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Sample records for abdenacer makhlouf sergei

  1. Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev receives assistance from suit technician

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Sergei Krikalev, alternative mission specialist for STS-63, gets help from Dawn Mays, a Boeing suit technician. The cosmonaut was about to participate in a training session at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). Wearing the training version of the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) space suit, weighted to allow neutral buoyancy in the 25 feet deep WETF pool, Krikalev minutes later was underwater simulating a contingency spacewalk, or extravehicular activity (EVA).

  2. Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev uses SAREX gear to talk to school children

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    On the Space Shuttle Discovery's aft flight deck, Russian Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev prepares for one chore while performing another. Using the Shuttle amateur raio experiment (SAREX) gear, the mission specialist was talking with students in Maine. He holds a camcorder, which was later called into action to record inflight activities.

  3. Professor Sergei Semjonovic Golovin (1866-1931): A Pioneer of Ocular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Moschos, Marilita M

    2017-10-01

    Professor Sergei Semjonovic Golovin (1866-1931) is considered as one of the founders of ophthalmology in Russia. He received a worldwide reputation thanks to his achievements in ocular surgery and pathology. He introduced new surgical techniques such as Golovin's operation (Exenteratio orbitosinualis), Golovin's osteoplastic frontal sinus operation, ligation of orbital veins, and opticociliary neurectomy. He also introduced his "cytotoxic theory" to interpret sympathetic ophthalmia. He was a reputable professor of ophthalmology.

  4. Inferring directions of evolution from patterns of variation: The legacy of Sergei Meyen

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Igamberdiev, Abir U.

    2014-01-01

    In the era of the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis, which no longer considers natural selection as the only leading factor of evolution, it is meaningful to revisit the legacy of biologists who discussed the role of alternative factors. Here we analyze the evolutionary views of Sergei Meyen (1935-1987), a paleobotanist who argued that the theory of evolution should incorporate a “nomothetical” approach which infers the laws of morphogenesis (i.e., form generation) from the observed patterns of variation in living organisms and in the fossil records. Meyen developed a theory of “repeated polymorphic sets” (RPSs), which he applied consistently to describe inter-organism variation in populations, intra-organism variation of metameric organs, variation of abnormalities, heterotopy, changes during embryo development, and inter-species variation within evolutionary lineages. The notion of RPS assumes the active nature of organisms that possess hidden morphogenic and behavioural capacities. Meyen's theory is compatible with Darwin's natural selection; however Meyen emphasized the importance of other forms of selection (e.g., selection of developmental trajectories, habitats, and behaviours) in choosing specific elements from the RPS. Finally, Meyen developed a new typological concept of time, where time represents variability (i.e., change) of real objects such as living organisms or geological formations. PMID:25072709

  5. 120th anniversary of the birth of Sergei Ivanovich Vavilov (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 30 March 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) dedicated to the 120th anniversary of the birth of Sergei Ivanovich Vavilov was held in the Conference Hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 30 March 2011. The following reports were put on the session's agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Masalov A V (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "S I Vavilov and nonlinear optics"; (2) Basiev T T (Laser Materials and Technology Research Center, A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Luminescent nanophotonics and high-power lasers"; (3) Vitukhnovsky A G (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Advances in luminescent light sources and displays"; (4) Aleksandrov E B (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Sergei Ivanovich Vavilov and the special theory of relativity"; (5) Bolotovsky B M (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Vavilov-Cherenkov effect"; (6) Vizgin V P (S I Vavilov Institute of the History of Natural Scienses and Technology, RAS, Moscow) "Sergei Ivanovich Vavilov as a historian of science"; (7) Ginzburg A S (Knowledge Society) "Academician S I Vavilov — a devotee of the enlightenment and the first president of the Knowledge Society of the USSR". The papers written on the basis of reports 1-4 and 6 are given below. The main contents of report 5 is reflected in the paper "Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation: its discovery and application" [Usp. Fiz. Nauk 179 1161 (2009); Phys. Usp. 52 1099 (2009)] published earlier by B M Bolotovsky. • S I Vavilov and nonlinear optics, A V Masalov, Z A Chizhikova Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 12, Pages 1257-1262 • Luminescent nanophotonics, fluoride laser ceramics, and crystals, T T Basiev, I T Basieva, M E Doroshenko Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 12, Pages 1262-1268 • Advances in light sources and displays, A G Vitukhnovsky Physics

  6. Justice for Sergei Magnitsky Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. McGovern, James P. [D-MA-3

    2010-09-29

    House - 12/20/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. McGovern, James P. [D-MA-3

    2012-04-19

    House - 06/07/2012 Ordered to be Reported (Amended) by Voice Vote. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.6156, which became Public Law 112-208 on 12/14/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Cardin, Benjamin L. [D-MD

    2011-05-19

    Senate - 07/23/2012 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 469. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. 78 FR 23827 - Designation of Eighteen Individuals Pursuant to the Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ...; POB Moscow Region, Russia (individual) [MAGNIT]. 2. KUZNETSOV, Artem (a.k.a. KUZNETSOV, Artyom); DOB... Samarkand, Uzbekistan (individual) [MAGNIT]. 4. STEPANOVA, Olga G.; DOB 29 Jul 1962; POB Moscow, Russia... Region, Russia (individual) [MAGNIT]. 6. KARPOV, Pavel; DOB 27 Aug 1977; POB Moscow, Russia (individual...

  10. Debate on the Chernobyl disaster: response to Dr. Sergei V. Jargin.

    PubMed

    Yablokov, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The author responds, point by point, to Dr. Jargin's critique in this Journal issue of A. V. Yablokov, V. B. Nesterenko, and A. B. Nesterenko, Chernobyl: consequences of the catastrophe for people and the environment, published in 2009 by the New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Debate on the Chernobyl disaster: response to Dr. Sergei V. Jargin.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Janette D

    2012-01-01

    The stated purpose of Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment, published by the New York Academy of Sciences in 2009, was to challenge and answer publications on Chemobyl and its aftermath by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Until the independence of the WHO from the IAEA is assured, we can have little faith in their statements, whether it involves Chernobyl or Fukushima.

  12. "To rid oneself of the uninvited guest": Robert Koch, Sergei Winogradsky and competing styles of practice in medical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Attenborough, Frederick Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Does an infectious disease have one, singular pathogenic cause, or many interacting causes? In the discipline of medical microbiology, there is no definitive theoretical answer to this question: there, the conditions of aetiological possibility exist in a curious tension. Ever since the late 19th century, the “germ theory of disease”–“one disease, one cause”– has co-existed with a much less well known theory of “multifactorality”–“one disease, many interacting causes”. And yet, in practice, it is always a singular and never a multifactorial aetiology that emerges once the pathogenic world is brought into the field of medical perception. This paper seeks to understand why. Performing a detailed, genealogical reading of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, it foregrounds a set of links that connect the practical diagnostic tools at work within contemporary, 21st century laboratories to the philosophical assumptions at work within late-19th century understandings of the “germ theory of disease”.

  13. 77 FR 24969 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    .... Contact Person: Sergei Radaev, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  14. 78 FR 20119 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    .... Contact Person: Sergei Radaev, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  15. iss031e140701

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-23

    ISS031-E-140701 (23 June 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Revin, Expedition 31 flight engineer, works on the BTKh-26 KASKAD (Cascade) experiment in the Rassvet Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) of the International Space Station.

  16. iss031e140699

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-23

    ISS031-E-140699 (23 June 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Revin, Expedition 31 flight engineer, works on the BTKh-26 KASKAD (Cascade) experiment in the Rassvet Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) of the International Space Station.

  17. Krikalev with failed Elektron Liquid Unit #6 (BZh-6)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-09

    ISS011-E-08465 (9 June 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, works on the Elektron oxygen-generation system in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS).

  18. Expedition 11 Training with Krikalev/Henderson

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-08-12

    Expedition 11 Training with Krikalev/Henderson as their continued their training in the Virtual Reality Laboratory in building 9. View includes: Sergei Krikalev and Henderson using the virtual optics to view the International Space Station.

  19. Volkov exercises on TVIS in Service Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-08

    ISS029-E-040701 (8 Nov. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 29 flight engineer, equipped with a bungee harness, exercises on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  20. Volkov performs maintenance on the TVIS during Expedition 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-08-12

    ISS017-E-012861 (12 Aug. 2008) --- Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 17 commander, performs in-flight maintenance on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  1. Expedition 32 Crew Members work in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-22

    ISS032-E-010076 (22 July 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Revin (left) and NASA astronaut Joe Acaba, both Expedition 32 flight engineers, use a computer in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  2. Proliferation, Potential TMD Roles, Demarcation and ABM Treaty Compatibility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    Dr. Sergei Blagovolin Dr. Stephen Cambone Amb. Sidney Graybeal Dr. Patricia McFate Dr. Alexander Savelyev Mr. Willis Stanley Ms. Linda Vlahos...control, missile defense, and other international security issues. He served as the director of this study. Dr. Alexander Savelyev is Vice President of...Interview with Dr. Sergei Blagovolin and Alexander Savelyev , July 15,1994, 69. Interview with Amb. Kathleen Bailey, former Assistant Director of

  3. Incidence of Vector-borne Disease and Climate Change: A Study in Semi-arid Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakey, T.; Bounoua, L.

    2012-12-01

    Leishmaniases are among the most important emerging and resurging vector-borne diseases, second only to malaria in terms of the number of affected people. Leishmaniases are endemic in 88 countries worldwide and threaten about 350 million people (WHO, 2007). Since the first reported case of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in Saida, Algeria in 1991, 1,275 cases have been recorded (Makhlouf & Houti, 2010) with the vast majority of study-area cases (99%) reported between the years of 2000 and 2009. An investigation of potential climatic indicators for the apparent shift in disease prevalence was conducted by comparing anomalies in the climate data specific to the local pathogen cycle. It was determined that long term climate trends have resulted in conditions that promote the prevalence of ZCL. Increased precipitation have resulted in greater vegetation and promoted host and vector population growth through a trophic cascade. Increased minimum temperatures have lengthened the annual duration of sandfly activity. Short term variations in maximum temperatures, however show a correlation with disease suppression in the subsequent years. These findings indicate a potential to forecast the risk of ZCL infection through models of the trophic cascade and sandfly population growth.

  4. iss028e032136

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    ISS028-E-032136 (17 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 28 flight engineer, is pictured floating freely in the Unity node of the International Space Station while filming an installment of the ?The Orbital Station. Life on Orbit? video, intended for a documentary film to be prepared by the Roscosmos TV studio for the ?Kultura? State TV channel.

  5. iss028e032133

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-17

    ISS028-E-032133 (17 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 28 flight engineer, is pictured in the Unity node of the International Space Station while filming an installment of the ?The Orbital Station. Life on Orbit? video, intended for a documentary film to be prepared by the Roscosmos TV studio for the ?Kultura? State TV channel.

  6. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, left, and Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia share a laugh during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. Collins and Krikaleve in Node 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-05

    S114-E-7145 (5 August 2005) --- Astronaut Eileen M. Collins (right), STS-114 commander, and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, pose for a photo in the Unity node after the STS-114 crew patch was added to the growing collection of insignias representing crews who have worked on the International Space Station.

  8. Crew Movie Night

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-19

    ISS045e019776 (09/19/2015) --- International Space Station Expedition 45 crewmembers watch an advance screening of "The Martian" movie in the Unity Node 1. Clockwise from left, are Russian cosmonauts flight engineers Oleg Kononenko and Sergei Volkov, NASA astronaut Commander Scott Kelly, and cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko. This image was released on social media.

  9. Eisenstein.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barna, Yon

    This biography of Sergei M. Eisenstein records the life of this pioneering Soviet filmmaker and concentrates upon the events in Eisenstein's life which motivated him to create films in the methods he chose. A chapter is devoted to each of Eisenstein's major films. His creative techniques are explored along with his relationship with other major…

  10. Eisenstein: 1898-1948-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Assesses Sergei Eisenstein's role in cinematic history and his reputation in the Soviet Union and throughout the world. Describes the Eisenstein exhibition planned for the Oxford Museum of Modern Art and examines additional activities designed to enhance public appreciation of this influential artist. Discusses several of his important films. (GEA)

  11. Vertical Hegelianism and Beyond: Digital Cinema Editing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Roger B.

    Cinema as an art and communication form is entering its second century of development. Sergei Eisenstein conceived of editing in horizontal and vertical terms. He saw vertical editing patterns primarily as the synchronization of simultaneous image and sound elements, particularly music, no create cinematic meaning by means of the relationship…

  12. Change of Command

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-20

    ISS029-E-043204 (20 Nov. 2011) --- In the Unity node, Expedition 29 crew members add the Expedition 29 patch to the growing collection of insignias representing crews who have worked on the International Space Station. Pictured are NASA astronaut Mike Fossum (center), commander; Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa (left) and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, both flight engineers.

  13. Krikalev on middeck with laptop computer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-06

    S88-E-5041 (12-06-98) --- Sergei Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), works on a laptop computer on Endeavour's middeck. The scene was photographed shortly after the successful mating of Unity with the shuttle's docking system.

  14. Krikalev on the aft flight deck with laptop computers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-10

    S88-E-5107 (12-11-98) --- Sergei Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), surrounded by monitors and computers on the flight deck, holds a large camera lens. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 09:33:22 GMT, Dec. 11.

  15. Expedition One CDR and Flight Engineer in Node 1/Unity module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-16

    STS98-E-5291 (16 February 2001) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (left), Expedition One flight engineer representing the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, and astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, Expedition One commander, look toward their astronaut visitors (out of frame), about to conclude their time on the outpost. The scene was recorded with a digital still camera during farewells in the Unity node.

  16. View in the Node 1/Unity module after docking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-10

    S88-E-5113 (12-10-98) --- Sergei Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), totes a notebook onboard the Unity connecting module while he and two crewmates perform various tasks to ready it for its ISS role. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 20:27:03 GMT, Dec. 10.

  17. Krikalev with mission patch in Node 1 / Unity module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-21

    ISS011-E-09363 (21 June 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, adds the Expedition 11 patch to the Unity node’s growing collection of insignias representing crews who have worked on the international space station.

  18. Krikalev and Gidzenko at ISS hatch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-10

    ISS-01-E-5324 (10 February 2001) --- Cosmonauts Sergei K. Krikalev (left), Expedition One flight engineer, and Yuri P. Gidzenko, Soyuz commander, are pictured at the hatch that leads from the Unity node into the newly attached Destiny laboratory. The picture was recorded with a digital still camera on the day the hatch was initially opened.

  19. Expedition 23 State Commission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-31

    Sergei Krikalev, Chief, State Organization, Gagarin Research and Test Cosmonaut Training Center speaks during the State Commission meeting to approve the Soyuz launch of Expedition 23 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov, Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson and Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko on Thursday, April 1, 2010, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Krikalev during Elektron repair

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-05

    ISS011-E-05513 (5 May 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, poses beside the disconnected Liquid Unit #5 (BZh-5) and the O2 end-filter (BD, secondary purification unit) from the BZh5 he removed while making repairs to the Elektron oxygen generator in the Zvezda Service Module of the international space station.

  1. Krikalev in front of flight deck windows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-12

    STS102-E-5139 (12 March 2001) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, now a member of the STS-102 crew, prepares to use a camera on Discovery's flight deck. Krikalev, representing Rosaviakosmos, had been onboard the International Space Station (ISS) since early November 2000. The photograph was taken with a digital still camera.

  2. New STS-102 crewmembers Krikalev and Gidzenko in the flight deck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-12

    STS102-E-5142 (12 March 2001) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, now a member of the STS-102 crew, prepares to use a camera on Discovery's flight deck. Krikalev, representing Rosaviakosmos, had been onboard the International Space Station (ISS) since early November 2000. The photograph was taken with a digital still camera.

  3. New STS-102 crewmembers Krikalev in the flight deck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-12

    STS102-E-5147 (12 March 2001) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, now a member of the STS-102 crew on Discovery's flight deck. A sun setting can be seen through the flight deck windows in the background. Krikalev, representing Rosaviakosmos, had been onboard the International Space Station (ISS) since early November 2000. The photograph was taken with a digital still camera.

  4. Cabana shaves on middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-08

    S88-E-5166 (12-08-98) --- Astronaut Robert D. Cabana, mission commander, shaves on Endeavour's middeck. Sergei K. Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency, is in the background. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 23:20:40 GMT, Dec. 8.

  5. Krikalev in Service module with tools

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-30

    ISS01-E-5150 (December 2000) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer, retrieves a tool during an installation and set-up session in the Zvezda service module aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The picture was recorded with a digital still camera.

  6. Various views of Expedition One crewmembers in Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-27

    JSC2000-E-27092 (20 October 2000) --- Astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, Expediton 1 commander, enlists the aid of crew mate cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (right), flight engineer, prior to participating in a simulation of launch day activities about a week-and-half away in Kazakhstan.

  7. Krikalev with CPAs in Node 1/Unity CBA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-21

    ISS011-E-09373 (21 June 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, prepares to uninstall two of the four Control Panel Assemblies (CPA) from the Unity node’s Common Berthing Assembly (CBA) on the International Space Station (ISS).

  8. Krikalev with CPAs in Node 1/Unity CBA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-21

    ISS011-E-09392 (21 June 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, moves one of the two Control Panel Assemblies (CPA) from the Unity node’s Common Berthing Assembly (CBA) on the International Space Station (ISS).

  9. STS-111 Expedition Five Crew Training Clip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The STS-111 Expedition Five Crew begins with training on payload operations. Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson and Mission Specialist Sandy Magnus are shown in Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) procedures. Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev gets suited for Neutral Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) training. Virtual Reality lab training is shown with Peggy Whitson. Habitation Equipment and procedures are also presented.

  10. Photographic coverage of EXP 7 during NBL training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-28

    JSC2002-01972 (28 October 2002) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, backup Expedition Seven mission commander, floats in a small life raft during an emergency bailout training session in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) near the Johnson Space Center (JSC). Krikalev represents Rosaviakosmos.

  11. STS-60 crewmembers and alternates during pre-flight press conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Three members of the STS-60 crew and an alternate crew member discuss their upcoming mission with the news media in JSC's public affairs facility. Seated from the left are Charles F. Bolden Jr., mission commander; Russian Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev, mission specialist; Russian Cosmonaut Vladimir Titov, alternate mission specialist; interpreter Vladimir Fischel and Astronaut Kenneth S. Reightler, pilot.

  12. Krikalev films Usachev in Node 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-17

    STS102-340-014 (8-21 March 2001) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer (left), and cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev, Expedition Two commander, are photographed in the Unity node holding cameras. Cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Expedition Two commander, joins them as he floats through the tunnel from the Russian-built Zarya control module. All three are associated with Rosaviakosmos.

  13. DSO 201 - Krikalev and Sega in the Spacehab module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-01

    STS060-21-027 (3-11 Feb 1994) --- Astronaut Ronald M. Sega (left) and Russian cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev work on a joint U.S./Russian metabolic experiment on the Space Shuttle Discovery's middeck. A number of other U.S./Russian cooperative Detailed Supplementary Objectives (DSO) are included among the experiments conducted on the eight-day mission.

  14. Krikalev holds tube within CPCF-2 Activation Mechanism during Expedition 10 / Expedition 11

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-18

    ISS010-E-24980 (18 April 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, holds a sample tube within the Commercial Protein Crystallization Facility-2 (CPCF-2) Activation Mechanism which is part of the Kriogem-03 refrigerator in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station (ISS).

  15. Whitson and Treschev work on TVIS treadmill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    ISS005-E-08808 (7 August 2002) --- Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev (left) and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, both Expedition Five flight engineers, perform maintenance on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS). Treschev represents Rosaviakosmos.

  16. Whitson and Treschev work on TVIS treadmill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    ISS005-E-08819 (7 August 2002) --- Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev (left) and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, both Expedition Five flight engineers, perform maintenance on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS). Treschev represents Rosaviakosmos.

  17. Whitson and Treschev work on TVIS treadmill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-08-07

    ISS005-E-08821 (7 August 2002) --- Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev (left) and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, both Expedition Five flight engineers, are photographed near the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS). Treschev represents Rosaviakosmos.

  18. Whitson and Treschev perform maintenance on the TVIS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-13

    ISS005-E-17387 (13 October 2002) --- Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev (left) and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition Five flight engineers, perform maintenance on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS). Treschev represents Rosaviakosmos.

  19. Krikalev with TVIS hardware in Zvezda

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-09-07

    ISS011-E-12601 (7 September 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, works with the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) during In-Flight Maintenance (IFM) in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  20. TVIS Inflight Maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-01

    ISS028-E-013758 (1 July 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov, Expedition 28 flight engineer; and Andrey Borisenko (mostly out of frame at left), commander, perform in-flight maintenance on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  1. Krikalev during TVIS IFM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-16

    ISS011-E-06188 (16 May 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, works with the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) removed from the Zvezda Service Module floor during In-Flight Maintenance (IFM) on the International Space Station (ISS).

  2. Krikalev with TVIS hardware in Zvezda

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-09-07

    ISS011-E-12494 (7 September 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, works with the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) during In-Flight Maintenance (IFM) in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  3. Expedition 43 Crew Final Exams in Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-13

    NASA Video File of ISS Expedition 43 final exams in Russia on March 5, 2015 with crewmembers Scott Kelly, Gennady Padalka, and Mikhail Kornienko; and backup crew Jeff Williams, Sergei Volkov and Alexei Ovchinin. Includes footage of final qualification training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC); interview with Emily Nelson, ISS Expedition 46 Lead Flight Director; and scenes from the qualification training.

  4. Volkov and Kononenko with the stowage bags in the ATV during Expedition 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-05-12

    ISS017-E-006545 (12 May 2008) --- Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonauts Sergei Volkov (left), Expedition 17 commander, and Oleg Kononenko, flight engineer, work with stowage bags in the Jules Verne Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) while it remains docked with the International Space Station.

  5. Volkov and Kononenko in the ATV during Expedition 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-05-12

    ISS017-E-006544 (12 May 2008) --- Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonauts Sergei Volkov (left), Expedition 17 commander, and Oleg Kononenko, flight engineer, take a moment for a photo in the Jules Verne Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) while it remains docked with the International Space Station.

  6. Volkov and Kononenko in the ATV during Expedition 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-05-12

    ISS017-E-006543 (12 May 2008) --- Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonauts Sergei Volkov (bottom), Expedition 17 commander, and Oleg Kononenko, flight engineer, take a moment for a photo in the Jules Verne Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) while it remains docked with the International Space Station.

  7. Chamitoff gives Volkov a haircut in the Node 2 during Expedition 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-07-20

    ISS017-E-011556 (20 July 2008) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, Expedition 17 flight engineer, trims Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Sergei Volkov's hair in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. Chamitoff used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  8. Whitson cuts Treschev's hair in the SM during Expedition Five on the ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-20

    ISS005-E-08151 (July 2002) --- Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition Five flight engineer, cuts cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev’s hair in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS). Treschev, flight engineer representing Rosaviakosmos, holds a vacuum device the crew has fashioned to garner freshly cut hair, which is floating freely.

  9. Volkov gives Chamitoff a haircut in the Node 2 during Expedition 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-07-20

    ISS017-E-011547 (20 July 2008) --- Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 17 commander, trims NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff's hair in the Harmony node of the International Space Station. Volkov used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  10. Payne-Gaposchkin, Cecilia Helena [née Payne] (1900-79)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, born in England, married Sergei Gaposchkin, first woman to become a full professor at Harvard. Worked on stellar atmospheres, and in her 1925 dissertation suggested correctly that the great range in strength, from star to star, of absorption lines in stellar spectra was due to differing amounts of ionization (differing temperatures), not differing chemical composition. She suggested t...

  11. View of the STS-88 crew at work in the FGB/Zarya module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-11

    STS088-357-011 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), work in the FGB or Zarya Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The two are using battery powered tools to extract bolts.

  12. STS-60 crewmembers during pre-flight press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-03-09

    Two prime crew members and an alternate are pictured during a mission planning session in JSC's public affairs facility. Left to right are astronaut Charles F. Bolden Jr., mission commander; and Cosmonauts sergei Krikalev and Vladimir Titov, prime and alternate mission specialists, respectively.

  13. Expedition Five crew members wave to onlookers as they leave KSC for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition Five crew members wave to onlookers as they leave KSC for Houston. From left are Science Officer Peggy Whitson and Commander Valery Korzun. Not seen is Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev. The three returned to Earth Dec. 7 on Endeavour, with the STS-113 crew, after six months on the International Space Station.

  14. Expedition Five crew is ready to leave KSC for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Expedition Five crew are ready to leave KSC for Houston. From left are Science Officer Peggy Whitson, Commander Valery Korzun and Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev. The three returned to Earth on Endeavour Dec. 7, with the STS-113 crew, after six months on the International Space Station.

  15. Expedition 11 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-10

    European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, left, and Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev participate in tilt table tests, Sunday, April 10, 2005, so technicians can collect pre-launch data on the state of their equilibrium prior to the April 15 launch to the International Space Station with Flight Engineer John Phillips in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Whitson and Treschev perform maintenance on the TVIS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-13

    ISS005-E-17388 (13 October 2002) --- Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev (left) and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition Five flight engineers, perform maintenance on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS). Treschev represents Rosaviakosmos.

  17. Expedition Five crew perform maintenance on the TVIS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-13

    ISS005-E-17402 (13 October 2002) --- Cosmonauts Valery G. Korzun (left), Expedition Five mission commander, Sergei Y. Treschev and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition Five flight engineers, perform maintenance on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS). Korzun and Treschev represent Rosaviakosmos.

  18. Expedition Five crew perform maintenance on the TVIS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-13

    ISS005-E-17390 (13 October 2002) --- Cosmonauts Valery G. Korzun (left), Expedition Five mission commander, Sergei Y. Treschev and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition Five flight engineers, perform maintenance on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS). Korzun and Treschev represent Rosaviakosmos.

  19. Expedition Five crew perform maintenance on the TVIS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-13

    ISS005-E-17392 (13 October 2002) --- Cosmonauts Valery G. Korzun (left), Expedition Five mission commander, Sergei Y. Treschev and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition Five flight engineers, perform maintenance on the Treadmill Vibration Isolation System (TVIS) in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS). Korzun and Treschev represent Rosaviakosmos.

  20. View of FE Volkov working with KPT-21 PK-3+ Plasma Crystal-3+ Payload

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-27

    ISS028-E-009754 (27 June 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 28 flight engineer, works with the new KPT-21 PK-3+ Plasma Crystal-3+ (Plazmennyi-Kristall-3 plus) Telescience payload in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station.

  1. FE Volkov works with the KPT-21 PK-3+ Plasma Crystal-3+ Telescience Payload

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-22

    ISS028-E-009187 (22 June 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 28 flight engineer, works with the new KPT-21 PK-3+ Plasma Crystal-3+ (Plazmennyi-Kristall-3 plus) Telescience payload in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station.

  2. View of FE Volkov working with KPT-21 PK-3+ Plasma Crystal-3+ Payload

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-27

    ISS028-E-009756 (27 June 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 28 flight engineer, works with the new KPT-21 PK-3+ Plasma Crystal-3+ (Plazmennyi-Kristall-3 plus) Telescience payload in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station.

  3. Violence and the Prevention of Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Leonore Loeb, Ed.; Denmark, Florence L., Ed.

    Contributors to this collection put forth many contemporary theoretical ideas about violence in society. All agree that finding ways to prevent violence is critical and that living in peace means acceptance of diversity. The following chapters are included: (1) "Motivational Approach to Violent Behavior: A Cross-Cultural Perspective: (Sergei V.…

  4. iss028e034854

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-31

    ISS028-E-034854 (31 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 28 flight engineer, checks the progress of a new growth experiment on the BIO-5 Rasteniya-2 (Plants-2) payload with its LADA-01 greenhouse in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  5. Expedition 11 Preflight training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-06-24

    JSC2004-E-26778 (24 June 2004) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia’s Federal Space Agency, participates in medical training at Johnson Space Center (JSC). Space Medicine Instructor Tyler N. Carruth with Wyle Life Sciences assisted Krikalev.

  6. Sequencing Effects of Balance and Plyometric Training on Physical Performance in Youth Soccer Athletes.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Raouf; Granacher, Urs; Makhlouf, Issam; Behm, David G; Chaouachi, Anis

    2016-12-01

    Hammami, R, Granacher, U, Makhlouf, I, Behm, DG, and Chaouachi, A. Sequencing effects of balance and plyometric training on physical performance in youth soccer athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3278-3289, 2016-Balance training may have a preconditioning effect on subsequent power training with youth. There are no studies examining whether the sequencing of balance and plyometric training has additional training benefits. The objective was to examine the effect of sequencing balance and plyometric training on the performance of 12- to 13-year-old athletes. Twenty-four young elite soccer players trained twice per week for 8 weeks either with an initial 4 weeks of balance training followed by 4 weeks of plyometric training (BPT) or 4 weeks of plyometric training proceeded by 4 weeks of balance training (PBT). Testing was conducted pre- and posttraining and included medicine ball throw; horizontal and vertical jumps; reactive strength; leg stiffness; agility; 10-, 20-, and 30-m sprints; Standing Stork balance test; and Y-Balance test. Results indicated that BPT provided significantly greater improvements with reactive strength index, absolute and relative leg stiffness, triple hop test, and a trend for the Y-Balance test (p = 0.054) compared with PBT. Although all other measures had similar changes for both groups, the average relative improvement for the BPT was 22.4% (d = 1.5) vs. 15.0% (d = 1.1) for the PBT. BPT effect sizes were greater with 8 of 13 measures. In conclusion, although either sequence of BPT or PBT improved jumping, hopping, sprint acceleration, and Standing Stork and Y-Balance, BPT initiated greater training improvements in reactive strength index, absolute and relative leg stiffness, triple hop test, and the Y-Balance test. BPT may provide either similar or superior performance enhancements compared with PBT.

  7. View of EV Crewmember during Russian EVA 29

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-03

    ISS028-E-020969 (3 Aug. 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev (out of frame), both Expedition 28 flight engineers, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Russian segment of the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 23-minute spacewalk, Volkov and Samokutyaev moved a cargo boom from one airlock to another, installed a prototype laser communications system and deployed an amateur radio micro-satellite.

  8. Expedition 37 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-24

    Expedition 37 NASA Flight Engineer Michael Hopkins, left, and Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov share a laugh at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for September 26 and will send Hopkins, Kotov and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Ryazansky on a five and a half-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  9. Crew in Node 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-05

    S114-E-7111 (5 August 2005) --- Crewmembers work on various tasks in the Unity node of the International Space Station. From the left are astronaut Charles J. Camarda, STS-114 mission specialist; cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency; astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer; and Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 commander.

  10. Expedition 28 prelaunch views from Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-16

    At the Kremlin Wall at Red Square in Moscow, Expedition 28 Flight Engineer Mike Fossum of NASA (left), Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (center) and Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov (right) pose for pictures May 16, 2011 after laying flowers and conducting other traditional activities. The trio will be launched June 8 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on the Soyuz TMA-02M spacecraft to the International Space Station.

  11. STS-97 Crew Activity Report/Flight Day 10 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On this tenth day of the STS-97 mission, Commander Brent W. Jett, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Joseph R. Tanner, Carlos I. Noriega, and Marc Garneau are seen saying good-bye to the International Space Station's (ISS's) resident crew (Commander Bill Shepherd, Pilot Yuri Gidzenko and Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev) and sealing the hatches between the Endeavour Orbiter and the ISS. Footage shows the ISS against a rotating Earth as it passes over China.

  12. Change of Command

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-20

    ISS029-E-043205 (20 Nov. 2011) --- In the Unity node, Expedition 29 crew members pose for a photo after adding the Expedition 29 patch to the growing collection of insignias representing crews who have worked on the International Space Station. Pictured are NASA astronaut Mike Fossum (center), commander; Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa (left) and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, both flight engineers.

  13. Currie and Krikalev remove launch restraint bolts in FGB/Zarya module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-11

    S88-E-5085 (12-11-98) --- Nancy J. Currie and Sergei Krikalev use rechargeable power tools to tighten and loosen nuts onboard the Russian-built Zarya module which they entered on Flight Day 8. The two are mission specialists, with Krikalev representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA). The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 05:28:53 GMT, Dec. 11.

  14. Landing of STS-60 Space Shuttle Discovery at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-02-11

    STS060-S-035 (11 Feb 1994) --- The drag chute for Space Shuttle Discovery is deployed on the Shuttle Landing Facility, marking an end to the eight-day STS-60 mission. Landing occurred at 2:19:22 p.m. (EST). Onboard were astronauts Charles F. Bolden Jr., Kenneth S. Reightler Jr., Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, N. Jan Davis and Ronald M. Sega along with Russian cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev.

  15. View of the STS-88 crew in the Node 1/Unity module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-10

    STS088-322-035 (4 - 15 DECEMBER 1998) --- Three STS-88 crew members are pictured in one of two Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMA) connected to the Unity and Zarya modules. Taking pictures in the foreground is astronaut Jerry L. Ross, mission specialist. Others are astronaut Robert D. Cabana (left), mission commander, and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA).

  16. Expedition 32 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-17

    Expedition 32 NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba is helped from a Russian Search and Rescue all terrain vehicle (ATV) to his helicopter after he and Expedition 32 Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineer Sergei Revin returned from the International Space Station on Monday, Sept. 17, 2012. Acaba, Padalka and Revin returned from five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 31 and 32 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  17. Expedition 32 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-17

    Expedition 32 NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba is helped from a Russian Search and Rescue all terrain vehicle (ATV) after he and Expedition 32 Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineer Sergei Revin returned from the International Space Station on Monday, Sept. 17, 2012. Acaba, Padalka and Revin returned from five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 31 and 32 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  18. Expedition 28 Docking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-10

    Vladimir Popovkin, Head of the Russian Federal Space Agency (ROSCOSMOS) answers a reporter’s question during a Soyuz post-docking press conference at the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia on Friday, June 10, 2011. The Soyuz TMA-02M docked to the International Space Station carrying Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov, NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum and JAXA (Japanase Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. Expedition 28 Docking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-10

    William Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator for Space Operations, is interviewed by Russian Federal Space Agency (ROSCOSMOS) TV following a Soyuz post-docking press conference at the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia on Friday, June 10, 2011. The Soyuz TMA-02M docked to the International Space Station carrying Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov, NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum and JAXA (Japanase Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 31 Soyuz TMA-04M Docking to ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-17

    Russian flight controllers at the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia monitor the Soyuz TMA-04M as it docks to the International Space Station on Thursday, May 17, 2012. Onboard the soyuz spacecraft are Expedition 31 Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, Flight Engineer Sergei Revin, and NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba. The crew of three launched at 9:01 a.m. Kazakhstan time on Tuesday, May 15 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Expedition 31 Soyuz TMA-04M Docking to ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-17

    The family of Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Joe Acaba applauds as they watch the docking of the Soyuz TMA-04M spacecraft on the TV screen at the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia, Thursday, May 17, 2012. The Soyuz docked to the International Space Station with Acaba and fellow crew members, Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, and Flight Engineer Sergei Revin two days after they launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Expedition 28 Docking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-10

    Top officials from the Russian Federal Space Agency and NASA hold a Soyuz post-docking press conference at the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia on Friday, June 10, 2011. The Soyuz TMA-02M docked to the International Space Station carrying Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov, NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum and JAXA (Japanase Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Kononenko, Padalka and Pettit in the US Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-17

    ISS031-E-081644 (17 May 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (left), Expedition 31 commander, conducts a crew safety briefing in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station shortly after Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka (center) and Sergei Revin (out of frame); along with NASA astronaut Joe Acaba (not pictured) docked with the space station in their Soyuz TMA-04M spacecraft. NASA astronaut Don Pettit, flight engineer, is at right.

  4. Crew Earth Observations (CEO) by Expedition Five Crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-09-16

    ISS005- E-15375 (22 September 2002) --- This digital still camera's picture, taken from the International Space Station (ISS) on September 22, 2002, shows the central eye of Hurricane Isidore. The eye become less defined as the hurricane stalled and weakened over the Yucatan Peninsula near Merida. Onboard the orbital outpost for the Expedition Five mission are cosmonauts Valery G. Korzun, commander, and Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineer, both with Rosaviakosmos; and astronaut Peggy A. Whitson, flight engineer.

  5. Expedition 11 and Expedition 12 commander and Spaceflight participant in Zvezda

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-08

    ISS011-E-14192 (8 October 2005) --- Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (right), Expedition 11 commander; astronaut William S. McArthur Jr. (center), Expedition 12 commander and NASA science officer; and U. S. Spaceflight Participant Gregory Olsen are pictured in the Destiny laboratory of the international space station following the ceremony of Changing-of-Command from Expedition 11 to Expedition 12.

  6. Expedition 31 Crew Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-14

    Quarantined Expedition 31 prime crew members, from left, NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba, Russian Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Revin pose for a group photograph during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Monday, May 14, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with the crew of three is scheduled for 9:01 a.m. local time on Tuesday, May 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Expedition 31 Crew Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-14

    Quarantined Expedition 31 prime crew members, from left, NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba, Russian Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Revin answer reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Monday, May 14, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with the crew of three is scheduled for 9:01 a.m. local time on Tuesday, May 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. STS-114: Discovery Question & Answer with Joint Crew on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    STS-114 Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Souichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Charles Camarda, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev and Flight Engineer John Phillips answers questions from United States, Japanese and Russian News media in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Risk, safety, extravehicular activities, spacewalks, re-entry, gap fillers, tiles, flight operations, flight crew activities, team work, and life in space are topics covered with the News media.

  9. STS-102 / Expedition 1 Crew Return Ceremony at Ellington Field.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-22

    JSC2001-E-08325 (22 March 2001) --- Some of the participants of the Expedition One and STS-102 crew return ceremony applaud one of the speakers. Pictured from the left are cosmonaut Vasily Tsibliev, Deputy Director of the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City; cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer; astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, mission commander; and Yuri P. Gidzenko, Soyuz commander.

  10. STS-102 / Expedition 1 Crew Return Ceremony at Ellington Field.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-22

    JSC2001-E-08317 (22 March 2001) --- Members of the Expedition One crew await opportunities to individually address a crowd gathered at Ellington Field to honor their return to Houston. return. Pictured from the left are cosmonaut Vasily Tsibliev, Deputy Director of the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City; cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer; astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, mission commander; and Yuri P. Gidzenko, Soyuz commander; along with Joseph Rothenberg, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight.

  11. Krikalev with probe-and-cone docking mechanism (StM) in the Zvezda module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-19

    ISS011-E-09210 (19 June 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, holds the dismantled probe-and-cone docking mechanism from the Progress 18 spacecraft in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The Progress docked to the aft port of the Service Module at 7:42 p.m. (CDT) as the two spacecraft flew approximately 225 statute miles, above a point near Beijing, China.

  12. Krikalev dismantles probe-and-cone docking mechanism (StM) in the Progress M-53 (18P)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-19

    ISS011-E-09204 (19 June 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, dismantles the probe-and-cone docking mechanism in the Progress 18 spacecraft. The Progress docked to the aft port of the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station (ISS) at 7:42 p.m. (CDT) as the Station flew approximately 225 statute miles, above a point near Beijing, China.

  13. Expedition 31 Soyuz TMA-04M Docking to ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-17

    The family of Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Joe Acaba sings happy birthday to him from the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia, Thursday, May 17, 2012. Acaba, Expedition 31 Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, and Flight Engineer Sergei Revin, docked their Soyuz TMA-04M spacecraft to the space station at 8:36 a.m. Moscow time, two days after they launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Arms Control and Proliferation Challenges to the Reset Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    all international situation in Northeast Asia, e.g., the Rise of China and Russo-Chinese partnership there. It suggests far-reaching and innovative ...Russian Energy Minis- ter Sergei Shmatko and Iranian Oil Minister Masoud Mirkazemi jointly announced a 30-year road map for bilateral cooperation...in oil and gas.138 The large deals mapped out as part of that partnership include co- operation on the transportation, swaps, and market- ing of

  15. Stowage bags in FGB/Zarya module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-31

    S114-E-5945 (31 July 2005) --- This scene in Zarya, the functional cargo block for the International Space Station, serves witness to the primary current emphasis onboard the orbital outpost. Transfers of additional water and supplies to the International Space Station continues on this Sunday as the crew aboard Space Shuttle Discovery begins Flight Day 6. Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev of Russia's Federal Space Agency can be seen at the far end of the cluttered hallway.

  16. Expedition 11 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-10

    Members of the 11th expedition to the International Space Station, astronaut John Phillips, top left, and cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev, front, arrive at Star City, Russia, Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2005. The crew landed near Arlalyk, Kazakhstan after a six-month mission in orbit. Along with American businessman Greg Olsen, who visited the station for more than a week, Phillips and Krikalev returned to Earth aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Installing the new PCE (Proximity Communications Equipment) hardware

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-29

    ISS011-E-09799 (27 June 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, works with the new Proximity Communications Equipment (PCE) hardware of the ASN-M satellite navigation system for the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) “Jules Verne” in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. The ATV is scheduled to arrive at the Station next year.

  18. Testing the newly installed PCE (Proximity Communications Equipment) hardware

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-29

    ISS011-E-09816 (28 June 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, tests the newly installed Proximity Communications Equipment (PCE) hardware of the ASN-M satellite navigation system for the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) “Jules Verne” in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station. The ATV is scheduled to arrive at the Station next year.

  19. Testing the newly installed PCE (Proximity Communications Equipment) hardware

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-28

    ISS011-E-09812 (28 June 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, tests the newly installed Proximity Communications Equipment (PCE) hardware of the ASN-M satellite navigation system for the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) “Jules Verne” in the Zvezda Service Module of the international space station. The ATV is scheduled to arrive at the station next year.

  20. Russia-Georgia Conflict in South Ossetia: Context and Implications for U.S. Interests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-13

    from possible attack. Actions in Abkhazia and Western Georgia. On August 10, the U.N. Assistant Secretary-General for Peacekeeping, Edmond Mulet ...weapons and military personnel towards the Kodori Valley.” Mulet also warned that Abkhaz separatist leader Sergei Bagapsh had threatened to push the...deployments” of Abkhaz rebel weaponry, Mulet reported. Fifteen UNOMIG observers were withdrawn from the Kodori Valley because the Abkhaz rebels announced that

  1. Russia-Georgia Conflict in South Ossetia: Context and Implications for U.S. Interests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-29

    Abkhazia and Western Georgia On August 10, the U.N. Assistant Secretary-General for Peacekeeping, Edmond Mulet , reported to the U.N. Security Council that...personnel towards the Kodori Valley.” Mulet also warned that Abkhaz separatist leader Sergei Bagapsh had threatened to push the Georgian armed forces out...weaponry, Mulet reported. Fifteen UNOMIG observers were withdrawn from the Kodori Valley because the Abkhaz rebels announced that their safety could not

  2. Expedition 31 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-24

    Expedition 31 NASA flight engineer Joe Acaba signs for his Soyuz vehicle simulation test card before senior officials at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Tuesday, April 24, 2012 in Star City, Russia, while his fellow crew members Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, left, and flight engineer Sergei Revin look on. Acaba, Padalka and Revin are set to launch to the International Space Station May 15 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Expedition 31 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-24

    Expedition 31 Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka signs for his Soyuz vehicle simulation test card before senior officials at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Tuesday, April 24, 2012 in Star City, Russia, while his fellow crew members NASA flight engineer Joe Acaba, left, and flight engineer Sergei Revin look on. Padalka, Acaba and Revin are set to launch to the International Space Station May 15 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  4. Expedition 29 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-22

    Expedition 29 Commander Mike Fossum is seen in a traditional Kazakhstan hat gifted to him during a welcome ceremony at the Kustanay Airport in Kazakhstan on Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011. NASA Astronaut Fossum, Russian Cosmonaut Sergei Volkov and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Astronaut Satoshi Furukawa returned from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 28 and 29 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Expedition 21 Crew Prepares For Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-29

    Chief, State Organization, Gagarin Research and Test Cosmonaut Training Center, Sergei Krikalev, left, Ambassador of the United States of America to the Russian Federation, John Beyrle, center, and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden say hello to each other prior to talking to Expedition 21 crew members Maxim Suraev, Jeffrey N. Williams and Spaceflight Participant Guy Laliberté, Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Expedition 37 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-24

    NASA backup crewmember Steve Swanson waves hello at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for September 26 and will send Hopkins, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Ryazansky on a five and a half-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. Krikalev works with the TORU teleoperated control system in the SM during Expedition 11

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-19

    ISS011-E-09184 (18 June 2005) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, practices docking procedures with the TORU teleoperated control system in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station (ISS) in preparation for the docking of the Progress 18 spacecraft. Krikalev, using the Simvol-TS screen and hand controllers, could manually dock the Progress to the Station in the event of a failure of the Kurs automated docking system.

  8. Krikalev and Currie perform an IFM on a battery recharger in the FGB/Zarya

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    STS088-334-029 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Astronaut Nancy J. Currie, mission specialist, and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), perform an in-flight maintenance on a battery charging unit on the Russian-built FGB Module (Zarya). One of Zarya's six batteries had experienced a problem discharging stored energy in its automatic configuration. Krikalev had swapped out an identical component during two previous flights on the Russia?s Mir Space Station.

  9. STS-88 Mission Highlights Resources Tape. Tape B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-88 flight crew, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Krikalev present a video overview of their space flight. Tape two of three includes the installation of an S-Band to help monitor the UNITY Connecting Module, the opening of UNITY's hatch, the opening of the main compartment hatch to ZARYA Control Module, and the repair of the inflight maintenance system.

  10. High Temperature Epoxy Nanocomposites for Aerospace Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-10

    thermal stability (~430°C) can be used for formulation of next generation aerospace nanocomposite matrix materials. 10 Publications: 1. J. Langat ...Properties Evaluation of Thermally Stable Layered Organosilicate Nanocomposites, Polymers for Advanced Technology, 18, 574(2007). 3. J. Langat , M...Properties in Polymer Nanocomposites, edited by Dr. Sergei Nazarenko (MRS Fall Meeting Symposium KK Proceedings) Boston, MA 2008 (in print). 5. J. Langat

  11. Official portrait of the ISS Expedition Five crewmembers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-01

    ISS005-S-002 (February 2002) --- Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun (left), Expedition Five mission commander; astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, both flight engineers, attired in training versions of the shuttle launch and entry suit, pause from their training schedule for a crew portrait. The three will be launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in early spring of this year aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Korzun and Treschev represent the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (Rosaviakosmos).

  12. STS-98 CDR and Expedition One Flight Engineer say goodbye

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-16

    STS98-E-5295 (16 February 2001) --- Astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell (left), STS-98 mission commander, participates in farewells with Expedition One crew members. Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (right foreground), Expedition One flight engineer, is one of three crew members who will stay behind for several weeks prior to return to Earth. Astronauts Mark L. Polansky, STS-98 pilot, and Robert L. Curbeam, mission specialist, are also pictured. The scene was recorded with a digital still camera.

  13. Effects of physical forcing on COastal ZOoplankton community structure: study of the unusual case of a MEDiterranean ecosystem under strong tidal influence (Project COZOMED-MERMEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Groupe COZOMED: R. Arfi (1), A. Atoui (2), H. Ayadi (6), B. Bejaoui (1), N. Bhairy (1), N. Barraj (2), M. Belhassen (2), S. Benismail (2), M.Y Benkacem (2), J. Blanchot (1), M. Cankovic(5), F. Carlotti (1), C. Chevalier (1), I Ciglenecki-Jusic (5), D. Couet (1), N. Daly Yahia (3), L. Dammak (2), J.-L. Devenon (1), Z. Drira (6), A. Hamza (2), S. Kmia (6), N. Makhlouf (3), M. Mahfoudi (2), M. Moncef (4), M. Pagano (1), C. Sammari (2), H. Smeti (2), A. Zouari (2) The COZOMED-MERMEX project aims at understanding how hydrodynamic forcing (currents, tides, winds) combine with anthropogenic forcing and climate to affect the variability of coastal Mediterranean zooplankton communities under contrasting tidal influence. This study includes (i) a zero state of knowledge via a literature review of existing data and (ii) a case study on the system Boughrara lagoon - Gulf of Gabes. This ecosystem gives major services for Tunisia (about 65% of national fish production) but is weakened by its situation in a heavily anthropized area and under influence of urban, industrial and agricultural inputs. Besides this region is subject to specific climate forcing (Sahelian winds, scorching heat, intense evaporation, flooding) which possible changes will be considered. The expected issues are (i) to improve our knowledge of hydrodynamic forcing on zooplankton and ultimately on the functioning of coastal Mediterranean ecosystems impacted by anthropogenic and climatic effects and (ii) to elaborate management tools to help preserving good ecological status of these ecosystems: hydrodynamic circulation model, mapping of isochrones of residence times, mapping of the areas of highest zooplankton abundances (swarms), and sensitive areas, etc. This project strengthens existing scientific collaborations within the MERMEX program (The MerMex Group, 2011) and in the frame of an international joint laboratory (COSYS-Med) created in 2014. A first field mulidisciplinary campaign was performed in October

  14. Expedition 31 Crew Prepares For Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-15

    Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Joe Acaba, left, Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, and, Flight Engineer Sergei Revin, right, receive a formal go for launch from Vitaly Alexandrovich Lopota, President of Energia, left, and Vladimir Popovkin, Director of Roscosmos prior to their launch onboard the Soyuz TMA-04M on Tuesday, May 15, 2012 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The Soyuz spacecraft with Padalka, Revin, and Acaba onboard, launched at 9:01 a.m. Kazakhstan time on Tuesday, May 15. Photo Credit: (NASA/GCTC/Andrey Shelepin)

  15. Expedition 10 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-10-08

    Expedition 10 Commander and NASA Science Officer Leroy Chiao, center and Flight Engineer and Soyuz Commander Salizhan Sharipov toured a museum bearing the name of historic Russian rocket designer Sergei Korolev October 9, 2004 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in advance of their liftoff to the International Space Station October 14. The traditional visit included the signing of their names in commemorative books and a wall at the museum, and touring the cottages nearby where Korolev and Yuri Gagarin slept on the eve of Gagarin's launch April 12, 1961 to become the first human in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Expedition 10 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-10-08

    Expedition 10 Commander and NASA Science Officer Leroy Chiao, right, Flight Engineer and Soyuz Commander Salizhan Sharipov and Russian Space Forces cosmonaut Yuri Shargin, left, toured a museum bearing the name of historic Russian rocket designer Sergei Korolev, Saturday, October 9, 2004, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in advance of their liftoff to the International Space Station October 14. The traditional visit included the signing of their names in commemorative books and a wall at the museum, and touring the cottages nearby where Korolev and Yuri Gagarin slept on the eve of Gagarin's launch April 12, 1961 to become the first human in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Change of Command

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-20

    ISS029-E-043148 (20 Nov. 2011) --- Expedition 28/29 and Expedition 29/30 crew members pose for a group portrait in the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory following the ceremony of Changing-of-Command from Expedition 29 to Expedition 30. Pictured from the left are Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin, Expedition 30 flight engineer; NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander; Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer; Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 29 flight engineer; NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 29 commander; and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, Expedition 29 flight engineer.

  18. Change of Command

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-20

    ISS029-E-043136 (20 Nov. 2011) --- Expedition 28/29 and Expedition 29/30 crew members pose for a group portrait in the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory following the ceremony of Changing-of-Command from Expedition 29 to Expedition 30. Pictured on the front row are NASA astronauts Dan Burbank (left), Expedition 30 commander; and Mike Fossum, Expedition 29 commander. Pictured from the left (back row) are Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin, and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers; and Sergei Volkov, Expedition 29 flight engineer; along with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, Expedition 29 flight engineer.

  19. Change of Command

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-20

    ISS029-E-043133 (20 Nov. 2011) --- Expedition 28/29 and Expedition 29/30 crew members pose for a group portrait in the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory following the ceremony of Changing-of-Command from Expedition 29 to Expedition 30. Pictured on the front row are NASA astronauts Dan Burbank (left), Expedition 30 commander; and Mike Fossum, Expedition 29 commander. Pictured from the left (back row) are Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin, and Anton Shkaplerov, both Expedition 30 flight engineers; and Sergei Volkov, Expedition 29 flight engineer; along with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, Expedition 29 flight engineer.

  20. Change of Command

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-20

    ISS029-E-043144 (20 Nov. 2011) --- Expedition 28/29 and Expedition 29/30 crew members pose for a group portrait in the International Space Station?s Kibo laboratory following the ceremony of Changing-of-Command from Expedition 29 to Expedition 30. Pictured from the left are Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin, Expedition 30 flight engineer; NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander; Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer; Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 29 flight engineer; NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 29 commander; and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, Expedition 29 flight engineer.

  1. Currie and Krikalev pull launch restraint bolts in the FGB/Zarya module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-19

    STS088-359-037 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Astronaut Nancy J. Currie and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, both mission specialists, use rechargeable power tools to manipulate nuts and bolts on the Russian-built Zarya module. Astronaut Robert D. Cabana, mission commander, translates along the rail network in the background. The six STS-88 crew members had earlier entered the module through the U.S.-built Unity connecting module. Rails, straps and tools indicate the crewmembers had been working awhile when this photo was taken. Krikalev, representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), has been assigned as a member of the three-man initial International Space Station (ISS) crew.

  2. Views of the ISS during Endeavour's final flyaround for STS-97

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-09

    STS097-703-030 (30 Nov.-11 Dec. 2000) --- The International Space Station (ISS) is photographed during a fly-around by the Space Shuttle Endeavour. The 240-foot-long, 38-foot-wide solar array (top) is the newest part and one of the most prominent components of the station. Onboard ISS for about 40 days at the time of this photo were astronaut William M. Shepherd and cosmonauts Yuri P. Gidzenko and Sergei K. Krikalev. Onboard the shuttle were STS-97 astronauts – commander Brent W. Jett, Jr., pilot Mike Bloomfield and mission specialists Marc Garneau of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), Carlos I. Noriega and Joseph R. Tanner.

  3. Launch of STS-60 Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-02-03

    STS060-S-105 (3 Feb 1994) --- The Space Shuttle Discovery heads toward an eight-day mission in Earth orbit with five NASA astronauts and a Russian cosmonaut aboard. Liftoff occurred as scheduled at 7:10 a.m. (EST), February 3, 1994. Aboard the spacecraft were astronauts Charles F. Bolden Jr., commander; Kenneth S. Reightler Jr., pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; and N. Jan Davis and Ronald M. Sega, mission specialists, along with Russian cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, also a mission specialist.

  4. In-flight portrait of the STS-60 crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-09

    STS060-31-028 (3-11 Feb. 1994) --- Five NASA astronauts and a Russian cosmonaut squeeze through the tunnel which connects the shirt-sleeve environments of the space shuttle Discovery and the SPACEHAB module. SPACEHAB is located in the spacecraft’s payload bay. Charles F. Bolden Jr., mission commander, is at upper right. Others, clockwise from the commander, are Ronald M. Sega and N. Jan Davis, both mission specialists; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, mission specialist; and Kenneth S. Reightler Jr., pilot. The six spent eight days in Earth orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Expedition One and STS-97 crew pose for portrait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-08

    S97-E-5144 (8 December 2000) --- The STS-97 astronauts and the Expedition 1 crew members pose for an historic portrait onboard the International Space Station (ISS) shortly after hatches were opened between the Space Shuttle Endeavour and the station. In front, from the left, are Sergei K. Krikalev, Brent W. Jett, Jr., William M. Shepherd and Joseph R. Tanner. In back, from the left, are Marc Garneau, Carlos I. Noriega, Yuri P. Gidzenko and Michael J. Bloomfield. A pre-set digital still camera was used to record the scene.

  6. Launch of STS-60 Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-02-03

    STS060-S-106 (3 Feb 1994) --- Palm trees are silhouetted in the foreground of this 70mm image as the Space Shuttle Discovery heads toward an eight-day mission in Earth orbit. Liftoff occurred as scheduled at 7:10 a.m. (EST), February 3, 1994. Aboard the spacecraft were astronauts Charles F. Bolden Jr., commander; Kenneth S. Reightler Jr., pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; and N. Jan Davis and Ronald M. Sega, mission specialists, along with Russian cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, also a mission specialist.

  7. In-flight portrait of the STS-60 crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-09

    STS060-31-009 (3-11 Feb. 1994) --- The six-member STS-60 crew pose for the traditional in-flight crew portrait, with American and Russian flags forming the backdrop on the space shuttle Discovery’s middeck. Left to right (front row) are N. Jan Davis, Charles F. Bolden Jr. and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz; and (back row) Ronald M. Sega, Sergei K. Krikalev and Kenneth S. Reightler Jr. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  8. Demikhov's "Mechanical Heart": The Circumstances Surrounding Creation of the World's First Implantable Total Artificial Heart in 1937.

    PubMed

    Glyantsev, Sergey P; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Bockeria, Leo A

    2016-01-01

    The world's first implantable total artificial heart was designed by Vladimir Demikhov as a fourth year biology student in Voronezh, Soviet Union, in 1937. As a prototype of his device, Demikhov must have used an apparatus for extracorporeal blood circulation invented by Sergei Bryukhonenko of Moscow. The device was the size of a dog's native heart and consisted of two diaphragm pumps brought into motion by an electric motor. A dog with an implanted device lived for 2.5 hours. In addition to having the prototype, the preconditions for Demikhov's artificial heart creation were his manual dexterity, expertise in animal physiology, and his mechanistic worldview.

  9. View of the STS-88 crew in the Node 1/Unity module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-10

    STS088-322-021 (4-15 DECEMBER 1998) --- Astronaut Robert D. Cabana (left), mission commander, and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), plan their approach to tasks in the U.S.-built Unity module. All six STS-88 crew members were involved in tasks to ready Unity and the now-connected Russian-built FGB module, also called Zarya, for their International Space Station (ISS) roles. Krikalev has been named as a member of the first ISS crew.

  10. View of the STS-88 crew in the Node 1/Unity module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-11

    STS088-332-010 (4-15 Dec. 1998) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (left), mission specialist representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), and astronaut Robert D. Cabana mission commander, plan their approach to tasks as they huddle at an internal hatch in the Russian built FGB, also called Zarya. All six STS-88 crew members were involved in tasks to ready Zarya and the now-connected U.S. Node 1, also called Unity, for their International Space Station (ISS) roles. Krikalev has been named as a member of the first ISS crew.

  11. Expedition 11 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-15

    Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev, Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori of Italy blast off aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Friday, April 15, 2005, for a two-day trip to the International Space Station. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the Station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Expedition 11 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-13

    Expedition 11 Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips is seen during a press conference, Thursday, April 14, 2005, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Phillips, Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev and, European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, are scheduled to launch aboard a Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft April 15. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Expedition 11 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-13

    Expedition 11 Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips speaks to the press, Thursday, April 14, 2005, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Phillips, Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, are scheduled to launch aboard a Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft April 15. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Expedition 11 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-13

    Expedition 11 Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips, left, crew Commander Sergei Krikalev and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, join together at a press conference, Thursday, April 14, 2005, prior to their April 15 launch aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Expedition 11 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-13

    The Soyuz TMA-6 sits on the pad ready for launch, Thursday, April 14, 2005, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Expedition 11 crew Commander Sergei Krikalev along with Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, will launch April 15, 2005. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Expedition 11 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-15

    Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev, Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, blast off aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Friday, April 15, 2005, for a two-day trip to the International Space Station. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the Station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Expedition 11 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-13

    Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev speaks to the press, Thursday, April 14, 2005, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Kiralev, Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, are scheduled to launch aboard a Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft April 15. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Expedition 32 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-17

    Expedition 32 NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba rests on the Russian Search and Rescue helicopter that is carrying him from the Soyuz TMA-04M landing site in a remote area outside Arkalyk, Kazakhstan to Kostanay, Kazakhstan shortly after he and Expedition 32 Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineer Sergei Revin returned from the International Space Station on Monday, Sept. 17, 2012. Acaba, Padalka and Revin returned from five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 31 and 32 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. Expedition 32 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-17

    A view inside inside the Russian Search and Rescue helicopter that will carry Expedition 32 Flight Engineer Joe Acaba from the Soyuz TMA-04M landing site in a remote area outside Arkalyk, Kazakhstan to Kostanay, Kazakhstan shortly after he and Expedition 32 Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineer Sergei Revin returned from the International Space Station on Monday, Sept. 17, 2012. Acaba, Padalka and Revin returned from five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 31 and 32 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 31 Soyuz TMA-04M Docking to ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-17

    View from the balcony of the Russian Mission Control Center shows the Expedition 31 crew portrait along with a timeline of Soyuz TMA-04M docking events on Thursday, May 17, 2012, in Korolev, Russia. The Soyuz docked to the International Space Station at 8:36 a.m. Moscow time with Expedition 31 Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, Flight Engineer Sergei Revin, and NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba two days after they launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Expedition 31 Soyuz TMA-04M Docking to ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-17

    View from the balcony of the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia a little more than an hour before the planned docking of the Soyuz TMA-04M to the International Space Station on Thursday, May 17, 2012. Onboard the soyuz spacecraft are Expedition 31 Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, Flight Engineer Sergei Revin, and NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba. The crew of three launched at 9:01 a.m. Kazakhstan time on Tuesday, May 15 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Expedition 31 Soyuz TMA-04M Docking to ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-17

    A television screen as seen from the balcony of the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia shows the Soyuz TMA-04M as it docks to the International Space Station on Thursday, May 17, 2012. Onboard the soyuz spacecraft are Expedition 31 Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, Flight Engineer Sergei Revin, and NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba. The crew of three launched at 9:01 a.m. Kazakhstan time on Tuesday, May 15 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Cosmonaut Krikalev takes photos in U.S. Laboratory /Destiny module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5138 (11 February 2001) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer, takes still photographs onboard the newly opened Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS). After astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, Expedition One commander, opened the Destiny hatch, he and astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell (out of frame) ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST), February 11, 2001. As depicted in subsequent digital images in this series, members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also took some photos and continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station.

  4. Kononenko, Padalka and Acaba in Columbus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-17

    ISS031-E-081658 (17 May 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka (background) and NASA astronaut Joe Acaba, both Expedition 31 flight engineers, are pictured during a crew safety briefing in the Columbus laboratory to familiarize them with the potential hazards and available safety measures onboard the International Space Station. Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko (mostly out of frame at left), commander, conducted the briefing. Out of frame are European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, NASA astronaut Don Pettit and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Revin, all flight engineers. The event took place shortly after Padalka, Revin and Acaba docked with the space station in their Soyuz TMA-04M spacecraft.

  5. Expedition 11 Soyuz Preparation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-11

    Russian technicians work, Tuesday, April 12, 2005, on mating the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft to the booster rocket inside the integration facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan as preparations continued for the April 15 launch of Expedition 11 with Commander Sergei Krikalev, Flight Engineer John Phillips and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, to the International Space Station. The rocket mating operation occurred on the 44th anniversary of the launch of Yuri Gagarin from the same complex to become the first human in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Expedition 11 Soyuz Preparation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-11

    A Russian technician works, Tuesday, April 12, 2005, on mating the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft to the booster rocket inside the integration facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan as preparations continued for the April 15 launch of Expedition 11 with Commander Sergei Krikalev, Flight Engineer John Phillips and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, to the International Space Station. The rocket mating operation occurred on the 44th anniversary of the launch of Yuri Gagarin from the same complex to become the first human in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Expedition 11 Soyuz Preparation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-11

    The engines for the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft are seen, Tuesday, April 12, 2005, inside the integration facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan as preparations continued for the April 15 launch of Expedition 11 with Commander Sergei Krikalev, Flight Engineer John Phillips and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, to the International Space Station. The rocket mating operation occurred on the 44th anniversary of the launch of Yuri Gagarin from the same complex to become the first human in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Expedition 11 Soyuz Preparation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-11

    The engines of the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft are seen, Tuesday, April 12, 2005, inside the integration facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan as preparations continued for the April 15 launch of Expedition 11 with Commander Sergei Krikalev, Flight Engineer John Phillips and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, to the International Space Station. The rocket mating operation occurred on the 44th anniversary of the launch of Yuri Gagarin from the same complex to become the first human in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Expedition 31 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-23

    Expedition 31 NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba, far left, Expedition 31 Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineer Sergei Revin, third from left, select International Space Station Russian segment event simulation test cards for their final qualification test in preparation for launch, Monday, April 23, 2012 at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia. Padalka, Acaba and Revin are set to launch May 15 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in their Soyuz TMA-04M spacecraft to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  10. Expedition 31 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-23

    Expedition 31 NASA NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba signs for his International Space Station Russian segment event simulation test card before senior officials at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Monday, April 23, 2012 in Star City, Russia, while his fellow crew members Soyuz commander Gennady Padalka (left) and Sergei Revin look on. Acaba, Padalka and Revin are set to launch May 15 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in their Soyuz TMA-04M spacecraft to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. Expedition 31 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-23

    Expedition 31 NASA backup crew member Kevin Ford signs for his Soyuz vehicle simulation test card before senior officials at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Monday, April 23, 2012 in Star City, Russia, while his fellow crew members Oleg Novitskiy (far left) and Evgeny Tarelkin look on. Expedition 31 prime crew members commander Gennady Padalka, flight engineers Joe Acaba and Sergei Revin practiced similar scenarios nearby in advance of their final approval for launch to the International Space Station, scheduled for May 15, 2012. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. McArthur in Destiny laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-05

    ISS011-E-14120 (5 October 2005) --- Astronaut William S. McArthur, Jr., Expedition 12 commander and NASA science officer, works with Space Station Remote Manipulator System or Canadarm2 controls located in the Destiny lab, while sharing duty time with the Expedition 11 crewmembers on the international space station. The Expedition 11 crew of cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev of Russia's Federal Space Agency, commander, and astronaut John L. Phillips, flight engineer and NASA science officer, along with spaceflight participant Greg Olsen, will be returning to Earth early next week.

  13. Newman, Krikalev and Ross on Endeavour's middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-08

    S88-E-5163 (12-08-98) --- Left to right, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross and Sergei K. Krikalev--all mission specialists--on Endeavour's middeck. Ross and Newman eventually participated in three space walks as part of the STS-88 work involved in readying the Unity and Zarya modules for their ISS roles. Krikalev, representing the Russian Space Agency, has been named as a member of the first ISS flight crew. This photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 23:14:01 GMT, Dec. 8.

  14. Expedition 11 and Expedition 12 on-orbit crew portrait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-08

    ISS011-E-14191 (8 October 2005) --- The crewmembers onboard the International Space Station pose for a group photo in the Destiny laboratory following the ceremony of Changing-of-Command from Expedition 11 to Expedition 12. From the left (front row) are Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander; and astronaut William S. McArthur Jr., Expedition 12 commander and NASA science officer. From the left (back row) are astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA science officer and flight engineer; U.S. Spaceflight Participant Gregory Olsen; and Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, Expedition 12 flight engineer.

  15. Newman and Krikalev on middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-14

    S88-E-5159 (12-14-98) --- Less than 48-hours prior to the completion of their 11-day mission in Earth orbit, two of the seven STS-88 crew members are pictured on Endeavour's middeck. They are James H. Newman (left) and Sergei K. Krikalev, both mission specialists. Krikalev represents the Russian Space Agency (RSA) and has been named to the first ISS crew. Newman earlier had joined astronaut Jerry L. Ross on three space walks to perform a number of tasks to ready the first components of ISS. The photo was taken with an electronic still camera (ESC) at 03:00:43, Dec. 14.

  16. STS-88 Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Five NASA astronauts and a Russian cosmonaut assigned to the STS-88 mission pose for a crew portrait. Seated in front (left to right) are mission specialists Sergei K. Krikalev, representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), and astronaut Nancy J. Currie. In the rear from the left, are astronauts Jerry L. Ross, mission specialist; Robert D. Cabana, mission commander; Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow, pilot; and James H. Newman, mission specialist. The STS-88 mission launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor on December 4, 1998 at 2:35 a.m. (CST) to deliver the Unity Node to the International Space Station (ISS).

  17. The STS-88 crew talks to media before DEPARTing for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-88 crew meet with news media at the Cape Canaveral Air Station Skid Strip before leaving for Houston. From left, they are Mission Specialists Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev and James H. Newman, Commander Robert D. Cabana (at microphone), Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and Nancy J. Currie, and Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow. The STS-88 crew returned Dec. 15 from a 12-day mission on orbit constructing the first elements of the International Space Station, the U.S.-built Unity connecting module and Russian-built Zarya control module.

  18. STS-74 flight day 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    On this sixth day of the STS-74 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Kenneth Cameron, Pilot James Halsell, and Mission Specialists William McArthur, Jerry Ross, and Chris Hatfield and the Mir 20 cosmonauts, Cmdr. Yuri Gidzenko, Flight Engineer Sergei Avdeyev, and Cosmonaut-Researcher (ESA) Thomas Reiter, were greeted and briefly interviewed by the Secretary General of the United Nations, Boutros Boutros-Ghali, on the 50th anniversary of the United Nations via a radio satellite hookup. An additional interview with other journalists from different areas of the United States and Canada was also presented.

  19. The STS-88 crew talks to media before DEPARTing for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-88 Commander Robert D. Cabana (at microphone) speaks to the news media before the crew's departure at Cape Canaveral Air Station. At left are Mission Specialists Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev and James H. Newman. The other crew members (not shown) are Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and Nancy J. Currie, and Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow. The STS-88 crew returned Dec. 15 from a 12-day mission on orbit constructing the first elements of the International Space Station, the U.S.-built Unity connecting module and Russian-built Zarya control module.

  20. Expedition 11 Soyuz Preparation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-11

    A detail of rail car wheels is seen, Tuesday, April 12, 2005, prior to transportation of the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft inside the integration facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan as preparations continued for the April 15 launch of Expedition 11 with Commander Sergei Krikalev, Flight Engineer John Phillips and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, to the International Space Station. The rocket mating operation occurred on the 44th anniversary of the launch of Yuri Gagarin from the same complex to become the first human in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. STS-112 Flight Day 7 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    On this seventh day of STS-112 mission members of the crew (Commander Jeff Ashby; Pilot Pam Melroy; Mission Specialist Sandy Magnus, Piers Sellers, Dave Wolf, and Fyodor Yurchikhin) along with the Expedition Five crew (Commander Valery Korzun; Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson, and Sergei Treschev) are seen answering questions during the mission's press interview and photo opportunity. They answered various questions regarding the mission's objectives, the onboard science experiments, the extravehicular activities (EVAs) and the effects of living in space. Shots of the test deployment of the S1 truss radiator and Canadarm rotor joint are also shown.

  2. STS-112 Flight Day 7 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On this seventh day of STS-112 mission members of the crew (Commander Jeff Ashby; Pilot Pam Melroy; Mission Specialist Sandy Magnus, Piers Sellers, Dave Wolf, and Fyodor Yurchikhin) along with the Expedition Five crew (Commander Valery Korzun; Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson, and Sergei Treschev) are seen answering questions during the mission's press interview and photo opportunity. They answered various questions regarding the mission's objectives, the onboard science experiments, the extravehicular activities (EVAs) and the effects of living in space. Shots of the test deployment of the S1 truss radiator and Canadarm rotor joint are also shown.

  3. The STS-88 crew and families DEPART for Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-88 Commander Robert D. Cabana and his wife, Nancy, enter the airplane that will return them to Houston and the Johnson Space Center. They will be joined by other crew members, with their families, Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow. Mission Specialists Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross and Nancy J. Currie. The STS-88 crew returned Dec. 15 from a 12- day mission on orbit constructing the first elements of the International Space Station, the U.S.-built Unity connecting module and Russian-built Zarya control module.

  4. Expedition 37 Soyuz Rollout

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-23

    Large gantry mechanisms on either side of the Soyuz TMA-10M spacecraft are raised into position to secure the rocket at the launch pad on Monday, Sept. 23, 2013 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for September 26 and will send Expedition 37 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov, NASA Flight Engineer Michael Hopkins and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Ryazansky on a five and a half-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. ISS Expedition 43 Crew Departure from Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-16

    NASA video file of ISS Expedition 43 crew departure from Russia on March 16, 2015 with crewmembers Scott Kelly, Gennady Padalka, and Mikhail Kornienko; and backupcrew Jeff Williams, Sergei Volkov and Alexie Ovchinin. Includes footage of crew and backup crew as the meet outside the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC); ISS Expedition 42 crewmembers Elena Serova and Alexander Samokutyaev as they exits the GCTC; crew and backup crew with family, friends and officials as they walk to park, pose for photographs and offers short remarks; and finally the crew as they are leaving by bus.

  6. Volkov and Kononenko prepare for the undocking of the ESA Jules Verne ATV during Expedition 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-09-05

    ISS017-E-015234 (5 Sept. 2008) --- Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonauts Sergei Volkov (left) and Oleg Kononenko, Expedition 17 commander and flight engineer, respectively, make preparations in the International Space Station's Zvezda Service Module for the undocking of the European Space Agency's (ESA) "Jules Verne" Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). The ATV departed from the aft port of Zvezda at 4:29 p.m. (CDT) on Sept. 5, 2008 and was placed in a parking orbit for three weeks, scheduled to be deorbited on Sept. 29 when lighting conditions are correct for an ESA imagery experiment of reentry.

  7. Volkov prepares for the undocking of the ESA Jules Verne ATV during Expedition 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-09-05

    ISS017-E-015230 (5 Sept. 2008) --- Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 17 commander, makes preparations in the International Space Station's Zvezda Service Module for the undocking of the European Space Agency's (ESA) "Jules Verne" Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). The ATV departed from the aft port of Zvezda at 4:29 p.m. (CDT) on Sept. 5, 2008 and was placed in a parking orbit for three weeks, scheduled to be deorbited on Sept. 29 when lighting conditions are correct for an ESA imagery experiment of reentry.

  8. Volkov and Kononenko prepare for the undocking of the ESA Jules Verne ATV during Expedition 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-09-05

    ISS017-E-015229 (5 Sept. 2008) --- Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonauts Sergei Volkov (left) and Oleg Kononenko, Expedition 17 commander and flight engineer, respectively, make preparations in the International Space Station's Zvezda Service Module for the undocking of the European Space Agency's (ESA) "Jules Verne" Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). The ATV departed from the aft port of Zvezda at 4:29 p.m. (CDT) on Sept. 5, 2008 and was placed in a parking orbit for three weeks, scheduled to be deorbited on Sept. 29 when lighting conditions are correct for an ESA imagery experiment of reentry.

  9. Krikalev at work in Node 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-07

    STS098-346-0032 (7-20 February 2001) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer representing the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, carries the Vozdukh in the Unity node. Vozdukh is designed to maintain the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the cabin air within the medically permissible range for long-duration exposure. It provides the primary means of removing CO2 from the outpost's atmosphere, and its operation is based on the use of regenerated adsorbers of CO2.

  10. STS-88 Mission Highlights Resources Tape. Tape C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-88 flight crew, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Krikalev present a video overview of their space flight. This is the last of three videos which show the highlights of the mission. This video covers the last four days (day 9 - 12) of the mission. Important images include the closing of the UNITY Connecting Module's hatch, the crew exercising, and the reentry of the spacecraft into Earth's atmosphere.

  11. STS-88 Day 01 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this first day of the STS-88 mission, the flight crew, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Krikalev can be seen performing pre-launch activities such as eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also, included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. The crew is readied in the "white room" for their mission. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters.

  12. Research summer camp in photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyanovskaya, Elizaveta; Melnik, Maksim; Egorov, Vladimir; Gleim, Artur; Lukishova, Svetlana; Kozlov, Sergei; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    ITMO University and the University of Rochester became close partners several years ago. One of the first outcomes of this mutually beneficial partnership was the creation of International Institute of Photonics and Optical Information Technologies led by Prof. Sergei Kozlov and Prof. Xi-Cheng Zhang. Universities have created a double Masters-degree program in optics in 2014, and several ITMO students have been awarded degrees from Rochester. At the same time ITMO University organizes Summer Research camp in Photonics for University of Rochester students. Students spent two weeks in the Northern Capital of Russia learning about the emerging practical applications of femtosecond optics, terahertz biomedicine and quantum information technologies.

  13. jsc2013e013833

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-07

    With a picture of the Russian great designer Sergei Korolev over his right shoulder, Expedition 35-36 Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy (right) poses for pictures March 7 with his crewmates, Flight Engineer Alexander Misurkin (left) and Soyuz Commander Pavel Vinogradov (center) at the Gagarin Museum at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia. The three crewmembers are training for their launch to the International Space Station March 29, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-08M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazkahstan. NASA / Stephanie Stoll

  14. STS-114 Discovery's approach for docking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-28

    ISS011-E-11255 (28 July 2005) --- Space shuttle Discovery was about 600 feet from the international space station when cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 11 commander, and astronaut John L. Phillips, NASA science officer and flight engineer, photographed the spacecraft as it approached the station and performed a backflip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photos will be analyzed by engineers on the ground as additional data to evaluate the condition of Discovery’s heat shield. The Italian-built Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is visible in the cargo bay.

  15. Expedition 27 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-24

    Chief, Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Sergei Krikalev shakes hands and welcomes home Expedition 27 Commander Dmitry Kondratyev at the Chkalovsky airport outside Star City, Russia several hours after Kondratyev and Flight Engineers Paolo Nespoli and Cady Coleman landed in their Soyuz TMA-20 southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. NASA Astronaut Coleman, Russian Cosmonaut Kondratyev and Italian Astronaut Nespoli are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Progress re-supply ship

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-14

    ISS01-324-002 (18 November 2000) --- A Progress supply ship linked up to the orbiting International Space Station (ISS) at 3:48 GMT, November 18, bringing Expedition 1 commander William M. Shepherd, pilot Yuri P. Gidzenko and flight engineer Sergei K. Krikalev two tons of food, clothing, hardware and holiday gifts from their families. The photograph was taken with a 35mm camera and the film was later handed over to the STS-97 crew members for return to Earth and subsequent processing.

  17. Expedition 11 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-10

    Astronaut John Phillips is attended to by a Russian nurse onboard the helicopter taking him from the Soyuz landing site near Arlalyk to Kustanay, Kazkahstan, Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2005. Members of the 11th expedition to the international space station, Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev, landed near Arlalyk after a six-month mission in orbit. Along with American businessman Greg Olsen, who visited the station for more than a week, Phillips and Krikalev returned to Earth aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Earth observations taken by the Expedition One crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-28

    ISS001-E-5981 (28 December 2000) --- A near-vertical digital still image from the International Space Station (ISS) features Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel. A small section of the Mediterranean Sea coastline is at bottom left. One of the Expedition One crew members used an extender on a 400mm lens to provide detail in the image. Onboard the outpost for the first habitation tour were astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, commander; along with cosmonauts Yuri P. Gidzenko, Soyuz commander; and Sergei K. Krikalev, flight engineer.

  19. Expedition 10 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-10-08

    Flight Engineer and Soyuz Commander Salizhan Sharipov tours a museum bearing the name of historic Russian rocket designer Sergei Korolev, Saturday, October 9, 2004, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in advance of their liftoff to the International Space Station October 14. The traditional visit included the signing of their names in commemorative books and a wall at the museum, and touring the cottages nearby where Korolev and Yuri Gagarin slept on the eve of Gagarin's launch April 12, 1961 to become the first human in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. First person - Chih-Wen Chu.

    PubMed

    2018-05-16

    First Person is a series of interviews with the first authors of a selection of papers published in Journal of Cell Science, helping early-career researchers promote themselves alongside their papers. Chih-Wen Chu is the first author on 'The Ajuba family protein Wtip regulates actomyosin contractility during vertebrate neural tube closure', published in Journal of Cell Science. Chih-Wen is an associate scientist in the lab of Sergei Sokol at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA, investigating apical constriction and planar cell polarity, with a focus on protein dynamics at the cell junctions. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. jsc2014e093279

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-18

    6103: At the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 42/43 crewmember Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency tests her vestibular system on a tilt table Nov. 18 as part of pre-launch training. Cristoforetti, Terry Virts of NASA and Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) will launch Nov. 24, Kazakh time, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in the Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Sergei Fyodorov

  2. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11948 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (seen in Phillip’;s helmet visor), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  3. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11949 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (seen in Phillip’;s helmet visor), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  4. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11947 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (seen in Phillip’;s helmet visor), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  5. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11958 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (out of frame), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of Station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the Station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  6. Phillips during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-18

    ISS011-E-11944 (18 August 2005) --- Attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, astronaut John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA science officer and flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA). The 4 hour 58 minute spacewalk by Phillips and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (out of frame), commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, was the 62nd EVA in support of station assembly and maintenance, the 34th conducted from the station itself, and the 16th from the Pirs Docking Compartment.

  7. jsc2012e051524

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-11

    At the historic museum near the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the Expedition 31/32 backup and prime crews pose for pictures May 11, 2012 in front of the mural depicting the likeness of Yuri Gagarin, the first human to fly in space. The photo session took place as training for the launch of Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, Flight Engineer Joe Acaba of NASA and Flight Engineer Sergei Revin drew to a close for their liftoff May 15 in their Soyuz TMA-04 spacecraft to begin a four-month mission on the International Space Station. From left to right are backup crewmembers Oleg Novitskiy, Kevin Ford of NASA and Evgeny Tarelkin, and the prime crew, Padalka, Revin and Acaba. In the foreground are replicas of the small cottages Gagarin and the Russian space program’s “Great Designer”, Sergei Korolev slept in on the eve of Gagarin’s launch on April 12, 1961. The real cottages are located near the museum in Baikonur. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  8. High Accuracy Potential Energy Surface, Dipole Moment Surface, Rovibrational Energies and Line List Calculations for ^{14}NH_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Phillip; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Polyansky, Oleg; Kyuberis, Aleksandra; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Zobov, Nikolay Fedorovich; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    We present a new spectroscopic potential energy surface (PES) for ^{14}NH_3, produced by refining a high accuracy ab initio PES to experimental energy levels taken predominantly from MARVEL. The PES reproduces 1722 matched J=0-8 experimental energies with a root-mean-square error of 0.035 cm-1 under 6000 cm^{-1} and 0.059 under 7200 cm^{-1}. In conjunction with a new DMS calculated using multi reference configuration interaction (MRCI) and H=aug-cc-pVQZ, N=aug-cc-pWCVQZ basis sets, an infrared (IR) line list has been computed which is suitable for use up to 2000 K. The line list is used to assign experimental lines in the 7500 - 10,500 cm^{-1} region and previously unassigned lines in HITRAN in the 6000-7000 cm^{-1} region. Oleg L. Polyansky, Roman I. Ovsyannikov, Aleksandra A. Kyuberis, Lorenzo Lodi, Jonathan Tennyson, Andrey Yachmenev, Sergei N. Yurchenko, Nikolai F. Zobov, J. Mol. Spec., 327 (2016) 21-30 Afaf R. Al Derzia, Tibor Furtenbacher, Jonathan Tennyson, Sergei N. Yurchenko, Attila G. Császár, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Trans., 161 (2015) 117-130

  9. Expedition One crew in Russian with Service Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-07-14

    Photographic documentation of Expedition One crew in Russia with Service Module. Views include: The three crew members for ISS Expedition One train with computers on the trainer / mockup for the Zvezda Service Module. From the left are cosmonauts Yuri Gidzenko, Soyuz commander; and Sergei Krikalev, flight engineer; and astronaut William Shepherd, mission commander. The session took place at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Russia (18628). View looking toward the hatch inside the Zvezda Service Module trainer / mockup at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Russia (18629). A wide shot of the Zvezda Service Module trainer / mockup, with the transfer compartment in the foreground (18630). Side view of the Zvezda Service Module (18631). An interior shot of the Zarya / Functional Cargo Bay (FGB) trainer / mockup (18632). Astronaut Scott Kelly, director of operations - Russia, walks through a full scale trainer / mockup for the Zvezda Service Module at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Russia (18633). Astronaut William Shepherd (right) mission commander for ISS Expedition One, and Sergei Krikalev, flight engineer, participate in a training session in a trainer / mockup of the Zvezda Service Module (18634).

  10. Smokey the Bear Toy in the Node 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-03

    ISS032-E-011662 (3 Aug. 2012) --- Smokey Bear floats freely in the Unity node of the International Space Station. On May 15, 2012, Smokey traveled aboard the Soyuz spacecraft with NASA astronaut Joe Acaba and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Sergei Revin to the space station. As a recognized symbol for wildland fire prevention, his presence on the orbiting complex also highlights the many areas of active space station research related to Earth observations, plant growth and combustion and materials sciences, as well as existing spinoff technologies in these areas. NASA, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the Texas Forest Service are teaming up to celebrate Smokey's 68th birthday Aug. 9 at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

  11. Smokey the Bear Toy in the Node 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-03

    ISS032-E-011654 (3 Aug. 2012) --- Smokey Bear floats freely near crew insignias placed in the Unity node of the International Space Station. On May 15, 2012, Smokey traveled aboard the Soyuz spacecraft with NASA astronaut Joe Acaba and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Sergei Revin to the space station. As a recognized symbol for wildland fire prevention, his presence on the orbiting complex also highlights the many areas of active space station research related to Earth observations, plant growth and combustion and materials sciences, as well as existing spinoff technologies in these areas. NASA, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the Texas Forest Service are teaming up to celebrate Smokey's 68th birthday Aug. 9 at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

  12. Smokey the Bear Toy floating in ISS Hatchway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-03

    ISS032-E-011678 (3 Aug. 2012) --- Smokey Bear floats freely near a hatchway on the International Space Station. On May 15, 2012, Smokey traveled aboard the Soyuz spacecraft with NASA astronaut Joe Acaba and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Sergei Revin to the space station. As a recognized symbol for wildland fire prevention, his presence on the orbiting complex also highlights the many areas of active space station research related to Earth observations, plant growth and combustion and materials sciences, as well as existing spinoff technologies in these areas. NASA, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the Texas Forest Service are teaming up to celebrate Smokey's 68th birthday Aug. 9 at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

  13. jsc2013e080223

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-06

    At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 37/38 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov (second from left) holds a toy cat mascot during a pre-launch news conference Sept. 6 as his crewmates, Flight Engineer Michael Hopkins of NASA (far left) and Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy (second from the right) look on. Also participating in the news conference was the head of the Cosmonaut Training Center, Sergei Krikalev (far right). The mascot will be mounted inside the crew’s Soyuz TMA-10M spacecraft over Kotov’s head as a “zero-g indicator” once the crew launches. Their launch to the International Space Station is set for Sept. 26, Kazakh time, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  14. Expedition 17 Pre-launch Images from Kazakhstan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-04-07

    JSC2008-E-032248 (7 April 2008) --- At their crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 17 Commander Sergei Volkov (center), Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko (right) and South Korean spaceflight participant So-yeon Yi clasp hands for photographers on April 7, 2008, the eve of their launch to the International Space Station. Volkov, Kononenko and Yi are scheduled to launch to the station on the Soyuz TMA-12 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on April 8 and arrive at the ISS on April 10 to begin what will be six months in space for Volkov and Kononenko. Yi will be in space nine days on the complex, returning to Earth with two of the Expedition 16 crewmembers currently on the station. Photo Credit: NASA /Victor Zelentsov

  15. Expedition 10 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-10-08

    Flight Engineer and Soyuz Commander Salizhan Sharipov, right, Expedition 10 Commander and NASA Science Officer Leroy Chiao and Russian Space Forces cosmonaut Yuri Shargin, left, toured a museum bearing the name of historic Russian rocket designer Sergei Korolev, Saturday, October 9, 2004, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan prior to their liftoff to the International Space Station October 14. The traditional visit included the signing of their names in commemorative books and a wall at the museum, and touring the cottages nearby where Korolev and Yuri Gagarin slept on the eve of Gagarin's launch April 12, 1961 to become the first human in space. The tour guide points out a piece of art made entirely of painted grains of rice depicting Yuri Gargarin and Korolev. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Crew Interviews: Treschev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sergei Treschev is a Cosmonaut of the Rocket Space Corporation Energia, (RSC), from Volynsky District, Lipetsk Region (Russia). He graduated from Moscow Energy Institute. After years of intense training with RSC Energia, he was selected as International Space Station (ISS) Increment 5 flight engineer. The Expedition-Five crew (two Russian cosmonauts and one American astronaut) will stay on the station for approximately 5 months. The Multipurpose Logistics Module, or MPLM, will carry experiment racks and three stowage and resupply racks to the station. The mission will also install a component of the Canadian Arm called the Mobile Base System (MBS) to the Mobile Transporter (MT) installed during STS-110. This completes the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. The mechanical arm will now have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab fixture to the MSS and travel along the Truss to work sites.

  17. STS-88 Endeavour: TCDT-Press Q & A at KSCNF Auditorium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Live footage of the (Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test) TCDT shows the crew of STS-88, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Curry, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman, and Sergei K. Krikalev, participating in a press conference. The moderator Bruce Buckingham is seen introducing Bob Cabana, who then introduces the rest of the crewmembers. Cabana explains the mission and addresses the flight day activities. He includes the building of the Node 1 station element to the Functional Energy Block (FGB) which will already be in orbit, and two space-walks to connect power and data transmission cables. The crewmembers took turn answering questions from both the audience and via radio communication with the Johnson Space Center.

  18. STS-114 and Expedition 11 Onboard Group Photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The seven crew members of the STS-114 mission and two Expedition 11 crew members gather for a group shot in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS). From the left (front row) are astronauts Andrew S. W. Thomas, mission specialist (MS); Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 commander; Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 commander representing Russia's Federal Space Agency; and John L. Phillips, Expedition 11 NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer. From the left (back row) are astronauts Soichi Noguchi, STS-114 MS, representing the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA); James M. Kelly, STS-114 pilot; and Charles J. Camarda, Wendy B. Lawrence, and Stephen K. Robinson, all STS-114 mission specialists.

  19. STS-97 and Expedition One crewmembers pose for a photo in the Service Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-08

    STS097-326-031 (8 December 2000)--- When the five STS-97 astronauts paid a visit to the three Expedition 1 crew members onboard the International Space Station (ISS), they all posed for a traditional in-flight portrait, albeit for the first time in the Zvezda Service Module. On the front row are (left to right) astronauts Brent W. Jett, Jr., STS-97 commander; William M. Shepherd, Expedition 1 mission commander; and Joseph R. Tanner, STS-97 mission specialist. On the second row are (from the left) cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 1 flight engineer; astronaut Carlos I. Noriega, STS-97 mission specialist; cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Expedition 1 Soyuz commander; and astronaut Michael J. Bloomfield, STS-97 pilot. Behind them is astronaut Marc Garneau, STS-97 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). Krikalev and Gidzenko represent the Russian Aviation and Space Agency.

  20. STS-97 and Expedition One crewmembers pose for a photo in the Service Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-08

    STS097-313-001 (8 December 2000)--- When the five STS-97 astronauts paid a visit to the three Expedition 1 crew members onboard the International Space Station (ISS), they all posed for a traditional in-flight portrait, albeit for the first time in the Zvezda Service Module. On the front row are (left to right) astronauts Brent W. Jett, Jr., STS-97 commander; William M. Shepherd, Expedition 1 mission commander; and Joseph R. Tanner, STS-97 mission specialist. On the second row are (from the left) cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition 1 flight engineer; astronaut Carlos I. Noriega, STS-97 mission specialist; cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Expedition 1 Soyuz commander; and astronaut Michael J. Bloomfield, STS-97 pilot. Behind them is astronaut Marc Garneau, STS-97 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). Krikalev and Gidzenko represent the Russian Aviation and Space Agency.

  1. Expedition 11 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-15

    European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, right, is outfitted in his Russian Sokol suit, Friday, April 15, 2005, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Vittori, along with Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev and Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips were preparing for launch aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at daybreak on April 15 for a two-day trip to the International Space Station. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Expedition 11 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-15

    Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev, seated, is outfitted in his Russian Sokol suit, Friday, April 15, 2005, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Krikalev, along with Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, were preparing for launch aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at daybreak on April 15 for a two-day trip to the International Space Station. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Expedition 11 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-15

    Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev, left, is outfitted in his Russian Sokol suit, Friday, April 15, 2005, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Krikalev, along with Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, were preparing for launch aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at daybreak on April 15 for a two-day trip to the International Space Station. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Expedition 11 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-13

    Expedition 11 backup crew Robert Thirsk of Canada, left, American Dan Tani, Russian Commander Mikhail Tyurin and prime Expedition 11 crew Commander Sergei Krikalev, fourth from left, Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori of Italy, right, talk to the press, Thursday, April 14, 2005, prior to the April 15 launch aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the Station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Expedition 11 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-15

    Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev, right, is outfitted in his Russian Sokol suit, Friday, April 15, 2005, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Krikalev, along with Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips and European Space Agency Astronaut Roberto Vittori of Italy were preparing for launch aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at daybreak on April 15 for a two-day trip to the International Space Station. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Expedition 11 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-15

    European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, left, Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev and Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips, right, pose for a photo with officials at the launch pad prior to launch aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Friday, April 15, 2005 for a two-day trip to the International Space Station. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the Station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Expedition 11 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-15

    European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, of Italy, is outfitted in his Russian Sokol suit, Friday, April 15, 2005, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Vittori, along with Expedition 11 Commander Sergei Krikalev and Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer John Phillips were preparing for launch aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at daybreak on April 15 for a two-day trip to the International Space Station. Krikalev and Phillips will spend six months on the station, replacing Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao and Flight Engineer Salizhan Sharipov, while Vittori will spend eight days on the Station under a commerical contract between ESA and the Russian Federal Space Agency, returning to Earth with Chiao and Sharipov on April 25. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. SciTech Connect

    None

    The 2013 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference was held in Santa Fe, NM from April 15-17. There were 15 invited talks spanning the field of fusion theory on topics such as stellerator theory, intrinsic rotation in tokamaks, transport in the plasma edge, and plasma-wall interactions. Author-provided summaries of several of the invited talks are included on pages 5 to 10 of this document. Plenary talks were given by Per Helander (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald, Germany) on “Overview of recent developments in stellerator theory”, Amit Misra (Los Alamos National Laboratory) on “Stable storage of Helium at interfaces in nanocomposites”, Sergei Krasheninnikovmore » (UC San Diego) on “On the physics of the first wall in fusion devices”, and Stuart Bale (UC Berkeley) on “Solar wind thermodynamics and turbulence: collisional – collisionless transitions”.« less

  9. Smokey the Bear Toy floating in the Node 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-03

    ISS032-E-011664 (3 Aug. 2012) --- Smokey Bear floats freely in the hatchway of the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory. On May 15, 2012, Smokey traveled aboard the Soyuz spacecraft with NASA astronaut Joe Acaba and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Sergei Revin to the space station. As a recognized symbol for wildland fire prevention, his presence on the orbiting complex also highlights the many areas of active space station research related to Earth observations, plant growth and combustion and materials sciences, as well as existing spinoff technologies in these areas. NASA, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the Texas Forest Service are teaming up to celebrate Smokey's 68th birthday Aug. 9 at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

  10. Smokey the Bear Toy floating in the Node 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-03

    ISS032-E-011666 (3 Aug. 2012) --- Smokey Bear floats freely in the hatchway of the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory. On May 15, 2012, Smokey traveled aboard the Soyuz spacecraft with NASA astronaut Joe Acaba and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Sergei Revin to the space station. As a recognized symbol for wildland fire prevention, his presence on the orbiting complex also highlights the many areas of active space station research related to Earth observations, plant growth and combustion and materials sciences, as well as existing spinoff technologies in these areas. NASA, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and the Texas Forest Service are teaming up to celebrate Smokey's 68th birthday Aug. 9 at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

  11. ISS Progress 24 Rollout

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-01-16

    JSC2007-E-03079 (16 Jan. 2007) --- Roll-out of the Progress 24 vehicle occurred on schedule at 7:00 a.m., Jan. 16, 2007 (local time) at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. Progress 24 bears on the side of the Soyuz launch vehicle the name of Sergei Korolev, the "Great Designer" of Soviet spacecraft, whose 100th birthday was celebrated on Jan. 12. A portrait of him is painted on the external payload fairing. Korolev, named in his memory, is now the suburb of Moscow where the Russian Mission Control Center resides. After it reaches orbit, a series of pre-programmed engine firings will lead to the automated docking of Progress 24 to the now-vacant Pirs Docking Compartment at 9:00 p.m. CST on Jan. 19. (6:00 a.m. on Jan. 20, Moscow time). Photo Credit: NASA

  12. STS-88 Crew Breakfast in O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-88 crew gather for the traditional pre-launch breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building. From left to right are Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and Nancy J. Currie, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow, and Mission Specialists James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. Mission STS-88 is expected to launch at 3:56 a.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Dec. 3. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module, which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already on orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, landing at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14.

  13. Konstantin Gringauz (1918-1993)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantin Gringauz of the Space Research Institute in Moscow died on June 10 of a heart attack. A pioneer of the space age, his professional legacy includes many important contributions to the broad field of space research during the past 4 decades.Born in Tula in southeast Russia in 1918, he was the son of a pharmacist. In 1947, he moved to a laboratory in Sergei Korolev's new Bureau for Rocket Development. A year later, he participated for the first time in the launching of a V-2 rocket, which carried his radio probe to study the ionosphere. In 1949, he received his Ph.D. and was put in charge of Korolev's laboratory for radio technology. In 1956, he began designing instruments.

  14. Red star in orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Since the Soviet Union launched Sputnik 1 in 1957, the extent and direction of the Soviet space effort have remained unclear. The present book penetrates the secrecy-shrouded Soviet space program, telling not only of its unpublicized disasters, but giving credit to its recent successes as well. The book discusses Khrushchev's sponsorship of early space successes as political surprises, and the incident in October 1960, when forty rocket engineers died in a launch-pad disaster. The life story of Sergei Korolev, the chief designer, is discussed, as well as the 'race to the moon' in the late 1960s. The Apollo-Soyuz expedition and other more recent space-station missions are presented.

  15. STS-88 in-flight crew portrait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-14

    S88-E-5169 (12-14-98) --- A pre-set electronic still camera (ESC) was used to take one of the traditional in-flight crew portraits for the STS-88 members on Endeavour's mid deck. From the left are Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman, Robert D. Cabana, Frederick W. (Rick) Sturckow, Nancy J. Currie and Sergei K. Krikalev. Krikalev, representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), has been assigned as one of the crew members for the first ISS crew. A banner representing the participating countries for ISS and a model of the connected Unity-Zarya modules are in the background. The photo was taken at 23:41:40, Dec. 14.

  16. Preflight coverage of STS-114 & Expedition 7 Crews, Emergency Egress Training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-09-12

    JSC2002-01650 (12 September 2002) --- The STS-114 and Expedition Seven crews, attired in training versions of the full-pressure launch and entry suit, pose for a group photo prior to a training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). From the left are astronauts Eileen M. Collins, James M. Kelly, STS-114 mission commander and pilot, respectively; Soichi Noguchi and Stephen K. Robinson, both STS-114 mission specialists; Edward T. Lu, Expedition Seven flight engineer; cosmonauts Sergei I. Moschenko and Yuri I. Malenchenko, Expedition Seven flight engineer and mission commander, respectively. Moschenko and Malenchenko represent Rosaviakosmos and Noguchi represents Japan’s National Space Development Agency (NASDA).

  17. STS-88 in-flight crew portrait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-14

    S88-E-5170 (12-15-98) --- A pre-set electronic still camera (ESC) was used to take one of the traditional in-flight crew portraits for the STS-88 members on Endeavour's mid deck. From the left are Frederick W. (Rick) Sturckow, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman, Nancy J. Currie, Robert D. Cabana and Sergei K. Krikalev. Krikalev, representing the Russian Space Agency (RSA), has been assigned as one of the crew members for the first ISS crew. A banner representing the participating countries for ISS and a model (near Krikalev) of the connected Unity-Zarya modules are in the background. The photo was taken at 00:12:48 GMT, Dec. 15.

  18. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew pose for a photograph with SPACEHAB workers in front of the International Cargo Carrier, which will carry cargo to the International Space Station (ISS). The crew are, left to right, Mission Specialists James Voss, Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), and Susan Helms. STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  19. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), pose in front of the U.S. Lab module, named Destiny, in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi- Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  20. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew look over the Integrated Cargo Carrier and the Russian crane Strela as part of familiarization activities. Starting second to left are Mission Specialists Susan Helms, cosmonaut Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), and James Voss. STS- 102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. It is also transporting Voss, Helms and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. The mission will also return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  1. STS-111 Flight Day 09 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The STS-111 flight crew consists of Kenneth D. Cockrell, Commander, Paul S. Lockhart, Pilot, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist, Philippe Perrin, (CNES), Mission Specialist, Valery G. Korzun, (RSA), ISS Up, Peggy A. Whitson, ISS Up , Sergei Y. Treschev (RSC), ISS Up, Yuri I. Onufriyenko (RSA), ISS Down, Carl E. Walz, and Daniel W. Bursch (ISS) Down. The main goal on this ninth day of flight STS-111, is to replace the wrist roll joint of the Robotic Arm on the International Space Station. Live footage of the wrist roll joint replacement is presented. Paul Lockhart is the spacewalk coordinator for this mission. Franklin Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin, are responsible for replacing the wrist roll joint and performing maintenance activities. The spacewalk to repair this joint occurs outside the Space Station's Quest Airlock. The wrist roll joint was replaced successfully. The spacewalk took approximately 7 hours and 17 minutes to complete.

  2. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), a technician (right) explains use of the equipment in front of (left) STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  3. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Workers at SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., help members of the STS-102 crew become familiar with the Integrated Cargo Carrier and elements of its cargo for their mission. Starting second from left are Mission Specialists James Voss and Susan Helms and, fourth from left, cosmonaut Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi- Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. It is also transporting Voss, Helms and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. The mission will also return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  4. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew look at part of the cargo for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  5. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., STS-102 Mission Specialist Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), looks at part of the cargo on the Integrated Cargo Carrier. STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. It is also transporting Usachev, and Mission Specialists James Voss and Susan Helms as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. The mission will also return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  6. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-102 crew members at left are briefed by workers (right) in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) on equipment for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  7. STS-102 (Expedition II) crew members at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At SPACEHAB, in Titusville, Fla., members of the STS-102 crew look at part of the equipment on the Integrated Cargo Carrier that will be on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Susan Helms, James Voss and Yuri Usachev, who is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi- Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000.

  8. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-28

    Launched on July 26 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform-2. Back dropped by popcorn-like clouds, the MPLM can be seen in the cargo bay as Discovery undergoes rendezvous and docking operations. Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft from the International Space Station (ISS).

  9. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-28

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform-2. Back dropped by popcorn-like clouds, the MPLM can be seen in the cargo bay as Discovery undergoes rendezvous and docking operations. Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft from the International Space Station (ISS).

  10. STS-60 Cosmonauts in Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-01-07

    S93-26022 (Feb 1993) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev maneuvers a small life raft during bailout training at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Shuttle crew members frequently utilize the 25-ft. deep pool to learn proper procedures to follow in the event of emergency egress from their Space Shuttle via the escape pole system. Krikalev is one of two cosmonauts in training for the STS-60 mission. One of the two will serve as primary payload specialist with the other filling an alternate's role. This pool and the facility in which it is housed are titled the WET-F because they are also used by astronauts rehearsing both mission-specific and contingency extravehicular activities (EVA).

  11. Off with your heads: isolated organs in early Soviet science and fiction.

    PubMed

    Krementsov, Nikolai

    2009-06-01

    In the summer of 1925, a debutant writer, Aleksandr Beliaev, published a 'scientific-fantastic story', which depicted the travails of a severed human head living in a laboratory, supported by special machinery. Just a few months later, a young medical researcher, Sergei Briukhonenko, succeeded in reviving the severed head of a dog, using a special apparatus he had devised to keep the head alive. This paper examines the relationship between the literary and the scientific experiments with severed heads in post-revolutionary Russia, which reflected the anxieties about death, revival, and survival in the aftermath of the 1914-1923 'reign of death' in that country. It contrasts the anguished ethical questions raised by the story with the public fascination for 'science that conquers death'.

  12. Off with your heads: isolated organs in early Soviet science and fiction

    PubMed Central

    Krementsov, Nikolai

    2009-01-01

    In the summer of 1925, a debutant writer, Aleksandr Beliaev, published a ‘scientific-fantastic story’, which depicted the travails of a severed human head living in a laboratory, supported by special machinery. Just a few months later, a young medical researcher, Sergei Briukhonenko, succeeded in reviving the severed head of a dog, using a special apparatus he had devised to keep the head alive. This paper examines the relationship between the literary and the scientific experiments with severed heads in post-revolutionary Russia, which reflected the anxieties about death, revival, and survival in the aftermath of the 1914–1923 ‘reign of death’ in that country. It contrasts the anguished ethical questions raised by the story with the public fascination for ‘science that conquers death’. PMID:19442924

  13. STS-88 crew members take part in news conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Introduced by NASA News Chief Bruce Buckingham (left), the STS-88 crew answer questions from media representatives after a day of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, they are Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module.

  14. STS-114 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The major activities of Day 8 for the STS-114 crew of the Space Shuttle Discovery (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) and the Expedition 11 crew of the International Space Station (ISS) (Commander Sergei Krikalev and NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer John Phillips) are a press conference and a conversation with President Bush. The two crews are interviewed by American, Japanese, and Russian media. Discovery crew members on the shuttle's mid-deck review paperwork regarding the impending extravehicular activity (EVA) to remove gap fillers from underneath the orbiter, and the Space Station Remote Manipulator System grapples the External Stowage Platform-2 in the Shuttle's payload bay. Finally, Mission control grants the shuttle crew some time off.

  15. STS-74 Flight Day 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On this fifth day of the STS-74 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Kenneth Cameron, Pilot James Halsell, and Mission Specialists William McArthur, Jerry Ross, and Chris Hadfield, were awakened to the theme from the movie '2001: A Space Odyssey.' The Mir 20 cosmonauts, Cmdr. Yuri Gidzenko, Flight Engineer Sergei Avdeyev, and Cosmonaut-Researcher (ESA) Thomas Reiter, and shuttle astronauts are shown giving each other plaques and presents to commemorate their historic docking event and the start towards the development of the International Space Station. There is a press conference from Moscow by a one of the officers of the Russian Space Agency with both flight crews and an additional separate press interview of the crews by Canadian reporters. There is video footage of the two docked spacecraft taken from various angles.

  16. STS-74 flight day 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    On this fifth day of the STS-74 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Kenneth Cameron, Pilot James Halsell, and Mission Specialists William McArthur, Jerry Ross, and Chris Hatfield, were awakened to the theme from the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey'. The Mir 20 cosmonauts, Cmdr. Yuri Gidzenko, Flight Engineer Sergei Avdeyev, and Cosmonaut-Researcher (ESA) Thomas Reiter, and shuttle astronauts are shown giving each other plaques and presents to commemorate their historic docking event and the start towards the development of the International Space Station. There is a press conference from Moscow by a one of the officers of the Russian Space Agency with both flight crews and an additional separate press interview of the crews by Canadian reporters. There is video footage of the two docked spacecraft taken from various angles.

  17. Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in Discovery Cargo Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform-2. Back dropped by popcorn-like clouds, the MPLM can be seen in the cargo bay as Discovery undergoes rendezvous and docking operations. Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft from the International Space Station (ISS).

  18. Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in Discovery Cargo Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) and the External Stowage Platform-2. Back dropped by popcorn-like clouds, the MPLM can be seen in the cargo bay as Discovery undergoes rendezvous and docking operations. Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft from the International Space Station (ISS).

  19. On S.N. Bernstein's derivation of Mendel's Law and 'rediscovery' of the Hardy-Weinberg distribution.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alan; Seneta, Eugene

    2012-04-01

    Around 1923 the soon-to-be famous Soviet mathematician and probabilist Sergei N. Bernstein started to construct an axiomatic foundation of a theory of heredity. He began from the premise of stationarity (constancy of type proportions) from the first generation of offspring. This led him to derive the Mendelian coefficients of heredity. It appears that he had no direct influence on the subsequent development of population genetics. A basic assumption of Bernstein was that parents coupled randomly to produce offspring. This paper shows that a simple model of non-random mating, which nevertheless embodies a feature of the Hardy-Weinberg Law, can produce Mendelian coefficients of heredity while maintaining the population distribution. How W. Johannsen's monograph influenced Bernstein is discussed.

  20. On S.N. Bernstein’s derivation of Mendel’s Law and ‘rediscovery’ of the Hardy-Weinberg distribution

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alan; Seneta, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Around 1923 the soon-to-be famous Soviet mathematician and probabilist Sergei N. Bernstein started to construct an axiomatic foundation of a theory of heredity. He began from the premise of stationarity (constancy of type proportions) from the first generation of offspring. This led him to derive the Mendelian coefficients of heredity. It appears that he had no direct influence on the subsequent development of population genetics. A basic assumption of Bernstein was that parents coupled randomly to produce offspring. This paper shows that a simple model of non-random mating, which nevertheless embodies a feature of the Hardy-Weinberg Law, can produce Mendelian coefficients of heredity while maintaining the population distribution. How W. Johannsen’s monograph influenced Bernstein is discussed. PMID:22888285

  1. STS-60 Cosmonauts in Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-01-07

    S93-26021 (Feb 1993) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev maneuvers a small life raft during bailout training at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Two SCUBA-equipped divers assisted Krikalev in the STS-60 training exercise. Shuttle crew members frequently utilize the 25-ft. deep pool to learn proper procedures to follow in the event of emergency egress from their Space Shuttle via the escape pole system. Krikalev is one of two cosmonauts in training for the STS-60 mission. One of the two will serve as primary payload specialist with the other filling an alternate's role. This pool and the facility in which it is housed are titled the WET-F, because they are also used by astronauts rehearsing both mission-specific and contingency extravehicular activities (EVA).

  2. jsc2013e091191

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-27

    The Expedition 38/39 backup crewmembers lay flowers in front of a statue of Sergei Korolev, the Russian space icon who supervised Yuri Gagarin’s launch in 1961 to become the first human to fly in space, during a tour of the city of Baikonur, Kazakhstan October 27. Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency (left), Max Suraev (center) and Reid Wiseman of NASA (right) are understudies to the prime crew, Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin and Rick Mastracchio of NASA, who will launch Nov. 7, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-11M spacecraft from Baikonur to begin a six-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  3. Expedition 29 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-22

    Expedition 29 Commander Mike Fossum, right, tosses his hat into the air and comments to Peggy Whitson, NASA Chief of the Astronaut Office, about how strange the effects of gravity feel as they land in a helicopter in Kustanay, Kazakhstan just a few hours after he and Expedition 29 Flight Engineers Sergei Volkov and Satoshi Furukawa landed in their Soyuz TMA-02M capsule in a remote area outside of the town of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011. NASA Astronaut Fossum, Russian Cosmonaut Volkov and JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Astronaut Furukawa are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 28 and 29 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Cosmonaut Krikalev with IMAX camera prior to hatch opening

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5124 (11 February 2001) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer representing the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, films activity in the Unity node, just outside the newly attached Destiny laboratory. The crews of Atlantis and the International Space Station on February 11 opened the Destiny laboratory and spent the first full day of what are planned to be years of work ahead inside the orbiting science and command center. Astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd (just out of frame here) opened the Destiny hatch, and he and Shuttle commander Kenneth D. Cockrell ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST). Members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station and filmed several scenes onboard the station using the IMAX camera. This scene was recorded with a digital still camera.

  5. Expedition One crewmembers with IMAX camera

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-11

    STS98-E-5167 (11 February 2001) --- Astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd (left), Expedition One commander, with the help of cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, films activity onboard the newly attached Destiny laboratory. The crews of Atlantis and the International Space Station on February 11 opened the Destiny laboratory and spent the first full day of what are planned to be years of work ahead inside the orbiting science and command center. Shepherd opened the Destiny hatch, and he and Shuttle commander Kenneth D. Cockrell ventured inside at 8:38 a.m. (CST). Members of both crews went to work quickly inside the new module, activating air systems, fire extinguishers, alarm systems, computers and internal communications. The crew also continued equipment transfers from the shuttle to the station and filmed several scenes onboard the station using an IMAX camera. This scene was recorded with a digital still camera.

  6. STS-102 Crew Activity Report/Flight Day 12 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On this 12th day of the STS-102 mission, the crews of STS-102 (Commander James Wetherbee, Pilot James Kelly, and Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas and Paul Richards), Expedition 1 (William Shepherd, Yuri Gidzenko, and Sergei Krikalev), and Expedition 2 (James Voss, Susan Helms, and Yuriy Usachev) are seen during the in-flight ceremony where Commander Shepherd transfers control of the International Space Station (ISS) to Commander Usachev. The hatch between the ISS and the Discovery Orbiter is closed, and Discovery is seen undocking from the ISS. External views of the ISS are shown against a backdrop of Earth. The Great Lakes area and Chicago are seen from space during night, when lights outline the city.

  7. STS-88 Mission Highlights Resources Tape. Tape A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-88 flight crew, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Krikalev present a video overview of their space flight. This is the first of three videos which show the highlights of the Endeavour mission. Important visual images include pre-launch activities such as the eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters. Once on-orbit crew members are seen delivering and connecting the UNITY Connecting Module to the ZARYA Control Module.

  8. Expedition 43 Media Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-21

    Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) Chief Epidemiologist Sergei Savin stands in the Cosmonaut Hotel lobby and instructs the media on how their access to the Expedition 43 prime and backup crews will be organized during media day, Saturday, March 21, 2015, Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Expedition 43 NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, and Russian Cosmonauts Gennady Padalka, and Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 28, Kazakh time (March 27 Eastern time.) As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. jsc2018e050018

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-05-21

    jsc2018e0500108 - In the town of Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 56 backup crewmembers Anne McClain of NASA (left), Oleg Kononenko of Roscosmos (center) and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency (right), lay flowers and pay tribute at the statue of Sergei Korolev, the Russian space designer icon May 21 during traditional pre-launch activities. They are the backups to the prime crew, Serena Aunon-Chancellor of NASA, Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos and Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, who will launch June 6 on the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft from Baikonur for a six-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Victor Zelentsov.

  10. Expedition 43 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-15

    Expedition 43 backup crew members Jeff Williams of NASA, left, Alexey Ovchinin, center, and Sergei Volkov of Russia's Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) stop to wave hello to photographers during their Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft fit check, Sunday, March 15, 2015 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The prime crew members Russian Cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko, Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly are preparing for launch to the International Space Station in their Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 28, Kazakh time. As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Photo Credit: (NASA/Victor Zelentsov)

  11. [The role of S.N. Davidenkov School in becoming of national neuro-genetics].

    PubMed

    Fando, R A

    2013-01-01

    The article considers the biography of prominent Russian scientist, full member of the Academy of medical sciences of the USSR Sergei Nikolayevitch Davidenkov studying genetics of nervous diseases. The main directions of activities of the scientific school created by him are analyzed. The significance of this school in development of biology and medicine is established. The staff organizational structure, specificity of considered scientific school are established. The role of leader in organization of non-formal research community and development of scientific program is demonstrated. It is marked that in solution of many fundamental and practical tasks of medical genetics an immense merit belonged to scientific schools as a "strong side" of national science of the first half of XX century.

  12. STS-124 and Expedition 17 crew portrait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-06-09

    S124-E-007905 (9 June 2008) --- The STS-124 and Expedition 17 crewmembers pose for a group portrait following a joint news conference from the newly installed Kibo Japanese Pressurized Module of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery is docked with the station. From the left (front row) are NASA astronauts Karen Nyberg, Garrett Reisman, both STS-124 mission specialists; Mark Kelly, STS-124 commander; Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, Expedition 17 commander; and NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, STS-124 mission specialist. From the left (back row) are NASA astronaut Ron Garan, STS-124 mission specialist; Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, Expedition 17 flight engineer; NASA astronauts Ken Ham, STS-124 pilot; Greg Chamitoff, Expedition 17 flight engineer; and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, STS-124 mission specialist. Reisman, who joined the station's crew in March, is being replaced by Chamitoff, who arrived at the station with the STS-124 crew.

  13. Expedition One crew insignia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-11-29

    ISS001-S-001 (October 2000) --- The first International Space Station (ISS) crew patch is a simplified graphic of the station complex when fully completed. The station is seen with solar arrays turned forward. The last names of the Expedition One crew, Soyuz pilot Yuri Gidzenko, flight engineer Sergei Krikalev, and expedition commander William (Bill) Shepherd, appear under the station symbol. The insignia design for ISS flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and cosmonauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator and NASA's international partners may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced.

  14. jsc2012e238541

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-27

    At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia, the next trio of residents to be launched to the International Space Station began two days of certification exams for flight Nov. 27, 2012. Expedition 34/35 NASA Flight Engineer Tom Marshburn (left), Soyuz Commander Roman Romanenko (center) and Flight Engineer Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency received preliminary instructions from GCTC Director Sergei Krikalev (far right). Romanenko, Marshburn and Hadfield and their backups are in the final weeks of training for launch on the Soyuz TMA-07M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Dec. 19 for 5 ½ months on the orbital laboratory. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  15. Robert Lawson (?1846-1896).

    PubMed

    Larner, A J; Gardner-Thorpe, C

    2012-04-01

    Various descriptions of what would now be called Korsakoff Syndrome may be found in the medical literature predating the eponymous reports of Sergei Korsakoff (1854-1900) that date from 1887 onwards. Of these, it has been stated that the "most promising account" (Draaisma in Disturbances of the mind 163-164, 2009) may be that of Dr. Robert Lawson, published in 1878 in the journal Brain in its inaugural year of publication (Lawson in Brain 1:182-194, 1878). As Lawson is likely to be an unfamiliar name to most neurologists, and does not appear in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, we offer this brief account of his life and work.

  16. Expedition 43 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-06

    Expedition 43 prime and backup crews pose for a photograph together in front of St. Basil's Cathedral in Moscow as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, from left, Expedition 43 backup crew members; NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams, Russian cosmonaut Sergei Volkov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Russian cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin of Roscosmos, Expedition 43 prime crew members; NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka of Roscosmos, and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of Roscosmos, Friday, March 6, 2015. Kelly, Padalka, and Kornienko are preparing for launch to the International Space Station in their Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 28, Kazakh time. As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. View of Atlantis leaving the ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-19

    ISS028-E-017501 (19 July 2011) --- This picture of the space shuttle Atlantis was photographed from the International Space Station as the orbiting complex and the shuttle performed their relative separation in the early hours of July 19, 2011. The Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module, which transported tons of supplies to the complex, can be seen in the cargo bay. It is filled with different materials from the station for return to Earth. Onboard the station were Russian cosmonauts Andrey Borisenko, commander; Sergei Volkov and Alexander Samokutyaev, both flight engineers; Japan Aerospace Exploration astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, and NASA astronauts Mike Fossum and Ron Garan, all flight engineers. Onboard the shuttle were NASA astronauts Chris Ferguson, commander; Doug Hurley, pilot; and Sandy Magnus and Rex Walheim, both mission specialists.

  18. STS-88 Mission Specialist Nancy Currie arrives at KSC for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-88 Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie climbs out of a T-38 jet aircraft in which she arrived after dark at the Shuttle Landing Facility in order to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Others in the STS-88 crew are Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow, Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. Ross and Newman will make three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment.

  19. STS-88 Mission Specialist Currie receives M-113 training during TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-88 Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie prepares to operate an M-113, an armored personnel carrier, as part of emergency egress training under the watchful eye of instructor George Hoggard (left) during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT also provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. Others in the STS-88 crew are Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana; Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow; and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman, and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut.

  20. sts111-s-008

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-05

    STS111-S-008 (5 June 2002) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour leaves the launch pad, headed into space for mission STS-111 to the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff occurred at 5:22:49 p.m. (EDT), June 5, 2002. The STS-111 crew includes astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin, mission specialists. Also onboard were the Expedition Five crew members including cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, commander, along with astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Perrin represents CNES, the French space agency, and Korzun and Treschev are with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (Rosaviakosmos). This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program.

  1. jsc2012e051224

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-09

    In the town of Baikonur, Kazakhstan, the Expedition 31/32 backup crew participated in Victory Day celebration activities May 9, 2012 as they took a break from training for the launch of the Soyuz TMA-04M May 15 to the International Space Station. Victory Day commemorates the triumph of Russia over Nazi Germany in World War II, one of Russia’s most solemn occasions. From left to right holding flowers are backup NASA Flight Engineer Kevin Ford, backup Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy and backup Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin. The prime crew, Gennady Padalka, Sergei Revin and NASA’s Joe Acaba, are training for their launch in the Soyuz vehicle on May 15 for a four-month mission on the orbital complex. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  2. jsc2012e051223

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-09

    In the town of Baikonur, Kazakhstan, the Expedition 31/32 backup crew participated in Victory Day celebration activities May 9, 2012 as they took a break from training for the launch of the Soyuz TMA-04M May 15 to the International Space Station. Victory Day commemorates the triumph of Russia over Nazi Germany in World War II, one of Russia’s most solemn occasions. From left to right holding flowers are backup NASA Flight Engineer Kevin Ford, backup Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy and backup Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin. The prime crew, Gennady Padalka, Sergei Revin and NASA’s Joe Acaba, are training for their launch in the Soyuz vehicle on May 15 for a four-month mission on the orbital complex. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  3. KSC-02pd0706

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-111 Mission Specialist Philippe Perrin, with the French Space Agency, looks over the payload installed in Endeavour's payload bay. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include payload familiarization and a simulated launch countdown. The crew also comprises Commander Kenneth Cockrell, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz. The payload on mission STS-111 to the International Space Station includes the Mobile Base System, an Orbital Replacement Unit and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Traveling on Endeavour is also the Expedition 5 crew - Commander Valeri Korzun, Peggy Whitson and Sergei Treschev -- who will replace the Expedition 4 crew on the Station. Korzun and Treschev are with the Russian Space Agency. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for May 30, 2002

  4. KSC-02pd0709

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Expedition 5 crew poses during suitup prior to going to the launch pad for a simulated countdown. From left are astronaut Sergei Treschev, astronaut Peggy Whitson and Commander Valeri Korzun. Treschev and Korzun are with the Russian Space Agency. The simulation is part of STS-111 Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also includes the mission crew Commander Kenneth Cockrell, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin, with the French Space Agency. The payload on the mission to the International Space Station includes the Mobile Base System, an Orbital Replacement Unit and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The Expedition 5 crew is traveling on Endeavour to replace the Expedition 4 crew on the Station. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

  5. KSC-02pd0707

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-111 Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin, with the French Space Agency, and Franklin Chang-Diaz pause during their checkout of the payload installed in Endeavour's payload bay. The crew is at KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include payload familiarization and a simulated launch countdown. The crew also comprises Commander Kenneth Cockrell and Pilot Paul Lockhart. The payload on the mission to the International Space Station includes the Mobile Base System, an Orbital Replacement Unit and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Traveling on Endeavour is also the Expedition 5 crew - Commander Valeri Korzun, Peggy Whitson and Sergei Treschev -- who will replace the Expedition 4 crew on the Station. Korzun and Treschev are with the Russian Space Agency. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

  6. KSC-2013-4333

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-10

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, three members of the STS-88 space shuttle crew speak to spaceport employees during a celebration commemorating the 15th anniversary of the start of assembly of the International Space Station. On stage, from the left, are mission specialist Nancy Currie and Jerry Ross, along with and mission commander Bob Cabana, who is Kennedy's director. The Russian Space Agency's Functional Cargo Block, named "Zarya," was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Nov. 20, 1998. Two weeks later, on Dec. 4, 1998, the space shuttle Endeavour lifted off from Kennedy on STS-88 with node 1, called "Unity." In addition to Cabana, Curie and Ross, the crew also included pilot Rick Sturckow, along with mission specialists Jim Newman and Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. For more information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossman

  7. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-01

    Huddled together in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) are the Expedition Four crew (dark blue shirts), Expedition Five crew (medium blue shirts) and the STS-111 crew (green shirts). The Expedition Four crewmembers are, from front to back, Cosmonaut Ury I. Onufrienko, mission commander; and Astronauts Daniel W. Bursch and Carl E. Waltz, flight engineers. The ISS crewmembers are, from front to back, Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, mission commander; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, mission specialist; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot; and Philippe Perrin, mission specialist. Expedition Five crewmembers are, from front to back, Cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, mission commander; Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. The ISS recieved a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after a record-setting 196 days in space, when the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour STS-111 mission visited in June 2002. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish additional mission objectives: the delivery and installation of the Mobile Base System (MBS), which is an important part of the station's Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the station; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.

  8. Expedition Crews Four and Five and STS-111 Crew Aboard the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Huddled together in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) are the Expedition Four crew (dark blue shirts), Expedition Five crew (medium blue shirts) and the STS-111 crew (green shirts). The Expedition Four crewmembers are, from front to back, Cosmonaut Ury I. Onufrienko, mission commander; and Astronauts Daniel W. Bursch and Carl E. Waltz, flight engineers. The ISS crewmembers are, from front to back, Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, mission commander; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, mission specialist; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot; and Philippe Perrin, mission specialist. Expedition Five crewmembers are, from front to back, Cosmonaut Valery G. Korzun, mission commander; Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. The ISS recieved a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after a record-setting 196 days in space, when the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour STS-111 mission visited in June 2002. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish additional mission objectives: the delivery and installation of the Mobile Base System (MBS), which is an important part of the station's Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the station; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.

  9. STS-98 and Expedition One portrait aboard ISS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-09

    STS98-E-5053 (9 February 2001) --- The three-man Expedition One crew hosts its second group of visitors since beginning occupancy of the International Space Station in November of last year. A pre-set digital still camera was used to record the gathering. Wearing blue flight suits for the reunion are the station's first fulltime occupants--astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd (rear left), Expedition One commander;cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko (front left), Soyuz commander; and cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev (rear right), flight engineer. Astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell (second left, rear) and Mark L. Polansky (second right, rear) are STS-98 mission commander and pilot, respectively. Astronauts Thomas D. Jones, Marsha S. Ivins and Robert L. Curbeam--all mission specialists--are in front. Atlantis docked to the station on schedule at 10:51 a.m. (CST), Feb. 9 and the station and shuttle crews opened hatches between the spacecraft at 1:03 p.m., promptly beginning to unload supplies. The three-member station crew, on the eve of their 100th day aboard the outpost, greeted their first visitors in almost two months. The hatches were open for about four hours before they were closed in preparation for the first of three upcoming space walks, a six-hour sojourn scheduled for the following day from Atlantis by Jones and Curbeam.

  10. STS-114 Flight Day 10 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On Flight Day 10 of the STS-114 mission the International Space Station (ISS) is seen in low lighting while the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), also known as Canadarm 2 grapples the Raffaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) in preparation for its undocking the following day. Members of the shuttle crew (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) and the Expedition 11 crew (Commander Sergei Krikalev and NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer John Phillips) of the ISS read statements in English and Russian in a ceremony for astronauts who gave their lives. Interview segments include one of Collins, Robinson, and Camarda, wearing red shirts to commemorate the STS-107 Columbia crew, and one of Collins and Noguchi on board the ISS, which features voice over from an interpreter translating questions from the Japanese prime minister. The video also features a segment showing gap fillers on board Discovery after being removed from underneath the orbiter, and another segment which explains an experimental plug for future shuttle repairs being tested onboard the mid deck.

  11. STS-114 Flight Day 11 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Flight Day 11 begins with the STS-114 crew of Space Shuttle Discovery (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) awaking to "Anchors Away," to signify the undocking of the Raffaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from the International Space Station (ISS). Canadarm 2, the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), retrieves the Raffaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from the nadir port of the Unity node of the ISS and returns it to Discovery's payload bay. The Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) hands the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS) to its counterpart, the SSRMS, for rebearthing in the payload bay as well. The rebearthing of the OBSS is shown in detail, including centerline and split-screen views. Collins sends a message to her husband, and talks with Representative Tom DeLay (R-TX). Earth views include the Amalfi coast of Italy. The ISS control room bids farewell to the STS-114 crew and the Expedition 11 crew (Commander Sergei Krikalev and NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer John Phillips) of the ISS.

  12. KSC-02pd0691

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-15

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews pose on top of the M-113 armored personnel carrier they practiced driving during emergency egress training at the pad. Standing, left to right, are Mission Commander Kenneth Cockrell, Mission Specialist Philippe Perrin, Expedition 5 member Peggy Whitson, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz; in front are Expedition 5 members Sergei Treschev (left) and Commander Valeri Korzun (right). The crews are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities at KSC, which include a simulated launch countdown. Expedition 5 will travel to the International Space Station on mission STS-111 as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Known as Utilization Flight -2, the mission includes attaching a Canadian-built mobile base system to the International Space Station that will enable the Canadarm2 robotic arm to move along a railway on the Station's truss to build and maintain the outpost. The crew will also replace a faulty wrist/roll joint on the Canadarm2 as well as unload almost three tons of experiments and supplies from the Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-111 is scheduled for May 30, 2002

  13. STS-111 crew on top of Launch Pad 39-A during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities at Launch Pad 39A, the Expedition 5 and STS-111 crews pose on the 295-foot level. Standing, left to right, are Pilot Paul Lockhart, and the Expedition 5 crew Peggy Whitson, Commander Valeri Korzun and Sergei Treschev. Kneeling in front are Mission Specialist Philippe Perrin, Commander Kenneth Cockrell and Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz. Korzun and Treschev are with the Russian Space Agency, and Perrin is with the French Space Agency. Seen behind the crews are the top of the orange external tank and one of the white solid rocket boosters. The TCDT includes emergency egress training at the pad and a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-111 is known as Utilization Flight 2, carrying supplies and equipment in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo to the International Space Station. The payload also includes the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to 'inchworm' from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Expedition 5 will travel to the Station on Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

  14. STS-112 Flight Day 10 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    On Flight Day 10 of the STS-112 mission, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) on the Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew on the International Space Station (ISS) (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) are shown exchanging farewells in the ISS's Destiny Laboratory Module following the completion of a week-long period of docked operations. The Expedition 5 crew is nearing the end of five and a half continuous months aboard the space station. Following the closing of the hatches, the Atlantis Orbiter undocks from the station, and Melroy pilots the shuttle slowly away from the ISS, and engages in a radial fly-around of the station. During the fly-around cameras aboard Atlantis shows ISS from a number of angles. ISS cameras also show Atlantis. There are several shots of each craft with a variety of background settings including the Earth, its limb, and open space. The video concludes with a live interview of Ashby, Melroy and Yurchikhin, still aboard Atlantis, conducted by a reporter on the ground. Questions range from feelings on the conclusion of the mission to the experience of being in space. The primary goal of the mission was the installation of the Integrated Truss Structure S1 on the ISS.

  15. STS-111 Onboard Photo of Endeavour Docking With PMA-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station (ISS), was launched on June 5, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander, Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is necessary for future construction tasks; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo multipurpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. In this photograph, the Space Shuttle Endeavour, back dropped by the blackness of space, is docked to the pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-2) at the forward end of the Destiny Laboratory on the ISS. A portion of the Canadarm2 is visible on the right and Endeavour's robotic arm is in full view as it is stretched out with the S0 (S-zero) Truss at its end.

  16. STS-111 Onboard Photo of Endeavour Docking With PMA-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station (ISS), was launched on June 5, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander, Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish mission objectives: The delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is necessary for future construction tasks; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo multipurpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. In this photograph, the Space Shuttle Endeavour, back dropped by the blackness of space, is docked to the pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-2) at the forward end of the Destiny Laboratory on the ISS. Endeavour's robotic arm is in full view as it is stretched out with the S0 (S-zero) Truss at its end.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. STS-88 Mission Commander Cabana looks at the mission payload Unity at pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    At Launch Pad 39A, STS-88 Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana gets a close look at the Unity connecting module that is in the payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour. Cabana and the STS-88 crew arrived at KSC in the early morning hours of Nov. 30 for pre- launch preparations. The other crew members are Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow, Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie, Mission Specialist James H. Newman and Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. The scheduled lift-off is at 3:56 a.m. on Dec. 3. Unity is the primary payload of the mission, which is the first U.S. launch for the International Space Station. The crew will be mating Unity with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. Endeavour is expected to land at KSC at 10:17 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 14.

  19. STS-88 Pilot Sturckow and Commander Cabana look over the payload Unity at pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    At Launch Pad 39A, STS-88 Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow and Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana look over the Unity connecting module that is in the payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour. Cabana, Sturckow and the STS-88 crew arrived at KSC in the early morning hours of Nov. 30 for pre-launch preparations. The other crew members are Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie, Mission Specialist James H. Newman and Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. The scheduled lift-off is at 3:56 a.m. on Dec. 3. Unity is the primary payload of the mission, which is the first U.S. launch for the International Space Station. The crew will be mating Unity with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. Endeavour is expected to land at KSC at 10:17 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 14.

  20. Decrypting protein insertion through the translocon with free-energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Gumbart, James C; Chipot, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Protein insertion into a membrane is a complex process involving numerous players. The most prominent of these players is the Sec translocon complex, a conserved protein-conducting channel present in the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum in eukaryotes. The last decade has seen tremendous leaps forward in our understanding of how insertion is managed by the translocon and its partners, coming from atomic-detailed structures, innovative experiments, and well-designed simulations. In this review, we discuss how experiments and simulations, hand-in-hand, teased out the secrets of the translocon-facilitated membrane insertion process. In particular, we focus on the role of free-energy calculations in elucidating membrane insertion. Amazingly, despite all its apparent complexity, protein insertion into membranes is primarily driven by simple thermodynamic and kinetic principles. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms☆

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins. Guest Editors: J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26766517

  2. STS-114 Space Shuttle Discovery Performs Back Flip For Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. Discovery was over Switzerland, about 600 feet from the ISS, when Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft as it performed a back flip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 Commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photographs were analyzed by engineers on the ground to evaluate the condition of Discovery's heat shield. The crew safely returned to Earth on August 9, 2005. The mission historically marked the Return to Flight after nearly a two and one half year delay in flight after the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy in February 2003.

  3. Revisiting the U.S.-Soviet space race: Comparing two systems in their competition to land a man on the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Andrew S.

    2018-07-01

    The Cold War space competition between the U.S. and the USSR, centered on their race to the moon, offers both an important historical case and larger implications for space and technology development and policy. In the late 1950s, under Premier Nikita Khrushchev's direction and Chief Designer Sergei Korolev's determined implementation, Moscow's capabilities appeared to eclipse Washington's. This called the international system's very nature into question and prompted President John F. Kennedy to declare a race to the moon. Despite impressive goals and talented engineers, in the centralized but under-institutionalized, resource-limited Soviet Union feuding chief designers playing bureaucratic politics promoted a cacophony of overambitious, overlapping, often uncompleted projects. The USSR suffered from inadequate standardization and quality control at outlying factories and failed to sustain its lead. In marked contrast, American private corporations, under NASA's well-coordinated guidance and adjudication, helped the United States overtake from behind to meet Kennedy's deadline in 1969. In critical respects, Washington's lunar landing stemmed from an effective systems management program, while Moscow's moonshot succumbed to the Soviet system, which proved unequal to the task. In less than a decade, Soviet space efforts shifted from one-upping, to keeping up, to covering up. This article reconsiders this historic competition and suggests larger conclusions.

  4. Timeliness of Creative Subjects in Architecture Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargot, T.

    2017-11-01

    The following article is about the problem of insufficient number of drawing and painting lessons delivered in the process of architectural education. There is a comparison between the education of successful architects of the past and modern times. The author stands for the importance of creative subjects being the essential part of development and education of future architects. Skills achieved during the study of creative subjects will be used not only as a mean of self-expression but as an instrument in the toolkit of a professional. Sergei Tchoban was taken as an example of a successful architect for whom the knowledge of a man-made drawing is very important. He arranges the contests of architectural drawings for students promoting creative development in this way. Nowadays, students tend to use computer programs to make architectural projects losing their individual approach. The creative process becomes a matter of scissors and paste being just a copy of something that already exists. The solution of the problem is the reconsideration of the department’s curriculum and adding extra hours for creative subjects.

  5. KSC-97pc654

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-04-16

    Representatives of RSC Energia in Russia and other onlookers in the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility examine an oxygen generator which the Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry to the Russian Mir Space Station on Mission STS-84. Sergei Romanov, second from right in the white shirt, is the spokesperson for generator manufacturer RSC Energia. The nearly 300-pound generator will be strapped down on the inside surface of a SPACEHAB Double Module for the trip to Mir. It will replace one of two Mir units that have been malfunctioning recently. The generator functions by electrolysis, which separates water into its oxygen and hydrogen components. The hydrogen is vented and the oxygen is used for breathing by the Mir crew. The generator is 4.2 feet in length and 1.4 feet in diameter. STS-84, which is planned to include a Mir crew exchange of astronaut C. Michael Foale for Jerry M. Linenger, is targeted for a May 15 liftoff. It will be the sixth Shuttle-Mir docking

  6. Historical aspects of the early Soviet/Russian manned space program.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    2001-10-01

    Human spaceflight was one of the great physiological and engineering triumphs of the 20th century. Although the history of the United States manned space program is well known, the Soviet program was shrouded in secrecy until recently. Konstantin Edvardovich Tsiolkovsky (1857-1935) was an extraordinary Russian visionary who made remarkable predictions about space travel in the late 19th century. Sergei Pavlovich Korolev (1907-1966) was the brilliant "Chief Designer" who was responsible for many of the Soviet firsts, including the first artificial satellite and the first human being in space. The dramatic flight of Sputnik 1 was followed within a month by the launch of the dog Laika, the first living creature in space. Remarkably, the engineering work for this payload was all done in less than 4 wk. Korolev's greatest triumph was the flight of Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin (1934-1968) on April 12, 1961. Another extraordinary feat was the first extravehicular activity by Aleksei Arkhipovich Leonov (1934-) using a flexible airlock that emphasized the entrepreneurial attitude of the Soviet engineers. By the mid-1960s, the Soviet program was overtaken by the United States program and attempts to launch a manned mission to the Moon failed. However, the early Soviet manned space program has a preeminent place in the history of space physiology.

  7. 'For our garden of remembrance is somewhere else': Narratives of separation through the eyes of Freud's patients.

    PubMed

    Mahalel, Anat Tzur

    2017-12-01

    This article presents a unique collection of narratives of separation - unique because the separation here is from psychoanalysis and from Freud as analyst. These narratives were published as part of memoirs written about Freud by three of his patients. Their narratives of separation give us an innovative point of view on the psychoanalytic process, in particular with respect to the importance they place on the termination phase of the analysis at a time when Freud himself had not given it much consideration. The three autobiographical texts are Abram Kardiner's memoir (1977); the memoir of Sergei Pankejeff, known as the Wolf Man (Gardiner, ); and 'Tribute to Freud', by the poet H.D. (). These three distinguished narratives are discussed here as works of translation, as understood by Walter Benjamin (1968 [1955]), Paul Ricoeur (2006 [2004]), and Jean Laplanche (1999 [1992]). They express translation under three aspects: reconstruction of the past (the work of memory), interpreting the conscious residues of the transference (the work of mourning), and, as a deferred action, deciphering the enigmatic messages received from Freud as the parental figure. This representation of the analysand's writing suggests that the separation from analysis is an endless work of translation within the endless process of deciphering the unconscious. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  8. STS-113 Post Flight Presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    The STS-113 post-flight presentation begins with a view of Mission Specialists Michael E. Lopez-Alegria and John B. Herrington getting suited for the space mission. The STS-113 crew consists of: Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Paul Lockhart, Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington. Cosmonauts Valery Korzun, and Sergei Treschev, and astronaut Peggy Whitson who are all members of the expedition five crew, and Commander Kenneth Bowersox, Flight Engineers Nikolai Budarin and Donald Pettit, members of Expedition Six. The main goal of this mission is to take Expedition Six up to the International Space Station and Return Expedition Five to the Earth. The second objective is to install the P(1) Truss segment. Three hours prior to launch, the crew of Expedition Six along with James Wetherbee, Paul Lockhart, Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are shown walking to an astrovan, which takes them to the launch pad. The actual liftoff is presented. Three Extravehicular Activities (EVA)'s are performed on this mission. Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are shown performing EVA 1 and EVA 2 which include making connections between the P1 and S(0) Truss segments, and installing fluid jumpers. A panoramic view of the ISS with the Earth in the background is shown. The grand ceremony of the crew exchange is presented. The astronauts performing everyday duties such as brushing teeth, washing hair, sleeping, and eating pistachio nuts are shown. The actual landing of the Space Shuttle is presented.

  9. STS-111 Flight Day 2 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Flight Day 2 of STS-111, the crew of Endeavour (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist) and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer), having successfully entered orbit around the Earth, begin to maneuver towards the International Space Station (ISS), where the Expedition 5 crew will replace the Expedition 4 crew. Live video is shown of the Earth from several vantage points aboard the Shuttle. The center-line camera, which will allow Shuttle pilots to align the docking apparatus with that on the ISS, provides footage of the Earth. Chang-Diaz participates in an interview, in Spanish, conducted from the ground via radio communications, with Cockrell also appearing. Footage of the Earth includes: Daytime video of the Eastern United States with some cloud cover as Endeavour passes over the Florida panhandle, Georgia, and the Carolinas; Daytime video of Lake Michigan unobscured by cloud cover; Nighttime low-light camera video of Madrid, Spain.

  10. STS-114 Crew Training Clip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The crew of Space Shuttle Atlantis on STS-114 is seen conducting several training exercises in preparation for their mission. The crew consists of Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, and Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi and Stephen Robinson. With them are Yuri Malenchenko, Sergei Moschenko, and Edward Lu, the intended Expedition 7 crew of the International Space Station (ISS). During extravehicular activity (EVA) training in the virtual reality (VR) laboratory, crew members explore the exterior of the ISS, seen on a monitor. Suiting up with VR equipment is also shown. More EVA training takes place in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL). Here the astronauts are suited up for the NBL pool, and lowered into the water on a platform. After a crew photo session, the astronauts are seated in the Motion Base Simulator in their flight suits. The simulator is shown rocking side-to-side. The crew also hears a hands-on explanation of EVA preparations in the ISS airlock, and practices emergency egress from the CCT, a simulator shaped like an orbiter.

  11. ISS General Resource Reel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This video is a collection of computer animations and live footage showing the construction and assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). Computer animations show the following: (1) ISS fly around; (2) ISS over a sunrise seen from space; (3) the launch of the Zarya Control Module; (4) a Proton rocket launch; (5) the Space Shuttle docking with Zarya and attaching Zarya to the Unity Node; (6) the docking of the Service Module, Zarya, and Unity to Soyuz; (7) the Space Shuttle docking to ISS and installing the Z1 Truss segment and the Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA); (8) Soyuz docking to the ISS; (9) the Transhab components; and (10) a complete ISS assembly. Live footage shows the construction of Zarya, the Proton rocket, Unity Node, PMA, Service Module, US Laboratory, Italian Multipurpose Logistics Module, US Airlock, and the US Habitation Module. STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry Ross and James Newman are seen training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL). The Expedition 1 crewmembers, William Shepherd, Yuri Gidzenko, and Sergei Krikalev, are shown training in the Black Sea and at Johnson Space Flight Center for water survival.

  12. STS-111 crew exits O&C building on way to LC-39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews hurry from the Operations and Checkout Building for a second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. From front to back are Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell; astronaut Peggy Whitson; Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA) and cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA); and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Endeavour will also carry the Expedition 5 crew, who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  13. STS-111 crew breakfast before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 crew gather for the traditional pre-launch meal before the second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. Seated left to right are Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin (CNES); the Expedition 5 crew cosmonauts Sergei Treschev (RSA) and Valeri Korzun (RSA) and astronaut Peggy Whitson; Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell. In front of them is the traditional cake. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  14. STS-111 crew exits the O&C Building before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews eagerly exit from the Operations and Checkout Building for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. It is the second launch attempt in six days. From front to back are Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell; astronaut Peggy Whitson; Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA) and cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA); and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Endeavour will also carry the Expedition 5 crew, who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  15. Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

    1997-06-01

    Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

  16. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-09

    The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station (ISS), was launched on June 5, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander, Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is necessary for future construction tasks; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo multipurpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. In this photograph, the Space Shuttle Endeavour, back dropped by the blackness of space, is docked to the pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-2) at the forward end of the Destiny Laboratory on the ISS. A portion of the Canadarm2 is visible on the right and Endeavour's robotic arm is in full view as it is stretched out with the S0 (S-zero) Truss at its end.

  17. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-05

    Aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour, the STS-111 mission was launched on June 5, 2002 at 5:22 pm EDT from Kennedy's launch pad. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander, Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish mission objectives: the delivery and installation of a new platform for the ISS robotic arm, the Mobile Base System (MBS) which is an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. Landing on June 19, 2002, the 14-day STS-111 mission was the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS.

  18. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-09

    The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station (ISS), was launched on June 5, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander, Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish mission objectives: The delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is necessary for future construction tasks; the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm; and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo multipurpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. In this photograph, the Space Shuttle Endeavour, back dropped by the blackness of space, is docked to the pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-2) at the forward end of the Destiny Laboratory on the ISS. Endeavour's robotic arm is in full view as it is stretched out with the S0 (S-zero) Truss at its end.

  19. KSC-98pc1358

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter in the early morning light, Space Shuttle Endeavour arrives at Launch Pad 39A after rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. At its left are the Rotating Service Structure and the Fixed Service Structure; at the right is the 300,000-gallon water tank, part of the sound suppression water system. While at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-88 launch targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. Mission STS-88 is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and connect it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time. Unity will be the main connecting point for later U.S. station modules and components. More than 40 launches are planned over five years involving the resources and expertise of 16 cooperating nations. Comprising the STS-88 crew are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev. Ross and Newman will make three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment

  20. KSC-98pc1359

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Endeavour arrives at Launch Pad 39A in the dim early morning light, atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, after rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. The flag identifying the Shuttle (at right) waves slightly from the wind. At left are the Fixed Service Structure and Rotating Service Structure. While at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-88 launch targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. Mission STS-88 is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and connect it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time. Unity will be the main connecting point for later U.S. station modules and components. More than 40 launches are planned over five years involving the resources and expertise of 16 cooperating nations. Comprising the STS-88 crew are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev. Ross and Newman will make three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment

  1. Parallel k-means++

    SciTech Connect

    A parallelization of the k-means++ seed selection algorithm on three distinct hardware platforms: GPU, multicore CPU, and multithreaded architecture. K-means++ was developed by David Arthur and Sergei Vassilvitskii in 2007 as an extension of the k-means data clustering technique. These algorithms allow people to cluster multidimensional data, by attempting to minimize the mean distance of data points within a cluster. K-means++ improved upon traditional k-means by using a more intelligent approach to selecting the initial seeds for the clustering process. While k-means++ has become a popular alternative to traditional k-means clustering, little work has been done to parallelize this technique.more » We have developed original C++ code for parallelizing the algorithm on three unique hardware architectures: GPU using NVidia's CUDA/Thrust framework, multicore CPU using OpenMP, and the Cray XMT multithreaded architecture. By parallelizing the process for these platforms, we are able to perform k-means++ clustering much more quickly than it could be done before.« less

  2. KSC-99pp1379

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-02

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-102's Expedition II discuss the Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3) (top of photo) with workers from Johnson Space Center. From left are Yuriy Vladimirovich Usachev, Dave Moore (JSC), Susan J. Helms, James S. Voss, Arne Aamodt and Matt Myers (both of JSC). The PMA-3 is a component of the International Space Station (ISS). Voss, Helms and Usachev will be staying on the ISS, replacing the Expedition I crew, Bill Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko. Along with the crew, Mission STS-102 also will be carrying the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) to the ISS. The Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module, which will have been carried to the ISS on a preceding Shuttle flight. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, logistics modules (there are three) also include components that provide some life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution and computer functions. Eventually, the modules also will carry refrigerator freezers for transporting experiment samples and food to and from the station. STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000, from Launch Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center

  3. KSC-99pp1376

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-02

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-102 crew member Susan J. Helms looks over a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3) in the Space Station Processing Facility. The PMA-3 is a component of the International Space Station (ISS). Helms is one of three who will be staying on the ISS as the Expedition II crew. The others are Yuriy Vladimirovich Usachev and James S. Voss. Along with the crew, Mission STS-102 also will be carrying the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) to the ISS. The Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module, which will have been carried to the ISS on a preceding Shuttle flight. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, logistics modules (there are three) also include components that provide some life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution and computer functions. Eventually, the modules also will carry refrigerator freezers for transporting experiment samples and food to and from the station. On the return of STS-102 to Earth, it will bring back the first crew on the station: Bill Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko. STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000, from Launch Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center

  4. KSC-99pp1375

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-02

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking over a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3) in the Space Station Processing Facility are Arne Aamodt, with Johnson Space Center, Yuriy Vladimirovich Usachev and Susan J. Helms. Usachev and Helms are two members of the STS-102 crew, who will be staying on the International Space Station (ISS). The third crew member is James S. Voss. They have been designated the Expedition II crew. Mission STS-102 also will be carrying the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) to the ISS. The Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module, which will have been carried to the ISS on a preceding Shuttle flight. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, logistics modules (there are three) also include components that provide some life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution and computer functions. Eventually, the modules also will carry refrigerator freezers for transporting experiment samples and food to and from the station. On the return of STS-102 to Earth, it will bring back the first crew on the station: Bill Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko. STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000, from Launch Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center

  5. KSC-99pp1378

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-02

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From a work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-102 crew members James S. Voss (left) and Yuriy Vladimirovich Usachev (right), of Russia, look over the Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3). The PMA-3 is a component of the International Space Station (ISS). Voss and Usachev are two crew members who will be staying on the ISS as the Expedition II crew. The third is Susan J. Helms. Along with the crew, Mission STS-102 also will be carrying the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) to the ISS. The Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module, which will have been carried to the ISS on a preceding Shuttle flight. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, logistics modules (there are three) also include components that provide some life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution and computer functions. Eventually, the modules also will carry refrigerator freezers for transporting experiment samples and food to and from the station. On the return of STS-102 to Earth, it will bring back the first crew on the station: Bill Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko. STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000, from Launch Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center

  6. KSC-99pp1377

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-02

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-102 crew, known as the Expedition II crew, and workers from Johnson Space Center get a close look at the Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3) in the Space Station Processing Facility. The PMA-3 is a component of the International Space Station (ISS). Making up the Expedition II crew are James S. Voss, Susan J. Helms and Yuriy Vladimirovich Usachev, of Russia. Along with the crew, Mission STS-102 also will be carrying the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) to the ISS. The Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module, which will have been carried to the ISS on a preceding Shuttle flight. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, logistics modules (there are three) also include components that provide some life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution and computer functions. Eventually, the modules also will carry refrigerator freezers for transporting experiment samples and food to and from the station. On the return of STS-102 to Earth, it will bring back the first crew on the station: Bill Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko. STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000, from Launch Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center

  7. KSC-99pp1380

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-02

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-102 crew pose with workers from Johnson Space Center in front of the Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3), a component of the International Space Station (ISS). From left are Dave Moore (JSC), Susan J. Helms, Arne Aamodt (JSC), Yuriy Vladimirovich Usachev, Matt Myers (JSC) and James S. Voss. Voss, Helms and Usachev, known as the Expedition II crew, will be staying on the ISS, replacing the Expedition I crew, Bill Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko. Along with the crew, Mission STS-102 also will be carrying the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) to the ISS. The Leonardo will be filled with equipment and supplies to outfit the U.S. laboratory module, which will have been carried to the ISS on a preceding Shuttle flight. In order to function as an attached station module as well as a cargo transport, logistics modules (there are three) also include components that provide some life support, fire detection and suppression, electrical distribution and computer functions. Eventually, the modules also will carry refrigerator freezers for transporting experiment samples and food to and from the station. STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000, from Launch Pad 39A, Kennedy Space Center

  8. KSC-02pd1865

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-113 Commander James Wetherbee shakes hands with KSC Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. following landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. From left are Kent Rominger, Deputy Director of Flight Crew Operations, Wetherbee, Dr. Daniel R. Mulville, NASA Associate Deputy Administrator, and Bridges. Commander Wetherbee earlier guided Space Shuttle Endeavour to a flawless touchdown on runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility after completing the 13-day, 18-hour, 48-minute, 5.74-million mile STS-113 mission to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown was at 2:37:12 p.m. EST, nose gear touchdown was at 2:37:23 p.m., and wheel stop was at 2:38:25 p.m. Poor weather conditions thwarted landing opportunities until a fourth day, the first time in Shuttle program history that a landing has been waved off for three consecutive days. The orbiter also carried the other members of the STS-113 crew, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington, as well as the returning Expedition Five crew, Commander Valeri Korzun, ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev. The installation of the P1 truss on the International Space Station was accomplished during the mission.

  9. KSC-02pd1866

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mrs. Daniel R. Mulville shakes hands with Kent V. Rominger, Deputy Director of Flight Crew Operations, on the runway of the Shuttle Landing Facility following the landing of Endeavour. Mrs. Mulville is the wife of Dr. Daniel R. Mulville, NASA Associate Deputy Administrator. In the group, from left are KSC Director Roy D. Bridges; Mrs. Mulville; Dr. Mulville (back to camera); James D. Halsell Jr., Manager of Launch Integration at KSC, Space Shuttle Program; Rominger; and STS-113 Commander James Wetherbee. Commander Wetherbee earlier guided Space Shuttle Endeavour to a flawless touchdown on runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility after completing the 13-day, 18-hour, 48-minute, 5.74-million mile STS-113 mission to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown was at 2:37:12 p.m. EST, nose gear touchdown was at 2:37:23 p.m., and wheel stop was at 2:38:25 p.m. Poor weather conditions thwarted landing opportunities until a fourth day, the first time in Shuttle program history that a landing has been waved off for three consecutive days. The orbiter also carried the other members of the STS-113 crew, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington, as well as the returning Expedition Five crew, Commander Valeri Korzun, ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev. The installation of the P1 truss on the International Space Station was accomplished during the mission.

  10. KSC-02pd0687

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-15

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities at KSC, Expedition 5 crew member Sergei Treschev pauses before climbing inside the M-113 armored personnel carrier, used for emergency egress training at the pad. At left (behind Treschev) is George Hoggard, with the KSC/CCAS Fire Department, who supervises the driving. At right are Expedition 5 member Peggy Whitson and astronaut Tracy Caldwell (far right), a mission specialist candidate currently assigned to the Astronaut Office Space Station Operations Branch. The TCDT also includes a simulated launch countdown Known as Utilization Flight -2, the mission includes attaching a Canadian-built mobile base system to the International Space Station that will enable the Canadarm2 robotic arm to move along a railway on the Station's truss to build and maintain the outpost. The crew will also replace a faulty wrist/roll joint on the Canadarm2 as well as unload almost three tons of experiments and supplies from the Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. . Expedition 5 will travel to the International Space Station on mission STS-111 as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-111 is scheduled for May 30, 2002

  11. STS-111 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Flight Day 8 of STS-111 (Space Shuttle Endeavour crew includes: Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist; International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 5 crew includes Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer; ISS Expedition 4 crew includes: Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), the Leonardo Multi Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is shown from the outside of the ISS. The MPLM, used to transport goods to the station for the Expedition 5 crew, and to return goods used by the Expedition 4 crew, is being loaded and unloaded by crewmembers. Live video from within the Destiny Laboratory Module shows Whitson and Chang-Diaz. They have just completed the second of three reboosts planned for this mission, in each of which the station will gain an additional statutory mile in altitude. Following this there is an interview conducted by ground-based reporters with some members from each of the three crews, answering various questions on their respective missions including sleeping in space and conducting experiments. Video of Earth and space tools precedes a second interview much like the first, but with the crews in their entirety. Topics discussed include the feelings of Bursch and Walz on their breaking the US record for continual days spent in space. The video ends with footage of the Southern California coastline.

  12. STS-112 Flight Day 10 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Flight Day 10 of the STS-112 mission, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) on the Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew on the International Space Station (ISS) (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) are shown exchanging farewells in the ISS's Destiny Laboratory Module following the completion of a week-long period of docked operations. The Expedition 5 crew is nearing the end of five and a half continuous months aboard the space station. Following the closing of the hatches, the Atlantis Orbiter undocks from the station, and Melroy pilots the shuttle slowly away from the ISS, and engages in a radial fly-around of the station. During the fly-around cameras aboard Atlantis shows ISS from a number of angles. ISS cameras also show Atlantis. There are several shots of each craft with a variety of background settings including the Earth, its limb, and open space. The video concludes with a live interview of Ashby, Melroy and Yurchikhin, still aboard Atlantis, conducted by a reporter on the ground. Questions range from feelings on the conclusion of the mission to the experience of being in space. The primary goal of the mission was the installation of the Integrated Truss Structure S1 on the ISS.

  13. STS-114 Flight Day 6 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Day 6 is a relatively quiet day for the STS-114 crew. The main responsibility for crew members of Space Shuttle Discovery (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) and the Expedition 11 crew of the International Space Station (ISS) (Commander Sergei Krikalev and NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer John Phillips) is to unload supplies from the shuttle payload bay and from the Raffaello Multipurpose Logistics Module onto the ISS. Several of the astronauts answer interview questions from the news media, with an emphasis on the significance of their mission for the Return to Flight, shuttle damage and repair, and the future of the shuttle program. Thomas announces the winners of an essay contest for Australian students about the importance of science and mathematics education. The video includes the installation of a stowage rack for the Human Research Facility onboard the ISS, a brief description of the ISS modules, and an inverted view of the Nile Delta.

  14. St. Petersburg, Russia as seen from STS-60

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-02-09

    STS060-103-055 (3-11 Feb 1994) --- This wintertime photograph shows the large city of St. Petersburg Russia at the head of the Gulf of Finland. The city, built by Peter the Great, is situated in the former swampy delta of the Neva River which connects the large Lake Ladoga (the frozen white surface on the edge of the photograph) to the Gulf of Finland. An interesting feature of St. Petersburg which can be discerned in this photograph is the new storm surge barrier built from both sides of the Gulf of Finland out to the island of Kronstadt in the middle. This barrier, similar to that which was built on the Thames River south of London to protect it from storm surges out of the North Sea, was constructed to protect St. Petersburg from storm surges coming out of the Baltic Sea and being magnified by the topography and hydrography of the Gulf of Finland. Also visible as a thin line between Kronstadt and St. Petersburg is the ice-free shipping channel kept open much of the winter. Power plant plumes are also visible on the frame. St. Petersburg is the home of the Russian cosmonaut, Sergei Krikalev, who flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery during STS-60.

  15. STS-114 Flight Day 12 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Flight Day 12 features a night undocking of Space Shuttle Discovery (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) from the International Space Station (ISS). The STS-114 crew and the Expedition 11 crew of the ISS (Commander Sergei Krikalev and NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer John Phillips) bid each other farewell. Prior to the undocking, Discovery and Mission Control are heard discussing troubleshooting of an oxygen flow sensor. Crew preparations for undocking are also heard. After the spacecraft are shown separating, Collins discusses with Mission Control possible debris seen on a monitor. The video includes several scenes of the ISS from the shuttle orbiter, one with Kazakhstan and another with the Himalayas in the background, and another shot with a hand-held camera by Noguchi. Other Earth views include the Sinai Peninsula and Nile Delta in Egypt, a storm at sea, and a black and white view of the Southern Lights over Australia.

  16. STS-88 Post Flight Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The flight crew of the STS-88 mission, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman, and Sergei K. Krikalev, present a video mission over-view of their space flight. Images include prelaunch activities such as eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also, included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. The crew can be seen being readied in the "white room" for their mission. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters. Once the seven-day mission begins, the astronauts comment on the mating of the U.S.-built Node 1 station element to the Functional Energy Block (FGB) which was already in orbit, and two EVAs that were planned to connect power and data transmission cables between the Node and the FGB. The crew can also be seen conducting a series of rendezvous maneuvers similar to those conducted on other Shuttle missions to reach the orbiting FGB.

  17. STS-111 Crew in white room during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room, Launch Pad 39A, the STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews pose in front of the entry into Space Shuttle Endeavour. From left are Expedition 5 crew member Sergei Treschev and Commander Valeri Korzun, with the Russian Space Agency; STS-111 Mission Specialist Philippe Perrin, with the French Space Agency; Commander Kenneth Cockrell and Pilot Paul Lockhart; Expedition 5 crew member Peggy Whitson; and Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz. The crews are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities at the pad, which include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. The mission is Utilization Flight 2, carrying supplies and equipment to the International Space Station, the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to 'inchworm' from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Expedition 5 will travel to the Station on Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002.

  18. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-28

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. Discovery was over Switzerland, about 600 feet from the ISS, when Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the spacecraft as it performed a back flip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 Commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photographs were analyzed by engineers on the ground to evaluate the condition of Discovery’s heat shield. The crew safely returned to Earth on August 9, 2005. The mission historically marked the Return to Flight after nearly a two and one half year delay in flight after the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy in February 2003.

  19. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-28

    Launched on July 26, 2005, from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. Discovery was over Switzerland, about 600 feet from the ISS, when Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the under side of the spacecraft as it performed a back flip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 Commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photographs were analyzed by engineers on the ground to evaluate the condition of Discovery’s heat shield. The crew safely returned to Earth on August 9, 2005. The mission historically marked the Return to Flight after nearly a two and one half year delay in flight after the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy in February 2003.

  20. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-28

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. Discovery was over Switzerland, about 600 feet from the ISS, when Cosmonaut Sergei K. Kriklev, Expedition 11 Commander, and John L. Phillips, NASA Space Station officer and flight engineer photographed the under side of the spacecraft as it performed a back flip to allow photography of its heat shield. Astronaut Eileen M. Collins, STS-114 Commander, guided the shuttle through the flip. The photographs were analyzed by engineers on the ground to evaluate the condition of Discovery’s heat shield. The crew safely returned to Earth on August 9, 2005. The mission historically marked the Return to Flight after nearly a two and one half year delay in flight after the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy in February 2003.

  1. STS-114 Flight Day 3 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Video coverage of Day 3 includes highlights of STS-114 during the approach and docking of Discovery with the International Space Station (ISS). The Return to Flight continues with space shuttle crew members (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) seen in onboard activities on the fore and aft portions of the flight deck during the orbiter's approach. Camarda sends a greeting to his family, and Collins maneuvers Discovery as the ISS appears steadily closer in sequential still video from the centerline camera of the Orbiter Docking System. The approach includes video of Discovery from the ISS during the orbiter's Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, giving the ISS a clear view of the thermal protection systems underneath the orbiter. Discovery docks with the Destiny Laboratory of the ISS, and the shuttle crew greets the Expedition 11 crew (Commander Sergei Krikalev and NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer John Phillips) of the ISS onboard the station. Finally, the Space Station Remote Manipulator System hands the Orbiter Boom Sensor System to its counterpart, the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System.

  2. Earth observation taken by the Expedition 11 crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-10

    ISS011-E-12401 (10 July 2005) --- Gulf of Finland is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 11 crew member on the international space station. This strongly oblique view shows the Gulf of Finland and Lake Ladoga in the sunglint of late afternoon. The image was taken from the station when the position of the craft lay north of the Caspian Sea, approximately 2,500 kilometers to the southeast on the Russia–Kazakhstan border. The Neva River appears in sunglint, connecting Lake Ladoga to the gulf. Although not visible, St. Petersburg—the home town of Sergei Krikalev, space station commander when this picture was taken—lies on the Neva River delta. In this view taken with a powerful 400 millimeter lens, sunglint even reveals the causeways to Kotlin Island in the gulf—including some of the details of their construction. Oblique views reveal marked layers of gray haze generated by air pollution, a common sight over Western Europe. Pollution also renders the bright glint areas a copper color.

  3. STS-88 Day 11 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this eleventh day of the STS-88 mission, the flight crew, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Krikalev are awakened with the song "Goodnight, Sweetheart, Goodnight". Pilot Rick Sturckow undocks Endeavour from the station and backs the shuttle away to a distance of 450 feet above the station before beginning a nose-forward fly-around. Later Cabana, Sturckow and Ross deploy the SAC-A satellite from Endeavour's payload bay. SAC-A is a small, self-contained, non-recoverable satellite built by the Argentinean National Commission of Space Activities. The cube-shaped, 590-pound satellite will test and characterize the performance of new equipment and technologies that may be used in future scientific or operational missions. The payload includes a differential global positioning system, a magnetometer, silicon solar cells, a charge-coupled device Earth camera and a whale tracker experiment.

  4. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-01

    These 10 astronauts and cosmonauts represent the base STS-102 space travelers, as well as the crew members for the station crews switching out turns aboard the outpost. Those astronauts wearing orange represent the STS-102 crew members. In the top photo, from left to right are: James M. Kelly, pilot; Andrew S.W. Thomas, mission specialist; James D. Wetherbee, commander; and Paul W. Richards, mission specialist. The group pictured in the lower right portion of the portrait are STS-members as well as Expedition Two crew members (from left): mission specialist and flight engineer James S. Voss; cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev, Expedition Two Commander; and mission specialist and flight engineer Susan Helms. The lower left inset are the 3 man crew of Expedition One (pictured from left): Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, flight engineer; astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, commander; and cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Soyuz commander. The main objective of the STS-102 mission was the first Expedition Crew rotation and the primary cargo was the Leonardo, the Italian Space Agency-built Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The Leonardo MPLM is the first of three such pressurized modules that will serve as the International Space Station's (ISS') moving vans, carrying laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments, and supplies to and from the Station aboard the Space Shuttle. NASA's 103rd overall mission and the 8th Space Station Assembly Flight, STS-102 mission launched on March 8, 2001 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery.

  5. STS-88 Pilot Sturckow and Mission Specialist Currie arrive for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pilot Frederick W. 'Rick' Sturckow and Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie walk across the landing strip at the Shuttle Landing Facility after exiting the T-38 jet aircraft behind them that brought them to KSC. They join other crew members Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana, Mission Specialist Jerry L. Ross, Mission Specialist James H. Newman and Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, for pre-launch preparations for mission STS-88 aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. The scheduled time of launch is 3:56 a.m. EST on Dec. 3 from Launch Pad 39A. The mission is the first U.S. launch for the International Space Station. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module which the crew will be mating with the Russian- built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. Endeavour is expected to land at KSC at 10:17 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 14.

  6. STS-111 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    On Flight Day 8 of STS-111 (Space Shuttle Endeavour crew includes: Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist; International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 5 crew includes Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer; ISS Expedition 4 crew includes: Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), the Leonardo Multi Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is shown from the outside of the ISS. The MPLM, used to transport goods to the station for the Expedition 5 crew, and to return goods used by the Expedition 4 crew, is being loaded and unloaded by crewmembers. Live video from within the Destiny Laboratory Module shows Whitson and Chang-Diaz. They have just completed the second of three reboosts planned for this mission, in each of which the station will gain an additional statutory mile in altitude. Following this there is an interview conducted by ground-based reporters with some members from each of the three crews, answering various questions on their respective missions including sleeping in space and conducting experiments. Video of Earth and space tools precedes a second interview much like the first, but with the crews in their entirety. Topics discussed include the feelings of Bursch and Walz on their breaking the US record for continual days spent in space. The video ends with footage of the Southern California coastline.

  7. KSC-98pc1792

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-12-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- As the Space Shuttle Endeavour lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on Mission STS-88, several fish believed to be mullet (at center left) "launch" themselves out of the water from one of the waterways around the pad. Liftoff of the first U.S. mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station was at 3:35:34 a.m. EST on Dec. 4. During the nearly 12-day mission, the six-member crew will mate in space the first two elements of the International Space Station the already-orbiting Zarya control module with the Unity connecting module carried by Endeavour. Crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. This was the second launch attempt for STS-88. The first one on Dec. 3 was scrubbed when launch controllers, following an assessment of a suspect hydraulic system, were unable to resume the countdown clock in time to launch within the remaining launch window

  8. STS-84 oxygen generator for Mir on display at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Representatives of RSC Energia in Russia and other onlookers in the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility examine an oxygen generator which the Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry to the Russian Mir Space Station on Mission STS-84. Sergei Romanov, second from right in the white shirt, is the spokesperson for generator manufacturer RSC Energia. The nearly 300-pound generator will be strapped down on the inside surface of a SPACEHAB Double Module for the trip to Mir. It will replace one of two Mir units that have been malfunctioning recently. The generator functions by electrolysis, which separates water into its oxygen and hydrogen components. The hydrogen is vented and the oxygen is used for breathing by the Mir crew. The generator is 4.2 feet in length and 1.4 feet in diameter. STS-84, which is planned to include a Mir crew exchange of astronaut C. Michael Foale for Jerry M. Linenger, is targeted for a May 15 liftoff. It will be the sixth Shuttle-Mir docking.

  9. KSC-02pd0771

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-27

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews wave to spectators. From left are Mission Commander Kenneth Cockrell, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin and Franklin Chang-Diaz; Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun, astronaut Peggy Whitson and cosmonaut Sergei Treschev. Perrin is with the French Space Agency; Korzun and Treschev are with the Russian Space Agency. The crews have arrived to prepare for launch. Expedition 5 is traveling to the International Space Station on Space Shuttle Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Known as Utilization Flight 2, STS-111 is carrying supplies and equipment to the Station. The payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002

  10. KSC-02pd0726

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun (with microphone) speaks to the media before leaving KSC. Behind him (left to right) are STS-111 Commander Kenneth Cockrell and Pilot Paul Lockhart; astronaut Peggy Whitson and cosmonaut Sergei Treschev; Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin and Franklin Chang-Diaz. Korzun and Treschev are with the Russian Space Agency; Perrin is with the French Space Agency. They have been taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. Expedition 5 will travel to the International Space Station on mission STS-111 as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Mission STS-111 is known as Utilization Flight 2, carrying supplies and equipment in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo to the International Space Station. The payload also includes the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002

  11. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-11

    The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station (ISS), was launched on June 5, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour. On board were the STS-111 and Expedition Five crew members. Astronauts Kerneth D. Cockrell, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot; and mission specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz and Philippe Perrin were the STS-111 crew members. Expedition Five crew members included Cosmonaut Valeri G. Korzun, commander; Astronaut Peggy A. Whitson and Cosmonaut Sergei Y. Treschev, flight engineers. Three space walks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System that allows the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is necessary for future construction tasks. In this photograph, Astronaut Philippe Perrin, representing CNES, the French Space Agency, participates in the second scheduled EVA. During the space walk, Perrin and Chang-Diaz attached power, data, and video cables from the ISS to the MBS, and used a power wrench to complete the attachment of the MBS onto the Mobile Transporter (MT).

  12. KSC-02pd0674

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-15

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Expedition 5 and STS-111 crews pose at the Shuttle Landing Facility after their arrival to take part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities for launch of mission STS-111. From left, they are the Expedition Five crew -- Commander Valeri Korzun and Sergei Treschev, both of the Russian Space Agency, and Peggy Whitson -- and the STS-111 crew -- Pilot Paul Lockhart, Commander Kenneth Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Phillipe Perrin, of the French Space Agency, and Franklin Chang-Diaz. Expedition 5 will travel on Space Shuttle Endeavour to the International Space Station as a replacement crew for Expedition 4. The TCDT is a rehearsal for launch and includes emergency egress training, familiarization with payload and a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-111 is a utilization flight that will deliver equipment and supplies to the Station. Along with the Multi-Purpose Logisitics Module Leonardo, the payload includes the Mobile Base System, part of the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and an Orbital Replacement Unit, the replacement wrist/roll joint for the SSRMS (Canadarm2). Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for May 30, 2002

  13. KSC-02pd0702

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During emergency egress training on the Launch Pad 39A, STS-111 Mission Specialist Philippe Perrin, with the French Space Agency, and Expedition 5 crew member Sergei Treschev, with the Russian Space Agency, get directions about using the slidewire basket they are standing in. The training for the two crews is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which also include a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-111 is known as Utilization Flight 2, carrying supplies and equipment in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo to the International Space Station. The payload also includes the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Expedition 5 will travel to the Station on Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002

  14. KSC-02pd0705

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities at Launch Pad 39A, the Expedition 5 and STS-111 crews pose on the 295-foot level. Standing, left to right, are Pilot Paul Lockhart, and the Expedition 5 crew Peggy Whitson, Commander Valeri Korzun and Sergei Treschev. Kneeling in front are Mission Specialist Philippe Perrin, Commander Kenneth Cockrell and Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz. Korzun and Treschev are with the Russian Space Agency, and Perrin is with the French Space Agency. Seen behind the crews are the top of the orange external tank and one of the white solid rocket boosters. The TCDT includes emergency egress training at the pad and a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-111 is known as Utilization Flight 2, carrying supplies and equipment in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo to the International Space Station. The payload also includes the Mobile Base System, which will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, and a replacement wrist/roll joint for Canadarm 2. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Expedition 5 will travel to the Station on Endeavour as the replacement crew for Expedition 4, who will return to Earth aboard the orbiter. Launch is scheduled for May 30, 2002

  15. STS-111/Endeavour/ISS UF2 Pre-Launch Activities: Launch with Playbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video of the preflight preparations for and launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-111 begins with a view of Endeavour on the launch pad. Additional launch pad views leading up to liftoff are interspersed with footage from the Firing Room at Kennedy Space Center, the crew's prelaunch activities, and inspection of the crew members in the White Room before boarding Endeavour. The crew is introduced by a narrator during the preflight banquet and suiting up, and a later clip shows them departing to the launch site. The crew consists of Commander Kenneth Cockrell, Pilot Paul Lockhart, Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin and Franklin Chang-Diaz, and the Expedition 5 crew of the International Space Station (ISS) (Commander Valery Korzun and Flight Engineers Peggy Whitsun and Sergei Treschev). The nozzles on Endeavour's Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are swiveled before liftoff, and the launch is shown past the separation of the solid rocket boosters. After a brief clip from the Mission Control Center at Johnson Space Center, the following launch replays are shown: Beach Tracker, VAB, Pad A, Tower 1, UCS-15, Grandstand, Cocoa Beach DOAMS, Playalinda DOAMS, UCS-23, and OTV-070.

  16. SciTech Connect

    Vahala, G.; Tracy, E.

    During the past year, the authors have concentrated on (1) divertor physics, (2) thermo-lattice Boltzmann (TLBE) approach to turbulence, and (3) phase space techniques in gyro-resonance problems in collaboration with Dieter Sigmar (MIT), Sergei Krasheninnikov (MIT), Linda Vahala (ODU), Joseph Morrison (AS and M/NASA-Langley), Pavol Pavlo and Josef Preinhaelter (institute of Plasma Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences) and Allan Kaufman (LBL/U.C.Berkeley). Using a 2-equation compressible closure model with a 2D mean flow, the authors are investigating the effects of 3D neutral turbulence on reducing the heat load to the divertor plate by various toroidal cavity geometries. These studies are beingmore » extended to examine 3D mean flows. Thermal Lattice Boltzmann (TLBE) methods are being investigated to handle 3D turbulent flows in nontrivial geometries. It is planned to couple the TLBE collisional regime to the weakly collisional regime and so be able to tackle divertor physics. In the application of phase space techniques to minority-ion RF heating, resonance heating is treated as a multi-stage process. A generalization of the Case-van Kampen analysis is presented for multi-dimensional non-uniform plasmas. Effects such as particle trapping and the ray propagation dynamics in tokamak geometry can now be handled using Weyl calculus.« less

  17. KSC-2013-4331

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-10

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the center's director, Bob Cabana, cuts a 15th anniversary cake during an employee celebration commemorating the start of assembly of the International Space Station. Cabana served as commander of STS-88, the space shuttle mission that launched the first American-built element of the space station, beginning the effort to construct the orbiting complex. Also participating in the ceremony were STS-88 mission specialists Nancy Currie and Jerry Ross. The Russian Space Agency's Functional Cargo Block, named "Zarya," was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Nov. 20, 1998. Two weeks later, on Dec. 4, 1998, the space shuttle Endeavour lifted off from Kennedy on STS-88 with node 1, called "Unity." In addition to Cabana, Curie and Ross, the crew also included pilot Rick Sturckow, along with mission specialists Jim Newman and Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. For more information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossman

  18. KSC-2013-4332

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-10

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the center's director, Bob Cabana, speaks during an employee celebration commemorating the 15th anniversary of the start of assembly of the International Space Station. Cabana served as commander of STS-88, the space shuttle mission that launched the first American-built element of the space station, beginning the effort to construct the orbiting complex. Also participating in the ceremony were STS-88 mission specialists Nancy Currie and Jerry Ross. The Russian Space Agency's Functional Cargo Block, named "Zarya," was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Nov. 20, 1998. Two weeks later, on Dec. 4, 1998, the space shuttle Endeavour lifted off from Kennedy on STS-88 with node 1, called "Unity." In addition to Cabana, Curie and Ross, the crew also included pilot Rick Sturckow, along with mission specialists Jim Newman and Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. For more information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossman

  19. KSC-2013-4334

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-10

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the center's director, Bob Cabana, right, speaks during an employee celebration commemorating the 15th anniversary of the start of assembly of the International Space Station. Cabana served as commander of STS-88, the space shuttle mission that launched the first American-built element of the space station, beginning the effort to construct the orbiting complex. Participating in the presentation, from the left, are STS-88 crew members Nancy Currie, Jerry Ross and Cabana. The Russian Space Agency's Functional Cargo Block, named "Zarya," was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Nov. 20, 1998. Two weeks later, on Dec. 4, 1998, the space shuttle Endeavour lifted off from Kennedy on STS-88 with node 1, called "Unity." In addition to Cabana, Curie and Ross, the crew also included pilot Rick Sturckow, along with mission specialists Jim Newman and Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut. For more information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossman

  20. STS-88 Day 10 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this tenth day of the STS-88 mission, the flight crew, Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow, and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman, Jerry L. Ross, and Sergei Krikalev are awakened by the sounds of Elvis Presley's "Hound Dog". Today's activities are devoted mostly to tasks that ready the station for future assembly work. The crew's first job is to release some cable ties on four cables connected on an earlier space walk, three located on Unity's upper mating adapter and one on its lower adapter, to relieve tension on the lines. The space walkers also will check an insulation cover on one cable connection on the lower Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA 2) to make sure it is fully installed. Near the end of the space walk, the astronauts conduct a detailed photographic survey of the space station from top to bottom. Finally, each astronaut test fires the Simplified Aid for Extravehicular Activity Rescue (SAFER) jet backpacks they are wearing, a type of space "lifejacket," that would allow an astronaut to fly back to the station if they should ever become untethered.

  1. LPHYS'14: 23rd International Laser Physics Workshop (Sofia, Bulgaria, 14-18 July 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyev, Alexander V.

    2014-04-01

    I Yukalov (Seminar 6) E-mail: yukalov@theor.jinr.ru Sergei P Kulik (Seminar 7) E-mail: sergei.kulik@gmail.com Sergey A Babin (Seminar 8) E-mail: babin@iae.nsk.su Nikolay B Narozhny (Symposium) E-mail: narozhny@theor.mephi.ru Deadlines Sending an entry visa support form, if needed: 15 April 2014 Receiving an abstract of your presentation: 15 April 2014 Sending a registration form: 15 April 2014 Workshop early payment fee: 15 April 2014 Workshop full payment fee: 1 July 2014 Workshop full payment fee at the conference site: on arrival Accommodation reservation (recommended): 15 May 2014 Sending a manuscript to be published in the Workshop Proceedings: 15 December 2014 Additional information for LPHYS14 can be found at www.lasphys.com

  2. LPHYS'13: 22nd International Laser Physics Workshop (Prague, 15-19 July 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyev, Alexander V.

    2013-04-01

    -mail: makarov@msu.ilc.edu.ru Vyacheslav I Yukalov (Seminar 6) E-mail: yukalov@theor.jinr.ru Sergei P Kulik (Seminar 7) E-mail: sergei.kulik@gmail.com Sergey A Babin (Seminar 8) E-mail: babin@iae.nsk.su Nikolay B Narozhny (Symposium) E-mail: narozhny@theor.mephi.ru Deadlines Sending an entry visa support form, if needed: 15 April 2013 Receiving an abstract of your presentation: 15 April 2013 Sending a registration form: 15 April 2013 Workshop early payment fee: 15 April 2013 Workshop full payment fee: 1 July 2013 Workshop full payment fee at the conference site: on arrival On-campus accommodation reservation (recommended): 15 May 2013 Manuscript to be published in the Workshop proceedings: 15 December 2013 Additional information for LPHYS'13 can be found at www.lasphys.com

  3. STS-111 Flight Day 7 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    On Flight Day 7 of STS-111 (Space Shuttle Endeavour crew includes: Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist; International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 5 crew includes Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer; ISS Expedition 4 crew includes: Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), this video opens with answers to questions asked by the public via e-mail about the altitude of the space station, the length of its orbit, how astronauts differentiate between up and down in the microgravity environment, and whether they hear wind noise during the shuttle's reentry. In video footage shot from inside the Quest airlock, Perrin is shown exiting the station to perform an extravehicular activity (EVA) with Chang-Diaz. Chang-Diaz is shown, in helmet mounted camera footage, attaching cable protection booties to a fish-stringer device with multiple hooks, and Perrin is seen loosening bolts that hold the replacement unit accomodation in launch position atop the Mobile Base System (MBS). Perrin then mounts a camera atop the mast of the MBS. During this EVA, the astronauts installed the MBS on the Mobile Transporter (MT) to support the Canadarm 2 robotic arm. A camera in the Endeavour's payload bay provides footage of the Pacific Ocean, the Baja Peninsula, and Midwestern United States. Plumes from wildfires in Nevada, Idaho, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and Montana are visible. The station continues over the Great Lakes and the Eastern Provinces of Canada.

  4. STS-102 Photo-op/Suit-up/Depart O&C/Launch Discovery On Orbit/Landing/Crew Egress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The spacecrews of STS-102 and the Expedition 1 and 2 crews of the International Space Station (ISS) are seen in this video, which presents an overview of their activities. The crew consists of Commander Jim Wetherbee, Pilot James Kelly, and Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas, and Paul Richards. The sections of the video include: Photo-op, Suit-up, Depart O&C, Ingress, Launch with Playbacks, On-orbit, Landing with Playbacks, and Crew Egress & Departs. The prelaunch activities are explained by two narrators, and the crew members are assisted in the White Room just before boarding the Space Shuttle Discovery. Isolated views of the shuttle's launch include: VAB, PAD-B, DLTR-3, UCS-23 Tracker, PATRICK IGOR, UCS-10 Tracker, Grandstand, Tower-1, OTV-160, OTV-170, OTV-171, and On-board Camera. The video shows two extravehicular activities (EVAs) to perform work on the ISS, one by astronauts Helms and Voss from Expedition 2, and another by Richards and Thomas. The attachment of the Leonardo Multipurpose Logistics Module, a temporary resupply module, is shown in a series of still images. The on-orbit footage also includes a view of the Nile River, and a crew exhange ceremony between Expedition 1 (Commander Yuri Gidzenko, Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev) and Expedition 2 (Commander Yury Usachev, Flight Engineers James Voss, Susan Helms). Isolated views of the landing at Kennedy Space Center include: North Runway Camera, VAB, Tower-1, Mid-field, Midfield IR, Tower-2, and UCS-12 IR. The Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV) for unloading the astronauts is shown, administrators greet the crew upon landing, and Commander Wetherbee gives a briefing.

  5. [Neurosciences and the ravings of the Soviet era. Spanish Republican physicians, a set of privileged witnesses].

    PubMed

    Marco-Igual, Miguel

    2011-08-16

    This study analyses the links between the Russian and Soviet neurosciences and their Spanish counterpart, especially with regard to the experiences of the Spanish Republican physicians exiled in the USSR. The Russian neurosciences, which date back to the second half of the 19th century, followed a path that ran parallel to the discipline throughout the rest of Europe and finally displayed signs of being influenced by the German and French schools. Important figures include Alexei Kojevnikov and Vladimir Bekhterev in neurology, Sergei Korsakov in psychiatry, Ivan Pavlov and his disciple Piotr Anojin in neurophysiology, Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria in neuropsychology, and Nikolai Burdenko in neurosurgery. When the Bolsheviks came to power, they brought with them a progressive conception of health care, which was modified during the Stalinist era to serve political interests, above all in the case of psychiatry. During the first third of the 20th century, Spanish scientists became interested in Pavlov's reflexology and the Soviets took a similar interest in Spanish histology. Among the 4500 Spanish Republicans who emigrated to the USSR because of the Spanish Civil War, there were several dozen physicians who were privileged witnesses of the madness that shook the science and the health care of that period. Relevant names worth citing here from the field of the neurosciences include Juan Planelles and Ramon Alvarez-Buylla in neurophysiology, Federico Pascual and Florencio Villa Landa in psychiatry, Angel Escobio and Maria Perez in neurology, Julian Fuster in neurosurgery and Manuel Arce in neuroimaging. © 2011 Revista de Neurología

  6. STS-112 Flight Day 4 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    On the fourth day of STS-112, its crew (Jeffrey Ashby, Commander; Pamela Melroy, Pilot; David Wolf, Mission Specialist; Piers Sellers, Mission Specialist; Sandra Magnus, Mission Specialist; Fyodor Yurchikhin, Mission Specialist) onboard Atlantis and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) are seen preparing for the installation of the S1 truss structure. Inside the Destiny Laboratory Module, Korzun and other crewmembers are seen as they busily prepare for the work of the day. Sellers dons an oxygen mask and uses an exercise machine in order to purge the nitrogen from his bloodstream, in preparation for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Whitson uses the ISS's Canadarm 2 robotic arm to grapple the S1 truss and remove it from Atlantis' payload bay, with the assistance of Magnus. Using the robotic arm, Whitson slowly maneuvers the 15 ton truss structure into alignment with its attachment point on the starboard side of the S0 truss structure, where the carefully orchestrated mating procedures take place. There is video footage of the entire truss being rotated and positioned by the arm, and ammonia tank assembly on the structure is visible, with Earth in the background. Following the completion of the second stage capture, the robotic arm is ungrappled from truss. Sellers and Wolf are shown exiting the the Quest airlock hatch to begin their EVA. They are shown performing a variety of tasks on the now attached S1 truss structure, including work on the Crew Equipment Translation Cart (CETA), the S-band Antenna Assembly, and umbilical cables that provide power and remote operation capability to cameras. During their EVA, they are shown using a foot platform on the robotic arm. Significant portions of their activities are shown from the vantage of helmet mounted video cameras. The video closes with a final shot of the ISS and its new S1 truss.

  7. STS-97 and Expedition One Crews Pose for Onboard Photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this image, the five STS-97 crew members pose with the 3 members of the Expedition One crew onboard the International Space Station (ISS) for the first ever traditional onboard portrait taken in the Zvezda Service Module. On the front row, left to right, are astronauts Brent W. Jett, Jr., STS-97 commander; William M. Shepherd, Expedition One mission commander; and Joseph R. Tarner, STS-97 mission specialist. On the second row, from the left are Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer; astronaut Carlos I. Noriega, STS-97 mission specialist; cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Expedition One Soyuz commander; and Michael J. Bloomfield, STS-97 pilot. Behind them is astronaut Marc Garneau, STS-97 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The primary objective of the STS-97 mission was the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the station aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment. The STS-97 crew of five launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000 for an 11 day mission.

  8. STS-114: Multi-Cut Profiles and Mission Overviews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Profiles of the seven crewmembers of the STS-114 Discovery are shown. Eileen Collins, Commander, talks about her fascination with flying as a young child and her eagerness to have someone teach her to fly at age 19. Her eagerness and hard work earned her a master's in operations research from Stanford University in 1986 and a master's in space systems management from Webster University in 1989. Jim Kelly, Pilot, talks about his desire to become an astronaut at a very young age. Charles Camarda, Mission Specialist, always wanted to become an astronaut and earned a Bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn in 1974, a Master's in engineering Science from George Washington University in 1980 and a doctorate in aerospace engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1990. Wendy Lawrence, Mission Specialist decided that she wanted to become an astronaut when she saw the first man to walk on the moon. Soichi Noguchi, Mission Specialist from JAXA expresses that people like scientists, doctors and engineers could fly and he also wanted to venture into spaceflight. Steve Robinson, Mission Specialist says that he was fascinated with things that flew as a child and wanted to make things fly. Australian born Andrew Thomas, Mission Specialist wanted to become an astronaut as a young boy but never realized that he would fulfill his dream. The crewmember profiles end with an overview of the STS-114 Discovery mission. Paul Hill, Lead Flight Director talks about the main goal of the STS-114 mission which is to demonstrate that changes to the Orbiter and flight procedures are good and the second goal is to finish construction of the International Space Station. Sergei Krikalev, Commander talks about increasing the capability of the International Space Station, Jim Kelly discusses the work that is being performed in the external tank, Andy Thomas talks about procedures done to stop foam release and Soichi Noguchi

  9. International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-07

    In this image, the five STS-97 crew members pose with the 3 members of the Expedition One crew onboard the International Space Station (ISS) for the first ever traditional onboard portrait taken in the Zvezda Service Module. On the front row, left to right, are astronauts Brent W. Jett, Jr., STS-97 commander; William M. Shepherd, Expedition One mission commander; and Joseph R. Tarner, STS-97 mission specialist. On the second row, from the left are Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer; astronaut Carlos I. Noriega, STS-97 mission specialist; cosmonaut Yuri P. Gidzenko, Expedition One Soyuz commander; and Michael J. Bloomfield, STS-97 pilot. Behind them is astronaut Marc Garneau, STS-97 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The primary objective of the STS-97 mission was the delivery, assembly, and activation of the U.S. electrical power system onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The electrical power system, which is built into a 73-meter (240-foot) long solar array structure consists of solar arrays, radiators, batteries, and electronics. The entire 15.4-metric ton (17-ton) package is called the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, and is the heaviest and largest element yet delivered to the station aboard a space shuttle. The electrical system will eventually provide the power necessary for the first ISS crews to live and work in the U.S. segment. The STS-97 crew of five launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor on November 30, 2000 for an 11 day mission.

  10. Phase diagram of the itinerant helical magnet MnSi at high pressures and strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stishov, Sergei

    We performed a series of resistivity, heat capacity and ultrasound speed measurements of a MnSi single crystal at high pressures and strong magnetic fields [1-3]. Two notable features of the phase transition in MnSi that disappear on pressure increasin are a sharp peak marking the first order phase transition and a shallow maximum, situated slightly above the critical temperature and pointing to the domain of prominent helical fluctuations. The longitudinal and transverse ultrasound speeds and attenuation were measured in a MnSi single crystal in the temperature range of 2-40 K and magnetic fields to 7 Tesla. The magnetic phase transition in MnSi in zero magnetic field is signified by a quasi-discontinuity in the c11 elastic constant, which almost vanishes at the skyrmion - paramagnetic transition at high magnetic fields. The powerful fluctuations at the minima of c11 make the mentioned crossing point of the minima and the phase transition lines similar to a critical end point, where a second order phase transition meets a first order one.

  11. List of participants at SIDE IV meeting, Tokyo, 27 November--1 December 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-12-01

    Mark J Ablowitz, Vsevolod Adler, Mark Alber, Said Belmehdi, Marco Boiti, Claude Brezinski, R Bullough, Y M Chiang, Theodore Chihara, Peter A Clarkson, Robert Conte, Adam Doliwa, Vladimir Dorodnitsyn, Mitsuaki Eguchi, Claire Gilson, Basil Grammaticos, Valeri Gromak, Rod Halburd, Koji Hasegawa, Jarmo Hietarinta, Ryogo Hirota, Xing Biao Hu, M Idzumi, J Inoguchi, Hiroya Ishikara, Mourad Ismail, Shin Isojima, Kenichi Ito, Yoshiaki Itoh, Masashi Iwasaki, Klara Janglajew, Michio Jimbo, Nalini Joshi, Kenji Kajiwara, Saburo Kakei, Masaru Kamata, Satoshi Kamei, Rinat Kashaev, Shingo Kawai, Taeko Kimijima, K Kimura, Anatol Kirillov, Koichi Kondo, Boris Konopelchenko, Martin Kruskal, Atsuo Kuniba, Wataru Kunishima, Franklin Lambert, Serguei Leble, Decio Levi, Shigeru Maeda, Manuel Manas, Ken-Ichi Maruno, Tetsu Masuda, J Matsukidaira, Atsushi Matsumiya, Shigeki Matsutani, Yukitaka Minesaki, Mikio Murata, Micheline Musette, Atsushi Nagai, Katsuya Nakagawa, Atsushi Nakamula, Akira Nakamura, Yoshimasa Nakamura, Frank Nijhoff, J J C Nimmo, Katsuhiro Nishinari, Michitomo Nishizawa, A Nobe, Masatoshi Noumi, Yaeko Ohsaki, Yasuhiro Ohta, Kazuo Okamoto, Alexandre Orlov, Naoki Osada, Flora Pempinelli, Spiro Pyrlis, Reinout Quispel, Orlando Ragnisco, Alfred Ramani, Jean-Pierre Ramis, Andreas Ruffing, Simon Ruijsenaars, Satoru Saito, Noriko Saitoh, Hidetaka Sakai, Paulo Santini, Narimasa Sasa, Ryu Sasaki, Yoshikatsu Sasaki, Junkichi Satsuma, Sergei Sergeev, Nobuhiko Shinzawa, Evgueni Sklyanin, Juris Suris, Norio Suzuki, Yukiko Tagami, Katsuaki Takahashi, Daisuke Takahashi, Tomoyuki Takenawa, Yoshiro Takeyama, K M Tamizhmani, T Tamizhmani, Kouichi Toda, Morikatsu Toda, Tetsuji Tokihiro, Takayuki Tsuchida, Yohei Tsuchiya, Teruhisa Tsuda, Satoru Tsujimoto, Walter Van Assche, Claude Viallet, Luc Vinet, Shinsuke Watanabe, Yoshihida Watanabe, Ralph Willox, Pavel Winternitz, Yasuhiko Yamada, Yuji Yamada, Jin Yoneda, Haruo Yoshida, Katsuhiko Yoshida, Daisuke Yoshihara, Fumitaka Yura, J

  12. Disasters, Scientists and Society: The Quest for Wisdom (Sergey Soloviev Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okal, Emile A.

    2013-04-01

    The horror which accompanied the significant natural disasters of the past decade (major earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes...), many of which exposing inadequate preparation and/or response, has revived our quest for improved mitigation, or in simple words, enhanced wisdom, to confront natural hazards, both in scientific and societal terms. The Sumatra and Tohoku megathrust earthquakes have led to the abandonment of the once-popular concept of a "maximum" earthquake predictable on the basis of simple tectonic parameters and the latter has dealt a serious blow to seismic scaling laws which had been the cornerstone of probabilistic hazard estimations. Similarly, large hurricanes such as Katrina and Sandy have featured a significant diversity poorly captured by the single concept of "category". On the other hand, substantial theoretical progress has been made with the development of real-time tsunami warning algorithms based on the seismic W phase. An examination of mitigation aspects and operational procedures during the recent disasters exposes very significant shortcomings in the relationship between Scientists and decision-makers. We will review fields as diverse as the proper evaluation of historical databases, the correct real-time assessment of major earthquakes, the adequate timing of an all-clear, and the role, rights and duties of hazard scientists in their interaction with Society. As the ultimate goal of mitigation, warning and evacuation from many disasters remains the saving of human lives, many recent stories having emphasized the value of education, which casts a substantial ray of hope and enlightenment in the never-ending pursuit of wisdom in the face of future disasters, a noble endeavor to which Sergei Leonidovich Solov'ev had dedicated his life.

  13. Invariance and optimality in the regulation of an enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Michaelis-Menten equation, proposed a century ago, describes the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed biochemical reactions. Since then, this equation has been used in countless, increasingly complex models of cellular metabolism, often including time-dependent enzyme levels. However, even for a single reaction, there remains a fundamental disconnect between our understanding of the reaction kinetics, and the regulation of that reaction through changes in the abundance of active enzyme. Results We revisit the Michaelis-Menten equation under the assumption of a time-dependent enzyme concentration. We show that all temporal enzyme profiles with the same average enzyme level yield identical substrate degradation– a simple analytical conclusion that can be thought of as an invariance principle, and which we validate experimentally using a β-galactosidase assay. The ensemble of all time-dependent enzyme trajectories with the same average concentration constitutes a space of functions. We develop a simple model of biological fitness which assigns a cost to each of these trajectories (in the form of a function of functions, i.e. a functional). We then show how one can use variational calculus to analytically infer temporal enzyme profiles that minimize the overall enzyme cost. In particular, by separately treating the static costs of amino acid sequestration and the dynamic costs of protein production, we identify a fundamental cellular tradeoff. Conclusions The overall metabolic outcome of a reaction described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics is ultimately determined by the average concentration of the enzyme during a given time interval. This invariance in analogy to path-independent phenomena in physics, suggests a new way in which variational calculus can be employed to address biological questions. Together, our results point to possible avenues for a unified approach to studying metabolism and its regulation. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Sergei

  14. STS-111 Flight Day 5 Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    On Flight Day 5 of STS-111, the crew of Endeavour (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist) and the Expedition 5 crew (Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and Expedition 4 crew (Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer) are aboard the docked Endeavour and International Space Station (ISS). The ISS cameras show the station in orbit above the North African coast and the Mediterranean Sea, as Chang-Diaz and Perrin prepare for an EVA (extravehicular activity). The Canadarm 2 robotic arm is shown in motion in a wide-angle shot. The Quest Airlock is shown as it opens to allow the astronauts to exit the station. As orbital sunrise approaches, the astronauts are shown already engaged in their EVA activities. Chang-Diaz is shown removing the PDGF (Power and Data Grapple Fixture) from Endeavour's payload bay as Perrin prepares its installation position in the ISS's P6 truss structure; The MPLM is also visible. Following the successful detachment of the PDGF, Chang-Diaz carries it to the installation site as he is transported there by the robotic arm. The astronauts are then shown installing the PDGF, with video provided by helmet-mounted cameras. Following this task, the astronauts are shown preparing the MBS (Mobile Base System) for grappling by the robotic arm. It will be mounted to the Mobile Transporter (MT), which will traverse a railroad-like system along the truss structures of the ISS, and support astronaut activities as well as provide an eventual mobile base for the robotic arm.

  15. KSC-98pc1360

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-10-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the cloud-dimmed light of early morning, Space Shuttle Endeavour sits in place at Launch Pad 39A , atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, after rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. At its left are the Rotating Service Structure and Fixed Service Structure with the orbiter access arm extended. The access arm swings out to the orbiter crew compartment hatch to allow personnel to enter the crew compartment. At its outer end is the white room, an environmental chamber, that mates with the orbiter. While at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-88 launch targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. Mission STS-88 is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and connect it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time. Unity will be the main connecting point for later U.S. station modules and components. More than 40 launches are planned over five years involving the resources and expertise of 16 cooperating nations. Comprising the STS-88 crew are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie, Jerry L. Ross, James H. Newman and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev. Ross and Newman will make three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment

  16. STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 1 of 4; Flight Days 1 - 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-111 crew (Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Phillipe Perrin, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 4. Also shown are the incoming Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, NASA ISS Science Officer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and outgoing Expedition 4 (Yuri Onufriyenko, Commander; Carl Walz, Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineers) crews of the ISS (International Space Station). The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002139469), 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139468), and 'STS-111 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002139474). The primary activity of flight day 1 is the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour. The crew is seen before the launch at a meal and suit-up, and some pre-flight procedures are shown. Perrin holds a sign with a personalized message. The astronauts communicate with Mission Control extensively after launch, and an inside view of the shuttle cabin is shown. The replays of the launch include close-ups of the nozzles at liftoff, and the fall of the solid rocket boosters and the external fuel tank. Flight day 2 shows footage of mainland Asia at night, and daytime views of the eastern United States and Lake Michigan. Flight day three shows the Endeavour orbiter approaching and docking with the ISS. After the night docking, the crews exchange greetings, and a view of the Nile river and Egypt at night is shown. On flight day 4, the MPLM (Multi-Purpose Logistics Module) Leonardo was temporarily transferred from Endeavour's payload bay to the ISS.

  17. On the need for widespread horizontal gene transfers under genome size constraint.

    PubMed

    Isambert, Hervé; Stein, Richard R

    2009-08-25

    emergence of more complex life styles and ecological integration of many eukaryotes. This article was reviewed by Pierre Pontarotti, Eugene V Koonin and Sergei Maslov.

  18. STS-111 Flight Day 7 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Flight Day 7 of STS-111 (Space Shuttle Endeavour crew includes: Kenneth Cockrell, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Mission Specialist; Philippe Perrin, Mission Specialist; International Space Station (ISS) Expedition 5 crew includes Valery Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitson, Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer; ISS Expedition 4 crew includes: Yury Onufrienko, Commander; Daniel Bursch, Flight Engineer; Carl Walz, Flight Engineer), this video opens with answers to questions asked by the public via e-mail about the altitude of the space station, the length of its orbit, how astronauts differentiate between up and down in the microgravity environment, and whether they hear wind noise during the shuttle's reentry. In video footage shot from inside the Quest airlock, Perrin is shown exiting the station to perform an extravehicular activity (EVA) with Chang-Diaz. Chang-Diaz is shown, in helmet mounted camera footage, attaching cable protection booties to a fish-stringer device with multiple hooks, and Perrin is seen loosening bolts that hold the replacement unit accomodation in launch position atop the Mobile Base System (MBS). Perrin then mounts a camera atop the mast of the MBS. During this EVA, the astronauts installed the MBS on the Mobile Transporter (MT) to support the Canadarm 2 robotic arm. A camera in the Endeavour's payload bay provides footage of the Pacific Ocean, the Baja Peninsula, and Midwestern United States. Plumes from wildfires in Nevada, Idaho, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and Montana are visible. The station continues over the Great Lakes and the Eastern Provinces of Canada.

  19. Cyanate as energy source for nitrifiers

    PubMed Central

    Palatinszky, Marton; Herbold, Craig; Jehmlich, Nico; Pogoda, Mario; Han, Ping; von Bergen, Martin; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Karst, Søren M.; Galushko, Alexander; Koch, Hanna; Berry, David; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizers are collectively responsible for the aerobic oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate and play essential roles for the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. The physiology of these nitrifying microbes has been intensively studied since the first experiments of Sergei Winogradsky more than a century ago. Urea and ammonia are the only recognized energy sources that promote the aerobic growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea. Here we report the aerobic growth of a pure culture of the ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaeote Nitrososphaera gargensis1 on cyanate as the sole source of energy and reductant, the first organism known to do so. Cyanate, which is a potentially important source of reduced nitrogen in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems2, is converted to ammonium and CO2 by this archaeon using a cyanase that is induced upon addition of this compound. Within the cyanase gene family, this cyanase is a member of a distinct clade that also contains cyanases of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrospira. We demonstrate by co-culture experiments that these nitrite-oxidizers supply ammonia-oxidizers lacking cyanase with ammonium from cyanate, which is fully nitrified by this consortium through reciprocal feeding. Screening of a comprehensive set of more than 3,000 publically available metagenomes from environmental samples revealed that cyanase-encoding genes clustering with the cyanases of these nitrifiers are widespread in the environment. Our results demonstrate an unexpected metabolic versatility of nitrifying microbes and suggest a previously unrecognized importance of cyanate for N-cycling in the environment. PMID:26222031

  20. PREFACE: Algebra, Geometry, and Mathematical Physics 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolin, A.; Abramov, V.; Fuchs, J.; Paal, E.; Shestopalov, Y.; Silvestrov, S.

    2012-02-01

    This proceedings volume presents results obtained by the participants of the 6th Baltic-Nordic workshop 'Algebra, Geometry, and Mathematical Physics (AGMP-6)' held at the Sven Lovén Centre for Marine Sciences in Tjärnö, Sweden on October 25-30, 2010. The Baltic-Nordic Network AGMP 'Algebra, Geometry, and Mathematical Physics' http://www.agmp.eu was created in 2005 on the initiative of two Estonian universities and two Swedish universities: Tallinn University of Technology represented by Eugen Paal (coordinator of the network), Tartu University represented by Viktor Abramov, Lund University represented by Sergei Silvestrov, and Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg represented by Alexander Stolin. The goal was to promote international and interdisciplinary cooperation between scientists and research groups in the countries of the Baltic-Nordic region in mathematics and mathematical physics, with special emphasis on the important role played by algebra and geometry in modern physics, engineering and technologies. The main activities of the AGMP network consist of a series of regular annual international workshops, conferences and research schools. The AGMP network also constitutes an important educational forum for scientific exchange and dissimilation of research results for PhD students and Postdocs. The network has expanded since its creation, and nowadays its activities extend beyond countries in the Baltic-Nordic region to universities in other European countries and participants from elsewhere in the world. As one of the important research-dissimilation outcomes of its activities, the network has a tradition of producing high-quality research proceedings volumes after network events, publishing them with various international publishers. The PDF also contains the following: List of AGMP workshops and other AGMP activities Main topics discussed at AGMP-6 Review of AGMP-6 proceedings Acknowledgments List of Conference Participants

  1. SciTech Connect

    Ball, D Y

    The abysmal state of Russia's conventional forces has caused Russia to rely on nuclear weapons to ensure its security. This reliance was formalized in Russia's military doctrine which states that nuclear weapons can be used ''in situations critical to the national security of the RF and its allies.'' In fact, most Russian security analysts believe that this dependence on nuclear weapons will remain for the foreseeable future because the economy will have to improve significantly before a conventional force build up can be contemplated. Yet, despite Russia's need to rely on nuclear weapons, even this may be problematic because itsmore » economic plight may create difficulties in maintaining its current level of nuclear forces. Thus, Russia has a keen interest in negotiating a treaty to reduce Strategic Nuclear Forces below START II levels and would prefer to go even beyond the 2,000-2,500 numbers agreed to by Presidents Yeltsin and Clinton in Helsinki in 1997. Sergei Rogov, an influential defense analyst, believes that Russia's strategic nuclear forces will fall below 1,000 warheads by 2010 irrespective of arms control agreements. Accordingly, Russia is keen to ensure rough parity with the US. To retain a credible deterrent posture at these lower levels, Russia believes that it is important to restrain US sea-launched cruise missiles (SLCM)--forces that have heretofore not been captured as strategic weapons in the START treaties. Russian officials reason that once strategic nuclear forces go to very low levels, SLCM capabilities become strategically significant. In fact, according to two well-known Russian security analysts, Anatoli Diakov and Pavel Podvig, Russia's current START III negotiating position calls for the complete elimination of all SLCMs, both nuclear and conventional. Prior to assessing Russia's position regarding cruise missiles and START III, I will examine Russia's overall view of its security position vis-a-vis the US in order to provide

  2. The cosmological model of eternal inflation and the transition from chance to biological evolution in the history of life

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2007-01-01

    plausibility of different models for the origin of life on earth directly depends on the adopted cosmological scenario. In an infinite universe (multiverse), emergence of highly complex systems by chance is inevitable. Therefore, under this cosmology, an entity as complex as a coupled translation-replication system should be considered a viable breakthrough stage for the onset of biological evolution. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eric Bapteste, David Krakauer, Sergei Maslov, and Itai Yanai. PMID:17540027

  3. The cosmological model of eternal inflation and the transition from chance to biological evolution in the history of life.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2007-05-31

    for the origin of life on earth directly depends on the adopted cosmological scenario. In an infinite universe (multiverse), emergence of highly complex systems by chance is inevitable. Therefore, under this cosmology, an entity as complex as a coupled translation-replication system should be considered a viable breakthrough stage for the onset of biological evolution. This article was reviewed by Eric Bapteste, David Krakauer, Sergei Maslov, and Itai Yanai.

  4. Parabolic replicator dynamics and the principle of minimum Tsallis information gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    systems might reflect the importance of group selection and competition between ensembles of cooperating replicators. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Viswanadham Sridhara (nominated by Claus Wilke), Puushottam Dixit (nominated by Sergei Maslov), and Nick Grishin. For the complete reviews, see the Reviewers’ Reports section. PMID:23937956

  5. PEPSI-Dock: a detailed data-driven protein-protein interaction potential accelerated by polar Fourier correlation.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Emilie; Ritchie, David W; Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2016-09-01

    Docking prediction algorithms aim to find the native conformation of a complex of proteins from knowledge of their unbound structures. They rely on a combination of sampling and scoring methods, adapted to different scales. Polynomial Expansion of Protein Structures and Interactions for Docking (PEPSI-Dock) improves the accuracy of the first stage of the docking pipeline, which will sharpen up the final predictions. Indeed, PEPSI-Dock benefits from the precision of a very detailed data-driven model of the binding free energy used with a global and exhaustive rigid-body search space. As well as being accurate, our computations are among the fastest by virtue of the sparse representation of the pre-computed potentials and FFT-accelerated sampling techniques. Overall, this is the first demonstration of a FFT-accelerated docking method coupled with an arbitrary-shaped distance-dependent interaction potential. First, we present a novel learning process to compute data-driven distant-dependent pairwise potentials, adapted from our previous method used for rescoring of putative protein-protein binding poses. The potential coefficients are learned by combining machine-learning techniques with physically interpretable descriptors. Then, we describe the integration of the deduced potentials into a FFT-accelerated spherical sampling provided by the Hex library. Overall, on a training set of 163 heterodimers, PEPSI-Dock achieves a success rate of 91% mid-quality predictions in the top-10 solutions. On a subset of the protein docking benchmark v5, it achieves 44.4% mid-quality predictions in the top-10 solutions when starting from bound structures and 20.5% when starting from unbound structures. The method runs in 5-15 min on a modern laptop and can easily be extended to other types of interactions. https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software/PEPSI-Dock sergei.grudinin@inria.fr. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  6. Circularity and self-cleavage as a strategy for the emergence of a chromosome in the RNA-based protocell

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    RNA chromosome, this study opens on the prospect of a prosperous RNA world, populated by RNA-based protocells with a number of genes, showing complicated functions. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Sergei Kazakov (nominated by Laura Landweber), Nobuto Takeuchi (nominated by Anthony Poole), and Eugene Koonin. PMID:23971788

  7. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Fifty Years of Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbidge, E. M.

    1999-05-01

    It is easy to pick out my most memorable meeting of the AAS: the 149th meeting held in January, 1977, and hosted by the University of Hawaii, in Honolulu, HI. It was the meeting at which two traditions of the Society were broken, and we moved into the era of equal opportunity for women astronomers. Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin received the highest award of the AAS: the Henry Norris Russell Lectureship. This award had never before been available to women, otherwise Cecilia would, years earlier, have been honored for the many achievements in her lifetime of renowned astronomical research. And I, the first woman to be elected President of the AAS, had the honor of presenting the illuminated scroll to Cecilia, and of introducing her on the platform where she delivered the Henry Norris Russell Prize Lecture, entitled ``Fifty Years of Novae"(1) . Cecilia opened by comparing the experience of young and old scientists in achieving exciting results from their research, and then led us through the history of the discoveries of and about some famous novae. She described the physical picture that emerged from studies of their light curves, their spectra, and the discovery of their binary nature. Three important tables were included, listing data on cataclysmic binaries (dwarf novae) and their link to the nova phenomenon in general. She recalled that she and Sergei Gaposchkin had hesitated between the names catastrophic and cataclysmic for the dwarf novae, and decided on the latter, from the dictionary definitions of those two terms: ``a cataclysm is a great and general flood" while a catastrophe ``is a final event". The nova phenomenon is recurrent, as are the dwarf novae, and both involve an outpouring of a flood of energy. She concluded by describing her 50 years' experience with novae as presenting ``the contemporary portrait of a nova", rather than a final picture, and by forecasting that the next 50 years of discovering and studying novae will be as full of surprises as the

  8. Relativistic Celestial Mechanics of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Efroimsky, Michael; Kaplan, George

    2011-09-01

    commission are to: * clarify the geometrical and dynamical concepts of fundamental astronomy within a relativistic framework, * provide adequate mathematical and physical formulations to be used in fundamental astronomy, * deepen the understanding of relativity among astronomers and students of astronomy, and * promote research needed to accomplish these tasks. The present book is intended to make a theoretical contribution to the efforts undertaken by this commission. The first three chapters of the book review the foundations of celestial mechanics as well as those of special and general relativity. Subsequent chapters discuss the theoretical and experimental principles of applied relativity in the solar system. The book is written for graduate students and researchers working in the area of gravitational physics and its applications inmodern astronomy. Chapters 1 to 3 were written by Michael Efroimsky and Sergei Kopeikin, Chapters 4 to 8 by Sergei Kopeikin, and Chapter 9 by George Kaplan. Sergei Kopeikin also edited the overall text. It hardly needs to be said that Newtonian celestial mechanics is a very broad area. In Chapter 1, we have concentrated on derivation of the basic equations, on explanation of the perturbed two-body problem in terms of osculating and nonosculating elements, and on discussion of the gauge freedom in the six-dimensional configuration space of the orbital parameters. The gauge freedom of the configuration space has many similarities to the gauge freedom of solutions of the Einstein field equations in general theory of relativity. It makes an important element of the Newtonian theory of gravity, which is often ignored in the books on classic celestial mechanics. Special relativity is discussed in Chapter 2. While our treatment is in many aspects similar to the other books on special relativity, we have carefully emphasised the explanation of the Lorentz and Poincaré transformations, and the appropriate transformation properties of geometric

  9. Comparable contributions of structural-functional constraints and expression level to the rate of protein sequence evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Maxim Y; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2008-01-01

    multidomain proteins or contained in distinct proteins. Substantial homogenization of evolutionary rates in multidomain proteins was, indeed, observed in both animals and plants, although highly significant differences between domain-specific rates remained. The contributions of the translation rate, as determined by the effect of the fusion of a pair of domains within a multidomain protein, and intrinsic, domain-specific structural-functional constraints appear to be comparable in magnitude. Conclusion Fusion of domains in a multidomain protein results in substantial homogenization of the domain-specific evolutionary rates but significant differences between domain-specific evolution rates remain. Thus, the rate of translation and intrinsic structural-functional constraints both exert sizable and comparable effects on sequence evolution. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Sergei Maslov, Dennis Vitkup, Claus Wilke (nominated by Orly Alter), and Allan Drummond (nominated by Joel Bader). For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' Reports section. PMID:18840284

  10. The Biological Big Bang model for the major transitions in evolution

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2007-01-01

    was reviewed by William Martin, Sergei Maslov, and Leonid Mirny. PMID:17708768

  11. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Smith, David R.

    2008-11-01

    multi-frequency cloaking Andrea Alù and Nader Engheta Electromagnetic cloaking devices for TE and TM polarizations Filiberto Bilotti, Simone Tricarico and Lucio Vegni An aberration-free lens with zero F-number D Schurig Transformational optics of plasmonic metamaterials I I Smolyaninov An acoustic metafluid: realizing a broadband acoustic cloak J B Pendry and Jensen Li On the possibility of metamaterial properties in spin plasmas G Brodin and M Marklund A homogenization route towards square cylindrical acoustic cloaks Mohamed Farhat, Sébastien Guenneau, Stefan Enoch, Alexander Movchan, Frédéric Zolla and André Nicolet Transformation optics: approaching broadband electromagnetic cloaking A V Kildishev, W Cai, U K Chettiar and V M Shalaev Generalized field-transforming metamaterials Sergei A Tretyakov, Igor S Nefedov and Pekka Alitalo Electromagnetic beam modulation through transformation optical structures Xiaofei Xu, Yijun Feng and Tian Jiang Superantenna made of transformation media Ulf Leonhardt and Tomáš Tyc Material parameters and vector scaling in transformation acoustics Steven A Cummer, Marco Rahm and David Schurig Isotropic transformation optics: approximate acoustic and quantum cloaking Allan Greenleaf, Yaroslav Kurylev, Matti Lassas and Gunther Uhlmann Transformation optical designs for wave collimators, flat lenses and right-angle bends Do-Hoon Kwon and Douglas H Werner Alternative derivation of electromagnetic cloaks and concentrators A D Yaghjian and S Maci Solutions in folded geometries, and associated cloaking due to anomalous resonance Graeme W Milton, Nicolae-Alexandru P Nicorovici, Ross C McPhedran, Kirill Cherednichenko and Zubin Jacob Finite wavelength cloaking by plasmonic resonance N-A P Nicorovici, R C McPhedran, S Enoch and G Tayeb

  13. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Mark B.; Kapustin, Anton N.; Schwarz, John Henry

    . Areas of activity include: CDMS II data analysis, contributions to SuperCDMS Soudan operations and analysis, R&D towards SuperCDMS SNOLAB, development of a novel screener for radiocontamination (the BetaCage), and development of new WIMP detector concepts. Ren-Yuan Zhu leads the HEP crystal laboratory for the advanced detector R&D effort. The crystal lab is involved in development of novel scintillating crystals and has proposed several crystal based detector concepts for future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers. Its current research effort is concentrated on development of fast crystal scintillators with good radiation hardness and low cost. II) THEORETICAL PHYSICS The main theme of Sergei Gukov's current research is the relation between the geometry of quantum group invariants and their categorification, on the one hand, and the physics of supersymmetric gauge theory and string theory, on the other. Anton Kapustin's research spans a variety of topics in non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory (QFT). His main areas of interest are supersymmetric gauge theories, non-perturbative dualities in QFT, disorder operators, Topological Quantum Field Theory, and non-relativistic QFT. He is also interested in the foundations and possible generalizations of Quantum Mechanics. Hirosi Ooguri's current research has two main components. One is to find exact results in Calabi-Yau compactification of string theory. Another is to explore applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence. He also plans to continue his project with Caltech postdoctoral fellows on BPS spectra of supersymmetric gauge theories in diverse dimensions. John Preskill works on quantum information science. This field may lead to important future technologies, and also lead to new understanding of issues in fundamental physics John Schwarz has been exploring a number of topics in superstring theory/M-theory, supersymmetric gauge theory, and their AdS/CFT relationships. Much of the motivation for these

  14. Changes in Russia's Military and Nuclear Doctrine

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkov, Benjamin M.; Balatsky, Galya I.

    definition of what doctrine meant in 2000 and an outline of the 2000 doctrine. An overview of the 2000 doctrine is: (1) The 2000 doctrine was a return to a more defensive posture; the threat of nuclear retaliation, rather than that of preemptive force, would be its deterrence; (2) In order to strengthen its nuclear deterrence, Russia extended and redefined the cases in which nuclear weapons could be used to include a wider range of conflict types and a larger spectrum of attackers; and (3) Russia's threats changed to reflect its latest fear of engaging in a limited conflict with no prospect of the use of nuclear deterrence. In 2006, the defense minister and deputy prime minister Sergei Ivanov announced that the government was starting on a draft of a future doctrine. Four years later, in 2010, the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation was put into effect with the intent of determining Russian doctrine until 2020. The 2010 doctrine, like all previous doctrines, was a product of the times in which it was written. Gone were many of the fears that had followed Russia for the past two decades. Below are an examination of the 2010 definition of doctrine as well as a brief analysis of the 2010 doctrine and its deviations from past doctrines. An overview of the 2010 doctrine is: (1) The new doctrine emphasizes the political centralization of command both in military policy and the use of nuclear weapons; (2) Nuclear doctrine remains the same in many aspects including the retention of first-use; (3) At the same time, doctrine was narrowed to using nuclear weapons only when the Russian state's existence is in danger; to continue strong deterrence, Russia also opted to follow the United States by introducing precision conventional weapons; (4) NATO is defined as Russia's primary external threat because of its increased global presence and its attempt to recruit states that are part of the Russian 'bloc'; and (5) The 2000 doctrine's defensive stance was left out of the doctrine

  15. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    KhodelVictorKurchatov Institute, Moscowvak@wuphys.wustl.edu KimuraMasaakiHokkaido University, Sapporomasaaki@nucl.sci.hokudai.ac.jp LacroixDenisGANIL, Caenlacroix@ganil.fr LiangHaozhaoPeking University, Beijinghzliang@pku.edu.cn MargueronJérômeIPN Orsayjerome.margueron@ipno.in2p3.fr MassotElisabethIPN Orsaymassot@ipno.in2p3.fr MengJiePeking University, Beijingmengj@pku.edu.cn MillerTomaszWarsaw University of Technologymillert@student.mini.pw.edu.pl MoghrabiKassemIPN Orsaymoghrabi@ipno.in2p3.fr NapolitaniPaoloIPN Orsaynapolita@ipno.in2p3.fr NeffThomasGSI Darmstadtt.neff@gsi.de NguyenVan GiaiIPN Orsaynguyen@ipno.in2p3.fr OtsukaTakaharuUniversity of Tokyootsuka@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp PilletNathalie-MarieCEA-DAM, Arpajonnathalie.pillet@cea.fr QiChongKTH Stockholmchongq@kth.se RamananSunethraICTP Triestesramanan@ictp.it RingPeterTU Munichring@ph.tum.de Rios HuguetArnauUniversity of Surreya.rios@surrey.ac.uk RivetMarie-FranceIPN Orsayrivet@ipno.in2p3.fr RobledoLuisUniversidad Autonoma de Madridluis.robledo@uam.es Roca MazaXavierINFN Milanoxavier.roca.maza@mi.infn.it RöpkeGerdRostock Universitygerd.roepke@uni-rostock.de RowleyNeilIPN Orsayrowley@ipno.in2p3.fr SagawaHiroyukiUniversity of Aizusagawa@u-aizu.ac.jp SandulescuNicolaeIFIN-HH, Bucharestsandulescu@theory.nipne.ro SchuckPeterIPN Orsayschuck@ipno.in2p3.fr SedrakianArmenGoethe Universität Frankfurtsedrakian@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de SeveryukhinAlexeyJINR Dubnasever@theor.jinr.ru SogoTakaakiIPN Orsaysogo@ipno.in2p3.fr SomàVittorioCEA Saclayvittorio.soma@cea.fr StrinatiGiancarloUniversità di Camerinogiancarlo.strinati@gmail.com SuharaTadahiroKyoto Universitysuhara@ruby.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp SukhoruchkinSergeiPetersburg Nuclear Physics Institutesergeis@pnpi.spb.ru SuzukiToruTokyo Metropolitan Universitysuzukitr@tmu.ac.jp SuzukiToshioNihon University, Tokyosuzuki@chs.nihon-u.ac.jp TarpanovDimitarINRNE, Sofiadimitert@yahoo.co.uk Tohsaki-SuzukiAkihiroOsaka Universitytohsaki@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp TypelStefanGSI Darmstadts

  16. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    Filho, R Saito, G Dresselhaus and M S Dresselhaus FTIR-luminescence mapping of dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes Sergei Lebedkin, Katharina Arnold, Frank Hennrich, Ralph Krupke, Burkhard Renker and Manfred M Kappes Structural properties of Haeckelite nanotubes Ph Lambin and L P Biró Structural changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes under non-hydrostatic pressures: x-ray and Raman studies Sukanta Karmakar, Surinder M Sharma, P V Teredesai, D V S Muthu, A Govindaraj, S K Sikka and A K Sood Novel properties of 0.4 nm single-walled carbon nanotubes templated in the channels of AlPO4-5 single crystals Z K Tang, N Wang, X X Zhang, J N Wang, C T Chan and Ping Sheng Lattice dynamics and symmetry of double wall carbon nanotubes M Damnjanovic, E Dobardzic, I Milosevic, T Vukovic and B Nikolic Optical characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic decomposition of alcohol Shigeo Maruyama, Yuhei Miyauchi, Yoichi Murakami and Shohei Chiashi Christian Thomsen, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany Hiromichi Kataura, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    planes to stable loops caused by annealing M Endo, B J Lee, Y A Kim, Y J Kim, H Muramatsu, T Yanagisawa, T Hayashi, M Terrones and M S Dresselhaus Energetics and electronic structure of C70-peapods and one-dimensional chains of C70 Susumu Okada, Minoru Otani and Atsushi Oshiyama Theoretical characterization of several models of nanoporous carbon F Valencia, A H Romero, E Hernández, M Terrones and H Terrones First-principles molecular dynamics study of the stretching frequencies of hydrogen molecules in carbon nanotubes Gabriel Canto, Pablo Ordejón, Cheng Hansong, Alan C Cooper and Guido P Pez The geometry and the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes: beyond the ideal behaviour Jeno Kürti, Viktor Zólyomi, Miklos Kertesz and Sun Guangyu Curved nanostructured materials Humberto Terrones and Mauricio Terrones A one-dimensional Ising model for C70 molecular ordering in C70-peapods Yutaka Maniwa, Hiromichi Kataura, Kazuyuki Matsuda and Yutaka Okabe Nanoengineering of carbon nanotubes for nanotools Yoshikazu Nakayama and Seiji Akita Narrow diameter double-wall carbon nanotubes: synthesis, electron microscopy and inelastic light scattering R R Bacsa, E Flahaut, Ch Laurent, A Peigney, S Aloni, P Puech and W S Bacsa Sensitivity of single multiwalled carbon nanotubes to the environment M Krüger, I Widmer, T Nussbaumer, M Buitelaar and C Schönenberger Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonance Raman scattering A Jorio, M A Pimenta, A G Souza Filho, R Saito, G Dresselhaus and M S Dresselhaus FTIR-luminescence mapping of dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes Sergei Lebedkin, Katharina Arnold, Frank Hennrich, Ralph Krupke, Burkhard Renker and Manfred M Kappes Structural properties of Haeckelite nanotubes Ph Lambin and L P Biró Structural changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes under non-hydrostatic pressures: x-ray and Raman studies Sukanta Karmakar, Surinder M Sharma, P V Teredesai, D V S Muthu, A Govindaraj, S K Sikka and A K Sood Novel properties of 0

  18. Stars Form Surprisingly Close to Milky Way's Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-10-01

    The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way has surprisingly helped spawn a new generation of stars, according to observations from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This novel mode of star formation may solve several mysteries about the supermassive black holes that reside at the centers of nearly all galaxies. "Massive black holes are usually known for violence and destruction," said Sergei Nayakshin of the University of Leicester, United Kingdom, and coauthor of a paper on this research in an upcoming issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. "So it's remarkable that this black hole helped create new stars, not just destroy them." Black holes have earned their fearsome reputation because any material -- including stars -- that falls within the so-called event horizon is never seen again. However, these new results indicate that the immense disks of gas known to orbit many black holes at a "safe" distance from the event horizon can help nurture the formation of new stars. Animation of Stars Forming Around Black Hole Animation of Stars Forming Around Black Hole This conclusion came from new clues that could only be revealed in X-rays. Until the latest Chandra results, astronomers have disagreed about the origin of a mysterious group of massive stars discovered by infrared astronomers to be orbiting less than a light year from the Milky Way's central black hole, a.k.a. Sagittarius A*, or Sgr A*. At such close distances to Sgr A*, the standard model for star formation predicts that gas clouds from which stars form should have been ripped apart by tidal forces from the black hole. Two models to explain this puzzle have been proposed. In the disk model, the gravity of a dense disk of gas around Sgr A* offsets the tidal forces and allows stars to form; in the migration model, the stars formed in a star cluster far away from the black hole and migrated in to form the ring of massive stars. The migration scenario predicts about a

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloud Physics FOCUS ON CLOUD PHYSICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkovich, Gregory; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2008-07-01

    condensation nuclei Antonio Celani, Andrea Mazzino and Marco Tizzi Laboratory and modeling studies of cloud-clear air interfacial mixing: anisotropy of small-scale turbulence due to evaporative cooling Szymon P Malinowski, Miroslaw Andrejczuk, Wojciech W Grabowski, Piotr Korczyk, Tomasz A Kowalewski and Piotr K Smolarkiewicz Evolution of non-uniformly seeded warm clouds in idealized turbulent conditions Stanislav Derevyanko, Gregory Falkovich and Sergei Turitsyn Lagrangian statistics in two-dimensional free turbulent convection A Bistagnino and G Boffetta Turbulence, raindrops and the l1/2 number density law S Lovejoy and D Schertzer Effects of turbulence on the geometric collision rate of sedimenting droplets. Part 2. Theory and parameterization Orlando Ayala, Bogdan Rosa and Lian-Ping Wang Effects of turbulence on the geometric collision rate of sedimenting droplets. Part 1. Results from direct numerical simulation Orlando Ayala, Bogdan Rosa, Lian-Ping Wang and Wojciech W Grabowski Collisions of particles advected in random flows K Gustavsson, B Mehlig and M Wilkinson Turbulent collision efficiency of heavy particles relevant to cloud droplets Lian-Ping Wang, Orlando Ayala, Bogdan Rosa and Wojciech W Grabowski

  20. INTRODUCTION Outline of Round Tables Outline of Round Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2010-12-01

    The Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, was held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, (ICTP), Trieste, Italy on 27 July-7 August 2009. TMB-2009 united over 180 participants ranging from students to members of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering, and including researchers at experienced and early stages of their carriers from leading scientific institutions in academia, national laboratories, corporations and industry worldwide. Responding to the community's inquiry and reaffirming the practices established at TMB-2007, two Round Tables were organized for the participants of TMB-2009 on 30 July 2009 and 6 August 2009 in the Oppenheimer Room at the Centre. The goals of the Round Tables were to encourage the information exchange among the members of the interdisciplinary and international TMB community, promote discussions regarding the state-of-the-art in TMB-related scientific areas, identify directions for frontier research, and articulate recommendations for future developments. This article is a summary of the collective work of the Round Table participants (listed alphabetically below by their last names), whose contributions form its substance and, as such, are greatly appreciated. Abarzhi, Snezhana I (University of Chicago, USA) Andrews, Malcolm (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) Belotserkovskii, Oleg (Institute for Computer Aided Design of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia) Bershadskii, Alexander (ICAR, Israel) Brandenburg, Axel (Nordita, Denmark) Chumakov, Sergei (Stanford University, USA) Desai, Tara (University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy) Galperin, Boris (University of South Florida, USA) Gauthier, Serge (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) Gekelman, Walter (University of California at Los Angeles, USA) Gibson, Carl (University of California at San Diego, USA) Goddard III, William A (California Institute of Technology, USA) Grinstein, Fernando

  1. WE-G-213-01: Roentgen and the Birth of Modern Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sprawls, P.

    Quimby was hired by Giacchino Failla as a radiation physicist at Memorial Hospital for Cancer in New York City. Failla had studied with Madame Curie and obtained his doctoral degree in her laboratory. After many groundbreaking medical physics studies from 1919 until 1942, they both moved to Columbia University. Dr. Quimby developed a widely employed dosimetry system for single plane implants with radium and radon seeds, and a dosimetry methodology for internal radionuclides. She was author of more than 75 scientific publications, and of significant textbooks including the first comprehensive physics textbook for radiologists “Physical Foundations of Radiology”, which was co-authored with Otto Glasser, Lauriston Taylor and James Weatherwax in the first edition, with Russell Morgan added for the second edition and Paul Goodwin for the fourth edition. With Sergei Feitelberg, M.D. she published two editions of “Radioactive Isotopes in Medicine and Biology: Basic Physics and Instrumentation”. Quimby became a renowned examiner for the American Board of Radiology when the third ABR examination, given in 1936, added physics. She served as President of the American Radium Society, received the RSNA Gold Medal, and also numerous prestigious awards given to women in science. Edith Quimby was a Charter Member of AAPM. The AAPM Lifetime Achievement Award was renamed the Edith H. Quimby Lifetime Achievement Award in her honor in 2011. Marvin Martin Dixon Williams (1902–1981) Marvin Williams was born in Walla Walla, WA in 1902, and attended the same college as Edith Quimby, graduating from Whitman College in 1926. He was greatly influenced to go into medical physics by her accomplishments. During his early career, Williams worked with James Weatherwax in Philadelphia while he was working toward an M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania. In 1931 Williams was awarded a Ph.D. in Biophysics from the University of Minnesota, with the work actually performed at the Mayo Clinic

  2. WE-G-213-02: The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, L.

    Quimby was hired by Giacchino Failla as a radiation physicist at Memorial Hospital for Cancer in New York City. Failla had studied with Madame Curie and obtained his doctoral degree in her laboratory. After many groundbreaking medical physics studies from 1919 until 1942, they both moved to Columbia University. Dr. Quimby developed a widely employed dosimetry system for single plane implants with radium and radon seeds, and a dosimetry methodology for internal radionuclides. She was author of more than 75 scientific publications, and of significant textbooks including the first comprehensive physics textbook for radiologists “Physical Foundations of Radiology”, which was co-authored with Otto Glasser, Lauriston Taylor and James Weatherwax in the first edition, with Russell Morgan added for the second edition and Paul Goodwin for the fourth edition. With Sergei Feitelberg, M.D. she published two editions of “Radioactive Isotopes in Medicine and Biology: Basic Physics and Instrumentation”. Quimby became a renowned examiner for the American Board of Radiology when the third ABR examination, given in 1936, added physics. She served as President of the American Radium Society, received the RSNA Gold Medal, and also numerous prestigious awards given to women in science. Edith Quimby was a Charter Member of AAPM. The AAPM Lifetime Achievement Award was renamed the Edith H. Quimby Lifetime Achievement Award in her honor in 2011. Marvin Martin Dixon Williams (1902–1981) Marvin Williams was born in Walla Walla, WA in 1902, and attended the same college as Edith Quimby, graduating from Whitman College in 1926. He was greatly influenced to go into medical physics by her accomplishments. During his early career, Williams worked with James Weatherwax in Philadelphia while he was working toward an M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania. In 1931 Williams was awarded a Ph.D. in Biophysics from the University of Minnesota, with the work actually performed at the Mayo Clinic

  3. WE-G-213-00: History Symposium: Radiological Physics Pioneers: Roentgen and the AAPM Award Eponyms - William Coolidge, Edith Quimby, and Marvin Williams - Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    Quimby was hired by Giacchino Failla as a radiation physicist at Memorial Hospital for Cancer in New York City. Failla had studied with Madame Curie and obtained his doctoral degree in her laboratory. After many groundbreaking medical physics studies from 1919 until 1942, they both moved to Columbia University. Dr. Quimby developed a widely employed dosimetry system for single plane implants with radium and radon seeds, and a dosimetry methodology for internal radionuclides. She was author of more than 75 scientific publications, and of significant textbooks including the first comprehensive physics textbook for radiologists “Physical Foundations of Radiology”, which was co-authored with Otto Glasser, Lauriston Taylor and James Weatherwax in the first edition, with Russell Morgan added for the second edition and Paul Goodwin for the fourth edition. With Sergei Feitelberg, M.D. she published two editions of “Radioactive Isotopes in Medicine and Biology: Basic Physics and Instrumentation”. Quimby became a renowned examiner for the American Board of Radiology when the third ABR examination, given in 1936, added physics. She served as President of the American Radium Society, received the RSNA Gold Medal, and also numerous prestigious awards given to women in science. Edith Quimby was a Charter Member of AAPM. The AAPM Lifetime Achievement Award was renamed the Edith H. Quimby Lifetime Achievement Award in her honor in 2011. Marvin Martin Dixon Williams (1902–1981) Marvin Williams was born in Walla Walla, WA in 1902, and attended the same college as Edith Quimby, graduating from Whitman College in 1926. He was greatly influenced to go into medical physics by her accomplishments. During his early career, Williams worked with James Weatherwax in Philadelphia while he was working toward an M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania. In 1931 Williams was awarded a Ph.D. in Biophysics from the University of Minnesota, with the work actually performed at the Mayo Clinic

  4. Speed of Gravity Measured for First Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Taking advantage of a rare cosmic alignment, scientists have made the first measurement of the speed at which the force of gravity propagates, giving a numerical value to one of the last unmeasured fundamental constants of physics. "Newton thought that gravity's force was instantaneous. Einstein assumed that it moved at the speed of light, but until now, no one had measured it," said Sergei Kopeikin, a physicist at the University of Missouri-Columbia. VLA Image of Jupiter VLA Image of Jupiter CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF "We have determined that gravity's propagation speed is equal to the speed of light within an accuracy of 20 percent," said Ed Fomalont, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Charlottesville, VA. The scientists presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Seattle, WA. The landmark measurement is important to physicists working on unified field theories that attempt to combine particle physics with Einstein's general theory of relativity and electromagnetic theory. "Our measurement puts some strong limits on the theories that propose extra dimensions, such as superstring theory and brane theories," Kopeikin said. "Knowing the speed of gravity can provide an important test of the existence and compactness of these extra dimensions," he added. Superstring theory proposes that the fundamental particles of nature are not pointlike, but rather incredibly small loops or strings, whose properties are determined by different modes of vibration. Branes (a word derived from membranes) are multidimensional surfaces, and some current physical theories propose space-time branes embedded to five dimensions. The scientists used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a continent-wide radio-telescope system, along with the 100-meter radio telescope in Effelsberg, Germany, to make an extremely precise observation when the planet Jupiter passed nearly in front of a bright quasar on

  5. IN MEMORIAM: In Memoriam: Alexander A Golovin and Alexei M Oparin In Memoriam: Alexander A Golovin and Alexei M Oparin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    deep sorrow without him. Lesha was an extraordinary personality. His professionalism, strength of mind and kindness were a source of enthusiasm for his colleagues and students. Lesha_s early death is an irreplaceable loss. We will always remember him, and his scientific results and achievements will serve as the origin of ideas and inspiration for computational scientists. Sergei I Anisimov, Nail A Inogamov, Oleg M Belotserkovskii and Oleg Troshkin Moscow, Russia 21 Dec 2008

  6. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    (continuous DNS/LES/RANS, Molecular dynamics, Monte-Carlo, predictive modeling) New Experimental Diagnostics (novel methods for flow visualization and control, high-tech) The First International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' was organized by the following members of the Organizing Committee: Snezhana I Abarzhi (chairperson, Chicago, USA) Malcolm J Andrews (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) Sergei I Anisimov (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) Donald Q Lamb (The University of Chicago, USA) Katsunobu Nishihara (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) Bruce A Remington (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) Robert Rosner (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) Katepalli R Sreenivasan (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy) Alexander L Velikovich (Naval Research Laboratory, USA) The Organizing Committee gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the Conference Sponsors: National Science Foundation (NSF), USA (Divisions and Programs Directors: Drs A G Detwiler, L M Jameson, E L Lomon, P E Phelan, G A Prentice, J A Raper, W Schultz, P R Westmoreland; PI: Dr S I Abarzhi) Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), USA (Program Director: Dr J D Schmisseur; PI: Dr S I Abarzhi) European Office of Aerospace Research and Development (EOARD) of the AFOSR, UK (Program Chief: Dr S Surampudi; PI: Dr S I Abarzhi) International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy (Centre's Director: Dr K R Sreenivasan) The University of Chicago and The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), USA (Laboratory's Director: Dr R Rosner) Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA), France (Directeur de Recherche: Dr S Gauthier) Department of Energy, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), USA (Program manager: Dr R J Hanrahan; Group Leader: Dr M J Andrew) The DOE ASC Alliance Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes, The University of Chicago, USA (Center's Director: Dr D Q Lamb

  7. PREFACE: Nonlinearity and Geometry: connections with integrability Nonlinearity and Geometry: connections with integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslinski, Jan L.; Ferapontov, Eugene V.; Kitaev, Alexander V.; Nimmo, Jonathan J. C.

    2009-10-01

    accessible to younger researchers. It is not out of place to recall that earlier the Institute of Theoretical of Physics of Warsaw University organized two, now legendary, Jadwisin Soliton Workshops (1977 and 1979); see the short note in Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena (1980 vol. 1, issue 1, pp 159-163) written by Antoni Sym who was deeply engaged in the organization of these conferences. In scale and scope both Jadwisin workshops preceded a series of very successful NEEDS conferences. Among the celebrated participants of the Jadwisin meeetings one can find names of great importance for the history of soliton theory: Martin Kruskal, Norman Zabuski, Mark Ablowitz, David Kaup, Allan Newell, Vladimir Zakharov, Sergei Manakov, Francesco Calogero, Antonio Degasperis and Ryogo Hirota. This special issue begins with an introductory historical article in which Antoni Sym presents the most important ideas in the scientific biography of Gaston Darboux. We encourage the readers discover the greatest (scientific!) love of Darboux. This is followed by five review papers. M Błaszak and B M Szablikowski discuss the general R-matrix formalism for the construction of integrable systems with infinitely many degrees of freedom. The general theory is applied to several infinite-dimensional Lie algebras leading to new examples of dispersionless and dispersive (soliton) integrable field systems in 1+1 and 2+1 dimensions. J L Cieśliński presents the Darboux-Bäcklund transformation for 1+1-dimensional integrable systems of PDEs. He compares existing approaches to the construction of multisoliton Darboux matrices, discusses the nonisospectral case and presents some new results on the linear and bilinear invariants of the Darboux-Bäcklund transformation. M Dunajski presents twistor theory as a geometric tool for solving nonlinear differential equations. Many soliton equations admit twistor interpretation in terms of holomophic vector bundles. A different approach is provided for dispersionless

  8. 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2013-07-01

    (University of South Florida, USA) • Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) • Joseph J Niemela (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy) • Katsunobu Nishihara (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • Katepalli R Sreenivasan (New York University, USA) We greatly acknowledge the effort and dedication of the members of the Committee for Best Poster Award: • Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) • Katsunobu Nishihara (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • Annick Pouquet (National Center for Atmospheric Research, USA) • Walter Gekelman (University of California, Los Angeles, USA) • Graeme Watt (Institute of Physics, UK) We greatly appreciate the work of conference web-master Daniil V Ilyin (University of Chicago, USA). We thank for technical support: • Bhanesh Akula (Texas A & M University, USA) • Ahmad Qamar (University of Chicago, USA) We warmly acknowledge the logistics assistance of the offices and officers of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics: • Conference Support Office, and Ms Katrina Danforth and Ms Daniela Giombi • Financial Office, and Mr Andrej Michelcich and Ms Alessandra Ricci • Visa Office, and Mr Erich Jost and Mr Adriano Maggio • Housing Office, and Ms Tiziana Bottazzi and Ms Dora Photiou • Publications Office, and Mr Guido Comar and Mr Raffaele Corona • Computer Office, and Dr Johannes Grassberger • Science Dissemination Unit, and Dr Enrique Canessa, Dr. Carlo Fonda and Dr Marco Zennaro We gratefully appreciate the support of the members of the Programme Coordination Board: • Snezhana I Abarzhi (University of Chicago, USA) • Malcolm J Andrews (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) • Sergei I Anisimov (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) • Hiroshi Azechi (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) • Vladimir E Fortov (Institute for High Energy Density, Russia) • Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l

  9. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    confined plasmas, magneto-convection, magneto-rotational instability, dynamo; Canonical plasmas: coupled plasmas, anomalous resistance, ionosphere; Physics of atmosphere: environmental fluid dynamics, weather forecasting, turbulent flows in stratified media and atmosphere, non-Boussinesq convection; Geophysics and Earth science: mantle-lithosphere tectonics, oceanography, turbulent convection under rotation, planetary interiors; Combustion: dynamics of flames and fires, deflagration-to-detonation transition, blast waves and explosions, flows with chemical reactions, flows in jet engines; Mathematical aspects of non-equilibrium dynamics: vortex dynamics, singularities, discontinuities, asymptotic dynamics, weak solutions, well- and ill-posedness, continuous transports out of thermodynamic equilibrium; Stochastic processes and probabilistic description: long-tail distributions and anomalous diffusion, data assimilation and processing methodologies, error estimate and uncertainty quantification, statistically unsteady processes; Advanced numerical simulations: continuous DNS/LES/RANS, molecular dynamics, Monte-Carlo, predictive modeling, validation and verification of numerical models; Experimental diagnostics: model experiments in high energy density and low energy density regimes, plasma diagnostics, fluid flow visualizations and control, opto-fluidics, novel optical methods, holography, advanced technologies. TMB-2009 was organized by the following members of the Organizing Committee: Snezhana I Abarzhi (chairperson, Chicago, USA) Malcolm J Andrews (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) Sergei I Anisimov (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) Hiroshi Azechi (Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) Serge Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) Christopher J Keane (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) Robert Rosner (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) Katepalli R Sreenivasan (International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Italy) Alexander

  10. Houston, We Have a Podcast. Episode 22: Astronaut Health

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-07

    , and you have to just kind of -- so, what's your job? Your job is to monitor it, record it, to help it? [00:03:36] Natacha Chough: We do take some samples and stuff in flight on return, but, you know, the crew can be pretty symptomatic in terms of like returning to a 1G environment, and so we kind of mitigate a lot of the symptoms that they're having, motion sickness, that type of thing, in the early hours, post-landing. [00:03:54] Host: So now you're a -- you're a flight surgeon now, right? Who's your crew members that you're working with? [00:03:59] Natacha Chough: So currently I'm assigned to Jeanette Epps, and she's launching next spring. [00:04:03] Host: Okay. Okay. So you -- what's some of the stuff you have to do this early ahead of time? [00:04:08] Natacha Chough: So right now, we just did her L minus 6 months physical, make sure that, you know, she's still within standards for long duration spaceflight. She's actually out of the country right now because in this part of the pre-launch timeframe, she and Alex [inaudible], he's a crew member, and then Sergei [inaudible], the Russian crew member, they're all serving as the backup crew to the prime crew that's launching this December. [00:04:33] Host: Oh, okay. So they're out there with Scott Tingle and [inaudible] and those guys? Okay, cool. Very cool. So you're -- you don't have to follow them for that then? You get to stay here? [00:04:43] Natacha Chough: Yeah. In the meantime, you know, there's a lot of just like pre-travel prep, making sure all of us, including the docs, are up on our immunizations for, you know, upcoming travel. In the next few months before launch, we'll also get together with her in our pharmacy, and make sure that she's got any prescription meds she takes on a regular basis put in these ISS medical accessory packs, people take, you know, nutritional supplements or daily vitamins or whatever, we make sure that all that is packed for them and any motion sickness meds they might need on the