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Sample records for abdominal ultrasound revealed

  1. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  2. Abdominal ultrasound and medical education.

    PubMed

    García de Casasola Sánchez, G; Torres Macho, J; Casas Rojo, J M; Cubo Romano, P; Antón Santos, J M; Villena Garrido, V; Diez Lobato, R

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasound is a very versatile diagnostic modality that permits real-time visualization of multiple internal organs. It is of invaluable help for the physical examination of the patients. To assess if ultrasound can be incorporated into medical education and if the students can perform a basic abdominal ultrasound examination without the necessity of a long period of training. Twelve medical students were trained in basic abdominal ultrasound during a 15-h training program including a 5-h theoretical and practical course and supervised practice in 20 selected patients. Subsequently, we conducted an evaluation test that assessed the ability of students to obtain the ultrasound views and to detect various pathologies in five different patients. The students were able to correctly identify the abdominal views more than 90% of the times. This percentage was only lower (80%) in the right subcostal view to locate the gallbladder. The accuracy or global efficiency of the ultrasound for the diagnosis of relevant pathological findings of the patients was greater than 90% (91.1% gallstones, abdominal aortic aneurysm 100%; splenomegaly 98.3%, ascites 100%; dilated inferior vena cava 100%; acute urinary retention 100%). The ultrasound may be a feasible learning tool in medical education. Ultrasound can help students to improve the physical examination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Reproducibility of abdominal fat assessment by ultrasound and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mauad, Fernando Marum; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Benedeti, Augusto César Garcia Saab; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Muller, Enrico Mattana; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    To test the accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for the quantification of abdominal fat in correlation with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical assessments. Using ultrasound and CT, we determined the thickness of subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat in 101 subjects-of whom 39 (38.6%) were men and 62 (61.4%) were women-with a mean age of 66.3 years (60-80 years). The ultrasound data were correlated with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters, as well as with the areas measured by abdominal CT. Intra-abdominal thickness was the variable for which the correlation with the areas of abdominal fat was strongest (i.e., the correlation coefficient was highest). We also tested the reproducibility of ultrasound and CT for the assessment of abdominal fat and found that CT measurements of abdominal fat showed greater reproducibility, having higher intraobserver and interobserver reliability than had the ultrasound measurements. There was a significant correlation between ultrasound and CT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.71. In the assessment of abdominal fat, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability were greater for CT than for ultrasound, although both methods showed high accuracy and good reproducibility.

  4. Reproducibility of abdominal fat assessment by ultrasound and computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mauad, Fernando Marum; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Benedeti, Augusto César Garcia Saab; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Muller, Enrico Mattana; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for the quantification of abdominal fat in correlation with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical assessments. Materials and Methods: Using ultrasound and CT, we determined the thickness of subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat in 101 subjects-of whom 39 (38.6%) were men and 62 (61.4%) were women-with a mean age of 66.3 years (60-80 years). The ultrasound data were correlated with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters, as well as with the areas measured by abdominal CT. Results: Intra-abdominal thickness was the variable for which the correlation with the areas of abdominal fat was strongest (i.e., the correlation coefficient was highest). We also tested the reproducibility of ultrasound and CT for the assessment of abdominal fat and found that CT measurements of abdominal fat showed greater reproducibility, having higher intraobserver and interobserver reliability than had the ultrasound measurements. There was a significant correlation between ultrasound and CT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.71. Conclusion: In the assessment of abdominal fat, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability were greater for CT than for ultrasound, although both methods showed high accuracy and good reproducibility. PMID:28670024

  5. Chronic abdominal wall pain and ultrasound-guided abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kanakarajan, Saravanakumar; High, Kristina; Nagaraja, Ravi

    2011-03-01

    Chronic abdominal wall pain occurs in about 10-30% of patients presenting with chronic abdominal pain. Entrapment of abdominal cutaneous nerves at the lateral border of the rectus abdominis muscle has been attributed as a cause of abdominal wall pain. We report our experience of treating such patients using ultrasound-guided abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration. We conducted a retrospective audit of abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration performed in the period between September 2008 to August 2009 in our center. All patients had received local anesthetic and steroid injection under ultrasound guidance. The response to the infiltration was evaluated in the post-procedure telephone review as well as in the follow-up clinic. Brief pain inventory (BPI) and numerical rating scale pain scores were collated from two points: the initial outpatient clinic and the follow up clinic up to 5 months following the injection. Nine patients had abdominal cutaneous nerve injections under ultrasound guidance in the period under review. Six patients reported 50% pain relief or more (responders) while three patients did not. Pain and BPI scores showed a decreasing trend in responders. The median duration of follow-up was 12 weeks. Ultrasound can reliably be used for infiltration of the abdominal cutaneous nerves. This will improve the safety as well as diagnostic utility of the procedure. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Office-based ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Blois, Beau

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the efficacy of an office-based, family physician–administered ultrasound examination to screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Design A prospective observational study. Consecutive patients were approached by nonphysician staff. Setting Rural family physician offices in Grand Forks and Revelstoke, BC. Participants The Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery screening recommendations for AAA were used to help select patients who were at risk of AAA. All men 65 years of age or older were included. Women 65 years of age or older were included if they were current smokers or had diabetes, hypertension, a history of coronary artery disease, or a family history of AAA. Main outcome measures A focused “quick screen,” which measured the maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta using point-of-care ultrasound technology, was performed in the office by a resident physician trained in emergency ultrasonography. Each patient was then booked for a criterion standard scan (ie, a conventional abdominal ultrasound scan performed by a technician and interpreted by a radiologist). The maximal abdominal aortic diameter measured by ultrasound in the office was compared with that measured by the criterion standard method. The time to screen each patient was recorded. Results Forty-five patients were included in data analysis; 62% of participants were men. The mean age was 73 years. The mean pairwise difference between the office-based ultrasound scan and the criterion standard scan was not statistically significant. The mean absolute difference between the 2 scans was 0.20 cm (95% CI 0.15 to 0.25 cm). Correlation between the scans was 0.81. The office-based ultrasound scan had both a sensitivity and a specificity of 100%. The mean time to screen each patient was 212 seconds (95% CI 194 to 230 seconds). Conclusion Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening can be safely performed in the office by family physicians who are trained to use point

  7. Office-based ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Blois, Beau

    2012-03-01

    To assess the efficacy of an office-based, family physician–administered ultrasound examination to screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A prospective observational study. Consecutive patients were approached by nonphysician staff. Rural family physician offices in Grand Forks and Revelstoke, BC. The Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery screening recommendations for AAA were used to help select patients who were at risk of AAA. All men 65 years of age or older were included. Women 65 years of age or older were included if they were current smokers or had diabetes, hypertension, a history of coronary artery disease, or a family history of AAA. A focused “quick screen”, which measured the maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta using point-of-care ultrasound technology, was performed in the office by a resident physician trained in emergency ultrasonography. Each patient was then booked for a criterion standard scan (i.e., a conventional abdominal ultrasound scan performed by a technician and interpreted by a radiologist). The maximal abdominal aortic diameter measured by ultrasound in the office was compared with that measured by the criterion standard method. The time to screen each patient was recorded. Forty-five patients were included in data analysis; 62% of participants were men. The mean age was 73 years. The mean pairwise difference between the office-based ultrasound scan and the criterion standard scan was not statistically significant. The mean absolute difference between the 2 scans was 0.20 cm (95% CI 0.15 to 0.25 cm). Correlation between the scans was 0.81. The office-based ultrasound scan had both a sensitivity and a specificity of 100%. The mean time to screen each patient was 212 seconds (95% CI 194 to 230 seconds). Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening can be safely performed in the office by family physicians who are trained to use point-of- care ultrasound technology. The screening test can be completed within the time constraints of a

  8. [Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block for upper abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Osaka, Yoshimune; Kashiwagi, Masanori; Nagatsuka, Yukio; Oosaku, Masayoshi; Hirose, Chikako

    2010-08-01

    Upper abdominal surgery leads to severe postoperative pain. Insufficient postoperative analgesia accompanies a high incidence of complications. Therefore, postoperative analgesia is very important. The epidural analgesia has many advantages. However it has a high risk of epidural hematoma in anticoagulated patients. Rectus sheath block provided safer and more reliable analgesia in recent years, by the development of ultrasound tools. We experienced two cases of the rectus sheath block in upper abdominal surgery under ultrasound guidance. Ultrasound guided rectus sheath block can reduce the risk of peritoneal puncture, bleeding, and other complications. Rectus sheath block is very effective to reduce postoperative pain in upper abdominal surgery as an alternative method to epidural anesthesia in anticoagulated patients.

  9. Evaluation of hospital complications and costs associated with using ultrasound guidance during abdominal paracentesis procedures.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pankaj A; Ernst, Frank R; Gunnarsson, Candace L

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal paracentesis is commonly performed for diagnostic, therapeutic, and palliative indications, but the use of ultrasound guidance for these procedures is relatively recent, variable, and not well documented. A retrospective database analysis of abdominal paracentesis procedures was performed to determine whether ultrasound guidance was associated with differences in adverse events (AEs) or hospital costs, compared to procedures without ultrasound guidance. The hospital database maintained by Premier was used to identify patients with abdominal paracentesis International Classification of Diseases - 9th Revision - Clinical Modification (ICD-9 code 54.9, Common Procedural Terminology CPT-4 codes 49080, 49081) in 2008. Use of ultrasound guidance was determined via patient billing data. The incidence of selected AEs and patients' hospitalization costs were calculated for two groups: procedures with ultrasound guidance and those without. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to evaluate differences between groups. This study identified 1297 abdominal paracentesis procedures, 723 (56%) with ultrasound and 574 (44%) without. The indications for paracentesis were similar between the two groups. The incidence of AEs was lower in ultrasound-guided procedures: all AEs (1.4% vs 4.7%, p = 0.01), post-paracentesis infection (0.41% vs 2.44%, p = 0.01), hematoma (0.0% vs 0.87%, p = 0.01), and seroma (0.14% vs 1.05%, p = 0.03). Analyses adjusted for patient and hospital covariates revealed significant reductions in AEs (OR = 0.349, 95% CI = 0.165, 0.739, p = 0.0059) and hospitalization costs ($8761 ± $5956 vs $9848 ± $6581, p < 0.001) for procedures with ultrasound guidance vs those without. There are several limitations to using claims data for clinical analyses; causality cannot be determined, the possibility of miscoded or missing data, and the inability to control for elements not captured in claims data that may

  10. Ultrasound in the diagnosis of palpable abdominal masses in children.

    PubMed

    Annuar, Z; Sakijan, A S; Annuar, N; Kooi, G H

    1990-12-01

    Ultrasound examinations were done to evaluate clinically palpable abdominal masses in 125 children. The examinations were normal in 21 patients. In 15 patients, the clinically palpable masses were actually anterior abdominal wall abscesses or hematomas. Final diagnosis was available in 87 of 89 patients with intraabdominal masses detected on ultrasound. The majority (71%) were retroperitoneal masses where two-thirds were of renal origin. Ultrasound diagnosis was correct in 68 patients (78%). All cases of hydronephrosis were correctly diagnosed based on characteristic ultrasound appearances. Correct diagnoses of all cases of adrenal hematoma, psoas abscess, liver hematoma, liver abscess and one case of liver metastases were achieved with correlation of relevant clinical information.

  11. The use of ultrasound in the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Young, J; Gilbert, A I; Graham, M F

    2007-08-01

    The diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias is not always straightforward and may require additional investigative modalities. Real-time ultrasound is accurate, non-invasive, relatively inexpensive, and readily available. The value of ultrasound as an adjunctive tool in the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias in both pre-operative and post-operative patients was studied. Retrospective analysis of 200 patients treated at the Hernia Institute of Florida was carried out. In these cases, ultrasound had been used to assist with case management. Patients without previous hernia surgery and those with early and late post-herniorrhaphy complaints were studied. Patients with obvious hernias were excluded. Indications for ultrasound examination included patients with abdominal pain without a palpable hernia, a palpable mass of questionable etiology, and patients with inordinate pain or excessive swelling during the early post-operative period. Patients were treated with surgery or conservative therapy depending on the results of the physical examination and ultrasound studies. Cases in which the ultrasound findings influenced the decision-making process by confirming clinical findings or altering the diagnosis and changing the treatment plan are discussed. Of the 200 patients, 144 complained of pain alone and on physical exam no hernia or mass was palpable. Of these 144 patients with pain alone, 21 had a hernia identified on the US examination and were referred for surgery. The 108 that had a negative ultrasound were treated conservatively with rest, heat, and anti-inflammatory drugs, most often with excellent results. Of the 56 remaining patients who had a mass, with or without pain, 22 had hernias identified by means of ultrasound examination. In the other 34, the etiology of the mass was not a hernia. Abdominal wall ultrasound is a valuable tool in the scheme of management of patients in whom the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernia is unclear. Therapeutic decisions can be

  12. Emergency ultrasound-based algorithms for diagnosing blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Dirk; Bauwens, Kai; Rademacher, Grit; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Güthoff, Claas

    2013-07-31

    Ultrasonography is regarded as the tool of choice for early diagnostic investigations in patients with suspected blunt abdominal trauma. Although its sensitivity is too low for definite exclusion of abdominal organ injury, proponents of ultrasound argue that ultrasound-based clinical pathways enhance the speed of primary trauma assessment, reduce the number of computed tomography scans and cut costs. To assess the effects of trauma algorithms that include ultrasound examinations in patients with suspected blunt abdominal trauma. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCO), publishers' databases, controlled trials registers and the Internet. Bibliographies of identified articles and conference abstracts were searched for further elligible studies. Trial authors were contacted for further information and individual patient data. The searches were updated in February 2013. randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials (qRCTs). patients with blunt torso, abdominal or multiple trauma undergoing diagnostic investigations for abdominal organ injury. diagnostic algorithms comprising emergency ultrasonography (US). diagnostic algorithms without ultrasound examinations (for example, primary computed tomography [CT] or diagnostic peritoneal lavage [DPL]). mortality, use of CT and DPL, cost-effectiveness, laparotomy and negative laparotomy rates, delayed diagnoses, and quality of life. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Where possible, data were pooled and relative risks (RRs), risk differences (RDs) and weighted mean differences, each with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were calculated by fixed- or random-effects modelling, as appropriate. We identified four studies meeting our inclusion criteria. Overall, trials were of moderate methodological quality. Few trial authors responded to

  13. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.19 Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic... ultrasound screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm under Medicare program; and (2) Is included in at least...

  14. Basic Abdominal Point-of-Care Ultrasound Training in the Undergraduate: Students as Mentors.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Casasola, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Francisco Javier García; Luordo, Davide; Zapata, Deborah Forrester; Frías, María Carnevali; Garrido, Victoria Villena; Martínez, Javier Villanueva; de la Sotilla, Alberto Forero; Rojo, José Manuel Casas; Macho, Juan Torres

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the ability of medical students to be integrated in the teaching of basic abdominal ultrasound using a peer-mentoring design. Thirty medical students previously trained in basic abdominal ultrasound (mentors) had to teach all fourth-year students (n = 136) from a single academic year the same training they had received. There were 3 stages to the ultrasound teaching: theoretical (online course); basic training (3 practical sessions in which students were guaranteed to have had a minimum of 15 hours of practical experience with ultrasound and performed at least 20 basic abdominal ultrasound studies); and evaluation (objective structured clinical examination in which students had to obtain the basic abdominal views and to identify 17 structures). The mean grade ± SD obtained was 8.71 ± 1.53 of a possible 10 points. Only 2 students (1.56%) obtained a grade lower than 5, and 14 students (10.86%) obtained a grade lower than 7. A total of 33 students (25.5%) achieved the maximum grade. The structures most easily identified were the liver, the right kidney, and the urinary bladder, with 97.7% of correct answers. Students obtained the poorest results when trying to identify the left and right cardiac cavities (subxiphoid view), with only 53.5% and 55.8% of correct answers, respectively. Teaching based on peer mentoring achieved an adequate level of training in basic abdominal ultrasound. The students acquired these skills in a relatively short training period. These results suggest that peer mentoring can facilitate the large-scale implementation of ultrasound teaching in undergraduate students. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Pocket-sized versus standard ultrasound machines in abdominal imaging.

    PubMed

    Tse, K H; Luk, W H; Lam, M C

    2014-06-01

    The pocket-sized ultrasound machine has emerged as an invaluable tool for quick assessment in emergency and general practice settings. It is suitable for instant and quick assessment in cardiac imaging. However, its applicability in the imaging of other body parts has yet to be established. In this pictorial review, we compared the performance of the pocketsized ultrasound machine against the standard ultrasound machine for its image quality in common abdominal pathology.

  16. Factors Predictive of Improved Abdominal Ultrasound Visualization after Oral Administration of Simethicone.

    PubMed

    Marsico, Maria; Gabbani, Tommaso; Casseri, Tommaso; Biagini, Maria Rosa

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasonography is a non-invasive, accurate and low-cost technique used to study the upper abdomen, but it has reduced reliability in the study of the pancreas and retroperitoneum. Simethicone is a well-known emulsifying agent that has been used to improve ultrasonographic visualization. The aim of this study was to identify anthropometric parameters that are able to predict a good response to simethicone in improving ultrasonographic visualization of abdominal structures. One hundred twenty-seven patients were recruited. After basal examination, their anthropometric parameters were collected. Patients with an incomplete upper abdominal examination because of gastrointestinal gas have greater body mass index, waist circumference and abdominal wall thickness. In our study, the best anthropometric parameter for identifying patients with poor visualization at abdominal ultrasound examination is waist circumference. Using a cutoff of 84 cm, we can identify patients with poor visibility at abdominal ultrasound examination (group B) with a sensitivity of 90%. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Strain measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysm with real-time 3D ultrasound speckle tracking.

    PubMed

    Bihari, P; Shelke, A; Nwe, T H; Mularczyk, M; Nelson, K; Schmandra, T; Knez, P; Schmitz-Rixen, T

    2013-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is caused by mechanical vascular tissue failure. Although mechanical properties within the aneurysm vary, currently available ultrasound methods assess only one cross-sectional segment of the aorta. This study aims to establish real-time 3-dimensional (3D) speckle tracking ultrasound to explore local displacement and strain parameters of the whole abdominal aortic aneurysm. Validation was performed on a silicone aneurysm model, perfused in a pulsatile artificial circulatory system. Wall motion of the silicone model was measured simultaneously with a commercial real-time 3D speckle tracking ultrasound system and either with laser-scan micrometry or with video photogrammetry. After validation, 3D ultrasound data were collected from abdominal aortic aneurysms of five patients and displacement and strain parameters were analysed. Displacement parameters measured in vitro by 3D ultrasound and laser scan micrometer or video analysis were significantly correlated at pulse pressures between 40 and 80 mmHg. Strong local differences in displacement and strain were identified within the aortic aneurysms of patients. Local wall strain of the whole abdominal aortic aneurysm can be analysed in vivo with real-time 3D ultrasound speckle tracking imaging, offering the prospect of individual non-invasive rupture risk analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment by ultrasound-guided local infiltration in adhesion-related abdominal pain and intractable hiccups: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Gu, Zhi-Yong; Lin, Chia-Shiang; Nie, Fa-Chuan; Cui, Jian

    2018-04-01

    Abdominal pain and hiccups secondary to intra-abdominal adhesion are surgical complications that are often treated by painkillers and secondary surgeries with an unsatisfactory therapeutic effect. This study presents a new treatment method that uses ultrasound-guided local infiltration in peritoneal and abdominal wall adhesions in patients with hiccups and abdominal pain. A 62-year-old patient presented to our hospital with a history of intractable hiccups and abdominal pain for 30 years. Her abdominal examination revealed a scar with an approximate length of 10 cm on the abdominal umbilical plane; pressing the right scar area could simultaneously induce abdominal pain and hiccups. Intraperitoneal computed tomography examination clearly demonstrated that the bowel had no obvious expansion. Ultrasonographic examination found that peritoneal motility below the normal peritoneal adhesion regions was significantly slower than in the normal regions. The diagnosis of chronic postoperative pain syndrome was clear. The symptoms were significantly alleviated by a successful treatment with ultrasound-guided local infiltration in the peritoneal and abdominal wall scar adhesions. After 3 stages of hospitalization and 1 year of follow-up, the patient's abdominal wall pain was relieved by approximately 80% and hiccups were relieved by approximately 70%. The above treatment is a useful option for managing abdominal adhesion and accompanying pain or hiccups resulting from abdominal surgery. This method could ease the psychological and economic burden of patients and improve their quality of life.

  19. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.19 Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic... definitions apply: Eligible beneficiary means an individual who— (1) Has received a referral for an ultrasound...

  20. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.19 Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic... definitions apply: Eligible beneficiary means an individual who— (1) Has received a referral for an ultrasound...

  1. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.19 Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic... definitions apply: Eligible beneficiary means an individual who— (1) Has received a referral for an ultrasound...

  2. Successful Treatment of Abdominal Cutaneous Entrapment Syndrome Using Ultrasound Guided Injection

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Myong Joo; Seo, Dong Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    There are various origins for chronic abdominal pain. About 10-30% of patients with chronic abdominal pain have abdominal wall pain. Unfortunately, abdominal wall pain is not thought to be the first origin of chronic abdominal pain; therefore, patients usually undergo extensive examinations, including diagnostic laparoscopic surgery. Entrapment of abdominal cutaneous nerves at the muscular foramen of the rectus abdominis is a rare cause of abdominal wall pain. If abdominal wall pain is considered in earlier stage of chronic abdominal pain, unnecessary invasive procedures are not required and patients will reach symptom free condition as soon as the diagnosis is made. Here, we report a case of successful treatment of a patient with abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome by ultrasound guided injection therapy. PMID:23862004

  3. Initial Experience Using a Telerobotic Ultrasound System for Adult Abdominal Sonography.

    PubMed

    Adams, Scott J; Burbridge, Brent E; Badea, Andreea; Langford, Leanne; Vergara, Vincent; Bryce, Rhonda; Bustamante, Luis; Mendez, Ivar M; Babyn, Paul S

    2017-08-01

    The study sought to assess the feasibility of performing adult abdominal examinations using a telerobotic ultrasound system in which radiologists or sonographers can control fine movements of a transducer and all ultrasound settings from a remote location. Eighteen patients prospectively underwent a conventional sonography examination (using EPIQ 5 [Philips] or LOGIQ E9 [GE Healthcare]) followed by a telerobotic sonography examination (using the MELODY System [AdEchoTech] and SonixTablet [BK Ultrasound]) according to a standardized abdominal imaging protocol. For telerobotic examinations, patients were scanned remotely by a sonographer 2.75 km away. Conventional examinations were read independently from telerobotic examinations. Image quality and acceptability to patients and sonographers was assessed. Ninety-two percent of organs visualized on conventional examinations were sufficiently visualized on telerobotic examinations. Five pathological findings were identified on both telerobotic and conventional examinations, 3 findings were identified using only conventional sonography, and 2 findings were identified using only telerobotic sonography. A paired sample t test showed no significant difference between the 2 modalities in measurements of the liver, spleen, and diameter of the proximal aorta; however, telerobotic assessments overestimated distal aorta and common bile duct diameters and underestimated kidney lengths (P values < .05). All patients responded that they would be willing to have another telerobotic examination. A telerobotic ultrasound system is feasible for performing abdominal ultrasound examinations at a distant location with minimal training and setup requirements and a moderate learning curve. Telerobotic sonography (robotic telesonography) may open up the possibility of remote ultrasound clinics for communities that lack skilled sonographers and radiologists, thereby improving access to care. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of

  4. [Abdominal ultrasound abnormalities incidentally discovered in patients with asymptomatic HIV in Lome (Togo)].

    PubMed

    Sonhaye, L; Tchaou, M; Amadou, A; Gbande, P; Assih, K; Djibril, M; Adjenou, K; Redah, D; N'Dakéna, K

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined ultrasound imaging of abdominal manifestations of HIV-AIDS, although these rank second only to its pleuropulmonary manifestations. Thus, this study sought to determine the features of abdominal ultrasound in HIV infection. This prospective, descriptive and analytical study took place in the radiology department of the University Hospital Campus Lomé and covered the three-year period of 2009-2011. It included all patients older than 15 years with positive HIV serology. During the study period, 566 patients met the inclusion criteria. Ultrasound examination showed the liver appeared normal in 153 patients (27.0%), but homogeneously hyperechoic and thus suggestive of hepatic steatosis in 107 (18.9%). The bile duct was dilatated in 12 patients or 2.1%. An anomaly in the corticomedullary differentiation in normal-sized kidneys was noted in 28.1% (159 patients). Diffuse homogeneous hypertrophy of the pancreas was found in 3 patients (0.53%). Splenomegaly was noted in 387 patients (68.4%); the echopattern of the spleen was diffusely micronodular in 6 patients (1.1%). Deep adenopathies were found in 29 patients (5.1%) and ascites in 46 patients (8.1%). Abdominal ultrasound is a medical imaging technique available in developing countries, less expensive than others, which can be considered an alternative to computed tomography (CT) in the countries of sub-Saharan Africa for the exploration of the abdominal manifestations of HIV.

  5. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Sessa, Barbara; Trinci, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Baseline ultrasound is essential in the early assessment of patients with a huge haemoperitoneum undergoing an immediate abdominal surgery; nevertheless, even with a highly experienced operator, it is not sufficient to exclude parenchymal injuries. More recently, a new ultrasound technique using second generation contrast agents, named contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been developed. This technique allows all the vascular phase to be performed in real time, increasing ultrasound capability to detect parenchymal injuries, enhancing some qualitative findings, such as lesion extension, margins and its relationship with capsule and vessels. CEUS has been demonstrated to be almost as sensitive as contrast-enhanced CT in the detection of traumatic injuries in patients with low-energy isolated abdominal trauma, with levels of sensitivity and specificity up to 95%. Several studies demonstrated its ability to detect lesions occurring in the liver, spleen, pancreas and kidneys and also to recognize active bleeding as hyperechoic bands appearing as round or oval spots of variable size. Its role seems to be really relevant in paediatric patients, thus avoiding a routine exposure to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, CEUS is strongly operator dependent, and it has some limitations, such as the cost of contrast media, lack of panoramicity, the difficulty to explore some deep regions and the poor ability to detect injuries to the urinary tract. On the other hand, it is timesaving, and it has several advantages, such as its portability, the safety of contrast agent, the lack to ionizing radiation exposure and therefore its repeatability, which allows follow-up of those traumas managed conservatively, especially in cases of fertile females and paediatric patients. PMID:26607647

  6. Performance Evaluation of Adaptive Imaging Based on Multiphase Apodization with Cross-correlation: A Pilot Study in Abdominal Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Shin, Junseob; Chen, Yu; Malhi, Harshawn; Chen, Frank; Yen, Jesse

    2018-05-01

    Degradation of image contrast caused by phase aberration, off-axis clutter, and reverberation clutter remains one of the most important problems in abdominal ultrasound imaging. Multiphase apodization with cross-correlation (MPAX) is a novel beamforming technique that enhances ultrasound image contrast by adaptively suppressing unwanted acoustic clutter. MPAX employs multiple pairs of complementary sinusoidal phase apodizations to intentionally introduce grating lobes that can be used to derive a weighting matrix, which mostly preserves the on-axis signals from tissue but reduces acoustic clutter contributions when multiplied with the beamformed radio-frequency (RF) signals. In this paper, in vivo performance of the MPAX technique was evaluated in abdominal ultrasound using data sets obtained from 10 human subjects referred for abdominal ultrasound at the USC Keck School of Medicine. Improvement in image contrast was quantified, first, by the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and, second, by the rating of two experienced radiologists. The MPAX technique was evaluated for longitudinal and transverse views of the abdominal aorta, the inferior vena cava, the gallbladder, and the portal vein. Our in vivo results and analyses demonstrate the feasibility of the MPAX technique in enhancing image contrast in abdominal ultrasound and show potential for creating high contrast ultrasound images with improved target detectability and diagnostic confidence.

  7. Transfer Learning with Convolutional Neural Networks for Classification of Abdominal Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Phillip M; Malhi, Harshawn S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate transfer learning with deep convolutional neural networks for the classification of abdominal ultrasound images. Grayscale images from 185 consecutive clinical abdominal ultrasound studies were categorized into 11 categories based on the text annotation specified by the technologist for the image. Cropped images were rescaled to 256 × 256 resolution and randomized, with 4094 images from 136 studies constituting the training set, and 1423 images from 49 studies constituting the test set. The fully connected layers of two convolutional neural networks based on CaffeNet and VGGNet, previously trained on the 2012 Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge data set, were retrained on the training set. Weights in the convolutional layers of each network were frozen to serve as fixed feature extractors. Accuracy on the test set was evaluated for each network. A radiologist experienced in abdominal ultrasound also independently classified the images in the test set into the same 11 categories. The CaffeNet network classified 77.3% of the test set images accurately (1100/1423 images), with a top-2 accuracy of 90.4% (1287/1423 images). The larger VGGNet network classified 77.9% of the test set accurately (1109/1423 images), with a top-2 accuracy of VGGNet was 89.7% (1276/1423 images). The radiologist classified 71.7% of the test set images correctly (1020/1423 images). The differences in classification accuracies between both neural networks and the radiologist were statistically significant (p < 0.001). The results demonstrate that transfer learning with convolutional neural networks may be used to construct effective classifiers for abdominal ultrasound images.

  8. Real-time correction of beamforming time delay errors in abdominal ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, K. W.

    2000-04-01

    The speed of sound varies with tissue type, yet commercial ultrasound imagers assume a constant sound speed. Sound speed variation in abdominal fat and muscle layers is widely believed to be largely responsible for poor contrast and resolution in some patients. The simplest model of the abdominal wall assumes that it adds a spatially varying time delay to the ultrasound wavefront. The adequacy of this model is controversial. We describe an adaptive imaging system consisting of a GE LOGIQ 700 imager connected to a multi- processor computer. Arrival time errors for each beamforming channel, estimated by correlating each channel signal with the beamsummed signal, are used to correct the imager's beamforming time delays at the acoustic frame rate. A multi- row transducer provides two-dimensional sampling of arrival time errors. We observe significant improvement in abdominal images of healthy male volunteers: increased contrast of blood vessels, increased visibility of the renal capsule, and increased brightness of the liver.

  9. Onset in abdominal muscles recorded simultaneously by ultrasound imaging and intramuscular electromyography.

    PubMed

    Vasseljen, Ottar; Fladmark, Anne M; Westad, Christian; Torp, Hans G

    2009-04-01

    Delayed onset of muscle activity in abdominal muscles has been related to low back pain. To investigate this in larger clinical trials it would be beneficial if non-invasive and less cumbersome alternatives to intramuscular electromyography (EMG) were available. This study was designed to compare onset of muscle activity recorded by intramuscular EMG to onset of muscle deformations by ultrasound imaging. Muscle deformations were recorded by two ultrasound imaging modes at high time resolution (m-mode and tissue velocity) in separate sessions and compared to simultaneously recorded intramuscular EMG in three abdominal muscles. Tissue velocity imaging was converted to strain rate which measures deformation velocity gradients within small regions, giving information about the rate of local tissue shortening or lengthening along the beam axis. Onsets in transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus abdominis (OI) and obliquus externus abdominis (OE) were recorded during rapid arm flexions in ten healthy subjects. During ultrasound m-mode recordings, the results showed that mean onsets by EMG were detected 7 ms (95% CI of mean difference; +/-4 ms) and 2 ms (95% CI of mean difference; +/-6 ms) before concurrent ultrasound m-mode detected onsets in TrA and OI, respectively. In contrast, OE onset was recorded 54 ms (95% CI of bias; +/-16 ms) later by EMG compared to ultrasound m-mode. The discrepancy of ultrasound m-mode to accurately record onset in OE was practically corrected in the ultrasound-based strain rate recordings. However, this could only be applied on half of the subjects due to the angle dependency between the ultrasound beam and the direction of the contraction in strain rate recordings. The angle dependency needs to be further explored.

  10. The role of abdominal ultrasound in the diagnosis of typhoid fever: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Younis, Saeed Nadhim

    2014-01-01

    To study the usefulness of abdominal ultrasound in the diagnosis of typhoid fever and to determine the common ultrasound findings early in the course of the disease. Abdominal ultrasound examination was performed within the first week of initiation of symptoms in 350 cases with clinical diagnosis of typhoid fever. Subsequent ultrasound follow-up examination was done 15 days later (beginning of the third week). All the patients proved to have positive Widal test and Sallmonella culture. The study was performed in Erbil-Iraq from the period January 1993 to October 2010. The following ultrasound findings were reported: hepatomegaly (31.4%), prominent intrahepatic bile ducts (64.85%), splenomegaly (100%), mesenteric lymphadenopathy (42.85%), bowel wall thickening (35.71%), acalculous cholecystitis (16.28%), perforations (1.14%), and ascites in (3.4%). The current study showed that the findings are typical enough to justify initiation of treatment for typhoid fever when serology is equivocal and culture is negative, and is fairly safe to say that normal ultrasound examination early in the course of febrile illness rules out typhoid fever. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Body Mass Normalization for Ultrasound Measurements of Adolescent Lateral Abdominal Muscle Thickness.

    PubMed

    Linek, Pawel; Saulicz, Edward; Wolny, Tomasz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of the allometric parameter for ultrasound measurements of the thickness of the oblique external (OE), internal (OI), and transversus abdominis (TrA) muscles in the adolescent population. The allometric parameter is the slope of the linear regression line between the log transformed body mass and log transformed muscle size measurement. The study included 321 adolescents between the ages of 10 and 17, consisting of 160 boys and 161 girls. The participants were recruited from local schools and attended regular school classes at normal grade levels. All individuals with no signs of scoliosis (screening with use of a scoliometer), and no surgical procedures performed on the trunk area were included. A real-time ultrasound B-scanner with a linear array transducer was used to obtain images of the lateral abdominal muscles from both sides of the body. The correlation between body mass and the OE muscle was r = 0.69; the OI muscle r = 0.68; and the TrA muscle r = 0.53 (in all cases, P < .0001). The allometric parameter for the OE was 0.88296; the OI 0.718756; and the TrA 0.60986. Using these parameters, no significant correlations were found between body mass and the allometric-scaled thickness of the lateral abdominal muscles. Significant positive correlations exist between body mass and lateral abdominal muscle thickness assessed by ultrasound imaging. Therefore, it is reasonable to advise that the values of the allometric parameters for OE, OI, and TrA obtained in this study should be used in other studies performed on adolescents. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Radiographer-performed abdominal and pelvic ultrasound: its value in a urology out-patient clinic.

    PubMed

    Nargund, V H; Lomas, K; Sapherson, D A; Flannigan, G M; Stewart, P A

    1994-04-01

    To assess the efficacy of radiographer-performed ultrasound examination as a routine investigative procedure in a urological out-patient clinic. A total of 151 patients attending a District General Hospital Urological Out-patient Department underwent an ultrasound examination in the clinic. Diagnosis by ultrasound was achieved in 93% of patients. The remaining patients underwent further investigations. Two (1%) patients with normal scans had small bladder tumours. Subsequent intravenous urography in these individuals showed normal upper tracts. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasound examination performed in the urological out-patient clinic on unprepared patients was the only investigation necessary for evaluation of common problems such as non-specific urinary symptoms, recurrent urinary tract infections and bladder outlet obstruction.

  13. Ultrasound findings in children with toxocariasis: report on 18 cases.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, M; Conchin, C F; Soares, M da G; Araujo, M A; Kramer, B

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate abdominal ultrasound (US) findings in children infected with Toxocara canis. Eighteen children, 18 months to 7 years of age, with serological diagnosis of T.canis infection underwent abdominal US. Eosinophil counts, hemoglobin levels and immunoglobulin E titers were measured for all patients. Abdominal ultrasound revealed multiple hypoechoic areas in the livers of 15 patients (83.3%). Hepatohilar lymph-node enlargement was present in 14 patients (77.7%), 2 of whom also showed peripancreatic lymph-node enlargement. Hepatomegaly was present in 13 patients (72.7%) and splenomegaly in 9 (50%). The most prevalent findings of abdominal ultrasound examination of children with T.canis infection are hepatic granulomas and abdominal lymph-node enlargement. This infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any children who exhibit these findings on abdominal US examination, especially for those with eosinophilia.

  14. Effect of abdominal liposuction on sonographically guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Peng; Chen, Jin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Zhi

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of abdominal liposuction on sonographically guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. A total of 10 women with uterine fibroids or adenomyosis who had received abdominal liposuction were analyzed after sonographically guided HIFU ablation. Of the 10 women, 6 had a diagnosis of uterine fibroids, and 4 had a diagnosis of uterine adenomyosis. All of them had a history of a horizontal-margin split-cesarean delivery. In addition, 26 women with a history of a single horizontal-margin split-cesarean delivery who had a diagnosis of uterine fibroids or adenomyosis but had not received liposuction were analyzed together as a control group. Of the 10 women, 1 woman with uterine fibroids developed local skin erythema after treatment; 1 women with uterine adenomyosis developed a skin burn after treatment; and the remaining women had obvious skin-burning pain during treatment. All women who had not received liposuction finished the treatment with no serious adverse events during or after treatment. The pain scores and incidence of skin-burning pain were significantly higher in the liposuction group than the control group (P= .021 and .038, respectively). Abdominal liposuction may increase the risk of skin burns during sonographically guided HIFU ablation. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Establishment of ultrasound as a diagnostic aid in the referral of patients with abdominal pain in an emergency department – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Liv la Cour; Bækgaard, Emilie Stokholm; Istre, Per Grosen; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Larsen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ultrasonography is a noninvasive, cheap, and fast way of assessing abdominal pain in an emergency department. Many physicians working in emergency departments do not have pre-existing ultrasound experience. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of first-year internship doctors to perform a reliable ultrasound examination on patients with abdominal pain in an emergency setting. Materials and methods This study took place in an emergency department in Denmark. Following a 1-day ultrasound introduction course, three doctors without prior ultrasound experience scanned 45 patients during a 2-month period. The applicability of the examinations was evaluated by subsequent control examination: computed tomography, operation, or ultrasound by a trained radiologist or gynecologist or, in cases where the patient was immediately discharged, by ultrasound image evaluation. Results In 14 out of 21 patients with a control examination, there was diagnostic agreement between the project ultrasound examination and the control. Image evaluation of all patients showed useful images of the gallbladder, kidneys, liver, abdominal aorta, and urinary bladder, but no useful images for either the pancreas or colon. Conclusion With only little formal training, it is possible for first-year internship doctors to correctly visualize some abdominal organs with ultrasonography. However, a longer study time frame, including more patients, and an ultrasound course specifically designed for the purpose of use in an emergency department, is needed to enhance the results. PMID:27147884

  16. Twisted intra-abdominal cyst in a neonate: a surprise revelation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ferzine; Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Karl, Immanuel Sampath

    2017-08-08

    We, herein, present a male neonate with an antenatally detected intra-abdominal cyst who presented at 18 days of life at which time, the ultrasound revealed a 5×4 cm cyst. Since he was asymptomatic, we planned to repeat the ultrasound a month later and operate if the cyst showed no regression. However, a week later, he presented with an acute abdomen, irritable cry and a repeat ultrasound showing a larger (8×6 cm) cystic mass with debris within. He was taken up for an emergency laparotomy. Intraoperatively, the cyst was found arising from the left lateral abdominal wall free from all structures with a twisted pedicle. Histopathology surprisingly revealed seminiferous tubules within the cyst wall with the vas deferens, thus confirming the diagnosis of a torsion of intra-abdominal testis. Hence, we emphasise the importance of examining for an undescended testis when dealing with a male neonate presenting with a cystic intra-abdominal mass. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Transabdominal ultrasound to assess pelvic floor muscle performance during abdominal curl in exercising women.

    PubMed

    Barton, Amanda; Serrao, Chloe; Thompson, Judith; Briffa, Kathy

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function using transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) in women attending group exercise classes. Specific aims were to: (1) identify the ability to perform a correct elevating PFM contraction and (2) assess bladder-base movement during an abdominal curl exercise. Ninety women participating in group exercise were recruited to complete a survey and TAUS assessment performed by two qualified Continence and Women's Health physiotherapists with clinical experience in ultrasound scanning. The assessment comprised three attempts of a PFM contraction and an abdominal curl exercise in crook lying. Bladder-base displacement was measured to determine correct or incorrect activation patterns. Twenty-five percent (n = 23) of women were unable to demonstrate an elevating PFM contraction, and all women displayed bladder-base depression on abdominal curl (range 0.33-31.2 mm). Parous women displayed, on average, significantly more bladder-base depression than did nulliparous women [15.5 (7.3) mm vs 11.4 (5.8) mm, p < 0.009). Sixty percent (n = 54) reported stress urinary incontinence (SUI). There was no association between SUI and the inability to perform an elevating PFM contraction (p = 0.278) or the amount of bladder-base depression with abdominal curl [14.1 (7.6) mm SUI vs 14.2 (6.7) mm non-SUI]. TAUS identified that 25 % of women who participated in group exercise were unable to perform a correctly elevating PFM contraction, and all depressed the bladder-base on abdominal curl. Therefore, exercising women may be at risk of PFM dysfunction when performing abdominal curl activities.

  18. Ultrasound Estimates of Visceral and Subcutaneous-Abdominal Adipose Tissues in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    De Lucia Rolfe, Emanuella; Modi, Neena; Uthaya, Sabita; Hughes, Ieuan A.; Dunger, David B.; Acerini, Carlo; Stolk, Ronald P.; Ong, Ken K.

    2013-01-01

    Other imaging techniques to quantify internal-abdominal adiposity (IA-AT) and subcutaneous-abdominal adiposity (SCA-AT) are frequently impractical in infants. The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to validate ultrasound (US) visceral and subcutaneous-abdominal depths in assessing IA-AT and SCA-AT from MRI as the reference method in infants and (b) to analyze the association between US abdominal adiposity and anthropometric measures at ages 3 months and 12 months. Twenty-two infants underwent MRI and US measures of abdominal adiposity. Abdominal US parameters and anthropometric variables were assessed in the Cambridge Baby Growth Study (CBGS), n = 487 infants (23 girls) at age 3 months and n = 495 infants (237 girls) at 12 months. US visceral and subcutaneous-abdominal depths correlated with MRI quantified IA-AT (r = 0.48, P < 0.05) and SCA-AT (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) volumes, respectively. In CBGS, mean US-visceral depths increased by ~20 % between ages 3 and 12 months (P < 0.0001) and at both ages were lower in infants breast-fed at 3 months than in other infants. US-visceral depths at both 3 and 12 months were inversely related to skinfold thickness at birth (P = 0.03 and P = 0.009 at 3 and 12 months, resp.; adjusted for current skinfold thickness). In contrast, US-subcutaneous-abdominal depth at 3 months was positively related to skinfold thickness at birth (P = 0.004). US measures can rank infants with higher or lower IA-AT and SCA-AT. Contrasting patterns of association with visceral and subcutaneous-abdominal adiposities indicate that they may be differentially regulated in infancy. PMID:23710350

  19. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP3-04: Feasibility Study of Real-Time Ultrasound Monitoring for Abdominal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Lin; Kien Ng, Sook; Zhang, Ying

    Purpose: Ultrasound is ideal for real-time monitoring in radiotherapy with high soft tissue contrast, non-ionization, portability, and cost effectiveness. Few studies investigated clinical application of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of real-time monitoring of 3D target motion using 4D ultrasound. Methods: An ultrasound probe holding system was designed to allow clinician to freely move and lock ultrasound probe. For phantom study, an abdominal ultrasound phantom was secured on a 2D programmable respiratory motion stage. One side of the stage was elevated than another side to generate 3D motion.more » The motion stage made periodic breath-hold movement. Phantom movement tracked by infrared camera was considered as ground truth. For volunteer study three healthy subjects underwent the same setup for abdominal SBRT with active breath control (ABC). 4D ultrasound B-mode images were acquired for both phantom and volunteers for real-time monitoring. 10 breath-hold cycles were monitored for each experiment. For phantom, the target motion tracked by ultrasound was compared with motion tracked by infrared camera. For healthy volunteers, the reproducibility of ABC breath-hold was evaluated. Results: Volunteer study showed the ultrasound system fitted well to the clinical SBRT setup. The reproducibility for 10 breath-holds is less than 2 mm in three directions for all three volunteers. For phantom study the motion between inspiration and expiration captured by camera (ground truth) is 2.35±0.02 mm, 1.28±0.04 mm, 8.85±0.03 mm in LR, AP, SI directly, respectively. The motion monitored by ultrasound is 2.21±0.07 mm, 1.32±0.12mm, 9.10±0.08mm, respectively. The motion monitoring error in any direction is less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The volunteer study proved the clinical feasibility of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal SBRT. The phantom and volunteer

  20. The use of ultrasound imaging of the abdominal drawing-in maneuver in subjects with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Miltenberger, Chad E; Deiters, Henry M; Del Toro, Yadira M; Pulliam, Jennifer N; Childs, John D; Boyles, Robert E; Flynn, Timothy W

    2005-06-01

    Randomized controlled trial among patients with low back pain (LBP). (1) Determine the reliability of real-time ultrasound imaging for assessing activation of the lateral abdominal muscles; (2) characterize the extent to which the abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) results in preferential activation of the transverse abdominis (TrA); and (3) determine if ultrasound biofeedback improves short-term performance of the ADIM in patients with LBP. Ultrasound imaging is reportedly useful for measuring and training patients to preferentially activate the TrA muscle. However, research to support these claims is limited. Thirty patients with LBP referred for lumbar stabilization training were randomized to receive either traditional training (n = 15) or traditional training with biofeedback (n = 15). Ultrasound imaging was used to measure changes in thickness of the lateral abdominal muscles. Differences in preferential changes in muscle thickness of the TrA between groups and across time were assessed using analysis of variance. Intrarater reliability measuring lateral abdominal muscle thickness exceeded 0.93. On average, patients in both groups demonstrated a 2-fold increase in the thickness of the TrA during the ADIM. Performance of the ADIM did not differ between the groups. These data provide construct validity for the notion that the ADIM results in preferential activation of the TrA in patients with LBP. Although, the addition of biofeedback did not enhance the ability to perform the ADIM at a short-term follow-up, our data suggest a possible ceiling effect or an insufficient training stimulus. Further research is necessary to determine if there is a subgroup of patients with LBP who may benefit from biofeedback.

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided drainage of an abdominal fluid collection following Whipple’s resection

    PubMed Central

    Jah, Asif; Jamieson, Neville; Huguet, Emmanuel; Griffiths, William; Carroll, Nicholas; Praseedom, Raaj

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous aspiration and drainage of post-operative abdominal fluid collections is a well established standard technique. However, some fluid collections are not amenable to percutaneous drainage either due to location or the presence of surrounding visceral structures. Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) has been widely used for the drainage of pancreatitis-related abdominal fluid collections. However, there are no reports on the use of this technique in the post-operative setting. We report a case where the EUS-guided technique was used to drain a percutaneously inaccessible post-operative collection which had developed after Whipple’s resection. PMID:19058316

  2. Comparison of abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for detection of abdominal lymphadenopathy in dogs with metastatic apocrine gland adenocarcinoma of the anal sac.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C L; MacKay, C S; Roberts, G D; Fidel, J

    2015-06-01

    Imaging studies in humans with anal and rectal cancer indicate that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a more sensitive technique than abdominal ultrasound (AUS) for the detection of abdominal lymphadenopathy. The purpose of this retrospective study was to directly compare the efficacy of these two techniques in detecting abdominal lymphadenopathy in dogs with apocrine gland adenocarcinoma of the anal sac (AGAAS). Six dogs with histologically confirmed AGAAS and histopathologic confirmation of metastasis to abdominal lymph nodes (LNs) had AUS and abdominal MRI. AUS identified lymphadenopathy in two of six dogs, whereas MRI identified lymphadenopathy in all the six dogs. Lymphadenopathy was predominantly sacral in location, with involvement of the medial iliac and hypogastric LNs in only two cases. These data suggest that MRI is more sensitive than AUS for detecting sacral abdominal lymphadenopathy in dogs with AGAAS. As such, MRI could be considered in any patient with AGAAS for initial staging of this disease. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation in pancreas) Spleen enlargement ( splenomegaly ) Portal hypertension Liver tumors Obstruction of bile ... Digestive system Kidney anatomy Ultrasound in pregnancy Kidney - blood and urine flow ...

  4. Aberrant heartworm migration to the abdominal aorta and systemic arteriolitis in a dog presenting with vomiting and hemorrhagic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Janet A; Scott, Katherine D; Edwards, John F

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-old Dachshund was presented for vomiting and diarrhea. Abdominal ultrasound revealed Dirofilaria immitis in the abdominal aorta and an avascular segment of small intestine. The dog was euthanized. Necropsy revealed D. immitis in the abdominal aorta and widespread necrotizing arteriolitis. This is a unique presentation of aberrant migration of D. immitis.

  5. Desmoid tumors of the abdominal wall: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Overhaus, Marcus; Decker, Pan; Fischer, Hans Peter; Textor, Hans Jochen; Hirner, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Background Desmoid tumors are slow growing deep fibromatoses with aggressive infiltration of adjacent tissue but without any metastatic potential. Case Presentation We report on two female patients with desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall who underwent primary resection. Both patients had a history of an earlier abdominal surgery. Preoperative evaluation included abdominal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. The histology in both cases revealed a desmoid tumor. Conclusion Complete surgical resection is the first line management of this tumor entity. PMID:12890284

  6. Laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks in the pediatric population: a novel technique with comparison to ultrasound-guided blocks and local wound infiltration alone.

    PubMed

    Landmann, Alessandra; Visoiu, Mihaela; Malek, Marcus M

    2018-03-01

    Abdominal wall nerve blocks have been gaining popularity for the treatment of perioperative pain in children. Our aim was to compare a technique of surgeon-performed, laparoscopic abdominal wall nerve blocks to anesthesia-placed, ultrasound-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks and the current standard of local wound infiltration. After institutional review board approval was obtained, a retrospective chart review was performed of pediatric patients treated at a single institution during a 2-year period. Statistics were calculated using analysis of variance with post-hoc Bonferonni t tests for pair-wise comparisons. Included in this study were 380 patients who received ultrasound-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks (n = 125), laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks (n = 88), and local wound infiltration (n = 117). Groups were well matched for age, sex, and weight. There was no significant difference in pain scores within the first 8 hours or narcotic usage between groups. Local wound infiltration demonstrated the shortest overall time required to perform (P < .0001). Patients who received a surgeon-performed abdominal wall nerve block demonstrated a shorter duration of hospital stay when compared to the other groups (P = .02). Our study has demonstrated that laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks show similar efficacy to ultrasound-guided nerve blocks performed by pain management physicians without increasing time in the operating room. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a reliable simulation-based test for diagnostic abdominal ultrasound with a pass/fail standard usable for mastery learning.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Mia L; Nielsen, Kristina R; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth; Konge, Lars; Nielsen, Michael B

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a test with validity evidence for abdominal diagnostic ultrasound with a pass/fail-standard to facilitate mastery learning. The simulator had 150 real-life patient abdominal scans of which 15 cases with 44 findings were selected, representing level 1 from The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Four groups of experience levels were constructed: Novices (medical students), trainees (first-year radiology residents), intermediates (third- to fourth-year radiology residents) and advanced (physicians with ultrasound fellowship). Participants were tested in a standardized setup and scored by two blinded reviewers prior to an item analysis. The item analysis excluded 14 diagnoses. Both internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.96) and inter-rater reliability (0.99) were good and there were statistically significant differences (p < 0.001) between all four groups, except the intermediate and advanced groups (p = 1.0). There was a statistically significant correlation between experience and test scores (Pearson's r = 0.82, p < 0.001). The pass/fail-standard failed all novices (no false positives) and passed all advanced (no false negatives). All intermediate participants and six out of 14 trainees passed. We developed a test for diagnostic abdominal ultrasound with solid validity evidence and a pass/fail-standard without any false-positive or false-negative scores. • Ultrasound training can benefit from competency-based education based on reliable tests. • This simulation-based test can differentiate between competency levels of ultrasound examiners. • This test is suitable for competency-based education, e.g. mastery learning. • We provide a pass/fail standard without false-negative or false-positive scores.

  8. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... asked to drink four to six glasses of liquid about an hour before the test to fill your bladder. You may be asked to avoid eating for eight to 12 hours before the test to avoid gas buildup in the intestines. For ultrasound of the ...

  9. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in diagnosis of abdominal and pelvic neoplasm in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailing; Li, Fangxuan; Liu, Juntian; Zhang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of abdominal and pelvic masses in adults has gained tremendous popularity. However, the application of the same treatment in children is not as popular because of apprehensions regarding inadequate tissues for the biopsy and accidental puncture of vital organs. Data of the application of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in 105 pediatric patients with clinically or ultrasound-diagnosed abdominopelvic masses were reviewed. Diagnostic procedures were conducted in our institution from May 2011 to May 2013. The biopsies were conducted on 86 malignant lesions and 19 benign lesions. 86 malignant tumors comprised neuroblastomas (30 cases), hepatoblastomas (15 cases), nephroblastomas (11 cases), and primitive neuroectodermal tumors/malignant small round cells (6 cases). Among malignant tumor cases, only a pelvic primitive neuroectodermal tumor did not receive a pathological diagnosis. Therefore, the biopsy accuracy was 98.8 % in malignant tumor. However, the biopsies for one neuroblastomas and one malignant small round cell tumor were inadequate for cytogenetic analysis. Therefore, 96.5 % of the malignant tumor patients received complete diagnosis via biopsy. 19 benign tumors comprised mature teratoma (10 cases), hemangioendothelioma (3 cases), paraganglioma (2 cases), and infection (2 cases). The diagnostic accuracy for benign neoplasm was 100 %. Five patients experienced postoperative complications, including pain (2 patients), bleeding from the biopsy site (2 patients), and wound infection (1 patient). Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy is an efficient, minimally invasive, accurate, and safe diagnostic method that can be applied in the management of abdominal or pelvic mass of pediatric patients.

  10. Can activity within the external abdominal oblique be measured using real-time ultrasound imaging?

    PubMed

    John, E K; Beith, I D

    2007-11-01

    Differences in the function of the anterolateral abdominal muscles have been the subject of much investigation, but primarily using electromyography. Recently changes in thickness of transversus abdominis and internal oblique measured from real-time ultrasound images have been shown to represent activity within these muscles. However it is still unclear if such a change in thickness in external oblique similarly represents activity within that muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between change in thickness and muscle activity in the external oblique using real-time ultrasound and surface electromyography. Simultaneous measurements of electromyography and real-time ultrasound images of external oblique were studied in up to 24 subjects during two tasks compared to the muscle at rest (1) isometric trunk rotation and (2) drawing in the lower abdomen. Changes in muscle thickness correlated significantly with electromyography during isometric trunk rotation in the majority of subjects but with a significant difference between subjects. In contrast, the relationship between change in thickness and electrical activity in the muscle when drawing in the lower abdomen was significant in less than 50% of subjects and the muscle often got thinner. Thickness changes of external oblique can be used as a valid indicator of electromyography activity during isometric trunk rotation, though the relationship is not as good as previously published data for transversus abdominis. Thickness changes of external oblique measured during lower abdominal drawing in cannot be used to detect activity within this muscle.

  11. Comparative Study of Abdominal Versus Transvaginal Ultrasound for Uterine Artery Doppler Velocimetry at 11 to 13 Weeks.

    PubMed

    Demers, Marie-Elaine; Dubé, Samuel; Bourdages, Mélodie; Gasse, Cedric; Boutin, Amélie; Girard, Mario; Bujold, Emmanuel; Demers, Suzanne

    2018-01-10

    To compare the first-trimester uterine artery pulsatility index (PI) measured by abdominal and transvaginal ultrasound (US). We performed a prospective study of singleton pregnant women recruited at 11 to 13 weeks' gestation. The mean uterine artery PI was obtained by abdominal followed by transvaginal US. The mean of the left and right uterine artery PIs was used, and differences between approaches were computed. The intraclass correlation coefficient and a Bland-Altman plot were used to compare the two approaches. Data were available for 940 participants, including 928 (99%) with uterine artery PIs obtained on both uterine sides. The mean uterine artery PI decreased with gestational age in both approaches (P < .001). We observed a moderate correlation between abdominal and transvaginal mean uterine artery PIs (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.69 to 0.75). Values obtained by abdominal US (median, 1.70, interquartile range, 1.35 to 2.09) were greater than those obtained by transvaginal US (median, 1.65; interquartile range, 1.37 to 1.99). There was a significant increase in differences as average measurements became higher (P < .01). The first-trimester mean uterine artery PI decreases with gestational age in both approaches. Abdominal US could be associated with greater uterine artery PI values than transvaginal US, especially at higher measurements. The first-trimester uterine artery PI for prediction of adverse perinatal outcomes should be adjusted for gestational age and possibly for the US approach. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Reproducibility of ECG-gated ultrasound diameter assessment of small abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Bredahl, K; Eldrup, N; Meyer, C; Eiberg, J E; Sillesen, H

    2013-03-01

    No standardised ultrasound procedure to obtain reliable growth estimates for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently available. We investigated the feasibility and reproducibility of a novel approach controlling for a combination of vessel wall delineation and cardiac cycle variation. Prospective comparative study. Consecutive patients (N = 27) with an AAA, attending their 6-month control as part of a medical treatment trial, were scanned twice by two ultrasound operators. Then, all ultrasound recordings were transferred to a core facility and analysed by a third person. The AAA diameter was determined in four different ways: from the leading edge of adventitia on the anterior wall to either the leading edge of the adventitia (method A) or leading edge of the intima (method B) on the posterior wall, with both measurements performed in systole and diastole. Inter-operator reproducibility was ± 3 mm for all methods applied. There was no difference in outcome between methods A and B; likewise, end-diastolic measurement did not improve reproducibility in preference to peak-systolic measurement. The use of a standardised ultrasound protocol including ECG-gating and subsequent off-line reading with minute calliper placement reduces variability. This may be of use in developing protocols to better detect even small AAA growth rates during clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening program using hand-held ultrasound in primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Kostov, Belchin; Navarro González, Marta; Cararach Salami, Daniel; Pérez Jiménez, Alfonso; Gilabert Solé, Rosa; Bru Saumell, Concepció; Donoso Bach, Lluís; Villalta Martí, Mireia; González-de Paz, Luis; Ruiz Riera, Rafael; Riambau Alonso, Vicenç; Acar-Denizli, Nihan; Farré Almacellas, Marta; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Benavent Àreu, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    We determined the feasibility of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening program led by family physicians in public primary healthcare setting using hand-held ultrasound device. The potential study population was 11,214 men aged ≥ 60 years attended by three urban, public primary healthcare centers. Participants were recruited by randomly-selected telephone calls. Ultrasound examinations were performed by four trained family physicians with a hand-held ultrasound device (Vscan®). AAA observed were verified by confirmatory imaging using standard ultrasound or computed tomography. Cardiovascular risk factors were determined. The prevalence of AAA was computed as the sum of previously-known aneurysms, aneurysms detected by the screening program and model-based estimated undiagnosed aneurysms. We screened 1,010 men, with mean age of 71.3 (SD 6.9) years; 995 (98.5%) men had normal aortas and 15 (1.5%) had AAA on Vscan®. Eleven out of 14 AAA-cases (78.6%) had AAA on confirmatory imaging (one patient died). The total prevalence of AAA was 2.49% (95%CI 2.20 to 2.78). The median aortic diameter at diagnosis was 3.5 cm in screened patients and 4.7 cm (p<0.001) in patients in whom AAA was diagnosed incidentally. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified coronary heart disease (OR = 4.6, 95%CI 1.3 to 15.9) as the independent factor with the highest odds ratio. A screening program led by trained family physicians using hand-held ultrasound was a feasible, safe and reliable tool for the early detection of AAA. PMID:28453577

  14. Morphometric analysis of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced lipolysis on cadaveric abdominal and thigh skin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sugun; Kim, Hee-Jin; Park, Hyun Jun; Kim, Hyoung Moon; Lee, So Hyun; Cho, Sung Bin

    2017-07-01

    Non-focused ultrasound and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) devices induce lipolysis by generating acoustic cavitation and coagulation necrosis in targeted tissues. We aimed to investigate the morphometric characteristics of immediate tissue reactions induced by 2 MHz, 13-mm focused HIFU via two-dimensional ultrasound images and histologic evaluation of cadaveric skin from the abdomen and thigh. Acoustic fields of a 2 MHz, 38-mm HIFU transducer were characterized by reconstruction of the fields using acoustic intensity measurement. Additionally, abdominal and thigh tissues from a fresh cadaver were treated with a HIFU device for a single, two, and three pulses at the pulse energy of 130 J/cm 2 and a penetration depth of 13 mm. Acoustic intensity measurement revealed characteristic focal zones of significant thermal injury at the depth of 38 mm. In both the abdomen and thigh tissue, round to oval ablative thermal injury zones (TIZs) were visualized in subcutaneous fat layers upon treatment with a single pulse of HIFU treatment. Two to three HIFU pulses generated larger and more remarkable ablative zones throughout subcutaneous fat layers. Finally, experimental treatment in a tumescent infiltration-like setting induced larger HIFU-induced TIZs of an oval or columnar shape, compared to non-tumescent settings. Although neither acoustic intensity measurement nor cadaveric tissue exactly reflects in vivo HIFU-induced reactions in human tissue, we believe that our data will help guide further in vivo studies in investigating the therapeutic efficacy and safety of HIFU-induced lipolysis.

  15. Abdominal Tumor Characterization and Recognition Using Superior-Order Cooccurrence Matrices, Based on Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Mitrea, Delia; Mitrea, Paulina; Nedevschi, Sergiu; Badea, Radu; Lupsor, Monica; Socaciu, Mihai; Golea, Adela; Hagiu, Claudia; Ciobanu, Lidia

    2012-01-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of the malignant tumors is an important issue in research nowadays. Our purpose is to elaborate computerized, texture-based methods for performing computer-aided characterization and automatic diagnosis of these tumors, using only the information from ultrasound images. In this paper, we considered some of the most frequent abdominal malignant tumors: the hepatocellular carcinoma and the colonic tumors. We compared these structures with the benign tumors and with other visually similar diseases. Besides the textural features that proved in our previous research to be useful in the characterization and recognition of the malignant tumors, we improved our method by using the grey level cooccurrence matrix and the edge orientation cooccurrence matrix of superior order. As resulted from our experiments, the new textural features increased the malignant tumor classification performance, also revealing visual and physical properties of these structures that emphasized the complex, chaotic structure of the corresponding tissue. PMID:22312411

  16. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Undetermined Abdominal Lesions: A Multidisciplinary Decision-Making Approach.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feng; Dong, Yi; Ji, Zhengbiao; Cao, Jiaying; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) guided biopsy of undetermined abdominal lesions in multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) decision-making approach. Methods. Between Jan 2012 and Dec 2015, 60 consecutive patients (male, 37; female, 23; mean age, 51.3 years ± 14.6) who presented with undetermined abdominal lesions were included. CEUS and core needle percutaneous biopsy was performed under real-time CEUS guidance in all lesions. Data were recorded and compared with conventional ultrasound (US) guidance group ( n = 75). All CEUS findings and clinical data were evaluated in MDT. Results. CEUS enabled the delimitation of more (88.3% versus 41.3%) and larger (14.1 ± 10.7 mm versus 32.3 ± 18.5 mm) nonenhanced necrotic areas. More inner (20.0% versus 6.7%) and surrounding (18.3% versus 2.7%) major vessels were visualized and avoided during biopsies. CEUS-guided biopsy increased the diagnostic accuracy from 93.3% to 98.3%, with correct diagnosis in 57 of 60 lesions (95.0%). The therapeutic plan was influenced by CEUS guided biopsies findings in the majority of patients (98.3%). Conclusion. The combination of CEUS guided biopsy and MDT decision-making approach is useful in the diagnostic work-up and therapeutic management.

  17. Malformations detected by abdominal ultrasound in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rosana Cardoso Manique; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano Machado; Flores, José Antônio Monteiro; Golendziner, Eliete; Oliveira, Ceres Andréia Vieira de; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo Gazzola

    2012-12-01

    Extracardiac malformations may be present in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), bringing greater risk of comorbidity and mortality. Verify frequency and types of abdominal abnormalities detected in children with and without CHD through abdominal ultrasound (AUS), compare the patients in relation to their dysmorphic/cytogenetic findings and perform an estimative of the cost-effectiveness of the screening through AUS. We conducted a cross-sectional study with a control cohort. The cases consisted of patients with CHD admitted for the first time in a pediatric intensive care unit; the controls consisted of children without CHD who underwent AUS at the hospital shortly thereafter a case. All patients with CHD underwent AUS, high-resolution karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for microdeletion 22q11.2. AUS identified clinically significant abnormalities in 12.2% of the cases and 5.2% of controls (p= 0.009), with a power of significance of 76.6%. Most malformations with clinical significance were renal anomalies (10.4% in cases and 4.9% in controls; p= 0.034). In Brazil, the cost of an AUS examination for the Unified Health System is US$ 21. Since clinically significant abnormalities were observed in one in every 8.2 CHD patients, the cost to identify an affected child was calculated as approximately US$ 176. Patients with CHD present a significant frequency of abdominal abnormalities detected by AUS, an inexpensive and noninvasive diagnostic method with good sensitivity. The cost of screening for these defects is considerably lower than the cost to treat the complications of late diagnoses of abdominal malformations such as renal disease.

  18. An automated spring-loaded needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided abdominal paracentesis in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S; Hikichi, Takuto; Takagi, Tadayuki; Shibukawa, Goro; Sato, Ai; Sato, Masaki; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Watanabe, Ko; Nakamura, Jun; Annangi, Srinadh; Tasaki, Kazuhiro; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of using an automated spring-loaded needle device for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided abdominal paracentesis (EUS-P) to see if this would make it easier to puncture the mobile and lax gastric wall for EUS-P. METHODS: The EUS database and electronic medical records at Fukushima Medical University Hospital were searched from January 2001 to April 2011. Patients with a history of cancer and who underwent EUS-P using an automated spring-loaded needle device with a 22-gauge puncture needle were included. The needle was passed through the instrument channel and advanced through the gastrointestinal wall under EUS guidance into the echo-free space in the abdominal cavity and ascitic fluid was collected. The confirmed diagnosis of malignant ascites included positive cytology and results from careful clinical observation for at least 6 mo in patients with negative cytology. The technical success rate, cytology results and complications were evaluated. RESULTS: We found 11 patients who underwent EUS-P with an automated spring-loaded needle device. In 4 cases, ascites was revealed only with EUS but not in other imaging modalities. EUS-P was done in 7 other cases because there was minimal ascitic fluid and no safe window for percutaneous abdominal aspiration. Ascitic fluid was obtained in all cases by EUS-P. The average amount aspirated was 14.1 mL (range 0.5-38 mL) and that was sent for cytological exam. The etiology of ascitic fluid was benign in 5 patients and malignant in 6. In all cases, ascitic fluid was obtained with the first needle pass. No procedure-related adverse effects occurred. CONCLUSION: EUS-P with an automated spring-loaded needle device is a feasible and safe method for ascites evaluation. PMID:24567793

  19. Point-of-care ultrasound performed by a medical student compared to physical examination by vascular surgeons in the detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Mai, Trinh; Woo, Michael Y; Boles, Kim; Jetty, Prasad

    2018-05-16

    To determine the test characteristics of point-of-care ultrasonography performed by a medical student versus physical examination by vascular surgeons compared to a gold standard reference scan for the detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms. We conducted a prospective, observer-blinded study recruiting patients from an outpatient vascular surgery clinic. Participants were screened for abdominal aortic aneurysms by standardized physical examination by a blinded vascular surgeon, followed by a point-of-care ultrasound examination by a blinded medical student. The student underwent prior training by a vascular sonographer and emergency physician on 60 patients (16 were supervised). Ultrasonography was used to visualize and measure the proximal, mid, and distal aortic diameters. The maximal aortic diameter was noted and compared to measurements obtained by the reference scan (CT scan or vascular sonographer-performed ultrasound). Reference scans were completed within 3 months of the recruitment visit. A total of 57 patients were enrolled over a 5-month period between October 2015 and March 2016. Mean age of recruited patients was 71 years and 61% were male. Mean body mass index was 27.9 ± 4.3 and mean waist-hip ratio was 0.96 ± 0.10. Sixteen abdominal aortic aneurysms were detected by the reference scan, with an average maximal aortic diameter of 44.9 mm. Physical examination by a vascular surgeon detected 11 of 16 abdominal aortic aneurysms with 2 false positives (sensitivity and specificity of 66.7% (95% CI 38.4-88.2) and 94.4% (95% CI 81.3-99.3), respectively). Point-of-care ultrasound detected 15 of 16 abdominal aortic aneurysms (sensitivity and specificity of 93.3% (95% CI 68.1-99.8) and 100% (95% CI 88.4-100), respectively). Seven of the 64 point-of-care ultrasound scans were indeterminate (>1 cm of the aorta was not visualized). Average time to conduct the physical examination was 35 seconds vs. 4.0 minutes for point-of-care ultrasonography. There was a

  20. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for intra-abdominal desmoid tumors: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yulan; Huang, Yanqin; Zhou, Meiqi; Ying, Xiao; Hu, Xiaoye

    2016-04-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare clonal fibroblastic proliferations that can arise at abdominal or extra-abdominal sites. Complete surgical resection is the primary treatment for resectable desmoid tumors, but a high rate of local recurrence has been reported even after complete resection. For patients with a recurrent tumor, the goals of treatment are to control the recurrence, maintain quality of life, and prolong survival. Radiofrequency ablation, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and other medical therapies can be used as alternative methods, but there are considerable controversies over the roles of these methods in the management of desmoid tumors. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive and effective method for treatment of solid tumors. We used HIFU to treat four patients with intra-abdominal desmoid tumors from June 2011 to September 2013. Post-procedural pain was seen in all patients. One patient had an intra-abdominal abscess and another suffered a slight injury to the femoral nerve. The patients were followed up for 19-46 months (mean 34 months) until April 2015. The tumor in one patient disappeared, and no tumor progression was observed in the other patients.

  1. Abdominal Adiposity Distribution Quantified by Ultrasound Imaging and Incident Hypertension in a General Population.

    PubMed

    Seven, Ekim; Thuesen, Betina H; Linneberg, Allan; Jeppesen, Jørgen L

    2016-11-01

    Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor for hypertension. However, different distributions of abdominal adipose tissue may affect hypertension risk differently. The main purpose of this study was to explore the association of subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with incident hypertension in a population-based setting. We hypothesized that VAT, rather than SAT, would be associated with incident hypertension. VAT and SAT were determined by ultrasound imagining in 3363 randomly selected Danes (mean age 49 years, 56% women, mean body mass index 25.8 kg/m 2 ). We constructed multiple logistic regression models to compute standardized odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals per SD increase in SAT and VAT. Of the 2119 normotensive participants at baseline, 1432, with mean SAT of 2.8 cm and mean VAT of 5.7 cm, returned 5 years later for a follow-up examination and among them 203 had developed hypertension. In models including both VAT and SAT, the Framingham Hypertension Risk Score variables (age, sex, smoking status, family history of hypertension, and baseline blood pressure) and glycated hemoglobin, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for incident hypertension for 1 SD increase in VAT and SAT was 1.27 (1.08-1.50, P=0.004) and 0.97 (0.81-1.15, P=0.70), respectively. Adjusting for body mass index instead of SAT attenuated the association between VAT and incident hypertension, but it was still significant (odds ratio, 1.22 [1.01-1.48, P=0.041] for each SD increase in VAT). In conclusion, ultrasound-determined VAT, but not SAT, was associated with incident hypertension in a random sample of Danish adults. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Ultrasound Assessment of Abdominal Muscle Thickness in Women With and Without Low Back Pain During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Weis, Carol Ann; Nash, Jennifer; Triano, John J; Barrett, Jon

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to determine the differences in abdominal musculature thickness, within 1 month of delivery, in women who experienced back pain during pregnancy compared with those who did not. B-mode ultrasound imaging was used to measure abdominal muscle thickness on 76 postpartum participants who participated in a larger study; 47 women experienced back pain during pregnancy, and 29 did not. Participant data were stratified by group, and primary comparisons were based on these grouping across the abdominal muscles, including rectus abdominis (upper and lower fibers), external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis. Means and standard deviations were also used to set parameters for future studies. In the present study, there was no difference in any abdominal muscle thickness between groups. Women with low back pain were significantly shorter (165.19 ± 6.64 cm) than women who did not have from back pain during pregnancy (169.38 ± 7.58 cm). All other demographics, such as age, weight, and date tested postpartum, were not significantly different between groups. The results of this study showed no variation in abdominal muscle thickness in women who had back pain during pregnancy and those who did not. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Diagnostic ultrasonography in cattle with abdominal fat necrosis.

    PubMed

    Tharwat, Mohamed; Buczinski, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the ultrasonographic findings in 14 cows with abdominal fat necrosis. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed the presence of heterogeneous hyperechoic masses and hyperechoic omentum with localized masses floating in a hypoechoic peritoneal fluid. A hyperechogenic rim was imaged around both kidneys. The intestines were coated with hyperechoic capsules and the intestinal lumens were constricted. Ultrasonographic examination of the pancreatic parenchyma showed an overall increased echogenicity which was homogenously distributed in 3 cases. A diagnosis of abdominal fat necrosis was made with ultrasound-guided biopsy of the echogenic masses, and thereafter at postmortem examination. Results from this study demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasonography as an imaging modality for antemortem diagnosis of abdominal lipomatosis in cattle. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first that illustrates ultrasonographic findings in cattle affected with abdominal lipomatosis.

  4. Reliability of ultrasound thickness measurement of the abdominal muscles during clinical isometric endurance tests.

    PubMed

    ShahAli, Shabnam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Bahmani, Andia; Karimi, Noureddin; Nabavi, Hoda

    2015-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the intra-examiner reliability of ultrasound (US) thickness measurement of abdominal muscles activity when supine lying and during two isometric endurance tests in subjects with and without Low back pain (LBP). A total of 19 women (9 with LBP, 10 without LBP) participated in the study. Within-day reliability of the US thickness measurements at supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests were assessed in all subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability of thickness measurement. The standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate the absolute reliability. Results indicated high ICC scores (0.73-0.99) and also small SEM and MDC scores for within-day reliability assessment. The Bland-Altman plots of agreement in US measurement of the abdominal muscles during the two isometric endurance tests demonstrated that 95% of the observations fall between the limits of agreement for test and retest measurements. Together the results indicate high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all the positions tested. According to the study's findings, US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscles activity in supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests employed, in participants with and without LBP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrasound imaging transducer motion during clinical maneuvers: respiration, active straight leg raise test and abdominal drawing in.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Jackie L; Warner, Martin B; Stokes, Maria J

    2010-08-01

    Clinical use of ultrasound imaging by physiotherapists is increasing; however, the clinical setting may be problematic due to variability inherent in the environment. As transducer motion interferes with accurate measurement, this study aimed to measure handheld transducer motion, relative to the pelvis, during a clinical simulation involving typical maneuvers employed in a physiotherapy assessment of the lumbopelvic region. Transducer motion about three axes and through one plane was measured (Vicon, Oxford, UK) on 12 participants during three clinical maneuvers at four abdominal imaging sites. Data were grouped and means used to determine discrepancies in transducer and pelvic motion for each imaging site/maneuver combination. None of the conditions produced large transducer motions relative to the pelvis and all findings were within previously established guidelines for acceptable amounts of transducer motion. These findings suggest that an ultrasound transducer can be held relatively stationary in a clinical setting, for the maneuvers tested. Copyright 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pain related to robotic cholecystectomy with lower abdominal ports: effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique of rectus sheath block in female patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Soo; Choi, Jong Bum; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Wook Hwan; Baek, Nam Hyun; Kim, Jayoun; Park, Chu Kyung; Lee, Yeon Ju; Park, Sung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Robotic cholecystectomy (RC) using port sites in the lower abdominal area (T12-L1) rather than the upper abdomen has recently been introduced as an alternative procedure for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the time course of different components of pain and the analgesic effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique for rectus sheath block (sRSB) after RC in female patients. Methods: We randomly assigned 40 patients to undergo ultrasound-guided sRSB (RSB group, n = 20) or to not undergo any block (control group, n = 20). Pain was subdivided into 3 components: superficial wound pain, deep abdominal pain, and referred shoulder pain, which were evaluated with a numeric rating scale (from 0 to 10) at baseline (time of awakening) and at 1, 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. Consumption of fentanyl and general satisfaction were also evaluated 1 hour (before discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and 24 hours postoperatively (end of study). Results: Superficial wound pain was predominant only at awakening, and after postoperative 1 hour in the control group. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB significantly decreased superficial pain after RC (P < 0.01) and resulted in a better satisfaction score (P < 0.05) 1 hour after RC in the RSB group compared with the control group. The cumulative postoperative consumption of fentanyl at 6, 9, and 24 hours was not significantly different between groups. Conclusions: After RC with lower abdominal ports, superficial wound pain predominates over deep intra-abdominal pain and shoulder pain only at the time of awakening. Afterwards, superficial and deep pain decreased to insignificant levels in 6 hours. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB was effective only during the first hour. This limited benefit should be balanced against the time and risks entailed in performing RSB. PMID:27495072

  7. Diagnostic Accuracy of Abdominal Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Giljaca, Vanja; Nadarevic, Tin; Poropat, Goran; Nadarevic, Vesna Stefanac; Stimac, Davor

    2017-03-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal ultrasound (US) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA), in terms of sensitivity, specificity and post-test probabilities for positive and negative result. A systematic search of MEDLINE, Embase, The Cochrane library and Science Citation Index Expanded from January 1994 to October 2014 was performed. Two authors independently evaluated studies for inclusion, extracted data and performed analyses. The reference standard for evaluation of final diagnosis was pathohistological report on tissue obtained at appendectomy. Summary sensitivity, specificity and post-test probability of AA after positive and negative result of US with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Out of 3306 references identified through electronic searches, 17 reports met the inclusion criteria, with 2841 included participants. The summary sensitivity and specificity of US for diagnosis of AA were 69% (95% CI 59-78%) and 81% (95% CI 73-88%), respectively. At the median pretest probability of AA of 76.4%, the post-test probability for a positive and negative result of US was 92% (95% CI 88-95%) and 55% (95% CI 46-63%), respectively. Abdominal ultrasound does not seem to have a role in the diagnostic pathway for diagnosis of AA in suspected patients. The summary sensitivity and specificity of US do not exceed that of physical examination. Patients that require additional diagnostic workup should be referred to more sensitive and specific diagnostic procedures, such as computed tomography.

  8. Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominal plane block with multimodal analgesia for pain management after total abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Gasanova, Irina; Grant, Erica; Way, Megan; Rosero, Eric B; Joshi, Girish P

    2013-07-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been shown to provide pain relief after abdominal procedures. However, TAP block combined with multimodal analgesia technique have not been assessed in a randomized controlled trial. This randomized, controlled, observer-blinded study was designed to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of bilateral ultrasound-guided TAP blocks with or without acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) combination. Patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy were randomized to one of three groups. Group 1 (n = 25) received a TAP block and ketorolac 30 mg, IV at the end of surgery and then ketorolac plus paracetamol 650 mg, orally, every 6 h for 24 h. Group 2 (n = 24) received only TAP block at the end of surgery. Group 3 (n = 25) received ketorolac 30 mg, IV at the end of surgery and then ketorolac plus paracetamol 650 mg, orally, every 6 h for 24 h. All patients received IV-PCA morphine for 24-h, postoperatively. All patients received a standardized general anaesthetic technique and dexamethasone 4 mg and ondansetron 4 mg, IV for antiemetic prophylaxis. There were no statistically significant differences in pain at rest between the groups. However, the pain on coughing (dynamic pain) in Group 1 was significantly less variable, compared with the other two groups (P = 0.012). Opioid consumption and occurrences of nausea, vomiting, and rescue antiemetic were similar in three the groups. The combination of TAP block and acetaminophen and NSAID provided less variability in dynamic pain compared with either treatment alone.

  9. Ultrasound Assessment of Abdominal Muscle Thickness in Postpartum vs Nulliparous Women.

    PubMed

    Weis, Carol Ann; Triano, John J; Barrett, Jon; Campbell, Michelle D; Croy, Martine; Roeder, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect size in measurable change of abdominal musculature morphology using ultrasonography in postpartum women within 1 month of a healthy, vaginal delivery. One hundred fifty-six participants were recruited for this study. B-mode ultrasound imaging was used to measure abdominal muscle thickness on 80 nulliparous women and 76 mothers who had delivered within the past 4 weeks. Measures were taken for the upper and lower rectus abdominus, external and internal obliques, and transversus abdominus at rest. Statistically significant differences were found in the thickness of the rectus abdominus muscle at both sites; upper (P < .0001) and lower (P < .0001) as well as the internal oblique (P < .0001). All 3 muscles were thinner in postpartum participants (8.29 ± 1.83 mm, 8.89 ± 2.29 mm, and 7.06 ± 1.82 mm, respectively) within the first month of delivery than in controls (10.82 ± 1.93 mm, 11.13 ± 2.38 mm, and 8.36 ± 1.87 mm, respectively). Large effect sizes were found for the influence of pregnancy on the rectus muscle segments (1.35 for the upper rectus abdominus and 1.00 for the lower rectus abdominus) and a medium effect size for the internal oblique (0.71). No significant differences were observed in the remaining 2 muscles. This study showed that there are differences in morphology of the abdominal muscles in pregnant women vs nonpregnant controls. The large effect sizes reported may provide the basis for future studies examining relationships between morphology, functional change, and back pain during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of inward pressure of the transducer on lateral abdominal muscle thickness during ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Sususmu

    2012-09-01

    Controlled laboratory study, technical note. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles induced by different inward pressures of the transducer during ultrasound imaging (USI). USI of the lateral abdominal muscles is increasingly used in managing musculoskeletal dysfunction. However, to the best of our knowledge, no study has evaluated the influence of different inward pressures of the transducer on the lateral abdominal muscle thickness during USI. Thirty healthy male volunteers participated in this study. The thickness of the transversus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles was measured with USI by the same rater in 4 conditions of inward pressures of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 N. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC1,1), with 95% confidence intervals, were calculated, and a repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to assess the influence of inward pressure on the thickness of the lateral abdominal muscles. The thickness of the transversus abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles was significantly different among the 4 conditions (P<.038). The mean difference between the 0.5-N and 4.0-N conditions was greater than the minimal detectable change of the 0.5-N condition in the lateral abdominal muscles. The difference in magnitude produced by the forces under different conditions was meaningful. When using a technique that involves a handheld transducer, the examiner should attempt to maintain consistent inward pressure of the transducer during USI to quantify the thickness of lateral abdominal muscles. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2012;42(9):815-818, Epub 19 April 2012. doi:10.2519/jospt.2012.4064.

  11. Emergency ultrasound-based algorithms for diagnosing blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Dirk; Rademacher, Grit; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Güthoff, Claas; Mutze, Sven

    2015-09-14

    Ultrasonography (performed by means of a four-quadrant, focused assessment of sonography for trauma (FAST)) is regarded as a key instrument for the initial assessment of patients with suspected blunt abdominal and thoraco-abdominal trauma in the emergency department setting. FAST has a high specificity but low sensitivity in detecting and excluding visceral injuries. Proponents of FAST argue that ultrasound-based clinical pathways enhance the speed of primary trauma assessment, reduce the number of unnecessary multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scans, and enable quicker triage to surgical and non-surgical care. Given the proven accuracy, increasing availability of, and indication for, MDCT among patients with blunt abdominal and multiple injuries, we aimed to compile the best available evidence of the use of FAST-based assessment compared with other primary trauma assessment protocols. To assess the effects of diagnostic algorithms using ultrasonography including in FAST examinations in the emergency department in relation to the early, late, and overall mortality of patients with suspected blunt abdominal trauma. The most recent search was run on 30th June 2015. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S, and CPSI-SSH), clinical trials registers, and screened reference lists. Trial authors were contacted for further information and individual patient data. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Participants were patients with blunt torso, abdominal, or multiple trauma undergoing diagnostic investigations for abdominal organ injury. The intervention was diagnostic algorithms comprising emergency ultrasonography (US). The control was diagnostic algorithms without US examinations (for example, primary computed tomography (CT) or diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL)). Outcomes were mortality, use of CT or invasive procedures (DPL

  12. Ring down artefacts on abdominal sonography to predict pulmonary abnormalities in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C-L; Wang, H-P; Lien, W-C; Chen, C-C; Lai, T-I; Chen, W-J

    2005-10-01

    Ring down artefacts are sometimes found when emergency physicians perform abdominal ultrasound to differentiate between various abdominal problems. We describe a patient who presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain and whose ultrasound examination showed ring down artefacts posterior to the right hemidiaphragm, which led to the eventual diagnosis of pneumonia. Ring down artefacts on ultrasound may be used to predict pulmonary abnormalities. Awareness of this sonographic finding may assist in accurate diagnosis and administration of appropriate treatment without delay.

  13. The role of follow-up ultrasound and clinical parameters after abdominal MDCT in patients with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Lucas L; Körner, M; Linsenmaier, U; Wirth, S; Reiser, M F; Meindl, T

    2014-05-01

    Beside its value during the initial trauma work-up (focused assessment with sonography for trauma), ultrasound (US) is recommended for early follow-up examinations of the abdomen in multiple injured patients. However, multidetector CT (MDCT) has proven to reliably diagnose traumatic lesions of abdominal organs, to depict their extent, and to assess their clinical relevance. To evaluate the diagnostic impact of follow-up US studies after MDCT of the abdomen and to identify possible clinical parameters indicating the need of a follow-up US. During a 30-month period, patients with suspected multiple trauma were allocated. Patients with admission to the ICU, an initial abdominal MDCT scan, and an US follow-up examination after 6 and 24 h were included. Two patient cohorts were defined: patients with normal abdominal MDCT (group 1), patients with trauma-related pathologic abdominal MDCT (group 2). In all patients, parameters indicating alteration of vital functions or hemorrhage within the first 24 h were obtained by reviewing the medical charts. Forty-four of 193 patients were included: 24 were categorized in group 1 (mean age, 41.1 years; range, 21-90 years), 20 in group 2 (mean age, 36.6 years; range, 16-71 years). In group 1, US did not provide new information compared to emergency MDCT. In group 2, there were no contradictory 6- and 24-h follow-up US findings. In patients with positive MDCT findings and alterations of clinical parameters, US did not detect progression of a previously diagnosed pathology or any late manifestation of such a lesion. In none of the patients with negative abdominal MDCT and pathological clinical parameters US indicated an abdominal injury. Routine US follow-up does not yield additional information after abdominal trauma. In patients with MDCT-proven organ lesions, follow-up MDCT should be considered if indicated by abnormal clinical and/or laboratory findings.

  14. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging will spread a clear, warm gel on the skin of the abdomen. This gel helps with the transmission of the sound waves. The ... abdominal ultrasound is painless. Your child may feel a slight ...

  15. The use of real-time ultrasound feedback in teaching abdominal hollowing exercises to healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Henry, Sharon M; Westervelt, Karen C

    2005-06-01

    Randomized controlled trial. To determine if supplementing typical clinical instruction with real-time ultrasound feedback facilitates performance and retention of the abdominal hollowing exercise (AHE). Increasingly clinicians are using real-time ultrasound imaging as a form of feedback when teaching patients trunk stabilization exercises; however, there has been no justification for this practice. Forty-eight subjects were divided randomly into 3 groups that received different types of feedback: group 1 received minimal verbal feedback, group 2 received verbal and palpatory feedback, and group 3 received real-time ultrasound, verbal, and palpatory feedback. If the subject performed 3 consecutive correct AHEs during the initial session, she/he returned for a retention test. The performance of 3 consecutive, correct AHEs was the criterion measure; the number of trials to criterion was also recorded during the initial and retention test sessions. The ability to perform the AHE differed among groups (P<.001). During the initial session, 12.5% of subjects in group 1, 50.0% of subjects in group 2, and 87.5% of subjects in group 3 were able to perform 3 consecutive AHEs. Group 3 subjects achieved the criterion in fewer trials than the other 2 groups (P = .0006). No differences among groups were found for the retention testing; however, low power due to fewer subjects precluded a strong interpretation of this finding. Real-time ultrasound feedback can decrease the number of trials needed to consistently perform the AHE; however, the data are inconclusive with regard to retention of this skill.

  16. Diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasonography in dogs with chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Leib, M S; Larson, M M; Grant, D C; Monroe, W E; Troy, G C; Panciera, D L; Rossmeisl, J H; Werre, S R

    2012-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is common in dogs and has many causes. Ultrasonographic descriptions of many gastrointestinal diseases have been published, but the diagnostic utility of ultrasonography in dogs with chronic diarrhea has not been investigated. Diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasound will be highest in dogs with GI neoplasia and lowest in those with inflammatory disorders. 87 pet dogs with chronic diarrhea. Prospective study in which medical records were reviewed and contribution of abdominal ultrasound toward making diagnosis was scored. In 57/87 (66%) of dogs, the same diagnosis would have been reached without ultrasonography. In 13/87 (15%) of dogs, the ultrasound examination was vital or beneficial to making the diagnosis. Univariable analysis identified that increased diagnostic utility was associated with weight loss (P = .0086), palpation of an abdominal or rectal mass (P = .0031), diseases that commonly have mass lesions visible on ultrasound examination (P < .0001), and a final diagnosis of GI neoplasia. Multivariable regression indicated that utility of abdominal ultrasonography would be 30 times more likely to be high in dogs in which an abdominal or rectal mass was palpated (odds ratio 30.5, 95% CI 5.5-169.6) (P < .0001) versus dogs without a palpable mass. In 15/87 (17%) of dogs, additional benefits of ultrasonography to case management, independent of the contribution to the diagnosis of diarrhea, were identified. Overall, the diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasonography was low in dogs with chronic diarrhea. Identification of factors associated with high diagnostic utility is an indication to perform abdominal ultrasonography in dogs with chronic diarrhea. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  17. [Abdominal ultrasound course an introduction to the ultrasound technique. Physical basis. Ultrasound language].

    PubMed

    Segura-Grau, A; Sáez-Fernández, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Díaz-Rodríguez, N

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is a non-invasive, accessible, and versatile diagnostic technique that uses high frequency ultrasound waves to define outline the organs of the human body, with no ionising radiation, in real time and with the capacity to visual several planes. The high diagnostic yield of the technique, together with its ease of uses plus the previously mentioned characteristics, has currently made it a routine method in daily medical practice. It is for this reason that the multidisciplinary character of this technique is being strengthened every day. To be able to perform the technique correctly requires knowledge of the physical basis of ultrasound, the method and the equipment, as well as of the human anatomy, in order to have the maximum information possible to avoid diagnostic errors due to poor interpretation or lack of information. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  19. [Application of lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion technique by ultrasound guiding during caesarean section in patients with pernicious placenta previa].

    PubMed

    Wei, L C; Gong, G Y; Chen, J H; Hou, P Y; Li, Q Y; Zheng, Z Y; Su, Y M; Zheng, Y; Luo, C Z; Zhang, K; Xu, T F; Ye, Y H; Lan, Y J; Wei, X M

    2018-03-27

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility, effect and safety of lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion technique by ultrasound guiding during caesarean section in patients with pernicious placenta previa. Methods: The clinical data of 40 patients with pernicious placenta previa complicated with placenta accreta from January 2015 to August 2017 in Liuzhou workers hospital were analyzed retrospectively. The study group included 20 cases, which were operated in the way of cesarean section combined lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion technique by ultrasound guiding, while the control group also included 20 cases, which were operated in the way of the conventional cesarean section without balloon occlusion technique. The bleeding amount, blood transfusion volume, operative total time, hysterectomy and complications of the two groups were compared. Results: The bleeding amount and blood transfusion volume in study group were(850±100)ml and (400±50)ml, which were lower than that of the control group[(2 500±230)ml and (1 500±100)ml], the difference was statistically significant( t =35.624, 16.523, all P <0.05). In addition, the hysterectomy rate in study group was 5%, which was lower than that in the control group(30%), the difference was statistically significant(χ 2 =8.672, P <0.05). And the total time of operation was (2.0±0.5)h in the study group, which was shorter than that in the control group[(3.5±0.4)h]. The difference was statistically significant( t =11.362, P <0.05). No postoperative complications took place in the study group.The blood pressure, heart rate and blood oxygen fluctuated significantly, and the postoperative renal function was significantly reduced in the control group. Conclusions: The lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion technique by ultrasound guiding during a caesarean section in patients with pernicious placenta previa can effectively control the bleeding during operation, and preserve reproductive function to the utmost degree

  20. [Abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging: a comparative study on the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease diagnosis in morbidly obese patients].

    PubMed

    Chaves, Gabriela Villaça; Pereira, Sílvia Elaine; Saboya, Carlos José; Cortes, Caroline; Ramalho, Rejane

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the concordance between abdominal ultrasound and an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in the diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and concordance of these two methods with the histopathological exam. The population studied was comprised of 145 patients with morbid obesity (BMI > or = 40 Kg/m(2)), of both genders. NAFLD diagnosis was performed by MRI and Ultrasound. Liver biopsy was performed in a sub-sample (n=40). To evaluate the concordance of these two methods, the kappa coefficient was used. Concordance between both methods (MRI and Ultrasound) was poor and not significant (Kappa adjusted= 0.27; CI 95%= 0.07-0.39.) Nevertheless a slight concordance was found between diagnosis of NAFLD by ultrasound and the hepatic biopsy, with 83.,3% of concordant results and Kappa adjusted= 0.67.Results of an MRI and the histopathological exam were compared and results showed 53.6% of concordant results and kappa adjusted= 0.07. The concordance found in the diagnosis performed using the ultrasound method and the hepatic biopsy, shows a need to implement and perform more research on the use of ultrasound to validate and reconsider these methods. This would minimize the need to perform biopsies to detect and diagnose such disease.

  1. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  2. Pain related to robotic cholecystectomy with lower abdominal ports: effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique of rectus sheath block in female patients: A prospective randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Soo; Choi, Jong Bum; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Wook Hwan; Baek, Nam Hyun; Kim, Jayoun; Park, Chu Kyung; Lee, Yeon Ju; Park, Sung Yong

    2016-08-01

    Robotic cholecystectomy (RC) using port sites in the lower abdominal area (T12-L1) rather than the upper abdomen has recently been introduced as an alternative procedure for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the time course of different components of pain and the analgesic effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique for rectus sheath block (sRSB) after RC in female patients. We randomly assigned 40 patients to undergo ultrasound-guided sRSB (RSB group, n = 20) or to not undergo any block (control group, n = 20). Pain was subdivided into 3 components: superficial wound pain, deep abdominal pain, and referred shoulder pain, which were evaluated with a numeric rating scale (from 0 to 10) at baseline (time of awakening) and at 1, 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. Consumption of fentanyl and general satisfaction were also evaluated 1 hour (before discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and 24 hours postoperatively (end of study). Superficial wound pain was predominant only at awakening, and after postoperative 1 hour in the control group. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB significantly decreased superficial pain after RC (P < 0.01) and resulted in a better satisfaction score (P < 0.05) 1 hour after RC in the RSB group compared with the control group. The cumulative postoperative consumption of fentanyl at 6, 9, and 24 hours was not significantly different between groups. After RC with lower abdominal ports, superficial wound pain predominates over deep intra-abdominal pain and shoulder pain only at the time of awakening. Afterwards, superficial and deep pain decreased to insignificant levels in 6 hours. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB was effective only during the first hour. This limited benefit should be balanced against the time and risks entailed in performing RSB.

  3. [Ultrasound screening of abdominal aortic aneurysm: Lessons from Vesale 2013].

    PubMed

    Laroche, J P; Becker, F; Baud, J M; Miserey, G; Jaussent, A; Picot, M C; Bura-Rivière, A; Quéré, I

    2015-12-01

    Although aneurysm of the abdominal infra-renal aorta (AAA) meets criteria warranting B mode ultrasound screening, the advantages of mass screening versus selective targeted opportunistic screening remain a subject of debate. In France, the French Society of Vascular Medicine (SFMV) and the Health Authority (HAS) published recommendations for targeted opportunistic screening in 2006 and 2013 respectively. The SFMV held a mainstream communication day on November 21, 2013 in France involving participants from metropolitan France and overseas departments that led to a proposal for free AAA ultrasound screening: the Vesalius operation. Being a consumer operation, the selection criteria were limited to age (men and women between 60 and 75 years); the age limit was lowered to 50 years in case of direct family history of AAA. More than 7000 people (as many women as men) were screened in 83 centers with a 1.70% prevalence of AAA in the age-based target population (3.12% for men, 0.27% for women). The median diameter of detected AAA was 33 mm (range 20 to 74 mm). The prevalence of AAA was 1.7% in this population. Vesalius data are consistent with those of the literature both in terms of prevalence and for cardiovascular risk factors with the important role of smoking. Lessons from Vesalius to take into consideration are: screening is warranted in men 60 years and over, especially smokers, and in female smokers. Screening beyond 75 years should be discussed. Given the importance of screening, the SFMV set up a year of national screening for AAA (Vesalius operation 2014/2015) in order to increase public and physician awareness about AAA detection, therapeutic management, and monitoring. AAA is a serious, common, disease that kills 6000 people each year. The goal of screening is cost-effective reduction in the death toll. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Fatty liver disease in severe obese patients: Diagnostic value of abdominal ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    de Moura Almeida, Alessandro; Cotrim, Helma Pinchemel; Barbosa, Daniel Batista Valente; de Athayde, Luciana Gordilho Matteoni; Santos, Adimeia Souza; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; de Freitas, Luiz Antonio Rodrigues; Rios, Adriano; Alves, Erivaldo

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of abdominal ultrasound (US) for the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis in severe obese subjects and its relation to histological grade of steatosis. METHODS: A consecutive series of obese patients, who underwent bariatric surgery from October 2004 to May 2005, was selected. Ultrasonography was performed in all patients as part of routine preoperative time and an intraoperative wedge biopsy was obtained at the beginning of the bariatric surgery. The US and histological findings of steatosis were compared, considering histology as the gold standard. RESULTS: The study included 105 patients. The mean age was 37.2 ± 10.6 years and 75.2% were female. The histological prevalence of steatosis was 89.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of US in the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis were, respectively, 64.9% (95% CI: 54.9-74.3) and 90.9% (95% CI: 57.1-99.5). The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were, respectively, 98.4% (95% CI: 90.2-99.9) and 23.3% (95% CI: 12.3-39.0). The presence of steatosis on US was associated to advanced grades of steatosis on histology (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Preoperative abdominal US in our series has not shown to be an accurate method for the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis in severe obese patients. Until another non-invasive method demonstrates better sensitivity and specificity values, histological evaluation may be recommended to these patients undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:18322958

  5. The utility of focused abdominal ultrasound in blunt abdominal trauma: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Helling, Thomas S; Wilson, Jennifer; Augustosky, Kim

    2007-12-01

    Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) has become commonplace in the management of blunt abdominal trauma. However, newer computed tomography (CT) scanners have decreased imaging time for trauma patients and provide more detailed examination of abdominal contents. It was the aim of the current study to evaluate practice patterns of FAST and abdominal CT in blunt trauma victims. This was a retrospective study of all blunt trauma patients (N = 299) who received at least 1 FAST examination in the emergency department by surgeons and were admitted. Patients were tracked for subsequent CT scanning, disposition from the emergency department, any operative findings, and survival. Twenty-one of 299 patients (7%) had a positive FAST. There were 7 deaths and 14 patients were taken directly to the operating room (OR) for control of abdominal bleeding. Thirty-one of 299 (10%) had equivocal FAST. There were 4 deaths and 8 patients were taken to the OR for control of abdominal bleeding. A total of 247 of the 299 patients had a negative FAST. CT scans were performed in 193: 15 showed a visceral injury. There were 13 deaths and 29 patients were taken to the OR (4 for bleeding). Patients with a positive FAST had a higher mortality than FAST-negative patients (P < .001) and greater likelihood for operation (P < .001). Those with equivocal FAST had a greater likelihood for operation than FAST-negative patients (P < .05). FAST examinations can identify patients at risk for hemorrhage and in whom operation may be needed and, therefore, can guide mobilization of hospital resources. FAST-negative patients can be managed expectantly, using more specific imaging techniques.

  6. Adding New Tools to the Black Bag—Introduction of Ultrasound into the Physical Diagnosis Course

    PubMed Central

    Amponsah, David; Yang, James; Mendez, Jennifer; Bridge, Patrick; Hays, Gregory; Baliga, Sudhir; Crist, Karen; Brennan, Simone; Jackson, Matt; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Ultrasound, a versatile diagnostic modality that permits real-time visualization at the patient’s bedside, can be used as an adjunct in teaching physical diagnosis (PD). Aims: (1) to study the feasibility of incorporating ultrasound into PD courses and (2) determine whether learners can demonstrate image recognition and acquisition skills. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Three hundred seven second-year medical students were introduced to cardiovascular and abdominal ultrasound scanning after training in the physical examination. This consisted of a demonstration of the ultrasound examination, followed by practice on standardized patients (SPs). Pre-post tests were administered to evaluate students’ knowledge and understanding of ultrasound. Students performed an ultrasound examination during the PD final examination. PROGRAM EVALUATION Pre-post test data revealed significant improvements in image recognition. On the final exam, the highest scores (98.4%) were obtained for the internal jugular vein and lowest scores (74.6%) on the Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma images. Eighty-nine percent of students’ surveyed felt ultrasound was a valuable tool for physicians. DISCUSSION An introductory ultrasound course is effective in improving medical students' acquisition and recognition of basic cardiovascular and abdominal ultrasound images. This innovative program demonstrates the feasibility of incorporating portable ultrasound as a learning tool during medical school. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1451-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20697974

  7. US Emergency Department Trends in Imaging for Pediatric Nontraumatic Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Niles, Lauren M; Goyal, Monika K; Badolato, Gia M; Chamberlain, James M; Cohen, Joanna S

    2017-10-01

    To describe national emergency department (ED) trends in computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound imaging for the evaluation of pediatric nontraumatic abdominal pain from 2007 through 2014. We used data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to measure trends in CT and ultrasound use among children with nontraumatic abdominal pain. We performed multivariable logistic regression to measure the strength of the association of ED type (pediatric versus general ED) with CT and ultrasound use adjusting for potential confounding variables. Of an estimated 21.1 million ED visits for nontraumatic abdominal pain, 14.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.2%-16.0%) had CT imaging only, 10.9% (95% CI, 9.7%-12.1%) had ultrasound imaging only, and 1.9% (95% CI, 1.4%-2.4%) received both CT and ultrasound. The overall use of CT and ultrasound did not significantly change over the study period ( P trend .63 and .90, respectively). CT use was lower among children treated in pediatric EDs compared with general EDs (adjusted odds ratio 0.34; 95% CI, 0.17-0.69). Conversely, ultrasound use was higher among children treated in pediatric EDs compared with general EDs (adjusted odds ratio 2.14; 95% CI, 1.29-3.55). CT imaging for pediatric patients with nontraumatic abdominal pain has plateaued since 2007 after the steady increase seen in the preceding 9 years. Among this population, an increased likelihood of CT imaging was demonstrated in general EDs compared with pediatric EDs, in which there was a higher likelihood of ultrasound imaging. Dissemination of pediatric-focused radiology protocols to general EDs may help optimize radiation exposure in children. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Utilization of bedside urogenital ultrasound in an austere combat setting: enterovesicular fistula case report.

    PubMed

    Lunceford, Nicole; Scherl, Robert J; Elliot, Jonathan; Bechtel, Brett F; Auten, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    The role of bedside ultrasound by physicians with advanced ultrasound training, such as emergency medicine providers, has been clearly established in the austere setting of combat medicine. This highly mobile, noninvasive, and versatile imaging modality has a role in evaluating battle- and nonbattle-related presentations. This case report describes a U.S. Marine reporting to an austere medical facility with the chief complaint of abdominal pain. An ultrasound of the patient's urinary tract revealed abnormalities that suggested right bladder wall thickening and an echo dense layer of sediment as the potential source of his discomfort. These findings supported patient transfer to a higher echelon of care. Further diagnostic testing revealed Crohn's disease with an associated enterovesicular fistula. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. Gastrointestinal manifestations of hereditary angioedema diagnosed by ultrasound in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Riguzzi, Christine; Losonczy, Lia; Teismann, Nathan; Herring, Andrew A; Nagdev, Arun

    2014-11-01

    Abdominal angioedema is a less recognized type of angioedema, which can occur in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE). The clinical signs may range from subtle, diffuse abdominal pain and nausea, to overt peritonitis. We describe two cases of abdominal angioedema in patients with known HAE that were diagnosed in the emergency department by point-of-care (POC) ultrasound. In each case, the patient presented with isolated abdominal complaints and no signs of oropharyngeal edema. Findings on POC ultrasound included intraperitoneal free fluid and bowel wall edema. Both patients recovered uneventfully after receiving treatment. Because it can be performed rapidly, requires no ionizing radiation, and can rule out alternative diagnoses, POC ultrasound holds promise as a valuable tool in the evaluation and management of patients with HAE.

  10. Simulation-Based Abdominal Ultrasound Training - A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, M L; Ewertsen, C; Konge, L; Albrecht-Beste, E; Bachmann Nielsen, M

    2016-06-01

    The aim is to provide a complete overview of the different simulation-based training options for abdominal ultrasound and to explore the evidence of their effect. This systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines and Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library was searched. Articles were divided into three categories based on study design (randomized controlled trials, before-and-after studies and descriptive studies) and assessed for level of evidence using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine (OCEBM) system and for bias using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias assessment tool. Seventeen studies were included in the analysis: four randomized controlled trials, eight before-and-after studies with pre- and post-test evaluations, and five descriptive studies. No studies scored the highest level of evidence, and 14 had the lowest level. Bias was high for 11 studies, low for four, and unclear for two. No studies used a test with established evidence of validity or examined the correlation between obtained skills on the simulators and real-life clinical skills. Only one study used blinded assessors. The included studies were heterogeneous in the choice of simulator, study design, participants, and outcome measures, and the level of evidence for effect was inadequate. In all studies simulation training was equally or more beneficial than other instructions or no instructions. Study designs had significant built-in bias and confounding issues; therefore, further research should be based on randomized controlled trials using tests with validity evidence and blinded assessors. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Use of ultrasound imaging for the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding in the bonnet macaque ( Macaca radiata).

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Uddhav K; Imran, M; Manjramkar, Dhananjay D; Metkari, Siddhanath M; Sable, Nilesh P; Gavhane, Dnyaneshwar S; Katkam, Rajendra R; Sachdeva, Geetanjali; Thakur, Meenakshi H; Kholkute, Sanjeeva D

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound is a powerful, low-cost, non-invasive medical tool used by laboratory animal veterinarians for diagnostic imaging. Sonohysterography and transvaginal ultrasound are frequently used to assess uterine anomalies in women presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB). In the present study, we have evaluated the abdominal ultrasound of bonnet monkeys ( n = 8) showing spontaneous ovulatory ( n = 5) and anovulatory ( n = 3) AUB. The ovulatory ( n = 5) macaques showed cyclic AUB for 7-8 days. The anovulatory ( n = 3) macaques had irregular AUB with menstrual cycles of 40-45 days. The B-mode abdominal, colour Doppler and 3D ultrasound scans were performed during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Ultrasound examination revealed endometrial polyps in five macaques and endometrial hyperplasia in three animals. The width and length of endometrial polyps was around 0.5-1 cm (average 0.51 ± 0.23 cm × 0.96 ± 0.16 cm) with significant increase in endometrial thickness ( P < 0.0002). 3D ultrasound also showed a homogeneous mass in the uterine cavity and colour Doppler ultrasound showed increased vascularity in the endometrial polyps. Endometrial hyperplasia characteristically appeared as a thickened echogenic endometrium ( P < 0.0002). This study demonstrates the use of non-invasive ultrasound techniques in the diagnosis of AUB in macaques.

  12. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Human Cystic Echinococcosis in the Cusco Region of the Peruvian Highlands Diagnosed Using Focused Abdominal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Hou, Amy; Morales, Maria Luisa; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Vilca, Freddy; Mozo, Karen; Bascope, Ruben; White, A. Clinton; Brunetti, Enrico; Chen, Lin; Cabada, Miguel M.

    2017-01-01

    Latin America is among the highly endemic regions for cystic echinococcosis (CE). In Peru, an estimated 1,139 disability-adjusted life years are lost annually from surgical treatment of CE. This is comparable with the combined total for Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, and Chile. The prevalence of human infection has been investigated in the central Peruvian Andes, but there are no community-based screening data from other regions of Peru. We carried out a population survey in January 2015 using abdominal ultrasound to estimate the prevalence of abdominal CE in the Canas and Canchis provinces, in the Cusco region of Peru. Among 1,351 subjects screened, 41 (3%) had CE. There was significant variation between communities with similar socioeconomic features in a small geographical area. A history of CE was reported by 4.1% of the screened subjects, among whom 30.3% still had CE on ultrasound. Among patients reporting previous CE treatment, 14.9% had CE in active stages. Limited education, community of residence, and knowing people with CE in the community were associated with CE. These results demonstrate a significant burden of CE in the region and suggest the need for further investigations, control activities, and optimization of clinical management for CE in this area. PMID:28719254

  13. Abdominal Trauma Revisited.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, David V

    2017-11-01

    Although abdominal trauma has been described since antiquity, formal laparotomies for trauma were not performed until the 1800s. Even with the introduction of general anesthesia in the United States during the years 1842 to 1846, laparotomies for abdominal trauma were not performed during the Civil War. The first laparotomy for an abdominal gunshot wound in the United States was finally performed in New York City in 1884. An aggressive operative approach to all forms of abdominal trauma till the establishment of formal trauma centers (where data were analyzed) resulted in extraordinarily high rates of nontherapeutic laparotomies from the 1880s to the 1960s. More selective operative approaches to patients with abdominal stab wounds (1960s), blunt trauma (1970s), and gunshot wounds (1990s) were then developed. Current adjuncts to the diagnosis of abdominal trauma when serial physical examinations are unreliable include the following: 1) diagnostic peritoneal tap/lavage, 2) surgeon-performed ultrasound examination; 3) contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis; and 4) diagnostic laparoscopy. Operative techniques for injuries to the liver, spleen, duodenum, and pancreas have been refined considerably since World War II. These need to be emphasized repeatedly in an era when fewer patients undergo laparotomy for abdominal trauma. Finally, abdominal trauma damage control is a valuable operative approach in patients with physiologic exhaustion and multiple injuries.

  14. Analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block after total abdominal hysterectomy: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Røjskjaer, Jesper O; Gade, Erik; Kiel, Louise B; Lind, Morten N; Pedersen, Lars M; Kristensen, Billy B; Rasmussen, Yvonne H; Foss, Nicolai B

    2015-03-01

    To assess the effect of bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block with ropivacaine compared with placebo as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial following the CONSORT criteria. Hvidovre University Hospital. Forty-six women scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy. Women received either ropivacaine 0.75%, 20 mL (n = 24) or 0.9% saline, 20 mL (n = 24) in the transversus abdominis plane on each side. Primary outcome was the 24-h postoperative morphine consumption. Secondary outcomes were pain scores at rest and during coughing, postoperative nausea and vomiting at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h, and time to first mobilization. There was no difference in the mean 24-h postoperative morphine consumption between the two groups (p = 0.733). The ropivacaine group had significantly lower median pain scores at 1 h (p = 0.008) and 2 h (p = 0.027) postoperatively at rest and at 8 h (p = 0.028) during coughing. There was no significant difference in other secondary outcomes. There was no reduction in 24-h morphine consumption when using an ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block in women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. As part of a multimodal regimen the transversus abdominis plane block showed some effect on pain scores at rest only in the early postoperative period. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. A navigation system for flexible endoscopes using abdominal 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, R.; Kaar, M.; Bathia, Amon; Bathia, Amar; Lampret, A.; Birkfellner, W.; Hummel, J.; Figl, M.

    2014-09-01

    A navigation system for flexible endoscopes equipped with ultrasound (US) scan heads is presented. In contrast to similar systems, abdominal 3D-US is used for image fusion of the pre-interventional computed tomography (CT) to the endoscopic US. A 3D-US scan, tracked with an optical tracking system (OTS), is taken pre-operatively together with the CT scan. The CT is calibrated using the OTS, providing the transformation from CT to 3D-US. Immediately before intervention a 3D-US tracked with an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) is acquired and registered intra-modal to the preoperative 3D-US. The endoscopic US is calibrated using the EMTS and registered to the pre-operative CT by an intra-modal 3D-US/3D-US registration. Phantom studies showed a registration error for the US to CT registration of 5.1 mm ± 2.8 mm. 3D-US/3D-US registration of patient data gave an error of 4.1 mm compared to 2.8 mm with the phantom. From this we estimate an error on patient experiments of 5.6 mm.

  16. Recurrent severe abdominal pain in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Homme, James L; Foster, Ashley A

    2014-05-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is a blockage occurring at the junction of the ureter and the renal pelvis. Pediatric patients with UPJO pose a diagnostic challenge when they present to the emergency department (ED) with severe recurrent abdominal pain if there is not a level of suspicion for this condition. Our aim was to review presentation of UPJO to the ED, methods of diagnosis, and treatment of this common but often overlooked condition. We report on 2 patients, a 9-year-old and 3-year-old, who had multiple presentations to health care providers and the ED with intermittent and recurrent abdominal pain. Subsequent testing, including ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) with diuretic-recreated symptoms, revealed UPJO. Open pyeloplasty was performed, resulting in complete resolution of symptoms. UPJO is an important diagnosis to consider when patients present to the ED with recurrent abdominal pain. US can be helpful in suspecting the diagnosis, but often CT, magnetic resonance urography, or diuretic scintigraphy is required for confirmation. Diuretics can be used to aid diagnostic testing by reproducing abdominal pain at the time of imaging. Referral to a urologist for open pyeloplasty is definitive treatment for this condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Abdominal calcifications and diagnostic imaging decision making: a topic review

    PubMed Central

    Bassano, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review commonly encountered calcifications found within the abdomen as seen on the lumbar spine radiograph and to determine which advanced imaging modality is best to thoroughly assess the patient. Methods Searches of electronic databases and textbooks were conducted to construct this narrative overview. Discussion By categorizing the type of calcification and localizing it anatomically, most often a definitive diagnosis can be reached. Two commonly encountered conditions, abdominal aortic aneurysms and urinary calculi, are used to compare the main advanced imaging modalities (diagnostic ultrasound and computed tomography) used to further assess abdominal calcifications. Conclusion In most circumstances, either diagnostic ultrasound or computed tomography will establish a definitive diagnosis and offer thorough imaging assessment for abdominal calcifications. PMID:19674671

  18. The effect of morphine added to bupivacaine in ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block for postoperative analgesia following lower abdominal cancer surgery, a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    El Sherif, Fatma Adel; Mohamed, Sahar Abdel-Baky; Kamal, Shereen Mamdouh

    2017-06-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block used for management of surgical abdominal pain by injecting local anesthetics into the plane between the internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles. We aimed to explore the effect of adding morphine to bupivacaine in ultrasound guided TAP-block in patients undergoing lower abdominal cancer surgery. Randomized, double-blind, prospective study. Clinical trial identifier: NCT02566096. Academic medical center. Sixty patients were enrolled in this study after ethical committee approval. Patients divided into 2 groups (30 each): Bupivacaine group (GB): given ultrasound guided TAP-block 20ml 0.5% bupivacaine diluted in 20ml saline; Morphine group (GM): given ultrasound guided TAP-block with 20ml 0.5% bupivacaine+10mg morphine sulphate diluted in 20ml saline. Patients were observed for total morphine consumption, time for first request of rescue analgesia, sedation scores, hemodynamics and side effects for 24h postoperatively. Morphine added to bupivacaine in TAP block compared to bupivacaine alone reduced total morphine consumption (5.33±1.28mg) (10.70±3.09mg) respectively (p<0.001), prolonged the time to first request of analgesia (10.40±4.96h) (6.97±3.26h) respectively (p<0.008), with a statistically significant decrease in (VAS-M) in GM compared with GB at 12h postoperatively (p<0.002). No significant differences in hemodynamics, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, sedation score, and side effects except for nausea were observed (p>0.05). Addition of morphine to bupivacaine in TAP block is effective method for pain management in patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery without serious side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An unusual cause of paediatric abdominal pain: Mesenteric masses accompanied with volvulus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Shan; Zhang, Jun; Kong, Xiang Ru; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Li, Chang Chun

    2016-07-01

    Volvulus caused by mesenteric masses is rare and may result in serious consequences. This study aimed to better characterize volvulus caused by mesenteric masses in children. A retrospective study was conducted in 24 patients who underwent surgical treatment between January 1994 and January 2014 in one single institution. There were 10 boys and 14 girls. The most frequent findings were abdominal pain (100%), emesis (91.7%) and nausea (83.3%). Physical examination showed positive ileus signs in majority cases, and palpable mass was found in half of the patients. Ultrasound and CT scans revealed mesenteric masses in 21 and 24 patients, and 'whirlpool sign' was observed in 19 and 22 patients, respectively. Emergency laparotomy was performed in all patients. Histological examination revealed that 18 cystic masses were lymphangioma, 5 solid cases were lipoma and the remaining one was lipoblastoma. The postoperative course was uneventful in 22 patients, and postoperative obstruction and incision infection occurred in 2 patients. There was no evidence of recurrence at follow-up. Volvulus caused by mesenteric masses is a rare but potentially life-threatening cause of abdominal pain, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of paediatric acute abdominal pain.

  20. Ultrasound detection of placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rahimi-Sharbaf, Fatemeh; Jamal, Ashraf; Mesdaghinia, Elaheh; Abedzadeh-Kalahroudi, Masoumeh; Niroomanesh, Shirin; Atoof, Fatemeh

    2014-06-01

    Placenta accreta is considered a life-threatening condition and the main cause of maternal mortality. Prenatal diagnosis of placenta accreta usually is made by clinical presentation, imaging studies like ultrasound and MRI in the second and third trimester. To determine accuracy of ultrasound findings for placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy. In a longitudinal study 323 high risk patients for placenta accreta were assessed. The eligible women were examined by vaginal and abdominal ultrasound for gestational sac and placental localization and they were followed up until the end of pregnancy. The ultrasound findings were compared with histopathological examinations as a gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of ultrasound were estimated for the first trimester and compared with other 2 trimesters in the case of repeated ultrasound examination. Ultrasound examinations in the first trimester revealed that 28 cases had the findings in favor of placenta accreta which ultimately was confirmed in 7 cases. The ultrasound sensitivity and specificity for detecting placenta accreta in the first trimester was 41% [95% CI: 16.2-62.7] and 88% [95% CI: 88.2-94.6] respectively. Ultrasound screening for placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy could not achieve the high sensitivity as second and third trimester of pregnancy.

  1. Epidemiology and contemporary management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Brant W; Hallett, Richard L; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2018-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is most commonly defined as a maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta in excess of 3 cm in either anterior-posterior or transverse planes or, alternatively, as a focal dilation ≥ 1.5 times the diameter of the normal adjacent arterial segment. Risk factors for the development of AAA include age > 60, tobacco use, male gender, Caucasian race, and family history of AAA. Aneurysm growth and rupture risk appear to be associated with persistent tobacco use, female gender, and chronic pulmonary disease. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and detected incidentally on various imaging studies, including abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomographic angiography. Symptoms associated with AAA may include abdominal or back pain, thromboembolization, atheroembolization, aortic rupture, or development of an arteriovenous or aortoenteric fistula. The Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Efficiently (SAAAVE) Act provides coverage for a one-time screening abdominal ultrasound at age 65 for men who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes and women who have family history of AAA disease. Medical management is recommended for asymptomatic patients with AAAs < 5 cm in diameter and focuses on modifiable risk factors, including smoking cessation and blood pressure control. Primary indications for intervention in patients with AAA include development of symptoms, rupture, rapid aneurysm growth (> 5 mm/6 months), or presence of a fusiform aneurysm with maximum diameter of 5.5 cm or greater. Intervention for AAA includes conventional open surgical repair and endovascular aortic stent graft repair.

  2. Dioctophyma renale (Goeze, 1782) in the abdominal cavity of a capuchin monkey (Cebus apella), Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Mirian Naomi; Imbeloni, Aline Amaral; Muniz, José Augusto Pereira Carneiro; Scalercio, Sarah Raphaella Rocha de Azevedo; Benigno, Raimundo Nonato Moraes; Pereira, Washington Luiz Assunção; Cunha Lacreta Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2010-10-29

    This study reports a case of parasitism by Dioctophyma renale (Goeze, 1762) encysted in the abdominal cavity of a capuchin monkey (Cebus apella) coming from the Centro Nacional de Primatas, Brazil. The animal was sent to the Veterinary Clinic sector with an increase in abdominal volume and no occurrence of any other clinical signs. Upon palpation, a movable circular mass with a diameter of approximately 10 cm was found. Urinalysis, complete blood count and serum biochemistry were performed without revealing any alterations. The animal was then submitted to an abdominal ultrasound exam. The cyst was punctured and a surgical removal procedure was performed, revealing a brownish-colored cylindrical structure that was already deteriorated, making it impossible to perform morphological analysis and classification. In the sediment of the liquid found, eggs were encountered that had morphological characteristics compatible with D. renale. The objective of this paper is to report the first case of parasitism by D. renale in C. apella (Linnaeus, 1758). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrasound detection of placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi-Sharbaf, Fatemeh; Jamal, Ashraf; Mesdaghinia, Elaheh; Abedzadeh- Kalahroudi, Masoumeh; Niroomanesh, Shirin; Atoof, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Placenta accreta is considered a life-threatening condition and the main cause of maternal mortality. Prenatal diagnosis of placenta accreta usually is made by clinical presentation, imaging studies like ultrasound and MRI in the second and third trimester. Objective: To determine accuracy of ultrasound findings for placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: In a longitudinal study 323 high risk patients for placenta accreta were assessed. The eligible women were examined by vaginal and abdominal ultrasound for gestational sac and placental localization and they were followed up until the end of pregnancy. The ultrasound findings were compared with histopathological examinations as a gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of ultrasound were estimated for the first trimester and compared with other 2 trimesters in the case of repeated ultrasound examination. Results: Ultrasound examinations in the first trimester revealed that 28 cases had the findings in favor of placenta accreta which ultimately was confirmed in 7 cases. The ultrasound sensitivity and specificity for detecting placenta accreta in the first trimester was 41% [95% CI: 16.2-62.7] and 88% [95% CI: 88.2-94.6] respectively. Conclusion: Ultrasound screening for placenta accreta in the first trimester of pregnancy could not achieve the high sensitivity as second and third trimester of pregnancy. PMID:25071851

  5. Measurement of superficial and deep abdominal muscle thickness: an ultrasonography study.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Nahid; Khademi-Kalantari, Khosro; Mohseni-Bandpei, Mohammad Ali; Mikaili, Saeed; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2016-08-23

    Real-time ultrasound imaging is a valid method in the field of rehabilitation. The ultrasound imaging allows direct visualization for real-time study of the muscles as they contract over the time. Measuring of the size of each abdominal muscle in relation to the others provides useful information about the differences in structure, as well as data on trunk muscle activation patterns. The purpose of this study was to assess the size and symmetry of the abdominal muscles at rest in healthy adults and to provide a reference range of absolute abdominal muscle size in a relatively large population. A total 156 healthy subjects with the age range of 18-44 years were randomly recruited. The thickness of internal oblique, external oblique, transverse abdominis, and rectus abdominis muscles was measured at rest on both right and left sides using ultrasound. Independent t test was used to compare the mean thickness of each abdominal muscle between males and females. Differences on side-to-side thicknesses were assessed using paired t test. The association between abdominal muscle thicknesses with gender and anthropometric variables was examined using the Pearson correlation coefficient. A normal pattern of increasing order of mean abdominal muscle thickness was found in both genders at both right and left sides: transverse abdominis < external oblique < internal oblique < rectus abdominis. There was a significant difference on the size of transverse abdominis, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles between right and left sides in both genders. Males had significantly thicker abdominal muscles than females. Age was significantly correlated with the thickness of internal oblique, external oblique, and rectus abdominis muscles. Body mass index was also positively correlated with muscle thickness of rectus abdominis and external oblique. The results provide a normal reference range for the abdominal muscles in healthy subjects and may be used as an index to

  6. Diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasonography in dogs with chronic vomiting.

    PubMed

    Leib, M S; Larson, M M; Panciera, D L; Troy, G C; Monroe, W E; Rossmeisl, J H; Forrester, S D; Herring, E S

    2010-01-01

    Chronic vomiting is a common problem in dogs that has many causes. Ultrasonographic descriptions of many gastrointestinal (GI) diseases have been published. However, diagnostic utility of ultrasonography in dogs with chronic vomiting has not been investigated. Diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasound will be highest in dogs with GI neoplasia and lowest in those with inflammatory disorders. Eighty-nine pet dogs with chronic vomiting. Medical records were reviewed and the contribution of abdominal ultrasound to the clinical diagnosis was subjectively scored. In 68.5% of dogs, the reviewers thought that the same diagnosis would have been reached without performing ultrasonography. In 22.5% of dogs, the ultrasound examination was considered to be vital or beneficial to the diagnosis. Univariable analysis identified that increased diagnostic utility was associated with increasing age, a greater number of vomiting episodes per week, presence of weight loss, a greater percentage of lost body weight, and a final diagnosis of GI lymphoma or gastric adenocarcinoma. However, multivariate analysis only identified increasing age and a final diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma or GI lymphoma to be associated with increased diagnostic utility. In 12.4% of dogs, additional benefits of ultrasonography to case management, excluding the contribution to the vomiting problem, were identified. The diagnostic utility of abdominal ultrasonography was high in 27% of dogs. The presence of factors that are associated with high diagnostic utility is an indication to perform abdominal ultrasonography in dogs with chronic vomiting.

  7. Echinococcus multilocularis Detection in Live Eurasian Beavers (Castor fiber) Using a Combination of Laparoscopy and Abdominal Ultrasound under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gottstein, Bruno; Cracknell, John; Schwab, Gerhard; Rosell, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis is an important pathogenic zoonotic parasite of health concern, though absent in the United Kingdom. Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber) may act as a rare intermediate host, and so unscreened wild caught individuals may pose a potential risk of introducing this parasite to disease-free countries through translocation programs. There is currently no single definitive ante-mortem diagnostic test in intermediate hosts. An effective non-lethal diagnostic, feasible under field condition would be helpful to minimise parasite establishment risk, where indiscriminate culling is to be avoided. This study screened live beavers (captive, n = 18 or wild-trapped in Scotland, n = 12) and beaver cadavers (wild Scotland, n = 4 or Bavaria, n = 11), for the presence of E. multilocularis. Ultrasonography in combination with minimally invasive surgical examination of the abdomen by laparoscopy was viable under field conditions for real-time evaluation in beavers. Laparoscopy alone does not allow the operator to visualize the parenchyma of organs such as the liver, or inside the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract, hence the advantage of its combination with abdominal ultrasonography. All live beavers and Scottish cadavers were largely unremarkable in their haematology and serum biochemistry with no values suspicious for liver pathology or potentially indicative of E. multilocularis infection. This correlated well with ultrasound, laparoscopy, and immunoblotting, which were unremarkable in these individuals. Two wild Bavarian individuals were suspected E. multilocularis positive at post-mortem, through the presence of hepatic cysts. Sensitivity and specificity of a combination of laparoscopy and abdominal ultrasonography in the detection of parasitic liver cyst lesions was 100% in the subset of cadavers (95%Confidence Intervals 34.24–100%, and 86.7–100% respectively). For abdominal ultrasonography alone sensitivity was only 50% (95%CI 9.5–90.6%), with

  8. Robot-based tele-echography: clinical evaluation of the TER system in abdominal aortic exploration.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Thomas; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Bressollette, Luc; Pelissier, Franck; Boidard, Eric; Troccaz, Jocelyne; Cinquin, Philippe

    2007-11-01

    The TER system is a robot-based tele-echography system allowing remote ultrasound examination. The specialist moves a mock-up of the ultrasound probe at the master site, and the robot reproduces the movements of the real probe, which sends back ultrasound images and force feedback. This tool could be used to perform ultrasound examinations in small health care centers or from isolated sites. The objective of this study was to prove, under real conditions, the feasibility and reliability of the TER system in detecting abdominal aortic and iliac aneurysms. Fifty-eight patients were included in 2 centers in Brest and Grenoble, France. The remote examination was compared with the reference standard, the bedside examination, for aorta and iliac artery diameter measurement, detection and description of aneurysms, detection of atheromatosis, the duration of the examination, and acceptability. All aneurysms (8) were detected by both techniques as intramural thrombosis and extension to the iliac arteries. The interobserver correlation coefficient was 0.982 (P < .0001) for aortic diameters. The rate of concordance between 2 operators in evaluating atheromatosis was 84% +/- 11% (95% confidence interval). Our study on 58 patients suggests that the TER system could be a reliable, acceptable, and effective robot-based system for performing remote abdominal aortic ultrasound examinations. Research is continuing to improve the equipment for general abdominal use.

  9. Effect of abdominal resistance exercise on abdominal subcutaneous fat of obese women: a randomized controlled trial using ultrasound imaging assessments.

    PubMed

    Kordi, Ramin; Dehghani, Saeed; Noormohammadpour, Pardis; Rostami, Mohsen; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of diet and an abdominal resistance training program to diet alone on abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness and waist circumference of overweight and obese women. This randomized clinical trial included 40 overweight and obese women randomly divided into 2 groups: diet only and diet combined with 12 weeks of abdominal resistance training. Waist and hip circumferences and abdominal skin folds of the subjects were measured at the beginning and 12 weeks after the interventions. In addition, abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness of the subjects was measured using ultrasonography. Percentage body fat and lean body mass of all the subjects were also measured using a bioelectric impedance device. After 12 weeks of intervention, the weight of participants in both groups decreased; but the difference between the 2 groups was not significant (P = .45). Similarly, other variables including abdominal subcutaneous fat, waist circumference, hip circumference, body mass index, body fat percentage, and skin fold thickness were reduced in both groups; but there were no significant differences between the groups. This study found that abdominal resistance training besides diet did not reduce abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness compared to diet alone in overweight or obese women. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasound cavitation versus cryolipolysis for non-invasive body contouring.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud ELdesoky, Mohamed Taher; Mohamed Abutaleb, Enas ELsayed; Mohamed Mousa, Gihan Samir

    2015-08-24

    The demand for non-surgical and non-invasive devices is continuous and increasing. Such devices have gradually gained ground in the reduction of localised fat and the improvement of body contouring. The study aimed to compare the effects of ultrasound cavitation and cryolipolysis on localised abdominal fat. In total, 60 participants with a body mass index (BMI) over 30 kg/m 2 , whose age ranged between 25 and 45 years, were included. The participants were randomly assigned to three groups of 20 each, using ultrasound cavitation and diet, cryolipolysis and diet, and diet only (the control group), respectively. Measures were bodyweight, BMI, waist circumference and suprailiac skinfold were measured at the beginning of the study and 2 months later. The three groups showed significant improvements in all measured variables after 2 months. There was no statistically significant difference in bodyweight or in BMI among the groups after treatment. However, the groups using ultrasound cavitation and cryolipolysis showed better post-treatment improvement than the diet-only group in waist circumference and suprailiac skinfold. There was no statistically significant difference post-treatment between the cavitation and cryolipolysis groups in waist circumference or suprailiac skinfold. Both ultrasound cavitation and cryolipolysis are safe and effective for the reduction of abdominal fat thickness and for abdominal contouring. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in detection of blunt abdominal trauma and comparison of early and late ultrasonography 24 hours after trauma.

    PubMed

    Feyzi, Ali; Rad, Masoud Pezeshki; Ahanchi, Navid; Firoozabadi, Jalil

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advantages of ultrasound scan, its use as a screening tool in blunt abdominal trauma is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of early and late ultrasound in patients with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). In this study which was performed in a level I trauma center, firstly, 2418 patients with BAT had ultrasound (US) examination by two trauma expert radiologists. Results were compared with the best available gold standards such as laparotomy, CT, repeated ultrasound or clinical course follow-up. Then, 400 patients with BAT were examined by a trained residency student. In the first phase, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value and accuracy of ultrasound were 97%, 98.1%, 99.7%, 83% and 98% respectively. In the second phase, they were 97.3%, 97.2%, 97.7%, 96.8% and 97.3% for the early and 98.5%, 97.6%, 98.5%, 97.5% and 98% for the late ultrasound respectively. Results obtained from this study indicate that negative ultrasound findings associated with negative clinical observation virtually exclude abdominal injury, and confirmation by performing other tests is unnecessary. High sensitivity and negative predictive value is achieved if ultrasound is performed by expert trauma radiologist.

  12. Incidental detection of ascariasis worms on USG in a protein energy malnourished (PEM) child with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Pokhraj Prakashchandra; Doshi, Rajkumar Prakashbhai; Mehta, Chetan; Vadera, Khyati P

    2015-03-12

    A 10-year-old child presented with dull aching periumbilical abdominal pain for 15 days. The child was not gaining weight despite a good appetite. Physical examination of the child revealed grade-I protein energy malnourishment (PEM) according to IAP (Indian Academic of Paediatrics) classification. The rest of the systemic examination was normal. Routine blood investigation revealed anaemia with eosinophilia. Abdominal ultrasonography did not show any abnormality with curvilinear transducer (3.5-5 MHz), however, linear ultrasound transducer (7.5-12 MHz) with harmonic tissue imaging showed worms in the lumen of the small intestine with curling movement on real time scanning. Stool examination for the eggs of ascariasis was positive. The patient was treated with antihelminthic drugs. Dietary modification for the PEM was advised. After 3 months of treatment, the patient improved and stool examination for Ascaris was negative on follow-up. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Defining the abdominal radiologist based on the current U.S. job market.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David H; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2018-03-24

    The purpose of the study is to characterize current practice patterns of abdominal radiologists based on work descriptions within job postings on numerous national radiology specialty websites. Job postings for either "abdominal" or "body" radiologists were searched weekly on five society websites (SAR, SCBT-MR, ARRS, ACR, RSNA) over a 1-year period. Postings were reviewed for various characteristics. Nine hundred and sixteen total ads for 341 unique abdominal radiologist positions were reviewed (34.6% academic, 64.2% private practice, 1.2% other). Postings occurred most commonly in March (12.3%) and least commonly in November (4.8%). States with most positions were Florida (27), California (26), and New York (24). Of postings delineating expectations of specific abdominal modalities, 67.4% mentioned MRI, 58.5% ultrasound, 41.1% fluoroscopy, 14.3% PET, and 54.0% interventions. Additional non-abdominal expectations included general radiology (28.7%), breast imaging (21.1%), and general nuclear medicine (9.7%). Additional skills included prostate MRI (7.0%), OBGYN ultrasound (5.0%), and CT colonoscopy (2.6%). 79.2% required an abdominal imaging fellowship (specifically a body MRI fellowship in 4.1%). By using job postings for abdominal radiologists, we have taken a practical approach to characterizing the current status of this subspecialty, reflecting recent job expectations and requirements. The large majority of positions required a body fellowship, and the positions commonly entailed a variety of skills beyond non-invasive diagnostic abdominal imaging. Of note, expectations of considerable minorities of positions included abdominal interventions, general radiology, and breast imaging. These insights may guide the development of abdominal radiology fellowships and mini-fellowships, as well as assist radiologists entering or returning to the job market.

  14. Ultrasound and computed tomography of the iliosacral lymphatic centre in dogs with anal sac gland carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pollard, R E; Fuller, M C; Steffey, M A

    2017-06-01

    In this prospective study, we hypothesized that computed tomography (CT) would identify more normal and abnormal iliosacral lymph nodes (LNs) than abdominal ultrasound in dogs with anal sac gland carcinoma (ASGC). Twelve client-owned dogs with ASGC but without distant metastasis were enrolled. Abdominal ultrasound and contrast-enhanced CT scans of the abdomen were obtained. Iliosacral LNs were counted and assessed for location, laterality and size. Significantly (P < 0.00001) more iliosacral LNs were identified with CT (61) than ultrasound (30), including significantly (P = 0.00012) more medial iliac LNs with CT (33) than ultrasound (19). There was no difference in number of internal iliac LNs identified with CT versus ultrasound. Significantly (P = 0.000061) more sacral LNs were identified with CT (15) than ultrasound (0). Ultrasound identified slightly more (7) abnormal iliosacral LNs than CT (5). Contrast CT was able to identify more normal but not more abnormal LNs than ultrasound. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of intra-abdominal cystic lesions by fetal ultrasonography: diagnostic agreement between prenatal and postnatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Marchitelli, Giulia; Stirnemann, Julien; Acanfora, Marta Maddalena; Rousseau, Veronique; Salomon, Laurent J; Ville, Yves

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic agreement between the prenatal diagnosis of intra-abdominal cystic lesions made by ultrasound examination and the postnatal diagnosis. We reviewed all consecutive cases referred for an anechoic abdominal cyst from 2009 to 2013. Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis was compared with postnatal diagnosis. Prenatal diagnosis was defined as 'correct' if a specific prenatal diagnosis or one of the possible diagnoses was confirmed postnatally, as 'not confirmed' if the postnatal examination revealed no abnormalities and as 'incorrect' if the postnatal diagnosis was different from those suggested prenatally. Seventy-three cases were included, and prenatal diagnoses were made at a median gestational age of 27 weeks (range: 13-36). Correct diagnoses were made in 66 cases (90.4%), including four in which the lesion resolved spontaneously in utero; two diagnoses were 'not confirmed' postnatally, and one was incorrect (a prenatal diagnosis of intestinal duplication was in fact an anorectal malformation). Postnatal diagnosis was not achieved in four cases: None of them required surgery, and clinical follow-up was favorable. The abdominal cysts were isolated in 52 cases (71%) and associated with other anomalies in 21 cases (29%). Aneuploidies were diagnosed in three cases (all trisomy 21). Eight cases underwent termination of pregnancy; there were no fetal deaths and one neonatal death. Postnatal surgery was performed in 30 out of 65 liveborn infants (46.1%). Overall diagnostic agreement between prenatal and postnatal diagnosis of fetal intra-abdominal cystic lesions is high. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Right Upper Quadrant Pain: Ultrasound First!

    PubMed

    Revzin, Margarita V; Scoutt, Leslie M; Garner, Joseph G; Moore, Christopher L

    2017-10-01

    Acute right upper quadrant (RUQ) pain is a common presenting symptom in emergency departments and outpatient medical practices, and is most commonly attributable to biliary and hepatic pathology. Ultrasound should be used as a first-line imaging modality for the diagnosis of gallstones and cholecystitis, as it allows the differentiation of medical and surgical causes of upper abdominal pathology, and in many circumstances is sufficient to guide patient management. Knowledge of strengths and limitations of ultrasound in the evaluation of RUQ is paramount in correct diagnosis. A spectrum of RUQ pathology for which a RUQ ultrasound examination should reasonably be considered as the initial imaging modality of choice will be reviewed. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  17. Segmentation of images of abdominal organs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Kamath, Markad V; Noseworthy, Michael D; Boylan, Colm; Poehlman, Skip

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal organ segmentation, which is, the delineation of organ areas in the abdomen, plays an important role in the process of radiological evaluation. Attempts to automate segmentation of abdominal organs will aid radiologists who are required to view thousands of images daily. This review outlines the current state-of-the-art semi-automated and automated methods used to segment abdominal organ regions from computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MEI), and ultrasound images. Segmentation methods generally fall into three categories: pixel based, region based and boundary tracing. While pixel-based methods classify each individual pixel, region-based methods identify regions with similar properties. Boundary tracing is accomplished by a model of the image boundary. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the above algorithms with an emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages for abdominal organ segmentation. Several evaluation metrics that compare machine-based segmentation with that of an expert (radiologist) are identified and examined. Finally, features based on intensity as well as the texture of a small region around a pixel are explored. This review concludes with a discussion of possible future trends for abdominal organ segmentation.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast enhanced ultrasound in patients with blunt abdominal trauma presenting to the emergency department: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Hong, Yucai; Liu, Ning; Chen, Yuhao

    2017-06-30

    We aimed to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in evaluating blunt abdominal trauma for patients presenting to the emergency department. Electronic search of Scopus and Pubmed was performed from inception to September 2016. Human studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of CEUS in identifying abdominal solid organ injuries were included. Risk of bias was assessed using the QUADAS tool. A total of 10 studies were included in the study and 9 of them were included for meta-analysis. The log(DOR) values ranged from 3.80 (95% CI: 2.81-4.79) to 8.52 (95% CI: 4.58-12.47) in component studies. The combined log(DOR) was 6.56 (95% CI: 5.66-7.45). The Cochran's Q was 11.265 (p = 0.793 with 16 degrees of freedom), and the Higgins' I 2 was 0%. The CEUS had a sensitivity of 0.981 (95% CI: 0.868-0.950) and a false positive rate of 0.018 (95% CI: 0.010-0.032) for identifying parenchymal injuries, with an AUC of 0.984. CEUS performed at emergency department had good diagnostic accuracy in identifying abdominal solid organ injuries. CEUS can be recommended in monitoring solid organ injuries, especially for patients managed with non-operative strategy.

  19. Is Abdominal Fetal Electrocardiography an Alternative to Doppler Ultrasound for FHR Variability Evaluation?

    PubMed Central

    Jezewski, Janusz; Wrobel, Janusz; Matonia, Adam; Horoba, Krzysztof; Martinek, Radek; Kupka, Tomasz; Jezewski, Michal

    2017-01-01

    the acquisition method. The obtained results prove that the abdominal FECG, considered as an alternative to the ultrasound approach, does not change the interpretation of the FHR signal, which was confirmed during both visual assessment and automated analysis. PMID:28559852

  20. Utility of Computed Tomography versus Abdominal Ultrasound Examination to Identify Iliosacral Lymphadenomegaly in Dogs with Apocrine Gland Adenocarcinoma of the Anal Sac.

    PubMed

    Palladino, S; Keyerleber, M A; King, R G; Burgess, K E

    2016-11-01

    Apocrine gland adenocarcinoma of the anal sac (AGAAS) is associated with high rates of iliosacral lymph node metastasis, which may influence treatment and prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) recently has been shown to be more sensitive than abdominal ultrasound examination (AUS) in affected patients. To compare the rate of detection of iliosacral lymphadenomegaly between AUS and computed tomography (CT) in dogs with AGAAS. Cohort A: A total of 30 presumed normal dogs. Cohort B: A total of 20 dogs with AGAAS that underwent AUS and CT. Using cohort A, mean normalized lymph node : aorta (LN : AO) ratios were established for medial iliac, internal iliac, and sacral lymph nodes. The CT images in cohort B then were reviewed retrospectively and considered enlarged if their LN : AO ratio measured 2 standard deviations above the mean normalized ratio for that particular node in cohort A. Classification and visibility of lymph nodes identified on AUS were compared to corresponding measurements obtained on CT. Computed tomography identified lymphadenomegaly in 13 of 20 AGAAS dogs. Of these 13 dogs, AUS correctly identified and detected all enlarged nodes in only 30.8%, and either misidentified or failed to detect additional enlarged nodes in the remaining dogs. Despite limitations in identifying enlargement in all affected lymph nodes, AUS identified at least 1 enlarged node in 100% of affected dogs. Abdominal ultrasound examination is an effective screening test for lymphadenomegaly in dogs with AGAAS, but CT should be considered in any patient in which an additional metastatic site would impact therapeutic planning. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. Bowel ultrasound imaging in patients with cystic fibrosis: Relationship with clinical symptoms and CFTR genotype.

    PubMed

    Fraquelli, Mirella; Baccarin, Alessandra; Corti, Fabiola; Conti, Clara Benedetta; Russo, Maria Chiara; Della Valle, Serena; Pozzi, Roberta; Cressoni, Massimo; Conte, Dario; Colombo, Carla

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is used to assess bowel abnormalities in gastrointestinal diseases. We aimed to assess the rate of predefined bowel ultrasound signs and their relationship with gastrointestinal symptoms and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) genotype in cystic fibrosis patients in regular follow-up. Prospective study of 70 consecutive patients with cystic fibrosis and 45 controls who underwent abdominal ultrasound; pertinent findings were related to gastrointestinal symptoms and, in cystic fibrosis patients, to pancreatic status, malabsorption degree, lipase intake, CFTR genotype (classified as severe or mild against functional class of CFTR mutations). 96% patients showed at least one abnormal bowel ultrasound sign. Most frequent signs were lymph node enlargement (64%), bowel loop dilatation (55%), thick corpuscular intraluminal content (49%), bowel wall hypervascularization (26%), thickened bowel wall (22%) and intussusception (17%). Patients with recurrent abdominal pain showed more bowel wall hypervascularization than patients without recurrent pain (47% vs. 19%, respectively; p = 0.02) and intussusception (58% vs. 17%, respectively; p < 0.01). Genotype was not associated to specific bowel ultrasound signs. Patients with bowel loop intussusception showed greater lipase intake than those without intussusception (8.118 ± 2.083 vs. 5.994 ± 4.187, respectively; p < 0.01). Cystic fibrosis patients present a higher rate of bowel ultrasound abnormalities than controls. Bowel ultrasound abnormalities are associated with abdominal symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Histological and Ultrastructural Effects of Ultrasound-induced Cavitation on Human Skin Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Bani, Daniele; Quattrini Li, Alessandro; Freschi, Giancarlo; Russo, Giulia Lo

    2013-09-01

    In aesthetic medicine, the most promising techniques for noninvasive body sculpturing purposes are based on ultrasound-induced fat cavitation. Liporeductive ultrasound devices afford clinically relevant subcutaneous fat pad reduction without significant adverse reactions. This study aims at evaluating the histological and ultrastructural changes induced by ultrasound cavitation on the different cell components of human skin. Control and ultrasound-treated ex vivo abdominal full-thickness skin samples and skin biopsies from patients pretreated with or without ultrasound cavitation were studied histologically, morphometrically, and ultrastructurally to evaluate possible changes in adipocyte size and morphology. Adipocyte apoptosis and triglyceride release were also assayed. Clinical evaluation of the effects of 4 weekly ultrasound vs sham treatments was performed by plicometry. Compared with the sham-treated control samples, ultrasound cavitation induced a statistically significant reduction in the size of the adipocytes (P < 0.001), the appearance of micropores and triglyceride leakage and release in the conditioned medium (P < 0.05 at 15 min), or adipose tissue interstitium, without appreciable changes in microvascular, stromal, and epidermal components and in the number of apoptotic adipocytes. Clinically, the ultrasound treatment caused a significant reduction of abdominal fat. This study further strengthens the current notion that noninvasive transcutaneous ultrasound cavitation is a promising and safe technology for localized reduction of fat and provides experimental evidence for its specific mechanism of action on the adipocytes.

  3. Abdominal Wall Desmoid during Pregnancy: Diagnostic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Johnny; Hammoud, Nadine; Farra, Chantal; Fares, Farah; Abi Saad, George; Ghazeeri, Ghina

    2013-01-01

    Background. Desmoids are benign tumors, with local invasive features and no metastatic potential, which have rarely been described to be pregnancy associated. Case. We described the rapid growth of an anterior abdominal wall mass in a 40-year-old pregnant woman. Due to its close proximity to the enlarged uterus, it was misdiagnosed to be a uterine leiomyoma by ultrasound examination. Final tissue diagnosis and radical resection were done at the time of abdominal delivery. Conclusion. Due to the diagnostic limitations of imaging techniques, desmoids should always be considered when the following manifestations are observed in combination: progressive growth of a solitary abdominal wall mass during pregnancy and well-delineated smooth tumor margins demonstrated by imaging techniques. This case emphasizes the importance of entertaining uncommon medical conditions in the differential diagnosis of seemingly common clinical manifestations. PMID:23346436

  4. Ultrasound-guided urinary bladder biopsy through a urinary catheter in a bitch.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Julio; Norman, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    A 34.4 kg 5 yr old spayed female mixed-breed dog was presented for evaluation of a urinary bladder mass. The dog had a recent onset of hematuria and stranguria but otherwise appeared to be healthy. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a mass in the urinary bladder. The dog was sedated and a 10-French rubber catheter that had the blunt end removed was passed from the urethra to the urinary bladder. Using ultrasound guidance, ellipsoid cup biopsy forceps were advanced through the rubber catheter to the urinary bladder mass and biopsies were successfully obtained. The dog was discharged from the hospital a few hours after the procedure. Histopathology of the mass was consistent with polypoid cystitis. Follow-up surgical removal of the polyp was uneventful, and histopathology confirmed the presurgical biopsy diagnosis. Procurement of urinary bladder biopsies through a urinary catheter with ultrasound guidance was used as a minimally invasive alternative to either cystoscopy or surgery in a bitch. Use of this technique achieved a diagnosis without the need for specialized endoscopic equipment, anesthesia, or surgery.

  5. A Multicenter Controlled Study to Evaluate Multiple Treatments With Nonthermal Focused Ultrasound for Noninvasive Fat Reduction.

    PubMed

    Coleman, William P; Coleman, William; Weiss, Robert A; Kenkel, Jeffrey M; Ad-El, Dean D; Amir, Ruthie

    2017-01-01

    Demand for nonsurgical esthetic body procedures has led to the development of noninvasive techniques for reducing localized subcutaneous adipose tissue. This study assessed multiple treatments with nonthermal focused ultrasound for noninvasive abdominal treatment of excess fat deposits. Subjects were randomly assigned to Group 1 for a 4-week control phase before undergoing 3 abdominal fat reduction treatments, at 2-week intervals, or to Group 2 for immediate treatment. Weight, abdominal circumference, tolerability to treatment, subject satisfaction, and adverse events were recorded. Weight remained stable in the 126 participants. Mean reduction in midline circumference was 2.5 ± 2.1 cm in the Group 1 and 3.5 ± 2.7 cm in the Group 2 at Week 22. The effect of multiple treatments was cumulative with a steady decrease in abdominal circumferences during the study. Erythema was observed in 28% of treatments but was mild and transient in nature. Subjects tolerated the treatments well and were satisfied with treatment outcome. The study demonstrated the efficacy and safety of multiple nonthermal focused ultrasound treatments of excess abdominal fat deposits. Although the remodeling effect is minor compared with traditional surgical procedures, successive focused ultrasound treatments significantly reduced treatment area circumference, while avoiding invasive techniques and their associated disadvantages.

  6. Motion tracing system for ultrasound guided HIFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xu; Jiang, Tingyi; Corner, George; Huang, Zhihong

    2017-03-01

    One main limitation in HIFU treatment is the abdominal movement in liver and kidney caused by respiration. The study has set up a tracking model which mainly compromises of a target carrying box and a motion driving balloon. A real-time B-mode ultrasound guidance method suitable for tracking of the abdominal organ motion in 2D was established and tested. For the setup, the phantoms mimicking moving organs are carefully prepared with agar surrounding round-shaped egg-white as the target of focused ultrasound ablation. Physiological phantoms and animal tissues are driven moving reciprocally along the main axial direction of the ultrasound image probe with slightly motion perpendicular to the axial direction. The moving speed and range could be adjusted by controlling the inflation and deflation speed and amount of the balloon driven by a medical ventilator. A 6-DOF robotic arm was used to position the focused ultrasound transducer. The overall system was trying to estimate to simulate the actual movement caused by human respiration. HIFU ablation experiments using phantoms and animal organs were conducted to test the tracking effect. Ultrasound strain elastography was used to post estimate the efficiency of the tracking algorithms and system. In moving state, the axial size of the lesion (perpendicular to the movement direction) are averagely 4mm, which is one third larger than the lesion got when the target was not moving. This presents the possibility of developing a low-cost real-time method of tracking organ motion during HIFU treatment in liver or kidney.

  7. [Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Aksu, Recep; Patmano, Gülçin; Biçer, Cihangir; Emek, Ertan; Çoruh, Aliye Esmaoğlu

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP) block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n=31), 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL saline in Group B (n=31), and 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL dexmedetomidine (100μg) in Group BD (n=31). Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (p<0.05); it was lower in group BD than in group B at 10-24h. In Group B, it was lower than Group C at 2-8h (p<0.05). Total morphine consumption was lower in Group BD compared to other groups and lower in group B than in the controls (p<0.001). Patient satisfaction was higher in Group BD than in other groups and was higher in both study groups than in the controls (p<0.001). Nausea-vomiting scores, antiemetic requirement, or additional analgesic administration were not significant among groups (p>0.05). The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Standard plane localization in ultrasound by radial component model and selective search.

    PubMed

    Ni, Dong; Yang, Xin; Chen, Xin; Chin, Chien-Ting; Chen, Siping; Heng, Pheng Ann; Li, Shengli; Qin, Jing; Wang, Tianfu

    2014-11-01

    Acquisition of the standard plane is crucial for medical ultrasound diagnosis. However, this process requires substantial experience and a thorough knowledge of human anatomy. Therefore it is very challenging for novices and even time consuming for experienced examiners. We proposed a hierarchical, supervised learning framework for automatically detecting the standard plane from consecutive 2-D ultrasound images. We tested this technique by developing a system that localizes the fetal abdominal standard plane from ultrasound video by detecting three key anatomical structures: the stomach bubble, umbilical vein and spine. We first proposed a novel radial component-based model to describe the geometric constraints of these key anatomical structures. We then introduced a novel selective search method which exploits the vessel probability algorithm to produce probable locations for the spine and umbilical vein. Next, using component classifiers trained by random forests, we detected the key anatomical structures at their probable locations within the regions constrained by the radial component-based model. Finally, a second-level classifier combined the results from the component detection to identify an ultrasound image as either a "fetal abdominal standard plane" or a "non- fetal abdominal standard plane." Experimental results on 223 fetal abdomen videos showed that the detection accuracy of our method was as high as 85.6% and significantly outperformed both the full abdomen and the separate anatomy detection methods without geometric constraints. The experimental results demonstrated that our system shows great promise for application to clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasound Assessment of the Transverse Abdominis During Functional Movement.

    PubMed

    Mangum, L Colby; Henderson, Kaitlin; Murray, Kyle P; Saliba, Susan A

    2018-05-01

    The traditional activation ratio divides contracted muscle thickness by resting muscle thickness while an abdominal draw-in maneuver is performed during hook lying. Ultrasound imaging during function, such as standing or gait, or peak knee flexion in a single-leg squat allows for further visualization of muscle activity. The goal of this study was to examine activation ratio calculations for transverse abdominis function in supine versus loaded conditions to determine the most informative normalization strategy for muscle activity based on thickness values. Transverse abdominis thickness was measured via ultrasound in 35 healthy participants under 4 different conditions. Comparisons were made between the traditional activation ratio tabletop, standing activation ratio (standing abdominal draw-in maneuver thickness/quiet standing thickness), and functional activation ratio (single-leg squat thickness/quiet standing thickness). Additionally, a cued activation ratio (single-leg squat with cued abdominal draw-in maneuver thickness/single-leg squat thickness) during the single-leg squat was obtained. Activation ratios of greater than 1.0 indicated that participants could activate the muscle during activity, and values were compared by analysis of variance. The participants included 23 women and 12 men with a mean age ± SD of 21.3 ± 2.7 years, mass of 66.1 ± 14.4 kg, and height of 168.5 ± 10.1 cm. Activation ratios exceeded 1.0 in 94.3% for the traditional activation ratio, 85.7% for the standing activation ratio, 82.9% for the cued activation ratio, and 82.9% for the functional activation ratio. With groups defined as tabletop activated or not, the standing, cued, and functional activation ratios were all significantly different (all P < .05). Normalizing muscle thickness to the corresponding functional position quiet value provides a useful functional activation ratio and may help clinicians better understand the transverse abdominis role

  10. Ultrasound Dopplerography of abdomen pathology using statistical computer programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, Irina V.; Arakelian, Sergei M.; Wapota, Alberto R. W.

    1998-04-01

    The modern ultrasound dopplerography give us the big possibilities in investigation of gemodynamical changes in all stages of abdomen pathology. Many of researches devoted to using of noninvasive methods in practical medicine. Now ultrasound Dopplerography is one of the basic one. We investigated 250 patients from 30 to 77 ages, including 149 men and 101 women. The basic diagnosis of all patients was the Ischaemic Pancreatitis. The Second diagnoses of pathology were the Ischaemic Disease of Heart, Gypertension, Atherosclerosis, Diabet, Vascular Disease of Extremities. We researched the abdominal aorta and her branches: Arteria Mesenterica Superior (AMS), truncus coeliacus (TC), arteria hepatica communis (AHC), arteria lienalis (AL). For investigation we use the following equipment: ACUSON 128 XP/10c, BIOMEDIC, GENERAL ELECTRIC (USA, Japan). We analyzed the following componetns of gemodynamical changes of abdominal vessels: index of pulsation, index of resistance, ratio of systol-dystol, speed of blood circulation. Statistical program included the following one: 'basic statistic's,' 'analytic program.' In conclusion we determined that the all gemodynamical components of abdominal vessels had considerable changes in abdominal ischaemia than in normal situation. Using the computer's program for definition degree of gemodynamical changes, we can recommend the individual plan of diagnostical and treatment program.

  11. Perforator-Guided Drug Injection in the Treatment of Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Weum, Sven; de Weerd, Louis

    2016-07-01

    Pain from the abdominal wall can be caused by nerve entrapment, a condition called abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES). As an alternative to surgery, ACNES may be treated with injection of local anesthetics, corticosteroids, or botulinum toxin at the point of maximal pain. The point of maximal pain was marked on the abdominal skin. Using color Doppler ultrasound, the corresponding exit point of perforating blood vessels through the anterior fascia of the rectus abdominis muscle was identified. Ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin in close proximity to the perforator's exit point was performed below and above the muscle fascia. The technique was used from 2008 to 2014 on 15 patients in 46 sessions with a total of 128 injections without complications. The injection technique provided safe and accurate administration of the drug in proximity to the affected cutaneous nerves. The effect of botulinum toxin on ACNES is beyond the scope of this article. Perforator-guided injection enables precise drug administration at the location of nerve entrapment in ACNES in contrast to blind injections. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Ultrasound-mediated structural changes in cells revealed by FTIR spectroscopy: A contribution to the optimization of gene and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, Paola; Di Giambattista, Lucia; Giordani, Serena; Udroiu, Ion; Pozzi, Deleana; Gaudenzi, Silvia; Bedini, Angelico; Giliberti, Claudia; Palomba, Raffaele; Congiu Castellano, Agostina

    2011-12-01

    Ultrasound effects on biological samples are gaining a growing interest concerning in particular, the intracellular delivery of drugs and genes in a safe and in a efficient way. Future progress in this field will require a better understanding of how ultrasound and acoustic cavitation affect the biological system properties. The morphological changes of cells due to ultrasound (US) exposure have been extensively studied, while little attention has been given to the cells structural changes. We have exposed two different cell lines to 1 MHz frequency ultrasound currently used in therapy, Jurkat T-lymphocytes and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, both employed as models respectively in the apoptosis and in the gene therapy studies. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy was used as probe to reveal the structural changes in particular molecular groups belonging to the main biological systems. The genotoxic damage of cells exposed to ultrasound was ascertained by the Cytokinesis-Block Micronucleus (CBMN) assay. The FTIR spectroscopy results, combined with multivariate statistical analysis, regarding all cellular components (lipids, proteins, nucleic acids) of the two cell lines, show that Jurkat cells are more sensitive to therapeutic ultrasound in the lipid and protein regions, whereas the NIH-3T3 cells are more sensitive in the nucleic acids region; a meaningful genotoxic effect is present in both cell lines only for long sonication times while in the Jurkat cells also a significant cytotoxic effect is revealed for long times of exposure to ultrasound.

  13. Automated abdominal plane and circumference estimation in 3D US for fetal screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, C.; Brosch, T.; Ciofolo-Veit, C.; Klinder, T.; Lefevre, T.; Cavallaro, A.; Salim, I.; Papageorghiou, A. T.; Raynaud, C.; Roundhill, D.; Rouet, L.; Schadewaldt, N.; Schmidt-Richberg, A.

    2018-03-01

    Ultrasound is increasingly becoming a 3D modality. Mechanical and matrix array transducers are able to deliver 3D images with good spatial and temporal resolution. The 3D imaging facilitates the application of automated image analysis to enhance workflows, which has the potential to make ultrasound a less operator dependent modality. However, the analysis of the more complex 3D images and definition of all examination standards on 2D images pose barriers to the use of 3D in daily clinical practice. In this paper, we address a part of the canonical fetal screening program, namely the localization of the abdominal cross-sectional plane with the corresponding measurement of the abdominal circumference in this plane. For this purpose, a fully automated pipeline has been designed starting with a random forest based anatomical landmark detection. A feature trained shape model of the fetal torso including inner organs with the abdominal cross-sectional plane encoded into the model is then transformed into the patient space using the landmark localizations. In a free-form deformation step, the model is individualized to the image, using a torso probability map generated by a convolutional neural network as an additional feature image. After adaptation, the abdominal plane and the abdominal torso contour in that plane are directly obtained. This allows the measurement of the abdominal circumference as well as the rendering of the plane for visual assessment. The method has been trained on 126 and evaluated on 42 abdominal 3D US datasets. An average plane offset error of 5.8 mm and an average relative circumference error of 4.9 % in the evaluation set could be achieved.

  14. Does this adult patient have a blunt intra-abdominal injury?

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Daniel K; Simel, David L; Wisner, David H; Holmes, James F

    2012-04-11

    Blunt abdominal trauma often presents a substantial diagnostic challenge. Well-informed clinical examination can identify patients who require further diagnostic evaluation for intra-abdominal injuries after blunt abdominal trauma. To systematically assess the precision and accuracy of symptoms, signs, laboratory tests, and bedside imaging studies to identify intra-abdominal injuries in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. We conducted a structured search of MEDLINE (1950-January 2012) and EMBASE (1980-January 2012) to identify English-language studies examining the identification of intra-abdominal injuries. A separate, structured search was conducted for studies evaluating bedside ultrasonography. We included studies of diagnostic accuracy for intra-abdominal injury that compared at least 1 finding with a reference standard of abdominal computed tomography, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, laparotomy, autopsy, and/or clinical course for intra-abdominal injury. Twelve studies on clinical findings and 22 studies on bedside ultrasonography met inclusion criteria for data extraction. Critical appraisal and data extraction were independently performed by 2 authors. The prevalence of intra-abdominal injury in adult emergency department patients with blunt abdominal trauma among all evidence level 1 and 2 studies was 13% (95% CI, 10%-17%), with 4.7% (95% CI, 2.5%-8.6%) requiring therapeutic surgery or angiographic embolization of injuries. The presence of a seat belt sign (likelihood ratio [LR] range, 5.6-9.9), rebound tenderness (LR, 6.5; 95% CI, 1.8-24), hypotension (LR, 5.2; 95% CI, 3.5-7.5), abdominal distention (LR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.9-7.6), or guarding (LR, 3.7; 95% CI, 2.3-5.9) suggest an intra-abdominal injury. The absence of abdominal tenderness to palpation does not rule out an intra-abdominal injury (summary LR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.46-0.80). The presence of intraperitoneal fluid or organ injury on bedside ultrasound assessment is more accurate than any history and

  15. Evaluation Experiment of Ultrasound Computed Tomography for the Abdominal Sound Speed Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, Keisuke; Yamada, Akira

    2007-07-01

    Abdominal sound speed tomographic imaging using through-transmission travel time data on the body surface was investigated. To this end, a hundred kHz range low-frequency wave was used to reduce the wave attenuation within an inner body medium. A method was investigated for the reconstruction of the image with the smallest possible number of path data around the abdominal surface. Specifically, the data from a strong scattering spinal cord should be avoided. To fulfill the requirement, the smoothed path algebraic reconstruction technique was introduced. The validity of this method was examined both on the numerically synthesized data and the experimentally measured data for the phantom specimen and actual human subject. It was shown that an abdominal tomographic sound speed image could be successfully obtained by preparing only 32 transducer locations at the circumference around the abdominal surface and their combination of less than 100 number of observation path data as well as by avoiding the data intersecting the spinal cord. In addition, fat regions were extracted having a sound speed lower than the threshold value to demonstrate the possibility of this method for metabolic syndrome diagnosis.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of fundal height and handheld ultrasound-measured abdominal circumference to screen for fetal growth abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Haragan, Adriane F.; Hulsey, Thomas C.; Hawk, Angela F.; Newman, Roger B.; Chang, Eugene Y.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to compare fundal height and handheld ultrasound–measured fetal abdominal circumference (HHAC) for the prediction of fetal growth restriction (FGR) or large for gestational age. STUDY DESIGN This was a diagnostic accuracy study in nonanomalous singleton pregnancies between 24 and 40 weeks’ gestation. Patients underwent HHAC and fundal height measurement prior to formal growth ultrasound. FGR was defined as estimated fetal weight less than 10%, whereas large for gestational age was defined as estimated fetal weight greater than 90%. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared using methods described elsewhere. RESULTS There were 251 patients included in this study. HHAC had superior sensitivity and specificity for the detection of FGR (sensitivity, 100% vs 42.86%) and (specificity, 92.62% vs 85.24%). HHAC had higher specificity but lower sensitivity when screening for LGA (specificity, 85.66% vs 66.39%) and (sensitivity, 57.14% vs 71.43%). CONCLUSION HHAC could prove to be a valuable screening tool in the detection of FGR. Further studies are needed in a larger population. PMID:25818672

  17. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Evolving Controversies and Uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Carino, Davide; Sarac, Timur P; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2018-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as a permanent dilatation of the abdominal aorta that exceeds 3 cm. Most AAAs arise in the portion of abdominal aorta distal to the renal arteries and are defined as infrarenal. Most AAAs are totally asymptomatic until catastrophic rupture. The strongest predictor of AAA rupture is the diameter. Surgery is indicated to prevent rupture when the risk of rupture exceeds the risk of surgery. In this review, we aim to analyze this disease comprehensively, starting from an epidemiological perspective, exploring etiology and pathophysiology, and concluding with surgical controversies. We will pursue these goals by addressing eight specific questions regarding AAA: (1) Is the incidence of AAA increasing? (2) Are ultrasound screening programs for AAA effective? (3) What causes AAA: Genes versus environment? (4) Animal models: Are they really relevant? (5) What pathophysiology leads to AAA? (6) Indications for AAA surgery: Are surgeons over-eager to operate? (7) Elective AAA repair: Open or endovascular? (8) Emergency AAA repair: Open or endovascular?

  18. Ultrasound-mediated structural changes in cells revealed by FTIR spectroscopy: a contribution to the optimization of gene and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Paola; Di Giambattista, Lucia; Giordani, Serena; Udroiu, Ion; Pozzi, Deleana; Gaudenzi, Silvia; Bedini, Angelico; Giliberti, Claudia; Palomba, Raffaele; Castellano, Agostina Congiu

    2011-12-15

    Ultrasound effects on biological samples are gaining a growing interest concerning in particular, the intracellular delivery of drugs and genes in a safe and in a efficient way. Future progress in this field will require a better understanding of how ultrasound and acoustic cavitation affect the biological system properties. The morphological changes of cells due to ultrasound (US) exposure have been extensively studied, while little attention has been given to the cells structural changes. We have exposed two different cell lines to 1 MHz frequency ultrasound currently used in therapy, Jurkat T-lymphocytes and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, both employed as models respectively in the apoptosis and in the gene therapy studies. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy was used as probe to reveal the structural changes in particular molecular groups belonging to the main biological systems. The genotoxic damage of cells exposed to ultrasound was ascertained by the Cytokinesis-Block Micronucleus (CBMN) assay. The FTIR spectroscopy results, combined with multivariate statistical analysis, regarding all cellular components (lipids, proteins, nucleic acids) of the two cell lines, show that Jurkat cells are more sensitive to therapeutic ultrasound in the lipid and protein regions, whereas the NIH-3T3 cells are more sensitive in the nucleic acids region; a meaningful genotoxic effect is present in both cell lines only for long sonication times while in the Jurkat cells also a significant cytotoxic effect is revealed for long times of exposure to ultrasound. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of core stability and general exercise on abdominal muscle thickness in non-specific chronic low back pain using ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, MohammadBagher; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Jamshidi, Aliashraf; Zarabi, Vida; Pourahmadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-05-01

    There is a controversy regarding whether core stability exercise (CSE) is more effective than general exercise (GE) for chronic LBP. To compare different exercises regarding their effect on improving back strength and stability, performance of abdominal muscles is a useful index. Ultrasound imaging for measuring muscle thickness could be used to assess muscle performance. The aim of this study was to compare CSE and GE in chronic LBP using ultrasound imaging for measurement of thickness of the deep stabilizing and main global trunk muscles in non-specific chronic LBP. Each program included 16 training sessions three times a week. Using ultrasound imaging, four transabdominal muscle thickness were measured before and after the intervention. Disability and pain were measured as secondary outcomes. After the intervention on participants (n = 43), a significant increase in muscle thickness (hypertrophy) was seen only in right and left rectus abdominis in the GE group, but significant difference to the CSE group was only on the right side. Disability and pain reduced within the groups without a significant difference in the change between them. The present results provided evidence that only GE increased right and left rectus muscle thickness. The only significant difference between CSE and GE groups was the right rectus thickness. As rectus is a global muscle, the effect of GE on strength improvement (one side stronger than the other) may have a negative effect on motor control of lumbopelvic muscles and possibly increase the risk of back pain occurring or becoming worse, though this was not observed in the present study.

  20. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-11-01

    Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. A systematic review was conducted. The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma formation and physical function. A total of 50 publications were identified; 42 publications were excluded leaving eight publications counting a total of 578 patients for analysis. Generally, the scientific quality of the studies was poor. Use of abdominal binder revealed a non-significant tendency to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases with the use of abdominal binders. Reduction of pulmonary function during use of abdominal binders has not been revealed. Abdominal binders reduce post-operative psychological distress, but their effect on post-operative pain after laparotomy and seroma formation after ventral hernia repair remains unclear. Due to the sparse evidence and poor quality of the literature, solid conclusions may be difficult to make, and procedure-specific, high-quality randomised clinical trials are warranted.

  1. Feasibility of a focused ultrasound training programme for medical undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ivan; Jayatilleke, Thilina; Kendall, Richard; Atkinson, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Although ultrasound is a core skill for many clinical specialties, UK medical schools are not currently required to teach this skill. The College of Emergency Medicine (CEM) has championed the use of ultrasound to answer focused clinical questions in emergency settings. We have designed and piloted an ultrasound training course for undergraduate medical students addressing one important indication: ultrasound assessment of the abdominal aorta. Fourteen clinical students, who had no prior experience of using ultrasound, received focused ultrasound training in the form of didactic instruction, a short bedside practical workshop and self-directed learning over a 20-day period. At the end of this period, the students were assessed by a structured viva and an observed structured clinical examination (OSCE) used for accreditation by the CEM. The primary endpoint was the number of students who passed the assessment. The secondary endpoint was the accuracy of the students' anatomical measurements. Thirteen of the 14 (93%) students completed the training and assessment. Eight of the 13 (62%) students passed both the viva and OSCE, and were deemed to have achieved the CEM standard. The measurements by the competent students were not statistically different from those of experienced practitioners. We have shown for the first time that it is feasible to train inexperienced undergraduate students to scan the abdominal aorta to a professional standard using a focused training course. It is time for the medical education community to address whether focused ultrasound training should accompany traditional clinical skills, such as using a stethoscope, in UK medical school curricula. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  2. Left hepatic lobe herniation through an incisional anterior abdominal wall hernia and right adrenal myelolipoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nuño-Guzmán, Carlos M; Arróniz-Jáuregui, José; Espejo, Ismael; Valle-González, Jesús; Butus, Hernán; Molina-Romo, Alejandro; Orranti-Ortega, Rodrigo I

    2012-01-10

    Herniation of the liver through an anterior abdominal wall hernia defect is rare. To the best of our knowledge, only three cases have been described in the literature. A 70-year-old Mexican woman presented with a one-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and jaundice to our Department of General Surgery. Her medical history included an open cholecystectomy from 20 years earlier and excessive weight. She presented with jaundice, abdominal distension with a midline surgical scar, right upper quadrant tenderness, and a large midline abdominal wall defect with dullness upon percussion and protrusion of a large, tender, and firm mass. The results of laboratory tests were suggestive of cholestasis. Ultrasound revealed choledocholithiasis. A computed tomography scan showed a protrusion of the left hepatic lobe through the anterior abdominal wall defect and a well-defined, soft tissue density lesion in the right adrenal topography. An endoscopic common bile duct stone extraction was unsuccessful. During surgery, the right adrenal tumor was resected first. The hernia was approached through a median supraumbilical incision; the totality of the left lobe was protruding through the abdominal wall defect, and once the lobe was reduced to its normal position, a common bile duct surgical exploration with multiple stone extraction was performed. Finally, the abdominal wall was reconstructed. Histopathology revealed an adrenal myelolipoma. Six months after the operation, our patient remains in good health. The case of liver herniation through an incisional anterior abdominal wall hernia in this report represents, to the best of our knowledge, the fourth such case reported in the literature. The rarity of this medical entity makes it almost impossible to specifically describe predisposing risk factors for liver herniation. Obesity, the right adrenal myelolipoma mass effect, and the previous abdominal surgery are likely to have contributed to

  3. Sonographic physical diagnosis 101: teaching senior medical students basic ultrasound scanning skills using a compact ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Angtuaco, Teresita L; Hopkins, Robert H; DuBose, Terry J; Bursac, Zoran; Angtuaco, Michael J; Ferris, Ernest J

    2007-06-01

    This project was designed to test the feasibility of introducing ultrasound to senior medical students as a primary diagnostic tool in the evaluation of patients. Specifically, its aim was to determine if it is possible for medical students untrained in sonography to gain basic competence in performing abdominal ultrasound with limited didactic and hands-on instructions. Registered sonographers provided the students with hands-on instructions on the use of a compact ultrasound system. They were likewise shown how to evaluate specific organs and perform measurements. The results of the student measurements and those obtained by the sonographers were compared. There was close correlation between the results obtained by sonographers and students on both normal and abnormal findings. This supports the concept that medical students can be taught basic ultrasound skills with limited didactic and hands-on instructions with the potential of using these skills in the patient clinics as an adjunct to routine physical diagnosis.

  4. Intra-abdominal abscess demonstrating an unusually large intra-abdominal pattern on an indium-111 leukocyte scan

    SciTech Connect

    Black, R.R.; Fernandez-Ulloa, M.; ter Penning, B.

    1988-12-01

    Indium-111 WBC imaging of a patient with occult septicemia revealed a large focal pattern of radiopharmaceutical distribution within the abdominal cavity at 24 hours post radiopharmaceutical administration. This finding was felt to represent a large intra-abdominal abscess. A five liter peritoneal abscess was found at surgery. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of an intra-abdominal abscess.

  5. Abdominal Cystic Echinococcosis Treated with Albendazole. A Pediatric Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Samanta; Moscatelli, Guillermo; Bournissen, Facundo García; González, Nicolás; Ballering, Griselda; Freilij, Héctor; Salgueiro, Fabián; Altcheh, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is endemic in Argentina. The standard pharmacological treatment for the disease is albendazole, but surgery is a common alternative. Even though primary infection occurs mainly in the pediatric population, the optimal therapeutic option in pediatrics is not clearly defined and few pediatric cohorts with cystic echinococcosis treated with albendazole have been described to date. To describe therapeutic response to albendazole in a cohort of pediatric patients with abdominal cystic echinococcosis. Patients (0-18 years old) with abdominal cystic echinococcosis who were treated with albendazole between January 1998 and August 2013. Diagnosis of abdominal cystic echinococcosis was made by ultrasound. All patients received albendazole, 10-15 mg/kg/day. Epidemiological data, symptoms, number, location and outcome of the cysts, serology and treatment received were analyzed. The parameter used to assess treatment response was cyst changes evaluated by ultrasound follow up using the WHO-IWGE classification. A total of 28 patients (with 46 abdominal cysts) were included in the cohort. Mean age at enrolment was 9.4 years and mean duration of follow-up, 23.8 months. All patients resided in rural areas and had had contact with dogs. The asymptomatic form of the disease was the most common presentation. All patients received albendazole (mean duration: 142.5 days), with low incidence of adverse events. Albendazole had a positive effect on most of the cysts. Surgery was performed in 13 patients. Treatment with albendazole for uncomplicated cystic echinococcosis cysts is safe and effective, and can potentially reduce the need for surgical intervention.

  6. How useful is abdominal ultrasonography in dogs with diarrhoea?

    PubMed

    Mapletoft, E K; Allenspach, K; Lamb, C R

    2018-01-01

    To assess the utility of abdominal ultrasonography in the diagnostic work-up of dogs with diarrhoea. Retrospective cross-sectional study based on a referral population of dogs with diarrhoea. Associations between the clinical signs, use of abdominal ultrasonography, results of abdominal ultrasonography and subsequent work-up were examined. The utility of abdominal ultrasonography was scored as high, moderate, none or counterproductive based on review of medical records. Medical records of 269 dogs were reviewed, of which 149 (55%) had abdominal ultrasonography. The most frequent result was no ultrasonographic abnormalities affecting the intestine in 65 (44%) dogs. Ultrasonography results were associated with subsequent work-up as follows: (1) no detected abnormalities and dietary trial; (2) focal thickening of the intestinal wall, loss of intestinal wall layers or enlarged abdominal lymph nodes and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirates; (3) diffuse thickening of the intestinal wall or hyperechoic striations in the small intestinal mucosa and endoscopy; and (4) small intestinal foreign body and coeliotomy. Abdominal ultrasonography was considered to be diagnostic without further testing in only four (3%) dogs: two had a portosystemic shunt identified ultrasonographically, one had a linear foreign body and one had a perforated pyloric ulcer. Abdominal ultrasonography had moderate utility in 56 (38%) dogs and no utility in 79 (53%) dogs. Abdominal ultrasonography was considered counterproductive in 10 (7%) dogs because results were either falsely negative or falsely positive. These results should prompt clinicians to reconsider routine use of abdominal ultrasonography in dogs with diarrhoea. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. Abdominal Ultrasound With Scintigraphic and Clinical Correlates in Infants With Sickle Cell Anemia: Baseline Data From the BABY HUG Trial

    PubMed Central

    McCarville, M. Beth; Luo, Zhaoyu; Huang, Xiangke; Rees, Renee C.; Rogers, Zora R.; Miller, Scott T.; Thompson, Bruce; Kalpatthi, Ram; Wang, Winfred C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to perform and evaluate baseline abdominal ultrasound in infants with sickle cell anemia who participated in the BABY HUG multiinstitutional randomized placebo-controlled trial of hydroxyurea therapy and to examine the potential relationships among ultrasound results and clinical, nuclear medicine, and laboratory data. SUBJECTS AND METHODS After local institutional review board approval and with informed guardian consent, 116 girls and 87 boys (age range, 7.5–18 months) with sickle cell anemia underwent standardized abdominal sonography at 14 institutions. Imaging was centrally reviewed by one radiologist who assessed and measured the spleen, kidneys, gallbladder, and common bile duct. Baseline physical assessment of spleen size, serum alanine aminotransferase and bilirubin levels, 99mTc sulfur colloid liver-spleen scans, and 99mTc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid clearance glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) were obtained. Analysis of variance and the Student test were performed to compare sonographic findings to published results in healthy children and to clinical and laboratory findings. RESULTS The mean (± SD) spleen volume (108 ± 47 mL) was significantly greater than published normal control values (30 ± 14 mL; p < 0.0001). There was no correlation between spleen volume and function assessed by liver-spleen scan. The mean GFR (125 ± 34 mL/min/1.73 m2) was elevated compared with control GFRs (92 ± 18 mL/min/1.73 m2). Renal volumes (right kidney, 29 ± 8 mL; left kidney, 31 ± 9 mL) were significantly greater than control volumes (right kidney, 27 ± 3 mL; left kidney, 27 ± 3 mL; p < 0.0001) and were positively correlated with GFR (p = 0.0009). Five percent of patients had sonographic biliary abnormalities (sludge, n = 6; dilated common bile duct, n = 2; and cholelithiasis and thickened gallbladder wall, n = 1 each). There was no correlation between biliary sonographic findings and laboratory results. CONCLUSION

  8. Congenital heart disease manifested as acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Macha, Mahender; Gupta, Dipin; Molina, Ezequiel; Palma, Jon; Rothman, Steven

    2007-06-12

    We present a case of a 53-year-old man with complaints of severe abdominal pain and nausea. Emergency department abdominal workup was non-diagnostic. Physical examination revealed signs of right- and left-heart failure. A past medical history of dysrhythmias and chronic abdominal complaints prompted hospital admission. Subsequent right heart catheterization revealed a significant left-to-right shunt. CT scan of the chest and angiography confirmed the diagnosis of an abnormal ascending vein between the innominate vein and the left superior pulmonary vein. After the anomalous vein was ligated, the patient's abdominal pain resolved.

  9. Wave intensity analysis in mice: an ultrasound-based study in the abdominal aorta and common carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lascio, N.; Kusmic, C.; Stea, F.; Faita, F.

    2017-03-01

    Wave Intensity Analysis (WIA) can provide parameters representative of the interaction between the vascular network and the heart. It has been already demonstrated that WIA-derived biomarkes have a quantitative physiological meaning. Aim of this study was to develop an image process algorithm for performing non-invasive WIA in mice and correlate commonly used cardiac function parameters with WIA-derived indexes. Sixteen wild-type male mice (8 weeks-old) were imaged with high-resolution ultrasound (Vevo 2100). Abdominal aorta and common carotid pulse wave velocities (PWVabd, PWVcar) were obtained processing B-Mode and PW-Doppler images and employed to assess WIA. Amplitudes of the first (W1abd, W1car) and the second (W2abd, W2car) local maxima and minimum (Wbabd,Wbcar) were evaluated; areas under the negative part of the curve were also calculated (NAabd, NAcar). Cardiac output (CO), ejection fraction (EF) fractional shortening (FS) and stroke volume (SV) were estimated; strain analysis provided strain and strain rate values for longitudinal, radial and circumferential directions (LS, LSR, RS, RSR, CS, CSR). Isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT) was calculated from mitral inflow PW-Doppler images; IVRT values were normalized for cardiac cycle length. W1abd was correlated with LS (R=0.65) and LSR (R=0.59), while W1car was correlated with CO (R=0.58), EF (R=0.72), LS (R=0.65), LSR (R=0.89), CS (R=0.71), CSR (R=0.70). Both W2abd and W2car were not correlated with IVRT. Carotid artery WIA-derived parameters are more representative of cardiac function than those obtained from the abdominal aorta. The described US-based method can provide information about cardiac function and cardio-vascular interaction simply studying a single vascular site.

  10. [Assessment of the sonographer's knowledge on the second trimester ultrasound recommendations of the National Technical Committee of Ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Matar, M; Picone, O; Dalmon, C; Ayoubi, J-M

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the sonographers' knowledge of the National Technical Committee of Ultrasound's recommendations concerning second trimester ultrasound. Anonymous questionnaire was sent by e-mails containing 25 questions about demographic elements, the practice of second trimester ultrasound and the recommendations of the National Technical Committee of Ultrasound about second trimester ultrasound. Six hundred and eighty-four responses were obtained. Six hundred and fifty-three upon 684 (95%) of respondents practice second trimester ultrasound and 635 upon 653 (97%) know about the existence of the report of the National Technical Committee of Ultrasound. The rates of correct answers concerning recommended biometrical images vary between 97% for the biparietal diameter and head circumference, 98% for abdominal circumference and 100% for the femur length. While for morphological images, rates vary between 52% and 100%. A subgroup analysis (whether the respondents have already read the recommendations or not) showed that those who had read the recommendations have significantly better results than those who did not. Those who have already read the recommendations have better knowledge and global knowledge can be improved. National recommendations serve to promote a policy of quality assurance of ultrasound and may be used in medicolegal issues. The societies that make recommendations should more diffuse their work and practitioners should make effort to pursue the continuing medical education and to implement the recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Abdominal Tumor Detection and High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation Monitoring: A Feasibility Study in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y.; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F.; Olive, Kenneth P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiation force-based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess relative tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radiofrequency signals using a 1D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated with a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  12. Intravascular application of electrocautery in a rabbit model of abdominal aortic endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuan; Xin, Yi; Li, Na; Li, Diankun; Li, Jingxing; Gu, Chengxiong

    2017-01-01

    Effective therapies for preventing perioperative complications such as thrombosis and inflammation after coronary endarterectomy (CE) are lacking. Electrocoagulation electrotomes have been routinely used in surgery for their cutting, clotting, and hemostatic properties. As strong flattening tools, their electrocautery function may prevent mechanical intimal-adventitial injury to arterial circulation and attenuate stenosis. The present study investigated the effects of intravascular application of electrocautery on ameliorating inflammation and thrombosis in a rabbit model of abdominal aortic endarterectomy. New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into the sham, control (endarterectomy), and study (endarterectomy + electrocautery) groups with 10 in each group. Abdominal aortas were partially blocked and intima was removed. Electrocautery was performed with an electrocoagulation electrotome through the entire blocked vessel lumen. Vascular ultrasound parameters, molecular biological and histological characteristics of the abdominal aorta including vascular diameter, blood flow velocity, serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and apoptosis rate of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) were evaluated postoperatively by vascular Doppler ultrasound, ELISA, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence at various time points. Compared with the endarterectomy + electrocautery group, the isolated endarterectomy group had significantly increased levels and gene expression of TNF-α and IL-6 (P<0.05), and rates of apoptosis of vascular ECs (P<0.05), with gradual vascular stenosis and decreased blood flow velocity. In conclusion, intravascular application of electrocautery has favorable short-term effects on the abdominal aorta and can reduce inflammation in a rabbit model of abdominal aorta endarterectomy. Long-term anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects on arterial remodeling and the clinical value of electrocautery in CE

  13. Intravascular application of electrocautery in a rabbit model of abdominal aortic endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Xin, Yi; Li, Na; Li, Diankun; Li, Jingxing; Gu, Chengxiong

    2017-07-01

    Effective therapies for preventing perioperative complications such as thrombosis and inflammation after coronary endarterectomy (CE) are lacking. Electrocoagulation electrotomes have been routinely used in surgery for their cutting, clotting, and hemostatic properties. As strong flattening tools, their electrocautery function may prevent mechanical intimal-adventitial injury to arterial circulation and attenuate stenosis. The present study investigated the effects of intravascular application of electrocautery on ameliorating inflammation and thrombosis in a rabbit model of abdominal aortic endarterectomy. New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into the sham, control (endarterectomy), and study (endarterectomy + electrocautery) groups with 10 in each group. Abdominal aortas were partially blocked and intima was removed. Electrocautery was performed with an electrocoagulation electrotome through the entire blocked vessel lumen. Vascular ultrasound parameters, molecular biological and histological characteristics of the abdominal aorta including vascular diameter, blood flow velocity, serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and apoptosis rate of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) were evaluated postoperatively by vascular Doppler ultrasound, ELISA, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence at various time points. Compared with the endarterectomy + electrocautery group, the isolated endarterectomy group had significantly increased levels and gene expression of TNF-α and IL-6 (P<0.05), and rates of apoptosis of vascular ECs (P<0.05), with gradual vascular stenosis and decreased blood flow velocity. In conclusion, intravascular application of electrocautery has favorable short-term effects on the abdominal aorta and can reduce inflammation in a rabbit model of abdominal aorta endarterectomy. Long-term anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects on arterial remodeling and the clinical value of electrocautery in CE

  14. Standards of ultrasound imaging of the adrenal glands

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, Wiesław S.; Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal glands are paired endocrine glands located over the upper renal poles. Adrenal pathologies have various clinical presentations. They can coexist with the hyperfunction of individual cortical zones or the medulla, insufficiency of the adrenal cortex or retained normal hormonal function. The most common adrenal masses are tumors incidentally detected in imaging examinations (ultrasound, tomography, magnetic resonance imaging), referred to as incidentalomas. They include a range of histopathological entities but cortical adenomas without hormonal hyperfunction are the most common. Each abdominal ultrasound scan of a child or adult should include the assessment of the suprarenal areas. If a previously non-reported, incidental solid focal lesion exceeding 1 cm (incidentaloma) is detected in the suprarenal area, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging should be conducted to confirm its presence and for differentiation and the tumor functional status should be determined. Ultrasound imaging is also used to monitor adrenal incidentaloma that is not eligible for a surgery. The paper presents recommendations concerning the performance and assessment of ultrasound examinations of the adrenal glands and their pathological lesions. The article includes new ultrasound techniques, such as tissue harmonic imaging, spatial compound imaging, three-dimensional ultrasound, elastography, contrast-enhanced ultrasound and parametric imaging. The guidelines presented above are consistent with the recommendations of the Polish Ultrasound Society. PMID:26807295

  15. Microvillus inclusion disease: prenatal ultrasound findings, molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling of congenital diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Hsueh, Chuen; Chang, Shueen-Dyh; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Wang, Chao-Ning; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wang, Wayseen

    2010-12-01

    To present prenatal ultrasound findings and molecular diagnosis of microvillus inclusion disease, and to review the literature of abnormal prenatal ultrasound findings associated with congenital diarrhea. A 21-year-old woman, gravida 1, para 0, had generalized bowel dilation of the fetus on prenatal ultrasound at 29 gestational weeks. She and her husband were non-consanguineous, and there was no family history of congenital diarrhea. Prenatal ultrasound at 29 gestational weeks revealed a honeycomb appearance of the bowel without ascites or intraperitoneal calcification. At 36 gestational weeks, polyhydramnios dilated bowel loops were observed, and a 3,355-g male baby was delivered with a distended abdomen. Postnatally, the neonate suffered from watery diarrhea and abdominal distension but there was no mechanical bowel obstruction. An endoscopic biopsy of the small bowel revealed intracytoplasmic inclusions lined by intact microvilli in the apical surface of the intestinal epithelial cells consistent with the diagnosis of microvillus inclusion disease. Mutation analysis of blood samples of the neonate and parents revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation of c.445C

  16. Prevalence, location and concurrent diseases of ultrasonographic cyst-like lesions of abdominal lymph nodes in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, A; Billen, F; Heimann, M; Hamaide, A; Rizza, M; Etienne, A L; Bolen, G

    2017-04-01

    Lymph nodal cyst-like lesions are occasionally identified during abdominal ultrasound in dogs. However, a study evaluating their prevalence and clinical significance is lacking. The aim of this observational cross-sectional study was to evaluate prevalence, most common location and concurrent diseases of cyst-like lymph nodes detected during abdominal ultrasound. Affected lymph nodes, patient signalment and concurrent diseases of dogs with cyst-like lymph nodal lesions having undergone abdominal ultrasound over a one-year period were recorded. Twenty-three affected lymph nodes were observed in 17/553 dogs (prevalence=3 per cent). The most commonly affected was the lumbar lymphocenter (7/23), followed by the coeliac (6/23), the cranial mesenteric (5/23) and the iliosacral (5/23). Twenty-three concurrent diseases were diagnosed in 17 dogs, among which 16/23 were non-neoplastic (70 per cent). The most common concurrent disease was renal insufficiency (8/23), followed by neoplasia (7/23), gastroenteropathy (3/23), benign prostatic disease (2/23), pancreatitis (1/23), peritonitis (1/23) and neurological disease (1/23). No statistical correlation existed between cyst-like lymph nodal lesion and a specific neoplastic or non-neoplastic disease. In conclusion, in the present study, cyst-like lymph nodal lesions have a low prevalence, involve different lymphocenters and were found in dogs affected by different diseases, including both non-neoplastic and neoplastic aetiologies. British Veterinary Association.

  17. Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Young Man with Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Maria Weinkouff; Huynh, Khiem Dinh; Baandrup, Ulrik Thorngren; Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2018-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are very rare in Marfan syndrome. We present a case with a young nonsmoking and normotensive male with Marfan syndrome, who developed an infrarenal AAA that presented with rupture to the retroperitoneal cavity causing life-threatening bleeding shock. The patient had acute aortic surgery and survived. Five months before this incident, the patient had uneventful elective aortic root replacement (ad modum David) due to an enlarged aortic root. At that time, his abdominal aorta was assessed with a routine ultrasound scan that showed a normal-sized abdominal aorta. This documents that the aneurysm had evolved very rapidly despite young age and absence of risk factors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Body Mass Normalization for Lateral Abdominal Muscle Thickness Measurements in Adolescent Athletes.

    PubMed

    Linek, Pawel

    2017-09-01

    To determine the value of allometric parameters for ultrasound measurements of the oblique external (OE), oblique internal (OI), and transversus abdominis (TrA) muscles in adolescent athletes. The allometric parameter is the slope of the linear regression line between the log-transformed body mass and log-transformed muscle size measurement. The study included 114 male adolescent football players between the ages of 10 and 19 years. All individuals with no surgical procedures performed on the trunk area and who had played a sport for at least 2 years were included. A real-time B-mode ultrasound scanner with a linear array transducer was used to obtain images of the lateral abdominal muscles from both sides of the body. A stabilometric platform was used to assess the body mass value. The correlations between body mass and the OE, OI, and TrA muscle thicknesses were r = 0.73, r = 0.79, and r = 0.64, respectively (in all cases, P < .0001). The allometric parameters were 0.77 for the OE, 0.67 for the OI, and 0.61 for the TrA. Using these parameters, no significant correlations were found between body mass and the allometric-scaled thickness of the lateral abdominal muscles. Significant positive correlations exist between body mass and lateral abdominal muscle thickness in adolescent athletes. Therefore, it is reasonable to advise that the values of the allometric parameters for the OE, OI, and TrA muscles obtained in this study should be used, and the allometric-scaled thicknesses of those muscles should be analyzed in future research on adolescent athletes. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis Eleven Years After Cesarean Section: Case Report

    PubMed

    Djaković, Ivka; Vuković, Ante; Bolanča, Ivan; Soljačić Vraneš, Hrvojka; Kuna, Krunoslav

    2017-03-01

    Endometriosis is a common chronic disease characterized by growth of the endometrial gland and stroma outside the uterus. Symptoms affect physical, mental and social well-being. Extrapelvic location of endometriosis is very rare. Abdominal wall endometriosis occurs in 0.03%-2% of women with a previous cesarean section or other abdominopelvic operation. The leading symptoms are abdominal nodular mass, pain and cyclic symptomatology. The number of cesarean sections is increasing and so is the incidence of abdominal wall endometriosis as a potential complication of the procedure. There are cases of malignant transformation of abdominal wall endometriosis. Therefore, it is important to recognize this condition and treat it surgically. We report a case of a 37-year-old woman with abdominal wall endometriosis 11 years after cesarean section. She had low abdominal pain related to menstrual cycle, which intensified at the end of menstrual bleeding. A nodule painful to palpation was found in the medial part of previous Pfannenstiel incision. Ultrasound guided biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of endometriosis confirmed. Surgery is the treatment of choice for abdominal wall endometriosis. Excision with histologically proven free surgical margins of 1 cm is mandatory to prevent recurrence. A wide spectrum of mimicking conditions is the main reason for late diagnosis and treatment of abdominal wall endometriosis. In our case, the symptoms lasted for eight years and had intensified in the last six months prior to surgery.

  20. Management of Respiratory Motion in Extracorporeal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment in Upper Abdominal Organs: Current Status and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, A., E-mail: arnaud.muller@chu-lyon.fr; Petrusca, L.; Auboiroux, V.

    2013-12-15

    Extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive therapy considered with increased interest for the ablation of small tumors in deeply located organs while sparing surrounding critical tissues. A multitude of preclinical and clinical studies have showed the feasibility of the method; however, concurrently they showed several obstacles, among which the management of respiratory motion of abdominal organs is at the forefront. The aim of this review is to describe the different methods that have been proposed for managing respiratory motion and to identify their advantages and weaknesses. First, we specify the characteristics of respiratory motion for the liver,more » kidneys, and pancreas and the problems it causes during HIFU planning, treatment, and monitoring. Second, we make an inventory of the preclinical and clinical approaches used to overcome the problem of organ motion. Third, we analyze their respective benefits and drawbacks to identify the remaining physical, technological, and clinical challenges. We thereby consider the outlook of motion compensation techniques and those that would be the most suitable for clinical use, particularly under magnetic resonance thermometry monitoring.« less

  1. Smart Ultrasound Remote Guidance Experiment (SURGE) Preliminary Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor; Dulchavsky, Scott; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Ebert, Doug

    2009-01-01

    To date, diagnostic quality ultrasound images were obtained aboard the International Space Station (ISS) using the ultrasound of the Human Research Facility (HRF) rack in the Laboratory module. Through the Advanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in Microgravity (ADUM) and the Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs (BRASLET SDTO) studies, non-expert ultrasound operators aboard the ISS have performed cardiac, thoracic, abdominal, vascular, ocular, and musculoskeletal ultrasound assessments using remote guidance from ground-based ultrasound experts. With exploration class missions to the lunar and Martian surfaces on the horizon, crew medical officers will necessarily need to operate with greater autonomy given communication delays (round trip times of up to 5 seconds for the Moon and 90 minutes for Mars) and longer periods of communication blackouts (due to orbital constraints of communication assets). The SURGE project explored the feasibility and training requirements of having non-expert ultrasound operators perform autonomous ultrasound assessments in a simulated exploration mission outpost. The project aimed to identify experience, training, and human factors requirements for crew medical officers to perform autonomous ultrasonography. All of these aims pertained to the following risks from the NASA Bioastronautics Road Map: 1) Risk 18: Major Illness and Trauna; 2) Risk 20) Ambulatory Care; 3) Risk 22: Medical Informatics, Technologies, and Support Systems; and 4) Risk 23: Medical Skill Training and Maintenance.

  2. 12th WINFOCUS world congress on ultrasound in emergency and critical care.

    PubMed

    Acar, Yahya; Tezel, Onur; Salman, Necati; Cevik, Erdem; Algaba-Montes, Margarita; Oviedo-García, Alberto; Patricio-Bordomás, Mayra; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Ali, Abbas; Mustafa, Alrayah; Abdelrahman, Ihab; Bahar, Mustafa; Ali, Osama; Lester Kirchner, H; Prosen, Gregor; Anzic, Ajda; Leeson, Paul; Bahreini, Maryam; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Hosseinnejad, Houman; Blecher, Gabriel; Meek, Robert; Egerton-Warburton, Diana; Ćuti, Edina Ćatić; Belina, Stanko; Vančina, Tihomir; Kovačević, Idriz; Rustemović, Nadan; Chang, Ikwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Kwak, Young Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Cheng, Chi-Yung; Pan, Hsiu-Yung; Kung, Chia-Te; Ćurčić, Ela; Pritišanac, Ena; Planinc, Ivo; Medić, Marijana Grgić; Radonić, Radovan; Fasina, Abiola; Dean, Anthony J; Panebianco, Nova L; Henwood, Patricia S; Fochi, Oliviero; Favarato, Moreno; Bonanomi, Ezio; Tomić, Ivan; Ha, Youngrock; Toh, Hongchuen; Harmon, Elizabeth; Chan, Wilma; Baston, Cameron; Morrison, Gail; Shofer, Frances; Hua, Angela; Kim, Sharon; Tsung, James; Gunaydin, Isa; Kekec, Zeynep; Ay, Mehmet Oguzhan; Kim, Jinjoo; Kim, Jinhyun; Choi, Gyoosung; Shim, Dowon; Lee, Ji-Han; Ambrozic, Jana; Prokselj, Katja; Lucovnik, Miha; Simenc, Gabrijela Brzan; Mačiulienė, Asta; Maleckas, Almantas; Kriščiukaitis, Algimantas; Mačiulis, Vytautas; Macas, Andrius; Mohite, Sharad; Narancsik, Zoltan; Možina, Hugon; Nikolić, Sara; Hansel, Jan; Petrovčič, Rok; Mršić, Una; Orlob, Simon; Lerchbaumer, Markus; Schönegger, Niklas; Kaufmann, Reinhard; Pan, Chun-I; Wu, Chien-Hung; Pasquale, Sarah; Doniger, Stephanie J; Yellin, Sharon; Chiricolo, Gerardo; Potisek, Maja; Drnovšek, Borut; Leskovar, Boštjan; Robinson, Kristine; Kraft, Clara; Moser, Benjamin; Davis, Stephen; Layman, Shelley; Sayeed, Yusef; Minardi, Joseph; Pasic, Irmina Sefic; Dzananovic, Amra; Pasic, Anes; Zubovic, Sandra Vegar; Hauptman, Ana Godan; Brajkovic, Ana Vujaklija; Babel, Jaksa; Peklic, Marina; Radonic, Vedran; Bielen, Luka; Ming, Peh Wee; Yezid, Nur Hafiza; Mohammed, Fatahul Laham; Huda, Zainal Abidin; Ismail, Wan Nasarudin Wan; Isa, W Yus Haniff W; Fauzi, Hashairi; Seeva, Praveena; Mazlan, Mohd Zulfakar

    2016-09-01

    veterans: a retrospective analysis from the first Croatian veteran's hospitalEdina Ćatić Ćuti, Stanko Belina, Tihomir Vančina, Idriz KovačevićA15 The challenge of AAA: unusual case of obstructive jaundiceEdina Ćatić Ćuti, Nadan RustemovićA16 Educational effectiveness of easy-made new simulator model for ultrasound-guided procedures in pediatric patients: vascular access and foreign body managementIkwan Chang, Jin Hee Lee, Young Ho Kwak, Do Kyun KimA17 Detection of uterine rupture by point-of-care ultrasound at emergency department: a case reportChi-Yung Cheng, Hsiu-Yung Pan, Chia-Te KungA18 Abdominal probe in the hands of interns as a relevant diagnostic tool in revealing the cause of heart failureEla Ćurčić, Ena Pritišanac, Ivo Planinc, Marijana Grgić Medić, Radovan RadonićA19 Needs assessment of the potential utility of point-of-care ultrasound within the Zanzibar health systemAbiola Fasina, Anthony J. Dean, Nova L. Panebianco, Patricia S. HenwoodA20 Ultrasonographic diagnosis of tracheal compressionOliviero Fochi, Moreno Favarato, Ezio BonanomiA21 The role of ultrasound in the detection of lung infiltrates in critically ill patients: a pilot studyMarijana Grgić Medić, Ivan Tomić, Radovan RadonićA22 The SAFER Lasso; a novel approach using point-of-care ultrasound to evaluate patients with abdominal complaints in the emergency departmentYoungrock Ha, Hongchuen TohA23 Awareness and use of clinician-performed ultrasound among clinical clerkship facultyElizabeth Harmon, Wilma Chan, Cameron Baston, Gail Morrison, Frances Shofer, Nova Panebianco, Anthony J. DeanA24 Clinical outcomes in the use of lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of pediatric pneumoniasAngela Hua, Sharon Kim, James TsungA25 Effectiveness of ultrasound in hypotensive patientsIsa Gunaydin, Zeynep Kekec, Mehmet Oguzhan AyA26 Moderate-to-severe left ventricular ejection fraction related to short-term mortality of patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

  3. Antennal and Abdominal Transcriptomes Reveal Chemosensory Genes in the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Bin, Shuying; Chen, Lei; Han, Qunxin; Lin, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri is the principal vector of the highly destructive citrus disease called Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, which is a major threat to citrus cultivation worldwide. More effective pest control strategies against this pest entail the identification of potential chemosensory proteins that could be used in the development of attractants or repellents. However, the molecular basis of olfaction in the Asian citrus psyllid is not completely understood. Therefore, we performed this study to analyze the antennal and abdominal transcriptome of the Asian citrus psyllid. We identified a large number of transcripts belonging to nine chemoreception-related gene families and compared their expression in male and female adult antennae and terminal abdomen. In total, 9 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 12 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 46 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 gustatory receptors (GRs), 35 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 4 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and 4 different gene families encoding odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs): 80 cytochrome P450s (CYPs), 12 esterase (ESTs), and 5 aldehyde dehydrogenases (ADE) were annotated in the D. citri antennal and abdominal transcriptomes. Our results revealed that a large proportion of chemosensory genes exhibited no distinct differences in their expression patterns in the antennae and terminal abdominal tissues. Notably, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) analyses showed that 4 DictOBPs, 4 DictCSPs, 4 DictIRs, 1 DictSNMP, and 2 DictCYPs were upregulated in the antennae relative to that in terminal abdominal tissues. Furthermore, 2 DictOBPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP9), 2 DictCSPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP12), 4 DictIRs (DictIR3, DictIR6, DictIR10, and DictIR35), and 1 DictCYP (DictCYP57) were expressed at higher levels in the male antennae than in the female antennae. Our study provides the first insights into the molecular basis of chemoreception in this insect

  4. Delayed rupture of gallbladder following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Debajyoti; Agarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Krittika; Garg, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-09-01

    A 29-year-old gentleman presented to surgery emergency with severe upper abdominal pain and vomiting. He reported to had been hit in his abdomen by a ball during a cricket match. Computerized tomogram of the abdomen revealed hematoma within the gallbladder lumen, laceration of segment six of liver, and hemoperitoneum. The patient did not agree for laparotomy advised to him, and so, managed conservatively. The patient reported back to us with high grade fever, jaundice, and painful abdominal distension after seven days of discharge from the hospital. His abdominal examination showed features of generalized peritonitis. Surgical abdominal exploration revealed a single perforation in the fundus of gallbladder with frozen calot'striangle. Subtotal cholecystectomy was done. Histopathology of excised gallbladder revealed xanthogranulomatous inflammation. The present case report highlights that early exploration and cholecystectomy should be considered in patients with gallbladder injury to obviate the risk of delayed perforation.

  5. Ultrasound in athletes: emerging techniques in point-of-care practice.

    PubMed

    Yim, Eugene S; Corrado, Gianmichel

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound offers sports medicine clinicians the potential to diagnose, treat, and manage a broad spectrum of conditions afflicting athletes. This review article highlights applications of ultrasound that hold promise as point-of-care diagnostics and therapeutic tools that can be used directly by clinicians to direct real-time management of athletes. Point-of-care ultrasound has been examined most in the context of musculoskeletal disorders in athletes, with attention given to Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy, hip and thigh pathology, elbow tendinopathy, wrist pathology, and shoulder pain. More research has focused on therapeutic applications than diagnostic, but initial evidence has been generated in both. Preliminary evidence has been published also on abdominal ultrasound for splenic enlargement in mononucleosis, cardiopulmonary processes and hydration status, deep vein thrombosis, and bone mineral density. Further research will be required to validate these applications and to explore further applications of portable ultrasound that can be used in the care of athletes.

  6. Point of Care Ultrasound Accurately Distinguishes Inflammatory from Noninflammatory Disease in Patients Presenting with Abdominal Pain and Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Kerri L.; Jacob, Deepti; Kaplan, Gilaad G.; Boyce, Emma; Ghosh, Subrata; Ma, Irene; Lu, Cathy; Wilson, Stephanie; Panaccione, Remo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Approaches to distinguish inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from noninflammatory disease that are noninvasive, accurate, and readily available are desirable. Such approaches may decrease time to diagnosis and better utilize limited endoscopic resources. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy for gastroenterologist performed point of care ultrasound (POCUS) in the detection of luminal inflammation relative to gold standard ileocolonoscopy. Methods. A prospective, single-center study was conducted on convenience sample of patients presenting with symptoms of diarrhea and/or abdominal pain. Patients were offered POCUS prior to having ileocolonoscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), as well as likelihood ratios, were calculated. Results. Fifty-eight patients were included in this study. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 80%, 97.8%, 88.9%, and 95.7%, respectively, with positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) of 36.8 and 0.20. Conclusion. POCUS can accurately be performed at the bedside to detect transmural inflammation of the intestine. This noninvasive approach may serve to expedite diagnosis, improve allocation of endoscopic resources, and facilitate initiation of appropriate medical therapy. PMID:27446838

  7. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring.

  8. Ultrasound as Diagnostic Tool for Diaphragmatic Myoclonus

    PubMed Central

    Llaneza Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie; Considine, Elaine; Karp, Barbara I.; Lungu, Codrin; Alter, Katharine; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Diaphragmatic myoclonus is a rare disorder of repetitive diaphragmatic contractions, acknowledged to be a spectrum that includes psychogenic features. Electromyography has been the diagnostic tool most commonly used in the literature. Methods To test if we could perform a noninvasive technique to delineate the diaphragm as the source of abnormal movements and demonstrate distractibility and entrainability, we used B-mode ultrasound in a patient with diaphragmatic myoclonus. Results Ultrasound imaging clearly delineated the diaphragm as the source of her abdominal movements. We were able to demonstrate entrainability of the diaphragm to hand tapping to a prescribed rhythm set by examiner. Conclusion We recommend the use of ultrasound as a noninvasive, convenient diagnostic tool for further studies of diaphragmatic myoclonus. We agree with previous findings that diaphragmatic myoclonus may be a functional movement disorder, as evidenced by distractibility and entrainability demonstrated on real-time video with ultrasonography. PMID:27430001

  9. Focused Ultrasound Lipolysis in the Treatment of Abdominal Cellulite: An Open-Label Study

    PubMed Central

    Moravvej, Hamideh; Akbari, Zahra; Mohammadian, Shahrzad; Razzaghi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Despite a growing popularity of noninvasive ultrasonic lipolysis procedure, there is a lack of evidence about the efficacy of this method. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of focused ultrasonic lipolysis on abdominal cellulite treatment. Methods: Twenty-eight consecutive subjects (age: 37.8 ± 8 years) underwent weekly transdermal focused ultrasonic lipolysis (Med Contour, General Project Ltd., Florence, Italy) and vacuum drainage for a maximum of eight sessions. Largest abdominal girth and 2 lines at 4 cm to 7 cm distance above and under it were located as fixed points of measurements. The mean value of the three fixed lines was considered as the abdominal circumference. Subjects were evaluated using measurements of circumference, immediately after and 3 weeks after the final treatment and compared using paired t test. Results: One hundred ninety-four ultrasonic lipolysis procedures were performed on 28 subjects. A statistically significant (P < .001) average of 1.89 cm (95% CI: 1.63-2.02 cm) decrease of circumference value was observed in each session of ultrasonic lipolysis. The mean pretreatment to posttreatment circumference reduction was 8.21 cm (95% CI: 6.38-10.04, P < .001) that declined to 7 cm (95% CI: 3.2-10.8, P < .001) at the 3-month follow-up visit. Conclusion: Focused ultrasonic lipolysis appears to be an effective method for reduction of abdominal cellulite, although some amount of circumference reduction reversal may be observed in long term follow-up visit. PMID:26464776

  10. Estimation of prenatal aorta intima-media thickness from ultrasound examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronese, E.; Tarroni, G.; Visentin, S.; Cosmi, E.; Linguraru, M. G.; Grisan, E.

    2014-10-01

    Prenatal events such as intrauterine growth restriction and increased cardiovascular risk in later life have been shown to be associated with an increased intima-media thickness (aIMT) of the abdominal aorta in the fetus. In order to assess and manage atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease risk in adults and children, in recent years the measurement of abdominal and carotid artery thickness has gained a growing appeal. Nevertheless, no computer aided method has been proposed for the analysis of prenatal vessels from ultrasound data, yet. To date, these measurements are being performed manually on ultrasound fetal images by skilled practitioners. The aim of the presented study is to introduce an automatic algorithm that identifies abdominal aorta and estimates its diameter and aIMT from routine third trimester ultrasonographic fetal data. The algorithm locates the aorta, then segments it and, by modeling the arterial wall longitudinal sections by means of a gaussian mixture, derives a set of measures of the aorta diameter (aDiam) and of the intima-media thickness (aIMT). After estimating the cardiac cycle, the mean diameter and the aIMT at the end-diastole phase are computed. Considering the aIMT value for each subject, the correlation between automatic and manual end-diastolic aIMT measurements is 0.91 in a range of values 0.44-1.10 mm, corresponding to both normal and pathological conditions. The automatic system yields a mean relative error of 19%, that is similar to the intra-observer variability (14%) and much lower that the inter-observer variability (42%). The correlation between manual and automatic measurements and the small error confirm the ability of the proposed system to reliably estimate aIMT values in prenatal ultrasound sequences, reducing measurement variability and suggesting that it can be used for an automatic assessment of aIMT. Preliminary results have been presented in E Veronese, E Cosmi, S Visentin, E Grisan: 'Semiautomatic estimation

  11. A Newborn With Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Alwan, Riham; Drake, Meredith; Gurria Juarez, Juan; Emery, Kathleen H; Shaaban, Aimen F; Szabo, Sara; Sobolewski, Brad

    2017-11-01

    A previously healthy 3-week-old boy presented with 5 hours of marked fussiness, abdominal distention, and poor feeding. He was afebrile and well perfused. His examination was remarkable for localized abdominal tenderness and distention. He was referred to the emergency department in which an abdominal radiograph revealed gaseous distention of the bowel with a paucity of gas in the pelvis. Complete blood cell count and urinalysis were unremarkable. His ongoing fussiness and abnormal physical examination prompted consultation with surgery and radiology. Our combined efforts ultimately established an unexpected diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome after Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Quaternary Syndromes?

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, A W; Nickerson, D; Roberts, D J; Rosen, M J; McBeth, P B; Petro, C C; Berrevoet, Frederik; Sugrue, M; Xiao, Jimmy; Ball, C G

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction with reconstitution of the container function of the abdominal compartment is increasingly being performed in patients with massive ventral hernia previously deemed inoperable. This situation places patients at great risk of severe intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome if organ failure ensues. Intra-abdominal hypertension and especially abdominal compartment syndrome may be devastating systemic complications with systematic and progressive organ failure and death. We thus reviewed the pathophysiology and reported clinical experiences with abnormalities of intra-abdominal pressure in the context of abdominal wall reconstruction. Bibliographic databases (1950-2015), websites, textbooks, and the bibliographies of previously recovered articles for reports or data relating to intra-abdominal pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, and the abdominal compartment syndrome in relation to ventral, incisional, or abdominal hernia repair or abdominal wall reconstruction. Surgeons should thus consider and carefully measure intra-abdominal pressure and its resultant effects on respiratory parameters and function during abdominal wall reconstruction. The intra-abdominal pressure post-operatively will be a result of the new intra-peritoneal volume and the abdominal wall compliance. Strategies surgeons may utilize to ameliorate intra-abdominal pressure rise after abdominal wall reconstruction including temporizing paralysis of the musculature either temporarily or semi-permanently, pre-operative progressive pneumoperitoneum, permanently removing visceral contents, or surgically releasing the musculature to increase the abdominal container volume. In patients without complicating shock and inflammation, and in whom the abdominal wall anatomy has been so functionally adapted to maximize compliance, intra-abdominal hypertension may be transient and tolerable. Intra-abdominal hypertension/abdominal compartment syndrome in the specific setting of

  13. Comparison of the sonographic features of the abdominal wall muscles and connective tissues in individuals with and without lumbopelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Jackie L; Warner, Martin B; Stokes, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional, case-control study. To measure and compare the resting thickness of the 4 abdominal wall muscles, their associated perimuscular connective tissue (PMCT), and interrecti distance (IRD) in persons with and without lumbopelvic pain (LPP), using ultrasound imaging. The muscles and PMCT of the abdominal wall assist in controlling the spine. Functional deficits of the abdominal wall muscles have been detected in populations with LPP. Investigations of the abdominal wall in those with LPP are primarily concerned with muscle, most commonly the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO). Because the abdominal wall functions as a unit, all 4 abdominal muscles and their associated connective tissues should be considered concurrently. B-mode ultrasound imaging was used to measure the resting thickness of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique, IO, and TrA muscles; the PMCT planes; and IRD in 50 male and female subjects, 25 with and 25 without LPP (mean ± SD age, 36.3 ± 9.4 and 46.6 ± 8.0 years, respectively). Univariate correlation analysis was used to identify covariates. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) and the Kruskal-Wallis test (IRD) were used to compare cohorts (α = .05). The LPP cohort had less total abdominal muscle thickness (LPP mean ± SD, 18.9 ± 3.0 mm; control, 20.3 ± 3.0 mm; ANCOVA adjusted for body mass index, P = .03), thicker PMCT (LPP, 5.5 ± 0.2 mm; control, 4.3 ± 0.2 mm; ANCOVA adjusted for body mass index, P = .007), and wider IRD (LPP, 11.5 ± 2.0 mm; control, 8.4 ± 1.8 mm; Kruskal-Wallis, P = .005). Analysis of individual muscle thickness revealed no difference in the external oblique, IO, and TrA, but a thinner RA in the LPP cohort (LPP mean ± SD, 7.8 ± 1.5 mm; control, 9.1 ± 1.2 mm; ANCOVA adjusted for body mass index, P<.001). To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the morphological characteristics of all 4 abdominal muscles and PMCT in individuals with LPP. The results suggest that there

  14. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks for perioperative analgesia in upper abdominal surgery: A randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Abdelsalam, Khaled; Mohamdin, O W

    2016-01-01

    Regional anesthetic techniques can be used to alleviate postoperative pain in patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of bilateral ultrasound (US)-guided rectus sheath (RS) and transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks for better perioperative analgesia. It is a prospective, observer-blinded, randomized clinical study. 40 eligible patients undergoing elective liver resection or Whipple procedure were included. All patients received a standardized anesthetic technique. Group 1 (n = 20) received preincisional US-guided bilateral RS and TAP blocks using 20 ml volume of bupivacaine 0.25% for each, and group 2 (n = 20) received local wound infiltration at end of surgery with 40 ml of bupivacaine 0.25%. A standardized postoperative analgesic regimen composed of intravenous paracetamol and a morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The use of intraoperative fentanyl and recovery room morphine boluses, PCA-administered morphine, pain scores as well as number of patients' experienced postoperative nausea and vomiting in the ward at 6 and 24 h were recorded. Group 1 patients received a significantly lower cumulative intraoperative fentanyl, significantly lesser boluses of morphine in postanesthesia care unit, as well, significantly lower cumulative 24 h postoperative morphine dosage than the group 2 patients. Pain visual analog scale scores were significantly lower at both 6 and 24 h postoperatively in TAP group when compared with the no-TAP group. There were no complications related to the TAP block procedures. No signs or symptoms of local anesthetic systemic toxicity were detected. The combination of bilateral US-guided RS and TAP blocks provides excellent perioperative analgesia for major upper abdominal surgery.

  15. [Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following blunt abdominal injury].

    PubMed

    Kargl, S; Breitwieser, J; Gitter, R; Pumberger, W

    2012-12-01

    Posttraumatic hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms are a rare but life-threatening complication of blunt abdominal trauma with liver damage. We report the case of a child who developed a pseudoaneurysm of the right hepatic artery after a bicycle accident with central liver rupture. After an episode of hemodynamically relevant hemobilia due to delayed bleeding, the asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed coincidentally by ultrasound. Because of the progression in size angiographic coiling was performed and led to thrombotic occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm. After a symptom-free period of 1 month the child required surgery because of acute cholecystitis.

  16. Effect of mild pressure applied by the ultrasound transducer on fetal cephalic measurements at 20-24 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Kliper, Yael; Ben-Ami, Moshe; Perlitz, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of mild pressure applied on the abdominal wall by the ultrasound transducer on fetal cephalic indices. We examined by ultrasound 60 fetuses of healthy women, at 20-24 weeks of pregnancy, during routine prenatal evaluation. For every fetus biparietal diameter and head circumference were measured, with and without applying mild pressure by the ultrasound transducer. The weight and gestational age (GA) were calculated. The pressure applied by the transducer had a significant effect on the cephalic indices and on the weight and GA evaluations (p < 0.001). Fetal positioning significantly affected the impact that applied pressure had on head circumference and on the weight evaluation derived from it (p < 0.05). Applied pressure by an abdominal ultrasound probe affects cephalic indices and the derived weight and GA estimations. This may lead to incorrect diagnoses or hide pathological findings. The effect of applied pressure depends on fetal positioning. The examiner must be aware of this effect when evaluating the results of the measurements.

  17. An integrated model-based software for FUS in moving abdominal organs.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, Michael; Strehlow, Jan; Haase, Sabrina; Jenne, Juergen; Tanner, Christine; Langø, Thomas; Loeve, Arjo J; Karakitsios, Ioannis; Xiao, Xu; Levy, Yoav; Sat, Giora; Bezzi, Mario; Braunewell, Stefan; Guenther, Matthias; Melzer, Andreas; Preusser, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a non-invasive method for tissue ablation that has the potential for complete and controlled local tumour destruction with minimal side effects. The treatment of abdominal organs such as the liver, however, requires particular technological support in order to enable a safe, efficient and effective treatment. As FUS is applied from outside the patient's body, suitable imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance imaging or diagnostic ultrasound, are needed to guide and track the procedure. To facilitate an efficient FUS procedure in the liver, the organ motion during breathing and the partial occlusion by the rib cage need to be taken into account in real time, demanding a continuous patient-specific adaptation of the treatment configuration. Modelling the patient's respiratory motion and combining this with tracking data improves the accuracy of motion predictions. Modelling and simulation of the FUS effects within the body allows the use of treatment planning and has the potential to be used within therapy to increase knowledge about the patient status. This article describes integrated model-based software for patient-specific modelling and prediction for FUS treatments of moving abdominal organs.

  18. An ergonomic, instrumented ultrasound probe for 6-axis force/torque measurement.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Matthew W; Anthony, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    An ergonomic, instrumented ultrasound probe has been developed for medical imaging applications. The device, which fits compactly in the hand of sonographers and permits rapid attachment & removal of the ultrasound probe, measures ultrasound probe-to-patient contact forces and torques in all six axes. The device was used to measure contact forces and torques applied by ten professional sonographers on five patients during thirty-six abdominal exams. Of the three contact forces, those applied along the probe axis were found to be largest, averaging 7.0N. Measurement noise was quantified for each axis, and found to be small compared with the axial force. Understanding the range of forces applied during ultrasound imaging enables the design of more accurate robotic imaging systems and could also improve understanding of the correlation between contact force and sonographer fatigue and injury.

  19. Unusual Discovery after an Examination for Abdominal Pain: Abernethy 1b Malformation and Liver Adenomatosis. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chira, Romeo Ioan; Calauz, Adriana; Manole, Simona; Valean, Simona; Mircea, Petru Adrian

    2017-03-01

    Congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (Abernethy malformation) is a rare condition characterized by developmental abnormalities of the portal venous system resulting in the diversion of the portal blood from the liver to the systemic venous system through a complete or partial shunt of the portomesenteric blood. We report the case of an 18 year-old female examined for abdominal pain, presenting cholestasis syndrome and an elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase level. Liver ultrasound examination revealed the absence of the portal vein with a complete extrahepatic shunt of the portal blood, multiple focal liver lesions, and multiple associated vascular anomalies. A surgical portosystemic shunt and a secondary portosystemic shunt due to portal vein thrombosis were excluded, enabling the diagnosis of a congenital portosystemic shunt. A complex investigation also discovered bone anomalies, and the liver biopsy of the dominant focal lesion revealed adenoma. On a short-term follow-up under hepatoprotective medication, the biochemical parameters improved mildly; however, the size of the main focal lesion increased. Congenital absence of the portal vein often remains an incidental diagnosis. In experienced hands, ultrasonography can diagnose it, but a comprehensive thoraco-abdominal evaluation is compulsory, considering the many potential associated anomalies. In these patients, development of adenomatous liver lesions secondary to Abernethy type Ib malformation represents an indication for liver transplantation.

  20. Seeing Is Believing: Evaluating a Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum for 1st-Year Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Bret P; Hojsak, Joanne; Dei Rossi, Elizabeth; Karani, Reena; Narula, Jagat

    2017-01-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound has been a novel addition to undergraduate medical education at a few medical schools. The impact is not fully understood, and few rigorous assessments of educational outcomes exist. This study assessed the impact of a point-of-care ultrasound curriculum on image acquisition, interpretation, and student and faculty perceptions of the course. All 142 first-year medical students completed a curriculum on ultrasound physics and instrumentation, cardiac, thoracic, and abdominal imaging. A flipped classroom model of preclass tutorials and tests augmenting live, hands-on scanning sessions was incorporated into the physical examination course. Students and faculty completed surveys on impressions of the curriculum, and all students under-went competency assessments with standardized patients. The curriculum was a mandatory part of the physical examination course and was taught by experienced clinician-sonographers as well as faculty who do not routinely perform sonography in their clinical practice. Students and faculty agreed that the physical examination course was the right time to introduce ultrasound (87% and 80%). Students demonstrated proper use of the ultrasound machine functions (M score = 91.55), and cardiac, thoracic, and abdominal system assessments (M score = 80.35, 79.58, and 71.57, respectively). Students and faculty valued the curriculum, and students demonstrated basic competency in performance and interpretation of ultrasound. Further study is needed to determine how to best incorporate this emerging technology into a robust learning experience for medical students.

  1. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapy System and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fucheng; He, Ye; Li, Rui

    2007-05-01

    At the end of last century, a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) tumor therapy system was successfully developed and manufactured in China, which has been already applied to clinical therapy. This article aims to discuss the HIFU therapy system and its application. Detailed research includes the following: power amplifiers for high-power ultrasound, ultrasound transducers with large apertures, accurate 3-D mechanical drives, a software control system (both high-voltage control and low-voltage control), and the B-mode ultrasonic diagnostic equipment used for treatment monitoring. Research on the dosage of ultrasound required for tumour therapy in multiple human cases has made it possible to relate a dosage formula, presented in this paper, to other significant parameters such as the volume of thermal tumor solidification, the acoustic intensity (I), and the ultrasound emission time (tn). Moreover, the HIFU therapy system can be applied to the clinical treatment of both benign and malignant tumors in the pelvic and abdominal cavity, such as uterine fibroids, liver cancer and pancreatic carcinoma.

  2. Comparison of radial 4D Flow-MRI with perivascular ultrasound to quantify blood flow in the abdomen and introduction of a porcine model of pre-hepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Frydrychowicz, A; Roldan-Alzate, A; Winslow, E; Consigny, D; Campo, C A; Motosugi, U; Johnson, K M; Wieben, O; Reeder, S B

    2017-12-01

    Objectives of this study were to compare radial time-resolved phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (4D Flow-MRI) with perivascular ultrasound (pvUS) and to explore a porcine model of acute pre-hepatic portal hypertension (PHTN). Abdominal 4D Flow-MRI and pvUS in portal and splenic vein, hepatic and both renal arteries were performed in 13 pigs of approximately 60 kg. In six pigs, measurements were repeated after partial portal vein (PV) ligature. Inter- and intra-reader comparisons and statistical analysis including Bland-Altman (BA) comparison, paired Student's t tests and linear regression were performed. PvUS and 4D Flow-MRI measurements agreed well; flow before partial PV ligature was 322 ± 30 ml/min in pvUS and 297 ± 27 ml/min in MRI (p = 0.294), and average BA difference was 25 ml/min [-322; 372]. Inter- and intra-reader results differed very little, revealed excellent correlation (R 2  = 0.98 and 0.99, respectively) and resulted in BA differences of -5 ml/min [-161; 150] and -2 ml/min [-28; 25], respectively. After PV ligature, PV flow decreased from 356 ± 50 to 298 ± 61 ml/min (p = 0.02), and hepatic arterial flow increased from 277 ± 36 to 331 ± 65 ml/min (p = n.s.). The successful in vivo comparison of radial 4D Flow-MRI to perivascular ultrasound revealed good agreement of abdominal blood flow although with considerable spread of results. A model of pre-hepatic PHTN was successfully introduced and acute responses monitored. • Radial 4D Flow-MRI in the abdomen was successfully compared to perivascular ultrasound. • Inter- and intra-reader testing demonstrated excellent reproducibility of upper abdominal 4D Flow-MRI. • A porcine model of acute pre-hepatic portal hypertension was successfully introduced. • 4D Flow-MRI successfully monitored acute changes in a model of portal hypertension.

  3. Torsion of normal adnexa in postmenarcheal women: can ultrasound indicate an ischemic process?

    PubMed

    Smorgick, N; Maymon, R; Mendelovic, S; Herman, A; Pansky, M

    2008-03-01

    Torsion of normal adnexa is a rare event involving steadily increasing congestion and ischemia of the ovary. We investigated whether this process can be characterized by sonographic features. Twelve menstrually cycling women with 14 separate episodes of laparoscopic-proven torsion of normal adnexa were identified retrospectively, and the results of their preoperative gray-scale ultrasound examinations and Doppler flow evaluations were analyzed. The cases were classified into 'short-term' (< 24 h; range, 3-24 h) and 'prolonged' (> 24 h; range, 1-10 days) duration of torsion according to the reported period of abdominal pain before admission. Absence of any additional adnexal pathology was confirmed by both intraoperative inspection and postoperative follow-up ultrasound examinations. The median age of the cohort was 24.0 (interquartile range (IQR), 20.5-28.7) years, and parity ranged from 0 to 3. All affected ovaries were significantly enlarged compared with non-affected ones (median cross-sectional area, 18.1 (IQR, 12.4-26.4) cm(2) vs. 4.3 (IQR, 2.9-6.2) cm(2), P < 0.01). We could distinguish two distinct sonographic patterns of torted ovaries: there were numerous small peripheral follicles in the ovarian parenchyma in nine cases, and there was a solid-appearing mass with hypo- and hyperechogenic foci in five cases. Comparison of the ultrasound images of patients with short-term vs. long-term abdominal pain revealed that the solid-appearing ovary was more common in the latter group (0/6 vs. 5/8, P = 0.03), while there was no significant difference between groups in the presence of free pelvic fluid or median ovarian cross-sectional area. Intraovarian blood flow was diminished or absent in five of the eight patients in whom color Doppler imaging was performed. Ultrasound images of twisted normal adnexa may vary according to the duration of the condition, reflecting the pathological series of events of increased ovarian congestion and necrosis. Recognition of the

  4. Liver fat contents, abdominal adiposity and insulin resistance in non-diabetic prevalent hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Yuan; Lin, Chien-Chu; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Hsu, Shih-Ping; Pai, Mei-Fen; Yang, Ju-Yeh; Wu, Hon-Yen; Peng, Yu-Sen

    2014-01-01

    The liver fat contents and abdominal adiposity correlate well with insulin resistance (IR) in the general population. However, the relationship between liver fat content, abdominal adiposity and IR in non-diabetic hemodialysis (HD) patients remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify the associations among these factors. This is a cross-sectional, observational study. All patients received abdominal ultrasound for liver fat content. Abdominal adiposity was quantified with the conicity index (Ci) and waist circumference (WC). We checked the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) for IR. A total of 112 patients (60 women) were analyzed. Subjects with higher liver fat contents and WC had higher IR indices. But Ci did not correlate with IR indices. In both the multi-variable linear regression model and the logistic regression model, only higher liver fat content predicted a severe IR status. Liver fat contents have a remarkable correlation with IR; however, abdominal adiposity, measured either by Ci or WC, dose not independently correlate with IR in non-diabetic prevalent HD patients. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Internal Medicine Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum: Consensus Recommendations from the Canadian Internal Medicine Ultrasound (CIMUS) Group.

    PubMed

    Ma, Irene W Y; Arishenkoff, Shane; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Desy, Janeve; Ailon, Jonathan; Martin, Leslie; Otremba, Mirek; Halman, Samantha; Willemot, Patrick; Blouw, Marcus

    2017-09-01

    Bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is increasingly used to assess medical patients. At present, no consensus exists for what POCUS curriculum is appropriate for internal medicine residency training programs. This document details the consensus-based recommendations by the Canadian Internal Medicine Ultrasound (CIMUS) group, comprising 39 members, representing 14 institutions across Canada. Guiding principles for selecting curricular content were determined a priori. Consensus was defined as agreement by at least 80% of the members on POCUS applications deemed appropriate for teaching and assessment of trainees in the core (internal medicine postgraduate years [PGY] 1-3) and expanded (general internal medicine PGY 4-5) training programs. We recommend four POCUS applications for the core PGY 1-3 curriculum (inferior vena cava, lung B lines, pleural effusion, and abdominal free fluid) and three ultrasound-guided procedures (central venous catheterization, thoracentesis, and paracentesis). For the expanded PGY 4-5 curriculum, we recommend an additional seven applications (internal jugular vein, lung consolidation, pneumothorax, knee effusion, gross left ventricular systolic function, pericardial effusion, and right ventricular strain) and four ultrasound-guided procedures (knee arthrocentesis, arterial line insertion, arterial blood gas sampling, and peripheral venous catheterization). These recommendations will provide a framework for training programs at a national level.

  6. Comparison of lateral abdominal muscle thickness between weightlifters and matched controls.

    PubMed

    Sitilertpisan, Patraporn; Pirunsan, Ubon; Puangmali, Aatit; Ratanapinunchai, Jonjin; Kiatwattanacharoen, Suchart; Neamin, Hudsaleark; Laskin, James J

    2011-11-01

    To compare lateral abdominal muscle thickness between weightlifters and matched controls. A case control study design. University laboratory. 16 female Thai national weightlifters and 16 matched controls participated in this study. Ultrasound imaging with a 12-MHz linear array was used to measure the resting thickness of transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and total thickness (Total) of lateral abdominal muscle (LAM) on the right side of abdominal wall. The absolute muscle thickness and the relative contribution of each muscle to the total thickness were determined. Weightlifters had significantly thicker absolute TrA and IO muscles than matched controls (p < 0.01). Further, the relative thickness of the IO was significantly greater in weightlifters than matched controls (p < 0.05). The findings of this study suggest that routine Olympic style weight training among female weightlifters appears to result in preferential hypertrophy or adaptation of the IO muscle. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Source Book of Educational Materials for Diagnostic Medical Ultrasound. Radiological Health Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pijar, Mary Lou, Comp; And Others

    This report is a compilation of educational materials that are available in the field of diagnostic medical ultrasound. Materials, which include publications, audiovisual aids, and teaching aids, are listed under the following categories: abdominal imaging; anatomy and physiology; anatomy and embryology; bioeffects; cardiology and vasculature;…

  8. Newly-developed, forward-viewing echoendoscope: a comparative pilot study to the standard echoendoscope in the imaging of abdominal organs and feasibility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Takuji; Nakai, Yousuke; Lee, John G; Park, Do Hyun; Muthusamy, V Raman; Chang, Kenneth J

    2012-02-01

    Multiple diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) procedures have been widely performed using a standard oblique-viewing (OV) curvilinear array (CLA) echoendoscope. Recently, a new, forward-viewing (FV) CLA was developed, with the advantages of improved endoscopic viewing and manipulation of devices. However, the FV-CLA echoendoscope has a narrower ultrasound scanning field, and lacks an elevator, which might represent obstacles for clinical use. The aim of this study was to compare the FV-CLA echoendoscope to the OV-CLA echoendoscope for EUS imaging of abdominal organs, and to assess the feasibility of EUS-guided interventions using the FV-CLA echoendoscope. EUS examinations were first performed and recorded using the OV-CLA echoendoscope, followed immediately by the FV-CLA echoendoscope. Video recordings were then assessed by two independent endosonographers in a blinded fashion. The EUS visualization and image quality of specific abdominal organs/structures were scored. Any indicated fine-needle aspiration (FNA) or intervention was performed using the FV-CLA echoendoscope, with the OV-CLA echoendoscope as salvage upon failure. A total of 21 patients were examined in the study. Both echoendoscopes had similar visualization and image quality for all organs/structures, except the common hepatic duct (CHD), which was seen significantly better with the FV-CLA echoendoscope. EUS interventions were conducted in eight patients, including FNA of pancreatic mass (3), pancreatic cyst (3), and cystgastrostomy (2). The FV-CLA echoendoscope was successful in seven patients. One failed FNA of the pancreatic head cyst was salvaged using the OV-CLA echoendoscope. There were no differences between the FV-CLA echoendoscope and the OV-CLA echoendoscope in visualization or image quality on upper EUS, except for the superior image quality of CHD using the FV-CLA echoendoscope. Therefore, the disadvantages of the FV-CLA echoendoscope appear minimal in light of the

  9. Splenic trauma during abdominal wall liposuction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Paul; Koak, Yashwant; Baker, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 35-year-old woman collapsed 18 hours after undergoing abdominal wall liposuction. Abdominal CT scan revealed a punctured spleen. She underwent an emergency splenectomy and made an uneventful recovery. PMID:18387911

  10. Ultrasound Applied to Subcutaneous Fat Tissue Measurements in International Elite Canoeists.

    PubMed

    Kopinski, S; Engel, T; Cassel, M; Fröhlich, K; Mayer, F; Carlsohn, A

    2015-12-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) measurements with ultrasound have recently been introduced to assess body fat in elite athletes. However, appropriate protocols and data on various groups of athletes are missing. We investigated intra-rater reliability of SAT measurements using ultrasound in elite canoe athletes. 25 international level canoeists (18 male, 7 female; 23±4 years; 81±11 kg; 1.83±0.09 m; 20±3 training h/wk) were measured on 2 consecutive days. SAT was assessed with B-mode ultrasound at 8 sites (ISAK): triceps, subscapular, biceps, iliac crest, supraspinal, abdominal, front thigh, medial calf, and quantified using image analysis software. Data was analyzed descriptively (mean±SD, [range]). Coefficient of variation (CV%), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, 2.1) and absolute (LoA) and ratio limits of agreement (RLoA) were calculated for day-to-day reliability. Mean sum of SAT thickness was 30.0±19.4 mm [8.0, 80.1 mm], with 3.9±1.8 mm [1.2 mm subscapular, 8.0 mm abdominal] for individual sites. CV for the sum of sites was 4.7%, ICC 0.99, LoA 1.7±3.6 mm, RLoA 0.940 ( *  /÷1.155). Measuring SAT with ultrasound has proved to have excellent day-to-day reliability in elite canoe athletes. Recommendations for standardization of the method will further increase accuracy and reproducibility. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Teaching point of care ultrasound skills in medical school: keeping radiology in the driver's seat.

    PubMed

    Webb, Emily M; Cotton, James B; Kane, Kevin; Straus, Christopher M; Topp, Kimberly S; Naeger, David M

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound is used increasingly in medical practice as a tool for focused bedside diagnosis and technical assistance during procedures. Widespread availability of small portable units has put this technology into the hands of many physicians and medical students who lack dedicated training, leaving the education and introduction of this key modality increasingly to physicians from other specialties. We developed a radiology-led program to teach ultrasound skills to preclinical medical students. To develop this new ultrasound program we 1) established a program leader, 2) developed teaching materials, 3) created a hands-on interactive program, and 4) recruited the necessary instructors. The program was piloted with the first-year medical student class of 154 students. The introductory session was assessed by pre- and post-activity Likert scale-based surveys. Of 154 (68.8%) students, 106 completed a voluntary online survey before starting the program and 145 students (94.2%) completed a voluntary survey after the session. Students found the program educationally valuable (4.64 of 5) and reported that it improved their understanding of ultrasound imaging (4.7 of 5). Students' reported confidence in identifying abdominal organs, intra-abdominal fluid, and Morison pouch that was significantly higher on the postactivity survey compared to the presurvey (P < .001 for all). We piloted a radiology-led program to teach ultrasound skills to preclinical medical students. Students found the experience enjoyable and educationally valuable. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementation of a pediatric critical care focused bedside ultrasound training program in a large academic PICU.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Thomas W; Himebauch, Adam S; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Chen, Aaron E; Dean, Anthony J; Panebianco, Nova; Darge, Kassa; Cohen, Meryl S; Greeley, William J; Berg, Robert A; Nishisaki, Akira

    2015-03-01

    To determine the feasibility and describe the process of implementing a pediatric critical care bedside ultrasound program in a large academic PICU and to evaluate the impact of bedside ultrasound on clinical management. Retrospective case series, description of program implementation. Single-center quaternary noncardiac PICU in a children's hospital. Consecutive patients from January 22, 2012, to July 22, 2012, with bedside ultrasounds performed and interpreted by pediatric critical care practitioners. A pediatric critical care bedside ultrasound program consisting of a 2-day immersive course followed by clinical performance with internal quality assurance review was implemented. Studies performed in the PICU following training were documented and reviewed against reference standards including subspecialist-performed ultrasound or clinical response. Seventeen critical care faculties and eight fellows recorded 201 bedside ultrasound studies over 6 months in defined core applications: 57 procedural (28%), 76 hemodynamic (38%), 35 thoracic (17%), and 33 abdominal (16%). A quality assurance review identified 23 studies (16% of all nonprocedural studies) as critical (affected clinical management or gave valuable information). Forty-eight percent of those studies (11/23) were within the hemodynamic core. The proportion of critical studies were not significantly different across the applications (hemodynamic, 11/76 [15%] vs thoracic and abdominal, 12/68 [18%]; p = 0.65). Examples of critical studies include evidence of tamponade secondary to pleural effusions, identification of pulmonary hypertension, hemodynamic assessment before tracheal intubation, recognition of hypovolemia and systemic vascular resistance abnormalities, determination of pneumothorax, location of chest tube and urinary catheter, and differentiation of pleural fluid from pulmonary consolidation. Implementation of a critical care bedside ultrasound program for critical care providers in a large

  13. Emergent ultrasound evaluation of the pediatric female pelvis.

    PubMed

    Back, Susan J; Maya, Carolina L; Zewdneh, Daniel; Epelman, Monica

    2017-08-01

    Ultrasound is the primary imaging modality of the pediatric female pelvis and is often requested to evaluate girls with pelvic or abdominal pain or abnormal bleeding. The US interpretation can help guide the clinician toward medical or surgical management. Here we discuss the normal US anatomy of the female pelvis and illustrate, through case examples, conditions encountered when performing emergent pelvic US for common and uncommon clinical scenarios.

  14. Robotically assisted velocity-sensitive triggered focused ultrasound surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Florian; Brunner, Alexander; Jenne, Jürgen W.; Krafft, Axel J.; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (FUS) of abdominal organs is challenging due to breathing motion and limited patient access in the MR environment. In this work, an experimental robotically assisted FUS setup was combined with a MR-based navigator technique to realize motion-compensated sonications and online temperature imaging. Experiments were carried out in a static phantom, during periodic manual motion of the phantom without triggering, and with triggering to evaluate the triggering method. In contrast to the non-triggered sonication, the results of the triggered sonication show a confined symmetric temperature distribution. In conclusion, the velocity sensitive navigator can be employed for triggered FUS to compensate for periodic motion. Combined with the robotic FUS setup, flexible treatment of abdominal targets might be realized.

  15. Feasibility of wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using three-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kok, Annette M; Nguyen, V Lai; Speelman, Lambert; Brands, Peter J; Schurink, Geert-Willem H; van de Vosse, Frans N; Lopata, Richard G P

    2015-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are local dilations that can lead to a fatal hemorrhage when ruptured. Wall stress analysis of AAAs is a novel tool that has proven high potential to improve risk stratification. Currently, wall stress analysis of AAAs is based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging; however, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) has great advantages over CT and magnetic resonance imaging in terms of costs, speed, and lack of radiation. In this study, the feasibility of 3D US as input for wall stress analysis is investigated. Second, 3D US-based wall stress analysis was compared with CT-based results. The 3D US and CT data were acquired in 12 patients (diameter, 35-90 mm). US data were segmented manually and compared with automatically acquired CT geometries by calculating the similarity index and Hausdorff distance. Wall stresses were simulated at P = 140 mm Hg and compared between both modalities. The similarity index of US vs CT was 0.75 to 0.91 (n = 12), with a median Hausdorff distance ranging from 4.8 to 13.9 mm, with the higher values found at the proximal and distal sides of the AAA. Wall stresses were in accordance with literature, and a good agreement was found between US- and CT-based median stresses and interquartile stresses, which was confirmed by Bland-Altman and regression analysis (n = 8). Wall stresses based on US were typically higher (+23%), caused by geometric irregularities due to the registration of several 3D volumes and manual segmentation. In future work, an automated US registration and segmentation approach is the essential point of improvement before pursuing large-scale patient studies. This study is a first step toward US-based wall stress analysis, which would be the modality of choice to monitor wall stress development over time because no ionizing radiation and contrast material are involved. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society - update. Ultrasound examination of the kidneys, ureters and urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Tyloch, Janusz F; Woźniak, Magdalena Maria; Wieczorek, Andrzej Paweł

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents the principles of performing proper ultrasound examinations of the urinary tract. The following are discussed: preparation of patients, type of optimal apparatus, technique of examination and conditions which its description should fulfill. Urinary track examination in adults and in children constitutes an integral part of each abdominal examination. Such examinations should be performed with fasting patients or several hours after the last meal, with filled urinary bladder. Ultrasound examinations in children and infants are performed using transducers with the frequency of 5.0-9.0 MHz and in adults - with the frequency of 2.0-6.0 MHz. Doppler options are desirable since they improve diagnostic capacity of sonography in terms of differentiation between renal focal lesions. Renal examinations are performed with the patients in the supine position. The right kidney is examined in the right hypochondriac region using the liver as the ultrasound "window." The left kidney is examined in the left hypochondriac region, preferably in the posterior axillary line. Ultrasound examinations of the upper segment of the ureters are performed after renal examination when the pelvicalyceal system is dilated. A condition necessary for a proper examination of the perivesical portion of the ureter is full urinary bladder. The scans of the urinary bladder are performed in transverse, longitudinal and oblique planes when the bladder is filled. The description should include patient's personal details, details of the referring unit, of the unit in which the examination is performed, examining physician's details, type of ultrasound apparatus and transducers as well as the description proper.

  17. Systemic mastocytosis: CT and US features of abdominal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Avila, N A; Ling, A; Worobec, A S; Mican, J M; Metcalfe, D D

    1997-02-01

    To study the imaging findings in patients with systemic mastocytosis and to correlate the findings with the severity of disease on the basis of an established classification system. Pathologic findings, when available, were correlated with imaging findings. Computed tomographic (CT) and ultrasound (US) scans and corresponding pathologic findings, when available, were retrospectively reviewed in 27 patients with systemic mastocytosis. Only five (19%) of the patients in our series had normal abdominal CT and/or US examination results. Common abdominal imaging findings associated with systemic mastocytosis were hepatosplenomegaly, retroperitoneal adenopathy, periportal adenopathy, mesenteric adenopathy, thickening of the omentum and the mesentery, and ascites. Less common findings included hepatofugal portal venous flow, Budd-Chiari syndrome, cavernous transformation of the portal vein, ovarian mass, and complications such as chloroma. The findings were more common in patients with category II and those with category III disease. Abdominal findings at CT and US are common in patients with systemic mastocytosis. Although the findings in patients with systemic mastocytosis are not specific to the disease, they are useful in directing further studies for diagnostic confirmation and in estimating the extent of systemic involvement.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of quercetin-loaded nanodroplets with ultrasound activation and their use for bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Li-Wen; Hou, Mei-Ling; Hung, Shuo-Hui; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Bubble formulations have both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, research on nanobubbles/nanodroplets remains in the initial stages. In this study, a nanodroplet formulation was prepared and loaded with a novel class of chemotherapeutic drug, ie, quercetin, to observe its pharmacokinetic properties and ultrasonic bioimaging of specific sites, namely the abdominal vein and bladder. Four parallel groups were designed to investigate the effects of ultrasound and nanodroplets on the pharmacokinetics of quercetin. These groups were quercetin alone, quercetin triggered with ultrasound, quercetin-encapsulated in nanodroplets, and quercetin encapsulated in nanodroplets triggered with ultrasound. Spherical vesicles with a mean diameter of 280 nm were formed, and quercetin was completely encapsulated within. In vivo ultrasonic imaging confirmed that the nanodroplets could be treated by ultrasound. The results indicate that the initial 5-minute serum concentration, area under the concentration–time curve, elimination half-life, and clearance of quercetin were significantly enhanced by nanodroplets with or without ultrasound. PMID:25945049

  19. Vaginal Pessary for Uterine Repositioning During High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Leiomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Pulanic, Tajana Klepac; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Segars, James; Sokka, Sham; Wood, Bradford J.; Stratton, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    In order to ensure safe magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of uterine leiomyomas, ultrasound beam path should be free of intervening scar and bowel. Pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging of a 9cm long and 7.7cm wide leiomyomatous uterus in a 39-year-old woman with menorrhagia and abdominopelvic pain initially demonstrated a focused ultrasound treatment path without bowel between the uterus and abdominal wall. On the day of ablation, however, multiple loops of bowel were observed in the ultrasound beam path by magnetic resonance imaging. Uterine repositioning was accomplished with a 76 mm donut vaginal pessary which anteverted the fundus and successfully displaced bowel. A vaginal pessary may aid in repositioning an axial or retroverted uterus to enable ablation of uterine leiomyomas. PMID:26584482

  20. Vaginal Pessary for Uterine Repositioning during High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Leiomyomas.

    PubMed

    Klepac Pulanic, Tajana; Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Segars, James; Sokka, Sham; Wood, Bradford J; Stratton, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure safe magnetic resonance-guided, high-intensity focused, ultrasound ablation of uterine leiomyomas, the ultrasound beam path should be free of intervening scar and bowel. Pre-treatment MRI of a 9-cm long and 7.7-cm wide leiomyomatous uterus in a 39-year-old woman with menorrhagia and abdominopelvic pain initially demonstrated a focused ultrasound treatment path without a bowel between the uterus and the abdominal wall. On the day of ablation, however, multiple loops of bowel were observed in the ultrasound beam path by MRI. Uterine repositioning was accomplished with a 76-mm donut vaginal pessary, which anteverted the fundus and successfully displaced the bowel. A vaginal pessary may aid in repositioning an axial or retroverted uterus to enable ablation of uterine leiomyomas. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. [Technique of abdominal ultrasonography in newborn foals and normal findings].

    PubMed

    Behn, C; Bostedt, H

    2000-09-01

    Under field conditions, the diagnosis of foal's diseases relies almost exclusively on the physical examination. As the signs of illness in the equine neonate are frequently vage and non-localizing, the diagnosis of diseases may be problematic. This often causes misinterpretations and leads to ineffective prophylaxis and treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of diagnostic ultrasonography of the foal's abdomen under field conditions to provide an optimized technique and to describe the normal findings. Diagnostic ultrasonography of the abdomen was performed after obtaining clinical history and passing the physical examination of 25 foals without signs of abdominal problems. The foals were scanned in a stable box, being restrained by three persons in semi-lateral recumbency. Usually, sedation was not necessary. The ventral abdominal wall was clipped, a generous amount of ultrasound coupling gel was applied and massaged on the skin surface. The ultrasonographic examination was carried out using a portable sector scanner ("Microimager 2000", Ausonics) with 5.0 and 7.5-MHz transducers or a combined 5.0 and 7.5-MHz transrectal linear-array scanner ("450 Enhanced", Pie Medical). Employing the 5.0-MHz sector scanner first, the abdomen was explored from caudal to cranial in left and right semi-lateral recumbency. The 7.5-MHz scanner was used to attain higher resolution of certain structures. The sector scanner turned out to be suitable under field conditions and adequate to examine the abdominal organs. The transrectal linear-array scanner also provided the most important informations, although it was difficult to maintain a good contact area of the scan head. By ultrasonography it was possible to identify the urinary bladder, kidneys, spleen, liver and part of the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, application of ultrasound could successfully be performed on newborn foals under field conditions.

  2. Perforated peptic ulcer associated with abdominal compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Jiun-Jen; Weng, Yi-Ming; Weng, Chia-Sui

    2008-11-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is defined as an increased intra-abdominal pressure with adverse physiologic consequences. Abdominal compartment syndrome caused by perforated peptic ulcer is rare owing to early diagnosis and management. Delayed recognition of perforated peptic ulcer with pneumoperitoneum, bowel distension, and decreased abdominal wall compliance can make up a vicious circle and lead to ACS. We report a case of perforated peptic ulcer associated with ACS. A 74-year-old man with old stroke and dementia history was found to have distended abdomen, edema of bilateral legs, and cyanosis. Laboratory tests revealed deterioration of liver and kidney function. Abdominal compartment syndrome was suspected, and image study was arranged to find the cause. The study showed pneumoperitoneum, contrast stasis in heart with decreased caliber of vessels below the abdominal aortic level, and diffuse lymphedema at the abdominal walls. Emergent laparotomy was performed. Perforated peptic ulcer was noted and the gastrorrhaphy was done. The symptoms, and liver and kidney function improved right after emergent operation.

  3. Lead toxicity as an etiology for abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Moriarity, Risa S; Harris, James T; Cox, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    Abdominal pain is an uncommon presentation of lead toxicity in the emergency department (ED). However, making the diagnosis is important in avoiding unnecessary testing and the long-term sequelae of lead toxicity. To illustrate possible presentations of abdominal pain secondary to lead toxicity and highlight the importance of taking a thorough patient history. We report 2 patients who presented to the ED with abdominal pain and underwent extensive evaluations that did not reveal an etiology. At follow-up visits, their occupational histories revealed possible lead exposures from working for a bullet-recycling company. Tests revealed that each patient had extremely high lead levels and they were both treated for lead toxicity. Their abdominal pain resolved as their lead levels decreased. These cases demonstrate a rare but significant cause of abdominal pain in the ED. Although history-taking in the ED is necessarily brief, these cases underscore the importance of obtaining an occupational history. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrasound predictors of neonatal outcome in intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Craigo, S D; Beach, M L; Harvey-Wilkes, K B; D'Alton, M E

    1996-11-01

    Our purpose was to assess the value of commonly performed ultrasound parameters in predicting neonatal outcome of fetuses with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). One hundred twenty-seven patients were identified on ultrasound examination to have IUGR. Estimated weight percentile, amniotic fluid volume, umbilical artery Doppler velocimetry, and head circumference/abdominal circumference ratio were compared with neonatal outcome. Thirty infants had severely adverse courses. The degree of growth restriction was strongly associated with adverse outcome and neonatal death. Umbilical artery Doppler waveforms with absent or reverse end-diastolic flow were predicted of neonatal death, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and adverse outcome in general. Oligohydramnios was predictive of adverse outcome and neonatal death. Logistic regression also showed that absent or reverse end-diastolic flow and oligohydramnios were independent predictors of adverse outcome. Ultrasound findings of low estimated weight percentile, absent or reverse end-diastolic umbilical blood flow, and oligohydramnios are independent predictors of adverse neonatal outcome of growth restricted fetuses.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound elastography: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Chang, Jian-Min; Kan, Quan-Cheng; Chiorean, Liliana; Ignee, Andre; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Elastography is a new ultrasound modality that provides images and measurements related to tissue stiffness. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has played an important role in the diagnosis and management of numerous abdominal and mediastinal diseases. Elastography by means of EUS examination can assess the elasticity of tumors in the proximity of the digestive tract that are hard to reach with conventional transcutaneous ultrasound probes, such as pancreatic masses and mediastinal or abdominal lymph nodes, thus improving the diagnostic yield of the procedure. Results from previous studies have promised benefits for EUS elastography in the differential diagnosis of lymph nodes, as well as for assessing masses with pancreatic or gastrointestinal (GI) tract locations. It is important to mention that EUS elastography is not considered a modality that can replace biopsy. However, it may be a useful adjunct, improving the accuracy of EUS-fine needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNAB) by selecting the most suspicious area to be targeted. Even more, it may be useful for guiding further clinical management when EUS-FNAB is negative or inconclusive. In the present paper we will discuss the current knowledge of EUS elastography, including the technical aspects, along with its applications in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant solid pancreatic masses and lymph nodes, as well as its aid in the differentiation between normal pancreatic tissues and chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, the emergent indication and future perspectives are summarized, such as the benefit of EUS elastography in EUS-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy, and its uses for characterization of lesions in liver, biliary tract, adrenal glands and GI tract. PMID:26715804

  6. Hadamard-Encoded Multipulses for Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Song, Pengfei; Chen, Shigao

    2017-11-01

    The development of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging offers great opportunities for new ultrasound clinical applications such as myocardial perfusion imaging and abdominal lesion characterization. In CEUS imaging, the contrast agents (i.e., microbubbles) are utilized to improve the contrast between blood and tissue based on their high nonlinearity under low ultrasound pressure. In this paper, we propose a new CEUS pulse sequence by combining Hadamard-encoded multipulses (HEM) with fundamental frequency bandpass filter (i.e., filter centered on transmit frequency). HEM consecutively emits multipulses encoded by a second-order Hadamard matrix in each of the two transmission events (i.e., pulse-echo events), as opposed to conventional CEUS methods which emit individual pulses in two separate transmission events (i.e., pulse inversion (PI), amplitude modulation (AM), and PIAM). In HEM imaging, the microbubble responses can be improved by the longer transmit pulse, and the tissue harmonics can be suppressed by the fundamental frequency filter, leading to significantly improved contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In addition, the fast polarity change between consecutive coded pulse emissions excites strong nonlinear microbubble echoes, further enhancing the CEUS image quality. The spatial resolution of HEM image is compromised as compared to other microbubble imaging methods due to the longer transmit pulses and the lower imaging frequency (i.e., fundamental frequency). However, the resolution loss was shown to be negligible and could be offset by the significantly enhanced CTR, SNR, and penetration depth. These properties of HEM can potentially facilitate robust CEUS imaging for many clinical applications, especially for deep abdominal organs and heart.

  7. Tracking of abdominal subcutaneous and preperitoneal fat mass during childhood. The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Vogelezang, S; Gishti, O; Felix, J F; van der Beek, E M; Abrahamse-Berkeveld, M; Hofman, A; Gaillard, R; Jaddoe, V W V

    2016-04-01

    Overweight and obesity in early life tends to track into later life. Not much is known about tracking of abdominal fat. Our objective was to examine the extent of tracking of abdominal fat measures during the first six years of life. We performed a prospective cohort study among 393 Dutch children followed from the age of 2 years (90% range 1.9; 2.3) until the age of 6 years (90% range 5.7; 6.2). At both ages, we performed abdominal ultrasound to measure abdominal subcutaneous and preperitoneal fat distances and areas, and we calculated the preperitoneal/subcutaneous fat distance ratio. High abdominal fat measures were defined as values in the upper 15%. Abdominal subcutaneous fat distance and area, and preperitoneal fat area at 2 years were correlated with their corresponding measures at 6 years (all P-values <0.01), with the strongest coefficients for abdominal subcutaneous fat measures. Preperitoneal fat distance at the age of 2 years was not correlated with the corresponding measure at 6 years. The tracking coefficient for preperitoneal/subcutaneous fat distance ratio from 2 to 6 years was r=0.36 (P<0.01). Children with high abdominal subcutaneous fat measures at 2 years had increased risk of having high abdominal subcutaneous fat measures at 6 years (odds ratios 9.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.1-20.8) and 12.4 (95% CI 5.4-28.6) for subcutaneous fat distance and area, respectively). These associations were not observed for preperitoneal fat measures. Our findings suggest that both abdominal subcutaneous and preperitoneal fat mass measures track during childhood, but with stronger tracking for abdominal subcutaneous fat measures. An adverse abdominal fat distribution in early life may have long-term consequences.

  8. Ultrasound contrast agent fabricated from microbubbles containing instant adhesives, and its ultrasound imaging ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuta, T.; Tamakawa, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive surgery techniques and drug delivery system with acoustic characteristics of ultrasound contrast agent have been studied intensively in recent years. Ultrasound contrast agent collapses easily under the blood circulating and the ultrasound irradiating because it is just a stabilized bubble without solid-shell by surface adsorption of surfactant or lipid. For improving the imaging stability, we proposed the fabrication method of the hollow microcapsule with polymer shell, which can be fabricated just blowing vapor of commonly-used instant adhesive (Cyanoacrylate monomer) into water as microbubbles. Therefore, the cyanoacrylate vapor contained inside microbubble initiates polymerization on the gasliquid interface soon after microbubbles are generated in water. Consequently, hollow microspheres coated by cyanoacrylate thin film are generated. In this report, we revealed that diameter distributions of microbubbles and microcapsules were approximately same and most of them were less than 10 μm, that is, smaller than blood capillary. In addition, we also revealed that hollow microcapsules enhanced the acoustic signal especially in the harmonic contrast imaging and were broken or agglomerated under the ultrasound field. As for the yield of hollow microcapsules, we revealed that sodium dodecyl sulfate addition to water phase instead of deoxycolic acid made the fabrication yield increased.

  9. Associations between low back pain, urinary incontinence, and abdominal muscle recruitment as assessed via ultrasonography in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Vânia F; Amorim, Juleimar S C; Pereira, Aline M; Ferreira, Paulo H; Pereira, Leani S M

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are highly prevalent among elderly individuals. In young adults, changes in trunk muscle recruitment, as assessed via ultrasound imaging, may be associated with lumbar spine stability. To assess the associations between LBP, UI, and the pattern of transversus abdominis (TrA), internal (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscle recruitment in the elderly as evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Fifty-four elderly individuals (mean age: 72±5.2 years) who complained of LBP and/or UI as assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form, and ultrasound imaging were included in the study. The statistical analysis comprised a multiple linear regression model, and a p-value <0.05 was considered significant. The regression models for the TrA, IO, and EO muscle thickness levels explained 2.0% (R2=0.02; F=0.47; p=0.628), 10.6% (R2=0.106; F=3.03; p=0.057), and 10.1% (R2=0.101; F=2.70; p=0.077) of the variability, respectively. None of the regression models developed for the abdominal muscles exhibited statistical significance. A significant and negative association (p=0.018; β=-0.0343) was observed only between UI and IO recruitment. These results suggest that age-related factors may have interfered with the findings of the study, thus emphasizing the need to perform ultrasound imaging-based studies to measure abdominal muscle recruitment in the elderly.

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening program in Poland.

    PubMed

    Jawien, A; Formankiewicz, B; Derezinski, T; Migdalski, A; Brazis, P; Woda, L

    Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently recommended by several vascular societies. In countries where it has been introduced the prevalence of AAAs differed greatly and was mainly related to cigarette smoking. The screening program also had an enormous impact on the decrease of AAA ruptures and reduced mortality rate. These facts have led to the introduction of the first screening program for AAAs in Poland. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of AAAs among men aged 60 years and older undergoing ultrasound examination of the abdominal aorta. A single ultrasonography of the abdomen was performed to assess the aorta from the renal arteries to the bifurcation and the diameter of the aorta was measured at its widest point. The cut-off value for determining an aortic aneurysm was set at a diameter of ≥ 30 mm. All ultrasonography measurements were performed by physicians in outpatient departments throughout the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Province. Additionally, each subject had to fill out a questionnaire with demographic data, smoking habits, existing comorbidities and familial occurrence of AAAs. The study was conducted from October 2009 to November 2011. The abdominal aorta ultrasound examinations were carried out in 1556 men aged 60 years and older. The prevalence of AAA in the study population was 6.0 % (94 out of 1556). The average age of the men was 69 years (SD 6 years, range 60-92 years). In the study population 55 % of the men smoked or had smoked and 3 % were aware of the presence of AAAs in family members. There were three risk factors significantly associated with the presence of AAAs: age (p < 0.05), smoking (72.3 % vs 53.9 %, p = 0.004) and family history of AAAs (9.6 % vs 2.7 %, p = 0.017). The prevalence of AAAs among men in Poland is higher than in other European countries and the USA. The screening program for AAAs is an easy and reliable method for detecting early stages of the disease and

  11. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clearinghouse What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ... Esophagus Stomach Large intestine Adhesion Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ...

  12. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Recurrent or Functional Abdominal Pain (RAP or FAP) What is abdominal pain? Abdominal pain , or stomachache, ... recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) or functional abdominal pain (FAP)? If your health care provider has ruled out ...

  13. Reliability of Central Adiposity Assessments Using B-Mode Ultrasound: A Comparison of Linear and Curved Array Transducers.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Lee; Geoffron, Morgane; Cornwall, Jon; Chinn, Victoria; Gram, Martin; Credeur, Daniel; Fryer, Simon

    2016-12-01

    Recently, it was reported that intra-abdominal thickness (IAT) assessments using ultrasound are most reliable if measured from the linea alba to the anterior vertebral column. These 2 anatomical sites can be simultaneously visualized using a linear array transducer. Linear array transducers have different operational characteristics when compared with conventional curved array transducers and are more reliable for some ultrasound-derived measures such as abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness. However, it is unknown whether linear array transducers facilitate more reliable IAT measurements than curved array transducers. The purpose of the current study was to (1) compare the reliability of linear and curved array transducer assessments of IAT and maximal abdominal ratio (MAR) and (2) use the findings to update central adiposity measurement guidelines. Fifteen healthy adults (mean [SD], 27 [10] years; 60% female) with a range of somatotypes (body mass index: mean [SD], 24 [4]; range, 19-33 kg/m; waist circumference: mean [SD], 75 [11]; range, 61-96 cm) were tested on 3 mornings under standardized conditions. Intra-abdominal thickness was assessed 2 cm above the umbilicus (transverse plane), measuring from linea alba to the anterior vertebral column. Maximal abdominal ratio was defined as the ratio of IAT to abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness. The IAT range was 25 to 87 mm, and the MAR range was 0.15 to 0.77. Between-day intraclass correlation coefficient values for IAT measurements made were comparable (0.96-0.97) for both transducers, as were MAR values (0.95). In conclusion, while both transducers provided equally reliable measurement of IAT, the use of a single linear array transducer simplifies the assessment of central adiposity.

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound in the evaluation of chronic upper abdominal pain of unknown etiology: a retrospective chart review examining the efficacy of EUS in determining a new diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michelle B; Ramirez, Jonathan C; De La Rosa, Lisa M; Wood, Adam S; Desai, Shiv; Arjunan, Ananth; Song, Juhee; Erickson, Richard A

    2015-02-01

    To explore the utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the evaluation of chronic upper abdominal pain (UAP) of undetermined etiology. Chronic UAP is a common problem with a challenging diagnosis and management. The role of EUS in the diagnosis of UAP may minimize additional testing; however, few studies describe the percentage of new diagnoses yielded in these patients. We conducted a retrospective analysis by reviewing electronic medical records at Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A&M Health Sciences Center for patients with abdominal pain for ≥ 12 months not explained by previous workup referred for EUS for chronic UAP from January 1, 1998 through October 1, 2007. Patients with previous EUS in past 12 months were excluded from the study. Patient demographic data and imaging performed 6 months before and 24 months after EUS were reviewed and results documented. EUS was successful at diagnosing a new clinical etiology of chronic UAP in 33 patients (8.89%) with previous workup that was unrevealing for a definitive diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses included pancreaticobiliary tree abnormalities, chronic pancreatitis, and fatty liver disease. Our results support the fact that the majority of patients UAP with prior imaging will have no identifiable organic etiology found on EUS to explain their pain; however, we suggest that EUS be considered in patients with suspected pancreatic or biliary pathology.

  15. Model-based ultrasound temperature visualization during and following HIFU exposure.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guoliang; Smith, Penny Probert; Noble, J Alison

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes the application of signal processing techniques to improve the robustness of ultrasound feedback for displaying changes in temperature distribution in treatment using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), especially at the low signal-to-noise ratios that might be expected in in vivo abdominal treatment. Temperature estimation is based on the local displacements in ultrasound images taken during HIFU treatment, and a method to improve robustness to outliers is introduced. The main contribution of the paper is in the application of a Kalman filter, a statistical signal processing technique, which uses a simple analytical temperature model of heat dispersion to improve the temperature estimation from the ultrasound measurements during and after HIFU exposure. To reduce the sensitivity of the method to previous assumptions on the material homogeneity and signal-to-noise ratio, an adaptive form is introduced. The method is illustrated using data from HIFU exposure of ex vivo bovine liver. A particular advantage of the stability it introduces is that the temperature can be visualized not only in the intervals between HIFU exposure but also, for some configurations, during the exposure itself. 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Seatbelt sign in a case of blunt abdominal trauma; what lies beneath it?

    PubMed

    Vailas, Michail G; Moris, Demetrios; Orfanos, Stamatios; Vergadis, Chrysovalantis; Papalampros, Alexandros

    2015-10-30

    The reported incidence of hollow viscus injuries (HVI) in blunt trauma patients is approximately 1%. The most common site of injury to the intestine in blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is the small bowel followed by colon, with mesenteric injuries occurring three times more commonly than bowel injuries. Isolated colon injury is a rarely encountered condition. Clinical assessment alone in patients with suspected intestinal or mesenteric injury after blunt trauma is associated with unacceptable diagnostic delays. This is a case of a 31-year-old man, admitted to the emergency department after being the restrained driver, involved in a car accident. After initial resuscitation, focused assessment with sonography for trauma examination (FAST) was performed revealing a subhepatic mass, suspicious for intraperitoneal hematoma. A computed tomography scan (CT) that followed showed a hematoma of the mesocolon of the ascending colon with active extravasation of intravenous contrast material. An exploratory laparotomy was performed, hemoperitomeum was evacuated, and a subserosal hematoma of the cecum and ascending colon with areas of totally disrupted serosal wall was found. Hematoma of the adjacent mesocolon expanding to the root of mesenteric vessels was also noted. A right hemicolectomy along with primary ileocolonic anastomosis was performed. Patient's recovery progressed uneventfully. Identifying an isolated traumatic injury to the bowel or mesentery after BAT can be a clinical challenge because of its subtle and nonspecific clinical findings; meeting that challenge may eventually lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment with subsequent increase in associated morbidity and mortality. Isolated colon injury is a rare finding after blunt trauma and usually accompanied by other intra-abdominal organ injuries. Abdominal 'seatbelt' sign, ecchymosis of the abdominal wall, increasing abdominal pain and distension are all associated with HVI. However, the accuracy of these findings

  17. Transcriptional analysis of abdominal fat in genetically fat and lean chickens reveals adipokines, lipogenic genes and a link between hemostasis and leanness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This descriptive study of the abdominal fat transcriptome takes advantage of two experimental lines of meat-type chickens (Gallus domesticus), which were selected over seven generations for a large difference in abdominal (visceral) fatness. At the age of selection (9 wk), the fat line (FL) and lean line (LL) chickens exhibit a 2.5-fold difference in abdominal fat weight, while their feed intake and body weight are similar. These unique avian models were originally created to unravel genetic and endocrine regulation of adiposity and lipogenesis in meat-type chickens. The Del-Mar 14K Chicken Integrated Systems microarray was used for a time-course analysis of gene expression in abdominal fat of FL and LL chickens during juvenile development (1–11 weeks of age). Results Microarray analysis of abdominal fat in FL and LL chickens revealed 131 differentially expressed (DE) genes (FDR≤0.05) as the main effect of genotype, 254 DE genes as an interaction of age and genotype and 3,195 DE genes (FDR≤0.01) as the main effect of age. The most notable discoveries in the abdominal fat transcriptome were higher expression of many genes involved in blood coagulation in the LL and up-regulation of numerous adipogenic and lipogenic genes in FL chickens. Many of these DE genes belong to pathways controlling the synthesis, metabolism and transport of lipids or endocrine signaling pathways activated by adipokines, retinoid and thyroid hormones. Conclusions The present study provides a dynamic view of differential gene transcription in abdominal fat of chickens genetically selected for fatness (FL) or leanness (LL). Remarkably, the LL chickens over-express a large number of hemostatic genes that could be involved in proteolytic processing of adipokines and endocrine factors, which contribute to their higher lipolysis and export of stored lipids. Some of these changes are already present at 1 week of age before the divergence in fatness. In contrast, the FL chickens have

  18. BMI, total and abdominal fat distribution, and cardiovascular risk factors in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Gishti, Olta; Gaillard, Romy; Durmus, Busra; Abrahamse, Marieke; van der Beek, Eline M; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; de Jonge, Layla L; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2015-05-01

    More specific total body and abdominal fat mass measures might be stronger associated with cardiovascular risk factors in childhood, than BMI. We examined the independent associations of total and abdominal fat measures with cardiovascular risk factors in school age children. We performed a population-based cohort study among 6,523 children. At the age of 6 y, we measured childhood BMI, and general and abdominal fat mass, using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and ultrasound and cardiovascular risk factors. Conditional on BMI, higher fat mass percentage and abdominal fat mass were associated with higher blood pressure, total- and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, insulin and c-peptide levels, but with lower left ventricular mass and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (P values < 0.05). These associations differed between underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese children. Higher childhood adiposity measures were associated with increased odds of cardiovascular risk factors clustering, with the strongest effect for fat mass percentage (odds ratios: 3.01 (95% confidence interval: 2.67, 3.9). Our results suggest that general and abdominal fat measures are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in childhood, independent from BMI. These measures may provide additional information for identification of children with an adverse cardiovascular profile.

  19. Laparoscopic excision of an epidermoid cyst arising from the deep abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hajime; Nakai, Takuya; Ueda, Kazuki; Haji, Seiji; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Ohyanagi, Harumasa

    2009-10-01

    Epidermoid cysts are the most common type of cutaneous cyst. However, their occurrence in the deep abdominal wall has not yet been reported. Here, we present the case of a 60-year-old woman who developed an epidermoid cyst in the deep abdominal wall, which was resected laparoscopically. The patient presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain on admission to our hospital. Computed tomography revealed cholecystolithiasis and an incidentally identified well-defined hypoattenuating mass (62 x 47 x 65 mm) in the deep abdominal wall on the left side of the navel. We performed laparoscopic complete resection of the abdominal wall tumor followed by cholecystectomy. The excised specimen was a cyst covered with a smooth thin membrane and contained sludge. Histopathologic examination revealed an epidermoid cyst. This is a very rare case with no previous reports on a similar type of epidermoid cyst.

  20. Effect of ultrasound on electrochemical chloride extraction from mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiqun; Yao, Wu; Zuo, Junqing

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of auxiliary ultrasound on electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE) was studied. The chloride removal efficiency was investigated by examining the chloride content with ultrasound-assisted ECE and changing the introducing time of ultrasound. The experimental results showed that removal of chloride ions was noted to be more effective in ECE treatment assisted with ultrasound treatment (UT). In addition, the lower w/c ratio led to more distinct effect of ultrasonic cavitation on chloride removal. Electrochemical behaviors measured with different treatment revealed that UT treatment was effective on moderating the corrosion condition. Microstructural analyses revealed a significant alteration in composition and morphology of cementitious phases with UT treatment. Pull-out tests indicated that ultrasound had a certain negative impact on the bond strength. Although the effect of introducing ultrasound in the first 2 weeks or the last 2 weeks on the extraction efficiency was not obvious, intermittent ultrasound could not only ensure the chloride extraction efficiency, but also reduce the adverse effect of ultrasound on the bond strength.

  1. Ultrasound guidance system for prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Kerschner, Reinhard; Kaar, Marcus; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Figl, Michael

    2017-03-01

    We designed a guidance system for prostate biopsy based on PET/MR images and 3D ultrasound (US). With our proposed method common inter-modal MR-US (or CT-US in case of PET/CTs) registration can be replaced by an intra-modal 3D/3D-US/US registration and an optical tracking system (OTS). On the pre-operative site, a PET/MR calibration allows to link both hybrid modalities with an abdominal 3D-US. On the interventional site, another abdominal 3D US is taken to merge the pre-operative images with the real-time 3D-US via 3D/3D-US/US registration. Finally, the images of a tracked trans-rectal US probe can be displayed with the pre-operative images by overlay. For PET/MR image fusion we applied a point-to-point registration between PET and OTS and MR and OTS, respectively. 3D/3D-US/US registration was evaluated for images taken in supine and lateral patient position. To enable table shifts between PET/MR and US image acquisition a table calibration procedure is presented. We found fiducial registration errors of 0.9 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, with respect to the MR and PET calibration. A target registration error between MR and 3D US amounted to 1.4 mm. The registration error for the 3D/3D-US/US registration was found to be 3.7 mm. Furthermore, we have shown that ultrasound is applicable in an MR environment.

  2. Comparison of the thickness of lateral abdominal muscles between pregnant women with and without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Mohsen; Noormohammadpour, Pardis; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Hantoushzadeh, Sedigheh; Farahbakhsh, Farzin; Nourian, Ruhollah; Kordi, Ramin

    2015-05-01

    To compare the thickness of the external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis muscles in pregnant subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) by the use of ultrasound to measure thickness. A case-control study. An academic and tertiary care referral spine and sports medicine center. Fifty pregnant women with LBP during pregnancy and 54 pregnant control subjects. Case and control subjects were matched for body mass index, gestational age, and number of previous pregnancies. A multiple linear regression model with adjustment for the gestational age of the subjects, as the potential confounder of the primary outcomes, was used to evaluate the association between LBP appearance and abdominal muscles thickness of the subjects. The thickness of lateral abdominal muscles was measured by ultrasound with the subject in a hook-lying position on the examination table. We found that there was no significant difference between pregnant subjects with and without LBP in terms of the thickness of external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis muscles. These findings suggest that other factors rather than the thickness of core stabilizing muscles are influential in the etiology of LBP during pregnancy. We hypothesize that enlargement of uterus during pregnancy might influence the thickness of the lateral abdominal muscles. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Gallbladder contractility in children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Iwańczak, Franciszek; Siedlecka-Dawidko, Jolanta; Iwanczak, Barbara

    2013-07-01

    III Rome Criteria of functional gastrointestinal disorders in children, distinguished the disturbances with abdominal pain, to which irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal pains, functional dyspepsia and abdominal migraine were included. THE AIM OF THE STUDY was sonographic assessment of the gallbladder and its contractility in functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children. The study comprised 96 children aged 6 to 18 years, 59 girls and 37 boys. Depending on diagnosis, the children were divided into three groups. 38 children with functional abdominal pain constituted the first group, 26 children with irritable bowel syndrome were included to the second group, the third group consisted of 32 healthy children (control group). Diagnosis of functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome was made based on the III Rome Criteria. In irritable bowel syndrome both forms with diarrhea (13) and with constipation (13) were observed. Anatomy and contractility of the gallbladder were assessed by ultrasound examination. The presence of septum, wall thickness, thick bile, vesicle volume in fasting state and 30th and 60th minute after test meal were taken into consideration. Test meal comprised about 15% of caloric requirement of moderate metabolism. Children with bile stones and organic diseases were excluded from the study. Thickened vesicle wall and thick bile were present more frequently in children with irritable bowel syndrome and functional abdominal pain than in control group (p < 0.02). Fasting vesicle volume was significantly greater in children with functional abdominal pain than in irritable bowel syndrome and control group (p = 0.003, p = 0.05). Vesicle contractility after test meal was greatest in children with functional abdominal pain. Evaluation of diminished (smaller than 30%) and enlarged (greater then 80%) gallbladder contractility at 30th and 60th minute after test meal demonstrated disturbances of contractility in children

  4. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... abdominal cavity ( most often cancer of the ovaries ) Cirrhosis of the liver Damaged bowel Heart disease Infection ...

  5. Evaluation of left ventricular function by bedside ultrasound in acute toxic myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cara; Budhram, Gavin

    2013-10-01

    Myocarditis can be difficult to diagnose in the Emergency Department (ED) due to the lack of classic symptoms and the wide variation in presentations. Poor cardiac contractility is a common finding in myocarditis and can be evaluated by bedside ultrasound. To demonstrate the utility of fractional shortening measurements as an estimation of left ventricular function during bedside cardiac ultrasound evaluation in the ED. A 54-year-old man presented to the ED complaining of 3 days of chest tightness, palpitations, and dyspnea, as well as persistent abdominal pain and vomiting. An electrocardiogram (ECG) showed sinus tachycardia with presumably new ST-segment elevation and signs of an incomplete right bundle branch block. A bedside echocardiogram was performed by the emergency physician that showed poor left ventricular function by endocardial fractional shortening measurements. On further questioning, the patient revealed that for the past 2 weeks he had been regularly huffing a commercially available compressed air duster. Based on these history and examination findings, the patient was given a presumptive diagnosis of toxic myocarditis. A follow-up echocardiogram approximately 7 weeks later demonstrated resolution of the left ventricular systolic dysfunction and his ECG findings normalized. Cardiac ultrasound findings of severely reduced global function measured by endocardial fractional shortening were seen in this patient and supported the diagnosis of myocarditis. Endocardial fractional shortening is a useful means of easily evaluating and documenting left ventricular function and can be performed at the bedside in the ED. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Taviloglu, Korhan

    2003-07-01

    To review the current developments in staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma. To overview the steps of damage control laparotomy. The ever increasing importance of the resuscitation phase with current intensive care unit (ICU) support techniques should be emphasized. General surgeons should be familiar to staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma and collaborate with ICU teams, interventional radiologists and several other specialties to overcome this entity.

  7. Ultrasound imaging in the management of bleeding and pain in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knez, Jure; Day, Andrea; Jurkovic, Davor

    2014-07-01

    Bleeding and pain are experienced by 20% of women during the first trimester of pregnancy. Although most pregnancies complicated by pain and bleeding tend to progress normally, these symptoms are distressing for woman, and they are also associated with an increased risk of miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy. Ultrasound is the first and often the only diagnostic modality that is used to determine location of early pregnancy and to assess its health. Ultrasound is an accurate, safe, painless and relatively inexpensive diagnostic tool, which all contributed to its widespread use in early pregnancy. Pain and bleeding in early pregnancy are sometimes caused by concomitant gynaecological, gastrointestinal, and urological problems, which could also be detected on ultrasound scan. In women with suspected intra-abdominal bleeding, ultrasound scan can be used to detect the presence of blood and provide information about the extent of bleeding. In this chapter, we comprehensively review the use of ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of early pregnancy complications. We include information about the diagnosis of gynaecological and other pelvic abnormalities, which could cause pain or bleeding in pregnancy. We also provide a summary of the current views on the safety of ultrasound in early pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genomic ancestry and education level independently influence abdominal fat distributions in a Brazilian admixed population.

    PubMed

    França, Giovanny Vinícius Araújo de; De Lucia Rolfe, Emanuella; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Gigante, Denise Petrucci; Yudkin, John S; Ong, Ken K; Victora, Cesar Gomes

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to identify the independent associations of genomic ancestry and education level with abdominal fat distributions in the 1982 Pelotas birth cohort study, Brazil. In 2,890 participants (1,409 men and 1,481 women), genomic ancestry was assessed using genotype data on 370,539 genome-wide variants to quantify ancestral proportions in each individual. Years of completed education was used to indicate socio-economic position. Visceral fat depth and subcutaneous abdominal fat thickness were measured by ultrasound at age 29-31y; these measures were adjusted for BMI to indicate abdominal fat distributions. Linear regression models were performed, separately by sex. Admixture was observed between European (median proportion 85.3), African (6.6), and Native American (6.3) ancestries, with a strong inverse correlation between the African and European ancestry scores (ρ = -0.93; p<0.001). Independent of education level, African ancestry was inversely associated with both visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat distributions in men (both P = 0.001), and inversely associated with subcutaneous abdominal fat distribution in women (p = 0.009). Independent of genomic ancestry, higher education level was associated with lower visceral fat, but higher subcutaneous fat, in both men and women (all p<0.001). Our findings, from an admixed population, indicate that both genomic ancestry and education level were independently associated with abdominal fat distribution in adults. African ancestry appeared to lower abdominal fat distributions, particularly in men.

  9. Genomic ancestry and education level independently influence abdominal fat distributions in a Brazilian admixed population

    PubMed Central

    De Lucia Rolfe, Emanuella; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Gigante, Denise Petrucci; Yudkin, John S.; Ong, Ken K.; Victora, Cesar Gomes

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to identify the independent associations of genomic ancestry and education level with abdominal fat distributions in the 1982 Pelotas birth cohort study, Brazil. In 2,890 participants (1,409 men and 1,481 women), genomic ancestry was assessed using genotype data on 370,539 genome-wide variants to quantify ancestral proportions in each individual. Years of completed education was used to indicate socio-economic position. Visceral fat depth and subcutaneous abdominal fat thickness were measured by ultrasound at age 29–31y; these measures were adjusted for BMI to indicate abdominal fat distributions. Linear regression models were performed, separately by sex. Admixture was observed between European (median proportion 85.3), African (6.6), and Native American (6.3) ancestries, with a strong inverse correlation between the African and European ancestry scores (ρ = -0.93; p<0.001). Independent of education level, African ancestry was inversely associated with both visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat distributions in men (both P = 0.001), and inversely associated with subcutaneous abdominal fat distribution in women (p = 0.009). Independent of genomic ancestry, higher education level was associated with lower visceral fat, but higher subcutaneous fat, in both men and women (all p<0.001). Our findings, from an admixed population, indicate that both genomic ancestry and education level were independently associated with abdominal fat distribution in adults. African ancestry appeared to lower abdominal fat distributions, particularly in men. PMID:28582437

  10. Co-registered photoacoustic, thermoacoustic, and ultrasound mouse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinecke, Daniel R.; Kruger, Robert A.; Lam, Richard B.; DelRio, Stephen P.

    2010-02-01

    We have constructed and tested a prototype test bed that allows us to form 3D photoacoustic CT images using near-infrared (NIR) irradiation (700 - 900 nm), 3D thermoacoustic CT images using microwave irradiation (434 MHz), and 3D ultrasound images from a commercial ultrasound scanner. The device utilizes a vertically oriented, curved array to capture the photoacoustic and thermoacoustic data. In addition, an 8-MHz linear array fixed in a horizontal position provides the ultrasound data. The photoacoustic and thermoacoustic data sets are co-registered exactly because they use the same detector. The ultrasound data set requires only simple corrections to co-register its images. The photoacoustic, thermoacoustic, and ultrasound images of mouse anatomy reveal complementary anatomic information as they exploit different contrast mechanisms. The thermoacoustic images differentiate between muscle, fat and bone. The photoacoustic images reveal the hemoglobin distribution, which is localized predominantly in the vascular space. The ultrasound images provide detailed information about the bony structures. Superposition of all three images onto a co-registered hybrid image shows the potential of a trimodal photoacoustic-thermoacoustic-ultrasound small-animal imaging system.

  11. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction.

    PubMed

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility was evaluated as the distance from the bladder base using ultrasound. [Results] According to exercise method, bridge exercise and abdominal curl-ups led to significantly different pelvic floor mobility. The pelvic floor muscle was elevated during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and descended during maximal expiration. Finally, pelvic floor muscle mobility was greater during abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. [Conclusion] According to these results, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver induced pelvic floor muscle contraction, and pelvic floor muscle contraction was greater during the abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise.

  12. Screening esophagus during routine ultrasound: medical and cost benefits.

    PubMed

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek M A; Eid, Khaled A; El-Sherif, Abd Elhalim A; Abd El Al, Usama M; El-Sherbiny, Samir M; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis is an approach used to determine the value of a medical care option and refers to a method used to assess the costs and health benefits of an intervention. Upon the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, the current guidelines recommend that all cirrhotic patients have to be screened for the presence of esophageal varices by endoscopy. In addition, patients with a positive family history of esophageal cancer are screened annually. These approaches place a heavy burden on endoscopy units, and repeated testing over time may have a detrimental effect on patient compliance. Following the recommendations of a recent study entitled 'Detection of risky esophageal varices using two dimensional ultrasound: when to perform endoscopy', the intra-abdominal portion of the esophagus of 1100 patients was divided into a hepatic group, which included 650 patients, and a nonhepatic group, which included 450 patients, who presented with manifestations of liver diseases and gastrointestinal symptoms, respectively, and were examined using standard two-dimensional ultrasound (US) to evaluate cost effectiveness, standard issues, and medical benefits using conventional US. The overall effectiveness analysis of 1100 patients yielded a 41% cost standard benefit calculated to be $114,760 in a 6-month study. Two-dimensional US can play an important role in screening for esophageal abnormalities, thus saving money and time. The esophagus should be screened during routine conventional abdominal US.

  13. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Abdominal aortic feminism

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. PMID:25398912

  15. Factors influencing the ablative efficiency of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment for adenomyosis: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunmei; Yang, Bin; Shi, Yarong; Liu, Zhongqiong; Wan, Lili; Zhang, Hong; Jiang, Denghua; Zhang, Lian

    2016-08-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate factors affecting ablative efficiency of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for adenomyosis. Materials and methods In all, 245 patients with adenomyosis who underwent ultrasound guided HIFU (USgHIFU) were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after HIFU treatment. The non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio, energy efficiency factor (EEF) and greyscale change were set as dependent variables, while the factors possibly affecting ablation efficiency were set as independent variables. These variables were used to build multiple regression models. Results A total of 245 patients with adenomyosis successfully completed HIFU treatment. Enhancement type on T1 weighted image (WI), abdominal wall thickness, volume of adenomyotic lesion, the number of hyperintense points, location of the uterus, and location of adenomyosis all had a linear relationship with the NPV ratio. Distance from skin to the adenomyotic lesion's ventral side, enhancement type on T1WI, volume of adenomyotic lesion, abdominal wall thickness, and signal intensity on T2WI all had a linear relationship with EEF. Location of the uterus and abdominal wall thickness also both had a linear relationship with greyscale change. Conclusion The enhancement type on T1WI, signal intensity on T2WI, volume of adenomyosis, location of the uterus and adenomyosis, number of hyperintense points, abdominal wall thickness, and distance from the skin to the adenomyotic lesion's ventral side can all be used as predictors of HIFU for adenomyosis.

  16. Improved Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging With Multiplane-Wave Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Song, Pengfei; Chen, Shigao

    2018-02-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging has great potential for use in new ultrasound clinical applications such as myocardial perfusion imaging and abdominal lesion characterization. In CEUS imaging, contrast agents (i.e., microbubbles) are used to improve contrast between blood and tissue because of their high nonlinearity under low ultrasound pressure. However, the quality of CEUS imaging sometimes suffers from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in deeper imaging regions when a low mechanical index (MI) is used to avoid microbubble disruption, especially for imaging at off-resonance transmit frequencies. In this paper, we propose a new strategy of combining CEUS sequences with the recently proposed multiplane-wave (MW) compounding method to improve the SNR of CEUS in deeper imaging regions without increasing MI or sacrificing frame rate. The MW-CEUS method emits multiple Hadamard-coded CEUS pulses in each transmission event (i.e., pulse-echo event). The received echo signals first undergo fundamental bandpass filtering (i.e., the filter is centered on the transmit frequency) to eliminate the microbubble's second-harmonic signals because they cannot be encoded by pulse inversion. The filtered signals are then Hadamard decoded and realigned in fast time to recover the signals as they would have been obtained using classic CEUS pulses, followed by designed recombination to cancel the linear tissue responses. The MW-CEUS method significantly improved contrast-to-tissue ratio and SNR of CEUS imaging by transmitting longer coded pulses. The image resolution was also preserved. The microbubble disruption ratio and motion artifacts in MW-CEUS were similar to those of classic CEUS imaging. In addition, the MW-CEUS sequence can be adapted to other transmission coding formats. These properties of MW-CEUS can potentially facilitate CEUS imaging for many clinical applications, especially assessing deep abdominal organs or the heart.

  17. Normal pelvic ultrasound or MRI does not rule out neoplasm in patients with gonadal dysgenesis and Y chromosome material.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Kristin M; Hewitt, Geri D; Indyk, Justin A; McCracken, Katherine A; Nahata, Leena; Jayanthi, Venkata R

    2018-04-01

    Patients with gonadal dysgenesis (GD) with a Y chromosome have an increased risk of gonadal neoplasm. Few data exist on the ability of imaging to detect malignancy in intra-abdominal gonads in these patients. We aimed to determine the correlation between preoperative imaging findings and gonadal pathology in GD patients with Y chromosome material. A retrospective review was performed of patients with XY or XO/XY GD who underwent gonadectomy at our institution from 2003 to 2017. Patients were assessed preoperatively with ultrasonography; some additionally underwent MRI. The series consisted of 10 patients, all with female gender and non-palpable gonads. Median age was 13.1 years (range 2.4-18.3 years). Overall, four of the ten patients (40%) had a tumor (gonadoblastoma or dysgerminoma) on final pathology. Four patients had a gonad or gonads that were definitively seen on ultrasonography. All visualized gonads were described as "normal" or "small" with the exception of one patient, who had a normal MRI. Three of the four patients in this group had a tumor on final pathology. The remaining six patients had a gonad or gonads that were not definitively visualized on ultrasound; one patient in this group had a tumor on final pathology. Overall, five of seven gonads (71%) definitively visualized on ultrasound had tumor on final pathology, and two of thirteen gonads (15%) not visualized on ultrasound had tumor on final pathology; this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.012). Three patients were imaged with MRI. Of the gonads that could be visualized on MRI, no definitive abnormalities were seen. All patients imaged with MRI had tumors on final pathology. Both ultrasound and MRI are relatively poor at identifying and characterizing intra-abdominal gonads in GD patients. The majority of patients who had a neoplasm had normal imaging findings. Gonads that were definitively visualized on ultrasound were more likely to contain neoplasms that could not be

  18. First trimester diagnosis of parapagus diprosopus dibrachius dipus twins with cranirachischisis totalis by three-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ülker, Kahraman; Akyer, Şahika P; Temur, İsmail; Tan, Temel; Karaca, Mehmet; Adıgüzel, Esat; Gül, Abdülaziz

    2012-02-01

    Parapagus (laterally fused), diprosopus (two faces), dibrachius (two upper extremities), dipus (two lower extremities) conjoined twinning is extremely rare. The coexistence of anencephaly with a contiguous spinal defect (craniorachischisis totalis) makes the present case one of the rarest of the published cases. In our case, it was difficult to make the final diagnosis by two-dimensional abdominal and vaginal ultrasound. Three-dimensional ultrasound was helpful for final diagnosis and post-abortal examination confirmed the prenatal ultrasound diagnosis. The heart, diaphragm, liver and perineum were all united. Fine dissection of the heart showed four vessels arising from the ventricles and a membranous type ventricular septal defect. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2011 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Robotic-assisted Abdominal Cerclage Placement During Pregnancy and Its Challenges.

    PubMed

    Menderes, Gulden; Clark, Mitchell; Clark-Donat, Lindsay; Azodi, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate a surgical video of 2 cases, in which the steps of robotic-assisted abdominal cerclage placement were delineated in one and a uterine vessel injury was repaired in the other. Step-by-step explanation of the technique using a surgical video (Canadian Task Force classification III). The procedures were performed at a teaching hospital. The first patient was a 25-year-old gravida 4 para 0, with a history of cervical incompetence, who was 13 weeks pregnant at the time of surgery. She had failed McDonald cerclage and was referred for abdominal cerclage placement. The second patient was a 32-year-old gravida 6 para 0 who was 15 weeks pregnant. She had a history of 3 second-trimester miscarriages with painless cervical dilation and had failed McDonald cerclage during her previous pregnancy. Both patients were taken to the operating room for robotic-assisted abdominal cerclage placement early in the second trimester. Robotic-assisted abdominal cerclage placement was performed with ultrasound guidance. The procedure was begun with formation of the bladder flap [1]. An avascular space between the ascending and descending branches of uterine artery, at the level of the cervicoisthmic junction, was subsequently developed. The Mersilene tape was passed through this space in a posterior-to-anterior direction and pulled taut until it was laid flat along the posterior uterine wall. Six knots were then placed with the Mersilene tape on the anterior aspect of the uterus. The free ends of the tape were trimmed and approximated with a nonabsorbable suture to prevent knot slippage. The vesicouterine reflection was then reapproximated, and correct cerclage placement was confirmed with transvaginal ultrasound. In the second case, an incidental uterine vessel injury occurred during development of the avascular space. Hemostasis was attained immediately by clamping the vessel with the fenestrated graspers. Permanent hemostasis required application of the vascular clips

  20. Abdominal pythiosis in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Buergelt, Claus; Powe, Joshua; White, Tamara

    2006-06-01

    An adult Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) housed in an outdoor sanctuary in Florida exhibited vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. A clinical workup did not reveal the source of the clinical signs and antibiotic therapy was unrewarding. Radiographs revealed the presence of an abdominal mass. The tiger died during an immobilization for a follow-up clinical examination. A necropsy was performed and tissue samples of intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes were submitted for histopathologic diagnosis. A pyogranulomatous panenteritis and lymphadenitis with intralesional hyphae led to a presumptive etiologic diagnosis of intestinal/abdominal pythiosis. The diagnosis of pythiosis was confirmed by serology and immunoblotting.

  1. Detection of comorbidities and synchronous primary tumours via thoracic radiography and abdominal ultrasonography and their influence on treatment outcome in dogs with soft tissue sarcomas, primary brain tumours and intranasal tumours.

    PubMed

    Bigio Marcello, A; Gieger, T L; Jiménez, D A; Granger, L Abbigail

    2015-12-01

    Canine soft tissue sarcomas (STS), primary brain tumours and intranasal tumours are commonly treated with radiotherapy (RT). Given the low metastatic potential of these tumours, recommendations regarding imaging tests as staging are variable among institutions. The purpose of our study was to describe thoracic radiographic and abdominal ultrasonographic findings in dogs with these neoplasms and to investigate association of abnormal findings with alterations in recommended treatment. Medical records from 101 dogs, each having thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound performed as part of their staging, were reviewed. In 98 of 101 (97%), imaging abnormalities were detected, 27% of which were further investigated with fine needle aspiration cytology or biopsy. Nine percent of the detected abnormalities were considered serious comorbidities that altered treatment recommendations, including 3 (3%) which were confirmed as synchronous primary neoplasms. These findings may influence recommendations regarding the decision to perform thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound prior to initiation of RT. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Microbubble and ultrasound radioenhancement of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tran, W T; Iradji, S; Sofroni, E; Giles, A; Eddy, D; Czarnota, G J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tumour vasculature is an important component of tumour growth and survival. Recent evidence indicates tumour vasculature also has an important role in tumour radiation response. In this study, we investigated ultrasound and microbubbles to enhance the effects of radiation. Methods: Human bladder cancer HT-1376 xenografts in severe combined immuno-deficient mice were used. Treatments consisted of no, low and high concentrations of microbubbles and radiation doses of 0, 2 and 8 Gy in short-term and longitudinal studies. Acute response was assessed 24 h after treatment and longitudinal studies monitored tumour response weekly up to 28 days using power Doppler ultrasound imaging for a total of 9 conditions (n=90 animals). Results: Quantitative analysis of ultrasound data revealed reduced blood flow with ultrasound-microbubble treatments alone and further when combined with radiation. Tumours treated with microbubbles and radiation revealed enhanced cell death, vascular normalisation and areas of fibrosis. Longitudinal data demonstrated a reduced normalised vascular index and increased tumour cell death in both low and high microbubble concentrations with radiation. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that ultrasound-mediated microbubble exposure can enhance radiation effects in tumours, and can lead to enhanced tumour cell death. PMID:22790798

  3. Ten good reasons to practice ultrasound in critical care.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Daniel; van Hooland, Simon; Elbers, Paul; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, critical care ultrasound has gained its place in the armamentarium of monitoring tools. A greater understanding of lung, abdominal, and vascular ultrasound plus easier access to portable machines have revolutionised the bedside assessment of our ICU patients. Because ultrasound is not only a diagnostic test, but can also be seen as a component of the physical exam, it has the potential to become the stethoscope of the 21st century. Critical care ultrasound is a combination of simple protocols, with lung ultrasound being a basic application, allowing assessment of urgent diagnoses in combination with therapeutic decisions. The LUCI (Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill) consists of the identification of ten signs: the bat sign (pleural line); lung sliding (seashore sign); the A-lines (horizontal artefact); the quad sign and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion; the fractal and tissue-like sign indicating lung consolidation; the B-lines and lung rockets indicating interstitial syndromes; abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign suggesting pneumothorax; and the lung point indicating pneumothorax. Two more signs, the lung pulse and the dynamic air bronchogram, are used to distinguish atelectasis from pneumonia. The BLUE protocol (Bedside Lung Ultrasound in Emergency) is a fast protocol (< 3 minutes), also including a vascular (venous) analysis allowing differential diagnosis in patients with acute respiratory failure. With this protocol, it becomes possible to differentiate between pulmonary oedema, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pneumothorax, each showing specific ultrasound patterns and profiles. The FALLS protocol (Fluid Administration Limited by Lung Sonography) adapts the BLUE protocol to be used in patients with acute circulatory failure. It makes a sequential search for obstructive, cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and distributive shock using simple real-time echocardiography in

  4. [Abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Sido, B; Grenacher, L; Friess, H; Büchler, M W

    2005-09-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma is much more frequent than penetrating abdominal trauma in Europe. As a consequence of improved quality of computed tomography, even complex liver injuries are increasingly being treated conservatively. However, missed hollow viscus injuries still remain a problem, as they considerably increase mortality in multiply injured patients. Laparoscopy decreases the rate of unnecessary laparotomies in perforating abdominal trauma and helps to diagnose injuries of solid organs and the diaphragm. However, the sensitivity in detecting hollow viscus injuries is low and the role of laparoscopy in blunt abdominal injury has not been defined. If intra-abdominal bleeding is difficult to control in hemodynamically unstable patients, damage control surgery with packing of the liver, total splenectomy, and provisional closure of hollow viscus injuries is of importance. Definitive surgical treatment follows hemodynamic stabilization and restoration of hemostasis. Injuries of the duodenum and pancreas after blunt abdominal trauma are often associated with other intra-abdominal injuries and the treatment depends on their location and severity.

  5. Induced transducer orientation during ultrasound imaging: effects on abdominal muscle thickness and bladder position.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Jackie L; Warner, Martin B; Stokes, Maria J

    2009-11-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging (USI) by physiotherapists to assess muscle behavior in clinical settings is increasing. However, there is relatively little evidence of whether the clinical environment is conducive to valid and reliable measurements. Accurate USI measurements depend on maintaining a relatively stationary transducer position, because motion may distort the image and lead to erroneous conclusions. This would seem particularly important during dynamic studies typical of a physiotherapy assessment. What is not known is how much transducer motion can occur before error is introduced. The aim of this study is to shed some light on this question. Eight healthy volunteers (19 to 52 y) participated. USI images were taken of the lateral abdominal wall (LAW) and bladder base (midline suprapubic) at various manually induced transducer orientations (approximately -10 to 10 degrees about 3 axes of rotation), which were quantified by a digital optical motion capture system. Measurements of transversus abdominis (TrA) thickness and bladder base position (cranial /caudal and anterior/posterior) were calculated. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to determine if the measurements obtained at the induced transducer orientations were statistically different (p<0.05) from an image corresponding to a reference or starting transducer orientation. Motion analysis data corresponding to measurements that did not differ from reference image measurements were summarized to provide a range of acceptable transducer motion (relative to the pelvis) for clockwise (CW)/counter-clockwise (CCW) rotation, cranial/caudal tilting, medial/lateral tilting and inward/outward displacement. There were no significant changes in TrA thickness measurements if CW/CCW transducer motion was <9 degrees and cranial/caudal or medial/lateral transducer tilting was <5 degrees . Further, there were no significant changes in measurements of bladder base position if CW/CCW transducer motion

  6. Abdominal foreign body: late presentation as a rectus sheath abscess.

    PubMed

    Noushif, M; Sivaprasad, S; Prashanth, A

    2011-05-01

    Intra-abdominal ingested foreign bodies are usually an incidental finding, typically encountered in mentally challenged patients. We present the case of a 65-year-old mentally sound woman who presented with recurrent abdominal pain and a lump in the hypogastrium. Evaluation revealed a rectus sheath abscess extending to the peritoneum, with a foreign body in situ. On enquiry, the patient revealed that she had accidentally ingested a tailoring needle 17 years ago. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of an ingested foreign body as a rectus sheath abscess after a long duration.

  7. Undiagnosed pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and chronic pancreatitis in functional GI disorder patients with diarrhea or abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Talley, Nicholas J; Holtmann, Gerald; Nguyen, Quoc Nam; Gibson, Peter; Bampton, Peter; Veysey, Martin; Wong, James; Philcox, Stephen; Koloski, Natasha; Bunby, Lisa; Jones, Michael

    2017-11-01

    A previous UK study showed that 6.1% of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) had evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), but these findings need replication. We aimed to identify the prevalence of PEI based on fecal elastase stool testing in consecutive outpatients presenting with chronic unexplained abdominal pain and/or diarrhea and/or IBS-D. Patients aged over 40 years presenting to hospital outpatient clinics from six sites within Australia with unexplained abdominal pain and/or diarrhea for at least 3 months and/or IBS-D were studied. Patients completed validated questionnaires and donated a stool sample in which elastase concentration was measured by ELISA. A concentration of < 100 mcg/g stool represented severe and < 200 mcg/g mild to moderate PEI. Patients whose fecal elastase was < 200 mcg/g underwent testing for pancreatic pathology with an endoscopic ultrasound or abdominal CT. Two hundred eighteen patients (mean age of 60 years, 29.4% male) were studied. PEI was found in 4.6% (95% CI 2.2-8.3%) (n = 10), with five patients (2.3% (95% CI 0.8-5.3%) having severe PEI. Only male sex and heavy alcohol use were significantly associated with abnormal versus normal pancreatic functioning. Of seven patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound or CT, two had features indicative of chronic pancreatitis. One in 50 patients with IBS-D or otherwise unexplained abdominal pain or diarrhea have an abnormal fecal elastase, but unexpected pancreatic insufficiency was detected in only a minority of these. This study failed to confirm the high prevalence of PEI among patients with unexplained GI symptoms previously reported. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Randomized and controlled prospective trials of Ultrasound-guided spinal nerve posterior ramus pulsed radiofrequency treatment for lower back post-herpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Pi, Z B; Lin, H; He, G D; Cai, Z; Xu, X Z

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided spinal nerve posterior ramus pulsed radiofrequency treatment for lower back post-herpetic neuralgia. 128 cases of lower back or anterior abdominal wall acute post-herpetic neuralgia patients were selected. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group A: oral treatment only with gabapentin + celecoxib + amitriptyline. Group B: while taking these drugs, patients were treated with radiofrequency (RF) pulses using a portable ultrasound device using the paravertebral puncture technique. In both groups, sudden outbreaks of pain were treated with immediate release 10mg morphine tablets. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was used for pain score, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scale (PSQI) was used to evaluate sleep quality and morphine consumption were recorded at different time points, before and after treatment. Treatment efficiency was calculated while the occurrence of complications was documented. At each time point after treatment, VAS scores were lower, but scores in the RF group was significantly lower than those of the oral-only group. In terms of sleep quality scores and morphine consumption between the two groups, the RF group was significantly lower than the oral-only group. During the procedure no error occurred with needle penetrating the abdominal cavity, chest, offal or blood vessels. Ultrasound-guided spinal nerve posterior ramus pulsed radiofrequency treatment of lower back or anterior abdominal wall post-herpetic neuralgia proved effective by reducing morphine use in patients and led to fewer adverse reactions.

  9. Chronic abdominal wall pain misdiagnosed as functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    van Assen, Tijmen; de Jager-Kievit, Jenneke W A J; Scheltinga, Marc R; Roumen, Rudi M H

    2013-01-01

    The abdominal wall is often neglected as a cause of chronic abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to identify chronic abdominal wall pain syndromes, such as anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES), in a patient population diagnosed with functional abdominal pain, including irritable bowel syndrome, using a validated 18-item questionnaire as an identification tool. In this cross-sectional analysis, 4 Dutch primary care practices employing physicians who were unaware of the existence of ACNES were selected. A total of 535 patients ≥18 years old who were registered with a functional abdominal pain diagnosis were approached when they were symptomatic to complete the questionnaire (maximum 18 points). Responders who scored at least the 10-point cutoff value (sensitivity, 0.94; specificity, 0.92) underwent a diagnostic evaluation to establish their final diagnosis. The main outcome was the presence and prevalence of ACNES in a group of symptomatic patients diagnosed with functional abdominal pain. Of 535 patients, 304 (57%) responded; 167 subjects (31%) recently reporting symptoms completed the questionnaire. Of 23 patients who scored above the 10-point cutoff value, 18 were available for a diagnostic evaluation. In half of these subjects (n = 9) functional abdominal pain (including IBS) was confirmed. However, the other 9 patients were suffering from abdominal wall pain syndrome, 6 of whom were diagnosed with ACNES (3.6% prevalence rate of symptomatic subjects; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.6), whereas the remaining 3 harbored a painful lipoma, an abdominal herniation, and a painful scar. A clinically relevant portion of patients previously diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome in a primary care environment suffers from an abdominal wall pain syndrome such as ACNES.

  10. Effects of ultrasound implementation on physical examination learning and teaching during the first year of medical education.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Vi Am; Frederick, Jon; Bartos, Rebekah; Shankel, Tamara M; Werner, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Increasing emphasis has been placed on point-of-care ultrasound in medical school. The overall effects of ultrasound curriculum implementation on the traditional physical examination skills of medical students are still unknown. We studied the effects on the Objective Standardized Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores of year 1 medical students before and after ultrasound curriculum implementation. An ultrasound curriculum was incorporated into the physical diagnosis course for year 1 medical students in the 2012-2013 academic year. We performed a prospective observational study comparing traditional OSCE scores of year 1 medical students exposed to the ultrasound curriculum (post-ultrasound) versus historic year 1 medical student controls (pre-ultrasound) with no ultrasound exposure. Questionnaire data were also obtained from year 1 medical students and physical diagnosis faculty to assess attitudes toward ultrasound implementation. The final overall OSCE scores were graded with a 5-point Likert-type scale from unsatisfactory to outstanding. There was a significant increase in outstanding scores in the post-ultrasound compared to the pre-ultrasound group (27.0% versus 10.9%; P< .001). The post-ultrasound group had significantly (P< .05) increased first-time pass rates on blood pressure measurements, the abdominal examination, and professionalism. Student and physical diagnosis faculty questionnaire data showed an overall positive response, with most agreeing or strongly agreeing that ultrasound should be included in the future year 1 medical student curriculum. Ultrasound implementation into a physical diagnosis curriculum for year 1 medical students is feasible and may improve their overall traditional physical examination skills. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility was evaluated as the distance from the bladder base using ultrasound. [Results] According to exercise method, bridge exercise and abdominal curl-ups led to significantly different pelvic floor mobility. The pelvic floor muscle was elevated during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and descended during maximal expiration. Finally, pelvic floor muscle mobility was greater during abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. [Conclusion] According to these results, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver induced pelvic floor muscle contraction, and pelvic floor muscle contraction was greater during the abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. PMID:27065532

  12. Incremental clinical value of ultrasound in men with mammographically confirmed gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Hao; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether ultrasound is of any value in male patients presenting with focal symptoms who have classic features of gynecomastia but no concerning findings on mammography. Over a 3-year period, all male patients who underwent mammographic evaluation were identified in this retrospective study. Patients with a mammographic diagnosis of gynecomastia and subsequent breast ultrasound at a large tertiary academic medical center comprised the study cohort. Men whose ultrasound diagnosis differed from the initial mammographic evaluation were analyzed for both additional benign findings as well as findings that warranted biopsy. A total of 353 mammograms were obtained from 327 unique patients (ages 18-95, mean 51 years). Of all mammographic examinations, gynecomastia was the sole finding in 73% (259). In those 259 studies, 85% were further evaluated with ultrasound, in which 6 (2.7%) showed additional benign findings, and 4 (1.8%) showed suspicious findings for which biopsy was recommended. No malignancies were detected in those patients. Furthermore, no malignancies were detected in patients whose mammogram revealed only normal fatty parenchyma or only gynecomastia. In all cases of cancer, mammography revealed visible masses. Judicious use of breast ultrasound in men improves outcome. Our data suggest that targeted ultrasound is of limited value in symptomatic male patients where mammography is negative or reveals only gynecomastia and leads to unnecessary benign biopsies in these patients. When mammography reveals concerning findings, ultrasound adds positively to clinical management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of Asymptomatic Renal Calcifications in Astronauts Using a Novel Ultrasound Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Reyes, David; Locke, James

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) specifically looking for asymptomatic renal calcifications that may be renal stones is typically not done in the terrestrial setting. Standard abdominal US without a renal focus may discover incidental, mineralized renal material (MRM); however punctate solid areas of MRM is less than 3 mm are usually considered subclinical. Detecting these early calcifications before they become symptomatic renal stones is critical to prevent adverse medical and mission outcomes during spaceflight.

  14. High-intensity focused ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology: the birth of a new era of noninvasive surgery?

    PubMed

    Griffiths, A; terHaar, G; Rivens, I; Giussani, D; Lees, C

    2012-12-01

    Although ultrasound is an essential investigative modality in obstetrics and gynecology, the potential for therapeutic high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) (also referred to as focused ultrasound surgery, FUS) to offer an alternative to invasive surgery is less well known. The ability of HIFU to create discrete regions of tissue necrosis only in precisely targeted positions by careful placement of the focus, without the need for any surgical intervention, has made HIFU of interest to those seeking noninvasive alternatives to conventional abdominal surgery. This article reviews the current experimental and clinical experience with HIFU in obstetrics and gynecology, and outlines potential future applications in fetal medicine and the challenges faced in their development. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Prevalence of incidental pancreatic cyst on upper endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Belén; Martínez, Juan F.; Aparicio, José R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of incidental pancreatic cysts in patients undergoing upper endoscopic ultrasound without a known pancreatic abnormality. Methods: This prospective study was conducted in two hospitals in Spain and enrolled consecutive patients referred for upper endoscopic ultrasound for a condition unrelated to the pancreas. Patients with a previous pancreatic anomaly, history of acute or chronic pancreatitis, evidence of acute pancreatitis, previous upper gastrointestinal surgery, or chronic abdominal pain suggestive of pancreatic origin were excluded. Univariate logistic regression was performed to evaluate individual covariates and the incidental pancreatic cyst risk. Results: A total of 298 patients were included, of whom 64 had pancreatic cysts (21.5%; 16.9-26.6%). The mean size of the cysts was 6.3±3.7 (range 3-25) mm. Six cysts (2%) were >10 mm and 16 (5.4%) were compatible with branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. The pancreatic cyst prevalence was similar in the two hospitals and increased significantly with age. Conclusion: The prevalence of incidental pancreatic cysts during endoscopic ultrasound was very high in our study population. PMID:29333072

  16. Intravenous leiomyomatosis of the uterus with extension to the right heart

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman admitted with debilitation and engorgement both lower extremities. Transthoracic two-dimensional echocardiography, abdominal ultrasound and computerized tomography revealed a lobulated pelvic mass, a mass within right internal iliac vein, both common iliac vein, as well as the inferior vena cava, extending into the right atrium. In addition, echocardiography and abdominal ultrasound showed the tumor of right atrium and inferior vena cave has no stalk and has well-demarcated borders with the wall of right atrium and inferior vena cave. Hence, the presumptive diagnosis of IVL was made by echocardiography and abdominal ultrasound and the presumptive diagnosis of sarcoma with invasion in right internal iliac vein, both common iliac vein, the inferior vena cava, as well as the right atrium was made by multi-detector-row computerized tomography. The patient underwent a one-stage combined multidisciplinary thoraco-abdominal operation under general anaesthetic. Subsequently the pathologic report confirmed IVL. PMID:21943238

  17. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN ULTRASOUND AND CLINICAL FINDINGS IN 87 CATS WITH URETHRAL OBSTRUCTION.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Jonathan R; Mai, Wilfried; Thomas, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Urethral obstruction is a life-threatening form of feline lower urinary tract disease. Ultrasonographic risk factors for reobstruction have not been previously reported. Purposes of this retrospective cross-sectional study were to describe urinary tract ultrasound findings in cats following acute urethral obstruction and determine whether ultrasound findings were associated with reobstruction. Inclusion criteria were a physical examination and history consistent with urethral obstruction, an abdominal ultrasound including a full evaluation of the urinary system within 24 h of hospitalization, and no cystocentesis prior to ultrasound examination. Medical records for included cats were reviewed and presence of azotemia, hyperkalemia, positive urine culture, and duration of hospitalization were recorded. For medically treated cats with available outcome data, presence of reobstruction was also recorded. Ultrasound images were reviewed and urinary tract characteristics were recorded. A total of 87 cats met inclusion criteria. Common ultrasound findings for the bladder included echogenic urine sediment, bladder wall thickening, pericystic effusion, hyperechoic pericystic fat, and increased urinary echoes; and for the kidneys/ureters included pyelectasia, renomegaly, perirenal effusion, hyperechoic perirenal fat, and ureteral dilation. Six-month postdischarge outcomes were available for 61 medically treated cats and 21 of these cats had reobstruction. No findings were associated with an increased risk of reobstruction. Ultrasonographic perirenal effusion was associated with severe hyperkalemia (P = 0.009, relative risk 5.75, 95% confidence interval [1.54-21.51]). Findings supported the use of ultrasound as an adjunct for treatment planning in cats presented with urethral obstruction but not as a method for predicting risk of reobstruction. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. Open versus endovascular stent graft repair for abdominal aortic aneurysms: an historical view.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Robert B

    2012-03-01

    Development of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysms repair (EVAR), now in its 4th decade, has involved at least 16 different devices, not counting major modifications of some, only 4 of which have emerged from clinical trials and gained US Food and Drug Administration approval. The main impetus behind EVAR has been its potential for significantly reducing procedural mortality and morbidity, but it was also expected to speed recovery and reduce costs through decreased use of hospital resources. At the outset, EVAR was touted as a better alternative to OPEN in high-risk patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms, and to "watchful waiting" (periodic ultrasound surveillance) for those with small abdominal aortic aneurysms. This new technology has evoked a mixed response with enthusiasts and detractors debating its pros and cons. Bias and conflict of interest exist on both sides. This review will attempt to present a balanced review of the development and current status of this controversial competition between EVAR and OPEN, comparing them in terms of the following key considerations: mortality and morbidity, complications, failure modes and durability, and costs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Abdominal rectus muscle pyomyositis: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Fountoukis, Tilemachos; Tsatsanidis, Nikolaos; Tilkeridou, Maria; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Fytas, Pantelis; Skandalos, Ioannis

    2018-01-01

    Pyomyositis is an uncommon primary bacterial infection of skeletal muscles, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Predisposing factors for pyomyositis include immunodeficiency, trauma, injection drug use, concurrent infection and malnutrition. The diagnosis, staging of the disease and differential diagnosis are established by ultrasound, CT and MRI. Treatment involves surgical drainage and antibiotic therapy. We report a case of abdominal rectus muscle pyomyositis, which constitutes, as far as we know, the second reported in bibliography, while Prevotella disiens is firstly reported as causative agent. PMID:29721242

  20. Point-of-care ultrasound leads to diagnostic shifts in patients with undifferentiated hypotension.

    PubMed

    Shokoohi, Hamid; Boniface, Keith S; Zaragoza, Michelle; Pourmand, Ali; Earls, James P

    2017-12-01

    To assess the impact of an ultrasound hypotension protocol in identifying life-threatening diagnoses that were missed in the initial evaluation of patients with hypotension and shock. A subset of cases from a previously published prospective study of hypotensive patients who presented at the Emergency Department in a single, academic tertiary care hospital is described. An ultrasound-trained emergency physician performed an ultrasound on each patient using a standardized hypotension protocol. In each case, the differential diagnosis and management plan was solicited from the treating physician immediately before and after the ultrasound. This is a case series of patients with missed diagnoses in whom ultrasound led to a dramatic shift in diagnosis and management by detecting life threatening pathologies. Following a published prospective study of the effect on an ultrasound protocol in 118 hypotensive patients, we identified a series of cases that ultrasound protocol unexpectedly determined serious life threatening diagnoses such as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, pulmonary embolism, pericardial effusion with tamponade physiology, abdominal aortic aneurysm and perforated viscus resulting in proper diagnoses and management. These hypotensive patients had completely unsuspected but critical diagnoses explaining their hypotension, who in every case had their management altered to target the newly identified life-threatening condition. A hypotension protocol is an optimal use of ultrasound that exemplifies "right time, right place", and impacts decision-making at the bedside. In cases with undifferentiated hypotension, ultrasound is often the most readily available option to ensure that the most immediate life-threatening conditions are quickly identified and addressed in the order of their risk potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Efficacy and problems of bladder volume measurement using portable three dimensional ultrasound scanning device--in particular, on measuring bladder volume lower than 100ml].

    PubMed

    Oh-Oka, Hitoshi; Nose, Ryuichiro

    2005-09-01

    Using a portable three dimensional ultrasound scanning device (The Bladder Scan BVI6100, Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation), we examined measured values of bladder volume, especially focusing on volume lower than 100 ml. A total of 100 patients (male: 66, female: 34) were enrolled in the study. We made a comparison study between the measured value (the average of three measurements of bladder urine volume after a trial in male and female modes) using BVI6100, and the actual measured value of the sample obtained by urethral catheterization in each patient. We examined the factors which could increase the error rate. We also introduced the effective techniques to reduce measurement errors. The actual measured values in all patients correlated well with the average value of three measurements after a trial in a male mode of the BVI6100. The correlation coefficient was 0.887, the error rate was--4.6 +/- 24.5%, and the average coefficient of variation was 15.2. It was observed that the measurement result using the BVI6100 is influenced by patient side factors (extracted edges between bladder wall and urine, thickened bladder wall, irregular bladder wall, flattened rate of bladder, mistaking prostate for bladder in male, mistaking bladder for uterus in a female mode, etc.) or examiner side factors (angle between BVI and abdominal wall, compatibility between abdominal wall and ultrasound probe, controlling deflection while using probe, etc). When appropriate patients are chosen and proper measurement is performed, BVI6100 provides significantly higher accuracy in determining bladder volume, compared with existing abdominal ultrasound methods. BVI6100 is a convenient and extremely effective device also for the measurement of bladder urine over 100 ml.

  2. Ultrasound in the Diagnosis & Management of Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Nilam J.; Franco, Ricardo; Velez, Maria I.; Schnobrich, Daniel; Dancel, Ria; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Mayo, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    We review the literature on the use of point-of-care ultrasound to evaluate and manage pleural effusions. Point-of-care ultrasound is more sensitive than physical exam and chest radiography to detect and characterize pleural fluid, and avoids many negative aspects of computerized tomography (CT). Additionally, point-of-care ultrasound can be used to assess pleural fluid volume and character, revealing possible underlying pathologies and guiding management. Thoracentesis performed with ultrasound guidance has lower risk of pneumothorax and bleeding complications. Future research should focus on the clinical-effectiveness of point-of-care ultrasound in the routine management of pleural effusions and how new technologies may expand its clinical utility. PMID:26218493

  3. Altered response of the anterolateral abdominal muscles to simulated weight-bearing in subjects with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hides, Julie A; Belavý, Daniel L; Cassar, Lana; Williams, Michelle; Wilson, Stephen J; Richardson, Carolyn A

    2009-03-01

    An important aspect of neuromuscular control at the lumbo-pelvic region is stabilization. Subjects with low back pain (LBP) have been shown to exhibit impairments in motor control of key muscles which contribute to stabilization of the lumbo-pelvic region. However, a test of automatic recruitment that relates to function has been lacking. A previous study used ultrasound imaging to show that healthy subjects automatically recruited the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles in response to a simulated weight-bearing task. This task has not been investigated in subjects with LBP. The aim of this study was to compare the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles among subjects with and without LBP in response to the simulated weight-bearing task. Twenty subjects with and without LBP were tested. Real-time ultrasound imaging was used to assess changes in thickness of the TrA and internal oblique IO muscles as well as lateral movement ("slide") of the anterior fascial insertion of the TrA muscle. Results showed that subjects with LBP showed significantly less shortening of the TrA muscle (P < 0.0001) and greater increases in thickness of the IO muscle (P = 0.002) with the simulated weight-bearing task. There was no significant difference between groups for changes in TrA muscle thickness (P = 0.055). This study provides evidence of changes in motor control of the abdominal muscles in subjects with LBP. This test may provide a functionally relevant and non-invasive method to investigate the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with and without LBP.

  4. Technical advances for abdominal wall closure after intestinal and multivisceral transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Undine A; Pascher, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Abdominal wall closure after intestinal transplantation (ITX) or multivisceral transplantation (MVTX) is challenging because of the loss of abdominal domain and wall elasticity as a result of previous operations and donor-to-recipient weight and height mismatch. We report on abdominal wall closure management in 30 ITX and MVTX recipients. In 60% of patients (n = 18), a primary abdominal closure (PAC) was achieved, in 40% (n = 12) a staged closure (SAC) was necessary. Patients with PAC had undergone less pretransplant operations and required less posttransplant relaparotomies. They were mainly ITX recipients or more abdominal domain because of a longer intestinal remnant. A literature review revealed different strategies to overcome a failed primary closure. They focus on graft reduction or an enlargement of the abdominal domain. The latter includes temporary coverage with prosthetic materials for SAC. Definite abdominal closure is achieved by skin only closure, or by using acellular dermal matrix, rotational flaps, rectus muscle fascia or abdominal wall grafts. Abdominal wall reconstruction after ITX/MVTX is commonly demanded and can be conducted by different strategies. The technique should be easy to use in a timely manner and should prevent abdominal infections, intestinal fistulation, incisional hernias, and wound dehiscence.

  5. [Vesico-cutaneous fistula revealing abdominal wall malakoplakia accompanied by Boeck's sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Knausz, József; Lipták, József; Andrásovszky, Zsolt; Baranyay, Ferenc

    2010-02-07

    Malakoplakia is an acquired granulomatous disorder first described by Michaelis and Gutmann in 1902. The pathogenesis of malakoplakia is hardly known, but it thought to be secondary to an acquired bactericidal defect in macrophages occurring mostly in immunosuppressed patients. 63-year-old female patient had been treated with methylprednisolone for ten years, because of pulmonary sarcoidosis. For six month, recurrent abdominal abscess and vesico-cutaneous fistula developed. Histological examination proved malakoplakia, and Escherichia coli was detected in the abscess cavity. Hematoxyline eosin staining, periodic acid-Schiff, Berlin-blue and Kossa reactions were performed. Microscopically malakoplakia consists of mainly macrophages, known as von Hansemann cells with scattered targetoid intracytoplasmic inclusions known as Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. In our presented case, after urological-surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy, the patient became free from complaints and symptoms. Malakoplakia has been described in numerous anatomic locations, mainly in the urogenital tract. Malakoplakia may be complicated with fistulas in different locations: vesico-coccygeal, rectoprostatic, anorectal fistulas have been were reported in the literature, while 6 cases of malakoplakia with Boeck's sarcoidosis are published. In the presented case sarcoidosis and the 10-year immunosuppressive treatment with methylprednisolone might have been in the background of abdominal wall malakoplakia, complicated by vesico-cutaneous fistula. The patient was successfully treated with surgery and the followed antibiotic therapy.

  6. Limited Abdominal Sonography for Evaluation of Children With Right Lower Quadrant Pain.

    PubMed

    Munden, Martha M; Wai, Shannon; DiStefano, Michael C; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether a complete abdominal sonographic examination is necessary in the evaluation of children with right lower quadrant pain that is suspicious for appendicitis in the emergency department and whether performing a limited, more-focused study would miss clinically important disease. With Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective study was performed of 704 patients, from ages 5-19 years, presenting to the emergency department with right lower quadrant pain that was suspicious for appendicitis who underwent a complete abdominal sonographic examination. Data were extracted from the complete abdominal sonographic examination to see whether abnormalities were noted in the pancreas, spleen, and left kidney. Patients' medical charts were reviewed to see whether any positive findings in these organs were clinically important. Of the 65 studies with a finding that would have been missed with a limited study, only 6 were found to be clinically important. Of those, 5 were managed medically and 1 surgically. The chance of missing a potentially important finding using a limited study with our group of patients was 65 of 704 patients (9.2%), with a 95% confidence interval of 7.2% to 11.7%. The chance of missing an abnormality that was clinically important was 6 of 704 patients (0.85%), with a 95% confidence interval of 0.35% to 1.94%. In children older than 5 years with abdominal pain that is suspicious for appendicitis, performing only a limited abdominal sonographic examination that excludes the pancreas, left kidney, and spleen will yield a miss rate for clinically important disease that is acceptably low to justify the savings of examination time. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  7. Paediatric abdominal tuberculosis in developed countries: case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Delisle, Megan; Seguin, Jade; Zeilinski, David; Moore, Dorothy L

    2016-03-01

    To provide an insight into the presentation, diagnosis and management of paediatric abdominal tuberculosis (TB) in developed countries. The records of all children at the Montreal Children's Hospital (MCH) admitted with abdominal TB between 1990 and 2014 were reviewed. An automated and manual literature search from 1946 to 2014 was performed. (1) CASE SERIES: six cases were identified at the MCH. All were male between 5 and 17 years of age. All were from populations known to have high rates of TB (aboriginal, immigrant). Three underwent major surgical interventions and three underwent ultrasound (US) or CT aspiration or biopsy for diagnosis. (2) LITERATURE REVIEW: 29 male (64%) and 16 female subjects (36%) aged between 14 months and 18 years were identified, including the MCH patients. All patients except one were from populations with a high incidence of TB. Most presented with a positive tuberculin skin test (90%), abdominal pain (76%), fever (71%) and weight loss (68%). On imaging, 22 (49%) were classified with gastrointestinal TB with colonic wall irregularity (41%) and 19 (42%) with peritoneal TB with ascites (68%). A positive culture was obtained in 33 (73%) patients. Three cases used CT- or US-guided aspiration or biopsy to obtain tissue samples. A surgical intervention was performed in 34 (76%) children; 13 (38%) of these were for diagnosis. Diagnosis based on clinical features (abdominal pain, fever and weight loss) and CT- or US-guided aspiration or biopsy may encourage physicians to adopt a more conservative approach to abdominal TB. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at risk of developing of intra abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Aim: This review seeks to define IAH and ACS, identify the aetiology and presentation of IAH and ACS, identify IAP measurement techniques, identify current management and discuss the implications of IAH and ACS for nursing practice. A search of the electronic databases was supervised by a health librarian. The electronic data bases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); Medline, EMBASE, and the World Wide Web was undertaken from 1996- January 2011 using MeSH and key words which included but not limited to: abdominal compartment syndrome, intra -abdominal hypertension, intra-abdominal pressure in adult populations met the search criteria and were reviewed by three authors using a critical appraisal tool. Data derived from the retrieved material are discussed under the following themes: (1) etiology of intra-abdominal hypertension; (2) strategies for measuring intra-abdominal pressure (3) the manifestation of abdominal compartment syndrome; and (4) the importance of nursing assessment, observation and interventions. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) have the potential to alter organ perfusion and compromise organ function. PMID:24499574

  9. Robotized High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) system for treatment of mobile organs using motion tracking by ultrasound imaging: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chanel, Laure-Anais; Nageotte, Florent; Vappou, Jonathan; Luo, Jianwen; Cuvillon, Loic; de Mathelin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is a very promising method for ablation of solid tumors. However, intra-abdominal organ motion, principally due to breathing, is a substantial limitation that results in incorrect tumor targeting. The objective of this work is to develop an all-in-one robotized HIFU system that can compensate motion in real-time during HIFU treatment. To this end, an ultrasound visual servoing scheme working at 20 Hz was designed. It relies on the motion estimation by using a fast ultrasonic speckle tracking algorithm and on the use of an interleaved imaging/HIFU sonication sequence for avoiding ultrasonic wave interferences. The robotized HIFU system was tested on a sample of chicken breast undergoing a vertical sinusoidal motion at 0.25 Hz. Sonications with and without motion compensation were performed in order to assess the effect of motion compensation on thermal lesions induced by HIFU. Motion was reduced by more than 80% thanks to this ultrasonic visual servoing system.

  10. [Point-of-care ultrasound in Spanish paediatric intensive care units].

    PubMed

    González Cortés, Rafael; Renter Valdovinos, Luis; Coca Pérez, Ana; Vázquez Martínez, José Luis

    2017-06-01

    Point-of-care (bedside) ultrasound is being increasingly used by paediatricians who treat critically ill children. The aim of this study is to describe its availability, use, and specific training in Paediatric Intensive Care Units in Spain. A descriptive, cross-sectional, multicentre study was performed using an online survey. Of a total of 51 PICUs identified in our country, 64.7% responded to the survey. Just over half (53.1%) have their own ultrasound machine, 25% share it, with other units with the usual location in the PICU, and 21.9% share it, but it is usually located outside the PICU. Ultrasound machine availability was not related to size, care complexity, or number PICU admissions. The ultrasound was used daily in 35% of the units, and was associated with location of the machine in the PICU (P=.026), the existence of a transplant program (P=.009), availability of ECMO (P=.006), and number of admissions (P=.015). 45.5% of PICUs has less than 50% of the medical staff specifically trained in bedside ultrasound, and 18.2% have all their medical staff trained. The presence of more than 50% of medical staff trained was associated with a higher rate of daily use (P=.033), and with specific use to evaluate cardiac function (P=.033), intravascular volume estimation (P=.004), or the presence of intra-abdominal collections (P=.021). Bedside ultrasound is frequently available in Spanish PICUs. Specific training is still variable, but it should serve to enhance its implementation. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Cow's milk allergy: color Doppler ultrasound findings in infants with hematochezia.

    PubMed

    Epifanio, Matias; Spolidoro, Jose Vicente; Missima, Nathalia Guarienti; Soder, Ricardo Bernardi; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    ultrasound (US) has been an important diagnostic tool to identify several causes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Infants with cow's milk allergy (CMA) may present hematochezia and the confirmation of the diagnosis can be difficult. The aim of this study is to describe grayscale and color Doppler ultrasound findings in patients with CMA. we retrospectively studied 13 infants with CMA. All infants presented severe hematochezia and abdominal pain. All underwent an US study with the diagnosis of allergic colitis. This diagnosis was based on clinical findings, recovery after infant or mother exclusion diets in the case of exclusive breastfeeding and positive oral challenge test. the mean age ranged from 1 to 6 months (mean=3.53). Seven out of 13 infants (53.8%) had grayscale and color Doppler sonographic repeated after exclusion diet. Twelve out of 13 (92,3%) showed abnormalities at US and CDUS at beginning. The positive findings suggesting colitis were thickened bowel walls and increased vascularity, especially in the descending and sigmoid colon. Colonoscopy and histopathological findings were compatible with allergic colitis. After a diet change the 13 infants recovered and their oral challenge tests were positive. Doppler US may be very useful in diagnosing secondary colitis, such as CMA, and to exclude several other abdominal diseases that can emulate this disease. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction of intussusception with saline: Safe and effective.

    PubMed

    Karadağ, Çetin Ali; Abbasoğlu, Latif; Sever, Nihat; Kalyoncu, Meltem Kaba; Yıldız, Abdullah; Akın, Melih; Candan, Mustafa; Dokucu, Ali İhsan

    2015-09-01

    The study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of ultrasound-guided saline enema in reducing intussusception and to determine the role of age and duration of symptoms on this event. The case records of patients who were treated for intussusception at our institutions over the past 10 years were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 419 patients were treated for intussusception and 375 of them were included into the study. Patients were excluded if they had symptoms and signs of acute abdominal disease and required surgery as an initial treatment. Hydrostatic reduction was successful in 313 of the 375 patients (83.46%). The procedure-related complication rate was nil. There were 29 episodes of recurrences in 23 patients, and recurrence rates did not differ between patients who responded to hydrostatic reduction and those who required surgery. Younger age [median (range); 11 months (3-108 months) vs. 20 months (1-180 months); p<0.05], rectal bleeding (p<0.01) and long duration of symptoms [mean (range); 1.95 days (1-7 days) vs. 1.44 days (1-10 days); p<0.01] were significantly associated with failed hydrostatic reduction. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction is an easy, safe and effective method for the treatment of intussusception in the absence of acute abdominal findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Current Trends in the Management of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Harris, K.A.; Ameli, F. Michael; Louis, E.L. St.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm has undergone dramatic changes over the last three decades. More sophisticated diagnostic techniques have allowed early elective repair to be carried out. Improvement has resulted in both morbidity and mortality rates. Investigations such as ultrasound, computerized tomographic scanning and arteriography allow easy confirmation of the diagnosis of aortic aneurysms and permit a better assessment of the extent prior to surgical intervention. Improvement in the pre-operative management, particularly in relation to cardiac, renal, and pulmonary disease, has led to greatly improved results. The most important change in surgical technique has been repair of the aneurysm rather than resection. Combined with better post-operative intensive care units, this development has contributed to the improved morbidity and mortality rates. Although the complication rate of elective repair is low, the major cause of death remains myocardial infarction. As a result of all these improvements, indication for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has been extended to patients over the age of 80. Following surgical repair, most patients can be expected to return to normal lifestyles and lifespans. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21263973

  14. Intra-abdominal fat measurement by ultrasonography: association with anthropometry and metabolic syndrome in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Novais, Rommel L R; Café, Ana Carolina C; Morais, Aisha A; Bila, Wendell C; Santos, Gilson D da S; Lopes, Carlos Alexandre de O; Belo, Vinícius S; Romano, Márcia Christina C; Lamounier, Joel A

    2018-04-27

    To associate intra-abdominal fat thickness measured by ultrasonography to the factors related to metabolic syndrome and to determine cutoff points of intra-abdominal fat measurement associated with a greater chance of metabolic syndrome in adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study, with 423 adolescents from public schools. Intra-abdominal fat was measured by ultrasonography. Anthropometric data were collected, and biochemical analyses were performed. Intra-abdominal fat was measured by ultrasonography, showing a statistically significant association with the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (p=0.037), body mass index (p<0.001), elevated triglyceride levels (p=0.012), decreased plasma HDL levels (p=0.034), and increased systemic blood pressure values (p=0.023). Cutoff values of intra-abdominal fat thickness measurements were calculated by ultrasound to estimate the individuals most likely to develop metabolic syndrome. In the logistic regression models, the cutoff values that showed the highest association with metabolic syndrome in males were 4.50, 5.35, 5.46, 6.24, and 6.50cm for the ages of 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18/19 years, respectively. In the female gender, the cutoff values defined for the same age groups were 4.46, 4.55, 4.45, 4.90, and 6.46cm. In an overall analysis using the ROC curve, without gender and age stratification, the cut-off of 3.67cm showed good sensitivity, but low specificity. Ultrasonography is a useful method to estimate intra-abdominal adipose tissue in adolescents, which is associated with the main factors related to obesity and metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Utility of Point-of-care Ultrasound in Children With Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bélard, Sabine; Heuvelings, Charlotte C; Banderker, Ebrahim; Bateman, Lindy; Heller, Tom; Andronikou, Savvas; Workman, Lesley; Grobusch, Martin P; Zar, Heather J

    2018-07-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) detects extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) in HIV infected adults but has not been evaluated in children despite their higher risk of EPTB. This study's aims were to investigate feasibility of POCUS for EPTB in children, frequency of POCUS findings suggestive of EPTB and time to sonographic resolution of findings with treatment. This prospective South African cohort study enrolled children with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). POCUS for pleural, pericardial or ascitic effusion, abdominal lymphadenopathy or splenic or hepatic microabscesses was performed and repeated at 1, 3 and 6 months of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Prevalence of POCUS findings and their association with HIV infection was investigated in children with confirmed PTB (microbiologically proven), unconfirmed PTB (clinically diagnosed) or unlikely TB (respiratory disease that improved during follow-up without TB treatment). Of 232 children [median age 37 months (interquartile range, 18-74)], 39 (17%) were HIV infected. Children with confirmed or unconfirmed PTB had a higher prevalence of POCUS findings than children with unlikely TB [18 of 58 (31%) and 36 of 119 (30%) vs. 8 of 55 (15%); P = 0.04 and P = 0.03, respectively]. Pleural effusion [n = 30 (13%)] or abdominal lymphadenopathy [n = 28 (12%)] were the most common findings; splenic microabscesses [n = 12 (5%)] were strongly associated with confirmed PTB. Children coinfected with HIV and TB were more likely than HIV-uninfected children with TB to have abdominal lymphadenopathy (37% vs. 10%; P < 0.001) or splenic microabscesses (23% vs. 3%; P < 0.001]. Most ultrasound findings were resolved by 3 months with appropriate TB treatment. POCUS for EPTB in children with PTB is feasible. The high prevalence of findings suggests that POCUS can contribute to timely diagnosis of childhood TB and to monitoring treatment response.

  16. The efficacy of a combination non-thermal focused ultrasound and radiofrequency device for noninvasive body contouring in Asians.

    PubMed

    Shek, Samantha Y N; Yeung, Chi K; Chan, Johnny C Y; Chan, Henry H L

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have been published on the first generation non-thermal focused ultrasound with an average improvement of 0-3.95 cm reported. We aim to investigate the efficacy of the second-generation non-thermal focused ultrasound device with a combined radiofrequency hand piece. With the addition of radiofrequency energy, the temperature of the adipose tissue is raised before focused ultrasound is applied. This facilitates the mechanical disruption of fat cells by focused ultrasound. Twenty subjects were recruited and underwent three treatments biweekly. Caliper reading, abdominal circumference, and standardized photographs were taken with the Vectra(®) system at all visits. We aim to have the subjects stand and hold the same position and the photograph taken after exhalation. Caliper and circumference measurements carry uncertainty. It is impossible to eliminate all uncertainties but can be improved by having the same trained physician assistant perform the measurement at the same site and taking an average of three readings. Pain score and satisfaction were recorded by means of the visual analogue scale. The efficacy is defined by a statistically significant improvement in circumferential improvement based on intention-to-treat analysis. Seventeen subjects completed the treatment schedule. Abdominal circumference showed statistically significant improvement at 2 weeks post-second treatment (P = 0.023) and almost all subsequent follow-ups. Caliper readings were statistically significant at 2 weeks post-second treatment (P = 0.013) and almost all follow-ups. The mean pain score reported was 2.3 on the visual analog scale and 6% were unsatisfied with the overall treatments. Six incidents of wheal formation appeared immediately after treatment all of which subsided spontaneously within several hours. The combination non-thermal focused ultrasound and radiofrequency device is effective for improving body contour in Asians. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Rupture of a hepatic adenoma in a young woman after an abdominal trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cotta-Pereira, Ricardo Lemos; Valente, Luana Ferreira; De Paula, Daniela Goncalves; Eiras-Araújo, Antônio Luís; Iglesias, Antônio Carlos

    2013-07-21

    Unlike hepatic haemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma, spontaneous abdomen bleeding is rare, even in the presence of a hepatocellular adenoma (HA) or carcinoma. However, the diagnosis of a tumour underlying a haematoma after liver trauma is unusual, especially when it occurs more after two years after the accident. Here, we report a case of a ruptured HA due to blunt abdominal trauma. A 36-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain. Her medical history revealed a blunt abdominal trauma two years prior. Initial abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a large haematoma measuring more than 16 cm in diameter in the right lobe of the liver. Magnetic resonance imaging showed haemorrhagic areas and some regions with hepatocyte hyperplasia, suggesting HA. The patient underwent right hepatic lobectomy, and a histopathological examination confirmed a diagnosis of HA. In conclusion, it is important to consider that abdominal trauma may hide old, asymptomatic and not previously detected injuries, as in the case reported.

  18. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (133). Retained placenta from an intra-abdominal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Win, T; Tang, P H; Lim, T Y

    2011-01-01

    A 29-year-old Indonesian woman presented with abdominal pain seven months after an intra-abdominal pregnancy. Ultrasonography revealed a cystic mass in the pelvis and magnetic resonance imaging showed an umbilical stump within it, indicating a retained placenta. This was removed surgically, and on histology, an infarcted placenta was confirmed.

  19. Abdominal muscle response to a simulated weight-bearing task by elite Australian Rules football players.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jodie; Stanton, Warren R; Hides, Julie A

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the automatic recruitment of the deep abdominal muscles during a unilateral simulated weight-bearing task by elite Australian Rules football (AFL) players with and without low back pain (LBP). An observational cross-sectional study was conducted using ultrasound imaging to measure the thickness of the internal oblique (IO) and transversus abdominis (TrA) muscles. Thirty-seven elite male AFL players participated. Repeated measures factors included 'force level' (rest, 25% and 45% of body weight), 'leg' (dominant or non-dominant kicking leg) and 'side' (ultrasound side ipsilateral or contralateral to the leg used for the weight-bearing task). The dependent variables were thickness of the IO and TrA muscles. The results of this study showed that thickness of the IO (p<.0001) and TrA (p<.0001) muscles increased in response to 'force level'. During the task, the thickness of the IO muscle on the contralateral side of the trunk relative to the leg being tested, increased more in participants with current LBP (p=.034). This pattern was more distinct on the non-dominant kicking leg. Altered abdominal muscle recruitment in elite athletes with low back pain may be an attempt by the central nervous system (CNS) to compensate for inadequate lumbo-pelvic stability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... following risk categories: (i) Has a family history of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. (ii) Is a man age 65 to...: (1) A procedure using soundwaves (or other procedures using alternative technologies of commensurate...

  1. Abdominal epilepsy as an unusual cause of abdominal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Yilmaz; Sefer, Ustebay; Dondu, Ulker Ustebay; Ismail, Ozanli; Yusuf, Ehi

    2016-09-01

    Abdominal pain, in etiology sometimes difficult to be defined, is a frequent complaint in childhood. Abdominal epilepsy is a rare cause of abdominal pain. In this article, we report on 5 year old girl patient with abdominal epilepsy. Some investigations (stool investigation, routine blood tests, ultrasonography (USG), electrocardiogram (ECHO) and electrocardiograpy (ECG), holter for 24hr.) were done to understand the origin of these complaints; but no abnormalities were found. Finally an EEG was done during an episode of abdominal pain and it was shown that there were generalized spikes especially precipitated by hyperventilation. The patient did well on valproic acid therapy and EEG was normal 1 month after beginning of the treatment. The cause of chronic recurrent paroxymal abdominal pain is difficult for the clinicians to diagnose in childhood. A lot of disease may lead to paroxysmal gastrointestinal symptoms like familial mediterranean fever and porfiria. Abdominal epilepsy is one of the rare but easily treatable cause of abdominal pain. In conclusion, abdominal epilepsy should be suspected in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

  2. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; Placenta previa - ultrasound; Multiple pregnancy - ultrasound; ...

  3. Subjective ultrasound assessment, the ADNEX model and ultrasound-guided tru-cut biopsy to differentiate disseminated primary ovarian cancer from metastatic non-ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Epstein, E; Van Calster, B; Timmerman, D; Nikman, S

    2016-01-01

    To compare subjective ultrasound assessment and the ADNEX model with ultrasound-guided tru-cut biopsy to differentiate disseminated primary ovarian cancer from metastatic non-ovarian cancer. This was a prospective study including 143 consecutive women with disseminated malignancy of unknown primary origin, with a pelvic tumor/carcinosis. Women underwent either transvaginal or transrectal ultrasound as well as transabdominal ultrasound examination followed by tru-cut biopsy. The ultrasound examiner assessed tumor morphology, spread in the pelvis and abdomen, and predicted tumor origin as primary ovarian or metastatic using both subjective assessment and the ADNEX model. Histology from tru-cut biopsy served as the gold standard for assessment of diagnostic accuracy. Biopsy adequacy and the complication rate were assessed. Tru-cut biopsy was performed transvaginally in 131/143 (92%) women. Two women needed inpatient care (one had abdominal wall hematoma, and one infection). Biopsy resulted in a conclusive diagnosis in 126/143 (88%) women, amongst whom cytoreductive surgery was performed in 30/126 confirming the diagnosis in all cases. Non-ovarian metastatic cancer was found in 37/126 (29%) women and primary ovarian cancer in 89/126 (71%) women. Subjective ultrasound evaluation had a sensitivity of 82% (73/89) and a specificity of 70% (26/37) in predicting primary ovarian cancer. The ADNEX model had an area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve of 0.891 (95% CI, 0.794-0.946) (in women with an ovarian lesion, n = 104). Tumor origin was associated with age, CA 125, previous neoplasia, presence of omental cake and tumor mobility. Subjective ultrasound assessment and the ADNEX model can both be used to predict whether a pelvic tumor is metastatic and of non-ovarian origin, indicating the need for tru-cut biopsy, which is associated with very few complications and will provide a conclusive diagnosis in nine out of 10 women. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG

  4. Towards clinical computed ultrasound tomography in echo-mode: Dynamic range artefact reduction.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Computed ultrasound tomography in echo-mode (CUTE) allows imaging the speed of sound inside tissue using hand-held pulse-echo ultrasound. This technique is based on measuring the changing local phase of beamformed echoes when changing the transmit beam steering angle. Phantom results have shown a spatial resolution and contrast that could qualify CUTE as a promising novel diagnostic modality in combination with B-mode ultrasound. Unfortunately, the large intensity range of several tens of dB that is encountered in clinical images poses difficulties to echo phase tracking and results in severe artefacts. In this paper we propose a modification to the original technique by which more robust echo tracking can be achieved, and we demonstrate in phantom experiments that dynamic range artefacts are largely eliminated. Dynamic range artefact reduction also allowed for the first time a clinical implementation of CUTE with sufficient contrast to reproducibly distinguish the different speed of sound in different tissue layers of the abdominal wall and the neck. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Neurolytic transversus abdominal plane block with alcohol for long-term malignancy related pain control.

    PubMed

    Hung, Joseph C; Azam, Nyla; Puttanniah, Vinay; Malhotra, Vivek; Gulati, Amitabh

    2014-01-01

    There have been several case reports in the literature of neurolytic transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks being used for malignant abdominal wall pain. However, most used phenol as a neurolytic agent. We found only a single case report by Sakamoto using alcohol for TAP neurolysis. Unfortunately this patient passed away only 5 days after performance of the block. We attempt to extend upon the existing literature by describing neurolytic TAP blockade outcomes using alcohol on 3 cancer patients with metastatic disease to the abdominal wall. Two of our 3 patients had colorectal cancer invading the abdominal musculature. The third patient had a metastatic neuroendocrine nodule in the left rectus muscle. In our case series, all 3 patients had sustained and significant (greater than 50%) relief of abdominal wall pain after performing TAP neurolysis using alcohol. Ultrasound guidance was used for all blocks. The concentration of alcohol used varied from 33% to 77% between patients. Duration of relief lasted between 17 days and 6 months. Opioid use either decreased or remained relatively stable for prolonged periods of time after neurolysis. Other than one patient with transient post-procedure pain related to alcohol injection, there were no significant complications. Addition of a depo steroid for diagnostic TAP blockade prior to neurolysis did not appear to extend or provide additional analgesia. Based on our observations, TAP neurolysis using alcohol also offers a feasible option for long-term control of malignant abdominal wall pain. Further investigation is needed to determine if alcohol offers any significant advantage compared with phenol.

  6. Imaging in gynecological disease (9): clinical and ultrasound characteristics of tubal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ludovisi, M; De Blasis, I; Virgilio, B; Fischerova, D; Franchi, D; Pascual, M A; Savelli, L; Epstein, E; Van Holsbeke, C; Guerriero, S; Czekierdowski, A; Zannoni, G; Scambia, G; Jurkovic, D; Rossi, A; Timmerman, D; Valentin, L; Testa, A C

    2014-03-01

    To describe clinical history and ultrasound findings in patients with tubal carcinoma. Patients with a histological diagnosis of tubal cancer who had undergone preoperative ultrasound examination were identified from the databases of 13 ultrasound centers. The tumors were described by the principal investigator at each contributing center on the basis of ultrasound images, ultrasound reports and research protocols (when applicable) using the terms and definitions of the International Ovarian Tumor Analysis (IOTA) group. In addition, three authors reviewed together all available digital ultrasound images and described them using subjective evaluation of gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasound findings. We identified 79 women with a histological diagnosis of primary tubal cancer, 70 of whom (89%) had serous carcinomas and 46 (58%) of whom presented at FIGO stage III. Forty-nine (62%) women were asymptomatic (incidental finding), whilst the remaining 30 complained of abdominal bloating or pain. Fifty-three (67%) tumors were described as solid at ultrasound examination, 14 (18%) as multilocular solid, 10 (13%) as unilocular solid and two (3%) as unilocular. No tumor was described as a multilocular mass. Most tumors (70/79, 89%) were moderately or very well vascularized on color or power Doppler ultrasound. Normal ovarian tissue was identified adjacent to the tumor in 51% (39/77) of cases. Three types of ultrasound appearance were identified as being typical of tubal carcinoma using pattern recognition: a sausage-shaped cystic structure with solid tissue protruding into it like a papillary projection (11/62, 18%); a sausage-shaped cystic structure with a large solid component filling part of the cyst cavity (13/62, 21%); an ovoid or oblong completely solid mass (36/62, 58%). A well vascularized ovoid or sausage-shaped structure, either completely solid or with large solid component(s) in the pelvis, should raise the suspicion of tubal cancer, especially if normal

  7. The challenging image-guided abdominal mass biopsy: established and emerging techniques 'if you can see it, you can biopsy it'.

    PubMed

    Sainani, Nisha I; Arellano, Ronald S; Shyn, Paul B; Gervais, Debra A; Mueller, Peter R; Silverman, Stuart G

    2013-08-01

    Image-guided percutaneous biopsy of abdominal masses is among the most commonly performed procedures in interventional radiology. While most abdominal masses are readily amenable to percutaneous biopsy, some may be technically challenging for a number of reasons. Low lesion conspicuity, small size, overlying or intervening structures, motion, such as that due to respiration, are some of the factors that can influence the ability and ultimately the success of an abdominal biopsy. Various techniques or technologies, such as choice of imaging modality, use of intravenous contrast and anatomic landmarks, patient positioning, organ displacement or trans-organ approach, angling CT gantry, triangulation method, real-time guidance with CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound, sedation or breath-hold, pre-procedural image fusion, electromagnetic tracking, and others, when used singularly or in combination, can overcome these challenges to facilitate needle placement in abdominal masses that otherwise would be considered not amenable to percutaneous biopsy. Familiarity and awareness of these techniques allows the interventional radiologist to expand the use of percutaneous biopsy in clinical practice, and help choose the most appropriate technique for a particular patient.

  8. Ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio and hepatic attenuation rate for quantifying liver fat content.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Ding, Fang; Chen, Tian; Xia, Liang-Hua; Qian, Juan; Lv, Guo-Yi

    2014-12-21

    To establish and validate a simple quantitative assessment method for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) based on a combination of the ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio and hepatic attenuation rate. A total of 170 subjects were enrolled in this study. All subjects were examined by ultrasound and (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) on the same day. The ultrasound hepatic/renal echo-intensity ratio and ultrasound hepatic echo-intensity attenuation rate were obtained from ordinary ultrasound images using the MATLAB program. Correlation analysis revealed that the ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio and hepatic echo-intensity attenuation rate were significantly correlated with (1)H-MRS liver fat content (ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio: r = 0.952, P = 0.000; hepatic echo-intensity attenuation r = 0.850, P = 0.000). The equation for predicting liver fat content by ultrasound (quantitative ultrasound model) is: liver fat content (%) = 61.519 × ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio + 167.701 × hepatic echo-intensity attenuation rate -26.736. Spearman correlation analysis revealed that the liver fat content ratio of the quantitative ultrasound model was positively correlated with serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and triglyceride, but negatively correlated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the optimal point for diagnosing fatty liver was 9.15% in the quantitative ultrasound model. Furthermore, in the quantitative ultrasound model, fatty liver diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 94.7% and 100.0%, respectively, showing that the quantitative ultrasound model was better than conventional ultrasound methods or the combined ultrasound hepatic/renal ratio and hepatic echo-intensity attenuation rate. If the (1)H-MRS liver fat content had a value < 15%, the sensitivity and specificity of the ultrasound quantitative model would be 81.4% and 100%, which still shows that using

  9. Defensive abdominal rotation patterns of tenebrionid beetle, Zophobas atratus, pupae.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Toshio; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Yamawaki, Yoshifumi

    2012-01-01

    Exarate pupae of the beetle Zophobas atratus Fab. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) have free appendages (antenna, palp, leg, and elytron) that are highly sensitive to mechanical stimulation. A weak tactile stimulus applied to any appendage initiated a rapid rotation of abdominal segments. High-speed photography revealed that one cycle of defensive abdominal rotation was induced in an all-or-none fashion by bending single or multiple mechanosensory hairs on a leg or prodding the cuticular surface of appendages containing campaniform sensilla. The direction of the abdominal rotation completely depended on the side of stimulation; stimulation of a right appendage induced a right-handed rotation about the anterior-posterior axis of the pupal body and vice versa. The trajectories of the abdominal rotations had an ellipsoidal or pear-shaped pattern. Among the trajectory patterns of the rotations induced by stimulating different appendages, there were occasional significant differences in the horizontal (right-left) component of abdominal rotational movements. Simultaneous stimulation of right and left appendages often induced variable and complex patterns of abdominal movements, suggesting an interaction between sensory signals from different sides. When an abdominal rotation was induced in a freely lying pupa, the rotation usually made the pupa move away from or turn its dorsum toward the source of stimulation with the aid of the caudal processes (urogomphi), which served as a fulcrum for transmitting the power of the abdominal rotation to the movement or turning of the whole body. Pattern generation mechanisms for the abdominal rotation were discussed.

  10. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Endovaginal ultrasound; Ultrasound - transvaginal; Fibroids - transvaginal ultrasound; Vaginal bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Uterine bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Menstrual bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; ...

  11. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in Association with Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Endovascular Era: Vigilance Remains Critical

    PubMed Central

    Bozeman, Matthew C.; Ross, Charles B.

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are common complications of ruptured abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms (rAAAs) and other abdominal vascular catastrophes even in the age of endovascular therapy. Morbidity and mortality due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) are significant. Recognition and management of IAH are key critical care measures which may decrease morbidity and improve survival in these vascular patients. Two strategies have been utilized: expectant management with prompt decompressive laparotomy upon diagnosis of threshold levels of IAH versus prophylactic, delayed abdominal closure based upon clinical parameters at the time of initial repair. Competent management of the abdominal wound with preservation of abdominal domain is also an important component of the care of these patients. In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events. PMID:22454763

  12. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in association with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in the endovascular era: vigilance remains critical.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, Matthew C; Ross, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are common complications of ruptured abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms (rAAAs) and other abdominal vascular catastrophes even in the age of endovascular therapy. Morbidity and mortality due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) are significant. Recognition and management of IAH are key critical care measures which may decrease morbidity and improve survival in these vascular patients. Two strategies have been utilized: expectant management with prompt decompressive laparotomy upon diagnosis of threshold levels of IAH versus prophylactic, delayed abdominal closure based upon clinical parameters at the time of initial repair. Competent management of the abdominal wound with preservation of abdominal domain is also an important component of the care of these patients. In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events.

  13. Abdominal Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Deborah; Weilitz, Pamela Becker

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints by patients, and assessment of abdominal pain and associated symptoms can be challenging for home healthcare providers. Reasons for abdominal pain are related to inflammation, organ distention, and ischemia. The history and physical examination are important to narrow the source of acute or chronic problems, identify immediate interventions, and when necessary, facilitate emergency department care.

  14. The role for peer-assisted ultrasound teaching in medical school.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Jonathan; Paul, Katie; Vila, Pierre; Whiticar, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Bedside ultrasonography has an increasing role in medicine yet medical students have limited exposure. Although countless hours are devoted to plain radiograph and electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation, ultrasound is frequently glossed over. Yet this imaging modality could enhance students' understanding of anatomy, physiology and pathology, and may increase their integration into hospital teams. We aimed to investigate whether a peer-assisted ultrasound course has a place within the undergraduate medical curriculum. We describe the implementation of a course and discuss its acceptability and utility in student education. Bedside ultrasonography has an increasing role in medicine yet medical students have limited exposure METHODS: Following consultation with the medical school, an improved ultrasonography course was developed with expert guidance from an ultrasonographer and with new equipment. Sessions involved peer-tutors teaching ultrasonography techniques to medical students during emergency medicine placements. Tutees completed questionnaires to assess the quality and perceived benefits of the course and of learning ultrasonography. Both quantitative and thematic analyses of the responses were conducted by the authors. Over a period of 8 months, 105 medical students received teaching across four sessions. A total of 103 students (98%) returned questionnaires on their evaluation of the course and tutors, and on their confidence in using ultrasound. Ninety-eight per cent felt that the teaching was well delivered, 100 per cent felt that their knowledge of ultrasound had improved and 100 per cent would recommend the course. The peer-assisted ultrasound course described here enabled the majority of students to feel confident gaining elementary ultrasound views, and performing abdominal aneurysm screening and trauma assessments: techniques that they could hopefully put to use during their placements. The peer-assisted model has an acceptable role in teaching

  15. Computed tomography use among children presenting to emergency departments with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Fahimi, Jahan; Herring, Andrew; Harries, Aaron; Gonzales, Ralph; Alter, Harrison

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate trends in and factors associated with computed tomography (CT) use among children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain. This study was a cross-sectional, secondary analysis of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 1998 to 2008. We identified ED patients aged <19 years with abdominal pain and collected patient demographic and hospital characteristics, and outcomes related to imaging, hospital admission, and diagnosis of appendicitis. Trend analysis was performed over the study period for the outcomes of interest, and a multivariate regression model was used to identify factors associated with CT use. Of all pediatric ED visits, 6.0% were for abdominal pain. We noted a rise in the proportion of these patients with CT use, from 0.9% in 1998 to 15.4% in 2008 (P < .001), with no change in ultrasound/radiograph use, diagnosis of appendicitis, or hospital admission. Older and male patients were more likely to have a CT scan, whereas black children were one-half as likely to undergo a CT scan compared with white children (odds ratio: 0.50 [95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.81]). Admitted children had much higher odds of undergoing a CT scan (odds ratio: 4.11 [95% confidence interval: 2.66-6.35]). There was a plateau in CT use in 2006 to 2008. There was a dramatic increase in the utilization of CT imaging in the ED evaluation of pediatric patients with abdominal pain. Some groups of children may have a differential likelihood of receiving CT scans.

  16. [Detection of small for gestational age fetuses during third trimester ultrasound. A monocentric observational study].

    PubMed

    Peyronnet, V; Kayem, G; Mandelbrot, L; Sibiude, J

    2016-09-01

    Fetus small for gestational age (SGA) screening rate is evaluated around 21,7 % in France. Recommendations were developed to improve the efficiency of ultrasound conducted in the third trimester (T3), because neonatal consequences can be significant. This study aims to evaluate screening of SGA during T3 ultrasound and to describe causes for failure and differences with the recommendations of CNGOF. All children born between 2011 and 2012 with a birth weight below the 3rd percentile were included in this observational, retrospective, monocentric study. We noted that the diagnosis of SGA was placed on file. Then, as recommended by the CNGOF, we calculated estimated fetal weight (EFW) with Hadlock 3 and Hadlock 4, and the corresponding percentiles, using the biometrics from the ultrasound report. We thus could evaluate a new screening rate with SGA fetus identified through this technique. A total of 142 patients were included. By calculating correctly all EFW and checking abdominal circumference percentiles, the screening rate of SGA fetuses with T3 ultrasound increased from 40 % to 50 % and the overall screening rate (clinical and ultrasound) from 54 % to 66 %. By following the recommendations we found a real improvement in fetal SGA screening rates to T3 ultrasound with a potential benefit for their care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... community Home > Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Ultrasound during pregnancy Ultrasound during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... you. What are some reasons for having an ultrasound? Your provider uses ultrasound to do several things, ...

  18. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: abdominal aorta, abdominal aortic aneurysm, abdominal pain, ...

  19. Ultrasound diagnosis of penile fracture.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Jason T; Sierzenski, Paul R

    2010-04-01

    Rupture of the corpus cavernosum, penile fracture, is an uncommon occurrence. Diagnosis is straightforward when classical historical and physical examination findings are present. However, atypical presentations can make the diagnosis difficult. Review the literature supporting use of ultrasound for the diagnosis of penile fracture. Review of the ultrasonographic findings in patients with penile fracture. A 32-year-old man presented with penile ecchymosis after sex but lacking several historical and physical examination elements for a diagnosis of penile fracture. Ultrasound performed by the treating physician revealed rupture of the tunica albuginea and presence of a hematoma, leading to a diagnosis of penile fracture. Ultrasound is a simple, efficient, and non-invasive imaging method to assist in the diagnosis of penile fracture. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development and evaluation of a novel, real time mobile telesonography system in management of patients with abdominal trauma: study protocol.

    PubMed

    Ogedegbe, Chinwe; Morchel, Herman; Hazelwood, Vikki; Chaplin, William F; Feldman, Joseph

    2012-12-18

    Despite the use of e-FAST in management of patients with abdominal trauma, its utility in prehospital setting is not widely adopted. The goal of this study is to develop a novel portable telesonography (TS) system and evaluate the comparability of the quality of images obtained via this system among healthy volunteers who undergo e-FAST abdominal examination in a moving ambulance and at the ED. We hypothesize that: (1) real-time ultrasound images of acute trauma patients in the pre-hospital setting can be obtained and transmitted to the ED via the novel TS system; and (2) Ultrasound images transmitted to the hospital from the real-time TS system will be comparable in quality to those obtained in the ED. Study participants are three healthy volunteers (one each with normal, overweight and obese BMI category). The ultrasound images will be obtained by two ultrasound-trained physicians The TS is a portable sonogram (by Sonosite) interfaced with a portable broadcast unit (by Live-U). Two UTPs will conduct e-FAST examinations on healthy volunteers in moving ambulances and transmit the images via cellular network to the hospital server, where they are stored. Upon arrival in the ED, the same UTPs will obtain another set of images from the volunteers, which are then compared to those obtained in the moving ambulances by another set of blinded UTPs (evaluators) using a validated image quality scale, the Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction (QUIS). Findings from this study will provide needed data on the validity of the novel TS in transmitting live images from moving ambulances to images obtained in the ED thus providing opportunity to facilitate medical care of a patient located in a remote or austere setting.

  1. Pocket ultrasound device as a complement to physical examination for ascites evaluation and guided paracentesis.

    PubMed

    Keil-Ríos, Daniel; Terrazas-Solís, Hiram; González-Garay, Alejandro; Sánchez-Ávila, Juan Francisco; García-Juárez, Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    The pocket ultrasound device (PUD) is a new tool that may be of use in the early detection of ascites. Abdominal ultrasound-guided paracentesis has been reported to decrease the rate of complications due to the procedure, but must be performed in a healthcare setting; this new tool may be a useful on an ambulatory basis. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic usefulness of the PUD in the diagnosis of ascites and the safety of guided paracentesis. We conducted a retrospective study that included adult patients suspected of having ascites and in whom an evaluation was performed with the PUD to identify it. Concordance with abdominal ultrasound (AUS) was determined with the Kappa coefficient. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and likelihood ratios (LR) were determined and compared with physical examination, AUS, computed tomography and procurement of fluid by paracentesis. Complications resulting from the guided paracentesis were analyzed. 89 participants were included and 40 underwent a paracentesis. The PUD for ascites detection had 95.8 % Se, 81.8 % Sp, 5.27 +LR and 0.05 -LR. It had a concordance with AUS of 0.781 (p < 0.001). Technical problems during the guided paracentesis were present in only two participants (5 %) and three patients (7.5 %) developed minor complications that required no further intervention. There were no severe complications or deaths. This study suggests that the PUD is a reliable tool for ascites detection as a complement to physical examination and appears to be a safe method to perform guided paracentesis.

  2. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound as a New Investigative Tool in Diagnostic Imaging of Muscle Injuries-A Pilot Study Evaluating Conventional Ultrasound, CEUS, and Findings in MRI.

    PubMed

    Hotfiel, Thilo; Heiss, Rafael; Swoboda, Bernd; Kellermann, Marion; Gelse, Kolja; Grim, Casper; Strobel, Deike; Wildner, Dane

    2018-07-01

    To emphasize the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the imaging of muscle injuries with different degrees of severity by comparing findings to established imaging modalities such as conventional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Case series. Institutional study. Conventional ultrasound and CEUS were performed in the Department of Internal Medicine. Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out in the Department of Radiology within the Magnetom Avanto 1.5T and Magnetom Skyra fit 3T (Siemens Healthineers, Erlangen, Germany) and in the Institution of Imaging Diagnostics and Therapy (Magnetom Avanto 1.5T; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Fifteen patients who underwent an acute muscle injury were recruited. The appearance and detectable size of muscle injuries were compared between each imaging modality. The injuries were assessed by 3 independent observers and blinded between imaging modalities. All 15 injuries were identified on MRI and CEUS, whereas 10 injuries showed abnormalities in conventional ultrasound. The determination and measurement revealed significant differences between conventional ultrasound and CEUS depending on injury severity. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed an impairment of microcirculation in grade I lesions (corresponding to intramuscular edema observed in MRI), which was not detectable using conventional ultrasound. Our results indicate that performing CEUS seems to be a sensitive additional diagnostic modality in the early assessment of muscle injuries. Our results highlight the advantages of CEUS in the imaging of low-grade lesions when compared with conventional ultrasound, as this was the more accurate modality for identifying intramuscular edema.

  3. Differences in regional homogeneity between patients with Crohn's disease with and without abdominal pain revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lu-Yi; Jin, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Si-Yao; Shi, Yin; Zhang, Jian-Ye; Zeng, Xiao-Qing; Ma, Li-Li; Qin, Wei; Zhao, Ji-Meng; Calhoun, Vince D.; Tian, Jie; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal pain processing in the central nervous system may be related to abdominal pain in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in resting-state brain activity in CD patients in remission and its relationship with the presence of abdominal pain. Twenty-five CD patients with abdominal pain, 25 CD patients without abdominal pain, and 32 healthy subjects were scanned using a 3.0 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) was used to assess resting-state brain activity. Daily pain scores were collected 1 week before fMRI scanning. We found that patients with abdominal pain exhibited lower ReHo values in the insula, middle cingulate cortex (MCC), and supplementary motor area, and higher ReHo values in the temporal pole. In contrast, patients without abdominal pain exhibited lower ReHo values in the hippocampal/parahippocampal cortex and higher ReHo values in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (all P<0.05, corrected). The ReHo values of the insula and MCC were significantly negatively correlated with daily pain scores for patients with abdominal pain (r=−0.53, P=0.008, and r=−0.61, P=0.002, respectively). These findings suggest that resting-state brain activities are different between remissive CD patients with and without abdominal pain, and that abnormal activities in insula and MCC are closely related to the severity of abdominal pain. PMID:26761381

  4. Defensive Abdominal Rotation Patterns of Tenebrionid Beetle, Zophobas atratus, Pupae

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Toshio; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Yamawaki, Yoshifumi

    2012-01-01

    Exarate pupae of the beetle Zophobas atratus Fab. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) have free appendages (antenna, palp, leg, and elytron) that are highly sensitive to mechanical stimulation. A weak tactile stimulus applied to any appendage initiated a rapid rotation of abdominal segments. High-speed photography revealed that one cycle of defensive abdominal rotation was induced in an all-or-none fashion by bending single or multiple mechanosensory hairs on a leg or prodding the cuticular surface of appendages containing campaniform sensilla. The direction of the abdominal rotation completely depended on the side of stimulation; stimulation of a right appendage induced a right-handed rotation about the anterior-posterior axis of the pupal body and vice versa. The trajectories of the abdominal rotations had an ellipsoidal or pear-shaped pattern. Among the trajectory patterns of the rotations induced by stimulating different appendages, there were occasional significant differences in the horizontal (right-left) component of abdominal rotational movements. Simultaneous stimulation of right and left appendages often induced variable and complex patterns of abdominal movements, suggesting an interaction between sensory signals from different sides. When an abdominal rotation was induced in a freely lying pupa, the rotation usually made the pupa move away from or turn its dorsum toward the source of stimulation with the aid of the caudal processes (urogomphi), which served as a fulcrum for transmitting the power of the abdominal rotation to the movement or turning of the whole body. Pattern generation mechanisms for the abdominal rotation were discussed. PMID:23448289

  5. The effect of motor control training on abdominal muscle contraction during simulated weight bearing in elite cricketers.

    PubMed

    Hides, Julie A; Endicott, Timothy; Mendis, M Dilani; Stanton, Warren R

    2016-07-01

    To investigate whether motor control training alters automatic contraction of abdominal muscles in elite cricketers with low back pain (LBP) during performance of a simulated unilateral weight-bearing task. Clinical trial. 26 male elite-cricketers attended a 13-week cricket training camp. Prior to the camp, participants were allocated to a LBP or asymptomatic group. Real-time ultrasound imaging was used to assess automatic abdominal muscle response to axial loading. During the camp, the LBP group performed a staged motor control training program. Following the camp, the automatic response of the abdominal muscles was re-assessed. At pre-camp assessment, when participants were axially loaded with 25% of their own bodyweight, the LBP group showed a 15.5% thicker internal oblique (IO) muscle compared to the asymptomatic group (p = 0.009). The post-camp assessment showed that participants in the LBP group demonstrated less contraction of the IO muscle in response to axial loading compared with the asymptomatic group. A trend was found in the automatic recruitment pattern of the transversus abdominis (p = 0.08). Motor control training normalized excessive contraction of abdominal muscles in response to a low load task. This may be a useful strategy for rehabilitation of cricketers with LBP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SU-D-210-06: Feasibility for Monitoring the Head of the Pancreas Motion Through a Surrogate Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, E; Noid, G; Ehlers, C

    Purpose: Substantial target motion during the delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for pancreatic cancer is well recognized as a major limiting factor on RT effectiveness. The aim of this work is to monitor intra-fractional motion of the pancreas using ultrasound during RT delivery. Methods: Transabdominal Ultrasound B-mode images were collected from 5 volunteers using a research version of the Clarity Autoscan System (Elekta). The autoscan transducer with center frequency of 5 MHz was utilized for the scans. Imaging parameters were adjusted to acquire images at the desired depth with good contrast and a wide sweep angle. Since well-defined boundaries ofmore » the pancreas can be difficult to find on ultrasound B-mode images, the portal vein was selected as a surrogate for motion estimation of the head of the pancreas. The selection was due to its anatomical location posterior to the neck of the pancreas and close proximity to the pancreas head. The portal vein was contoured on the ultrasound images acquired during simulation using the Clarity Research AFC Workstation software. Volunteers were set up in a similar manner to the simulation for their monitoring session and the ultrasound transducer was mounted on an arm fixed to the couch. A video segment of the portal vein motion was captured. Results: The portal vein was visualized and segmented. Successful monitoring sessions of the portal vein were observed. In addition, our results showed that the ultrasound transducer itself reduces breathing related motion. This is analogous to the use of a compression plate to suppress respiration motion during thorax or abdominal irradiation. Conclusion: We demonstrate the feasibility of tracking the pancreas through the localization of the portal vein using abdominal ultrasound. This will allow for real-time tracking of the intra-fractional motion to justify PTV-margin and to account for unusual motions, thus, improving normal tissue sparing. This research was funding in

  7. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in pediatrics. A review.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Farah Chedly; Ejike, Janeth Chiaka

    2017-10-01

    To consolidate pediatric intensivists' understanding of the pathophysiology, definition, incidence, monitoring, and management of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS); and to highlight the characteristics related to the pediatric population. This is a narrative review article that utilized a systematic search of the medical literature published in the English language between January 1990 and august 2016. Studies were identified by conducting a comprehensive search of Pub Med databases. Search terms included "intra-abdominal hypertension and child", "intra-abdominal hypertension and pediatrics", "abdominal compartment syndrome and child", and "abdominal compartment syndrome and pediatrics". Intra-abdominal hypertension and ACS are associated with a number of pathophysiological disturbances and increased morbidity and mortality. These conditions have been well described in critically ill adults. In children, the IAH and the ACS have a reported incidence of 13% and 0.6 to 10% respectively; they carry similar prognostic impact but are still under-diagnosed and under-recognized by pediatric health care providers. Intra-abdominal hypertension and ACS are conditions that are regularly encountered in critically ill children. They are associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. Early recognition, prevention and timely management of this critical condition are necessary to improve its outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Plain abdominal radiography in acute abdominal pain; past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Gans, Sarah L; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that a diagnosis based solely on a patient’s medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests is not reliable enough, despite the fact that these aspects are essential parts of the workup of a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. Traditionally, imaging workup starts with abdominal radiography. However, numerous studies have demonstrated low sensitivity and accuracy for plain abdominal radiography in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain as well as various specific diseases such as perforated viscus, bowel obstruction, ingested foreign body, and ureteral stones. Computed tomography, and in particular computed tomography after negative ultrasonography, provides a better workup than plain abdominal radiography alone. The benefits of computed tomography lie in decision-making for management, planning of a surgical strategy, and possibly even avoidance of negative laparotomies. Based on abundant available evidence, major advances in diagnostic imaging, and changes in the management of certain diseases, we can conclude that there is no place for plain abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute abdominal pain presenting in the emergency department in current practice. PMID:22807640

  9. The accuracy of combined physical examination and ultrasonography for the detection of abdominal aorta aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Cârstea, Doina; Streba, Letiţia Adela Maria; Glodeanu, Adina; Cârstea, A P; Vancu, Mihaela; Ninulescu, Ana-Maria

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most frequent cause in the appearance of an abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA) and plays an important role in his development. Most AAA does not cause any symptoms, especially when talking about elderly patients, however, many of those aneurysms can be detected during physical examination. Their detection is very important because the natural evolution and the major reason in treating AAA is their tendency to rupture. We present the case of an adult man with a complex clinical pathology, but not related to the AAA. The diagnosis of the AAA has been suspicion through palpation, and the abdominal ultrasound exam confirmed it. This case is particular interesting, as the AAA requires surgical intervention, while patient's health status was poor. An essential issue is establishing the importance of the AAA screening, when there are no symptoms present. For now, there are not satisfactory studies to be used as a guide.

  10. Low prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm in the Seychelles population aged 50 to 65 years.

    PubMed

    Yerly, Patrick; Madeleine, George; Riesen, Walter; Bovet, Pascal

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and its risk factors are well known in Western countries but few data are available from low- and middle- income countries. We are not aware of systematically collected population- based data on AAA in the African region. We evaluated the prevalence of AAA in a population- based cardiovascular survey conducted in the Republic of Seychelles in 2004 (Indian Ocean, African region). Among the 353 participants aged 50 to 64 years and screened with ultrasound, the prevalence of AAA was 0.3% (95% CI: 0- 0.9) and the prevalence of ectatic dilatations of the abdominal aorta was 1.5% (95% CI: 0.2- 2.8). The prevalence of AAA in the general population seemed lower in Seychelles than in Western countries, despite a high prevalence in Seychelles of risk factors of AAA, such as smoking (in men), high blood pressure and hypercholesterolaemia.

  11. Gastrointestinal perforations in children: a continuing challenge to nonoperative treatment of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ulman, I; Avanoğlu, A; Ozcan, C; Demircan, M; Ozok, G; Erdener, A

    1996-07-01

    The present trend towards conservative management of hemodynamically stable pediatric trauma patients may be increasing the risk of delay in the diagnosis of traumatic hollow viscus perforations (HVP). The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a delay in the diagnosis of HVP because of expectant management. A survey of factors leading to diagnostic delay was also made and the value of current diagnostic tools were reevaluated. In 1,283 trauma admissions between 1980-1994, 34 patients were operated for HVP caused by blunt abdominal trauma. Sites of perforation were; stomach (four), duodenum (five), jejunum (12), ileum (nine), and jejunum/ileum (four). Signs of peritoneal irritation were positive in 32 of 34 patients. There was free air in only six of 24 abdominal roentgenograms. Free peritoneal fluid without solid organ injury was detected in only four out of 13 patients with ultrasound. Peritoneal lavage was diagnostic in eight of nine patients. Time from admission to operating room averaged 24 +/- 4.1 (mean +/- standard deviation) hours. Eleven patients died after the operation mostly because of accompanying head injury. Only two of the deaths were the result of sepsis originating from the perforated bowel. There is an apparent delay in the diagnosis of traumatic HVP in this series. Signs of peritoneal irritation are the most consistent findings of HVP after blunt abdominal trauma in children. Persistence of abdominal signs indicates peritoneal lavage, which has a high diagnostic sensitivity for HVP compared to other diagnostic modalities.

  12. Temperature-dependent differences in the nonlinear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents revealed by high-speed imaging and bulk acoustics.

    PubMed

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Tang, Mengxing; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Previous work by the authors has established that increasing the temperature of the suspending liquid from 20°C to body temperature has a significant impact on the bulk acoustic properties and stability of an ultrasound contrast agent suspension (SonoVue, Bracco Suisse SA, Manno, Lugano, Switzerland). In this paper the influence of temperature on the nonlinear behavior of microbubbles is investigated, because this is one of the most important parameters in the context of diagnostic imaging. High-speed imaging showed that raising the temperature significantly influences the dynamic behavior of individual microbubbles. At body temperature, microbubbles exhibit greater radial excursion and oscillate less spherically, with a greater incidence of jetting and gas expulsion, and therefore collapse, than they do at room temperature. Bulk acoustics revealed an associated increase in the harmonic content of the scattered signals. These findings emphasize the importance of conducting laboratory studies at body temperature if the results are to be interpreted for in vivo applications. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines: Traditional ultrasound: This uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound: This ...

  14. Management of complex abdominal wall defects associated with penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Arul, G Suren; Sonka, B J; Lundy, J B; Rickard, R F; Jeffery, S L A

    2015-03-01

    The paradigm of Damage Control Surgery (DCS) has radically improved the management of abdominal trauma, but less well described are the options for managing the abdominal wall itself in an austere environment. This article describes a series of patients with complex abdominal wall problems managed at the UK-led Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility (MTF) in Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. Contemporaneous review of a series of patients with complex abdominal wall injuries who presented to the Role 3 MTF between July and November 2012. Five patients with penetrating abdominal trauma associated with significant damage to the abdominal wall were included. All patients were managed using DCS principles, leaving the abdominal wall open at the end of the first procedure. Subsequent management of the abdominal wall was determined by a multidisciplinary team of general and plastic surgeons, intensivists and specialist nurses. The principles of management identified included minimising tissue loss on initial laparotomy by joining adjacent wounds and marginal debridement of dead tissue; contraction of the abdominal wall was minimised by using topical negative pressure dressing and dermal-holding sutures. Definitive closure was timed to allow oedema to settle and sepsis to be controlled. Closure techniques include delayed primary closure with traction sutures, components separation, and mesh closure with skin grafting. A daily multidisciplinary team discussion was invaluable for optimal decision making regarding the most appropriate means of abdominal closure. Dermal-holding sutures were particularly useful in preventing myostatic contraction of the abdominal wall. A simple flow chart was developed to aid decision making in these patients. This flow chart may prove especially useful in a resource-limited environment in which returning months or years later for closure of a large ventral hernia may not be possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  15. High-frequency ultrasound-responsive block copolymer micelle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Pelletier, Maxime; Zhang, Hongji; Xia, Hesheng; Zhao, Yue

    2009-11-17

    Micelles of a diblock copolymer composed of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(2-tetrahydropyranyl methacrylate) (PEO-b-PTHPMA) in aqueous solution could be disrupted by high-frequency ultrasound (1.1 MHz). It was found that, upon exposure to a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beam at room temperature, the pH value of the micellar solution decreased over irradiation time. The infrared spectroscopic analysis of solid block copolymer samples collected from the ultrasound irradiated micellar solution revealed the formation of carboxylic acid dimers and hydroxyl groups. These characterization results suggest that the high-frequency HIFU beam could induce the hydrolysis reaction of THPMA at room temperature resulting in the cleavage of THP groups. The disruption of PEO-b-PTHPMA micelles by ultrasound was investigated by using dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. On the basis of the pH change, it was found that the disruption process was determined by a number of factors such as the ultrasound power, the micellar solution volume and the location of the focal spot of the ultrasound beam. This study shows the potential to develop ultrasound-sensitive block copolymer micelles by having labile chemical bonds in the polymer structure, and to use the high-frequency HIFU to trigger a chemical reaction for the disruption of micelles.

  16. Prospects for telediagnosis using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Dewey, C F; Thomas, J D; Kunt, M; Hunter, I W

    1996-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is currently used as a primary diagnostic tool in cardiology, abdominal disorders, pulmonary medicine, trauma, and obstetrics. Because of its relatively low capital and operating costs as well as its growth potential, it represents one of the major diagnostic modalities of future health care. However, the use of ultrasonography as a mobile and powerful modality is controlled by the availability of a highly skilled technician to acquire the images and an experienced physician to interpret them. This paper discusses the technology required to increase the availability of a diagnosing physician by employing telerobotics. With this technology, the physician can guide the motion of the transducer by the technician from a remote location. Thus, the physician controls the examination and renders the diagnosis. It is shown that communication lines at 1.5 Mbits/s (T-1 speed) can, with appropriate compression, support both real-time viewing of the ultrasound images and telerobotic manipulation of the transducer. The incremental costs of telediagnosis for an examination are estimated to be a small fraction of the base charges and significantly less than the expense of bringing a physician to a remote location or transporting a patient to a regional medical center. Telediagnosis can, in addition, provide benefits from immediate interpretation and consultation that cannot be duplicated using store-and-forward scenarios.

  17. Effects of aerobic exercise associated with abdominal microcurrent: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Noites, Andreia; Nunes, Rita; Gouveia, Ana Isabel; Mota, Alexandra; Melo, Cristina; Viera, Ágata; Adubeiro, Nuno; Bastos, José Mesquita

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the short- and long-term effects of microcurrent used with aerobic exercise on abdominal fat (visceral and subcutaneous). Forty-two female students from a university population were randomly assigned into five group: intervention group (IG) 1 (n=9), IG2 (n=9), IG3 (n=7), IG4 (n=8), and placebo group (PG) (n=9). An intervention program of 10 sessions encompassing microcurrent and aerobic exercise (performed with a cycloergometer) was applied in all groups, with slightly differences between them. In IG1 and IG2, microcurrent with transcutaneous electrodes was applied, with different frequency values; 30-minute exercise on the cycloergometer was subsequently performed. IG3 used the same protocol as IG1 but with different electrodes (percutaneous), while in IG4 the microcurrent was applied simultaneously with the cycloergometer exercise. Finally, the PG used the IG1 protocol but with the microcurrent device switched off. All groups were evaluated through ultrasound and abdominal perimeter measurement for visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat assessment; through calipers for skinfolds measurement; through bioimpedance to evaluate weight, fat mass percentage, and muscular mass; and through blood analyses to measure cholesterol, triglyceride, and glucose levels. After intervention sessions, visceral fat decreased significantly in IG1 compared with the PG. Subcutaneous fat was reduced significantly in all groups compared with the PG. After 4 weeks, almost all results were maintained. The addition of microcurrent to aerobic exercise may reduce fat more than does aerobic exercise alone.

  18. Portable Bladder Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Data from the National Population Health Survey indicate prevalence rates of urinary incontinence are 2.5% in women and 1.4 % in men in the general population. Prevalence of urinary incontinence is higher in women than men and prevalence increases with age. Identified risk factors for urinary incontinence include female gender, increasing age, urinary tract infections (UTI), poor mobility, dementia, smoking, obesity, consuming alcohol and caffeine beverages, physical activity, pregnancy, childbirth, forceps and vacuum-assisted births, episiotomy, abdominal resection for colorectal cancer, and hormone replacement therapy. For the purposes of this review, incontinence populations will be stratified into the following; the elderly, urology patients, postoperative patients, rehabilitation settings, and neurogenic bladder populations. Urinary incontinence is defined as any involuntary leakage of urine. Incontinence can be classified into diagnostic clinical types that are useful in planning evaluation and treatment. The major types of incontinence are stress (physical exertion), urge (overactive bladder), mixed (combined urge and stress urinary incontinence), reflex (neurological impairment of the central nervous system), overflow (leakage due to full bladder), continuous (urinary tract abnormalities), congenital incontinence, and transient incontinence (temporary incontinence). Postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, which is the amount of urine in the bladder immediately after urination, represents an important component in continence assessment and bladder management to provide quantitative feedback to the patient and continence care team regarding the effectiveness of the voiding technique. Although there is no standardized definition of normal PVR urine volume, measurements greater than 100 mL to 150 m

  19. The value of plain abdominal radiographs in management of abdominal emergencies in Luth.

    PubMed

    Ashindoitiang, J A; Atoyebi, A O; Arogundade, R A

    2008-01-01

    The plain abdominal x-ray is still the first imaging modality in diagnosis of acute abdomen. The aim of this study was to find the value of plain abdominal x-ray in the management of abdominal emergencies seen in Lagos university teaching hospital. The accurate diagnosis of the cause of acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging undertakings in emergency medicine. This is due to overlapping of clinical presentation and non-specific findings of physical and even laboratory data of the multifarious causes. Plain abdominal radiography is one investigation that can be obtained readily and within a short period of time to help the physician arrive at a correct diagnosis The relevance of plain abdominal radiography was therefore evaluated in the management of abdominal emergencies seen in Lagos over a 12 month period (April 2002 to March 2003). A prospective study of 100 consecutively presenting patients with acute abdominal conditions treated by the general surgical unit of Lagos University Teaching Hospital was undertaken. All patients had supine and erect abdominal x-ray before any therapeutic intervention was undertaken. The diagnostic features of the plain films were compared with final diagnosis to determine the usefulness of the plain x-ray There were 54 males and 46 females (M:F 1.2:1). Twenty-four percent of the patients had intestinal obstruction, 20% perforated typhoid enteritis; gunshot injuries and generalized peritonitis each occurred in 13%, blunt abdominal trauma in 12%, while 8% and 10% had acute appendicitis and perforated peptic ulcer disease respectively. Of 100 patients studied, 54% had plain abdominal radiographs that showed positive diagnostic features. Plain abdominal radiograph showed high sensitivity in patients with intestinal obstruction 100% and perforated peptic ulcer 90% but was less sensitive in patients with perforated typhoid, acute appendicitis, and blunt abdominal trauma and generalized peritonitis. In conclusion, this study

  20. Evaluation of the levels of metalloproteinsase-2 in patients with abdominal aneurysm and abdominal hernias.

    PubMed

    Antoszewska, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms and abdominal hernias become an important health problems of our times. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and its rupture is one of the most dangerous fact in vascular surgery. There are some theories pointing to a multifactoral genesis of these kinds of diseases, all of them assume the attenuation of abdominal fascia and abdominal aortic wall. The density and continuity of these structures depend on collagen and elastic fibers structure. Reducing the strength of the fibers may be due to changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) by the proteolytic enzymes-matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that degrade extracellular matrix proteins. These enzymes play an important role in the development of many disease: malignant tumors (colon, breast, lung, pancreas), cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, ischemia-reperfusion injury), connective tissue diseases (Ehler-Danlos Syndrome, Marfan's Syndrome), complications of diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy). One of the most important is matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The aim of the study was an estimation of the MMP-2 blood levels in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia, and in patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm. The study involved 88 patients aged 42 to 89 years, including 75 men and 13 women. Patients were divided into two groups: patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia (45 persons, representing 51.1% of all group) and patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm (43 persons, representing 48,9% of all group). It was a statistically significant increase in MMP-2 blood levels in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia compared to patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm. It was a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of POCHP in patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia. Statistically significant

  1. Influence of catch-up growth on abdominal fat distribution in very low birth weight children - cohort study.

    PubMed

    Alves, João Guilherme; Vasconcelos, Sarita Amorim; de Almeida, Tais Sá; Lages, Raquel; Just, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A rapid catch-up growth in very low birth weight has been associated both with a higher height growth and a higher risk to metabolic disturbances, including insulin resistance and its consequences. Abdominal fat distribution in early postnatal life may play a role in these outcomes and can help in addressing this neonatal dilemma. This study aimed to compare abdominal fat distribution among very low birth weight (VLBW) children with and without rapid catch-up growth. A cohort study followed 86 VLBW (<1500) children born in Brazil, during the first 3 years of life. Rapid catch-up growth was considered as an increased in length >2 Z score during the first year of life. Abdominal subcutaneous and preperitoneal fat thickness was determined by ultrasound. χ²-Test and Student's t-test were used to compare the groups. A total of 79 VLBW children completed the study, of whom 22 (27.8%) showed rapid catch-up growth. Abdominal subcutaneous and preperitoneal fat thickness showed no differences among children with or without rapid catch-up growth at 3.3 mm vs. 3.8 mm, respectively (p=0.79) and 4.0 mm vs. 4.0 mm (p=0.55), respectively. VLBW children with rapid catch-up growth were also taller. Rapid catch-up growth during the first year of life in VLBW children does not seem to change abdominal fat distribution until the third year of life.

  2. Treatment of abdominal cellulite and circumference reduction with radiofrequency and dynamic muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Iamphonrat, Thanawan; Thanomkitti, Kanchalit; Lektrakul, Nittaya; Manuskiatti, Woraphong

    2015-01-01

    Cellulite is a frequent skin condition for which treatment remains a challenge. A wide variety of treatments are available but most procedures offer suboptimal clinical effect and/or delayed therapeutic outcome. Only few therapeutic options have proven efficacy in the treatment of cellulite. To determine the efficacy and the safety profiles of radiofrequency and dynamic muscle activation technology in treatment of abdominal cellulite and circumference reduction. Twenty-five females with abdominal cellulite received 6 weekly radiofrequency and dynamic muscle activation treatments. Treatment areas included the abdomen and both sides of flanks. Subjects were evaluated using standardized photographs, and measurements of body weight and abdominal circumference at baseline, before every treatment visit, and 1 week and four weeks after the final treatment. Subcutaneous tissue thickness was recorded by ultrasound at baseline and 4 weeks after completion of treatment protocol. Physicians' evaluation and patient's satisfaction of clinical improvement were also measured. All subjects completed the treatment protocol and attended every follow-up visits. There was significant abdominal circumference reduction of 2.96 and 2.52 cm at 1-, and 4-week follow-up visits (p < 0.05), respectively. At four weeks after the last treatment, the average circumferential reduction was sustained. Most of the patients were rated to have 25-49% improvement at 5th treatment, and 1- and 4-week follow-up visits. Ninety-two percent of the patients were satisfied with the treatment outcome. Radiofrequency provided beneficial effects on the reduction of abdomen and cellulite appearance. The benefit of muscle activation is yet to be determined.

  3. [A commonly seen cause of abdominal pain: abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Ilker; Talay, Mustafa; Tekindur, Şükrü; Kurt, Ercan

    2012-01-01

    Although abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES) is accepted as a rare condition, it is a syndrome that should be diagnosed more commonly when the clinical signs cannot explain the cause of abdominal pain. Abdominal pain is commonly considered by physicians to be based on intra-abdominal causes. Consequently, redundant tests and consultations are requested for these patients, and unnecessary surgical procedures may be applied. Patients with this type of pain are consulted to many clinics, and because their definitive diagnoses cannot be achieved, they are assessed as psychiatric patients. Actually, a common cause of abdominal wall pain is nerve entrapment on the lateral edge of the rectus abdominis muscle. In this paper, we would like to share information about the diagnosis and treatment of a patient who, prior to presenting to us, had applied to different clinics for chronic abdominal pain and had undergone many tests and consultations; abdominal surgery was eventually decided.

  4. Characterization of the mechanical behavior and pathophysiological state of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on 4D ultrasound strain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittek, Andreas; Blase, Christopher; Derwich, Wojciech; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Fritzen, Claus-Peter

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are a degenerative disease of the human aortic wall that may lead to weakening and eventually rupture of the wall with high mortality rates. Since the currently established criterion for surgical or endovascular treatment of the disease is imprecise in the individual case and treatment is not free of complications, the need for additional patient-individual biomarkers for short-term AAA rupture risk as basis for improved clinical decision making. Time resolved 3D ultrasound combined with speckle tracking algorithms is a novel non-invasive medical imaging technique that provides full-field displacement and strain measurements of aortic and aneurysmal wall motion. This is patient-individual information that has not been used so far to assess wall strength and rupture risk. The current study uses simple statistical indices of the heterogeneous spatial distribution of in-plane strain components as biomarkers for the pathological state of the aortic and aneurysmal wall. The pathophysiological rationale behind this approach are the known changes in microstructural composition of the aortic wall with progression of AAA development that results in increased stiffening and heterogeneity of the walls mechanical properties and in decreased wall strength. In a comparative analysis of the aortic wall motion of young volunteers without known cardiovascular diseases, aged arteriosclerotic patients without AAA, and AAA patients, mean values of all in-plane strain components were significantly reduced, and the heterogeneity of circumferential strain was significantly increased in the AAA group compared to both other groups. The capacity of the proposed method to differentiate between wall motion of aged, arteriosclerotic patients and AAA patients is a promising step towards a new method for in vivo assessment of AAA wall strength or stratification of AAA rupture risk as basis for improved clinical decision making on surgical or endovascular

  5. Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block for postoperative pain management: a review.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Jan; Wickerts, Liselott; Forsberg, Sune; Ledin, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block has a long history and there is currently extensive clinical experience around TAP blocks. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the present evidence on the effects of TAP block and to provide suggestions for further studies. There are several approaches to performing abdominal wall blocks, with the rapid implementation of ultrasound-guided technique facilitating a major difference in TAP block performance. During surgery, an abdominal wall block may also be applied by the surgeon from inside the abdominal cavity. Today, there are more than 11 meta-analyses providing a compiled evidence base around the effects of TAP block. These analyses include different procedures, different techniques of TAP block administration and, importantly, they compare the TAP block with a variety of alternative analgesic regimes. The effects of TAP block during laparoscopic cholecystectomy seem to be equivalent to local infiltration analgesia and also seem to be beneficial during laparoscopic colon resection. The effects of TAP are more pronounced when it is provided prior to surgery and these effects are local anaesthesia dose-dependent. TAP block seems an interesting alternative in patients with, for example, severe obesity where epidural or spinal anaesthesia/analgesia is technically difficult and/or poses a risk. There is an obvious need for further high-quality studies comparing TAP block prior to surgery with local infiltration analgesia, single-shot spinal analgesia, and epidural analgesia. These studies should be procedure-specific and the effects should be evaluated, both regarding short-term pain and analgesic requirement and also including the effects on postoperative nausea and vomiting, recovery of bowel function, ambulation, discharge, and protracted recovery outcomes (assessed by e.g., postoperative quality of recovery scale).

  6. Volumetry and biomechanical parameters detected by 3D and 2D ultrasound in patients with and without an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Batagini, Nayara Cioffi; Ventura, Carlos Augusto Pinto; Raghavan, Madhavan L; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Tachibana, Adriano; da Silva, Erasmo Simão

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the ability of ultrasound (US) with 3D properties to evaluate volumetry and biomechanical parameters of the aorta in patients with and without abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Thirty-one patients with normal aortas (group 1), 46 patients with AAA measuring 3.0-5.5 cm (group 2) and 31 patients with AAA ⩾ 5.5 cm (group 3) underwent a 2D/3D-US examination of the infra-renal aorta, and the images were post-processed prior to being analyzed. In the maximum diameter, the global circumferential strain and the global maximum rotation assessed by 2D speckle-tracking algorithms were compared among the three groups. The volumetry data obtained using 3D-US from 40 AAA patients were compared with the volumetry data obtained by a contemporary computed tomography (CT) scan. The median global circumferential strain was 2.0% (interquartile range (IR): 1.0-3.0), 1.0% (IR: 1.0-2.0) and 1.0% (IR: 1.0-1.75) in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (p < 0.001). The median global maximum rotation decreased progressively from group 1 to group 3 (1.38º (IR: 0.77-2.13), 0.80º (IR: 0.57-1.0) and 0.50º (IR: 0.31-0.75), p < 0.001). AAA volume estimations by 3D-US correlated well with CT (R(2) = 0.76). In conclusion, US with 3D properties is non-invasive and has the potential to evaluate volumetry and biomechanical characteristics of AAA. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Ultrasound criteria and guided fine-needle aspiration diagnostic yields in small animal peritoneal, mesenteric and omental disease.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Daniel A; Ober, Christopher P; Snyder, Laura A; Hill, Sara A; Jessen, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal, mesenteric, and omental diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans and animals, although information in the veterinary literature is limited. The purposes of this retrospective study were to determine whether objectively applied ultrasound interpretive criteria are statistically useful in differentiating among cytologically defined normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic peritoneal conditions in dogs and cats. A second goal was to determine the cytologically interpretable yield on ultrasound-guided, fine-needle sampling of peritoneal, mesenteric, or omental structures. Sonographic criteria agreed upon by the authors were retrospectively and independently applied by two radiologists to the available ultrasound images without knowledge of the cytologic diagnosis and statistically compared to the ultrasound-guided, fine-needle aspiration cytologic interpretations. A total of 72 dogs and 49 cats with abdominal peritoneal, mesenteric, or omental (peritoneal) surface or effusive disease and 17 dogs and 3 cats with no cytologic evidence of inflammation or neoplasia were included. The optimized, ultrasound criteria-based statistical model created independently for each radiologist yielded an equation-based diagnostic category placement accuracy of 63.2-69.9% across the two involved radiologists. Regional organ-associated masses or nodules as well as aggregated bowel and peritoneal thickening were more associated with peritoneal neoplasia whereas localized, severely complex fluid collections were more associated with inflammatory peritoneal disease. The cytologically interpretable yield for ultrasound-guided fine-needle sampling was 72.3% with no difference between species, making this a worthwhile clinical procedure. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  8. Validation of a technique for accurate fine-wire electrode placement into posterior gluteus medius using real-time ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Hodges, P W; Kippers, V; Richardson, C A

    1997-01-01

    Fine-wire electromyography is primarily utilised for the recording of activity of the deep musculature, however, due to the location of these muscles, accurate electrode placement is difficult. Real-time ultrasound imaging (RTUI) of muscle tissue has been used for the guidance of the needle insertion for the placement of electrodes into the muscles of the abdominal wall. The validity of RTUI guidance of needle insertion into the deep muscles has not been determined. A cadaveric study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy with which RTUI can be used to guide fine-wire electrode placement using the posterior fibres of gluteus medius (PGM) as an example. Pilot studies revealed that the ultrasound resolution of cadaveric tissue is markedly reduced making it impossible to directly evaluate the technique, therefore, three studies were conducted. An initial study involved the demarcation of the anatomical boundaries of PGM using RTUI to define a technique based on an anatomical landmark that was consisent with the in vivo RTUI guided needle placement technique. This anatomical landmark was then used as the guide for the cadaveric needle insertion. Once the needle was positioned 0.05 ml of dye was introduced and the specimen dissected. The dye was accurately placed in PGM in 100% of the specimens. Finally, fine-wire electrodes were inserted into the PGM of five volunteers and manoeuvres performed indicating the accuracy of placement. This study supports the use of ultrasound imaging for the accurate guidance of needle insertion for fine-wire and needle EMG electrodes.

  9. Optimizing sonication protocols for transthoracic focused ultrasound surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Volovick, A.; Cao, R.; Nabi, G.; Cochran, S.; Melzer, A.; Huang, Z.

    2012-11-01

    During transthoracic focused ultrasound surgery (TFUS), the intervening ribs absorb and reflect the majority of the ultrasound energy excited by an acoustic source, resulting in pain, bone injuries and insufficient energy delivered to the target organs of liver, kidney, and pancreas. Localized hot spots may also exist at the interfaces between the ribs and soft tissue and in the highly absorptive regions such as the skin and connective tissue. The aims of this study were to clarify the effects of focal beam distortion and frequency-dependent rib heating in TFUS and to propose possible techniques to reduce the side-effects of rib heating and increase ultrasound efficacy. Frequency-dependent heating at the target and the ribs were estimated using finite element analysis (PZFlex, Weidlinger Associates Inc, USA) along with experimental verification on a range of different phantoms. The ratio of ultrasonic power density at the target and the ribs, the time-varying spatial distribution of temperature, and the ablated focus of each sonication were taken as key indicators to determine the optimal operating frequency. Comparison with a patient specific model was also made. TFUS seems to be useful to treat tumours that are small and near the surface of the abdominal organs. For targets deep inside these organs, severe attenuation of energy occurs, suggesting that purely ultrasound thermal ablation with advanced heating patterns will have limited effects in improving the treatment efficacy. Results demonstrate that the optimal ultrasound frequency is around 0.8 MHz for the configurations considered, but this may shift to higher frequencies with changes in the axial and lateral positions of the tumours relative to the ribs. To date, we have elucidated the most important effects and correlated these with idealised anatomical geometry. The changes in frequency and other techniques such as selection of excited element patterns in FUS arrays had some effect. However, more advanced

  10. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Ahmad Vaqas; Qazi, Saqib Hamid; Khan, Muhammad Arif Mateen; Akhtar, Wassem; Majeed, Amina

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the role of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma patients, and to see if the role of computed tomography scan could be limited to only those cases in which sonography was positive. The retrospective study covered 10 years, from January 1,2000 to December 31,2009, and was conducted at the Department of Radiology and Department of Emergency Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised cases of 174 children from birth to 14 years who had presented with blunt abdominal trauma and had focussed abdominal sonography for trauma done at the hospital. The findings were correlated with computed tomography scan of the abdomen and clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma were calculated for blunt abdominal trauma. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. Of the total 174 cases, 31 (17.81%) were later confirmed by abdominal scan. Of these 31 children, sonography had been positive in 29 (93.54%) children. In 21 (67.74%) of the 31 children, sonograpy had been true positive; 8 (25%) (8/31) were false positive; and 2 (6%) (2/31) were false negative. There were 6 (19.3%) children in which sonography was positive and converted to laparotomy. There was no significant difference on account of gender (p>0.356). Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in the study had sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value of 73%, and negative predictive value of 73% with accuracy of 94%. All patients who had negative sonography were discharged later, and had no complication on clinical follow-up. Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma is a fairly reliable mode to assess blunt abdominal trauma in children. It is a useful tool to pick high-grade solid and hollow viscous injury. The results suggest that the role of computed tomography scan can be limited to those cases in which focussed

  11. Grey Turner's and Cullen's signs induced by spontaneous hemorrhage of the abdominal wall after coughing.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhe; Zhang, Yingyi

    2017-08-01

    Grey Turner's and Cullen's signs are rare clinical signs, which most appear in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. The present patient complained of abdominal pain after coughing. However, contrast-enhanced CT revealed a hemorrhage of the abdominal wall. Therefore, spontaneous hemorrhage of the abdominal wall was diagnosed. The patient recovered through immobilization and hemostasis therapy. This case report and literature review aims to remind clinicians of manifestations and treatment of spontaneous hemorrhage.

  12. Child with Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rajalakshmi; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the common symptoms reported by children in urgent care clinics. While most children tend to have self-limiting conditions, the treating pediatrician should watch out for underlying serious causes like intestinal obstruction and perforation peritonitis, which require immediate referral to an emergency department (ED). Abdominal pain may be secondary to surgical or non-surgical causes, and will differ as per the age of the child. The common etiologies for abdominal pain presenting to an urgent care clinic are acute gastro-enteritis, constipation and functional abdominal pain; however, a variety of extra-abdominal conditions may also present as abdominal pain. Meticulous history taking and physical examination are the best tools for diagnosis, while investigations have a limited role in treating benign etiologies.

  13. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  14. Investigation and identification of etiologies involved in the development of acquired hydronephrosis in aged laboratory mice with the use of high-frequency ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Danielle A.; Allen, Michele; Hoffman, Victoria; Brinster, Lauren; Starost, Matthew F.; Bryant, Mark; Eckhaus, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory mice develop naturally occurring lesions that affect biomedical research. Hydronephrosis is a recognized pathologic abnormality of the mouse kidney. Acquired hydronephrosis can affect any mouse, as it is caused by any naturally occurring disease that impairs free urine flow. Many etiologies leading to this condition are of particular significance to aging mice. Non-invasive ultrasound imaging detects renal pelvic dilation, renal enlargement, and parenchymal loss for pre-mortem identification of this condition. High-frequency ultrasound transducers produce high-resolution images of small structures, ideal for detecting organ pathology in mice. Using a 40 MHz linear array transducer, we obtained high-resolution images of a diversity of pathologic lesions occurring within the abdomen of seven geriatric mice with acquired hydronephrosis that enabled a determination of the underlying etiology. Etiologies diagnosed from the imaging results include pyelonephritis, neoplasia, urolithiasis, mouse urologic syndrome, and spontaneous hydronephrosis, and were confirmed at necropsy. A retrospective review of abdominal scans from an additional 149 aging mice shows that the most common etiologies associated with acquired hydronephrosis are mouse urologic syndrome and abdominal neoplasia. This report highlights the utility of high-frequency ultrasound for surveying research mice for age-related pathology, and is the first comprehensive report of multiple cases of acquired hydronephrosis in mice. PMID:25143818

  15. Evaluation of trainees' ability to perform obstetrical ultrasound using simulation: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Gihad E; Bernardi, Valeria; Gueneuc, Alexandra; Houssin, Isabelle; Stirnemann, Julien J; Ville, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of trainee's ability in obstetrical ultrasound is a time-consuming process, which requires involving patients as volunteers. With the use of obstetrical ultrasound simulators, virtual reality could help in assessing competency and evaluating trainees in this field. The objective of the study was to test the validity of an obstetrical ultrasound simulator as a tool for evaluating trainees following structured training by comparing scores obtained on obstetrical ultrasound simulator with those obtained on volunteers and by assessing correlations between scores of images and of dexterity given by 2 blinded examiners. Trainees, taking the 2013 French national examination for the practice of obstetrical ultrasound were asked to obtain standardized ultrasound planes both on volunteer pregnant women and on an obstetrical ultrasound simulator. These planes included measurements of biparietal diameter, abdominal circumference, and femur length as well as reference planes for cardiac 4-chamber and outflow tracts, kidneys, stomach/diaphragm, spine, and face. Images were stored and evaluated subsequently by 2 national examiners who scored each picture according to previously established quality criteria. Dexterity was also evaluated and subjectively scored between 0 and 10. The Raghunathan's modification of Pearson, Filon's z, Spearman's rank correlation, and analysis of variance tests were used to assess correlations between the scores by the 2 examiners and scores of dexterity and also to compare the final scores between the 2 different methods. We evaluated 29 trainees. The mean dexterity scores in simulation (6.5 ± 2.0) and real examination (5.9 ± 2.3) were comparable (P = .31). Scores with an obstetrical ultrasound simulator were significantly higher than those obtained on volunteers (P = .027). Nevertheless, there was a good correlation between the scores of the 2 examiners judging on simulation (R = 0.888) and on volunteers (R = 0.873) (P = .81). An

  16. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in a child with sickle cell anemia and recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, L; Mahoney, D H; Redel, C A

    1997-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common complaint in children with sickle cell disease. Helicobacter pylori gastritis has recently been described in association with recurrent abdominal pain in children. A case report is given of a 16-year-old black male with hemoglobin SS disease presenting with recurrent abdominal pain and hematemesis. Endoscopic exam of the upper gastrointestinal tract revealed gastritis, and biopsy confirmed H. pylori infection. Serology studies demonstrated increased anti-H. pylori antibody titers. The young man responded well to treatment, with resolution of his symptoms. Helicobacter pylori infection is a new diagnostic consideration for children with recurrent abdominal pain and should be included in the differential diagnosis of children with sickle cell disease, especially when abdominal pain is recurrent and accompanied by vomiting. Larger case studies will be necessary to determine the true incidence of H. pylori in children with sickle cell disease and recurrent abdominal pain.

  17. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  18. [Is the stomach a main landmark on the abdominal circumference? Audit of 3 operators].

    PubMed

    Laurent, A-C; Blanc, J; Grangé, G

    2016-05-01

    The fetal weight estimation depends largely on the accuracy of abdominal circumference. The quality criteria are standardized to minimize variability and include visualization of the stomach. The objective of this study is to investigate the presence or absence of the stomach on the abdominal circumference for 3 different operators. We conducted re-reading of 204 ultrasound images in the second and third trimester of pregnancy, performed by three operators, at the maternity Port Royal in Paris in 2013. On these images, the presence of the stomach was sought and other quality criteria were verified. Among the 204 images, 166 included the stomach (81%). When studying for each of the three operators, there were 79%, 72% and 98% of the stomach into the abdominal circumference, a significant difference between operators (P=0.0029). Regarding the secondary criteria, the quality criteria found most often were the calipers and well placed ellipse (89%). According to the previous studies, the stomach seems to be a reference to search. Our study shows variability depending on the different operators. If a hierarchy of quality criteria is to be considered, the stomach does not seem to be the first criterion to search. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two- ... sound waves and appear dark or black. An ultrasound can supply vital information about a mother's pregnancy ...

  20. Effect of Abdominal Ultrasound on Clinical Care, Outcomes, and Resource Use Among Children With Blunt Torso Trauma: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Holmes, James F; Kelley, Kenneth M; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; Utter, Garth H; Abramson, Lisa P; Rose, John S; Tancredi, Daniel J; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2017-06-13

    The utility of the focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) examination in children is unknown. To determine if the FAST examination during initial evaluation of injured children improves clinical care. A randomized clinical trial (April 2012-May 2015) that involved 975 hemodynamically stable children and adolescents younger than 18 years treated for blunt torso trauma at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, a level I trauma center. Patients were randomly assigned to a standard trauma evaluation with the FAST examination by the treating ED physician or a standard trauma evaluation alone. Coprimary outcomes were rate of abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scans in the ED, missed intra-abdominal injuries, ED length of stay, and hospital charges. Among the 925 patients who were randomized (mean [SD] age, 9.7 [5.3] years; 575 males [62%]), all completed the study. A total of 50 patients (5.4%, 95% CI, 4.0% to 7.1%) were diagnosed with intra-abdominal injuries, including 40 (80%; 95% CI, 66% to 90%) who had intraperitoneal fluid found on an abdominal CT scan, and 9 patients (0.97%; 95% CI, 0.44% to 1.8%) underwent laparotomy. The proportion of patients with abdominal CT scans was 241 of 460 (52.4%) in the FAST group and 254 of 465 (54.6%) in the standard care-only group (difference, -2.2%; 95% CI, -8.7% to 4.2%). One case of missed intra-abdominal injury occurred in a patient in the FAST group and none in the control group (difference, 0.2%; 95% CI, -0.6% to 1.2%). The mean ED length of stay was 6.03 hours in the FAST group and 6.07 hours in the standard care-only group (difference, -0.04 hours; 95% CI, -0.47 to 0.40 hours). Median hospital charges were $46 415 in the FAST group and $47 759 in the standard care-only group (difference, -$1180; 95% CI, -$6651 to $4291). Among hemodynamically stable children treated in an ED following blunt torso trauma, the use of FAST compared with standard care only did not improve clinical care, including

  1. Risk Assessment of Abdominal Wall Thickness Measured on Pre-Operative Computerized Tomography for Incisional Surgical Site Infection after Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tongyoo, Assanee; Chatthamrak, Putipan; Sriussadaporn, Ekkapak; Limpavitayaporn, Palin; Mingmalairak, Chatchai

    2015-07-01

    thickness ≥ 20 mm. The incidence of SSI of the thickness ±20 mm group was 37.2% (16/43) and of the less thickness group was 19.8% (19/96), with p < 0.05. The univariate analysis revealed that abdominal wall thickness ≥ 20 mm, body weight ≥ 60 kg, and wound classification were the important factors related to SSI after the abdominal operation. However, only abdominal wall thickness and wound classification were still significant by multivariate analysis. The findings of this study confirmed the significance of the subcutaneous thickness of abdominal wall at the surgical site on the incidence of incisional SSI. The thickness ≥ 20 mm had an effect on increasing post operative SSI rate especially in contaminated operations. These findings could be helpful in making healthcare providers fully aware and thus exercise special attention in wound care or even develop new modalities to prevent SSI in patients with the aforementioned risks.

  2. Performance of chest ultrasound in pediatric pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Claes, Anne-Sophie; Clapuyt, Philippe; Menten, Renaud; Michoux, Nicolas; Dumitriu, Dana

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of ultrasound in detecting lung consolidation in children suspected of pneumonia, in comparison to the current gold standard, chest X-rays. From September 2013 to June 2014, a monocentric prospective study was performed on all children between 0 and 16 years-old, referred for chest X-ray for suspected pneumonia. Each child was examined by chest ultrasound by an examiner blinded to the chest X-ray. The presence or absence of areas of consolidation, their number and location were noted for each technique. The size of the consolidations identified only on ultrasound was compared with that of consolidations visible on both techniques. 143 children (mean age 3 years; limits between 8days and 14 years) were included. Ultrasound detected at least one area of consolidation in 44 out of 45 patients with positive X-rays. Of the 59 areas of consolidation on X-ray, ultrasound identified 54. In the 8 patients with negative X-ray, ultrasound revealed 17 areas of consolidation. The mean size of consolidations visible only on ultrasound was 9.4mm; for consolidations visible on both techniques the mean size was 26mm (p<0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound were calculated at 98% and 92%. PPV and NPV were 85% and 99%, respectively. Chest ultrasound is a fast, non-ionizing and feasible technique. With its high negative predictive value, it can replace X-rays in order to exclude lung consolidation in children, thus reducing radiation exposure in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of the effect of ultrasound on the fibrinolysis of clots

    PubMed Central

    Chernysh, Irina N.; Everbach, E. Carr; Purohit, Prashant K.; Weisel, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Ultrasound accelerates tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA)-induced fibrinolysis of clots in vitro and in vivo. Objective To identify mechanisms for the enhancement of t-PA-induced fibrinolysis of clots. Methods Turbidity is an accurate and convenient method, not previously used, to follow the effects of ultrasound. Deconvolution microscopy was used to determine changes in structure, while fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was used to characterize the kinetics of binding/unbinding and transport. Results The ultrasound pulse repetition frequency affected clot lysis times, but there were no thermal effects. Ultrasound in the absence of t-PA produced a slight but consistent decrease in turbidity, suggesting a decrease in fibrin diameter due solely to the action of the ultrasound, likely caused by an increase in protofibril tension because of vibration from ultrasound. Changes in fibrin network structure during lysis with ultrasound were visualized in real time by deconvolution microscopy, revealing that the network becomes unstable when 30–40% of the protein in the network was digested, whereas without ultrasound, the fibrin network was digested gradually and retained structural integrity. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching during lysis revealed that the off-rate of oligomers from digesting fibers was not much affected but the number of binding/unbinding sites was increased. Conclusions Ultrasound causes a decrease in the diameter of the fibers due to tension as a result of vibration, leading to increased binding sites for plasmin(ogen)/t-PA. The positive feedback of this structural change together with increased mixing/transport of t-PA/plasmin(ogen) is likely to account for the observed enhancement of fibrinolysis by ultrasound. PMID:25619618

  4. Transcriptional analysis of abdominal fat in chickens divergently selected on bodyweight at two ages reveals novel mechanisms controlling adiposity: validating visceral adipose tissue as a dynamic endocrine and metabolic organ.

    PubMed

    Resnyk, C W; Carré, W; Wang, X; Porter, T E; Simon, J; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Duclos, M J; Aggrey, S E; Cogburn, L A

    2017-08-16

    Decades of intensive genetic selection in the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) have enabled the remarkable rapid growth of today's broiler (meat-type) chickens. However, this enhanced growth rate was accompanied by several unfavorable traits (i.e., increased visceral fatness, leg weakness, and disorders of metabolism and reproduction). The present descriptive analysis of the abdominal fat transcriptome aimed to identify functional genes and biological pathways that likely contribute to an extreme difference in visceral fatness of divergently selected broiler chickens. We used the Del-Mar 14 K Chicken Integrated Systems microarray to take time-course snapshots of global gene transcription in abdominal fat of juvenile [1-11 weeks of age (wk)] chickens divergently selected on bodyweight at two ages (8 and 36 wk). Further, a RNA sequencing analysis was completed on the same abdominal fat samples taken from high-growth (HG) and low-growth (LG) cockerels at 7 wk, the age with the greatest divergence in body weight (3.2-fold) and visceral fatness (19.6-fold). Time-course microarray analysis revealed 312 differentially expressed genes (FDR ≤ 0.05) as the main effect of genotype (HG versus LG), 718 genes in the interaction of age and genotype, and 2918 genes as the main effect of age. The RNA sequencing analysis identified 2410 differentially expressed genes in abdominal fat of HG versus LG chickens at 7 wk. The HG chickens are fatter and over-express numerous genes that support higher rates of visceral adipogenesis and lipogenesis. In abdominal fat of LG chickens, we found higher expression of many genes involved in hemostasis, energy catabolism and endocrine signaling, which likely contribute to their leaner phenotype and slower growth. Many transcription factors and their direct target genes identified in HG and LG chickens could be involved in their divergence in adiposity and growth rate. The present analyses of the visceral fat transcriptome in

  5. Diode laser for abdominal tissue cauterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durville, Frederic M.; Rediker, Robert H.; Connolly, Raymond J.; Schwaitzberg, Steven D.; Lantis, John

    1999-06-01

    We have developed a new device to effectively and quickly stop bleeding. The new device uses a small, 5 W diode laser to heat-up the tip of a modified medical forceps. The laser beam is totally contained within a protective enclosure, satisfying the requirements for a Class I laser system, which eliminates the need to protective eyewear. The new device is used in a manner similar to that of a bipolar electrocautery device. After visual location, the bleeding site or local vessel(s) is grabbed and clamped with the tips of the forceps-like instrument. The laser is then activated for a duration of typically 5 sec or until traditional visual or auditory clues such as local blubbling and popping indicate that the targeted site is effectively cauterized. When the laser is activated, the tip of the instrument, thus providing hemostasis. The new device was evaluated in animal models and compared with the monopolar and bipolar electrocautery, and also with the recently developed ultrasound technology. It has new been in clinical trials for abdominal surgery since September 1997.

  6. Development of a robust MRI fiducial system for automated fusion of MR-US abdominal images.

    PubMed

    Favazza, Christopher P; Gorny, Krzysztof R; Callstrom, Matthew R; Kurup, Anil N; Washburn, Michael; Trester, Pamela S; Fowler, Charles L; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J

    2018-05-21

    We present the development of a two-component magnetic resonance (MR) fiducial system, that is, a fiducial marker device combined with an auto-segmentation algorithm, designed to be paired with existing ultrasound probe tracking and image fusion technology to automatically fuse MR and ultrasound (US) images. The fiducial device consisted of four ~6.4 mL cylindrical wells filled with 1 g/L copper sulfate solution. The algorithm was designed to automatically segment the device in clinical abdominal MR images. The algorithm's detection rate and repeatability were investigated through a phantom study and in human volunteers. The detection rate was 100% in all phantom and human images. The center-of-mass of the fiducial device was robustly identified with maximum variations of 2.9 mm in position and 0.9° in angular orientation. In volunteer images, average differences between algorithm-measured inter-marker spacings and actual separation distances were 0.53 ± 0.36 mm. "Proof-of-concept" automatic MR-US fusions were conducted with sets of images from both a phantom and volunteer using a commercial prototype system, which was built based on the above findings. Image fusion accuracy was measured to be within 5 mm for breath-hold scanning. These results demonstrate the capability of this approach to automatically fuse US and MR images acquired across a wide range of clinical abdominal pulse sequences. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Castleman Disease Presenting as an Abdominal Mass.

    PubMed

    Shariati, Farnaz; Verter, Elizabeth; Chang, Wendy; Huang, Li; Joshi, Virendra

    2017-01-01

    Unicentric Castleman disease is a rare condition of lymphoid hyperplasia, of which only 15% of cases occur in the abdomen. We report a 66-year-old man who presented with complaints of abdominal pain. Computed tomography scans revealed nephrolithiasis and a homogeneous calcified mass between the pancreas and stomach and several para-pancreatic nodes. Direct visualization during exploratory laparotomy revealed a mass on the lesser curvature of the stomach. Pyloromyotomy and mass resection were performed. Biopsy showed reactive lymphoid hyperplasia consistent with the hyaline vascular variant of Castleman disease.

  8. Castleman Disease Presenting as an Abdominal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Verter, Elizabeth; Chang, Wendy; Huang, Li; Joshi, Virendra

    2017-01-01

    Unicentric Castleman disease is a rare condition of lymphoid hyperplasia, of which only 15% of cases occur in the abdomen. We report a 66-year-old man who presented with complaints of abdominal pain. Computed tomography scans revealed nephrolithiasis and a homogeneous calcified mass between the pancreas and stomach and several para-pancreatic nodes. Direct visualization during exploratory laparotomy revealed a mass on the lesser curvature of the stomach. Pyloromyotomy and mass resection were performed. Biopsy showed reactive lymphoid hyperplasia consistent with the hyaline vascular variant of Castleman disease. PMID:28584844

  9. A renal transplant patient with abdominal discomfort, vomiting and diarrhoea for 1 week.

    PubMed

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2011-08-24

    The patient is a 61-year-old diabetic male with history of renal transplant who presented to the emergency department with complaints of intermittent abdominal discomfort accompanied by multiple episodes of vomiting and diarrhoea. He had delayed seeking medical attention until his friends insisted that he come to the emergency department, since the abdominal discomfort was worsening. The patient's ECG revealed an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

  10. Physiological Motion and Registration of Abnormalities in Liver During Focused Ultrasound Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Sunita; Rh, Abhilash

    Continuous deformation and dislocation of soft tissues in the abdominal and thoracic region presents a major issue for effective targeting of all non-invasive ablative modalities such as radiotherapy/surgery and Focused Ultrasound Surgery. Most significant among these is the movement of the target organs due to physiological processes such as respiration. The movement is found to be most significant for liver and kidneys. We studied movement and compensation strategies with the aim to implement them during ultrasound ablation using our robotic system for targeted FUS dose delivery. The motion pattern of the liver can be assumed to be in a single plane as it closely follows the movement of the diaphragm. However, the movement of kidneys is three dimensional and follows complicated patterns. Kidney motion is highly subject specific and has poor repeatability. In our research, we quantify the relation of liver movement and the breathing pattern so as to achieve real-time movement compensation using a prediction-correlation approach.

  11. Quantitative Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Parameters in Crohn Disease: Their Role in Disease Activity Determination With Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Medellin-Kowalewski, Alexandra; Wilkens, Rune; Wilson, Alexandra; Ruan, Ji; Wilson, Stephanie R

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of our study was to examine the association between contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) parameters and established gray-scale ultrasound with color Doppler imaging (CDI) for the determination of disease activity in patients with Crohn disease. Our secondary objective was to develop quantitative time-signal intensity curve thresholds for disease activity. One hundred twenty-seven patients with Crohn disease underwent ultrasound with CDI and CEUS. Reviewers graded wall thickness, inflammatory fat, and mural blood flow as showing remission or inflammation (mild, moderate, or severe). If both gray-scale ultrasound and CDI predicted equal levels of disease activity, the studies were considered concordant. If ultrasound images suggested active disease not supported by CDI findings, the ultrasound results for disease activity were indeterminate. Time-signal intensity curves from CEUS were acquired with calculation of peak enhancement (PE), and AUCs. Interobserver variation and associations between PE and ultrasound parameters were examined. Multiclass ROC analysis was used to develop CEUS thresholds for activity. Ninety-six (76%) studies were concordant, 19 of which showed severe disease, and 31 (24%) studies were indeterminate. Kappa analyses revealed good interobserver agreement on grades for CDI (κ = 0.76) and ultrasound (κ = 0.80) assessments. PE values on CEUS and wall thickness showed good association with the Spearman rank correlation coefficient for the entire population (ρ = 0.62, p < 0.01) and for the concordant group (ρ = 0.70, p < 0.01). Multiclass ROC analyses of the concordant group using wall thickness alone as the reference standard showed cutoff points of 18.2 dB for differentiating mild versus moderate activity (sensitivity, 89.0% and specificity, 87.0%) and 23.0 dB for differentiating moderate versus severe (sensitivity, 90% and specificity, 86.8%). Almost identical cutoff points were observed when using ultrasound global

  12. The importance of a normal breathing pattern for an effective abdominal-hollowing maneuver in healthy people: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sung-min; Kwon, Oh-yun; Kim, Su-jung; Choung, Sung-dae

    2014-02-01

    A normal breathing pattern while performing the abdominal-hollowing (AH) maneuver or spinal-stabilization exercise is essential for the success of rehabilitation programs and exercises. In previous studies, subjects were given standardized instructions to control the influence of respiration during the AH maneuver. However, the effect of breathing pattern on abdominal-muscle thickness during the AH maneuver has not been investigated. To compare abdominal-muscle thickness in subjects performing the AH maneuver under normal and abnormal breathing-pattern conditions and to investigate the effect of breathing pattern on the preferential contraction ratio (PCR) of the transverse abdominis. Comparative, repeated-measures experimental study. University research laboratory. 16 healthy subjects (8 male, 8 female) from a university population. A real-time ultrasound scanner was used to measure abdominal-muscle thickness during normal and abnormal breathing patterns. A paired t test was used to assess the effect of breathing pattern on abdominal-muscle thickness and PCR. Muscle thickness in the transverse abdominis and internal oblique muscles was significantly greater under the normal breathing pattern than under the abnormal pattern (P < .05). The PCR of the transverse abdominis was significantly higher under the normal breathing pattern compared with the abnormal pattern (P < .05). The results indicate that a normal breathing pattern is essential for performance of an effective AH maneuver. Thus, clinicians should ensure that patients adopt a normal breathing pattern before performing the AH maneuver and monitor transverse abdominis activation during the maneuver.

  13. Don't Forget the Abdominal Wall: Imaging Spectrum of Abdominal Wall Injuries after Nonpenetrating Trauma.

    PubMed

    Matalon, Shanna A; Askari, Reza; Gates, Jonathan D; Patel, Ketan; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal wall injuries occur in nearly one of 10 patients coming to the emergency department after nonpenetrating trauma. Injuries range from minor, such as abdominal wall contusion, to severe, such as abdominal wall rupture with evisceration of abdominal contents. Examples of specific injuries that can be detected at cross-sectional imaging include abdominal muscle strain, tear, or hematoma, including rectus sheath hematoma (RSH); traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH); and Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) (closed degloving injury). These injuries are often overlooked clinically because of (a) a lack of findings at physical examination or (b) distraction by more-severe associated injuries. However, these injuries are important to detect because they are highly associated with potentially grave visceral and vascular injuries, such as aortic injury, and because their detection can lead to the diagnosis of these more clinically important grave traumatic injuries. Failure to make a timely diagnosis can result in delayed complications, such as bowel hernia with potential for obstruction or strangulation, or misdiagnosis of an abdominal wall neoplasm. Groin injuries, such as athletic pubalgia, and inferior costochondral injuries should also be considered in patients with abdominal pain after nonpenetrating trauma, because these conditions may manifest with referred abdominal pain and are often included within the field of view at cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Radiologists must recognize and report acute abdominal wall injuries and their associated intra-abdominal pathologic conditions to allow appropriate and timely treatment. © RSNA, 2017.

  14. Correlation between intra-abdominal pressure and pulmonary volumes after superior and inferior abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Cleva, Roberto de; Assumpção, Marianna Siqueira de; Sasaya, Flavia; Chaves, Natalia Zuniaga; Santo, Marco Aurelio; Fló, Claudia; Lunardi, Adriana C; Jacob Filho, Wilson

    2014-07-01

    Patients undergoing abdominal surgery are at risk for pulmonary complications. The principal cause of postoperative pulmonary complications is a significant reduction in pulmonary volumes (FEV1 and FVC) to approximately 65-70% of the predicted value. Another frequent occurrence after abdominal surgery is increased intra-abdominal pressure. The aim of this study was to correlate changes in pulmonary volumes with the values of intra-abdominal pressure after abdominal surgery, according to the surgical incision in the abdomen (superior or inferior). We prospectively evaluated 60 patients who underwent elective open abdominal surgery with a surgical time greater than 240 minutes. Patients were evaluated before surgery and on the 3rd postoperative day. Spirometry was assessed by maximal respiratory maneuvers and flow-volume curves. Intra-abdominal pressure was measured in the postoperative period using the bladder technique. The mean age of the patients was 56 ± 13 years, and 41.6% 25 were female; 50 patients (83.3%) had malignant disease. The patients were divided into two groups according to the surgical incision (superior or inferior). The lung volumes in the preoperative period showed no abnormalities. After surgery, there was a significant reduction in both FEV1 (1.6 ± 0.6 L) and FVC (2.0 ± 0.7 L) with maintenance of FEV1/FVC of 0.8 ± 0.2 in both groups. The maximum intra-abdominal pressure values were similar (p=0.59) for the two groups. There was no association between pulmonary volumes and intra-abdominal pressure measured in any of the groups analyzed. Our results show that superior and inferior abdominal surgery determines hypoventilation, unrelated to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Patients at high risk of pulmonary complications should receive respiratory care even if undergoing inferior abdominal surgery.

  15. Fetal and infant growth patterns associated with total and abdominal fat distribution in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Gishti, Olta; Gaillard, Romy; Manniesing, Rashindra; Abrahamse-Berkeveld, Marieke; van der Beek, Eline M; Heppe, Denise H M; Steegers, Eric A P; Hofman, Albert; Duijts, Liesbeth; Durmuş, Büşra; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2014-07-01

    Higher infant growth rates are associated with an increased risk of obesity in later life. We examined the associations of longitudinally measured fetal and infant growth patterns with total and abdominal fat distribution in childhood. We performed a population-based prospective cohort study among 6464 children. We measured growth characteristics in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, at birth, and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Body mass index, fat mass index (body fat mass/height(2)), lean mass index (body lean mass/height(2)), android/gynoid fat ratio measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and sc and preperitoneal abdominal fat measured by ultrasound at the median age of 6.0 years (90% range, 5.7-7.4). We observed that weight gain in the second and third trimesters of fetal life and in early, mid, and late infancy were independently and positively associated with childhood body mass index (P < .05). Only infant weight gain was associated with higher fat mass index, android/gynoid fat ratio, and abdominal fat in childhood (P < .05). Children with both fetal and infant growth acceleration had the highest childhood body mass index, fat mass index, and sc abdominal fat, whereas children with fetal growth deceleration and infant growth acceleration had the highest value for android/gynoid fat ratio and the lowest value for lean mass index (P < .05). Growth in both fetal life and infancy affects childhood body mass index, whereas only infant growth directly affects measured total body and abdominal fat. Fetal growth deceleration followed by infant growth acceleration may lead to an adverse body fat distribution in childhood.

  16. [Perforation of hollow organs in the abdominal contusion: diagnostic features and prognostic factors of death].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, A E; Merlan, V; Dinescu, G; Crăciun, M; Kitkani, A; Beuran, M

    2012-01-01

    Blunt hollow viscus perforations (HVP) due to abdominal contusions (AC), although rare, are difficult to diagnose early and are associated with a high mortality. Our paper analyses retrospectively data from patients operated for HVP between January 2005 and January 2009, the efficiency of different diagnostic tools, mortality and prognostic factors for death. There were 62 patients operated for HVP, 14 of which had isolated abdominal contusion and 48 were poly trauma patients. There were 9 women and 53 men, the mean age was 41.5 years (SD: +17,9), the mean ISS was 32.94 (SD: +15,94), 23 patients had associated solid viscus injuries (SVI). Clinical examination was irelevant for 16 of the 62 patients, abdominal Xray was false negative for 30 out of 35 patients and abdominal ultrasound was false negative for 16 out of 60 patients. Abdominal CT was initially false negative for 7 out of 38 patients: for 4 of them the abdominal CT was repeated and was positive for HVP, for 3 patients a diagnostic laparoscopy was performed. Direct signs for HVP on abdominal CT were present for 3 out of 38 patients. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed for 7 patients with suspicion for HVP, and was positive for 6 of them and false negative for a patient with a duodenal perforation. Single organ perforations were present in 55 cases, multi organ perforations were present in 7 cases. There were 15 deaths (15.2%), most of them caused by haemodynamic instability (3 out of 6 patients) and associated lesions: SOL for 9 out of 23 cases, pelvic fracture (PF) for 6 out of 14 patients, craniocerebral trauma (CCT) for 12 out of 33 patients.Multivariate analysis showed that the prognostic factors for death were ISS value (p = 0,023) and associated CCT (odds ratio = 4,95; p = 0,017). The following factors were not confirmed as prognostic factors for death: age, haemodynamic instability, associated SVI, thoracic trauma (TT), pelvic fractures (PF), limbs fractures (LF) and admission-operation interval

  17. A resected perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) of the pancreas diagnosed using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Okuwaki, Kosuke; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Masutani, Hironori; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Tetuo; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Takezawa, Miyoko; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2013-01-01

    Primary perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) of the pancreas are extremely rare. We herein report our experience with a patient who had a primary PEComa of the pancreas that was diagnosed by the preoperative histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). The patient was a 43-year-old woman whose chief complaint was abdominal pain. Imaging studies revealed a pancreatic tumor. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), solid pseudopapillary tumor and neuroendocrine tumor were considered in the differential diagnosis. A histopathological examination of a specimen of the tumor obtained using EUS-FNA showed spindle-shaped tumor cells with enlarged nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm. The tumor cells proliferated in a sheet-like fashion and stained positive for the melanoma-associated antigen HMB-45. A PEComa was thus diagnosed. If an adequate tumor specimen can be obtained using EUS-FNA, immunostaining may facilitate the diagnosis of extremely rare diseases and therefore assist in deciding the treatment policy.

  18. A novel transperitoneal abdominal wall nerve block for postoperative pain in laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Jun; Watanabe, Jun; Sawatsubashi, Yusuke; Akiyama, Masaki; Arase, Koichi; Minagawa, Noritaka; Torigoe, Takayuki; Hamada, Kotaro; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Hirata, Keiji

    2017-04-04

    Although the laparoscopic approach reduces pain associated with abdominal surgery, postoperative pain remains a problem. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and transversus abdominis plane block have become increasingly popular means of providing analgesia for laparoscopic surgery. Ninety patients were enrolled in this study. A laparoscopic puncture needle was inserted via the port, and levobupivacaine was injected into the correct plane through the peritoneum. The patients' postoperative pain intensity was assessed using a numeric rating scale. The effects of laparoscopic nerve block versus percutaneous anesthesia were compared. This novel form of transperitoneal anesthesia did not jeopardize completion of the operative procedures. The percutaneous approach required more time for performance of the procedure than the transperitoneal technique. This new analgesia technique can become an optional postoperative treatment regimen for various laparoscopic abdominal surgeries. What we mainly want to suggest is that the transperitoneal approach has the advantage of a higher completion rate. A percutaneous technique is sometimes difficult with patients who have severe obesity and/or coagulation disorders. Additional studies are required to evaluate its benefits. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  19. Orchiopexy for intra-abdominal testes: factors predicting success.

    PubMed

    Stec, Andrew A; Tanaka, Stacy T; Adams, Mark C; Pope, John C; Thomas, John C; Brock, John W

    2009-10-01

    Intra-abdominal testes can be treated with several surgical procedures. We evaluated factors influencing the outcome of orchiopexy for intra-abdominal testis. We retrospectively reviewed 156 consecutive orchiopexies performed for intra-abdominal testis, defined as a nonpalpable testis on examination and located in the abdomen at surgery. All surgical approaches were included in the study. Primary outcome was the overall success rate and secondary outcomes were success based on surgical approach, age and a patent processus vaginalis. Success was considered a testis with normal texture and size compared to the contralateral testis at followup. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine factors predictive of success. The overall success rate of all orchiopexies was 79.5%. Median patient age at orchiopexy was 12 months and mean followup was 16 months. Of the patients 117 had a patent processus vaginalis at surgery. One-stage abdominal orchiopexy was performed in 92 testes with 89.1% success. Of these cases 32 were performed laparoscopically with 96.9% success. One-stage Fowler-Stephens orchiopexy was performed in 27 testes and 2-stage Fowler-Stephens orchiopexy was performed in 37 with success in 63.0% and 67.6%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that 1-stage orchiopexy without vessel division had more successful outcomes than 1 and 2-stage Fowler-Stephens orchiopexy (OR 0.24, p = 0.007 and 0.29, p = 0.19, respectively). Neither age at surgery nor an open internal ring was significant (p = 0.49 and 0.12, respectively). The overall success of orchiopexy for intra-abdominal testis is 79.5%. While patient selection remains a critical factor, 1-stage orchiopexy without vessel division was significantly more successful and a laparoscopic approach was associated with the fewest failures for intra-abdominal testes.

  20. Ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of pelvic collections.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Anuj; Sundareyan, Ramaniwas; Kumar, Sheo; Arora, Divya

    2015-01-01

    The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain intra-abdominal collections not reached by the transabdominal approach. We discuss 6 patients with such pelvic collections treated with transrectal drainage using catheter placement via Seldinger technique. Transrectal drainage helped achieve clinical and radiological resolution of pelvic collections in 6 and 5 of 6 cases, respectively. It simultaneously helped avoid injury to intervening bowel loops and neurovascular structures using real-time visualization of armamentarium used for drainage. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopic/CT guidance was avoided. Morbidity and costs incurred in surgical exploration were reduced using this much less invasive ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of deep-seated pelvic collections.

  1. FAST at MACH 20: clinical ultrasound aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Sargsyan, Ashot E; Hamilton, Douglas R; Jones, Jeffrey A; Melton, Shannon; Whitson, Peggy A; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Martin, David; Dulchavsky, Scott A

    2005-01-01

    Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) examination has been proved accurate for diagnosing trauma when performed by nonradiologist physicians. Recent reports have suggested that nonphysicians also may be able to perform the FAST examination reliably. A multipurpose ultrasound system is installed on the International Space Station as a component of the Human Research Facility. Nonphysician crew members aboard the International Space Station receive modest training in hardware operation, sonographic techniques, and remotely guided scanning. This report documents the first FAST examination conducted in space, as part of the sustained effort to maintain the highest possible level of available medical care during long-duration space flight. An International Space Station crew member with minimal sonography training was remotely guided through a FAST examination by an ultrasound imaging expert from Mission Control Center using private real-time two-way audio and a private space-to-ground video downlink (7.5 frames/second). There was a 2-second satellite delay for both video and audio. To facilitate the real-time telemedical ultrasound examination, identical reference cards showing topologic reference points and hardware controls were available to both the crew member and the ground-based expert. A FAST examination, including four standard abdominal windows, was completed in approximately 5.5 minutes. Following commands from the Mission Control Center-based expert, the crew member acquired all target images without difficulty. The anatomic content and fidelity of the ultrasound video were excellent and would allow clinical decision making. It is possible to conduct a remotely guided FAST examination with excellent clinical results and speed, even with a significantly reduced video frame rate and a 2-second communication latency. A wider application of trauma ultrasound applications for remote medicine on earth appears to be possible and warranted.

  2. Complex sacral abscess 8 years after abdominal sacral colpopexy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sarah A; Tulikangas, Paul K; LaSala, Christine A; Lind, Lawrence R

    2011-08-01

    Sacral colpopexy is an effective, durable repair for women with apical vaginal or uterovaginal prolapse. There are few reports of serious complications diagnosed in the remote postoperative period. A 74-year-old woman presented 8 years after undergoing posthysterectomy abdominal sacral colpopexy using polypropylene mesh. Posterior vaginal mesh erosion had been diagnosed several months before presentation. She suffered severe infectious complications including an infected thrombus in the inferior vena cava, sacral osteomyelitis, and a complex abscess with presacral and epidural components. Surgical exploration revealed an abscess cavity surrounding the mesh. Although minor complications commonly occur after sacral colpopexy using abdominal mesh, serious and rare postoperative infectious complications may occur years postoperatively.

  3. The ultrasound unit and infection control – Are we on the right track?

    PubMed Central

    Westerway, Susan C

    2017-01-01

    Best practice guidelines for the disinfection of ultrasound transducers and infection prevention in ultrasound departments are generally recommended by either government health groups or the ultrasound societies of individual countries. The literature shows a wide variance in not only transducer cleaning methods but basic hygiene practices in the ultrasound workplace. This paper describes results from a UK survey of disinfection of ultrasound transducers and hygiene practice in the workplace. The survey revealed that some ultrasound practitioners did not follow current guidelines with regard to the correct disinfection method of transducers, cords or ultrasound machine keyboards. Furthermore, the survey exposed the lack of training from the product manufacturers on how to use the disinfection product appropriately. These inconsistencies may be responsible for compliance issues and highlight the need for an awareness campaign and a unified approach to infection control by ultrasound practitioners. PMID:28228825

  4. Comparison of Epidural Analgesia with Transversus Abdominis Plane Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Lower Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Sadasivan Shankar; Bavishi, Harshit; Mohan, Chadalavada Venkataram; Kaur, Navdeep

    2017-01-01

    Anesthesiologists play an important role in postoperative pain management. For analgesia after lower abdominal surgery, epidural analgesia and ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block are suitable options. The study aims to compare the analgesic efficacy of both techniques. Seventy-two patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery under spinal anesthesia were randomized to postoperatively receive lumbar epidural catheter (Group E) or ultrasound-guided TAP block (Group T) through intravenous cannulas placed bilaterally. Group E received 10 ml 0.125% bupivacaine stat and 10 ml 8 th hourly for 48 h. Group T received 20 ml 0.125% bupivacaine bilaterally stat and 20 ml bilaterally 8 th hourly for 48 h. Pain at rest and on coughing, total paracetamol and tramadol consumption were recorded. Analgesia at rest was comparable between the groups in the first 16 h. At 24 and 48 h, Group E had significantly better analgesia at rest ( P = 0.001 and 0.004 respectively). Patients in Group E had significantly higher number of patients with nil or mild pain on coughing at all times. Paracetamol consumption was comparable in both groups, but tramadol consumption was significantly higher in Group T at the end of 48 h ( P = 0.001). For lower abdominal surgeries, analgesia provided by intermittent boluses of 0.125% is comparable for first 16 h between epidural and TAP catheters. However, the quality of analgesia provided by the epidural catheter is superior to that provided by TAP catheters beyond that both at rest and on coughing with reduced opioid consumption.

  5. Comparison of Epidural Analgesia with Transversus Abdominis Plane Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Lower Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Sadasivan Shankar; Bavishi, Harshit; Mohan, Chadalavada Venkataram; Kaur, Navdeep

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anesthesiologists play an important role in postoperative pain management. For analgesia after lower abdominal surgery, epidural analgesia and ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block are suitable options. The study aims to compare the analgesic efficacy of both techniques. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery under spinal anesthesia were randomized to postoperatively receive lumbar epidural catheter (Group E) or ultrasound-guided TAP block (Group T) through intravenous cannulas placed bilaterally. Group E received 10 ml 0.125% bupivacaine stat and 10 ml 8th hourly for 48 h. Group T received 20 ml 0.125% bupivacaine bilaterally stat and 20 ml bilaterally 8th hourly for 48 h. Pain at rest and on coughing, total paracetamol and tramadol consumption were recorded. Results: Analgesia at rest was comparable between the groups in the first 16 h. At 24 and 48 h, Group E had significantly better analgesia at rest (P = 0.001 and 0.004 respectively). Patients in Group E had significantly higher number of patients with nil or mild pain on coughing at all times. Paracetamol consumption was comparable in both groups, but tramadol consumption was significantly higher in Group T at the end of 48 h (P = 0.001). Conclusion: For lower abdominal surgeries, analgesia provided by intermittent boluses of 0.125% is comparable for first 16 h between epidural and TAP catheters. However, the quality of analgesia provided by the epidural catheter is superior to that provided by TAP catheters beyond that both at rest and on coughing with reduced opioid consumption. PMID:28928569

  6. Estimating abdominal adipose tissue with DXA and anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Hill, Alison M; LaForgia, Joe; Coates, Alison M; Buckley, Jonathan D; Howe, Peter R C

    2007-02-01

    To identify an anatomically defined region of interest (ROI) from DXA assessment of body composition that when combined with anthropometry can be used to accurately predict intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT) in overweight/obese individuals. Forty-one postmenopausal women (age, 49 to 66 years; BMI, 26 to 37 kg/m(2)) underwent anthropometric and body composition assessments. ROI were defined as quadrilateral boxes extending 5 or 10 cm above the iliac crest and laterally to the edges of the abdominal soft tissue. A single-slice computed tomography (CT) scan was measured at the L3 to L4 intervertebral space, and abdominal skinfolds were taken. Forward step-wise regression revealed the best predictor model of IAAT area measured by CT (r(2) = 0.68, standard error of estimate = 17%) to be: IAAT area (centimeters squared) = 51.844 + DXA 10-cm ROI (grams) (0.031) + abdominal skinfold (millimeters) (1.342). Interobserver reliability for fat mass (r = 0.994; coefficient of variation, 2.60%) and lean mass (r = 0.986, coefficient of variation, 2.67%) in the DXA 10-cm ROI was excellent. This study has identified a DXA ROI that can be reliably measured using prominent anatomical landmarks, in this case, the iliac crest. Using this ROI, combined with an abdominal skinfold measurement, we have derived an equation to predict IAAT in overweight/obese postmenopausal women. This approach offers a simpler, safer, and more cost-effective method than CT for assessing the efficacy of lifestyle interventions aimed at reducing IAAT. However, this warrants further investigation and validation with an independent cohort.

  7. Assessment of the accuracy of AortaScan for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).

    PubMed

    Abbas, A; Smith, A; Cecelja, M; Waltham, M

    2012-02-01

    AortaScan AMI 9700 is a portable 3D ultrasound device that automatically measures the maximum diameter of the abdominal aorta without the need for a trained sonographer. It is designed to rapidly diagnose or exclude an AAA and may have particular use in screening programs. Our objective was to determine its accuracy to detect AAA. Subjects from our AAA screening and surveillance programs were examined. The aorta was scanned using the AortaScan and computed tomography (CT). Ninety-one subjects underwent imaging (44 AAA on conventional ultrasound surveillance and 47 controls). The largest measurement obtained by AortaScan was compared against the CT-aortic measurement. The mean aortic diameter was 2.8 cm. The CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of AAA in 43 subjects. There was one false positive measurement on conventional ultrasound. AortaScan missed the diagnosis of AAA in eight subjects. There were thirteen false positive measurements. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 81%, 72%, 72% and 81% respectively. A device to detect AAA without the need for a trained operator would have potential in a community-based screening programme. The AortaScan, however, lacks adequate sensitivity and significant technical improvement is necessary before it could be considered a replacement for trained screening personnel. Copyright © 2011 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fetal growth and air pollution - A study on ultrasound and birth measures.

    PubMed

    Malmqvist, Ebba; Liew, Zeyan; Källén, Karin; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna; Rittner, Ralf; Rylander, Lars; Ritz, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution has been suggested to affect fetal growth, but more data is needed to assess the timing of exposure effects by using ultrasound measures. It is also important to study effects in low exposure areas to assess eventual thresholds of effects. The MAPSS (Maternal Air Pollution in Southern Sweden) cohort consists of linked registry data for around 48,000 pregnancies from an ultrasound database, birth registry and exposure data based on residential addresses. Measures of air pollution exposure were obtained through dispersion modelling with input data from an emissions database (NO x ) with high resolution (100-500m grids). Air pollution effects were assessed with linear regressions for the following endpoints; biparietal diameter, femur length, abdominal diameter and estimated fetal weight measured in late pregnancy and birth weight and head circumference measured at birth. We estimated negative effects for NO x ; in the adjusted analyses the decrease of abdominal diameter and femur length were -0.10 (-0.17, -0.03) and -0.13 (-0.17, -0.01)mm, respectively, per 10µg/m 3 increment of NO x . We also estimated an effect of NO x -exposures on birth weight by reducing birth weight by 9g per 10µg/m 3 increment of NO x . We estimated small but statistically significant effects of air pollution on late fetal and birth size and reduced fetal growth late in pregnancy in a geographic area with levels below current WHO air quality guidelines. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A renal transplant patient with abdominal discomfort, vomiting and diarrhoea for 1 week

    PubMed Central

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2011-01-01

    The patient is a 61-year-old diabetic male with history of renal transplant who presented to the emergency department with complaints of intermittent abdominal discomfort accompanied by multiple episodes of vomiting and diarrhoea. He had delayed seeking medical attention until his friends insisted that he come to the emergency department, since the abdominal discomfort was worsening. The patient’s ECG revealed an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. PMID:22678945

  10. Spontaneous puerperal extraperitoneal bladder wall rupture in young woman with diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sabat, Debabrat Kumar; Panigrahi, Pradeep Kumar; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Acharya, Mousumi; Sahu, Mahesh Ch

    2015-01-01

    A young female presented with an acute abdominal pain and oliguria for 1 week following normal vaginal delivery. No history of hematuria was present. Patient was having lochia rubra. Sealed uterine rupture was suspected clinically. Initial ultrasound of the patient showed distended urinary bladder containing Foley catheter ballon with clamping of Foley catheter and particulate ascites. Abdominal paracentesis revealed hemorrhagic fluid. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of abdomen revealed ascites, distended urinary bladder and no extraluminal contrast extravasation in delayed scan. As patient condition deteriorated, repeat ultrasound guided abdominal paracentesis was done which revealed transudative peritoneal collection with distended bladder. Cystoscopy revealed urinary bladder ruptures with exudate sealing the rupture site. Exploratory laparotomy was done and a diagnosis of extraperitoneal bladder rupture was confirmed. The rent was repaired in layers. She was put on continuous bladder drainage for 3 weeks followed by bladder training. It presented in a unique way as there was hemorrhagic peritoneal tap, no macroscopic hematuria and urinary bladder was distended in spite of urinary bladder wall rupture which delayed the diagnosis and treatment. Complete emptying of urinary bladder before second stage of labor and during postpartum period with perineal repair is mandatory to prevent urinary bladder rupture. PMID:26985426

  11. Spontaneous puerperal extraperitoneal bladder wall rupture in young woman with diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Sabat, Debabrat Kumar; Panigrahi, Pradeep Kumar; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Acharya, Mousumi; Sahu, Mahesh Ch

    2015-01-01

    A young female presented with an acute abdominal pain and oliguria for 1 week following normal vaginal delivery. No history of hematuria was present. Patient was having lochia rubra. Sealed uterine rupture was suspected clinically. Initial ultrasound of the patient showed distended urinary bladder containing Foley catheter ballon with clamping of Foley catheter and particulate ascites. Abdominal paracentesis revealed hemorrhagic fluid. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of abdomen revealed ascites, distended urinary bladder and no extraluminal contrast extravasation in delayed scan. As patient condition deteriorated, repeat ultrasound guided abdominal paracentesis was done which revealed transudative peritoneal collection with distended bladder. Cystoscopy revealed urinary bladder ruptures with exudate sealing the rupture site. Exploratory laparotomy was done and a diagnosis of extraperitoneal bladder rupture was confirmed. The rent was repaired in layers. She was put on continuous bladder drainage for 3 weeks followed by bladder training. It presented in a unique way as there was hemorrhagic peritoneal tap, no macroscopic hematuria and urinary bladder was distended in spite of urinary bladder wall rupture which delayed the diagnosis and treatment. Complete emptying of urinary bladder before second stage of labor and during postpartum period with perineal repair is mandatory to prevent urinary bladder rupture.

  12. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  13. 4D-CT scans reveal reduced magnitude of respiratory liver motion achieved by different abdominal compression plate positions in patients with intrahepatic tumors undergoing helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yong, E-mail: hu.yong@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Zhou,

    -axes, respectively. There was no significant difference in respiratory liver motion between group C (displacement: 3.23 ± 1.47, 9.95 ± 2.32, and 2.92 ± 1.10 mm on the X-, Y-, and Z-axes, respectively) and group D (displacement: 3.35 ± 1.55, 9.53 ± 2.62, and 3.35 ± 1.73 mm on the X-, Y-, and Z-axes, respectively). Abdominal compression was least effective in group C (compression on caudal umbilicus), with liver motion in this group similar to that of free-breathing patients (group D). Conclusions: 4D-CT scans revealed significant liver motion control via abdominal compression of the subxiphoid area; however, this control of liver motion was not observed with compression of the caudal umbilicus. The authors, therefore, recommend compression of the subxiphoid area in patients undergoing external radiotherapy for intrahepatic carcinoma.« less

  14. Improvement in abdominal and flank contouring by a novel adipocyte-selective non-contact radiofrequency device.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Young Jae; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Woo Jin; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Won, Chonghyun

    2018-05-07

    The demand for undergoing subcutaneous fat reduction has been gradually increasing, and there are many methods and devices for performing non-surgical and non-invasive fat reduction, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound, cryolipolysis, radiofrequency (RF) devices, and lasers. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a novel adipocyte-selective non-contact RF device for improving abdominal contouring in Asian subjects. Twenty-four Asian subjects with abundant subcutaneous abdominal and love handle fat tissues were enrolled in this prospective clinical study. They received six 45-min weekly treatments with an RF field device over the abdominal and love handle regions. The body mass index and abdominal circumference were measured at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks post the last treatment. The thickness of the abdomen and depth of subcutaneous abdominal fat tissue were respectively assessed using calipers and abdominal ultrasonography. A subset of 15 subjects was selected by randomization for fat volume measurement via abdominal CT. For safety evaluation, serum lipid, and liver-related blood tests were performed at baseline and at the sixth treatment session. Subjects rated their heat perception level using a four point scale and their pain score using an 11-point visual analog scale during RF treatment. Twenty-four subjects (21 females and 3 males) completed this study with an 8-week follow-up. The average decreases in abdominal circumference at 4 and 8 weeks post treatment were 3.48 ± 2.11 cm (P < 0.001) and 5.12 ± 0.47 cm (P < 0.001), respectively. The average decreases in abdominal fat thickness at 4 and 8 weeks treatment were 0.27 ± 0.61 cm (P = 0.041) and 0.47 ± 0.60 cm (P = 0.001), respectively. The average decreases in subcutaneous fat tissue depth at 4 and 8 weeks post treatment were 0.16 ± 0.43 cm (P = 0.091) and 0.34 ± 0.39 cm (P < 0.001), respectively. However, there was no

  15. Fast Numerical Simulation of Focused Ultrasound Treatments During Respiratory Motion With Discontinuous Motion Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, Michael; Georgii, Joachim; Preusser, Tobias

    2017-07-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is rapidly gaining clinical acceptance for several target tissues in the human body. Yet, treating liver targets is not clinically applied due to a high complexity of the procedure (noninvasiveness, target motion, complex anatomy, blood cooling effects, shielding by ribs, and limited image-based monitoring). To reduce the complexity, numerical FUS simulations can be utilized for both treatment planning and execution. These use-cases demand highly accurate and computationally efficient simulations. We propose a numerical method for the simulation of abdominal FUS treatments during respiratory motion of the organs and target. Especially, a novel approach is proposed to simulate the heating during motion by solving Pennes' bioheat equation in a computational reference space, i.e., the equation is mathematically transformed to the reference. The approach allows for motion discontinuities, e.g., the sliding of the liver along the abdominal wall. Implementing the solver completely on the graphics processing unit and combining it with an atlas-based ultrasound simulation approach yields a simulation performance faster than real time (less than 50-s computing time for 100 s of treatment time) on a modern off-the-shelf laptop. The simulation method is incorporated into a treatment planning demonstration application that allows to simulate real patient cases including respiratory motion. The high performance of the presented simulation method opens the door to clinical applications. The methods bear the potential to enable the application of FUS for moving organs.

  16. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm--a pilot study in six medical schemes.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Alan D; McLeod, Heather; Walters, Laubi; Veller, Martin

    2007-01-01

    A pilot study to assess the feasibility and affordability of a targeted screening programme for abdominal aortic aneurysms in a group of employer-based medical schemes. Administrative database review and data extraction. Member enrolment by mail. Analysis using simple descriptive statistics. Review of international experience. Screening uptake and findings, type and cost of interventions recommended by providers. Database review identified 2187 age-eligible subjects (males between 60 and 65 years) who were advised to consult with their doctor/s if they had a history of smoking/and or cardiovascular disease. Two hundred and seven were referred for abdominal ultrasound screening, and aneurysms > or = 3.0 cm were found in 11 (5.3%). Only 1 subject had an aneurysm of sufficient size to justify early surgical intervention, and which resulted in the patient's death. Total cost of this pilot study approached R1 million. Analysis indicated that the sampling rate would have to be increased if such a programme were to be introduced as a routine medical benefit. International experience has been that screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms reduces morbidity and mortality but at a significant cost. Opinion of the researchers and trustees of the participating medical schemes was that this cost would be beyond the means of schemes at this time. Screening programmes, particularly those that increase health care costs in the early phases by identifying subjects for costly interventions, are unlikely to enjoy support as long as the health funding environment maintains its focus on short-term costs and benefits.

  17. Role of routine abdominal ultrasonography in intensified tuberculosis case finding algorithms at HIV clinics in high TB burden settings.

    PubMed

    Spalgais, Sonam; Agarwal, Upasna; Sarin, Rohit; Chauhan, Devesh; Yadav, Anita; Jaiswal, Anand

    2017-05-18

    High proportion of TB in people living with HIV (PLHIV) is undiagnosed. Due to this active TB case finding is recommended for HIV clinics in high TB burden countries. Presently sputum examination and chest radiography are frontline tests recommended for HIV infected TB presumptives. Abdominal TB which occurs frequently in PLHIV may be missed even by existing programmatic intensified case finding protocols. This study evaluated the routine use of ultrasonography (USG) for active case finding of abdominal TB in HIV clinics. Retrospective analysis of eight years' data from an HIV Clinic in a TB hospital in India. Patients underwent chest x-ray, sputum examination, USG abdomen and routine blood tests at entry to HIV care. Case forms were scrutinized for diagnosis of TB, USG findings and CD4 cell counts. Abdominal TB was classified as probable or possible TB. Probable TB was based on presence of two major USG (abdomen) findings suggestive of active TB, or one major USG finding with at least two minor USG findings or at least two symptoms, or any USG finding with microbiologically confirmed active TB at another site. Possible TB was based on the presence of one major USG finding, or the presence of two minor USG findings with at least two symptoms. Bacteriological confirmation was not obtained. Eight hundred and eighty-nine people PLHIV underwent a baseline USG abdomen. One hundred and thirteen of 340 cases already diagnosed with TB and 87 of the 91 newly diagnosed with TB at time of HIV clinic registration had abdominal TB. Non-abdominal symptoms like weight loss, fever and cough were seen in 53% and 22% cases had no symptoms at all. Enlarged abdominal lymph nodes with central caseation, ascitis, splenic microabsesses, bowel thickening and hepatosplenomegaly were the USG findings in these cases. Abdominal TB is a frequent TB site in PLHIV presenting with non-abdominal symptoms. It can be easily detected on basis of features seen on a simple abdominal ultrasound

  18. Evaluation of Ultrasound-Induced Damage to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by Flow Cytometry and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Ahn, Juhee; Liu, Donghong; Chen, Shiguo; Ye, Xingqian

    2016-01-01

    As a nonthermal sterilization technique, ultrasound has attracted great interest in the field of food preservation. In this study, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy were employed to investigate ultrasound-induced damage to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. For flow cytometry studies, single staining with propidium iodide (PI) or carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) revealed that ultrasound treatment caused cell death by compromising membrane integrity, inactivating intracellular esterases, and inhibiting metabolic performance. The results showed that ultrasound damage was independent of initial bacterial concentrations, while the mechanism of cellular damage differed according to the bacterial species. For the Gram-negative bacterium E. coli, ultrasound worked first on the outer membrane rather than the cytoplasmic membrane. Based on the double-staining results, we inferred that ultrasound treatment might be an all-or-nothing process: cells ruptured and disintegrated by ultrasound cannot be revived, which can be considered an advantage of ultrasound over other nonthermal techniques. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the mechanism of ultrasound-induced damage was multitarget inactivation, involving the cell wall, cytoplasmic membrane, and inner structure. Understanding of the irreversible antibacterial action of ultrasound has great significance for its further utilization in the food industry. PMID:26746712

  19. Acute abdominal pain in patients with lassa fever: Radiological assessment and diagnostic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Eze, Kenneth C.; Salami, Taofeek A.; Kpolugbo, James U.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To highlight the problems of diagnosis and management of acute abdomen in patients with lassa fever. And to also highlight the need for high index of suspicion of lassa fever in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain in order to avoid surgical intervention with unfavourable prognosis and nosocomial transmission of infections, especially in Lassa fever-endemic regions. Materials and Methods: A review of experiences of the authors in the management of lassa fever over a 4-year period (2004-2008). Literature on lassa fever, available in the internet and other local sources, was studied in November 2010 and reviewed. Results: Normal plain chest radiographic picture can change rapidly due to pulmonary oedema, pulmonary haemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Plain abdominal radiograph may show dilated bowels with signs of paralytic ileus or dynamic intestinal obstruction due to bowel wall haemorrhage or inflamed and enlarged Peyer's patches. Ultrasound may show free intra-peritoneal fluid due to peritonitis and intra-peritoneal haemorrhage. Bleeding into the gall bladder wall may erroneously suggest infective cholecystitis. Pericardial effusion with or without pericarditis causing abdominal pain may be seen using echocardiography. High index of suspicion, antibody testing for lassa fever and viral isolation in a reference laboratory are critical for accurate diagnosis. Conclusion: Patients from lassa fever-endemic regions may present with features that suggest acute abdomen. Radiological studies may show findings that suggest acute abdomen but these should be interpreted in the light of the general clinical condition of the patient. It is necessary to know that acute abdominal pain and vomiting in lassa fever-endemic areas could be caused by lassa fever, which is a medical condition. Surgical option should be undertaken with restraint as it increases the morbidity, may worsen the prognosis and increase the risk of nosocomial transmission

  20. Acute abdominal pain in patients with lassa fever: Radiological assessment and diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Eze, Kenneth C; Salami, Taofeek A; Kpolugbo, James U

    2014-05-01

    To highlight the problems of diagnosis and management of acute abdomen in patients with lassa fever. And to also highlight the need for high index of suspicion of lassa fever in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain in order to avoid surgical intervention with unfavourable prognosis and nosocomial transmission of infections, especially in Lassa fever-endemic regions. A review of experiences of the authors in the management of lassa fever over a 4-year period (2004-2008). Literature on lassa fever, available in the internet and other local sources, was studied in November 2010 and reviewed. Normal plain chest radiographic picture can change rapidly due to pulmonary oedema, pulmonary haemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Plain abdominal radiograph may show dilated bowels with signs of paralytic ileus or dynamic intestinal obstruction due to bowel wall haemorrhage or inflamed and enlarged Peyer's patches. Ultrasound may show free intra-peritoneal fluid due to peritonitis and intra-peritoneal haemorrhage. Bleeding into the gall bladder wall may erroneously suggest infective cholecystitis. Pericardial effusion with or without pericarditis causing abdominal pain may be seen using echocardiography. High index of suspicion, antibody testing for lassa fever and viral isolation in a reference laboratory are critical for accurate diagnosis. Patients from lassa fever-endemic regions may present with features that suggest acute abdomen. Radiological studies may show findings that suggest acute abdomen but these should be interpreted in the light of the general clinical condition of the patient. It is necessary to know that acute abdominal pain and vomiting in lassa fever-endemic areas could be caused by lassa fever, which is a medical condition. Surgical option should be undertaken with restraint as it increases the morbidity, may worsen the prognosis and increase the risk of nosocomial transmission.

  1. Retrospective comparison of abdominal ultrasonography and radiography in the investigation of feline abdominal disease

    PubMed Central

    Won, Wylen Wade; Sharma, Ajay; Wu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography are commonly used as part of the initial diagnostic plan for cats with nonspecific signs of abdominal disease. This retrospective study compared the clinical usefulness of abdominal radiography and ultrasonography in 105 feline patients with signs of abdominal disease. The final diagnosis was determined more commonly with ultrasonography (59%) compared to radiography (25.7%). Ultrasonography was also able to provide additional clinically relevant information in 76% of cases, and changed or refined the diagnosis in 47% of cases. Based on these findings, ultrasonography may be sufficient as an initial diagnostic test for the investigation of feline abdominal disease. PMID:26483582

  2. Unusual case of iron overload with cancer-mimicking abdominal splenosis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Giacomo; Avesani, Giacomo; Zamò, Alberto; Girelli, Domenico

    2018-05-16

    A 48-year-old man, former alcohol abuser and drug addicted, was referred to our tertiary referral centre for iron disorders because of marked hyperferritinaemia. His clinical history revealed chronic hepatitis C, ß-thalassaemia trait and post-traumatic splenectomy at age of 22. MRI-estimated liver iron content was markedly elevated, while first-line genetic test for haemochromatosis was negative. Alpha-fetoprotein was increased but liver ultrasonography did not reveal focal liver lesions. Multiphasic contrast-enhanced CT confirmed this result but showed two abdominal masses (diameter of 9 cm and 7 cm, respectively) among bowel loops, strongly suspicious for cancer. However, biopsy of one of the masses led to the final diagnosis of abdominal splenosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. J.; Brown, S. J.; Beeman, R. W.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  4. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J J; Brown, S J; Beeman, R W; Denell, R E

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  5. Portal vein thrombosis and liver abscess due to Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Güz, Galip; Yeğin, Zeynep Arzu; Doğan, Ibrahim; Hizel, Kenan; Bali, Musa; Sindel, Sükrü

    2006-06-01

    A 26-year-old man was admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Abdominal ultrasonography and Doppler ultrasound eventually revealed portal vein thrombosis and a pyogenic liver abscess (17x11x11 cm). Lactococcus lactis was isolated from a culture of the abscess material. This organism is not a common pathogen in humans. This is the first published description of portal vein thrombosis and pyogenic liver abscess due to L. lactis.

  6. Ultrasound assessment of spleen size in collegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Hosey, R G; Mattacola, C G; Kriss, V; Armsey, T; Quarles, J D; Jagger, J

    2006-03-01

    To determine normal spleen dimensions in a healthy collegiate athletic population. 631 Division I collegiate athletes from one university participated in the study. During pre-participation examinations, demographic data collected were collected from volunteer athletes including sex, race, measurement of height and weight, and age. Subjects also completed a medical history form to determine any history of mononucleosis infection, platelet disorder, sickle cell disease (or trait), thalassaemia, or recent viral symptoms. Subjects then underwent a limited abdominal ultrasound examination, where splenic length and width were recorded. Mean (SD) splenic length was 10.65 (1.55) cm and width, 5.16 (1.21) cm. Men had larger spleens than women (p<0.001). White subjects had larger spleens than African-American subjects (p<0.001). A previous history of infectious mononucleosis or the presence of recent cold symptoms had no significant affect on spleen size. In more than 7% of athletes, baseline spleen size met current criteria for splenomegaly. There is a wide range of normal spleen size among collegiate athletes. Average spleen size was larger in men and white athletes than in women and black athletes. A single ultrasound examination for determination of splenomegaly is of limited value in this population.

  7. PACS and teleradiology for on-call support of abdominal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Steven C.; Garra, Brian S.; Mun, Seong K.; Zeman, Robert K.; Levine, Betty A.; Fielding, Robert

    1991-07-01

    One aspect of the Georgetown image management and communications system (IMACS or PACS) is a built-in capability to support teleradiology. Unlike many dedicated teleradiology systems, the support of this capability as a part of PACS means that any acquired images are remotely accessible, not just those specifically input for transmission. Over the past one and one-half years, two radiologists (SCH, BSG) in the abdominal imaging division of the department of radiology have been accumulating experience with teleradiology for on-call support of emergency abdominal imaging, chiefly in ultrasound. As of the time of this writing, use of the system during on-call (one of these attending radiologists primarily responsible) or back-up call (the attending responsible for the Fellow on primary call) has resulted in a marked reduction in the number of times one of them has to drive to the hospital at night or over the weekend. Approximately 80% of the time, use of the teleradiology system obviates having to go in to review a case. The remainder of the time, the radiologist has to perform a procedure (e.g., abscess drainage) or a scan (e.g., complex Doppler study) himself. This paper reviews the system used for teleradiology, how it is electronically and operationally integrated with the PACS, the clinical benefits and disadvantages of this use, and radiologist and referring physician acceptance.

  8. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-02

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain.

  9. Chronic Contained Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: From Diagnosis to Endovascular Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto, E-mail: marcello.chiocchi@fastwebnet.it; Chiocchi, Marcello; Maresca, Luciano

    2008-07-15

    A male patient, 69 years old, presented with fever, leucocytosis, and persistent low back pain; he also had an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), as previously diagnosed by Doppler UltraSound (US), and was admitted to our hospital. On multislice computed tomography (msCT), a large abdominal mass having no definite border and involving the aorta and both of the psoas muscles was seen. This mass involved the forth-lumbar vertebra with lysis, thus simulating AAA rupture into a paraspinal collection; it was initially considered a paraspinal abscess. After magnetic resonance imaging examination and culture of the fluid aspirated from the mass, no infectivemore » organisms were found; therefore, a diagnosisof chronically contained AAA rupture was made, and an aortic endoprosthesis was subsequently implanted. The patient was discharged with decreased lumbar pain. At 12-month follow-up, no evidence of leakage was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first case of endoprosthesis implantation in a patient, who was a poor candidate for surgical intervention due to renal failure, leucocytosis and high fever, having a chronically contained AAA ruptured simulatingspodilodiscitis abscess. Appropriate diagnosis and therapy resolved potentially crippling pathology and avoided surgical graft-related complications.« less

  10. Ultrasound contrast agents: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, David

    2006-12-01

    vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage). An important situation where demonstrating tissue devitalisation is important is in interstitial ablation of focal liver lesions: using microbubble contrast agents at the end of a procedure allows immediate evaluation of the adequacy of the ablation which can be extended if needed; this is much more convenient and cost-saving than moving the patient to CT and perhaps needing an additional ablation session at a later date. Similar considerations suggest that contrast-enhanced ultrasound might have a role in abdominal trauma: injury to the liver, spleen and kidneys can be assessed rapidly and repeatedly if necessary. Its role here alongside dynamic CT remains to be evaluated. Infarcts or ischaemia and regions of abnormal vascularity, especially in malignancies, in the kidneys and spleen seem to be useful and improved detection of the neovascularisation of ovarian carcinomas is promising. Similar benefits in the head-and-neck and in the skin while the demonstration of the neovascularisation of atheromatous plaques and of aggressive joint inflammation offer interesting potentials.

  11. [Case report: Rapidly growing abdominal wall giant desmoid tumour during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Palacios-Zertuche, Jorge Tadeo; Cardona-Huerta, Servando; Juárez-García, María Luisa; Valdés-Flores, Everardo; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo Enrique

    Desmoid tumours are one of the rarest tumours worldwide, with an estimated yearly incidence of 2-4 new cases per million people. They are soft tissue monoclonal neoplasms that originate from mesenchymal stem cells. It seems that the hormonal and immunological changes occurring during pregnancy may play a role in the severity and course of the disease. The case is presented on 28-year-old female in her fifth week of gestation, in whom an abdominal wall tumour was found attached to left adnexa and uterus while performing a prenatal ultrasound. The patient was followed up under clinical and ultrasonographic surveillance. When she presented with abnormal uterine activity at 38.2 weeks of gestation, she was admitted and obstetrics decided to perform a caesarean section. Tumour biopsy was taken during the procedure. Histopathology reported a desmoid fibromatosis. A contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography scan was performed, showing a tumour of 26×20.5×18cm, with well-defined borders in contact with the uterus, left adnexa, bladder and abdominal wall, with no evidence of infiltration to adjacent structures. A laparotomy, with tumour resection, hysterectomy and left salpingo-oophorectomy, components separation techniques, polypropylene mesh insertion, and drainage was performed. The final histopathology report was desmoid fibromatosis. There is no evidence of recurrence after 6 months follow-up. Desmoid tumours are locally aggressive and surgical resection with clear margins is the basis for the treatment of this disease, using radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy as an adjunct in the treatment. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Thyroid gland visualization with 3D/4D ultrasound: integrated hands-on imaging in anatomical dissection laboratory.

    PubMed

    Carter, John L; Patel, Ankura; Hocum, Gabriel; Benninger, Brion

    2017-05-01

    In teaching anatomy, clinical imaging has been utilized to supplement the traditional dissection laboratory promoting education through visualization of spatial relationships of anatomical structures. Viewing the thyroid gland using 3D/4D ultrasound can be valuable to physicians as well as students learning anatomy. The objective of this study was to investigate the perceptions of first-year medical students regarding the integration of 3D/4D ultrasound visualization of spatial anatomy during anatomical education. 108 first-year medical students were introduced to 3D/4D ultrasound imaging of the thyroid gland through a detailed 20-min tutorial taught in small group format. Students then practiced 3D/4D ultrasound imaging on volunteers and donor cadavers before assessment through acquisition and identification of thyroid gland on at least three instructor-verified images. A post-training survey was administered assessing student impression. All students visualized the thyroid gland using 3D/4D ultrasound. Students revealed 88.0% strongly agreed or agreed 3D/4D ultrasound is useful revealing the thyroid gland and surrounding structures and 87.0% rated the experience "Very Easy" or "Easy", demonstrating benefits and ease of use including 3D/4D ultrasound in anatomy courses. When asked, students felt 3D/4D ultrasound is useful in teaching the structure and surrounding anatomy of the thyroid gland, they overwhelmingly responded "Strongly Agree" or "Agree" (90.2%). This study revealed that 3D/4D ultrasound was successfully used and preferred over 2D ultrasound by medical students during anatomy dissection courses to accurately identify the thyroid gland. In addition, 3D/4D ultrasound may nurture and further reinforce stereostructural spatial relationships of the thyroid gland taught during anatomy dissection.

  13. A rare cause of abdominal lymphadenopathy--tularemia: report of two pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Gülhan, Belgin; Tezer, Hasan; Kanık-Yüksek, Saliha; Kılıç, Selçuk; Senel, Emrah

    2014-01-01

    Tularemia caused by Francisella tularensis occurs worldwide in the northern hemisphere, with great variation in geographic and temporal occurrence. It generally presents as an acute febrile disease with the major clinical presentations including the six classic forms of tularemia: ulceroglandular, glandular, oculoglandular, oropharyngeal, typhoidal, and pneumonic. In contrast to European countries, where the ulceroglandular form is more prominent, the oropharyngeal form is the most common presentation in Turkey. We present rare cases of oropharyngeal tularemia in a 16-year-old boy and nine-year-old girl. To the best of our knowledge, these are the firstly described abdominal lymphadenopathy cases from Turkey. The second case was admitted with erythema nodosum, and abdominal lymphadenopathy was detected during the investigation. Excisional lymph node biopsy revealed abdominal tularemia. It is necessary to consider tularemia in the differential diagnosis of abdominal lymphadenopathy in tularemia regions. We also conclude that oropharyngeal tularemia can cause lymphadenopathy in any part of the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Sonographic demonstration of stomach pathology: Reviewing the cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The stomach can be the source of complaints for many patients attending for upper abdominal ultrasound. It is not routinely imaged as part of most upper abdominal ultrasound protocols, with sonographers and sonologists alike commonly muttering the line; “I can't see the stomach on ultrasound”. However, this is incorrect, as the gastric antrum can almost always be visualised sonographically. Discussion: It is possible to detect a range of pathologies affecting the stomach sonographically, from common, largely tolerable conditions such as hiatus hernias through to life‐threatening neoplasms. Conclusion: The stomach can easily be assessed during routine abdominal ultrasound providing the sonographer has knowledge of stomach anatomy, normal ultrasound appearances and limitations to its visualisation. While endoscopy is the gold standard for investigation of the stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract, many patients will initially present for abdominal ultrasound due to its easy, non‐invasive nature, ready availability and low cost. For patients with mild abdominal symptoms, a normal abdominal ultrasound may be the extent of their imaging investigations meaning stomach pathologies may go undiagnosed. PMID:28191199

  15. Efficacy of Transcerebellar Diameter/Abdominal Circumference Versus Head Circumference/Abdominal Circumference in Predicting Asymmetric Intrauterine Growth Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Bhimarao; Bhat, Venkataramana; Gowda, Puttanna VN

    2015-01-01

    Background The high incidence of IUGR and its low recognition lead to increasing perinatal morbidity and mortality for which prediction of IUGR with timely management decisions is of paramount importance. Many studies have compared the efficacy of several gestational age independent parameters and found that TCD/AC is a better predictor of asymmetric IUGR. Aim To compare the accuracy of transcerebellar diameter/abdominal circumference with head circumference/abdominal circumference in predicting asymmetric intrauterine growth retardation after 20 weeks of gestation. Materials and Methods The prospective study was conducted over a period of one year on 50 clinically suspected IUGR pregnancies who were evaluated with 3.5 MHz frequency ultrasound scanner by a single sonologist. BPD, HC, AC and FL along with TCD were measured for assessing the sonological gestational age. Two morphometric ratios- TCD/AC and HC/AC were calculated. Estimated fetal weight was calculated for all these pregnancies and its percentile was determined. Statistical Methods The TCD/AC and HC/AC ratios were correlated with advancing gestational age to know if these were related to GA. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and diagnostic accuracy (DA) for TCD/AC and HC/AC ratios in evaluating IUGR fetuses were calculated. Results In the present study, linear relation of TCD and HC in IUGR fetuses with gestation was noted. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV & DA were 88%, 93.5%, 77.1%, 96.3% & 92.4% respectively for TCD/AC ratio versus 84%, 92%, 72.4%, 95.8% & 90.4% respectively for HC/AC ratio in predicting IUGR. Conclusion Both ratios were gestational age independent and can be used in detecting IUGR with good diagnostic accuracy. However, TCD/AC ratio had a better diagnostic validity and accuracy compared to HC/AC ratio in predicting asymmetric IUGR. PMID:26557588

  16. The effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation at different frequencies on the activations of deep abdominal stabilizing muscles.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Kyung; Jung, Gil Su; Kim, Eun Hyuk; Cho, Yun Woo; Kim, Sang Woo; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with transversus abdominis (TrA) dysfunction. Recently, it was proposed that Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) could be used to stimulate deep abdominal muscle contractions and improve lumbopelvic stability. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal stimulation frequency required during NMES for the activation of deep abdominal muscles. Twenty healthy volunteers between the ages of 24 and 32 were included. The portable research-stimulator was applied using a 10 second contraction time, and a 10 second resting time at 20 Hz, 50 Hz, and 80 Hz. Changes in muscle thicknesses were determined for the TrA, obliquus internus (OI), and obliquus externus (OE) by real time ultrasound imaging. Significant thickness increases in the TrA, OI, and OE were observed during NMES versus the resting state (p < 0.05). Of the frequencies examined, 50 Hz NMES produced the greatest increase in TrA thickness (1.33 fold as compared with 1.22 fold at 20 Hz and 1.21 fold at 80 Hz) (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that NMES can preferentially stimulate contractions in deep abdominal stabilizing muscles. Most importantly, 50 Hz NMES produced greater muscle thickness increases than 20 or 80 Hz.

  17. [Undifferentiated (embryonal) sarcoma of the liver. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Orozco, H; Mercado, M A; Takahashi, T; Chan, C; Quintanilla, L; Jiménez, M; Sosa, R; Esquivel, E

    1991-01-01

    A 15-year-old woman who was studied because an abdominal mass at the Instituto Nacional de la Nutricion Salvador Zubiran (INNSZ) is reported. The history revealed only malaise and mild abdominal pain. At physical exploration, an abdominal mass in the upper right quadrant was found. Liver function tests were normal. Abdominal ultrasound and computerized tomography revealed a large cystic mass of the right hepatic lobe. She underwent exploratory laparotomy. Intraoperative frozen sections of the biopsies demonstrated undifferentiated sarcoma of the liver, and an extended right trisegmentectomy was performed. Postoperative outcome was uneventful. Adjuvant treatment with doxorubicin and dacarbazine was given, and at six months of follow-up, the patient is alive without any evidence of recurrence. Clinical and histopathologic features of this rare malignant tumor are discussed, as well as the therapeutic choices.

  18. A new fringeline-tracking approach for color Doppler ultrasound imaging phase unwrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Ashraf A.; Shapiro, Linda G.

    2008-03-01

    Color Doppler ultrasound imaging is a powerful non-invasive diagnostic tool for many clinical applications that involve examining the anatomy and hemodynamics of human blood vessels. These clinical applications include cardio-vascular diseases, obstetrics, and abdominal diseases. Since its commercial introduction in the early eighties, color Doppler ultrasound imaging has been used mainly as a qualitative tool with very little attempts to quantify its images. Many imaging artifacts hinder the quantification of the color Doppler images, the most important of which is the aliasing artifact that distorts the blood flow velocities measured by the color Doppler technique. In this work we will address the color Doppler aliasing problem and present a recovery methodology for the true flow velocities from the aliased ones. The problem is formulated as a 2D phase-unwrapping problem, which is a well-defined problem with solid theoretical foundations for other imaging domains, including synthetic aperture radar and magnetic resonance imaging. This paper documents the need for a phase unwrapping algorithm for use in color Doppler ultrasound image analysis. It describes a new phase-unwrapping algorithm that relies on the recently developed cutline detection approaches. The algorithm is novel in its use of heuristic information provided by the ultrasound imaging modality to guide the phase unwrapping process. Experiments have been performed on both in-vitro flow-phantom data and in-vivo human blood flow data. Both data types were acquired under a controlled acquisition protocol developed to minimize the distortion of the color Doppler data and hence to simplify the phase-unwrapping task. In addition to the qualitative assessment of the results, a quantitative assessment approach was developed to measure the success of the results. The results of our new algorithm have been compared on ultrasound data to those from other well-known algorithms, and it outperforms all of them.

  19. Ultrasound in twin pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Morin, Lucie; Lim, Kenneth

    2011-06-01

    and normal assessment. (III) 2. There are insufficient data to recommend a routine preterm labour surveillance protocol in terms of frequency, timing, and optimal cervical length thresholds. (II-2) 3. Singleton growth curves currently provide the best predictors of adverse outcome in twins and may be used for evaluating growth abnormalities. (III) 4. It is suggested that growth discordance be defined using either a difference (20 mm) in absolute measurement in abdominal circumference or a difference of 20% in ultrasound-derived estimated fetal weight. (II-2) 5. Although there is insufficient evidence to recommend a specific schedule for ultrasound assessment of twin gestation, most experts recommend serial ultrasound assessment every 2 to 3 weeks, starting at 16 weeks of gestation for monochorionic pregnancies and every 3 to 4 weeks, starting from the anatomy scan (18 to 22 weeks) for dichorionic pregnancies. (II-1) 6. Umbilical artery Doppler may be useful in the surveillance of twin gestations when there are complications involving the placental circulation or fetal hemodynamic physiology. (II-2) 7. Although many methods of evaluating the level of amniotic fluid in twins (deepest vertical pocket, single pocket, amniotic fluid index) have been described, there is not enough evidence to suggest that one method is more predictive than the others of adverse pregnancy outcome. (II-3) 8. Referral to an appropriate high-risk pregnancy centre is indicated when complications unique to twins are suspected on ultrasound. (II-2) These complications include: 1. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome 2. Monoamniotic twins gestation 3. Conjoined twins 4. Twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence 5. Single fetal death in the second or third trimester 6. Growth discordance in monochorionic twins. Recommendations 1. All patients who are suspected to have a twin pregnancy on first trimester physical examination or who are at risk (e.g., pregnancies resulting from assisted reproductive

  20. [Abdominal compartment syndrome by tension pneumoperitoneum secondary to barotrauma. Presentation case].

    PubMed

    García-Santos, Esther; Puerto-Puerto, Alejandro; Sánchez-García, Susana; Ruescas-García, Francisco Javier; Alberca-Páramo, Ana; Martín-Fernández, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is defined as the existence of extraluminal air in the abdominal cavity. In 80-90% of cases is due to perforation of a hollow organ. However, in 10-15% of cases, it is nonsurgical pneumoperitoneum. The case of a patient undergoing mechanical ventilation, developing abdominal compartment syndrome tension pneumoperitoneum is reported. Female, 75 years old asking for advise due to flu of long term duration. Given her respiratory instability, admission to the Intensive Care Unit is decided. It is then intubated and mechanically ventilated. Chest x-ray revealed a large pneumoperitoneum but no pneumothorax neither mediastinum; and due to the suspicion of viscera perforation with clinical instability secondary to intra-abdominal hypertension box, emergency surgery was decided. When discarded medical history as a cause of pneumoperitoneum, it is considered that ventilation is the most common cause. Benign idiopathic or nonsurgical pneumoperitoneum, can be be treated conservatively if the patient agrees. But if intraabdominal hypertension prevails, it can result in severe respiratory and hemodynamic deterioration, sometimes requiring abdominal decompression to immediately get lower abdominal pressure and thus improve hemodynamic function. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Contrast-enhanced and targeted ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Postema, Michiel; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2011-01-07

    Ultrasonic imaging is becoming the most popular medical imaging modality, owing to the low price per examination and its safety. However, blood is a poor scatterer of ultrasound waves at clinical diagnostic transmit frequencies. For perfusion imaging, markers have been designed to enhance the contrast in B-mode imaging. These so-called ultrasound contrast agents consist of microscopically small gas bubbles encapsulated in biodegradable shells. In this review, the physical principles of ultrasound contrast agent microbubble behavior and their adjustment for drug delivery including sonoporation are described. Furthermore, an outline of clinical imaging applications of contrast-enhanced ultrasound is given. It is a challenging task to quantify and predict which bubble phenomenon occurs under which acoustic condition, and how these phenomena may be utilized in ultrasonic imaging. Aided by high-speed photography, our improved understanding of encapsulated microbubble behavior will lead to more sophisticated detection and delivery techniques. More sophisticated methods use quantitative approaches to measure the amount and the time course of bolus or reperfusion curves, and have shown great promise in revealing effective tumor responses to anti-angiogenic drugs in humans before tumor shrinkage occurs. These are beginning to be accepted into clinical practice. In the long term, targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging and eventually for directed anti-tumor therapy are expected to be tested.

  2. Contrast-enhanced and targeted ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Postema, Michiel; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic imaging is becoming the most popular medical imaging modality, owing to the low price per examination and its safety. However, blood is a poor scatterer of ultrasound waves at clinical diagnostic transmit frequencies. For perfusion imaging, markers have been designed to enhance the contrast in B-mode imaging. These so-called ultrasound contrast agents consist of microscopically small gas bubbles encapsulated in biodegradable shells. In this review, the physical principles of ultrasound contrast agent microbubble behavior and their adjustment for drug delivery including sonoporation are described. Furthermore, an outline of clinical imaging applications of contrast-enhanced ultrasound is given. It is a challenging task to quantify and predict which bubble phenomenon occurs under which acoustic condition, and how these phenomena may be utilized in ultrasonic imaging. Aided by high-speed photography, our improved understanding of encapsulated microbubble behavior will lead to more sophisticated detection and delivery techniques. More sophisticated methods use quantitative approaches to measure the amount and the time course of bolus or reperfusion curves, and have shown great promise in revealing effective tumor responses to anti-angiogenic drugs in humans before tumor shrinkage occurs. These are beginning to be accepted into clinical practice. In the long term, targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging and eventually for directed anti-tumor therapy are expected to be tested. PMID:21218081

  3. Correlating Abdominal Wall Thickness and Body Mass Index to Predict Usefulness of Right Lower Quadrant Ultrasound for Evaluation of Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeannie K; Trexler, Nowice; Reisch, Joan; Pfeifer, Cory M; Ginos, Jason; Powell, Jerry Allen; Veltkamp, Jennifer; Anene, Alvin; Fernandes, Neil; Chen, Li Ern

    2017-11-06

    To inform selective and efficient use of appendix ultrasound (US) beyond adult parameters of body mass index (BMI) of less than 25 kg/m, we correlate abdominal wall thickness (AWT) with age and BMI to generate parameters for male and female children. Information presented in chart format can aid in the decision to utilize US for the evaluation of appendicitis. In this observational study, 1600 pediatric computed tomography scans of the abdomen and pelvis were analyzed to obtain measurements of AWT in the right lower quadrant. Measurements were correlated by patient age, BMI, and sex. Results and consensus-based recommendations were presented in chart format with color-coded groupings to allow for convenient referencing in the clinical setting. One thousand four hundred eighty-eight computed tomography scans and AWT measurements were included. All age groups with BMI of less than 25 kg/m and all male and female groups younger than 6 years regardless of BMI had median AWT of less than 4 cm resulting in strong recommendation for US. Males older than 6 years and all female age groups with BMI of greater than 30 kg/m and female older than 15 years and BMI of greater than 25 kg/m had AWT of more than 5 cm resulting in low recommendation for US. While the BMI cutoff standard of less than 25 kg/m for usefulness of appendix US holds in the adult population, our data expand the acceptable range in children younger than 9 years regardless of BMI and male children with BMI up to 30 kg/m. Female children younger than 15 years with a BMI up to 30 kg/m may also be amenable to right lower quadrant US based on AWT. These parameters inform selective and efficient use of US for appendix evaluation.

  4. Severe abdominal pain as a presenting symptom of probable catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haskin, Orly; Amir, Jacob; Schwarz, Michael; Schonfeld, Tommy; Nahum, Elhanan; Ling, Galina; Prais, Dario; Harel, Liora

    2012-07-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pediatric medicine is rare. We report 3 adolescents who presented with acute onset of severe abdominal pain as the first manifestation of probable catastrophic APS. The 3 patients, 2 male patients and 1 female patient were 14 to 18 years old. One had been diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus in the past, but the other 2 had no previous relevant medical history. All presented with excruciating abdominal pain without additional symptoms. Physical examination was noncontributory. Laboratory results were remarkable for high inflammatory markers. Abdominal ultrasonography was normal, and abdominal computed tomography scan showed nonspecific findings of liver infiltration. Only computed tomography angiography revealed evidence of extensive multiorgan thrombosis. All patients had elevated titers of antiphospholipid antibodies. The patients were treated with full heparinization, high-dose steroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin with a resolution of symptoms. One patient was resistant to the treatment and was treated with rituximab. In conclusion, severe acute abdominal pain can be the first manifestation of a thromboembolic event owing to catastrophic APS even in previously healthy adolescents. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion with prompt evaluation and treatment to prevent severe morbidity and mortality.

  5. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography using Infrared Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared (IR) thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and IR imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with IR-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (− 0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (− 0.69 ± 0.18 °C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the IR measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45 – 50 °C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies where thermocouples or water-bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results show that high resolution IR thermography provides a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods. PMID:26547634

  6. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... perform an ultrasound-guided biopsy . Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it is often used to guide biopsy ...

  7. Obstetric Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Stuart F.; Nimrod, Carl A.

    1988-01-01

    This article addresses the current indications for an obstetric ultrasound and describes the findings that it is reasonable to expect when reading an ultrasound report. The authors discuss several common obstetrical problems focussing the attention on the usefulness of the imaging information. Finally, they provide a glimpse into the future direction of obstetric ultrasound by discussing vaginal scanning, Doppler assessment of fetal blood flow, and routine ultrasound in pregnancy. PMID:21253229

  8. How to set up a low cost tele-ultrasound capable videoconferencing system with wide applicability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Worldwide ultrasound equipment accessibility is at an all-time high, as technology improves and costs decrease. Ensuring that patients benefit from more accurate resuscitation and diagnoses from a user-dependent technology, such as ultrasound, requires accurate examination, typically entailing significant training. Remote tele-mentored ultrasound (RTUS) examination is, however, a technique pioneered in space medicine that has increased applicability on earth. We, thus, sought to create and demonstrate a cost-minimal approach and system with potentially global applicability. Methods The cost-minimal RTUS system was constructed by utilizing a standard off-the-shelf laptop computer that connected to the internet through an internal wireless receiver and/or was tethered through a smartphone. A number of portable hand-held ultrasound devices were digitally streamed into the laptop utilizing a video converter. Both the ultrasound video and the output of a head-mounted video camera were transmitted over freely available Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) software to remote experts who could receive and communicate using any mobile device (computer, tablet, or smartphone) that could access secure VOIP transmissions from the internet. Results The RTUS system allowed real-time mentored tele-ultrasound to be conducted from a variety of settings that were inside buildings, outside on mountainsides, and even within aircraft in flight all unified by the simple capability of receiving and transmitting VOIP transmissions. . Numerous types of ultrasound examinations were conducted such as abdominal and thoracic examinations with a variety of users mentored who had previous skills ranging from none to expert. Internet connectivity was rarely a limiting factor, with competing logistical and scheduling demands of the participants predominating. Conclusions RTUS examinations can educate and guide point of care clinical providers to enhance their use of ultrasound. The scope

  9. Chronic stress increases vulnerability to diet-related abdominal fat, oxidative stress, and metabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; Kornfeld, Sarah; Picard, Martin; Puterman, Eli; Havel, Peter J; Stanhope, Kimber; Lustig, Robert H; Epel, Elissa

    2014-08-01

    In preclinical studies, the combination of chronic stress and a high sugar/fat diet is a more potent driver of visceral adiposity than diet alone, a process mediated by peripheral neuropeptide Y (NPY). In a human model of chronic stress, we investigated whether the synergistic combination of highly palatable foods (HPF; high sugar/fat) and stress was associated with elevated metabolic risk. Using a case-control design, we compared 33 post-menopausal caregivers (the chronic stress group) to 28 age-matched low-stress control women on reported HPF consumption (modified Block Food Frequency Questionnaire), waistline circumference, truncal fat ultrasound, and insulin sensitivity using a 3-h oral glucose tolerance test. A fasting blood draw was assayed for plasma NPY and oxidative stress markers (8-hydroxyguanosine and F2-Isoprostanes). Among chronically stressed women only, greater HPF consumption was associated with greater abdominal adiposity, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance at baseline (all p's≤.01). Furthermore, plasma NPY was significantly elevated in chronically stressed women (p<.01), and the association of HPF with abdominal adiposity was stronger among women with high versus low NPY. There were no significant predictions of change over 1-year, likely due to high stability (little change) in the primary outcomes over this period. Chronic stress is associated with enhanced vulnerability to diet-related metabolic risk (abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress). Stress-induced peripheral NPY may play a mechanistic role. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Relative abdominal adiposity is associated with chronic low back pain: a preliminary explorative study.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Cristy; Siegler, Jason C; Marshall, Paul W M

    2016-08-02

    Although previous research suggests a relationship between chronic low back pain (cLBP) and adiposity, this relationship is poorly understood. No research has explored the relationship between abdominal-specific subcutaneous and visceral adiposity with pain and disability in cLBP individuals. The aim of this study therefore was to examine the relationship of regional and total body adiposity to pain and disability in cLBP individuals. A preliminary explorative study design of seventy (n = 70) adult men and women with cLBP was employed. Anthropometric and adiposity measures were collected, including body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, total body adiposity and specific ultrasound-based abdominal adiposity measurements. Self-reported pain and disability were measured using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaires respectively. Relationships between anthropometric and adiposity measures with pain and disability were assessed using correlation and regression analyses. Significant correlations between abdominal to lumbar adiposity ratio (A-L) variables and the waist-to-hip ratio with self-reported pain were observed. A-L variables were found to predict pain, with 9.1-30.5 % of the variance in pain across the three analysis models explained by these variables. No relationships between anthropometric or adiposity variables to self-reported disability were identified. The findings of this study indicated that regional distribution of adiposity via the A-L is associated with cLBP, providing a rationale for future research on adiposity and cLBP.

  11. Application of airborne ultrasound in the convective drying of fruits and vegetables: A review.

    PubMed

    Fan, Kai; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S

    2017-11-01

    The application of airborne ultrasound is a promising technology in the drying of foods, particularly to fruits and vegetables. In this paper, designs of dryers using ultrasound to combine the convective drying process are described. The main factors affecting the drying kinetics with the ultrasound application are discussed. The results show that the ultrasound application accelerated the drying kinetics. Ultrasound application during the convective drying of fruits and vegetables shorten the drying time. Ultrasound application can produce an increase of the effective moisture diffusivity and the mass transfer coefficient. The influence of ultrasound on physical and chemical parameters evaluating the product quality is reviewed. Ultrasound application can decrease the total color change, reveal a low water activity and reduce the loss of some nutrient elements. Meanwhile, ultrasound application can also better preserve the microstructure of fruits and vegetables in comparison to convective drying. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to underlying GI pathology: seven cases].

    PubMed

    Monneuse, O; Gruner, L; Barth, X; Malick, P; Timsit, M; Gignoux, B; Tissot, E

    2007-01-01

    Gas gangrene of the abdominal wall is a rare clinical occurrence with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The primary source of the infection is often unknown. To analyze the primary underlying intestinal etiologies and diagnostic approaches of gas gangrene of the abdominal wall, and to highlight specific treatment problems, particularly that of constructing a colostomy exteriorized through a massively infected abdominal wall. Seven cases of abdominal wall gas gangrene due to a gastrointestinal etiology were identified. (Cases arising from proctologic sources or related to recent abdominal surgery were excluded.) During the same period, 39 other patients presenting with abdominal wall gangrene from non-intestinal sources were treated. The etiologies were: perforated sigmoid diverticulitis (n=2), perforated appendicitis (n=1), acute pancreatitis with associated cecal perforation (n=1), and perforated colorectal cancer (n=3). Four of the seven patients died despite treatment (mortality of 57%). The clinical presentations of these seven cases demonstrate that a GI source must be suspected whenever a patient presents with abdominal wall gas gangrene, even when there are no specific GI symptoms. Imaging, particularly with CT scan, is essential both to visualize the extent of tissue necrosis and to reveal underlying primary GI pathology. This optimizes the surgical approach both by allowing for complete debridement and drainage of infected tissue, and by focussing the intervention on correction of the underlying primary GI source of infection.

  13. [Renal failure in surgery of abdominal aorta aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Pokrovskiĭ, A V; Asamov, R E; Ermoliuk, R S; Iudin, V I; Kapanadze, G I

    1994-09-01

    The authors analyse the experience in operations for resection of an aneurysm of the abdominal aorta in 70 patients, which were performed at the Vishnevsky Institute of Surgery, AMS of Russia, from 1983 to 1991. Preoperative examination revealed renal insufficiency in 8 (11.4%) patients. Resection of the aneurysm of the abdominal aorta with one-stage prosthetics of the renal arteries was carried out in 10 cases. To prevent ischemic damage to the renal parenchyma and acute renal insufficiency, local methods of kidney protection (isolated cold perfusion--2 and normothermic aorto-renal perfusion--2) were applied in 4 of 70 cases. The work discusses the methods of kidney protection and the indications and contraindications for their use, and factors promoting the development of postoperative renal insufficiency. Postoperative complications are shown and their causes are identified.

  14. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration of 545 focal pancreatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Giulia A; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Idili, Antonio; Malagò, Roberto; Iozzia, Roberta; Manfrin, Erminia; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and short-term complication rate of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytologic sampling of focal pancreatic lesions. We reviewed 545 consecutive ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytologic sampling procedures for focal pancreatic lesions from January 2004 through June 2008. The procedures were performed with a 20- or 21-gauge needle. The onsite cytopathologist evaluated the appropriateness of the sample and made a diagnosis. We reviewed the final diagnosis and the radiologic and medical records of all patients for onset of complications during or within 7 days of the procedure. The study sample included 262 women and 283 men (mean age, 62 years; range, 25-86 years). The head or uncinate process of the pancreas was the location of 63.0% of the lesions, and 35.2% of the lesions were located in the body or tail of the pancreas. The site of 10 lesions (1.8%) was not specified. Sampling was diagnostic in 509 of the 545 cases (93.4%). Excluding the 36 nondiagnostic samples, ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytologic sampling had 99.4% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 99.4% accuracy. In 537 of the 545 cases (98.5%), the procedure was uneventful. In two cases, abdominal fluid was found after the procedure that was not present before the procedure. Six patients experienced postprocedural pain without abnormal findings at subsequent imaging. No major complications occurred. Ultrasound-guided cytologic sampling is safe and accurate for the diagnosis and planning of management of focal pancreatic lesions. With a cytologist on site, the rate of acquisition of samples adequate for diagnosis is high, reducing the need for patient recall.

  15. Abdominal elephantiasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Dominique; Cloutier, Richard; Lapointe, Roch; Desgagné, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    Elephantiasis is a well-known condition in dermatology usually affecting the legs and external genitalia. It is characterized by chronic inflammation and obstruction of the lymphatic channels and by hypertrophy of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. The etiology is either idiopathic or caused by a variety of conditions such as chronic filarial disease, leprosy, leishmaniasis, and chronic recurrent cellulites. Elephantiasis of the abdominal wall is very rare. A complete review of the English and French literature showed only two cases reported in 1966 and 1973, respectively. We report a third case of abdominal elephantiasis and we briefly review this entity. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who had progressively developed an enormous pediculated abdominal mass hanging down her knees. The skin was thickened, hyperpigmented, and fissured. She had a history of multiple abdominal cellulites. She underwent an abdominal lipectomy. Histopathology of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of abdominal elephantiasis. Abdominal elephantiasis is a rare disease that represents end-stage failure of lymph drainage. Lipectomy should be considered in the management of this condition.

  16. Ultrasound phonophoresis of panax notoginseng improves the strength of repairing ligament: a rat model.

    PubMed

    Ng, Gabriel Y F; Wong, Richard Y F

    2008-12-01

    This study examined the phonophoretic effect of a therapeutic ultrasound coupled with a Panax notoginseng (PN) gel and compared it with a therapeutic ultrasound alone for medial collateral ligament repair in rats. Twenty mature male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving surgical transection to the left medial collateral ligament (MCL) were divided randomly into three groups: ultrasound (US, n = 7), ultrasound with PN coupling gel (PNUS, n = 7) and control (n = 6). The treatments started on day 3 after surgery for six days per week over a two-week period. The US group received 4 min of pulsed ultrasound (1 MHz) at the intensity of 0.5W/cm(2) with a normal ultrasonic coupling gel. The PNUS group received the same ultrasound treatment, but with a coupling gel that contained PN extract. The control group received a placebo ultrasound treatment similar to the other two groups. On day 17, the ligaments were mechanically tested for load-relaxation, stiffness and ultimate tensile strength (UTS). Values of the left side were normalized against that of the right side of each animal for analysis. Results revealed significantly higher normalized stiffness (p = 0.009) and UTS (p = 0.022) in the PNUS group than the other two groups, but insignificant difference in load-relaxation among all groups. This study reveals a positive ultrasonic phonophoretic effect of Panax notoginseng extract for improving the strength of ligament repair than ultrasound therapy alone.

  17. Forward-viewing endoscopic ultrasound-guided NOTES interventions: A study on peritoneoscopic potential

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Uk; Aizan, Hassanuddin; Song, Tae Jun; Seo, Dong Wan; Kim, Su-Hui; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of diagnostic and therapeutic transgastric (TG) peritoneoscopic interventions with a forward-viewing endoscopic ultrasound (FV-EUS). METHODS: This prospective endoscopic experimental study used an animal model. Combined TG peritoneoscopic interventions and EUS examination of the intra-abdominal organs were performed using an FV-EUS on 10 animal models (1 porcine and 9 canine). The procedures carried out include EUS evaluation and endoscopic biopsy of intraperitoneal organs, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), EUS-guided radiofrequency ablation (EUS-RFA), and argon plasma coagulation (APC) for hemostatic control. The animals were kept alive for 7 d, and then necropsy was performed to evaluate results and complications. RESULTS: In all 10 animals, TG peritoneoscopy, followed by endoscopic biopsy for the liver, spleen, abdominal wall, and omentum, was performed successfully. APC helped control minor bleeding. Visualization of intra-abdominal solid organs with real-time EUS was accomplished with ease. Intraperitoneal EUS-FNA was successfully performed on the liver, spleen, and kidney. Similarly, a successful outcome was achieved with EUS-RFA of the hepatic parenchyma. No adverse events were recorded during the study. CONCLUSION: Peritoneoscopic natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) interventions through FV-EUS were feasible in providing evaluation and performing endoscopic procedures. It promises potential as a platform for future EUS-based NOTES. PMID:24222961

  18. In vitro comparison of intra-abdominal hypertension development after different temporary abdominal closure techniques.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Emanuel; Labler, Ludwig; Seifert, Burkhardt; Trentz, Otmar; Menger, Michael D; Meier, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    To compare volume reserve capacity (VRC) and development of intra-abdominal hypertension after different in vitro temporary abdominal closure (TAC) techniques. A model of the abdomen was designed. The abdominal wall was simulated with polychloroprene, a synthetic rubber compound. A lentil-shaped defect of 150 cm(2) was cut into the anterior aspect of the abdominal wall. TAC of this defect was performed by a zipper system (ZS), a bag silo closure (BSC), or a vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with subatmospheric pressures ranging from 0- to 200 mmHg. The model with intact abdominal wall served as reference. The model was filled with water to baseline level. The intra-abdominal pressure was increased in 2 mmHg steps from baseline level (6 mmHg) to 40 mmHg by adding volume to the system according to a standardized protocol. VRC with corresponding intra-abdominal pressure were analyzed and compared for the different TAC techniques. VRC was the highest after BSC at all pressure levels studied (P < 0.05). VAC and ZS resulted in significantly lower VRC compared with BSC and reference (P < 0.05). The magnitude of negative pressure on the VAC did not significantly influence the VRC. In the present in vitro model, BSC demonstrated the highest VRC of all evaluated TAC techniques. Different levels of subatmospheric pressures applied to the VAC did not affect VRC. The results for ZS and VAC indicate that these TAC techniques may increase the risk for recurrent intra-abdominal hypertension and should therefore not be used in high-risk patients during the initial phase after abdominal decompression.

  19. Automated hierarchical time gain compensation for in-vivo ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Hemmsen, Martin C.; Martins, Bo; Brandt, Andreas H.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.; Nielsen, Michael B.; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2015-03-01

    Time gain compensation (TGC) is essential to ensure the optimal image quality of the clinical ultrasound scans. When large fluid collections are present within the scan plane, the attenuation distribution is changed drastically and TGC compensation becomes challenging. This paper presents an automated hierarchical TGC (AHTGC) algorithm that accurately adapts to the large attenuation variation between different types of tissues and structures. The algorithm relies on estimates of tissue attenuation, scattering strength, and noise level to gain a more quantitative understanding of the underlying tissue and the ultrasound signal strength. The proposed algorithm was applied to a set of 44 in vivo abdominal movie sequences each containing 15 frames. Matching pairs of in vivo sequences, unprocessed and processed with the proposed AHTGC were visualized side by side and evaluated by two radiologists in terms of image quality. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to evaluate whether radiologists preferred the processed sequences or the unprocessed data. The results indicate that the average visual analogue scale (VAS) is positive ( p-value: 2.34 × 10-13) and estimated to be 1.01 (95% CI: 0.85; 1.16) favoring the processed data with the proposed AHTGC algorithm.

  20. Ovary and vaginal epithelium dynamics during the estrous cycle in Dasyprocta prymnolopha Wagler, 1831: ultrasound and cytological examinations

    PubMed Central

    Carreiro, Artur N.; Diniz, João A. R. A.; Souza, Joyce G.; Araújo, Débora V. F.; Dias, Rômulo F. F.; Azerêdo, Liliane M. S.; Rocha, Ediane F.; La Salles, Ana Y. F.; Peña-Alfaro, Carlos E.; Carvalho, Maria A. M.; Illera, Maria J.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to monitor and characterize morphological alterations in ovaries of agouti (Dasyprocta prymnolopha), reared in captivity, by using abdominal ultrasonography. All animals underwent daily vaginal cytological examination to identify the current cycle phase. For each phase of the estrous cycle, ultrasound examinations were carried out to identify and describe the morphology of both ovaries. Topographic parameters in an ultrasound window were established to locate the ovaries. The agouti estrous cycle lasted an average of 29.94 ± 6.77 days. During vaginal cytology examinations, all cell types were identified, and each phase of the estrous cycle was established by cell counts. No significant alterations were observed in the assessed ovarian morphometry measurements. In 75% of the animals examined, ovarian follicle presence was observed in the proestrus phase. PMID:29284211

  1. Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (or abdominal cocoon).

    PubMed

    Serafimidis, Costas; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Vernadakis, Spyros; Rallis, George; Giannopoulos, George; Legakis, Nikolaos; Peros, George

    2006-02-13

    Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (or abdominal cocoon) is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction, especially in adult population. Diagnosis is usually incidental at laparotomy. We discuss one such rare case, outlining the fact that an intra-operative surprise diagnosis could have been facilitated by previous investigations. A 56 year-old man presented in A&E department with small bowel ileus. He had a history of 6 similar episodes of small bowel obstruction in the past 4 years, which resolved with conservative treatment. Pre-operative work-up did not reveal any specific etiology. At laparotomy, a fibrous capsule was revealed, in which small bowel loops were encased, with the presence of interloop adhesions. A diagnosis of abdominal cocoon was established and extensive adhesiolysis was performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery and follow-up. Idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, although rare, may be the cause of a common surgical emergency such as small bowel ileus, especially in cases with attacks of non-strangulating obstruction in the same individual. A high index of clinical suspicion may be generated by the recurrent character of small bowel ileus combined with relevant imaging findings and lack of other plausible etiologies. Clinicians must rigorously pursue a preoperative diagnosis, as it may prevent a "surprise" upon laparotomy and result in proper management.

  2. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  3. Atypical moyamoya syndrome with brain calcification and stenosis of abdominal aorta and renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Uchikawa, Hideki; Fujii, Katsunori; Fujita, Mayuko; Okunushi, Tomoko; Shimojo, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    Moyamoya syndrome is a progressive cerebrovascular disease that is characterized by stenosis of the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and its main branches, in combination with an accompanying disease. We herein describe an 8-year-old boy exhibiting transient loss of consciousness, who had recurrent seizures in infancy with progressive brain calcification. On admission, he was alert but magnetic resonance angiography showed bilateral stenosis of the whole internal carotid artery and proliferation of vascular collaterals, and brain CT revealed calcification on bilateral putamen. Given that this fulfilled diagnostic criteria, we finally diagnosed him as having moyamoya syndrome, though the etiology was unclear. Interestingly, a whole vessel survey revealed vascular stenosis of abdominal aorta and renal arteries, in which the former has not been reported in moyamoya syndrome. We considered that brain calcification was gradually formed by decreased cerebral vascular flow from infancy, and stenosis of abdominal aorta was possibly extended from renal arteries. This is, moyamoya syndrome with brain calcification and stenosis of abdominal aorta, suggesting that morphological screening of whole vessels containing cerebral and abdominal arteries should be considered in cases of slowly progressive brain calcification. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in rheumatology in Korea: targeted ultrasound initiative survey.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taeyoung; Wakefield, Richard J; Emery, Paul

    2016-04-01

    In collaboration with the Targeted Ultrasound Initiative (TUI), to conduct the first study in Korea to investigate current practices in ultrasound use among Korean rheumatologists. We translated the TUI Global Survey into Korean and added questions to better understand the specific challenges facing rheumatologists in Korea. To target as many rheumatologists in Korea as possible, we created an on-line version of this survey, which was conducted from March to April 2013. Rheumatologists are in charge of ultrasound in many Korean hospitals. Rheumatologists in hospitals and private clinics use ultrasound to examine between one and five patients daily; they use ultrasound for diagnosis more than monitoring and receive compensation of about US$30-50 per patient. There are marked differences in the rates of ultrasound usage between rheumatologists who work in private practice compared with tertiary hospitals. Korean rheumatologists not currently using ultrasound in their practice appear eager to do so. This survey provides important insights into the current status of ultrasound in rheumatology in Korea and highlights several priorities; specifically, greater provision of formal training, standardization of reporting and accrual of greater experience among ultrasound users. If these needs are addressed, all rheumatology departments in Korea are likely to use ultrasound or have access to it in the future. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection of genicular artery pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Rachakonda, Aditya; Qato, Khalil; Khaddash, Tamim; Carroccio, Alfio; Pamoukian, Vicken; Giangola, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication after arthroscopic procedures involving the knee. A 38-year-old man presented 1 month after right-knee arthroscopy with a 2-cm pulsating mass on the medial side of the right knee. Duplex ultrasound evaluation revealed 2.5 × 2.1-cm pseudoaneurysm just distal to the patella with arterialized flow communicating with the inferior medial genicular artery. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection was performed in an office setting, and the resolution of active flow within the pseudoaneurysm was confirmed with duplex ultrasonography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The use of three-dimensional ultrasound does not improve training in fetal biometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lin W; Ting, Yuen H; Lao, Terence T; Chau, Macy M C; Fung, Tak Y; Leung, Tak Y; Sahota, Daljit S; Lau, Tze K

    2011-09-01

    To investigate whether three-dimensional (3D) technology offers any advantage over two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound in fetal biometric measurement training. Ten midwives with no hands-on experience in ultrasound were randomized to receive training on 2D or 3D ultrasound fetal biometry assessment. Midwives were taught how to obtain fetal biometric measurements (biparietal diameter (BPD), head circumference (HC), abdominal circumference (AC), and femur length (FL)) by a trainer. Subsequently, each midwife measured the parameters on another 10 fetuses. The same set of measurements was repeated by the trainer. The percentage deviation between the midwives' and the trainer's measurements was determined and compared between training groups. Time required for completion was recorded. Frozen images were reviewed by another sonographer to assess the image quality using a standardized scoring system. The median time for the complete set of measurements was significantly shorter in the 2D than in 3D group (13.4 min versus 17.8 min, P = 0.03). The mean percentage deviations did not reach statistical significance between the two groups except for FL (3.83% in 2D group versus 2.23% in 3D group (P = 0.046)). There were no significant differences in the quality scores. This study showed that the only demonstrable advantage of 3D ultrasound was a slightly more accurate measurement of FL, at the expense of a significantly longer time required.

  7. Ultrasound arthroscopy of human knee cartilage and subchondral bone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liukkonen, Jukka; Lehenkari, Petri; Hirvasniemi, Jukka; Joukainen, Antti; Virén, Tuomas; Saarakkala, Simo; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2014-09-01

    Arthroscopic ultrasound imaging enables quantitative evaluation of articular cartilage. However, the potential of this technique for evaluation of subchondral bone has not been investigated in vivo. In this study, we address this issue in clinical arthroscopy of the human knee (n = 11) by determining quantitative ultrasound (9 MHz) reflection and backscattering parameters for cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, in each knee, seven anatomical sites were graded using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) system based on (i) conventional arthroscopy and (ii) ultrasound images acquired in arthroscopy with a miniature transducer. Ultrasound enabled visualization of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. ICRS grades based on ultrasound images were higher (p < 0.05) than those based on conventional arthroscopy. The higher ultrasound-based ICRS grades were expected as ultrasound reveals additional information on, for example, the relative depth of the lesion. In line with previous literature, ultrasound reflection and scattering in cartilage varied significantly (p < 0.05) along the ICRS scale. However, no significant correlation between ultrasound parameters and structure or density of subchondral bone could be demonstrated. To conclude, arthroscopic ultrasound imaging had a significant effect on clinical grading of cartilage, and it was found to provide quantitative information on cartilage. The lack of correlation between the ultrasound parameters and bone properties may be related to lesser bone change or excessive attenuation in overlying cartilage and insufficient power of the applied miniature transducer. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dual-Targeted Theranostic Delivery of miRs Arrests Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Searle, Amy Kate; Hohmann, Jan David; Liu, Ao Leo; Abraham, Meike-Kristin; Palasubramaniam, Jathushan; Lim, Bock; Yao, Yu; Wallert, Maria; Yu, Eefang; Chen, Yung-Chih; Peter, Karlheinz

    2018-04-04

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an often deadly disease without medical, non-invasive treatment options. The upregulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) on aortic endothelium provides an early target epitope for a novel biotechnological theranostic approach. MicroRNA-126 was used as a therapeutic agent, based on its capability to downregulate VCAM-1 expression in endothelial cells and thereby reduces leukocyte adhesion and exerts anti-inflammatory effects. Ultrasound microbubbles were chosen as carriers, allowing both molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of AAA. Microbubbles were coupled with a VCAM-1-targeted single-chain antibody (scFv mVCAM-1 ) and a microRNA-126 mimic (M 126 ) constituting theranostic microbubbles (Targ MB -M 126 ). Targ MB -M 126 downregulates VCAM-1 expression in vitro and in an in vivo acute inflammatory murine model. Most importantly, using Targ MB -M 126 and ultrasound-guided burst delivery of M 126 , the development of AAA in an angiotensin-II-induced mouse model can be prevented. Overall, we describe a unique biotechnological theranostic approach with the potential for early diagnosis and long-sought-after medical therapy of AAA. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. General and abdominal fat outcomes in school-age children associated with infant breastfeeding patterns.

    PubMed

    Durmuş, Büşra; Heppe, Denise H M; Gishti, Olta; Manniesing, Rashindra; Abrahamse-Berkeveld, Marieke; van der Beek, Eline M; Hofman, Albert; Duijts, Liesbeth; Gaillard, Romy; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2014-06-01

    Breastfeeding may have a protective effect on the development of obesity in later life. Not much is known about the effects of infant feeding on more-specific fat measures. We examined associations of breastfeeding duration and exclusiveness and age at the introduction of solid foods with general and abdominal fat outcomes in children. We performed a population-based, prospective cohort study in 5063 children. Information about infant feeding was obtained by using questionnaires. At the median age of 6.0 y (95% range: 5.7 y, 6.8 y), we measured childhood anthropometric measures, total fat mass and the android:gynoid fat ratio by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and preperitoneal abdominal fat by using ultrasound. We observed that, in the models adjusted for child age, sex, and height only, a shorter breastfeeding duration, nonexclusive breastfeeding, and younger age at the introduction of solid foods were associated with higher childhood general and abdominal fat measures (P-trend < 0.05) but not with higher childhood body mass index. The introduction of solid foods at a younger age but not breastfeeding duration or exclusivity was associated with higher risk of overweight or obesity (OR: 2.05; 95% CI: 1.41, 2.90). After adjustment for family-based sociodemographic, maternal lifestyle, and childhood factors, the introduction of solid food between 4 and 4.9 mo of age was associated with higher risks of overweight or obesity, but the overall trend was not significant. Associations of infant breastfeeding and age at the introduction of solid foods with general and abdominal fat outcomes are explained by sociodemographic and lifestyle-related factors. Whether infant dietary composition affects specific fat outcomes at older ages should be further studied. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Sequential Total Variation Denoising for the Extraction of Fetal ECG from Single-Channel Maternal Abdominal ECG

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Jin; Lee, Boreom

    2016-01-01

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) is an important determinant of fetal health. Cardiotocography (CTG) is widely used for measuring the FHR in the clinical field. However, fetal movement and blood flow through the maternal blood vessels can critically influence Doppler ultrasound signals. Moreover, CTG is not suitable for long-term monitoring. Therefore, researchers have been developing algorithms to estimate the FHR using electrocardiograms (ECGs) from the abdomen of pregnant women. However, separating the weak fetal ECG signal from the abdominal ECG signal is a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose a method for estimating the FHR using sequential total variation denoising and compare its performance with that of other single-channel fetal ECG extraction methods via simulation using the Fetal ECG Synthetic Database (FECGSYNDB). Moreover, we used real data from PhysioNet fetal ECG databases for the evaluation of the algorithm performance. The R-peak detection rate is calculated to evaluate the performance of our algorithm. Our approach could not only separate the fetal ECG signals from the abdominal ECG signals but also accurately estimate the FHR. PMID:27376296

  11. Sequential Total Variation Denoising for the Extraction of Fetal ECG from Single-Channel Maternal Abdominal ECG.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jin; Lee, Boreom

    2016-07-01

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) is an important determinant of fetal health. Cardiotocography (CTG) is widely used for measuring the FHR in the clinical field. However, fetal movement and blood flow through the maternal blood vessels can critically influence Doppler ultrasound signals. Moreover, CTG is not suitable for long-term monitoring. Therefore, researchers have been developing algorithms to estimate the FHR using electrocardiograms (ECGs) from the abdomen of pregnant women. However, separating the weak fetal ECG signal from the abdominal ECG signal is a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose a method for estimating the FHR using sequential total variation denoising and compare its performance with that of other single-channel fetal ECG extraction methods via simulation using the Fetal ECG Synthetic Database (FECGSYNDB). Moreover, we used real data from PhysioNet fetal ECG databases for the evaluation of the algorithm performance. The R-peak detection rate is calculated to evaluate the performance of our algorithm. Our approach could not only separate the fetal ECG signals from the abdominal ECG signals but also accurately estimate the FHR.

  12. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  13. Integrated medical school ultrasound: development of an ultrasound vertical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Bahner, David P; Adkins, Eric J; Hughes, Daralee; Barrie, Michael; Boulger, Creagh T; Royall, Nelson A

    2013-07-02

    Physician-performed focused ultrasonography is a rapidly growing field with numerous clinical applications. Focused ultrasound is a clinically useful tool with relevant applications across most specialties. Ultrasound technology has outpaced the education, necessitating an early introduction to the technology within the medical education system. There are many challenges to integrating ultrasound into medical education including identifying appropriately trained faculty, access to adequate resources, and appropriate integration into existing medical education curricula. As focused ultrasonography increasingly penetrates academic and community practices, access to ultrasound equipment and trained faculty is improving. However, there has remained the major challenge of determining at which level is integrating ultrasound training within the medical training paradigm most appropriate. The Ohio State University College of Medicine has developed a novel vertical curriculum for focused ultrasonography which is concordant with the 4-year medical school curriculum. Given current evidenced-based practices, a curriculum was developed which provides medical students an exposure in focused ultrasonography. The curriculum utilizes focused ultrasonography as a teaching aid for students to gain a more thorough understanding of basic and clinical science within the medical school curriculum. The objectives of the course are to develop student understanding in indications for use, acquisition of images, interpretation of an ultrasound examination, and appropriate decision-making of ultrasound findings. Preliminary data indicate that a vertical ultrasound curriculum is a feasible and effective means of teaching focused ultrasonography. The foreseeable limitations include faculty skill level and training, initial cost of equipment, and incorporating additional information into an already saturated medical school curriculum. Focused ultrasonography is an evolving concept in medicine

  14. Obstetric ultrasound aids prompt referral of gestational trophoblastic disease in marginalized populations on the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Kathryn; Myat Min, Aung; Karunkonkowit, Noaeni; Keereechareon, Suporn; Tyrosvoutis, Mary Ellen; Tun, Nay Win; Rijken, Marcus J; Hoogenboom, Gabie; Boel, Machteld; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Nosten, François; McGready, Rose

    2017-01-01

    The use of obstetric ultrasound in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) in high-income settings is well established, leading to prompt management and high survival rates. Evidence from low-income settings suggests ultrasound is essential in identifying complicated pregnancies, but with limited studies reviewing specific conditions including GTD. The aim of this study is to review the role of ultrasound in diagnosis and management of GTD in a marginalized population on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Antenatal ultrasound became available in this rural setting in 2001 and care for women with GTD has been provided by Thailand public hospitals for 20 years. Retrospective record review. The incidence of GTD was 103 of 57,004 pregnancies in Karen and Burmese women on the Thailand-Myanmar border from 1993-2013. This equates to a rate of 1.8 (95% CI 1.5-2.2) per 1000 or 1 in 553 pregnancies. Of the 102 women with known outcomes, one (1.0%) died of haemorrhage at home. The median number of days between first antenatal clinic attendance and referral to hospital was reduced from 20 (IQR 5-35; range 1-155) to 2 (IQR 2-6; range 1-179) days (p = 0.002) after the introduction of ultrasound. The proportion of severe outcomes (death and total abdominal hysterectomy) was 25% (3/12) before ultrasound compared to 8.9% (8/90) with ultrasound (p = 0.119). A recurrence rate of 2.5% (2/80) was observed in the assessable population. The presence of malaria parasites in maternal blood was not associated with GTD. The rate of GTD in pregnancy in this population is comparable to rates previously reported within South-East Asia. Referral time for uterine evacuation was significantly shorter for those women who had an ultrasound. Ultrasound is an effective method to improve diagnosis of GTD in low-income settings and an effort to increase availability in marginalized populations is required.

  15. Appearance of burning abdominal pain during cesarean section under spinal anesthesia in a patient with complex regional pain syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kato, Jitsu; Gokan, Dai; Hirose, Noriya; Iida, Ryoji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ogawa, Setsuro

    2013-02-01

    The mechanism of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) was reported as being related to both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recurrence of CRPS was, reportedly, induced by hand surgery in a patient with upper limb CRPS. However, there is no documentation of mechanical allodynia and burning abdominal pain induced by Cesarean section under spinal anesthesia in patients with upper limb CRPS. We report the case of a patient who suffered from burning abdominal pain during Cesarean section under spinal anesthesia 13 years after the occurrence of venipuncture-induced CRPS of the upper arm. The patient's pain characteristics were similar to the pain characteristics of her right arm during her previous CRPS episode 13 years earlier. In addition, mechanical allodynia around the incision area was confirmed after surgery. We provided ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block using 20 mL of 0.4% ropivacaine under ultrasound guidance twice, which resulted in the disappearance of the spontaneous pain and allodynia. The pain relief was probably related to blockade of the peripheral input by this block, which in turn would have improved her central sensitization. Our report shows that attention should be paid to the appearance of neuropathic pain of the abdomen during Cesarean section under spinal anesthesia in patients with a history of CRPS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Correlation of cytologic and histopathologic findings with perinodal echogenicity of abdominal lymph nodes in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Davé, Aditya C; Zekas, Lisa J; Auld, Danelle M

    2017-07-01

    Abdominal lymphadenopathy in dogs and cats is routinely investigated with ultrasound. As the determination between benign and neoplastic etiologies of lymphadenopathy affects patient management, specific sonographic characteristics associated with both benign and neoplastic lymph nodes have been suggested. However, a significant overlap between these characteristics exists, necessitating a cytologic or histopathologic diagnosis in most instances. The objectives of this retrospective, cross-sectional study were to evaluate whether echogenicity of perinodal fat could be a discriminator between benign and neoplastic abdominal lymphadenopathy and to assess if additional sonographic features associated with malignancy could be identified in lymph nodes with hyperechoic perinodal fat. Small animal patients (257 dogs and 117 cats) with sonographic evidence of abdominal lymphadenopathy and a cytological or histopathological diagnosis were evaluated for differences in the proportions of sonographic features between benign and neoplastic groups. Greater maximum long axis diameter (in dogs and cats) and a greater number of abnormal lymph nodes (in cats) were associated with malignancy in lymph nodes with hyperechoic perinodal fat. Canine lymph nodes with round cell neoplasia were significantly more likely to have hyperechoic perinodal fat. Lymph nodes affected with other neoplasia or with lymphadenitis were equally likely to have normal or hyperechoic perinodal fat. Reactive lymph nodes were significantly less likely to have hyperechoic perinodal fat in both species. These results suggest that though echogenicity of perinodal fat is a nonspecific finding, abdominal lymph nodes with hyperechoic perinodal fat are less likely to be reactive and sampling of these lymph nodes may be indicated. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  17. Impact of the clinical ultrasound elective course on retention of anatomical knowledge by second-year medical students in preparation for board exams.

    PubMed

    Kondrashov, Peter; Johnson, Jane C; Boehm, Karl; Rice, Daris; Kondrashova, Tatyana

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound has been integrated into a gross anatomy course taught during the first year at an osteopathic medical school. A clinical ultrasound elective course was developed to continue ultrasound training during the second year of medical school. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of this elective course on the understanding of normal anatomy by second-year students. An anatomy exam was administered to students enrolled in the clinical ultrasound elective course before the start of the course and after its conclusion. Wilcoxon signed ranks tests were used to determine whether exam scores changed from the pre-test to the post-test. Scores from two classes of second-year students were analyzed. Students who took the elective course showed significant improvement in the overall anatomy exam score between the pre-test and post-test (P < 0.001). Scores for exam questions pertaining to the heart, abdomen, upper extremity, and lower extremity also significantly improved from the pretest to post-test (P < 0.001), but scores for the neck and eye showed no significant improvement. The clinical ultrasound elective course offered during the second year of medical school provided students with an important review of key anatomical concepts while preparing them for board exams. Our results suggested that more emphasis should be placed on head and neck ultrasound to improve student performance in those areas. Musculoskeletal, abdominal, and heart ultrasound labs were more successful for retaining relevant anatomical information. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Abdominal Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Borioni, Raoul; Garofalo, Mariano; De Paulis, Ruggero; Nardi, Paolo; Scaffa, Raffaele; Chiariello, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    Isolated abdominal aortic dissections are rare events. Their anatomic and clinical features are different from those of atherosclerotic aneurysms. We report 4 cases of isolated abdominal aortic dissection that were successfully treated with surgical or endovascular intervention. The anatomic and clinical features and a review of the literature are also presented. PMID:15902826

  19. Introduction of basic obstetrical ultrasound screening in undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Hamza, A; Solomayer, E-F; Takacs, Z; Juhasz-Boes, I; Joukhadar, R; Radosa, J C; Mavrova, R; Marc, W; Volk, T; Meyberg-Solomayer, G

    2016-09-01

    Teaching ultrasound procedures to undergraduates has recently been proposed to improve the quality of medical education. We address the impact of applying standardized ultrasound teaching to our undergraduates. Medical students received an additional theoretical and practical course involving hands-on ultrasound screening during their mandatory practical training week in obstetrics and gynecology. The students' theoretical knowledge and fetal image recognition skills were tested before and after the course. After the course, the students were asked to answer a course evaluation questionnaire. To standardize the teaching procedure, we used Peyton's 4-Step Approach to teach the skills needed for a German Society of Ultrasound in Medicine Level 1 ultrasound examiner. The multiple-choice question scores after the course showed statistically significant improvement (50 vs. 80 %; P < 0.001). The questionnaire revealed that students were satisfied with the course, felt that it increased their ultrasound knowledge, and indicated that they wanted more sonographic hands-on training in both obstetrics and gynecology and other medical fields. Using practical, hands-on medical teaching is an emerging method for undergraduate education that should be further evaluated, standardized, and developed.

  20. [Perioperative management of abdominal aortic balloon occlusion in patients complicated with placenta percteta: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yang; Guo, Xiang-yang

    2015-12-18

    When placenta previa complicated with placenta percreta, the exposure of operative field is difficult and the routine methods are difficult to effectively control the bleeding, even causing life-threatening results. A 31-year-old woman, who had been diagnosed with a complete type of placenta previa and placenta percreta with bladder invasion at 34 weeks gestation. Her ultrasound results showed a complete type of placenta previa and there was a loss of the decidual interface between the placenta and the myometrium on the lower part of the uterus, suggestive of placenta increta. For further evaluation of the placenta, pelvis magnetic resonance imaging was performed, which revealed findings suspicious of a placenta percreta. She underwent elective cecarean section at 36 weeks of gestation. Firstly, two ureteral stents were placed into the bilateral ureter through the cystoscope. After the infrarenal abdominal aorta catheter was inserted via the femoral artery (9 F sheath ), subarachnoid anesthesia had been established. A healthy 2 510 g infant was delivered, with Apgar scores of 10 at 1 min and 10 at 5 min. Immediately after the baby was delivered, following which there was massive haemorrhage and general anaesthesia was induced. The balloon catheter was immediately inflated until the wave of dorsal artery disappeared. With the placenta retained within the uterus, a total hysterectomy was performed. The occluding time was 30 min. The intraoperative blood loss was 2 500 mL. The occluding balloon was deflated at the end of the operation. The patient had stable vital signs and normal laboratory findings during the recovery period and the hemoglobin was 116 g/L. She was discharged six days after delivery without intervention-related complications. This case illustrates that temporary occlusion of the infrarenal abdominal aorta using balloon might be a safe and effective treatment option for patients with placenta previa complicated with placenta percreta, who were at high

  1. Biliary stricture due to neuroma after an innocent blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Katsinelos, P; Dimiropoulos, S; Galanis, I; Tsolkas, P; Paroutoglu, G; Arvaniti, M; Katsiba, D; Baltaglannis, S; Pilpilidis, I; Papagiannis, A; Vaslliadis, I

    2002-10-01

    A traumatic neuroma of the biliary tract is rarely associated with biliary obstruction. However, when it arises in the common bile duct (CBD) and is associated with obstructive jaundice, it is difficult to distinguish it from bile duct cancer. We describe a patient who developed obstructive jaundice and itching, due to CBD stricture, 8 years after innocent blunt abdominal trauma. The stricture was resected and hepatico-jejunal anastomosis was performed. Histological examination revealed a traumatic neuroma and a fibrous scar around the common bile duct. Symptoms disappeared following surgical removal of the lesion. Blunt abdominal injury may cause the late onset of a fibrous scar and traumatic neuroma in the common bile duct. To our knowledge, a traumatic neuroma of the biliary tract after blunt abdominal trauma has not been reported previously. We review the clinical picture of this relatively rare problem, along with its diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment.

  2. Da Vinci-assisted abdominal cerclage.

    PubMed

    Barmat, Larry; Glaser, Gretchen; Davis, George; Craparo, Frank

    2007-11-01

    To report the first placement of an abdominal cervicoisthmic cerclage using the da Vinci robot. Case report. Tertiary-care hospital. A 39-year-old female with a history of cervical insufficiency who required a cerclage and was not a candidate for transvaginal cerclage placement. Abdominal cervicoisthmic cerclage placement using the da Vinci robot. Ability to safely and successfully place an abdominal cerclage using the da Vinci robot. Abdominal cerclage was successfully placed using the da Vinci robot. The patient had minimal blood loss and was discharged to home on the same day as surgery. Da Vinci robot-assisted abdominal cerclage placement is an innovative application of robotic surgery and may alter the standard of care for women who require this surgery.

  3. Automated anatomical labeling method for abdominal arteries extracted from 3D abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Hoang, Bui Huy; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents an automated anatomical labeling method of abdominal arteries. In abdominal surgery, understanding of blood vessel structure concerning with a target organ is very important. Branching pattern of blood vessels differs among individuals. It is required to develop a system that can assist understanding of a blood vessel structure and anatomical names of blood vessels of a patient. Previous anatomical labbeling methods for abdominal arteries deal with either of the upper or lower abdominal arteries. In this paper, we present an automated anatomical labeling method of both of the upper and lower abdominal arteries extracted from CT images. We obtain a tree structure of artery regions and calculate feature values for each branch. These feature values include the diameter, curvature, direction, and running vectors of a branch. Target arteries of this method are grouped based on branching conditions. The following processes are separately applied for each group. We compute candidate artery names by using classifiers that are trained to output artery names. A correction process of the candidate anatomical names based on the rule of majority is applied to determine final names. We applied the proposed method to 23 cases of 3D abdominal CT images. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is able to perform nomenclature of entire major abdominal arteries. The recall and the precision rates of labeling are 79.01% and 80.41%, respectively.

  4. Nerve ultrasound normal values - Readjustment of the ultrasound pattern sum score UPSS.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Axer, Hubertus; Heiling, Bianka; Winter, Natalie

    2018-07-01

    Reference values are crucial for nerve ultrasound. Here, we reevaluated normal nerve and fascicle cross-sectional area (CSA) values in humans and compared them to published values. Based on these data, ultrasound pattern sum score (UPSS) boundary values were revisited and readjusted. Ultrasound of different peripheral nerves was performed in 100 healthy subjects at anatomically defined landmarks. Correlations with age, gender, height and weight were calculated. Overall, correspondence to other published reference values was high. Gender-dependency was found for the proximal median nerve. Dependency from height occurred in the tibial nerve (TN). Weight-dependency was not found. However, the most obvious differences were found in the TN between men >60 years and women <60 years. Thus, general boundary values were defined using the mean plus the twofold standard deviation for all subjects and nerve segments except for the TN, in which different cut-offs were proposed for elder men. Accordingly, the cut-offs for the UPSS were re-adjusted, none of the individuals revealed more than 2 points at maximum. The influence of distinct epidemiological factors on nerve size is most prominent in the TN, for which thus several normal values are useful. Adjusted reference values improve the accuracy of the UPSS. Copyright © 2018 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Grover, Madhusudan; Drossman, D