Science.gov

Sample records for abdominal oncology clinical

  1. Sedation in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    González Barón, Manuel; Gómez Raposo, César; Pinto Marín, Alvaro

    2005-08-01

    The clinical status of terminal cancer patients is very complex and is affected by several severe symptoms, of extended duration, changing with time and of multifactorial origin. When there are no reasonable cancer treatments specifically able to modify the natural history of the disease, symptom control acquires priority and favours the possible better adaptation to the general inexorable deterioration related to the neoplasic progression. Despite the important advances in Palliative Medicine, symptoms are frequently observed that are intolerable for the patient and which do not respond to usual palliative measures. This situation, characterised by rapid deterioration of the patient, very often heralds, implicitly or explicitly, approaching death. The intolerable nature and being refractory to treatment indicates to the health-care team, on many occasions, the need for sedation of the patient. The requirement for sedation of the cancer patient is a situation that does not allow for an attitude of doubt regarding maintenance of the patient in unnecessary suffering for more than a reasonable time. Given the undoubted clinical difficulty in its indication, it is important to have explored at an earlier stage all usual treatments possible and the grade of response, commensurate with the patient's values and desires. Sedation consists of the deliberate administration of drugs in minimum doses and combinations required not only to reduce the consciousness of the patients but also to achieve adequate alleviation of one or more refractory symptoms, and with the prior consent given by the patient explicitly, or implicitly or delegated. Sedation is accepted as ethically warranted when considering the imperative of palliation and its administration and, whenever contemplated, the arguments that justify them are clear recorded in the clinical history. It is not an easy decision for the physician since, traditionally, the training has been "for the fight to save life

  2. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  4. Are we at a crossroads or a plateau? Radiomics and machine learning in abdominal oncology imaging.

    PubMed

    Summers, Ronald M

    2018-05-05

    Advances in radiomics and machine learning have driven a technology boom in the automated analysis of radiology images. For the past several years, expectations have been nearly boundless for these new technologies to revolutionize radiology image analysis and interpretation. In this editorial, I compare the expectations with the realities with particular attention to applications in abdominal oncology imaging. I explore whether these technologies will leave us at a crossroads to an exciting future or to a sustained plateau and disillusionment.

  5. ICRF-187 in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Poster, D S; Penta, J S; Bruno, S; Macdonald, J S

    1981-01-01

    Although the mechanism of action of ICRF-159 and 187 has not been clearly defined, it is evident from both preclinical and early clinical studies that these compounds are of interest. There are three distinct characteristics of these ICRF compounds that deserve careful clinical evaluation. First, these drugs are apparently alkylating agents with modest, predictable and noncumulative bone marrow toxicity that makes them good potential candidates for combination chemotherapy regimens. The second characteristic that should be investigated is the suggestion that combination of ICRF-187 with an anthracycline may ameliorate the cardiac toxicity of the latter. The third factor in the preclinical evaluation of the bis-diketopiperazines that may have clinical application is the evidence that suggests that these drugs have an antimetastatic effect.

  6. Clinical outcomes research in gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Alexander; Rauh-Hain, J Alejandro; Schorge, John O

    2017-09-01

    Clinical outcomes research seeks to understand the real-world manifestations of clinical care. In particular, outcomes research seeks to reveal the effects of pharmaceutical, procedural, and structural aspects of healthcare on patient outcomes, including mortality, disease control, toxicity, cost, and quality of life. Although outcomes research can utilize interventional study designs, insightful use of observational data is a defining feature of this field. Many questions in gynecologic oncology are not amenable to investigation in randomized clinical trials due to cost, feasibility, or ethical concerns. When a randomized trial is not practical or has not yet been conducted, well-designed observational studies have the potential to provide the best available evidence about the effects of clinical care. Such studies may use surveys, medical records, disease registries, and a variety of administrative data sources. Even when a randomized trial has been conducted, observational studies can be used to estimate the real-world effect of an intervention, which may differ from the results obtained in the controlled setting of a clinical trial. This article reviews the goals, methodologies, data sources, and limitations of clinical outcomes research, with a focus on gynecologic oncology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Clinical applications of PET in oncology.

    PubMed

    Rohren, Eric M; Turkington, Timothy G; Coleman, R Edward

    2004-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides metabolic information that has been documented to be useful in patient care. The properties of positron decay permit accurate imaging of the distribution of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The wide array of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals has been used to characterize multiple physiologic and pathologic states. PET is used for characterizing brain disorders such as Alzheimer disease and epilepsy and cardiac disorders such as coronary artery disease and myocardial viability. The neurologic and cardiac applications of PET are not covered in this review. The major utilization of PET clinically is in oncology and consists of imaging the distribution of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). FDG, an analogue of glucose, accumulates in most tumors in a greater amount than it does in normal tissue. FDG PET is being used in diagnosis and follow-up of several malignancies, and the list of articles supporting its use continues to grow. In this review, the physics and instrumentation aspects of PET are described. Many of the clinical applications in oncology are mature and readily covered by third-party payers. Other applications are being used clinically but have not been as carefully evaluated in the literature, and these applications may not be covered by third-party payers. The developing applications of PET are included in this review.

  8. Veterinary interventional oncology: from concept to clinic.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Chick

    2015-08-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) involves the use of contemporary imaging modalities to gain access to different structures in order to deliver materials for therapeutic purposes. Veterinarians have been expanding the use of these minimally invasive techniques in animals with a variety of conditions involving all of the major body systems. Interventional oncology (IO) is a growing subspecialty of IR in human medicine used (1) to restore patency to malignant obstructions through endoluminal stenting, (2) to provide dose escalations to tumors without increasing systemic chemotherapy toxicities via superselective transarterial chemotherapy delivery, (3) to stop hemorrhage or reduce blood flow to tumors via transarterial embolization or chemoembolization, and (4) to provide therapies for those cancers with no safe or effective alternative options. This review provides a brief introduction to a few of the techniques currently available to veterinarians for cancer treatment. For each technique, the concept for improved palliation, patient quality of life, or tumor control is presented, followed by the most current veterinary clinical information available. Although promising, more studies will be necessary to determine if veterinary IO will provide the same benefits as has already been demonstrated in oncology care in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. American Society of Clinical Oncology 2012 Annual Meeting: highlights from the gynecologic oncology track.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2012-11-01

    The 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) was held in Chicago, June 1-5, 2011, and brought together more than 25,000 oncology professionals from a broad range of specialties to explore the theme, "Collaborating to Conquer Cancer". The Gynecologic Oncology Track had a strong international presence, with important clinical trials being presented from Japan, Germany, Norway, the United States, and others. This meeting report will highlight several phase 3 and phase 2 clinical trials as well as notable translational research endeavors and other selected abstracts.

  10. Clinical oncology in Malaysia: 1914 to present

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    A narration of the development of staff, infrastructure and buildings in the various parts of the country is given in this paper. The role of universities and other institutions of learning, public health, palliative care, nuclear medicine and cancer registries is described together with the networking that has been developed between the government, non-governmental organisations and private hospitals. The training of skilled manpower and the commencement of the Master of Clinical Oncology in the University of Malaya is highlighted. Efforts taken to improve the various aspects of cancer control which includes prevention of cancer, early detection, treatment and palliative care are covered. It is vital to ensure that cancer care services must be accessible and affordable throughout the entire health system, from the primary care level up to the centres for tertiary care, throughout the whole country. PMID:21614216

  11. Effects of Age Expectations on Oncology Social Workers' Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Annemarie; Choi, Namkee G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of oncology social workers' expectations regarding aging (ERA) and ERA with cancer (ERAC) on their clinical judgment. Methods: Oncology social workers (N = 322) were randomly assigned to one of four vignettes describing a patient with lung cancer. The vignettes were identical except for the patent's age…

  12. The Role of Oncology Nurses in Discussing Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Flocke, Susan A; Antognoli, Elizabeth; Daly, Barbara J; Jackson, Brigid; Fulton, Sarah E; Liu, Tasnuva M; Surdam, Jessica; Manne, Sharon; Meropol, Neal J

    2017-09-01

    To describe oncology nurses' experiences discussing clinical trials with their patients, and to assess barriers to these discussions.
. A qualitative study designed to elicit narratives from oncology nurses. 
. Community- and academic-based oncology clinics throughout the United States.
. 33 oncology nurses involved in direct patient care in community-based and large hospital-based settings. The sample was drawn from members of the Oncology Nursing Society. 
. In-depth interviews were conducted and analyzed using a 
immersion/crystallization approach to identify themes and patterns. The analyses highlight specific issues, examples, and contexts that present challenges to clinical trial discussions with patients.
. Oncology nurses view their roles as patient educators and advocates to be inclusive of discussion of clinical trials. Barriers to such discussions include lack of knowledge and strategies for addressing patients' common misconceptions and uncertainty about the timing of discussions.
. These data indicate that enabling nurses to actively engage patients in discussions of clinical trials requires educational interventions to build self-efficacy and close knowledge gaps. 
. Oncology nurses can play a critical role in advancing cancer care by supporting patients in decision making about clinical trial participation. This will require training and education to build their knowledge, reduce barriers, and increase their self-efficacy to fulfill this responsibility in various clinical settings.

  13. How to Develop a Cardio-Oncology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Snipelisky, David; Park, Jae Yoon; Lerman, Amir; Mulvagh, Sharon; Lin, Grace; Pereira, Naveen; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin; Villarraga, Hector R; Herrmann, Joerg

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular demands to the care of cancer patients are common and important given the implications for morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, interactions with cardiovascular disease specialists have intensified to the point of the development of a new discipline termed cardio-oncology. As an additional consequence, so-called cardio-oncology clinics have emerged, in most cases staffed by cardiologists with an interest in the field. This article addresses this gap and summarizes key points in the development of a cardio-oncology clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. American Society of Clinical Oncology National Census of Oncology Practices: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Gaetano J.; Hanley, Amy; Hagerty, Karen; Kurup, Anupama; Neuss, Michael N.; Mulvey, Therese M.

    2013-01-01

    In response to reports of increasing financial and administrative burdens on oncology practices and a lack of systematic information related to these issues, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) leadership started an effort to collect key practice-level data from all oncology practices in the United States. The result of the effort is the ASCO National Census of Oncology Practices (Census) launched in June 2012. The initial Census work involved compiling an inventory of oncology practices from existing lists of oncology physicians in the United States. A comprehensive, online data collection instrument was developed, which covered a number of areas, including practice characteristics (staffing configuration, organizational structure, patient mix and volume, types of services offered); organizational, staffing, and service changes over the past 12 months; and an assessment of the likelihood that the practice would experience organizational, staffing, and service changes in the next 12 months. More than 600 practices participated in the Census by providing information. In this article, we present preliminary highlights from the data gathered to date. We found that practice size was related to having experienced practice mergers, hiring additional staff, and increasing staff pay in the past 12 months, that geographic location was related to having experienced hiring additional staff, and that practices in metropolitan areas were more likely to have experienced practice mergers in the past 12 months than those in nonmetropolitan areas. We also found that practice size and geographic location were related to higher likelihoods of anticipating practice mergers, sales, and purchases in the future. PMID:23633966

  15. Back to the Future for Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Chabner

    1996-01-01

    Dear Colleague: I remember, but just barely, what it was like to practice medicine in the first half of this century. My Dad was a general practitioner in a very small farming community in central Illinois, with a hospital of six beds and a trusting clientele. His patients thought he knew how to do everything: deliver babies, set broken bones and take out an appendix. He was an advocate for his patients, not for an HMO or an insurance company. He derived great satisfaction from his practice and was comfortable in this role, up to a point, but knew that he frequently needed the help of specialists from Decatur, St. Louis, and the Mayo Clinic. As his experience and practice evolved, and as medicine itself changed, referrals became a sign of good practice and not an indication of weakness or inadequacy. Some doctors in our town continued to do more than they should have and resisted the trend, and their patients, many with blind faith in their doctor, suffered for it. Clearly, there were economic as well as emotional factors that contributed to this reluctance to ask for help. Clinical oncology is facing much the same situation today. Scientific and economic forces are revolutionizing medicine, but not always in compatible directions. Practice and research have evolved to the point where old patterns of practice are no longer optimal. Few cancer patients can be managed without the input, advice, and even direct involvement of specialists from sister disciplines. Thus, multimodality management of cancer patients is now the norm rather than the exception. At the same time, strong economic forces are dictating a movement in the opposite direction, undermining the strength of traditional academic centers and limiting choices, streamlining patient evaluation, and creating "pathways" to standardize patient management. Who should be setting the course for the cancer patient? We agree that it should not be a clerk at the other end of the phone at the HMO, a computerized

  16. Regulatory and clinical considerations for biosimilar oncology drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L; Chen, Brian; Hermanson, Terhi; Wyatt, Michael D; Schulz, Richard M; Georgantopoulos, Peter; Kessler, Samuel; Raisch, Dennis W; Qureshi, Zaina P; Lu, Z Kevin; Love, Bryan L; Noxon, Virginia; Bobolts, Laura; Armitage, Melissa; Bian, John; Ray, Paul; Ablin, Richard J; Hrushesky, William J; Macdougall, Iain C; Sartor, Oliver; Armitage, James O

    2015-01-01

    Biological oncology products are integral to cancer treatment, but their high costs pose challenges to patients, families, providers, and insurers. The introduction of biosimilar agents—molecules that are similar in structure, function, activity, immunogenicity, and safety to the original biological drugs—provide opportunities both to improve healthcare access and outcomes, and to reduce costs. Several international regulatory pathways have been developed to expedite entry of biosimilars into global marketplaces. The first wave of oncology biosimilar use was in Europe and India in 2007. Oncology biosimilars are now widely marketed in several countries in Europe, and in Australia, Japan, China, Russia, India, and South Korea. Their use is emerging worldwide, with the notable exception of the USA, where several regulatory and cost barriers to biosimilar approval exist. In this Review, we discuss oncology biosimilars and summarise their regulatory frameworks, clinical experiences, and safety concerns. PMID:25456378

  17. Results of an Oncology Clinical Trial Nurse Role Delineation Study.

    PubMed

    Purdom, Michelle A; Petersen, Sandra; Haas, Barbara K

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the relevance of a five-dimensional model of clinical trial nursing practice in an oncology clinical trial nurse population. 
. Web-based cross-sectional survey.
. Online via Qualtrics.
. 167 oncology nurses throughout the United States, including 41 study coordinators, 35 direct care providers, and 91 dual-role nurses who provide direct patient care and trial coordination.
. Principal components analysis was used to determine the dimensions of oncology clinical trial nursing practice.
. Self-reported frequency of 59 activities.
. The results did not support the original five-dimensional model of nursing care but revealed a more multidimensional model.
. An analysis of frequency data revealed an eight-dimensional model of oncology research nursing, including care, manage study, expert, lead, prepare, data, advance science, and ethics.
. This evidence-based model expands understanding of the multidimensional roles of oncology nurses caring for patients with cancer enrolled in clinical trials.

  18. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Ethan; Prestrud, Ann Alexis; Hesketh, Paul J.; Kris, Mark G.; Feyer, Petra C.; Somerfield, Mark R.; Chesney, Maurice; Clark-Snow, Rebecca Anne; Flaherty, Anne Marie; Freundlich, Barbara; Morrow, Gary; Rao, Kamakshi V.; Schwartz,, Rowena N.; Lyman, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline for antiemetics in oncology. Methods A systematic review of the medical literature was completed to inform this update. MEDLINE, the Cochrane Collaboration Library, and meeting materials from ASCO and the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer were all searched. Primary outcomes of interest were complete response and rates of any vomiting or nausea. Results Thirty-seven trials met prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria for this systematic review. Two systematic reviews from the Cochrane Collaboration were identified; one surveyed the pediatric literature. The other compared the relative efficacy of the 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists. Recommendations Combined anthracycline and cyclophosphamide regimens were reclassified as highly emetic. Patients who receive this combination or any highly emetic agents should receive a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist. A large trial validated the equivalency of fosaprepitant, a single-day intravenous formulation, with aprepitant; either therapy is appropriate. Preferential use of palonosetron is recommended for moderate emetic risk regimens, combined with dexamethasone. For low-risk agents, patients can be offered dexamethasone before the first dose of chemotherapy. Patients undergoing high emetic risk radiation therapy should receive a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist before each fraction and for 24 hours after treatment and may receive a 5-day course of dexamethasone during fractions 1 to 5. The Update Committee noted the importance of continued symptom monitoring throughout therapy. Clinicians underestimate the incidence of nausea, which is not as well controlled as emesis. PMID:21947834

  19. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Medical Oncology Pharmacy: A New Role for the Clinical Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carl R.; Hickman, Mary Johne

    1977-01-01

    The University of Tennessee has established a training program for clinical pharmacists dealing with cancer chemotherapy patients. Health-care settings are described in which these individuals can contribute as unique health-care team members in oncology. (Author/LBH)

  1. Perspectives on the Use of Clinical Pathways in Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Anne C; Ellis, Peter; Zon, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Pathways and guidelines are valuable tools to provide evidence-based care in oncology. Pathways may be more restrictive than guidelines because they attempt (where possible) to reduce cost, add efficiency, and remove unwarranted variability. Pathways offer an opportunity to measure, report, and improve quality of care; they can drive to evidence-based targeted therapy where appropriate; they can enhance efficiency through standardization; and, finally, they can be a vehicle to enhance participation in clinical trials. Pathway implementation requires understanding and commitment on the part of the physician and leadership as they may initially disrupt workflow, but ultimately have the ability to enhance patient care. ASCO criteria have been published for the development and implementation of high-quality oncology pathway programs. Future challenges for pathways include incorporation of molecular testing and appropriate targeted care in a real-time precision oncology approach.

  2. Strategies For Clinical Implementation: Precision Oncology At Three Distinct Institutions.

    PubMed

    Nadauld, Lincoln D; Ford, James M; Pritchard, Daryl; Brown, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Despite rapid advances in molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics, the adoption of precision medicine into clinical oncology workflows has been slow. Questions about clinical utility, inconsistent reimbursement for molecular diagnostics, and limited access to targeted therapies are some of the major hurdles that have hampered clinical adoption. Despite these challenges, providers have invested in precision medicine programs in an ongoing search for innovative care models to deliver improved patient outcomes and achieve economic gains. We describe the precision oncology medicine programs implemented by an integrated delivery system, a community care center, and an academic medical center, to demonstrate the approaches and challenges associated with clinical implementation efforts designed to advance this treatment paradigm. Payer policies that include coverage for broad genomic testing panels would support the broader application of precision medicine, deepen research benefits, and bring targeted therapies to more patients with advanced cancer.

  3. Oncology biomarkers: discovery, validation, and clinical use.

    PubMed

    Heckman-Stoddard, Brandy M

    2012-05-01

    To discuss the discovery, validation, and clinical use of multiple types of biomarkers. Medical literature and published guidelines. Formal validation of biomarkers should include both retrospective analyses of well-characterized samples as well as a prospective clinical trial in which the biomarker is tested for its ability to predict the presence of disease or the efficacy of a cancer therapy. Biomarker development is complicated, with very few biomarker discoveries leading to clinically useful tests. Nurses should understand how a biomarker was developed, including the sensitivity and specificity before applying new biomarkers in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Antidrug Antibody Formation in Oncology: Clinical Relevance and Challenges.

    PubMed

    van Brummelen, Emilie M J; Ros, Willeke; Wolbink, Gertjan; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2016-10-01

    : In oncology, an increasing number of targeted anticancer agents and immunotherapies are of biological origin. These biological drugs may trigger immune responses that lead to the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). ADAs are directed against immunogenic parts of the drug and may affect efficacy and safety. In other medical fields, such as rheumatology and hematology, the relevance of ADA formation is well established. However, the relevance of ADAs in oncology is just starting to be recognized, and literature on this topic is scarce. In an attempt to fill this gap in the literature, we provide an up-to-date status of ADA formation in oncology. In this focused review, data on ADAs was extracted from 81 clinical trials with biological anticancer agents. We found that most biological anticancer drugs in these trials are immunogenic and induce ADAs (63%). However, it is difficult to establish the clinical relevance of these ADAs. In order to determine this relevance, the possible effects of ADAs on pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety parameters need to be investigated. Our data show that this was done in fewer than 50% of the trials. In addition, we describe the incidence and consequences of ADAs for registered agents. We highlight the challenges in ADA detection and argue for the importance of validating, standardizing, and describing well the used assays. Finally, we discuss prevention strategies such as immunosuppression and regimen adaptations. We encourage the launch of clinical trials that explore these strategies in oncology. Because of the increasing use of biologicals in oncology, many patients are at risk of developing antidrug antibodies (ADAs) during therapy. Although clinical consequences are uncertain, ADAs may affect pharmacokinetics, patient safety, and treatment efficacy. ADA detection and reporting is currently highly inconsistent, which makes it difficult to evaluate the clinical consequences. Standardized reporting of ADA investigations in

  5. Characteristics of oncology clinical trials: insights from a systematic analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Bradford R; Califf, Robert M; Cheng, Steven K; Tasneem, Asba; Horton, John; Chiswell, Karen; Schulman, Kevin A; Dilts, David M; Abernethy, Amy P

    2013-06-10

    Clinical trials are essential to cancer care, and data about the current state of research in oncology are needed to develop benchmarks and set the stage for improvement. To perform a comprehensive analysis of the national oncology clinical research portfolio. All interventional clinical studies registered on ClinicalTrials.gov between October 2007 and September 2010 were identified using Medical Subject Heading terms and submitted conditions. They were reviewed to validate classification, subcategorized by cancer type, and stratified by design characteristics to facilitate comparison across cancer types and with other specialties. Of 40 970 interventional studies registered between October 2007 and September 2010, a total of 8942 (21.8%) focused on oncology. Compared with other specialties, oncology trials were more likely to be single arm (62.3% vs 23.8%; P < .001), open label (87.8% vs 47.3%; P < .001), and nonrandomized (63.9% vs 22.7%; P < .001). There was moderate but significant correlation between number of trials conducted by cancer type and associated incidence and mortality (Spearman rank correlation coefficient, 0.56 [P = .04] and 0.77 [P = .001], respectively). More than one-third of all oncology trials were conducted solely outside North America. There are significant variations between clinical trials in oncology and other diseases, as well as among trials within oncology. The differences must be better understood to improve both the impact of cancer research on clinical practice and the use of constrained resources.

  6. Precision Oncology: A New Era of Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Renfro, Lindsay A.; An, Ming-Wen; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, site of disease and anatomic staging have been used to define patient populations to be studied in individual cancer clinical trials. In the past decade, however, oncology has become increasingly understood on a cellular and molecular level, with many cancer subtypes being described as a function of biomarkers or tumor genetic mutations. With these changes in the science of oncology have come changes to the way we design and perform clinical trials. Increasingly common are trials tailored to detect enhanced efficacy in a patient subpopulation, e.g., patients with a known biomarker value or whose tumors harbor a specific genetic mutation. Here, we provide an overview of traditional and newer biomarker-based trial designs, and highlight lessons learned through implementation of several ongoing and recently completed trials. PMID:26987624

  7. Chemotherapy safety in clinical veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Klahn, Shawna

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to chemotherapy is a health hazard for all personnel in facilities that store, prepare, or administer antineoplastic agents. Contamination levels have been measured as much as 15 times higher in the veterinary medicine sector than in human facilities. Recent publications in human and veterinary medicine indicate that exposure extends beyond the clinic walls to affect the patient's home and family. This article provides an update on the advances in chemotherapy safety, the current issues, and the impact on cancer management in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology Strategic Plan for Increasing Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce.

    PubMed

    Winkfield, Karen M; Flowers, Christopher R; Patel, Jyoti D; Rodriguez, Gladys; Robinson, Patricia; Agarwal, Amit; Pierce, Lori; Brawley, Otis W; Mitchell, Edith P; Head-Smith, Kimberly T; Wollins, Dana S; Hayes, Daniel F

    2017-08-01

    In December 2016, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Board of Directors approved the ASCO Strategic Plan to Increase Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce. Developed through a multistakeholder effort led by the ASCO Health Disparities Committee, the purpose of the plan is to guide the formal efforts of ASCO in this area over the next three years (2017 to 2020). There are three primary goals: (1) to establish a longitudinal pathway for increasing workforce diversity, (2) to enhance ASCO leadership diversity, and (3) to integrate a focus on diversity across ASCO programs and policies. Improving quality cancer care in the United States requires the recruitment of oncology professionals from diverse backgrounds. The ASCO Strategic Plan to Increase Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce is designed to enhance existing programs and create new opportunities that will move us closer to the vision of achieving an oncology workforce that reflects the demographics of the US population it serves.

  9. Advanced abdominal pregnancy: an increasingly challenging clinical concern for obstetricians

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ke; Song, Lei; Wang, Longxia; Gao, Zhiying; Meng, Yuanguang; Lu, Yanping

    2014-01-01

    Advanced abdominal pregnancy is rare. The low incidence, high misdiagnosis rate, and lack of specific clinical signs and symptoms explain the fact that there are no standard diagnostic and treatment options available for advanced abdominal pregnancy. We managed a case of abdominal pregnancy in a woman who was pregnant for the first time. This case was further complicated by a concurrent singleton intrauterine pregnancy; the twin pregnancy was not detected until 20 weeks of pregnancy. The case was confirmed at 26 weeks gestational age using MRI to be an abdominal combined with intrauterine pregnancy. The pregnancy was terminated by cesarean section at 33 + 5 weeks gestation. We collected the relevant data of the case while reviewing the advanced abdominal pregnancy-related English literature in the Pubmed, Proquest, and OVID databases. We compared and analyzed the pregnancy history, gestational age when the diagnosis was confirmed, the placental colonization position, the course of treatment and surgical processes, related concurrency rate, post-operative drug treatment programs, and follow-up results with the expectation to provide guidance for other physicians who might encounter similar cases. PMID:25337188

  10. Clinical oncologic applications of PET/MRI: a new horizon

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Sasan; Kohan, Andres; Rubbert, Christian; Vercher-Conejero, Jose Luis; Gaeta, Chiara; Yuh, Roger; Zipp, Lisa; Herrmann, Karin A; Robbin, Mark R; Lee, Zhenghong; Muzic, Raymond F; Faulhaber, Peter; Ros, Pablo R

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) leverages the high soft-tissue contrast and the functional sequences of MR with the molecular information of PET in one single, hybrid imaging technology. This technology, which was recently introduced into the clinical arena in a few medical centers worldwide, provides information about tumor biology and microenvironment. Studies on indirect PET/MRI (use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images software fused with MRI images) have already generated interesting preliminary data to pave the ground for potential applications of PET/MRI. These initial data convey that PET/MRI is promising in neuro-oncology and head & neck cancer applications as well as neoplasms in the abdomen and pelvis. The pediatric and young adult oncology population requiring frequent follow-up studies as well as pregnant woman might benefit from PET/MRI due to its lower ionizing radiation dose. The indication and planning of therapeutic interventions and specifically radiation therapy in individual patients could be and to a certain extent are already facilitated by performing PET/MRI. The objective of this article is to discuss potential clinical oncology indications of PET/MRI. PMID:24753986

  11. Translating genomic discoveries to the clinic in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Glade Bender, Julia; Verma, Anupam; Schiffman, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    The present study describes the recent advances in the identification of targetable genomic alterations in pediatric cancers, along with the progress and associated challenges in translating these findings into therapeutic benefit. Each field within pediatric cancer has rapidly and comprehensively begun to define genomic targets in tumors that potentially can improve the clinical outcome of patients, including hematologic malignancies (leukemia and lymphoma), solid malignancies (neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and osteosarcoma), and brain tumors (gliomas, ependymomas, and medulloblastomas). Although each tumor has specific and sometimes overlapping genomic targets, the translation to the clinic of new targeted trials and precision medicine protocols is still in its infancy. The first clinical tumor profiling studies in pediatric oncology have demonstrated feasibility and patient enthusiasm for the personalized medicine paradigm, but have yet to demonstrate clinical utility. Complexities influencing implementation include rapidly evolving sequencing technologies, tumor heterogeneity, and lack of access to targeted therapies. The return of incidental findings from the germline also remains a challenge, with evolving policy statements and accepted standards. The translation of genomic discoveries to the clinic in pediatric oncology continues to move forward at a brisk pace. Early adoption of genomics for tumor classification, risk stratification, and initial trials of targeted therapeutic agents has led to powerful results. As our experience grows in the integration of genomic and clinical medicine, the outcome for children with cancer should continue to improve.

  12. Found in translation: Integrating laboratory and clinical oncology research

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, H

    2008-01-01

    Translational research in medicine aims to inform the clinic and the laboratory with the results of each other’s work, and to bring promising and validated new therapies into clinical application. While laudable in intent, this is complicated in practice and the current state of translational research in cancer shows both striking success stories and examples of the numerous potential obstacles as well as opportunities for delays and errors in translation. This paper reviews the premises, promises, and problems of translational research with a focus on radiation oncology and suggests opportunities for improvements in future research design. PMID:21611010

  13. Immuno-oncology Clinical Trial Design: Limitations, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Christina S.; Rubin, Eric H.; Forde, Patrick M.; Mehnert, Janice M.; Collyar, Deborah; Butler, Marcus O.; Dixon, Erica L.; Chow, Laura Q.M.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in immuno-oncology and regulatory approvals have been rapid and paradigm shifting in many difficult-to-treat malignancies. Despite immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy becoming the standard of care across multiple tumor types, there are many unanswered questions that need to be addressed before this therapeutic modality can be fully harnessed. Areas of limitations include treatment of patients not sufficiently represented in clinical trials, uncertainty of the optimal treatment dosing and duration, and lack of understanding regarding long-term immune related toxicities and atypical tumor responses. Patients such as those with autoimmune disease, chronic viral infections, limited performance status, and brain metastases were often excluded from initial trials due to concerns of safety. However, limited data suggest that some of these patients can benefit from therapy with manageable toxicities; thus, future studies should incorporate these patients to clearly define safety and efficacy. There are still controversies regarding the optimal dosing strategy that can vary from weight-based to flat dosing, with undefined treatment duration. Further elucidation of the optimal dosing approach and evaluation of predictive biomarkers should be incorporated in the design of future trials. Finally, there are long-term immune-mediated toxicities, atypical tumor responses such as pseudoprogression and endpoints unique to immuno-oncology that are not adequately captured by traditional trial designs; thus, novel study designs are needed. In this article, we discuss in detail the above challenges and propose needed areas of research for exploration and incorporation in the next generation of immuno-oncology clinical trials. PMID:28864727

  14. Oedema is associated with clinical outcome following emergency abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Vaughan-Shaw, P G; Saunders, J; Smith, T; King, A T; Stroud, M A

    2013-09-01

    Oedema is observed frequently following surgery and may be associated with worse outcomes. To date, no study has investigated the role of oedema in the emergency surgical patient. This study assesses the incidence of oedema following emergency abdominal surgery and the value of early postoperative oedema measurement in predicting clinical outcome. A prospective cohort study of patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery at a university unit over a two-month period was undertaken. Nutritional and clinical outcome data were collected and oedema was measured in the early postoperative period. Predictors of oedema and outcomes associated with postoperative oedema were identified through univariate and multivariate analysis. Overall, 55 patients (median age: 66 years) were included in the study. Postoperative morbidity included ileus (n=22) and sepsis (n=6) with 12 deaths at follow-up. Postoperative oedema was present in 19 patients and was associated with prolonged perioperative fasting (107 vs 30 hours, p=0.009) but not with body mass index (24 kg/m(2) vs 27 kg/m(2), p=0.169) or preadmission weight loss (5% vs 3%, p=0.923). On multivariate analysis, oedema was independently associated with gastrointestinal recovery (B=6.91, p=0.038), artificial nutritional support requirement (odds ratio: 6.91, p=0.037) and overall survival (χ(2) =13.1, df=1, p=0.001). Generalised oedema is common after emergency abdominal surgery and appears to independently predict gastrointestinal recovery, the need for artificial nutritional support and survival. Oedema is not associated with commonly applied markers of nutritional status such as body mass index or recent weight loss. Measurement of oedema offers utility in identifying those at risk of poor clinical outcome or those requiring artificial nutritional support following emergency abdominal surgery.

  15. Oedema is associated with clinical outcome following emergency abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan-Shaw, PG; Saunders, J; Smith, T; King, AT

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Oedema is observed frequently following surgery and may be associated with worse outcomes. To date, no study has investigated the role of oedema in the emergency surgical patient. This study assesses the incidence of oedema following emergency abdominal surgery and the value of early postoperative oedema measurement in predicting clinical outcome. Methods A prospective cohort study of patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery at a university unit over a two-month period was undertaken. Nutritional and clinical outcome data were collected and oedema was measured in the early postoperative period. Predictors of oedema and outcomes associated with postoperative oedema were identified through univariate and multivariate analysis. Results Overall, 55 patients (median age: 66 years) were included in the study. Postoperative morbidity included ileus (n=22) and sepsis (n=6) with 12 deaths at follow-up. Postoperative oedema was present in 19 patients and was associated with prolonged perioperative fasting (107 vs 30 hours, p=0.009) but not with body mass index (24kg/m2 vs 27kg/m2, p=0.169) or preadmission weight loss (5% vs 3%, p=0.923). On multivariate analysis, oedema was independently associated with gastrointestinal recovery (B=6.91, p=0.038), artificial nutritional support requirement (odds ratio: 6.91, p=0.037) and overall survival (χ2=13.1, df=1, p=0.001). Conclusions Generalised oedema is common after emergency abdominal surgery and appears to independently predict gastrointestinal recovery, the need for artificial nutritional support and survival. Oedema is not associated with commonly applied markers of nutritional status such as body mass index or recent weight loss. Measurement of oedema offers utility in identifying those at risk of poor clinical outcome or those requiring artificial nutritional support following emergency abdominal surgery. PMID:24025285

  16. [Quality management in oncology supported by clinical cancer registries].

    PubMed

    Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika; Gerken, Michael; Barlag, Hagen; Tillack, Anett

    2015-01-01

    Efforts in nationwide quality management for oncology have so far failed to comprehensively document all levels of care. New organizational structures such as population-based clinical cancer registries or certified organ cancer centers were supposed to solve this problem more sufficiently, but they have to be accompanied by valid trans-sectoral documentation and evaluation of clinical data. To measure feasibility and qualitative effectiveness of guideline implementation we approached this problem with a nationwide investigation from 2000 to 2011. The rate of neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy in stage UICC II/III rectum cancer, cut-off point 80% for separating good from insufficient quality, was used as a quality indicator. The nationwide analysis indicates an increase from 45% to 70%, but only with the implementation strategy of CME. The combination of new structures, evidence-based quality indicators, organ cancer center and clinical cancer registries has shown good feasibility and seems promising. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  17. Prospective Clinical Study of Precision Oncology in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Davendra P S; Rini, Brian I; Khorana, Alok A; Dreicer, Robert; Abraham, Jame; Procop, Gary W; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Pennell, Nathan A; Stevenson, James P; Pelley, Robert; Estfan, Bassam; Shepard, Dale; Funchain, Pauline; Elson, Paul; Adelstein, David J; Bolwell, Brian J

    2015-11-09

    Systematic studies evaluating clinical benefit of tumor genomic profiling are lacking. We conducted a prospective study in 250 patients with select solid tumors at the Cleveland Clinic. Eligibility required histopathologic diagnosis, age of 18 years or older, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-2, and written informed consent. Tumors were sequenced using FoundationOne (Cambridge, MA). Results were reviewed at the Cleveland Clinic Genomics Tumor Board. Outcomes included feasibility and clinical impact. Colorectal (25%), breast (18%), lung (13%), and pancreatobiliary (13%) cancers were the most common diagnoses. Median time from consent to result was 25 days (range = 3-140). Of 223 evaluable samples, 49% (n = 109) of patients were recommended a specific therapy, but only 11% (n = 24) received such therapy: 12 on clinical trials, nine off-label, three on-label. Lack of clinical trial access (n = 49) and clinical deterioration (n = 29) were the most common reasons for nonrecommendation/nonreceipt of genomics-driven therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Toward a science of tumor forecasting for clinical oncology

    DOE PAGES

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J.; ...

    2015-03-15

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community makes a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is only assessed post hoc by physical examination or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of a treatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapiesmore » is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. Furthermore, with a successful methodology toward tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor-specific datasets of varied types and effectively defeat one cancer patient at a time.« less

  19. Toward a science of tumor forecasting for clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J; Rericha, Erin C

    2015-03-15

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community makes a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is only assessed post hoc by physical examination or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of a treatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapies is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. With a successful methodology toward tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor-specific datasets of varied types and effectively defeat one cancer patient at a time. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Towards a Science of Tumor Forecasting for Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J.; Rericha, Erin C.

    2015-01-01

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community make a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is- only assessed post hoc by physical exam or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of atreatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapies is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. With a successful methodology towards tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor specific datasets of varied types, and effectively defeat cancer one patient at a time. PMID:25592148

  1. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  2. The changing face of clinical trials in the personalized medicine and immuno-oncology era: report from the international congress on clinical trials in Oncology & Hemato-Oncology (ICTO 2017).

    PubMed

    Golan, Talia; Milella, Michele; Ackerstein, Aliza; Berger, Ranaan

    2017-12-28

    In the past decade, the oncology community has witnessed major advances in the understanding of cancer biology and major breakthroughs in several different therapeutic areas, from solid tumors to hematological malignancies; moreover, the advent of effective immunotherapy approaches, such as immune-checkpoint blockade, is revolutionizing treatment algorithms in almost all oncology disease areas. As knowledge evolves and new weapons emerge in the "war against cancer", clinical and translational research need to adapt to a rapidly changing environment to effectively translate novel concepts into sustainable and accessible therapeutic options for cancer patients.With this in mind, translational cancer researchers, oncology professionals, treatment experts, CRO and industry leaders, as well as patient representatives gathered in London, 16-17 March 2017, for The International Congress on Clinical Trials in Oncology and Hemato-Oncology (ICTO2017), to discuss the changing face of oncology clinical trials in the new era of personalized medicine and immuno-oncology. A wide range of topics, including clinical trial design in immuno-oncology, biomarker-oriented drug development paths, statistical design and endpoint selection, challenges in the design and conduct of personalized medicine clinical trials, risk-based monitoring, financing and reimbursement, as well as best operational practices, were discussed in an open, highly interactive format, favoring networking among all relevant stakeholders. The most relevant data, approaches and issues emerged and discussed during the conference are summarized in this report.

  3. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma in the clinical evaluation of children with blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ishay, Offir; Daoud, Mai; Peled, Zvi; Brauner, Eran; Bahouth, Hany; Kluger, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    In pediatric care, the role of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) remains ill defined. The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of FAST for detecting free peritoneal fluid in children. The trauma registry of a single level I pediatric trauma center was queried for the results of FAST examination of consecutive pediatric (<18 years) blunt trauma patients over a period of 36 months, from January 2010 to December 2012. Demographics, type of injuries, FAST results, computerized tomography (CT) results, and operative findings were reviewed. During the study period, 543 injured pediatric patients (mean age 8.2 ± 5 years) underwent FAST examinations. In 95 (17.5 %) FAST was positive for free peritoneal fluid. CT examination was performed in 219 (40.3 %) children. Positive FAST examination was confirmed by CT scan in 61/73 (83.6 %). CT detected intra-peritoneal fluid in 62/448 (13.8 %) of the patients with negative FAST results. These findings correspond to a sensitivity of 50 %, specificity of 88 %, positive predictive value (PPV) of 84 %, and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 58 %. In patients who had negative FAST results and no CT examination (302), no missed abdominal injury was detected on clinical ground. FAST examination in the young age group (<2 years) yielded lower sensitivity and specificity (36 and 78 % respectively) with a PPV of only 50 %. This study shows that although a positive FAST evaluation does not necessarily correlate with an IAI, a negative one strongly suggests the absence of an IAI, with a high NPV. These findings are emphasized in the analysis of the subgroup of children less than 2 years of age. FAST examination tempered with sound clinical judgment seems to be an effective tool to discriminate injured children in need of further imaging evaluation.

  4. [Systemic learning planification for medical students during oncology clinical rotation].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Anthony; Viens, Patrice; Gilabert, Marine; Turrini, Olivier; Lambaudie, Eric; Prebet, Thomas; Farnault, Bertrand; Eisinger, François; Gorincour, Guillaume; Bertucci, François

    2011-12-01

    The expected increase in cancer incidence emphasizes the need for specific training in this area, including either family physician or specialized oncologists. In France, the fourth to sixth years of medical teaching include both theoretical classes at the university and daily actual practice at the hospital. Thus, clinical rotations are thought to play a major role in the training of medical students and also largely participate to the choice of the student of his/her final specialty. Pedagogic quality of these rotations is dependent on multiple parameters, including a rigorous planification of the expected learning. Here, we reported a systemic planification of learning activities for medical students during an oncology rotation at the Paoli-Calmettes Institute in Marseille, France, a regional comprehensive cancer center. This planification includes an evaluation of learning requirements, definition of learning objectives, selection of learning methods and choice of methods of assessment of the students' achievement of these objectives as well as the learning activity itself.

  5. Surgical, oncological, and obstetrical outcomes after abdominal radical trachelectomy - a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Pareja, René; Rendón, Gabriel J; Sanz-Lomana, Carlos Millán; Monzón, Otto; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2013-10-01

    Radical trachelectomy is a standard treatment for selected patients with early-stage cervical cancer. Outcomes are well established for vaginal radical trachelectomy (VRT), but not for abdominal radical trachelectomy (ART). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL (October 1997 through October 2012) using the terms: uterine cervix neoplasms, cervical cancer, abdominal radical trachelectomy, vaginal radical trachelectomy, fertility sparing, and fertility preservation. We included original articles, case series, and case reports. Excluded were review articles, articles with duplicate patient information, and articles not in English. We identified 485 patients. Ages ranged from 6 to 44 years. The most common stage was IB1 (331/464; 71%), and the most common histologic subtype was squamous cell carcinoma (330/470; 70%). Operative times ranged from 110 to 586 min. Blood loss ranged from 50 to 5568 mL. Three intraoperative complications were reported. Forty-seven patients (10%) had conversion to radical hysterectomy. One hundred fifty-five patients (35%) had a postoperative complication. The most frequent postoperative complication was cervical stenosis (n=42; 9.5%). The median follow-up time was 31.6 months (range, 1-124). Sixteen patients (3.8%) had disease recurrence. Two patients (0.4%) died of disease. A total of 413 patients (85%) were able to maintain their fertility. A total of 113 patients (38%) attempted to get pregnant, and 67 of them (59.3%) were able to conceive. ART is a safe treatment option in patients with early-stage cervical cancer interested in preserving fertility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Abdominal auscultation does not provide clear clinical diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Durup-Dickenson, Maja; Christensen, Marie Kirk; Gade, John

    2013-05-01

    Abdominal auscultation is a part of the clinical examination of patients, but the determining factors in bowel sound evaluation are poorly described. The aim of this study was to assess inter- and intra-observer agreement in physicians' evaluation of pitch, intensity and quantity in abdominal auscultation. A total of 100 physicians were presented with 20 bowel sound recordings in a blinded set-up. Recordings had been made in a mix of healthy volunteers and emergency patients. They evaluated pitch, intensity and quantity of bowel sounds in a questionnaire with three, three and four categories of answers, respectively. Fleiss' multi-rater kappa (κ) coefficients were calculated for inter-observer agreement; for intra-observer agreement, calculation of probability was performed. Inter-observer agreement regarding pitch, intensity and quantity yielded κ-values of 0.19 (p < 0.0001), 0.30 (p < 0.0001) and 0.24 (p < 0.0001), respectively, corresponding to slight, fair and fair agreement. Regarding intra-observer agreement, the probability of agreement was 0.55 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.51-0.59), 0.45 (95% CI: 0.42-0.49) and 0.41 (95% CI: 0.38-0.45) for pitch, intensity and quantity, respectively. Although relatively poor, observer agreement was slight to fair and thus better than expected by chance. Since the diagnostic value of auscultation increases with addition of history and clinics, and may be further improved by systematic training, it should still be used in the examination of patients with acute abdominal pain. not relevant. not relevant.

  7. The use of biosimilar medicines in oncology - position statement of the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology (SBOC).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, G S; Sternberg, C; Lopes, G; Chammas, R; Gifoni, M A C; Gil, R A; Araujo, D V

    2018-01-11

    A biosimilar is a biologic product that is similar to a reference biopharmaceutical product, the manufacturing process of which hinders the ability to identically replicate the structure of the original product, and therefore, it cannot be described as an absolute equivalent of the original medication. The currently available technology does not allow for an accurate copy of complex molecules, but it does allow the replication of similar molecules with the same activity. As biosimilars are about to be introduced in oncology practice, these must be evaluated through evidence-based medicine. This manuscript is a position paper, where the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology (SBOC) aims to describe pertinent issues regarding the approval and use of biosimilars in oncology. As a working group on behalf of SBOC, we discuss aspects related to definition, labeling/nomenclature, extrapolation, interchangeability, switching, automatic substitution, clinical standards on safety and efficacy, and the potential impact on financial burden in healthcare. We take a stand in favor of the introduction of biosimilars, as they offer a viable, safe, and cost-effective alternative to the biopharmaceutical products currently used in cancer. We hope this document can provide valuable information to support therapeutic decisions that maximize the clinical benefit for the thousands of cancer patients in Brazil and can contribute to expedite the introduction of this new drug class in clinical practice. We expect the conveyed information to serve as a basis for further discussion in Latin America, this being the first position paper issued by a Latin American Oncology Society.

  8. [Economic analysis of multinational clinical trials in oncology].

    PubMed

    Lejeune, Catherine; Lueza, Béranger; Bonastre, Julia

    2018-02-01

    In oncology, as in other fields of medicine, international multicentre clinical trials came into being so as to include a sufficient number of subjects to investigate a clinical situation. The existence of tight budgetary constraints and the desire to make the best use of the resources available have resulted in the development of economic evaluations associated with these trials, which, thanks to their level of evidence and their size, provide particularly relevant material. Nonetheless, economic evaluations alongside international clinical trials raise specific questions of methodology with regard to both the design and the analysis of the results. Indeed, the costs of goods and services consumed, the types and quantities of resources, and medical practices vary from one country to another and within an individual country. Economic data from the different countries involved must be available so as to study and to take into account this variability, and appropriate techniques for cost estimations and analysis must be implemented to aggregate the results from several countries. From a review of the literature, the aim of this work was to provide an overview of the specific methodological features of economic evaluations alongside international clinical trials: analysis of efficacy data from several countries, collection of resources and real costs, methods to establish the monetary value of resources, methods to aggregate results accounting for the trial effect. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Addressing Low Literacy and Health Literacy in Clinical Oncology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sofia F.; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Low functional literacy and low health literacy continue to be under-recognized and are associated with poorer patient health outcomes. Health literacy is a dynamic state influenced by how well a healthcare system delivers information and services that match patients’ abilities, needs and preferences. Oncology care poses considerable health literacy demands on patients who are expected to process high stakes information about complex multidisciplinary treatment over lengths of time. Much of the information provided to patients in clinical care and research is beyond their literacy levels. In this paper, we provide an overview of currently available guidelines and resources to improve how the needs of patients with diverse literacy skills are met by cancer care providers and clinics. We present recommendations for health literacy assessment in clinical practice and ways to enhance the usability of health information and services by improving written materials and verbal communication, incorporating multimedia and culturally appropriate approaches, and promoting health literacy in cancer care settings. The paper also includes a list of additional resources that can be used to develop and implement health literacy initiatives in cancer care clinics. PMID:20464884

  10. Reforming the community research program: from Community Clinical Oncology Program to the National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program.

    PubMed

    Zon, Robin T

    2014-01-01

    Community research has been an integral and influential component of the National Research Program since the late 1970s. Institutionalization of community research in the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) has resulted in successful collaborations, meaningful accrual, achievement of quality standards, and translation of research into clinical practice. Although the national clinical trial system is undergoing modernization and improvement, the success of the CCOP and minority-based CCOP in cancer treatment, prevention, and control research is being extended to include cancer care delivery research in the newly created National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Oncology Research Program. This article briefly presents a historic perspective of community involvement in federally sponsored clinical trials and introduces the continued involvement in the newly created NCI program.

  11. Attrition in NRG Oncology's Radiation-Based Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Connie M; Deshmukh, Snehal; Pugh, Stephanie L; Hanlon, Alexandra; Grady, Christine; Watkins Bruner, Deborah; Curran, Walter

    2018-05-10

    To determine individual, organizational, and protocol-specific factors associated with attrition in NRG Oncology's radiation-based clinical trials. This retrospective analysis included 27,443 patients representing 134 NRG Oncology's radiation-based clinical trials .trials with primary efficacy results published from 1985-2011. Trials were separated on the basis of the primary endpoint (fixed time vs event driven). The cumulative incidence approach was used to estimate time to attrition, and cause-specific Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess factors associated with attrition. Most patients (69%) were enrolled in an event-driven trial (n = 18,809), while 31% were enrolled in a fixed-time trial (n = 8634). Median follow-up time for patients enrolled in fixed-time trials was 4.1 months and 37.2 months for patients enrolled in event-driven trials. Fixed time trials with a duration < 6 months had a 5 month attrition rate of 4.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.4%, 5.5%) and those with a duration ≥ 6 months had a 1 year attrition rate of 1.6% (95% CI: 1.2, 2.1). Event-driven trials had 1- and 5-year attrition rates of 0.5% (95% CI: 0.4%, 0.6%) and 13.6% (95% CI: 13.1%, 14.1%), respectively. Younger age, female gender, and Zubrod performance status >0 were associated with greater attrition as were enrollment by institutions in the West and South regions and participation in fixed-time trials. Attrition in clinical trials can have a negative effect on trial outcomes. Data on factors associated with attrition can help guide the development of strategies to enhance retention. These strategies should focus on patient characteristics associated with attrition in both fixed-time and event-driven trials as well as in differing geographic regions of the country. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. A national radiation oncology medical student clerkship survey: didactic curricular components increase confidence in clinical competency.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S; Raleigh, David R; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R; Chmura, Steven J; Golden, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank-sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic

  13. Clinical neuro-oncology formal education opportunities for medical students in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Karan S; Nicholas, Martin Kelly; Lukas, Rimas V

    2014-12-01

    To develop an understanding of the availability of the formal clinical neuro-oncology educational opportunities for medical students. The curriculum websites of all medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education were reviewed for the presence of clinical neuro-oncology electives as well as other relevant data. Ten (6.8%) of medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education offer formal neuro-oncology electives. Half are clustered in the Midwest. Forty percent are at institutions with neuro-oncology fellowships. All are at institutions with neurosurgery and neurology residency programs. Formal clinical neuro-oncology elective opportunities for medical students in the United States and Canada are limited. Additional such opportunities may be of value in the education of medical students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oncological emergencies: clinical importance and principles of management.

    PubMed

    Samphao, S; Eremin, J M; Eremin, O

    2010-11-01

    Oncological emergencies are common conditions associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Delay in diagnosis and treatment can result in unfavourable outcomes. Cancer itself, cancer-related hormones or cytokines, or treatment effects can cause emergency problems. Febrile neutropaenia, frequently associated with chemotherapy, can lead to life-threatening conditions. Treatment requires systematic evaluation and early empirical antibiotics. Hypercalcaemia of malignancy is the most common metabolic emergency in cancer patients. Non-specific clinical features may cause delay in diagnosis and increase morbidity and mortality. Treatment includes active fluid resuscitation, diuretics and intravenous bisphosphonates. Superior vena cava syndrome is usually caused by external compression. Computerised tomography is useful to confirm diagnosis, evaluate the extent of disease and guide invasive tissue diagnosis. Treatment and prognosis depend on the underlying malignancies. Spinal cord compression is a true emergency due to risk of permanent neurological impairment. Localised back pain is the most common presenting symptom while late presentation of neurological deficit is associated with irreversible outcomes. Magnetic resonance imaging is the investigation of choice. Treatment includes corticosteroids, radiotherapy and/or decompressive surgery. © 2009 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Phase 3 Oncology Clinical Trials in South Africa: Experimentation or Therapeutic Misconception?

    PubMed

    Malan, Tina; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2016-02-01

    Although clinical research in oncology is vital to improve current understanding of cancer and to validate new treatment options, voluntary informed consent is a critical component. Oncology research participants are a particularly vulnerable population; hence, therapeutic misconception often leads to ethical and legal challenges. We conducted a qualitative study administering semi-structured questionnaires on 29 adult, Phase 3, oncology clinical trial participants at three different private oncology clinical trial sites in South Africa. A descriptive content analysis was performed to identify perceptions of these participants regarding Phase 3 clinical trials. We found that most participants provided consent to be included in the trial for self-benefit. More than half of the participants had a poor understanding of Phase 3 clinical trials, and almost half the participants believed the clinical trial did not pose any significant risk to them. The word "hope" was used frequently by participants, displaying clear optimism with regard to the clinical trial and its outcome. This indicated that therapeutic misconception does occur in the South African oncology research setting and has the potential to lead to underestimation of the risks of a Phase 3 clinical trial. Emphasizing the experimental nature of a clinical trial during the consent process is critical to address therapeutic misconception in oncology research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncologymore » experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These

  17. Routine clinical application of virtual reality in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Sampogna, Gianluca; Pugliese, Raffaele; Elli, Marco; Vanzulli, Angelo; Forgione, Antonello

    2017-06-01

    The advantages of 3D reconstruction, immersive virtual reality (VR) and 3D printing in abdominal surgery have been enunciated for many years, but still today their application in routine clinical practice is almost nil. We investigate their feasibility, user appreciation and clinical impact. Fifteen patients undergoing pancreatic, hepatic or renal surgery were studied realizing a 3D reconstruction of target anatomy. Then, an immersive VR environment was developed to import 3D models, and some details of the 3D scene were printed. All the phases of our workflow employed open-source software and low-cost hardware, easily implementable by other surgical services. A qualitative evaluation of the three approaches was performed by 20 surgeons, who filled in a specific questionnaire regarding a clinical case for each organ considered. Preoperative surgical planning and intraoperative guidance was feasible for all patients included in the study. The vast majority of surgeons interviewed scored their quality and usefulness as very good. Despite extra time, costs and efforts necessary to implement these systems, the benefits shown by the analysis of questionnaires recommend to invest more resources to train physicians to adopt these technologies routinely, even if further and larger studies are still mandatory.

  18. [Abdominal obesity and coronary heart disease. Pathophysiology and clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Hauner, H

    1995-02-01

    The relationship between overweight and cardiovascular disease was a matter of debate for many years. Recent studies have demonstrated that obesity defined as body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher is associated with an exponential increase of cardiovascular complications. This effect is largely mediated by the induction of established risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recently, there is growing evidence that the occurrence of most complications of obesity depends not only on the degree of overweight but also on the pattern of body fat distribution. Many data suggest that the anatomical localization of body fat is more important for the risk of developing complications than the adipose tissue mass per se. An abdominal, upper-body type of fat distribution, which can be easily determined by the measurement of waist and hip circumferences (waist/hip ratio = WHR), is also a confirmed risk factor for metabolic disturbances, hypertension and atherosclerosis, independent of body weight. However, the clinical appearance of these disturbances is frequently associated with the development of obesity. This network of metabolic disorders and their vascular complications is termed "metabolic syndrome" or "syndrome X" (Table 2). Abdominal obesity is now known to be closely associated with the metabolic syndrome and is regarded to represent its readily recognizable phenotypic feature. The components of the metabolic syndrome are characterized by varying forms and degrees of insulin resistance. It is assumed that insulin resistance, defined as diminished biological response to the action of insulin, represents the primary defect or at least the common pathogenetic link between these disturbances.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. [Clinical Approach to Abdominal Pain as Functional Origin].

    PubMed

    Ryu, Han Seung; Choi, Suck Chei

    2018-02-25

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom that patients refer to a hospital. Organic causes should be differentiated in patients with abdominal pain and treatment should be administered in accordance with the causes. A meticulous history taking and physical examination are highly useful in making a diagnosis, and blood tests, imaging modalities, and endoscopy are useful for confirming diagnosis. However, in many cases, patients have functional disorders with no obvious abnormal findings obtained even if many diagnostic tests are performed. Patients with functional disorders usually complain the vague abdominal pain located in the center and other portions of the abdominal area. Although the most representative disease is irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal pain syndrome is currently researched as a new disease entity of functional abdominal pain. As various receptors related to functional abdominal pain have been discovered, drugs associated with those receptors are used to treat the disorders, and additional new drugs are vigorously developed. In addition, medical therapy with pharmacological or non-pharmacological psychiatric treatment is effective for treating functional abdominal pain.

  20. Detailed prospective peer review in a community radiation oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, James D; Chesnut, Thomas J; Eastham, David V; Demandante, Carlo N; Hoopes, David J

    In 2012, we instituted detailed prospective peer review of new cases. We present the outcomes of peer review on patient management and time required for peer review. Peer review rounds were held 3 to 4 days weekly and required 2 physicians to review pertinent information from the electronic medical record and treatment planning system. Eight aspects were reviewed for each case: 1) workup and staging; 2) treatment intent and prescription; 3) position, immobilization, and simulation; 4) motion assessment and management; 5) target contours; 6) normal tissue contours; 7) target dosimetry; and 8) normal tissue dosimetry. Cases were marked as, "Meets standard of care," "Variation," or "Major deviation." Changes in treatment plan were noted. As our process evolved, we recorded the time spent reviewing each case. From 2012 to 2014, we collected peer review data on 442 of 465 (95%) radiation therapy patients treated in our hospital-based clinic. Overall, 91 (20.6%) of the cases were marked as having a variation, and 3 (0.7%) as major deviation. Forty-two (9.5%) of the cases were altered after peer review. An overall peer review score of "Variation" or "Major deviation" was highly associated with a change in treatment plan (P < .01). Changes in target contours were recommended in 10% of cases. Gastrointestinal cases were significantly associated with a change in treatment plan after peer review. Indicators on position, immobilization, simulation, target contours, target dosimetry, motion management, normal tissue contours, and normal tissue dosimetry were significantly associated with a change in treatment plan. The mean time spent on each case was 7 minutes. Prospective peer review is feasible in a community radiation oncology practice. Our process led to changes in 9.5% of cases. Peer review should focus on technical factors such as target contours and dosimetry. Peer review required 7 minutes per case. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Funding oncology clinical trials: are cooperative group trials sustainable?

    PubMed

    Seow, Hsien-Yeang; Whelan, Patrick; Levine, Mark N; Cowan, Kathryn; Lysakowski, Barbara; Kowaleski, Brenda; Snider, Anne; Xu, Rebecca Y; Arnold, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Many oncology clinical trials departments (CTDs) are in serious fiscal deficit and their sustainability is in jeopardy. This study investigates whether the payment models used to fund industry versus cooperative group trials contribute to the fiscal deficit of a CTD. We examined the lifetime costs of all cooperative group and industry trials activated in the CTD of a cancer center between 2007 and 2011. A trial's lifetime is defined as being from the date the first patient was accrued until the last patient's actual or projected final follow-up visit. For each trial, we calculated the lifetime monthly net income, which was defined as monthly revenue minus monthly costs. Data sources included study protocols, trial budgets, and accrual data. Of the 97 trials analyzed, 64 (66%) were cooperative group trials. The pattern of lifetime net income for cooperative group trials has a positive peak during patient accrual followed by a negative trough during follow-up. In contrast, the pattern for industry trials resembled an "l" shape. The patterns reflect the differing payment models: upfront lump-sum payments (cooperative group) versus milestone payments (industry). The negative trough in the lifetime net income of a cooperative group trial occurs because follow-up costs are typically not funded or are underfunded. CTDs accrue more patients in new trials to offset that deficit. The CTD uses revenue from accrual to existing trials to cross-subsidize past trials in follow-up. As the number of patients on follow-up increases, the fiscal deficit grows larger each year, perpetuating the cycle.

  2. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Richard K.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed. PMID:26380186

  3. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs.

    PubMed

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Freeman, Richard K; Krasna, Mark J

    2015-08-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed.

  4. A Window Into Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Oncology Testing Practices.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Rakesh; Bartley, Angela N; Bridge, Julia A; Jennings, Lawrence J; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Kim, Annette; Lazar, Alexander J; Lindeman, Neal I; Moncur, Joel; Rai, Alex J; Routbort, Mark J; Vasalos, Patricia; Merker, Jason D

    2017-12-01

    - Detection of acquired variants in cancer is a paradigm of precision medicine, yet little has been reported about clinical laboratory practices across a broad range of laboratories. - To use College of American Pathologists proficiency testing survey results to report on the results from surveys on next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing practices. - College of American Pathologists proficiency testing survey results from more than 250 laboratories currently performing molecular oncology testing were used to determine laboratory trends in next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing. - These presented data provide key information about the number of laboratories that currently offer or are planning to offer next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing. Furthermore, we present data from 60 laboratories performing next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing regarding specimen requirements and assay characteristics. The findings indicate that most laboratories are performing tumor-only targeted sequencing to detect single-nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions, using desktop sequencers and predesigned commercial kits. Despite these trends, a diversity of approaches to testing exists. - This information should be useful to further inform a variety of topics, including national discussions involving clinical laboratory quality systems, regulation and oversight of next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing, and precision oncology efforts in a data-driven manner.

  5. Music therapy services in pediatric oncology: a national clinical practice review.

    PubMed

    Tucquet, Belinda; Leung, Maggie

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national clinical practice review conducted in Australia of music therapy services in pediatric oncology hospitals. Literature specifically related to music therapy and symptom management in pediatric oncology is reviewed. The results from a national benchmarking survey distributed to all music therapists working with children with cancer in Australian pediatric hospitals are discussed. Patient and family feedback provided from a quality improvement activity conducted at a major pediatric tertiary hospital is summarized, and considerations for future growth as a profession and further research is proposed. © 2014 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  6. Integrating genomics into clinical oncology: ethical and social challenges from proponents of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Michelle L; Settersten, Richard A; Juengst, Eric T; Fishman, Jennifer R

    2014-02-01

    The use of molecular tools to individualize health care, predict appropriate therapies, and prevent adverse health outcomes has gained significant traction in the field of oncology under the banner of "personalized medicine" (PM). Enthusiasm for PM in oncology has been fueled by success stories of targeted treatments for a variety of cancers based on their molecular profiles. Though these are clear indications of optimism for PM, little is known about the ethical and social implications of personalized approaches in clinical oncology. The objective of this study is to assess how a range of stakeholders engaged in promoting, monitoring, and providing PM understand the challenges of integrating genomic testing and targeted therapies into clinical oncology. The study involved the analysis of in-depth interviews with 117 stakeholders whose experiences and perspectives on PM span a wide variety of institutional and professional settings. Despite their considerable enthusiasm for this shift, promoters, monitors, and providers of PM identified 4 domains that provoke heightened ethical and social concerns: (1) informed consent for cancer genomic testing, (2) privacy, confidentiality, and disclosure of genomic test results, (3) access to genomic testing and targeted therapies in oncology, and (4) the costs of scaling up pharmacogenomic testing and targeted cancer therapies. These specific concerns are not unique to oncology, or even genomics. However, those most invested in the success of PM view oncologists' responses to these challenges as precedent setting because oncology is farther along the path of clinical integration of genomic technologies than other fields of medicine. This study illustrates that the rapid emergence of PM approaches in clinical oncology provides a crucial lens for identifying and managing potential frictions and pitfalls that emerge as health care paradigms shift in these directions. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Recurrent abdominal pain in children: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Quek, S H

    2015-03-01

    The term 'recurrent abdominal pain', or RAP, refers mainly to the duration of painful period and frequency of pain. The commonly accepted duration is at least three months in the preceding period, and over this three-month period, there are at least three episodes of pain that are severe enough to affect the daily activities of the affected patients. Over the years, with advances in medical technology and better understanding of the pathophysiology of abdominal pain, more and more organic causes have been identified. However, the most common cause of RAP in children is still functional in origin.

  9. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  10. Clinical practice guidelines and consensus statements in oncology--an assessment of their methodological quality.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Carmel; Graham, Ian D; Makarski, Julie; Chassé, Michaël; Fergusson, Dean; Hutton, Brian; Clemons, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines are widely available for enhancing the care of cancer patients. Despite subtle differences in their definition and purpose, these terms are often used interchangeably. We systematically assessed the methodological quality of consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published in three commonly read, geographically diverse, cancer-specific journals. Methods Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents. Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents. Thirty-four consensus statements and 67 clinical practice guidelines were evaluated. The rigour of development score for consensus statements over the three journals was 32% lower than that of clinical practice guidelines. The editorial independence score was 15% lower for consensus statements than clinical practice guidelines. One journal scored consistently lower than

  11. The differences in the assessments of side effects at an oncology outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar-Ekincioglu, A; Kucuk, E

    2018-04-01

    Background There is a growing interest in the use of targeted and immunotherapies in oncology. However, the assessment of side effects can be different due to interpretation of patients' health status by healthcare professionals in oncology outpatient clinics. Objective To demonstrate the differences in the assessments of side effects conducted independently by a clinical pharmacist and nurses in patients who receive targeted therapies at an oncology outpatient clinic. Setting The study was conducted at the University Oncology Hospital in an outpatient clinic from October 2015 to March 2016. Method Patients receiving ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, bevacizumab, panitumumab or cetuximab during study period were included. The assessment of side effects was conducted by a pharmacist and nurse independently using the NCI-CTCAE version-2. Main outcome measure To compare the severity assessments of side effects between a clinical pharmacist and nurses in an outpatient clinic. Results During the study, 204 visits for 43 patients with a total of 5508 side effect assessments were recorded where 1137 (20.64%) assessments were graded differently. Out of 1137 assessments, 473 of them were graded higher by a clinical pharmacist whereas 664 were graded higher by nurses. Statistically significant differences were detected in the assessment of vomiting, taste changes, sense changes, alopecia, fatigue, mood changes, anxiety, hearing impairment, and allergic reactions. Conclusion An assessment of side effects by healthcare providers in patients with cancer may be challenging due to an increased workload in clinics and undistinguishable symptoms of side effects and cancer itself. Therefore, a new care model which increases an interprofessional communication may improve pharmaceutical care in oncology outpatient clinics.

  12. Informatics in clinical research in oncology: current state, challenges, and a future perspective.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Amar P S

    2011-01-01

    The informatics landscape of clinical trials in oncology has changed significantly in the last 10 years. The current state of the infrastructure for clinical trial management, execution, and data management is reviewed. The systems, their functionality, the users, and the standards available to researchers are discussed from the perspective of the oncologist-researcher. Challenges in complexity and in the processing of information are outlined. These challenges include the lack of communication and information-interchange between systems, the lack of simplified standards, and the lack of implementation and adherence to the standards that are available. The clinical toxicology criteria from the National Cancer Institute (CTCAE) are cited as a successful standard in oncology, and HTTP on the Internet is referenced for its simplicity. Differences in the management of information standards between industries are discussed. Possible future advances in oncology clinical research informatics are addressed. These advances include strategic policy review of standards and the implementation of actions to make standards free, ubiquitous, simple, and easily interpretable; the need to change from a local data-capture- or transaction-driven model to a large-scale data-interpretation model that provides higher value to the oncologist and the patient; and the need for information technology investment in a readily available digital educational model for clinical research in oncology that is customizable for individual studies. These new approaches, with changes in information delivery to mobile platforms, will set the stage for the next decade in clinical research informatics.

  13. Closure of abdominal wounds by adhesive strips: a clinical trial.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, D J; Davis, P W

    1975-01-01

    In a randomized trial of wound closure in 512 abdominal wounds, wounds were closed with either reinforced Steristrip skin closures or interrupted silk sutures. Comparisons were made of wound pain and discomfort, wound infection, discharge, redness, width, and skin reaction. The causes of peeling of the tapes were assessed. The results showed that tapes were significantly more comfortable and that patients preferred them to sutures (P less than 0.01), but wide scars occurred more often. There was no difference in rates of wound infection and no case of allergy to the tapes was seen. Closure of abdominal wounds by these tapes is a satisfactory procedure that could be used more extensively. PMID:1100188

  14. Survey of Medical Oncology Status in Korea (SOMOS-K): A National Survey of Medical Oncologists in the Korean Association for Clinical Oncology (KACO).

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Yeun; Lee, Yun Gyoo; Kim, Bong-Seog

    2017-07-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the current role of medical oncologists in cancer care with a focus on increasing the recognition of medical oncology as an independent specialty. Questionnaires modified from the Medical Oncology Status in Europe Survey dealing with oncology structure, resources, research, and patterns of care given by medical oncologists were selected. Several modifications were made to the questionnaire after feedback from the insurance and policy committee of the Korean Association for Clinical Oncology (KACO). The online survey was then sent to KACO members. A total of 214 medical oncologists (45.8% of the total inquiries), including 71 directors of medical oncology institutions, took the survey. Most institutions had various resources, including a medical oncology department (94.1%) and a department of radiation oncology (82.4%). There was an average of four medical oncologists at each institution. Medical oncologists were involved in various treatments from diagnosis to end-of-life care. They were also chemotherapy providers from a wide range of institutions that treated many types of solid cancers. In addition, 86.2% of the institutions conducted research. This is the first national survey in Korea to show that medical oncologists are involved in a wide range of cancer treatments and care. This survey emphasizes the contributions and proper roles of medical oncologists in the evolving health care environment in Korea.

  15. Clinical Pathways and the Patient Perspective in the Pursuit of Value-Based Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Ersek, Jennifer L; Nadler, Eric; Freeman-Daily, Janet; Mazharuddin, Samir; Kim, Edward S

    2017-01-01

    The art of practicing oncology has evolved substantially in the past 5 years. As more and more diagnostic tests, biomarker-directed therapies, and immunotherapies make their way to the oncology marketplace, oncologists will find it increasingly difficult to keep up with the many therapeutic options. Additionally, the cost of cancer care seems to be increasing. Clinical pathways are a systematic way to organize and display detailed, evidence-based treatment options and assist the practitioner with best practice. When selecting which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway, considerations must include the efficacy and safety, as well as costs, of the therapy. Pathway treatment regimens must be continually assessed and modified to ensure that the most up-to-date, high-quality options are incorporated. Value-based models, such as the ASCO Value Framework, can assist providers in presenting economic evaluations of clinical pathway treatment options to patients, thus allowing the patient to decide the overall value of each treatment regimen. Although oncologists and pathway developers can decide which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway based on the efficacy of the treatment, assessment of the value of that treatment regimen ultimately lies with the patient. Patient definitions of value will be an important component to enhancing current value-based oncology care models and incorporating new, high-quality, value-based therapeutics into oncology clinical pathways.

  16. Outcomes assessment of a pharmacist-directed seamless care program in an ambulatory oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Scott J; Abbott, Rick; Edwards, Jonathan; LeBlanc, Michael; Dranitsaris, George; Donnan, Jennifer; Laing, Kara; Whelan, Maria A; MacKinnon, Neil J

    2014-02-01

    The primary goal of seamless care is improved patient outcomes and improved standards of care for patients with cancer. The pharmacy service of the Newfoundland Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation conducted a randomized control study that measured clinical and humanistic outcomes of a pharmacist-directed seamless care program in an ambulatory oncology clinic. This article focuses on the intervention group, particularly the identification of drug-related problems (DRPs) and utilization of health care services as well the satisfaction of 3 types of health professionals with the services provided by the pharmacist-directed seamless care program. Overall, the seamless care pharmacist (SCP) identified an average of 3.7 DRPs per intervention patient; the most common DRP reported was a patient not receiving or taking a drug therapy for which there is an indication. The SCP identified more DRPs in patients receiving adjuvant treatment compared to those receiving palliative treatment. On average, family physicians, oncology nurses, and hospital pharmacists were satisfied with the SCP intervention indicating that they agreed the information collected and distributed by the SCP was useful to them. Pharmacist-directed seamless care services in an ambulatory oncology clinic have a significant impact on clinical outcomes and processes of patient care. The presence of a SCP can help identify and resolve DRPs experienced by patients in an outpatient oncology clinic, ensuring that patients are receiving the highest standard of care.

  17. Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology. Report on a WHO Working Group (The Hague, The Netherlands, December 6-8, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The 1978 report of the Working Group of Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in collaboration with the government of The Netherlands, is presented. The groups analyzed models of postgraduate training in clinical oncology and evaluated their suitability in relation to…

  18. The clinical trial landscape in oncology and connectivity of somatic mutational profiles to targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Sara E; Liu, Rangjiao; Statz, Cara M; Durkin, Daniel; Lakshminarayana, Anuradha; Mockus, Susan M

    2016-01-16

    Precision medicine in oncology relies on rapid associations between patient-specific variations and targeted therapeutic efficacy. Due to the advancement of genomic analysis, a vast literature characterizing cancer-associated molecular aberrations and relative therapeutic relevance has been published. However, data are not uniformly reported or readily available, and accessing relevant information in a clinically acceptable time-frame is a daunting proposition, hampering connections between patients and appropriate therapeutic options. One important therapeutic avenue for oncology patients is through clinical trials. Accordingly, a global view into the availability of targeted clinical trials would provide insight into strengths and weaknesses and potentially enable research focus. However, data regarding the landscape of clinical trials in oncology is not readily available, and as a result, a comprehensive understanding of clinical trial availability is difficult. To support clinical decision-making, we have developed a data loader and mapper that connects sequence information from oncology patients to data stored in an in-house database, the JAX Clinical Knowledgebase (JAX-CKB), which can be queried readily to access comprehensive data for clinical reporting via customized reporting queries. JAX-CKB functions as a repository to house expertly curated clinically relevant data surrounding our 358-gene panel, the JAX Cancer Treatment Profile (JAX CTP), and supports annotation of functional significance of molecular variants. Through queries of data housed in JAX-CKB, we have analyzed the landscape of clinical trials relevant to our 358-gene targeted sequencing panel to evaluate strengths and weaknesses in current molecular targeting in oncology. Through this analysis, we have identified patient indications, molecular aberrations, and targeted therapy classes that have strong or weak representation in clinical trials. Here, we describe the development and disseminate

  19. Media Reporting of Practice-Changing Clinical Trials in Oncology: A North American Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Michael M.; O’Connor, Stephen; Valdes, Mario; Tang, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Media reporting of clinical trials impacts patient-oncologist interactions. We sought to characterize the accuracy of media and Internet reporting of practice-changing clinical trials in oncology. Materials and Methods. The first media articles referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials were collected from 4 media outlets: newspapers, cable news, cancer websites, and industry websites. Measured outcomes were media reporting score, social media score, and academic citation score. The media reporting score was a measure of completeness of information detailed in media articles as scored by a 15-point scoring instrument. The social media score represented the ubiquity of social media presence referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials in cancer as determined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology in its annual report, entitled Clinical Cancer Advances 2012; social media score was calculated from Twitter, Facebook, and Google searches. The academic citation score comprised total citations from Google Scholar plus the Scopus database, which represented the academic impact per clinical cancer advance. Results. From 170 media articles, 107 (63%) had sufficient data for analysis. Cohen’s κ coefficient demonstrated reliability of the media reporting score instrument with a coefficient of determination of 94%. Per the media reporting score, information was most complete from industry, followed by cancer websites, newspapers, and cable news. The most commonly omitted items, in descending order, were study limitations, exclusion criteria, conflict of interest, and other. The social media score was weakly correlated with academic citation score. Conclusion. Media outlets appear to have set a low bar for coverage of many practice-changing advances in oncology, with reports of scientific breakthroughs often omitting basic study facts and cautions, which may mislead the public. The media should be encouraged to use a standardized reporting

  20. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (160). Levocardia with abdominal situs inversus

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Nor Lenny; Quek, Swee Chye; Seto, Kar Yin; Teo, Lynette Li San

    2015-01-01

    Levocardia (left-sided cardiac apex) with abdominal situs inversus is extremely rare. This is also known as isolated levocardia and is almost always associated with severe forms of congenital heart defects with poor prognosis. We report isolated levocardia in a 13-year-old symptomatic male patient. The purpose of this paper is to outline the imaging features of isolated levocardia and to highlight the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in the diagnosis and management of such cases. Other forms of cardiac malposition, including dextrocardia, mesocardia and criss-cross heart, with chest radiograph and CMR correlation, are also discussed. PMID:25917470

  1. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  2. Management of an Outbreak of Exophiala dermatitidis Bloodstream Infections at an Outpatient Oncology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Amber; Zavasky, D; Chow, N A; Gade, L; Zlatanic, E; Elkind, S; Litvintseva, A P; Pappas, P G; Perfect, J R; Revankar, S; Lockhart, S R; Chiller, T; Ackelsberg, J; Vallabhaneni, S

    2018-03-05

    We report the presentation and management of 17 cases of Exophiala dermatitidis and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa bloodstream infections caused by a compounded parenteral medication at an oncology clinic. Twelve patients were asymptomatic. All central venous catheters were removed and antifungal therapy, primarily voriconazole, was administered to patients. Three patients died.

  3. Metro-Minnesota Community Clinical Oncology Program (MM-CCOP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Metro-Minnesota Community Clinical Oncology (MMCCOP) program has a long-standing history which clearly demonstrates the success of the consortium, as demonstrated by both the ongoing commitment of the original consortium members and the growth of the consortium from 1979 through 2014. The MMCCOP consortium represents an established community program base which began in

  4. Increasing minority patient participation in cancer clinical trials using oncology nurse navigation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dennis Ricky; Major, Jacquelyn; Lyonga, Doris Efosi; Alleyne, Rebecca Simone; Clayton, Sheilah Marie

    2012-04-01

    Residential distance from an academic or cancer center is a significant barrier to minority patient participation in cancer research. Most cancer clinical trials (CTs) are only accessible at academic and cancer centers, yet most cancer patients receive treatment in their home communities where access to CTs may be limited. Oncology nurse navigation is an innovative approach for increasing minority CT participation by facilitating access to cancer CTs in communities where minority patients live. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of oncology nurse navigation on community-based recruitment of black patients to breast cancer CTs at a major cancer center. We merged the roles of a traditional oncology research nurse and a professional patient navigator to create a novel health care provider role, the oncology nurse navigator. The primary duties of the oncology nurse navigator were to engage black cancer patients in the offices of their community physicians and to collaborate with community physicians to increase black patient participation in cancer research. The oncology nurse navigator played a key role in all phases of the CT participation process (e.g., screening for eligibility and completion of informed consent and clinical research forms) and guided each patient around barriers in the health care system. The accrual of eligible patients to breast cancer CTs was used to assess the impact of oncology nurse navigation on community-based recruitment of blacks to cancer CTs. Between January 2007 and December 2008, a total of 132 black breast cancer patients were screened by a single oncology nurse navigator for eligibility to University of Southern California-sponsored breast cancer CTs. Fifty-nine patients were eligible for CTs, and each was invited to participate in 1 or more CTs for which they were eligible. Fifty-one of 59 eligible black patients (86% of eligible patients) were enrolled to 1 or more research protocols. The estimated cost per

  5. Quantitative assessment of workload and stressors in clinical radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Lukasz M; Mosaly, Prithima R; Jackson, Marianne; Chang, Sha X; Burkhardt, Katharin Deschesne; Adams, Robert D; Jones, Ellen L; Hoyle, Lesley; Xu, Jing; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B

    2012-08-01

    Workload level and sources of stressors have been implicated as sources of error in multiple settings. We assessed workload levels and sources of stressors among radiation oncology professionals. Furthermore, we explored the potential association between workload and the frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the World Health Organization (WHO). Data collection was aimed at various tasks performed by 21 study participants from different radiation oncology professional subgroups (simulation therapists, radiation therapists, physicists, dosimetrists, and physicians). Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index (NASA TLX). Sources of stressors were quantified using observational methods and segregated using a standard taxonomy. Comparisons between professional subgroups and tasks were made using analysis of variance ANOVA, multivariate ANOVA, and Duncan test. An association between workload levels (NASA TLX) and the frequency of radiotherapy incidents (WHO incidents) was explored (Pearson correlation test). A total of 173 workload assessments were obtained. Overall, simulation therapists had relatively low workloads (NASA TLX range, 30-36), and physicists had relatively high workloads (NASA TLX range, 51-63). NASA TLX scores for physicians, radiation therapists, and dosimetrists ranged from 40-52. There was marked intertask/professional subgroup variation (P<.0001). Mental demand (P<.001), physical demand (P=.001), and effort (P=.006) significantly differed among professional subgroups. Typically, there were 3-5 stressors per cycle of analyzed tasks with the following distribution: interruptions (41.4%), time factors (17%), technical factors (13.6%), teamwork issues (11.6%), patient factors (9.0%), and environmental factors (7.4%). A positive association between workload and frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the WHO was found (r = 0.87, P value=.045). Workload level and sources of stressors vary

  6. Quantitative Assessment of Workload and Stressors in Clinical Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Lukasz M., E-mail: lukasz_mazur@ncsu.edu; Industrial Extension Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina; Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Workload level and sources of stressors have been implicated as sources of error in multiple settings. We assessed workload levels and sources of stressors among radiation oncology professionals. Furthermore, we explored the potential association between workload and the frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the World Health Organization (WHO). Methods and Materials: Data collection was aimed at various tasks performed by 21 study participants from different radiation oncology professional subgroups (simulation therapists, radiation therapists, physicists, dosimetrists, and physicians). Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index (NASA TLX). Sources of stressors were quantified using observational methodsmore » and segregated using a standard taxonomy. Comparisons between professional subgroups and tasks were made using analysis of variance ANOVA, multivariate ANOVA, and Duncan test. An association between workload levels (NASA TLX) and the frequency of radiotherapy incidents (WHO incidents) was explored (Pearson correlation test). Results: A total of 173 workload assessments were obtained. Overall, simulation therapists had relatively low workloads (NASA TLX range, 30-36), and physicists had relatively high workloads (NASA TLX range, 51-63). NASA TLX scores for physicians, radiation therapists, and dosimetrists ranged from 40-52. There was marked intertask/professional subgroup variation (P<.0001). Mental demand (P<.001), physical demand (P=.001), and effort (P=.006) significantly differed among professional subgroups. Typically, there were 3-5 stressors per cycle of analyzed tasks with the following distribution: interruptions (41.4%), time factors (17%), technical factors (13.6%), teamwork issues (11.6%), patient factors (9.0%), and environmental factors (7.4%). A positive association between workload and frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the WHO was found (r = 0.87, P value=.045

  7. Tracking the Workforce: The American Society of Clinical Oncology Workforce Information System

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, M. Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Goldstein, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. Methods: The WIS report is composed of three sections: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. Results: The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Conclusion: Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages. PMID:23633965

  8. Single-Cell Sequencing Technology in Oncology: Applications for Clinical Therapies and Research.

    PubMed

    Ye, Baixin; Gao, Qingping; Zeng, Zhi; Stary, Creed M; Jian, Zhihong; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Gu, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity is a fundamental characteristic of many cancers. A lack of cellular homogeneity contributes to difficulty in designing targeted oncological therapies. Therefore, the development of novel methods to determine and characterize oncologic cellular heterogeneity is a critical next step in the development of novel cancer therapies. Single-cell sequencing (SCS) technology has been recently employed for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of individual cells at the genome-wide level. SCS requires (1) precise isolation of the single cell of interest; (2) isolation and amplification of genetic material; and (3) descriptive analysis of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic data. In addition to targeted analysis of single cells isolated from tumor biopsies, SCS technology may be applied to circulating tumor cells, which may aid in predicting tumor progression and metastasis. In this paper, we provide an overview of SCS technology and review the current literature on the potential application of SCS to clinical oncology and research.

  9. Defining High-Quality Palliative Care in Oncology Practice: An American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine Guidance Statement.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Kathleen E; McNiff, Kristen; Buss, Mary K; Kamal, Arif; Lupu, Dale; Abernethy, Amy P; Broder, Michael S; Shapiro, Charles L; Acheson, Anupama Kurup; Malin, Jennifer; Evans, Tracey; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2016-09-01

    Integrated into routine oncology care, palliative care can improve symptom burden, quality of life, and patient and caregiver satisfaction. However, not all oncology practices have access to specialist palliative medicine. This project endeavored to define what constitutes high-quality primary palliative care as delivered by medical oncology practices. An expert steering committee outlined 966 palliative care service items, in nine domains, each describing a candidate element of primary palliative care delivery for patients with advanced cancer or high symptom burden. Using modified Delphi methodology, 31 multidisciplinary panelists rated each service item on three constructs: importance, feasibility, and scope within medical oncology practice. Panelists endorsed the highest proportion of palliative care service items in the domains of End-of-Life Care (81%); Communication and Shared Decision Making (79%); and Advance Care Planning (78%). The lowest proportions were in Spiritual and Cultural Assessment and Management (35%) and Psychosocial Assessment and Management (39%). In the largest domain, Symptom Assessment and Management, there was consensus that all symptoms should be assessed and managed at a basic level, with more comprehensive management for common symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dyspnea, and pain. Within the Appropriate Palliative Care and Hospice Referral domain, there was consensus that oncology practices should be able to describe the difference between palliative care and hospice to patients and refer patients appropriately. This statement describes the elements comprising high-quality primary palliative care for patients with advanced cancer or high symptom burden, as delivered by oncology practices. Oncology providers wishing to enhance palliative care delivery may find this information useful to inform operational changes and quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. The role of clinical trials in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Burton, Jenna; Khanna, Chand

    2014-09-01

    Clinical trials for companion animals are becoming more common and more accessible to pet owners as veterinary oncologists seek to expand their knowledge of tumor biology in companion animal species and improve the way they diagnose and treat cancer for these animals. Many owners enroll their pets because they wish to participate in clinical cancer research that may ultimately benefit pets and people. Understanding the goals, benefits, and risks of clinical trials participation provides the knowledge needed by primary care veterinarians to counsel their clients as to whether clinical trial participation is a good choice for them and their pets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Methods of Academic Course Planning for Cancer Biology PhD Students to Enhance Knowledge of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Swart, Elizabeth; Markwell, Steven M; Wen, Sijin; Vona-Davis, Linda C

    2017-09-15

    Little is known about how clinical oncology concepts are taught to PhD students or the most effective methods of doing so. In this study, electronic surveys were sent to faculty and students at PhD training programs, assessing their institution's methods of clinical oncology education and their perspective on optimal approaches to clinical oncology education. Only 40.0% of students reported any clinical oncology component to their institution's training, and only 26.5% had a clinician on their graduate advisory committee. Forty-three percent of students believed that they had a good understanding for translating basic science research into clinical practice, and 77.2% of all participants believed dual degree MD/PhD students were superior to PhD students in this regard. Lectures on clinical oncology research topics were the most valuable type of experience for all participants and were also the most common type of experience utilized. Working with a clinician to develop a clinical trial with correlative endpoints was also highly valued, but was only utilized by approximately 10% of programs. Faculty rated the value of nearly all types of clinical oncology exposure significantly lower than did students. Inclusion of the approaches identified in this study is likely to enhance PhD training in oncology-related disciplines. Cancer Res; 77(18); 4741-4. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Multi-scale Modeling in Clinical Oncology: Opportunities and Barriers to Success.

    PubMed

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; An, Gary; Saut, Oliver; Luebeck, E Georg; Popel, Aleksander S; Ribba, Benjamin; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Weis, Jared A; Ye, Kaiming; Genin, Guy M

    2016-09-01

    Hierarchical processes spanning several orders of magnitude of both space and time underlie nearly all cancers. Multi-scale statistical, mathematical, and computational modeling methods are central to designing, implementing and assessing treatment strategies that account for these hierarchies. The basic science underlying these modeling efforts is maturing into a new discipline that is close to influencing and facilitating clinical successes. The purpose of this review is to capture the state-of-the-art as well as the key barriers to success for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology. We begin with a summary of the long-envisioned promise of multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology, including the synthesis of disparate data types into models that reveal underlying mechanisms and allow for experimental testing of hypotheses. We then evaluate the mathematical techniques employed most widely and present several examples illustrating their application as well as the current gap between pre-clinical and clinical applications. We conclude with a discussion of what we view to be the key challenges and opportunities for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology.

  13. Assessment of a brain-tumour-specific Patient Concerns Inventory in the neuro-oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Alasdair G; Netten, Anouk; McNamara, Shanne; Erridge, Sara; Peoples, Sharon; Whittle, Ian; Hacking, Belinda; Grant, Robin

    2014-04-01

    Brain tumour patients may struggle to express their concerns in the outpatient clinic, creating a physician-focused rather than a shared agenda. We created a simple, practical brain-tumour-specific holistic needs assessment (HNA) tool for use in the neuro-oncology outpatient clinic. We posted the brain tumour Patient Concerns Inventory (PCI) to a consecutive sample of adult brain tumour attendees to a neuro-oncology outpatient clinic. Participants brought the completed PCI to their clinic consultation. Patients and staff provided feedback. Seventy seven patients were eligible and 53 participated (response rate = 68%). The PCI captured many problems absent from general cancer checklists. The five most frequent concerns were fatigue, fear of tumour coming back, memory, concentration, and low mood. Respondents used the PCI to formulate 105 specific questions, usually about the meaning of physical or psychological symptoms. Patients and staff found the PCI to be useful, and satisfaction with the instrument was high. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of the brain tumour PCI in a neuro-oncology clinic. The combination of a brain-tumour-specific concerns checklist and an intervention to focus patient agenda creates a simple and efficient HNA tool.

  14. Multi-scale Modeling in Clinical Oncology: Opportunities and Barriers to Success

    PubMed Central

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; An, Gary; Saut, Oliver; Luebeck, E. Georg; Popel, Aleksander S.; Ribba, Benjamin; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Weis, Jared A.; Ye, Kaiming; Genin, Guy M.

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical processes spanning several orders of magnitude of both space and time underlie nearly all cancers. Multi-scale statistical, mathematical, and computational modeling methods are central to designing, implementing and assessing treatment strategies that account for these hierarchies. The basic science underlying these modeling efforts is maturing into a new discipline that is close to influencing and facilitating clinical successes. The purpose of this review is to capture the state-of-the-art as well as the key barriers to success for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology. We begin with a summary of the long-envisioned promise of multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology, including the synthesis of disparate data types into models that reveal underlying mechanisms and allow for experimental testing of hypotheses. We then evaluate the mathematical techniques employed most widely and present several examples illustrating their application as well as the current gap between pre-clinical and clinical applications. We conclude with a discussion of what we view to be the key challenges and opportunities for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology. PMID:27384942

  15. A national study of the provision of oncology sperm banking services among Canadian fertility clinics.

    PubMed

    Yee, S; Buckett, W; Campbell, S; Yanofsky, R A; Barr, R D

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the current state of oncology sperm banking services provided by fertility clinics across Canada. A total of 78 Canadian fertility facilities were invited to complete a questionnaire related to the availability, accessibility, affordability and utilisation of sperm banking services for cancer patients. The total response rate was 59%, with 20 (69%) in vitro fertilisation clinics and 26 (53%) other fertility centres returning the survey. A total of 24 responding facilities accepted oncology sperm banking referrals. The time frame to book the first banking appointment for 19 (79%) facilities was within 2 days. Inconsistent practice was found regarding the consent process for cancer patients who are of minority age. Eight (33%) facilities did not provide any subsidy and charged a standard banking fee regardless of patients' financial situations. Overall, the utilisation of oncology sperm banking services was low despite its availability and established efficacy, suggesting that Canadian cancer patients are notably underserved. The study has highlighted some important issues for further consideration in improving access to sperm banking services for cancer patients, especially for adolescents. Better collaboration between oncology and reproductive medicine to target healthcare providers would help to improve sperm banking rates. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. An exploration of the experience of compassion fatigue in clinical oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Perry, Beth; Toffner, Greg; Merrick, Trish; Dalton, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Compassion fatigue (CF) is "debilitating weariness brought about by repetitive, empathic responses to the pain and suffering of others" (LaRowe, 2005, p. 21). The work performed by oncology nurses, and the experiences of the people they care for, place oncology nurses at high risk for CF (Pierce et al., 2007; Ferrell & Coyle, 2008). Thus oncology nurses were chosen as the study focus. This paper details a descriptive exploratory qualitative research study that investigated the experience of CF in Canadian clinical oncology registered nurses (RNs). A conceptual stress process model by Aneshensel, Pearlin, Mullan, Zarit, and Whitlatch (1995) that considers caregivers' stress in four domains provided the study framework (see Figure 1). Nineteen study participants were recruited through an advertisement in the Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal (CONJ). The advertisement directed potential participants to a university-based online website developed for this study. Participants completed a questionnaire and wrote a narrative describing an experience with CF and submitted these through the secure research website. Data were analyzed thematically. Five themes include: defining CF, causes of CF, factors that worsen CF, factors that lessen CF, and outcomes of CF. Participants had limited knowledge about CF, about lack of external support, and that insufficient time to provide high quality, care may precipitate CF. The gap between quality of care nurses wanted to provide and what they were able to do, compounded by coexisting physical and emotional stress, worsened CF. CF was lessened by colleague support, work-life balance, connecting with others, acknowledgement, and maturity and experience. Outcomes of CF included profound fatigue of mind and body, negative effects on personal relationships, and considering leaving the specialty. Recommendations that may enhance oncology nurse well-being are provided.

  17. Why providers participate in clinical trials: considering the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    PubMed

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L

    2012-11-01

    The translation of research evidence into practice is facilitated by clinical trials such as those sponsored by the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) that help disseminate cancer care innovations to community-based physicians and provider organizations. However, CCOP participation involves unsubsidized costs and organizational challenges that raise concerns about sustained provider participation in clinical trials. This study was designed to improve our understanding of why providers participate in the CCOP in order to inform the decision-making process of administrators, clinicians, organizations, and policy-makers considering CCOP participation. We conducted a multi-site qualitative study of five provider organizations engaged with the CCOP. We interviewed 41 administrative and clinician key informants, asking about what motivated CCOP participation, and what benefits they associated with involvement. We deductively and inductively analyzed verbatim interview transcripts, and explored themes that emerged. Interviewees expressed both "altruistic" and "self-interested" motives for CCOP participation. Altruistic reasons included a desire to increase access to clinical trials and feeling an obligation to patients. Self-interested reasons included the desire to enhance reputation, and a need to integrate disparate cancer care activities. Perceived benefits largely matched expressed motives for CCOP participation, and included internal and external benefits to the organization, and quality of care benefits for both patients and participating physicians. The motives and benefits providers attributed to CCOP participation are consistent with translational research goals, offering evidence that participation can contribute value to providers by expanding access to innovative medical care for patients in need. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Optimizing oncology therapeutics through quantitative translational and clinical pharmacology: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, K; Friberg, L E; Ouellet, D; Mettetal, J T; Stein, A; Trocóniz, I F; Bruno, R; Mehrotra, N; Gobburu, J; Mould, D R

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in biomedical research that have deepened our understanding of cancer hallmarks, resulting in the discovery and development of targeted therapies, the success rates of oncology drug development remain low. Opportunities remain for objective dose selection informed by exposure-response understanding to optimize the benefit-risk balance of novel therapies for cancer patients. This review article discusses the principles and applications of modeling and simulation approaches across the lifecycle of development of oncology therapeutics. Illustrative examples are used to convey the value gained from integration of quantitative clinical pharmacology strategies from the preclinical-translational phase through confirmatory clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety. © 2014 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  19. Survey of Implementation of Antiemetic Prescription Standards in Indian Oncology Practices and Its Adherence to the American Society of Clinical Oncology Antiemetic Clinical Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijay; Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Parikh, Purvish; Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Chakraborty, Santam; Jandyal, Sunny; Muddu, Vamshi; Ramaswamy, Anant; Babu, K. Govinda; Lokeshwar, Nilesh; Hingmire, Sachin; Ghadyalpatil, Nikhil; Banavali, Shripad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Adherence to international antiemetic prophylaxis guidelines like those of ASCO can result in better control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting; however, the extent of implementation of such guidelines in India is unknown. Therefore, this survey was planned. Methods This study was an anonymized cross-sectional survey approved by the ethics committee. Survey items were generated from the clinical questions given in the ASCO guidelines. The survey was disseminated through personal contacts at an oncology conference and via e-mail to various community oncology centers across India. The B1, B2, and B3 domains included questions regarding the optimal antiemetic prophylaxis for high, moderate, and low-minimal emetogenic regimens. Results Sixty-six (62.9%) of 105 responded and 65 centers (98.5%) were aware of the published guidelines. The partial, full, and no implementation scores were 92.5%, 4.5%, and 3.0%, respectively. Full implementation was better for the low-minimal emetogenic regimens (34.8%) than the highly emetogenic regimens (6.1%). The three most frequent reasons for hampered implementation of ASCO guidelines in routine chemotherapy practice cited by centers were a lack of sensitization (26 centers; 39.4%), lack of national guidelines (12 centers; 18.2%), and lack of administrative support (10 centers; 15.2%). Conclusion Awareness regarding ASCO antiemetic guidelines is satisfactory in Indian oncology practices; however, there is a need for sensitization of oncologists toward complete implementation of these guidelines in their clinical practice. PMID:28831443

  20. Assessing the Eventual Publication of Clinical Trial Abstracts Submitted to a Large Annual Oncology Meeting.

    PubMed

    Massey, Paul R; Wang, Ruibin; Prasad, Vinay; Bates, Susan E; Fojo, Tito

    2016-03-01

    Despite the ethical imperative to publish clinical trials when human subjects are involved, such data frequently remain unpublished. The objectives were to tabulate the rate and ascertain factors associated with eventual publication of clinical trial results reported as abstracts in the Proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (American Society of Clinical Oncology). Abstracts describing clinical trials for patients with breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian, and prostate cancer from 2009 to 2011 were identified by using a comprehensive online database (http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/abstracts). Abstracts included reported results of a treatment or intervention assessed in a discrete, prospective clinical trial. Publication status at 4-6 years was determined by using a standardized search of PubMed. Primary outcomes were the rate of publication for abstracts of randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials. Secondary outcomes included factors influencing the publication of results. A total of 1,075 abstracts describing 378 randomized and 697 nonrandomized clinical trials were evaluated. Across all years, 75% of randomized and 54% of nonrandomized trials were published, with an overall publication rate of 61%. Sample size was a statistically significant predictor of publication for both randomized and nonrandomized trials (odds ratio [OR] per increase of 100 participants = 1.23 [1.11-1.36], p < .001; and 1.64 [1.15-2.34], p = .006, respectively). Among randomized studies, an industry coauthor or involvement of a cooperative group increased the likelihood of publication (OR 2.37, p = .013; and 2.21, p = .01, respectively). Among nonrandomized studies, phase II trials were more likely to be published than phase I (p < .001). Use of an experimental agent was not a predictor of publication in randomized (OR 0.76 [0.38-1.52]; p = .441) or nonrandomized trials (OR 0.89 [0.61-1.29]; p = .532). This is the largest reported study examining why oncology trials are

  1. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement: oversight of clinical research.

    PubMed

    2003-06-15

    Well-publicized lapses in the review or implementation of clinical research studies have raised public questions about the integrity of the clinical research process. Public trust in the integrity of research is critical not only for funding and participation in clinical trials but also for confidence in the treatments that result from the trials. The questions raised by these unfortunate cases pose an important opportunity to reassess the clinical trials oversight system to ensure the integrity of clinical research and the safety of those who enroll in clinical trials. Since its inception, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has worked for the advancement of cancer treatments through clinical research and to help patients gain prompt access to scientifically excellent and ethically unimpeachable clinical trials. As an extension of its mission, ASCO is affirming with this policy statement the critical importance of a robust review and oversight system to ensure that clinical trials participants give fully informed consent and that their safety is a top priority. Ensuring the integrity of research cannot be stressed enough because of its seminal connection to the advancement of clinical cancer treatment. The overall goal of this policy is to enhance public trust in the cancer clinical trials process. To achieve this, the following elements are essential: 1. Ensure safety precautions for clinical trial participants and their fully informed consent. 2. Ensure the validity and integrity of scientific research. 3. Enhance the educational training of clinical scientists and research staff to ensure the highest standards of research conduct. 4. Promote accountability and responsibility among all those involved in clinical research (not just those serving on institutional review boards [IRBs], but also institutional officials, researchers, sponsors, and participants) and ensure support for an effective oversight process. 5. Enhance the professional and public

  2. Basket Studies: Redefining Clinical Trials in the Era of Genome-Driven Oncology.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jessica J; Schram, Alison M; Hyman, David M

    2018-01-29

    Understanding a tumor's detailed molecular profile has become increasingly necessary to deliver the standard of care for patients with advanced cancer. Innovations in both tumor genomic sequencing technology and the development of drugs that target molecular alterations have fueled recent gains in genome-driven oncology care. "Basket studies," or histology-agnostic clinical trials in genomically selected patients, represent one important research tool to continue making progress in this field. We review key aspects of genome-driven oncology care, including the purpose and utility of basket studies, biostatistical considerations in trial design, genomic knowledgebase development, and patient matching and enrollment models, which are critical for translating our genomic knowledge into clinically meaningful outcomes.

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine use in patients presenting to a head and neck oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Tarren; Hart, Robert D; Trites, Jonathan R; Philips, Timothy J; Archibald, Kathleen E M; Phillips, Judith E; Taylor, S Mark

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among patients presenting to a head and neck oncology clinic prior to a diagnosis. The study was conducted by administering questionnaires to 102 patients after being seen in the Head and Neck Oncology clinic for their initial consultation. The questionnaire assessed the extent of CAM use, types of CAMs used, and their reasons for use. A total of 132 CAMs were currently being used among 56 patients. The most common CAMs in use were multivitamins (26/132) and vitamin D (21/132). Meditation and yoga were associated with the greatest perceived benefit. The majority of patients obtained their information from family and friends. Most patients were using CAMs for physical health and well-being. As CAM use among the population is widespread, it is important for clinicians to specifically address their use on initial presentation. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2010.

  4. Radiomics in Oncological PET/CT: Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Won; Lee, Sang Mi

    2018-06-01

    18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is widely used for staging, evaluating treatment response, and predicting prognosis in malignant diseases. FDG uptake and volumetric PET parameters such as metabolic tumor volume have been used and are still used as conventional PET parameters to assess biological characteristics of tumors. However, in recent years, additional features derived from PET images by computational processing have been found to reflect intratumoral heterogeneity, which is related to biological tumor features, and to provide additional predictive and prognostic information, which leads to the concept of radiomics. In this review, we focus on recent clinical studies of malignant diseases that investigated intratumoral heterogeneity on PET/CT, and we discuss its clinical role in various cancers.

  5. The Confused Oncologic Patient: A Rational Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Craig; DeAngelis, Lisa M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to provide a practical clinical approach to confusion in the patient with cancer. Confusion in the cancer population has a broader differential diagnosis than in the general medical population. The clinician must consider the usual differential diagnoses as well as causes unique to the cancer patient including direct complications from the cancer and indirect complications related to cancer treatment. Recent findings In the recent age of precision medicine, the oncologist now utilizes the genomic profile of both the patient and the tumor to provide advanced biologic therapies including targeted anticancer drugs, antiangiogenic agents, and immunotherapy. Such advances carry with them an emerging pattern of neurotoxicity which, although less well described in the literature, is now an important consideration to the clinical approach to confusion in cancer patients. Summary Confusion is the most common neurologic complication in cancer and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and prolonged hospital stays resulting in increased health care costs. Early recognition and treatment of delirium is essential to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:27676278

  6. Is the clinical use of cannabis by oncology patients advisable?

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Avisar, Adva; Batash, Ron; Schaffer, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    The use of the cannabis plant for various medical indications by cancer patients has been rising significantly in the past few years in several European countries, the US and Israel. The increase in use comes from public demand for the most part, and not due to a scientific basis. Cannabis chemistry is complex, and the isolation and extraction of the active ingredient remain difficult. The active agent in cannabis is unique among psychoactive plant materials, as it contains no nitrogen and, thus, is not an alkaloid. Alongside inconclusive evidence of increased risks of lung and head and neck cancers from prolonged smoking of the plant produce, laboratory evidence of the anti-cancer effects of plant components exists, but with no clinical research in this direction. The beneficial effects of treatment with the plant, or treatment with medicine produced from its components, are related to symptoms of the disease: pain, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight loss. The clinical evidence of the efficacy of cannabis for these indications is only partial. However, recent scientific data from studies with THC and cannabidiol combinations report the first clinical indication of cancer-related pain relief. The difficulties of performing research into products that are not medicinal, such as cannabis, have not allowed a true study of the cannabis plant extract although, from the public point of view, such studies are greatly desirable.

  7. Searching for Clinically Relevant Biomarkers in Geriatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Katsila, Theodora; Patrinos, George P; Kardamakis, Dimitrios

    2018-01-01

    Ageing, which is associated with a progressive decline and functional deterioration in multiple organ systems, is highly heterogeneous, both inter- and intraindividually. For this, tailored-made theranostics and optimum patient stratification become fundamental, when decision-making in elderly patients is considered. In particular, when cancer incidence and cancer-related mortality and morbidity are taken into account, elderly patient care is a public health concern. In this review, we focus on oncogeriatrics and highlight current opportunities and challenges with an emphasis on the unmet need of clinically relevant biomarkers in elderly cancer patients. We performed a literature search on PubMed and Scopus databases for articles published in English between 2000 and 2017 coupled to text mining and analysis. Considering the top insights, we derived from our literature analysis that information knowledge needs to turn into knowledge growth in oncogeriatrics towards clinically relevant biomarkers, cost-effective practices, updated educational schemes for health professionals (in particular, geriatricians and oncologists), and awareness of ethical issues. We conclude with an interdisciplinary call to omics, geriatricians, oncologists, informatics, and policy-makers communities that Big Data should be translated into decision-making in the clinic.

  8. Informed consent in oncology clinical trials: A Brown University Oncology Research Group prospective cross-sectional pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Andrew; Sikov, William M.; Quesenberry, Matthew I.; Safran, Howard; Khurshid, Humera; Mitchell, Kristen M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Informed consent forms (ICFs) for oncology clinical trials have grown increasingly longer and more complex. We evaluated objective understanding of critical components of informed consent among patients enrolling in contemporary trials of conventional or novel biologic/targeted therapies. Methods We evaluated ICFs for cancer clinical trials for length and readability, and patients registered on those studies were asked to complete a validated 14-question survey assessing their understanding of key characteristics of the trial. Mean scores were compared in groups defined by trial and patient characteristics. Results Fifty patients, of whom half participated in trials of immunotherapy or biologic/targeted agents and half in trials of conventional therapy, completed the survey. On average, ICFs for industry-originated trials (N = 9 trials) were significantly longer (P < .0001) and had lower Flesch ease-of-reading scores (P = .003) than investigator-initiated trials (N = 11). At least 80% of patients incorrectly responded to three key questions which addressed the experimental nature of their trial therapy, its purported efficacy and potential risks relative to alternative treatments. The mean objective understanding score was 76.9±8.8, but it was statistically significantly lower for patients who had not completed high school (P = .011). The scores did not differ significantly by type of cancer therapy (P = .12) or trial sponsor (P = .38). Conclusions Many participants enrolled on cancer trials had poor understanding of essential elements of their trial. In order to ensure true informed consent, innovative approaches, such as expanded in-person counseling adapted to the patient’s education level or cultural characteristics should be evaluated across socio-demographic groups. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01772511 PMID:28235011

  9. Recommendations for Obesity Clinical Trials in Cancer Survivors: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    PubMed

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Hershman, Dawn; Ballard, Rachel M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Courneya, Kerry S; Daniels, Elvan C; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Frank, Elizabeth S; Goodwin, Pamela J; Irwin, Melinda L; Levit, Laura A; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Minasian, Lori M; O'Rourke, Mark A; Pierce, John P; Stein, Kevin D; Thomson, Cynthia A; Hudis, Clifford A

    2015-11-20

    Observational evidence has established a relationship between obesity and cancer risk and outcomes. Interventional studies have demonstrated the feasibility and benefits of lifestyle change after cancer diagnosis, and guidelines recommend weight management and regular physical activity in cancer survivors; however, lifestyle interventions are not a routine part of cancer care. The ASCO Research Summit on Advancing Obesity Clinical Trials in Cancer Survivors sought to identify the knowledge gaps that clinical trials addressing energy balance factors in cancer survivors have not answered and to develop a roadmap for the design and implementation of studies with the potential to generate data that could lead to the evidence-based incorporation of weight management and physical activity programs into standard oncology practice. Recommendations highlight the need for large-scale trials evaluating the impact of energy balance interventions on cancer outcomes, as well as the concurrent conduct of studies focused on dissemination and implementation of interventions in diverse populations of cancer survivors, including answering critical questions about the degree of benefit in key subgroups of survivors. Other considerations include the importance of incorporating economic metrics into energy balance intervention trials, the need to establish intermediate biomarkers, and the importance of integrating traditional and nontraditional funding sources. Establishing lifestyle change after cancer diagnosis as a routine part of cancer care will require a multipronged effort to overcome barriers related to study development, funding, and stakeholder engagement. Given the prevalence of obesity and inactivity in cancer survivors in the United States and elsewhere, energy balance interventions hold the potential to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality in millions of patients, and it is essential that we move forward in determining their role in cancer care with the same care and

  10. Fertility Preservation for Patients With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    PubMed Central

    Loren, Alison W.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Beck, Lindsay Nohr; Brennan, Lawrence; Magdalinski, Anthony J.; Partridge, Ann H.; Quinn, Gwendolyn; Wallace, W. Hamish; Oktay, Kutluk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To update guidance for health care providers about fertility preservation for adults and children with cancer. Methods A systematic review of the literature published from March 2006 through January 2013 was completed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Panel reviewed the evidence and updated the recommendation language. Results There were 222 new publications that met inclusion criteria. A majority were observational studies, cohort studies, and case series or reports, with few randomized clinical trials. After review of the new evidence, the Update Panel concluded that no major, substantive revisions to the 2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations were warranted, but clarifications were added. Recommendations As part of education and informed consent before cancer therapy, health care providers (including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gynecologic oncologists, urologists, hematologists, pediatric oncologists, and surgeons) should address the possibility of infertility with patients treated during their reproductive years (or with parents or guardians of children) and be prepared to discuss fertility preservation options and/or to refer all potential patients to appropriate reproductive specialists. Although patients may be focused initially on their cancer diagnosis, the Update Panel encourages providers to advise patients regarding potential threats to fertility as early as possible in the treatment process so as to allow for the widest array of options for fertility preservation. The discussion should be documented. Sperm and embryo cryopreservation as well as oocyte cryopreservation are considered standard practice and are widely available. Other fertility preservation methods should be considered investigational and should be performed by providers with the necessary expertise. PMID:23715580

  11. Identifying Health Information Technology Needs of Oncologists to Facilitate the Adoption of Genomic Medicine: Recommendations From the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Omics and Precision Oncology Workshop.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Kevin S; Ambinder, Edward P; Hess, Gregory P; Yu, Peter Paul; Bernstam, Elmer V; Routbort, Mark J; Clemenceau, Jean Rene; Hamm, John T; Febbo, Phillip G; Domchek, Susan M; Chen, James L; Warner, Jeremy L

    2017-09-20

    At the ASCO Data Standards and Interoperability Summit held in May 2016, it was unanimously decided that four areas of current oncology clinical practice have serious, unmet health information technology needs. The following areas of need were identified: 1) omics and precision oncology, 2) advancing interoperability, 3) patient engagement, and 4) value-based oncology. To begin to address these issues, ASCO convened two complementary workshops: the Omics and Precision Oncology Workshop in October 2016 and the Advancing Interoperability Workshop in December 2016. A common goal was to address the complexity, enormity, and rapidly changing nature of genomic information, which existing electronic health records are ill equipped to manage. The subject matter experts invited to the Omics and Precision Oncology Workgroup were tasked with the responsibility of determining a specific, limited need that could be addressed by a software application (app) in the short-term future, using currently available genomic knowledge bases. Hence, the scope of this workshop was to determine the basic functionality of one app that could serve as a test case for app development. The goal of the second workshop, described separately, was to identify the specifications for such an app. This approach was chosen both to facilitate the development of a useful app and to help ASCO and oncologists better understand the mechanics, difficulties, and gaps in genomic clinical decision support tool development. In this article, we discuss the key challenges and recommendations identified by the workshop participants. Our hope is to narrow the gap between the practicing oncologist and ongoing national efforts to provide precision oncology and value-based care to cancer patients.

  12. Assessing the Eventual Publication of Clinical Trial Abstracts Submitted to a Large Annual Oncology Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruibin; Prasad, Vinay; Bates, Susan E.; Fojo, Tito

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite the ethical imperative to publish clinical trials when human subjects are involved, such data frequently remain unpublished. The objectives were to tabulate the rate and ascertain factors associated with eventual publication of clinical trial results reported as abstracts in the Proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (American Society of Clinical Oncology). Materials and Methods. Abstracts describing clinical trials for patients with breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian, and prostate cancer from 2009 to 2011 were identified by using a comprehensive online database (http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/abstracts). Abstracts included reported results of a treatment or intervention assessed in a discrete, prospective clinical trial. Publication status at 4−6 years was determined by using a standardized search of PubMed. Primary outcomes were the rate of publication for abstracts of randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials. Secondary outcomes included factors influencing the publication of results. Results. A total of 1,075 abstracts describing 378 randomized and 697 nonrandomized clinical trials were evaluated. Across all years, 75% of randomized and 54% of nonrandomized trials were published, with an overall publication rate of 61%. Sample size was a statistically significant predictor of publication for both randomized and nonrandomized trials (odds ratio [OR] per increase of 100 participants = 1.23 [1.11–1.36], p < .001; and 1.64 [1.15–2.34], p = .006, respectively). Among randomized studies, an industry coauthor or involvement of a cooperative group increased the likelihood of publication (OR 2.37, p = .013; and 2.21, p = .01, respectively). Among nonrandomized studies, phase II trials were more likely to be published than phase I (p < .001). Use of an experimental agent was not a predictor of publication in randomized (OR 0.76 [0.38–1.52]; p = .441) or nonrandomized trials (OR 0.89 [0.61–1.29]; p = .532). Conclusion

  13. Media Reporting of Practice-Changing Clinical Trials in Oncology: A North American Perspective.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Peter; Vickers, Michael M; O'Connor, Stephen; Valdes, Mario; Tang, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    Media reporting of clinical trials impacts patient-oncologist interactions. We sought to characterize the accuracy of media and Internet reporting of practice-changing clinical trials in oncology. The first media articles referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials were collected from 4 media outlets: newspapers, cable news, cancer websites, and industry websites. Measured outcomes were media reporting score, social media score, and academic citation score. The media reporting score was a measure of completeness of information detailed in media articles as scored by a 15-point scoring instrument. The social media score represented the ubiquity of social media presence referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials in cancer as determined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology in its annual report, entitled Clinical Cancer Advances 2012; social media score was calculated from Twitter, Facebook, and Google searches. The academic citation score comprised total citations from Google Scholar plus the Scopus database, which represented the academic impact per clinical cancer advance. From 170 media articles, 107 (63%) had sufficient data for analysis. Cohen's κ coefficient demonstrated reliability of the media reporting score instrument with a coefficient of determination of 94%. Per the media reporting score, information was most complete from industry, followed by cancer websites, newspapers, and cable news. The most commonly omitted items, in descending order, were study limitations, exclusion criteria, conflict of interest, and other. The social media score was weakly correlated with academic citation score. Media outlets appear to have set a low bar for coverage of many practice-changing advances in oncology, with reports of scientific breakthroughs often omitting basic study facts and cautions, which may mislead the public. The media should be encouraged to use a standardized reporting template and provide accessible references to original source

  14. Mucosal malignant melanoma - a clinical, oncological, pathological and genetic survey.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Lauge H; Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; von Buchwald, Christian; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Prause, Jan U; Heegaard, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal melanomas constitute 1.3% of all melanomas and they may develop in any mucosal membrane. Conjunctival melanomas (0.5/million/year) and melanomas in the sinonasal cavity (0.5/million/year) are the most common, followed by anorectal melanomas (0.4/million/year) and melanomas in the oral cavity (0.2/million/year). Anorectal melanoma occurs slightly more often in females, whereas oral melanoma has a male predilection. Mucosal melanoma most commonly develops in a patient's sixth or seventh decade of life, and no differences between races have been found except for sinonasal melanoma and conjunctival melanoma, which are very rare in Black people. The symptoms are not tumour-specific and are related to the organ system affected, and the disease is most often diagnosed at an advanced clinical stage. The diagnosis of a primary tumour is difficult, and metastatic cutaneous melanoma and choroidal melanoma must be excluded. Mutations in KIT are frequently found, while BRAF and NRAS mutations are rarely found - except in conjunctival melanomas that carry BRAF mutations. Mutations in the TERT promotor region are also found in mucosal melanomas. Complete surgical resection with free margins is the treatment of choice. The prognosis is poor, with the 5-year survival rate ranging from 0% (gastric melanoma) to 80% (conjunctival melanoma). © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Bias in reporting of randomised clinical trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Vera-Badillo, Francisco E; Napoleone, Marc; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Chan, An-Wen; Ocana, Alberto; Seruga, Bostjan; Templeton, Arnoud J; Amir, Eitan; Tannock, Ian F

    2016-07-01

    Bias in reporting efficacy and toxicity in clinical trials may impact treatment decisions. Here, we report quality of reporting of efficacy and of toxicity in articles describing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of cancer therapy and the association between biased reporting and study results, funding and financial relationships of the authors with the sponsor. We reviewed articles published from July 2010 to December 2012 in six high-impact journals reporting RCTs of systemic treatment for cancer. Bias in reporting of the primary end-point and toxicity were assessed. Associations between biased reporting and study results, funding source and financial ties of the author with the funding source were evaluated using logistic regression. Two hundred articles were identified. Among 107 RCTs where there was no statistically significant difference in the primary end-point between the two arms, 50 (47%) reports used biased reporting in the abstract of the paper to imply benefit of the experimental treatment. Toxicity was not reported in the abstract in 18.5% of the studies and this was associated with a positive primary end-point. Source of funding and financial ties were not associated with biased reporting. Bias in reporting of efficacy outcomes is common for studies with a negative primary end-point and can lead to off-label misuse of experimental therapies, if they are approved for other indications. Toxicity is under-reported, especially for studies with a positive primary end-point, leading to a biased view of the safety of new treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Awareness and attitudes towards clinical trials among Polish oncological patients who had never participated in a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Anna; Lubiejewska, Adriana; Czerw, Aleksandra; Dąbrowska-Bender, Marta; Duda-Zalewska, Aneta; Olejniczak, Dominik; Juszczyk, Grzegorz; Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena

    2018-03-21

    Participation in a clinical trial significantly shortens waiting time associated with receiving specialist care. Furthermore, it may be the case that, through clinical trials, subjects can access medicines that are not typically available in Poland. The aim of this study was to determine the opinions of oncological patients about clinical trials. The research has been carried out during the years 2014-2016. A proprietary questionnaire consisting of 10 closed, single and multiple choice questions about awareness and perceptions of clinical trials, and 5 questions concerning demographic information was used. A group of 256 patients with cancer (54% women, 46% men), aged 21-77 years, was surveyed. Respondents were statistically more likely to decide to participate in a clinical trial as oncological patients than the healthy volunteers (Pearson's χ2 test p = 0.00006). The desire to qualify for clinical trials in no way depends on the knowledge of side effects (Pearson's χ2 test p = 0.16796). Our study found that the patients' awareness about clinical trials varied. However, a positive attitude towards research was visible. The main identified barriers to clinical trial participation were fear of possible side effects. Most patients regarded clinical trials as useful, and considered that they are conducted to introduce new treatment/new drug.

  17. Agreement between oncology guidelines and clinical practice in Italy: the 'right' program. A project of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM).

    PubMed

    Barni, S; Venturini, M; Beretta, G D; Gori, S; Molino, A; Carnaghi, C; Labianca, R; Sgarbi, S; Simoni, L; Maiello, E

    2007-06-01

    RIGHT (Research for the Identification of the most effective and hIGhly accepted clinical guidelines for the cancer Treatment) is a project promoted by the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) to measure the concordance between oncology guidelines and clinical practice. The goal of this pilot phase was to develop and test a reliable process to measure this concordance nationwide. Twenty Italian centers participated to the survey. Breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC): guidelines issued by AIOM in 2003 were selected. A total of 29 indicators linked to the process of care were abstracted. Patients who had their first visit at the oncology center between February 2004 and June 2005, with a diagnosis of invasive BC (stage 1 or 2), colon cancer (stage 3), rectal cancer (stage T3-4 or N1-2) or advanced CRC were enclosed. One hundred and sixty-one patients (80%) were analyzed. On average, 93% of BC and 80.3% of colorectal patients received recommended care. These first results indicate that the RIGHT system provides a valid measurement of oncology care to assess agreement with guidelines. A second larger phase of this nationwide monitoring program will enable results to be generalized.

  18. Recent trends for drug lag in clinical development of oncology drugs in Japan: does the oncology drug lag still exist in Japan?

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideki; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    This study exhaustively and historically investigated the status of drug lag for oncology drugs approved in Japan. We comprehensively investigated oncology drugs approved in Japan between April 2001 and July 2014, using publicly available information. We also examined changes in the status of drug lag between Japan and the United States, as well as factors influencing drug lag. This study included 120 applications for approval of oncology drugs in Japan. The median difference over a 13-year period in the approval date between the United States and Japan was 875 days (29.2 months). This figure peaked in 2002, and showed a tendency to decline gradually each year thereafter. In 2014, the median approval lag was 281 days (9.4 months). Multiple regression analysis identified the following potential factors that reduce drug lag: "Japan's participation in global clinical trials"; "bridging strategies"; "designation of priority review in Japan"; and "molecularly targeted drugs". From 2001 to 2014, molecularly targeted drugs emerged as the predominant oncology drug, and the method of development has changed from full development in Japan or bridging strategy to global simultaneous development by Japan's taking part in global clinical trials. In line with these changes, the drug lag between the United States and Japan has significantly reduced to less than 1 year.

  19. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Oncology: Review of Gene—Drug Associations for Clinical Use †

    PubMed Central

    Mlakar, Vid; Huezo-Diaz Curtis, Patricia; Satyanarayana Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2016-01-01

    During the 3rd congress of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT) in Budapest in 2015, a preliminary meeting was held aimed at establishing a pediatric individualized treatment in oncology and hematology committees. The main purpose was to facilitate the transfer and harmonization of pharmacogenetic testing from research into clinics, to bring together basic and translational research and to educate health professionals throughout Europe. The objective of this review was to provide the attendees of the meeting as well as the larger scientific community an insight into the compiled evidence regarding current pharmacogenomics knowledge in pediatric oncology. This preliminary evaluation will help steer the committee’s work and should give the reader an idea at which stage researchers and clinicians are, in terms of personalizing medicine for children with cancer. From the evidence presented here, future recommendations to achieve this goal will also be suggested. PMID:27618021

  20. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Oncology: Review of Gene-Drug Associations for Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Mlakar, Vid; Huezo-Diaz Curtis, Patricia; Satyanarayana Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2016-09-08

    During the 3rd congress of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT) in Budapest in 2015, a preliminary meeting was held aimed at establishing a pediatric individualized treatment in oncology and hematology committees. The main purpose was to facilitate the transfer and harmonization of pharmacogenetic testing from research into clinics, to bring together basic and translational research and to educate health professionals throughout Europe. The objective of this review was to provide the attendees of the meeting as well as the larger scientific community an insight into the compiled evidence regarding current pharmacogenomics knowledge in pediatric oncology. This preliminary evaluation will help steer the committee's work and should give the reader an idea at which stage researchers and clinicians are, in terms of personalizing medicine for children with cancer. From the evidence presented here, future recommendations to achieve this goal will also be suggested.

  1. American Society of Clinical Oncology position statement on obesity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Courneya, Kerry S; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Burger, Robert A; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Fabian, Carol J; Gucalp, Ayca; Hershman, Dawn L; Hudson, Melissa M; Jones, Lee W; Kakarala, Madhuri; Ness, Kirsten K; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Hudis, Clifford A

    2014-11-01

    Rates of obesity have increased significantly over the last three decades in the United States and globally. In addition to contributing to heart disease and diabetes, obesity is a major unrecognized risk factor for cancer. Obesity is associated with worsened prognosis after cancer diagnosis and also negatively affects the delivery of systemic therapy, contributes to morbidity of cancer treatment, and may raise the risk of second malignancies and comorbidities. Research shows that the time after a cancer diagnosis can serve as a teachable moment to motivate individuals to adopt risk-reducing behaviors. For this reason, the oncology care team--the providers with whom a patient has the closest relationships in the critical period after a cancer diagnosis--is in a unique position to help patients lose weight and make other healthy lifestyle changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology is committed to reducing the impact of obesity on cancer and has established a multipronged initiative to accomplish this goal by 1) increasing education and awareness of the evidence linking obesity and cancer; 2) providing tools and resources to help oncology providers address obesity with their patients; 3) building and fostering a robust research agenda to better understand the pathophysiology of energy balance alterations, evaluate the impact of behavior change on cancer outcomes, and determine the best methods to help cancer survivors make effective and useful changes in lifestyle behaviors; and 4) advocating for policy and systems change to address societal factors contributing to obesity and improve access to weight management services for patients with cancer. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Clinical and scientific importance of source control in abdominal infections: summary of a symposium

    PubMed Central

    Bohnen, John M.A.; Marshall, John C.; Fry, Donald E.; Johnson, Steven B.; Solomkin, Joseph S.

    1999-01-01

    In May 1997, a panel of surgeon-investigators met to discuss the clinical importance and research implications of controlling the source of abdominal infections. It was concluded that source control is critical to therapeutic success and that antimicrobial therapy and other adjunctive interventions will fail if the source of infection is not controlled by resection, exteriorization or other means. The panelists presented different definitions of source control, depending on the scientific purpose of the definition. All participants agreed that failure to consider the adequacy of source control of infection has limited the value of most clinical trials of therapeutic anti-infective agents. Besides recognizing source control as an essential goal of patient care, the panelists emphasized the need for further investigative work to define, record and stratify the adequacy of source control in clinical trials of therapeutic agents for abdominal infections. PMID:10223073

  3. Clinical and prognostic role of ammonia in advanced decompensated heart failure. The cardio-abdominal syndrome?

    PubMed

    Frea, Simone; Bovolo, Virginia; Pidello, Stefano; Canavosio, Federico G; Botta, Michela; Bergerone, Serena; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2015-09-15

    Advanced heart failure is associated with end-organ damage. Recent literature suggested an intriguing crosstalk between failing heart, abdomen and kidneys. Venous ammonia, as a by-product of the gut, could be a marker of abdominal injury in heart failure patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical and prognostic role of ammonia in patients with advanced decompensated heart failure (ADHF). 90 patients admitted with ADHF were prospectively studied. The prognostic role of ammonia at admission was evaluated. Primary end-points were: a composite of cardiac death, urgent heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support at 3 months and need for renal replacement therapies (RRT). In the study cohort (age 59.0 ± 12.0 years, FE 21.6 ± 9.0%, INTERMACS profile 3.7 ± 0.9, creatinine 1.71 ± 0.95 mg/dl) 27 patients (30%) underwent the cardiac composite endpoint, while 9 patients (10%) needed RRT. At ROC curve analysis ammonia ≥ 130 μg/dl (abdominal damage) showed the best diagnostic accuracy. At multivariate analysis abdominal damage predicted the cardiac composite endpoint. Abdominal damage further increased risk among patient with cold profile at admission (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-7.0, p = 0.046). At multivariate analysis abdominal damage also predicted need for RRT (OR 10.8, 95% CI 1.5-75.8, p = 0.017). The combined use of estimated right atrial pressure and ammonia showed the highest diagnostic accuracy and a very high specificity in prediction of need for RRT. In a selected population admitted for ADHF ammonia, as a marker of abdominal derangement, predicted adverse cardiac events and need for RRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Japanese Society of Medical Oncology Clinical Guidelines: Molecular Testing for Colorectal Cancer Treatment, Third Edition.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kentaro; Taniguchi, Hiroya; Yoshino, Takayuki; Akagi, Kiwamu; Ishida, Hideyuki; Ebi, Hiromichi; Nakatani, Kaname; Muro, Kei; Yatabe, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2018-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Medical Oncology (JSMO) previously published 2 editions of the clinical guidelines: "Japanese guidelines for testing of KRAS gene mutation in colorectal cancer" in 2008 and "Japanese Society of Medical Oncology Clinical Guidelines: RAS (KRAS/NRAS) mutation testing in colorectal cancer patients" in 2014. These guidelines have contributed to the proper use of KRAS and RAS mutation testing, respectively. Recently, clinical utility, particularly for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with BRAF V600E mutation or DNA mismatch-repair (MMR) deficiency, has been established. Therefore, the guideline members decided these genetic alterations should also be involved. The aim of this revision is to properly carry out testing for BRAF V600E mutation and MMR deficiency in addition to RAS mutation. The revised guidelines include the basic requirements for testing for these genetic alterations based on recent scientific evidence. Furthermore, because clinical utility of comprehensive genetic testing using next-generation sequencing and somatic gene testing of analyzing circulating tumor DNA has increasingly evolved with recent advancements in testing technology, we noted the current situation and prospects for these testing technologies and their clinical implementation in the revised guidelines. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Clinical Study in 1,016 Hematology/Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Hierl, Marina; Pfirstinger, Jochen; Andreesen, Reinhard; Holler, Ernst; Mayer, Stephanie; Wolff, Daniel; Vogelhuber, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Surveys state a widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with malignant diseases. CAM methods might potentially interfere with the metabolization of tumor-specific therapy. However, there is little communication about CAM use in hematology/oncology patients between patients, CAM providers, and oncologists. A self-administered questionnaire was handed out to all patients attending to the hematology/oncology outpatient clinic of Regensburg University Hospital. Subsequently, a chart review of all CAM users was performed. Questionnaires of 1,016 patients were analyzed. Of these patients, 30% used CAM, preferably vitamins and micronutrients. Main information sources for CAM methods were physicians/nonmedical practitioners and friends/relatives. CAM therapies were provided mainly by licensed physicians (29%), followed by nonmedical practitioners (14%) and the patients themselves (13%). Although 62% of the CAM users agreed that the oncologist may know about their CAM therapy, a chart entry about CAM use was found only in 41%. CAM is frequently used by hematology/oncology patients. Systematic communication about CAM is essential to avoid possible drug interactions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. The American Society of Clinical Oncology's Efforts to Support Global Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    El-Saghir, Nagi S.; Cufer, Tanja; Cazap, Eduardo; de Guzman, Roselle; Othieno-Abinya, Nicholas Anthony; Sanchez, Jose Angel; Pyle, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Despite much progress in the management of malignant diseases, the number of new cases and cancer-related deaths continues to rise around the world. More than half of new cases occur in economically developing countries, where more than two thirds of cancer deaths are expected. However, implementation of all necessary steps to accomplish the dissemination of state-of-the-art prevention, diagnosis, and management will require increased allocation of resources, and, more importantly, harmonization of the efforts of hundreds of national and international public health agencies, policy-setting bodies, governments, pharmaceutical companies, and philanthropic organizations. More than 30% of the members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reside and practice outside US borders, and more than half of attendees at all of the scientific congresses and symposia organized by ASCO are international. As cancer has become an increasingly global disease, ASCO has evolved as a global organization. The ASCO Board of Directors currently includes members from France, Brazil, and Canada. In 2013, the ASCO Board of Directors identified a number of strategic priorities for the future. Recognizing the importance of non-US members to the society, their first strategic priority was improving the society's service to non-US members and defining these members' identity in the international oncology community. This article reviews current ASCO activities in the international arena and its future plans in global oncology. PMID:26578614

  7. [Rethinking clinical research in surgical oncology. From comic opera to quality control].

    PubMed

    Evrard, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of surgical interventions is relatively poor and data from large, randomized prospective studies are rare with often a poor quality. Many efforts have been made to increase the number of high quality randomized trials in surgery and theoretical proposals have been put forward to improve the situation, but practical implementation of these proposals is seriously lacking. The consequences of this policy are not trivial; with very few patients included in surgical oncology trials, this represents wasted opportunity for advances in cancer treatment. In this review, we cover the difficulties inherent to clinical research in surgical oncology, such as quality control, equipoise, accrual, and funding and promote alternative designs to the randomized controlled trial. Although the classic randomized controlled trial has a valid but limited place in surgical oncology, other prospective designs need to be promoted as a new deal. This new deal not only implicates surgeons but also journal editors, tender jury, as well as regulatory bodies to cover legal gaps currently surrounding surgical innovation. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. GNOSIS: guidelines for neuro-oncology: standards for investigational studies--reporting of surgically based therapeutic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Susan; Vogelbaum, Michael; Lang, Frederick F; Haines, Stephen; Kunwar, Sandeep; Chiocca, E Antonio; Olivi, Alessandro; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Parsa, Andrew; Warnick, Ronald

    2007-04-01

    We present guidelines to standardize the reporting of surgically based neuro-oncology trials. The guidelines are summarized in a checklist format that can be used as a framework from which to construct a surgically based trial. This manuscript follows and is taken in part from GNOSIS: Guidelines for neuro-oncology: Standards for investigational studies-reporting of phase 1 and phase 2 clinical trials [Chang SM, Reynolds SL, Butowski N, Lamborn KR, Buckner JC, Kaplan RS, Bigner DD (2005) Neuro-oncology 7:425-434].

  9. Developing emotional intelligence ability in oncology nurses: a clinical rounds approach.

    PubMed

    Codier, Estelle; Freitas, Beth; Muneno, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility and impact of an emotional intelligence ability development program on staff and patient care. A mixed method, pre/post-test design. A tertiary care hospital in urban Honolulu, HI. Rounds took place on a 24-bed inpatient oncology unit. 33 RNs in an oncology unit. After collection of baseline data, the emotional intelligence rounds were conducted in an inpatient oncology nursing unit on all shifts during a 10-month period. Demographic information, emotional intelligence scores, data from rounds, chart reviews of emotional care documentation, and unit-wide satisfaction and safety data. The ability to identify emotions in self and others was demonstrated less frequently than expected in this population. The low test response rate prevented comparison of scores pre- and postintervention. The staff's 94% participation in rounds, the positive (100%) evaluation of rounds, and poststudy improvements in emotional care documentation and emotional care planning suggest a positive effect from the intervention. Additional research is recommended over a longer period of time to evaluate the impact emotional intelligence specifically has on the staff's identification of emotions. Because the intervention involved minimal time and resources, feasibility for continuation of the intervention poststudy was rated "high" by the research team. Research in other disciplines suggests that improvement in emotional intelligence ability in clinical staff nurses may improve retention, performance, and teamwork in nursing, which would be of particular significance in high-risk clinical practice environments. Few research studies have explored development of emotional intelligence abilities in clinical staff nurses. Evidence from this study suggests that interventions in the clinical environment may be used to develop emotional intelligence ability. Impact from such development may be used in the future to not only improve the quality of nursing care, but also

  10. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. Genetic consultation embedded in a gynecologic oncology clinic improves compliance with guideline-based care.

    PubMed

    Senter, Leigha; O'Malley, David M; Backes, Floor J; Copeland, Larry J; Fowler, Jeffery M; Salani, Ritu; Cohn, David E

    2017-10-01

    Analyze the impact of embedding genetic counseling services in gynecologic oncology on clinician referral and patient uptake of cancer genetics services. Data were reviewed for a total of 737 newly diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer patients seen in gynecologic oncology at a large academic medical center including 401 from 11/2011-7/2014 (a time when cancer genetics services were provided as an off-site consultation). These data were compared to data from 8/2014-9/2016 (n=336), when the model changed to the genetics embedded model (GEM), incorporating a cancer genetic counselor on-site in the gynecologic oncology clinic. A statistically significant difference in proportion of patients referred pre- and post-GEM was observed (21% vs. 44%, p<0.0001). Pre-GEM, only 38% of referred patients were actually scheduled for genetics consultation and post-GEM 82% were scheduled (p<0.00001). The difference in the time from referral to scheduling in genetics was also statistically significant (3.92months pre-GEM vs. 0.79months post-GEM, p<0.00001) as was the time from referral to completion of genetics consultation (2.52months pre-GEM vs. 1.67months post-GEM, p<0.01). Twenty-five percent of patients referred post GEM were seen by the genetic counselor on the same day as the referral. Providing cancer genetics services on-site in gynecologic oncology and modifying the process by which patients are referred and scheduled significantly increases referral to cancer genetics and timely completion of genetics consultation, improving compliance with guideline-based care. Practice changes are critical given the impact of genetic test results on treatment and familial cancer risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Vienna international summer school on experimental and clinical oncology for medical students: an Austrian cancer education project.

    PubMed

    Fromm-Haidenberger, Sabine; Pohl, Gudrun; Widder, Joachim; Kren, Gerhard; Fitzal, Florian; Bartsch, Rupert; de Vries, Jakob; Zielinski, Christoph; Pötter, Richard

    2010-03-01

    The "International Summer School on Experimental and Clinical Oncology for Medical Students" is organised at the Medical University of Vienna to teach a multidisciplinary approach to oncology to medical students in the final phase of their studies. The program includes biology, diagnosis, clinical and psycho-oncology. Lectures are given by medical, radiation and surgical oncologists. Teaching includes case reports, poster presentations and role-play. As part of the organising committee, Austrian students organise a social program. Since 1999, six courses have been held (147 students from 19 countries). Students recorded high satisfaction with organisation, scientific content and topic range. Case presentations, poster presentations and role-play were very useful. Early criticism that the program was too intense (long lectures and little interaction) has been answered. The summer school has a high degree of acceptance and is a very useful tool to teach medical students about oncology and approaching a cancer patient.

  13. New evidence-based adaptive clinical trial methods for optimally integrating predictive biomarkers into oncology clinical development programs

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, Robert A.; Chen, Cong

    2013-01-01

    Predictive biomarkers are important to the future of oncology; they can be used to identify patient populations who will benefit from therapy, increase the value of cancer medicines, and decrease the size and cost of clinical trials while increasing their chance of success. But predictive biomarkers do not always work. When unsuccessful, they add cost, complexity, and time to drug development. This perspective describes phases 2 and 3 development methods that efficiently and adaptively check the ability of a biomarker to predict clinical outcomes. In the end, the biomarker is emphasized to the extent that it can actually predict. PMID:23489587

  14. A qualitative study evaluating causality attribution for serious adverse events during early phase oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Som D; Coombes, Megan E; Levine, Mitch; Cosby, Jarold; Kowaleski, Brenda; Arnold, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    In early phase oncology trials, novel targeted therapies are increasingly being tested in combination with traditional agents creating greater potential for enhanced and new toxicities. When a patient experiences a serious adverse event (SAE), investigators must determine whether the event is attributable to the investigational drug or not. This study seeks to understand the clinical reasoning, tools used and challenges faced by the researchers who assign causality to SAE's. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical oncologists and trial coordinators at six Canadian academic cancer centres. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Individual interview content analysis was followed by thematic analysis across the interview set. Our study found that causality assessment tends to be a rather complex process, often without complete clinical and investigational data at hand. Researchers described using a common processing strategy whereby they gather pertinent information, eliminate alternative explanations, and consider whether or not the study drug resulted in the SAE. Many of the interviewed participants voiced concern that causality assessments are often conducted quickly and tend to be highly subjective. Many participants were unable to identify any useful tools to help in assigning causality and welcomed more objectivity in the overall process. Attributing causality to SAE's is a complex process. Clinical trial researchers apply a logical system of reasoning, but feel that the current method of assigning causality could be improved. Based on these findings, future research involving the development of a new causality assessment tool specifically for use in early phase oncology clinical trials may be useful.

  15. Implementation of Electronic Checklists in an Oncology Medical Record: Initial Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Kevin V.; Miller, Alexis A.; Roeske, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of any medical treatment depends on the accurate processing of multiple complex components of information, with proper delivery to the patient. This is true for radiation oncology, in which treatment delivery is as complex as a surgical procedure but more dependent on hardware and software technology. Uncorrected errors, even if small or infrequent, can result in catastrophic consequences for the patient. We developed electronic checklists (ECLs) within the oncology electronic medical record (EMR) and evaluated their use and report on our initial clinical experience. Methods: Using the Mosaiq EMR, we developed checklists within the clinical assessment section. These checklists are based on the process flow of information from one group to another within the clinic and enable the processing, confirmation, and documentation of relevant patient information before the delivery of radiation therapy. The clinical use of the ECL was documented by means of a customized report. Results: Use of ECL has reduced the number of times that physicians were called to the treatment unit. In particular, the ECL has ensured that therapists have a better understanding of the treatment plan before the initiation of treatment. An evaluation of ECL compliance showed that, with additional staff training, > 94% of the records were completed. Conclusion: The ECL can be used to ensure standardization of procedures and documentation that the pretreatment checks have been performed before patient treatment. We believe that the implementation of ECLs will improve patient safety and reduce the likelihood of treatment errors. PMID:22043184

  16. Clinical evaluation of extraperitoneal colostomy without damaging the muscle layer of the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Dong, L-R; Zhu, Y-M; Xu, Q; Cao, C-X; Zhang, B-Z

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether extraperitoneal colostomy without damaging the muscle layer of the abdominal wall is an improved surgical procedure compared with conventional sigmoid colostomy in patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection. Patients with rectal cancer undergoing abdominoperineal resection were selected and randomly divided into two groups: the study group received extraperitoneal colostomy without damaging the muscle layer of the abdominal wall and the control group received conventional colostomy. Clinical data from both groups were analysed. A total of 128 patients were included: 66 received extraperitoneal colostomy without damaging the muscle layer of the abdominal wall and 62 received conventional colostomy. Significant differences between the two groups were found in relation to colostomy operating time, defaecation sensation, bowel control and overall stoma-related complications. Duration of postoperative hospital stay was also significantly different between the study groups. Extraperitoneal colostomy without damaging the muscle layer of the abdominal wall was found to be an improved procedure compared with conventional sigmoid colostomy in abdominoperineal resection, and may reduce colostomy-related complications, shorten operating time and postoperative hospital stay, and potentially improve patients' quality of life.

  17. AAPM Task Group 103 report on peer review in clinical radiation oncology physics

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Per H.; Das, Indra J.; Fraser, Martin; Freedman, D. Jay; Rice, Robert E.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Parsai, E. Ishmael; Robin, T. Tydings; Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides guidelines for a peer review process between two clinical radiation oncology physicists. While the Task Group's work was primarily focused on ensuring timely and productive independent reviews for physicists in solo practice, these guidelines may also be appropriate for physicists in a group setting, particularly when dispersed over multiple separate clinic locations. To ensure that such reviews enable a collegial exchange of professional ideas and productive critique of the entire clinical physics program, the reviews should not be used as an employee evaluation instrument by the employer. Such use is neither intended nor supported by this Task Group. Detailed guidelines are presented on the minimum content of such reviews, as well as a recommended format for reporting the findings of a review. In consideration of the full schedules faced by most clinical physicists, the process outlined herein was designed to be completed in one working day. PACS numbers: 87.53.Xd, 87.90.+y PMID:16421500

  18. Knowledge bases, clinical decision support systems, and rapid learning in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter Paul

    2015-03-01

    One of the most important benefits of health information technology is to assist the cognitive process of the human mind in the face of vast amounts of health data, limited time for decision making, and the complexity of the patient with cancer. Clinical decision support tools are frequently cited as a technologic solution to this problem, but to date useful clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have been limited in utility and implementation. This article describes three unique sources of health data that underlie fundamentally different types of knowledge bases which feed into CDSS. CDSS themselves comprise a variety of models which are discussed. The relationship of knowledge bases and CDSS to rapid learning health systems design is critical as CDSS are essential drivers of rapid learning in clinical care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Relationships Between Authorship Contributions and Authors' Industry Financial Ties Among Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Susannah L.; Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Joffe, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that authors who play key scientific roles in oncology clinical trials, and who therefore have increased influence over the design, analysis, interpretation or reporting of trials, are more likely than those who do not play such roles to have financial ties to industry. Methods Data were abstracted from all trials (n = 235) of drugs or biologic agents published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology between January 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007. Article-level data included sponsorship, age group (adult v pediatric), phase, single versus multicenter, country (United States v other), and number of authors. Author-level data (n = 2,927) included financial ties (eg, employment, consulting) and performance of key scientific roles (ie, conception/design, analysis/interpretation, or manuscript writing). Associations between performance of key roles and financial ties, adjusting for article-level covariates, were examined using generalized linear mixed models. Results One thousand eight hundred eighty-one authors (64%) reported performing at least one key role, and 842 authors (29%) reported at least one financial tie. Authors who reported performing a key role were more likely than other authors to report financial ties to industry (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.3; 99% CI, 3.0 to 6.0; P < .0001). The association was stronger among trials with, compared with those without, industry funding (OR, 5.0 [99% CI, 3.4 to 7.5] v OR, 2.5 [99% CI, 1.3 to 4.8]), but was present regardless of sponsorship. Conclusion Authors who perform key roles in the conception and design, analysis, and interpretation, or reporting of oncology clinical trials are more likely than authors who do not perform such roles to have financial ties to industry. PMID:20065190

  20. Relationships between authorship contributions and authors' industry financial ties among oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rose, Susannah L; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Joffe, Steven

    2010-03-10

    PURPOSE To test the hypothesis that authors who play key scientific roles in oncology clinical trials, and who therefore have increased influence over the design, analysis, interpretation or reporting of trials, are more likely than those who do not play such roles to have financial ties to industry. METHODS Data were abstracted from all trials (n = 235) of drugs or biologic agents published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology between January 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007. Article-level data included sponsorship, age group (adult v pediatric), phase, single versus multicenter, country (United States v other), and number of authors. Author-level data (n = 2,927) included financial ties (eg, employment, consulting) and performance of key scientific roles (ie, conception/design, analysis/interpretation, or manuscript writing). Associations between performance of key roles and financial ties, adjusting for article-level covariates, were examined using generalized linear mixed models. Results One thousand eight hundred eighty-one authors (64%) reported performing at least one key role, and 842 authors (29%) reported at least one financial tie. Authors who reported performing a key role were more likely than other authors to report financial ties to industry (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.3; 99% CI, 3.0 to 6.0; P < .0001). The association was stronger among trials with, compared with those without, industry funding (OR, 5.0 [99% CI, 3.4 to 7.5] v OR, 2.5 [99% CI, 1.3 to 4.8]), but was present regardless of sponsorship. CONCLUSION Authors who perform key roles in the conception and design, analysis, and interpretation, or reporting of oncology clinical trials are more likely than authors who do not perform such roles to have financial ties to industry.

  1. Attrition rates, reasons, and predictive factors in supportive care and palliative oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hui, David; Glitza, Isabella; Chisholm, Gary; Yennu, Sriram; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-03-01

    Attrition is common among supportive care/palliative oncology clinical trials. However, to the authors' knowledge, few studies to date have documented the reasons and predictors for dropout. In the current study, the authors' objective was to determine the rate, reasons, and factors associated with attrition both before reaching the primary endpoint and at the end of the study. A review of all prospective interventional supportive care/palliative oncology trials conducted in the Department of Palliative Care and Rehabilitation Medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston between 1999 and 2011 was performed. Patient and study characteristics and attrition data were extracted. A total of 1214 patients were included in 18 clinical trials. The median age of the patients was 60 years. Approximately 41% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of ≥ 3, a median Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) for fatigue of 7 of 10, and a median ESAS for dyspnea of 2 of 10. The attrition rate was 26% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 23%-28%) for the primary endpoint and 44% (95% CI, 41%-47%) for the end of the study. Common reasons for primary endpoint dropout were symptom burden (21%), patient preference (15%), hospitalization (10%), and death (6%). Primary endpoint attrition was associated with a higher baseline intensity of fatigue (odds ratio [OR], 1.10 per point; P = .01) and a longer study duration (P = .04). End-of-study attrition was associated with higher baseline levels of dyspnea (OR, 1.06; P = .01), fatigue (OR, 1.08; P = .01), Hispanic race (OR, 1.87; P = .002), higher level of education (P = .02), longer study duration (P = .01), and outpatient studies (P = 0.05). The attrition rate was high in supportive care/palliative oncology clinical trials, and was associated with various patient characteristics and a high baseline symptom burden. These findings have implications for future clinical trial design including

  2. Same-Day Imaging Using Small Proteins: Clinical Experience and Translational Prospects in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Krasniqi, Ahmet; D'Huyvetter, Matthias; Devoogdt, Nick; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Sörensen, Jens; Orlova, Anna; Keyaerts, Marleen; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2018-06-01

    Imaging of expression of therapeutic targets may enable stratification of patients for targeted treatments. The use of small radiolabeled probes based on the heavy-chain variable region of heavy-chain-only immunoglobulins or nonimmunoglobulin scaffolds permits rapid localization of radiotracers in tumors and rapid clearance from normal tissues. This makes high-contrast imaging possible on the day of injection. This mini review focuses on small proteins for radionuclide-based imaging that would allow same-day imaging, with the emphasis on clinical applications and promising preclinical developments within the field of oncology. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  3. Oncology nurses' use of National Comprehensive Cancer Network clinical practice guidelines for chemotherapy-induced and febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Nirenberg, Anita; Reame, Nancy K; Cato, Kenrick D; Larson, Elaine L

    2010-11-01

    To describe oncology nurses' use of National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) clinical practice guidelines for chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) and febrile neutropenia (FN). Cross-sectional survey design; descriptive, correlational analysis. E-mail invitation to Web-based survey. Random sample of 309 Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) members with e-mail addresses who provide care to adult patients receiving chemotherapy. The investigator-developed Neutropenia Oncology Nurses Survey was used. Descriptive tests compared respondents' personal and professional characteristics to those of general ONS members; nonparametric chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to correlate respondents' survey subscale scores with demographic data. Significant associations were entered into multiple logistic regression models. The Neutropenia Oncology Nurses Survey's subscales measured subjective norm, attitude, perceived competence and confidence, perceived barriers, and use of NCCN clinical practice guidelines for CIN and FN. Response rate of nurses who opened the survey was 50%. Most practiced in community versus academic centers. Eighty percent reported using the NCCN clinical practice guidelines for CIN and FN. Respondents were more likely to use clinical practice guidelines when they were expected to by physician and nurse colleagues, they perceived fewer barriers, or they held advanced oncology certification. This study was the first to assess oncology nurses' reported use of NCCN clinical practice guidelines for CIN and FN. It also demonstrated the feasibility of partnering with ONS for Web-based survey research. The findings give insight into work-place barriers to evidence-based practice in various settings. Expanding dissemination and implementation of clinical practice guideline recommendations will support the development of oncology nursing standards for risk assessment, management, and patient and family education in CIN and FN.

  4. Treatment of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Kindler, Hedy L; Ismaila, Nofisat; Armato, Samuel G; Bueno, Raphael; Hesdorffer, Mary; Jahan, Thierry; Jones, Clyde Michael; Miettinen, Markku; Pass, Harvey; Rimner, Andreas; Rusch, Valerie; Sterman, Daniel; Thomas, Anish; Hassan, Raffit

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to practicing physicians and others on the management of malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel of medical oncology, thoracic surgery, radiation oncology, pulmonary, pathology, imaging, and advocacy experts to conduct a literature search, which included systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, and prospective and retrospective comparative observational studies published from 1990 through 2017. Outcomes of interest included survival, disease-free or recurrence-free survival, and quality of life. Expert Panel members used available evidence and informal consensus to develop evidence-based guideline recommendations. Results The literature search identified 222 relevant studies to inform the evidence base for this guideline. Recommendations Evidence-based recommendations were developed for diagnosis, staging, chemotherapy, surgical cytoreduction, radiation therapy, and multimodality therapy in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/thoracic-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  5. Pragmatic precision oncology: the secondary uses of clinical tumor molecular profiling.

    PubMed

    Rioth, Matthew J; Thota, Ramya; Staggs, David B; Johnson, Douglas B; Warner, Jeremy L

    2016-07-01

    Precision oncology increasingly utilizes molecular profiling of tumors to determine treatment decisions with targeted therapeutics. The molecular profiling data is valuable in the treatment of individual patients as well as for multiple secondary uses. To automatically parse, categorize, and aggregate clinical molecular profile data generated during cancer care as well as use this data to address multiple secondary use cases. A system to parse, categorize and aggregate molecular profile data was created. A naÿve Bayesian classifier categorized results according to clinical groups. The accuracy of these systems were validated against a published expertly-curated subset of molecular profiling data. Following one year of operation, 819 samples have been accurately parsed and categorized to generate a data repository of 10,620 genetic variants. The database has been used for operational, clinical trial, and discovery science research. A real-time database of molecular profiling data is a pragmatic solution to several knowledge management problems in the practice and science of precision oncology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Pragmatic precision oncology: the secondary uses of clinical tumor molecular profiling

    PubMed Central

    Thota, Ramya; Staggs, David B; Johnson, Douglas B; Warner, Jeremy L

    2016-01-01

    Background Precision oncology increasingly utilizes molecular profiling of tumors to determine treatment decisions with targeted therapeutics. The molecular profiling data is valuable in the treatment of individual patients as well as for multiple secondary uses. Objective To automatically parse, categorize, and aggregate clinical molecular profile data generated during cancer care as well as use this data to address multiple secondary use cases. Methods A system to parse, categorize and aggregate molecular profile data was created. A naÿve Bayesian classifier categorized results according to clinical groups. The accuracy of these systems were validated against a published expertly-curated subset of molecular profiling data. Results Following one year of operation, 819 samples have been accurately parsed and categorized to generate a data repository of 10,620 genetic variants. The database has been used for operational, clinical trial, and discovery science research. Conclusions A real-time database of molecular profiling data is a pragmatic solution to several knowledge management problems in the practice and science of precision oncology. PMID:27026612

  7. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-10-21

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  8. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: Current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  9. Computational oncology.

    PubMed

    Lefor, Alan T

    2011-08-01

    Oncology research has traditionally been conducted using techniques from the biological sciences. The new field of computational oncology has forged a new relationship between the physical sciences and oncology to further advance research. By applying physics and mathematics to oncologic problems, new insights will emerge into the pathogenesis and treatment of malignancies. One major area of investigation in computational oncology centers around the acquisition and analysis of data, using improved computing hardware and software. Large databases of cellular pathways are being analyzed to understand the interrelationship among complex biological processes. Computer-aided detection is being applied to the analysis of routine imaging data including mammography and chest imaging to improve the accuracy and detection rate for population screening. The second major area of investigation uses computers to construct sophisticated mathematical models of individual cancer cells as well as larger systems using partial differential equations. These models are further refined with clinically available information to more accurately reflect living systems. One of the major obstacles in the partnership between physical scientists and the oncology community is communications. Standard ways to convey information must be developed. Future progress in computational oncology will depend on close collaboration between clinicians and investigators to further the understanding of cancer using these new approaches.

  10. R-IDEAL: A Framework for Systematic Clinical Evaluation of Technical Innovations in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Verkooijen, Helena M; Kerkmeijer, Linda G W; Fuller, Clifton D; Huddart, Robbert; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Verheij, Marcel; Mook, Stella; Sahgal, Arjun; Hall, Emma; Schultz, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The pace of innovation in radiation oncology is high and the window of opportunity for evaluation narrow. Financial incentives, industry pressure, and patients' demand for high-tech treatments have led to widespread implementation of innovations before, or even without, robust evidence of improved outcomes has been generated. The standard phase I-IV framework for drug evaluation is not the most efficient and desirable framework for assessment of technological innovations. In order to provide a standard assessment methodology for clinical evaluation of innovations in radiotherapy, we adapted the surgical IDEAL framework to fit the radiation oncology setting. Like surgery, clinical evaluation of innovations in radiation oncology is complicated by continuous technical development, team and operator dependence, and differences in quality control. Contrary to surgery, radiotherapy innovations may be used in various ways, e.g., at different tumor sites and with different aims, such as radiation volume reduction and dose escalation. Also, the effect of radiation treatment can be modeled, allowing better prediction of potential benefits and improved patient selection. Key distinctive features of R-IDEAL include the important role of predicate and modeling studies (Stage 0), randomization at an early stage in the development of the technology, and long-term follow-up for late toxicity. We implemented R-IDEAL for clinical evaluation of a recent innovation in radiation oncology, the MRI-guided linear accelerator (MR-Linac). MR-Linac combines a radiotherapy linear accelerator with a 1.5-T MRI, aiming for improved targeting, dose escalation, and margin reduction, and is expected to increase the use of hypofractionation, improve tumor control, leading to higher cure rates and less toxicity. An international consortium, with participants from seven large cancer institutes from Europe and North America, has adopted the R-IDEAL framework to work toward coordinated, evidence

  11. Effect of Crossover in Oncology Clinical Trials on Evidence Levels in Early Benefit Assessment in Germany.

    PubMed

    Isbary, Georg; Staab, Thomas R; Amelung, Volker E; Dintsios, Charalabos-Markos; Iking-Konert, Christof; Nesurini, Sonja Mariotti; Walter, Miriam; Ruof, Jörg

    2018-06-01

    In oncology clinical trials, crossover is used frequently but may lead to uncertainties regarding treatment effects. To investigate the handling of evidence from crossover trials by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the German Federal Joint Committee (G-BA). For oncology medicines with early benefit assessments before January 2015, presence of crossover, clinical data, EMA requests for additional data, and G-BA benefit ratings/evidence levels were analyzed from manufacturers' dossiers, G-BA appraisals, European Public Assessment Reports, and original publications. Eleven of 21 benefit assessments included crossover trials. Significant intergroup differences (P < 0.05) in overall survival (OS) were noted in 7 of 11 trials with and 7 of 10 without crossover. For 6 of 11 medicines with crossover, these were demonstrated before crossover. Treatment effects generally worsened with increasing proportions of crossover. The EMA requested additional data more frequently if crossover was performed, particularly if no OS data were available before crossover. The G-BA granted a considerable benefit to 73% of medicines with crossover and 40% of those without. Evidence levels were intermediate for 50% and 75%, respectively. None of the medicines received the highest evidence level. In G-BA appraisals, oncology medicines with crossover received better additional benefit ratings, but were assigned lower evidence levels, than those without. The five medicines with crossover after progression were assigned lower evidence levels than the six medicines with crossover after demonstration of superior OS, indicating that the way in which crossover is implemented may be one factor influencing the assignment of evidence levels by the G-BA. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Follow-up care, surveillance protocol, and secondary prevention measures for survivors of colorectal cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline endorsement.

    PubMed

    Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Mangu, Pamela B; Flynn, Patrick J; Korde, Larissa; Loprinzi, Charles L; Minsky, Bruce D; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Ryan, Kim; Schrag, Deborah H; Wong, Sandra L; Benson, Al B

    2013-12-10

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing recent clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) Guideline on Follow-up Care, Surveillance Protocol, and Secondary Prevention Measures for Survivors of Colorectal Cancer was reviewed by ASCO for methodologic rigor and considered for endorsement. The ASCO Panel concurred with the CCO recommendations and recommended endorsement, with the addition of several qualifying statements. Surveillance should be guided by presumed risk of recurrence and functional status of the patient (important within the first 2 to 4 years). Medical history, physical examination, and carcinoembryonic antigen testing should be performed every 3 to 6 months for 5 years. Patients at higher risk of recurrence should be considered for testing in the more frequent end of the range. A computed tomography scan (abdominal and chest) is recommended annually for 3 years, in most cases. Positron emission tomography scans should not be used for surveillance outside of a clinical trial. A surveillance colonoscopy should be performed 1 year after the initial surgery and then every 5 years, dictated by the findings of the previous one. If a colonoscopy was not preformed before diagnosis, it should be done after completion of adjuvant therapy (before 1 year). Secondary prevention (maintaining a healthy body weight and active lifestyle) is recommended. If a patient is not a candidate for surgery or systemic therapy because of severe comorbid conditions, surveillance tests should not be performed. A treatment plan from the specialist should have clear directions on appropriate follow-up by a nonspecialist.

  13. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu; Moiseenko, Vitali; Kagadis, George C.

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authorsmore » contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.« less

  14. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu; Moiseenko, Vitali; Kagadis, George C.

    2014-01-15

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authorsmore » contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.« less

  15. The role of Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core for precision medicine era of clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) services have been established for the quality assurance (QA) of imaging and radiotherapy (RT) for NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) for any trials that contain imaging or RT. The randomized clinical trial is the gold standard for evidence-based medicine. QA ensures data quality, preventing noise from inferior treatments obscuring clinical trial outcome. QA is also found to be cost-effective. IROC has made great progress in multi-institution standardization and is expected to lead QA standardization, QA science in imaging and RT and to advance quality data analysis with big data in the future. The QA in the era of precision medicine is of paramount importance, when individualized decision making may depend on the quality and accuracy of RT and imaging. PMID:29218265

  16. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kevin L; Kagadis, George C; McNutt, Todd R; Moiseenko, Vitali; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  17. Successful use of nitrous oxide during lumbar punctures: A call for nitrous oxide in pediatric oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Mylynda; Lawell, Miranda; McAllister, Nancy

    2017-11-01

    Numerous reports describe the successful use of nitrous oxide for analgesia in children undergoing painful procedures. Although shown to be safe, effective, and economical, nitrous oxide use is not yet common in pediatric oncology clinics and few reports detail its effectiveness for children undergoing repeated lumbar punctures. We developed a nitrous oxide clinic, and undertook a review of pediatric oncology lumbar puncture records for those patients receiving nitrous oxide in 2011. No major complications were noted. Minor complications were noted in 2% of the procedures. We offer guidelines for establishing such a clinic. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Enhancing value of clinical pharmacodynamics in oncology drug development: An alliance between quantitative pharmacology and translational science.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, K; Ecsedy, J A

    2017-01-01

    Clinical pharmacodynamic evaluation is a key component of the "pharmacologic audit trail" in oncology drug development. We posit that its value can and should be greatly enhanced via application of a robust quantitative pharmacology framework informed by biologically mechanistic considerations. Herein, we illustrate examples of intersectional blindspots across the disciplines of quantitative pharmacology and translational science and offer a roadmap aimed at enhancing the caliber of clinical pharmacodynamic research in the development of oncology therapeutics. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  19. Applicability of randomized trials in radiation oncology to standard clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Chiu, Wing K; Kimple, Randall J; Harris, Stephen L; Morris, David E; Tepper, Joel E

    2013-08-15

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are commonly used to inform clinical practice; however, it is unclear how generalizable RCT data are to patients in routine clinical practice. The authors of this report assessed the availability and applicability of randomized evidence guiding medical decisions in a cohort of patients who were evaluated for consideration of definitive management in a radiation oncology clinic. The medical records of consecutive, new patient consultations between January and March 2007 were reviewed. Patient medical decisions were classified as those with (Group 1) or without (Group 2) available, relevant level I evidence (phase 3 RCT) supporting recommended treatments. Group 1 medical decisions were further divided into 3 groups based on the extent of fulfilling eligibility criteria for each RCT: Group 1A included decisions that fulfilled all eligibility criteria; Group 1B, decisions that did not fulfill at least 1 minor eligibility criteria; or Group 1C, decisions that did not fulfill at least 1 major eligibility criteria. Patient and clinical characteristics were tested for correlations with the availability of evidence. Of the 393 evaluable patients, malignancies of the breast (30%), head and neck (18%), and genitourinary system (14%) were the most common presenting primary disease sites. Forty-seven percent of all medical decisions (n = 451) were made without available (36%) or applicable (11%) randomized evidence to inform clinical decision making. Primary tumor diagnosis was significantly associated with the availability of evidence (P < .0001). A significant proportion of medical decisions in an academic radiation oncology clinic were made without available or applicable level I evidence, underscoring the limitations of relying solely on RCTs for the development of evidence-based health care. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  20. Validation of a next-generation sequencing assay for clinical molecular oncology.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Catherine E; Al-Kateb, Hussam; Bredemeyer, Andrew J; Duncavage, Eric J; Spencer, David H; Abel, Haley J; Lockwood, Christina M; Hagemann, Ian S; O'Guin, Stephanie M; Burcea, Lauren C; Sawyer, Christopher S; Oschwald, Dayna M; Stratman, Jennifer L; Sher, Dorie A; Johnson, Mark R; Brown, Justin T; Cliften, Paul F; George, Bijoy; McIntosh, Leslie D; Shrivastava, Savita; Nguyen, Tudung T; Payton, Jacqueline E; Watson, Mark A; Crosby, Seth D; Head, Richard D; Mitra, Robi D; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Seibert, Karen; Virgin, Herbert W; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Pfeifer, John D

    2014-01-01

    Currently, oncology testing includes molecular studies and cytogenetic analysis to detect genetic aberrations of clinical significance. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows rapid analysis of multiple genes for clinically actionable somatic variants. The WUCaMP assay uses targeted capture for NGS analysis of 25 cancer-associated genes to detect mutations at actionable loci. We present clinical validation of the assay and a detailed framework for design and validation of similar clinical assays. Deep sequencing of 78 tumor specimens (≥ 1000× average unique coverage across the capture region) achieved high sensitivity for detecting somatic variants at low allele fraction (AF). Validation revealed sensitivities and specificities of 100% for detection of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) within coding regions, compared with SNP array sequence data (95% CI = 83.4-100.0 for sensitivity and 94.2-100.0 for specificity) or whole-genome sequencing (95% CI = 89.1-100.0 for sensitivity and 99.9-100.0 for specificity) of HapMap samples. Sensitivity for detecting variants at an observed 10% AF was 100% (95% CI = 93.2-100.0) in HapMap mixes. Analysis of 15 masked specimens harboring clinically reported variants yielded concordant calls for 13/13 variants at AF of ≥ 15%. The WUCaMP assay is a robust and sensitive method to detect somatic variants of clinical significance in molecular oncology laboratories, with reduced time and cost of genetic analysis allowing for strategic patient management. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Presentation of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Saps, Miguel; Mintjens, Stijn; Pusatcioglu, Cenk K; Cohen, Daniel M; Sternberg, Petra

    2017-08-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity and abnormal coping are common in children with functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). Thus, it would be expected that children with visceral hypersensitivity would report more pain if their gut is acutely inflamed. The aim of the study was to compare clinical symptoms and somatization of children with and without FAPDs at time of an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Seventy children with acute gastroenteritis and their parents completed the Rome III Diagnostic Questionnaire for Pediatric Functional GI Disorders and the Children's Somatization Inventory. Twenty-one percent of children were diagnosed with an FAPD. Children with FAPDs showed significantly more nongastrointestinal somatic symptoms than children without FAPDs. There were no significant differences in abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or school absenteeism between both groups at time of consultation.

  2. Application of next-generation sequencing in clinical oncology to advance personalized treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yan-Fang; Li, Gai-Rui; Wang, Rong-Jiao; Yi, Yu-Ting; Yang, Ling; Jiang, Dan; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Peng, Yin

    2012-01-01

    With the development and improvement of new sequencing technology, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied increasingly in cancer genomics research over the past decade. More recently, NGS has been adopted in clinical oncology to advance personalized treatment of cancer. NGS is used to identify novel and rare cancer mutations, detect familial cancer mutation carriers, and provide molecular rationale for appropriate targeted therapy. Compared to traditional sequencing, NGS holds many advantages, such as the ability to fully sequence all types of mutations for a large number of genes (hundreds to thousands) in a single test at a relatively low cost. However, significant challenges, particularly with respect to the requirement for simpler assays, more flexible throughput, shorter turnaround time, and most importantly, easier data analysis and interpretation, will have to be overcome to translate NGS to the bedside of cancer patients. Overall, continuous dedication to apply NGS in clinical oncology practice will enable us to be one step closer to personalized medicine. PMID:22980418

  3. Modeling the economic outcomes of immuno-oncology drugs: alternative model frameworks to capture clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gibson, E J; Begum, N; Koblbauer, I; Dranitsaris, G; Liew, D; McEwan, P; Tahami Monfared, A A; Yuan, Y; Juarez-Garcia, A; Tyas, D; Lees, M

    2018-01-01

    Economic models in oncology are commonly based on the three-state partitioned survival model (PSM) distinguishing between progression-free and progressive states. However, the heterogeneity of responses observed in immuno-oncology (I-O) suggests that new approaches may be appropriate to reflect disease dynamics meaningfully. This study explored the impact of incorporating immune-specific health states into economic models of I-O therapy. Two variants of the PSM and a Markov model were populated with data from one clinical trial in metastatic melanoma patients. Short-term modeled outcomes were benchmarked to the clinical trial data and a lifetime model horizon provided estimates of life years and quality adjusted life years (QALYs). The PSM-based models produced short-term outcomes closely matching the trial outcomes. Adding health states generated increased QALYs while providing a more granular representation of outcomes for decision making. The Markov model gave the greatest level of detail on outcomes but gave short-term results which diverged from those of the trial (overstating year 1 progression-free survival by around 60%). Increased sophistication in the representation of disease dynamics in economic models is desirable when attempting to model treatment response in I-O. However, the assumptions underlying different model structures and the availability of data for health state mapping may be important limiting factors.

  4. Everolimus: a proliferation signal inhibitor with clinical applications in organ transplantation, oncology, and cardiology.

    PubMed

    Gabardi, Steven; Baroletti, Steven A

    2010-10-01

    Everolimus, a proliferation signal inhibitor in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) drug class, has many clinical applications, including in organ transplantation, oncology, and cardiology. It currently has United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for prophylaxis against rejection in de novo renal transplant recipients, treatment of renal cell carcinoma, and use as a drug-eluting stent. To review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of everolimus, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1997-April 2010) for all English-language articles of in vitro and in vivo studies that evaluated everolimus, as well as abstracts from recent scientific meetings and the manufacturer. In transplantation, everolimus demonstrates immunosuppressive properties and has been used to prevent acute rejection in cardiac, liver, lung, and renal transplant recipients. It appears that this agent may be potent enough to allow for the minimization or removal of calcineurin inhibitors in the long-term management of renal transplant recipients. In oncology, everolimus has been proven effective for the management of treatment-resistant renal cell carcinoma. In cardiology, everolimus is available as a drug-coated stent and is used in percutaneous coronary interventions for prevention of restenosis. In transplant recipients and patients with renal cell carcinoma, everolimus appears to have an extensive adverse-event profile. The pharmacologic properties of everolimus differentiate this agent from other drugs used in these clinical areas, and its pharmacokinetic properties differentiate it from sirolimus.

  5. Modeling the economic outcomes of immuno-oncology drugs: alternative model frameworks to capture clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, EJ; Begum, N; Koblbauer, I; Dranitsaris, G; Liew, D; McEwan, P; Tahami Monfared, AA; Yuan, Y; Juarez-Garcia, A; Tyas, D; Lees, M

    2018-01-01

    Background Economic models in oncology are commonly based on the three-state partitioned survival model (PSM) distinguishing between progression-free and progressive states. However, the heterogeneity of responses observed in immuno-oncology (I-O) suggests that new approaches may be appropriate to reflect disease dynamics meaningfully. Materials and methods This study explored the impact of incorporating immune-specific health states into economic models of I-O therapy. Two variants of the PSM and a Markov model were populated with data from one clinical trial in metastatic melanoma patients. Short-term modeled outcomes were benchmarked to the clinical trial data and a lifetime model horizon provided estimates of life years and quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Results The PSM-based models produced short-term outcomes closely matching the trial outcomes. Adding health states generated increased QALYs while providing a more granular representation of outcomes for decision making. The Markov model gave the greatest level of detail on outcomes but gave short-term results which diverged from those of the trial (overstating year 1 progression-free survival by around 60%). Conclusion Increased sophistication in the representation of disease dynamics in economic models is desirable when attempting to model treatment response in I-O. However, the assumptions underlying different model structures and the availability of data for health state mapping may be important limiting factors. PMID:29563820

  6. Treatment of the rectal cancer in casuistic Clinic for Abdominal Surgery, Clinical Centre of the University of Sarajevo (2006.-2010.).

    PubMed

    Kandic, Z; Firdus, N; Kandic, A; Catic, L; Kandic, A; Kandic, E

    2012-01-01

    Malignant disease of the colon and rectum is the most often human neoplasm which comprises about 30% of all digestive tumours. Thereat, cancer of the lower end the colon (rectum) comprises 45 to 48% of all CRC (colorectal cancers). According to "American Society Cancer", only lung and prostate cancer in men and breast and cervix cancer in women are more frequent than CRC. The incidence of colorectal cancer is 20 to 30/100.000 citizens. Rectal cancer is the result of interection of disturbed genetic factors with external factors. The first surgical treatments began with Faget, who did the first rectal extraperitoneal excision (1739). It was improved by Ernest Milles in 1908, and in 1923, Hartman did the resection without anamnesis. In the middle of 20th century, Dixon defined the resective interventions and in Litre did a colostomy. The aim of this study is point out the necessity of early diagnosis and protocolar chirurgical end oncological approach to the treatment of this malignant disease which must be done before choosing any operative procedure in order to prevent postoperative morbidity. On the material of the Clinic for Abdominal Surgery at the Clinical centre University of Sarajevo, during the four-year period (from 2006 to 2010), out of the 406 patients with CRC, 261 of them (64.3%) had cancer of the final part of the colon and rectum. In this case, all the time of the treatment, protocol was strictly applied. Primary surgery was performed on the early stages of the disease. Radiochemotherapy (RCT) followed by operation after 6 to 8 week is applied in the progressive state of the disease with the penetration of the meso rectal fascia with positive lymph-gland assessment (NMR-nuclear magnete resonance). Out of 261 operated patients, 5 of them (1.9%) underwent transanal resections where the tumour was up to 2 cm; 104 patients (39.8%) underwent rectal resection with TME (II and III tumour states of recto-sigma); 24 (9.2%) patients uderwent amputation; 156 (22

  7. Outbreak of Tsukamurella species bloodstream infection among patients at an oncology clinic, West Virginia, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    See, Isaac; Nguyen, Duc B; Chatterjee, Somu; Shwe, Thein; Scott, Melissa; Ibrahim, Sherif; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; McNulty, Steven; Noble-Wang, Judith; Price, Cindy; Schramm, Kim; Bixler, Danae; Guh, Alice Y

    2014-03-01

    To determine the source and identify control measures of an outbreak of Tsukamurella species bloodstream infections at an outpatient oncology facility. Epidemiologic investigation of the outbreak with a case-control study. A case was an infection in which Tsukamurella species was isolated from a blood or catheter tip culture during the period January 2011 through June 2012 from a patient of the oncology clinic. Laboratory records of area hospitals and patient charts were reviewed. A case-control study was conducted among clinic patients to identify risk factors for Tsukamurella species bloodstream infection. Clinic staff were interviewed, and infection control practices were assessed. Fifteen cases of Tsukamurella (Tsukamurella pulmonis or Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens) bloodstream infection were identified, all in patients with underlying malignancy and indwelling central lines. The median age of case patients was 68 years; 47% were male. The only significant risk factor for infection was receipt of saline flush from the clinic during the period September-October 2011 (P = .03), when the clinic had been preparing saline flush from a common-source bag of saline. Other infection control deficiencies that were identified at the clinic included suboptimal procedures for central line access and preparation of chemotherapy. Although multiple infection control lapses were identified, the outbreak was likely caused by improper preparation of saline flush syringes by the clinic. The outbreak demonstrates that bloodstream infections among oncology patients can result from improper infection control practices and highlights the critical need for increased attention to and oversight of infection control in outpatient oncology settings.

  8. Chest physiotherapy during immediate postoperative period among patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery: randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Roberta Munhoz; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo Fernandes de; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Vieira, Joaquim Edson

    2008-09-01

    Abdominal surgical procedures increase pulmonary complication risks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of chest physiotherapy during the immediate postoperative period among patients undergoing elective upper abdominal surgery. This randomized clinical trial was performed in the post-anesthesia care unit of a public university hospital. Thirty-one adults were randomly assigned to control (n = 16) and chest physiotherapy (n = 15) groups. Spirometry, pulse oximetry and anamneses were performed preoperatively and on the second postoperative day. A visual pain scale was applied on the second postoperative day, before and after chest physiotherapy. The chest physiotherapy group received treatment at the post-anesthesia care unit, while the controls did not. Surgery duration, length of hospital stay and postoperative pulmonary complications were gathered from patients' medical records. The control and chest physiotherapy groups presented decreased spirometry values after surgery but without any difference between them (forced vital capacity from 83.5 +/- 17.1% to 62.7 +/- 16.9% and from 95.7 +/- 18.9% to 79.0 +/- 26.9%, respectively). In contrast, the chest physiotherapy group presented improved oxygen-hemoglobin saturation after chest physiotherapy during the immediate postoperative period (p < 0.03) that did not last until the second postoperative day. The medical record data were similar between groups. Chest physiotherapy during the immediate postoperative period following upper abdominal surgery was effective for improving oxygen-hemoglobin saturation without increased abdominal pain. Breathing exercises could be adopted at post-anesthesia care units with benefits for patients.

  9. The Clinical Research Associate Retention Study: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Owens Pickle, Emily E; Borgerson, Dawn; Espirito-Santo, Anelise; Wigginton, Sabrina; Devine, Susan; Stork, Sue

    Pediatric medicine often struggles to receive adequate research funding for its small, yet vulnerable population of patients. Remarkable discovery in pediatric oncology is credited in large part to the collaborative structure of its research community. The Children's Oncology Group conducts studies supported by the National Cancer Institute. The clinical research associate (CRA) discipline comprises professionals who support administrative duties, regulatory duties, subject management, and data collection at individual research sites. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with CRA retention, as the group continues to have high turnover and position vacancy. A cross-sectional survey design was used to characterize the most frequently cited reasons CRAs gave when considering leaving or staying within their position. Results suggest that low salary, unmanageable workload, lack of career advancement and professional development, and lack of research commitment from the medical team were associated with intent to leave CRA positions. The most frequently cited reasons for staying at their job were the meaningfulness and interest in the work, a supportive principal investigator, and enjoyment working with colleagues. CRAs reported serious but eminently solvable issues that can be addressed using practical and low-cost solutions to improve job satisfaction and retention.

  10. [ANMCO/AICO/AIOM Consensus document: Clinical and management pathways in cardio-oncology].

    PubMed

    Tarantini, Luigi; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Maurea, Nicola; Abrignani, Maurizio Giuseppe; Bisceglia, Irma; Bovelli, Daniella; De Gennaro, Luisa; Del Sindaco, Donatella; Macera, Francesca; Parrini, Iris; Radini, Donatella; Russo, Giulia; Scardovi, Angela Beatrice; Inno, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, cardiovascular diseases and cancer are the leading causes of death. Both diseases share the same risk factors and, having the highest incidence and prevalence in the elderly, they often coexist in the same individual. Furthermore, the enhanced survival of cancer patients registered in the last decades and linked to early diagnosis and improvement of care, not infrequently exposes them to the appearance of ominous cardiovascular complications due to the deleterious effects of cancer treatment on the heart and circulatory system. The above considerations have led to the development of a new branch of clinical cardiology based on the principles of multidisciplinary collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists: Cardio-oncology, which aims to find solutions to the prevention, monitoring, diagnosis and treatment of heart damage induced by cancer care in order to pursue, in the individual patient, the best possible care for cancer while minimizing the risk of cardiac toxicity. In this consensus document we provide practical recommendations on how to assess, monitor, treat and supervise the candidate or patient treated with potentially cardiotoxic cancer therapy in order to treat cancer and protect the heart at all stages of the oncological disease.

  11. Clinical and financial analysis of an acute palliative care unit in an oncological department.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, S; Intravaia, G; Villari, P; Ferrera, P; David, F; Casuccio, A; Mangione, S

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the clinical activity and medical intervention of an acute model of palliative care unit (APC), as well as the reimbursement procedures and economic viability. A sample of 504 patients admitted at an APC in 1 year was surveyed. Indications for admission, pain and symptom intensity, analgesic treatments, procedures, instrumental examinations and modalities of discharge were recorded. For each patient, tariff for reimbursement was calculated according to the existent disease related grouping (DRG) system. The mean age was 62 years, and 246 patients were males. The mean hospital stay was 5.4 days. Pain control was the most frequent indication for admission. All patients had laboratory tests and several instrumental examinations. Almost all patients were prescribed one or more opioids at significant doses, and different routes of administration, as well as medication as needed. 59 patients received blood cell transfusions and 34 interventional procedures. Only 40 patients died in the unit, 11 of them being sedated at the end of life. Treatment efficacy was considered optimal and mild in 264 and 226 patients respectively. A mean of 3019 euros for admission was reimbursed by the Health Care System. APCs are of paramount importance within an oncological department, as they provide effective and intensive treatments during the entire course of disease, providing a simultaneous and integrated approach. Our findings also suggest both a cost and quality incentive for oncological departments to develop APC.

  12. Precision Oncology Medicine: The Clinical Relevance of Patient-Specific Biomarkers Used to Optimize Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Keith T; Chau, Cindy H; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-12-01

    Precision medicine in oncology is the result of an increasing awareness of patient-specific clinical features coupled with the development of genomic-based diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. Companion diagnostics designed for specific drug-target pairs were the first to widely utilize clinically applicable tumor biomarkers (eg, HER2, EGFR), directing treatment for patients whose tumors exhibit a mutation susceptible to an FDA-approved targeted therapy (eg, trastuzumab, erlotinib). Clinically relevant germline mutations in drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (eg, TPMT, DPYD) have been shown to impact drug response, providing a rationale for individualized dosing to optimize treatment. The use of multigene expression-based assays to analyze an array of prognostic biomarkers has been shown to help direct treatment decisions, especially in breast cancer (eg, Oncotype DX). More recently, the use of next-generation sequencing to detect many potential "actionable" cancer molecular alterations is further shifting the 1 gene-1 drug paradigm toward a more comprehensive, multigene approach. Currently, many clinical trials (eg, NCI-MATCH, NCI-MPACT) are assessing novel diagnostic tools with a combination of different targeted therapeutics while also examining tumor biomarkers that were previously unexplored in a variety of cancer histologies. Results from ongoing trials such as the NCI-MATCH will help determine the clinical utility and future development of the precision-medicine approach. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  13. Ethics of Mandatory Research Biopsy for Correlative End Points Within Clinical Trials in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Shapira, Iuliana; Collyar, Deborah; Deshields, Teresa; Lin, Nancy; Krop, Ian; Grunwald, Hans; Friedman, Paula; Partridge, Ann H.; Schilsky, Richard L.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical investigators in oncology are increasingly interested in using molecular analysis of cancer tissue to understand the biologic bases of response or resistance to novel interventions and to develop prognostic and predictive biomarkers that will guide clinical decision making. Some scientific questions of this nature can only be addressed, or may best be addressed, through the conduct of a clinical trial in which research biopsies are obtained from all participants. However, trial designs with mandatory research biopsies have raised ethical concerns related to the risk of harm to participants, the adequacy of voluntary informed consent, and the potential for misunderstanding among research participants when access to an experimental intervention is linked to the requirement to undergo a research biopsy. In consideration of the ethical and scientific issues at stake in this debate, the Cancer and Leukemia Group B Ethics Committee proposes guidelines for clinical trials involving mandatory research biopsies. Any cancer clinical trial that requires research biopsies of participants must be well designed to address the scientific question, obtain the biopsy in a way that minimizes risk, and ensure that research participants are fully informed of the risks, rationale, and requirements of the study, as well as of treatment alternatives. Further guidelines and discussions of this issue are specified in this position paper. We feel that if these principles are respected, an informed adult with cancer can both understand and voluntarily consent to participation in a clinical trial involving mandatory research biopsy for scientific end points. PMID:20406927

  14. Predicting the performance of a strategic alliance: an analysis of the Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    PubMed

    Kaluzny, A D; Lacey, L M; Warnecke, R; Hynes, D M; Morrissey, J; Ford, L; Sondik, E

    1993-06-01

    This study is designed to examine the effects of environment and structure of the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) on performance as measured by patient accrual to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-approved treatment protocols. Data and analysis are part of a larger evaluation of the NCI Community Clinical Oncology Program during its second funding cycle, June 1987-May 1990. Data, taken from primary and secondary sources, included a survey of selected informants in CCOPs and research bases, CCOP grant applications, CCOP annual progress reports, and site visits to a subsample of CCOPs (N = 20) and research bases (N = 5). Accrual data were obtained from NCI records. Analysis involved three complementary sets of factors: the local health care resources environment available to the CCOP, the larger policy environment as reflected by the relationship of the CCOP to selected research bases and the NCI, and the operational structure of the CCOP itself. A hierarchical model examined the separate and cumulative effects of local and policy environment and structure on performance. Other things equal, the primary predictors of treatment accrual were: (1) the larger policy environment, as measured by the attendance of nurses at research base meetings; and (2) operational structure, as measured by the number and character of components within participating CCOPs and the number of hours per week worked by data managers. These factors explained 73 percent of the total variance in accrual performance. Findings suggest criteria for selecting the types of organizations to participate in the alliance, as well as for establishing guidelines for managing such alliances. A future challenge is to determine the extent to which factors predicting accrual to cancer treatment clinical trials are equally important as predictors of accrual to cancer prevention and control trials.

  15. Recommendations for incorporating patient-reported outcomes into clinical comparative effectiveness research in adult oncology.

    PubMed

    Basch, Ethan; Abernethy, Amy P; Mullins, C Daniel; Reeve, Bryce B; Smith, Mary Lou; Coons, Stephen Joel; Sloan, Jeff; Wenzel, Keith; Chauhan, Cynthia; Eppard, Wayland; Frank, Elizabeth S; Lipscomb, Joseph; Raymond, Stephen A; Spencer, Merianne; Tunis, Sean

    2012-12-01

    Examining the patient's subjective experience in prospective clinical comparative effectiveness research (CER) of oncology treatments or process interventions is essential for informing decision making. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are the standard tools for directly eliciting the patient experience. There are currently no widely accepted standards for developing or implementing PRO measures in CER. Recommendations for the design and implementation of PRO measures in CER were developed via a standardized process including multistakeholder interviews, a technical working group, and public comments. Key recommendations are to include assessment of patient-reported symptoms as well as health-related quality of life in all prospective clinical CER studies in adult oncology; to identify symptoms relevant to a particular study population and context based on literature review and/or qualitative and quantitative methods; to assure that PRO measures used are valid, reliable, and sensitive in a comparable population (measures particularly recommended include EORTC QLQ-C30, FACT, MDASI, PRO-CTCAE, and PROMIS); to collect PRO data electronically whenever possible; to employ methods that minimize missing patient reports and include a plan for analyzing and reporting missing PRO data; to report the proportion of responders and cumulative distribution of responses in addition to mean changes in scores; and to publish results of PRO analyses simultaneously with other clinical outcomes. Twelve core symptoms are recommended for consideration in studies in advanced or metastatic cancers. Adherence to methodologic standards for the selection, implementation, and analysis/reporting of PRO measures will lead to an understanding of the patient experience that informs better decisions by patients, providers, regulators, and payers.

  16. [Early clinical trials in paediatric oncology in Spain: a nationwide perspective].

    PubMed

    Bautista, Francisco; Gallego, Soledad; Cañete, Adela; Mora, Jaume; Díaz de Heredia, Cristina; Cruz, Ofelia; Fernández, José María; Rives, Susana; Berlanga, Pablo; Hladun, Raquel; Juan Ribelles, Antonio; Madero, Luis; Ramírez, Manuel; Fernández Delgado, Rafael; Pérez-Martínez, Antonio; Mata, Cristina; Llort, Anna; Martín Broto, Javier; Cela, María Elena; Ramírez, Gema; Sábado, Constantino; Acha, Tomás; Astigarraga, Itziar; Sastre, Ana; Muñoz, Ascensión; Guibelalde, Mercedes; Moreno, Lucas

    2017-09-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death between the first year of life and adolescence, and some types of diseases are still a major challenge in terms of cure. There is, therefore, a major need for new drugs. Recent findings in cancer biology open the door to the development of targeted therapies against individual molecular changes, as well as immunotherapy. Promising results in adult anti-cancer drug development have not yet been translated into paediatric clinical practice. A report is presented on the activity in early paediatric oncology trials (phase I-II) in Spain. All members of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology Oncology (SEHOP) were contacted in order to identify early clinical trials in paediatric cancer opened between 2005 and 2015. A total of 30 trials had been opened in this period: 21 (70%) in solid tumours, and 9 (30%) in malignant haemopathies. A total of 212 patients have been enrolled. The majority was industry sponsored (53%). Since 2010, four centres have joined the international consortium of Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer (ITCC), which has as its aim to develop novel therapies for paediatric tumours. A significant number of new studies have opened since 2010, improving the treatment opportunities for our children. Results of recently closed trials show the contribution of Spanish investigators, the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, and their benefits. The activity in clinical trials has increased in the years analysed. The SEHOP is committed to develop and participate in collaborative academic trials, in order to help in the advancement and optimisation of existing therapies in paediatric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Lean methodology improves efficiency in outpatient academic uro-oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Skeldon, Sean C; Simmons, Andrea; Hersey, Karen; Finelli, Antonio; Jewett, Michael A; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Fleshner, Neil E

    2014-05-01

    To determine if lean methodology, an industrial engineering tool developed to optimize manufacturing efficiency, can successfully be applied to improve efficiencies and quality of care in a hospital-based high-volume uro-oncology clinic. Before the lean initiative, baseline data were collected on patient volumes, wait times, cycle times (patient arrival to discharge), nursing assessment time, patient teaching, and physician ergonomics (via spaghetti diagram). Value stream analysis and a rapid improvement event were carried out, and significant changes were made to patient check-in, work areas, and nursing face time. Follow-up data were obtained at 30, 60, and 90 days. The Student t test was used for analysis to compare performance metrics with baseline. The median cycle time before the lean initiative was 46 minutes. This remained stable at 46 minutes at 30 days but improved to 35 minutes at 60 days and 41 minutes at 90 days. Shorter wait times allowed for increased nursing and physician face time. The average length of the physician assessment increased from 7.5 minutes at baseline to 10.6 minutes at 90 days. The average proportion of value-added time compared with the entire clinic visit increased from 30.6% at baseline to 66.3% at 90 days. Using lean methodology, we were able to shorten the patient cycle time and the time to initial assessment as well as integrate both an initial registered nurse assessment and registered nurse teaching to each visit. Lean methodology can effectively be applied to improve efficiency and patient care in an academic outpatient uro-oncology clinic setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Predicting the performance of a strategic alliance: an analysis of the Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzny, A D; Lacey, L M; Warnecke, R; Hynes, D M; Morrissey, J; Ford, L; Sondik, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study is designed to examine the effects of environment and structure of the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) on performance as measured by patient accrual to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-approved treatment protocols. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. Data and analysis are part of a larger evaluation of the NCI Community Clinical Oncology Program during its second funding cycle, June 1987-May 1990. Data, taken from primary and secondary sources, included a survey of selected informants in CCOPs and research bases, CCOP grant applications, CCOP annual progress reports, and site visits to a subsample of CCOPs (N = 20) and research bases (N = 5). Accrual data were obtained from NCI records. STUDY DESIGN. Analysis involved three complementary sets of factors: the local health care resources environment available to the CCOP, the larger policy environment as reflected by the relationship of the CCOP to selected research bases and the NCI, and the operational structure of the CCOP itself. A hierarchical model examined the separate and cumulative effects of local and policy environment and structure on performance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Other things equal, the primary predictors of treatment accrual were: (1) the larger policy environment, as measured by the attendance of nurses at research base meetings; and (2) operational structure, as measured by the number and character of components within participating CCOPs and the number of hours per week worked by data managers. These factors explained 73 percent of the total variance in accrual performance. CONCLUSIONS. Findings suggest criteria for selecting the types of organizations to participate in the alliance, as well as for establishing guidelines for managing such alliances. A future challenge is to determine the extent to which factors predicting accrual to cancer treatment clinical trials are equally important as predictors of accrual to cancer prevention and control trials. PMID:8514498

  19. Effect of the clinical support nurse role on work-related stress for nurses on an inpatient pediatric oncology unit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ann; Kicis, Jennifer; Sangha, Gurjit

    2007-01-01

    High patient acuity, heavy workload, and patient deaths can all contribute to work-related stress for pediatric oncology nurses. A new leadership role, the clinical support nurse (CSN), was recently initiated on the oncology unit of a large Canadian pediatric hospital to support frontline staff and reduce some of the stresses related to clinical activity. The CSN assists nurses with complex patient care procedures, provides hands-on education at the bedside, and supports staff in managing challenging family situations. This study explores the effect of the CSN role on the nurses' work-related stress using the Stressor Scale for Pediatric Oncology Nurses. A total of 58 nurses participated in this study for a response rate of 86%. The results show that the intensity of work-related stress experienced by nurses in this study is significantly less (P < .001) on shifts staffed with a CSN compared with shifts without a CSN.

  20. Development of the quantitative indicator of abdominal examination for clinical application: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seok-Jae; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Seul-Ki; Kim, Minji; Kim, Jinsung; Lee, Beom-Joon; Park, Jae-Woo

    2015-06-01

    Abdominal examination (AE) is the evaluation of the status of illness by examining the abdominal region in traditional Korean medicine (TKM). Although AE is currently considered an important diagnostic method in TKM, owing to its clinical usage, no studies have been conducted to objectively assess its accuracy and develop standards. Twelve healthy subjects and 21 patients with functional dyspepsia have participated in this study. The patients were classified into epigastric discomfort group (n=11) and epigastric discomfort with tenderness group (n=10) according to the clinical diagnosis by AE. After evaluating the subjective epigastric discomfort in all subjects, two independent clinicians measured the pressure pain threshold (PPT) two times at an acupoint (CV 14) using an algometer. We then assessed the interrater and intrarater reliability of the PPT measurements and evaluated the validity (sensitivity and specificity) via a receiver operating characteristic plot and optimal cutoff value. The results of the interrater reliability test showed a very strong correlation (correlation coefficient range: 0.82-0.91). The results of intrarater reliability test also showed a higher than average correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.58-0.70). The optimal cutoff value of PPT in the epigastric area was 1.8 kg/cm(2) with 100% sensitivity and 54.54% specificity. PPT measurements in the epigastric area with an algometer demonstrated high reliability and validity for AE, which makes this approach potentially useful in clinical applications as a new quantitative measurement in TKM.

  1. Building trust and diversity in patient-centered oncology clinical trials: An integrated model.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Thelma C; Kaplan, Charles D; Cook, Elise D; Chilton, Janice A; Lytton, Jay S; Hawk, Ernest T; Jones, Lovell A

    2017-04-01

    Trust is the cornerstone of clinical trial recruitment and retention. Efforts to decrease barriers and increase clinical trial participation among diverse populations have yielded modest results. There is an urgent need to better understand the complex interactions between trust and clinical trial participation. The process of trust-building has been a focus of intense research in the business community. Yet, little has been published about trust in oncology clinical trials or the process of building trust in clinical trials. Both clinical trials and business share common dimensions. Business strategies for building trust may be transferable to the clinical trial setting. This study was conducted to understand and utilize contemporary thinking about building trust to develop an Integrated Model of Trust that incorporates both clinical and business perspectives. A key word-directed literature search of the PubMed, Medline, Cochrane, and Google Search databases for entries dated between 1 January 1985 and 1 September 2015 was conducted to obtain information from which to develop an Integrated Model of Trust. Successful trial participation requires both participants and clinical trial team members to build distinctly different types of interpersonal trust to effect recruitment and retention. They are built under conditions of significant emotional stress and time constraints among people who do not know each other and have never worked together before. Swift Trust and Traditional Trust are sequentially built during the clinical trial process. Swift trust operates during the recruitment and very early active treatment phases of the clinical trial process. Traditional trust is built over time and operates during the active treatment and surveillance stages of clinical trials. The Psychological Contract frames the participants' and clinical trial team members' interpersonal trust relationship. The "terms" of interpersonal trust are negotiated through the psychological

  2. The roots of modern oncology: from discovery of new antitumor anthracyclines to their clinical use.

    PubMed

    Cassinelli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-02

    In May 1960, the Farmitalia CEO Dr. Bertini and the director of the Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori of Milan Prof. Bucalossi (talent scout and city's Mayor) signed a research agreement for the discovery and development up to clinical trials of new natural antitumor agents. This agreement can be considered as a pioneering and fruitful example of a translational discovery program with relevant transatlantic connections. Owing to an eclectic Streptomyces, found near Castel del Monte (Apulia), and to the skilled and motivated participants of both institutions, a new natural antitumor drug, daunomycin, was ready for clinical trials within 3 years. Patent interference by the Farmitalia French partner was overcome by the good quality of the Italian drug and by the cooperation between Prof. Di Marco, director of the Istituto Ricerche Farmitalia Research Laboratories for Microbiology and Chemotherapy, and Prof. Karnofsky, head of the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute of New York, leading to the first transatlantic clinical trials. The search for daunomycin's sister anthracyclines led to the discovery and development of adriamycin, one of the best drugs born in Milan. This was the second act prologue of the history of Italian antitumor discovery and clinical oncology, which started in July 1969 when Prof. Di Marco sent Prof. Bonadonna the first vials of adriamycin (doxorubicin) to be tested in clinical trials. This article reviews the Milan scene in the 1960s, a city admired and noted for the outstanding scientific achievements of its private and public institutions in drugs and industrial product discovery.

  3. Differentiation between intra-abdominal neoplasms and abscesses in horses, using clinical and laboratory data: 40 cases (1973-1988).

    PubMed

    Zicker, S C; Wilson, W D; Medearis, I

    1990-04-01

    The medical records of 25 horses with intra-abdominal neoplasms and 15 horses with intra-abdominal abscesses were reviewed. Common clinical signs of disease observed by owners of horses in both groups included anorexia, weight loss, fever, signs of colic, and depression. Clinical laboratory abnormalities included leukocytosis, hyperfibrinogenemia, hypoalbuminemia, and hypocalcemia. There was considerable overlap of laboratory test results within and between the 2 groups of horses. Peritoneal fluid was classified as an exudate in 12 of 15 horses with intra-abdominal abscesses and in 14 of 25 horses with intra-abdominal neoplasms. Cytologic examination of peritoneal fluid yielded an accurate diagnosis in 11 of 25 horses with neoplasia and in 3 of 15 horses with abscesses. A mean number of 1.45 cytologic analyses/horse was needed to diagnose neoplasms in the 11 horses in which the analysis was successful in definitively diagnosing the condition.

  4. Radiographer-performed abdominal and pelvic ultrasound: its value in a urology out-patient clinic.

    PubMed

    Nargund, V H; Lomas, K; Sapherson, D A; Flannigan, G M; Stewart, P A

    1994-04-01

    To assess the efficacy of radiographer-performed ultrasound examination as a routine investigative procedure in a urological out-patient clinic. A total of 151 patients attending a District General Hospital Urological Out-patient Department underwent an ultrasound examination in the clinic. Diagnosis by ultrasound was achieved in 93% of patients. The remaining patients underwent further investigations. Two (1%) patients with normal scans had small bladder tumours. Subsequent intravenous urography in these individuals showed normal upper tracts. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasound examination performed in the urological out-patient clinic on unprepared patients was the only investigation necessary for evaluation of common problems such as non-specific urinary symptoms, recurrent urinary tract infections and bladder outlet obstruction.

  5. Missing data and censoring in the analysis of progression-free survival in oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Denne, J S; Stone, A M; Bailey-Iacona, R; Chen, T-T

    2013-01-01

    Progression-free survival (PFS) is increasingly used as a primary endpoint in oncology clinical trials. However, trial conduct is often such that PFS data on some patients may be partially missing either due to incomplete follow-up for progression, or due to data that may be collected but confounded by patients stopping randomized therapy or starting alternative therapy prior to progression. Regulatory guidance on how to handle these patients in the analysis and whether to censor these patients differs between agencies. We present results of a reanalysis of 28 Phase III trials from 12 companies or institutions performed by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association-sponsored PFS Expert Team. We show that analyses not adhering to the intention-to-treat principle tend to give hazard ratio estimates further from unity and describe several factors associated with this shift. We present illustrative simulations to support these findings and provide recommendations for the analysis of PFS.

  6. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy for relationships with companies: background and rationale.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology's (ASCO's) new conflict of interest policy reflects a commitment to transparency and independence in the development and presentation of scientific and educational content. ASCO supports thorough and accessible disclosure of financial relationships with companies at institutional and individual levels and calls for rigorous evaluation of content in light of the information disclosed. For abstracts and articles presenting original research, ASCO holds first, last, and corresponding authors to a clear standard of independence. In imposing restrictions, the new policy focuses on the role of these authors rather than of the principal investigator(s) as in the previous policy. ASCO remains actively engaged with the broader scientific community in seeking and implementing efficient, effective approaches to conflict of interest management.

  7. Primary Prevention of Cervical Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Resource-Stratified Guideline.

    PubMed

    Arrossi, Silvina; Temin, Sarah; Garland, Suzanne; Eckert, Linda O'Neal; Bhatla, Neerja; Castellsagué, Xavier; Alkaff, Sharifa Ezat; Felder, Tamika; Hammouda, Doudja; Konno, Ryo; Lopes, Gilberto; Mugisha, Emmanuel; Murillo, Rául; Scarinci, Isabel C; Stanley, Margaret; Tsu, Vivien; Wheeler, Cosette M; Adewole, Isaac Folorunso; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2017-10-01

    To provide resource-stratified (four tiers), evidence-based recommendations on the primary prevention of cervical cancer globally. The American Society of Clinical Oncology convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of oncology, obstetrics/gynecology, public health, cancer control, epidemiology/biostatistics, health economics, behavioral/implementation science, and patient advocacy experts. The Expert Panel reviewed existing guidelines and conducted a modified ADAPTE process and a formal consensus-based process with additional experts (consensus ratings group) for one round of formal ratings. Existing sets of guidelines from five guideline developers were identified and reviewed; adapted recommendations formed the evidence base. Five systematic reviews, along with cost-effectiveness analyses, provided evidence to inform the formal consensus process, which resulted in agreement of ≥ 75%. In all resource settings, two doses of human papillomavirus vaccine are recommended for girls age 9 to 14 years, with an interval of at least 6 months and possibly up to 12 to 15 months. Individuals with HIV positivity should receive three doses. Maximal and enhanced settings: if girls are age ≥ 15 years and received their first dose before age 15 years, they may complete the series; if no doses were received before age 15 years, three doses should be administered; in both scenarios, vaccination may be through age 26 years. Limited and basic settings: if sufficient resources remain after vaccinating girls age 9 to 14 years, girls who received one dose may receive additional doses between age 15 and 26 years. Maximal, enhanced, and limited settings: if ≥ 50% coverage in the priority female target population, sufficient resources, and cost effectiveness, boys may be vaccinated to prevent other noncervical human papillomavirus-related cancers and diseases. Basic settings: vaccinating boys is not recommended. It is the view of the American Society of Clinical Oncology that

  8. Primary Prevention of Cervical Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Resource-Stratified Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Arrossi, Silvina; Temin, Sarah; Garland, Suzanne; Eckert, Linda O’Neal; Bhatla, Neerja; Castellsagué, Xavier; Alkaff, Sharifa Ezat; Felder, Tamika; Hammouda, Doudja; Konno, Ryo; Lopes, Gilberto; Mugisha, Emmanuel; Murillo, Rául; Scarinci, Isabel C.; Stanley, Margaret; Tsu, Vivien; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Adewole, Isaac Folorunso; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To provide resource-stratified (four tiers), evidence-based recommendations on the primary prevention of cervical cancer globally. Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of oncology, obstetrics/gynecology, public health, cancer control, epidemiology/biostatistics, health economics, behavioral/implementation science, and patient advocacy experts. The Expert Panel reviewed existing guidelines and conducted a modified ADAPTE process and a formal consensus-based process with additional experts (consensus ratings group) for one round of formal ratings. Results Existing sets of guidelines from five guideline developers were identified and reviewed; adapted recommendations formed the evidence base. Five systematic reviews, along with cost-effectiveness analyses, provided evidence to inform the formal consensus process, which resulted in agreement of ≥ 75%. Recommendations In all resource settings, two doses of human papillomavirus vaccine are recommended for girls age 9 to 14 years, with an interval of at least 6 months and possibly up to 12 to 15 months. Individuals with HIV positivity should receive three doses. Maximal and enhanced settings: if girls are age ≥ 15 years and received their first dose before age 15 years, they may complete the series; if no doses were received before age 15 years, three doses should be administered; in both scenarios, vaccination may be through age 26 years. Limited and basic settings: if sufficient resources remain after vaccinating girls age 9 to 14 years, girls who received one dose may receive additional doses between age 15 and 26 years. Maximal, enhanced, and limited settings: if ≥ 50% coverage in the priority female target population, sufficient resources, and cost effectiveness, boys may be vaccinated to prevent other noncervical human papillomavirus–related cancers and diseases. Basic settings: vaccinating boys is not recommended. It is the view of the

  9. Emergency department assessment of abdominal pain: clinical indicator tests for detecting peritonism.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Scott; Watt, Martin

    2005-12-01

    Peritonism is a finding that leads to a more cautious approach in the emergency department management of abdominal pain. This study examined whether peritonism assessment using inspiration, expiration and cough tests was associated with the patient's clinical management. This prospective observational study evaluated consecutive patients presenting directly to the emergency department for 3 months from June 2000 with abdominal pain. Triage initial observations of blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and temperature were recorded. The examining emergency physician recorded each patient's response and pain score to the individual peritonism tests and scored it as positive if there was an indication of it being a painful manoeuvre. The results were blinded from the receiving specialty if subsequent referral was required. Sixty-seven patients had peritonism tests performed. No individual test was more painful than the others with similar values in pain scores. In all, 70% (7/10) were admitted when all three tests were positive, compared with 21% (12/57) when two or less of the tests scored positive (P=0.004, Fisher's exact test). Admission was not associated with any individual test or combination of tests, or any other variable. The peritonism tests were not associated with any other physiological observation or measurement. These peritonism tests represent a simple investigation, and are significantly associated with admission when all three tests are positive. They seem to be a clinical predictor of cases in which continuing assessment was required, and may be useful as a departmental 'safety net' in the management of abdominal pain.

  10. Can patient comorbidities be included in clinical performance measures for radiation oncology?

    PubMed

    Owen, Jean B; Khalid, Najma; Ho, Alex; Kachnic, Lisa A; Komaki, Ritsuko; Tao, May Lin; Currey, Adam; Wilson, J Frank

    2014-05-01

    Patient comorbidities may affect the applicability of performance measures that are inherent in multidisciplinary cancer treatment guidelines. This article describes the distribution of common comorbid conditions by disease site and by patient and facility characteristics in patients who received radiation therapy as part of treatment for cancer of the breast, cervix, lung, prostate, and stomach, and investigates the association of comorbidities with treatment decisions. Stratified two-stage cluster sampling provided a random sample of radiation oncology facilities. Eligible patients were randomly sampled from each participating facility for each disease site, and data were abstracted from medical records. The Adult Comorbidity Evaluation Index (ACE-27) was used to measure comorbid conditions and their severity. National estimates were calculated using SUDAAN statistical software. Multivariable logistic regression models predicted the dependent variable "treatment changed or contraindicated due to comorbidities." The final model showed that ACE-27 was highly associated with change in treatment for patients with severe or moderate index values compared to those with none or mild (P < .001). Two other covariates, age and medical coverage, had no (age) or little (medical coverage) significant contribution to predicting treatment change in the multivariable model. Disease site was associated with treatment change after adjusting for other covariates in the model. ACE-27 is highly predictive of treatment modifications for patients treated for these cancers who receive radiation as part of their care. A standardized tool identifying patients who should be excluded from clinical performance measures allows more accurate use of these measures. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Fenestrated endovascular aortic repair and clinical trial devices for complex abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Brinster, Clayton J; Milner, Ross

    2018-06-01

    Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) has revolutionized the treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), with consistently low reported perioperative morbidity and mortality. Universal applicability of EVAR to treat AAA is hindered by several specific anatomic constraints, however, and many patients cannot be treated with commercially available stent-grafts within the device specific instructions for use. Treatment of these complex pararenal aneurysms is increasingly accomplished by extension of EVAR into the visceral segment of the abdominal aorta with branches or fenestrations that allow perfusion of the visceral and renal arteries. Fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) was initially developed to treat high-risk patients unfit for open surgery and anatomically ineligible for standard infrarenal EVAR, but this technique has evolved over the past decade into a mature treatment option for complex AAA. High-volume, single-center reports, multicenter series and clinical reviews have demonstrated that FEVAR is a safe and effective technique with favorable results at proficient centers. Generalizability of these outcomes to less advanced centers remains unproven, and reintervention rates following FEVAR in the mid- and long-term, even among the most experienced centers, remain a concern. Several off-the-shelf devices that are undergoing clinical trial seek to broaden the anatomic applicability and overall availability of FEVAR. A significant number of patients are not candidates for off-the-shelf or customized stent-grafts, however, stressing the need for continued refinement of existing devices, development of novel devices with broader indications for use, and maintenance of open surgical skills.

  13. Alarmins and Clinical Outcomes After Major Abdominal Surgery-A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Máca, Jan; Burša, Filip; Ševčík, Pavel; Sklienka, Peter; Burda, Michal; Holub, Michal

    2017-06-01

    Tissue injury causing immune response is an integral part of surgical procedure. Evaluation of the degree of surgical trauma could help to improve postoperative management and determine the clinical outcomes. We analyzed serum levels of alarmins, including S100A5, S100A6, S100A8, S100A9, S100A11, and S100A12; high-mobility group box 1; and heat-shock protein 70, after elective major abdominal surgery (n = 82). Blood samples were collected for three consecutive days after surgery. The goals were to evaluate the relationships among the serum levels of alarmins and selected surgical characteristics and to test potential of alarmins to predict the clinical outcomes. Significant, positive correlations were found for high-mobility group box 1 with the length of surgery, blood loss, and intraoperative fluid intake for all three days of blood sampling. The protein S100A8 serum levels showed positive correlations with intensive care unit length of stay, 28-day and in-hospital mortality. The protein S100A12 serum levels had significant, positive correlations with intensive care unit length of stay, 28-day mortality, and in-hospital mortality. We did not find significant differences in alarmin levels between cancer and noncancer subjects. The high-mobility group box 1 serum levels reflect the degree of surgical injury, whereas proteins S100A8 and S100A12 might be considered good predictors of major abdominal surgery morbidity and mortality.

  14. [Clinical peculiarities of atherosclerosis of peripheral arteries in patients with abdominal aortic calcification].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikov, M V; Zelinskiĭ, V A

    The authors analysed clinical peculiarities of atherosclerosis of peripheral arteries (hereinafter referred to as APA) in patients presenting with abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). In order to determine the incidence rate of AAC in the population of patients with APA we analysed medical records of a total of 1,800 patients. The study itself included a total of 193 patients with APA further subdivided into two groups: 108 patients with AAC (Study Group) and 85 patients without AAC. Beside general clinical examination all patients were subjected to transthoracic echocardiography, duplex scanning of the aorta and lower-limb arteries, extended lipidogram and coagulogram. AAC was verified by means of computed tomography. It was determined that in one third of cases AAC was combined with abdominal aortic calcification, with APA on the background of AAC having certain peculiarities, i.e., high incidence of multisegmental lesions (68%) with predominant localization of the process in the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal segments (43%); frequent involvement of the terminal portion of the aorta and pelvic arteries. Patients with AAC also were noted to have a series of peculiarities in the indices of lipid metabolism, as well as signs of procoagulant syndrome and alterations of the structural and functional characteristics of the myocardium. It was stated that peculiarities of APA on the background of AAC should be taken into consideration while working out the program of diagnosis, treatment (including surgical), and rehabilitation of patients.

  15. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Thomas J; Armstrong, Deborah K; Brady, Mark F; Coleman, Robert L; Einstein, Mark H; Monk, Bradley J; Mannel, Robert S; Thigpen, J Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A; Villella, Jeannine A; Alvarez, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect from active post-progression therapies

  16. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Brady, Mark F.; Coleman, Robert L.; Einstein, Mark H.; Monk, Bradley J.; Mannel, Robert S.; Thigpen, J. Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A.; Villella, Jeannine A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. Methods A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Results Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Conclusions Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect

  17. ENRICH: A promising oncology nurse training program to implement ASCO clinical practice guidelines on fertility for AYA cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Gwede, Clement K; Meade, Cathy; Kelvin, Joanne; Reich, Richard R; Reinecke, Joyce; Bowman, Meghan; Sehovic, Ivana; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2016-11-01

    We describe the impact of ENRICH (Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare), a web-based communication-skill-building curriculum for oncology nurses regarding AYA fertility and other reproductive health issues. Participants completed an 8-week course that incorporated didactic content, case studies, and interactive learning. Each learner completed a pre- and post-test assessing knowledge and a 6-month follow-up survey assessing learner behaviors and institutional changes. Out of 77 participants, the majority (72%) scored higher on the post-test. Fifty-four participants completed the follow-up survey: 41% reviewed current institutional practices, 20% formed a committee, and 37% gathered patient materials or financial resources (22%). Participants also reported new policies (30%), in-service education (37%), new patient education materials (26%), a patient navigator role (28%), and workplace collaborations with reproductive specialists (46%). ENRICH improved nurses' knowledge and involvement in activities addressing fertility needs of oncology patients. Our study provides a readily accessible model to prepare oncology nurses to integrate American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines and improve Quality Oncology Practice Initiative measures related to fertility. Nurses will be better prepared to discuss important survivorship issues related to fertility and reproductive health, leading to improved quality of life outcomes for AYAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of follow-up ultrasound and clinical parameters after abdominal MDCT in patients with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Lucas L; Körner, M; Linsenmaier, U; Wirth, S; Reiser, M F; Meindl, T

    2014-05-01

    Beside its value during the initial trauma work-up (focused assessment with sonography for trauma), ultrasound (US) is recommended for early follow-up examinations of the abdomen in multiple injured patients. However, multidetector CT (MDCT) has proven to reliably diagnose traumatic lesions of abdominal organs, to depict their extent, and to assess their clinical relevance. To evaluate the diagnostic impact of follow-up US studies after MDCT of the abdomen and to identify possible clinical parameters indicating the need of a follow-up US. During a 30-month period, patients with suspected multiple trauma were allocated. Patients with admission to the ICU, an initial abdominal MDCT scan, and an US follow-up examination after 6 and 24 h were included. Two patient cohorts were defined: patients with normal abdominal MDCT (group 1), patients with trauma-related pathologic abdominal MDCT (group 2). In all patients, parameters indicating alteration of vital functions or hemorrhage within the first 24 h were obtained by reviewing the medical charts. Forty-four of 193 patients were included: 24 were categorized in group 1 (mean age, 41.1 years; range, 21-90 years), 20 in group 2 (mean age, 36.6 years; range, 16-71 years). In group 1, US did not provide new information compared to emergency MDCT. In group 2, there were no contradictory 6- and 24-h follow-up US findings. In patients with positive MDCT findings and alterations of clinical parameters, US did not detect progression of a previously diagnosed pathology or any late manifestation of such a lesion. In none of the patients with negative abdominal MDCT and pathological clinical parameters US indicated an abdominal injury. Routine US follow-up does not yield additional information after abdominal trauma. In patients with MDCT-proven organ lesions, follow-up MDCT should be considered if indicated by abnormal clinical and/or laboratory findings.

  19. Randomized clinical trial of ligasure™ versus conventional splenectomy for injured spleen in blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Amirkazem, Vejdan Seyyed; Malihe, Khosravi

    2017-02-01

    Spleen is the most common organ damaged in cases of blunt abdominal trauma and splenectomy and splenorrhaphy are the main surgical procedures that are used in surgical treatment of such cases. In routine open splenectomy cases, after laparotomy, application of sutures in splenic vasculature is the most widely used procedure to cease the bleeding. This clinical trial evaluates the role and benefits of the Ligasure™ system in traumatic splenectomy without using any suture materials and compares the result with conventional method of splenectomy. After making decision for splenectomy secondary to a blunt abdominal trauma, patients in control group (39) underwent splenectomy using conventional method with silk suture ligation of splenic vasculature. In the interventional group (41) a Ligasure™ vascular sealing system was used for ligating of the splenic vein and artery. The results of operation time, volume of intra-operation bleeding and post-operative complications were compared in both groups. The mean operation times in control and interventional group were 21 and 12 min respectively (p < 0.05). The average volume of bleeding in control group during open splenectomy was 280 cc, but in the interventional group decreased significantly to 80 ml (p < 0.05) using the Ligasure system. Post-operative complications such as bleeding were non-existent in both groups. The application of Ligasure™ in blunt abdominal trauma for splenectomy not only can decrease the operation time but also can decrease the volume of bleeding during operation without any additional increase in post-operative complications. This method is recommendable in traumatic splenic injuries that require splenectomy in order to control the bleeding as opposed to use of traditional silk sutures. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Landscape of Clinical Trials Evaluating the Theranostic Role of PET Imaging in Oncology: Insights from an Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov Database.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Lv, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    In the war on cancer marked by personalized medicine, positron emission tomography (PET)-based theranostic strategy is playing an increasingly important role. Well-designed clinical trials are of great significance for validating the PET applications and ensuring evidence-based cancer care. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive landscape of the characteristics of PET clinical trials using the substantial resource of ClinicalTrials.gov database. We identified 25,599 oncology trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov in the last ten-year period (October 2005-September 2015). They were systematically reviewed to validate classification into 519 PET trials and 25,080 other oncology trials used for comparison. We found that PET trials were predominantly phase 1-2 studies (86.2%) and were more likely to be single-arm (78.9% vs. 57.9%, P <0.001) using non-randomized assignment (90.1% vs. 66.7%, P <0.001) than other oncology trials. Furthermore, PET trials were small in scale, generally enrolling fewer than 100 participants (20.3% vs. 25.7% for other oncology trials, P = 0.014), which might be too small to detect a significant theranostic effect. The funding support from industry or National Institutes of Health shrunk over time (both decreased by about 5%), and PET trials were more likely to be conducted in only one region lacking international collaboration (97.0% vs. 89.3% for other oncology trials, P <0.001). These findings raise concerns that clinical trials evaluating PET imaging in oncology are not receiving the attention or efforts necessary to generate high-quality evidence. Advancing the clinical application of PET imaging will require a concerted effort to improve the quality of trials.

  1. The Landscape of Clinical Trials Evaluating the Theranostic Role of PET Imaging in Oncology: Insights from an Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Lv, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    In the war on cancer marked by personalized medicine, positron emission tomography (PET)-based theranostic strategy is playing an increasingly important role. Well-designed clinical trials are of great significance for validating the PET applications and ensuring evidence-based cancer care. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive landscape of the characteristics of PET clinical trials using the substantial resource of ClinicalTrials.gov database. We identified 25,599 oncology trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov in the last ten-year period (October 2005-September 2015). They were systematically reviewed to validate classification into 519 PET trials and 25,080 other oncology trials used for comparison. We found that PET trials were predominantly phase 1-2 studies (86.2%) and were more likely to be single-arm (78.9% vs. 57.9%, P <0.001) using non-randomized assignment (90.1% vs. 66.7%, P <0.001) than other oncology trials. Furthermore, PET trials were small in scale, generally enrolling fewer than 100 participants (20.3% vs. 25.7% for other oncology trials, P = 0.014), which might be too small to detect a significant theranostic effect. The funding support from industry or National Institutes of Health shrunk over time (both decreased by about 5%), and PET trials were more likely to be conducted in only one region lacking international collaboration (97.0% vs. 89.3% for other oncology trials, P <0.001). These findings raise concerns that clinical trials evaluating PET imaging in oncology are not receiving the attention or efforts necessary to generate high-quality evidence. Advancing the clinical application of PET imaging will require a concerted effort to improve the quality of trials. PMID:28042342

  2. Clinical Cancer Advances 2013: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jyoti D; Krilov, Lada; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Basch, Ethan; Brose, Marcia S; Carroll, William L; de Lima, Marcos; Gilbert, Mark R; Kris, Mark G; Marshall, John L; Masters, Gregory A; O'Day, Steven J; Polite, Blasé; Schwartz, Gary K; Sharma, Sunil; Thompson, Ian; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Roth, Bruce J

    2014-01-10

    Since its founding in 1964, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has been committed to improving cancer outcomes through research and the delivery of quality care. Research is the bedrock of discovering better treatments--providing hope to the millions of individuals who face a cancer diagnosis each year. The studies featured in "Clinical Cancer Advances 2013: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology" represent the invaluable contributions of thousands of patients who participate in clinical trials and the scientists who conduct basic and clinical research. The insights described in this report, such as how cancers hide from the immune system and why cancers may become resistant to targeted drugs, enable us to envision a future in which cancer will be even more controllable and preventable. The scientific process is thoughtful, deliberate, and sometimes slow, but each advance, while helping patients, now also points toward new research questions and unexplored opportunities. Both dramatic and subtle breakthroughs occur so that progress against cancer typically builds over many years. Success requires vision, persistence, and a long-term commitment to supporting cancer research and training. Our nation's longstanding investment in federally funded cancer research has contributed significantly to a growing array of effective new treatments and a much deeper understanding of the drivers of cancer. But despite this progress, our position as a world leader in advancing medical knowledge and our ability to attract the most promising and talented investigators are now threatened by an acute problem: Federal funding for cancer research has steadily eroded over the past decade, and only 15% of the ever-shrinking budget is actually spent on clinical trials. This dismal reality threatens the pace of progress against cancer and undermines our ability to address the continuing needs of our patients. Despite this

  3. Implementing clinical protocols in oncology: quality gaps and the learning curve phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kedikoglou, Simos; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Skalkidis, Yannis; Ploiarchopoulou, Fani; Dessypris, Nick; Petridou, Eleni

    2005-08-01

    The quality improvement effort in clinical practice has focused mostly on 'performance quality', i.e. on the development of comprehensive, evidence-based guidelines. This study aimed to assess the 'conformance quality', i.e. the extent to which guidelines once developed are correctly and consistently applied. It also aimed to assess the existence of quality gaps in the treatment of certain patient segments as defined by age or gender and to investigate methods to improve overall conformance quality. A retrospective audit of clinical practice in a well-defined oncology setting was undertaken and the results compared to those obtained from prospectively applying an internally developed clinical protocol in the same setting and using specific tools to increase conformance quality. All indicators showed improvement after the implementation of the protocol that in many cases reached statistical significance, while in the entire cohort advanced age was associated (although not significantly) with sub-optimal delivery of care. A 'learning curve' phenomenon in the implementation of quality initiatives was detected, with all indicators improving substantially in the second part of the prospective study. Clinicians should pay separate attention to the implementation of chosen protocols and employ specific tools to increase conformance quality in patient care.

  4. The history of the Gynecologic Cancer Study Group (GCSG) of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG).

    PubMed

    Onda, Takashi; Konishi, Ikuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Kamura, Toshiharu

    2011-10-01

    The Gynecologic Cancer Study Group (GCSG) of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) was organized in 1994. The GCSG has developed under the leadership of three successive group representatives, five principal study investigators, the cooperation of group members and the support of several public research funds. At present, 38 institutions are participating as active members of the GCSG of the JCOG. In addition to gynecologic oncologists, medical oncologists, pathologists and radiotherapists are participating in our group. Our group manages female genital malignancies including uterine cervical, endometrial, ovarian, tubal and vulvar cancers. Because the incidences of uterine cervical (in younger women), endometrial and ovarian cancer have increased in Japan in recent years, we are developing new standard treatments especially for these malignancies. As of 31 May 2011, our group has conducted six JCOG clinical trials (three completed and three ongoing) and completed one JCOG accompanying study, which is now in preparation for publication. Our group has also conducted several retrospective studies, and Phase I and II trials independent of the JCOG Data Center. Our aim is to conduct unique and high-quality clinical trials which we can appeal to the world. In this review, we present the organization and achievements of our group, along with a list of participating institutions, as the history of the GCSG of the JCOG.

  5. Strategies to facilitate shared decision-making about pediatric oncology clinical trial enrollment: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Eden G; Wakefield, Claire E; Signorelli, Christina; Cohn, Richard J; Patenaude, Andrea; Foster, Claire; Pettit, Tristan; Fardell, Joanna E

    2018-07-01

    We conducted a systematic review to identify the strategies that have been recommended in the literature to facilitate shared decision-making regarding enrolment in pediatric oncology clinical trials. We searched seven databases for peer-reviewed literature, published 1990-2017. Of 924 articles identified, 17 studies were eligible for the review. We assessed study quality using the 'Mixed-Methods Appraisal Tool'. We coded the results and discussions of papers line-by-line using nVivo software. We categorized strategies thematically. Five main themes emerged: 1) decision-making as a process, 2) individuality of the process; 3) information provision, 4) the role of communication, or 5) decision and psychosocial support. Families should have adequate time to make a decision. HCPs should elicit parents' and patients' preferences for level of information and decision involvement. Information should be clear and provided in multiple modalities. Articles also recommended providing training for healthcare professionals and access to psychosocial support for families. High quality, individually-tailored information, open communication and psychosocial support appear vital in supporting decision-making regarding enrollment in clinical trials. These data will usefully inform future decision-making interventions/tools to support families making clinical trial decisions. A solid evidence-base for effective strategies which facilitate shared decision-making is needed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Controversies on the management of clinical situations with low therapeutic effectiveness in oncology.

    PubMed

    Expósito, José; Bretón, Juan José; Domínguez, Carmen; Pons, Joana

    2010-07-01

    Clinical scenarios associated with low therapeutic effectiveness (LTE) are especially complex and highly relevant in oncology. The objective was to test a methodological framework for creating consensual clinical recommendations for routine practice. The study was in three phases from Mars 2006 to January 2008: 1) Definition of LTE situations; 2) Preparation by 10 experts of a panel of LTE situations in cancers of breast, lung, head and neck, colon and rectum and brain; and 3) Development of a consensus on each situation and its optimal treatment by gathering agreement and disagreements (two-round Delphi method) from 68 practicing oncologists in Andalusian Community. Three major and three minor criteria were established for an LTE situation, defined when at least one major or two minor criteria were met. The expert group proposed 48 possible LTE clinical scenarios for breast (n = 7), lung (10), brain (11), head and neck (11) and colorectal cancers (9). Sixty-eight oncologists agreed to participate in the study; the response rate was 79% (from 34 medical and 17 radiation oncologists) In the first round (definition), maximum agreement was obtained with the LTE definition of 10 of the 48 scenarios; in the second round (treatment options), maximum agreement was obtained on the treatment of 3 of these 10 scenarios. Oncologists reached low levels of agreement on the definition of an LTE situation and on its treatment recommendations. This study proposes an approach to the improvement of cancer management in situations of high uncertainty.

  7. Evaluation of clinical pharmacy services in a hematology/oncology outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sachin; Dowell, Jonathan; Greene, Shane

    2006-09-01

    The Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System in Dallas, TX, provides a unique opportunity for clinical pharmacists to work as providers. Even though clinical pharmacists are actively involved in patient care, many of their efforts remain undocumented, resulting in an underestimation of the importance of their services and missed opportunities for improvements and new directions. To document and evaluate the services of a hematology/oncology clinical pharmacy in the outpatient setting. Pendragon Forms 3.2 software was used to design the documentation template. The template was designed to collect diagnoses, supportive care issues, drug-specific interventions, and prescriptions written. This template was uploaded to the personal digital assistant (PDA) for documentation. Patient-specific information was documented in a password-protected PDA. Data collected from November 1, 2002, to October 31, 2003, were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical pharmacists were involved in 423 patient visits for chemotherapy follow-up or disease management. Cancer diagnoses included colorectal (n = 99), multiple myeloma (59), non-small cell lung (56), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (44), myelodysplastic syndromes (22), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (19). During the 423 patient visits, 342 supportive care issues were addressed including anemia (34%), pain management (22%), constipation/diarrhea (15%), and nausea/vomiting (8%). Major drug-specific interventions included drug addition (41%), discontinuation (23%), and adjustment (21%). Four hundred forty-five prescriptions were filled, of which 181 were new and 150 were refilled. This is the first study, as of July 25, 2006, to document considerable contribution of an outpatient clinical pharmacist in direct cancer patient care. Although the disease management and supportive care issues addressed here may differ based on institution and patient population, the results of our study show that clinical pharmacists have ever

  8. Outbreak of Pantoea agglomerans Bloodstream Infections at an Oncology Clinic-Illinois, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Brian R; Dantes, Raymund; Tsai, Victoria; Lim, Rachel; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Arduino, Matthew; Jensen, Bette; Patel, Megan Toth; Vernon, Michael O; Grant-Greene, Yoran; Christiansen, Demian; Conover, Craig; Kallen, Alexander; Guh, Alice Y

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the source of a healthcare-associated outbreak of Pantoea agglomerans bloodstream infections. DESIGN Epidemiologic investigation of the outbreak. SETTING Oncology clinic (clinic A). METHODS Cases were defined as Pantoea isolation from blood or catheter tip cultures of clinic A patients during July 2012-May 2013. Clinic A medical charts and laboratory records were reviewed; infection prevention practices and the facility's water system were evaluated. Environmental samples were collected for culture. Clinical and environmental P. agglomerans isolates were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. RESULTS Twelve cases were identified; median (range) age was 65 (41-78) years. All patients had malignant tumors and had received infusions at clinic A. Deficiencies in parenteral medication preparation and handling were identified (eg, placing infusates near sinks with potential for splash-back contamination). Facility inspection revealed substantial dead-end water piping and inadequate chlorine residual in tap water from multiple sinks, including the pharmacy clean room sink. P. agglomerans was isolated from composite surface swabs of 7 sinks and an ice machine; the pharmacy clean room sink isolate was indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis from 7 of 9 available patient isolates. CONCLUSIONS Exposure of locally prepared infusates to a contaminated pharmacy sink caused the outbreak. Improvements in parenteral medication preparation, including moving chemotherapy preparation offsite, along with terminal sink cleaning and water system remediation ended the outbreak. Greater awareness of recommended medication preparation and handling practices as well as further efforts to better define the contribution of contaminated sinks and plumbing deficiencies to healthcare-associated infections are needed. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:314-319.

  9. Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    PubMed

    von Mehren, Margaret; Randall, R Lor; Benjamin, Robert S; Boles, Sarah; Bui, Marilyn M; Ganjoo, Kristen N; George, Suzanne; Gonzalez, Ricardo J; Heslin, Martin J; Kane, John M; Keedy, Vicki; Kim, Edward; Koon, Henry; Mayerson, Joel; McCarter, Martin; McGarry, Sean V; Meyer, Christian; Morris, Zachary S; O'Donnell, Richard J; Pappo, Alberto S; Paz, I Benjamin; Petersen, Ivy A; Pfeifer, John D; Riedel, Richard F; Ruo, Bernice; Schuetze, Scott; Tap, William D; Wayne, Jeffrey D; Bergman, Mary Anne; Scavone, Jillian L

    2018-05-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare solid tumors of mesenchymal cell origin that display a heterogenous mix of clinical and pathologic characteristics. STS can develop from fat, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and other connective tissues. The evaluation and treatment of patients with STS requires a multidisciplinary team with demonstrated expertise in the management of these tumors. The complete NCCN Guidelines for STS provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of extremity/superficial trunk/head and neck STS, as well as intra-abdominal/retroperitoneal STS, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, desmoid tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines discusses general principles for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of STS of the extremities, superficial trunk, or head and neck; outlines treatment recommendations by disease stage; and reviews the evidence to support the guidelines recommendations. Copyright © 2018 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  10. Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    PubMed

    von Mehren, Margaret; Randall, R Lor; Benjamin, Robert S; Boles, Sarah; Bui, Marilyn M; Conrad, Ernest U; Ganjoo, Kristen N; George, Suzanne; Gonzalez, Ricardo J; Heslin, Martin J; Kane, John M; Koon, Henry; Mayerson, Joel; McCarter, Martin; McGarry, Sean V; Meyer, Christian; O'Donnell, Richard J; Pappo, Alberto S; Paz, I Benjamin; Petersen, Ivy A; Pfeifer, John D; Riedel, Richard F; Schuetze, Scott; Schupak, Karen D; Schwartz, Herbert S; Tap, William D; Wayne, Jeffrey D; Bergman, Mary Anne; Scavone, Jillian

    2016-06-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare solid tumors of mesenchymal cell origin that display a heterogenous mix of clinical and pathologic characteristics. STS can develop from fat, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and other connective tissues. The evaluation and treatment of patients with STS requires a multidisciplinary team with demonstrated expertise in the management of these tumors. The complete NCCN Guidelines for Soft Tissue Sarcoma (available at NCCN.org) provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of extremity/superficial trunk/head and neck STS, as well as intra-abdominal/retroperitoneal STS, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, desmoid tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma. This manuscript discusses guiding principles for the diagnosis and staging of STS and evidence for treatment modalities that include surgery, radiation, chemoradiation, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  11. NRG Oncology medical physicists' manpower survey quantifying support demands for multi-institutional clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Monroe, James I; Boparai, Karan; Xiao, Ying; Followill, David; Galvin, James M; Klein, Eric E; Low, Daniel A; Moran, Jean M; Zhong, Haoyu; Sohn, Jason W

    2018-02-04

    A survey was created by NRG to assess a medical physicists' percent full time equivalent (FTE) contribution to multi-institutional clinical trials. A 2012 American Society for Radiation Oncology report, "Safety Is No Accident," quantified medical physics staffing contributions in FTE factors for clinical departments. No quantification of FTE effort associated with clinical trials was included. To address this lack of information, the NRG Medical Physics Subcommittee decided to obtain manpower data from the medical physics community to quantify the amount of time medical physicists spent supporting clinical trials. A survey, consisting of 16 questions, was designed to obtain information regarding physicists' time spent supporting clinical trials. The survey was distributed to medical physicists at 1996 radiation therapy institutions included on the membership rosters of the 5 National Clinical Trials Network clinical trial groups. Of the 451 institutions who responded, 50% (226) reported currently participating in radiation therapy trials. On average, the designated physicist at each institution spent 2.4 hours (standard deviation [SD], 5.5) per week supervising or interacting with clinical trial staff. On average, 1.2 hours (SD, 3.1), 1.8 hours (SD, 3.9), and 0.6 hours (SD, 1.1) per week were spent on trial patient simulations, treatment plan reviews, and maintaining a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine server, respectively. For all trial credentialing activities, physicists spent an average of 32 hours (SD, 57.2) yearly. Reading protocols and supporting dosimetrists, clinicians, and therapists took an average of 2.1 hours (SD, 3.4) per week. Physicists also attended clinical trial meetings, on average, 1.2 hours (SD, 1.9) per month. On average, physicist spent a nontrivial total of 9 hours per week (0.21 FTE) supporting an average of 10 active clinical trials. This time commitment indicates the complexity of radiation therapy clinical trials and should

  12. Update on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Research: From Clinical to Genetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, Helena; Ryer, Evan J.; Elmore, James R.; Hinterseher, Irene; Smelser, Diane T.; Tromp, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a dilatation of the abdominal aorta with a diameter of at least 3.0 cm. AAAs are often asymptomatic and are discovered as incidental findings in imaging studies or when the AAA ruptures leading to a medical emergency. AAAs are more common in males than females, in individuals of European ancestry, and in those over 65 years of age. Smoking is the most important environmental risk factor. In addition, a positive family history of AAA increases the person's risk for AAA. Interestingly, diabetes has been shown to be a protective factor for AAA in many large studies. Hallmarks of AAA pathogenesis include inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, extracellular matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. Autoimmunity may also play a role in AAA development and progression. In this Outlook paper, we summarize our recent studies on AAA including clinical studies related to surgical repair of AAA and genetic risk factor and large-scale gene expression studies. We conclude with a discussion on our research projects using large data sets available through electronic medical records and biobanks. PMID:24834361

  13. Acute right lower abdominal pain in women of reproductive age: Clinical clues

    PubMed Central

    Hatipoglu, Sinan; Hatipoglu, Filiz; Abdullayev, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study possible gynecological organ pathologies in the differential diagnosis of acute right lower abdominal pain in patients of reproductive age. METHODS: Following Clinical Trials Ethical Committee approval, the retrospective data consisting of physical examination and laboratory findings in 290 patients with sudden onset right lower abdominal pain who used the emergency surgery service between April 2009 and September 2013, and underwent surgery and general anesthesia with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis were collated. RESULTS: Total data on 290 patients were obtained. Two hundred and twenty-four (77.2%) patients had acute appendicitis, whereas 29 (10%) had perforated appendicitis and 37 (12.8%) had gynecological organ pathologies. Of the latter, 21 (7.2%) had ovarian cyst rupture, 12 (4.2%) had corpus hemorrhagicum cyst rupture and 4 (1.4%) had adnexal torsion. Defense, Rovsing’s sign, increased body temperature and increased leukocyte count were found to be statistically significant in the differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis and gynecological organ pathologies. CONCLUSION: Gynecological pathologies in women of reproductive age are misleading in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:24744594

  14. A Clinical Librarian-Nursing Partnership to Bridge Clinical Practice and Research in an Oncology Setting.

    PubMed

    Ginex, Pamela K; Hernandez, Marisol; Vrabel, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Nurses in clinical settings in which evidence-based, individualized care is expected are often the best resource to identify important clinical questions and gaps in practice. These nurses are frequently challenged by a lack of resources to fully develop their questions and identify the most appropriate methods to answer them. A strategic and ongoing partnership between medical library services and nursing can support nurses as they embark on the process of answering these questions and, ultimately, improving patient care and clinical outcomes

  15. Role of routine abdominal ultrasonography in intensified tuberculosis case finding algorithms at HIV clinics in high TB burden settings.

    PubMed

    Spalgais, Sonam; Agarwal, Upasna; Sarin, Rohit; Chauhan, Devesh; Yadav, Anita; Jaiswal, Anand

    2017-05-18

    High proportion of TB in people living with HIV (PLHIV) is undiagnosed. Due to this active TB case finding is recommended for HIV clinics in high TB burden countries. Presently sputum examination and chest radiography are frontline tests recommended for HIV infected TB presumptives. Abdominal TB which occurs frequently in PLHIV may be missed even by existing programmatic intensified case finding protocols. This study evaluated the routine use of ultrasonography (USG) for active case finding of abdominal TB in HIV clinics. Retrospective analysis of eight years' data from an HIV Clinic in a TB hospital in India. Patients underwent chest x-ray, sputum examination, USG abdomen and routine blood tests at entry to HIV care. Case forms were scrutinized for diagnosis of TB, USG findings and CD4 cell counts. Abdominal TB was classified as probable or possible TB. Probable TB was based on presence of two major USG (abdomen) findings suggestive of active TB, or one major USG finding with at least two minor USG findings or at least two symptoms, or any USG finding with microbiologically confirmed active TB at another site. Possible TB was based on the presence of one major USG finding, or the presence of two minor USG findings with at least two symptoms. Bacteriological confirmation was not obtained. Eight hundred and eighty-nine people PLHIV underwent a baseline USG abdomen. One hundred and thirteen of 340 cases already diagnosed with TB and 87 of the 91 newly diagnosed with TB at time of HIV clinic registration had abdominal TB. Non-abdominal symptoms like weight loss, fever and cough were seen in 53% and 22% cases had no symptoms at all. Enlarged abdominal lymph nodes with central caseation, ascitis, splenic microabsesses, bowel thickening and hepatosplenomegaly were the USG findings in these cases. Abdominal TB is a frequent TB site in PLHIV presenting with non-abdominal symptoms. It can be easily detected on basis of features seen on a simple abdominal ultrasound

  16. Clinical Efficacy of Transthoracic Echocardiography for Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Turkish Patients.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Salih; Saracoglu, Erhan; Cekici, Yusuf

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in Turkish patients aged ≥ 65 years, and to demonstrate the applicability of echocardiography to AAA screening. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed in all consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years who were referred to cardiology clinics or were referred from other outpatient clinics. The abdominal aorta (AA) of each patient was scanned using the same probe, and the time spent was recorded. Demographic and clinic characteristics of the patients were recorded at the end of the echocardiography. Among 1948 patients (mean age 70.9 ± 6 years; 49.8% male), the AA was visualized in 96.3%. AAA was identified in 3.7% (69/1878) of the patients, of whom AAA was previously known in 20.3% (n = 14). The prevalence of unknown AAA was 2.93%. The average time needed to scan and measure the AA was 1 minute and 3 seconds (±23 seconds). Aortic root diameters were significantly higher in the patients with AAA than in those without AAA (34.7 ± 4.2 vs. 29.8 ± 4.7; p < 0.001). Age (per 1 year increase) [odds ratio (OR), 1.245; p < 0.001], male gender (OR, 5.382; p < 0.001), smoking (OR, 2.118; p = 0.037), and aortic root diameter (per 1 mm increase) (OR, 1.299; p < 0.001) were independent predictors of AAA. This study is important in that it showed a high prevalence of AAA in Turkish patients aged ≥ 65 years, and demonstrated that AAA can be visualized in the majority of patients in as little as 1 minute during TTE.

  17. Efficient multi-atlas abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired CT with SIMPLE context learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P; Lee, Christopher P; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Poulose, Benjamin K; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-08-01

    Abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) has been a challenging problem given the inter-subject variance of human abdomens and complex 3-D relationships among organs. Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) provides a potentially robust solution by leveraging label atlases via image registration and statistical fusion. We posit that the efficiency of atlas selection requires further exploration in the context of substantial registration errors. The selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) method is a MAS technique integrating atlas selection and label fusion that has proven effective for prostate radiotherapy planning. Herein, we revisit atlas selection and fusion techniques for segmenting 12 abdominal structures using clinically acquired CT. Using a re-derived SIMPLE algorithm, we show that performance on multi-organ classification can be improved by accounting for exogenous information through Bayesian priors (so called context learning). These innovations are integrated with the joint label fusion (JLF) approach to reduce the impact of correlated errors among selected atlases for each organ, and a graph cut technique is used to regularize the combined segmentation. In a study of 100 subjects, the proposed method outperformed other comparable MAS approaches, including majority vote, SIMPLE, JLF, and the Wolz locally weighted vote technique. The proposed technique provides consistent improvement over state-of-the-art approaches (median improvement of 7.0% and 16.2% in DSC over JLF and Wolz, respectively) and moves toward efficient segmentation of large-scale clinically acquired CT data for biomarker screening, surgical navigation, and data mining. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychosocial Issues in Pediatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial oncology, a relatively new discipline, is a multidisciplinary application of the behavioral and social sciences, and pediatric psychosocial oncology is an emerging subspecialty within the domain of psychosocial oncology. This review presents a brief overview of some of the major clinical issues surrounding pediatric psychosocial oncology. PMID:23049457

  19. HRV biofeedback for pediatric irritable bowel syndrome and functional abdominal pain: a clinical replication series.

    PubMed

    Stern, Mark J; Guiles, Robert A F; Gevirtz, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and Functional Abdominal Pain (FAP) are among the most commonly reported Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. Both have been associated with varying autonomic dysregulation. Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (HRVB) has recently begun to show efficacy in the treatment of both IBS and FAP. The purpose of this multiple clinical replication series was to analyze the clinical outcomes of utilizing HRVB in a clinical setting. Archival data of twenty-seven consecutive pediatric outpatients diagnosed with IBS or FAP who received HRVB were analyzed. Clinical outcomes were self-report and categorized as full or remission with patient satisfaction, or no improvement. Qualitative reports of patient experiences were also noted. Full remission was achieved by 69.2 % and partial remission was achieved by 30.8 % of IBS patients. Full remission was achieved by 63.6 % and partial remission was achieved by 36.4 % of FAP patients. No patients in either group did not improve to a level of patient satisfaction or >50 %. Patient's commonly reported feeling validated in their discomfort as a result of psychophysiological education. Results suggest that HRVB is a promising intervention for pediatric outpatients with IBS or FAP. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to accurately determine clinical efficacy of HRVB in the treatment of IBS and FAP.

  20. A review of Raman spectroscopy advances with an emphasis on clinical translation challenges in oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Aubertin, Kelly; St-Arnaud, Karl; Madore, Wendy-Julie; De Montigny, Etienne; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Trudel, Dominique; Wilson, Brian C.; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    There is an urgent need for improved techniques for disease detection. Optical spectroscopy and imaging technologies have potential for non- or minimally-invasive use in a wide range of clinical applications. The focus here, in vivo Raman spectroscopy (RS), measures inelastic light scattering based on interaction with the vibrational and rotational modes of common molecular bonds in cells and tissue. The Raman ‘signature’ can be used to assess physiological status and can also be altered by disease. This information can supplement existing diagnostic (e.g. radiological imaging) techniques for disease screening and diagnosis, in interventional guidance for identifying disease margins, and in monitoring treatment responses. Using fiberoptic-based light delivery and collection, RS is most easily performed on accessible tissue surfaces, either on the skin, in hollow organs or intra-operatively. The strength of RS lies in the high biochemical information content of the spectra, that characteristically show an array of very narrow peaks associated with specific chemical bonds. This results in high sensitivity and specificity, for example to distinguish malignant or premalignant from normal tissues. A critical issue is that the Raman signal is often very weak, limiting clinical use to point-by-point measurements. However, non-linear techniques using pulsed-laser sources have been developed to enable in vivo Raman imaging. Changes in Raman spectra with disease are often subtle and spectrally distributed, requiring full spectral scanning, together with the use of tissue classification algorithms that must be trained on large numbers of independent measurements. Recent advances in instrumentation and spectral analysis have substantially improved the clinical feasibility of RS, so that it is now being investigated with increased success in a wide range of cancer types and locations, as well as for non-oncological conditions. This review covers recent advances and

  1. Sustainability and performance of the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, William R.; Fortune-Greeley, Alice K.; Zullig, Leah L.; Lee, Shoou-Yih; Weiner, Bryan J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) contributes one third of NCI treatment trial enrollment (“accrual”) and most cancer prevention and control (CP/C) trial enrollment. Prior research indicated that the local clinical environment influenced CCOP accrual performance during the 1990s. As the NCI seeks to improve the operations of the clinical trials system following critical reports by the Institute of Medicine and the NCI Operational Efficiency Working Group, the current relevance of the local environmental context on accrual performance is unknown. Materials and methods This longitudinal quasi-experimental study used panel data on 45 CCOPs nationally for years 2000–2007. Multivariable models examine organizational, research network, and environmental factors associated with accrual to treatment trials, CP/C trials, and trials overall. Results For total trial accrual and treatment trial accrual, the number of active CCOP physicians and the number of trials were associated with CCOP performance. Factors differ for CP/C trials. CCOPs in areas with fewer medical school-affiliated hospitals had greater treatment trial accrual. Conclusions Findings suggest a shift in the relevance of the clinical environment since the 1990s, as well as changes in CCOP structure associated with accrual performance. Rather than a limited number of physicians being responsible for the preponderance of trial accrual, there is a trend toward accrual among a larger number of physicians each accruing relatively fewer patients to trial. Understanding this dynamic in the context of CCOP efficiency may inform and strengthen CCOP organization and physician practice. PMID:21986391

  2. Invited review: study design considerations for clinical research in veterinary radiology and radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Scrivani, Peter V; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    High quality clinical research is essential for advancing knowledge in the areas of veterinary radiology and radiation oncology. Types of clinical research studies may include experimental studies, method-comparison studies, and patient-based studies. Experimental studies explore issues relative to pathophysiology, patient safety, and treatment efficacy. Method-comparison studies evaluate agreement between techniques or between observers. Patient-based studies investigate naturally acquired disease and focus on questions asked in clinical practice that relate to individuals or populations (e.g., risk, accuracy, or prognosis). Careful preplanning and study design are essential in order to achieve valid results. A key point to planning studies is ensuring that the design is tailored to the study objectives. Good design includes a comprehensive literature review, asking suitable questions, selecting the proper sample population, collecting the appropriate data, performing the correct statistical analyses, and drawing conclusions supported by the available evidence. Most study designs are classified by whether they are experimental or observational, longitudinal or cross-sectional, and prospective or retrospective. Additional features (e.g., controlled, randomized, or blinded) may be described that address bias. Two related challenging aspects of study design are defining an important research question and selecting an appropriate sample population. The sample population should represent the target population as much as possible. Furthermore, when comparing groups, it is important that the groups are as alike to each other as possible except for the variables of interest. Medical images are well suited for clinical research because imaging signs are categorical or numerical variables that might be predictors or outcomes of diseases or treatments. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  3. Physician perspective on incorporation of oncology patient quality-of-life, fatigue, and pain assessment into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Joleen M; Grothey, Axel F; McWilliams, Robert R; Buckner, Jan C; Sloan, Jeff A

    2014-07-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) such as pain, fatigue, and quality of life (QOL) are important for morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. Systematic approaches to collect and incorporate PROs into clinical practice are still evolving. We set out to determine the impact of PRO assessment on routine clinical practice. Beginning in July 2010, the symptom assessment questionnaire (SAQ) was administered to every patient in a solid tumor oncology practice at an academic center. The SAQ measures pain, fatigue, and QOL, each on a scale of 0 to 10 points. Results were available to providers before each visit in the electronic medical record. Eighteen months after the SAQ was implemented, an online survey was sent to 83 oncology care providers regarding the use of the SAQ and how it affected their clinical practice, including discussion with patients, duration of visits, and work burden. A total of 53% of care providers completed the online survey, producing 44 evaluable surveys. Of these, 86% of care providers reported using information from the SAQ; > 90% of care providers indicated the SAQ did not change the length of clinic visits or contribute to increased work burden. A majority of care providers felt that the SAQ had helped or enhanced their practice. Providers endorsed the SAQ for facilitating communication with their patients. This study indicates that simple single-item measures of pain, fatigue, and QOL can be incorporated into oncology clinical practice with positive implications for both patients and physicians without increasing duration of visits or work burden. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clearinghouse What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ... Esophagus Stomach Large intestine Adhesion Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ...

  5. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Recurrent or Functional Abdominal Pain (RAP or FAP) What is abdominal pain? Abdominal pain , or stomachache, ... recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) or functional abdominal pain (FAP)? If your health care provider has ruled out ...

  6. Clinical cancer advances 2011: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Benowitz, Steven I; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Chang, Susan Marina; Dreyer, Zoann Eckert; Janne, Pasi A; Ko, Andrew H; Masters, Greg A; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Patel, Jyoti D; Roth, Bruce J; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Seidman, Andrew D; Tap, William D; Temel, Jennifer S; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Kris, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    A message from ASCO'S President. It has been forty years since President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act of 1971, which many view as the nation's declaration of the "War on Cancer." The bill has led to major investments in cancer research and significant increases in cancer survival. Today, two-thirds of patients survive at least five years after being diagnosed with cancer compared with just half of all diagnosed patients surviving five years after diagnosis in 1975. The research advances detailed in this year's Clinical Cancer Advances demonstrate that improvements in cancer screening, treatment, and prevention save and improve lives. But although much progress has been made, cancer remains one of the world's most serious health problems. In the United States, the disease is expected to become the nation's leading cause of death in the years ahead as our population ages. I believe we can accelerate the pace of progress, provided that everyone involved in cancer care works together to achieve this goal. It is this viewpoint that has shaped the theme for my presidential term: Collaborating to Conquer Cancer. In practice, this means that physicians and researchers must learn from every patient's experience, ensure greater collaboration between members of a patient's medical team, and involve more patients in the search for cures through clinical trials. Cancer advocates, insurers, and government agencies also have important roles to play. Today, we have an incredible opportunity to improve the quality of cancer care by drawing lessons from the real-world experiences of patients. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is taking the lead in this area, in part through innovative use of health information technology. In addition to our existing quality initiatives, ASCO is working with partners to develop a comprehensive rapid-learning system for cancer care. When complete, this system will provide physicians with personalized, real

  7. Comparative effectiveness of senna to prevent problematic constipation in pediatric oncology patients receiving opioids: a multicenter study of clinically detailed administrative data.

    PubMed

    Feudtner, Chris; Freedman, Jason; Kang, Tammy; Womer, James W; Dai, Dingwei; Faerber, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric oncology patients often receive prolonged courses of opioids, which can result in constipation. Comparing patients who received senna matched with similar patients who received other oral bowel medications, determine the subsequent risk of "problematic constipation," assessed as the occurrence of the surrogate markers of receiving an enema, escalation of oral bowel medications, and abdominal radiographic imaging. This was a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized pediatric oncology patients less than 21 years of age in 78 children's and adult hospitals between 2006 and 2011 who were started on seven consecutive days or more of opioid therapy and were started on an oral bowel medication within the first two days of opioid therapy. Clinically detailed administrative data were used from the Pediatric Health Information System and the Premier Perspective Database. After performing propensity score matching of similar patients who started senna and who started a different oral bowel medication, Cox regression modeling was used to compare the subsequent hazard of the surrogate markers. The final matched sample of 586 patients averaged 11.5 years of age (range 0-20 years); 41.8% (n = 245) had blood cancer, 50.3% (n = 295) had solid tumor cancer, and 7.9% (n = 46) had brain cancer. Initiating senna therapy within two days of starting the prolonged opioid course, compared with initiating another oral bowel medication, was significantly associated with a lower hazard during the ensuing five days for receipt of an enema (hazard ratio [HR], 0.31; 95% CI, 0.11-0.91) or undergoing abdominal radiographic imaging (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.55-0.98), was marginally associated with a lower hazard of oral bowel medicine escalation (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.59-1.03), and overall was significantly associated with a lower hazard of the composite end point of problematic constipation (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.56-0.88). Initiating senna therapy, compared with other oral bowel

  8. Mass Spectrometry Strategies for Clinical Metabolomics and Lipidomics in Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuro-Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics research has the potential to provide biomarkers for the detection of disease, for subtyping complex disease populations, for monitoring disease progression and therapy, and for defining new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. These potentials are far from being realized because of a number of technical, conceptual, financial, and bioinformatics issues. Mass spectrometry provides analytical platforms that address the technical barriers to success in metabolomics research; however, the limited commercial availability of analytical and stable isotope standards has created a bottleneck for the absolute quantitation of a number of metabolites. Conceptual and financial factors contribute to the generation of statistically under-powered clinical studies, whereas bioinformatics issues result in the publication of a large number of unidentified metabolites. The path forward in this field involves targeted metabolomics analyses of large control and patient populations to define both the normal range of a defined metabolite and the potential heterogeneity (eg, bimodal) in complex patient populations. This approach requires that metabolomics research groups, in addition to developing a number of analytical platforms, build sufficient chemistry resources to supply the analytical standards required for absolute metabolite quantitation. Examples of metabolomics evaluations of sulfur amino-acid metabolism in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology and of lipidomics in neurology will be reviewed. PMID:23842599

  9. Mass spectrometry strategies for clinical metabolomics and lipidomics in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Wood, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics research has the potential to provide biomarkers for the detection of disease, for subtyping complex disease populations, for monitoring disease progression and therapy, and for defining new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. These potentials are far from being realized because of a number of technical, conceptual, financial, and bioinformatics issues. Mass spectrometry provides analytical platforms that address the technical barriers to success in metabolomics research; however, the limited commercial availability of analytical and stable isotope standards has created a bottleneck for the absolute quantitation of a number of metabolites. Conceptual and financial factors contribute to the generation of statistically under-powered clinical studies, whereas bioinformatics issues result in the publication of a large number of unidentified metabolites. The path forward in this field involves targeted metabolomics analyses of large control and patient populations to define both the normal range of a defined metabolite and the potential heterogeneity (eg, bimodal) in complex patient populations. This approach requires that metabolomics research groups, in addition to developing a number of analytical platforms, build sufficient chemistry resources to supply the analytical standards required for absolute metabolite quantitation. Examples of metabolomics evaluations of sulfur amino-acid metabolism in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology and of lipidomics in neurology will be reviewed.

  10. The 150 most important questions in cancer research and clinical oncology series: questions 40-49.

    PubMed

    2017-07-13

    Since the beginning of 2017, Chinese Journal of Cancer has published a series of important questions in cancer research and clinical oncology, which sparkle diverse thoughts, interesting communications, and potential collaborations among researchers all over the world. In this article, 10 more questions are presented as followed. Question 40. Why do mice being used as tumorigenesis models raised in different places or different conditions possess different tumor formation rate? Question 41. How could we generate more effective anti-metastasis drugs? Question 42. What is the molecular mechanism underlying heterogeneity of cancer cachexia in patients with the same pathologic type? Question 43. Will patients with oligo-metastatic disease be curable by immunotherapy plus stereotactic body radiotherapy? Question 44. Can the Warburg effect regulation be targeted for cancer treatment? Question 45. Why do adenocarcinomas seldom occur in the small intestine? Question 46. Is Epstein-Barr virus infection a causal factor for nasal natural killer/T cell lymphoma formation? Question 47. Why will not all but very few human papillomavirus-infected patients eventually develop cervical cancer? Question 48. Why do cervical carcinomas induced by human papilloma virus have a low mutation rate in tumor suppressor genes? Question 49. Can viral infection trigger lung cancer relapse?

  11. The 150 most important questions in cancer research and clinical oncology series: questions 50-56.

    PubMed

    2017-08-29

    Since the beginning of 2017, Chinese Journal of Cancer has published a series of important questions in cancer research and clinical oncology, which sparkle diverse thoughts, interesting communications, and potential collaborations among researchers all over the world. In this article, seven more questions are presented as followed. Question 50. When tumor cells spread from primary site to distant sites, are they required to be "trained" or "armed" in the bone marrow niche prior to colonizing soft tissues? Question 51. Are there tipping points during cancer progression which can be identified for manipulation? Question 52. Can we replace molecular biomarkers by network biomarkers? Question 53. Are conventional inhibitors of key cellular processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation more effective than targeted chemotherapeutics that antagonize the downstream cell signaling network via cell-surface receptors such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and c-Met, or intracellular receptors such as androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER), by drugs like erlotinib, sunitinib and cabozantinib, or enzalutamide and tomoxifen? Question 54. How can we robustly identify the candidate causal event of somatic genome alteration (SGA) by using computational approach? Question 55. How can we systematically reveal the immune evasion mechanism exploited by each tumor and utilize such information to guide targeted therapy to restore immune sensitivity? Question 56. Can the nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC) subtype benefit from more specific targeted therapy?

  12. The script concordance test in radiation oncology: validation study of a new tool to assess clinical reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Carole; Gagnon, Robert; Nguyen, David; Charlin, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Background The Script Concordance test (SCT) is a reliable and valid tool to evaluate clinical reasoning in complex situations where experts' opinions may be divided. Scores reflect the degree of concordance between the performance of examinees and that of a reference panel of experienced physicians. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate SCT's usefulness in radiation oncology. Methods A 90 items radiation oncology SCT was administered to 155 participants. Three levels of experience were tested: medical students (n = 70), radiation oncology residents (n = 38) and radiation oncologists (n = 47). Statistical tests were performed to assess reliability and to document validity. Results After item optimization, the test comprised 30 cases and 70 questions. Cronbach alpha was 0.90. Mean scores were 51.62 (± 8.19) for students, 71.20 (± 9.45) for residents and 76.67 (± 6.14) for radiation oncologists. The difference between the three groups was statistically significant when compared by the Kruskall-Wallis test (p < 0.001). Conclusion The SCT is reliable and useful to discriminate among participants according to their level of experience in radiation oncology. It appears as a useful tool to document the progression of reasoning during residency training. PMID:19203358

  13. Tobacco control: reducing cancer incidence and saving lives. American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    1996-06-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) supports the elimination of tobacco products. Toward that goal, ASCO urges the adoption of national policy that strengthens regulation of the sale, promotion, and distribution of such products. To reduce cancer mortality, our regulatory policies must recognize that the nicotine within tobacco is an addictive substance, the use of which leads to 30% of all cancer deaths and a total of 419,000 deaths each year. Tobacco-related advertising and promotion should be banned. At a minimum, national policies should: ban billboards; limit advertising to black and white text only; prohibit the sale or giveaway of products that contain tobacco brand names or logos; prohibit brand name sponsorship of sporting or entertainment events; and require stronger and more prominent warning labels on all tobacco products. Despite existing state laws prohibiting sale of tobacco products to minors, children are able to buy such products easily. National regulation of the sale and distribution of tobacco products is necessary to eliminate children's access to tobacco. Where sales are permitted, they should be limited to face-to-face purchases by individuals 18 and older. Vending machines and other means of distributing tobacco without a face-to-face purchase should be outlawed. To the extent tobacco sales are allowed to continue, the federal government should mandate that the tobacco industry contribute substantial funds for a national public education campaign to prevent young people from smoking and other tobacco use. ASCO has long advocated a substantial increase (in the range of $2) in the federal excise tax on cigarettes and other tobacco products- a measure known to decrease consumption, particularly among children. Revenue from a tax on tobacco products should be used to support retraining for tobacco farmers, biomedical research, health care delivery, and antitobacco education. United State trade policies should discourage the export

  14. American Society of Clinical Oncology guidance statement: the cost of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Meropol, Neal J; Schrag, Deborah; Smith, Thomas J; Mulvey, Therese M; Langdon, Robert M; Blum, Diane; Ubel, Peter A; Schnipper, Lowell E

    2009-08-10

    Advances in early detection, prevention, and treatment have resulted in consistently falling cancer death rates in the United States. In parallel with these advances have come significant increases in the cost of cancer care. It is well established that the cost of health care (including cancer care) in the United States is growing more rapidly than the overall economy. In part, this is a result of the prices and rapid uptake of new agents and other technologies, including advances in imaging and therapeutic radiology. Conventional understanding suggests that high prices may reflect the costs and risks associated with the development, production, and marketing of new drugs and technologies, many of which are valued highly by physicians, patients, and payers. The increasing cost of cancer care impacts many stakeholders who play a role in a complex health care system. Our patients are the most vulnerable because they often experience uneven insurance coverage, leading to financial strain or even ruin. Other key groups include pharmaceutical manufacturers that pass along research, development, and marketing costs to the consumer; providers of cancer care who dispense increasingly expensive drugs and technologies; and the insurance industry, which ultimately passes costs to consumers. Increasingly, the economic burden of health care in general, and high-quality cancer care in particular, will be less and less affordable for an increasing number of Americans unless steps are taken to curb current trends. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is committed to improving cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and eliminating disparities in cancer care through support of evidence-based and cost-effective practices. To address this goal, ASCO established a Cost of Care Task Force, which has developed this Guidance Statement on the Cost of Cancer Care. This Guidance Statement provides a concise overview of the economic issues facing stakeholders in the cancer

  15. Bilateral hypogastric artery occlusion in endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Zander, Tobias; Baldi, Sebastian; Rabellino, Martin; Rostagno, Roman; Isaza, Baltasar; Llorens, Rafael; Carreira, Jose M; Maynar, Manuel

    2007-12-01

    Endovascular treatment of aortoiliac aneurysms near or involving the hypogastric artery (HGA) requires HGA occlusion before endografting to avoid retrograde filling of the aneurysm. The purpose of this study is to evaluate clinical outcomes of bilateral HGA occlusion and determine if benefits gained by endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) outweigh the morbidity associated with the procedure. Between 1999 and 2004, 128 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were treated with bifurcated endograft placement. Bilateral coverage or embolization of HGAs was performed in 14 patients (10.9%). Embolization was achieved by deployment of coils and coverage was accomplished by extending the endoprosthesis into the external iliac artery. Clinical follow-up and computed tomographic angiography were performed at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months and annually thereafter to detect potential aneurysm growth and endoleaks. During follow-up (range, 1-72 months), buttock claudication was noted in four patients (28.6%), including unilateral claudication in two and bilateral claudication in two. One patient experienced claudication longer than 12 months, which resolved within 18 months. De novo erectile dysfunction was seen in one patient, and pelvic ischemia was not found in any patient. There was no evidence of endoleak, aneurysm enlargement, or death associated with HGA occlusion. In our series, complications of bilateral HGA occlusion before EVAR were moderate and resolved over time. The benefits gained from EVAR outweigh the clinical problems caused by bilateral HGA occlusion, as there are no technical complications added to the EVAR procedure.

  16. Characterization of abdominal pain during methylnaltrexone treatment of opioid-induced constipation in advanced illness: a post hoc analysis of two clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Slatkin, Neal E; Lynn, Richard; Su, Chinyu; Wang, Wenjin; Israel, Robert J

    2011-11-01

    Methylnaltrexone is a selective peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist that decreases the constipating effects of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. In two double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase III studies of methylnaltrexone for opioid-induced constipation in patients with advanced illness, abdominal pain was the most common adverse event (AE) reported. This analysis sought to further characterize the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities-defined abdominal pain AEs experienced in these studies. A post hoc analysis of verbatim descriptions was used to further assess AEs characterized as abdominal pain in both trials. Descriptive summary statistics were used to assess severity of abdominal pain, effect of abdominal pain on global pain scores, and other characteristics. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association of baseline characteristics with abdominal pain. Most verbatim descriptions of abdominal pain referred to "abdominal cramps" or "cramping." Abdominal pain AEs were mostly mild to moderate in severity and did not affect patients' global evaluation of pain. The incidence of abdominal pain AEs in methylnaltrexone-treated patients was greatest after the first dose and decreased with subsequent doses. No association between abdominal pain AEs and most baseline patient characteristics was noted. Abdominal pain AEs in methylnaltrexone-treated patients in clinical trials are usually described as "cramps" or "cramping," are mostly mild to moderate in severity, and decrease in incidence with subsequent dosing. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement update: genetic testing for cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    2003-06-15

    As the leading organization representing cancer specialists involved in patient care and clinical research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reaffirms its commitment to integrating cancer risk assessment and management, including molecular analysis of cancer predisposition genes, into the practice of oncology and preventive medicine. The primary goal of this effort is to foster expanded access to, and continued advances in, medical care provided to patients and families affected by hereditary cancer syndromes. The 1996 ASCO Statement on Genetic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility set forth specific recommendations relating to clinical practice, research needs, educational opportunities, requirement for informed consent, indications for genetic testing, regulation of laboratories, and protection from discrimination, as well as access to and reimbursement for cancer genetics services. In updating this Statement, ASCO endorses the following principles: Indications for Genetic Testing: ASCO recommends that genetic testing be offered when 1) the individual has personal or family history features suggestive of a genetic cancer susceptibility condition, 2) the test can be adequately interpreted, and 3) the results will aid in diagnosis or influence the medical or surgical management of the patient or family members at hereditary risk of cancer. ASCO recommends that genetic testing only be done in the setting of pre- and post-test counseling, which should include discussion of possible risks and benefits of cancer early detection and prevention modalities. Special Issues in Testing Children for Cancer Susceptibility: ASCO recommends that the decision to offer testing to potentially affected children should take into account the availability of evidence-based risk-reduction strategies and the probability of developing a malignancy during childhood. Where risk-reduction strategies are available or cancer predominantly develops in childhood, ASCO believes that

  18. Turkish Ministry of Health, 2nd Turkish Medical General Assembly Clinical Oncology Study Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Vahit; Dağoğlu, Nergiz; Dede, İsmet; Akçakaya, Adem; Kerem, Mustafa; Göksel, Fatih; Özgür, Enver; Başkan, Emel; Yaylacı, Mustafa; Ceydeli, Adil; Baykara, Meltem; Kızıltan, Huriye Şenay; Kömürcü, Şeref; Gümüş, Mahmut; Türk, H. Mehmet; Demirhan, Recep; Akgün, Ali; Kadoglou, Naim; Yatman, Emre; Elbi, Cem Cüneyt; Güleç, Seza; Soran, Atilla; Özet, Ahmet; Keleştimur, Fahrettin

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is an increase in the incidence of cancer, and consequently in mortality rates, both in the world and in Turkey. The increase in the incidence and mortality rate of cancer are more prominent in our country as well as in other developing countries. The aim of this workshop was to determine the current status on prevention, screening, early diagnosis and treatment of cancer in our country, to identify related shortcomings, specify solutions and to share these with health system operators, and to aid in implementation of these systems. Developments on palliative care were also evaluated. Materials and Methods The current situation in the practice of clinical oncology, related drawbacks, problems encountered during multidisciplinary approach and their solutions were discussed under several sub-headings during a 3-day meeting organized by the Turkish Ministry of Health (Türkiye Cumhuriyeti Sağlık Bakanlığı-TCSB) with participation of 16 scientists from Turkey and 6 from abroad, and the conclusions were reported. Results It is expected that the newly established Turkish Health Institutes Association (Türkiye Sağlık Enstitüleri Başkanlığı-TÜSEB) and the National Cancer Institute (Ulusal Kanser Enstitüsü) will provide a new framework in the field of oncology. The current positive findings include the increase in the number of scientists who carry out successful trials in oncology both in Turkey and abroad, the implementation of the national cancer registry program by the Cancer Control Department and the breast cancer registry program by the Turkish Federation of Breast Diseases Societies (Türkiye Meme Hastalıkları Dernekleri Federasyonu-TMHDF), and introduction of Cancer Early Diagnosis, Screening, and Training Centers (Kanser Erken Tanı, Tarama ve Eğitim Merkezi-KETEM) for the application of community-based cancer screening programs. In addition to these, obvious shortcomings related to education, implementation, management and

  19. Why Providers Participate in Clinical Trials: Considering the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Song, Paula H.; Reiter, Kristin L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The translation of research evidence into practice is facilitated by clinical trials such as those sponsored by the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) that help disseminate cancer care innovations to community-based physicians and provider organizations. However, CCOP participation involves unsubsidized costs and organizational challenges that raise concerns about sustained provider participation in clinical trials. Objectives This study was designed to improve our understanding of why providers participate in the CCOP in order to inform the decision-making process of administrators, clinicians, organizations, and policy-makers considering CCOP participation. Research Methods We conducted a multi-site qualitative study of five provider organizations engaged with the CCOP. We interviewed 41 administrative and clinician key informants, asking about what motivated CCOP participation, and what benefits they associated with involvement. We deductively and inductively analyzed verbatim interview transcripts, and explored themes that emerged. Results Interviewees expressed both “altruistic” and “self-interested” motives for CCOP participation. Altruistic reasons included a desire to increase access to clinical trials and feeling an obligation to patients. Self-interested reasons included the desire to enhance reputation, and a need to integrate disparate cancer care activities. Perceived benefits largely matched expressed motives for CCOP participation, and included internal and external benefits to the organization, and quality of care benefits for both patients and participating physicians. Conclusion The motives and benefits providers attributed to CCOP participation are consistent with translational research goals, offering evidence that participation can contribute value to providers by expanding access to innovative medical care for patients in need. PMID:22925970

  20. Systemic Therapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Gregory A.; Temin, Sarah; Azzoli, Christopher G.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Baker, Sherman; Brahmer, Julie R.; Ellis, Peter M.; Gajra, Ajeet; Rackear, Nancy; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Johnson, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to update the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline on systemic therapy for stage IV non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods An Update Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology NSCLC Expert Panel based recommendations on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials from January 2007 to February 2014. Results This guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Recommendations There is no cure for patients with stage IV NSCLC. For patients with performance status (PS) 0 to 1 (and appropriate patient cases with PS 2) and without an EGFR-sensitizing mutation or ALK gene rearrangement, combination cytotoxic chemotherapy is recommended, guided by histology, with early concurrent palliative care. Recommendations for patients in the first-line setting include platinum-doublet therapy for those with PS 0 to 1 (bevacizumab may be added to carboplatin plus paclitaxel if no contraindications); combination or single-agent chemotherapy or palliative care alone for those with PS 2; afatinib, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with sensitizing EGFR mutations; crizotinib for those with ALK or ROS1 gene rearrangement; and following first-line recommendations or using platinum plus etoposide for those with large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Maintenance therapy includes pemetrexed continuation for patients with stable disease or response to first-line pemetrexed-containing regimens, alternative chemotherapy, or a chemotherapy break. In the second-line setting, recommendations include docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed for patients with nonsquamous cell carcinoma; docetaxel, erlotinib, or gefitinib for those with squamous cell carcinoma; and chemotherapy or ceritinib for those with ALK rearrangement who experience progression after crizotinib. In the third-line setting, for patients who have not received erlotinib or gefitinib, treatment with erlotinib is

  1. Recommendations on disease management for patients with advanced human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer and brain metastases: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Naren; Temin, Sarah; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Crews, Jennie R; Davidson, Nancy E; Esteva, Francisco J; Giordano, Sharon H; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Krop, Ian; Levinson, Jennifer; Modi, Shanu; Patt, Debra A; Perez, Edith A; Perlmutter, Jane; Winer, Eric P; Lin, Nancy U

    2014-07-01

    To provide formal expert consensus-based recommendations to practicing oncologists and others on the management of brain metastases for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -positive advanced breast cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a panel of medical oncology, radiation oncology, guideline implementation, and advocacy experts and conducted a systematic review of the literature. When that failed to yield sufficiently strong quality evidence, the Expert Panel undertook a formal expert consensus-based process to produce these recommendations. ASCO used a modified Delphi process. The panel members drafted recommendations, and a group of other experts joined them for two rounds of formal ratings of the recommendations. No studies or existing guidelines met the systematic review criteria; therefore, ASCO conducted a formal expert consensus-based process. Patients with brain metastases should receive appropriate local therapy and systemic therapy, if indicated. Local therapies include surgery, whole-brain radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. Treatments depend on factors such as patient prognosis, presence of symptoms, resectability, number and size of metastases, prior therapy, and whether metastases are diffuse. Other options include systemic therapy, best supportive care, enrollment onto a clinical trial, and/or palliative care. Clinicians should not perform routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen for brain metastases, but rather should have a low threshold for MRI of the brain because of the high incidence of brain metastases among patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. GNOSIS: Guidelines for neuro-oncology: Standards for investigational studies—reporting of phase 1 and phase 2 clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Susan M.; Reynolds, Sharon L.; Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Buckner, Jan C.; Kaplan, Richard S.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2005-01-01

    We present guidelines to standardize the reporting of phase 1 and phase 2 neuro-oncology trials. The guidelines are also intended to assist with accurate interpretation of results from these trials, to facilitate the peer-review process, and to expedite the publication of important and accurate manuscripts. Our guidelines are summarized in a checklist format that can be used as a framework from which to construct a phase 1 or 2 clinical trial. PMID:16212807

  3. GNOSIS: guidelines for neuro-oncology: standards for investigational studies-reporting of phase 1 and phase 2 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Susan M; Reynolds, Sharon L; Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Buckner, Jan C; Kaplan, Richard S; Bigner, Darell D

    2005-10-01

    We present guidelines to standardize the reporting of phase 1 and phase 2 neuro-oncology trials. The guidelines are also intended to assist with accurate interpretation of results from these trials, to facilitate the peer-review process, and to expedite the publication of important and accurate manuscripts. Our guidelines are summarized in a checklist format that can be used as a framework from which to construct a phase 1 or 2 clinical trial.

  4. The benefits and challenges of using computer-assisted symptom assessments in oncology clinics: results of a qualitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Mark, Tami L; Johnson, Gina; Fortner, Barry; Ryan, Katheryn

    2008-10-01

    Developed for clinical use in oncology settings, the Patient Assessment, Care & Education (PACE) System is a computer technology tool designed to address the under-identification and treatment of chemotherapy-related symptoms. This system includes general core questions together with the Patient Care Monitor (PCM), a validated questionnaire that assesses patient-reported problems, six symptom burden indices, and one global quality of life index. The system automatically scores the PCM and generates a written report. The objective of this study was to assess the manner in which clinicians use this system and identify the benefits and challenges that oncology clinics may face when adopting this system. The study was part of a larger evaluation of the system that included standardized surveys and chart review. Sixteen providers (physicians, nurses, and physician assistants) at 13 community oncology clinics participated in a 30-minute interview. Responses were coded according to common phrases or concepts. Clinicians indicated that they use the system mainly for symptom assessment or review of systems. The most common benefits identified included the improved ability to identify under-reported symptoms, enhanced communication with patients; increased efficiency; and its ability to highlight patients' most bothersome symptoms. Challenges included patient burden from the frequent need to answer the questionnaires, issues with the wording and formatting of the screening questionnaire, and technical difficulties. In sum, these interviews suggest that electronic symptom assessments offer potential advantages in terms improving the integration of routine assessment of patients' symptoms and health-related quality of life into the daily flow of an oncology clinic. The approach should receive additional research and development attention.

  5. The clinical and financial impact of a pediatric surgical neuro-oncology clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Eric M; Gururangan, Sridharan; Grant, Gerald; Mitchell, Duane; Sampson, John H

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric surgical trials are rare and the impact of such trials on the institutions in which they are conducted is unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical and financial impact of The Re-MATCH trial, a Phase I clinical trial requiring the biopsy or resection of recurrent medulloblastoma or PNET for enrollment. Inpatient financial and clinical volume information was collected during the 3 years of trial enrollment and the years preceding and following it. The primary endpoints were the difference in direct contribution margin (DCM), or net gain, of study and non-study patients and the difference in surgical volume during the study and non-study periods. The trial enrolled 18 patients; 15 had surgery at the sponsor institution and three had surgery at their home institution, then transferred tumor material to the sponsor institution. There were no differences between the two groups for potentially confounding variables such as neurosurgical procedure work relative value units (P = 0.13) or insurance provider (P = 0.26). There was no difference between the inpatient DCM per case for the institution for non-study patients (mean ± SD, $9039 ± $28,549) and study patients ($14,332 ± $20,231) (P = 0.4819). During the non-study period, there were a mean of 2.78 ± 1.65 pediatric brain tumor resections per month compared to 3.34 ± 1.66 cases per month during the study period, a 17% increase. When the 15 study patients were excluded, there were 2.97 ± 1.64 cases per month, a 7% increase. However, this increase in total case volume including study and non-study patients was not significant (P = 0.121). Phase I investigator-initiated surgically-based clinical trials may increase institutional surgical volume without imposing a financial burden. Finances are unlikely to be a barrier for researchers negotiating for resources to conduct such trials.

  6. AN INTRACORPOREAL (ABDOMINAL) LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE [ALVAD], XXX: CLINICAL READINESS AND INITIAL TRIALS IN MAN

    PubMed Central

    Norman, John C.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present documenting evidence of the clinical readiness of an abdominal left ventricular assist device (ALVAD) according to NHLI criteria,‡ and the initiation of clinical trials of this device in otherwise irretrievable adult post-cardiotomy patients at the Texas Heart Institute of St. Luke's Episcopal and Texas Children's Hospitals. The ALVAD system has been developed, modified, and improved under NHLI auspices over the last eight years,‡‡ with annual reviews. Over 20,000 hours of in-vivo testing in the calf have been accomplished in our laboratories. The current clinical trials underwent two federal reviews (May 22, 1973 and October 17, 1974) and were the topic of an Ad Hoc Workshop at NHLI on October 28, 1973.‡‡‡ More recently, a consecutive series of 26 bovine ALVAD implantations were undertaken; acute and chronic hemodynamic effectiveness with maintenance or augmentation of the systemic circulation during profound ventricular unloading without undue blood trauma, intra-or extra-prosthetic thrombosis, or sepsis was demonstrated; no biomaterials problems were encountered. In-vivo realibility and durability, histologic and pathologic results were detailed, summarized, and submitted to NHLI. Patient acceptability surveys and geometric and volumetric human configuration studies were analyzed. Categorizations of the patients at risk in our institutions and the needs for such a device were documented. The periods of intended use (two weeks-one month), weaning procedures, and the possibility of pump dependence have been discussed. The legal, moral, ethical and informed consent issues were addressed. Clinical protocols (anesthesia, surgical, cardiologic, hematologic, engineering, computerized data-acquisition, follow-up) and cost analyses were developed. The device has now been used in four terminal patients since December, 1975; all subsequently succumbed, but their circulations were temporarily supported during total left

  7. Optimising translational oncology in clinical practice: strategies to accelerate progress in drug development.

    PubMed

    Stahel, R; Bogaerts, J; Ciardiello, F; de Ruysscher, D; Dubsky, P; Ducreux, M; Finn, S; Laurent-Puig, P; Peters, S; Piccart, M; Smit, E; Sotiriou, C; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; Tabernero, J

    2015-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the socioeconomic burden of cancer remains unacceptably high and treatment advances for many common cancers have been limited, suggesting a need for a new approach to drug development. One issue central to this lack of progress is the heterogeneity and genetic complexity of many tumours. This results in considerable variability in therapeutic response and requires knowledge of the molecular profile of the tumour to guide appropriate treatment selection for individual patients. While recent advances in the molecular characterisation of different cancer types have the potential to transform cancer treatment through precision medicine, such an approach presents a major economic challenge for drug development, since novel targeted agents may only be suitable for a small cohort of patients. Identifying the patients who would benefit from individual therapies and recruiting sufficient numbers of patients with particular cancer subtypes into clinical trials is challenging, and will require collaborative efforts from research groups and industry in order to accelerate progress. A number of molecular screening platforms have already been initiated across Europe, and it is hoped that these networks, along with future collaborations, will benefit not only patients but also society through cost reductions as a result of more efficient use of resources. This review discusses how current developments in translational oncology may be applied in clinical practice in the future, assesses current programmes for the molecular characterisation of cancer and describes possible collaborative approaches designed to maximise the benefits of translational science for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Bryan A.; Shkedy, Clive I.; Powell, Adam C.; Happe, Laura E.; Royalty, Julie A.; Miao, Michael T.; Smith, Gary L.; Long, James W.; Gupta, Amit K.

    2016-01-01

    Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011) and after (2013) the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR). After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, p<0.05). For the aggregate of all cancers, the under-treatment rate significantly declined (p = 0.008) from 4% to 0% after the introduction of case rate payments, while the over-treatment rate remained steady at 9%, with no significant change (p = 0.20). These findings suggest that the introduction of case rate payments did not adversely affect the rate of guideline-based care at the provider examined. Additional research is needed to isolate the effect of the payment model and assess implications in other populations. PMID:26870963

  9. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Loy, Bryan A; Shkedy, Clive I; Powell, Adam C; Happe, Laura E; Royalty, Julie A; Miao, Michael T; Smith, Gary L; Long, James W; Gupta, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011) and after (2013) the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR). After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, p<0.05). For the aggregate of all cancers, the under-treatment rate significantly declined (p = 0.008) from 4% to 0% after the introduction of case rate payments, while the over-treatment rate remained steady at 9%, with no significant change (p = 0.20). These findings suggest that the introduction of case rate payments did not adversely affect the rate of guideline-based care at the provider examined. Additional research is needed to isolate the effect of the payment model and assess implications in other populations.

  10. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  11. Does abdominal massage improve gastrointestinal functions of intensive care patients with an endotracheal tube?: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Mahlagha; Fatehi Poor, Amanollah; Mehdipoor, Roghayeh; Ahmadinejad, Mehdi

    2018-02-01

    Gastrointestinal dysfunction is one of the most common problems among patients hospitalized in intensive care units. Currently, medicinal and non-medicinal methods are being used to prevent gastrointestinal problems. Among non-medicinal methods, abdominal massage is considered as a relatively acceptable method. The present study aims to examine the effect of abdominal massage on gastrointestinal functions of the intensive care patients with an endotracheal tube. In this clinical trial, 70 intensive care patients with an endotracheal tube were chosen by convenience sampling and allocated to an intervention or a control group randomly. In the intervention group, a 15-min abdominal massage was conducted twice a day for three days, while the control group received only routine cares. The abdominal circumference, gastric residual volume, times of defecation, and frequency of constipation were measured. Gastric residual volume decreased significantly in the intervention group and increased significantly in the control group; however, there was no significant difference between two groups (P = .15). There was a significant difference between two groups regarding abdominal circumference and it was decreased in the intervention group (P < .001). The defecation times significantly increased in the intervention group (P = .002). After the intervention, the prevalence of constipation was significantly decreased in the intervention group (P = .008). The results revealed that abdominal massage could improve gastrointestinal functions in enterally fed patients with an endotracheal tube. It is suggested to use abdominal massage as an adjunct therapy for improving gastrointestinal functions in intensive care patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome: From Clinical Findings to Basic Understandings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is one of the less common functional gastrointestinal disorders. Conventional therapy has unsatisfactory response to it so people turn to Chinese medicine for help. Currently, we reviewed the whole picture of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) clinical and basic application in the treatment of FAPS, especially the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, the single herb, and Chinese medicine formulae, thus to provide a solid base to further develop evidence-based study for this common gastrointestinal complaint in the future. We developed the search strategy and set the inclusion and exclusion criteria for article search. From the included articles, we totally retrieved 586 records according to our searching criteria, of which 16 were duplicate records and 291 were excluded for reasons of irrelevance. The full text of 279 articles was retrieved for detailed assessment, of which 123 were excluded for various reasons. The number one used single herb is Radix Ginseng. The most common syndrome was liver qi depression. The most frequently used classic formula was Si-Mo-Tang. This reflected the true situation of clinical practice of Chinese medicine practitioners and could be further systematically synthesized as key points of the therapeutic research for FAPS. PMID:27366194

  13. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome: From Clinical Findings to Basic Understandings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Li; Zhong, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is one of the less common functional gastrointestinal disorders. Conventional therapy has unsatisfactory response to it so people turn to Chinese medicine for help. Currently, we reviewed the whole picture of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) clinical and basic application in the treatment of FAPS, especially the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, the single herb, and Chinese medicine formulae, thus to provide a solid base to further develop evidence-based study for this common gastrointestinal complaint in the future. We developed the search strategy and set the inclusion and exclusion criteria for article search. From the included articles, we totally retrieved 586 records according to our searching criteria, of which 16 were duplicate records and 291 were excluded for reasons of irrelevance. The full text of 279 articles was retrieved for detailed assessment, of which 123 were excluded for various reasons. The number one used single herb is Radix Ginseng. The most common syndrome was liver qi depression. The most frequently used classic formula was Si-Mo-Tang. This reflected the true situation of clinical practice of Chinese medicine practitioners and could be further systematically synthesized as key points of the therapeutic research for FAPS.

  14. Evaluating the quality, clinical relevance, and resident perception of the radiation oncology in-training examination: A national survey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Bar Ad, Voichita; McAna, John; Dicker, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    The yearly radiation oncology in-training examination (ITE) by the American College of Radiology is a widely used, norm-referenced educational assessment, with high test reliability and psychometric performance. We distributed a national survey to evaluate the academic radiation oncology community's perception of the ITE. In June 2014, a 7-question online survey was distributed via e-mail to current radiation oncology residents, program directors, and attending physicians who had completed residency in the past 5 years or junior attendings. Survey questions were designed on a 5-point Likert scale. Sign test was performed with P ≤ .05 considered statistically different from neutral. Thirty-one program directors (33.3%), 114 junior attendings (35.4%), and 225 residents (41.2%) responded. Junior attendings and program directors reported that the ITE directly contributed to their preparation for the American Board of Radiology written certification (P = .050 and .004, respectively). Residents did not perceive the examination as an accurate assessment of relevant clinical and scientific knowledge (P < .0001) and feel the quality assurance is insufficient in its current form (P < .0001). Residents and junior attendings agree that there are factual errors, and unclear questions/answers (P < .0001 and .04, respectively). Free response suggestions included: less questions on rare disease sites (16.4%), more relevance to clinical practice (15.4%), avoiding questions that discriminate between a few percentage points (11.8%), and designing the test similar to the written certification examination (9.2%). Despite high examination reliability and psychometric performance, resident and attending physicians report a need for improved quality assurance and clinical relevance in the ITE. Although the current examination allows limited feedback, establishing a venue for individualized feedback may allow continual and timely improvement of the ITE. Adopting a criterion

  15. Clinical characteristics of ceftriaxone plus metronidazole in complicated intra-abdominal infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Empirical antibiotics in complicated intra-abdominal infection (c-IAI), such as secondary peritonitis are a first step of treatment. Empirical antibiotic regimen is very diverse. Ceftriaxone plus metronidazole regimen (CMR) is one of the empirical antibiotic regimens used in treatment of c-IAI. However, although CMR is a widely used empirical antibiotic regimen, study regarding success, failure or efficacy of CMR has been poorly understood. This retrospective study is conducted to compare the clinical efficacy of this regimen in c-IAI according to clinical characteristics. Methods The subjects were patients in this hospital who were diagnosed as secondary peritonitis between 2009 and 2013. Retrospective analysis was performed based on the records made after surgery regarding clinical characteristics including albumin level, blood pressure, pulse rate, respiration rate, smoking, age, sex, body mass index, hemoglobin, coexisting disease, leukocytosis, and APACHE (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation) II score. Results A total of 114 patients were enrolled. In univariated analysis, the success and failure of CMR showed significant association with preoperative low albumin, old age, and preoperative tachycardia. In multivariated analysis, low albumin and preoperative tachycardia were significant. Conclusion It is thought that an additional antibiotic treatment plan is necessary in patients with low albumin and tachycardia when the empirical antibiotic regimen is CMR in c-IAI. Conduct of research through well-designed prospective randomized clinical study is also necessary in order to evaluate the appropriateness of CMR and decide on a proper empirical antibiotic regimen between many regimens in c-IAI based on our country. PMID:26131444

  16. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (133). Retained placenta from an intra-abdominal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Win, T; Tang, P H; Lim, T Y

    2011-01-01

    A 29-year-old Indonesian woman presented with abdominal pain seven months after an intra-abdominal pregnancy. Ultrasonography revealed a cystic mass in the pelvis and magnetic resonance imaging showed an umbilical stump within it, indicating a retained placenta. This was removed surgically, and on histology, an infarcted placenta was confirmed.

  17. Statistical controversies in clinical research: comparison of primary outcomes in protocols, public clinical-trial registries and publications: the example of oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, A S; Tran, V-T; Dechartres, A; Ravaud, P

    2017-04-01

    Protocols are often unavailable to peer-reviewers and readers. To detect outcome reporting bias (ORB), readers usually have to resort to publicly available descriptions of study design such as public clinical trial registries. We compared primary outcomes in protocols, ClinicalTrials.gov and publications of oncology trials and evaluated the use of ClinicalTrials.gov as compared with protocols in detecting discrepancies between planned and published outcomes. We searched for phase III oncology trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology and New England Journal of Medicine between January 2014 and June 2015. We extracted primary outcomes reported in the protocol, ClinicalTrials.gov and the publication. First, we assessed the quality of primary outcome descriptions by using a published framework. Second, we evaluated modifications of primary outcomes between each source. Finally, we evaluated the agreement, specificity and sensitivity of detecting modifications between planned and published outcomes by using protocols or ClinicalTrials.gov. We included 65 trials, with 81 primary outcomes common among the 3 sources. The proportion of primary outcomes reporting all items from the framework was 73%, 22%, and 75% for protocols, ClinicalTrials.gov and publications, respectively. Eight (12%) trials presented a discrepancy between primary outcomes reported in the protocol and in the publication. Twelve (18.5%) trials presented a discrepancy between primary outcomes registered at ClinicalTrials.gov and in publications. We found a moderate agreement in detecting discrepant reporting of outcomes by using protocols or ClinicalTrials.gov [κ = 0.53, 95% confidence interval (0.25-0.81)]. Using ClinicalTrials.gov to detect discrepant reporting of outcomes showed high specificity (89.5%) but lacked sensitivity (75%) as compared with use of protocols. In oncology trials, primary outcome descriptions in ClinicalTrials.gov are often of

  18. Clinical effect of traditional Chinese spinal orthopedic manipulation in treatment of Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xing, Liyang; Qu, Liuxin; Chen, Hong; Gao, Song

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of Traditional Chinese Spinal Orthopedic Manipulation (TCSOM) in treating Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome (FAPS) in comparison with Pinaverium Bromide (Dicetel, PBD), and to assess a possible cause for FAPS. 60 cases of FAPS patients were randomly assigned to the TCSOM group and PBD group according to the random number table method. The TCSOM group was treated with thumb pressing manipulation, every other day in the first week, and once every three days in the second week, for 5 times treatments. Patients in the PBD group were instructed to take 50mg 3 times a day, consistently for 2 weeks. The symptoms of pre-treatment and post-treatment were assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) pain score. A symptom improvement rating (SIR) was implemented in order to evaluate the effects of the treatments, and to statistically compare the two groups. The symptoms of 21 patients of the TCSOM group were resolved soon after the first spinal manipulation treatment and 4 cases were significantly improved. The VAS pain scores in the TCSOM group were significantly lower than those in the PBD group after 2 weeks treatment. According to the SIR based on VAS, the TCSOM research group included 20 cases with excellent results, 8 cases with good, and 2 cases with poor. There were no side effects in the TCSOM group after treatment. Based on VAS, the PBD research group reported 6 cases with excellent results, 8 cases with good and 16 cases with poor. All cases were statistically analyzed, revealing a significant difference (P<0.001) between the two groups. TCSOM group performed much better than PBD group for relief of the symptoms of FAPS. Thumb pressing manipulation on the thoracic and/or lumbar region can correct the displacement of inter-vertebral discs and/or vertebra, resolving the stimuli caused by pressure exerting on the nerves and vessels around the spine. with thumb pressing manipulation on the Back-Shu acupoints, the Jiaji (EX-B2) and the

  19. [Challenges for clinical trials in oncology within the scope of early benefit assessment of drugs].

    PubMed

    Lange, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Until May 31, 2015 the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) conducted 108 assessments for various diseases on the basis of 103 dossiers within the scope of the early benefit assessment of drugs pursuant to the Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products (AMNOG). 29 of these assessments (28 dossiers) referred to advanced stages of oncologic (including neoplastic-hematologic) diseases. In 21 of these 29 assessments (72%), IQWiG found an added benefit for at least one subpopulation or subgroup, compared to 33% with non-oncologic diseases. For oncologic diseases, the extent of benefit was classified as "major" in six assessments (21%), compared to 5% for non-oncologic disorders. In contrast, the conclusions of the oncologic studies were less certain: only one assessment provided proof (of an added benefit); for non-oncologic diseases, this was the case in eight assessments. A distinctive methodological feature of the available oncologic studies is that, as a rule, treatment switching was planned in the event of progression (normally on the basis of imaging or laboratory findings) and that shortly afterwards the follow-up of important endpoints (adverse events and patient-reported outcomes) was normally discontinued. In particular, the pre-specified option in the study protocol allowing the control group to switch treatment to the experimental intervention after progression ("protocol-permitted treatment switches") makes it extremely difficult to interpret the results beyond the outcome "progression" (or progression-free survival). This treatment switching is mostly justified by reference to ethical necessity. This, however, alleges that the experimental intervention (i. e., the new drug) is superior to the control intervention, which means that circular reasoning is unavoidable. But despite this, oncologic studies are better than their reputation. Hence, so far the results of the early benefit assessment of new drugs (regarding

  20. Clinical Implications of TiGRT Algorithm for External Audit in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Saeb, Mohsen; Monadi, Shahram; Jabbari, Iraj

    2017-01-01

    Performing audits play an important role in quality assurance program in radiation oncology. Among different algorithms, TiGRT is one of the common application software for dose calculation. This study aimed to clinical implications of TiGRT algorithm to measure dose and compared to calculated dose delivered to the patients for a variety of cases, with and without the presence of inhomogeneities and beam modifiers. Nonhomogeneous phantom as quality dose verification phantom, Farmer ionization chambers, and PC-electrometer (Sun Nuclear, USA) as a reference class electrometer was employed throughout the audit in linear accelerators 6 and 18 MV energies (Siemens ONCOR Impression Plus, Germany). Seven test cases were performed using semi CIRS phantom. In homogeneous regions and simple plans for both energies, there was a good agreement between measured and treatment planning system calculated dose. Their relative error was found to be between 0.8% and 3% which is acceptable for audit, but in nonhomogeneous organs, such as lung, a few errors were observed. In complex treatment plans, when wedge or shield in the way of energy is used, the error was in the accepted criteria. In complex beam plans, the difference between measured and calculated dose was found to be 2%-3%. All differences were obtained between 0.4% and 1%. A good consistency was observed for the same type of energy in the homogeneous and nonhomogeneous phantom for the three-dimensional conformal field with a wedge, shield, asymmetric using the TiGRT treatment planning software in studied center. The results revealed that the national status of TPS calculations and dose delivery for 3D conformal radiotherapy was globally within acceptable standards with no major causes for concern.

  1. Can Patient Comorbidities Be Included in Clinical Performance Measures for Radiation Oncology?

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jean B.; Khalid, Najma; Ho, Alex; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Tao, May Lin; Currey, Adam; Wilson, J. Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patient comorbidities may affect the applicability of performance measures that are inherent in multidisciplinary cancer treatment guidelines. This article describes the distribution of common comorbid conditions by disease site and by patient and facility characteristics in patients who received radiation therapy as part of treatment for cancer of the breast, cervix, lung, prostate, and stomach, and investigates the association of comorbidities with treatment decisions. Materials and Methods: Stratified two-stage cluster sampling provided a random sample of radiation oncology facilities. Eligible patients were randomly sampled from each participating facility for each disease site, and data were abstracted from medical records. The Adult Comorbidity Evaluation Index (ACE-27) was used to measure comorbid conditions and their severity. National estimates were calculated using SUDAAN statistical software. Results: Multivariable logistic regression models predicted the dependent variable “treatment changed or contraindicated due to comorbidities.” The final model showed that ACE-27 was highly associated with change in treatment for patients with severe or moderate index values compared to those with none or mild (P < .001). Two other covariates, age and medical coverage, had no (age) or little (medical coverage) significant contribution to predicting treatment change in the multivariable model. Disease site was associated with treatment change after adjusting for other covariates in the model. Conclusions: ACE-27 is highly predictive of treatment modifications for patients treated for these cancers who receive radiation as part of their care. A standardized tool identifying patients who should be excluded from clinical performance measures allows more accurate use of these measures. PMID:24643573

  2. Malignant glioma--a nemesis which requires clinical and basic investigation in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.W.

    1989-06-01

    Malignant gliomas account for 40% of all central nervous system malignancies. These are essentially localized neoplastic tumors that have defied most treatment. In spite of improved techniques, surgery is unlikely to increase survival further since true cancer operations cannot be performed. Radiation therapy has made a significant difference in outcome. Investigation in radiation oncology is essential for further improvement in the treatment of these tumors. The pattern of failure is local tumor recurrence, but the method to overcome this resistance to treatment is not clear. Radiation therapy techniques and inherent radio-resistance have been considered as possible reasons for failure. Withmore » newer imaging procedures, the extent of tumor can be more accurately defined allowing improved treatment planning. Identifying an effective treatment program is more difficult. Studies have documented the beneficial effect of radiation therapy, but the optimal dose or fractionation schedule has not been determined. Whereas some studies have reported improved survival using higher radiation doses, others have reported no benefit. More recently, studies of multiple daily fractionation schedules have been conducted using two or three daily fractions. Equally confusing results have been reported. Histologically, these tumors have necrotic areas and may be radioresistant due to hypoxic cells. Treatment methods designed to overcome the radioprotective effect of hypoxia have yielded disappointing results. The addition of hypoxic cell sensitizers has not produced the expected improvement in outcome. Studies using neutron radiation therapy report tumor control but not improved survival. Radiobiologic information is now available which may contribute to our understanding of the response of these tumors to radiation. Further laboratory and clinical investigation is required. 83 references.« less

  3. Toward a Tiered Model to Share Clinical Trial Data and Samples in Precision Oncology.

    PubMed

    Broes, Stefanie; Lacombe, Denis; Verlinden, Michiel; Huys, Isabelle

    2018-01-01

    The recent revolution in science and technology applied to medical research has left in its wake a trial of biomedical data and human samples; however, its opportunities remain largely unfulfilled due to a number of legal, ethical, financial, strategic, and technical barriers. Precision oncology has been at the vanguard to leverage this potential of "Big data" and samples into meaningful solutions for patients, considering the need for new drug development approaches in this area (due to high costs, late-stage failures, and the molecular diversity of cancer). To harness the potential of the vast quantities of data and samples currently fragmented across databases and biobanks, it is critical to engage all stakeholders and share data and samples across research institutes. Here, we identified two general types of sharing strategies. First, open access models, characterized by the absence of any review panel or decision maker, and second controlled access model where some form of control is exercised by either the donor (i.e., patient), the data provider (i.e., initial organization), or an independent party. Further, we theoretically describe and provide examples of nine different strategies focused on greater sharing of patient data and material. These models provide varying levels of control, access to various data and/or samples, and different types of relationship between the donor, data provider, and data requester. We propose a tiered model to share clinical data and samples that takes into account privacy issues and respects sponsors' legitimate interests. Its implementation would contribute to maximize the value of existing datasets, enabling unraveling the complexity of tumor biology, identify novel biomarkers, and re-direct treatment strategies better, ultimately to help patients with cancer.

  4. Clinical Implications of TiGRT Algorithm for External Audit in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Saeb, Mohsen; Monadi, Shahram; Jabbari, Iraj

    2017-01-01

    Background: Performing audits play an important role in quality assurance program in radiation oncology. Among different algorithms, TiGRT is one of the common application software for dose calculation. This study aimed to clinical implications of TiGRT algorithm to measure dose and compared to calculated dose delivered to the patients for a variety of cases, with and without the presence of inhomogeneities and beam modifiers. Materials and Methods: Nonhomogeneous phantom as quality dose verification phantom, Farmer ionization chambers, and PC-electrometer (Sun Nuclear, USA) as a reference class electrometer was employed throughout the audit in linear accelerators 6 and 18 MV energies (Siemens ONCOR Impression Plus, Germany). Seven test cases were performed using semi CIRS phantom. Results: In homogeneous regions and simple plans for both energies, there was a good agreement between measured and treatment planning system calculated dose. Their relative error was found to be between 0.8% and 3% which is acceptable for audit, but in nonhomogeneous organs, such as lung, a few errors were observed. In complex treatment plans, when wedge or shield in the way of energy is used, the error was in the accepted criteria. In complex beam plans, the difference between measured and calculated dose was found to be 2%–3%. All differences were obtained between 0.4% and 1%. Conclusions: A good consistency was observed for the same type of energy in the homogeneous and nonhomogeneous phantom for the three-dimensional conformal field with a wedge, shield, asymmetric using the TiGRT treatment planning software in studied center. The results revealed that the national status of TPS calculations and dose delivery for 3D conformal radiotherapy was globally within acceptable standards with no major causes for concern. PMID:28989910

  5. Toward a Tiered Model to Share Clinical Trial Data and Samples in Precision Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Broes, Stefanie; Lacombe, Denis; Verlinden, Michiel; Huys, Isabelle

    2018-01-01

    The recent revolution in science and technology applied to medical research has left in its wake a trial of biomedical data and human samples; however, its opportunities remain largely unfulfilled due to a number of legal, ethical, financial, strategic, and technical barriers. Precision oncology has been at the vanguard to leverage this potential of “Big data” and samples into meaningful solutions for patients, considering the need for new drug development approaches in this area (due to high costs, late-stage failures, and the molecular diversity of cancer). To harness the potential of the vast quantities of data and samples currently fragmented across databases and biobanks, it is critical to engage all stakeholders and share data and samples across research institutes. Here, we identified two general types of sharing strategies. First, open access models, characterized by the absence of any review panel or decision maker, and second controlled access model where some form of control is exercised by either the donor (i.e., patient), the data provider (i.e., initial organization), or an independent party. Further, we theoretically describe and provide examples of nine different strategies focused on greater sharing of patient data and material. These models provide varying levels of control, access to various data and/or samples, and different types of relationship between the donor, data provider, and data requester. We propose a tiered model to share clinical data and samples that takes into account privacy issues and respects sponsors’ legitimate interests. Its implementation would contribute to maximize the value of existing datasets, enabling unraveling the complexity of tumor biology, identify novel biomarkers, and re-direct treatment strategies better, ultimately to help patients with cancer. PMID:29435448

  6. An ICT infrastructure to integrate clinical and molecular data in oncology research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The ONCO-i2b2 platform is a bioinformatics tool designed to integrate clinical and research data and support translational research in oncology. It is implemented by the University of Pavia and the IRCCS Fondazione Maugeri hospital (FSM), and grounded on the software developed by the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) research center. I2b2 has delivered an open source suite based on a data warehouse, which is efficiently interrogated to find sets of interesting patients through a query tool interface. Methods Onco-i2b2 integrates data coming from multiple sources and allows the users to jointly query them. I2b2 data are then stored in a data warehouse, where facts are hierarchically structured as ontologies. Onco-i2b2 gathers data from the FSM pathology unit (PU) database and from the hospital biobank and merges them with the clinical information from the hospital information system. Our main effort was to provide a robust integrated research environment, giving a particular emphasis to the integration process and facing different challenges, consecutively listed: biospecimen samples privacy and anonymization; synchronization of the biobank database with the i2b2 data warehouse through a series of Extract, Transform, Load (ETL) operations; development and integration of a Natural Language Processing (NLP) module, to retrieve coded information, such as SNOMED terms and malignant tumors (TNM) classifications, and clinical tests results from unstructured medical records. Furthermore, we have developed an internal SNOMED ontology rested on the NCBO BioPortal web services. Results Onco-i2b2 manages data of more than 6,500 patients with breast cancer diagnosis collected between 2001 and 2011 (over 390 of them have at least one biological sample in the cancer biobank), more than 47,000 visits and 96,000 observations over 960 medical concepts. Conclusions Onco-i2b2 is a concrete example of how integrated Information and Communication

  7. Breast cancer follow-up and management after primary treatment: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update.

    PubMed

    Khatcheressian, James L; Hurley, Patricia; Bantug, Elissa; Esserman, Laura J; Grunfeld, Eva; Halberg, Francine; Hantel, Alexander; Henry, N Lynn; Muss, Hyman B; Smith, Thomas J; Vogel, Victor G; Wolff, Antonio C; Somerfield, Mark R; Davidson, Nancy E

    2013-03-01

    To provide recommendations on the follow-up and management of patients with breast cancer who have completed primary therapy with curative intent. To update the 2006 guideline of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), a systematic review of the literature published from March 2006 through March 2012 was completed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Committee reviewed the evidence to determine whether the recommendations were in need of updating. There were 14 new publications that met inclusion criteria: nine systematic reviews (three included meta-analyses) and five randomized controlled trials. After its review and analysis of the evidence, the Update Committee concluded that no revisions to the existing ASCO recommendations were warranted. Regular history, physical examination, and mammography are recommended for breast cancer follow-up. Physical examinations should be performed every 3 to 6 months for the first 3 years, every 6 to 12 months for years 4 and 5, and annually thereafter. For women who have undergone breast-conserving surgery, a post-treatment mammogram should be obtained 1 year after the initial mammogram and at least 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. Thereafter, unless otherwise indicated, a yearly mammographic evaluation should be performed. The use of complete blood counts, chemistry panels, bone scans, chest radiographs, liver ultrasounds, pelvic ultrasounds, computed tomography scans, [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen, CA 15-3, and CA 27.29) is not recommended for routine follow-up in an otherwise asymptomatic patient with no specific findings on clinical examination.

  8. Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Prediction of Mortality From Clinical Presentation and Glasgow Aneurysm Score.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Toby N; Thompson, Lauren T; Licatino, Lauren K; Bailey, Christopher H; Schroeder, Darrell R; Sprung, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    To examine association of presenting clinical acuity and Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS) with perioperative and 1-year mortality. Retrospective chart review. Major tertiary care facility. Patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) from 2003 through 2013. Emergency repair of rAAA. The authors reviewed outcomes after stable versus unstable presentation and by GAS. Unstable presentation included hypotension, cardiac arrest, loss of consciousness, and preoperative tracheal intubation. In total, 125 patients (40 stable) underwent repair. Perioperative mortality rates were 41% and 12% in unstable and stable patients, respectively (p<0.001). Unstable status had 88% sensitivity and 41% specificity for predicting perioperative mortality. Using logistic regression, higher GAS was associated with perioperative mortality (p<0.001). Using receiver operating characteristic analysis, the area under the curve was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.62-0.82) and cutoff GAS≥96 had 63% and 72% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Perioperative mortality for GAS≥96 was 51% (25/49), whereas it was 20% (15/76) for GAS≤95. The estimated 1-year survival (95% CI) was 75% (62%-91%) for stable patients and 48% (38%-60%) for unstable patients. Estimated 1-year survival (95% CI) was 23% (13%-40%) for GAS≥96 and 77% (67%-87%) for GAS≤95. Clinical presentation and GAS identified patients with rAAA who were likely to have a poor surgical outcome. GAS≥96 was associated with poor long-term survival, but>20% of these patients survived 1 year. Thus, neither clinical presentation nor GAS provided reliable guidance for decisions regarding futility of surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of Distress in Oncology Patients: A Comparison of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a Thorough Clinical Assessment.

    PubMed

    Thalén-Lindström, Annika M; Glimelius, Bengt G; Johansson, Birgitta B

    2016-01-01

    Screening is recommended to identify cancer patients with distress, anxiety, and depression. The ability of current methods to identify distress in oncology patients is of high importance. We compared the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) with a thorough clinical assessment. Furthermore, we explored the agreement of HADS with clinical assessment outcomes as a function of age, sex, and treatment intention. One hundred forty-six oncology patients, representing both sexes, different ages (<65/≥ 65 years), and treatment intention (curative/palliative), completed the HADS before the clinical assessment. Two study team members (blind to the HADS results) completed clinical assessments of anxiety, depression, and distress analogous to categories used in the HADS. The HADS identified 49 participants and the clinical assessment 71 participants as having anxiety, depression, or distress. The overall agreement between the HADS and the clinical assessment was moderate. The greatest differences were found to be a function of participant sex and age. Agreement between the methods was better for females than for males in relation to distress and anxiety and better for the older (≥ 65 years) than younger participants in relation to depression. By treatment intention, agreement was equal for all domains. Especially male and young participants appear to have potential problems that the HADS fails to identify. When the HADS is used for screening, nurses must be aware of psychosocial problems perceived by patients that are not covered by the HADS. Many patients identified as having distress have resources to manage problems without additional support.

  10. The role of Internet resources in clinical oncology: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Bradford W; Greenberg, Alexandra J; Rutten, Lila J Finney

    2016-12-01

    The Internet is a valuable tool that continues to revolutionize many aspects of our lives; however, the ability to disseminate diverse data across populations and nations presents both opportunities and challenges. Online resources are increasingly used in health care, providing wider access to information for patients, researchers, and clinicians. At the turn of the millennium, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) predicted that Internet-based technologies would create a revolution in communication for oncology professionals and patients with cancer. Herein, findings from the NCI's Health Information National Trends Survey are reviewed to give insight into how Internet trends related to oncology patients are evolving. Future trends are discussed, including examples of 'connected health' in oncology; the spread of mobile and ubiquitous access points to Internet-hosted information; the diffusion of devices, sensors, and apps; the spread of personal data sharing; and an evolution in how networks can support person-centred and family-centred care.

  11. Clinical outcomes of pediatric patients with acute abdominal pain and incidental findings of free intraperitoneal fluid on diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Matz, Samantha; Connell, Mary; Sinha, Madhumita; Goettl, Christopher S; Patel, Palak C; Drachman, David

    2013-09-01

    The presence of free intraperitoneal fluid on diagnostic imaging (sonography or computed tomography [CT]) may indicate an acute inflammatory process in children with abdominal pain in a nontraumatic setting. Although clinical outcomes of pediatric trauma patients with free fluid on diagnostic examinations without evidence of solid-organ injury have been studied, similar studies in the absence of trauma are rare. Our objective was to study clinical outcomes of children with acute abdominal pain of nontraumatic etiology and free intraperitoneal fluid on diagnostic imaging (abdominal/pelvic sonography, CT, or both). We conducted a retrospective review of medical records of children aged 0 to 18 years presenting to a pediatric emergency department with acute abdominal pain (nontraumatic) between April 2008 and March 2009. Patients with intraperitoneal free fluid on imaging were divided into 2 groups: group I, imaging suggestive of an intra-abdominal surgical condition such as appendicitis; and group II, no evidence of an acute surgical condition on imaging, including patients with equivocal studies. Computed tomograms and sonograms were reviewed by a board-certified radiologist, and the free fluid volume was quantitated. Of 1613 patients who underwent diagnostic imaging, 407 were eligible for the study; 134 (33%) had free fluid detected on diagnostic imaging. In patients with both sonography and CT, there was a significant correlation in the free fluid volume (r = 0.79; P < .0005). A significantly greater number of male patients with free fluid had a surgical condition identified on imaging (57.4% versus 25%; P < .001). Children with free fluid and an associated condition on imaging were more likely to have surgery (94.4% versus 6.3%; P < .001). We found clinical outcomes (surgical versus nonsurgical) to be most correlated with a surgical diagnosis on diagnostic imaging and not with the amount of fluid present.

  12. Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders based on Rome III criteria in a pediatric gastroenterology clinic.

    PubMed

    Talachian, Elham; Bidari, Ali; Zahmatkesh, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) entail several distinct conditions that collectively account for a sizeable proportion of patients complaining of abdominal pain. Physicians' awareness is fundamental to avoid unnecessary evaluations and to alleviate stress-related problems. This study aimed to assess the relative frequencies of FGIDs and related categories in a selected Iranian population. We conducted this cross-sectional study in a gastroenterology clinic of a tertiary care pediatric hospital in Iran. Children and adolescents between the age of 4 and 18 years referred to the clinic from October 2011 to February 2013 were enrolled if they were diagnosed with FGID according to the Rome III criteria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on demographic characteristics, pain location, duration and frequency, associated symptoms, and pertinent family history. We used descriptive analyses to show mean (±SD) and relative frequencies of categories of FGIDs. We diagnosed 183 (114 female) with FGIDs out of 1307 children and adolescents who were visited in the clinic. There was history of psychiatric disorders in 42 (22.9%) participants, and migraine headaches and gastrointestinal disorders were at least in one of the parents in 21 (11.5%) and 64 (34.9%) participants, respectively. We defined 84 (46%) patients under Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) category, 38 (21%) under Abdominal Migraine, 26 (14%) under Functional Abdominal Pain, 21 (11%) under Functional Dyspepsia, and 7 (4%) under Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome. Seven children (4%) had no defining feature for FGID categories and therefore labeled as unclassified. FGID was a prevalent diagnosis among children and adolescents with abdominal pain. IBS was the largest category. Only a minority were unclassifiable under the Rome III criteria, indicating improved differentiation characteristics of Rome III criteria compared to the Rome II version.

  13. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... abdominal cavity ( most often cancer of the ovaries ) Cirrhosis of the liver Damaged bowel Heart disease Infection ...

  14. Can I look at my list? An evaluation of a 'prompt sheet' within an oncology outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, R; Ostler, P; Lumley-Graybow, S; Chait, I; Hughes, R; Grainger, J; Leverton, T J

    2006-06-01

    We introduced a patient 'prompt sheet' into our clinic between January 2004 and January 2005. The aim was to determine whether it would facilitate communication and help patients in obtaining their desired level of information about their illness, and assist with decision making. We conducted an audit survey to investigate the way follow-up takes place in our oncology clinic, to determine what works and what does not work in the clinic, and to examine how patients access the most useful information and to assess the utility of, and patient satisfaction with, a locally developed pilot prompt sheet. A single questionnaire was designed to elicit information on patients' information needs, overall satisfaction with the oncology clinic, and uptake and perceived usefulness of the prompt sheet. We carried out an audit survey in the form of a Likert-scale questionnaire (33 questions), followed immediately afterwards by a semi-structured interview. A specialist nurse asked a range of open questions about what was good and bad about the clinic and the prompt sheets. Despite efforts to ensure that all patients received the prompt-sheet leaflets, only 254 out of 300 (85%) received them. Of these, 195 (65%) felt that they were 'very helpful', and 30 (10%) found them 'fairly helpful'. However, 15 (5%) had no strong feelings and only three found them either fairly or completely unhelpful. One-third of the patients were able to ask more questions about their disease as a result of the prompt sheet, although they felt the doctor was busy and did not want to take up too much of their time. Men with prostate cancer found the prompt sheet particularly helpful to ask questions. This satisfaction audit suggests that our pilot prompt sheet is helpful to patients attending oncology outpatient appointments, particularly for men with prostate cancer. We aim to adapt the present prompt sheet on the basis of the replies obtained, and re-audit in the future.

  15. Racial disparities in cancer survival among randomized clinical trials patients of the Southwest Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Albain, Kathy S; Unger, Joseph M; Crowley, John J; Coltman, Charles A; Hershman, Dawn L

    2009-07-15

    Racial disparities in cancer outcomes have been observed in several malignancies. However, it is unclear if survival differences persist after adjusting for clinical, demographic, and treatment variables. Our objective was to determine whether racial disparities in survival exist among patients enrolled in consecutive trials conducted by the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG). We identified 19 457 adult cancer patients (6676 with breast, 2699 with lung, 1244 with colon, 1429 with ovarian, and 1843 with prostate cancers; 1291 with lymphoma; 2067 with leukemia; and 2208 with multiple myeloma) who were treated on 35 SWOG randomized phase III clinical trials from October 1, 1974, through November 29, 2001. Patients were grouped according to studies of diseases with similar histology and stage. Cox regression was used to evaluate the association between race and overall survival within each disease site grouping, controlling for available prognostic factors plus education and income, which are surrogates for socioeconomic status. Median and ten-year overall survival estimates were derived by the Kaplan-Meier method. All statistical tests were two-sided. Of 19 457 patients registered, 2308 (11.9%, range = 3.9%-21.6%) were African American. After adjustment for prognostic factors, African American race was associated with increased mortality in patients with early-stage premenopausal breast cancer (hazard ratio [HR] for death = 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10 to 1.82; P = .007), early-stage postmenopausal breast cancer (HR for death = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.73; P < .001), advanced-stage ovarian cancer (HR for death = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.18 to 2.18; P = .002), and advanced-stage prostate cancer (HR for death = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.37; P = .001). No statistically significant association between race and survival for lung cancer, colon cancer, lymphoma, leukemia, or myeloma was observed. Additional adjustments for socioeconomic status did not substantially change

  16. Implementing and integrating a clinically driven electronic medical record for radiation oncology in a large medical enterprise.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, John P; Light, Kim L; Walker, Robyn M; Georgas, Debra L; Antoine, Phillip A; Clough, Robert W; Cozart, Heidi B; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yoo, Sua; Willett, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    clinicians to access/enter patient information has substantially increased. While productivity is improving with experience, substantial growth will require better integration of the system components, decreased access times, and improved user interfaces. $127K was spent on new hardware and software; elimination of paper yields projected savings of $21K/year. One year after conversion to an EMR, more than 90% of department staff favored the EMR over the previous paper charts. Successful implementation of a Radiation Oncology EMR required not only the effort and commitment of all functions of the department, but support from senior health system management, corporate IT, and vendors. Realization of the full benefits of an EMR will require experience, faster/better integrated software, and continual improvement in underlying clinical processes.

  17. Quality of cancer family history and referral for genetic counseling and testing among oncology practices: a pilot test of quality measures as part of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Oncology Practice Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wood, Marie E; Kadlubek, Pamela; Pham, Trang H; Wollins, Dana S; Lu, Karen H; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Neuss, Michael N; Hughes, Kevin S

    2014-03-10

    Family history of cancer (CFH) is important for identifying individuals to receive genetic counseling/testing (GC/GT). Prior studies have demonstrated low rates of family history documentation and referral for GC/GT. CFH quality and GC/GT practices for patients with breast (BC) or colon cancer (CRC) were assessed in 271 practices participating in the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Oncology Practice Initiative in fall 2011. A total of 212 practices completed measures regarding CFH and GC/GT practices for 10,466 patients; 77.4% of all medical records reviewed documented presence or absence of CFH in first-degree relatives, and 61.5% of medical records documented presence or absence of CFH in second-degree relatives, with significantly higher documentation for patients with BC compared with CRC. Age at diagnosis was documented for all relatives with cancer in 30.7% of medical records (BC, 45.2%; CRC, 35.4%; P ≤ .001). Referall for GC/GT occurred in 22.1% of all patients with BC or CRC. Of patients with increased risk for hereditary cancer, 52.2% of patients with BC and 26.4% of those with CRC were referred for GC/GT. When genetic testing was performed, consent was documented 77.7% of the time, and discussion of results was documented 78.8% of the time. We identified low rates of complete CFH documentation and low rates of referral for those with BC or CRC meeting guidelines for referral among US oncologists. Documentation and referral were greater for patients with BC compared with CRC. Education and support regarding the importance of accurate CFH and the benefits of proactive high-risk patient management are clearly needed.

  18. A simple, effective and clinically applicable method to compute abdominal aortic aneurysm wall stress.

    PubMed

    Joldes, Grand Roman; Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Doyle, Barry

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent and irreversible dilation of the lower region of the aorta. It is a symptomless condition that if left untreated can expand to the point of rupture. Mechanically-speaking, rupture of an artery occurs when the local wall stress exceeds the local wall strength. It is therefore desirable to be able to non-invasively estimate the AAA wall stress for a given patient, quickly and reliably. In this paper we present an entirely new approach to computing the wall tension (i.e. the stress resultant equal to the integral of the stresses tangent to the wall over the wall thickness) within an AAA that relies on trivial linear elastic finite element computations, which can be performed instantaneously in the clinical environment on the simplest computing hardware. As an input to our calculations we only use information readily available in the clinic: the shape of the aneurysm in-vivo, as seen on a computed tomography (CT) scan, and blood pressure. We demonstrate that tension fields computed with the proposed approach agree well with those obtained using very sophisticated, state-of-the-art non-linear inverse procedures. Using magnetic resonance (MR) images of the same patient, we can approximately measure the local wall thickness and calculate the local wall stress. What is truly exciting about this simple approach is that one does not need any information on material parameters; this supports the development and use of patient-specific modelling (PSM), where uncertainty in material data is recognised as a key limitation. The methods demonstrated in this paper are applicable to other areas of biomechanics where the loads and loaded geometry of the system are known. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Clinical and microbiological characteristics of complicated intra-abdominal infection in Colombia: a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Marta; Cuesta, Diana P; Flórez, Luz E; Correa, Adriana; Llanos, Carmen E; Isaza, Berenice; Vanegas, Stella; Osorio, Johanna; Casanova, Lucía; Villegas, María V

    2016-06-01

    Complicated community-acquired intra-abdominal infections (CA-cIAI) are a common cause of acute abdomen. To identify the clinical and microbiology profile of CA-cIAI in four Colombian hospitals. This is a prospective, descriptive study, between 08-2012 and 09-2014, including patients with CA-cIAI > 15 years. Data collected included: socio-demographic, clinical, diagnosis, and isolates of the first culture obtained aseptically during surgery with antimicrobial susceptibility. 192 patients were included, 62% men, median age 47.3 years. Co-morbidities were present in 38.4%, 13% had been hospitalized in the previous year 13%, and 9.4% had received antibiotics in the last 6 months; 44.3% were admitted for appendicitis, 17.7% for peritonitis and 16.7% for bowel perforation. CA-cIAI were assessed as moderate in 64.1% of the cases and were treated with ampicillin/sulbactam (SAM) and ertapenem. In 70.8% of cases a bacteria was isolated: 65.1% were gramnegative rods (80.0% Escherichia coli, 44.8% of them susceptible to pipercillin/tazobactam, 65.7% to SAM; 11.2 % were K.pneumoniae, 85% was susceptible for SAM; 16.7% were grampositive cocci (28.1% Streptococci viridans group). The median hospital stay was 7 days and 15.1% died. E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. viridans were the main organisms to consider in an empiric therapy for CA-cIAI and it is important to know the local epidemiology in order to choose the right antibiotic.

  20. Navigating recurrent abdominal pain through clinical clues, red flags, and initial testing.

    PubMed

    Noe, Joshua D; Li, B U K

    2009-05-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common chronic complaint that presents to your office. The constant challenge is one of detecting those with organic disease from the majority who have a functional pain disorder including functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal pain, and abdominal migraine. Beginning with a detailed history and physical exam, you can: 1) apply the symptom-based Rome III criteria to positively identify a functional disorder, and 2) filter these findings through the diagnostic clues and red flags that point toward specific organic disease and/or further testing. Once a functional diagnosis has been made or an organic disease is suspected, you can initiate a self-limited empiric therapeutic trial. With this diagnostic approach, you should feel confident navigating through the initial evaluation, management, and consultation referral for a child or adolescent with recurrent abdominal pain.

  1. Group Therapy with Patients in the Waiting Room of an Oncology Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnowitz, Edward; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a therapy group for cancer patients, conducted by cotherapists in an oncology waiting room. Group members provided mutual support and shared concerns and coping methods. Medical staff members became more involved and were more able to address the affective needs of the patients and their families. (JAC)

  2. [Introduction of a clinical protocol for extravasation at the National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary].

    PubMed

    Bartal, Alexandra; Mátrai, Zoltán; Rosta, András; Szûcs, Attila

    2011-03-01

    Extravasation of cytostatics occurs when an infusion containing a cytotoxic drug leaks into the surrounding perivascular and subcutaneous tissues. Incidence of cytostatic extravasation is found to be 0.1-6% according to the literature. Depending on the severity of complications, pain, loss of function in the extremities, or in extreme cases tissue necrosis necessitating an amputation may develop, drawing consequences like delay or interruption of the chemotherapy. Extent of complications is greatly influenced by the type of medication administered, general condition of the patient, and professional preparedness of staff providing the oncological health service. The protocol recently implemented in the National Institute of Oncology is a short, compact guidance for physicians and nurses providing oncological care, so by quick and adequate management of extravasation cases, severe complications could be prevented. More complex practical guidelines including algorithms could be created as a result of a wider collaboration, with the help of which oncological health professionals could easily cope with this rare problem. The authors describe in their review the implementation of the use of dry warm and cold packs, dymethylsulfoxide and hyaluronidase and their function within the algorithm of extravasation treatment.

  3. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome after Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Quaternary Syndromes?

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, A W; Nickerson, D; Roberts, D J; Rosen, M J; McBeth, P B; Petro, C C; Berrevoet, Frederik; Sugrue, M; Xiao, Jimmy; Ball, C G

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction with reconstitution of the container function of the abdominal compartment is increasingly being performed in patients with massive ventral hernia previously deemed inoperable. This situation places patients at great risk of severe intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome if organ failure ensues. Intra-abdominal hypertension and especially abdominal compartment syndrome may be devastating systemic complications with systematic and progressive organ failure and death. We thus reviewed the pathophysiology and reported clinical experiences with abnormalities of intra-abdominal pressure in the context of abdominal wall reconstruction. Bibliographic databases (1950-2015), websites, textbooks, and the bibliographies of previously recovered articles for reports or data relating to intra-abdominal pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, and the abdominal compartment syndrome in relation to ventral, incisional, or abdominal hernia repair or abdominal wall reconstruction. Surgeons should thus consider and carefully measure intra-abdominal pressure and its resultant effects on respiratory parameters and function during abdominal wall reconstruction. The intra-abdominal pressure post-operatively will be a result of the new intra-peritoneal volume and the abdominal wall compliance. Strategies surgeons may utilize to ameliorate intra-abdominal pressure rise after abdominal wall reconstruction including temporizing paralysis of the musculature either temporarily or semi-permanently, pre-operative progressive pneumoperitoneum, permanently removing visceral contents, or surgically releasing the musculature to increase the abdominal container volume. In patients without complicating shock and inflammation, and in whom the abdominal wall anatomy has been so functionally adapted to maximize compliance, intra-abdominal hypertension may be transient and tolerable. Intra-abdominal hypertension/abdominal compartment syndrome in the specific setting of

  4. Engaging Future Clinical Oncology Researchers: An Initiative to Integrate Teaching of Biostatistics and Research Methodology into Specialty Training.

    PubMed

    Turner, S; Sundaresan, P; Mann, K; Pryor, D; Gebski, V; Shaw, T

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the learner's perspectives on a novel workshop programme designed to improve skills in biostatistics, research methodology and critical appraisal in oncology. Trainees were surveyed anonymously at the completion of each annual workshop from 2012 to 2015. In total, 103 trainees in years 2-4 of training in radiation oncology responded, giving a 94% survey response rate. A 1 day workshop, designed by biostatisticians and radiation oncologist facilitators, is the central component of a programme teaching skills in biostatistics, research methods and critical appraisal. This links short didactic lectures about statistical concepts to interactive trainee discussions around discipline-related publications. The workshop was run in conjunction with the major radiation oncology clinical trials group meeting with alternating programmes (A and B). Most of the participants (44-47/47 for A and 48-55/56 for B), reported that their understanding of one or more individual topics improved as a result of teaching. Refinement of the workshop over time led to a more favourable perception of the 'optimal' balance between didactic/interactive teaching: nine of 27 (33%) 'optimal' responses seen in 2013 compared with 23 of 29 (79%) in 2015 (P < 0.001). Commonly reported themes were: clinician facilitators and access to biostatisticians helped contextualise learning and small group, structured discussions provided an environment conducive to learning. Overall, radiation oncology trainees reported positive perceptions of the educational value of this programme, with feedback identifying areas where this resource might be improved. This model could readily be adapted to suit other medical disciplines and/or other training environments, using specialty-specific research to illuminate key statistical concepts. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnosis of Upper-Quadrant Lymphedema Secondary to Cancer: Clinical Practice Guideline From the Oncology Section of APTA

    PubMed Central

    Levenhagen, Kimberly; Davies, Claire; Perdomo, Marisa; Ryans, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The Oncology Section of APTA developed a clinical practice guideline to aid the clinician in diagnosing secondary upper-quadrant cancer-related lymphedema. Methods: Following a systematic review of published studies and a structured appraisal process, recommendations were written to guide the physical therapist and other health care clinicians in their diagnostic process. Overall, clinical practice recommendations were formulated on the basis of the evidence for each diagnostic method and were assigned a grade based on the strength of the evidence for different patient presentations and clinical utility. Recommendations: In an effort to make these clinically applicable, recommendations were based on the characteristics as to the location and stage of a patient's upper-quadrant lymphedema. PMID:28748128

  6. Clinical and laboratory parameter dynamics as markers of blood stream infections in pediatric oncology patients with fever and neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Guy; Ben-Shimol, Shalom; Fruchtman, Yariv; Abu-Quider, Abed; Kapelushnik, Joseph; Moser, Asher; Falup-Pecurariu, Oana; Greenberg, David

    2014-07-01

    Identifying markers associated with blood stream infection (BSI) in children with fever and neutropenia (FN) could lead to a substantial reduction in unnecessary treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the association between clinical/laboratory parameters and BSI in pediatric oncology patients with FN. This prospective study was conducted between 2007 and 2010 at the Pediatric oncology unit. Clinical and laboratory parameters were obtained from all hospitalized FN patients. Linear regression and trends were calculated to determine the association between clinical/laboratory parameters and BSI. Of the 195 FN episodes in 73 children, BSIs were identified in 38 (19%) episodes. Gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, and fungi caused 47%, 43%, and 10% of all BSIs, respectively. Mean fever duration was longer in the BSI group (5 d) compared with the non-BSI group (2 d, P=0.01). Mean (±SD) monocyte count at admission was lower in the BSI group compared with the non-BSI group (0.06±0.1 vs. 0.14±0.33 cells/mm, respectively, P=0.05). Mean C-reactive protein (CRP) levels at hospitalization days 5 to 8 were higher in children with BSI (P<0.001). Increment trends of monocyte and platelet levels and decrement trend of CRP levels were noted in the BSI group but not in the non-BSI group (P<0.01 for all). Prolonged fever, lower monocyte count at admission, higher CRP levels between the fifth and the eighth hospitalization days, increment trends of monocyte and platelet levels, and CRP level decrement were associated with BSI. These factors may serve as markers for BSI in pediatric oncology patients with FN.

  7. Cardiovascular risk assessment according to the Framingham score and abdominal obesity in individuals seen by a clinical school of nutrition.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Alane Cabral Menezes de; Ferreira, Raphaela Costa; Santos, Arianne Albuquerque

    2016-04-01

    To analyze the relation of abdominal obesity on cardiovascular risk in individuals seen by a clinic school of nutrition, classifying them based on Framingham score. Cross-sectional study, conducted at the nutrition clinic of a private college in the city of Maceió, Alagoas. We included randomly selected adults and elderly individuals with abdominal obesity, of both sexes, treated from August to December of 2009, with no history of cardiomyopathy or cardiovascular events. To determine the cardiovascular risk, the Framingham score was calculated. All analyzes were performed with SPSS software version 20.0, with p <0.05 as significative. We studied 54 subjects, 83% female, the mean age was 48 years old, ranging from 31 to 73 years. No correlation was observed between measurements of waist circumference and cardiovascular risk in the subjects studied (r=0.065, p=0.048), and there was no relationship between these parameters. Abdominal fat distribution was weakly related to cardiovascular risk in patients seen by a clinical school of nutrition.

  8. Distinguishing infected from noninfected abdominal fluid collections after surgery: an imaging, clinical, and laboratory-based scoring system.

    PubMed

    Gnannt, Ralph; Fischer, Michael A; Baechler, Thomas; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Karlo, Christoph; Seifert, Burkhardt; Lesurtel, Mickael; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2015-01-01

    Mortality from abdominal abscesses ranges from 30% in treated cases up to 80% to 100% in patients with undrained or nonoperated abscesses. Various computed tomographic (CT) imaging features have been suggested to indicate infection of postoperative abdominal fluid collections; however, features are nonspecific and substantial overlap between infected and noninfected collections exists. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system on the basis of CT imaging findings as well as laboratory and clinical parameters for distinguishing infected from noninfected abdominal fluid collections after surgery. The score developmental cohort included 100 consecutive patients (69 men, 31 women; mean age, 58 ± 17 years) who underwent portal-venous phase CT within 24 hours before CT-guided intervention of postoperative abdominal fluid collections. Imaging features included attenuation (Hounsfield unit [HU]), volume, wall enhancement and thickness, fat stranding, as well as entrapped gas of fluid collections. Laboratory and clinical parameters included diabetes, intake of immunosuppressive drugs, body temperature, C-reactive protein, and leukocyte blood cell count. The score was validated in a separate cohort of 30 consecutive patients (17 men, 13 women; mean age, 51 ± 15 years) with postoperative abdominal fluid collections. Microbiologic analysis from fluid samples served as the standard of reference. Diabetes, body temperature, C-reactive protein, attenuation of the fluid collection (in HUs), wall enhancement and thickness of the wall, adjacent fat stranding, as well as entrapped gas within the fluid collection were significantly different between infected and noninfected collections (P < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed diabetes, C-reactive protein, attenuation of the fluid collection (in HUs), as well as entrapped gas as significant independent predictors of infection (P < 0.001) and thus was selected for constructing a scoring

  9. Omics AnalySIs System for PRecision Oncology (OASISPRO): A Web-based Omics Analysis Tool for Clinical Phenotype Prediction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Fitzpatrick, Michael R; Pappas, Luke; Chan, Warren; Kung, Jessica; Snyder, Michael

    2017-09-12

    Precision oncology is an approach that accounts for individual differences to guide cancer management. Omics signatures have been shown to predict clinical traits for cancer patients. However, the vast amount of omics information poses an informatics challenge in systematically identifying patterns associated with health outcomes, and no general-purpose data-mining tool exists for physicians, medical researchers, and citizen scientists without significant training in programming and bioinformatics. To bridge this gap, we built the Omics AnalySIs System for PRecision Oncology (OASISPRO), a web-based system to mine the quantitative omics information from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). This system effectively visualizes patients' clinical profiles, executes machine-learning algorithms of choice on the omics data, and evaluates the prediction performance using held-out test sets. With this tool, we successfully identified genes strongly associated with tumor stage, and accurately predicted patients' survival outcomes in many cancer types, including mesothelioma and adrenocortical carcinoma. By identifying the links between omics and clinical phenotypes, this system will facilitate omics studies on precision cancer medicine and contribute to establishing personalized cancer treatment plans. This web-based tool is available at http://tinyurl.com/oasispro ;source codes are available at http://tinyurl.com/oasisproSourceCode . © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Clinical diagnostic accuracy of acute colonic diverticulitis in patients admitted with acute abdominal pain, a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Jamal Talabani, A; Endreseth, B H; Lydersen, S; Edna, T-H

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the capability of clinical findings, temperature, C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) count to discern patients with acute colonic diverticulitis from all other patients admitted with acute abdominal pain. The probability of acute diverticulitis was assessed by the examining doctor, using a scale from 0 (zero probability) to 10 (100 % probability). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the clinical diagnostic accuracy of acute colonic diverticulitis in patients admitted with acute abdominal pain. Of 833 patients admitted with acute abdominal pain, 95 had acute colonic diverticulitis. ROC curve analysis gave an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.95 (CI 0.92 to 0.97) for ages <65 years, AUC = 0.86 (CI 0.78 to 0.93) in older patients. Separate analysis showed an AUC = 0.83 (CI 0.80 to 0.86) of CRP alone. White blood cell count and temperature were almost useless to discriminate acute colonic diverticulitis from other types of acute abdominal pain, AUC = 0.59 (CI 0.53 to 0.65) for white blood cell count and AUC = 0.57 (0.50 to 0.63) for temperature, respectively. This prospective study demonstrates that standard clinical evaluation by non-specialist doctors based on history, physical examination, and initial blood tests on admission provides a high degree of diagnostic precision in patients with acute colonic diverticulitis.

  11. ANMCO/AIOM/AICO Consensus Document on clinical and management pathways of cardio-oncology: executive summary

    PubMed Central

    Tarantini, Luigi; Massimo Gulizia, Michele; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Maurea, Nicola; Giuseppe Abrignani, Maurizio; Bisceglia, Irma; Bovelli, Daniella; De Gennaro, Luisa; Del Sindaco, Donatella; Macera, Francesca; Parrini, Iris; Radini, Donatella; Russo, Giulia; Beatrice Scardovi, Angela; Inno, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease and cancer are leading causes of death. Both diseases share the same risk factors and, having the highest incidence and prevalence in the elderly, they often coexist in the same individual. Furthermore, the enhanced survival of cancer patients registered in the last decades and linked to early diagnosis and improvement of care, not infrequently exposes them to the appearance of ominous cardiovascular complications due to the deleterious effects of cancer treatment on the heart and circulatory system. The above considerations have led to the development of a new branch of clinical cardiology based on the principles of multidisciplinary collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists: Cardio-oncology, which aims to find solutions to the prevention, monitoring, diagnosis and treatment of heart damage induced by cancer care in order to pursue, in the individual patient, the best possible care for cancer while minimizing the risk of cardiac toxicity. In this consensus document we provide practical recommendations on how to assess, monitor, treat and supervise the candidate or patient treated with potentially cardiotoxic cancer therapy in order to treat cancer and protect the heart at all stages of the oncological disease. Cardiovascular diseases and cancer often share the same risk factors and can coexist in the same individual. Such possibility is amplified by the deleterious effects of cancer treatment on the heart. The above considerations have led to the development of a new branch of clinical cardiology, based on multidisciplinary collaboration between cardiologist and oncologist: the cardio-oncology. It aims to prevent, monitor, and treat heart damages induced by cancer therapies in order to achieve the most effective cancer treatment, while minimizing the risk of cardiac toxicity. In this paper, we provide practical recommendations on how to assess, monitor, treat and supervise patients treated with potential cardiotoxic cancer

  12. ANMCO/AIOM/AICO Consensus Document on clinical and management pathways of cardio-oncology: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Tarantini, Luigi; Massimo Gulizia, Michele; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Maurea, Nicola; Giuseppe Abrignani, Maurizio; Bisceglia, Irma; Bovelli, Daniella; De Gennaro, Luisa; Del Sindaco, Donatella; Macera, Francesca; Parrini, Iris; Radini, Donatella; Russo, Giulia; Beatrice Scardovi, Angela; Inno, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease and cancer are leading causes of death. Both diseases share the same risk factors and, having the highest incidence and prevalence in the elderly, they often coexist in the same individual. Furthermore, the enhanced survival of cancer patients registered in the last decades and linked to early diagnosis and improvement of care, not infrequently exposes them to the appearance of ominous cardiovascular complications due to the deleterious effects of cancer treatment on the heart and circulatory system. The above considerations have led to the development of a new branch of clinical cardiology based on the principles of multidisciplinary collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists: Cardio-oncology, which aims to find solutions to the prevention, monitoring, diagnosis and treatment of heart damage induced by cancer care in order to pursue, in the individual patient, the best possible care for cancer while minimizing the risk of cardiac toxicity. In this consensus document we provide practical recommendations on how to assess, monitor, treat and supervise the candidate or patient treated with potentially cardiotoxic cancer therapy in order to treat cancer and protect the heart at all stages of the oncological disease. Cardiovascular diseases and cancer often share the same risk factors and can coexist in the same individual. Such possibility is amplified by the deleterious effects of cancer treatment on the heart. The above considerations have led to the development of a new branch of clinical cardiology, based on multidisciplinary collaboration between cardiologist and oncologist: the cardio-oncology. It aims to prevent, monitor, and treat heart damages induced by cancer therapies in order to achieve the most effective cancer treatment, while minimizing the risk of cardiac toxicity. In this paper, we provide practical recommendations on how to assess, monitor, treat and supervise patients treated with potential cardiotoxic cancer

  13. Following patient pathways to psycho-oncological treatment: Identification of treatment needs by clinical staff and electronic screening.

    PubMed

    Loth, Fanny L; Meraner, Verena; Holzner, Bernhard; Singer, Susanne; Virgolini, Irene; Gamper, Eva M

    2018-04-01

    In this retrospective investigation of patient pathways to psycho-oncological treatment (POT), we compared the number of POT referrals before and after implementation of electronic screening for POT needs and investigated psychosocial predictors for POT wish at a nuclear medicine department. We extracted medical chart information about number of referrals and extent of follow-up contacts. During standard referral (November 2014 to October 2015), POT needs were identified by clinical staff only. In the screening-assisted referral period (November 2015 to October 2016), identification was supported by electronic screening for POT needs. Psychosocial predictors for POT wish were examined using logistic regression. We analysed data from 487 patients during standard referral (mean age 56.4 years; 60.2% female, 88.7% thyroid carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumours) of which 28 patients (5.7%) were referred for POT. Of 502 patients in the screening-assisted referral period (mean age 57.0 years; 55.8% female, 86.6% thyroid carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumours), 69 (13.7%) were referred for POT. Of these, 36 were identified by psycho-oncological (PO) screening and 33 by clinical staff. After PO-screening implementation, referrals increased by a factor of 2.4. The strongest predictor of POT wish was depressive mood (P < .001). During both referral periods, about 15% of patients visited the PO outpatient unit additionally to inpatient PO consultations. Our results provide evidence from a real-life setting that PO screening can foster POT referrals, reduce barriers to express the POT wish, and hence help to meet psychosocial needs of this specific patient group. Differences between patients' needs, wish, and POT uptake should be further investigated. © 2018 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Study of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the pediatrics outpatient clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Badr, M A; El-Saadany, Hosam F; Ali, Adel S A; Abdelrahman, D

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the Outpatient Pediatric Clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals. The study was conducted on 100 children suffering from different GIT symptoms mainly recurrent abdominal pain, they were categorized into 3 categories according to their ages. First category below 5 years, second category between 5 and 10 years and last category above 10 years. All subjects underwent full history taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Protozoa infection was in 29% of patients, helminthes 10%, chronic constipation 4% and UTI 4%. The patients with apparent etiology were excluded. The data do not support the hypothesis that there is a direct role for H. pylori infection as a causative agent for Recurrent Abdominal Pain (RAP) in children. The mean +/- SD of age of patients were 5.7 +/- 3.7, with range of 1:18 years. Male to female ratio was 1:1.1. H. pylori serum IgG antibodies were in 26 patients (43.3%) and 24 controls (p = 0.71), and H. pylori stool Ag in stool of 22 cases and 20 controls (p = 0.7).

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysm with periaortic malignant lymphoma differentiated from aneurysmal rupture by clinical presentation and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Sokichi; Itou, Yoshito; Idoguchi, Koji; Imakita, Masami; Funatsu, Toshihiro; Yagihara, Toshikatsu

    2018-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) associated with periaortic malignant lymphoma is difficult to differentiate from aneurysmal rupture because of similarities in their clinical presentation and appearance on computed tomography images. We here report a case of AAA associated with periaortic malignant lymphoma diagnosed preoperatively with an absence of typical symptoms, showing that AAA in periaortic malignant lymphoma can present without any clinical correlates. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to confirm the diagnosis. The patient was treated by endovascular repair, which may be safer and more effective than open surgery for AAA associated with malignant lymphoma because of the tight adhesion between the aneurysm and the lymphoid tissue.

  16. Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis for Therapeutic Innovation in Clinical Oncology? Taking the Root Out, Not Chopping the Leaf.

    PubMed

    Dzobo, Kevin; Senthebane, Dimakatso Alice; Rowe, Arielle; Thomford, Nicholas Ekow; Mwapagha, Lamech M; Al-Awwad, Nasir; Dandara, Collet; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-12-01

    Clinical oncology is in need of therapeutic innovation. New hypotheses and concepts for translation of basic research to novel diagnostics and therapeutics are called for. In this context, the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis rests on the premise that tumors comprise tumor cells and a subset of tumor-initiating cells, CSCs, in a quiescent state characterized by slow cell cycling and expression of specific stem cell surface markers with the capability to maintain a tumor in vivo. The CSCs have unlimited self-renewal abilities and propagate tumors through division into asymmetric daughter cells. This differentiation is induced by both genetic and environmental factors. Another characteristic of CSCs is their therapeutic resistance, which is due to their quiescent state and slow dividing. Notably, the CSC phenotype differs greatly between patients and different cancer types. The CSCs may differ genetically and phenotypically and may include primary CSCs and metastatic stem cells circulating within the blood system. Targeting CSCs will require the knowledge of distinct stem cells within the tumor. CSCs can differentiate into nontumorigenic cells and this has been touted as the source of heterogeneity observed in many solid tumors. The latter cannot be fully explained by epigenetic regulation or by the clonal evolution theory. This heterogeneity markedly influences how tumors respond to therapy and prognosis. The present expert review offers an analysis and synthesis of the latest research and concepts on CSCs, with a view to truly disruptive innovation for future diagnostics and therapeutics in clinical oncology.

  17. Drug interactions between antineoplastic and antidepressant agents: analysis of patients seen at an oncology clinic at a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Reinert, Camila de Araújo; Ribas, Marcelo Rodrigues; Zimmermann, Paulo Roberto

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms among oncology patients and identify simultaneous use of antineoplastic and antidepressant agents. This was a cross-sectional study that interviewed 56 oncology patients using two data collection instruments: a questionnaire covering clinical and sociodemographic data and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), for assessment of depressive symptoms. For data analysis, descriptive statistics were used to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms and the chi-square test was used to evaluate associations between sociodemographic and clinical variables and depressive symptoms. A 26.7% (15 patients) prevalence of depression was detected. Just eight of these 15 patients (53.3%) were receiving treatment for depression. In the sample as a whole, 13 of the patients interviewed (23.2%) were taking antidepressants and 11 of these 13 patients (19.6%) were taking antidepressive and antineoplastic agents simultaneously. A total of five (8.9% of the sample) contraindicated drug interactions were detected. Depressive symptoms are more prevalent among cancer patients than in the general population, but they are generally under-diagnosed and under-treated. Simultaneous use of antidepressant and antineoplastic agents is common and so, in order to reduce the number of harmful adverse effects, possible drug interactions must be identified before antidepressants are prescribed to cancer patients.

  18. Validation workflow for a clinical Bayesian network model in multidisciplinary decision making in head and neck oncology treatment.

    PubMed

    Cypko, Mario A; Stoehr, Matthaeus; Kozniewski, Marcin; Druzdzel, Marek J; Dietz, Andreas; Berliner, Leonard; Lemke, Heinz U

    2017-11-01

    Oncological treatment is being increasingly complex, and therefore, decision making in multidisciplinary teams is becoming the key activity in the clinical pathways. The increased complexity is related to the number and variability of possible treatment decisions that may be relevant to a patient. In this paper, we describe validation of a multidisciplinary cancer treatment decision in the clinical domain of head and neck oncology. Probabilistic graphical models and corresponding inference algorithms, in the form of Bayesian networks, can support complex decision-making processes by providing a mathematically reproducible and transparent advice. The quality of BN-based advice depends on the quality of the model. Therefore, it is vital to validate the model before it is applied in practice. For an example BN subnetwork of laryngeal cancer with 303 variables, we evaluated 66 patient records. To validate the model on this dataset, a validation workflow was applied in combination with quantitative and qualitative analyses. In the subsequent analyses, we observed four sources of imprecise predictions: incorrect data, incomplete patient data, outvoting relevant observations, and incorrect model. Finally, the four problems were solved by modifying the data and the model. The presented validation effort is related to the model complexity. For simpler models, the validation workflow is the same, although it may require fewer validation methods. The validation success is related to the model's well-founded knowledge base. The remaining laryngeal cancer model may disclose additional sources of imprecise predictions.

  19. Effect of Abdominal Ultrasound on Clinical Care, Outcomes, and Resource Use Among Children With Blunt Torso Trauma: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Holmes, James F; Kelley, Kenneth M; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; Utter, Garth H; Abramson, Lisa P; Rose, John S; Tancredi, Daniel J; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2017-06-13

    The utility of the focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) examination in children is unknown. To determine if the FAST examination during initial evaluation of injured children improves clinical care. A randomized clinical trial (April 2012-May 2015) that involved 975 hemodynamically stable children and adolescents younger than 18 years treated for blunt torso trauma at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, a level I trauma center. Patients were randomly assigned to a standard trauma evaluation with the FAST examination by the treating ED physician or a standard trauma evaluation alone. Coprimary outcomes were rate of abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scans in the ED, missed intra-abdominal injuries, ED length of stay, and hospital charges. Among the 925 patients who were randomized (mean [SD] age, 9.7 [5.3] years; 575 males [62%]), all completed the study. A total of 50 patients (5.4%, 95% CI, 4.0% to 7.1%) were diagnosed with intra-abdominal injuries, including 40 (80%; 95% CI, 66% to 90%) who had intraperitoneal fluid found on an abdominal CT scan, and 9 patients (0.97%; 95% CI, 0.44% to 1.8%) underwent laparotomy. The proportion of patients with abdominal CT scans was 241 of 460 (52.4%) in the FAST group and 254 of 465 (54.6%) in the standard care-only group (difference, -2.2%; 95% CI, -8.7% to 4.2%). One case of missed intra-abdominal injury occurred in a patient in the FAST group and none in the control group (difference, 0.2%; 95% CI, -0.6% to 1.2%). The mean ED length of stay was 6.03 hours in the FAST group and 6.07 hours in the standard care-only group (difference, -0.04 hours; 95% CI, -0.47 to 0.40 hours). Median hospital charges were $46 415 in the FAST group and $47 759 in the standard care-only group (difference, -$1180; 95% CI, -$6651 to $4291). Among hemodynamically stable children treated in an ED following blunt torso trauma, the use of FAST compared with standard care only did not improve clinical care, including

  20. Reliability of ultrasound thickness measurement of the abdominal muscles during clinical isometric endurance tests.

    PubMed

    ShahAli, Shabnam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Bahmani, Andia; Karimi, Noureddin; Nabavi, Hoda

    2015-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the intra-examiner reliability of ultrasound (US) thickness measurement of abdominal muscles activity when supine lying and during two isometric endurance tests in subjects with and without Low back pain (LBP). A total of 19 women (9 with LBP, 10 without LBP) participated in the study. Within-day reliability of the US thickness measurements at supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests were assessed in all subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability of thickness measurement. The standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate the absolute reliability. Results indicated high ICC scores (0.73-0.99) and also small SEM and MDC scores for within-day reliability assessment. The Bland-Altman plots of agreement in US measurement of the abdominal muscles during the two isometric endurance tests demonstrated that 95% of the observations fall between the limits of agreement for test and retest measurements. Together the results indicate high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all the positions tested. According to the study's findings, US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscles activity in supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests employed, in participants with and without LBP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal oligometastases: a biological and clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Advances in imaging and biological targeting have led to the development of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as an alternative treatment of extracranial oligometastases. New radiobiological concepts, such as ceramide-induced endothelial apoptosis after hypofractionated high-dose SBRT, and the identification of patients with oligometastatic disease by microRNA expression may yet lead to further developments. Key factors in SBRT are delivery of a high dose per fraction, proper patient positioning, target localisation, and management of breathing–related motion. Our review addresses the radiation doses and schedules used to treat liver, abdominal lymph node (LN) and adrenal gland oligometastases and treatment outcomes. Reported local control (LC) rates for liver and abdominal LN oligometastases are high (median 2-year actuarial LC: 61 -100% for liver oligometastases; 4-year actuarial LC: 68% in a study of abdominal LN oligometastases). Early toxicity is low-to-moderate; late adverse effects are rare. SBRT of adrenal gland oligometastases shows promising results in the case of isolated lesions. In conclusion, properly conducted SBRT procedures are a safe and effective treatment option for abdominal oligometastases. PMID:22852764

  2. [New drugs in oncology--features of clinical trials for market authorisation and arguments for the rapid implementation of independent clinical trials following approval].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Schott, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    The market authorisation or extension of indication for all oncology drugs in Europe is now based on Regulation (EC) No. 726/2004, a centralised procedure of the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Studies in recent years have highlighted deficiencies in pivotal studies. For example, the requirements of the EMA are not always consistently followed and studies are stopped prematurely after only interim analysis that at this time point shows improved efficacy with regard to the comparator arm. Our current analysis of the European Assessment Reports (reporting period: 01/01/2009 to 08/13/2012) on 29 drugs for 39 oncology indications shows that the quality of the trials for market authorisation has improved in several respects. Primary endpoints recommended by the EMA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) such as overall survival and progression-free survival are used, and only one study was conducted as a phase II trial with no comparator arm. In contrast, oncology drugs that are approved for the treatment of rare diseases (orphan drugs) are based on small studies which are often carried out without blinding, are not randomised and investigate surrogate endpoints. To answer patient-relevant issues following market authorisation, it is necessary to conduct independent clinical studies. Increased public funding needs to be provided and bureaucratic hurdles have to be reduced. Only this will permit a more efficient use of limited health care resources and allow to improve the quality of care for cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Evaluation of the quality of the reporting of phase II clinical trials in oncology: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rivoirard, Romain; Langrand-Escure, Julien; Oriol, Mathieu; Tinquaut, Fabien; Chauvin, Franck; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas; Bourmaud, Aurélie

    2018-05-01

    To describe the current state of knowledge concerning the quality of reporting in phase II clinical trials in oncology and to describe the various methods published allowing this quality evaluation. databases including MEDLINE and COCHRANE were searched. Reviews and meta-analyses analyzing the quality of the reporting of phase II trials in oncology were included. Descriptive analysis of the results was performed. Thirteen publications were retained. Only 2 publications adopted a systematic approach of evaluation of the quality of reporting by overall scores. The Key Methodological Score (KMS), proposed by Grellety et al., gathering 3 items, seemed adapted for such an evaluation. A score of 3/3 was found in 16.1% of the 156 phase II trials analysed by this score. The other reviews used a qualitative analysis to evaluate the reporting, via an analysis of a single criterion, generally the statistical plan of the study. This item was considered as having been correctly reported in less than 50% of the analysed articles. The quality of reporting in phase II trials in oncology is a field that has been investigated very little (13 publications). When it is studied, the estimated level of quality is not satisfactory, whatever the method employed. The use of an overall score of evaluation is a path which should be pursued, in order to get reliable results. It also seems necessary to propose strong recommendations, which would create a consensus for the methodology and the reporting of these studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. To friend or not to friend: the use of social media in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Lori; Crum, Caroline; Grady, Christine; Merchant, Melinda

    2012-03-01

    Online social networking has replaced more traditional methods of personal and professional communication in many segments of society today. The wide reach and immediacy of social media facilitate dissemination of knowledge in advocacy and cancer education, but the usefulness of social media in personal relationships between patients and providers is still unclear. Although professional guidelines regarding e-mail communication may be relevant to social media, the inherent openness in social networks creates potential boundary and privacy issues in the provider-patient context. This commentary seeks to increase provider awareness of unique issues and challenges raised by the integration of social networking into oncology communications.

  5. To Friend or Not to Friend: The Use of Social Media in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Crum, Caroline; Grady, Christine; Merchant, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    Online social networking has replaced more traditional methods of personal and professional communication in many segments of society today. The wide reach and immediacy of social media facilitate dissemination of knowledge in advocacy and cancer education, but the usefulness of social media in personal relationships between patients and providers is still unclear. Although professional guidelines regarding e-mail communication may be relevant to social media, the inherent openness in social networks creates potential boundary and privacy issues in the provider-patient context. This commentary seeks to increase provider awareness of unique issues and challenges raised by the integration of social networking into oncology communications. PMID:23077437

  6. Abdominal Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Borioni, Raoul; Garofalo, Mariano; De Paulis, Ruggero; Nardi, Paolo; Scaffa, Raffaele; Chiariello, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    Isolated abdominal aortic dissections are rare events. Their anatomic and clinical features are different from those of atherosclerotic aneurysms. We report 4 cases of isolated abdominal aortic dissection that were successfully treated with surgical or endovascular intervention. The anatomic and clinical features and a review of the literature are also presented. PMID:15902826

  7. Health-related quality-of-life as co-primary endpoint in randomized clinical trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Fiteni, Frédéric; Pam, Alhousseiny; Anota, Amélie; Vernerey, Dewi; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Westeel, Virginie; Bonnetain, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Overall survival (OS) has been considered as the most relevant primary endpoint but trials using OS often require large numbers of patients and long-term follow-up. Therefore composite endpoints, which are assessed earlier, are frequently used as primary endpoint but suffer from important limitations specially a lack of validation as surrogate of OS. Therefore, Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) could be considered as an outcome to judge efficacy of a treatment. An alternative approach would be to combine HRQoL with composite endpoints as co-primary endpoint to ensure a clinical benefit for patients of a new therapy. The decision rules of such design, the procedure to control the Type I error and the determination of sample size remain questions to debate. Here, we discusses HRQoL as co-primary endpoints in randomized clinical trials in oncology and provide some solutions to promote such design.

  8. The National Cancer Institute-American Society of Clinical Oncology Cancer Trial Accrual Symposium: summary and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Denicoff, Andrea M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Grubbs, Stephen S; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Comis, Robert L; Devine, Peggy; Dilts, David M; Duff, Michelle E; Ford, Jean G; Joffe, Steven; Schapira, Lidia; Weinfurt, Kevin P; Michaels, Margo; Raghavan, Derek; Richmond, Ellen S; Zon, Robin; Albrecht, Terrance L; Bookman, Michael A; Dowlati, Afshin; Enos, Rebecca A; Fouad, Mona N; Good, Marjorie; Hicks, William J; Loehrer, Patrick J; Lyss, Alan P; Wolff, Steven N; Wujcik, Debra M; Meropol, Neal J

    2013-11-01

    Many challenges to clinical trial accrual exist, resulting in studies with inadequate enrollment and potentially delaying answers to important scientific and clinical questions. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) cosponsored the Cancer Trial Accrual Symposium: Science and Solutions on April 29-30, 2010 to examine the state of accrual science related to patient/community, physician/provider, and site/organizational influences, and identify new interventions to facilitate clinical trial enrollment. The symposium featured breakout sessions, plenary sessions, and a poster session including 100 abstracts. Among the 358 attendees were clinical investigators, researchers of accrual strategies, research administrators, nurses, research coordinators, patient advocates, and educators. A bibliography of the accrual literature in these three major areas was provided to participants in advance of the meeting. After the symposium, the literature in these areas was revisited to determine if the symposium recommendations remained relevant within the context of the current literature. Few rigorously conducted studies have tested interventions to address challenges to clinical trials accrual. Attendees developed recommendations for improving accrual and identified priority areas for future accrual research at the patient/community, physician/provider, and site/organizational levels. Current literature continues to support the symposium recommendations. A combination of approaches addressing both the multifactorial nature of accrual challenges and the characteristics of the target population may be needed to improve accrual to cancer clinical trials. Recommendations for best practices and for future research developed from the symposium are provided.

  9. Gene Patents and Personalized Cancer Care: Impact of the Myriad Case on Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Offit, Kenneth; Bradbury, Angela; Storm, Courtney; Merz, Jon F.; Noonan, Kevin E.; Spence, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Genomic discoveries have transformed the practice of oncology and cancer prevention. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances based on cancer genomics developed during a time when it was possible to patent genes. A case before the Supreme Court, Association for Molecular Pathology v Myriad Genetics, Inc seeks to overturn patents on isolated genes. Although the outcomes are uncertain, it is suggested here that the Supreme Court decision will have few immediate effects on oncology practice or research but may have more significant long-term impact. The Federal Circuit court has already rejected Myriad's broad diagnostic methods claims, and this is not affected by the Supreme Court decision. Isolated DNA patents were already becoming obsolete on scientific grounds, in an era when human DNA sequence is public knowledge and because modern methods of next-generation sequencing need not involve isolated DNA. The Association for Molecular Pathology v Myriad Supreme Court decision will have limited impact on new drug development, as new drug patents usually involve cellular methods. A nuanced Supreme Court decision acknowledging the scientific distinction between synthetic cDNA and genomic DNA will further mitigate any adverse impact. A Supreme Court decision to include or exclude all types of DNA from patent eligibility could impact future incentives for genomic discovery as well as the future delivery of medical care. Whatever the outcome of this important case, it is important that judicial and legislative actions in this area maximize genomic discovery while also ensuring patients' access to personalized cancer care. PMID:23766521

  10. Opioid use in gynecologic oncology in the age of the opioid epidemic: Part I - Effective opioid use across clinical settings, a society of gynecologic oncology evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Lefkowits, Carolyn; Buss, Mary K; Ramzan, Amin A; Fischer, Stacy; Urban, Renata R; Fisher, Christine M; Duska, Linda R

    2018-05-01

    As the only oncologists that provide both medical and surgical oncologic care, gynecologic oncologists encounter an exceptionally broad range of indications for prescribing opioids, from management of acute post-operative pain to chronic cancer-related pain to end-of-life care. If we are to balance opioid efficacy, safety and accessibility for our patients, we must be intimately familiar with appropriate clinical use of opioids in a range of settings, and engage in the national conversation around opioid misuse and how associated regulations and legislation may impact us and our patients. This article examines the appropriate use of opioids across the range of clinical settings encountered in gynecologic oncology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics and quality of life outcomes among oncology patients with different types of pain.

    PubMed

    Posternak, Victoria; Dunn, Laura B; Dhruva, Anand; Paul, Steven M; Luce, Judith; Mastick, Judy; Levine, Jon D; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Hammer, Marylin; Wright, Fay; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study, in oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy (n = 926), were to: describe the occurrence of different types of pain (ie, no pain, only noncancer pain [NCP], only cancer pain [CP], or both CP and NCP) and evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics, and quality of life (QOL) among the 4 groups. Patients completed self-report questionnaires on demographic and symptom characteristics and QOL. Patients who had pain were asked to indicate if it was or was not related to their cancer or its treatment. Medical records were reviewed for information on cancer and its treatments. In this study, 72.5% of the patients reported pain. Of the 671 who reported pain, 21.5% reported only NCP, 37.0% only CP, and 41.5% both CP and NCP. Across the 3 pain groups, worst pain scores were in the moderate to severe range. Compared with the no pain group, patients with both CP and NCP were significantly younger, more likely to be female, have a higher level of comorbidity, and a poorer functional status. In addition, these patients reported: higher levels of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbance; lower levels of energy and attentional function; and poorer QOL. Patients with only NCP were significantly older than the other 3 groups. The most common comorbidities in the NCP group were back pain, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and depression. Unrelieved CP and NCP continue to be significant problems. Oncology outpatients need to be assessed for both CP and NCP conditions.

  12. American Society of Clinical Oncology Summit on Addressing Obesity Through Multidisciplinary Provider Collaboration: Key Findings and Recommendations for Action.

    PubMed

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Hershman, Dawn L; Merrill, Janette K; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dixon, Suzanne; Hassink, Sandra G; Jakicic, John M; Morton, John Magaña; Okwuosa, Tochi M; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Rothberg, Amy E; Stephens, Mark; Streett, Sarah E; Wild, Robert A; Westman, Eric A; Williams, Ronald J; Wollins, Dana S; Hudis, Clifford A

    2017-11-01

    Given the increasing evidence that obesity increases the risk of developing and dying from malignancy, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) launched an Obesity Initiative in 2013 that was designed to increase awareness among oncology providers and the general public of the relationship between obesity and cancer and to promote research in this area. Recognizing that the type of societal change required to impact the obesity epidemic will require a broad-based effort, ASCO hosted the "Summit on Addressing Obesity through Multidisciplinary Collaboration" in 2016. This meeting was held to review current challenges in addressing obesity within the respective health care provider communities and to identify priorities that would most benefit from a collective and cross-disciplinary approach. Efforts focused on four key areas: provider education and training; public education and activation; research; and policy and advocacy. Summit attendees discussed current challenges in addressing obesity within their provider communities and identified priorities that would most benefit from multidisciplinary collaboration. A synopsis of recommendations to facilitate future collaboration, as well as examples of ongoing cooperative efforts, provides a blueprint for multidisciplinary provider collaboration focused on obesity prevention and treatment. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  13. Barriers to a Career Focus in Cancer Prevention: A Report and Initial Recommendations From the American Society of Clinical Oncology Cancer Prevention Workforce Pipeline Work Group

    PubMed Central

    Meyskens, Frank L.; Bajorin, Dean F.; George, Thomas J.; Jeter, Joanne M.; Khan, Shakila; Tyne, Courtney A.; William, William N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assist in determining barriers to an oncology career incorporating cancer prevention, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Cancer Prevention Workforce Pipeline Work Group sponsored surveys of training program directors and oncology fellows. Methods Separate surveys with parallel questions were administered to training program directors at their fall 2013 retreat and to oncology fellows as part of their February 2014 in-training examination survey. Forty-seven (67%) of 70 training directors and 1,306 (80%) of 1,634 oncology fellows taking the in-training examination survey answered questions. Results Training directors estimated that ≤ 10% of fellows starting an academic career or entering private practice would have a career focus in cancer prevention. Only 15% of fellows indicated they would likely be interested in cancer prevention as a career focus, although only 12% thought prevention was unimportant relative to treatment. Top fellow-listed barriers to an academic career were difficulty in obtaining funding and lower compensation. Additional barriers to an academic career with a prevention focus included unclear career model, lack of clinical mentors, lack of clinical training opportunities, and concerns about reimbursement. Conclusion Reluctance to incorporate cancer prevention into an oncology career seems to stem from lack of mentors and exposure during training, unclear career path, and uncertainty regarding reimbursement. Suggested approaches to begin to remedy this problem include: 1) more ASCO-led and other prevention educational resources for fellows, training directors, and practicing oncologists; 2) an increase in funded training and clinical research opportunities, including reintroduction of the R25T award; 3) an increase in the prevention content of accrediting examinations for clinical oncologists; and 4) interaction with policymakers to broaden the scope and depth of reimbursement for prevention counseling and

  14. Robot-based tele-echography: clinical evaluation of the TER system in abdominal aortic exploration.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Thomas; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Bressollette, Luc; Pelissier, Franck; Boidard, Eric; Troccaz, Jocelyne; Cinquin, Philippe

    2007-11-01

    The TER system is a robot-based tele-echography system allowing remote ultrasound examination. The specialist moves a mock-up of the ultrasound probe at the master site, and the robot reproduces the movements of the real probe, which sends back ultrasound images and force feedback. This tool could be used to perform ultrasound examinations in small health care centers or from isolated sites. The objective of this study was to prove, under real conditions, the feasibility and reliability of the TER system in detecting abdominal aortic and iliac aneurysms. Fifty-eight patients were included in 2 centers in Brest and Grenoble, France. The remote examination was compared with the reference standard, the bedside examination, for aorta and iliac artery diameter measurement, detection and description of aneurysms, detection of atheromatosis, the duration of the examination, and acceptability. All aneurysms (8) were detected by both techniques as intramural thrombosis and extension to the iliac arteries. The interobserver correlation coefficient was 0.982 (P < .0001) for aortic diameters. The rate of concordance between 2 operators in evaluating atheromatosis was 84% +/- 11% (95% confidence interval). Our study on 58 patients suggests that the TER system could be a reliable, acceptable, and effective robot-based system for performing remote abdominal aortic ultrasound examinations. Research is continuing to improve the equipment for general abdominal use.

  15. Application of 80-kVp scan and raw data-based iterative reconstruction for reduced iodine load abdominal-pelvic CT in patients at risk of contrast-induced nephropathy referred for oncological assessment: effects on radiation dose, image quality and renal function.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yasunori; Tanoue, Shota; Tsuji, Akinori; Urata, Joji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yoshida, Eri; Yoshida, Morikatsu; Kidoh, Masafumi; Tateishi, Machiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the image quality, radiation dose, and renal safety of contrast medium (CM)-reduced abdominal-pelvic CT combining 80-kVp and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) in patients with renal dysfunction for oncological assessment. We included 45 patients with renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate  <45 ml per min per 1.73 m 2 ) who underwent reduced-CM abdominal-pelvic CT (360 mgI kg -1 , 80-kVp, SAFIRE) for oncological assessment. Another 45 patients without renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate >60 ml per lmin per 1.73 m 2 ) who underwent standard oncological abdominal-pelvic CT (600 mgI kg -1 , 120-kVp, filtered-back projection) were included as controls. CT attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were compared. Two observers performed subjective image analysis on a 4-point scale. Size-specific dose estimate and renal function 1-3 months after CT were measured. The size-specific dose estimate and iodine load of 80-kVp protocol were 32 and 41%,, respectively, lower than of 120-kVp protocol (p < 0.01). CT attenuation and contrast-to-noise ratio of parenchymal organs and vessels in 80-kVp images were significantly better than those of 120-kVp images (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in quantitative or qualitative image noise or subjective overall quality (p > 0.05). No significant kidney injury associated with CM administration was observed. 80-kVp abdominal-pelvic CT with SAFIRE yields diagnostic image quality in oncology patients with renal dysfunction under substantially reduced iodine and radiation dose without renal safety concerns. Advances in knowledge: Using 80-kVp and SAFIRE allows for 40% iodine load and 32% radiation dose reduction for abdominal-pelvic CT without compromising image quality and renal function in oncology patients at risk of contrast-induced nephropathy.

  16. Pediatric oncology clinical trial participation where the geography is vast: Development of a clinical research system for tertiary and satellite centers in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Sarah; Greenberg, Mark; Malkin, David; Portwine, Carol; Johnston, Donna; Silva, Mariana; Zelcer, Shayna; Sonshine, Samantha; Manzo, Janet; Bennett, Carla; Brodeur-Robb, Kathy; Deveault, Catherine; Ramachandran, Nivetha; Gibson, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Opportunities for participation in clinical trials are a core component of the care of children with cancer. In Ontario, many pediatric patients live long distances from their cancer center. This paper describes the work that was done in order to allow patients participating in Children's Oncology Group trials to receive care, including research protocol related care, jointly between the tertiary pediatric cancer center and the closer-to-home satellite center. The system is a pragmatic risk-based model, supporting excellence in care while ensuring good conduct of the research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, including ethics oversight. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Child with Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rajalakshmi; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the common symptoms reported by children in urgent care clinics. While most children tend to have self-limiting conditions, the treating pediatrician should watch out for underlying serious causes like intestinal obstruction and perforation peritonitis, which require immediate referral to an emergency department (ED). Abdominal pain may be secondary to surgical or non-surgical causes, and will differ as per the age of the child. The common etiologies for abdominal pain presenting to an urgent care clinic are acute gastro-enteritis, constipation and functional abdominal pain; however, a variety of extra-abdominal conditions may also present as abdominal pain. Meticulous history taking and physical examination are the best tools for diagnosis, while investigations have a limited role in treating benign etiologies.

  18. Electronic Medical Record-Based Radiation Oncology Toxicity Recording Instrument Aids Benchmarking and Quality Improvement in the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Kevin; Rodgers, Kellie; Spangler, Ann; Rahimi, Asal; Willett, DuWayne

    2018-03-01

    The on-treatment visit (OTV) for radiation oncology is essential for patient management. Radiation toxicities recorded during the OTV may be inconsistent because of the use of free text and the lack of treatment site-specific templates. We developed a radiation oncology toxicity recording instrument (ROTOX) in a health system electronic medical record (EMR). Our aims were to assess improvement in documentation of toxicities and to develop clinic toxicity benchmarks. A ROTOX that was based on National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4.0) with flow-sheet functionality was developed in the EMR. Improvement in documentation was assessed at various time intervals. High-grade toxicities (ie, grade ≥ 3 by CTCAE) by site were audited to develop benchmarks and to track nursing and physician actions taken in response to these. A random sample of OTV notes from each clinic physician before ROTOX implementation was reviewed and assigned a numerical document quality score (DQS) that was based on completeness and comprehensiveness of toxicity grading. The mean DQS improved from an initial level of 41% to 99% (of the maximum possible DQS) when resampled at 6 months post-ROTOX. This high-level DQS was maintained 3 years after ROTOX implementation at 96% of the maximum. For months 7 to 9 after implementation (during a 3-month period), toxicity grading was recorded in 4,443 OTVs for 698 unique patients; 107 episodes of high-grade toxicity were identified during this period, and toxicity-specific intervention was documented in 95%. An EMR-based ROTOX enables consistent recording of treatment toxicity. In a uniform sample of patients, local population toxicity benchmarks can be developed, and clinic response can be tracked.

  19. Personalized Risk Prediction in Clinical Oncology Research: Applications and Practical Issues Using Survival Trees and Random Forests.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chen; Steingrimsson, Jon Arni

    2018-01-01

    A crucial component of making individualized treatment decisions is to accurately predict each patient's disease risk. In clinical oncology, disease risks are often measured through time-to-event data, such as overall survival and progression/recurrence-free survival, and are often subject to censoring. Risk prediction models based on recursive partitioning methods are becoming increasingly popular largely due to their ability to handle nonlinear relationships, higher-order interactions, and/or high-dimensional covariates. The most popular recursive partitioning methods are versions of the Classification and Regression Tree (CART) algorithm, which builds a simple interpretable tree structured model. With the aim of increasing prediction accuracy, the random forest algorithm averages multiple CART trees, creating a flexible risk prediction model. Risk prediction models used in clinical oncology commonly use both traditional demographic and tumor pathological factors as well as high-dimensional genetic markers and treatment parameters from multimodality treatments. In this article, we describe the most commonly used extensions of the CART and random forest algorithms to right-censored outcomes. We focus on how they differ from the methods for noncensored outcomes, and how the different splitting rules and methods for cost-complexity pruning impact these algorithms. We demonstrate these algorithms by analyzing a randomized Phase III clinical trial of breast cancer. We also conduct Monte Carlo simulations to compare the prediction accuracy of survival forests with more commonly used regression models under various scenarios. These simulation studies aim to evaluate how sensitive the prediction accuracy is to the underlying model specifications, the choice of tuning parameters, and the degrees of missing covariates.

  20. Quantitative PET/CT scanner performance characterization based upon the society of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging clinical trials network oncology clinical simulator phantom.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, John J; Christian, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Trials Network (CTN) of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) operates a PET/CT phantom imaging program using the CTN's oncology clinical simulator phantom, designed to validate scanners at sites that wish to participate in oncology clinical trials. Since its inception in 2008, the CTN has collected 406 well-characterized phantom datasets from 237 scanners at 170 imaging sites covering the spectrum of commercially available PET/CT systems. The combined and collated phantom data describe a global profile of quantitative performance and variability of PET/CT data used in both clinical practice and clinical trials. Individual sites filled and imaged the CTN oncology PET phantom according to detailed instructions. Standard clinical reconstructions were requested and submitted. The phantom itself contains uniform regions suitable for scanner calibration assessment, lung fields, and 6 hot spheric lesions with diameters ranging from 7 to 20 mm at a 4:1 contrast ratio with primary background. The CTN Phantom Imaging Core evaluated the quality of the phantom fill and imaging and measured background standardized uptake values to assess scanner calibration and maximum standardized uptake values of all 6 lesions to review quantitative performance. Scanner make-and-model-specific measurements were pooled and then subdivided by reconstruction to create scanner-specific quantitative profiles. Different makes and models of scanners predictably demonstrated different quantitative performance profiles including, in some cases, small calibration bias. Differences in site-specific reconstruction parameters increased the quantitative variability among similar scanners, with postreconstruction smoothing filters being the most influential parameter. Quantitative assessment of this intrascanner variability over this large collection of phantom data gives, for the first time, estimates of reconstruction variance introduced into trials from allowing

  1. The European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale in daily practice: a single institution, real-life experience at the Medical University of Vienna.

    PubMed

    Kiesewetter, Barbara; Raderer, Markus; Steger, Günther G; Bartsch, Rupert; Pirker, Robert; Zöchbauer-Müller, Sabine; Prager, Gerald; Krainer, Michael; Preusser, Matthias; Schmidinger, Manuela; Zielinski, Christoph C

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (MCBS) has been designed to stratify the therapeutic benefit of a certain drug registered for the treatment of cancer. However, though internally validated, this tool has not yet been evaluated for its feasibility in the daily practice of a major center of medical oncology. The practicability of the MCBS for advanced oncological diseases at the Clinical Division of Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, which constitutes one of the largest oncological centres in Europe, was analysed in a three-step approach. First, retrospectively collected data were analysed to gain an overview of treatments in regular use. Second, data were scored by using the MCBS. Third, the ensuing results were evaluated within corresponding programme directorships to assess feasibility in a real-life clinical context. In the majority of tumour entities, the MCBS results reported earlier are consistent with daily clinical practice. Thus, in metastatic breast cancer or advanced lung cancer, there was a high level of clinical benefit for first-line treatment standards, and these results reflected well real-life experience. However, analyses based on the first version of the MCBS are limited if it comes to salvage treatment in tumour entities in which optimal sequencing of potential treatment options is of major importance, as in metastatic colorectal or renal cell cancer. In contrast to this, it is remarkable that certain novel therapies such as nivolumab assessed for heavily pretreated advanced renal cancer reached the highest level of clinical benefit due to prolongation in survival and a favourable toxicity profile. The MCBS clearly underlines the potential benefit of these compounds. The MCBS is an excellent tool for daily clinical practice of a tertiary referral centre. It supports treatment decisions based on the clinical benefit to be expected from a novel approach such as immunotherapy in as yet

  2. The comparative oncologic effectiveness of available management strategies for clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Mark D; Penson, David F; Resnick, Matthew J

    2017-02-01

    The primary goal of modern prostate cancer treatment paradigms is to optimize the balance of predicted benefits associated with prostate cancer treatment against the predicted harms of therapy. However, given the limitations in the existing evidence as well as the significant tradeoffs posed by each treatment, there remain myriad challenges associated with individualized prostate cancer treatment decision-making. In this review, we summarize the existing comparative effectiveness evidence of treatments for localized prostate cancer with an emphasis on oncologic control. While we focus on the major treatment categories of radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, and observation, we also provide a review of emerging therapies such as cryotherapy and high-intensity frequency ultrasound (HIFU). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer 2017.

    PubMed

    Aljubran, Ali; Abusamra, Ashraf; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Rabah, Danny; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alkushi, Hussain; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Alharbi, Hulayel; Eltijani, Amin; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alsharm, Abdullah; Ahmad, Imran; Murshid, Esam

    2018-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation and medical and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7 th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence levels based on a comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Local factors, such as availability, logistic feasibility, and familiarity of various treatment modalities, have been taken into consideration. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health-care policymakers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

  4. Comparing oncology clinical programs by use of innovative designs and expected net present value optimization: Which adaptive approach leads to the best result?

    PubMed

    Parke, Tom; Marchenko, Olga; Anisimov, Vladimir; Ivanova, Anastasia; Jennison, Christopher; Perevozskaya, Inna; Song, Guochen

    2017-01-01

    Designing an oncology clinical program is more challenging than designing a single study. The standard approaches have been proven to be not very successful during the last decade; the failure rate of Phase 2 and Phase 3 trials in oncology remains high. Improving a development strategy by applying innovative statistical methods is one of the major objectives of a drug development process. The oncology sub-team on Adaptive Program under the Drug Information Association Adaptive Design Scientific Working Group (DIA ADSWG) evaluated hypothetical oncology programs with two competing treatments and published the work in the Therapeutic Innovation and Regulatory Science journal in January 2014. Five oncology development programs based on different Phase 2 designs, including adaptive designs and a standard two parallel arm Phase 3 design were simulated and compared in terms of the probability of clinical program success and expected net present value (eNPV). In this article, we consider eight Phase2/Phase3 development programs based on selected combinations of five Phase 2 study designs and three Phase 3 study designs. We again used the probability of program success and eNPV to compare simulated programs. For the development strategies, we considered that the eNPV showed robust improvement for each successive strategy, with the highest being for a three-arm response adaptive randomization design in Phase 2 and a group sequential design with 5 analyses in Phase 3.

  5. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Anna; De Angelis, Carmine; Lambertini, Matteo; Cremolini, Chiara; Imbimbo, Martina; Berardi, Rossana; Di Maio, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; La Verde, Nicla

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs. Methods A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction. Results Three-hundred and eleven (57%) out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72%) participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49%) declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79%) of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%). Overall, 246 residents (79%) gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools. Conclusions The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the

  6. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Anna; Ghidini, Michele; De Angelis, Carmine; Lambertini, Matteo; Cremolini, Chiara; Imbimbo, Martina; Berardi, Rossana; Di Maio, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; La Verde, Nicla

    2016-01-01

    Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs. A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction. Three-hundred and eleven (57%) out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72%) participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49%) declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79%) of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%). Overall, 246 residents (79%) gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools. The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the access to research opportunity are needed; the perception

  7. [Tongue, trachea, abdominal wall, uterus, and penis allografts. More details on some other clinical applications of vascularized composite tissue allotransplantation].

    PubMed

    Petit, F

    2007-10-01

    The first hand and face allografts opened a new era in medicine history: a time when allotransplantation and reconstructive surgery coupled their principles. Their success and their development made composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA) a clinical reality for our speciality. Although still recent and limited, experience from this new surgical practice will widen with feedback from the first clinical cases and with experience gained from more clinical cases, more anatomical areas, more type of allografts, more surgical techniques, more immunosuppressive regimens. Tongue, trachea, abdominal wall, uterus, penis allotransplantations have been performed, contemporarily. Whatever the future and the benefits for the selected patients might have been, reports from these - un- and misknown - cases contribute to a better knowledge of CTA, its therapeutic potential, its limits, its challenges.

  8. Cultivating Interest in Oncology Through a Medical Student Oncology Society.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ankit; Shah, Aishwarya; Byler, Shannon; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this descriptive analysis is to describe a formal method to foster interest in oncology among medical students through a Student Oncology Society (SOS). The SOS is a student-run multidisciplinary interest group that offers oncology-related events to interested medical students at the Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). We employed a student survey to document the impact of the SOS on student interest in careers in oncology and students' perceived accessibility of mentors in oncology at our institution. All 35 students who attended the event reported that they found the discussion panels "valuable" or "somewhat valuable." A minority of students reported that student and faculty were "somewhat accessible" or "very accessible." At the end of the survey, 37 % of the students reported that a discussion of career paths of various physicians or a student/resident panel on oncology would be beneficial. By giving students an opportunity to learn about the different medical and surgical specialties within oncology, the SOS is able to cultivate early interest and understanding of the field of oncology among pre-clinical medical students. Further work must be done to connect medical students to faculty mentors in oncology. Although this short report provides a model for other medical schools to begin their own student oncology interest groups, further rigorous evaluation of pre-clinical oncology education initiatives are necessary in order to document their long-term impact on medical education.

  9. Experimental and clinical study of influence of high-frequency electric surgical knives on healing of abdominal incision.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guang-Wei; Wu, Yuan-Zhi; Wang, Xu; Pan, Hua-Xiong; Li, Ping; Du, Wan-Ying; Qi, Zhi; Huang, An; Zhang, Li-Wei; Zhang, Li; Chen, Wen; Liu, Guang-Hua; Xu, Hui; Li, Quan; Yuan, Ai-Hua; He, Xiao-Ping; Mei, Guo-Hua

    2006-07-07

    To study the influence of high-frequency electric surgical knives on healing of abdominal incision. Two hundred and forty white rats were divided into 10(0), 10(2), 10(5), and 10(8) groups and rat models of abdominal operation were induced by using electric surgical knives and common lancets respectively. Then they were respectively given hypodermic injections of normal saline and 0.2 mL quantitative mixture of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a concentration of 10(2), 10(5) and 10(8). On the basis of the animal experiment, 220 patients undergoing abdominal operations (above type II) were randomly allocated into one of following three groups: electric knife (EK, 93 cases), electro-coagulation (EC, 55 cases) and control (72 cases). High-frequency electric surgical knives were used to dissect abdominal tissues and electro-coagulation for hemostasis in EK group. Common lancets and electro-coagulation were applied in EC group. Common lancets and tying silk suture were used in the controls. In all the groups except group 10(0), infection rate of incisional wounds made by electric surgical knives were remarkably higher than that with common lancets. Furthermore, there were significant differences in groups 10(2), 10(5), and 10(8) (P<0.05), but not in group 10(0) (P>0.05) between EK and EC groups. Clinical studies showed a delayed wound healing in 16 cases (17.20%) in EK, 11 cases (16.36%) in EC and 2 cases (2.86%) in the control groups. A significant difference between EK and the control groups (chi2 = 8.57, P<0.01), and between EC and the control groups (chi2 = 5.66, P<0.05) was observed, but not between EK and EC (chi2 = 0.017, P>0.05). High-frequency electric knives may remarkably delay abdominal incision healing. Its application should be minimized so as to reduce the possibility of postoperative complications.

  10. SU-F-P-13: NRG Oncology Medical Physics Manpower Survey Quantifying Support Demands for Multi Institutional Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J; Case Western Reserve University; Boparai, K

    Purpose: A survey was taken by NRG Oncology to assess Full Time Equivalent (FTE) contributions to multi institutional clinical trials by medical physicists.No current quantification of physicists’ efforts in FTE units associated with clinical trials is available. The complexity of multi-institutional trials increases with new technologies and techniques. Proper staffing may directly impact the quality of trial data and outcomes. The demands on physics time supporting clinical trials needs to be assessed. Methods: The NRG Oncology Medical Physicist Subcommittee created a sixteen question survey to obtain this FTE data. IROC Houston distributed the survey to their list of 1802 contactmore » physicists. Results: After three weeks, 363 responded (20.1% response). 187 (51.5%) institutions reporting external beam participation were processed. There was a wide range in number of protocols active and supported at each institution. Of the 187 clinics, 134 (71.7%) participate in 0 to 10 trials, 28 (15%) in 11 to 20 trials, 10 (5.3%) in 21 to 30 trials, 9 (4.8%) had 40 to 75 trials. On average, physicist spent 2.7 hours (SD: 6.0) per week supervising or interacting with clinical trial staff. 1.25 hours (SD: 3.37), 1.83 hours (SD: 4.13), and 0.64 hours(SD: 1.13) per week were spent on patient simulation, reviewing treatment plans, and maintaining a DICOM server, respectively. For all protocol credentialing activities, physicist spent an average of 37.05 hours (SD: 96.94) yearly. To support dosimetrists, clinicians, and therapists, physicist spend on average 2.07 hours (SD: 3.52) per week just reading protocols. Physicist attended clinical trial meetings for on average 1.13 hours (SD: 1.85) per month. Conclusion: Responding physicists spend a nontrivial amount of time: 8.8 hours per week (0.22 FTE) supporting, on average, 9 active multi-institutional clinical trials.« less

  11. Clinical use of organic near-infrared fluorescent contrast agents in image-guided oncologic procedures and its potential in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Favril, Sophie; Abma, Eline; Blasi, Francesco; Stock, Emmelie; Devriendt, Nausikaa; Vanderperren, Katrien; de Rooster, Hilde

    2018-04-28

    One of the major challenges in surgical oncology is the intraoperative discrimination of tumoural versus healthy tissue. Until today, surgeons rely on visual inspection and palpation to define the tumoural margins during surgery and, unfortunately, for various cancer types, the local recurrence rate thus remains unacceptably high. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging is an optical imaging technique that can provide real-time preoperative and intraoperative information after administration of a fluorescent probe that emits NIR light once exposed to a NIR light source. This technique is safe, cost-effective and technically easy. Several NIR fluorescent probes are currently studied for their ability to highlight neoplastic cells. In addition, NIR fluorescence imaging holds great promise for sentinel lymph node mapping. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a literature review of the current organic NIR fluorescent probes tested in the light of human oncology and to introduce fluorescence imaging as a valuable asset in veterinary oncology. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. A nurse-run clinic for patients with incidentally discovered small abdominal aortic aneurysms is feasible and cost-effective.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J L; Clarke, G A; Roake, J A; Lewis, D R

    2015-04-01

    Patients with incidentally discovered small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) require assessment by a vascular surgery department for possible enrollment in a surveillance programme. Our unit implemented a vascular nurse-run AAA clinic in October 2010. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a specialist nurse-run small AAA clinic. Demographic and clinical data were collected prospectively for all patients seen in the new vascular nurse clinic between October 2010 and November 2012. A validated AAA operative mortality score was used to aid decision making by the vascular nurse. Some 250 patients were seen in the clinic. 198 (79.2%) patients were enrolled in surveillance, 40 (16%) declined enrollment and 12 (4.8%) were referred to a consultant clinic for further assessment. The majority of patients were male and the mean age was 73.7 years. Co-morbidities included hypertension, a history of cardiovascular disease, and hyperlipidaemia. The majority of referrals were considered to be low operative risk. No aneurysms ruptured whilst under surveillance. A nurse-run clinic that assesses patients with incidentally discovered small AAAs for inclusion in AAA surveillance is a feasible alternative to assessment of these patients in a consultant-run clinic. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Genetic risk assessment for women with epithelial ovarian cancer: referral patterns and outcomes in a university gynecologic oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    Petzel, Sue V; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Bensend, Tracy; Leininger, Anna; Argenta, Peter A; Geller, Melissa A

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about genetic service utilization and ovarian cancer. We identified the frequency and outcome of genetic counseling referral, predictors of referral, and referral uptake for ovarian cancer patients. Using pathology reports, we identified all epithelial ovarian cancer patients seen in a university gynecologic oncology clinic (1/04-8/06). Electronic medical records (EMR) were used to document genetic service referral, time from diagnosis-to-referral, point-in-treatment at referral, personal/family cancer history, demographics, and genetic test results. Groups were compared using chi-squared and Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables. The study population consisted of 376 women with ovarian cancer, 72 (19 %) of who were referred for genetic counseling/testing, primarily during surveillance. Of those referred, 42 (58 %) had personal or family genetic counseling and 34 (47 %) were ultimately tested or identified due to known family mutation. Family history and prior cancer were associated with referral. Family history, living in a larger community, higher-stage disease, and serous histology were associated with undergoing genetic counseling. Risk assessment identified 20 BRCA1/2 (5.3 %) and 1 HNPCC (0.3 %) mutation carriers. Based on recent estimates that 11.7-16.6 % of women with ovarian cancer are BRCA carriers and 2 % are HNPCC carriers, results suggest under-identification of carriers and under-utilization of genetic services by providers and patients. Interventions to increase medical providers' referrals, even in a specialized oncology clinic, are necessary and may include innovations in educating these providers using web-based methods. Ease of referral by the introduction of an electronic cancer genetic referral form represents another new direction that may increase genetic risk assessment for high-risk women with ovarian cancer.

  14. Heterogeneous Optimization Framework: Reproducible Preprocessing of Multi-Spectral Clinical MRI for Neuro-Oncology Imaging Research.

    PubMed

    Milchenko, Mikhail; Snyder, Abraham Z; LaMontagne, Pamela; Shimony, Joshua S; Benzinger, Tammie L; Fouke, Sarah Jost; Marcus, Daniel S

    2016-07-01

    Neuroimaging research often relies on clinically acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets that can originate from multiple institutions. Such datasets are characterized by high heterogeneity of modalities and variability of sequence parameters. This heterogeneity complicates the automation of image processing tasks such as spatial co-registration and physiological or functional image analysis. Given this heterogeneity, conventional processing workflows developed for research purposes are not optimal for clinical data. In this work, we describe an approach called Heterogeneous Optimization Framework (HOF) for developing image analysis pipelines that can handle the high degree of clinical data non-uniformity. HOF provides a set of guidelines for configuration, algorithm development, deployment, interpretation of results and quality control for such pipelines. At each step, we illustrate the HOF approach using the implementation of an automated pipeline for Multimodal Glioma Analysis (MGA) as an example. The MGA pipeline computes tissue diffusion characteristics of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) acquisitions, hemodynamic characteristics using a perfusion model of susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI, and spatial cross-modal co-registration of available anatomical, physiological and derived patient images. Developing MGA within HOF enabled the processing of neuro-oncology MR imaging studies to be fully automated. MGA has been successfully used to analyze over 160 clinical tumor studies to date within several research projects. Introduction of the MGA pipeline improved image processing throughput and, most importantly, effectively produced co-registered datasets that were suitable for advanced analysis despite high heterogeneity in acquisition protocols.

  15. A screening tool to enhance clinical trial participation at a community center involved in a radiation oncology disparities program.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Julian W; Martz, Elaine; Schenken, Larry L; Rainville, Rebecca; Marlowe, Ursula

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a screening tool to enhance clinical trial participation at a community radiation oncology center involved in a National Cancer Institute-funded disparities program but lacking on-site clinical trials personnel. The screening form was pasted to the front of the charts and filled out for all new patients over the 9-month period of the study, during which time five external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) trials and a patient perception study were open for accrual. Patient consent was obtained by assorted personnel at several different sites. Patients potentially eligible for a trial were identified and approached by one of the clinic staff. Patients who were under- or uninsured, age > 80 years, members of an racial/ethnic minority, or recipients of medical assistance were identified as at risk for health care disparities and were offered patient navigator services. Of 196 patients consulted during the study, 144 were treated with EBRT. Of the 24 patients eligible for EBRT trials, 23 were approached (one had an incomplete screening form), and 15 accepted. Of 77 patients eligible for a patient perception trial, 72 were approached (five had incomplete forms), and 45 accepted. The eligibility and acceptance rates for EBRT trials were similar for disparities and nondisparities patients. Screening was completed for 96 patients (67%). When completed, the screening tool ensured clinical trial accrual. The major factor limiting overall accrual was a shortage of available trials.

  16. A Screening Tool to Enhance Clinical Trial Participation at a Community Center Involved in a Radiation Oncology Disparities Program

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Julian W.; Martz, Elaine; Schenken, Larry L.; Rainville, Rebecca; Marlowe, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of a screening tool to enhance clinical trial participation at a community radiation oncology center involved in a National Cancer Institute–funded disparities program but lacking on-site clinical trials personnel. Patients and Methods: The screening form was pasted to the front of the charts and filled out for all new patients over the 9-month period of the study, during which time five external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) trials and a patient perception study were open for accrual. Patient consent was obtained by assorted personnel at several different sites. Patients potentially eligible for a trial were identified and approached by one of the clinic staff. Patients who were under- or uninsured, age > 80 years, members of an racial/ethnic minority, or recipients of medical assistance were identified as at risk for health care disparities and were offered patient navigator services. Results: Of 196 patients consulted during the study, 144 were treated with EBRT. Of the 24 patients eligible for EBRT trials, 23 were approached (one had an incomplete screening form), and 15 accepted. Of 77 patients eligible for a patient perception trial, 72 were approached (five had incomplete forms), and 45 accepted. The eligibility and acceptance rates for EBRT trials were similar for disparities and nondisparities patients. Screening was completed for 96 patients (67%). Conclusion: When completed, the screening tool ensured clinical trial accrual. The major factor limiting overall accrual was a shortage of available trials. PMID:21886496

  17. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  18. Putting your best foot forward in a challenging role: finding the resources needed to work in a freestanding radiation oncology clinic.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kelly L; Bruce, Susan D

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of a nurse in a new role in a freestanding radiation oncology clinic. Networking to find the resources that patients need and providing guidance to the patients in using the resources through their course of treatment are discussed. Local and national resources that can be used as tools in radiation therapy nursing also are described.

  19. Intestinal obstruction management in patients with advanced abdominal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Simion, L; Straja, Nd; Alecu, M; Poroch, V; Moşoiu, D; Panti, C; Grigorean, V; Brătucu, E

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the difficulties encountered in the diagnostic process and treatment of intestinal obstruction developed by patients with advanced abdominal neoplasia. This unicentric and retrospective study evaluates patients suffering from intestinal occlusion operated on at the First Surgical Clinic of the Oncology Institute in Bucharest, over a period of 4 years (2010 - 2013). Of these, 61 cases in which the occlusion occurred on the background of an advanced abdominal neoplasia were selected. We considered as advanced those cases of abdominal cancer where curative oncologic treatment is no longer possible due to the evolution stage. The random selection of the study period, the introduction of all the patients identified with this type of pathology, as well as the concentration of advanced abdominal neoplasia at the Oncology Institute in Bucharest are the elements that allow us to state that the results of this study are representative. Particularities related to the clinical aspects of the intestinal occlusion in these patients, as well as difficulties in establishing the correct diagnosis were encountered.Surgical cure of the occlusion, with palliative aim of course,was possible in only 47 cases (representing 77.05%). A standard treatment course cannot be devised for this type of patients. Palliative care, indispensable in cases of advanced neoplastic disease, remains the sole therapeutic method available for patients with no surgical cure for the obstruction. The main objective, for the entire study lot, was to ensure an as high as possible quality of life,a factor we must bear in mind as often as possible when choosing a surgical solution. Of course, when surgical treatment can be applied, overcoming the occlusive episode prolongs these patients' life and can even allow for other courses of complementary treatment to be undertaken. Celsius.

  20. The National Cancer Institute–American Society of Clinical Oncology Cancer Trial Accrual Symposium: Summary and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Denicoff, Andrea M.; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Grubbs, Stephen S.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Comis, Robert L.; Devine, Peggy; Dilts, David M.; Duff, Michelle E.; Ford, Jean G.; Joffe, Steven; Schapira, Lidia; Weinfurt, Kevin P.; Michaels, Margo; Raghavan, Derek; Richmond, Ellen S.; Zon, Robin; Albrecht, Terrance L.; Bookman, Michael A.; Dowlati, Afshin; Enos, Rebecca A.; Fouad, Mona N.; Good, Marjorie; Hicks, William J.; Loehrer, Patrick J.; Lyss, Alan P.; Wolff, Steven N.; Wujcik, Debra M.; Meropol, Neal J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Many challenges to clinical trial accrual exist, resulting in studies with inadequate enrollment and potentially delaying answers to important scientific and clinical questions. Methods: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) cosponsored the Cancer Trial Accrual Symposium: Science and Solutions on April 29-30, 2010 to examine the state of accrual science related to patient/community, physician/provider, and site/organizational influences, and identify new interventions to facilitate clinical trial enrollment. The symposium featured breakout sessions, plenary sessions, and a poster session including 100 abstracts. Among the 358 attendees were clinical investigators, researchers of accrual strategies, research administrators, nurses, research coordinators, patient advocates, and educators. A bibliography of the accrual literature in these three major areas was provided to participants in advance of the meeting. After the symposium, the literature in these areas was revisited to determine if the symposium recommendations remained relevant within the context of the current literature. Results: Few rigorously conducted studies have tested interventions to address challenges to clinical trials accrual. Attendees developed recommendations for improving accrual and identified priority areas for future accrual research at the patient/community, physician/provider, and site/organizational levels. Current literature continues to support the symposium recommendations. Conclusions: A combination of approaches addressing both the multifactorial nature of accrual challenges and the characteristics of the target population may be needed to improve accrual to cancer clinical trials. Recommendations for best practices and for future research developed from the symposium are provided. PMID:24130252

  1. A Bayesian Dose-finding Design for Oncology Clinical Trials of Combinational Biological Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chunyan; Yuan, Ying; Ji, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Treating patients with novel biological agents is becoming a leading trend in oncology. Unlike cytotoxic agents, for which efficacy and toxicity monotonically increase with dose, biological agents may exhibit non-monotonic patterns in their dose-response relationships. Using a trial with two biological agents as an example, we propose a dose-finding design to identify the biologically optimal dose combination (BODC), which is defined as the dose combination of the two agents with the highest efficacy and tolerable toxicity. A change-point model is used to reflect the fact that the dose-toxicity surface of the combinational agents may plateau at higher dose levels, and a flexible logistic model is proposed to accommodate the possible non-monotonic pattern for the dose-efficacy relationship. During the trial, we continuously update the posterior estimates of toxicity and efficacy and assign patients to the most appropriate dose combination. We propose a novel dose-finding algorithm to encourage sufficient exploration of untried dose combinations in the two-dimensional space. Extensive simulation studies show that the proposed design has desirable operating characteristics in identifying the BODC under various patterns of dose-toxicity and dose-efficacy relationships. PMID:24511160

  2. [Application of low-power visible and near infrared radiation in clinical oncology].

    PubMed

    Zimin, A A; Zhevago, N A; Buĭniakova, A I; Samoĭlova, K A

    2009-01-01

    Although low-power visible (VIS) and near infrared (nIR) radiation emitted from lasers, photodiodes, and other sources does not cause neoplastic transformation of the tissue, these phototherapeutic techniques are looked at with a great deal of caution for fear of their stimulatory effect on tumour growth. This apprehension arises in the first place from the reports on the possibility that the proliferative activity of tumour cells may increase after their in vitro exposure to light. Much less is known that these phototherapeutic modalities have been successfully used for the prevention and management of complications developing after surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy. The objective of the present review is to summarize the results of applications of low-power visible and near infrared radiation for the treatment of patients with oncological diseases during the last 20-25 years. It should be emphasized that 2-4 year-long follow-up observations have not revealed any increase in the frequency of tumour recurrence and metastasis.

  3. Neuro-Oncology Branch Appointment - what happens at the clinical center | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    What Happens When I Get To The Clinical Center at NIH? 1. Visit the Admissions Department Registering is the first step to being evaluated by the Brain Tumor Clinic. Visit Admissions to get registered as a patient. They will ask you for your contact information and provide you with a patient identification number. 2. Proceed to the NOB Clinic Proceed to the Brain Tumor Clinic

  4. Neuro-Oncology Branch Appointment - what happens at the clinical center | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    What Happens When I Get To The Clinical Center at NIH? 1. Visit the Admissions Department Registering is the first step to being evaluated by the Brain Tumor Clinic. Visit Admissions to get registered as a patient. They will ask you for your contact information and provide you with a patient identification number. 2. Proceed to the NOB Clinic Proceed to the Brain Tumor Clinic on the 13th floor.

  5. [Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of blunt abdominal trauma in patients undergoing surgery at the General Hospital of National Reference of N'Djamena, Chad: about 49 cases].

    PubMed

    Choua, Ouchemi; Rimtebaye, Kimassoum; Yamingue, Ngueidjo; Moussa, Kalli; Kaboro, Mignagnal

    2017-01-01

    Blunt abdominal traumas are common. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 49 patients with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent surgery at the General Hospital of National Reference of N'Djamena, Chad over a period of 5 years. Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic parameters of patients were studied. The study included 42 men and 7 women, mean age 21.3 years. The causes of blunt abdominal traumas were: road traffic accidents in 61.2% of cases; wall collapses (14.3%); assaults (8.2%). Blunt abdominal traumas were more frequent in August (14.28%) and October (16.32%). The waiting time for admission in hospital was 6-12h in 43% of cases. At discharge, wounded patients used private car in 85.7% of cases. Clinically, patients were often hemodynamically stable (55.1%). Medical imaging was dominated by direct radiography of the abdomen (57.1%). The most observed lesions were those located only in the small intestine (16.32%) or related to that of the bladder (8.16%) and spleen (2.04%). Laparotomy was negative in 6.12% of cases. Morbidity (12.2%) was dominated by abdominal wall abscess. Mortality rate was 6.1%. Road traffic accidents are the leading cause of blunt abdominal traumas. It is important to minimize delays in diagnosis, and treatment. Road safety measures should be implemented to prevent accidents.

  6. Posterior trunk reconstruction with the dorsal intercostal artery perforator based flap: Clinical experience on 20 consecutive oncological cases.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Beniamino; Tenna, Stefania; Aveta, Achille; Poccia, Igor; Segreto, Francesco; Cerbone, Vincenzo; Persichetti, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Few studies in the recent literature have investigated the reliability of dorsal intercostal artery perforator (DICAP) flap in posterior trunk reconstruction. The purpose of this report is to describe our clinical experience with the use of DICAP flaps in a cohort of oncological patients. Twenty patients underwent posterior trunk reconstruction with DICAP based flaps. Patients age ranged from 45 to 76 years. All defects resulted from skin cancer ablation. Defect sizes ranged from 4 × 4 to 6 × 8 cm. The flaps were mobilized in V-Y or propeller fashion. The flaps were islanded on 1 (12 cases), 2 (6 cases), or 3 (2 cases) perforators. Donor sites were always closed primarily. Eleven V-Y advancement flaps were performed; one of these was converted to a perforator-plus peninsular flap design, which retained an additional source of blood supply from the opposite skin bridge. Nine flaps were mobilized in propeller fashion. Flap dimensions ranged from 4 × 6 to 6 × 14 cm. Mean operative time was 70 min. One V-Y flap complicated with marginal necrosis that healed with no need for reintervention. All the other flaps survived uneventfully. No other complications were observed at recipient and donor sites. Follow-up ranged from 3 months to 2 years. All the patients were satisfied with the surgical outcome. DICAP based flaps proved to be a reliable option to resurface posterior trunk defects following oncological resection, allowing to achieve like-with-like reconstruction with excellent contour and minimal donor-site morbidity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 36:546-551, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p < .001) and the importance of receiving dental care (p < .001) were significant factors in relation to self-rated dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts. © 2013 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Use of Bayesian Decision Analysis to Minimize Harm in Patient-Centered Randomized Clinical Trials in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Montazerhodjat, Vahid; Chaudhuri, Shomesh E.; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) currently apply the same statistical threshold of alpha = 2.5% for controlling for false-positive results or type 1 error, regardless of the burden of disease or patient preferences. Is there an objective and systematic framework for designing RCTs that incorporates these considerations on a case-by-case basis? Objective To apply Bayesian decision analysis (BDA) to cancer therapeutics to choose an alpha and sample size that minimize the potential harm to current and future patients under both null and alternative hypotheses. Data Sources We used the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database and data from the 10 clinical trials of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. Study Selection The NCI SEER database was used because it is the most comprehensive cancer database in the United States. The Alliance trial data was used owing to the quality and breadth of data, and because of the expertise in these trials of one of us (D.J.S.). Data Extraction and Synthesis The NCI SEER and Alliance data have already been thoroughly vetted. Computations were replicated independently by 2 coauthors and reviewed by all coauthors. Main Outcomes and Measures Our prior hypothesis was that an alpha of 2.5% would not minimize the overall expected harm to current and future patients for the most deadly cancers, and that a less conservative alpha may be necessary. Our primary study outcomes involve measuring the potential harm to patients under both null and alternative hypotheses using NCI and Alliance data, and then computing BDA-optimal type 1 error rates and sample sizes for oncology RCTs. Results We computed BDA-optimal parameters for the 23 most common cancer sites using NCI data, and for the 10 Alliance clinical trials. For RCTs involving therapies for cancers with short survival times, no existing treatments, and low prevalence, the BDA-optimal type 1 error rates were much

  9. Use of Bayesian Decision Analysis to Minimize Harm in Patient-Centered Randomized Clinical Trials in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Montazerhodjat, Vahid; Chaudhuri, Shomesh E; Sargent, Daniel J; Lo, Andrew W

    2017-09-14

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) currently apply the same statistical threshold of alpha = 2.5% for controlling for false-positive results or type 1 error, regardless of the burden of disease or patient preferences. Is there an objective and systematic framework for designing RCTs that incorporates these considerations on a case-by-case basis? To apply Bayesian decision analysis (BDA) to cancer therapeutics to choose an alpha and sample size that minimize the potential harm to current and future patients under both null and alternative hypotheses. We used the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database and data from the 10 clinical trials of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. The NCI SEER database was used because it is the most comprehensive cancer database in the United States. The Alliance trial data was used owing to the quality and breadth of data, and because of the expertise in these trials of one of us (D.J.S.). The NCI SEER and Alliance data have already been thoroughly vetted. Computations were replicated independently by 2 coauthors and reviewed by all coauthors. Our prior hypothesis was that an alpha of 2.5% would not minimize the overall expected harm to current and future patients for the most deadly cancers, and that a less conservative alpha may be necessary. Our primary study outcomes involve measuring the potential harm to patients under both null and alternative hypotheses using NCI and Alliance data, and then computing BDA-optimal type 1 error rates and sample sizes for oncology RCTs. We computed BDA-optimal parameters for the 23 most common cancer sites using NCI data, and for the 10 Alliance clinical trials. For RCTs involving therapies for cancers with short survival times, no existing treatments, and low prevalence, the BDA-optimal type 1 error rates were much higher than the traditional 2.5%. For cancers with longer survival times, existing treatments, and high prevalence, the

  10. Anesthesia Practice in Pediatric Radiation Oncology: Mayo Clinic Arizona's Experience 2014-2016.

    PubMed

    Khurmi, Narjeet; Patel, Perene; Koushik, Sarang; Daniels, Thomas; Kraus, Molly

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the goals of targeted radiation therapy in pediatrics is critical to developing high quality and safe anesthetic plans in this patient population. An ideal anesthetic plan includes allaying anxiety and achieving optimal immobilization, while ensuring rapid and efficient recovery. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children receiving anesthesia for radiation oncology procedures from 1/1/2014 to 7/31/2016. No anesthetics were excluded from the analysis. The electronic anesthesia records were analyzed for perianesthetic complications along with efficiency data. To compare our results to past and current data, we identified relevant medical literature covering a period from 1984-2017. A total of 997 anesthetic procedures were delivered in 58 unique patients. The vast majority of anesthetics were single-agent anesthesia with propofol. The average duration of radiation treatment was 13.24 min. The average duration of anesthesia was 37.81 min, and the average duration to meet discharge criteria in the recovery room was 29.50 min. There were seven instances of perianesthetic complications (0.7%) and no complications noted for the 80 CT simulations. Two of the seven complications occurred in patients receiving total body irradiation. The 5-year survival rate for pediatric cancers has improved greatly in part due to more effective and targeted radiation therapy. Providing an anesthetic with minimal complications is critical for successful daily radiation treatment. The results of our data analysis corroborate other contemporary studies showing minimal risk to patients undergoing radiation therapy under general anesthesia with propofol. Our data reveal that single-agent anesthesia with propofol administered by a dedicated anesthesia team is safe and efficient and should be considered for patients requiring multiple radiation treatments under anesthesia.

  11. American Society of Clinical Oncology Obesity Initiative: Rationale, Progress, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Wollins, Dana

    2016-12-10

    Obesity is increasingly being linked to the risk of developing and dying from cancer. In recognition of the growing contribution of obesity to cancer risk and outcomes, ASCO made obesity and cancer one of its core initiatives in 2014. The goals of this initiative included raising awareness of the relationship between obesity and cancer, providing tools and resources to oncology providers and patients to help encourage conversations regarding weight management in cancer survivors, fostering a robust research agenda, and advocating for access to evidence-based weight management programs for cancer survivors. Efforts to date have included developing patient and provider toolkits focused on weight management and physical activity, publishing a policy statement outlining ASCO's initiatives in this area, and hosting a summit focused on obesity research in cancer populations. As ASCO has defined its priorities in the area of obesity and cancer, it has become increasingly clear that obesity is a problem that extends far beyond its impact on cancer risk and outcomes. Many groups, including those focused on heart disease, diabetes, and endocrinology, have been developing, testing, and implementing obesity prevention and treatment strategies for years. As ASCO moves forward with its obesity initiative, the next steps will focus on forging collaboration with groups working on obesity-related initiatives both within and outside of the field of cancer to learn from their efforts and to partner with them on efforts to increase the education of medical professionals; raising awareness in lay populations regarding the negative health consequences of obesity and effective strategies to foster weight loss; developing collaborative research initiatives; and working together to advocate for the societal changes that will be needed to combat the obesity epidemic in the United States and beyond.

  12. A peer review process as part of the implementation of clinical pathways in radiation oncology: Does it improve compliance?

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Brian J; Heron, Dwight E; Beriwal, Sushil

    Clinical pathways are patient management plans that standardize evidence-based practices to ensure high-quality and cost-effective medical care. Implementation of a pathway is a collaborative process in our network, requiring the active involvement of physicians. This approach promotes acceptance of pathway recommendations, although a peer review process is necessary to ensure compliance and to capture and approve off-pathway selections. We investigated the peer review process and factors associated with time to completion of peer review. Our cancer center implemented radiation oncology pathways for every disease site throughout a large, integrated network. Recommendations are written based upon national guidelines, published literature, and institutional experience with evidence evaluated hierarchically in order of efficacy, toxicity, and then cost. Physicians enter decisions into an online, menu-driven decision support tool that integrates with medical records. Data were collected from the support tool and included the rate of on- and off-pathway selections, peer review decisions performed by disease site directors, and time to complete peer review. A total of 6965 treatment decisions were entered in 2015, and 605 (8.7%) were made off-pathway and were subject to peer review. The median time to peer review decision was 2 days (interquartile range, 0.2-6.8). Factors associated with time to peer review decision >48 hours on univariate analysis include disease site (P < .0001) with a trend toward significance (P = .066) for radiation therapy modality. There was no difference between recurrent and non-recurrent disease (P = .267). Multivariable analysis revealed disease site was associated with time to peer review (P < .001), with lymphoma and skin/sarcoma most strongly influencing decision time >48 hours. Clinical pathways are an integral tool for standardizing evidence-based care throughout our large, integrated network, with 91.3% of all treatment decisions being

  13. Ultrasound imaging transducer motion during clinical maneuvers: respiration, active straight leg raise test and abdominal drawing in.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Jackie L; Warner, Martin B; Stokes, Maria J

    2010-08-01

    Clinical use of ultrasound imaging by physiotherapists is increasing; however, the clinical setting may be problematic due to variability inherent in the environment. As transducer motion interferes with accurate measurement, this study aimed to measure handheld transducer motion, relative to the pelvis, during a clinical simulation involving typical maneuvers employed in a physiotherapy assessment of the lumbopelvic region. Transducer motion about three axes and through one plane was measured (Vicon, Oxford, UK) on 12 participants during three clinical maneuvers at four abdominal imaging sites. Data were grouped and means used to determine discrepancies in transducer and pelvic motion for each imaging site/maneuver combination. None of the conditions produced large transducer motions relative to the pelvis and all findings were within previously established guidelines for acceptable amounts of transducer motion. These findings suggest that an ultrasound transducer can be held relatively stationary in a clinical setting, for the maneuvers tested. Copyright 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Business Case for Provider Participation in Clinical Trials Research: An Application to the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    Song, Paula H.; Reiter, Kristin L.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-01-01

    Background Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. Purpose This study explores whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. Methodology/Approach We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program, a longstanding federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. Findings We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis, and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. Practice Implications As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally-funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research. PMID:23044836

  15. The business case for provider participation in clinical trials research: an application to the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program.

    PubMed

    Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L; Weiner, Bryan J; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2013-01-01

    Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. The aim of this study was to explore whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program, a long-standing federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semistructured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research.

  16. The Development of Delta: Using Agile to Develop a Decision Aid for Pediatric Oncology Clinical Trial Enrollment.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Eden G; Wakefield, Claire E; Cohn, Richard J; O'Brien, Tracey; Ziegler, David S; Fardell, Joanna E

    2018-05-04

    The internet is increasingly being used to disseminate health information. Given the complexity of pediatric oncology clinical trials, we developed Delta, a Web-based decision aid to support families deciding whether or not to enroll their child with cancer in a clinical trial. This paper details the Agile development process of Delta and user testing results of Delta. Development was iterative and involved 5 main stages: a requirements analysis, planning, design, development, and user testing. For user testing, we conducted 13 eye-tracking analyses and think-aloud interviews with health care professionals (n=6) and parents (n=7). Results suggested that there was minimal rereading of content and a high level of engagement in content. However, there were some navigational problems. Participants reported high acceptability (12/13) and high usability of the website (8/13). Delta demonstrates the utility for the use of Agile in the development of a Web-based decision aid for health purposes. Our study provides a clear step-by-step guide to develop a Web-based psychosocial tool within the health setting. ©Eden G Robertson, Claire E Wakefield, Richard J Cohn, Tracey O'Brien, David S Ziegler, Joanna E Fardell. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 04.05.2018.

  17. Computer-assisted bar-coding system significantly reduces clinical laboratory specimen identification errors in a pediatric oncology hospital.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Randall T; Patterson, Donna J; Jay, Dennis W; Cross, Carl; Dotson, Pamela; Possel, Robert E; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Mirro, Joseph; Shenep, Jerry L

    2008-02-01

    To assess the ability of a bar code-based electronic positive patient and specimen identification (EPPID) system to reduce identification errors in a pediatric hospital's clinical laboratory. An EPPID system was implemented at a pediatric oncology hospital to reduce errors in patient and laboratory specimen identification. The EPPID system included bar-code identifiers and handheld personal digital assistants supporting real-time order verification. System efficacy was measured in 3 consecutive 12-month time frames, corresponding to periods before, during, and immediately after full EPPID implementation. A significant reduction in the median percentage of mislabeled specimens was observed in the 3-year study period. A decline from 0.03% to 0.005% (P < .001) was observed in the 12 months after full system implementation. On the basis of the pre-intervention detected error rate, it was estimated that EPPID prevented at least 62 mislabeling events during its first year of operation. EPPID decreased the rate of misidentification of clinical laboratory samples. The diminution of errors observed in this study provides support for the development of national guidelines for the use of bar coding for laboratory specimens, paralleling recent recommendations for medication administration.

  18. Clinical Oncology Society of Australia position statement on the use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Braun, Lesley; Harris, Jessica; Katris, Paul; Cain, Michael; Dhillon, Haryana; Koczwara, Bogda; Olver, Ian; Robotin, Monica

    2014-12-01

    Health professionals involved in the clinical management of cancer are becoming increasingly aware that their patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). As cancer incidence and survival rates increase, use of CAM is also likely to increase. This paper outlines the position of the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) on the use of CAM by cancer patients and provides guidance for health professionals involved with the treatment of cancer patients who are using or wish to use CAM. Key definitions and common communication scenarios are presented along with evidence-based recommended steps for health professionals when discussing CAM use. COSA encourages health professionals to focus on open discussion with their patients regarding CAM, to become familiar with reputable resources for CAM information, to discuss with patients the concept of evidence-based medicine, to recognize limitations to their knowledge of CAM and seek further advice when necessary, and to be respectful of the patients' right to autonomy. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-03-10

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number-one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include electronic cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or former smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the health of the public; however, definitive data are lacking. The AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the US Food and Drug Administration and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. This policy statement was developed by a joint writing group composed of members from the Tobacco and Cancer Subcommittee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Science Policy and Government Affairs (SPGA) Committee and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Tobacco Cessation and Control

  20. Abdominal Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Deborah; Weilitz, Pamela Becker

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints by patients, and assessment of abdominal pain and associated symptoms can be challenging for home healthcare providers. Reasons for abdominal pain are related to inflammation, organ distention, and ischemia. The history and physical examination are important to narrow the source of acute or chronic problems, identify immediate interventions, and when necessary, facilitate emergency department care.

  1. Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Adjuvant Systemic Therapy for Women With Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lyndsay N; Ismaila, Nofisat; McShane, Lisa M; Andre, Fabrice; Collyar, Deborah E; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M; Hammond, Elizabeth H; Kuderer, Nicole M; Liu, Minetta C; Mennel, Robert G; Van Poznak, Catherine; Bast, Robert C; Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-04-01

    To provide recommendations on appropriate use of breast tumor biomarker assay results to guide decisions on adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. A literature search and prospectively defined study selection sought systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, prospective-retrospective studies, and prospective comparative observational studies published from 2006 through 2014. Outcomes of interest included overall survival and disease-free or recurrence-free survival. Expert panel members used informal consensus to develop evidence-based guideline recommendations. The literature search identified 50 relevant studies. One randomized clinical trial and 18 prospective-retrospective studies were found to have evaluated the clinical utility, as defined by the guideline, of specific biomarkers for guiding decisions on the need for adjuvant systemic therapy. No studies that met guideline criteria for clinical utility were found to guide choice of specific treatments or regimens. In addition to estrogen and progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, the panel found sufficient evidence of clinical utility for the biomarker assays Oncotype DX, EndoPredict, PAM50, Breast Cancer Index, and urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in specific subgroups of breast cancer. No biomarker except for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 was found to guide choices of specific treatment regimens. Treatment decisions should also consider disease stage, comorbidities, and patient preferences. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Cardiovascular Risk and Level of Statin Use Among Women With Breast Cancer in a Cardio-Oncology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Shum, Kelly; Solivan, Amber; Parto, Parham; Polin, Nichole; Jahangir, Eiman

    2016-01-01

    Because of the improvements in survival rates, patients with breast cancer are now more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than from cancer. Thus, providing appropriate preventive cardiovascular care to patients with cancer is of the utmost importance. We retrospectively compared the cardiovascular risk and management of 146 women treated at the Cardio-Oncology (Cardio-Onc) and the Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob-Gyn) clinics. We calculated cardiovascular risk using the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk calculator and the Framingham Risk Score Calculator. We also determined the prevalence of appropriate statin use according to both the 2013 ACC/AHA and the 2002 Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III lipid guidelines. The 10-year ASCVD risk score was not significantly different between the 2 cohorts. More patients in the Ob-Gyn cohort with an ASCVD risk score >7.5% were already appropriately on statins compared to patients in the Cardio-Onc cohort (60.9% vs 31.0%, respectively, P=0.003), but after the first Cardio-Onc visit, 4 additional patients with breast cancer were prescribed statins (44.8% total). Fourteen (19.2%) Cardio-Onc patients had a high Framingham Risk Score compared to 6 (8.2%) Ob-Gyn patients. We demonstrated that the ASCVD risk is similar between women with breast cancer attending the Cardio-Onc clinic and the women without breast cancer attending the Ob-Gyn clinic, but the Cardio-Onc cohort had significantly more patients with a high Framingham Risk Score. Both clinics had similarly poor rates of appropriate statin prescribing rates according to the ATP III guidelines.

  3. Cardiovascular Risk and Level of Statin Use Among Women With Breast Cancer in a Cardio-Oncology Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Kelly; Solivan, Amber; Parto, Parham; Polin, Nichole; Jahangir, Eiman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Because of the improvements in survival rates, patients with breast cancer are now more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than from cancer. Thus, providing appropriate preventive cardiovascular care to patients with cancer is of the utmost importance. Methods: We retrospectively compared the cardiovascular risk and management of 146 women treated at the Cardio-Oncology (Cardio-Onc) and the Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob-Gyn) clinics. We calculated cardiovascular risk using the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk calculator and the Framingham Risk Score Calculator. We also determined the prevalence of appropriate statin use according to both the 2013 ACC/AHA and the 2002 Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III lipid guidelines. Results: The 10-year ASCVD risk score was not significantly different between the 2 cohorts. More patients in the Ob-Gyn cohort with an ASCVD risk score >7.5% were already appropriately on statins compared to patients in the Cardio-Onc cohort (60.9% vs 31.0%, respectively, P=0.003), but after the first Cardio-Onc visit, 4 additional patients with breast cancer were prescribed statins (44.8% total). Fourteen (19.2%) Cardio-Onc patients had a high Framingham Risk Score compared to 6 (8.2%) Ob-Gyn patients. Conclusion: We demonstrated that the ASCVD risk is similar between women with breast cancer attending the Cardio-Onc clinic and the women without breast cancer attending the Ob-Gyn clinic, but the Cardio-Onc cohort had significantly more patients with a high Framingham Risk Score. Both clinics had similarly poor rates of appropriate statin prescribing rates according to the ATP III guidelines. PMID:27660568

  4. The National Center for Oncological Hadron Therapy: status of the project and future clinical use of the facility.

    PubMed

    Orecchia, Roberto; Fossati, Piero; Rossi, Sandro

    2009-01-01

    Hadron therapy is an advanced radiotherapy technique that employs charged particle beams. Several particles (pions, oxygen, neon and helium ions) have been investigated in the past, but at present only protons and carbon ions are used in clinical practice. Hadron therapy has been used for more than 50 years, more than 50,000 patients have been treated worldwide, and many new facilities are being built. Indications are still a matter of debate. The Italian National Center for Oncological Hadron Therapy (CNAO) is under construction in Pavia and will begin to treat patients in the near future. The CNAO will be a center capable of using both protons and carbon ions. In the first phase, three rooms with vertical and horizontal fixed beams will be available, subsequently the center will be upgraded with two more rooms equipped with a rotating gantry. The facility will use active scanning delivery systems and state-of-the-art immobilization and setup verification devices. One additional room will be devoted to physical and radiobiological research. The CNAO will be a high-patient-throughput facility capable of treating more than 3,000 patients per year. Seven areas of interest have been identified: lung cancer, liver cancer, head and neck malignancies, pediatric solid cancers, eye tumors, sarcoma and central nervous system cancers. A disease-specific working group has been created for each area and has defined selection criteria and protocols to be used at the CNAO. Two more working groups are being set up on gynecological and digestive (pancreas, biliary tract and rectum) tumors. All the patients will participate in clinical trials to establish with sound evidence the real indications for hadron therapy. National and international cooperation networks are being set up to facilitate patient referral and follow-up. A medical service is already operative to assist patients and in selected case to refer them abroad. The CNAO will be the only carbon ion facility in Italy and

  5. Clinical response and mortality in tigecycline complicated intra-abdominal infection and complicated skin and soft-tissue infection trials.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Matteo; McGovern, Paul C; Wenisch, Christoph; Meyer, R Daniel; Yan, Jean Li; Wible, Michele; Rottinghaus, Scott T; Quintana, Alvaro

    2015-09-01

    An imbalance in all-cause mortality was noted in tigecycline phase 3 and 4 comparative clinical trials across all studied indications. We investigated clinical failure and mortality in phase 3 and 4 complicated skin and soft-tissue infection (cSSTI) and complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI) tigecycline trials using descriptive analyses of a blinded adjudication of mortality and multivariate regression analyses. Attributable mortality analyses of cSSTI revealed death due to infection in 0.1% of each treatment group (P=1.000). In cIAI, there were no significant differences between tigecycline (1.2%) and comparator (0.7%) subjects who died due to infection (P=0.243). For cIAI clinical failure, treatment interaction with organ dysfunction was observed with no difference observed between clinical cure for tigecycline (85.4%) and comparator (76.7%) treatment groups (odds ratio=0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.28-1.19). Tigecycline-treated subjects had more adverse events of secondary pneumonias (2.1% vs. 1.2%) and more adverse events of secondary pneumonias with an outcome of death (0.5% vs. 0.1%). These analyses do not suggest that tigecycline is a factor either for failure (cSSTI and cIAI studies) or for death (cIAI studies). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A critical appraisal of the clinical utility of proton therapy in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy is an emerging technology for providing radiation therapy to cancer patients. The depth dose distribution of a proton beam makes it a preferable radiation modality as it reduces radiation to the healthy tissue outside the tumor, compared with conventional photon therapy. While theoretically beneficial, its clinical values are still being demonstrated from the increasing number of patients treated with proton therapy, from several dozen proton therapy centers around the world. High equipment and facility costs are often the major obstacle for its wider adoption. Because of the high cost and lack of definite clinical evidence of its superiority, proton therapy treatment faces criticism on its cost-effectiveness. Technological development is causing a gradual lowering of costs, and research and clinical studies are providing further evidence on its clinical utility. PMID:26604838

  7. Roadmap to a Comprehensive Clinical Data Warehouse for Precision Medicine Applications in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Foran, David J; Chen, Wenjin; Chu, Huiqi; Sadimin, Evita; Loh, Doreen; Riedlinger, Gregory; Goodell, Lauri A; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirshfield, Kim; Rodriguez, Lorna; DiPaola, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Leading institutions throughout the country have established Precision Medicine programs to support personalized treatment of patients. A cornerstone for these programs is the establishment of enterprise-wide Clinical Data Warehouses. Working shoulder-to-shoulder, a team of physicians, systems biologists, engineers, and scientists at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey have designed, developed, and implemented the Warehouse with information originating from data sources, including Electronic Medical Records, Clinical Trial Management Systems, Tumor Registries, Biospecimen Repositories, Radiology and Pathology archives, and Next Generation Sequencing services. Innovative solutions were implemented to detect and extract unstructured clinical information that was embedded in paper/text documents, including synoptic pathology reports. Supporting important precision medicine use cases, the growing Warehouse enables physicians to systematically mine and review the molecular, genomic, image-based, and correlated clinical information of patient tumors individually or as part of large cohorts to identify changes and patterns that may influence treatment decisions and potential outcomes. PMID:28469389

  8. What does physicians' clinical expertise contribute to oncologic decision-making? A qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Salloch, Sabine; Otte, Ina; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Vollmann, Jochen

    2018-02-01

    Physicians' clinical expertise forms an exclusive body of competences, which helps them to find the appropriate diagnostics and treatment for each individual patient. Empirical evidence, however, suggests that there is an inverse relationship between the number of years in practice and the quality of care provided by a physician. Knowledge and adherence to professional standards (such as clinical guidelines) are often used as indicators in previous research. Semistructured interviews and the Q method were used for an explorative study on oncologists' views on the interplay between their own clinical expertise, intuition, and the external evidence incorporated in clinical guidelines. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed ad verbatim, and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Data analysis shows the complex character of clinical expertise with respect to experience, professional development, and intuition. An irreplaceable role is attributed to personal and bodily experience during the providing of care for a patient. Professional experience becomes important, particularly in those situations that lie out of the focus of "guideline medicine." Intuition is regarded as having a strong emotional component and helps for deciding which therapeutic option the patient can deal with. Using measurable knowledge and adherence to standards as indicators does not account for the complexity of clinical expertise. Other factors, such as the importance of bodily experience and physicians' intuitive knowledge, must be considered, also with respect to the occurrence of treatment biases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. [Clinical and immunological study of the relationship of the digestive system chronic diseases and atherosclerosis in the basin of the abdominal aorta in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Dolgushina, A I; Shaposhnik, I I; Volchegorskiĭ, I A

    2014-01-01

    Paper describes clinical and immunological study about the relationship between chronic diseases of the digestive system and atherosclerosis in the basin of the abdominal aorta in patients of elderly and senile age. There were revealed the structural and clinical features of the gastrointestinal tract diseases, depending on the extent of atherosclerosis in the basin of the abdominal aorta. Evaluation of the immune status included the determination of lymphocyte subpopulation composition, the functional state of neutrophils and cytokine levels. It is found that the progression of atherosclerosis in the basin of the abdominal aorta in patients of elderly and senile age with chronic diseases of the digestive system was accompanied by the activation of pro-inflammatory mechanisms of the immune system and the accompanying intensification of oxidative stress.

  10. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  11. Clinical Study of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) for Severe Pelvic Fracture and Intra Abdominal Hemorrhagic Shock using Continuous Vital Signs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0025 TITLE: Clinical Study of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) for Severe Pelvic...Intra-Abdominal Hemorrhagic Shock 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0025 Clinical Study of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta ...sites. Resuscitative balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) has been clinically demonstrated to stop bleeding below the diaphragm. It has the potential

  12. Importance of Different Grades of Abdominal Obesity on Testosterone Level, Erectile Dysfunction, and Clinical Coincidence.

    PubMed

    Fillo, Juraj; Levcikova, Michaela; Ondrusova, Martina; Breza, Jan; Labas, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of different grades of abdominal obesity (AO) on the prevalence of testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS), erectile dysfunction (ED), and metabolic syndrome (MetS). In a cross-sectional descriptive study, a total of 216 males underwent a complete urological, internal, and hormonal evaluation. Males were divided according to waist circumference into five groups: less than 94 cm (Grade [G] 0), 94 to 101 cm (G1), 102 to 109 cm (G2), 110 to 119 cm (G3), and more than 120 cm (G4). Incidence of ED, TDS, and MetS was compared in these groups and in participants without AO. Some degree of ED was identified in 74.7% of males with AO. In G1, there were 61% of males with ED, in G2 68%, in G3 83%, and in G4 87%. A strong correlation between testosterone (TST) level and AO was identified. Ninety-eight out of 198 (49.5%) males with AO and 1/18 (5.5%) males without AO had TDS. There were significant differences between individual groups. In the group of males with AO G4 (more than 120 cm), 87.1% had TDS. MetS was diagnosed in 105/198 (53.0%) males with AO, but in G4, 83.9% of males with AO had MetS. Males older than 40 years of age with AO have a higher incidence of ED, TDS, and MetS. Dividing males into five groups according to waist circumference seems to be reasonable. With growing AO, there were significantly more males with ED, TDS, and MetS.

  13. Clinical Utility of Risk Models to Refer Patients with Adnexal Masses to Specialized Oncology Care: Multicenter External Validation Using Decision Curve Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wynants, Laure; Timmerman, Dirk; Verbakel, Jan Y; Testa, Antonia; Savelli, Luca; Fischerova, Daniela; Franchi, Dorella; Van Holsbeke, Caroline; Epstein, Elisabeth; Froyman, Wouter; Guerriero, Stefano; Rossi, Alberto; Fruscio, Robert; Leone, Francesco Pg; Bourne, Tom; Valentin, Lil; Van Calster, Ben

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of preoperative diagnostic models for ovarian cancer based on ultrasound and/or biomarkers for referring patients to specialized oncology care. The investigated models were RMI, ROMA, and 3 models from the International Ovarian Tumor Analysis (IOTA) group [LR2, ADNEX, and the Simple Rules risk score (SRRisk)]. Experimental Design: A secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from 2 cross-sectional cohort studies was performed to externally validate diagnostic models. A total of 2,763 patients (2,403 in dataset 1 and 360 in dataset 2) from 18 centers (11 oncology centers and 7 nononcology hospitals) in 6 countries participated. Excised tissue was histologically classified as benign or malignant. The clinical utility of the preoperative diagnostic models was assessed with net benefit (NB) at a range of risk thresholds (5%-50% risk of malignancy) to refer patients to specialized oncology care. We visualized results with decision curves and generated bootstrap confidence intervals. Results: The prevalence of malignancy was 41% in dataset 1 and 40% in dataset 2. For thresholds up to 10% to 15%, RMI and ROMA had a lower NB than referring all patients. SRRisks and ADNEX demonstrated the highest NB. At a threshold of 20%, the NBs of ADNEX, SRrisks, and RMI were 0.348, 0.350, and 0.270, respectively. Results by menopausal status and type of center (oncology vs. nononcology) were similar. Conclusions: All tested IOTA methods, especially ADNEX and SRRisks, are clinically more useful than RMI and ROMA to select patients with adnexal masses for specialized oncology care. Clin Cancer Res; 23(17); 5082-90. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Surrogate endpoints in oncology: when are they acceptable for regulatory and clinical decisions, and are they currently overused?

    PubMed

    Kemp, Robert; Prasad, Vinay

    2017-07-21

    Surrogate outcomes are not intrinsically beneficial to patients, but are designed to be easier and faster to measure than clinically meaningful outcomes. The use of surrogates as an endpoint in clinical trials and basis for regulatory approval is common, and frequently exceeds the guidance given by regulatory bodies. In this article, we demonstrate that the use of surrogates in oncology is widespread and increasing. At the same time, the strength of association between the surrogates used and clinically meaningful outcomes is often unknown or weak. Attempts to validate surrogates are rarely undertaken. When this is done, validation relies on only a fraction of available data, and often concludes that the surrogate is poor. Post-marketing studies, designed to ensure drugs have meaningful benefits, are often not performed. Alternatively, if a drug fails to improve quality of life or overall survival, market authorization is rarely revoked. We suggest this reliance on surrogates, and the imprecision surrounding their acceptable use, means that numerous drugs are now approved based on small yet statistically significant increases in surrogates of questionable reliability. In turn, this means the benefits of many approved drugs are uncertain. This is an unacceptable situation for patients and professionals, as prior experience has shown that such uncertainty can be associated with significant harm. The use of surrogate outcomes should be limited to situations where a surrogate has demonstrated robust ability to predict meaningful benefits, or where cases are dire, rare or with few treatment options. In both cases, surrogates must be used only when continuing studies examining hard endpoints have been fully recruited.

  15. Clinical Application of Prognostic Gene Expression Signature in Fusion Gene-Negative Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Pooja; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet; Anderson, James R; Triche, Timothy J; Delorenzi, Mauro; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Wing, Michele; Hawkins, Douglas S; Skapek, Stephen X

    2015-10-15

    Pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) has two common histologic subtypes: embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar (ARMS). PAX-FOXO1 fusion gene status is a more reliable prognostic marker than alveolar histology, whereas fusion gene-negative (FN) ARMS patients are clinically similar to ERMS patients. A five-gene expression signature (MG5) previously identified two diverse risk groups within the fusion gene-negative RMS (FN-RMS) patients, but this has not been independently validated. The goal of this study was to test whether expression of the MG5 metagene, measured using a technical platform that can be applied to routine pathology material, would correlate with outcome in a new cohort of patients with FN-RMS. Cases were taken from the Children's Oncology Group (COG) D9803 study of children with intermediate-risk RMS, and gene expression profiling for the MG5 genes was performed using the nCounter assay. The MG5 score was correlated with clinical and pathologic characteristics as well as overall and event-free survival. MG5 standardized score showed no significant association with any of the available clinicopathologic variables. The MG5 signature score showed a significant correlation with overall (N = 57; HR, 7.3; 95% CI, 1.9-27.0; P = 0.003) and failure-free survival (N = 57; HR, 6.1; 95% CI, 1.9-19.7; P = 0.002). This represents the first, validated molecular prognostic signature for children with FN-RMS who otherwise have intermediate-risk disease. The capacity to measure the expression of a small number of genes in routine pathology material and apply a simple mathematical formula to calculate the MG5 metagene score provides a clear path toward better risk stratification in future prospective clinical trials. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. MIBG avidity correlates with clinical features, tumor biology, and outcomes in neuroblastoma: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    DuBois, Steven G; Mody, Rajen; Naranjo, Arlene; Van Ryn, Collin; Russ, Douglas; Oldridge, Derek; Kreissman, Susan; Baker, David L; Parisi, Marguerite; Shulkin, Barry L; Bai, Harrison; Diskin, Sharon J; Batra, Vandana; Maris, John M; Park, Julie R; Matthay, Katherine K; Yanik, Gregory

    2017-11-01

    Prior studies suggest that neuroblastomas that do not accumulate metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) on diagnostic imaging (MIBG non-avid) may have more favorable features compared with MIBG avid tumors. We compared clinical features, biologic features, and clinical outcomes between patients with MIBG nonavid and MIBG avid neuroblastoma. Patients had metastatic high- or intermediate-risk neuroblastoma and were treated on Children's Oncology Group protocols A3973 or A3961. Comparisons of clinical and biologic features according to MIBG avidity were made with chi-squared or Fisher exact tests. Event-free (EFS) and overall (OS) survival compared using log-rank tests and modeled using Cox models. Thirty of 343 patients (8.7%) had MIBG nonavid disease. Patients with nonavid tumors were less likely to have adrenal primary tumors (34.5 vs. 57.2%; P = 0.019), bone metastases (36.7 vs. 61.7%; P = 0.008), or positive urine catecholamines (66.7 vs. 91.0%; P < 0.001) compared with patients with MIBG avid tumors. Nonavid tumors were more likely to be MYCN amplified (53.8 vs. 32.6%; P = 0.030) and had lower norepinephrine transporter expression. Patients with MIBG nonavid disease had a 5-year EFS of 50.0% compared with 38.7% for patients with MIBG avid disease (P = 0.028). On multivariate testing in high-risk patients, MIBG avidity was the sole adverse prognostic factor for EFS identified (hazard ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.04-2.99; P = 0.034). Patients with MIBG nonavid neuroblastoma have lower rates of adrenal primary tumors, bone metastasis, and catecholamine secretion. Despite being more likely to have MYCN-amplified tumors, these patients have superior outcomes compared with patients with MIBG avid disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A new SPECT/CT reconstruction algorithm: reliability and accuracy in clinical routine for non-oncologic bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, Olivier; Robin, Philippe; Gouillou, Maelenn; Le Duc-Pennec, Alexandra; Alavi, Zarrin; Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Abgral, Ronan; Salaun, Pierre-Yves; Bourhis, David; Querellou, Solène

    2018-02-12

    xSPECT Bone® (xB) is a new reconstruction algorithm developed by Siemens® in bone hybrid imaging (SPECT/CT). A CT-based tissue segmentation is incorporated into SPECT reconstruction to provide SPECT images with bone anatomy appearance. The objectives of this study were to assess xB/CT reconstruction diagnostic reliability and accuracy in comparison with Flash 3D® (F3D)/CT in clinical routine. Two hundred thirteen consecutive patients referred to the Brest Nuclear Medicine Department for non-oncological bone diseases were evaluated retrospectively. Two hundred seven SPECT/CT were included. All SPECT/CT were independently interpreted by two nuclear medicine physicians (a junior and a senior expert) with xB/CT then with F3D/CT three months later. Inter-observer agreement (IOA) and diagnostic confidence were determined using McNemar test, and unweighted Kappa coefficient. The study objectives were then re-assessed for validation through > 18 months of clinical and paraclinical follow-up. No statistically significant differences between IOA xB and IOA F3D were found (p = 0.532). Agreement for xB after categorical classification of the diagnoses was high (κ xB = 0.89 [95% CI 0.84 -0.93]) but without statistically significant difference F3D (κ F3D = 0.90 [95% CI 0.86 - 0.94]). Thirty-one (14.9%) inter-reconstruction diagnostic discrepancies were observed of which 21 (10.1%) were classified as major. The follow-up confirmed the diagnosis of F3D in 10 cases, xB in 6 cases and was non-contributory in 5 cases. xB reconstruction algorithm was found reliable, providing high interobserver agreement and similar diagnostic confidence to F3D reconstruction in clinical routine.

  18. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  19. Influence of rurality, deprivation and distance from clinic on uptake in men invited for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening.

    PubMed

    Crilly, M A; Mundie, A; Bachoo, P; Nimmo, F

    2015-07-01

    Effective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening requires high uptake. The aim was to assess the independent association of screening uptake with rurality, social deprivation, clinic type, distance to clinic and season. Screening across Grampian was undertaken by trained nurses in six community and three hospital clinics. Men aged 65 years were invited for screening by post (with 2 further reminders for non-responders). AAA screening data are stored on a national call-recall database. The Scottish postcode directory was used to allocate to all invited men a deprivation index (Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation), a Scottish urban/rural category and distance to clinic. Multivariable analysis was undertaken. The cohort included 5645 men invited for screening over 12 months (October 2012 to October 2013); 42·6 per cent lived in urban areas, 38·9 per cent in rural areas and 18·5 per cent in small towns (uptake 87·0, 89·3 and 90·8 per cent respectively). Overall uptake was 88·6 per cent with 76 new AAAs detected: 15·2 (95 per cent c.i. 11·8 to 18·6) per 1000 men screened. Aberdeen city (large urban area) had the lowest uptake (86·1 per cent). Uptake declined with increasing deprivation, with the steepest decline in urban areas. On multivariable analysis, a 1-point increase in deprivation deciles was associated with a 0·08 (95 per cent c.i. 0·06 to 0·11) reduction in the odds of being screened (P < 0·001). Clinic type (community versus hospital), distance to clinic and season were not associated independently with uptake. Both urban residence and social deprivation were associated independently with uptake among men invited for AAA screening. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Do Oncologists Engage in Bereavement Practices? A Survey of the Israeli Society of Clinical Oncology and Radiation Therapy (ISCORT)

    PubMed Central

    Shabtai, Esther; Merimsky, Ofer; Inbar, Moshe; Rosenbaum, Eli; Meirovitz, Amichay; Wexler, Isaiah D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. We sought to determine the level of involvement of oncologists in bereavement rituals after a patient dies. Subjects and Methods. Members of the Israeli Society for Clinical Oncology and Radiation Therapy (ISCORT) were surveyed. The survey instrument consisted of questions regarding participation in bereavement rituals for patients in general and those with whom the oncologist had a special bond. Oncologists were queried as to the reasons for nonparticipation in bereavement rituals. Results. Nearly 70% of the ISCORT membership (126 of 182) completed the survey tool. Respondents included radiation, surgical, and medical oncologists. In general, oncologists rarely participated in bereavement rituals that involved direct contact with families such as funerals and visitations. Twenty-eight percent of physicians at least occasionally participated in rituals involving direct contact whereas 45% had indirect contact (e.g., letter of condolence) with the family on an occasional basis. There was significantly greater involvement in bereavement rituals when oncologists developed a special bond with the patient. In a stepwise linear regression model, the only factor significantly associated with greater participation in bereavement rituals was self-perceived spirituality in those claiming not to be religious. The major reasons offered for nonparticipation were time constraints, need to maintain appropriate boundaries between physicians and patients, and fear of burnout. Conclusion. Although many oncologists participate at least occasionally in some sort of bereavement ritual, a significant proportion of oncologists are not involved in these practices at all. PMID:20228130

  1. Training oncology and palliative care clinical nurse specialists in psychological skills: evaluation of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jane E; Aitken, Susan; Watson, Nina; McVey, Joanne; Helbert, Jan; Wraith, Anita; Taylor, Vanessa; Catesby, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    National guidelines in the United Kingdom recommend training Clinical Nurse Specialists in psychological skills to improve the assessment and intervention with psychological problems experienced by people with a cancer diagnosis (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, 2004). This pilot study evaluated a three-day training program combined with supervision sessions from Clinical Psychologists that focused on developing skills in psychological assessment and intervention for common problems experienced by people with cancer. Questionnaires were developed to measure participants' levels of confidence in 15 competencies of psychological skills. Participants completed these prior to the program and on completion of the program. Summative evaluation was undertaken and results were compared. In addition, a focus group interview provided qualitative data of participants' experiences of the structure, process, and outcomes of the program. Following the program, participants rated their confidence in psychological assessment and skills associated with providing psychological support as having increased in all areas. This included improved knowledge of psychological theories, skills in assessment and intervention and accessing and using supervision appropriately. The largest increase was in providing psycho-education to support the coping strategies of patients and carers. Thematic analysis of interview data identified two main themes including learning experiences and program enhancements. The significance of the clinical supervision sessions as key learning opportunities, achieved through the development of a community of practice, emerged. Although this pilot study has limitations, the results suggest that a combined teaching and supervision program is effective in improving Clinical Nurse Specialists' confidence level in specific psychological skills. Participants' experiences highlighted suggestions for refinement and development of the program

  2. Management and Care of Women With Invasive Cervical Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Resource-Stratified Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Linus T.; Temin, Sarah; Camacho, Rolando; Dueñas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Feldman, Sarah; Gultekin, Murat; Gupta, Vandana; Horton, Susan; Jacob, Graciela; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Lishimpi, Kennedy; Nakisige, Carolyn; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Small, William; Thomas, Gillian; Berek, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based, resource-stratified global recommendations to clinicians and policymakers on the management and palliative care of women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer. Methods ASCO convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of cancer control, medical and radiation oncology, health economic, obstetric and gynecologic, and palliative care experts to produce recommendations reflecting resource-tiered settings. A systematic review of literature from 1966 to 2015 failed to yield sufficiently strong quality evidence to support basic- and limited-resource setting recommendations; a formal consensus-based process was used to develop recommendations. A modified ADAPTE process was also used to adapt recommendations from existing guidelines. Results Five existing sets of guidelines were identified and reviewed, and adapted recommendations form the evidence base. Eight systematic reviews, along with cost-effectiveness analyses, provided indirect evidence to inform the consensus process, which resulted in agreement of 75% or greater. Recommendations Clinicians and planners should strive to provide access to the most effective evidence-based antitumor and palliative care interventions. If a woman cannot access these within her own or neighboring country or region, she may need to be treated with lower-tier modalities, depending on capacity and resources for surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and supportive and palliative care. For women with early-stage cervical cancer in basic settings, cone biopsy or extrafascial hysterectomy may be performed. Fertility-sparing procedures or modified radical or radical hysterectomy may be additional options in nonbasic settings. Combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy (including brachytherapy) should be used for women with stage IB to IVA disease, depending on available resources. Pain control is a vital component of palliative care. Additional information is available at www

  3. Management and Care of Women With Invasive Cervical Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Resource-Stratified Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Linus T; Temin, Sarah; Camacho, Rolando; Dueñas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Feldman, Sarah; Gultekin, Murat; Gupta, Vandana; Horton, Susan; Jacob, Graciela; Kidd, Elizabeth A; Lishimpi, Kennedy; Nakisige, Carolyn; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Small, William; Thomas, Gillian; Berek, Jonathan S

    2016-10-01

    To provide evidence-based, resource-stratified global recommendations to clinicians and policymakers on the management and palliative care of women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer. ASCO convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of cancer control, medical and radiation oncology, health economic, obstetric and gynecologic, and palliative care experts to produce recommendations reflecting resource-tiered settings. A systematic review of literature from 1966 to 2015 failed to yield sufficiently strong quality evidence to support basic- and limited-resource setting recommendations; a formal consensus-based process was used to develop recommendations. A modified ADAPTE process was also used to adapt recommendations from existing guidelines. Five existing sets of guidelines were identified and reviewed, and adapted recommendations form the evidence base. Eight systematic reviews, along with cost-effectiveness analyses, provided indirect evidence to inform the consensus process, which resulted in agreement of 75% or greater. Clinicians and planners should strive to provide access to the most effective evidence-based antitumor and palliative care interventions. If a woman cannot access these within her own or neighboring country or region, she may need to be treated with lower-tier modalities, depending on capacity and resources for surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and supportive and palliative care. For women with early-stage cervical cancer in basic settings, cone biopsy or extrafascial hysterectomy may be performed. Fertility-sparing procedures or modified radical or radical hysterectomy may be additional options in nonbasic settings. Combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy (including brachytherapy) should be used for women with stage IB to IVA disease, depending on available resources. Pain control is a vital component of palliative care. Additional information is available at www

  4. A contemporary case study illustrating the integration of health information technologies into the organisation and clinical practice of radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alexis Andrew; Phillips, Aaron K

    The development of software in radiation oncology departments has seen the increase in capability from the Record and Verify software focused on patient safety to a fully-fledged Oncology Information System (OIS). This paper reports on the medical aspects of the implementation of a modern Oncology Information System (IMPAC MultiAccess, also known as the Siemens LANTIS) in a New Zealand hospital oncology department. The department was successful in translating paper procedures into electronic procedures, and the report focuses on the changes in approach to organisation and data use that occurred. The difficulties that were faced, which included procedural re-design, management of change, removal of paper, implementation cost, integration with the HIS, quality assurance and datasets, are highlighted along with the local solutions developed to overcome these problems.

  5. Slow-release granisetron (APF530) versus palonosetron for chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting: analysis by American Society of Clinical Oncology emetogenicity criteria.

    PubMed

    Raftopoulos, Harry; Boccia, Ralph; Cooper, William; O'Boyle, Erin; Gralla, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    APF530 is a novel sustained-release formulation of granisetron. In a Phase III trial, APF530 500 mg was noninferior to palonosetron 0.25 mg in preventing acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) after moderately (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and delayed CINV after MEC, but not superior in preventing delayed CINV after HEC. Emetogenicity was classified by Hesketh criteria; this reanalysis uses newer American Society of Clinical Oncology criteria. Complete responses (no emesis or rescue medication) after cycle one were reanalyzed after reclassification of MEC and HEC by American Society of Clinical Oncology criteria. APF530 maintained noninferiority to palonosetron. Single-dose APF530 is a promising alternative to palonosetron for preventing acute and delayed CINV after MEC or HEC. The Clinicaltrials.gov identifier for this study is NCT00343460.

  6. Using Big Data in oncology to prospectively impact clinical patient care: A proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Dougoud-Chauvin, Vérène; Lee, Jae Jin; Santos, Edgardo; Williams, Vonetta L; Battisti, Nicolò M L; Ghia, Kavita; Sehovic, Marina; Croft, Cortlin; Kim, Jongphil; Balducci, Lodovico; Kish, Julie A; Extermann, Martine

    2018-04-17

    Big Data is widely seen as a major opportunity for progress in the practice of personalized medicine, attracting the attention from medical societies and presidential teams alike as it offers a unique opportunity to enlarge the base of evidence, especially for older patients underrepresented in clinical trials. This study prospectively assessed the real-time availability of clinical cases in the Health & Research Informatics Total Cancer Care™ (TCC) database matching community patients with cancer, and the impact of such a consultation on treatment. Patients aged 70 and older seen at the Lynn Cancer Institute (LCI) with a documented malignancy were eligible. Geriatric screening information and the oncologist's pre-consultation treatment plan were sent to Moffitt. A search for similar patients was done in TCC and additional information retrieved from Electronic Medical Records. A report summarizing the data was sent and the utility of such a consultation was assessed per email after the treatment decision. Thirty one patients were included. The geriatric screening was positive in 87.1% (27) of them. The oncogeriatric consultation took on average 2.2 working days. It influenced treatment in 38.7% (12), and modified it in 19.4% (6). The consultation was perceived as "somewhat" to "very useful" in 83.9% (26). This study establishes a proof of concept of the feasibility of real time use of Big Data for clinical practice. The geriatric screening and the consultation report influenced treatment in 38.7% of cases and modified it in 19.4%, which compares very well with oncogeriatric literature. Additional steps are needed to render it financially and clinically viable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gender, alexithymia and physical inactivity associated with abdominal obesity in type 1 diabetes mellitus: a cross sectional study at a secondary care hospital diabetes clinic.

    PubMed

    Melin, Eva O; Svensson, Ralph; Thunander, Maria; Hillman, Magnus; Thulesius, Hans O; Landin-Olsson, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is linked to cardiovascular diseases and increasingly common in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) since the introduction of intensified insulin therapy. Our main aim was to explore associations between obesity and depression, anxiety, alexithymia and self-image measures and to control for lifestyle variables in a sample of persons with T1DM. Secondary aims were to explore associations between abdominal and general obesity and cardiovascular complications in T1DM. Cross sectional study of 284 persons with T1DM (age 18-59 years, men 56%), consecutively recruited from one secondary care hospital diabetes clinic in Sweden. Assessments were performed with self-report instruments (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 items and Structural Analysis of Social Behavior). Anthropometrics and blood samples were collected for this study and supplemented with data from the patients' medical records. Abdominal obesity was defined as waist circumference men/women (meters): ≥1.02/≥0.88, and general obesity as BMI ≥30 kg/m 2 for both genders. Abdominal obesity was chosen in the analyses due to the high association with cardiovascular complications. Different explanatory logistic regression models were elaborated for the associations and calibrated and validated for goodness of fit with the data variables. The prevalence of abdominal obesity was 49/284 (17%), men/women: 8%/29% ( P  < 0.001). Abdominal obesity was associated with women (AOR 4.9), physical inactivity (AOR 3.1), alexithymia (AOR 2.6) and age (per year) (AOR 1.04). One of the three alexithymia sub factors, "difficulty identifying feelings" (AOR 3.1), was associated with abdominal obesity. Gender analyses showed that abdominal obesity in men was associated with "difficulty identifying feelings" (AOR 7.7), and in women with use of antidepressants (AOR 4.3) and physical inactivity (AOR 3.6). Cardiovascular complications were associated with abdominal obesity (AOR 5

  8. Assessing the relationship between toxicity and economic cost of oncological target agents: A systematic review of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Tartari, Francesca; Conti, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Target agents are peculiar oncological drugs which differ from the traditional therapies in their ability of recognizing specific molecules expressed by tumor cells and microenvironment. Thus, their toxicity is generally lower than that associated to chemotherapy, and they represent nowadays a new standard of care in a number of tumors. This paper deals with the relationship between economic costs and toxicity of target agents. At this aim, a cluster analysis-based exploration of the main features of a large collection of them is carried out, with a specific focus on the variables leading to the identification of their toxicity and related costs. The analysis of the toxicity is based on the Severe Adverse Events (SAE) and Discontinuation (D) rates of each target agent considering data published on PubMed from 1965 to 2016 in the phase II and III studies that have led to the approval of these drugs for cancer patients by US Food and Drug Administration. The construction of the dataset represents a key step of the research, and is grounded on the critical analysis of a wide set of clinical studies. In order to capture different evaluation strategies of the toxicity, clustering is performed according to three different criteria (including Voronoi tessellation). Our procedure allows us to identify 5 different groups of target agents pooled by similar SAE and D rates and, at the same time, 3 groups based on target agents’ costs for 1 month and for the median whole duration of therapy. Results highlight several specific regularities for toxicity and costs. This study present several limitations, being realized starting from clinical trials and not from individual patients’ data. However, a macroscopic perspective suggests that costs are rather heterogeneous, and they do not clearly follow the clustering based on SAE and D rates. PMID:28829823

  9. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement: The Role of the Oncologist in Cancer Prevention and Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zon, Robin T.; Goss, Elizabeth; Vogel, Victor G.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Jatoi, Ismail; Robson, Mark E.; Wollins, Dana S.; Garber, Judy E.; Brown, Powel; Kramer, Barnett S.

    2009-01-01

    Oncologists have a critical opportunity to utilize risk assessment and cancer prevention strategies to interrupt the initiation or progression of cancer in cancer survivors and individuals at high risk of developing cancer. Expanding knowledge about the natural history and prognosis of cancers positions oncologists to advise patients regarding the risk of second malignancies and treatment-related cancers. In addition, as recognized experts in the full spectrum of cancer care, oncologists are afforded opportunities for involvement in community-based cancer prevention activities. Although oncologists are currently providing many cancer prevention and risk assessment services to their patients, economic barriers exist, including inadequate or lack of insurance, that may compromise uniform patient access to these services. Additionally, insufficient reimbursement for existing and developing interventions may discourage patient access to these services. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the medical society representing cancer specialists involved in patient care and clinical research, is committed to supporting oncologists in their wide-ranging involvement in cancer prevention. This statement on risk assessment and prevention counseling, although not intended to be a comprehensive overview of cancer prevention describes the current role of oncologists in risk assessment and prevention; provides examples of risk assessment and prevention activities that should be offered by oncologists; identifies potential opportunities for coordination between oncologists and primary care physicians in prevention education and coordination of care for cancer survivors; describes ASCO's involvement in education and training of oncologists regarding prevention; and proposes improvement in the payment environment to encourage patient access to these services. PMID:19075281

  10. Primary Cryotherapy for High-Grade Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Oncologic and Functional Outcomes from the COLD Registry.

    PubMed

    Tay, Kae Jack; Polascik, Thomas J; Elshafei, Ahmed; Cher, Michael L; Given, Robert W; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Ross, Ashley E; Jones, J Stephen

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the oncological and functional outcomes of primary cryotherapy in men with clinically localized, high-grade prostate cancer. We included all men with biopsy Gleason score ≥8, localized (cT1-2) disease with a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤50 ng/mL from the Cryo On-Line Data (COLD) registry. The primary outcome was biochemical progression free survival (BPFS) as defined by the Phoenix criteria (nadir PSA +2 ng/mL). Secondary outcomes of continence (defined as strictly no leak) and potency (able to have intercourse) were patient reported. Factors influencing BPFS were evaluated individually using Kaplan Meier and in a multivariate model using Cox regression. Altogether, 300 men were included for analysis. The median follow-up was 18.2 months (mean 28.4) and median BPFS was 69.8 months. Based on Kaplan-Meier analysis, the estimated 2- and 5-year BPFS rate was 77.2% and 59.1%, respectively. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy was administered to 41% of men and this tended to occur in men with larger prostates, likely as a technical consideration for downsizing before cryosurgery. At multivariate analysis, the presence of Gleason score 9 or 10 (Hazard Ratio [HR] 1.9) and a posttreatment PSA nadir of ≥0.4 ng/mL (HR 5.7) were the only significant variables associated with biochemical progression using Cox regression. Complete continence was noted in 90.5% of men and potency in 17% of men at the 12-month follow-up. The incidence of rectourethral fistulae and urinary retention requiring intervention beyond temporary catheterization was 1.3% and 3.3%, respectively. Primary cryotherapy appears to be effective and safe in the community setting for high-grade, clinically localized prostate cancer in the short term.

  11. Clinical usefulness of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy in oncological diagnostics: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Plachcinska, Anna; Mikolajczak, Renata; Maecke, Helmut; Mlodkowska, Ewa; Kunert-Radek, Jolanta; Michalski, Andrzej; Rzeszutek, Katarzyna; Kozak, Jozek; Kusmierek, Jacek

    2004-04-01

    The clinical usefulness of a new 99mTc-labeled somatostatin analogue has been studied from the standpoint of oncological diagnostics. The group of patients studied included 40 individuals with diagnosed malignant neoplasms (32 primary and 8 metastatic). Among the primary tumors were 7 pituitary adenomas (5 hormonally active and 2 inactive), 1 liposarcoma, 2 carcinoids, 1 breast carcinoma, and 21 cases of lung cancer (2 small cell and 19 non-small cell) were represented. The metastatic tumors consisted of: 3 malignant melanomas, 1 pheochromocytoma, 1 prostatic cancer, 1 leiomyosarcoma, 1 pancreatic carcinoma ectopically secreting ACTH, and 1 carcinoid of the thymus. The radiopharmaceutical, 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-octreotide, was i.v. administered at the activity of 740-925 MBq. The imaging was comprized of a whole-body scan and single photon emission computed tomography. Positive scintigrams were obtained in 4 of 5 hormonally active pituitary adenomas, in 1 of 2 cases of carcinoid, in liposarcoma, breast cancer, and all cases of small cell (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The neoplastic metastases were visualized in 2 of 3 cases of melanoma and in patients with pheochromocytoma, pancreatic carcinoma secreting ACTH, and thymic carcinoid. Scintigrams were negative in both hormonally inactive pituitary adenomas, in one case of metastatic malignant melanoma, leiomyosarcoma, and in cases of metastasis from the prostatic carcinomas. The results of this pilot study indicated that 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC is a potentially useful radiopharmaceutical for the imaging of a wide range of primary and metastatic tumors. More detailed indications for the clinical usefulness of the new tracer for the imaging of selected tumor types require studies on much larger groups of patients. Special attention should be paid to the successful imaging of all cases of NSCLC.

  12. Predictors of outpatients' request for palliative care service at a medical oncology clinic of a German comprehensive cancer center.

    PubMed

    Tewes, Mitra; Rettler, Teresa; Wolf, Nathalie; Hense, Jörg; Schuler, Martin; Teufel, Martin; Beckmann, Mingo

    2018-05-05

    Early integration of palliative care (PC) is recommended. The determination of predictors for patients' request for PC may guide implementation in clinical practice. Toward this end, we analyzed the symptom burden and distress of cancer patients in outpatient care and examined their need and request for PC. Between October 2013 and March 2016, 705 patients receiving outpatient cancer treatment took part in the survey. We used the new MInimal DOcumentation System to detect symptom clusters. Additionally, patients' request for palliative and psychosocial support was assessed. Groups of patients with PC request were compared to patients without PC request regarding their symptom clusters. Logistic regression analysis was applied to discover significant predictors for the requested inclusion of PC. A total of 159 patients (25.5%) requested additional support by PC. Moderate and severe tiredness (40.3%), weakness (37.9%), pain (25.0%), loss of appetite (22.3%), and dyspnea (19.1%) were the most frequent symptoms. The group of patients requesting PC differed significantly in terms of pain, nausea, dyspnea, constipation, weakness, loss of appetite, tiredness, depression, and anxiety from patients without request for PC (p < .01). The perceived need for PC was identified by the significant predictors "depression," "anxiety," and "weakness" with an explained variance of 22%. Combining a standardized screening questionnaire and the assessment of patients' request for PC allows systematic monitoring for patients' need for PC in a large Medical Oncology clinic. Depression, anxiety, and weakness are predictors of requesting PC service by patients receiving outpatient cancer treatment.

  13. Abdominal Ultrasound With Scintigraphic and Clinical Correlates in Infants With Sickle Cell Anemia: Baseline Data From the BABY HUG Trial

    PubMed Central

    McCarville, M. Beth; Luo, Zhaoyu; Huang, Xiangke; Rees, Renee C.; Rogers, Zora R.; Miller, Scott T.; Thompson, Bruce; Kalpatthi, Ram; Wang, Winfred C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to perform and evaluate baseline abdominal ultrasound in infants with sickle cell anemia who participated in the BABY HUG multiinstitutional randomized placebo-controlled trial of hydroxyurea therapy and to examine the potential relationships among ultrasound results and clinical, nuclear medicine, and laboratory data. SUBJECTS AND METHODS After local institutional review board approval and with informed guardian consent, 116 girls and 87 boys (age range, 7.5–18 months) with sickle cell anemia underwent standardized abdominal sonography at 14 institutions. Imaging was centrally reviewed by one radiologist who assessed and measured the spleen, kidneys, gallbladder, and common bile duct. Baseline physical assessment of spleen size, serum alanine aminotransferase and bilirubin levels, 99mTc sulfur colloid liver-spleen scans, and 99mTc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid clearance glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) were obtained. Analysis of variance and the Student test were performed to compare sonographic findings to published results in healthy children and to clinical and laboratory findings. RESULTS The mean (± SD) spleen volume (108 ± 47 mL) was significantly greater than published normal control values (30 ± 14 mL; p < 0.0001). There was no correlation between spleen volume and function assessed by liver-spleen scan. The mean GFR (125 ± 34 mL/min/1.73 m2) was elevated compared with control GFRs (92 ± 18 mL/min/1.73 m2). Renal volumes (right kidney, 29 ± 8 mL; left kidney, 31 ± 9 mL) were significantly greater than control volumes (right kidney, 27 ± 3 mL; left kidney, 27 ± 3 mL; p < 0.0001) and were positively correlated with GFR (p = 0.0009). Five percent of patients had sonographic biliary abnormalities (sludge, n = 6; dilated common bile duct, n = 2; and cholelithiasis and thickened gallbladder wall, n = 1 each). There was no correlation between biliary sonographic findings and laboratory results. CONCLUSION

  14. The clinical impact of using complex molecular profiling strategies in routine oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Laes, Jean-François; Aftimos, Philippe; Barthelemy, Philippe; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Berchem, Guy; Camps, Carlos; Peñas, Ramón de Las; Finzel, Ana; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Hervonen, Petteri; Wahid, Ibrahim; Joensuu, Timo; Kathan, Louis; Kong, Anthony; Mackay, James; Mikropoulos, Christos; Mokbel, Kefah; Mouysset, Jean-Loup; Odarchenko, Sergey; Perren, Timothy J; Pienaar, Rika; Regonesi, Carlos; Alkhayyat, Shadi Salem; El Kinge, Abdul Rahman; Abulkhair, Omalkhair; Galal, Khaled Morsi; Ghanem, Hady; El Karak, Fadi; Garcia, Angel; Ghitti, Gregori; Sadik, Helen

    2018-04-17

    Molecular profiling and functional assessment of signalling pathways of advanced solid tumours are becoming increasingly available. However, their clinical utility in guiding patients' treatment remains unknown. Here, we assessed whether molecular profiling helps physicians in therapeutic decision making by analysing the molecular profiles of 1057 advanced cancer patient samples after failing at least one standard of care treatment using a combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS), immunohistochemistry (IHC) and other specific tests. The resulting information was interpreted and personalized treatments for each patient were suggested. Our data showed that NGS alone provided the oncologist with useful information in 10-50% of cases (depending on cancer type), whereas the addition of IHC/other tests increased extensively the usefulness of the information provided. Using internet surveys, we investigated how therapy recommendations influenced treatment choice of the oncologist. For patients who were still alive after the provision of the molecular information (76.8%), 60.4% of their oncologists followed report recommendations. Most treatment decisions (93.4%) were made based on the combination of NGS and IHC/other tests, and an approved drug- rather than clinical trial enrolment- was the main treatment choice. Most common reasons given by physicians to explain the non-adherence to recommendations were drug availability and cost, which remain barriers to personalised precision medicine. Finally, we observed that 27% of patients treated with the suggested therapies had an overall survival > 12 months. Our study demonstrates that the combination of NGS and IHC/other tests provides the most useful information in aiding treatment decisions by oncologists in routine clinical practice.

  15. Notes from the Field: Fungal Bloodstream Infections Associated with a Compounded Intravenous Medication at an Outpatient Oncology Clinic - New York City, 2016.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Amber M; Lake, Jason; Ngai, Stephanie; Halbrook, Megan; Vallabhaneni, Snigdha; Keckler, M Shannon; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Lockhart, Shawn R; Lee, Christopher T; Perkins, Kiran; Perz, Joseph F; Antwi, Mike; Moore, Miranda S; Greenko, Jane; Adams, Eleanor; Haas, Janet; Elkind, Sandra; Berman, Marjorie; Zavasky, Dani; Chiller, Tom; Ackelsberg, Joel

    2016-11-18

    On May 24, 2016, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene notified CDC of two cases of Exophiala dermatitidis bloodstream infections among patients with malignancies who had received care from a single physician at an outpatient oncology facility (clinic A). Review of January 1-May 31, 2016 microbiology records identified E. dermatitidis bloodstream infections in two additional patients who also had received care at clinic A. All four patients had implanted vascular access ports and had received intravenous (IV) medications, including a compounded IV flush solution containing saline, heparin, vancomycin, and ceftazidime, compounded and administered at clinic A.

  16. Targeted therapies and adverse drug reactions in oncology: the role of clinical pharmacist in pharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Fornasier, G; Taborelli, M; Francescon, S; Polesel, J; Aliberti, M; De Paoli, P; Baldo, P

    2018-05-21

    Background The majority of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reported in the summary of product characteristics (SPCs) are based on pivotal clinical trials, performed under controlled conditions and with selected patients. Objectives (1) to observe ADRs in the real-world setting and to evaluate if the supervision of the pharmacist impacts on the management of ADRs and on the satisfaction of patients; (2) to sensitise health professionals and patients on the need to increase the reporting of ADRs, in compliance with Pharmacovigilance. Setting CRO Aviano, Italian National Cancer Institute. Method From February 2013 to April 2015, we conducted an observational study enrolling 154 patients (≥ 18 years) undergoing treatment with at least one of ten targeted-therapies included in the study. Main outcome ADR reporting in the real-world setting. Patient satisfaction with clinical pharmacist support. Results Reported ADRs in the real setting do not always correspond with data described in the respective SPCs. Unknown ADRs were also identified such as hyperglycaemia with lenalidomide and sorafenib; and hypomagnesaemia with bevacizumab. We also observed a 124.3% increase in spontaneous reports. Conclusion This study shows the high value of active pharmacovigilance programs, and our results might be a starting point for developing a randomised trial which should aim to demonstrate the impact of the pharmacist on improving patient's adherence and in measuring the difference in ADRs reports in the different arms followed or not by the pharmacist.

  17. Charting the Future of Cancer Health Disparities Research: A Position Statement from the American Association of Cancer Research, the American Cancer Society, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the National Cancer Institute

    Cancer.gov

    The American Association for Cancer Research, American Cancer Society, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and NCI present a unified strategy to promote cooperation in all areas of the cancer health disparities research community.

  18. Clinical trials in pediatric neuro-oncology: what is missing and how we can improve.

    PubMed

    Byer, Lennox; Kline, Cassie; Mueller, Sabine

    2016-10-01

    Brain tumors are the most common solid tumor in childhood, yet outcomes vary dramatically. High-grade gliomas have dismal outcomes with poor survival. By contrast, low-grade gliomas, have high survival rates, but children suffer from morbidity of tumor burden and therapy-associated side effects. In this article, we discuss how current trial designs often miss the opportunity to include end points beyond tumor response and thus fail to offer complete assessments of therapeutic approaches. Quality of life, neurocognitive function and neurofunctional deficits need to be considered when assessing overall success of a therapy. Herein, we identify specific end points that should be included in the interpretation of clinical trial results and accordingly, offer a more comprehensive approach to treatment decision-making.

  19. Feasibility of a Centralized Clinical Trials Coverage Analysis: A Joint Initiative of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the National Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek, Connie M; Hurley, Patricia; Good, Marjorie J; Denicoff, Andrea; Willenberg, Kelly; Dawson, Casey; Kurbegov, Dax

    2017-06-01

    Clinical trial billing compliance is a challenge that is faced by overburdened clinical trials sites. The requirements place institutions and research sites at increased potential for financial risk. To reduce their risk, sites develop a coverage analysis (CA) before opening each trial. For multisite trials, this translates into system-wide redundancies, inconsistencies, trial delays, and potential costs to sites and patients. These factors exacerbate low accrual rates to cancer clinical trials. ASCO and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) collaborated to address this problem. An ASCO Research Community Forum working group proposed the concept of providing centrally developed CAs to research sites at protocol startup. The group collaborated with NCI and billing compliance experts to hold a symposium for key stakeholders to share knowledge, build skills, provide tools to conduct centralized CAs, and strategize about the next steps. Forty-eight attendees, who represented a range of stakeholders, participated in the symposium. As a result of this initiative, NCI directed the Cancer Trials Support Unit to convene a working group with NCI's National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) and Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) to develop tools and processes for generating CAs for their trials. A CA template with core elements was developed and is being adapted in a pilot project across NCTN Group and NCORP Research Bases. Centralized CAs for multisite trials-using standardized tools and templates-are feasible. They have the potential to reduce risk for patients and sites, forecast budget needs, and help decrease trial startup times that impede patient access and accrual to clinical trials.

  20. Clinical and Oncological Value of Preoperative BMI in Gastric Cancer Patients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Voglino, Costantino; Di Mare, Giulio; Ferrara, Francesco; De Franco, Lorenzo; Roviello, Franco; Marrelli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The impact of preoperative BMI on surgical outcomes and long-term survival of gastric cancer patients was investigated in various reports with contrasting results. Materials & Methods. A total of 378 patients who underwent a surgical resection for primary gastric cancer between 1994 and 2011 were retrospectively studied. Patients were stratified according to BMI into a normal group (<25, group A), an overweight group (25–30, group B), and an obesity group (≥30, group C). These 3 groups were compared according to clinical-pathological characteristics, surgical treatment, and long-term survival. Results. No significant correlations between BMI and TNM (2010), UICC stage (2010), Lauren's histological type, surgical results, lymph node dissection, and postoperative morbidity and mortality were observed. Factors related to higher BMI were male gender (P < 0.05), diabetes (P < 0.001), and serum blood proteins (P < 0.01). A trend to fewer lymph nodes retrieved during gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy in overweight patients (B and C groups) was observed, although not statistically significant. There was no difference in overall survival or disease-specific survival between the three groups. Conclusion. According to our data, BMI should not be considered a significant predictor of postoperative complications or long-term result in gastric cancer patients. PMID:25759721

  1. Clinical cancer advances 2008: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Winer, Eric; Gralow, Julie; Diller, Lisa; Karlan, Beth; Loehrer, Patrick; Pierce, Lori; Demetri, George; Ganz, Patricia; Kramer, Barnett; Kris, Mark; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert; Pfister, David; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory; Sandler, Howard; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn; Sweetenham, John; Vahdat, Linda; Schilsky, Richard L

    2009-02-10

    significant clinical research is conducted increasingly overseas. In addition, talented young physicians in the United States, seeing less opportunity in the field of oncology, are choosing other specialties instead. Although greater investment in research is critical, the need for new therapies is only part of the challenge. Far too many people in the United States lack access to the treatments that already exist, leading to unnecessary suffering and death. Uninsured cancer patients are significantly more likely to die than those with insurance, racial disparities in cancer incidence and mortality remain stark, and even insured patients struggle to keep up with the rapidly rising cost of cancer therapies. As this annual American Society of Clinical Oncology report of the major cancer research advances during the last year demonstrates, we are making important progress against cancer. But sound public policies are essential to accelerate that progress. In 2009, we have an opportunity to reinvest in cancer research, and to support policies that will help ensure that every individual in the United States receives potentially life-saving cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment. Sincerely, Richard L. Schilsky, MD President American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Funding source, conflict of interest and positive conclusions in neuro-oncology clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Fabio Y; Mendez, Lucas C; Taunk, Neil K; Raman, Srinivas; Suh, John H; Souhami, Luis; Slotman, Ben; Weltman, Eduardo; Spratt, Daniel E; Berlin, Alejandro; Marta, Gustavo N

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to test any association between authors' conclusions and self-reported COI or funding sources in central nervous system (CNS) studies. A review was performed for CNS malignancy clinical trials published in the last 5 years. Two investigators independently classified study conclusions according to authors' endorsement of the experimental therapy. Statistical models were used to test for associations between positive conclusions and trials characteristics. From February 2010 to February 2015, 1256 articles were retrieved; 319 were considered eligible trials. Positive conclusions were reported in 56.8% of trials with industry-only, 55.6% with academia-only, 44.1% with academia and industry, 77.8% with none, and 76.4% with not described funding source (p = 0.011). Positive conclusions were reported in 60.4% of trials with unrelated COI, 60% with related COI, and 60% with no COI reported (p = 0.997). Factors that were significantly associated with the presence of positive conclusion included trials design (phase 1) [OR 11.64 (95 CI 4.66-29.09), p < 0.001], geographic location (outside North America or Europe) [OR 1.96 (95 CI 1.05-3.79), P = 0.025], primary outcomes (non-overall or progression free survival) [OR 3.74 (95 CI 2.27-6.18), p < 0.001], and failure to disclose funding source [OR 2.45 (95 CI 1.22-5.22), p = 0.011]. In a multivariable regression model, all these factors remained significantly associated with trial's positive conclusion. Funding source and self-reported COI did not appear to influence the CNS trials conclusion. Funding source information and COI disclosure were under-reported in 14.1 and 17.2% of the CNS trials. Continued efforts are needed to increase rates of both COI and funding source reporting.

  3. Differences in Funding Sources of Phase III Oncology Clinical Trials by Treatment Modality and Cancer Type.

    PubMed

    Jairam, Vikram; Yu, James B; Aneja, Sanjay; Wilson, Lynn D; Lloyd, Shane

    2017-06-01

    Given the limited resources available to conduct clinical trials, it is important to understand how trial sponsorship differs among different therapeutic modalities and cancer types and to consider the ramifications of these differences. We searched clinicaltrials.gov for a cross-sectional register of active, phase III, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying treatment-related endpoints such as survival and recurrence for the 24 most prevalent malignancies. We classified the RCTs into 7 categories of therapeutic modality: (1) chemotherapy/other cancer-directed drugs, (2) targeted therapy, (3) surgery, (4) radiation therapy (RT), (5) RT with other modalities, (6) multimodality therapy without RT, and (7) other. RCTs were categorized as being funded by one or more of the following groups: (1) government, (2) hospital/university, (3) industry, and (4) other. χ analysis was performed to detect differences in funding source distribution between modalities and cancer types. The percentage of multimodality trials (5%) and radiation RCTs (4%) funded by industry was less than that for chemotherapy (32%, P<0.01) or targeted therapy (48%, P<0.01). Trials studying targeted therapy were less likely to have hospital/university funding than any of the other modalities (P<0.01 in each comparison). Trials of chemotherapy were more likely to be funded by industry if they also studied targeted therapy (P<0.01). RCTs studying targeted therapies are more likely to be funded by industry than trials studying multimodality therapy or radiation. The impact of industry funding versus institutional or governmental sources of funding for cancer research is unclear and requires further study.

  4. Factors associated with failure of oncology drugs in late-stage clinical development: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jardim, Denis L; Groves, Eric S; Breitfeld, Philip P; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to describe the reasons for failure of experimental anticancer drugs in late-stage clinical development. We searched the PharmaProjects database (https://citeline.com/products/pharmaprojects/) for anticancer drugs discontinued between 01/01/2009 and 06/30/2014. Drug programs that reached phase III trials, but never gained Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval were compared to 37 anti-cancer drugs achieving FDA approval in this time period. Forty-two drugs fit our criteria for development failures. These failed drugs (49% targeted, 23% cytotoxics, and 28% other) were tested in 43 cancer indications (drug programs). Only 16% (7/43) of failed drug programs adopted a biomarker-driven rationale for patient selection versus 57% (21/37) of successful drug programs (P<0.001). Phase II trial information was available in 32 of 43 failed drug programs and in 32 of 37 successful programs. Nine of the 32 trials (28%) of failed drugs versus 28 of 32 trials (87%) of successful drugs (P<0.001) achieved proof of concept (single agent response rate (RR) ⩾20% or combination therapy showing a ⩾20% RR increase above the median historical RR without the experimental agent (with a minimal absolute increase of 5%) or a randomized phase II trial showing significance (P⩽0.05) for its primary outcome). No pattern of study sites, trial design or funding characteristics emerged from the failed drug analysis. For drugs that reached Phase III, lack of a biomarker-driven strategy and failure to attain proof of concept in phase II are potential risk factors for later discontinuation, especially for targeted agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Results From the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston's Anthropomorphic Phantoms Used for Proton Therapy Clinical Trial Credentialing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paige A., E-mail: pataylor@mdanderson.org; Kry, Stephen F.; Alvarez, Paola

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to summarize the findings of anthropomorphic proton phantom irradiations analyzed by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston QA Center (IROC Houston). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 phantoms were irradiated by proton therapy centers participating in clinical trials. The anthropomorphic phantoms simulated heterogeneous anatomy of a head, liver, lung, prostate, and spine. Treatment plans included those for scattered, uniform scanning, and pencil beam scanning beam delivery modalities using 5 different treatment planning systems. For every phantom irradiation, point doses and planar doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and film, respectively. Differencesmore » between measured and planned doses were studied as a function of phantom, beam delivery modality, motion, repeat attempt, treatment planning system, and date of irradiation. Results: The phantom pass rate (overall, 79%) was high for simple phantoms and lower for phantoms that introduced higher levels of difficulty, such as motion, multiple targets, or increased heterogeneity. All treatment planning systems overestimated dose to the target, compared to TLD measurements. Errors in range calculation resulted in several failed phantoms. There was no correlation between treatment planning system and pass rate. The pass rates for each individual phantom are not improving over time, but when individual institutions received feedback about failed phantom irradiations, pass rates did improve. Conclusions: The proton phantom pass rates are not as high as desired and emphasize potential deficiencies in proton therapy planning and/or delivery. There are many areas for improvement with the proton phantom irradiations, such as treatment planning system dose agreement, range calculations, accounting for motion, and irradiation of multiple targets.« less

  6. Novel influenza a (H1N1) infection in a Pediatric Hematology Oncology Clinic during the 2009-2010 pandemia.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Nihal; Celkan, Tiraje; Midilli, Kenan; Aygün, Gökhan; Sinekbasan, Serhat; Kılıç, Omer; Apak, Hilmi; Camcıoğlu, Yıldız; Yıldız, Inci

    2011-05-01

    Pandemic influenza A infection (2009 H1N1) was associated with a worldwide outbreak of febrile respiratory infection. Although usually it results in a mild illness, certain patient groups are at increased risk for complications. The authors reviewed their experience in a pediatric hematology-oncology unit to determine the outcome of this disease in children with hematological conditions and solid tumors. During the second outbreak (1 November 2009 to 14 January 2010), a total of 187 children from pediatric clinic were tested for H1N1 influenza A by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 63 of them were positive. Patients' signs and symptoms were recorded prospectively. Ten (35.7%) (5 children with solid tumors, 4 with leukemia, 1 with hereditary spherocytosis) of 28 tested children with hematological conditions were diagnosed with 2009 H1N1 influenza infection. Fever (100%) and cough (90%) were the most common symptoms. Five were neutropenic (neutrophil count <1000/mm(3)), 4 had severe neutropenia (neutrophil count <500/mm(3)). Systemic antibiotics were given in 5 patients with the diagnosis of febrile neutropenia. Four were inpatients, others were hospitalized after the diagnosis. One patient required mechanical ventilation; however, he had concomitant invasive fungal infection. Eight patients were treated by oseltamivir, all tolerated the drug well. A total of 4 cases from 9 cancer patients had a delay in their planned chemotherapy for 7 to 15 days. Pandemic H1N1 influenza caused mild symptoms in children with cancer and/or hematological conditions but resulted in delay in anticancer therapy and increase in hospitalization and antibiotic usage.

  7. Defining Clinical Response Criteria and Early Response Criteria for Precision Oncology: Current State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Chuang, Hubert H; Gambhire, Dhiraj; Kairemo, Kalevi

    2017-02-15

    In this era of precision oncology, there has been an exponential growth in the armamentarium of genomically targeted therapies and immunotherapies. Evaluating early responses to precision therapy is essential for "go" versus "no go" decisions for these molecularly targeted drugs and agents that arm the immune system. Many different response assessment criteria exist for use in solid tumors and lymphomas. We reviewed the literature using the Medline/PubMed database for keywords "response assessment" and various known response assessment criteria published up to 2016. In this article we review the commonly used response assessment criteria. We present a decision tree to facilitate selection of appropriate criteria. We also suggest methods for standardization of various response assessment criteria. The relevant response assessment criteria were further studied for rational of development, key features, proposed use and acceptance by various entities. We also discuss early response evaluation and provide specific case studies of early response to targeted therapy. With high-throughput, advanced computing programs and digital data-mining it is now possible to acquire vast amount of high quality imaging data opening up a new field of "omics in radiology"-radiomics that complements genomics for personalized medicine. Radiomics is rapidly evolving and is still in the research arena. This cutting-edge technology is poised to move soon to the mainstream clinical arena. Novel agents with new mechanisms of action require advanced molecular imaging as imaging biomarkers. There is an urgent need for development of standardized early response assessment criteria for evaluation of response to precision therapy.

  8. Clinical usefulness of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy in oncological diagnostics: a preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Płachcińska, Anna; Mikołajczak, Renata; Maecke, Helmut R; Młodkowska, Ewa; Kunert-Radek, Jolanta; Michalski, Andrzej; Rzeszutek, Katarzyna; Kozak, Józef; Kuśmierek, Jacek

    2003-10-01

    This study assessed the clinical usefulness of a new technetium-99m labelled somatostatin analogue from the standpoint of oncological diagnostics. The study group comprised 40 patients in whom malignant neoplasms (32 primary and 8 metastatic) had been diagnosed. Among the primary tumours there were 21 cases of lung cancer (2 small cell and 19 non-small cell), seven pituitary adenomas (five hormonally active and two inactive), one liposarcoma, two carcinoids and one breast carcinoma. The metastatic tumours consisted of three malignant melanomas, one phaeochromocytoma, one prostatic cancer, one leiomyosarcoma, one pancreatic carcinoma ectopically secreting ACTH and one carcinoid of the thymus. The radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide was administered i.v. at an activity of 740-925 MBq. The imaging comprised a whole-body scan and a single-photon emission tomography acquisition. Positive scintigrams were obtained in all cases of small cell and non-small cell lung cancer, four out of five hormonally active pituitary adenomas, one out of two cases of carcinoid, the liposarcoma and the breast cancer. Neoplastic metastases were visualised in two out of three patients with melanoma and in patients with phaeochromocytoma, ACTH-secreting pancreatic carcinoma and thymic carcinoid. Scintigrams were negative in both hormonally inactive pituitary adenomas, in one case of metastatic malignant melanoma, in the leiomyosarcoma and in the case of metastasis from prostatic carcinoma. The results of this pilot study indicate that 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC is a potentially useful radiopharmaceutical for imaging of a wide range of primary and metastatic tumours. Special attention should be paid to the successful imaging of all cases of non-small cell lung cancer.

  9. Elective Clinical Target Volumes for Conformal Therapy in Anorectal Cancer: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Contouring Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Myerson, Robert J.; Garofalo, Michael C.; El Naqa, Issam

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas of the elective clinical target volume (CTV) definitions to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for anal and rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: The Gastrointestinal Committee of the RTOG established a task group (the nine physician co-authors) to develop this atlas. They responded to a questionnaire concerning three elective CTVs (CTVA: internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodal regions for both anal and rectal case planning; CTVB: external iliac nodal region for anal case planning and for selected rectal cases; CTVC: inguinal nodal region for anal case planning andmore » for select rectal cases), and to outline these areas on individual computed tomographic images. The imaging files were shared via the Advanced Technology Consortium. A program developed by one of the co-authors (I.E.N.) used binomial maximum-likelihood estimates to generate a 95% group consensus contour. The computer-estimated consensus contours were then reviewed by the group and modified to provide a final contouring consensus atlas. Results: The panel achieved consensus CTV definitions to be used as guidelines for the adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer and definitive therapy for anal cancer. The most important difference from similar atlases for gynecologic or genitourinary cancer is mesorectal coverage. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusion: This report serves as a template for the definition of the elective CTVs to be used in IMRT planning for anal and rectal cancers, as part of prospective RTOG trials.« less

  10. Performance in quasi-firms: an example from the Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    PubMed

    Lacey, L M; Hynes, D M; Kaluzny, A D

    1992-01-01

    In this analysis, the authors examined the effects of different sets of process, structure, and environmental variables on the performance of the CCOP as a quasi-firm. Specifically, they distinguished between internal organizational processes, structural, and size characteristics of the CCOP and the organizational environment created by prior NCI program experience and the relationship within the quasi-firm. The analysis revealed that these sets of organizational and environmental characteristics have differential effects on treatment accrual. The strongest predictors are those associated with the quasi-firm relationship between the CCOP and its chosen research bases. Any definitive policy implications for the design of organizational network relationships--especially the CCOPs--will require further analysis. Particular attention needs to be given to the longitudinal nature of the relationships and the ability of these organizational and environmental factors to affect other aspects of performance. Several points have been made within this initial assessment. First, the structural character of the CCOP and its relationship to its organizational environment are important factors affecting accrual performance. The subtleties of this multivariate model are not as important as simply demonstrating that the various internal and external characteristics of these organizations as quasi-firms simultaneously affect their ability to accrue patients to clinical trials. Secondly, the importance of research base relations, and particularly the significant role of nurses, needs to be emphasized. While CCOPs were originally designed as a network of physicians and hospitals, it appears that an infrastructure of professionally active nurses working within a larger organizational environment is critical to success--at least as defined by accrual to treatment protocols. Finally, the failure of prior experience with other NCI community programs to affect CCOP accrual performance

  11. Clinical cancer advances 2007: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gralow, Julie; Ozols, Robert F; Bajorin, Dean F; Cheson, Bruce D; Sandler, Howard M; Winer, Eric P; Bonner, James; Demetri, George D; Curran, Walter; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Davidson, Nancy E; Schilsky, Richard L; Lichter, Allen S

    2008-01-10

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT: For the third year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO publishes this report to demonstrate the important progress being made on the front lines of clinical cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and organizations, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening, the association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer incidence, the link between human papillomavirus and head and neck cancers, and the use of radiation therapy to prevent lung cancer from spreading. They also report on effective new targeted therapies for cancers that have been historically difficult to treat, such as liver cancer and kidney cancer, among many others. A total of 24 advances are featured in this year's report. These advances and many more over the past several years show that the nation's long-term investment in cancer research is paying off. But there are disturbing signs that progress could slow. We are now in the midst of the longest sustained period of flat government funding for cancer research in history. The budgets for the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have been unchanged for four years. When adjusted for inflation, cancer research funding has actually declined 12% since 2004. These budget constraints limit the NCI's ability to fund promising cancer research. In the past several years the number of grants that the NCI has been able to fund has significantly decreased; this year, in response to just the

  12. Clinical Cancer Advances 2018: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Heymach, John; Krilov, Lada; Alberg, Anthony; Baxter, Nancy; Chang, Susan Marina; Corcoran, Ryan; Dale, William; DeMichele, Angela; Magid Diefenbach, Catherine S; Dreicer, Robert; Epstein, Andrew S; Gillison, Maura L; Graham, David L; Jones, Joshua; Ko, Andrew H; Lopez, Ana Maria; Maki, Robert G; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Schilsky, Richard L; Sznol, Mario; Westin, Shannon Neville; Burstein, Harold

    2018-04-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I remember when ASCO first conceived of publishing an annual report on the most transformative research occurring in cancer care. Thirteen reports later, the progress we have chronicled is remarkable, and this year is no different. The research featured in ASCO's Clinical Cancer Advances 2018 report underscores the impressive gains in our understanding of cancer and in our ability to tailor treatments to tumors' genetic makeup. The ASCO 2018 Advance of the Year, adoptive cell immunotherapy, allows clinicians to genetically reprogram patients' own immune cells to find and attack cancer cells throughout the body. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy-a type of adoptive cell immunotherapy-has led to remarkable results in young patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in adults with lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Researchers are also exploring this approach in other types of cancer. This advance would not be possible without robust federal investment in cancer research. The first clinical trial of CAR T-cell therapy in children with ALL was funded, in part, by grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and researchers at the NCI Center for Cancer Research were the first to report on possible CAR T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma. These discoveries follow decades of prior research on immunology and cancer biology, much of which was supported by federal dollars. In fact, many advances that are highlighted in the 2018 Clinical Cancer Advances report were made possible thanks to our nation's support for biomedical research. Funding from the US National Institutes of Health and the NCI helps researchers pursue critical patient care questions and addresses vital, unmet needs that private industry has little incentive to take on. Federally supported cancer research generates the biomedical innovations that fuel the development and availability of new and improved treatments for patients. We need sustained federal

  13. Initial clinical experience with a radiation oncology dedicated open 1.0T MR‐simulation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ning; Hearshen, David; Kim, Joshua; Pantelic, Milan; Zhao, Bo; Mancell, Tina; Levin, Kenneth; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.; Siddiqui, M. Salim

    2015-01-01

    than slow (50.4% (3 s) and 39.4% (5 s), p<0.001) and ~ fourfold acquisition time increase was measured for ten‐phase versus two‐phase. Superior–inferior object extent was underestimated 8% (6 mm) for two‐phase as compared to ten‐phase MIPs, although <2% difference was obtained for ≥4 phases. 4D MRI for a patient demonstrated acceptable image quality in ~7 min. MR‐SIM was integrated into our workflow and QA procedures were developed. Clinical applicability was demonstrated for 4D MRI and UTE imaging to support MR‐SIM for single modality treatment planning. PACS numbers: 87.56.Fc, 87.61.‐c, 87.57.cp PMID:26103190

  14. Study and classification of the abdominal adiposity throughout the application of the two-dimensional predictive equation Garaulet et al., in the clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Piernas Sánchez, C M; Morales Falo, E M; Zamora Navarro, S; Garaulet Aza, M

    2010-01-01

    The excess of visceral abdominal adipose tissue is one of the major concerns in obesity and its clinical treatment. To apply the two-dimensional predictive equation proposed by Garaulet et al. to determine the abdominal fat distribution and to compare the results with the body composition obtained by multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (M-BIA). We studied 230 women, who underwent anthropometry and M-BIA. The predictive equation was applied. Multivariate lineal and partial correlation analyses were performed with control for BMI and % body fat, using SPSS 15.0 with statistical significance P < 0.05. Overall, women were considered as having subcutaneous distribution of abdominal fat. Truncal fat, regional fat and muscular mass were negatively associated with VA/SA(predicted), while the visceral index obtained by M-BIA was positively correlated with VA/SA(predicted). The predictive equation may be useful in the clinical practice to obtain an accurate, costless and safe classification of abdominal obesity.

  15. Untapped Potential of Observational Research to Inform Clinical Decision Making: American Society of Clinical Oncology Research Statement.

    PubMed

    Visvanathan, Kala; Levit, Laura A; Raghavan, Derek; Hudis, Clifford A; Wong, Sandra; Dueck, Amylou; Lyman, Gary H

    2017-06-01

    ASCO believes that high-quality observational studies can advance evidence-based practice for cancer care and are complementary to randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Observational studies can generate hypotheses by evaluating novel exposures or biomarkers and by revealing patterns of care and relationships that might not otherwise be discovered. Researchers can then test these hypotheses in RCTs. Observational studies can also answer or inform questions that either have not been or cannot be answered by RCTs. In addition, observational studies can be used for postmarketing surveillance of new cancer treatments, particularly in vulnerable populations. The incorporation of observational research as part of clinical decision making is consistent with the position of many leading institutions. ASCO identified five overarching recommendations to enhance the role of observational research in clinical decision making: (1) improve the quality of electronic health data available for research, (2) improve interoperability and the exchange of electronic health information, (3) ensure the use of rigorous observational research methodologies, (4) promote transparent reporting of observational research studies, and (5) protect patient privacy.

  16. NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force Workshop Provides Guidance for Analytical Validation of Protein-based Multiplex Assays | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force (IOTF) Molecular Diagnostics Workshop was held on October 30, 2008 in Cambridge, MA, to discuss requirements for analytical validation of protein-based multiplex technologies in the context of its intended use. This workshop developed through NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative and the FDA focused on technology-specific analytical validation processes to be addressed prior to use in clinical settings. In making this workshop unique, a case study approach was used to discuss issues related to

  17. Direct health costs and clinical outcomes of open surgery in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm in Spain. The RECAPTA study.

    PubMed

    Egea, Marta; Fernández-Samos, Rafael; Lechón, José Antonio; Reparaz, Luis; Álvarez, María; Cairols, Marc

    2018-06-18

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a chronic, progressive disease that often requires surgical repair. This study aimed to assess the healthcare costs and clinical outcomes of open AAA repair in Spain. Observational, retrospective, multicenter study with a one-year follow-up. Healthcare resource use and costs related to the surgical procedure, hospital stay, and follow-up period were assessed. Ninety patients with asymptomatic AAA who underwent open repair were recruited between 2003 and 2009 at three Spanish hospitals. Four patients (4.44%) died in the first 30 postoperative days. Mean [standard deviation] procedure time was 292.83 [72.10] minutes and mean hospital length of stay was 11.44 days [5.42]. Thirty two patients (35.56%) presented in-hospital complications and three patients (3.45%) underwent re-intervention during follow-up. The mean overall cost per patient during the study period was €21,622.59, of which 42.40% (€9,168.19), 52.08% (€11,261.74), and 5.52% (€1,192.66) corresponded to the surgical procedure, the inpatient stay, and the study follow-up period, respectively. Given the economic burden imposed by the treatment of patients admitted with AAA on the Spanish health system, additional efforts comparing the cost of open repair with endovascular treatments are needed to ensure greater efficiency.

  18. Ongoing Use of Data and Specimens from NCI Sponsored Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials in the Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    Minasian, Lori; Tangen, Catherine M.; Wickerham, D. Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Large cancer prevention trials provide opportunities to collect a wide array of data and biospecimens at study entry and longitudinally, for a healthy, aging population without cancer. This provides an opportunity to use pre-diagnostic data and specimens to evaluate hypotheses about the initial development of cancer. This paper reports on strides made by, and future possibilities for, the use of accessible biorepositories developed from precisely annotated samples obtained through large-scale National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer prevention clinical trials conducted by the NCI Cooperative Groups. These large cancer prevention studies, which have enrolled over 80,000 volunteers, continue to contribute to our understanding of cancer development more than 10 years after they were closed. PMID:26433556

  19. Systemic Therapy in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K.; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C.; Frame, James N.; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W.; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L.; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R. Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Virgo, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. Results When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 (223Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Recommendations Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or 223Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to

  20. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Testing in Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists Clinical Practice Guideline Focused Update.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Antonio C; Hammond, M Elizabeth Hale; Allison, Kimberly H; Harvey, Brittany E; Mangu, Pamela B; Bartlett, John M S; Bilous, Michael; Ellis, Ian O; Fitzgibbons, Patrick; Hanna, Wedad; Jenkins, Robert B; Press, Michael F; Spears, Patricia A; Vance, Gail H; Viale, Giuseppe; McShane, Lisa M; Dowsett, Mitchell

    2018-05-30

    - To update key recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing in breast cancer guideline. - Based on the signals approach, an Expert Panel reviewed published literature and research survey results on the observed frequency of less common in situ hybridization (ISH) patterns to update the recommendations. - Two recommendations addressed via correspondence in 2015 are included. First, immunohistochemistry (IHC) 2+ is defined as invasive breast cancer with weak to moderate complete membrane staining observed in >10% of tumor cells. Second, if the initial HER2 test result in a core needle biopsy specimen of a primary breast cancer is negative, a new HER2 test may (not "must") be ordered on the excision specimen based on specific clinical criteria. The HER2 testing algorithm for breast cancer is updated to address the recommended workup for less common clinical scenarios (approximately 5% of cases) observed when using a dual-probe ISH assay. These scenarios are described as ISH group 2 ( HER2/chromosome enumeration probe 17 [CEP17] ratio ≥2.0; average HER2 copy number <4.0 signals per cell), ISH group 3 ( HER2/CEP17 ratio <2.0; average HER2 copy number ≥6.0 signals per cell), and ISH group 4 ( HER2/CEP17 ratio <2.0; average HER2 copy number ≥4.0 and <6.0 signals per cell). The diagnostic approach includes more rigorous interpretation criteria for ISH and requires concomitant IHC review for dual-probe ISH groups 2 to 4 to arrive at the most accurate HER2 status designation (positive or negative) based on combined interpretation of the ISH and IHC assays. The Expert Panel recommends that laboratories using single-probe ISH assays include concomitant IHC review as part of the interpretation of all single-probe ISH assay results.

  1. Use of epoetin and darbepoetin in patients with cancer: 2007 American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Society of Hematology clinical practice guideline update.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, J Douglas; Somerfield, Mark R; Hagerty, Karen L; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Bohlius, Julia; Bennett, Charles L; Cella, David F; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Goode, Matthew J; Jakubowski, Ann A; Rarick, Mark U; Regan, David H; Lichtin, Alan E

    2008-01-01

    To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Society of Hematology (ASCO/ASH) recommendations for the use of epoetin. The guideline was expanded to address use of darbepoetin and thromboembolic risk associated with these agents. An Update Committee ("Committee") reviewed and analyzed data published since 2002 through July 2007. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library databases were searched. For patients with chemotherapy-associated anemia, the Committee continues to recommend initiating an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) as hemoglobin (Hb) approaches, or falls below, 10 g/dL, to increase Hb and decrease transfusions. ESA treatment continues to be recommended for patients with low-risk myelodysplasia for similar reasons. There is no evidence showing increased survival as a result of ESA treatment. Conclusive evidence is lacking that, absent clinical circumstances necessitating earlier treatment, initiating ESAs at Hb levels greater than 10 g/dL either spares more patients from transfusion or substantially improves their quality of life. Starting doses and dose modifications based on response or lack thereof should follow the package insert. Continuing ESAs beyond 6 to 8 weeks in the absence of response, assuming appropriate dose increase has been attempted in nonresponders as per US Food and Drug Administration-approved labeling, does not seem to be beneficial, and ESA therapy should be discontinued. The Committee recommends monitoring iron stores and supplementing iron intake for ESA-treated patients. ESAs should be used cautiously with chemotherapy, or in clinical states, associated with elevated risk for thromboembolic complications. The Committee also cautions against ESA use for patients with cancer who are not receiving chemotherapy, since recent trials report increased thromboembolic risks and decreased survival under these circumstances.

  2. Use of epoetin and darbepoetin in patients with cancer: 2007 American Society of Hematology/American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, J Douglas; Somerfield, Mark R; Hagerty, Karen L; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Bohlius, Julia; Bennett, Charles L; Cella, David F; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Goode, Matthew J; Jakubowski, Ann A; Rarick, Mark U; Regan, David H; Lichtin, Alan E

    2008-01-01

    To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Society of Hematology (ASCO/ASH) recommendations for the use of epoetin. The guideline was expanded to address use of darbepoetin and thromboembolic risk associated with these agents. An Update Committee ("Committee") reviewed and analyzed data published since 2002 through July 2007. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library databases were searched. For patients with chemotherapy-associated anemia, the Committee continues to recommend initiating an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) as hemoglobin (Hb) approaches, or falls below, 10 g/dL, to increase Hb and decrease transfusions. ESA treatment continues to be recommended for patients with low-risk myelodysplasia for similar reasons. There is no evidence showing increased survival as a result of ESA treatment. Conclusive evidence is lacking that, absent clinical circumstances necessitating earlier treatment, initiating ESAs at Hb levels greater than 10 g/dL either spares more patients from transfusion or substantially improves their quality of life. Starting doses and dose modifications based on response or lack thereof should follow the package insert. Continuing ESAs beyond 6 to 8 weeks in the absence of response, assuming appropriate dose increase has been attempted in nonresponders as per US Food and Drug Administration-approved label, does not seem to be beneficial, and ESA therapy should be discontinued. The Committee recommends monitoring iron stores and supplementing iron intake for ESA-treated patients. ESAs should be used cautiously with chemotherapy, or in clinical states, associated with elevated risk for thromo-embolic complications. The Committee also cautions against ESA use for patients with cancer who are not receiving chemotherapy, since recent trials report increased thromboembolic risks and decreased survival under these circumstances.

  3. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James M.; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is establishedmore » at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as

  4. A pilot study to assess the pharmacy impact of implementing a chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting collaborative disease therapy management in the outpatient oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kasey; Letton, Cathy; Maldonado, Andy; Bodiford, Andrew; Sion, Amy; Hartwell, Rebekah; Graham, Anastasia; Bondarenka, Carolyn; Uber, Lynn

    2018-01-01

    Background Collaborative drug therapy management is a formal partnership between a pharmacist and physician to allow the pharmacist to manage a patient's drug therapy. Literature supports collaborative disease therapy management can improve patient outcomes, improve medication adherence, enhance medication safety, and positively influence healthcare expenditures. Chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting is considered one of the most distressing and feared adverse events among patients receiving chemotherapy. Chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting can impact a patient's quality of life and may affect compliance with the treatment plan. Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to determine the pharmacy impact of implementing a chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting collaborative disease therapy management protocol in the outpatient oncology clinics at a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center associated with an academic medical center. The primary endpoint was to determine the number and type of chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting clinical interventions made by the oncology pharmacists. Secondary endpoints included comparing patient's Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer scores and revenue of pharmacists' services. Methods The credentialed oncology pharmacists were consulted by an oncologist to manage chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting. Patients were included in the chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting collaborative disease therapy management if they were seen in an outpatient oncology clinic from October 2016 to January 2017 and had a referral from a qualified provider to help manage chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting. Patients admitted to the hospital at the time of consult were excluded from the study. The pharmacists interviewed patients and provided recommendations. The pharmacists followed up with the patient via a telephone call or during the next scheduled clinic visit to assess their symptoms

  5. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: gondi@humonc.wisc.edu; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 tomore » 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical

  6. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group and European Association for Neuro-Oncology recommendations for the clinical use of PET imaging in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nathalie L.; Weller, Michael; Suchorska, Bogdana; Galldiks, Norbert; Soffietti, Riccardo; Kim, Michelle M.; la Fougère, Christian; Pope, Whitney; Law, Ian; Arbizu, Javier; Chamberlain, Marc C.; Vogelbaum, Michael