. Department of...methodological departments were reprimanded as were the Society’s regional organizations in Kiev, Ivano- Frankivsk and Sumy. Several members of the

  19. Evidence of the existence and eastward motion of superclusters at the Equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Yoshi-Yuki; Nakazawa, Tetsuo

    1989-01-01

    A numerical experiment performed by Hayashi and Sumi (1986) with an atmospheric GCM has shown that moist convection in the equatorial region is spontaneously organized into a form of supercluster (an area of precipitation with a spatial extent of about 2000 km and an eastward propagation speed of about 15 m/sec. Here, the existence of superclusters in the real atmosphere is shown through a comparison between satellite observations and the GCM results. It is argued that eastward motion of convective activity occurs not only as the well-known property of the 30-60-day oscillation, but as a property of synoptic-scale disturbances at the equator.

  20. Implantation-Free 4H-SiC Bipolar Junction Transistors with Double Base Epi-layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-14

    gain 4H-SiC NPN power bipolar junction transistor ,” IEEE Electron Device Letters, vol. 24, pp. 327-329, May 2003. [3] C.-F. Huang and J. A. Cooper...Jr., “High current gain 4H-SiC NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors ,” IEEE Electron Device Letters, vol. 24, pp. 396-398, Jun. 2003. [4] Sumi...Implantation-Free 4H-SiC Bipolar Junction Transistors with Double Base Epi-layers Jianhui Zhang, member, IEEE, Xueqing, Li, Petre Alexandrov

  1. Energy Fluctuation of Ideal Fermi Gas Trapped under Generic Power Law Potential U=\\sum_{i=1}^{d} c_i\\vert x_{i}/a_{i}\\vert^{n_{i} } in d Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir; Muktadir Rahman, Md.; Debnath, Dwaipayan; Sakhawat Hossain Himel, Md.

    2016-04-01

    Energy fluctuation of ideal Fermi gas trapped under generic power law potential U=\\sumi=1d ci \\vertxi/ai \\vert n_i has been calculated in arbitrary dimensions. Energy fluctuation is scrutinized further in the degenerate limit μ ≫ KBT with the help of Sommerfeld expansion. The dependence of energy fluctuation on dimensionality and power law potential is studied in detail. Most importantly our general result can not only exactly reproduce the recently published result regarding free and harmonically trapped ideal Fermi gas in d = 3 but also can describe the outcome for any power law potential in arbitrary dimension.

  2. Installation Restoration Program. Remedial Investigation Report. Minnesota Air National Guard Base Duluth International Airport, Duluth, Minnesota. Volume 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Comipounds (0) SPCC -Sys1i-Perforniance-CheckzCoipounds (I-) Corn Ulf Page 3 of 310 9 8c SEMIVOLATILE INTERNAL STANDARD AREA SUMI4ARY Lab’ Name: b...alibration (led. Conpound5 (9) -SPC-Systen Perfornance Cheel. Conpoun15 (it) Corn VII Page I of 3 1412 Continuing Cal ibration Check HSI Conipound5 WaE...ropyi)Ether 2.35722 3M5191 50.26 N-li troso--ropylaenne I.I1; 1310. 5678 32.86 ’ flexach𔃻orethane . 7056 .69501 .79 Dibromochloropropane

  3. Investigation of Bose Condensation in Ideal Bose Gas Trapped under Generic Power Law Potential in d Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir; Sazzad Hossain, Md.; Muktadir Rahman, Md.

    2016-02-01

    The changes in characteristics of Bose condensation of ideal Bose gas due to an external generic power law potential U=\\sumi=1dci\\vert xi/ai\\vertni are studied carefully. Detailed calculation of Kim et al. (J. Phys. Condens. Matter 11 (1999) 10269) yielded the hierarchy of condensation transitions with changing fractional dimensionality. In this manuscript, some theorems regarding specific heat at constant volume CV are presented. Careful examination of these theorems reveal the existence of hidden hierarchy of the condensation transition in trapped systems as well.

  4. Scattering Parabolic Solutions for the Spatial N-Centre Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscaggin, Alberto; Dambrosio, Walter; Terracini, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    For the N-centre problem in the three dimensional space, {ddot{x}} = -sum_{i=1}N m_i (x-c_i)/\\vert x - c_i \\vert^{α+2}, qquad x in R^3 {setminus} {c_1,ldots,c_N}, where {N ≥q 2}, {m_i > 0} and {α in [1,2)}, we prove the existence of entire parabolic trajectories having prescribed asymptotic directions. The proof relies on a variational argument of min-max type. Morse index estimates and regularization techniques are used in order to rule out the possible occurrence of collisions.

  5. Trace Element Status (Iron, Zinc, Copper, Chromium, Cobalt, and Nickel) in Iron-Deficiency Anaemia of Children under 3 Years

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Maria Georgieva; Petkova-Marinova, Tsvetelina Valentinova; Pogorielov, Maksym Vladimirovich; Loboda, Andrii Nikolaevich; Nedkova-Kolarova, Vania Nedkova; Bozhinova, Atanaska Naumova

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine trace element status and aetiologic factors for development of trace elements deficiencies in children with iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) aged 0 to 3 years. Contingent and Methods. 30 patients of the University Hospital, Pleven, Bulgaria—I group; 48 patients of the Sumy Regional Child's Clinical Hospital, Sumy, Ukraine—II group; 25 healthy controls were investigated. Serum concentrations of iron, zinc, copper, chromium, cobalt, and nickel were determined spectrophotometrically and by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results. Because the obtained serum levels of zinc, copper, and chromium were near the lower reference limits, I group was divided into IA and IB. In IA group, serum concentrations were lower than the reference values for 47%, 57%, and 73% of patients, respectively. In IB group, these were within the reference values. In II group, results for zinc, cobalt, and nickel were significantly lower (P < 0.05), and results for copper were significantly higher in comparison to controls. Conclusion. Low serum concentrations of zinc, copper, cobalt, and nickel were mainly due to inadequate dietary intake, malabsorption, and micronutrient interactions in both studied groups. Increased serum copper in II group was probably due to metabolic changes resulting from adaptations in IDA. Data can be used for developing a diagnostic algorithm for IDA. PMID:24839556

  6. Exponentially Small Splitting and Arnold Diffusion for Multiple Time Scale Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procesi, Michela

    We consider the class of Hamiltonians: \\[ \\frac{1}{2}\\sum_{j=1}^{n-1} I_j^2 + \\frac{1}{2} ǎrepsilon I_n^2 + \\frac{p^2}{2} + ǎrepsilon [(cos q - 1) - b^2 (cos 2q - 1)] + ǎrepsilon \\mu f(q) \\sum_{i=1}^n \\sin(\\psi_i) , \\] where 0<= b < (1)/(2), and the perturbing function f(q) is a rational function of eiq. We prove upper and lower bounds on the splitting for such class of systems, in regions of the phase space characterized by one fast frequency. Finally using an appropriate Normal Form theorem we prove the existence of chains of heteroclinic intersections.

  7. Web-based application on employee performance assessment using exponential comparison method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryana, S.; Kurnia, E.; Ruyani, A.

    2017-02-01

    Employee performance assessment is also called a performance review, performance evaluation, or assessment of employees, is an effort to assess the achievements of staffing performance with the aim to increase productivity of employees and companies. This application helps in the assessment of employee performance using five criteria: Presence, Quality of Work, Quantity of Work, Discipline, and Teamwork. The system uses the Exponential Comparative Method and Weighting Eckenrode. Calculation results using graphs were provided to see the assessment of each employee. Programming language used in this system is written in Notepad++ and MySQL database. The testing result on the system can be concluded that this application is correspond with the design and running properly. The test conducted is structural test, functional test, and validation, sensitivity analysis, and SUMI testing.

  8. A nonextensive approach to the dynamics of financial observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, S. M. D.; Moyano, L. G.; de Souza, J.; Tsallis, C.

    2007-01-01

    We present results about financial market observables, specifically returns and traded volumes. They are obtained within the current nonextensive statistical mechanical framework based on the entropy Sq=k1-sum_{i=1}W pi q/1-q (qin Re) left(S1 equiv S_{BG}=-ksum_{i=1}Wpi ln piright). More precisely, we present stochastic dynamical mechanisms which mimic probability density functions empirically observed. These mechanisms provide possible interpretations for the emergence of the entropic indices q in the time evolution of the corresponding observables. In addition to this, through multi-fractal analysis of return time series, we verify that the dual relation qstat+qsens=2 is numerically satisfied, qstat and qsens being associated to the probability density function and to the sensitivity to initial conditions respectively. This type of simple relation, whose understanding remains ellusive, has been empirically verified in various other systems.

  9. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  10. Exact solutions for semirelativistic problems with non-local potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Richard L.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that exact solutions may be found for the energy eigenvalue problem generated by the class of semirelativistic Hamiltonians of the form H = \\sqrt{m^2+p^2} + \\hat{V} , where \\hat{V} is a non-local potential with a separable kernel of the form {\\cal V}(r,r^{\\prime}) = - \\sum_{i=1}^n v_i f_i(r)g_i(r^{\\prime}) . Explicit examples in one and three dimensions are discussed, including the Yamaguchi and Gauss potentials. The results are used to obtain lower bounds for the energy of the corresponding N-boson problem, with upper bounds provided by the use of a Gaussian trial function.

  11. Quantum effect of intramolecular high-frequency vibrational modes on diffusion-controlled electron transfer rate: From the weak to the strong electronic coupling regions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Zhao, Yi

    2007-05-14

    The Sumi-Marcus theory is extended by introducing two approaches to investigate electron transfer reactions from weak-to-strong electronic coupling regime. One of these approaches is the quantum R-matrix theory, useful for dealing with the intramolecular vibrational motions in the whole electronic coupling domain. The other is the split operator approach that is employed to solve the reaction-diffusion equation. The approaches are then applied to electron transfer in the Marcus inverted regime to investigate the nuclear tunneling effect on the long time rate and the survival probabilities. The numerical results illustrate that the adiabatic suppression obtained from the R-matrix approach is much smaller than that from the Landau-Zener theory whereas it cannot be predicted by the perturbation theory. The jointed effects of the electronic coupling and solvent relaxation time on the rates are also explored.

  12. Design, Implementation, and Wide Pilot Deployment of FitForAll: An Easy to use Exergaming Platform Improving Physical Fitness and Life Quality of Senior Citizens.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Evdokimos I; Billis, Antonis S; Mouzakidis, Christos A; Zilidou, Vasiliki I; Antoniou, Panagiotis E; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2016-01-01

    Many platforms have emerged as response to the call for technology supporting active and healthy aging. Key requirements for any such e-health systems and any subsequent business exploitation are tailor-made design and proper evaluation. This paper presents the design, implementation, wide deployment, and evaluation of the low cost, physical exercise, and gaming (exergaming) FitForAll (FFA) platform system usability, user adherence to exercise, and efficacy are explored. The design of FFA is tailored to elderly populations, distilling literature guidelines and recommendations. The FFA architecture introduces standard physical exercise protocols in exergaming software engineering, as well as, standard physical assessment tests for augmented adaptability through adjustable exercise intensity. This opens up the way to next generation exergaming software, which may be more automatically/smartly adaptive. 116 elderly users piloted FFA five times/week, during an eight-week controlled intervention. Usability evaluation was formally conducted (SUS, SUMI questionnaires). Control group consisted of a size-matched elderly group following cognitive training. Efficacy was assessed objectively through the senior fitness (Fullerton) test, and subjectively, through WHOQoL-BREF comparisons of pre-postintervention between groups. Adherence to schedule was measured by attendance logs. The global SUMI score was 68.33±5.85%, while SUS was 77.7. Good usability perception is reflected in relatively high adherence of 82% for a daily two months pilot schedule. Compared to control group, elderly using FFA improved significantly strength, flexibility, endurance, and balance while presenting a significant trend in quality of life improvements. This is the first elderly focused exergaming platform intensively evaluated with more than 100 participants. The use of formal tools makes the findings comparable to other studies and forms an elderly exergaming corpus.

  13. [INCIDENCE, PREDISPOSING RISK FACTORS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND SPREADING OF ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS IN THE NORTH-EASTERN REGION OF UKRAINE].

    PubMed

    Malysh, N G; Chemych, N D; Zaritsky, A M

    2016-01-01

    Using data of the branch statistical reporting of the State Sanitary and Epidemiological Service in Sumy region and Sumy Regional State Laboratory of Veterinary Medicine, the incidence rate, modern risk factors for the development and spreading of acute infectious diarrheas were determined in the North-Eastern region of Ukraine. Under the current conditions incidence rate indices of acute intestinal infections and food toxicoinfections are within the range of 159.8-193.6 per 100 thousands. pop. Seasonal and epidemical rises are associated with a species of the agent. In the etiological structure of acute diarrheal infections there are dominated viruses, of food toxicoinfections--Klebsiellae pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter cloacae (p < 0.05). Predictors of the complication of epidemiological situation of Shigella infections are the gain in the detection of bacterially contaminated samples of milk and dairy products (r = 0.75), for food toxicoinfections caused by Klebsiellae pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae--pastry with cream and cooking meat products (r = 0.64; r = 0.75). Epizootic situation in the region affects on the salmonellosis incidence rate of the population (r = 0.89). There were revealed correlations between the selection of E. coli bacteria from swabs taken from the enterprises of catering, in child care centers and the levels of incidence rates of salmonellosis, acute intestinal infections of unknown etiology (r = 0.59; r = 0.60). Timely detection and sanitation of Shigella carriers are a powerful instrument to reduce the incidence rate of shigellosis (r = 0.83).

  14. Invariant sums of random matrices and the onset of level repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burda, Zdzisław; Livan, Giacomo; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2015-06-01

    We compute analytically the joint probability density of eigenvalues and the level spacing statistics for an ensemble of random matrices with interesting features. It is invariant under the standard symmetry groups (orthogonal and unitary) and yet the interaction between eigenvalues is not Vandermondian. The ensemble contains real symmetric or complex Hermitian matrices S of the form {S}=\\sumi=1M < {O}i {D}_i{O}_iT> or {S}=\\sumi=1M < {U}i {D}_i{U}_i^\\dagger> respectively. The diagonal matrices {D}_i=diag\\{λ_1(i),\\ldots,λ_N(i)\\} are constructed from real eigenvalues drawn independently from distributions p(i)(x), while the matrices Oi and Ui are all orthogonal or unitary. The average <·> is simultaneously performed over the symmetry group and the joint distribution of \\{λ_j(i)\\} . We focus on the limits (i.) N → ∞ and (ii.) M → ∞, with N = 2. In the limit (i.), the resulting sum S develops level repulsion even though the original matrices do not feature it, and classical RMT universality is restored asymptotically. In the limit (ii.) the spacing distribution attains scaling forms that are computed exactly: for the orthogonal case, we recover the β = 1 Wigner's surmise, while for the unitary case an entirely new universal distribution is obtained. Our results allow to probe analytically the microscopic statistics of the sum of random matrices that become asymptotically free. We also give an interpretation of this model in terms of radial random walks in a matrix space. The analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  15. Ground Motion Attenuation and Shear-Wave Splitting Analyses for the November 2011 M5.7 Prague, Oklahoma Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumy, D. F.; Cochran, E. S.; Keranen, K. M.; Neighbors, C.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    During November 2011, three M≥5.0 earthquakes and thousands of aftershocks occurred on and near the Wilzetta fault, a structurally complex ~200 km long, Pennsylvanian-aged fault near Prague, Oklahoma, in close proximity to several active wastewater injection wells. All three M≥5.0 earthquakes had strike-slip mechanisms consistent with rupture on three independent focal planes, suggesting activation of three different strands of the Wilzetta fault. Wastewater injection can cause a buildup of pore fluid pressure along the fault, which decreases the fault strength and may induce earthquakes. Based on the proximity of earthquakes to active fluid injection wells, the unilateral progression of aftershocks away from the initial M5.0 event, and shallow earthquake depths, Keranen et al. [2013] concluded that fluid injection was responsible for inducing the first M5.0 event. Furthermore, Sumy et al. [2014] found that the initial M5.0 event increased the Coulomb stress in the region of the M5.7 mainshock, triggering a cascade of earthquakes along the Wilzetta fault. Thus, while nearby wastewater injection directly induced the initial M5.0 event, this earthquake triggered successive failure along the Wilzetta fault; however, it remains unclear if the additional ruptured fault strands are also influenced by fluid injection. In this study, we explore instrumental ground motions and shear-wave splitting of the November 2011 Prague, Oklahoma sequence, in order to construct ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and understand the local stress regime, respectively. We examine ~1,000 earthquakes recorded by a total of 47 seismometers, located within ~150 km of the Wilzetta fault. With respect to GMPEs, initial results suggest that the ground motions are smaller than similar magnitude earthquakes of natural/tectonic origins, and these lower intensities may be a result of lower stress drops [e.g. Hough, 2014]. With respect to shear-wave splitting, we examine quality graded

  16. Level repulsion exponent β for many-body localization transitions and for Anderson localization transitions via Dyson Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    The generalization of the Dyson Brownian motion approach of random matrices to Anderson localization (AL) models (Chalker et al 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 554) and to many-body localization (MBL) Hamiltonians (Serbyn and Moore 2015 arXiv:1508.07293) is revisited to extract the level repulsion exponent β, where β =1 in the delocalized phase governed by the Wigner-Dyson statistics, β =0 , in the localized phase governed by the Poisson statistics, and 0<{βc}<1 at the critical point. The idea is that the Gaussian disorder variables h i are promoted to Gaussian stationary processes h i (t) in order to sample the disorder stationary distribution with some time correlation τ. The statistics of energy levels can then be studied via Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations. For the MBL quantum spin Hamiltonian with random fields h i , we obtain β =2qn,n+1\\text{EA}(N)/qn,n\\text{EA}(N) in terms of the Edwards-Anderson matrix qnm\\text{EA}(N)\\equiv \\frac{1}{N}{\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|σ iz|{φm}> {{|}2} for the same eigenstate m  =  n and for consecutive eigenstates m  =  n  +  1. For the Anderson localization tight-binding Hamiltonian with random on-site energies h i , we find β =2{{Y}n,n+1}(N)/≤ft({{Y}n,n}(N)-{{Y}n,n+1}(N)\\right) in terms of the density correlation matrix {{Y}nm}(N)\\equiv {\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|i> {{|}2}|< i|{φm}> {{|}2} for consecutive eigenstates m  =  n  +  1, while the diagonal element m  =  n corresponds to the inverse participation ratio {{Y}nn}(N)\\equiv {\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|i> {{|}4} of the eigenstate |{φn}> .

  17. Usability testing of a monitoring and feedback tool to stimulate physical activity

    PubMed Central

    van der Weegen, Sanne; Verwey, Renée; Tange, Huibert J; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; de Witte, Luc P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A monitoring and feedback tool to stimulate physical activity, consisting of an activity sensor, smartphone application (app), and website for patients and their practice nurses, has been developed: the ‘It’s LiFe!’ tool. In this study the usability of the tool was evaluated by technology experts and end users (people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or type 2 diabetes, with ages from 40–70 years), to improve the user interfaces and content of the tool. Patients and methods The study had four phases: 1) a heuristic evaluation with six technology experts; 2) a usability test in a laboratory by five patients; 3) a pilot in real life wherein 20 patients used the tool for 3 months; and 4) a final lab test by five patients. In both lab tests (phases 2 and 4) qualitative data were collected through a thinking-aloud procedure and video recordings, and quantitative data through questions about task complexity, text comprehensiveness, and readability. In addition, the post-study system usability questionnaire (PSSUQ) was completed for the app and the website. In the pilot test (phase 3), all patients were interviewed three times and the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI) was completed. Results After each phase, improvements were made, mainly to the layout and text. The main improvement was a refresh button for active data synchronization between activity sensor, app, and server, implemented after connectivity problems in the pilot test. The mean score on the PSSUQ for the website improved from 5.6 (standard deviation [SD] 1.3) to 6.5 (SD 0.5), and for the app from 5.4 (SD 1.5) to 6.2 (SD 1.1). Satisfaction in the pilot was not very high according to the SUMI. Discussion The use of laboratory versus real-life tests and expert-based versus user-based tests revealed a wide range of usability issues. The usability of the It’s LiFe! tool improved considerably during the study. PMID:24669188

  18. Hydrogen peroxide triggers a novel alternative splicing of arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Daigo; Takeda, Chieri; Yasuoka, Daiki; Himeno, Seiichiro

    2016-11-04

    We previously reported that two splicing variants of human AS3MT mRNA, exon-3 skipping form (Δ3) and exons-4 and -5 skipping form (Δ4,5), were detected in HepG2 cells and that both variants lacked arsenic methylation activity (Sumi et al., 2011). Here we studied whether hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) triggers alternative splicing of AS3MT mRNA. The results showed that exposure of HepG2 cells to H2O2 resulted in increased levels of a novel spliced form skipping exon-3 to exon-10 (Δ3-10) in an H2O2-concentration-dependent manner, although no change was detected in the mRNA levels of Δ3 AS3MT. We found decreased protein levels of serine/arginine-rich 40 (SRp40), which we determined to be a candidate splice factor for controlling the splicing of AS3MT mRNA. We next compared the amounts of methylated arsenic metabolites between control and H2O2-exposed HepG2 cells after the addition of arsenite as a substance. The results showed lower levels of methylated arsenic metabolites in HepG2 cells exposed to H2O2. These data suggest that the splicing of AS3MT pre-mRNA was disconcerted by oxidative stress and that abnormal alternative splicing of AS3MT mRNA may affect arsenic methylation ability.

  19. Condensation transition in polydisperse hard rods.

    PubMed

    Evans, M R; Majumdar, S N; Pagonabarraga, I; Trizac, E

    2010-01-07

    We study a mass transport model, where spherical particles diffusing on a ring can stochastically exchange volume v, with the constraint of a fixed total volume V= sum(i=1) (N)v(i), N being the total number of particles. The particles, referred to as p-spheres, have a linear size that behaves as v(i) (1/p) and our model thus represents a gas of polydisperse hard rods with variable diameters v(i) (1/p). We show that our model admits a factorized steady state distribution which provides the size distribution that minimizes the free energy of a polydisperse hard-rod system, under the constraints of fixed N and V. Complementary approaches (explicit construction of the steady state distribution on the one hand; density functional theory on the other hand) completely and consistently specify the behavior of the system. A real space condensation transition is shown to take place for p>1; beyond a critical density a macroscopic aggregate is formed and coexists with a critical fluid phase. Our work establishes the bridge between stochastic mass transport approaches and the optimal polydispersity of hard sphere fluids studied in previous articles.

  20. Assessment of the usability and impact of the Idaho Health Data Exchange (IHDE).

    PubMed

    Reis, Janet; MacKenzie, Lisa; Soelberg, Terri; Smith, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Eighty four health care professionals participated in an online survey assessing the usability, and clinical and administrative impact of the Idaho Health Data Exchange's (IHDE) Virtual Health Record (VHR). The IHDE VHR allows authorized users to use a secure web interface to view lab, radiology and transcribed reports from multiple facilities and view medical histories on patients in the data exchange. Results indicate the usability of the IHDE VHR was almost universally positively rated with the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI) utilized as the assessment method. Medical providers however had the lowest rating of the exchange, raising concerns about the need for additional training and support. The addition of other Idaho health care organizations to the health data exchange was most widely desired, with the most frequently cited benefit being more comprehensive access to patients' records. In contrast to other published evaluations of health data exchanges in the U.S., few of the concerns emerged about cost of implementation of the data exchange or trust in the quality of information contained therein.

  1. Reflections on urban science teacher-student self-efficacy dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Sumi; Maulucci, Maria S. Rivera; Ramos, S. Lizette

    2011-12-01

    This forum article consists of commentaries—authored by Sumi Hagiwara, Maria S. Rivera Maulucci and Lizette Ramos—on the feature article by Virginia Jennings Bolshakova, Carla C. Johnson, and Charlene M. Czerniak. We reflect on a series of questions that take retrospective, introspective, and prospective views of self-efficacy in science education. We review selected studies that explore some of the historical developments and methodological approaches in the literature and examine a teacher-student self-efficacy system model that shows the ways in which teachers' and students' self-efficacy judgments are based upon multiple individual and shared components, such as identity and social interaction within the classroom and school. We close with a call for the design of measures of teacher-student self-efficacy systems, so that we can begin to tailor professional development experiences to the goals and motivations of individual and collective groups of teachers and students in ways that accommodate the unique cultural features of their classrooms and foster student self-efficacy.

  2. The insecticide esfenvalerate modulates neuronal excitability in mammalian central nervous system in vitro.

    PubMed

    Varró, Petra; Kovács, Melinda; Világi, Ildikó

    2017-02-05

    Pyrethroids are neurotoxic insecticides showing significant selective toxicity on insects over mammals, but effects on mammalian nervous system are not negligible. These substances act on the voltage-gated sodium channel, prolonging the duration of the open state. The present study focused on the effect of the pyrethroid esfenvalerate on the excitability of neuronal networks in vitro. From isolated rat brain slices, neocortical and hippocampal evoked field potentials were recorded; four concentrations (5-40μM) of esfenvalerate were tested using in vitro administration of the commercial product Sumi-Alpha 5 EC(®). Basic excitability and short- and long-term synaptic plasticity were studied. Application of the lowest concentration elicited epileptiform discharges in neocortex, while the highest concentration exerted a strong inhibitory effect on the excitability of both brain areas. The amplitude of population spikes in hippocampal slices was decreased by all applied concentrations. Significant decrease in basic excitability was accompanied by increase of paired-pulse facilitation in hippocampus and decreased efficacy of the development of long-term potentiation in both regions. Pyrethroids have been scarcely studied on brain slices so far, but our results are in concordance with literary data obtained on other in vitro neuronal test systems. It has been described previously that lower concentrations of pyrethroids lead to overexcitation of neurons and repetitive firing (which is in the background of hyperexcitatory symptoms occurring in case of in vivo exposure). Higher concentrations, however, may lead to depolarization block and to inhibition of neuronal firing.

  3. Molecular Understanding of Efficient DNA Repair Machinery of Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2012-06-01

    Photolyases repair the UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in damage DNA with high efficiency, through a cylic light-driven electron transfer radical mechanism. We report here our systematic studies of the repair dynamics in E. coli photolyase with mutation of five active-site residues. The significant loss of repair efficiency by the mutation indicates that those active-site residues play an important role in the DNA repair by photolyase. To understand how the active-site residues modulate the efficiency, we mapped out the entire evolution of each elementary step during the repair in those photolyase mutants with femtosecond resolution. We completely analyzed the electron transfer dynamics using the Sumi-Marcus model. The results suggest that photolyase controls the critical electron transfer and the ring-splitting of pyrimidine dimer through modulation of the redox potentials and reorganization energies, and stabilization of the anionic intermediates, maintaining the dedicated balance of all the reaction steps and achieving the maximum function activity.

  4. The microscopic and ultramicroscopic changes in the skeletal muscles, caused by heavy metal salts

    PubMed Central

    Tymoshenko, Alexey; Tkach, Gennadii; Sikora, Vitalii; Bumeister, Valentina; Shpetnyi, Ihor; Lyndin, Mykola; Maksymova, Olena; Maslenko, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The article is devoted to study the structural changes in the skeletal muscles caused by heavy metal salts. Materials and methods The study was conducted on 72 mature male rats. The experimental groups were given to drink water with combinations of heavy metal salts for one, two and three months. This type of water is typical for the water basins in the northern districts of the Sumy region. The study of morphological changes in the striated muscles was concluded using light and scanning electron microscopy. Results The data analysis revealed that a prolonged duration of negative factor could intensify sclerotic and edematous processes. The structure of muscle fibers was destroyed, nuclei were deformed and placed irregularly, and many petechial hemorrhages occurred. Besides, cross-striation was irregular, I and A bands were deformed and destroyed, H band was hardly visualized. The inner mitochondrial membrane and cristae become deformed. The symplastic nuclei were placed irregularly within sarcoplasm. Besides, they were swollen. Against swollen and enlarged symplastic nuclei, pyknotic nuclei were also found. The structures of sarcoplasmic reticulum were mainly dilated with deformed and ruptured areas. Conclusion Our study approves that high concentrations of heavy metal salts have a destructive influence on the skeletal striated muscles. PMID:28386464

  5. Impact of better and worse eye damage on quality of life in advanced glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Mizu; Sugisaki, Kenji; Murata, Hiroshi; Hirasawa, Hiroyo; Mayama, Chihiro; Asaoka, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of VF and the VA on vision related quality of life (VRQoL) in advanced glaucoma. Subjects consist of 50 glaucoma patients with mean deviation (MD) less than −20 dB in at least one eye. Patients' VRQoL was assessed using the ‘Sumi questionnaire’. The impact of seven visual measures on VRQoL were compared using principal component regression: MDs of better and worse eyes with 10-2 and 24-2 Humphrey VFs, LogMAR VAs of better and worse eyes and the Esterman score. The root mean of the squared prediction error (RMSE) was calculated using leave-one-out cross validation. Better eye summary measurements were much more influential on VRQoL than corresponding worse eye measurements and Esterman score in every VRQoL task. In conclusion, in advanced glaucoma, VF parameters of the better eye are important for the VRQoL of the patient. PMID:24553352

  6. Phenotypic reversion in analbuminemic rats due to an altered splicing mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Esumi, Hiroyasu; Sugimura, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Serum albumin is regarded as an important and indispensable protein, but analbuminemic rats established by Sumi Nagase in 1977 seems to exhibit few symptoms in spite of an almost total lack of albumin in the serum. The albumin gene of analbuminemic rats was found to have a seven-base-pair deletion in an intron, close to exon-intron junction, resulting in the formation of non-functional mRNA in hepatocytes. Immunostaining for albumin was negative in young analbuminemic rat hepatocytes, but a significant number of immunoreactive hepatocytes were observed in aged rats. The incidence of immunoreactive hepatocytes increased with aging. Surprisingly, many immunoreactive hepatocytes were observed after hepatocarcinogen treatment sometimes in large clusters. Albumin transcripts in analbuminemic rat liver after treatment with carcinogen, showed an altered pattern of exon-skipping. The altered albumin molecules thus synthesized accumulated in cellular organelles. Analbuminemic rats exhibited a high sensitivity in various organs to different types of carcinogens. Further challenges remain regarding the biology of analbuminemic rats. PMID:24019588

  7. Gas dynamic design of the pipe line compressor with 90% efficiency. Model test approval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galerkin, Y.; Rekstin, A.; Soldatova, K.

    2015-08-01

    Gas dynamic design of the pipe line compressor 32 MW was made for PAO SMPO (Sumy, Ukraine). The technical specification requires compressor efficiency of 90%. The customer offered favorable scheme - single-stage design with console impeller and axial inlet. The authors used the standard optimization methodology of 2D impellers. The original methodology of internal scroll profiling was used to minimize efficiency losses. Radically improved 5th version of the Universal modeling method computer programs was used for precise calculation of expected performances. The customer fulfilled model tests in a 1:2 scale. Tests confirmed the calculated parameters at the design point (maximum efficiency of 90%) and in the whole range of flow rates. As far as the authors know none of compressors have achieved such efficiency. The principles and methods of gas-dynamic design are presented below. The data of the 32 MW compressor presented by the customer in their report at the 16th International Compressor conference (September 2014, Saint- Petersburg) and later transferred to the authors.

  8. Anticarcinogenic effects of glycoalkaloids from potatoes against human cervical, liver, lymphoma, and stomach cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel; Lee, Kap-Rang; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, In-Seon; Kozukue, Nobuyuke

    2005-07-27

    Methods were devised for the isolation of large amounts of pure alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine from Dejima potatoes and for the extraction and analysis of total glycoalkaloids from five fresh potato varieties (Dejima, Jowon, Sumi, Toya, and Vora Valley). These compounds were then evaluated in experiments using a tetrazolium microculture (MTT) assay to assess the anticarcinogenic effects of (a) the isolated pure glycoalkaloids separately, (b) artificial mixtures of the two glycoalkaloids, and (c) the total glycoalkaloids isolated from each of the five potato varieties. All samples tested reduced the numbers of the following human cell lines: cervical (HeLa), liver (HepG2), lymphoma (U937), stomach (AGS and KATO III) cancer cells and normal liver (Chang) cells. The results show that (a) the effects of the glycoalkaloids were concentration dependent in the range of 0.1-10 mug/mL (0.117-11.7 nmol/mL); (b) alpha-chaconine was more active than was alpha-solanine; (c) some mixtures exhibited synergistic effects, whereas other produced additive ones; (d) the different cancer cells varied in their susceptibilities to destruction; and (e) the destruction of normal liver cells was generally lower than that of cancer liver cells. The decreases in cell populations were also observed visually by reversed-phase microscopy. The results complement related observations on the anticarcinogenic potential of food ingredients.

  9. Retrieval of Latent Heating from TRMM Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Smith, E. A.; Adler, R. F.; Hou, A. Y.; Meneghini, R.; Simpson, J.; Haddad, Z. S.; Iguchi, T.; Satoh, S.; Kakar, R.; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Kummerow, C. D.; Lang, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Okamoto, K.; Shige, S.; Olson, W. S.; Takayabu, Y.; Tripoli, G. J.; Yang, S.

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation, in driving the global hydrological cycle, strongly influences the behavior of the Earth's weather and climate systems and is central to their variability. Two-thirds of the global rainfall occurs over the Tropics, which leads to its profound effect on the general circulation of the atmosphere. This is because its energetic equivalent, latent heating (LH), is the tropical convective heat engine's primary fuel source as originally emphasized by Riehl and Malkus (1958). At low latitudes, LH stemming from extended bands of rainfall modulates large-scale zonal and meridional circulations and their consequent mass overturnings (e.g., Hartmann et al. 1984; Hack and Schubert 1990). Also, LH is the principal energy source in the creation, growth, vertical structure, and propagation of long-lived tropical waves (e.g., Puri 1987; Lau and Chan 1988). Moreover, the distinct vertical distribution properties of convective and stratiform LH profiles help influence climatic outcomes via their tight control on large-scale circulations (Lau and Peng 1987; Nakazawa 1988; Sui and Lau 1988; Emanuel et al. 1994; Yanai et al. 2000; Sumi and Nakazawa 2002; Schumacher et al. 2004). The purpose of this paper is to describe how LH profiles are being derived from satellite precipitation rate retrievals, focusing on those being made with Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite measurements.

  10. Free-floating planets from core accretion theory: microlensing predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sizheng; Mao, Shude; Ida, Shigeru; Zhu, Wei; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the microlensing event rate and typical time-scales for the free-floating planet (FFP) population that is predicted by the core accretion theory of planet formation. The event rate is found to be ˜1.8 × 10-3 of that for the stellar population. While the stellar microlensing event time-scale peaks at around 20 d, the median time-scale for FFP events (˜0.1 d) is much shorter. Our values for the event rate and the median time-scale are significantly smaller than those required to explain the Sumi et al. result, by factors of ˜13 and ˜16, respectively. The inclusion of planets at wide separations does not change the results significantly. This discrepancy may be too significant for standard versions of both the core accretion theory and the gravitational instability model to explain satisfactorily. Therefore, either a modification to the planet formation theory is required or other explanations to the excess of short-time-scale microlensing events are needed. Our predictions can be tested by ongoing microlensing experiment such as Korean Microlensing Telescope Network, and by future satellite missions such as WFIRST and Euclid.

  11. Olfactory Response and Feeding Preference of Liriomyza huidobrensis (Diptera: Agromyzidae) to Potato Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Rameswor; Jung, Chuleui

    2016-10-01

    Liriomyza huidobrensis (Blanchard) is a serious invasive pest of potato in Korea. In sessile insect herbivores like leafminer flies, host plant choice is a critical decision made by adults for offspring survival, and one that is often influenced by host plant quality. In annual host plants like potato, leafminer choice is sometimes influenced by cultivar characteristics. To determine the basis of host selection, the odor and feeding preferences of adult L. huidobrensis were examined using a five-arm olfactometer offering a choice of five different potato cultivars: 'Chubeak', 'Seohong', 'Goun', 'Dejima', and 'Sumi'. Preferences of adult leafminers varied significantly among potato cultivars. Liriomyza huidobrensis showed a preference for the Goun cultivar in both olfactory and adult feeding tests. When measured 2 wk after release onto actual plants, plant damage ratings and the number of mines were consistent with the feeding preference results. Further studies should examine the influence of cultivar characteristics on larval fitness and adult longevity to develop a resistant potato cultivar through the selection behavior of leafminers.

  12. Sources of SOA gaseous precursors in contrasted urban environments: a focus on mono-aromatic compounds and intermediate volatility compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salameh, Therese; Borbon, Agnès; Ait-Helal, Warda; Afif, Charbel; Sauvage, Stéphane; Locoge, Nadine; Bonneau, Stéphane; Sanchez, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    , SP95 E10, and SP98) and was used to constraint evaporative emissions in order to predict the headspace vapour composition (Harley and Coulter-Burke, 2000). Modelled and observed compositions are in good agreement (differences up to 20%). Therefore, the implemented model is a relevant tool to test the sensitivity of BTEX and other VOCs ambient composition to evaporative emissions of fuels with regards to their composition. Such analysis will be extended to other target cities and similarities/differences will be presented regarding regional characteristics. This work was supported by the Ile de France region, Life and PHOTOPAQ grant, PICS-CNRS, ENVIMED and ChArMEx. We would like to thank Laurence Dépelchin and Thierry Léonardis for technical support and AIRPARIF for providing the data. Borbon, A., et al. (2013) Emission ratios of anthropogenic VOC in northern mid-latitude megacities: observations vs. emission inventories in Los Angeles and Paris, J. Geophys. Res. 118, 2041 - 2057. Harley, R. and Coulter-Burke, S. (2000) Relating Liquid Fuel and Headspace Vapor Composition for California Reformulated Gasoline Samples Containing Ethanol, Environ. Sci. Technol. 34, 4088-4094. Ait-Helal, W.; Borbon, A.; Sauvage, S.; et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. vol. 14 , No. 19 , p. 10439-10464

  13. Analysis of the influence of tectonics on the evolution valley network based on the SRTM DEM and the relationship of automatically extracted lineaments and the tectonic faults, Jemma River basin, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusák, Michal

    2016-04-01

    visualization in GIS identifies a larger number of shorter lineaments than lineaments by visual interpretation. Key words: valley network, lineaments, faults, azimuth, Jemma River basin, Ethiopian Highlands GANI, N., D., ABDELSALAM, M., G., GERA, S., GANI, M., R. (2009): Stratigraphic and structural evolution of the Blue Nile Basin, Northweastern Ethiopian Plateau. Geologic Journal, 44, s. 30-56. KAZMIN, V. (1975): Geological Map of Ethiopia. Geological Survey of Ethiopia, Adrie Ababa, Ethiopia. MANGESHA, T., CHERNET, T., HARO, W. (1996): Geological Map Of Ethiopia (1: 250,000). Geological Survey of Ethiopia: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. PIK, R., MARTY, B., CARIGNAN, J., LAVÉ, J. (2003): Stability of the Upper Nile drainage network (Ethiopia) deduces from (U/Th)/He thermochronometry: implications for uplift and erosion of the Afar plume dome. and Planetary Science Letters, 215, s. 73 - 88.

  14. [Sugar content in non-alcoholic beverages and dietary recemmendations for children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Bilek, Maciej; Rybakowa, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Wprowadzenie. Wzrost podaży cukrów prostych w diecie mieszkańców krajów wysokorozwiniętych związany jest m.in. z rosnącą konsumpcją napojów bezalkoholowych, dla których udowodniono związek z epidemią otyłości, szczególnie wśród dzieci i młodzieży. W tym kontekście wskazywane są napoje typu soft drink, słodzone najczęściej syropem glukozowo-fruktozowym, tj. napoje typu cola, tonik, ice tea, czy lemoniady. Napoje, soki i nektary owocowe w powszechnej świadomości wymieniane są jako zdrowa alternatywa napojów soft drink. Nie zwraca się jednak uwagi na fakt wysokiej zawartości cukrów prostych i sacharozy w tych produktach. Cel pracy oznaczenie zawartości cukrów prostych i sacharozy, występujących w popularnych wśród dzieci i młodzieży napojach bezalkoholowych. Materiał i metody. 80 napojów bezalkoholowych typu cola, tonik, lemoniada, ice tea, wód smakowych, soków owocowych, nektarów owocowych oraz napojów owocowych. Ocenę zawartości cukrów prostych i sacharozy prowadzono metodą wysokosprawnej chromatografii cieczowej (HPLC). Wyniki. W badanych napojach bezalkoholowych występowały cukry proste (glukoza i fruktoza) oraz sacharoza. Produktem o najniższej zawartości sumy cukrów była woda smakowa o smaku cytrynowym na bazie wody mineralnej (2,72 g/100 ml). W grupie soków, nektarów i napojów owocowych stwierdzono najwyższe sumaryczne zawartości sumy cukrów spośród badanych napojów bezalkoholowych (12,94 g/100 ml dla nektaru aroniowego i 12,76 g/100ml dla soku z granatu i winogron). Wnioski. Wysoka zawartość cukrów prostych i sacharozy w badanych napojach bezalkoholowych skłania do twierdzenia, że ich producenci powinni zostać zobligowani do umieszczania na etykietach ostrzeżeń adresowanych do pacjentów cierpiących na zaburzenia gospodarki węglowodanowej, zaś w programach edukacyjnych, adresowanych do dzieci i młodzieży chorujących na cukrzycę, należałoby wprowadzić informacje dotycz

  15. Obituary: Jason G. Porter, 1954-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2005-12-01

    development of a solar ultraviolet magnetograph instrument (SUMI) capable of measuring vector magnetic fields in the upper chromosphere and transition region where the magnetic reconnection that powers solar flares and CMEs is believed to occur. He continued to provide inspiring leadership to the development of SUMI up until the last month of his life. Jason was admired by his colleagues on both a professional and personal level. He also had a rich life outside of his professional work. He loved the outdoors - hiking, camping, and fishing in particular. He loved music. Bluegrass was one of his favorites. He played the steel guitar, the Dobro, and the trombone, and spent many evenings playing in a local bluegrass band. He also loved finely crafted lagers and ales and would occasionally bring some strange brew to liven up an evening of poker. Jason and Linda have two sons, Graham (13) and Allen (11). All who knew him well will miss him dearly.

  16. The electronic structure of epitaxially strained iridate thin films and superlattices from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Johannes; Fennie, Craig J.

    2012-02-01

    Within the Ruddlesden-Popper iridates Srn+1IrnO3n+1, strong spin-orbit interactions lead to the formation of a half-filled, narrow Jeff=1/2 band and filled Jeff=3/2 bands. This places the iridates in the vicinity of a Mott transition, which is sensitive to perturbations in crystal structure, despite relatively weak on-site Coulomb interactions [1]. For example, Sr2IrO4 (n=1) is an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator that displays an almost rigid coupling between spin canting and IrO6 octahedron rotations [2], while epitaxially stabilized SrIrO3 (n=∞) is a correlated metal. In this talk, we will discuss from first-principles within the LDA+SO+U approach the possibility to engineer the electronic structure of SrIrO3 and CaIrO3 thin films using epitaxial strain and by creating superlattices of the form (AIrO3)m(A'BO3)m' with A, A' = Ca, Sr. [1] S.J. Moon, H. Jin, K.W. Kim, W.S. Choi, Y.S. Lee, J. Yu, G. Cao, A. Sumi, H. Funakubo, C. Bernhard, and T.W. Noh, PRL 101, 226402 (2008). [2] B.J. Kim, H. Jin, S.J. Moon, J.-Y. Kim, B.-G. Park, C.S. Leem, J. Yu, T.W. Noh, C. Kim, S.-J. Oh, J.-H. Park, V. Durairaj, G. Cao, and E. Rotenberg, PRL 101, 076402 (2008).

  17. Mapping Mortality and Geophysical Features During a Heat Wave in Los Angeles County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, L.

    2011-12-01

    With climate change, heat waves are predicted to increase in intensity and duration, particularly in areas where they have occurred previously. Human mortality increases during heat waves, and that increase may vary by community due to a variety of factors including differing geophysical and built environment features. In July 2006, California experienced a statewide heat wave that was unprecedented in duration, lasting 10 days in much of the state, and longer in some areas. To explore heat wave health impacts by community, we focused on Los Angeles County, selected for its urban density and diverse social and geographic landscapes. We calculated the ratio of deaths during the heat wave period (July 15 - Aug 1) to deaths in reference days from the non-heat wave period in the same summer. The raw and empirical Bayes smoothed rate ratios were mapped by census tract (average population size approximately 5000). We then used spatial scanning procedures to identify census tract clusters of high and low mortality. Onto the heat mortality maps, we overlaid such geographic and built environment characteristics as elevation, recordings from temperature monitors, building climate zone boundaries, and air conditioning use. In this presentation, we will discuss the potential relationship between mortality and geophysical and built environment features. In the future, we will expand this analysis statewide and share our findings with local stakeholders to explore factors which may make their communities more resilient (low health impact) or vulnerable (high health impact). Ultimately, knowledge of vulnerability and resiliency factors may inform future applied research and climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. Authors: Lauren Joe, Daniel Smith, Svetlana Smorodinksy, Sumi Hoshiko, Martha Harnly Environmental Health Investigations Branch, California Department of Public Health

  18. Complications after treating esophageal strictures with prostheses and stents – 20 years’ experience

    PubMed Central

    Brzeziński, Daniel; Rębowski, Marek; Kozak, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over 80% of patients with esophageal cancer are qualified only for palliative treatment. The main goal of the therapy is to eliminate symptoms of dysphagia. Aim To analyze complications after insertion of prostheses and stents in patients with inoperable cancer of the esophagus/cardia. Material and methods From 1996 to 2015 prostheses of the esophagus were implanted in 1309 patients. In the strictures of the lower part of the esophagus, Barbin-Mousseau prostheses (102 cases) and Häring prostheses (324 cases) were placed. In the strictures of the upper and middle part of the esophagus, Wilson-Cook prostheses (65 cases) and Sumi prostheses (51 cases) were implanted using rigid oesophagoscopy. Since 2001, 867 esophageal stents have been implanted. Results Complications occurred in 146 (11%) patients, including 7 (0.6%) cases of death. The most common complication was the recurrence of swallowing disorders (74 patients). In 51 patients, tumor overgrowth over the stent/prosthesis was responsible for that symptom, and in 23 patients its clogging. A fistula (22 cases) and the passage of the prosthesis/stent (25 cases) were the second most common group of complications. Compression of the trachea, bleeding, and dehiscence of wounds occurred in a total of 18 patients. Complications were mostly treated through the repositioning of the prosthesis/stent or the insertion of an additional one. Conclusions The most common complications after esophageal prosthetics are the recurrence of dysphagia, a fistula and the displacement of the prosthesis/stent. The basic treatment of complications is the repositioning or insertion of an additional prosthesis. PMID:28194251

  19. A case study on toxicological aspects of the pest and disease control in the production of the high-quality raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Sadło, Stanisław; Szpyrka, Ewa; Piechowicz, Bartosz; Grodzicki, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    The field studies on the residue levels of the fungicides and insecticides used in commercial raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) plantation have been performed. Starting on the first day of harvesting (on June 19), 20 laboratory samples of fruit, 10 laboratory samples of leaves and 4 samples of soil were analyzed and the residue levels were compared to the Maximum Residue Limits (MRL) and Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADI). All analyses were carried out using extraction method and gas chromatography technique. Esfenwalerate (Sumi-alpha 050 EC) and beta-cyfluthrin (Bulldock 025 EC), the insecticides belonging to the group of synthetic pyrethroids, were not found in harvested ripe fruits, while cypermethrin residues (Cyperkill 25 EC) applied on May 24, 25 days later was still found on low levels in fruits (0.026 mg kg(-1)) and in leaves (2.58 mg kg(-1)). In turn, residues of chlorpyrifos (Dursban 480 EC), applied to the soil on May 15 against the cockchafers Melolontha melolontha and Otiorhynchus sp., were found at the level 0.004 mg kg(-1). The content of pesticides in ripe fruits depended mainly on the dose and on the time that has elapsed from the date of their application and were as follows: boscalid -0.950, pyrimethanil -0.917, pyraclostrobin -0.253 cypermethrin -0.026 and chlorpyrifos -0.004 mg kg(-1) while in leaves: boscalid -30.64, pyrimethanil -8.13, pyraclostrobin -15.82, cypermethrin -2.58 and chlorpyrifos -0.15 mg kg(-1). The highest average daily intake was in the case of boscalid, and in fruits and leaves reached the levels 0.205 and 6.63, in total 0.33% and 12.18% of ADI, respectively.

  20. CAN THE MASSES OF ISOLATED PLANETARY-MASS GRAVITATIONAL LENSES BE MEASURED BY TERRESTRIAL PARALLAX?

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Botzler, C. S.; Bray, J. C.; Cherrie, J. M.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Philpott, L. C.; Abe, F.; Muraki, Y.; Albrow, M. D.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Christie, G. W.; Natusch, T.; Dionnet, Z.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Heyrovský, D.; McCormick, J. M.; Skowron, J.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Recently Sumi et al. reported evidence for a large population of planetary-mass objects (PMOs) that are either unbound or orbit host stars in orbits ≥10 AU. Their result was deduced from the statistical distribution of durations of gravitational microlensing events observed by the MOA collaboration during 2006 and 2007. Here we study the feasibility of measuring the mass of an individual PMO through microlensing by examining a particular event, MOA-2011-BLG-274. This event was unusual as the duration was short, the magnification high, the source-size effect large, and the angular Einstein radius small. Also, it was intensively monitored from widely separated locations under clear skies at low air masses. Choi et al. concluded that the lens of the event may have been a PMO but they did not attempt a measurement of its mass. We report here a re-analysis of the event using re-reduced data. We confirm the results of Choi et al. and attempt a measurement of the mass and distance of the lens using the terrestrial parallax effect. Evidence for terrestrial parallax is found at a 3σ level of confidence. The best fit to the data yields the mass and distance of the lens as 0.80 ± 0.30 M {sub J} and 0.80 ± 0.25 kpc respectively. We exclude a host star to the lens out to a separation ∼40 AU. Drawing on our analysis of MOA-2011-BLG-274 we propose observational strategies for future microlensing surveys to yield sharper results on PMOs including those down to super-Earth mass.

  1. Tug-of-war and the infinity Laplacian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, Yuval; Schramm, Oded; Sheffield, Scott; Wilson, David B.

    2009-01-01

    We prove that every bounded Lipschitz function F on a subset Y of a length space X admits a tautest extension to X , i.e., a unique Lipschitz extension u:X rightarrow {R} for which operatorname{Lip}_U u =operatorname{Lip}_{partial U} u for all open U subset Xsetminus Y . This was previously known only for bounded domains in {R}^n , in which case u is infinity harmonic; that is, a viscosity solution to Δ_infty u = 0 , where Δ_infty u = \\vertnabla u\\vert^{-2} sum_{i,j} u_{x_i} u_{x_ix_j} u_{x_j}. We also prove the first general uniqueness results for Δ_{infty} u = g on bounded subsets of {R}^n (when g is uniformly continuous and bounded away from 0) and analogous results for bounded length spaces. The proofs rely on a new game-theoretic description of u . Let u^\\varepsilon(x) be the value of the following two-player zero-sum game, called tug-of-war: fix x_0=xin X setminus Y . At the k{^{{th}}} turn, the players toss a coin and the winner chooses an x_k with d(x_k, x_{k-1})< \\varepsilon . The game ends when x_k in Y , and player I's payoff is F(x_k) - frac{\\varepsilon^2}{2}sum_{i=0}^{k-1} g(x_i) . We show that Vert u^\\varepsilon- uVert _{infty} to 0 . Even for bounded domains in {R}^n , the game theoretic description of infinity harmonic functions yields new intuition and estimates; for instance, we prove power law bounds for infinity harmonic functions in the unit disk with boundary values supported in a δ -neighborhood of a Cantor set on the unit circle.

  2. An analytical continuation approach for evaluating emission lineshapes of molecular aggregates and the adequacy of multichromophoric Förster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchi, Leonardo; Costagliola, Gianluca; Ishizaki, Akihito; Giorda, Paolo

    2013-05-01

    In large photosynthetic chromophore-protein complexes not all chromophores are coupled strongly, and thus the situation is well described by formation of delocalized states in certain domains of strongly coupled chromophores. In order to describe excitation energy transfer among different domains without performing extensive numerical calculations, one of the most popular techniques is a generalization of Förster theory to multichromophoric aggregates (generalized Förster theory) proposed by Sumi [J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 252 (1999), 10.1021/jp983477u] and Scholes and Fleming [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 1854 (2000), 10.1021/jp993435l]. The aim of this paper is twofold. In the first place, by means of analytic continuation and a time convolutionless quantum master equation approach, a theory of emission lineshape of multichromophoric systems or molecular aggregates is proposed. In the second place, a comprehensive framework that allows for a clear, compact, and effective study of the multichromophoric approach in the full general version proposed by Jang, Newton, and Silbey [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 218301 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.218301] is developed. We apply the present theory to simple paradigmatic systems and we show on one hand the effectiveness of time-convolutionless techniques in deriving lineshape operators and on the other hand we show how the multichromophoric approach can give significant improvements in the determination of energy transfer rates in particular when the systems under study are not the purely Förster regime. The presented scheme allows for an effective implementation of the multichromophoric Förster approach which may be of use for simulating energy transfer dynamics in large photosynthetic aggregates, for which massive computational resources are usually required. Furthermore, our method allows for a systematic comparison of multichromophoric Föster and generalized Förster theories and for a clear understanding of their respective limits

  3. Low stress drops observed for M1.5-5.6 Earthquakes During the 2011 Prague, Oklahoma sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, E. S.; Sumy, D. F.; Neighbors, C.; Keranen, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    In November 2011, three M≥4.8 earthquakes and thousands of aftershocks occurred along the structurally complex Wilzetta fault system near Prague, Oklahoma. Previous studies suggest that fluid injection in nearby wells was responsible for inducing the M4.8 foreshock [Keranen et al., 2013], which subsequently triggered the M5.6 mainshock [Sumy et al., 2014]. We examine earthquake source properties using waveforms collected by 47 temporary and permanent seismic stations installed within ~100 km of the events. Brune stress drops are calculated for a subset of 278 aftershocks of the Prague, Oklahoma sequence that range in magnitude from M1.0-4.9. We compute the horizontal amplitude spectra and smooth the spectra with a Konno and Ohmachi [1998] filter. We then assume a standard Brune source spectral model and iteratively solve for seismic moment (Mo), corner frequency (fc) and kappa (κ) using a Gauss-Newton method. We are able to recover reasonably fit Mo, fc, and κ for 172 earthquakes, but find the Mo determined by spectra fit are consistently overestimated for events with M<1.5. Therefore only stress drops for the 149 events with initial Mo > 1.5 are reported. The median stress drop is ~0.3 MPa (3 bars), which is significantly lower than typical values (10+ MPa) observed for CEUS events. We find minimal dependence of stress drop on focal depth for the depth range from 1-10 km. However, we observe some spatial variation of stress drops, with higher stress drops observed near the intersection of the mainshock rupture plane with the fault plane associated with the M4.8 aftershock. The low stress drops observed for events on both the foreshock and mainshock fault plane may indicate both of these segments of the Wilzetta fault system were influenced by local wastewater injection. Our results echo those of several recent studies [Hough, 2014; Sun and Hartzell, 2014], which conclude that induced earthquakes have lower stress drops than tectonic events.

  4. Constraining the Frequency of Free-floating Planets from a Synthesis of Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Survey Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2017-01-01

    A microlensing survey by Sumi et al. exhibits an overabundance of short-timescale events (STEs; tE < 2 days) relative to what is expected from known stellar populations and a smooth power-law extrapolation down to the brown dwarf regime. This excess has been interpreted as a population of approximately Jupiter-mass objects that outnumber main-sequence stars nearly twofold; however the microlensing data alone cannot distinguish between events due to wide-separation (a ≳ 10 au) and free-floating planets. Assuming these STEs are indeed due to planetary-mass objects, we aim to constrain the fraction of these events that can be explained by bound but wide-separation planets. We fit the observed timescale distribution with a lens mass function comprised of brown dwarfs, main-sequence stars, and stellar remnants, finding and thus corroborating the initial identification of an excess of STEs. We then include a population of bound planets that are expected not to show signatures of the primary lens (host) in their microlensing light curves and that are also consistent with results from representative microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. We find that bound planets alone cannot explain the entire STE excess without violating the constraints from the surveys we consider and thus some fraction of these events must be due to free-floating planets, if our model for bound planets holds. We estimate a median fraction of STEs due to free-floating planets to be f = 0.67 (0.23 ≤ f ≤ 0.85 at 95% confidence) when assuming “hot-start” planet evolutionary models and f = 0.58 (0.14 ≤ f ≤ 0.83 at 95% confidence) for “cold-start” models. Assuming a delta-function distribution of free-floating planets of mass {m}p=2 {M}{Jup} yields a number of free-floating planets per main-sequence star of N = 1.4 (0.48 ≤ N ≤ 1.8 at 95% confidence) in the “hot-start” case and N = 1.2 (0.29 ≤ N ≤ 1.8 at 95% confidence) in the “cold-start” case.

  5. Photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer kinetics in small unilamellar vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Kumbhakar, Manoj; Nath, Sukhendu; Pal, Haridas

    2007-11-21

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from N,N-dimethylaniline to some coumarin derivatives has been studied in small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of the phospholipid, DL-{alpha}-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine, using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching, both below and above the phase transition temperature of the vesicles. The primary interest was to examine whether Marcus inversion [H. Sumi and R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] could be observed for the present ET systems in these organized assemblies. The influence of the topology of SUVs on the photophysical properties of the reactants and consequently on their ET kinetics has also been investigated. Absorption and fluorescence spectral data of the coumarins in SUVs and the variation of their fluorescence decays with temperature indicate that the dyes are localized in the bilayer of the SUVs. Time-resolved area normalized emission spectra analysis, however, reveals that the dyes are distributed in two different microenvironments in the SUVs, which we attribute to the two leaflets of the bilayer, one toward bulk water and the other toward the inner water pool. The microenvironments in the two leaflets are, however, not indicated to be that significantly different. Time-resolved anisotropy decays were biexponential for all the dyes in SUVs, and this has been interpreted in terms of the compound motion model according to which the dye molecules can experience a fast wobbling-in-cone type of motion as well as a slow overall rotating motion of the cone containing the molecule. The expected bimolecular diffusion-controlled rates in SUVs, as estimated by comparing the microviscosities in SUVs (determined from rotational correlation times) and that in acetonitrile solution, are much slower than the observed fluorescence quenching rates, suggesting that reactant diffusion (translational) does not play any role in the quenching kinetics in the present systems. Accordingly, clear inversions are

  6. A comprehensive classification of complex statistical systems and an axiomatic derivation of their entropy and distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanel, R.; Thurner, S.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the hope that the thermodynamical framework might be extended to strongly interacting statistical systems —complex systems in particular— a number of generalized entropies has been proposed in the past. So far the understanding of their fundamental origin has remained unclear. Here we address this question from first principles. We start by observing that many statistical systems fulfill a set of three general conditions (Shannon-Khinchin axioms, K1-K3). A fourth condition (separability) holds for non-interacting, uncorrelated or Markovian systems only (Shannon-Khinchin axiom, K4). If all four axioms hold the Shannon theorem provides a unique entropy, S=\\sum_i^W p_i \\ln p_i , i.e. Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. Here we ask about the consequences of violating the 4th axiom while assuming the first three to hold. By a simple scaling argument we prove that under these conditions each statistical system is characterized by a unique pair of scaling exponents (c, d) in the large size limit. These exponents define equivalence classes for all interacting and non-interacting systems and parametrize a unique entropy, S_{c,d}\\propto \\sum_i ^W \\Gamma(d+1, 1- c \\ln p_i) , where Γ(a,b) is the incomplete Gamma function. It covers all systems respecting K1-K3. A series of known entropies can be classified in terms of these equivalence classes. Corresponding distribution functions are special forms of Lambert-{\\cal W} exponentials containing —as special cases— Boltzmann, stretched exponential and Tsallis distributions (power laws) —all widely abundant in Nature. In the derivation we assume S=\\sum_i g(p_i) , with g some function, however more general entropic forms can be classified along the same lines. This is to our knowledge the first ab initio justification for generalized entropies. We discuss a physical example displaying two sets of scaling exponents depending on the external parameters.

  7. Identifying Areas of the Visual Field Important for Quality of Life in Patients with Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Hiroshi; Hirasawa, Hiroyo; Aoyama, Yuka; Sugisaki, Kenji; Araie, Makoto; Mayama, Chihiro; Aihara, Makoto; Asaoka, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to create a vision-related quality of life (VRQoL) prediction system to identify visual field (VF) test points associated with decreased VRQoL in patients with glaucoma. Method VRQoL score was surveyed in 164 patients with glaucoma using the ‘Sumi questionnaire’. A binocular VF was created from monocular VFs by using the integrated VF (IVF) method. VRQoL score was predicted using the ‘Random Forest’ method, based on visual acuity (VA) of better and worse eyes (better-eye and worse-eye VA) and total deviation (TD) values from the IVF. For comparison, VRQoL scores were regressed (linear regression) against: (i) mean of TD (IVF MD); (ii) better-eye VA; (iii) worse-eye VA; and (iv) IVF MD and better- and worse-eye VAs. The rank of importance of IVF test points was identified using the Random Forest method. Results The root mean of squared prediction error associated with the Random Forest method (0.30 to 1.97) was significantly smaller than those with linear regression models (0.34 to 3.38, p<0.05, ten-fold cross validation test). Worse-eye VA was the most important variable in all VRQoL tasks. In general, important VF test points were concentrated along the horizontal meridian. Particular areas of the IVF were important for different tasks: peripheral superior and inferior areas in the left hemifield for the ‘letters and sentences’ task, peripheral, mid-peripheral and para-central inferior regions for the ‘walking’ task, the peripheral superior region for the ‘going out’ task, and a broad scattered area across the IVF for the ‘dining’ task. Conclusion The VRQoL prediction model with the Random Forest method enables clinicians to better understand patients’ VRQoL based on standard clinical measurements of VA and VF. PMID:23520528

  8. Multiple Field Induced Transitions in the Dipolar Pyrochlore Gd2 Ti2 O_7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastry, B. Sriram

    2003-03-01

    Pyrochlore frustrated magnetic systems have received considerable attention after the experiment by Ramirez and coworkers on the ``Spin Ice'' compound DTO or Dy2 Ti2 O_7, a magnetic realization of entropic Ice originally studied by Pauling, Bernal and Fowler. DTO consists of effective spin half moments residing on the Pyrochlore lattice, but by changing the rare earth, one has realizations of the XY and also Heisenberg models. GTO, or Gd2 Ti2 O7 is a Heisenberg system, where the interactions are predominantly dipolar with a weak isotropic superexchange. This enables one to study almost for the first time, the rich and novel behavior of spins living on undistorted cubic systems with dipolar interactions, in contrast to the well understood spin flop transition in uniaxial magnets. The thermodynamics in the presence of a magnetic field of (powder) GTO shows a remarkably rich phase diagram[1], with several phase transitions occurring at a given temperature as the field is varied. In an effort to understand this, we have studied a 4- sublattice mean field theory[1] wherein the spins interact via a dipolar interaction plus superexchange. This mean field theory is intriguingly non trivial and reproduces the observed transitions with only one free parameter (J). The magnetic field partially lifts the degeneracy of the six zero field states in a specific ways depending on the direction of the field, signaling the transitions. The nature of some of the transitions is best described in terms of a nematic type order parameter T^α, β=1/4 sum_i=1^4 m^αi m^βi where mi is the sublattice magnetization vector. This talk describes the above experiment and theory, its recent extensions, and also some more recent experiments on GTO. [1] "Multiple Phase Transitions in a Geometrically-Frustrated Dipolar Spin System Gd_2Ti_2O_7, (A P Ramirez, B S Shastry , A Hayashi, J J Krajewski, D A Huse, and R J Cava), Phys. Rev. Letts. 89, 067202 (2002).

  9. Induced Seismicity: Balancing the Scientific Process With the Need for Rapid Communication of Evolving Seismic Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, E. S.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Llenos, A. L.; Rubinstein, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation, we outline the USGS response to dramatically increased earthquake activity in the central and eastern US, with a focus on Oklahoma. Using the November 2011 Prague, OK earthquake sequence as an example, we describe the tensions between the need to conduct thorough scientific investigations while providing timely information to local, state, and federal government agencies, and the public. In the early morning hours of November 5, 2011 a M4.8 earthquake struck near the town of Prague, Oklahoma and was followed by a M5.6 earthquake just over 20 hours later. The mainshock was widely felt across the central US, causing damage to homes close to the epicenter and injuring at least 2 people. Within hours of the initial event several portable instruments were installed and following the mainshock a larger seismic deployment was mounted (Keranen et al., 2013). A sizeable earthquake in the central or eastern US is always of scientific interest due to the dearth of seismic data available for assessing seismic hazard. The Prague sequence garnered especially strong scientific and public interest when a link between the sequence and injection of wastewater at several local deep wells was postulated. Therefore, there was a need to provide immediate information as it became available. However, in the first few days to months it was impossible to confidently confirm or refute whether the seismicity was linked to injection, but it was known that the foreshock occurred close to several deep injection wells and many of the events were shallow; thus, the sequence warranted further study. Over the course of the next few years, several studies built the case that the Prague sequence was likely induced by wastewater injection (Keranen et al., 2013; Sumy et al., 2014; McGarr, 2014) and additional studies suggested that the changes in seismicity throughout Oklahoma were not due to natural variations in seismicity rates (Llenos and Michael, 2013; Ellsworth, 2013). These

  10. Safe Vibrations of Spilling Basin Explosions at "Gotvand Olya Dam" Using Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshandeh Amnieh, Hassan; Bahadori, Moein

    2014-12-01

    Ground vibration is an undesirable outcome of an explosion which can have destructive effects on the surrounding environment and structures. Peak Particle Velocity (PPV) is a determining factor in evaluation of the damage caused by an explosion. To predict the ground vibration caused by blasting at the Gotvand Olya Dam (GOD) spilling basin, thirty 3-component records (totally 90) from 19 blasts were obtained using 3 VIBROLOC seismographs. Minimum and the maximum distance from the center of the exploding block to the recording station were set to be 11 and 244 meters, respectively. To evaluate allowable safe vibration and determining the permissible explosive charge weight, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) was employed with Back Propagation (BP) and 3 hidden layers. The mean square error and the correlation coefficient of the network in this study were found to be 1.95 and 0.995, respectively, which compared to those obtained from the known empirical correlations, indicating substantially more accurate prediction. Considering the network high accuracy and precision in predicting vibrations caused by such blasting operations, the nearest distance from the center of the exploding block at this study was 11 m, and considering the standard allowable vibration of 120 mm/sec for heavy concrete structures, the maximum permissible explosive weight per delay was estimated to be 47.00 Kg. These results could be employed in subsequent safer blasting operation designs. Wibracje gruntu to niepożądany skutek prowadzenia prac strzałowych, które mogą negatywnie wpływać na otaczające środowisko oraz znajdujące się w sąsiedztwie budowle. Głównym wskaźnikiem używanym przy określaniu szkód spowodowanych przez wybuchy jest wskaźnik maksymalnej prędkości cząstek (PPV). Przy prognozowaniu wibracji terenu wskutek prac strzałowych prowadzonych na tamie Gotvand Olya i w zbiorniku zbadano zapisy 3-składnikowych prędkości ( w sumie 90 zapisów) z 13 wybuch

  11. Ionospheric parameter analysis techniques and anomaly identification in periods of ionospheric perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrikova, Oksana; Polozov, Yury; Fetisova Glushkova, Nadejda; Shevtsov, Boris

    In the present paper we suggest intellectual techniques intended for the analysis of ionospheric parameters. These techniques are directed at studying dynamic processes in the "magnetosphere-ionosphere" system during perturbations. Using the combination of the wavelet transform and neural networks, the authors have developed a technique of approximating the time variation of ionospheric parameters. This technique allows us to make data predictions and detect anomalies in the ionosphere. Multiscale component approximations of the critical frequency of the ionosphere layer F2 were constructed. These approximations can be presented in the following form: begin{center} c_{l,k+m} (t) = varphi_m(3) Bigl (sum_i omega(3_{mi}) varphi_i(2) Bigl (sum_j omega(2_{ij}) varphi_j(1) Bigl (sum_k omega(1_{jk}) c_{l,k} (t) Bigr ) Bigr ) Bigr ) , where c_{l,k} = bigl < f , Psi_{l,k} bigr > ; Psi_{l,k} (t) = 2(l/2) Psi (2(l) t - k) is the wavelet basis; omega(1_{jk}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron j of the network input layer; omega(2_{ij}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron i of the network hidden layer; omega(3_{mi}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron m of the network output layer; varphi(1_j) (z) = varphi(2_i) (z) = (1)/(1+exp(-z))) ; varphi(3_m) (z) = x*z+y . The coefficients c_{l,k} can be found as a result of transforming the original function f into the space with the scale l . In order to obtain the approximations of the time variation of data, neural networks can be united in groups. In the paper we have suggested a multicomponent time variation model of ionospheric parameters, which makes it possible to perform the analysis of the ionospheric dynamic mode, receive predictions about parameter variations, and detect anomalies in periods of perturbations. The multicomponent model also allows us to fill missing values in critical frequency data taking into account diurnal and seasonal variations. Identification of the model is based on combining

  12. Nonadditive entropy: The concept and its use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsallis, C.

    2009-06-01

    The thermodynamical concept of entropy was introduced by Clausius in 1865 in order to construct the exact differential dS = δ Q/ T , where δ Q is the heat transfer and the absolute temperature T its integrating factor. A few years later, in the period 1872-1877, it was shown by Boltzmann that this quantity can be expressed in terms of the probabilities associated with the microscopic configurations of the system. We refer to this fundamental connection as the Boltzmann-Gibbs (BG) entropy, namely (in its discrete form) ensuremath S_{BG}=-ksum_{i=1}^W p_i ln p_i , where k is the Boltzmann constant, and { p i} the probabilities corresponding to the W microscopic configurations (hence ∑W i=1 p i = 1 . This entropic form, further discussed by Gibbs, von Neumann and Shannon, and constituting the basis of the celebrated BG statistical mechanics, is additive. Indeed, if we consider a system composed by any two probabilistically independent subsystems A and B ( i.e., ensuremath p_{ij}^{A+B}=p_i^A p_j^B, forall(i,j) , we verify that ensuremath S_{BG}(A+B)=S_{BG}(A)+S_{BG}(B) . If a system is constituted by N equal elements which are either independent or quasi-independent ( i.e., not too strongly correlated, in some specific nonlocal sense), this additivity guarantees SBG to be extensive in the thermodynamical sense, i.e., that ensuremath S_{BG}(N) ∝ N in the N ≫ 1 limit. If, on the contrary, the correlations between the N elements are strong enough, then the extensivity of SBG is lost, being therefore incompatible with classical thermodynamics. In such a case, the many and precious relations described in textbooks of thermodynamics become invalid. Along a line which will be shown to overcome this difficulty, and which consistently enables the generalization of BG statistical mechanics, it was proposed in 1988 the entropy ensuremath S_q=k [1-sum_{i=1}^W p_i^q]/(q-1) (qin{R}; S_1=S_{BG}) . In the context of cybernetics and information theory, this and similar forms

  13. Analysis of geomagnetic data and cosmic ray variations in periods of magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrikova, Oksana; Zalyaev, Timur; Solovev, Igor; Shevtsov, Boris

    field and predicting strong magnetic storms. Using the combination of the wavelet transform and neural networks, we have developed a technique of approximating the time variation of cosmic-ray data. This technique allows us to perform detailed analysis of geomagnetic data and detect anomalies in periods of high solar activity. Approximations of large-scale time variation components of cosmic-ray data have been obtained in the following form: [ c_{j,n+1}(t)=\\varphi^3_m Biggl (sum_i omega^3_{mi}\\varphi^2_i biggl (sum_l omega^2_{il}\\varphi^1_lBigl(sum_n omega^1_{ln}c_{j,n}(t)Bigr )biggr ) Biggr ) ] where c_{j,n}=< y, phi_{j,n} > ;phi_{j,n}=2(j/2) phi(2(j(t)-n)) is the scaling function, omega(1_{ln}) are the weights of the neurons of the network input layer l,omega(2_{il}) are the weights of the neurons of the network hidden layer i, omega(3_{mi}) are the weights of the neurons of the network output layer m, varphi(1_l(z)=varphi^2_i(z)=(2)/(1+exp(-2z))-1) ,varphi(3_m(z)) =a*z+b. Coefficients c_{j,n} are the result of transforming of the original function y to the space with the scale j. Analysis of long geomagnetic data from the Paratunka observatory (Kamchatka region, Russia) provided quantitative estimates of the storminess degree of the geomagnetic field before and during magnetic storms. Furthermore, we have managed to identify local weak increases of the field perturbations prior to the main phase of storms. The intensity of field perturbations rises on average 2.5 days before the onset of a storm. Abnormal time periods connected with increased solar activity have been detected in the flow of cosmic rays. Comparison of the results with the geomagnetic data has shown that the anomalies in the cosmic ray variations occur in periods of strong geomagnetic perturbations. The tools and techniques suggested in the present work, together with other methods of data -analysis will help forecast space weather, estimate more accurately the condition of the Earth’s magnetic

  14. Why should we pay more for layout designers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Samee U.

    2003-12-01

    ,G2j^2,....,Gmj^2 6. Compute I, (Mij) in each Gij^2 7. Compute Si=si(u)|u belongs to Mij 8. Find the minimum index i such that w(Si)<= w(D) 9. Return Sj 10. Compute G'=min Mij belongs V [max si sum{i=0}^{|Sj|] 11. Return G' Theorem 2 The PNL algorithm is complete and will identify a solution, if there exists one. Proof (Trivial and not included due to space) Theorem 3 The PNL algorithm has a lower bound of 4-approximation to the optimal algorithm. Proof (Not included due to space, but the basic argument, is due to the fact that picking a node v with 2-epsilon in G^2, would required the neighbors to be picked in G^4, thus the PNL is no better than 4-epsilon, where epsilon >0) Experiments We made some initial experiments, which are showing promissing results with savings in fiber, equipment cost, due to space, and inital phase of the experiments, we are not including the results here. P.S. My appologies for exceeding the text limit. There is much more detail to the formal proof, I hope the idea is still conveyed. There are also 2 figures which will be faxed.

  15. Feasibility Analysis of Groundwater Abstraction for Gas Shale Fracturing in the Lublin Basin (Eastern Poland) / Ocena Możliwości Poboru Wód Podziemnych Do Szczelinowania Łupków Gazonośnych W Basenie Lubelskim (Wschodnia Polska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, Robert; Macuda, Jan

    2015-03-01

    ęści znajdujących się w zasięgu obszaru badań (Fig. 1). Zanalizowano rozkłady zmienności i skumulowanej gęstości prawdopodobieństwa w celu uzyskania odpowiednich zakresów zmienności wartości q studni ujmujących wodę z badanych trzech formacji litostratygraficznych (Fig. 2, 3). Wyróżniono na wykresach zakres równy sumie jednego odchylenia standardowego (SD) powyżej i poniżej wartości mediany (X-), czyli X- ± 1SD. W tym przedziale zawiera się po 34.1% danych o wartościach odpowiednio: większych i mniejszych od mediany; łącznie przedział zawiera 68.2% danych. Na będących źródłem danych arkuszach MHP obejmujących obszar badań, ilość danych dotyczących studni ujmujących wodę z utworów czwartorzędu i trzeciorzędu zazwyczaj jest mniejsza niż 30. Wykonano więc zestawienie q także dla danych skumulowanych w odniesieniu do poszczególnych poziomów litostratygraficznych (Fig. 3b). Uzyskane wyniki w odniesieniu do skał kredy górnej wskazują, że analizowany obszar dzieli się na bardziej wodonośną część położoną na zachód od rzeki Wieprz, tj. w granicach arkuszy "Łuków", "Lublin", "Rzeszów" oraz słabiej wodonośną część położoną na wschód od tej rzeki, czyli w obszarach arkuszy "Włodawa", "Chełm" i "Tomaszów Lubelski". W zakresie X- ± 1SD w strefach występowania margli ilastych i kredy piszącej (część wschodnia obszaru) q zawierają się w przedziale 0.6 ≤ q ≤ 40 m3h-1 na 1 m depresji. W rejonach występowania opok, gez, margli i wapieni (część zachodnia) q jest w przedziale 1.1 ≤ q ≤ 110 m3h-1 na 1 m. Wartości q studni zafiltrowanych w utworach trzeciorzędu i czwartorzędu, za względu na małą ilość danych analizowano łącznie dla całego obszaru badań i stwierdzono, że zawierają się w przedziale X- ± 1SD odpowiednio 0.8 ≤ q ≤ 20 m3h-1 na 1m oraz 1.0 ≤ q ≤ 10 m3h-1 na 1m. Oprócz zmienności litologicznej, rozkład zmienności q w skali regionalnej w danym poziomie