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Sample records for abdominal aortic coarctation

  1. Use of extracorporeal circulation and selective renal perfusion during the surgical correction of abdominal aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Karaca, S; Roussos, C; Cikirikcioglu, M; Tatar, T; Kalangos, A

    2009-08-01

    Coarctation of the abdominal aorta is a rare pathology. Stenosis of visceral and renal arteries may present together with coarctation, which requires specific operation techniques. We present the case of a patient with coarctation of the abdominal aorta associated with stenosis of the celiac trunk, the superior mesenteric and the right renal arteries. Distal aortic perfusion by extracorporeal circulation and selective right renal perfusion techniques were used during the operation to protect the spinal cord and kidney against hypoperfusion and ischemia.

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Schramm, René; Kupatt, Christian; Becker, Christoph; Bombien, René; Reichart, Bruno; Sodian, Ralf; Schmitz, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    A 77-year-old male patient was scheduled for transcatheter aortic valve implantation for symptomatic and severe aortic valve stenosis. Severe multidirectional kinking of the aorta based on aortic coarctation did not allow for the transfemoral, but only for the transapical approach. The procedure was complicated because of the technically challenging retrograde passage of the transfemorally inserted pig-tail catheter required for intraoperative angiography of the aortic root. Correct positioning of the pig-tail catheter into the ascending aorta was accomplished by use of a loop snare, which was advanced into the descending aorta via the antegrade route, passing the cardiac apex, the stenotic aortic valve, and the coarctation-associated kinking. The pig-tail catheter tip was manipulated into the loop snare, pulled traverse the coarctation, and released within the proximal ascending aorta. Subsequent procedures were uneventful and followed the standardized protocol. A 29 mm Edwards Lifescience transcatheter Sapien bioprosthesis was successfully implanted. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Flow in an Aortic Coarctation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loma, Luis; Miller, Paul; Hertzberg, Jean

    2009-11-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital cardiovascular defect that causes a constriction in the descending thoracic aorta. To gain a better understanding of the cause of post-surgical problems, a rigid glass and a compliant in vitro model of the aortic arch and descending aorta with a coarctation were constructed. Near-physiologic compliance was obtained using a silicone elastomer. Stereoscopic PIV was used to obtain 3D velocity maps. Results show a high speed turbulent jet formed at the exit of the coarctation. Flow in the rigid model was significantly different from in the compliant model. In the rigid model, the jet was symmetric, creating a toroidal recirculation area. In the compliant model, the jet was directed towards the medial wall, inducing flow reversal only at the lateral wall. Peak velocities and turbulence intensities were higher in the rigid model, however shear rate values in the compliant model were significantly above both the rigid model and normal in vivo values at the medial wall. In both models the reattachment region fluctuated, creating oscillatory shear.

  4. Late complication after repair of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Anaïs; Cuttone, Fabio; Desgué, Julien; Ivascau, Calin; Caprio, Sabino; Saplacan, Vladimir; Belin, Annette; Babatasi, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital malformation that has long been considered completely correctable with appropriate surgery in childhood. However, with the aging of these patients, many late complications have been reported, and this notion must be reevaluated. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent reoperation between 1992 and 2012 in our adult cardiac surgery department following surgical correction of coarctation in childhood; 18 patients over 15-years old were included in the study. The median time from coarctation repair to reoperation was 25 years. Patients were reoperated on for several late complications: aortic valve disease secondary to bicuspid aortic valve, ascending aortic aneurysm, recoarctation, aortic arch hypoplasia, pseudoaneurysm, associated recoarctation and pseudoaneurysm, subvalvular aortic obstruction, and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. One patient died due to an intraoperative complication. In the other cases, the surgical results were satisfactory at the 6-month follow-up. According to literature data, age at coarctation repair and surgical technique appear to be essential factors in late complications: older age and surgical repair with prosthesis interposition are associated with a higher rate of reintervention. Patients who have undergone repair of aortic coarctation frequently remain asymptomatic for a long time. Late complications can be appropriately treated when diagnosed early. Consequently, all coarctation patients need careful lifelong follow-up, especially those with congenital aortic valve disease or surgery in childhood with interposition of prosthetic material. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Aortic coarctation repair in the adult.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Abecasis, Miguel; Anjos, Rui; Marques, Marta; Koukoulis, Giovanna; Aguiar, Carlos; Neves, José Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Aortic coarctation can be repaired surgically or percutaneously. The decision should be made according to the anatomy and location of the coarctation, age of the patient, presence of other cardiac lesions, and other anatomic determinants (extensive collaterals or aortic calcification). This article reviews the different therapeutic options available, explaining the differences between children and adults, describing different approaches to the same disease, exemplified by three cases of nonclassic surgical approach and one percutaneous treatment.

  6. Aortic coarctation with persistent fifth left aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Caianiello, Giuseppe; Palladino, Maria Teresa; Iacono, Carola; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2009-08-14

    A neonate with severe aortic coarctation showed a double lumen transverse aorta (persistent fifth aortic arch) with both channels joining at the isthmus where the obstruction was confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Surgical repair was performed with a pantaloon-shaped patch. Persistent fifth aortic arch does not result in a vascular ring and, per se, is not hemodynamically significant unless associated with other cardiac malformations.

  7. Severe Aortic Coarctation in a 75-Year-Old Woman: Total Simultaneous Repair of Aortic Coarctation and Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hyun; Song, Sung Gook; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jun; Choo, Ki Seuk; Kim, June Hong; Lee, Sang Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Aortic coarctation is usually diagnosed and repaired in childhood and early adulthood. Survival of a patient with an uncorrected coarctation to more than 70 years of age is extremely unusual, and management strategies for these cases remain controversial. We present a case of a 75-year-old woman who was first diagnosed with aortic coarctation and severe aortic valve stenosis 5 years ago and who underwent a successful one-stage repair involving valve replacement and insertion of an extra-anatomical bypass graft from the ascending to the descending aorta. PMID:22363387

  8. One stage surgical treatment of aortic valve disease and aortic coarctation with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zipu; Wu, Shengjun; Li, Chengchen; Zou, Yu; Ma, Liang

    2015-11-10

    To validate ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting treatment for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease. The three patients in whom a descending atypical aortic coarctation was associated with an aortic valve disease were treated with one stage surgical treatment with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement in our heart center. Operative technique consisted of performing ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting through diaphragm muscle and implementing aortic valve replacement. The mean time for extracorporeal circulation and occluding clamp of aorta was recorded. Blood pressure data for pre- and post-operation was measured in the limbs. Computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms of pre- and post-operation were applied for detection of aortic stenosis. The other adverse events were noticed in outpatient service during a follow-up period. The mean extracorporeal circulation time was 54 ± 11 min. The mean time for occluding clamp of aorta was 34 ± 6 min. An arterial pressure gradient was totally corrected after surgical treatment. Post-operation computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms showed the grafts to be open with a fluent flow. The patients had no gastrointestinal tract complications. No adverse event was noticed during a follow-up period in outpatient service. Treatment of ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass is advisable for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease.

  9. CT and MRI of aortic coarctation: pre- and postsurgical findings.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to summarize the roles of CT and MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with aortic coarctation. CONCLUSION. Aortic coarctation is a common congenital heart disease accounting for approximately 6-8% of congenital heart defects. Despite its deceptively simple anatomic presentation, it is a complex medical problem with several associated anatomic and physiologic abnormalities. CT and MRI may provide very accurate information of the coarctation anatomy and other associated cardiac abnormalities.

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  11. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  12. [Surgery repair of aortic coarctation in infancy].

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Bañuelos, Iliana; González-Peña, Javier; Chagolla-Santillán, Miguel Ángel; Hernández-Morales, Gunter; Farías-Serratos, Claudia Vianey

    2013-01-01

    The study's purpose is to present our experience with surgical correction of aortic coarctation in infants, at short and medium term, particularly morbidity and mortality. This is a retrospective observational and descriptive trial. We included all infant patients undergoing surgical correction of AC. All data were obtained from the clinical database of the hospital. We included 20 patients with AC. The surgical technique was extended coarctectomy in 19 patients and, in one patient, a subclavian artery flap was performed. In all patients, the average time of aortic clamping was 18min. The residual gradient measured by echocardiography was in average of 12.2mmHg. One patient died of sepsis secondary to pneumonia. The main cause of immediate postoperative morbidity was systemic hypertension in seven patients, nosocomial infection in four patients with development of sepsis, one patient had to be reoperated due to high gradient. One patient had cholestatic syndrome. Eighteen patients required a transfusion at some time during their hospital stay. Average in-hospital stay was of 12 days. The aortic coarctation surgery has had favorable results so far and we can conclude that the program has been successful. The surgical technique has shown low mortality and complications and midterm follow-up shows low rate of recoarctation. Copyright © 2012 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Aortic coarctation, aneurysm, and ventricular dysfunction in an asymptomatic infant.

    PubMed

    García, Ana I; Aguilar, Juan M; García, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Aortic arch coarctation with post-coarctation aneurysm is rare in infants. We present the case of an asymptomatic 3-month-old infant with severe left ventricular dysfunction in this setting. The patient underwent surgical repair, and the left ventricular ejection fraction improved to recovery the 4th post-operative month.

  14. Transcatheter double stent implantation for treatment of middle aortic coarctation syndrome.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Colin J; Lambert, Imelda; Walsh, Kevin P

    2013-10-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with severe systemic hypertension. His upper limb blood pressure measured 190/100 mm Hg and lower limb blood pressure measured 98/64 mm Hg. The brachial pulses were bounding and femoral pulses were not palpable. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance angiography confirmed middle aortic syndrome. There was severe diffuse thoraco-abdominal coarctation with continuous Doppler run-off. Cardiac catheterization was undertaken and using a retrograde approach two Advanta V12 stents were implanted in the complex thoraco-abdominal coarctation. The gradient across the coarctation was reduced from 80 to 40 mm Hg gradient with a significant improvement in the luminal diameter of the aorta. His upper limb blood pressure reduced to 142/78 mm Hg six weeks later.

  15. [Surgery of aortic coarctation with aneurysm of the ascending aorta and aortic coronary fistula].

    PubMed

    Ben Jmaà, H; Abdennadher, M; Hadj Kacem, A; Masmoudi, S; Kammoun, S; Karoui, A; Frikha, I

    2009-11-01

    Aortic coarctation is rarely associated with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and an aortic coronary fistula. In this study, we report the case of a 52-year-old man undergoing surgery for an isthmic coarctation who also had an aneurysm of the initial portion of the aorta and an aortic coronary fistula. The diagnosis was clinically suspected and confirmed by vascular catheterism. The first operative stage consisted of treating the coarctation. The second stage was performed two months later to remove the aneurysm and replace the ascending aorta and the aortic valve with a prosthesis. The coronary arteries were then reimplanted. The postoperative results were quite favourable.

  16. Lusoria flap for the management of aortic coarctation in an eight-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Sara C; Willems, Tineke P; Mungroop, Hubert E; van den Heuvel, Freek; Ebels, Tjark

    2013-07-01

    Anomalous origin of right subclavian artery arising from the descending aorta is known as "arteria lusoria." The diagnosis in asymptomatic children is usually the by-product of other symptomatic-associated anomalies, such as aortic coarctation. We describe a case of an eight-year-old boy with juxtaductal aortic coarctation and rare origin of the arteria lusoria proximal to the aortic coarctation. The anomalous arteria lusoria was used as a flap to repair the aortic coarctation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported application of lusoria flap in a young child (not newborn) with ductal aortic coarctation.

  17. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  18. Endovascular treatment of acute type B dissection complicating aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Abbasi, Kyomars; Mousavi, Mehdi; Sahebjam, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment poses a high risk to patients with concomitant aortic coarctation and dissection, and an interventional approach could be an alternative. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a long history of untreated hypertension and aortic coarctation who emergently presented at our institution with an acute Stanford type B dissection. The patient's elevated serum creatinine level, perfusion deficit in the right lower limb, and hypertension did not respond to medical therapy, and he did not consent to surgery. By endovascular means, we used a self-expandable stent-graft to cover the entry point of the dissection; then, we deployed a balloon-expandable bare-metal stent to correct residual stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the endovascular treatment of aortic coarctation complicated by type B dissection.

  19. Aortic Wall Injury Related to Endovascular Therapy for Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Justin T; Jones, Thomas K; McElhinney, Doff B

    2015-09-01

    Aortic wall complications can occur in unrepaired aortic coarctation (CoA) and after surgical repair or endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the available literature and current understanding of aortic wall injury (AWI) surrounding the management of CoA, focusing specifically on acute and follow-up AWI after endovascular treatment. There have been 23 reported cases of aortic rupture after endovascular treatment for CoA, including angioplasty alone, bare metal stenting, and primary covered stent therapy. Even if these published cases represent only a minority of ruptures that have actually occurred, the incidence is substantially <1%. The incidence of acute aneurysm formation was 0% to 13% after angioplasty, 0% to 5% after bare metal stent placement, and <1% after covered stent placement. The reported incidence and natural history of both acute and new AWI during follow-up after endovascular therapy for CoA varies considerably, likely secondary to ascertainment and reporting biases and inconsistent definitions. Although important AWI after endovascular treatment of CoA seems to be declining in frequency with increasing experience and improving technology, it remains one of the most important potential adverse outcomes. Long-term surveillance for new AWI and monitoring of existing AWI is mandatory, with institution of appropriate treatment when necessary. A central research focus in this population should be determination of the appropriate treatment for both native and recurrent CoA across various ages with regard to limiting recurrent CoA and preventing associated aortic wall complications, in addition to determining the appropriate treatment of various AWI. Consistent definitions and reporting are necessary to truly understand the incidence of, risk factors for, and measures protective against AWI after angioplasty or stent implantation for CoA.

  20. Myocardial revascularization with both internal thoracic arteries 25 years after delayed repair for aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Gaudino, Mario; Farina, Piero; Cammertoni, Federico; Massetti, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    Aortic coarctation has been reported to cause alterations in the internal thoracic arteries that make these vessels unsuitable to be used as grafts for myocardial revascularization, especially if coarctation repair was performed in adulthood. This is the first reported bilateral internal thoracic grafting for myocardial revascularization in a patient who had undergone aortic coarctation repair 25 years earlier.

  1. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels.

  2. Aortic aneurysm formation following coarctation repair by Dacron patch aortoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Walhout, R.J.; Braam, R.L.; Schepens, M.A.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Plokker, H.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the finding of an aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic 43-year-old male, who was managed by Dacron patch aortoplasty for native coarctation of the aorta 25 years before. The role of magnetic resonance angiography as standard imaging technique in lifelong postoperative surveillance is discussed subsequently. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:376-7.) PMID:20730007

  3. Aortic aneurysm formation following coarctation repair by Dacron patch aortoplasty.

    PubMed

    Walhout, R J; Braam, R L; Schepens, M A; Mulder, B J M; Plokker, H W M

    2010-08-01

    We describe the finding of an aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic 43-year-old male, who was managed by Dacron patch aortoplasty for native coarctation of the aorta 25 years before. The role of magnetic resonance angiography as standard imaging technique in lifelong postoperative surveillance is discussed subsequently. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:376-7.).

  4. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  5. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  6. Single-stage repair of aortic coarctation and multiple concomitant cardiac lesions through a median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Kervan, Umit; Yurdakok, Okan; Genc, Bahadir; Ozen, Anil; Saritas, Ahmet; Kucuker, Seref Alp; Pac, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Through a median sternotomy, we performed a single-stage repair of severe aortic coarctation, ventricular septal defect, patent foramen ovale, and mitral valve insufficiency. The severe aortic coarctation was repaired by interposing a synthetic graft between the distal ascending aorta and the descending aorta. We first repaired the coarctation with the 38-year-old man on cardiopulmonary bypass, before aortic cross-clamping, in order to shorten the cross-clamp time.

  7. Outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair in adult coarctation patients.

    PubMed

    Lala, Salim; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Chandrekashar, Satish; Giles, Kristina A; Fatima, Javairiah; Berceli, Scott A; Back, Martin R; Huber, Thomas S; Beaver, Thomas M; Beck, Adam W

    2017-09-22

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is most commonly identified in pediatric patients; however, adults can present with late sequelae of untreated coarctation or complications of prior open repair. To date, there are limited data about the role of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in this group of patients. The purpose of this analysis was to describe our experience with management of adult coarctation patients using TEVAR. All TEVAR patients treated for primary coarctation or late sequelae of previous open repair (eg, pseudoaneurysm, recurrent coarctation or anastomotic stenosis related to index open coarctation repair) were reviewed. Demographics, comorbidities, procedure-related variables, postoperative outcomes, and reintervention were recorded. Computed tomography centerline assessments of endograft morphology were completed to delineate stent anatomy at the coarctation site. Survival and reintervention were estimated using life-table analysis. A total of 21 patients were identified (median age, 46 years [range, 33-71 years]; 67% male [n = 14]). Nine patients (43%) were treated for symptomatic primary (n = 6) or recurrent (n = 3) coarctation. Other indications included degenerative thoracic aneurysm (n = 6), pseudoaneurysm (n = 4), and dissection (n = 2). Technical success was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84%-100%). No 30-day mortality or paraplegia events occurred; however, two patients (10%) experienced postoperative nondisabling stroke. In primary or recurrent coarctation patients with available computed tomography imaging (n = 8 of 9), nominal stent graft diameters were achieved proximal and distal to the coarctation (range, -0.4 to -1.2 mm of desired final stent diameter). Specific to the coarctation site, there was a significant increase in aortic diameter after TEVAR (before stenting, 11.5 [95% CI, 6.8-12.3] mm; after stenting, 15 [95% CI, 13.7-15.7] mm; P = .004). Concurrently, systolic arterial blood pressure at time of discharge was

  8. Stent graft implantation in an aortic pseudoaneurysm associated with a fractured Cheatham-Platinum stent in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Berden, Pavel; Podnar, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of aortic pseudoaneurysm associated with a fractured bare Cheatham-Platinum stent following stenting for aortic coarctation. These complications were recognised 6 years after the implantation procedure and were successfully managed by percutaneous stent graft implantation. Staged approach for stent dilatation might prevent development of aortic pseudoaneurysms. In addition, careful follow-up is warranted after stenting for aortic coarctation, particularly in patients with recognised aortic wall injury.

  9. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  10. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  11. Familial aortic coarctation: a rare cause of refractory hypertension in the elderly: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lara-Rojas, Carmen M; Bernal-Lopez, M Rosa; Lopez-Carmona, M Dolores; Gomez-Huelgas, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of late presentation of familial aortic coarctation, a rare cause of hypertension. Diagnosis of familial aortic coarctation in the elderly is exceptional, given that in the absence of endovascular or surgical repair patients do not usually survive beyond 50 years of age. Our case concerns a 72-year-old woman with hypertension of long evolution, control of which improved markedly after endovascular repair of the coarctation. Her son had undergone surgery for repair of aortic coarctation at the age of 23 years.

  12. Aortic Coarctation Diagnosed During Pregnancy in a Woman With Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Zakaria; Iriart, Xavier; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2015-09-01

    Aortic coarctation is thought to be a rare condition in patients with tetralogy of Fallot. We report the case of a 26 year old woman presenting with systemic hypertension at 17 weeks of pregnancy after repair of tetralogy of Fallot in childhood. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed right aortic arch with severe isthmic coarctation. Her blood pressure was controlled medically during the rest of her pregnancy, and delivery was uneventful. Successful transcatheter placement of a covered stent at the level of the coarctation was performed after delivery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of aortic coarctation diagnosed in an adult patient late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.

  13. Aortic root aneurysm in an adult patient with aortic coarctation: a single-stage approach

    PubMed Central

    Ananiadou, Olga G.; Koutsogiannidis, Charilaos; Ampatzidou, Fotini; Drossos, George E.

    2012-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a common congenital defect that may be undiagnosed until adulthood. Moreover, coarctation is associated with congenital and acquired cardiac pathology that may require surgical intervention. The management of an adult patient with aortic coarctation and an associated cardiac defect poses a great technical challenge since there are no standard guidelines for the therapy of such a complex pathology. Several extra-anatomic bypass grafting techniques have been described, including methods in which distal anastomosis is performed on the descending thoracic aorta, allowing simultaneous intracardiac repair. We report here a 37-year old man who was diagnosed with an aortic root aneurysm and aortic coarctation. The patient was treated electively with a single-stage approach through a median sternotomy that consisted of valve-sparing replacement of the aortic root and ascending-to-descending extra-anatomic aortic bypass, using a 18-mm Dacron graft. Firstly, the aortic root was replaced with the Yacoub remodelling procedure, and then the distal anastomosis was performed to the descending aorta, behind the heart, with the posterior pericardial approach. The extra-anatomic bypass graft was brought laterally from the right atrium and implanted in the ascending graft. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and a control computed tomographic angiogram 1 month after complete repair showed good results. PMID:22647969

  14. Aortic root aneurysm in an adult patient with aortic coarctation: a single-stage approach.

    PubMed

    Ananiadou, Olga G; Koutsogiannidis, Charilaos; Ampatzidou, Fotini; Drossos, George E

    2012-09-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a common congenital defect that may be undiagnosed until adulthood. Moreover, coarctation is associated with congenital and acquired cardiac pathology that may require surgical intervention. The management of an adult patient with aortic coarctation and an associated cardiac defect poses a great technical challenge since there are no standard guidelines for the therapy of such a complex pathology. Several extra-anatomic bypass grafting techniques have been described, including methods in which distal anastomosis is performed on the descending thoracic aorta, allowing simultaneous intracardiac repair. We report here a 37-year old man who was diagnosed with an aortic root aneurysm and aortic coarctation. The patient was treated electively with a single-stage approach through a median sternotomy that consisted of valve-sparing replacement of the aortic root and ascending-to-descending extra-anatomic aortic bypass, using a 18-mm Dacron graft. Firstly, the aortic root was replaced with the Yacoub remodelling procedure, and then the distal anastomosis was performed to the descending aorta, behind the heart, with the posterior pericardial approach. The extra-anatomic bypass graft was brought laterally from the right atrium and implanted in the ascending graft. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and a control computed tomographic angiogram 1 month after complete repair showed good results.

  15. Surgical versus percutaneous treatment of aortic coarctation: new standards in an era of transcatheter repair.

    PubMed

    Luijendijk, Paul; Bouma, Berto J; Groenink, Maarten; Boekholdt, Matthijs; Hazekamp, Mark G; Blom, Nico A; Koolbergen, Dave R; de Winter, Robbert J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2012-12-01

    Aortic coarctation is a common congenital cardiovascular defect, which can be diagnosed over a wide range of ages and with varying degrees of severity. Surgery has proven to be an effective treatment for the management of native aortic coarctation, and remains the treatment of choice in neonates. Balloon angioplasty with or without stenting has evolved rapidly over the past decade. Balloon angioplasty is the treatment of choice in children with re-coarctation, and currently available immediate results in native coarctation are similar with regards to gradient reduction as compared with surgery. However, both treatment options carry the risk of restenosis and aortic wall complications, especially after balloon angioplasty without stenting in native coarctation. On the other hand, stent implantation has shown excellent short-term results in both children beyond infancy and in adults with native coarctation. In patients with recurrent coarctation who are at high surgical risk, balloon angioplasty and stent repair offer a less invasive and equally effective method. Stent repair is preferred over balloon angioplasty in adults and outgrown children with a recurrent coarctation, as the risk for re-coarctation and aneurysm formation seems to be lower. Data with regard to long-term outcome after percutaneous treatment strategies are scarce. This review summarizes the current insights in the efficacy and safety of both surgical and transcatheter treatment options for aortic coarctation.

  16. Extra-anatomical bypass in complex and recurrent aortic coarctation and hypoplastic arch.

    PubMed

    Delmo Walter, Eva Maria; Javier, Mariano Francisco Del Maria; Hetzer, Roland

    2017-09-01

    Our goal was to report the selection schemes, technical variations and long-term outcome of extra-anatomical bypass to correct complex, recurrent aortic coarctation and hypoplastic aortic arch. Between 1989 and 2012, 53 patients (mean age 13.2 ± 4.3, median 11.6, range 9-23 years) with complex aortic coarctation (n = 33; long-segment hypoplastic aortic arch in 15), recurrent coarctation (n = 20; anastomosic pseudoaneurysm in 10), underwent correction using extra-anatomical bypass, either with (n = 18: femoral bypass = 13, left heart bypass = 5) or without (n = 35) extracorporeal circulation via a left lateral thoracotomy (n= 48) and combined median sternotomy and median laparotomy (n = 5). The decision to use extracorporeal circulation was based on the anatomical location of the coarctation, the length of the hypoplasia and a history of previous repair. Preoperatively, mean systolic blood pressure was 130 ± 30 mmHg at rest and 180 ± 40 mmHg during exercise, with a mean pressure gradient of 80 ± 11.6 (range 40-120) mmHg. Various extra-anatomical bypass strategies included left subclavian artery to descending aorta (n = 38), ascending aorta to left subclavian artery (n = 3), ascending aorta to descending aorta (n = 4), aortic arch to descending aorta (n = 3) and ascending aorta to abdominal aorta (n = 5). Graft size (median 18, range 10-26, mm) was chosen according to the diameter of the vessel proximal and distal to the planned graft. No operative deaths, paraplegia or abdominal malperfusion occurred. The mean reduction in systolic blood pressure was 60 ± 25 mmHg without pressure gradients. During a mean follow-up of 18.3 ± 3.7 years, there were no reoperations, graft complications or pseudoaneurysm formation on anastomotic sites. Seven (11.6%) patients are on antihypertensive medications. No patient presented with claudication nor did anyone experience orthostatic problems from

  17. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  18. Concomitant percutaneous treatment of aortic coarctation and associated intercostal aneurysms: pre-procedural recognition is key.

    PubMed

    Batlivala, Sarosh P; Rome, Jonathan J

    2016-02-01

    Intercostal aneurysms are associated with aortic coarctation. Their aetiology is not well-understood but may be related to intrinsic vascular pathology and altered flow dynamics through the intercostal artery. We present the cases of two patients with coarctation and intercostal aneurysms. The aneurysms were recognised on pre-catheterisation imaging studies and were selectively occluded during the same procedure to treat the coarctation. There were no complications; both the patients have no residual coarctation at the most recent follow-up. Intercostal aneurysms associated with coarctation can have significant consequences including late rupture, paralysis, and even death. These aneurysms are common with an incidence of up to 40% with adult-diagnosed coarctation; one treatment plan is to treat both the coarctation and aneurysm during a single catheterisation. Pre-catheterisation CT or MRI may play a role in this strategy.

  19. Internal mammary artery dilatation in a patient with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, and coronary disease. Case report.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jose Rubio; Lopez, Laura Reija; Quiroga, Juan Sierra; Martinez Comendador, Jose M; Martinez-de-Alegria, Anxo; Martinez Cereijo, Jose M; Dominguez, Cristian Delgado

    2011-04-17

    The ideal surgical approach is unclear in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta that is associated with other cardiovascular pathologies that require intervention. Standard median sternotomy allows simultaneous, coronary revascularization surgery, valve replacement and repair of aortic coarctation. However the collateral circulation and the anatomy of the mammary arteries must be determined, to avoid possible complications. We report a case of a 69 year-old man with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, coronary artery disease and internal mammary artery dilatation who underwent concomitant surgical procedures through a median sternotomy.

  20. A rare combination of vascular anomalies: Hypoplastic aortic arch, coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bayar, Nermin; Arslan, Şakir; Üreyen, Çağın Mustafa; Küçükseymen, Selçuk; Erol, Bekir

    2015-04-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is the fifth most common congenital cardiac anomaly encountered in adults. It is important for prognosis to diagnose and treat this anomaly early. An aneurysm might develop due to tunica media abnormalities in patients with coarctation of the aorta. We hereby present an adult case with a very rare combination of vascular anomalies including ascending aorta aneurysm, hypoplastic aortic arch, coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm.

  1. Fetal nuchal cystic hygroma associated with aortic coarctation and trisomy 21: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Kitazawa, Riko

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of fetal nuchal cystic hygroma associated with aortic coarctation and trisomy 21. A stillborn baby, delivered at 15 weeks and 5 days of gestation, had a huge nuchal cystic hygroma. Autopsy revealed aortic coarctation of the periductal type with patent ductus arteriosus, endocardial cushion defect and left ventricular hypoplasia. Trisomy 21 was evident by karyotyping. Macroscopically, while an apparent association of nuchal cystic hygroma and aortic coarctation resembled Turner syndrome, histopathological findings were those typically seen in trisomy 21: numerous dilated lymphatics in the subcutaneous tissue with severe mesenchymal edema, and an enlarged jugular lymphatic sac. PMID:19918412

  2. Transcatheter therapy for aortic coarctation with severe systemic hypertension during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Assaidi, Anass; Sbragia, Pascal; Fraisse, Alain

    2013-10-01

    Aortic coarctation is an unusual cause of hypertension during pregnancy and its management is not clarified. We report transcatheter balloon dilatation and stenting for native aortic coarctation in a 22-year-old pregnant woman with severe and uncontrolled systemic hypertension. Arterial blood pressure could be successfully controlled with medical treatment during the rest of the pregnancy and the patient underwent uneventful delivery. No adverse events or recoarctation was observed during 24 months clinical follow-up. In conclusion, native aortic coarctation can be successfully treated during pregnancy with transcatheter therapy. More experience is needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of such management.

  3. Double Invasive Blood Pressure Monitoring for Cesarean Delivery in a Pregnant Woman With Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Barcellos, Bruno Mendonça; Loureiro, Fernanda Martins; Sampaio, Livia Fernandes; de Resende, Marco Antonio Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Aortic coarctation is a discrete narrowing of the proximal thoracic aorta. It is poorly tolerated during pregnancy because of its association with hypertension, cerebrovascular accident, and aortic rupture. We report a case of severe uncorrected congenital aortic coarctation in a 31-year-old symptomatic pregnant woman at 29 weeks of gestation who underwent successful cesarean delivery with an epidural anesthetic technique. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a gradient of 75 mm Hg. To avoid undiagnosed arterial hypotension and inadequate uteroplacental flow distal to the coarctation, double (radial and femoral) invasive arterial blood pressure measurement was used to monitor both pre- and postcoarctation arterial blood pressure.

  4. [Contemporary therapeutic management of adult's congenital aortic coarctation].

    PubMed

    da Gama, A Dinis

    2013-01-01

    Adult congenital aortic coarctation is an entity rarely seen in clinical practice. It is commonly diagnosed and managed in the early stages of life, mean in the neo-natal or young children's ages. Some cases however can be overlooked at this scrutinity and become recognizable at later stages, in adulthood, through symptoms and signs resulting from the deep hemodynamic deregulation caused by the disease in the proximal and distal aortic physiology, requiring often imperative therapeutic repair. In this paper, an extensive revision is made on the main pathologic, clinical and diagnostic features of the disease, culminating in a critical analysis on the contemporary therapeutic methods available, which includes the conventional open surgery and the endovascular intervention, which includes the balloon angioplasty, the stenting and the covered stents.

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  6. Aortic Endoprosthesis for the Treatment of Native Aortic Coarctation and Concomitant Aneurysm in an Octogenarian Patient.

    PubMed

    Rabellino, Martín; Kotowicz, Vadim; Kenny, Alberto; Kohan, Andres Alejandro; García-Mónaco, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of an 82-year-old female patient with native coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. On consultation, she was receiving 4 antihypertensive drugs, and physical examination revealed nonpalpable lower-limb pulses with intermittent claudication at 50 min. Because of her age, high surgical risk and combination of lesions, endovascular treatment was suggested. Placement of a Valiant thoracic aorta endoprosthesis followed by coarctation angioplasty was performed. At 48 hr, the patient was discharged on 1 antihypertensive drug, palpable pulses on both limbs and a normal ankle-brachial index. At 1 month follow-up, the patient remained as discharged and multislice computed tomography angiography depicted complete coarctation expansion without residual stenosis, exclusion of the aortic aneurysm, and no signs of endoleaks.

  7. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  8. Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Coarctation of the Aorta: A Hybrid Approach to Treatment.

    PubMed

    McLennan, Daniel; Caputo, Massimo; Taliotis, Demetris

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid surgery is becoming more popular in the treatment of children with congenital heart disease, particularly small infants and neonates. We report a case of a patient with aortic stenosis (AS) and coarctation of the aorta (CoA).

  9. Kabuki syndrome in a girl with mosaic 45,X/47,XXX and aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chern, Schu-Rern; Wang, Wayseen

    2008-06-01

    To describe the clinical findings of a patient with mosaic 45,X/47,XXX and aortic coarctation. Descriptive case study. Tertiary medical center. A 6-year-old girl with stigmata of Turner syndrome, aortic coarctation, patent ductus arteriosus, and a peculiar facial appearance. None. Cytogenetic analysis. The patient manifested a characteristic Kabuki syndrome facial appearance with long palpebral fissures, everted lateral third of lower eyelids, arched eyebrows, a depressed nasal tip, large dysplastic ears and epicanthic folds. She had undergone cardiac surgery for treatment of aortic coarctation and patent ductus arteriosus. Cytogenetic analysis of the blood lymphocytes revealed a karyotype of mos 45,X,9ph [35 cells]/47,XXX,9ph [5 cells]. This is the first report of mosaic 45,X/47,XXX associated with Kabuki syndrome. We emphasize that Kabuki syndrome, a peculiar facial appearance and aortic coarctation, should be considered in girls with sex chromosome abnormalities.

  10. [Management of aortic coarctation at the adult age].

    PubMed

    Godart, F

    2007-05-01

    Classical treatment of coarctation of the aorta consists of resection and suture through a left thoracotomy. However, over the last 20 years, balloon angioplasty, recently associated with stenting, has progressively supplanted surgery in the adult both in native forms and in recoarctions. Usually, the diameters of the balloon and stent are chosen to be the same as that of the aortic isthmus or proximal aortic arch without exceeding that of the aorta at the diaphragm. Moreover, the tendency now is to recommend stenting in cases of severe, tubular and long stenosis associated with proximal hypoplasia and in cases of residual gradients after dilatation. The complications of percutaneous techniques are the risk of restenosis (11-15%), aneurysm formation (5%), and a very small risk of dissection. However, it is recognised that stenting is associated with fewer complications than dilatation alone or surgery. After correction, the main problem is that of hypertension, often associated with persistence of a pressure gradient at the isthmus. Coarctation is often associated with a congenital bicuspid aortic valve in nearly 50% of cases and the valvular condition may progress to stenosis or incompetence requiring corrective surgery. In these cases, a dilatation of the aorta must also be suspected which may progress to an aneurysm. In addition, pregnancy is often complicated by maternal hypertension. The consequences are a high risk of abortion and, for the child, a prematurity, poor growth, and a small risk of recurrence of the cardiac disease. Pregnant women should be followed up in a multidisciplinary fashion and, when possible, problems of residual stenosis, aneurysm and hypertension should be controlled and corrected before the woman wishes to be pregnant. In practice, medium and long term follow up should be undertaken by specialist teams and comprise clinical examination, blood pressure investigations on effort and by ambulatory recording, Doppler ultrasonography of the

  11. Infolding of covered stents used for aortic coarctation: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Wan, Andrea W; Lee, Kyong-Jin; Benson, Lee N

    2014-01-01

    Covered stents have been used for the treatment of aortic coarctation to protect the arterial wall during dilation. Early results have shown them to be safe and effective. We report two cases of infolding of the proximal edge of a covered aortic coarctation stent. Management required implantation of a second stent. Poor stent apposition to the vessel wall and/or recoil may allow conditions for these events to occur.

  12. Early severe coronary artery disease and aortic coarctation in a child with familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Labib, Dina; Soliman, Haytham; Said, Kareem; Sorour, Khaled

    2016-11-30

    An 11-year-old boy presented with easy fatigability, multiple xanthomas, and absent pedal pulsations. Laboratory workup showed severe hypercholesterolaemia and non-invasive imaging revealed 'normally functioning' bicuspid aortic valve and tight aortic coarctation. Coronary angiography showed severe right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis. Medical treatment resulted in significant improvement of dyslipidaemia. We successfully performed balloon dilation and stenting of his coarctation, as well as percutaneous coronary intervention for RCA lesion.

  13. Surgical management of a hypoplastic distal aortic arch and coarctation of aorta in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, ascending aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Sabol, Frantisek; Kolesar, Adrián; Toporcer, Tomás; Bajmoczi, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome has been associated with cardiovascular malformations, but only 3 cases have been reported to be associated with aortic coarctation and surgical management is not defined. A 51-year old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome associated with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta, hypoplastic aortic arch and aortic coarctation at the level of the left subclavian artery presented with shortness of breath 2 years after diagnosis. Imaging identified interim development of a 7.2-cm aneurysm at the level of the aortic coarctation. She underwent surgical repair with a Dacron interposition graft under hypothermic circulatory arrest. She continues to do well 18 months following repair.

  14. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Medical management of aortic coarctation is feasible & durable in selected patients: a case report & literature review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asif N; Carter, William; Mousa, Albeir Y

    2015-01-01

    Long-term survival in patients with complete aortic coarctation (AC) without surgical repair has not been well characterized and is rarely documented. We report a case of an 84 year old male with complete aortic coarctation with history of hypertension for more than 40 years. Since the diagnosis was made in early 1950's medical treatment to control hypertension was initiated as patient was deemed high risk for surgical intervention. He has survived to the age of 84 years with minimal medical problems. This report also reviews the few documented cases of prolonged survival in patients with aortic coarctation. This report demonstrates that prolonged survival is possible in patients with documented complete coarctation and awareness of this report may influence the decision to use medical treatment for selected elderly patients with high risk of mortality associated with surgical repair.

  16. Hemodynamic responses to acute aortic coarctation in conscious sinoaortic denervated rats.

    PubMed

    Fazan Júnior, R; Machado, B H; Salgado, H C

    1997-10-01

    The hemodynamic responses to acute (45 min) partial aortic constriction were studied in conscious intact (N = 7) or sinoaortic denervated (SAD) adult male Wistar rats (280-350 g, N = 7) implanted with carotid and femoral arterial catheters, a pneumatic cuff around the abdominal aorta and a pulsed Doppler flow probe to measure changes in aortic resistance. In addition, the hypertensive response and the reflex bradycardia elicited by total (N = 8) vs partial (N = 7) aortic constriction (monitored by maintenance of the pressure distal to the cuff at 50 mmHg) were compared in two other groups of intact rats. Intact rats presented a smaller hypertensive response (26 to 40% above basal level) to partial aortic constriction than SAD rats (38 to 58%). The calculated change in aortic resistance imposed by constriction of the aorta increased progressively only in intact rats, but was significantly smaller (193 to 306%) than that observed (501 to 591%) in SAD rats. Intact rats showed a significant bradycardia (23 to 26% change in basal heart rate) throughout coarctation, whereas the SAD rats did not (1 to 3%). Partial or total occlusion of the aorta induced similar hypertensive responses (37-38% vs 24-30% for total constriction) as well as reflex bradycardia (-15 to -17% vs -22 to -33%) despite a greater gradient in pressure (97-98 vs 129-140 mmHg) caused by total constriction. The present data indicate that the integrity of the baroreflex in intact rats can cause the hypertensive response to level off at a lower value than in SAD rats despite a progressive increase in aortic resistance. In addition, they also indicate that the degree of partial aortic constriction by maintenance of the pressure distal to the cuff at 50 mmHg already elicits a maximal stimulation of the arterial baroreflex.

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2010-12-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective surgery of symptomfree AAA. In order to fulfil all WHO, European, and Danish criteria for screening, a randomised hospitalbased screening trial of 12,639 65-73 year old men in Viborg County (Denmark) was initiated in 1994. It seemed that US screening is a valid, suitable and acceptable method of screening. The acceptance rate was 77%, and 95% accept control scans. Furthermore, persons at the highest risk of having an AAA attend screening more frequently. We found that 97% of the interval cases developed from aortas that initially measured 2.5-2.9 cm - i.e. approx. only 5% attenders need re-screening at 5-year intervals. Two large RCTs have given clear indications of operation. Survivors of surgery enjoy the same quality of life as the background population, and only 2-5% of patients refuse an offer of surgery. Early detection seems relevant since the cardiovascular mortality is more than 4 times higher in AAA patients without previous hospital discharge diagnoses due to cardiovascular disease than among similar men without AAA. The absolute risk difference after 5 years was 16%. So, they will benefit from general cardiovascular preventive action as smoking cessation, statins and low-dose aspirin, which could inhibit further AAA progression. All 4 existing RCTs point in the same direction, viz. in favour of screening of men aged 65 and above. We found that screening significantly reduced AAA-related mortality by 67% within the first five years (NNT = 352). Restriction of screening to men with previous cardiovascular or pulmonary hospital discharge diagnoses would request only 27% of the relevant male population study to be invited, but would only have prevented 46.7% of the

  18. Comparison of CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography in the diagnosis of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Miabi, Zinat; Pourfathi, Hojjat; Midia, Mehran; Midia, Ramin; Parvizi, Rezayat

    2011-01-01

    There are several methods for the diagnosis and evaluation of coarctation of the aorta. Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) is the standard detection method, though it entails complications and side-effects. The aim of the present study was to compare Computed Tomography (CT) angiography with DSA for diagnosing aortic coarctation. We performed a cross-sectional study of 15 patients (11 males and four females aged between two and 30 years) referred to Tabriz Shahid Madani Hospital and Imaging Center between August 2005 and February 2006 with suspected aortic coarctation. All patients were subjected to DSA and CT angiography for diagnosis of aortic coarctation. The mean age of the patients was 14.6 years; 11 were male (74.4%) and four (26.6%) were female. The DSA and CT angiography results were comparable in all patients in terms of diagnosis and the detection of complications, particularly cardiovascular complications. However, CT angiography was less time-consuming to perform than DSA (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, CT angiography, comparableto DSA, diagnosed coarctation of aorta in all the patients. However, CT angiography is a non-invasive, cost effective procedure that takes significantly less time to carry out than DSA. Therefore, CT angiography is recommended as an appropriate method for diagnosing the coarctation of aorta.

  19. Redo sternotomy for extra-anatomical correction of aortic coarctation and mitral repair in an adult after failed endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozker, E; Saritas, B; Vuran, C; Yoruker, U; Kocyigit, O I; Turkoz, R

    2011-07-01

    Recently, extra-anatomical bypass surgery has been widely used in complicated adult aortic coarctation cases with concomitant intracardiac repair. Stent implantation has been widely used for primary aortic coarctation as well. The procedure has been shown to be effective with long term follow ups. However, failed stent implantations like stent fracture and dislodgement may complicate the clinical status and subsequent surgical procedure. Extra-anatomic bypass can provide effective results and lower morbidity in cases with concomitant intracardiac problems and stent failure. Here we present an adult aortic coarctation patient who had undergone a Bentall operation and two unsuccessful stent implantations for recurrent aortic coarctation. The patient then got an extra-anatomic bypass for aortic coarctation and concomitant mitral valve commissurotomy through median sternotomy.

  20. Unexpected death caused by rupture of a dilated aorta in an adult male with aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Knudsen, Peter Thiis

    2015-09-01

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is a congenital aortic narrowing. We describe for the first time the findings obtained by unenhanced post mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in a case where the death was caused by cardiac tamponade from a ruptured aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch without dissection combined with aortic coarctation. The patient, a 46-year-old man, was found dead at home. PMCT showed haemopericardium and dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch. This appearance led to the mistaken interpretation that the images represented a dissecting aneurysm. The autopsy showed instead a thin-walled and floppy dilatation of the ascending aorta and aortic arch with a coarctation just proximal to the ligamentum arteriosum. A longitudinal tear was found in the posterior aortic wall just above the valves. Blood in the surrounding soft tissue intersected with a large haematoma (1000ml) in the pericardial sac. Cardiac hypertrophy (556g) was observed in the patient, though no other cardiovascular abnormalities were found. Histological analysis showed cystic medial necrosis of the ascending aortic wall. A ruptured aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch without aortic dissection associated with AC is an uncommon cause of haemopericardium that has only been described a few times before. The case is discussed in relation to other reported cases and in the context of the present understanding of this condition.

  1. Saccular aneurysm formation of the descending aorta associated with aortic coarctation in an infant.

    PubMed

    Ozyuksel, Arda; Canturk, Emir; Dindar, Aygun; Akcevin, Atif

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysm of the descending aorta associated with CoA is an extremely rare congenital abnormality. In this report, we present a 16 months old female patient in whom cardiac catheterization had been performed which had revealed a segment of coarctation and saccular aneurysm in the descending aorta. The patient was operated and a 3x2 centimeters aneurysm which embraces the coarcted segment in descending aorta was resected. In summary, we present a case of saccular aortic aneurysm distal to aortic coarctation in an infant without any history of intervention or vascular inflammatory disease. Our case report seems to be the youngest patient in literature with this pathology.

  2. One-Stage Hybrid Procedure to Treat Aortic Coarctation Complicated by Intracardiac Anomalies in Two Adults.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiao; Lin, Ke; Gan, Chang-ping; Feng, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The traditional approach for treating aortic coarctation with intracardiac anomalies in adults is surgery using 2 surgical incisions or a two-stage hybrid method with a peripheral artery pathway that requires intervention. This paper reports a one-stage hybrid procedure to treat this type of congenital heart disease using 1 surgical incision combined with an ascending aorta puncture intervention approach as transaortic intervention approach. Here, we present 2 aortic coarctation cases; 1 complicated by ventricular septal defect and patent ductus arteriosus, and another complicated by an incomplete atrioventricular septal defect and mitral valve cleft. Both were successfully treated by our one-stage hybrid approach.

  3. Screening for aortic aneurysm after treatment of coarctation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, James L; Gray, Robert G; LuAnn Minich, L; Wilkinson, Stephen E; Heywood, Mason; Edwards, Reggie; Weng, Hsin Ti; Su, Jason T

    2014-01-01

    Isolated coarctation of the aorta (CoA) occurs in 6-8 % of patients with congenital heart disease. After successful relief of obstruction, patients remain at risk for aortic aneurysm formation at the site of the repair. We sought to determine the diagnostic utility of echocardiography compared with advanced arch imaging (AAI) in diagnosing aortic aneurysms in pediatric patients after CoA repair. The Congenital Heart Databases from 1996 and 2009 were reviewed. All patients treated for CoA who had AAI defined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), or catheterization were identified. Data collected included the following: type, timing, and number of interventions, presence and time to aneurysm diagnosis, and mortality. Patients were subdivided into surgical and catheterization groups for analysis. Seven hundred and fifty-nine patients underwent treatment for CoA during the study period. Three hundred and ninety-nine patients had at least one AAI. Aneurysms were diagnosed by AAI in 28 of 399 patients at a mean of 10 ± 8.4 years after treatment. Echocardiography reports were available for 380 of 399 patients with AAI. The sensitivity of echocardiography for detecting aneurysms was 24 %. The prevalence of aneurysms was significantly greater in the catheterization group (p < 0.05) compared with the surgery group. Aneurysm was also diagnosed earlier in the catheterization group compared with the surgery group (p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed a significantly increased risk of aneurysm diagnosis in patients in the catheterization subgroup and in patients requiring more than three procedures. Aortic aneurysms continue to be an important complication after CoA repair. Although serial echocardiograms are the test of choice for following-up most congenital cardiac lesions in pediatrics, our data show that echocardiography is inadequate for the detection of aneurysms after CoA repair. Because the time to aneurysm diagnosis was

  4. Adult aortic coarctation discovered incidentally after the rupture of sinus of Valsalva aneurysm: combined surgical and interventional approach.

    PubMed

    Ouali, Sana; Kortas, Chokri; Brockmeier, Konrad; Boughzela, Essia

    2011-12-01

    Combination of ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA), and a coexisting asymptomatic adult aortic isthmic coarctation is extremely rare. The timing and sequence of surgical and/or interventional repair of these two pathologies are controversial. We present a case of a 37-year-old male who was admitted to our department because of severe acute congestive heart failure and signs of ruptured aneurysm of the SV into the right ventricle. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography confirmed the communication between an important right coronary SVA and right ventricle, bicuspid aortic valve, mild aortic regurgitation, and revealed severe aortic coarctation. Because of the severe dilation of right sinus of Valsalva a surgical repair of the ruptured aneurysm was performed. Aortic coarctation was treated four weeks later by a percutaneous stent-graft implantation. This case report supports the concept that hybrid approach is feasible in patients with ruptured SVA and aortic coarctation in adulthood.

  5. MRI in adult patients with aortic coarctation: diagnosis and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, B; Abbas, A; McParland, P; Fitzsimmons, S; Shambrook, J; Peebles, C; Brown, I; Harden, S

    2015-04-01

    Aortic coarctation is a disease that usually presents in infancy; however, a proportion of patients present for the first time in adulthood. These lesions generally require repair with either surgery or interventional techniques. The success of these techniques means that increasing numbers of patients are presenting for follow-up imaging in adulthood, whether their coarctation was initially repaired in infancy or as adults. Thus, the adult presenting to the radiologist for assessment of possible coarctation or follow-up of coarctation repair is not an uncommon scenario. In this review, we present details of the MRI protocols and MRI findings in these patients so that a confident and accurate assessment can be made.

  6. Hemodynamic assessment of pre- and post-operative aortic coarctation from MRI.

    PubMed

    Ralovich, Kristóf; Itu, Lucian; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Ionasec, Razvan; Vitanovski, Dime; Krawtschuk, Waldemar; Everett, Allen; Ringel, Richard; Navab, Nassir; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA), is a congenital defect characterized by a severe narrowing of the aorta, usually distal to the aortic arch. The treatment options include surgical repair, stent implantation, and balloon angioplasty. In order to evaluate the physiological significance of the pre-operative coarctation and to assess the post-operative results, the hemodynamic analysis is usually performed by measuring the pressure gradient (deltaP) across the coarctation site via invasive cardiac catheterization. The measure of success is reduction of the (deltaP > 20 mmHg) systolic blood pressure gradient. In this paper, we propose a non-invasive method based on Computational Fluid Dynamics and MR imaging to estimate the pre- and post-operative hemodynamics for both native and recurrent coarctation patients. High correlation of our results and catheter measurements is shown on corresponding pre- and post-operative examination of 5 CoA patients.

  7. Multi-drug-resistant hypertension caused by severe aortic coarctation presenting in late adulthood.

    PubMed

    Meller, Stephanie M; Fahey, John T; Setaro, John F; Forrest, John K

    2015-04-01

    Aortic coarctation, a congenital narrowing in the region of the ligamentum arteriosium, is a rare etiology for multi-drug-resistant hypertension in adulthood; however, advances in stenting modalities may offer long-term improvements in morbidity and possibly even cure. We report on a female patient in her late 50s presenting with refractory hypertension and severely elevated renin levels, ultimately diagnosed with aortic coarctation and treated with percutaneous stent implantation, which resulted in successful blood pressure control with verapamil monotherapy. This case highlights the efficacy of endovascular stent implantation for the treatment of coarctation and the need for clinicians to consider this disease entity in the differential diagnosis of refractory hypertension even in late adulthood.

  8. Intravascular Treatment of Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm Coexisting with Aortic Coarctation in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pogorzelski, Ryszard; Wołoszko, Tomasz; Toutounchi, Sadegh; Fiszer, Patryk; Krajewska, Ewa; Jakuczun, Wawrzyniec; Szostek, Małgorzata M; Celejewski, Krzysztof; Gałązka, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Coexistence of aortic coarctation with aneurysm of subclavian artery is a uncommon situation and may require unusual treatment in patients. A 40-year-old patient diagnosed incidentally with left subclavian artery aneurysm coexisting with aortic coarctation. Patient was initially referred for hybrid treatment. Initially ostium of the left subclavian artery was covered with a stent-graft. Over a 30-month follow-up period aneurysm became thrombosed all the way up to the ostium of internal mammary artery. The patient did not present with neurological symptoms or signs of upper limb ischemia. Taking into consideration good blood supply to the axillary artery via reversed blood flow in the thyreocervical trunk, hence we decided not to proceed with cervicoaxillary bypass grafting. Implantation stent-graft into aorta coarctation with covering axillary artery is proper way of treatment and may need no other surgical procedures. PMID:28401193

  9. Correction of aortic coarctation in a girl with severe PHACE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lian; Xia, Zhenkun; Fan, Chengming; Zhang, Weizhi; Yang, Jinfu

    2014-10-14

    A 12-year-old Chinese girl was demonstrated multivessel distortion and malformation: aortic coarctation with the narrowest lumen diameter measuring of 4 mm located between the left common carotid artery and the left subclavian artery, a huge and thin-walled aneurysm is connected to the coarctation, and the descending aorta was distorted. Cerebrovascular revealed distorted arteries and a completely aberrant brain blood supply. She underwent correction of the aortic coarctation by establishing a bypass between the ascending aorta and the descending aorta using a 13-mm Gore-tex tube. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, at 6-month follow-up, the cervical vascular pulsatility was relieved and she is in good condition.

  10. The effect of aortic coarctation surgical repair on QTc and JTc dispersion in severe aortic coarctation newborns: a short-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Nigro, G; Russo, V; Rago, A; Papa, A A; Cioppa, N D; Scarpati, C; Palladino, T; Corcione, A; Sarubbi, B; Caianiello, G; Russo, M G

    2014-01-01

    Sudden death is a possible occurrence for newborns younger than 1 year with severe aortic coarctation (CoA) before surgical correction. In our previous study, we showed a significant increase of QTc-D and JTc-D in newborns with isolated severe aortic coarctation, electrocardiographic parameters that clinical and experimental studies have suggested could reflect the physiological variability of regional and ventricular repolarization and could provide a substrate for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of surgical repair of CoA on QTc-d, JTc-d in severe aortic coarctation newborns with no associated congenital cardiac malformations. The study included 30 newborns (18M; 70+/-12 h old) affected by severe congenital aortic coarctation, without associated cardiac malformations. All newborns underwent to classic extended end-to-end repair. Echocardiographic and electrocardiographic measurements were performed in each patient 24 h before and 24 h after the interventional procedure and at the end of the follow-up period, 1 month after the surgical correction. All patients at baseline, 24 h and one month after CoA surgical repair did not significantly differ in terms of heart rate, weight, height, and echocardiographic parameters. There were no statistically significant differences in QTc-D (111.7+/-47.4 vs 111.9+/-63.8 ms vs 108.5+/-55.4 ms; P=0.4) and JTc-D (98.1+/-41.3 vs 111.4+/-47.5 vs 105.1+/-33.4 ms; P=0.3) before, 24 h and 1 month after CoA surgical correction. In conclusions, our study did not show a statistically significant decrease in QTc-D and JTc-D, suggesting the hypothesis that the acute left ventricular afterload reduction, related to successful CoA surgical correction, may not reduce the ventricular electrical instability in the short-term follow-up.

  11. Including aortic valve morphology in computational fluid dynamics simulations: initial findings and application to aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Wendell, David C; Samyn, Margaret M; Cava, Joseph R; Ellwein, Laura M; Krolikowski, Mary M; Gandy, Kimberly L; Pelech, Andrew N; Shadden, Shawn C; LaDisa, John F

    2013-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations quantifying thoracic aortic flow patterns have not included disturbances from the aortic valve (AoV). 80% of patients with aortic coarctation (CoA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) which may cause adverse flow patterns contributing to morbidity. Our objectives were to develop a method to account for the AoV in CFD simulations, and quantify its impact on local hemodynamics. The method developed facilitates segmentation of the AoV, spatiotemporal interpolation of segments, and anatomic positioning of segments at the CFD model inlet. The AoV was included in CFD model examples of a normal (tricuspid AoV) and a post-surgical CoA patient (BAV). Velocity, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) results were compared to equivalent simulations using a plug inlet profile. The plug inlet greatly underestimated TKE for both examples. TAWSS differences extended throughout the thoracic aorta for the CoA BAV, but were limited to the arch for the normal example. OSI differences existed mainly in the ascending aorta for both cases. The impact of AoV can now be included with CFD simulations to identify regions of deleterious hemodynamics thereby advancing simulations of the thoracic aorta one step closer to reality. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. INCLUDING AORTIC VALVE MORPHOLOGY IN COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS: INITIAL FINDINGS AND APPLICATION TO AORTIC COARCTATION

    PubMed Central

    Wendell, David C.; Samyn, Margaret M.; Cava, Joseph R.; Ellwein, Laura M.; Krolikowski, Mary M.; Gandy, Kimberly L.; Pelech, Andrew N.; Shadden, Shawn C.; LaDisa, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations quantifying thoracic aortic flow patterns have not included disturbances from the aortic valve (AoV). 80% of patients with aortic coarctation (CoA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) which may cause adverse flow patterns contributing to morbidity. Our objectives were to develop a method to account for the AoV in CFD simulations, and quantify its impact on local hemodynamics. The method developed facilitates segmentation of the AoV, spatiotemporal interpolation of segments, and anatomic positioning of segments at the CFD model inlet. The AoV was included in CFD model examples of a normal (tricuspid AoV) and a post-surgical CoA patient (BAV). Velocity, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) results were compared to equivalent simulations using a plug inlet profile. The plug inlet greatly underestimated TKE for both examples. TAWSS differences extended throughout the thoracic aorta for the CoA BAV, but were limited to the arch for the normal example. OSI differences existed mainly in the ascending aorta for both cases. The impact of AoV can now be included with CFD simulations to identify regions of deleterious hemodynamics thereby advancing simulations of the thoracic aorta one step closer to reality. PMID:22917990

  13. [Aortic coarctation in the recipient in TTTS--diagnostic problems--a case report].

    PubMed

    Ropacka-Lesiak, Mariola; Kowalska-Jasiecka, Joanna; Kowalska, Katarzyna; Lech, Joanna; Malewski, Wojciech; Breborowicz, Grzegorz

    2012-07-01

    The paper presents a case of coexistence of the aortic coarctation with TTTS. This rare coincidence and hemodynamic disturbances resulting from hypovolemia interfere with the hemodynamic picture of the structural cardiac defect. Prenatal diagnosis is based on the assessment of the size of both ventricles. If the defect is present, the left ventricle is usually smaller than the right one. Coarctation may be also suspected in case there is disparity between large vessels in the mediastinum. Comparison of the width of the aorta, and ductus arteriosus, especially if the rate is 2:1 in favor of the latter may suggest such defect. Furthermore, the finding of continuous flow through the aortic isthmus increases the likelihood of the defect 16-fold. The presence of "coarctation shelf" in color Doppler may suggest the existence of the cardiac defect that will require an intervention. In the present study the aortic coarctation was diagnosed in the recipient, who presented marked features of hypervolemia in venous Doppler studies, and in echocardiographic assessment of the right heart. The paper presents signs of hemodynamic disturbances in Doppler studies and changes of Doppler blood flow parameters observed during therapy (i.e., amnioreduction, fetoscopy). Diagnosis of coarctation may be hindered by the presence of the right heart volume overload, hypertrophy of the heart muscle as a result of associated hemodynamic disturbances in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome. The impact of therapeutic interventions such as amnioreduction and fetoscopy the on cardiovascular hemodynamic parameters of both fetuses is also discussed. Also, a wide ductus arteriosus may make it difficult to diagnose this defect in utero. The paper presents diagnostic and therapeutic management in a case of TITS complicated by an aortic coarctation in the recipient.

  14. Aortic arch geometry and exercise-induced hypertension in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    De Caro, Enrico; Trocchio, Gianluca; Smeraldi, Attilio; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Pongiglione, Giacomo

    2007-05-01

    Hypertension at rest or during effort is not uncommon in patients with aortic coarctation (CoA), even those with a successful repair or mild degree of obstruction. Anatomic factors and functional abnormalities have been proposed as causes of this finding. Recently, aortic arch geometry was reported in association with hypertension at rest in patients with successful CoA repair. Forty-one patients (age 15.7 +/- 4.6 years) without significant obstruction at rest (mean systolic Doppler gradient at rest < or =25 mm Hg) were selected for the study. All patients underwent a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test and magnetic resonance imaging of the aorta. Aortic arch shape was defined on global geometry as normal, gothic, and crenel. Percentage of anatomic narrowing (AN) was also calculated. Twenty-four patients (58%) showed exercise-induced hypertension (EIH). Regarding the shape of the aortic arch, normal geometry was present in 17 patients (41%), 9 (21%) had gothic geometry, and 15 (36%) had crenel geometry. There were no differences among the 3 geometries in regard to the incidence of EIH (70.6% in normal, 55.6% in gothic, and 46.7% in crenel) or AN (36.9% in normal, 33.5% in gothic, and 36.6% in crenel). In conclusion, our results fail to show a correlation between a specific aortic arch shape and the incidence of EIH and significant AN in patients with native or residual CoA or repeat CoA. Therefore, at present, the role of aortic arch geometry in identifying patients at risk of EIH is still uncertain.

  15. New technique for single-staged repair of aortic coarctation and coexisting cardiac disorder.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Askin Ali; Guden, Mustafa; Onan, Burak; Tarakci, Sevim Indelen; Demir, Ali Soner; Sagbas, Ertan; Sarikaya, Tugay

    2011-01-01

    The management of adults with aortic coarctation and a coexisting cardiac disorder is still a surgical challenge. Single-staged procedures have lower postoperative morbidity and mortality rates than do 2-staged procedures. We present our experience with arch-to-descending aorta bypass grafting in combination with intracardiac or ascending aortic aneurysm repair.From October 2004 through April 2010, 5 patients (4 men, 1 woman; mean age, 45.8 ± 9.4 yr) underwent anatomic bypass grafting of the arch to the descending aorta through a median sternotomy and concomitant repair of an intracardiac disorder or an ascending aortic aneurysm. Operative indications included coarctation of the aorta in all cases, together with severe mitral insufficiency arising from damaged chordae tendineae in 2 patients, ascending aortic aneurysm with aortic regurgitation in 2 patients, and coronary artery disease in 1 patient. Data from early and midterm follow-up were reviewed.There was no early or late death. Follow-up was complete for all patients, and the mean follow-up period was 34.8 ± 18 months (range, 18 mo-5 yr). All grafts were patent. No late graft-related sequelae or reoperations were observed.For single-staged repair of aortic coarctation with a coexistent cardiac disorder, we propose arch-to-descending aorta bypass through a median sternotomy as an alternative for selected patients.

  16. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    PubMed

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities.

  17. Aortic arch morphology and late systemic hypertension following correction of coarctation of aorta.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Daniel; Curtin, John; Malcolm, Paul; Clark, Allan; Freeman, Leisa

    2007-01-01

    To reproduce in an adult population a pediatric study that found an association between aortic arch geometry and late systemic hypertension following successful repair of aortic coarctation. Fifty-one patients with successful repair of coarctation of the aorta had blood pressure measurement at rest and during exercise. After cross-sectional imaging of the aortic arch, patients were assigned to 1 of 3 previously defined morphological categories: normal, gothic, or crenel. The degree of residual stenosis and the ratio of the height/transverse diameter of the arch (A/T ratio) were calculated. No relationship was found between arch geometry and either resting- or exercise-induced hypertension. We found the classification into 3 morphological types difficult and did not find an association between gothic arch or a high A/T ratio and hypertension.

  18. Partially uncovered Cheatham platinum-covered stent to treat complex aortic coarctation associated with aortic wall aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Butera, Gianfranco; Piazza, Luciane

    2015-04-01

    Percutaneous treatment of aortic coarctation is a widely used option. Covered stents have increased the profile of efficacy and safety of this procedure. Here we report on a 32-year-old woman with significant aortic recoarctation associated with aortic wall aneurysm and close proximity of both lesions to the origin of both the subclavian arteries. It was decided to manually and partially uncover the proximal part of the stent to have a hybrid stent that could act as a bare stent at the level of the origin of the subclavian arteries and as a covered stent at the level of the aneurysm.

  19. [Relationship between aortic arch shape and blood pressure response after coarctation repair].

    PubMed

    Ou, P; Mousseaux, E; Auriacombe, L; Pédroni, E; Balleux, F; Sidi, D; Bonnet, D

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of secondary hypertension after repair of coarctation of the aorta are not well understood. Abnormalities of the architecture of the aortic arch and their consequences on blood pressure have not been studied. In order to study the relationship between abnormalities or aortic arch architecture and resting blood pressure ninety-four patients without re-coarctation were followed up prospectively from 1997 to 2004 (mean age 16.9 +/- 8.1 years; mean weight 57.5 +/- 18.3 Kg; interval since surgery 16.3 +/- 5.4 years). All underwent MRI angiography of the thoracic aorta which enabled the abnormalities to be classified in 3 groups: gothic arch, crenellated arch and roman arch. Twenty-four patients (25.5%) were hypertensive and 70 (74.4%) normotensive. There were 40 gothic arches (42.5%). 14 crenellated arches (15%) and 40 roman arches (42.5%). Gothic arches were more commonly observed in the hypertensive patients (18/40, [45%, 95% CI 31-62]) than the crenellated arches (4/14, [28.5%, 95% CI 7-48]) or the roman arches (2/40, [5%, 95% CI 2-12]). Only the gothic arch was independently correlated with hypertension on multivariate analysis. The authors conclude that gothic deformation of the aortic arch is an independent predictive factor of hypertension in patients operated for coarctation with an excellent result on the isthmic region. Patients with a gothic appearance of their aortic arch should be followed up closely.

  20. [Does NMR provide information complementary to cardiac catheterization in aortic coarctation?].

    PubMed

    Godart, F; Beregi, J P; Rey, C; Louvegny, S; Desmoucelles, F; Nicol, L; Vaksmann, G; Brevière, G M; Francart, C

    1998-05-01

    The results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the investigation of coarctation of the aorta were assessed and compared with those of cardiac catheterisation. This was a retrospective study of a series of 24 patients aged 14 +/- 4 years with a coarctation treated and documented by MRI. The investigation was performed with a high field 1.5 tesla (Vision, Siemens) system. Twenty-one children underwent comparative retrograde cardiac catheterisation with angiography and measurement of the peak-to-peak pressure gradient across the isthmus. No significant difference in the measurements of the aorta in MRI spin echo, gradient echo and retrograde aortic angiography were observed. On the other hand, there was a slight correlation between the degree of stenosis measured by MRI and the peak-to-peak haemodynamic gradient (r = 0.40). Seven patients had a loss of signal at the level of the aortic isthmus on MRI angiography which correlated with the haemodynamic gradient (p = 0.04). The authors conclude that MRI is a reliable non-invasive technique of investigating coarctations of the aorta. It gives accurate morphological data concerning the stenosis and blood flow. MRI should be part of the investigations of coarctation of the aorta, especially in poor indication to be able to correct it or consider the results of angioplasty or surgical correction.

  1. Management of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Dehlin, Jennifer M; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a lethal disease. Ultrasound is the modality of choice for screening patients for AAAs. It is reasonable to screen patients over age 60, particularly men, women with cardiovascular risk factors, smokers, and patients with a family history of AAAs. Patients with small (< 5.5 cm) AAAs should be followed with serial ultrasound. Medical management should focus on treating comorbidities, particularly those that put patients at risk for other cardiovascular diseases. Smoking cessation is mandatory in these patients. Patients with large or symptomatic AAAs should be evaluated for surgery; this includes careful imaging of the abdomen, aggressive treatment of comorbidities, and perioperative beta blockade. Endovascular repair has lower short-term morbidity compared with conventional open repair. Trials assessing long-term results are in progress. Basic science and translational research focusing on the underlying pathogenesis of AAAs will likely pave the way for medical therapies in the future.

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysms in women

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has long been recognized as a condition predominantly afflicting males, with sex-associated differences described for almost every aspect of the disease from pathophysiology and epidemiology to morbidity and mortality. Women are generally spared from AAA formation by the immunomodulating effects of estrogen but once they develop, the natural history of AAAs in women appears to be more aggressive, with more rapid expansion, a higher tendency to rupture at smaller diameters, and higher mortality following rupture. However, simply repairing AAA at smaller diameters in women is a debatable solution, as even elective endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is fraught with higher morbidity and mortality in women compared to men. The goal of this review is to summarize what is currently known about the effect of gender on AAA presentation, treatment, and outcomes. Additionally, we aim to review current controversies over screening recommendations and threshold for repair in women. PMID:26747679

  3. [Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in aortic coarctation. The short- and median-term results].

    PubMed

    Ledesma Velasco, M; Acosta Valdes, J L; Munayer Calderón, J; Salgado Escobar, J L; Arias Monroy, L; Soberanis Torruco, C N

    1991-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed in 34 patients with aortic coarctation (Ao Co). One of them with coarctation after surgical correction, the rest were native Ao Co. We used one balloon in 28 patients and two balloons simultaneously in 6. They were separated in three groups according to the degree of aortic arc hypoplasia. Group I (mild to moderate hypoplasia N = 9) the gradient dropped 39% with angiographic improvement of 48% during the follow-up (m = 13.1 months). Three cases with restenosis, 2 were satisfactory dilated and one was sent to surgery. In Group II (severe hypoplasia N = 4) the gradient dropped 31% with angiographic improvement of 30% (follow-up 16.3 months). Two cases with recoarctation were sent to surgery. In Group III (without hypoplasia N = 21) we obtained dropped of gradient of 71% with angiographic improvement of 60% (follow-up 18.5 months). Two cases were redilated successfully. The complications were: cerebral hemorrhage with death due to hypertensive crisis, (1) cerebral embolism, (1) thrombosis in the puncture site 1 and small aneurysm in dilated zone. (1) We think PTA is a good choice to conventional surgery with low rate of morbidity-mortality. The results depend basically on the anatomic type of coarctation and degree of aortic arch hypoplasia.

  4. Quantifying Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Aortic Coarctation with Large Eddy Simulation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-11-01

    In this study, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in an aortic coarctation was studied using both a numerical technique (large eddy simulation, LES) and in vivo measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High levels of TKE are undesirable, as kinetic energy is extracted from the mean flow to feed the turbulent fluctuations. The patient underwent surgery to widen the coarctation, and the flow before and after surgery was computed and compared to MRI measurements. The resolution of the MRI was about 7 × 7 voxels in axial cross-section while 50x50 mesh cells with increased resolution near the walls was used in the LES simulation. In general, the numerical simulations and MRI measurements showed that the aortic arch had no or very low levels of TKE, while elevated values were found downstream the coarctation. It was also found that TKE levels after surgery were lowered, indicating that the diameter of the constriction was increased enough to decrease turbulence effects. In conclusion, both the numerical simulation and MRI measurements gave very similar results, thereby validating the simulations and suggesting that MRI measured TKE can be used as an initial estimation in clinical practice, while LES results can be used for detailed quantification and further research of aortic flows.

  5. Hybrid treatment of a huge complex aortic pseudo-aneurysm subsequent to a coarctation.

    PubMed

    Rizza, Antonio; Barletta, Valentina; Palmieri, Cataldo; Berti, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    Endovascular treatment of pseudo-aneurysms subsequent to a pre-existing aortic coarctation is becoming a well-accepted technical solution especially in patients presenting anatomical challenges involving the aortic arch. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with a huge pseudo-aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. Diagnostic imaging assessment documented also the presence of an aneurysmatic aberrant right subclavian artery. Due to patient's anatomical arterial condition, we decided to treat the aneurysm applying a hybrid approach. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Coarctation of the Aorta: A Hybrid Approach to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, Daniel; Caputo, Massimo; Taliotis, Demetris

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid surgery is becoming more popular in the treatment of children with congenital heart disease, particularly small infants and neonates. We report a case of a patient with aortic stenosis (AS) and coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Case: a 1-month-old baby presented with severe AS and CoA. The decision was made to perform a hybrid surgical procedure. The patient underwent a lateral thoracotomy for repair of the CoA and carotid cutdown for aortic balloon valvuloplasty (AoVP). PMID:28367436

  7. Pitfalls of stenting coarctation of an angulated right circumflex aortic arch in Goldenhar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rad, Elaheh Malakan; Mortezaeian, Hojjat; Pouraliakbar, Hamid Reza; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2017-01-01

    We report stenting of coarctation of an angulated right circumflex aortic arch (RCAA) using four Cheatham Platinum stents in a child with Goldenhar syndrome. Difficulties in measuring the accurate length of the curved and narrowed transverse aortic arch marked discrepancy between the luminal diameters of the long narrow transverse arch and wide descending thoracic aorta, increased displacement force caused by the 90° bend between the two parts resulted in repeated stent migrations. We discuss the tips to avoid distal stent migration in the setting of an angulated RCAA.

  8. Endovascular Aortic Repair of Primary Adult Coarctation: Implications and Challenges for Postoperative Nursing.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Christina E; Then, Karen L; Rankin, James A; Appoo, Jehangir J

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular aortic repair is a relatively new surgical technique used to treat a variety of aortic pathologies. Aortic coarctation traditionally has been managed with open surgical repair, involving a large posterolateral thoracotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass, and replacement of the narrowed section of the aorta with a dacron graft. Recent advances in minimally invasive aortic surgery have allowed for repair of the diseased section with an endovascular stent placed percutaneously through the groin under intraoperative fluoroscopic guidance. In this paper, the authors willfocus on the implicationsfor postoperative nursing care after endovascular repair of aortic coarctation using a case study of a 17-year-old male. This novel technique required education of the health care team with respect to implications for practice, understanding potential complications, discharge planning and follow-up. With any new surgical technique there are many questions and challenges that health care professionals raise. The main concerns expressed from the health care team stemmed from a lack of understanding of the disease pathology, and the different risk profile associated with an endovascular repair in contrast to an open repair. The authors will address these concerns in detail.

  9. Co-existence of severe coarctation of the aorta and aortic valve stenosis in a 65-year-old woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Onohara, Daisuke; Sato, Aiko; Tasaki, Yuichi; Yamada, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is usually diagnosed and corrected early in life. Survival to more than 60 years of age of a patient with unrepaired coarctation of the aorta is extremely unusual, and the optimal management strategies for such patients are controversial. We describe the case of a woman who was first diagnosed as having coarctation of the aorta and aortic valve stenosis at the age of 65 years and underwent successful aortic valve replacement.

  10. Beyond Pressure Gradients: The Effects of Intervention on Heart Power in Aortic Coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, Jan; Hellmeier, Florian; Nordmeyer, Sarah; da Silva, Tiago Ferreira; Schubert, Stephan; Berger, Felix; Kuehne, Titus; Kelm, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Background In aortic coarctation, current guidelines recommend reducing pressure gradients that exceed given thresholds. From a physiological standpoint this should ideally improve the energy expenditure of the heart and thus prevent long term organ damage. Objectives The aim was to assess the effects of interventional treatment on external and internal heart power (EHP, IHP) in patients with aortic coarctation and to explore the correlation of these parameters to pressure gradients obtained from heart catheterization. Methods In a collective of 52 patients with aortic coarctation 25 patients received stenting and/or balloon angioplasty, and 20 patients underwent MRI before and after an interventional treatment procedure. EHP and IHP were computed based on catheterization and MRI measurements. Along with the power efficiency these were combined in a cardiac energy profile. Results By intervention, the catheter gradient was significantly reduced from 21.8±9.4 to 6.2±6.1mmHg (p<0.001). IHP was significantly reduced after intervention, from 8.03±5.2 to 4.37±2.13W (p < 0.001). EHP was 1.1±0.3 W before and 1.0±0.3W after intervention, p = 0.044. In patients initially presenting with IHP above 5W intervention resulted in a significant reduction in IHP from 10.99±4.74 W to 4.94±2.45W (p<0.001), and a subsequent increase in power efficiency from 14 to 26% (p = 0.005). No significant changes in IHP, EHP or power efficiency were observed in patients initially presenting with IHP < 5W. Conclusion It was demonstrated that interventional treatment of coarctation resulted in a decrease in IHP. Pressure gradients, as the most widespread clinical parameters in coarctation, did not show any correlation to changes in EHP or IHP. This raises the question of whether they should be the main focus in coarctation interventions. Only patients with high IHP of above 5W showed improvement in IHP and power efficiency after the treatment procedure. Trial Registration clinicaltrials

  11. Valve morphology effect in aortic coarctation flow using realistic silicon models and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrufo, Oscar; Solis-Najera, Sergio; Pibarot, Philippe; Kadem, Lyes; Kesharvarz-Motamed, Zahra; Rodriguez, Alfredo O.; Garcia, Julio

    2014-11-01

    Aortic valve morphology and phenotype may alter the aortic wall structure and its normal flow hemodynamics. However, the relationship between altered flow patterns and progression of wall pathology is often not fully understood in patients with aortic coartation and needs larger experimental work. In this study, we introduced a compatible experimental setup with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a realistic aortic coarctation (AoCo) silicon model which can replicate physiological flow conditions (pressure, flow-wave, and systemic load). We evaluated the aortic valve hemodynamics of a normal tricuspid valve and a stenotic bicuspid valve using valve effective orifice area (EOA), peak and mean transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG). AoCo severity was assessed by the AoCo pressure gradient. For the tricuspid valve we obtained an EOA = 1.89 cm2, a peak TPG = 10 mmHg, and a mean TPG = 5 mmHg. For the bicuspid valve we obtained an EOA = 1.03 cm2, a peak TPG = 37 mmHg and a mean TPG = 13 mmHg. Furthermore, AoCo with tricuspid valve led to a peak AoCo pressure gradient (PG) = 11 mmHg and a mean PG = 5 mmHg. AoCo with bicuspid valve led to a peak PG = 6 mmHg and a mean PG = 3 mmHg. Aortic flow reattachment was more evident in presence of bicuspid valve and helical flow was present in all cases. This study showed that silicon prototyping in combination with MRI velocity measurements could successfully be used to assess hemodynamic effects of aortic valve morphology in aortic coarctation flow.

  12. Long term results (15-30 years) of surgical repair of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed Central

    Presbitero, P; Demarie, D; Villani, M; Perinetto, E A; Riva, G; Orzan, F; Bobbio, M; Morea, M; Brusca, A

    1987-01-01

    The late outcome in 226 patients who survived surgical repair of aortic coarctation was assessed 15-30 years after operation. Twenty six patients died during the follow up mainly from causes related to surgical repair or to associated cardiovascular anomalies. The survival rates of patients operated on between the ages of four and 20 years are 97%, 97%, 92% at 10, 20, and 30 years after operation. For patients operated on after the age of 20 the corresponding rates are 93%, 85%, and 68%. This difference is statistically significant from the fifteenth year of follow up onwards. The survival of patients operated on before the age of 20 is not significantly different from that of a comparable general Italian population. Recoarctation occurred in only 8% of patients who had end to end anastomosis, whereas it occurred in 35% of those who had other types of operation. Two thirds of the patients were hypertensive at the last visit. The actuarial curve shows that blood pressure was normal in most patients 5-10 years after operation, but 30 years after coarctation repair only 32% of patients are expected to be normotensive. Thus early repair of aortic coarctation appears to improve long term survival. Intervention in older patients and when blood pressure is high seem to be the most important predictors of late hypertension. PMID:3593616

  13. CT diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Moore, A.V. Jr.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1984-08-01

    Abdominal computed tomography was performed in six patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm but in whom an alternate clinical diagnosis was seriously considered. In each patient, a large aortic aneurysm was demonstrated in association with a retroperitoneal accumulation of high-density blood. The retroperitoneal blood was primarily confined to the extracapsular perinephric space. In four of the six patients, a focal area of the aortic wall was indistinct on the side of the retroperitoneal hemorrhage at the presumed site of rupture. Five of the six patients underwent emergency surgery, which confirmed the site of aneurysm, presence of rupture and the location of fresh retroperitoneal blood.

  14. Aortic arch laceration during aortic coarctation repair in a low-weight neonate and use of an extra-anatomical conduit.

    PubMed

    Cantinotti, Massimiliano; Maizza, Anna F; Murzi, Michele; Assanta, Nadia; Margaryan, Rafik; Recla, Sabine; Murzi, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    We report the case of a 3-day-old male baby, weighing 1.6 kg with severe aortic coarctation and associated cardiac anomalies and extracardiac defects. We adopted an extra-anatomical conduit running from the left carotid artery to the descending aorta after laceration of the distal aortic arch due to extreme tissue fragility and baby immaturity.

  15. Long-Term Follow-Up of Percutaneous Balloon Angioplasty in Adult Aortic Coarctation

    SciTech Connect

    Paddon, Alex J.; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Ettles, Duncan F.; Travis, Simon J.; Dyet, John F.

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: To assess long-term outcomes following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of congenital aortic coarctation in adults.Methods: Seventeen patients underwent PTA for symptomatic adult coarctation of the aorta. Sixteen patients, with a mean age of 28 years (range 15-60 years), were reviewed at a mean interval after angioplasty of 7.3 years (range 1.5-11 years). Assessment included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler echocardiography, and clinical examination. Current clinical measurements were compared with pre- and immediate post-angioplasty measurements.Results: At follow-up 16 patients were alive and well. The patient not included in follow-up had undergone surgical repair and excision of the coarctation segment following PTA. Mean brachial systolic blood pressure for the group decreased from 174 mmHg before angioplasty to 130 mmHg at follow-up (p 0.0001). The mean gradient had fallen significantly from 50.9 to 17.8 at follow-up (p = 0.001). The average number of antihypertensive drugs required per patient decreased from 0.56 to 0.31 (p = 0.234). No significant residual stenoses or restenoses were seen at MRI. Small but clinically insignificant residual pressure gradients were recorded in all patients using Doppler echocardiography. Complications included one transient ischemic attack at 5 days, one external iliac dissection requiring stent insertion, and a further patient who developed a false aneurysm close to the coarctation site at 12 months which subsequently required surgical excision.Conclusion: PTA of adult coarctation is safe and effective in the long term. Although primary stenting has recently been advocated in the treatment of this condition, our results suggest that PTA remains the treatment of choice.

  16. Myelopathy in adult aortic coarctation: Causes and caveats of an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Chandan; Verma, Ashish; Bansal, Anand; Shukla, Ram C; Srivastava, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old female presenting with acute-onset paraplegia was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cervico-dorsal spine. On MRI, multiple tortuous dilated vessels were noted in the epidural space with long segment cord compression and imaging features of compressive myelopathy. Associated small acute cervico-dorsal epidural hematoma was also noted in the same region. Computed tomography (CT) angiography was performed subsequently which revealed post-ductal coarctation of aorta with multiple arterial collaterals in the chest wall and spinal canal. An extensive review of English language literature pertaining to the clinical presentations of adult aortic coarctation revealed only few reports of acute compressive myelopathy due to spinal epidural collateral vessels. Further, presentation at such a late age has not been reported before. In the present case, apart from a hypertrophied anterior spinal artery and perispinal collaterals, an anterior epidural hematoma was an additional important factor in the causation of myelopathy. PMID:28104936

  17. Effects of exercise on plasma renin, aldosterone and catecholamines before and after surgery for aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Sehested, J; Kornerup, H J; Pedersen, E B; Christensen, N J

    1983-01-01

    The pre- and postoperative values of blood pressure, pulse rate, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone concentration and circulating catecholamines were studied in a group of 12 patients with uncomplicated aortic coarctation before and after exercise. Mean age of patients studied was 21.5 years. Postoperative studies were carried out on average 204 days after surgery. Following operation, both resting and exercising upper extremity pressures decreased. Six out of the 11 patients still had an abnormally high exercising blood pressure when compared with a normal control group of six persons. Postoperative pulse rates during exercise were significantly higher than pre-operatively (P less than 0.01). No statistically significant differences between pre- and postoperative values, and between patients and normal controls were found in the hormonal studies. This study suggests that the renin-aldosterone-system does not have a major role in the maintenance of the hypertension associated with coarctation of the aorta.

  18. MRI-based hemodynamical analysis in patients with surgically treated aortic coarctations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delles, Michael; Noe, Manuela; Jeong, Yoo-Jin; Ley, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Unterhinninghofen, Roland

    2013-03-01

    In management of cardiovascular diseases, information about the patient-specific behavior of blood flow and pressure can be essential. In the human aorta, velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the only method capable of measuring complete time-resolved three-dimensional vector fields of the blood flow velocities. Additionally, computations of relative blood pressure from this data source have been presented in recent years. Thus, velocityencoded MRI can be a valuable measurement technique for both blood flow and blood pressure values in diagnostics and therapy control of aortic diseases. In the last years, we have developed the software framework MEDIFRAME for cardiovascular diagnostics based on MRI acquisitions. In this article, we apply our in-house developed software framework for a MRI-based hemodynamic analysis in five patients with surgically treated aortic coarctations. We compared our results to a control group of five healthy volunteers. The study included the measurement of blood flow velocities by phase-contrast MRI and the subsequent computation of relative blood pressure values. We generated a set of suitable visualizations for flow and pressure and created centerline diagrams of the cross-sectional area, flow and mean relative blood pressure. Additionally, characteristic values were computed from the centerline diagrams for every subject. In the vast majority of the visualization and quantification techniques of our software framework, we observed significant effects of the treated aortic coarctations. Therefore, we draw the conclusion that this kind of MRI-based hemodynamic analysis can be a valuable tool for diagnostics and therapy control of aortic coarctations.

  19. Very Long Segment Congenital Thoracoabdominal Aortic Coarctation (Diffuse Aortic Dysplasia) with Infrarenal Aortobi-Iliac and Cavobi-Iliac Aplasia in a 30-Year-Old Patient.

    PubMed

    Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Luther, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Congenital dysplastic aortic syndromes range from coarctation at the aortic isthmus to more extended aortic disease (midaortic syndrome). The latter is usually restricted to dysplastic aortic segments of up to 15 cm. Long segment dysplasia of the entire abdominal or thoracic aorta is extremely rare. This case of a 30-year-old patient with a very long segment congenital thoracoabdominal aortic coarctation and infrarenal aortobi-iliac and cavobi-iliac aplasia represents to our knowledge the most extended congenital vascular malformation in a surviving adult patient. The developed extensive collateral pathways ensured the survival of the patient, so that the main clinical manifestation was a refractory hypertension. Because of the extent of the disease, open surgery represented the only viable option. Interestingly, after 30 years of uncontrollable hypertension, the patient's blood pressure promptly responded to surgical treatment. A concomitant infrarenal aplasia of both the aorta and cava vein is also very unusual and points to a major developmental deficit during vascular embryogenesis.

  20. Genes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, nearly 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. The studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, if appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called CNTN3 which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. Two follow-up studies, however, could not replicate the association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33 were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense RNA that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute to AAA pathogenesis. PMID:21146954

  1. Successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation through aortic stent graft after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The patient was a 91-year-old woman presenting with severe aortic valve stenosis. Pre-procedural computed tomography scan revealed a 45-mm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) was performed after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of the AAA. The 23-mm Edwards Sapien XT system passed through the aortic stent graft smoothly. This is the first case report showing that successful TF-TAVI can be performed through a prior abdominal aortic stent graft. TF-TAVI after EVAR of AAA is a feasible option for patients with extremely poor access.

  2. Mathematical, numerical and experimental study in the human aorta with coexisting models of bicuspid aortic stenosis and coarctation of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Z; Garcia, J; Kadem, L

    2011-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is an obstruction of the aorta and is usually associated with other concomitant cardiovascular abnormalities especially with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The objectives of this study are, (1) to investigate the effects of coarctation on the hemodynamics in the aorta to gain a better understanding of the cause of certain post-surgical coarctation problems, (2) to develop and introduce a new lumped parameter model, mainly based on non-invasive data, allowing the description of the interaction between left ventricle, coarctation of the aorta, aortic valve stenosis, and the arterial system.

  3. Endovascular Exclusion of Aortobronchial Fistula and Distal Anastomotic Aneurysm after Extra-Anatomic Bypass for Aortic Coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Arici, Vittorio; Rodolico, Giuseppe; Brunetto, Massimo Borri; Argenteri, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of choice for aortic coarctation in adults remains open surgical repair. Aortobronchial fistula is a rare but potentially fatal late sequela of surgical correction of isthmic aortic coarctation via the interposition of a graft. The endovascular treatment of aortobronchial fistula is still under discussion because of its high risk for infection, especially if the patient has a history of cardiovascular prosthetic implantation. Patients need close monitoring, most notably those with secondary aortobronchial fistula. We discuss the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with the combined conditions, and we briefly review the relevant medical literature. PMID:28265214

  4. Limitations of Doppler echocardiography for the post-operative evaluation of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    De Mey, S; Segers, P; Coomans, I; Verhaaren, H; Verdonck, P

    2001-07-01

    Doppler blood flow measurements and derived pressure differences, through the Bernoulli equation, are used in the diagnosis of aortic coarctation, a congenital stenosis distal to the left subclavian artery. Doppler velocities remain elevated at the coarctation site after successful repair of coarctation, leading to high Doppler derived pressure differences without significant arm-leg pressure differences. We studied this apparent contradiction of two diagnostic methods, in vivo using patient and control data, and in vitro using a hydraulic model. Clinical and echocardiographic data from 31 patients, aged 13.0 +/- 4.0, 10.5 +/- 4.7 yr after coarctectomy by end-to-end anastomosis, and 18 age-matched healthy subjects were reviewed. Doppler peak velocities at the aortic isthmus were elevated in patients (2.2 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.2m/s, P < 0.001), corresponding to significant Doppler differences (20 +/- 7 mmHg), however, without significant arm-leg pressure differences. In all patients, a mild anatomic stenosis could still be observed. Local stiffness was increased. The hypothesis that the less distensible surgical scar in post-coarctectomy patients leads to a significant dynamic obstruction in systole was validated in a latex model of the aorta. Rigid rings (0.5-1.5 cm), matching the unloaded aortic diameter, were mounted around the aorta. Under loading conditions, Doppler peak velocities increased by 40 +/-7%, yielding Doppler differences of 21 +/- 3 mmHg, without a significant pressure drop. An alternative expression to calculate pressure differences, using both velocity and geometric information, was validated in the model. In conclusion, post-operatively, Doppler velocities remain elevated due to a mild anatomical and significant dynamic narrowing, but the specific geometry, resembling a tubular hypoplasia rather than an abrupt stenosis, permits an almost complete pressure recovery explaining the occurrence of Doppler differences in disagreement with the

  5. Non-invasive hemodynamic assessment of aortic coarctation: validation with in vivo measurements.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Sharma, Puneet; Ralovich, Kristóf; Mihalef, Viorel; Ionasec, Razvan; Everett, Allen; Ringel, Richard; Kamen, Ali; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2013-04-01

    We propose a CFD-based approach for the non-invasive hemodynamic assessment of pre- and post-operative coarctation of aorta (CoA) patients. Under our approach, the pressure gradient across the coarctation is determined from computational modeling based on physiological principles, medical imaging data, and routine non-invasive clinical measurements. The main constituents of our approach are a reduced-order model for computing blood flow in patient-specific aortic geometries, a parameter estimation procedure for determining patient-specific boundary conditions and vessel wall parameters from non-invasive measurements, and a comprehensive pressure-drop formulation coupled with the overall reduced-order model. The proposed CFD-based algorithm is fully automatic, requiring no iterative tuning procedures for matching the computed results to observed patient data, and requires approximately 6-8 min of computation time on a standard personal computer (Intel Core2 Duo CPU, 3.06 GHz), thus making it feasible for use in a clinical setting. The initial validation studies for the pressure-drop computations have been performed on four patient datasets with native or recurrent coarctation, by comparing the results with the invasively measured peak pressure gradients recorded during routine cardiac catheterization procedure. The preliminary results are promising, with a mean absolute error of less than 2 mmHg in all the patients.

  6. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Riambau, Vicente; Guerrero, Francisco; Montañá, Xavier; Gilabert, Rosa

    2007-06-01

    Recent technological advances in the diagnosis and therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease are continuing to bring about changes in the way patients suffering from these conditions are treated. The prevalence of both these conditions is increasing. This is due to greater life-expectancy in patients with arteriosclerosis, a pathogenetic factor underlying both conditions. The application of diagnostic imaging techniques to non-vascular conditions has led to the early diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Clinical suspicion of reno-vascular disease can be confirmed easily using high-resolution diagnostic imaging modalities such as CT angiography and magnetic resonance angiography. Endovascular intervention is successfully replacing conventional surgical repair techniques, with the result that it may be possible to improve outcome in both conditions using effective and minimally invasive approaches. Future technological developments will enable these endovascular techniques to be applied in the large majority of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm or renovascular disease.

  7. Vitamins and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    To summarize the association of vitamins (B6, B12, C, D, and E) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we reviewed clinical studies with a comprehensive literature research and meta-analytic estimates. To identify all clinical studies evaluating the association of vitamins B6/B12/C/D/E and AAA, databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2015, using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). For each case-control study, data regarding vitamin levels in both the AAA and control groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Pooled analyses of the 4 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin B6 levels (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.11; P=0.003) but non-significantly lower vitamin B12 levels (SMD, -0.42; 95% CI, -1.09 to 0.25; P=0.22) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Pooled analyses of the 2 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower levels of circulating vitamins C (SMD, -0.71; 95% CI, -1.23 to -0.19; P=0.007) and E (SMD, -1.76; 95% CI, -2.93 to 0.60; P=0.003) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Another pooled analysis of the 3 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels (SMD, -0.25; 95% CI, -0.50 to -0.01; P=0.04) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. In a double-blind controlled trial, 4.0-year treatment with a high-dose folic acid and vitamin B6/B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a rate of AAA repair despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. In another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 5.8-year supplementation with α-tocopherol (vitamin E) had no preventive effect on large AAA among male smokers. In clinical setting, although low circulating vitamins B6/C/D/E (not B12) levels are associated with AAA presence, vitamins B6/B12/E

  8. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... your doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Am I at risk for AAA? Men ...

  9. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  10. [Anesthesia for total and descending aorta replacement and aortic valve replacement for post-repair aneurysm of coarctation of aorta and aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yuko; Shimizu, Jun; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro

    2012-04-01

    We experienced anesthesia for total arch and descending aorta replacement and aortic valve replacement for post-repair aneurysm of coarctation of aorta and aortic stenosis. Because there was possibility that post coarctectomy syndrome would occur after repair of coarctation of aorta, administration of depressor that acts on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and careful observation were needed postoperatively. In consideration of the development of collateral vessels, preoperative imaging evaluation was added and operative method in cardiopulmonary bypass was adjusted. Careful preoperative evaluation is very important in cardiac anesthesia.

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open ... Open surgery to repair an AAA is sometimes done as an emergency procedure when there is bleeding inside your body from the aneurysm. You may have an ...

  12. Current aortic endografts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Colvard, Benjamin; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil; Swanstrom, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular Aneurysm Repair is a widely adopted method of treatment for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The minimally invasive approach offered with EVAR has become popular not only among physicians and patients, but in the medical device industry as well. Over the past 25 years the global market for aortic endografts has increased rapidly, resulting in a wide range of devices from various companies. Currently, there are seven endografts approved by the FDA for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. These devices offer a wide range of designs intended to increase inclusion criteria while decreasing technical complications such as endoleak and migration. Despite advances in device design, secondary interventions and follow-up requirements remain a significant issue. New devices are currently being studied in the U.S. and abroad and may significantly reduce complications and secondary interventions.

  13. Thoracic Stent Graft Implantation for Aortic Coarctation with Patent Ductus Arteriosus via Retroperitoneal Iliac Approach in the Presence of Small Sized Femoral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Ozge; Beton, Osman; Goksel, Sabahattin; Kaya, Hakkı; Berkan, Ocal

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular stent graft implantation is a favorable method for complex aortic coarctation accompanied by patent ductus arteriosus. Herein, an 18-year-old woman with complex aortic coarctation and patent ductus arteriosus was successfully treated by endovascular thoracic stent graft via retroperitoneal approach. The reason for retroperitoneal iliac approach was small sized common femoral arteries which were not suitable for stent graft passage. This case is the first aortic coarctation plus patent ductus arteriosus case described in the literature which is treated by endovascular thoracic stent graft via retroperitoneal approach. PMID:27242935

  14. In vivo validation of numerical prediction for turbulence intensity in an aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Ebbers, Tino; Shadden, Shawn C

    2012-04-01

    This paper compares numerical predictions of turbulence intensity with in vivo measurement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out on a 60-year-old female with a restenosed aortic coarctation. Time-resolved three-directional phase-contrast (PC) MRI data was acquired to enable turbulence intensity estimation. A contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA) and a time-resolved 2D PCMRI measurement were also performed to acquire data needed to perform subsequent image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. A 3D model of the aortic coarctation and surrounding vasculature was constructed from the MRA data, and physiologic boundary conditions were modeled to match 2D PCMRI and pressure pulse measurements. Blood flow velocity data was subsequently obtained by numerical simulation. Turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) was computed from the resulting CFD data. Results indicate relative agreement (error ≈10%) between the in vivo measurements and the CFD predictions of TKE. The discrepancies in modeled vs. measured TKE values were within expectations due to modeling and measurement errors.

  15. [Ascending-descending Aortic Bypass and Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Coarctation with Bicuspid Aortic Valve and an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Asano, Ryota; Nakano, Kiyoharu; Kodera, Kojiro; Sato, Atsuhiko; Kataoka, Go; Tatsuishi, Wataru; Kubota, Sayaka; Namiki, Shigetaka; Suzuki, Seiya

    2015-08-01

    A 53-year-old woman was developed congestive heart failure. She was diagnosed as having aortic coarctation, incompetent bicuspid aortic valve and an aberrant right subclavian artery by using echocardiography and enhanced computed tomography. Ankle brachial pressure index(ABI)in the right was 0.71 and 0.69 in the left. Blood pressure of the right arm was 60 mmHg lower than that of the left arm. To avoid perioperative adverse cardiac events due to a 2-staged operation, we performed ascending-descending aortic bypass and aortic valve replacement simultaneously through a median sternotomy. The heart was retracted cranially, and a vascular prosthesis was anastomosed to the descending aorta just above the diaphragm in an end-to-side manner. Then the graft was placed curvilinearly around the right atrium and was anastomosed to the ascending aorta. After the operation, the right and left ABI increased to 0.90 and 0.98 respectively. There was no pressure difference between the arms. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  16. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  17. Understanding the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, Helena; Ryer, Evan J.; Elmore, James R.; Tromp, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Summary An aortic aneurysm is a dilatation in which the aortic diameter is ≥ 3.0 cm. If left untreated, the aortic wall continues to weaken and becomes unable to withstand the forces of the luminal blood pressure resulting in progressive dilatation and rupture, a catastrophic event associated with a mortality of 50 – 80%. Smoking and positive family history are important risk factors for the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Several genetic risk factors have also been identified. On the histological level, visible hallmarks of AAA pathogenesis include inflammation, smooth muscle cell apoptosis, extracellular matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. We expect that large genetic, genomic, epigenetic, proteomic and metabolomic studies will be undertaken by international consortia to identify additional risk factors and biomarkers, and to enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of AAA. Collaboration between different research groups will be important in overcoming the challenges to develop pharmacological treatments for AAA. PMID:26308600

  18. Fluid Dynamics of Coarctation of the Aorta and Effect of Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Garcia, Julio; Kadem, Lyes

    2013-01-01

    Up to 80% of patients with coarctation of the aorta (COA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). Patients with COA and BAV have elevated risks of aortic complications despite successful surgical repair. The development of such complications involves the interplay between the mechanical forces applied on the artery and the biological processes occurring at the cellular level. The focus of this study is on hemodynamic modifications induced in the aorta in the presence of a COA and a BAV. For this purpose, numerical investigations and magnetic resonance imaging measurements were conducted with different configurations: (1) normal: normal aorta and normal aortic valve; (2) isolated COA: aorta with COA (75% reduction by area) and normal aortic valve; (3) complex COA: aorta with the same severity of COA (75% reduction by area) and BAV. The results show that the coexistence of COA and BAV significantly alters blood flow in the aorta with a significant increase in the maximal velocity, secondary flow, pressure loss, time-averaged wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index downstream of the COA. These findings can contribute to a better understanding of why patients with complex COA have adverse outcome even following a successful surgery. PMID:24015239

  19. The aortic reservoir-wave as a paradigm for arterial haemodynamics: insights from three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction simulations in a model of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Segers, Patrick; Taelman, Liesbeth; Degroote, Joris; Bols, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The reservoir-wave paradigm considers aortic pressure as the superposition of a 'reservoir pressure', directly related to changes in reservoir volume, and an 'excess' component ascribed to wave dynamics. The change in reservoir pressure is assumed to be proportional to the difference between aortic inflow and outflow (i.e. aortic volume changes), an assumption that is virtually impossible to validate in vivo. The aim of this study is therefore to apply the reservoir-wave paradigm to aortic pressure and flow waves obtained from three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction simulations in a model of a normal aorta, aortic coarctation (narrowed descending aorta) and stented coarctation (stiff segment in descending aorta). We found no unequivocal relation between the intraaortic volume and the reservoir pressure for any of the simulated cases. When plotted in a pressure-volume diagram, hysteresis loops are found that are looped in a clockwise way indicating that the reservoir pressure is lower than the pressure associated with the change in volume. The reservoir-wave analysis leads to very high excess pressures, especially for the coarctation models, but to surprisingly little changes of the reservoir component despite the impediment of the buffer capacity of the aorta. With the observation that reservoir pressure is not related to the volume in the aortic reservoir in systole, an intrinsic assumption in the wave-reservoir concept is invalidated and, consequently, also the assumption that the excess pressure is the component of pressure that can be attributed to wave travel and reflection.

  20. Numerical and experimental assessment of turbulent kinetic energy in an aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Engvall, Jan; Karlsson, Matts

    2013-07-26

    The turbulent blood flow through an aortic coarctation in a 63-year old female patient was studied experimentally using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and numerically using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), before and after catheter intervention. Turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) was computed in the numerical model using large eddy simulation and compared with direct in vivo MRI measurements. Despite the two totally different methods to obtain TKE values, both quantitative and qualitative results agreed very well. The results showed that even though both blood flow rate and Reynolds number increased after intervention, total turbulent kinetic energy levels decreased in the coarctation. Therefore, the use of the Reynolds number alone as a measure of turbulence in cardiovascular flows should be used with caution. Furthermore, the change in flow field and kinetic energy were assessed, and it was found that before intervention a jet formed in the throat of the coarctation, which impacted the arterial wall just downstream the constriction. After intervention the jet was significantly weaker and broke up almost immediately, presumably resulting in less stress on the wall. As there was a good agreement between measurements and numerical results (the increase and decrease of integrated TKE matched measurements almost perfectly while peak values differed by approximately 1mJ), the CFD results confirmed the MRI measurements while at the same time providing high-resolution details about the flow. Thus, this preliminary study indicates that MR-based TKE measurements might be useful as a diagnostic tool when evaluating intervention outcome, while the detailed numerical results might be useful for further understanding of the flow for treatment planning.

  1. Noninvasive pressure difference mapping derived from 4D flow MRI in patients with unrepaired and repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Rengier, Fabian; Delles, Michael; Eichhorn, Joachim; Azad, Yoo-Jin; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Ley, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    To develop a method for computing and visualizing pressure differences derived from time-resolved velocity-encoded three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (4D flow MRI) and to compare pressure difference maps of patients with unrepaired and repaired aortic coarctation to young healthy volunteers. 4D flow MRI data of four patients with aortic coarctation either before or after repair (mean age 17 years, age range 3-28, one female, three males) and four young healthy volunteers without history of cardiovascular disease (mean age 24 years, age range 20-27, one female, three males) was acquired using a 1.5-T clinical MR scanner. Image analysis was performed with in-house developed image processing software. Relative pressures were computed based on the Navier-Stokes equation. A standardized method for intuitive visualization of pressure difference maps was developed and successfully applied to all included patients and volunteers. Young healthy volunteers exhibited smooth and regular distribution of relative pressures in the thoracic aorta at mid systole with very similar distribution in all analyzed volunteers. Patients demonstrated disturbed pressures compared to volunteers. Changes included a pressure drop at the aortic isthmus in all patients, increased relative pressures in the aortic arch in patients with residual narrowing after repair, and increased relative pressures in the descending aorta in a patient after patch aortoplasty. Pressure difference maps derived from 4D flow MRI can depict alterations of spatial pressure distribution in patients with repaired and unrepaired aortic coarctation. The technique might allow identifying pathophysiological conditions underlying complications after aortic coarctation repair.

  2. Abdominal Aortic Surgery: Anesthetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the review are to highlight the clinical characteristics of the patient population; to assess multivariate risk factor analysis and the invasive/non-invasive techniques available for risk factor identification and management in this high-risk surgical population; to assess the major hemodynamic, metabolic, and regional blood flow changes associated with aortic cross-clamping/unclamping procedures and techniques for their modification or attenuation; and to assess the influence of perioperative anesthetic techniques and management on patient outcome. PMID:1814052

  3. Gender Differences in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hannawa, Kevin K.; Eliason, Jonathan L.; Upchurch, Gilbert R.

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) comprise the 10th leading cause of death in Caucasian males 65–74 years of age, and accounted for nearly 16,000 deaths overall in the year 2000. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology of AAAs is an important undertaking. Clinically, multiple risk factors are associated with the development of AAAs, including increasing age, positive smoking history, and hypertension. Male gender is also a well-established risk factor for the development of an AAA with a 4:1 male to female ratio. The reason for this gender disparity is unknown. The pathogenesis of AAAs formation is complex and multifactorial. Histologically, AAAs are characterized by early chemokine driven leukocyte infiltration into the aortic wall. Subsequent destruction of elastin and collagen in the media and adventitia ensues due to excessive local production of matrix degrading enzymes, and is accompanied by smooth muscle cell loss and thinning of the aortic wall. At present, there are no medical therapies available to treat patients with aortic aneurysms, using only the crude measurement of aortic diameter as a threshold for which patients must undergo life-threatening and costly surgery. Defining the early mechanisms underlying gender-related differences in AAA formation are critical, as understanding differences in disease patterns based on gender may allow us to develop new translational approaches to the prevention and treatment of patients with aortic aneurysms. PMID:19426607

  4. Gender differences in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Hannawa, Kevin K; Eliason, Jonathan L; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) comprise the tenth leading cause of death in Caucasian males 65 to 74 years of age and accounted for nearly 16,000 deaths overall in 2000. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology of AAAs is an important undertaking. Clinically, multiple risk factors are associated with the development of AAAs, including increasing age, positive smoking history, and hypertension. Male gender is also a well-established risk factor for the development of an AAA, with a 4:1 male to female ratio. The reason for this gender disparity is unknown. The pathogenesis of AAAs formation is complex and multifactorial. Histologically, AAAs are characterized by early chemokine-driven leukocyte infiltration into the aortic wall. Subsequent destruction of elastin and collagen in the media and adventitia ensues owing to excessive local production of matrix-degrading enzymes and is accompanied by smooth muscle cell loss and thinning of the aortic wall. At present, no medical therapies are available to treat patients with aortic aneurysms, using only the crude measurement of aortic diameter as a threshold for which patients must undergo life-threatening and costly surgery. Defining the early mechanisms underlying gender-related differences in AAA formation is critical as understanding differences in disease patterns based on gender may allow us to develop new translational approaches to the prevention and treatment of patients with aortic aneurysms.

  5. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: an autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Jagadesham, Vamshi P; Scott, D Julian A; Carding, Simon R

    2008-12-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a multifactorial degenerative vascular disorder. One of the defining features of the pathophysiology of aneurysmal disease is inflammation. Recent developments in vascular and molecular cell biology have increased our knowledge on the role of the adaptive and innate immune systems in the initiation and propagation of the inflammatory response in aortic tissue. AAAs share many features of autoimmune disease, including genetic predisposition, organ specificity and chronic inflammation. Here, this evidence is used to propose that the chronic inflammation observed in AAAs is a consequence of a dysregulated autoimmune response against autologous components of the aortic wall that persists inappropriately. Identification of the molecular and cellular targets involved in AAA formation will allow the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of AAA.

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting as meralgia paraesthetica.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, A; Hodgetts, T

    1997-01-01

    A case of abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported in a patient with long standing low back pain, presenting as meralgia paraesthetica and an increase in the severity of back pain. The case highlights the need for objective assessment of new symptoms arising in a chronic condition, and for a systematic approach to the assessment of radiographs performed in the accident and emergency department. Images p50-a PMID:9147718

  7. Gene Expression in Experimental Aortic Coarctation and Repair: Candidate Genes for Therapeutic Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    LaDisa, John F.; Bozdag, Serdar; Olson, Jessica; Ramchandran, Ramani; Kersten, Judy R.; Eddinger, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is a constriction of the proximal descending thoracic aorta and is one of the most common congenital cardiovascular defects. Treatments for CoA improve life expectancy, but morbidity persists, particularly due to the development of chronic hypertension (HTN). Identifying the mechanisms of morbidity is difficult in humans due to confounding variables such as age at repair, follow-up duration, coarctation severity and concurrent anomalies. We previously developed an experimental model that replicates aortic pathology in humans with CoA without these confounding variables, and mimics correction at various times using dissolvable suture. Here we present the most comprehensive description of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) to date from the pathology of CoA, which were obtained using this model. Aortic samples (n=4/group) from the ascending aorta that experiences elevated blood pressure (BP) from induction of CoA, and restoration of normal BP after its correction, were analyzed by gene expression microarray, and enriched genes were converted to human orthologues. 51 DEGs with >6 fold-change (FC) were used to determine enriched Gene Ontology terms, altered pathways, and association with National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headers (MeSH) IDs for HTN, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CoA. The results generated 18 pathways, 4 of which (cell cycle, immune system, hemostasis and metabolism) were shared with MeSH ID’s for HTN and CVD, and individual genes were associated with the CoA MeSH ID. A thorough literature search further uncovered association with contractile, cytoskeletal and regulatory proteins related to excitation-contraction coupling and metabolism that may explain the structural and functional changes observed in our experimental model, and ultimately help to unravel the mechanisms responsible for persistent morbidity after treatment for CoA. PMID:26207811

  8. Gene Expression in Experimental Aortic Coarctation and Repair: Candidate Genes for Therapeutic Intervention?

    PubMed

    LaDisa, John F; Bozdag, Serdar; Olson, Jessica; Ramchandran, Ramani; Kersten, Judy R; Eddinger, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is a constriction of the proximal descending thoracic aorta and is one of the most common congenital cardiovascular defects. Treatments for CoA improve life expectancy, but morbidity persists, particularly due to the development of chronic hypertension (HTN). Identifying the mechanisms of morbidity is difficult in humans due to confounding variables such as age at repair, follow-up duration, coarctation severity and concurrent anomalies. We previously developed an experimental model that replicates aortic pathology in humans with CoA without these confounding variables, and mimics correction at various times using dissolvable suture. Here we present the most comprehensive description of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) to date from the pathology of CoA, which were obtained using this model. Aortic samples (n=4/group) from the ascending aorta that experiences elevated blood pressure (BP) from induction of CoA, and restoration of normal BP after its correction, were analyzed by gene expression microarray, and enriched genes were converted to human orthologues. 51 DEGs with >6 fold-change (FC) were used to determine enriched Gene Ontology terms, altered pathways, and association with National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headers (MeSH) IDs for HTN, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CoA. The results generated 18 pathways, 4 of which (cell cycle, immune system, hemostasis and metabolism) were shared with MeSH ID's for HTN and CVD, and individual genes were associated with the CoA MeSH ID. A thorough literature search further uncovered association with contractile, cytoskeletal and regulatory proteins related to excitation-contraction coupling and metabolism that may explain the structural and functional changes observed in our experimental model, and ultimately help to unravel the mechanisms responsible for persistent morbidity after treatment for CoA.

  9. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome, coarctation of the aorta and hypoplastic aortic arch: a case series report.

    PubMed

    van den Boom, Jutta; Battin, Malcolm; Hornung, Tim

    2010-03-01

    The twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) complicates 10-30% of monochorionic pregnancies. The incidence of pulmonary stenosis and endocardial fibroelastosis is especially high in the recipient twin. We report a novel finding of four cases of coarctation of the aorta and hypoplastic aortic arch in the donor to raise awareness of cardiac lesions in twins affected by TTTS. Retrospective review of both neonatal database and mortality data from 2002 to 2007 with cross-validation from the local tertiary cardiology unit data (1998-2006) to identify children presenting with coarctation who were also twins. We identified four monochorionic twin pairs affected by the TTTS, delivered between 25 weeks and 36 weeks' gestation, where the donor was found to have coarctation of the aorta or a hypoplastic aortic arch. In addition, two of the four recipients also had cardiac abnormalities. There was a high mortality rate of 30% for both twins, and a high morbidity rate, especially for neurological sequelae. We believe that the types of abnormalities seen may be explained by the altered fetal blood flow and haemodynamics in TTTS. Given the increased prevalence of congenital heart disease in TTTS, with an increased risk of coarctation in the donor twin and pulmonary stenosis in the recipient, intra-uterine surveillance and a post-natal comprehensive cardiac assessment for both twins is warranted.

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sourabh; Qamar, Arman; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Alka

    2011-01-01

    An arterial aneurysm is defined as a focal dilation of a blood vessel with respect to the original artery. The risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) increases dramatically in the presence of the following factors: age older than 60 years, smoking, hypertension and Caucasian ethnicity. The likelihood that an aneurysm will rupture is influenced by the aneurysm size, expansion rate, continued smoking and persistent hypertension. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and are detected as an incidental finding on ultrasonography, abdominal computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging performed for other purposes. It can also present with abdominal pain or complications such as thrombosis, embolization and rupture. Approximately 30% of asymptomatic AAAs are discovered as a pulsatile abdominal mass on routine physical examination. Abdominal ultrasonography is considered the screening modality of choice for detecting AAAs because of its high sensitivity and specificity, as well as its safety and relatively lower cost. The decision to screen for AAAs is challenging. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommended that men between the age of 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked should be screened at least once for AAAs by abdominal ultrasonography. Management options for patients with an asymptomatic AAA include reduction of risk factors such as smoking, hypertension and dyslipidemia; medical therapy with beta-blockers; watchful waiting; endovascular stenting; and surgical repair depending on the size and expansion rate of the aneurysm and underlying comorbidities. PMID:21523201

  11. Retraction: Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion under mild hypothermia during primary repair for aortic coarctation with ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    The following article from Artificial Organs, "Selective Cerebro-Myocardial Perfusion Under Mild Hypothermia During Primary Repair for Aortic Coarctation With Ventricular Septal Defect" by Huiwen Chen, Haifa Hong, Zhongqun Zhu and Jinfen Liu, published online on 2 November 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Paul S. Malchesky, the International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed due to simultaneous publication of a substantially similar article, "Continuous Cerebral and Myocardial Perfusion During One-Stage Repair for Aortic Coarctation With Ventricular Septal Defect", by Huiwen Chen, Haifa Hong, Zhongqun Zhu and Jinfen Liu, in Pediatric Cardiology 7 November 2012 [Epub ahead of print]. © 2013, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2013, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation andWiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Arterial hypertension and neurofibromatosis: renal artery stenosis and coarctation of abdominal aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, W.; Messerli, F. H.; Genest, J.; Lefebvre, R.; Roy, P.; Carter, P.; Rojo-Ortega, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A 10-year-old girl had arterial hypertension, generalized neurofibromatosis, coarctation of the abdominal aorta and multiple stenoses at the origin of each renal artery. After resection of the stenotic areas and reimplantation of the renal arteries in the aorta, her arterial pressure decreased substantially. However, hypertension recurred and radiologic follow-up 4 1/2 years later showed distinct progression of the coarctation and renewed stenosis of all renal arteries at their origin. The stenotic areas showed eccentric intimal proliferation, frequently bulging into the lumen, with small nodular aggregates of smooth muscle cells and proliferation of fibrous tissue containing spindle-shaped nuclei in a palisading pattern. Hypertension associated with neurofibromatotic vascular disease has been described in 47 other patients in the literature. These patients have been young (mean age, 14 years) and predominantly male. In contrast to fibromuscular dysplasia, in which 95% of all stenoses are found in the distal two thirds of the renal arteries, in vascular neurofibromatosis more than 50% of the stenoses are found at the origin. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:810239

  13. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a systematic review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in comparison to open surgical repair. An abdominal aortic aneurysm [AAA] is the enlargement and weakening of the aorta (major blood artery) that may rupture and result in stroke and death. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair [EVAR] is a procedure for repairing abdominal aortic aneurysms from within the blood vessel without open surgery. In this procedure, an aneurysm is excluded from blood circulation by an endograft (a device) delivered to the site of the aneurysm via a catheter inserted into an artery in the groin. The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this technology. The review included 44 eligible articles out of 489 citations identified through a systematic literature search. Most of the research evidence is based on non-randomized comparative studies and case series. In the short-term, EVAR appears to be safe and comparable to open surgical repair in terms of survival. It is associated with less severe hemodynamic changes, less blood transfusion and shorter stay in the intensive care and hospital. However, there is concern about a high incidence of endoleak, requiring secondary interventions, and in some cases, conversion to open surgical repair. Current evidence does not support the use of EVAR in all patients. EVAR might benefit individuals who are not fit for surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and whose risk of rupture of the aneurysm outweighs the risk of death from EVAR. The long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of EVAR cannot be determined at this time. Further evaluation of this technology is required. OBJECTIVE The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of endovascular repair of

  14. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hagerty, Tracy; Geraghty, Patrick; Braverman, Alan C

    2017-04-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) leads to aortic root aneurysm, while descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) occurs less commonly. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is rarely reported in MFS. Risk factors for AAA are poorly understood and there are no guidelines for AAA screening in MFS. We sought to characterize AAA among Marfan patients in our center. The records of 12 adults with MFS and AAA disease were reviewed. Clinical features, imaging, operative reports, and outcomes were analyzed. Twelve adults with MFS and AAA were studied; age at AAA diagnosis was 44 ± 15 years (range 18-63). Nine patients smoked cigarettes. Eleven patients underwent prior aortic root replacement at age 31 ± 15 years. The size of AAA was 5.0 ± 1.3 cm (range 3.5-7.5) at the time of diagnosis. The AAA was suprarenal in 5, juxtarenal in 2, and infrarenal in 5 patients. Two patients had a descending TAA. Branch vessel aneurysms were present in 7 patients. Five patients underwent open surgical repair, 5 underwent endovascular repair, and 5 are being treated medically. One patient died suddenly with AAA size 5.7 cm, 2 months before death. Three patients subsequently developed type B aortic dissection, from 3 months to 9 years after AAA diagnosis. Adults with MFS are at risk for developing AAA. Evaluation for AAA is recommended in adults with MFS and prior root replacement, especially if descending aortic or branch vessel aneurysm is present or the patient smokes cigarettes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Augmentation of the Lesser Curvature With an Autologous Vascular Patch in Complex Aortic Coarctation and Interruption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heemoon; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook; Cho, Yang Hyun; Kang, I-Seok; Huh, June; Song, Jinyoung

    2016-06-01

    Reconstruction of the aortic arch in patients with complex aortic coarctation or interruption continues to be a challenge because of early left main bronchial compression or recoarctation and late Gothic arch formation. We propose a modified arch reconstruction technique augmenting the lesser curvature with an autologous vascular patch, which can relieve tension on the anastomosis without a prosthetic material. We retrospectively reviewed 33 patients with coarctation and arch hypoplasia (n = 31) or arch interruption (n = 2) who underwent arch reconstruction with an autologous vascular patch from 2007 to 2012. Median age at the operation was 17 days (range, 5 to 200 days). Median body weight was 3.7 kg (range, 2.3 to 7.0 kg). Cardiopulmonary bypass was used for all operations. Median antegrade selective cerebral perfusion time was 35 minutes (range, 23 to 59 minutes). Combined intracardiac anomalies in 29 patients (88%) were corrected simultaneously. The reconstructed arch was supplemented in the lesser curvature with an autologous vascular patch that was harvested from aortic isthmus (n = 25), pulmonary artery (n = 4), left subclavian artery (n = 2), aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1), or distal arch (n = 1). One patient (3%) died of acute respiratory distress syndrome. All survivors were discharged at 15 days (range, 7 to 58 days) postoperatively without neurologic complications or bronchial obstructions. Median follow-up was 24.8 months (range, 0.2 to 48.5 months). No recoarctation was observed during follow-up, and no patient needed reoperation. Augmenting the lesser curvature with an autologous vascular patch during arch reconstruction resulted in excellent midterm outcomes. Not only can a more natural shape of arch and less tension on the anastomosis be obtained, but complications, such as left main bronchial obstruction or recoarctation, can also be minimized. Long-term follow-up is needed to evaluate late development of recoarctation

  16. Sustained maternal hyperoxygenation improves aortic arch dimensions in fetuses with coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shi; Zhou, Jiawei; Peng, Qinghai; Deng, Wen; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Yili; Wang, Tao; Zhou, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the impact of maternal hyperoxygenation (HO) on cardiac dimensions in fetuses with isolated Coarctation (CoA). Fetal echocardiography was performed serially in 48 fetuses with CoA and gestation age matched normal fetues. The Z-scores for the mitral valve (MV), tricuspid valve (TV), aortic valve (AV), ascending aorta (AAo), isthmus, pulmonary valve (PV), main pulmonary artery (MPA), and descending aorta (DAo) were measured and compared among normal fetuses, CoA fetuses with oxygen and CoA fetuses with air. In the group with oxygen, 6 L/min oxygen was administered to the mother using a face mask. Regression analyses were performed to identify potential factors for HO outcome. The left heart dimension Z-scores increased gradually during HO therapy periods, especially at 4 weeks after oxygen therapy (P < 0.05). As for the case group with air, the left heart dimension remained unchanged. The duration of HO was associated with aortic arch Z-scores (adjusted R2 = 0.199, 0.60 for AAO and isthmus, respectively). Sustained maternal middle-flow oxygenation can be safely used to improve left heart dimensions in fetuses with isolated CoA. The duration of HO were associated with treatment outcome. These findings may provide useful information for developing novel treatment strategies. PMID:27982102

  17. Diagnosis of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm using 67-gallium citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Blumoff, R.L.; McCartney, W.; Jaques, P.; Johnson, G. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    Mycotic aneurysms of the abdominal aorta are uncommon, but potentially lethal problems. Clinical subtleties may suggest their presence, but in the past, definitive diagnosis has been dependent on surgical exploration or autopsy findings. A case is presented in which 67-gallium citrate abdominal scanning localized the site of sepsis in an abdominal aortic aneurysm and allowed for prompt and successful surgical therapy. This noninvasive technique is recommended as a adjunct in the diagnosis of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  18. Intraoperative Treatment of Fetal Asystole After Endovascular Repair of Aortic Coarctation in a Pregnant Woman with Mitral Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Laleh; Delgado Upegui, Carlos; Ferreira, Renata; Simmons, Lavonne; Ciliberto, Christopher

    2016-03-15

    A G1P0 woman with aortic coarctation and mitral valve stenosis underwent endovascular aortic repair with continuous fetal monitoring during the 20th week of pregnancy. On tracheal extubation, an episode of fetal asystole followed by fetal bradycardia was identified. Ephedrine, nitroglycerin, and terbutaline were administered for intrauterine fetal resuscitation. Subsequently, the patient developed hypertension and pulmonary edema, which were treated with furosemide and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. The fetal heart rate normalized. We conclude that intraoperative monitoring of a previable fetus may aid in optimizing maternal hemodynamics. Before performing interventional procedures in pregnant women, a multidisciplinary team should discuss the goals of neonatal care should adverse fetal events be detected.

  19. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sternbergh, W. Charles; Yoselevitz, Moises; Money, Samuel R.

    1999-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is an exciting new minimally invasive treatment option for patients with this disease. Ochsner Clinic has been the only institution in the Gulf South participating in FDA clinical trials of these investigational devices. Early results with endovascular AAA repair demonstrate a trend towards lower mortality and morbidity when compared with traditional open surgery. Length of stay has been reduced by two-thirds with a marked reduction in postoperative pain and at-home convalescence. If the long-term data on efficacy and durability of these devices are good, most AAAs in the future will be treated with this minimally invasive technique. PMID:21845135

  20. Surrogate Markers of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    The natural course of many abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is to gradually expand and eventually rupture and monitoring the disease progression is essential to their management. In this publication, we review surrogate markers of AAA progression. AAA diameter remains the most widely used and important marker of AAA growth. Standardized reporting of reproducible methods of measuring AAA diameter is essential. Newer imaging assessments, such as volume measurements, biomechanical analyses, and functional and molecular imaging, as well as circulating biomarkers, have potential to add important information about AAA progression. Currently, however, there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use in clinical practice.

  1. Self-Expandable Stent for Repairing Coarctation of the Left-Circumferential Aortic Arch with Right-sided Descending Aorta and Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery with Kommerell's Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khajali, Zahra; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Mohebbi, Bahram; Aeinfar, Kamran; Zolfaghari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular treatment offers a great advantage in the management of main arteries stenoses. However, simultaneous presence of a group of anomalies may complicate the situation. Here we present a case of 21-year-old man with aortic coarctation. Radiographic imaging and angiography demonstrated aortic coarctation of the left-circumferential aortic arch, right-sided descending aorta, and Kommerell's diverticulum at the origin of right subclavian artery. These anomalies have rarely been reported to concurrently exist in the same case and the treatment is challenging. Percutaneous treatment for repair of aortic coarctation was successfully performed with deployment of self-expanding nitinol stents. Follow-up demonstrated the correction of blood pressure and improvement of the symptoms. It appears that deployment of self-expandable nitinol stents present a viable option for the management of coarcted aorta in patients having all or some of these anomalies together.

  2. Early Diagnosis and Repair of Double Saccular Aneurysms of the Aortic Arch Associated With Aortic Coarctation in an Infant With Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ilyin, Vladimir N; Kornoukhov, O Ju; Khovrin, Valery V; Kryukov, Vladislav A; Valitova, Asia A; Ilina, Maria V

    2016-03-01

    Multiple saccular aneurysms of the thoracic aorta in neonates and infants are exceedingly rare. An association of these aneurysms with Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) in older age-groups is well known. This case report describes the diagnosis and subsequent successful repair of aortic coarctation associated with double saccular aneurysms of the thoracic aorta in patient with LDS during the first year of life.

  3. Computational models of aortic coarctation in hypoplastic left heart syndrome: considerations on validation of a detailed 3D model.

    PubMed

    Biglino, Giovanni; Corsini, Chiara; Schievano, Silvia; Dubini, Gabriele; Giardini, Alessandro; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Pennati, Giancarlo; Taylor, Andrew M

    2014-05-01

    Reliability of computational models for cardiovascular investigations strongly depends on their validation against physical data. This study aims to experimentally validate a computational model of complex congenital heart disease (i.e., surgically palliated hypoplastic left heart syndrome with aortic coarctation) thus demonstrating that hemodynamic information can be reliably extrapolated from the model for clinically meaningful investigations. A patient-specific aortic arch model was tested in a mock circulatory system and the same flow conditions were re-created in silico, by setting an appropriate lumped parameter network (LPN) attached to the same three-dimensional (3D) aortic model (i.e., multi-scale approach). The model included a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt and coarctation of the aorta. Different flow regimes were tested as well as the impact of uncertainty in viscosity. Computational flow and pressure results were in good agreement with the experimental signals, both qualitatively, in terms of the shape of the waveforms, and quantitatively (mean aortic pressure 62.3 vs. 65.1 mmHg, 4.8% difference; mean aortic flow 28.0 vs. 28.4% inlet flow, 1.4% difference; coarctation pressure drop 30.0 vs. 33.5 mmHg, 10.4% difference), proving the reliability of the numerical approach. It was observed that substantial changes in fluid viscosity or using a turbulent model in the numerical simulations did not significantly affect flows and pressures of the investigated physiology. Results highlighted how the non-linear fluid dynamic phenomena occurring in vitro must be properly described to ensure satisfactory agreement. This study presents methodological considerations for using experimental data to preliminarily set up a computational model, and then simulate a complex congenital physiology using a multi-scale approach.

  4. [Microalbuminuria as a marker of endothelial dysfunction in the long-term follow-up patients after surgical correction of aortic coarctation].

    PubMed

    Volkova, N I; Lazoryshynets, V V

    2013-06-01

    1170 patients after surgical correction of aortic coarctation during the period from 1988 to 2002 were studied. The median period of medical supervision after coarctation repair was 13,8 years, maximum age - 24 years. For diagnostics of the Microalbuminuria (MAU) it were used the special test-strings Microalbu PHAN (PLIVA-Lachema Diagnostica). MAU were discovered in 62.6% of and 34.9% of normotesive patients. Credible decrease of MAU of hypertensive patients with corrected coarctation of the aorta were defined after 3 months-long treatment by Losartan.

  5. Endovascular Repair of a Blunt Abdominal Aortic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tobler, William D.; Tan, Tze-Woei; Farber, Alik

    2012-01-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury is an uncommon traumatic finding. In the past, treatment options have traditionally consisted of open operative repair; however, the development of endovascular surgery has created new interventional possibilities. This case is presented to demonstrate the applications of endovascular abdominal aortic repair for a blunt traumatic injury. PMID:23730142

  6. Monocytes and macrophages in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Raffort, Juliette; Lareyre, Fabien; Clément, Marc; Hassen-Khodja, Réda; Chinetti, Giulia; Mallat, Ziad

    2017-04-13

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening disease associated with high morbidity, and high mortality in the event of aortic rupture. Major advances in open surgical and endovascular repair of AAA have been achieved during the past 2 decades. However, drug-based therapies are still lacking, highlighting a real need for better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in AAA formation and progression. The main pathological features of AAA include extracellular matrix remodelling associated with degeneration and loss of vascular smooth muscle cells and accumulation and activation of inflammatory cells. The inflammatory process has a crucial role in AAA and substantially influences many determinants of aortic wall remodelling. In this Review, we focus specifically on the involvement of monocytes and macrophages, summarizing current knowledge on the roles, origin, and functions of these cells in AAA development and its complications. Furthermore, we show and propose that distinct monocyte and macrophage subsets have critical and differential roles in initiation, progression, and healing of the aneurysmal process. On the basis of experimental and clinical studies, we review potential translational applications to detect, assess, and image macrophage subsets in AAA, and discuss the relevance of these applications for clinical practice.

  7. Volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Kusnick, Catherine A.; Shamsolkottabi, Susanne; Lang, Elvira V.; Corson, J. D.; Stanford, William; Thompson, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid, reliable and accurate system of measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysms, using volumetric analysis of x-ray computed tomographic data. This study evaluates illustrative cases, and compares measurements of AAA phantoms, using standard 2D versus volumetric methods. To validate the volumetric analysis, four phantom aneurysms were constructed in a range of diameters (4.5 - 7.0 cm) which presents the greatest management challenge to the clinician. These phantoms were imaged using a Toshiba Xpress SX helical CT. Separate scans were obtained at conventional (10 mm X 10 mm) and thin slice (5 mm X 5 mm) collimations. The thin slices were reconstructed at 2 mm intervals. Data from each of the 96 scans were interpreted using a standard 2D approach, then analyzed using task-oriented volumetric software. We evaluate patient assessments, and compare greatest outer diameters of phantoms, by standard versus volumetric methods. Qualitative differences between solutions based on standard versus volumetric analysis of illustrative patient cases are substantial. Expert radiologists' standard measurements of phantom aneurysms are highly reliable (r2 equals 0.901 - 0.958; p < 0.001), but biased toward significant overestimation of aneurysm diameters in the range of clinical interest. For the same phantoms, volumetric analysis was both more reliable (r2 equals 0.986 - 0.996; p < 0.001), and more accurate, with no significant bias in the range of interest. Volumetric analysis promotes selection of more valid management strategies, by providing vital information not otherwise available, and allowing more reliable and accurate assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is particularly valuable in the presence of aortic tortuosity, vessel eccentricity, and uncertain involvement of critical vessels.

  8. Aortic stenting in the growing sheep causes aortic endothelial dysfunction but not hypertension: Clinical implications for coarctation repair.

    PubMed

    Maschietto, Nicola; Semplicini, Luca; Ceolotto, Giulio; Cattelan, Arianna; Poser Dvm, Helen; Iacopetti, Ilaria; Gerardi, Gabriele; De Benedictis, Giulia Maria; Pilla, Tommaso; Bernardini, Daniele; Aresu, Luca; Rizzo, Stefania; Basso, Cristina; Semplicini, Andrea; Milanesi, Ornella

    2017-01-01

    Stent implantation is the treatment of choice for adolescents and adults with aortic coarctation (CoAo). Despite excellent short-term results, 20%-40% of the patients develop arterial hypertension later in life, which was attributed to inappropriate response of the aortic baroreceptors to increased stiffness of the ascending aorta (ASAO), either congenital or induced by CoAo repair. In particular, it has been hypothesized that stent itself may cause or sustain hypertension. Therefore, we aimed to study the hemodynamic and structural impact following stent implantation in the normal aorta of a growing animal. Eight female sheep completed the study and a stent was implanted in four. Every 3 mo we measured blood pressure of the anterior and posterior limbs and left ventricular function by echocardiography. Twelve months later invasive pressure was measured under baseline and simulated stress conditions. Expression of genes indicating oxidative stress (OS), endothelial dysfunction (ED) and stiffness, as well as pathological examination were performed in ascending (ASAO) and descending aorta (DSAO). SOD1 and MMP9 gene expression were higher in ASAO of the stented animals, compared to DSAO and controls, while NOS3 was decreased. No differences were found in blood pressure and echocardiographic parameters. No histological differences were found in the aorta of the two groups of animals. Stent does not affect central and peripheral hemodynamics, cardiac structure and function even in the long term. However, the finding of markers of OS and increased stiffness of ASAO, proximal to the stent, points to molecular mechanisms for increased cardiovascular risk of patients with stented CoAo. © 2016 The Authors Congenital Heart Disease published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Wall Shear Stress in an Aortic Coarctation - Impact of Virtual Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Matts; Andersson, Magnus; Lantz, Jonas

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent and wall impinging blood flow causes abnormal shear forces onto the lumen and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, wall shear stress (WSS) and related flow parameters were studied in a pre-treated aortic coarctation (CoA) as well as after several virtual interventions using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Patient-specific geometry and flow conditions were derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Finite element analysis was performed to acquire six different dilated CoAs. The unsteady pulsatile flow was resolved by large eddy simulation (LES) including non-Newtonian blood rheology. Pre-intervention, the presence of jet flow wall impingement caused an elevated WSS zone, with a distal region of low and oscillatory WSS. After intervention, cases with a more favorable centralized jet showed reduced high WSS values at the opposed wall. Despite significant turbulence reduction post-treatment, enhanced regions of low and oscillatory WSS were observed for all cases. This numerical method has demonstrated the morphological impact on WSS distribution in an CoA. With the predictability and validation capabilities of a combined CFD/MRI approach, a step towards patient-specific intervention planning is taken.

  10. Clarence Crafoord: a giant in cardiothoracic surgery, the first to repair aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Olin, Christian L

    2009-01-01

    On October 19, 1944, Clarence Crafoord performed the first successful repair of aortic coarctation. The operation was done a year before Robert Gross did his first case (he is often claimed to have been the first). In fact, Gross had read Crafoord's report before he performed his own first operation. Crafoord's achievement was not an isolated event. In the late 1920s he had performed two successful pulmonary embolectomies, in the 1930s he introduced heparin as thrombosis prophylaxis, and in the 1940s he pioneered mechanical positive-pressure ventilation during thoracic operations and worked out a safe and precise technique for pneumonectomy. During the 1950s a string of innovative surgical procedures were done at his unit in Stockholm. These included the second successful case of cardiopulmonary bypass in the world, the first case of atrial repair of transposition of the great arteries, endarterectomy of the left coronary artery, and the first implantation of a pacemaker into a human. In this article we will pay tribute to Clarence Crafoord and describe some of the contributions that he and his collaborators made to the field of cardiothoracic surgery.

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Turbulence and Flow Eccentricity in an Aortic Coarctation: Impact of Virtual Interventions.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Magnus; Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Karlsson, Matts

    2015-09-01

    Turbulence and flow eccentricity can be measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we propose quantitative techniques to assess turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and flow eccentricity that could assist in the evaluation and treatment of stenotic severities. These hemodynamic parameters were studied in a pre-treated aortic coarctation (CoA) and after several virtual interventions using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to demonstrate the effect of different dilatation options on the flow field. Patient-specific geometry and flow conditions were derived from MRI data. The unsteady pulsatile flow was resolved by large eddy simulation including non-Newtonian blood rheology. Results showed an inverse asymptotic relationship between the total amount of TKE and degree of dilatation of the stenosis, where turbulent flow proximal the constriction limits the possible improvement by treating the CoA alone. Spatiotemporal maps of TKE and flow eccentricity could be linked to the characteristics of the jet, where improved flow conditions were favored by an eccentric dilatation of the CoA. By including these flow markers into a combined MRI-CFD intervention framework, CoA therapy has not only the possibility to produce predictions via simulation, but can also be validated pre- and immediate post treatment, as well as during follow-up studies.

  12. Arm-ankle systolic blood pressure difference at rest and after exercise in the assessment of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed Central

    Engvall, J.; Sonnhag, C.; Nylander, E.; Stenport, G.; Karlsson, E.; Wranne, B.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the difference in systolic blood pressure at the arm and ankle at rest and after various exercise tests for the assessment of aortic coarctation. METHODS--22 patients (mean age 33 years, range 17-66) were investigated on the suspicion of having haemodynamically significant aortic coarctation. Eight had undergone previous coarctation surgery, of whom five had received vascular grafts and three end to end anastomoses. The patients exercised submaximally while supine, seated on a bicycle, and walking on a treadmill, as well as exercising maximally on a treadmill. Arm and ankle blood pressure were measured with a cuff at rest and 1-10 minutes after exercise. Invasive pressures and cardiac output by thermodilution were recorded during catheterisation while patients were at rest and during and after supine bicycle exercise. The degree of constriction was assessed by angiography. Twelve healthy volunteers (mean age 32 years, range 17-56) provided reference values for cuff pressures after exercise. RESULTS--All patients with a difference in cuff pressure at rest of 35 mm Hg or more had a difference in invasive pressure of 35 mm Hg or more. Increasing severity of constriction on angiography correlated with larger pressure gradients at rest and during exercise (P < 0.0001). When cuff measurements after exercise were considered singly or combined to form a predictor they did not improve the prediction of the invasive pressure gradients at rest or after maximal exercise. A pressure gradient between arm and ankle also developed in normal subjects after maximal but not after submaximal exercise. CONCLUSION--In most patients with suspected haemodynamically significant coarctation the difference in cuff pressure between arm and ankle at rest is sufficient to select patients in need of further evaluation. If exercise is performed submaximal exercise is preferable. PMID:7727189

  13. Avoidable costs of stenting for aortic coarctation in the United Kingdom: an economic model.

    PubMed

    Salcher, Maximilian; Mcguire, Alistair; Muthurangu, Vivek; Kelm, Marcus; Kuehne, Titus; Naci, Huseyin

    2017-04-10

    Undesirable outcomes in health care are associated with patient harm and substantial excess costs. Coarctation of the aorta (CoA), one of the most common congenital heart diseases, can be repaired with stenting but requires monitoring and subsequent interventions to detect and treat disease recurrence and aortic wall injuries. Avoidable costs associated with stenting in patients with CoA are unknown. We developed an economic model to calculate potentially avoidable costs in stenting treatment of CoA in the United Kingdom over 5 years. We calculated baseline costs for the intervention and potentially avoidable complications and follow-up interventions and compared these to the costs in hypothetical scenarios with improved treatment effectiveness and complication rates. Baseline costs were £16 688 ($25 182) per patient. Avoidable costs ranged from £137 ($207) per patient in a scenario assuming a 10% reduction in aortic wall injuries and reinterventions at follow-up, to £1627 ($2455) in a Best-case scenario with 100% treatment success and no complications. Overall costs in the Best-case scenario were 90.2% of overall costs at Baseline. Reintervention rate at follow-up was identified as most influential lever for overall costs. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed a considerable degree of uncertainty for avoidable costs with widely overlapping 95% confidence intervals. Significant improvements in the treatment effectiveness and reductions in complication rates are required to realize discernible cost savings. Up to 10% of total baseline costs could be avoided in the best-case scenario. This highlights the need to pursue patient-specific treatment approaches which promise optimal outcomes.

  14. Flexible tubular replicas of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Berry, E; Marsden, A; Dalgarno, K W; Kessel, D; Scott, D J A

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to manufacture life-size, flexible, tubular replicas of human abdominal aortic aneurysms and the associated vasculature, suitable for use in a training simulator for endovascular procedures. Selective laser sintering was used to create a geometrically correct master model for each of ten anatomical variations. The masters were used to generate flexible latex replicas. The use of the replicas in the training simulator was demonstrated. In total ten silicone rubber models were produced. When connected into the training simulator and perfused at arterial pressure it was possible to deploy an endovascular stent under fluoroscopic control and to perform angiography. The study has shown that conventional rapid prototyping technology can be used to manufacture flexible, radiolucent replicas which provide a realistic training environment for endovascular procedures.

  15. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  16. Evaluation of descending aortic flow volumes and effective orifice area through aortic coarctation by spatiotemporal integration of color Doppler data: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Wanitkun, S; Gharib, M; Zarandi, M; Shiota, T; Sahn, D J

    1999-06-01

    Flow volumes in an in vitro model of the aorta with 3 different degrees of stiffness (stiff, moderately stiff, and compliant) proximal to a coarctation were calculated by using a digital color Doppler echocardiography flow calculation method that semiautomatically integrates spatial and temporal color flow velocity data. These flow volumes were compared with those obtained by the conventional pulsed Doppler method with reference to ultrasonic flowmeter. Flow volumes determined by the automated method agreed well with those obtained by ultrasonic flowmeter, even in this compliant aorta model with vessel size changing with pulsation, whereas the pulsed Doppler method overestimated the reference data, especially for more compliant descending aortic segments. The combination of flow data with continuous wave Doppler allows definition of effective orifice area for coarctation.

  17. Temporal changes of aortic neck morphology in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Propper, Brandon W; Rasmussen, Todd E; Jones, W Tracey; Gifford, Shaun M; Burkhardt, Gabriel E; Clouse, W Darrin

    2010-05-01

    This study characterized temporal changes in the infrarenal aortic aneurysm neck in patients with small, untreated abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Patients with infrarenal AAA who had contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans separated by >6 months were identified and their images reviewed. Infrarenal neck diameter and length were measured along with aneurysm diameter. Comparisons between the interval CT scans were made and analysis of factors affecting neck changes performed. Sixty patients met inclusion criteria with an imaging interval of 3.8 years (median, 3.4 years; range, 0.75-9.6 years). During the interval, there was an increase in proximal and distal neck diameters of 1.1 mm (SD, 2.2) (0.28 mm/y) and 1.0 mm (SD, 3.0) (0.26 mm/y), respectively. During the same interval, the neck length decreased by 4 mm (SD, 11) (1 mm/y). A neck length of <15 mm was present in 10 patients (17%) at the initial imaging. Four of the remaining 50 patients experienced an interval decrease in neck length to <15 mm, all of whom had initial lengths of 15 to 20 mm. Medications had no association with changes in neck morphology; however, diabetes correlated with a slower rate of neck shortening (P = .001). The natural history of the aneurysm neck is one of expansion and shortening that will not affect most patients under surveillance. Patients with marginal neck lengths (range, 15-20 mm) at the initial imaging are more likely to experience loss of neck length that may negatively affect endovascular suitability. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  18. Ultrasound Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Clinical Need Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a localized abnormal dilatation of the aorta greater than 3 cm. In community surveys, the prevalence of AAA is reported to be between 2% and 5.4%. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are found in 4% to 8% of older men and in 0.5% to 1.5% of women aged 65 years and older. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are largely asymptomatic. If left untreated, the continuing extension and thinning of the vessel wall may eventually result in rupture of the AAA. Often rupture may occur without warning, causing acute pain. Rupture is always life threatening and requires emergency surgical repair of the ruptured aorta. The risk of death from ruptured AAA is 80% to 90%. Over one-half of all deaths attributed to a ruptured aneurysm take place before the patient reaches hospital. In comparison, the rate of death in people undergoing elective surgery is 5% to 7%; however, symptoms of AAA rarely occur before rupture. Given that ultrasound can reliably visualize the aorta in 99% of the population, and its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing AAA approaches 100%, screening for aneurysms is worth considering as it may reduce the incidence of ruptured aneurysms and hence reduce unnecessary deaths caused by AAA-attributable mortality. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Case reports, letters, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, non-human studies, and comments were excluded. Questions asked: Is population-based AAA screening effective in improving health outcomes in asymptomatic populations? Is AAA screening acceptable to the population? Does this affect the

  19. Exercise capacity, physical activity, and obesity in adults with repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Buys, Roselien; Budts, Werner; Delecluse, Christophe; Vanhees, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Patients with aortic coarctation (COA) have a reduced exercise capacity and seem to be more prone to adopt a sedentary lifestyle. During clinical practice, we often observe that patients seem to be overweight. However, data on physical activity and weight status in this population are currently not available. This study aimed to describe weight status, self-reported physical activity levels, and self-perceived health status in adults with repaired COA in comparison with healthy counterparts and to investigate the relationships among exercise capacity, physical activity, weight status, and perceived health status. We studied 103 COA patients who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing and who completed the Flemish Physical Activity Computerized Questionnaire and the short-form 36 health survey questionnaire. Patients with COA show a significantly lower exercise tolerance than what would be expected in healthy persons (P < .0001). Weight status was similar to the overall Belgian population, but a tendency toward higher body mass index was present. Patients with COA report a lower level of habitual physical activity (P < .05) as well as reductions in perceived vitality, general health, and mental health (P < .05). Parameters of habitual physical activity are related to exercise capacity (total energy expenditure: r = 0.278, P = .0015). The more active COA patients report higher scores of perceived physical functioning, general health, and mental health. Overweight patients did not perform significantly different than patients with a healthy weight did. Adults with repaired COA have a reduced exercise tolerance, which is related to low physical activity levels. Up to one-third of the COA patients we studied are overweight. As a poor exercise capacity identifies patients at risk for hospitalization and death and obesity might adversely influence the development of cardiovascular disease, it is important to improve the exercise capacity in these patients. Guiding

  20. Treating a 20 mm Hg gradient alleviates myocardial hypertrophy in experimental aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Wendell, David C; Friehs, Ingeborg; Samyn, Margaret M; Harmann, Leanne M; LaDisa, John F

    2017-10-01

    Children with coarctation of the aorta (CoA) can have a hyperdynamic and remodeled left ventricle (LV) from increased afterload. Literature from an experimental model suggests the putative 20 mm Hg blood pressure gradient (BPG) treatment guideline frequently implemented in CoA studies may permit irreversible vascular changes. LV remodeling from pressure overload has been studied, but data are limited following correction and using a clinically representative BPG. Rabbits underwent CoA at 10 weeks to induce a 20 mm Hg BPG using permanent or dissolvable suture thereby replicating untreated and corrected CoA, respectively. Cardiac function was evaluated at 32 weeks by magnetic resonance imaging using a spoiled cine GRE sequence (TR/TE/FA 8/2.9/20), 14 × 14-cm FOV, and 3-mm slice thickness. Images (20 frames/cycle) were acquired in 6-8 short axis views from the apex to the mitral valve annulus. LV volume, ejection fraction (EF), and mass were quantified. LV mass was elevated for CoA (5.2 ± 0.55 g) versus control (3.6 ± 0.16 g) and corrected (4.0 ± 0.44 g) rabbits, resulting in increased LV mass/volume ratio for CoA rabbits. A trend toward increased EF and stroke volume was observed but did not reach significance. Elevated EF by volumetric analysis in CoA rabbits was supported by concomitant increases in total aortic flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The indices quantified trended toward a persistent hyperdynamic LV despite correction, but differences were not statistically significant versus control rabbits. These findings suggest the current putative 20 mm Hg BPG for treatment may be reasonable from the LV's perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Huge dissected ascending aorta associated with pseudo aneurysm and aortic coarctation feridoun.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Khosravi, Donya

    2015-07-01

    We report a unique case of chronic dissection of the ascending aorta complicated with huge and thrombotic pseudoaneurysm in a patient with coarctation of descending aorta. Preoperative investigations such as transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) confirmed the diagnosis of dissection. Intraoperative findings included a12 cm eccentric bulge of the right lateral side of dilated the ascending aorta filled with the clot and a circular shaped intimal tear communicating with an extended hematoma and dissection of the media layer. The rarity of the report is an association of the chronic dissection with huge pseudoaneurysm and coarctation. The patient underwent staged repair of an aneurysm and coarctation and had an uneventful postoperative recovery period.

  2. Novel Molecular Imaging Approaches to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Risk Stratification.

    PubMed

    Toczek, Jakub; Meadows, Judith L; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2016-01-01

    Selection of patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is currently based on aneurysm size, growth rate, and symptoms. Molecular imaging of biological processes associated with aneurysm growth and rupture, for example, inflammation and matrix remodeling, could improve patient risk stratification and lead to a reduction in abdominal aortic aneurysm morbidity and mortality. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging are 2 novel approaches to abdominal aortic aneurysm imaging evaluated in clinical trials. A variety of other tracers, including those that target inflammatory cells and proteolytic enzymes (eg, integrin αvβ3 and matrix metalloproteinases), have proven effective in preclinical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm and show great potential for clinical translation.

  3. Advancements in identifying biomechanical determinants for abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Metaxa, Eleni; Papaharilaou, Yannis; Tavlas, Emmanouil; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Christos

    2015-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are a common health problem and currently the need for surgical intervention is determined based on maximum diameter and growth rate criteria. Since these universal variables often fail to predict accurately every abdominal aortic aneurysms evolution, there is a considerable effort in the literature for other markers to be identified towards individualized rupture risk estimations and growth rate predictions. To this effort, biomechanical tools have been extensively used since abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is in fact a material failure of the diseased arterial wall to compensate the stress acting on it. The peak wall stress, the role of the unique geometry of every individual abdominal aortic aneurysm as well as the mechanical properties and the local strength of the degenerated aneurysmal wall, all confer to rupture risk. In this review article, the assessment of these variables through mechanical testing, advanced imaging and computational modeling is reviewed and the clinical perspective is discussed.

  4. Three-dimensional digital visible heart model and myocardial pathological characteristics of fetal single ventricle connected with aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Ren, B; Jiang, Y; Xia, H M; Li, X Y; Tan, L W; Li, Y; Li, Q Y; Li, X S; Gao, Y H

    2013-10-30

    This study aimed to provide data for imaging diagnosis and clinical surgical plans by reconstructing a three-dimensional (3-D) digital visible heart model of single ventricle (SV) connection with aortic coarctation (CoA) and characterizing the myocardial and vascular wall pathological characteristics. Fifteen miscarried fetus cadavers with SV and CoA were selected. Fourteen cardiac specimens were systematically reviewed for segmental anatomy and conventional histological examinations. One fetus cadaver was used to obtain the structural dataset of the fetal body and to reconstruct a 3-D digital visible heart model. Specimen pathological dissection indicated hypertrophic myocardium SV, significant aortic wall thickening, and localized coarctation area elevation. Ten cases of SV with left ventricular morphology displayed a large muscle ridge and solitus normally aligned great arteries. Five cases of SV with right ventricular morphology had coarse, parallel trabeculations and received a common atrioventricular valve. The reconstructed 3-D heart and the main internal structures were realistic, which were beneficial for clinical and image teaching of fetal heart development. The change of characteristics of the myocardium and great vascular wall was obvious and may be the critical cause leading to progressive dysfunction in the postnatal heart.

  5. Medical management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Rodionov, Roman N; Mahlmann, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are the most common arterial aneurysms. Endovascular or open surgical aneurysm repair is indicated in patients with large AAA ≥ 5.5 cm in diameter as this prevents aneurysm rupture. The presence even of small AAAs not in need of immediate repair is associated with a very high cardiovascular risk including myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death. This risk by far exceeds the risk of aneurysm rupture. These patients therefore should be considered as high-risk patients and receive optimal medical treatment and life-style modification of their cardiovascular risk factors to improve their prognosis. In addition, these patients should be followed-up for aneurysm growth and receive medical treatment to decrease aneurym progression and rupture rate. Treatment with statins has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality in these patients, and also slows the rate of AAA growth. Use of beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors and AT1-receptor antagonists does not affect AAA growth but may be indicated for comorbidities. Antibiotic therapy with roxithromycin has a small effect on AAA growth, but this effect must be critically weighed against the potential risk of wide-spread use of antibiotics.

  6. Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Dominique B.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; Moll, Frans L.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are usually treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), which has become the standard of care in many hospitals for patients with suitable anatomy. Clinical evidence indicates that EVAR is associated with superior perioperative outcomes and similar long-term survival compared with open repair. Since the randomized, controlled trials that provided this evidence were conducted, however, the stent graft technology for infrarenal AAA has been further developed. Improvements include profile downsizing, optimization of sealing and fixation, and the use of low porosity fabrics. In addition, imaging techniques have improved, enabling better preoperative planning, stent graft placement, and postoperative surveillance. Also in the past few years, fenestrated and branched stent grafts have increasingly been used to manage anatomically challenging aneurysms, and experiments with off-label use of stent grafts have been performed to treat patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for other treatment strategies. Overall, the indications for endovascular management of AAA are expanding to include increasingly complex and anatomically challenging aneurysms. Ongoing studies and optimization of imaging, in addition to technological refinement of stent grafts, will hopefully continue to broaden the utilization of EVAR. PMID:24343568

  7. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system.

  8. Osteoprotegerin Prevents Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Koichi; Aoki, Hiroki; Orita, Yuichi; Ishida, Takafumi; Ohtaki, Megu; Nagao, Masataka; Ishida, Mari; Yoshizumi, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), which commonly occur among elderly individuals, are accompanied by a risk of rupture and subsequent high mortality. Establishment of medical therapies for the prevention of AAAs requires further understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this condition. This report details the possible involvement of Osteoprotegerin (OPG) in the prevention of AAAs through inhibition of Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). In CaCl2-induced AAA models, both internal and external diameters were significantly increased with destruction of elastic fibers in the media in Opg knockout (KO) mice, as compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, up-regulation of TRAIL expression was observed in the media by immunohistochemical analyses. Using a culture system, both the TRAIL-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and the chemoattractive effect of TRAIL on SMCs were inhibited by OPG. These data suggest that Opg may play a preventive role in the development of AAA through its antagonistic effect on Trail. PMID:26783750

  9. Abdominal aortic aneurysm: an illustrated narrative review.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Colin M; Hurtgen-Grace, Kristin; Talarico, Ernest; Marley, John

    2003-01-01

    To present a descriptive review of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), including a review of risk factors for and case finding in AAA for chiropractors as primary contact health care practitioners. Clinical and scientific literature identified through various sources including MEDLINE and citation tracking. Selective narrative review of relevant literature. AAA may be asymptomatic; however, back pain is a common presenting feature. Risk factors include male gender, increasing age, cigarette smoking, hypertension, chronic obstructive airway disease, claudication, and AAA in a first-degree relative. AAA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of older white patients, especially males, with low back pain. Estimated prevalence for AAAs in older males is in the order of 3% to 5%; rupture accounts for 1.7% of deaths in men aged 65 to 75 years. Elective surgical resection of AAAs (prior to rupture) offers a low operative mortality and good prognosis. AAA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of older patients presenting with low back pain and those with risk factors for AAA. Chiropractors, as primary contact health care practitioners, have a responsibility to refer patients suspected of having AAA for appropriate imaging and, where indicated, vascular surgical opinion.

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Judy; Martufi, Giampaolo; Di Martino, Elena; Washington, Christopher B.; Grisafi, Joseph; Muluk, Satish C.; Finol, Ender A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the maximum transverse diameter of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and expansion rate are not entirely reliable indicators of rupture potential. We hypothesize that aneurysm morphology and wall thickness are more predictive of rupture risk and can be the deciding factors in the clinical management of the disease. A non-invasive, image-based evaluation of AAA shape was implemented on a retrospective study of 10 ruptured and 66 unruptured aneurysms. Three-dimensional models were generated from segmented, contrast-enhanced computed tomography images. Geometric indices and regional variations in wall thickness were estimated based on novel segmentation algorithms. A model was created using a J48 decision tree algorithm and its performance was assessed using ten-fold cross validation. Feature selection was performed using the χ2-test. The model correctly classified 65 datasets and had an average prediction accuracy of 86.6% (κ = 0.37). The highest ranked features were sac length, sac height, volume, surface area, maximum diameter, bulge height, and intra-luminal thrombus volume. Given that individual AAAs have complex shapes with local changes in surface curvature and wall thickness, the assessment of AAA rupture risk should be based on the accurate quantification of aneurysmal sac shape and size. PMID:20890661

  11. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis following the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Ayerdi, Juan; Gupta, Sushil K; Sampson, Lawrence N; Deshmukh, Narayan

    2002-04-01

    Complications from the Heimlich maneuver are relatively infrequent. Two fatal cases of abdominal aortic thrombosis have been reported following this technique. We report on the first patient that suffered an acute thrombosis of the abdominal aorta and survived. Prompt recognition of this complication provides the only hope of survival from this rare and catastrophic complication.

  12. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms. A 20-year experience.

    PubMed

    Dalainas, I; Nano, G; Ranucci, M; Bianchi, P; Stegher, S; Casana, R; Malacrida, G; Tealdi, D G

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the study was to report a 20-year single Institution experience, with the early and late outcomes of surgical treatment of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms. In a 20-year period, 2 275 consecutive patients underwent elective surgical repair for non-rupture abdominal aortic aneurysm. Fifty-two patients (2.3%) were classified as inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms. Early and late outcomes were analyzed. One patient died in the perioperative period, giving a mortality rate of 1.92%. One patient died from a pseudoaneurysm rupture 7 months after operation. Three patients developed an aortic pseudoaneurysm in the follow-up period (mean 12.1 years, range 1-20 years) and underwent a redo operation. Overall surgical outcome of these patients, in terms of short-term and long-term is good. A high rate of pseudoaneurysm formation was observed.

  13. 3D image analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, Marko; Loncaric, Sven; Sorantin, Erich

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a method for 3-D segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm from computed tomography angiography images. The proposed method is automatic and requires minimal user assistance. Segmentation is performed in two steps. First inner and then outer aortic border is segmented. Those two steps are different due to different image conditions on two aortic borders. Outputs of these two segmentations give a complete 3-D model of abdominal aorta. Such a 3-D model is used in measurements of aneurysm area. The deformable model is implemented using the level-set algorithm due to its ability to describe complex shapes in natural manner which frequently occur in pathology. In segmentation of outer aortic boundary we introduced some knowledge based preprocessing to enhance and reconstruct low contrast aortic boundary. The method has been implemented in IDL and C languages. Experiments have been performed using real patient CTA images and have shown good results.

  14. MATR3 disruption in human and mouse associated with bicuspid aortic valve, aortic coarctation and patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Xi, Qiongchao J.; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Lee, Ji Hyun; Higgins, Anne W.; Anchan, Raymond M.; Roberts, Amy E.; Seong, Ihn Sik; Fan, Xueping; Lage, Kasper; Lu, Lily Y.; Tao, Joanna; Hu, Xuchen; Berezney, Ronald; Gelb, Bruce D.; Kamp, Anna; Moskowitz, Ivan P.; Lacro, Ronald V.; Lu, Weining; Morton, Cynthia C.; Gusella, James F.; Maas, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) defects represent a common but heterogeneous subset of congenital heart disease for which gene identification has been difficult. We describe a 46,XY,t(1;5)(p36.11;q31.2)dn translocation carrier with pervasive developmental delay who also exhibited LVOT defects, including bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), coarctation of the aorta (CoA) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). The 1p breakpoint disrupts the 5′ UTR of AHDC1, which encodes AT-hook DNA-binding motif containing-1 protein, and AHDC1-truncating mutations have recently been described in a syndrome that includes developmental delay, but not congenital heart disease [Xia, F., Bainbridge, M.N., Tan, T.Y., Wangler, M.F., Scheuerle, A.E., Zackai, E.H., Harr, M.H., Sutton, V.R., Nalam, R.L., Zhu, W. et al. (2014) De Novo truncating mutations in AHDC1 in individuals with syndromic expressive language delay, hypotonia, and sleep apnea. Am. J. Hum. Genet., 94, 784–789]. On the other hand, the 5q translocation breakpoint disrupts the 3′ UTR of MATR3, which encodes the nuclear matrix protein Matrin 3, and mouse Matr3 is strongly expressed in neural crest, developing heart and great vessels, whereas Ahdc1 is not. To further establish MATR3 3′ UTR disruption as the cause of the proband's LVOT defects, we prepared a mouse Matr3Gt-ex13 gene trap allele that disrupted the 3′ portion of the gene. Matr3Gt-ex13 homozygotes are early embryo lethal, but Matr3Gt-ex13 heterozygotes exhibit incompletely penetrant BAV, CoA and PDA phenotypes similar to those in the human proband, as well as ventricular septal defect (VSD) and double-outlet right ventricle (DORV). Both the human MATR3 translocation breakpoint and the mouse Matr3Gt-ex13 gene trap insertion disturb the polyadenylation of MATR3 transcripts and alter Matrin 3 protein expression, quantitatively or qualitatively. Thus, subtle perturbations in Matrin 3 expression appear to cause similar LVOT defects in human and mouse. PMID

  15. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and aortoiliac vein fistula.

    PubMed

    Gyoten, Takayuki; Doi, Toshio; Yamashita, Akio; Fukahara, Kazuaki; Kotoh, Keiju; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted with severe abdominal pain and back pain. Computed tomography showed an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (8.4 × 8.3 cm) and a large retroperitoneal hematoma. Immediately afterwards, the patient suffered circulatory collapse and was rushed to the operating theater. A fistula communicating with the left iliac vein was found. It was repaired with a Dacron patch while balloon-tipped catheters controlled the bleeding. The abdominal aortic aneurysm was replaced with a bifurcated graft. The postoperative course was uneventful. There have been few reports of successful repair of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with aortoiliac arteriovenous fistula.

  16. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: a persistent painful hip

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Dinnish; Ashraf, Nadeem; Ahmad, Adil; Menon, Jay

    2013-01-01

    The presentation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with isolated hip pain is a rare phenomenon. We present an atypical case of a 58-year-old previously fit man who presented with a 6-month history of progressively worsening left hip pain associated with unintentional weight loss, tender bilateral testicular swellings and a large non-tender palpable mass on abdominal examination. Urgent abdominal CT scan findings revealed a 15 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm extending to the aortic bifurcation associated with an extensive left hydronephrosis. In theatre, the diagnosis of inflammatory AAA (IAAA) was confirmed following the presence of pyuria and a successful repair with an open approach using a bifurcated dacron graft was performed. PMID:24038286

  17. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: a persistent painful hip.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Dinnish; Ashraf, Nadeem; Ahmad, Adil; Menon, Jay

    2013-09-13

    The presentation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with isolated hip pain is a rare phenomenon. We present an atypical case of a 58-year-old previously fit man who presented with a 6-month history of progressively worsening left hip pain associated with unintentional weight loss, tender bilateral testicular swellings and a large non-tender palpable mass on abdominal examination. Urgent abdominal CT scan findings revealed a 15 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm extending to the aortic bifurcation associated with an extensive left hydronephrosis. In theatre, the diagnosis of inflammatory AAA (IAAA) was confirmed following the presence of pyuria and a successful repair with an open approach using a bifurcated dacron graft was performed.

  18. Benefit of endovascular stenting for aortic coarctation on systemic hypertension in adults.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Tahir; Motwani, Manish; Schneider, Heiko; Dua, Jaspal Singh; Hoschtitzky, Andreas; Clarke, Bernard; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2015-12-01

    Endovascular stenting is a recognised treatment strategy for aortic coarctation (CoA) in adults. We assessed systemic hypertension control and the need for antihypertensive therapy after CoA stenting in adults. Data were collected prospectively on 54 patients (36 men; mean age: 34 ± 16 years) who underwent endovascular stenting for CoA over a 7-year period. Five patients were excluded as they did not attend follow-up appointments. Patients underwent clinical examination, including right arm systolic blood pressure (SBP) and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring at baseline, 6-12 weeks and 9-12 months. There was a significant fall in mean peak-to-peak systolic gradient (PG) across the CoA after stenting (26 ± 11 mmHg vs. 5 ± 4 mmHg; P<0.01). There were successive reductions in right arm SBP and ambulatory SBP at baseline, 6-12 weeks and 9-12 months post-procedure (right arm: 155 ± 18 mmHg vs. 137 ± 17 mmHg vs. 142 ± 16 mmHg, respectively; all P-values <0.01; ambulatory: 142 ± 14 mmHg vs. 132 ± 16 mmHg vs. 131 ± 15 mmHg, respectively; all P-values <0.01). Twenty-four patients had severe CoA (PG >25 mmHg before stenting); baseline SBP was significantly higher in severe versus non-severe patients (160 mmHg vs. 148 mmHg; P=0.02). The absolute reduction in PG after stenting was significantly higher in the severe group (31 ± 7 mmHg vs. 14 ± 5 mmHg; P<0.0001), but there was no significant difference in SBP between groups at 6-12 weeks (141 mmHg vs. 135 mmHg; P=0.21) or 9-12 months (139 mmHg vs. 139 mmHg; P=0.96). Endovascular stenting of CoA results in a significant reduction in SBP at 6-12 weeks, which is sustained at 9-12 months, with similar outcomes in severe and non-severe CoA groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Understanding administrative abdominal aortic aneurysm mortality data.

    PubMed

    Hussey, K; Siddiqui, T; Burton, P; Welch, G H; Stuart, W P

    2015-03-01

    Administrative data in the form of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and the Scottish Morbidity Record (SMR) have been used to describe surgical activity. These data have also been used to compare outcomes from different hospitals and regions, and to corroborate data submitted to national audits and registries. The aim of this observational study was to examine the completeness and accuracy of administrative data relating to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Administrative data (SMR-01 returns) from a single health board relating to AAA repair were requested (September 2007 to August 2012). A complete list of validated procedures; termed the reference data set was compiled from all available sources (clinical and administrative). For each patient episode electronic health records were scrutinised to confirm urgency of admission, diagnosis, and operative repair. The 30-day mortality was recorded. The reference data set was used to systematically validate the SMR-01 returns. The reference data set contained 608 verified procedures. SMR-01 returns identified 2433 episodes of care (1724 patients) in which a discharge diagnosis included AAA. This included 574 operative repairs. There were 34 missing cases (5.6%) from SMR-01 returns; nine of these patients died within 30 days of the index procedure. Omission of these cases made a statistically significant improvement to perceived 30-day mortality (p < .05, chi-square test). If inconsistent SMR-01 data (in terms of ICD-10 and OPCS-4 codes) were excluded only 81.9% of operative repairs were correctly identified and only 30.9% of deaths were captured. The SMR-01 returns contain multiple errors. There also appears to be a systematic bias that reduces apparent 30-day mortality. Using these data alone to describe or compare activity or outcomes must be done with caution. Copyright © 2014 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute Type B Aortic Dissection in a Patient with Previous Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hun; Rha, Seung-Woon

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) was relatively safe, and became a widely performed procedure. If aortic dissection (AD) occurred in patient with previous EVAR, it could cause fatal complications like endograft collapse. Surgical treatment was limited in this situation for comorbidities and complex anatomies. Here we report a rare case of acute type B AD developed following trans-radial coronary intervention in a patient with previous EVAR of abdominal aortic aneurysm, which was treated with thoracic EVAR. PMID:28377913

  1. Three-Dimensional Evaluation of Aortic Valve Annular Shape in Children With Bicuspid Aortic Valves and/or Aortic Coarctation Compared With Controls.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Christen R; Sugeng, Lissa; Abraham, Sharon; Li, Fangyong; Weismann, Constance G

    2015-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital cardiac abnormality, occurring in 1% to 2% of the general population. Adults with degenerative aortic valve (AV) disease have been shown to have an elliptical shaped AV annulus. The goal of this study was to investigate the shape of the aortic annulus in children with BAV, coarctation of the aorta (CoA) with or without BAV, and normal controls with trileaflet AVs using 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). We reviewed echocardiograms of children with isolated BAV (n = 40), CoA (n = 26), and controls (n = 40) that included 3DE of the AV. Eccentricity index (EI) was defined as the ratio between the smaller and larger annular dimension. ΔD was defined as the difference between the larger and smaller annular dimension. Patients with BAV had an eccentric AV annulus compared with controls (BAV EI 0.85 ± 0.05 and control EI 0.96 ± 0.03; p <0.001). Subjects with CoA also had a more eccentric annulus than controls regardless of AV morphology (CoA 0.84 ± 0.06; p <0.001). EI was not associated with somatic growth parameters or gender. Among all patients with BAV, AV dysfunction was associated with fusion of the right and noncoronary (R-N) cusps (p <0.001), but there was no association between valve dysfunction and EI. ΔD was higher in both the BAV and CoA groups compared with the control group (BAV 3.4 ± 1.9 mm, CoA 2.8 ± 1.8 mm, and control 0.6 ± 0.4 mm; p <0.001 each). Although there was no significant correlation of ΔD with age in the control group during childhood, ΔD increased with age in the BAV and CoA groups. In conclusion, children with BAV and/or CoA have an elliptical shaped AV annulus by 3DE, which is independent of age, gender, or body surface area. AV annular eccentricity may lead to inaccurate measurement of AV annular size if measured by 2DE alone. Considering AV annular eccentricity when balloon sizing the annulus before valvuloplasty may help improve interventional results in some

  2. Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Replacement in the Awake Patient.

    PubMed

    Meecham, L; Torrance, A; Vijay, S; Burtenshaw, A; Downing, R

    2017-03-01

    Nonintubated aortic surgery using various techniques has been reported, but despite publication of favorable outcomes in select patient groups, awake aortic surgery remains unpopular. Our patient had an abdominal aortic aneurysm that was unsuitable for endovascular repair. Because of the significant respiratory disease, general anesthesia represented an unacceptably high risk. As a result, he underwent open AAA repair via a retroperitoneal approach with the aid of epidural anesthesia. Here, we highlight the benefits of the procedure which offer a select cohort of patients the chance of life-saving surgery.

  3. Adventitial vasa vasorum arteriosclerosis in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Takeshi; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Onoue, Kenji; Ikegami, Koji; Morita, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Naoto; Mano, Yuuki; Sano, Masaki; Saito, Takaaki; Sato, Kohji; Konno, Hiroyuki; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Unno, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease among elderly individuals. However, the precise pathophysiology of AAA remains unknown. In AAA, an intraluminal thrombus prevents luminal perfusion of oxygen, allowing only the adventitial vaso vasorum (VV) to deliver oxygen and nutrients to the aortic wall. In this study, we examined changes in the adventitial VV wall in AAA to clarify the histopathological mechanisms underlying AAA. We found marked intimal hyperplasia of the adventitial VV in the AAA sac; further, immunohistological studies revealed proliferation of smooth muscle cells, which caused luminal stenosis of the VV. We also found decreased HemeB signals in the aortic wall of the sac as compared with those in the aortic wall of the neck region in AAA. The stenosis of adventitial VV in the AAA sac and the malperfusion of the aortic wall observed in the present study are new aspects of AAA pathology that are expected to enhance our understanding of this disease.

  4. Computational simulations of hemodynamic changes within thoracic, coronary, and cerebral arteries following early wall remodeling in response to distal aortic coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Jessica S.; Humphrey, Jay D.; Figueroa, C. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pulsatile character of blood pressure and flow within large arteries plays a particularly important role as a mechano-biological stimulus for wall growth and remodeling. Nevertheless, understanding better the highly coupled interactions between evolving wall geometry, structure, and properties and the hemodynamics will require significantly more experimental data. Computational fluid–solid-growth models promise to aid in the design and interpretation of such experiments and to identify candidate mechanobiological mechanisms for the observed arterial adaptations. Motivated by recent aortic coarctation models in animals, we used a computational fluid–solid interaction model to study possible local and systemic effects on the hemodynamics within the thoracic aorta and coronary, carotid, and cerebral arteries due to a distal aortic coarctation and subsequent spatial variations in wall adaptation. In particular, we studied an initial stage of acute cardiac compensation (i.e., maintenance of cardiac output) followed by early arterial wall remodeling (i.e., spatially varying wall thickening and stiffening). Results suggested, for example, that while coarctation increased both the mean and pulse pressure in the proximal vessels, the locations nearest to the coarctation experienced the greatest changes in pulse pressure. In addition, after introducing a spatially varying wall adaptation, pressure, left ventricular work, and wave speed all increased. Finally, vessel wall strain similarly experienced spatial variations consistent with the degree of vascular wall adaptation. PMID:22415052

  5. Endovascular treatment of spontaneous isolated abdominal aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Giribono, Anna Maria; Ferrara, Doriana; Spalla, Flavia; Narese, Donatella; Bracale, Umberto; Pecoraro, Felice; Bracale, Renata; del Guercio, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Isolated abdominal aortic dissection is a rare clinical disease representing only 1.3% of all dissections. There are a few case series reported in the literature. The causes of this pathology can be spontaneous, iatrogenic, or traumatic. Most patients are asymptomatic and symptoms are usually abdominal or back pain, while claudication and lower limb ischemia are rare. Surgical and endovascular treatment are two valid options with acceptable results. We herein describe nine cases of symptomatic spontaneous isolated abdominal aortic dissection, out of which four successfully were treated with an endovascular approach between July 2003 and July 2013. All patients were men, smokers, symptomatic (either abdominal or back pain or lower limb ischemia), with a history of high blood pressure, with a medical history negative for concomitant aneurysmatic dilatation or previous endovascular intervention. Diagnosis of isolated abdominal aortic dissection were established by contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the thoracic and abdominal aorta. All nine patients initially underwent medical treatment. In four symptomatic cases, non-responsive to medical therapy, bare-metal stents or stent grafts were successfully positioned. All patients completed a CTA follow-up of at least 12 months, during which they remained symptom-free. Endovascular management of this condition is associated with a high rate of technical success and a low mortality; therefore, it can be considered the treatment of choice when it is feasible. PMID:27994881

  6. Endovascular treatment of false-aneurysm ten years after dacron patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    False aneurysm degeneration is a known complication of patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Open surgical treatment consists of prosthetic graft repair of the involved aorta, often requires circulatory arrest to achieve a safe proximal aortic control and perform proximal anastomosis, and finally is associated with substantial perioperative morbidity. Endografting of the diseased aorta is a valuable alternative to open repair, when feasible, with good short and long term results. We now report one more case of false aneurysm ten years after Dacron patch aortoplasty for isthmic coarctation in a 26-year-old woman, successfully treated by endovascular repair via the left common iliac artery, and a complete exclusion of the aneurysm at two year follow-up.

  7. Single-stage repair of aneurysm of the ascending aorta associated with aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Attaran, Saina; Felderhoff, Jeremy; Westwood, Mark A; Awad, Wael I

    2010-08-01

    A 38-year-old man with a history of uncontrolled hypertension was investigated for atypical chest pains and found to have an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and a coexisting coarctation of the aorta. The timing and sequence of surgical repair of these 2 pathologies are controversial. We report an elective single-stage operation in which the ascending aorta was replaced and an extracardiac bypass from the ascending to the descending aorta was performed with excellent results.

  8. Frequency of abdominal aortic expansion after thoracic endovascular repair of type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tim F; Böckler, Dittmar; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Bischoff, Moritz; Kronlage, Moritz; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hyhlik-Dürr, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    To determine abdominal aortic expansion after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with aortic dissection type B and 36 months minimum follow-up. Retrospective study of 18 TEVAR patients with follow-up >36 months. Abdominal aortic diameters at celiac trunk (location B) and infrarenal aorta (location C) were recorded on the first and last imaging after TEVAR. False lumen thrombosis was determined at level of endograft (A) and at B and C. Aortic expansion was defined as diameter increase of 5 mm or 15%. Correlation analyses were performed to investigate potential determinants of expansion. Median follow-up was 75.2 months. Sixteen of 18 patients (88.9%) demonstrated abdominal expansion. Mean expansion was 9.9 ± 6.1 mm at B and 11.7 ± 6.5 mm at C, without a difference between acute and chronic dissections. Critical diameters of 55 mm were reached in two patients treated for chronic dissection (11.1%). Annual diameter increase was significantly greater at locations with baseline diameters >30 mm (2.1 ± 1.1 mm vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 mm, p = 0.009). Baseline diameters were greater in patients with chronic dissections. Abdominal aortic expansion can be frequently recognized after TEVAR for aortic dissection type B and occurs independently from thoracic false lumen thrombosis. Clinical significant abdominal aortic expansion may occur more frequently in patients treated with TEVAR for chronic dissection. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. [Pseudomembranous colitis after surgery for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Lozano Sánchez, F; Sánchez Fernández, J; Palacios, E; Fernández, M; Ingelmo Morin, A; Gómez Alonso, A

    1993-01-01

    We present a rare postoperative complication after surgical procedures for rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The disease, a pseudomembranous colitis, was early recognized (by evidence of clostridium difficile after a coprocultive) and satisfactorily treated with vancomycin. From the literature review we found only a similar case but results were absolutely different from our case.

  10. [Ultrasoud screening in abdominal aortic aneurysm--numbers, data, facts].

    PubMed

    Hyhlik-Dürr, A; Debus, S; Eckstein, H-H; Lang, W; Schmitz-Rixen, T; Böckler, D; Boeckler, D

    2010-10-01

    There are increasing numbers of elective surgeries not only for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair but also for emergencies because of ruptured aneurysms (rAAA). Mortality rates of rAAA up to 40-50% have remained unchanged for years. Because of the elevated incidence of complications in rAAA, the overall mortality is at least 80% and shows a dismal prognosis for this group of patients. With ultrasonography, a cost-efficient, technically simple and safe method with high sensitivity is available for detecting abdominal aortic aneurysms. On the basis on an electronic Medline literature search and evaluation of data from the "voluntary quality assurance for abdominal aortic aneurysms 2008" of the German Society of Vascular Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gefäßchirurgie und Gefäßmedizin DGG), this review presents critical analysis of the efficacy and cost-efficiency of an ultrasound-based screening programme for the early detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms. In this systematic review of the literature on AAA screening, a description of epidemiology and current situation concerning AAA in Germany will be given. The evaluation of 4 randomised studies for ultrasonic AAA screening is discussed and the recommendations of the German Society of Vascular Surgery concerning screening for AAA are highlighted. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart ˙ New York.

  11. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  12. Transcatheter wiring of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, P.; Simonetti, G.; Passariello, R.; Stipa, S.; Cavallaro, A.

    1983-04-01

    A new technique of transcatheder wiring of unresectable aortic aneurysm is described that provides simultaneous transcatheder occlusion of both common iliac arteries followed by exillofemoral bypass. The spring coil used for aortic aneurysm wiring was of our own making. The outer portion of a movable core stainless steel guidewire was bent in a coil shape and introduced into the aneurysm through a 7 French Teflon catheder via the right femoral artery. The same catheder was also used for coil embolus occlusion of both iliac arteries.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms. [Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.K.T.; Ling, D.; Heiken, J.P.; Glazer, H.S.; Sicard, G.A.; Totty, W.G.; Levitt, R.G.; Murphy, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 20 patients with radiologically or surgically proven abdominal aortic aneurysms using a Siemens Magnetom scanner with a 0.35-T superconductive magnet. Of nine patients who underwent surgical repair, MRI correctly demonstrated the origin of the aortic aneurysm in nine and accurately determined the status of the iliac arteries in eight. Of 11 patients who did not have surgical repair, MRI findings correlated well with other radiologic studies. MRI was found to be more reliable than sonography in determining the relation between the aneurysm and the renal arteries as well as the status of the iliac arteries. Despite these advantages, the authors still advocate sonography as the screening procedure of choice in patients with suspected abdominal aortic aneurysms because of its lower cost and ease of performance. MRI should be reserved for patients who have had unsuccessful or equivocal sonographic examinations.

  14. [The computed tomographic diagnosis of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Koch, J A; Grützner, G; Jungblut, R M; Kniemeyer, H W; Mödder, U

    1994-07-01

    Amongst 1599 patients undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm, there were 89 patients (5.6%) who showed typical features of inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA). 37 of the 89 patients had been examined preoperatively by CT. In 73% of the cases (27/37) a correct diagnosis had been made. Localisation, width and extent of the IAAA was correctly diagnosed in all patients. Involvement of the renal arteries by the inflammatory process, the extent of thrombus and of mural calcification were accurately shown. The inflammatory tissues were typically ventral and lateral to the aorta. Frequently, there were adhesions to neighbouring structures. Aortic rupture, aortic dissection and retroperitoneal lymphoma may produce similar CT appearances; nevertheless, CT remains at present the method of choice for the diagnosis of IAAA because of its high sensitivity.

  15. Surgical repair of middle aortic syndrome in a three-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Ayik, Fatih; Engin, Cagatay; Ertugay, Serkan; Atay, Yüksel

    2011-11-01

    Middle aortic syndrome is a rare variation of aortic coarctation that is localized to the distal thoracic and abdominal aorta, and can involve the visceral and renal arteries. Irreversible organ damage and end-stage congestive heart failure may be the possible harmful complications of this disease in untreated patients. We report a three-year-old patient with diffuse thoracic and abdominal aorta hypoplasia treated with a thoracic to abdominal aortic bypass graft. 

  16. Mortality outcomes of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms and rural presentation.

    PubMed

    Munday, Emily; Walker, Stuart

    2016-10-01

    Centralisation of vascular surgery services has coincided with a move towards endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms with the goal to improve patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of rural presentation and transfer times on survival from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. A retrospective review. All patients presenting with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to public hospitals in Tasmania between July 2006 and April 2013. Demographic data, Glasgow aneurysm score, Hardman index, transfer times, operative technique and 30-day mortality were collected from medical records. Over the study period 127 patients presented to public hospitals in Tasmania with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. A total of 27 presented to north west hospitals where no vascular surgery service is provided (NWRH), 23 to a northern hospital where an intermittent vascular surgery service is provided (LGH) and 77 to the state tertiary vascular surgery service (RHH). Of these, 4 (14.8%) died at NWRH, 6 (26.1%) died at LGH and 43 (55.8%) died at RHH without operation. Of the 35 patients transferred from NWRH and LGH to RHH, 5 died without operation. Median time from presentation to theatre at RHH if transferred from NWRH was 6.25 hours, from the LGH 4.75 hours, compared to 2.75 hours when presenting directly to RHH. Open repair was performed in 41 patients and endovascular repair in 23 patients. Overall 30-day mortality in those treated at RHH was 26.6% (39.0% for open repair, 4.3% for endovascular repair). Mortality for intended operative patients initially presenting to non-RHH hospitals was 33.3% vs. 32.3% for those initially presenting to RHH. p Value 0.93. There was no clinical or statistical disadvantage to rural presentation and transfer for patients presenting with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in Tasmania. Endovascular repair has a role despite long transfer times. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Association between osteopontin and human abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Muller, Juanita; Shephard, Neil; Clancy, Paula; Smallwood, Linda; Moran, Corey; Dear, Anthony E; Palmer, Lyle J; Norman, Paul E

    2007-03-01

    In vitro and animal studies have implicated osteopontin (OPN) in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysm. The relationship between serum concentration of OPN and variants of the OPN gene with human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was investigated. OPN genotypes were examined in 4227 subjects in which aortic diameter and clinical risk factors were measured. Serum OPN was measured by ELISA in two cohorts of 665 subjects. The concentration of serum OPN was independently associated with the presence of AAA. Odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) for upper compared with lower OPN tertiles in predicting presence of AAA were 2.23 (1.29 to 3.85, P=0.004) for the population cohort and 4.08 (1.67 to 10.00, P=0.002) for the referral cohort after adjusting for other risk factors. In 198 patients with complete follow-up of aortic diameter at 3 years, initial serum OPN predicted AAA growth after adjustment for other risk factors (standardized coefficient 0.24, P=0.001). The concentration of OPN in the aortic wall was greater in patients with small AAAs (30 to 50 mm) than those with aortic occlusive disease alone. There was no association between five single nucleotide polymorphisms or haplotypes of the OPN gene and aortic diameter or AAA expansion. Serum and tissue concentrations of OPN are associated with human AAA. We found no relationship between variation of the OPN gene and AAA. OPN may be a useful biomarker for AAA presence and growth.

  18. Late diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysms substantiates underutilization of abdominal aortic aneurysm screening for Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Mell, Matthew W; Hlatky, Mark A; Shreibati, Jacqueline B; Dalman, Ronald L; Baker, Laurence C

    2013-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening remains largely underutilized in the U.S., and it is likely that the proportion of patients with aneurysms requiring prompt treatment is much higher compared with well-screened populations. The goals of this study were to determine the proportion of AAAs that required prompt repair after diagnostic abdominal imaging for U.S. Medicare beneficiaries and to identify patient and hospital factors contributing to early vs late diagnosis of AAA. Data were extracted from Medicare claims records for patients at least 65 years old with complete coverage for 2 years who underwent intact AAA repair from 2006 to 2009. Preoperative ultrasound and computed tomography was tabulated from 2002 to repair. We defined early diagnosis of AAA as a patient with a time interval of greater than 6 months between the first imaging examination and the index procedure, and late diagnosis as patients who underwent the index procedure within 6 months of the first imaging examination. Of 17,626 patients who underwent AAA repair, 14,948 met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 77.5 ± 6.1 years. Early diagnosis was identified for 60.6% of patients receiving AAA repair, whereas 39.4% were repaired after a late diagnosis. Early diagnosis rates increased from 2006 to 2009 (59.8% to 63.4%; P < .0001) and were more common for intact repair compared with repair after rupture (62.9% vs 35.1%; P < .0001) and for women compared with men (66.3% vs 59.0%; P < .0001). On multivariate analysis, repair of intact vs ruptured AAAs (odds ratio, 3.1; 95% confidence interval, 2.7-3.6) and female sex (odds ratio, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-1.5) remained the strongest predictors of surveillance. Although intact repairs were more likely to be diagnosed early, over one-third of patients undergoing repair for ruptured AAAs received diagnostic abdominal imaging greater than 6 months prior to surgery. Despite advances in screening practices, significant missed opportunities

  19. Mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in experimental rodent abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Indranil; Sinha-Hikim, Amiya P; Hannawa, Kevin K; Henke, Peter K; Eagleton, Matthew J; Stanley, James C; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-10-01

    While extrinsic mechanisms of apoptosis in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are recognized, this project hypothesizes that an intrinsic, mitochondrial-dependent, mechanism of apoptosis also contributes to experimental AAA formation. Rat aortas were perfused with either saline or elastase (N = 5 per group) and harvested 7 days postperfusion. The aortas were placed in gluteraldehyde for subsequent transmission electron microscopy, Bouin's solution for TUNEL, or paraformaldehyde for immunohistochemical staining for caspase-9, caspase-3, and Bid. Abdominal aortic diameters increased 168 +/- 25% (mean +/- SEM) after elastase perfusion. compared with 30 +/- 5% after saline perfusion (P < .001). Apoptosis of aortic smooth muscle cells, macrophages, and neutrophils was evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL in the elastase-perfused aneurysmal aortas. Quantitative analysis of the apoptotic cells revealed a significant (P < .01) increase in the number of total apoptotic cells in the elastase-perfused aortas (12 +/- 3 cells per high-power field), compared with that of saline-infused controls (1.3 +/- 0.2). Caspase-9, the key initiator in the mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway, stained positively in only elastase-perfused aortas. Bid staining was not detected in either the elastase-perfused aortas or the saline controls. Apoptosis is evident in multiple cell lines in elastase-perfused aneurysmal aortas, but rarely observed in control aortas. Caspase-9, the key initiator of intrinsic apoptosis, was documented only in elastase-perfused aortas. These results suggest that mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis is associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

  20. De Novo Migraine With Aura After Surgical Repair of Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuji; Hayashi, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Masuoka, Ayumu; Abe, Tetsuya; Hasebe, Takahiro; Tanahashi, Norio; Takao, Masaki

    2017-05-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is reported to be associated with an increased risk for migraine. We describe here the case of a 13-year-old female patient who presented migraine with aura after surgical repair of CoA with a stent. As possible reasons for her condition, we postulate host responses to stent placement and/or disturbed cerebral autoregulation related to intracranial hypertension before the surgical repair and hypotension afterward, leading to hypoperfusion. This case demonstrates that de novo migraine with aura can occur after surgical repair of CoA and should be recognized as a potential complication. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  1. Noninvasive 4D pressure difference mapping derived from 4D flow MRI in patients with repaired aortic coarctation: comparison with young healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rengier, Fabian; Delles, Michael; Eichhorn, Joachim; Azad, Yoo-Jin; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Ley, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    To assess spatial and temporal pressure characteristics in patients with repaired aortic coarctation compared to young healthy volunteers using time-resolved velocity-encoded three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (4D flow MRI) and derived 4D pressure difference maps. After in vitro validation against invasive catheterization as gold standard, 4D flow MRI of the thoracic aorta was performed at 1.5T in 13 consecutive patients after aortic coarctation repair without recoarctation and 13 healthy volunteers. Using in-house developed processing software, 4D pressure difference maps were computed based on the Navier-Stokes equation. Pressure difference amplitudes, maximum slope of pressure amplitudes and spatial pressure range at mid systole were retrospectively measured by three readers, and twice by one reader to assess inter- and intraobserver agreement. In vitro, pressure differences derived from 4D flow MRI showed excellent agreement to invasive catheter measurements. In vivo, pressure difference amplitudes, maximum slope of pressure difference amplitudes and spatial pressure range at mid systole were significantly increased in patients compared to volunteers in the aortic arch, the proximal descending and the distal descending thoracic aorta (p < 0.05). Greatest differences occurred in the proximal descending aorta with values of the three parameters for patients versus volunteers being 19.7 ± 7.5 versus 10.0 ± 2.0 (p < 0.001), 10.9 ± 10.4 versus 1.9 ± 0.4 (p = 0.002), and 8.7 ± 6.3 versus 1.6 ± 0.9 (p < 0.001). Inter- and intraobserver agreements were excellent (p < 0.001). Noninvasive 4D pressure difference mapping derived from 4D flow MRI enables detection of altered intraluminal aortic pressures and showed significant spatial and temporal changes in patients with repaired aortic coarctation.

  2. Endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm followed by type B dissection.

    PubMed

    Shingaki, Masami; Kato, Masaaki; Motoki, Manabu; Kubo, Yoji; Isaji, Toshihiko; Okubo, Nobukazu

    2016-10-01

    An 86-year-old man with an abdominal aortic aneurysm was diagnosed with type B aortic dissection accompanied by a patent false lumen that started at the distal arch of the thoracic aorta and terminated at the left common iliac artery. Meticulous preoperative assessment detected 3 large intimal tears in the descending aorta, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and left common iliac artery. We performed single-stage thoracic and abdominal endovascular aneurysm repair and concomitant axillary-axillary bypass. The abdominal aortic aneurysm with type B aortic dissection was successfully treated using a single-stage endovascular stent graft, without any complications due to the careful preoperative examinations.

  3. Age at detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms in siblings of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Linné, Anneli; Forsberg, Johan; Lindström, David; Ideskog, Ester; Hultgren, Rebecka

    2016-04-01

    Few countries offer organized screening of siblings of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), although a hereditary trait is well known to exist. Male relatives, but not female, are invited within the population-based screening programs for elderly men in Sweden. Evidence regarding the optimal age to screen siblings is scarce. The aim of this study was to describe the age at detection in siblings found with AAAs. All patients treated for AAAs in two Swedish counties were screened for siblings. Consenting siblings aged 80 and younger were examined (N = 529) with ultrasound and were interviewed per protocol. In the cohort of 529 siblings to AAA patients, 53 siblings were diagnosed with AAAs (sisters 16/276 [5.8%] and brothers 37/253 [14.6%]). The prevalence of AAAs in the siblings 65 years of age or younger was 16/207 (7.7%). One-third of the siblings found with AAAs were young (16/53 [30%]). Among the young siblings with AAAs, 8/16 (50%) had an aneurysm larger than 50 mm or were already surgically treated. The prevalence of AAAs in siblings older than 65 years of age was 37/322 (12%). The AAA prevalence in this sibling cohort is strikingly high compared to the prevalence in the population (in Sweden, 1.4%-2.2% in 65-year-old men). The young ages among diagnosed siblings reinforce that male siblings of AAA patients should be screened before age 65 (before the population-based program) and that structured programs for female siblings are called for. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Abdominal aortic thrombosis in association with an attempted Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Roehm, E F; Twiest, M W; Williams, R C

    1983-03-04

    We report herein a case of an incorrectly applied Heimlich maneuver--to the best of our knowledge, the first reported fatal complication associated with a Heimlich maneuver, acute thrombosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, and the distal aorta. While the Heimlich maneuver is effective for the relief of foreign body-induced upper airway obstruction, increased efforts should be directed toward instructing the public in correctly recognizing and optimally treating airway obstruction.

  5. Influence of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Shape on Hemodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-19

    simulation was performed on two patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms ( AAA ) using physiologically realistic flow conditions. The patients have... AAA with diameters of approximately 5 and 7 cm, respectively. The blood flow hemodynamics are shown to consist of large-scale periodic structures and...been reached and turbulence persists in the AAA after the bulk flow decelerates to a laminar condition. For both cases, a jet of blood forms at the AAA

  6. Stent-Grafts for Unruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, John

    2006-06-15

    Aortic stent-grafts were introduced at the beginning of the 1990s as a less invasive method of dealing with aortic aneurysms in patients with poor cardiovascular reserve. The numbers of procedures performed worldwide has increased exponentially despite the current lack of any substantial evidence for long-term efficacy in comparison with the gold standard of open surgical grafting. This review summarizes the evolution of the abdominal aortic stent-graft, the techniques used for assessment and deployment, and the effect of the procedure on both the patient and the device. The recent publication of two national multicenter trials has confirmed that the endovascular technique confers a 2.5-fold reduction in 30-day mortality in comparison with open surgery. However, over 4 years of follow-up, there is a 3-fold increase in the risk of reintervention and the overall costs are 30% greater with endovascular repair. Although the improvement in aneurysm-related mortality persists in the mid-term, because of the initial reduction in perioperative mortality, the all-cause mortality rate at 4 years is actually no better than for open surgery. Longer-term data from the randomized trials are awaited as well as results from the latest trials utilizing state-of-the-art devices. Whilst the overall management of abdominal aortic aneurysms has undoubtedly benefited from the introduction of stent-grafts, open repair currently remains the gold standard treatment.

  7. Endovascular Stent-Graft Repair as a Late Secondary Procedure After Previous Aortic Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Matsagas, Miltiadis I. Anagnostopoulos, Constantine E.; Papakostas, John C.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Siminelakis, Stavros; Katsouras, Christos S.; Toumpoulis, Ioannis K.; Drossos, George E.; Michalis, Lampros K.

    2006-08-15

    Thoracic and abdominal aortic endovascular procedures as alternatives to aortic reoperations were studied in three different cases. An anastomotic aneurysm after previous thoracic aortic graft for coarctation, a second-stage elephant trunk repair (descending thoracic aortic aneurysm), and a secondary aneurysm proximal to a previous abdominal aortic graft were successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts. During the follow-up period no lethal events or major aortic or graft-related complications were observed, except a type II endoleak in the anastomotic aortic aneurysm case. An endovascular stent-graft can be safely deployed into a previously implanted vascular graft, avoiding repeat surgery.

  8. Aortic coarctation and carotid artery aneurysm in a patient with Hardikar syndrome: Cardiovascular implications for affected individuals.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Kaitlin M; Ellis, Alexander R; Raafat, Reem; Bhoj, Elizabeth J; Hakonarson, Hakon; Li, Dong; Schrier Vergano, Samantha

    2016-02-01

    Hardikar syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome first characterized in 1992 by Hardikar et al. to describe two individuals with cholestasis, cleft lip/palate, retinal pigmentation, intestinal abnormalities, and genitourinary anomalies. Between 1992 and 2002, four individuals with Hardikar syndrome were reported in the literature. The fourth individual [Maluf et al. (2002), Transplantation 74:1058-1061; Poley and Proud (2008) Am J Med Genet Part A 146A:2473-2479], who had progressive cholestatic liver disease ultimately requiring liver transplantation, has continued to be followed at our institution. Recently, at the age of 14 years, during an evaluation for refractory hypertension, she was found to have developed coarctation of the aorta that was treated with aortic angioplasty and stenting, dramatically improving her hypertension. Further vascular investigation also revealed a small aneurysm of her carotid artery requiring neurosurgical evaluation and anticoagulant therapy. To our knowledge, these vascular anomalies have not been reported in Hardikar syndrome and the high association of congenital heart disease in the individuals with Hardikar syndrome has not been further addressed. Herein, we discuss this additional clinical information, speculate briefly on possible molecular etiologies, and discuss potential cardiac surveillance recommendations. We hope that broadening the known phenotype of this very rare disorder will further aid clinicians in their management and surveillance for these individuals.

  9. 3D image analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, Marko; Loncaric, Sven; Sorantin, Erich

    2001-07-01

    In this paper we propose a technique for 3-D segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) from computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Output data (3-D model) form the proposed method can be used for measurement of aortic shape and dimensions. Knowledge of aortic shape and size is very important in planning of minimally invasive procedure that is for selection of appropriate stent graft device for treatment of AAA. The technique is based on a 3-D deformable model and utilizes the level-set algorithm for implementation of the method. The method performs 3-D segmentation of CTA images and extracts a 3-D model of aortic wall. Once the 3-D model of aortic wall is available it is easy to perform all required measurements for appropriate stent graft selection. The method proposed in this paper uses the level-set algorithm for deformable models, instead of the classical snake algorithm. The main advantage of the level set algorithm is that it enables easy segmentation of complex structures, surpassing most of the drawbacks of the classical approach. We have extended the deformable model to incorporate the a priori knowledge about the shape of the AAA. This helps direct the evolution of the deformable model to correctly segment the aorta. The algorithm has been implemented in IDL and C languages. Experiments have been performed using real patient CTA images and have shown good results.

  10. Intraoperative Sac Pressure Measurement During Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ohta, Takashi; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Iwata, Hirohide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tadakoshi, Masao; Hida, Noriyuki; Orimoto, Yuki; Kamei, Seiji

    2010-10-15

    PurposeIntraoperative sac pressure was measured during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) to evaluate the clinical significance of sac pressure measurement.MethodsA microcatheter was placed in an aneurysm sac from the contralateral femoral artery, and sac pressure was measured during EVAR procedures in 47 patients. Aortic blood pressure was measured as a control by a catheter from the left brachial artery.ResultsThe systolic sac pressure index (SPI) was 0.87 {+-} 0.10 after main-body deployment, 0.63 {+-} 0.12 after leg deployment (P < 0.01), and 0.56 {+-} 0.12 after completion of the procedure (P < 0.01). Pulse pressure was 55 {+-} 21 mmHg, 23 {+-} 15 mmHg (P < 0.01), and 16 {+-} 12 mmHg (P < 0.01), respectively. SPI showed no significant differences between the Zenith and Excluder stent grafts (0.56 {+-} 0.13 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.10, NS). Type I endoleak was found in seven patients (15%), and the SPI decreased from 0.62 {+-} 0.10 to 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (P = 0.10) after fixing procedures. Type II endoleak was found in 12 patients (26%) by completion angiography. The SPI showed no difference between type II endoleak positive and negative (0.58 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.55 {+-} 0.12, NS). There were no significant differences between the final SPI of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter decreased in the follow-up and that of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter did not change (0.53 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.57 {+-} 0.12, NS).ConclusionsSac pressure measurement was useful for instant hemodynamic evaluation of the EVAR procedure, especially in type I endoleaks. However, on the basis of this small study, the SPI cannot be used to reliably predict sac growth or regression.

  11. Endovascular Repair of an Anastomotic Leak Following Open Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Flett, M.; Milne, A.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of an early postoperative anastomotic leak following elective open repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm which was successfully treated by endovascular stent-grafting. A 71-year-old man underwent open tube graft repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Twelve days later he presented with a contained leak from the distal anastomosis, which was confirmed on CT scan. This was successfully treated with a bifurcated aortic stent-graft. This case illustrates the usefulness of the endovascular approach for resolving this rare surgical complication of open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and the challenges associated with the deployment of such a device within an aortic tube graft.

  12. Improving the Efficiency of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall Stress Computations

    PubMed Central

    Zelaya, Jaime E.; Goenezen, Sevan; Dargon, Phong T.; Azarbal, Amir-Farzin; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a pathological dilation of the abdominal aorta, which carries a high mortality rate if ruptured. The most commonly used surrogate marker of rupture risk is the maximal transverse diameter of the aneurysm. More recent studies suggest that wall stress from models of patient-specific aneurysm geometries extracted, for instance, from computed tomography images may be a more accurate predictor of rupture risk and an important factor in AAA size progression. However, quantification of wall stress is typically computationally intensive and time-consuming, mainly due to the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the abdominal aortic aneurysm walls. These difficulties have limited the potential of computational models in clinical practice. To facilitate computation of wall stresses, we propose to use a linear approach that ensures equilibrium of wall stresses in the aneurysms. This proposed linear model approach is easy to implement and eliminates the burden of nonlinear computations. To assess the accuracy of our proposed approach to compute wall stresses, results from idealized and patient-specific model simulations were compared to those obtained using conventional approaches and to those of a hypothetical, reference abdominal aortic aneurysm model. For the reference model, wall mechanical properties and the initial unloaded and unstressed configuration were assumed to be known, and the resulting wall stresses were used as reference for comparison. Our proposed linear approach accurately approximates wall stresses for varying model geometries and wall material properties. Our findings suggest that the proposed linear approach could be used as an effective, efficient, easy-to-use clinical tool to estimate patient-specific wall stresses. PMID:25007052

  13. Improving the efficiency of abdominal aortic aneurysm wall stress computations.

    PubMed

    Zelaya, Jaime E; Goenezen, Sevan; Dargon, Phong T; Azarbal, Amir-Farzin; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a pathological dilation of the abdominal aorta, which carries a high mortality rate if ruptured. The most commonly used surrogate marker of rupture risk is the maximal transverse diameter of the aneurysm. More recent studies suggest that wall stress from models of patient-specific aneurysm geometries extracted, for instance, from computed tomography images may be a more accurate predictor of rupture risk and an important factor in AAA size progression. However, quantification of wall stress is typically computationally intensive and time-consuming, mainly due to the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the abdominal aortic aneurysm walls. These difficulties have limited the potential of computational models in clinical practice. To facilitate computation of wall stresses, we propose to use a linear approach that ensures equilibrium of wall stresses in the aneurysms. This proposed linear model approach is easy to implement and eliminates the burden of nonlinear computations. To assess the accuracy of our proposed approach to compute wall stresses, results from idealized and patient-specific model simulations were compared to those obtained using conventional approaches and to those of a hypothetical, reference abdominal aortic aneurysm model. For the reference model, wall mechanical properties and the initial unloaded and unstressed configuration were assumed to be known, and the resulting wall stresses were used as reference for comparison. Our proposed linear approach accurately approximates wall stresses for varying model geometries and wall material properties. Our findings suggest that the proposed linear approach could be used as an effective, efficient, easy-to-use clinical tool to estimate patient-specific wall stresses.

  14. [Acute and chronic aortic diseases of the thoracic and abdominal aorta of the adult - 2014 AS SMC Guidelines on the classification and diagnosis of aortic diseases].

    PubMed

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, Ľudovít

    2015-01-01

    In addition to organovascular arterial ischemic diseases (cardiovascular, vasculovascular, neurovascular, extre-mitovascular, renovascular, genitovascular, bronchopulmovascular, mesenteriovascular, osteoarthromusculovascular, dermovascular, oculovascular, otovascular, stomatovascular etc.), aortic diseases contribute to the wide spectrum of arterial diseases: aortic aneurysms (AA), acute aortic syndromes (AAS) including aortic dissection (AD), intramural haematoma (IMH), penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) and traumatic aortic injury (TAI), pseudoaneurysm, aortic rupture, atherosclerosis, vasculitis as well as genetic diseases (e.g. Turner syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) and congenital abnormalities including the coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Similarly to other arterial diseases, aortic diseases may be diagnosed after a long period of subclinical development or they may have an acute presentation. Acute aortic syndrome is often the first sign of the disease, which needs rapid diagnosis and decisionmaking to reduce the extremely poor prognosis. Key clinical-etiology-anatomy-patophysiology (CEAP) diagnostic aspects of aortic diseases are discussed in this document (project Vessels).

  15. Genetic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

    SciTech Connect

    St. Jean, P.L.; Hart, B.K.; Zhang, X.C.

    1994-09-01

    The association between AAA and gender, smoking (SM), hypertension (HTN) and inguinal herniation (IH) was examined in 141 AAA probands and 139 of their 1st degree relatives with aortic exam (36 affected, 103 unaffected). There was no significant difference between age at diagnosis of affecteds and age at exam of unaffecteds. Of 181 males, 142 had AAA; of 99 females, 35 had AAA. Using log-linear modeling AAA was significantly associated at the 5% level with gender, SM and HTN but not IH. The association of AAA with SM and HTN held when males and females were analyzed separately. HTN was -1.5 times more common in both affected males and females, while SM was 1.5 and 2 times more common in affected males and females, respectively. Tests of association and linkage analyses were performed with relevant candidate genes: 3 COL3A1 polymorphisms (C/T, ALA/THR, AvaII), 2 ELN polymorphisms (SER/GLY, (CA)n), FBN1(TAAA)n, 2 APOB polymorphisms (Xbal,Ins/Del), CLB4B (CA)n, PI and markers D1S243 (CA)n, HPR (CA)n and MFD23(CA)n. The loci were genotyped in > 100 AAA probands and > 95 normal controls. No statistically significant evidence of association at the 5% level was obtained for any of the loci using chi-square test of association. 28 families with 2 or more affecteds were analyzed using the affected pedigree member method (APM) and lod-score analyses. There was no evidence for linkage with any loci using APM. Lod-score analysis under an autosomal recessive model resulted in excluding linkage (lod score < -2) of all loci to AAA at {theta}=0.0. Under an autosomal dominant model, linkage was excluded at {theta}=0.0 to ELN, APOB, CLG4B, D1S243, HPR and MFD23. The various genes previously proposed in AAA pathogenesis are neither associated nor casually related in our study population.

  16. Thrombus Volume Change Visualization after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiora, Josu; García, Guillermo; Macía, Iván; Legarreta, Jon Haitz; Boto, Fernando; Paloc, Céline; Graña, Manuel; Abuín, Javier Sanchez

    A surgical technique currently used in the treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) is the Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR). This minimally invasive procedure involves inserting a prosthesis in the aortic vessel that excludes the aneurysm from the bloodstream. The stent, once in place acts as a false lumen for the blood current to travel down, and not into the surrounding aneurysm sac. This procedure, therefore, immediately takes the pressure off the aneurysm, which thromboses itself after some time. Nevertheless, in a long term perspective, different complications such as prosthesis displacement or bloodstream leaks into or from the aneurysmatic bulge (endoleaks) could appear causing a pressure elevation and, as a result, increasing the danger of rupture. The purpose of this work is to explore the application of image registration techniques to the visual detection of changes in the thrombus in order to assess the evolution of the aneurysm. Prior to registration, both the lumen and the thrombus are segmented

  17. Pregnancy in women with corrected aortic coarctation: Uteroplacental Doppler flow and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Anne S; Kampman, Marlies A M; Bilardo, Caterina M; Balci, Ali; van Dijk, Arie P J; Oudijk, Martijn A; Mulder, Barbara J M; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Koenen, Steven V; Sollie-Szarynska, Krystyna M; Ebels, Tjark; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Pieper, Petronella G

    2017-09-22

    Women with repaired coarctation of the aorta (rCoA) are at risk of hypertensive disorders and other complications during pregnancy. Hypertensive disorders in pregnant women are associated with inadequate uteroplacental flow, which is related to adverse offspring outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of maternal cardiac function, placental function and pregnancy complications in women with rCoA. We included 49 pregnant women with rCoA and 69 controls from the prospective ZAHARA-studies (Zwangerschap bij Aangeboren HARtAfwijkingen, pregnancy in congenital heart disease). Clinical evaluation, echocardiography and uteroplacental Doppler flow (UDF) measurements were performed at 20 and 32weeks gestation. Univariable regression analysis was performed. Comparison of rCoA and healthy women. In women with rCoA, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) decreased during pregnancy (25.7mm to 22.8mm, P=0.006). UDF indices and pregnancy complication rates were similar in both groups. Offspring of rCoA women had lower birth weight (3233g versus 3578g, P=0.001), which was associated with β-blocker use during pregnancy (β=-418.0, P=0.01). Association of cardiac function and UDF. Right ventricular (RV) function before pregnancy (TAPSE) and at 20weeks gestation (TAPSE and RV fractional area change) were associated with impaired UDF indices (umbilical artery pulsatility index at 20weeks β=-0.02, P=0.01, resistance index at 20 and 32weeks β=-0.01, P=0.02 and β=-0.02, P=0.01 and uterine artery pulsatility and resistance index at 20weeks gestation β=-0.02, P=0.05 and β=-0.01, P=0.02). Women with rCoA tolerate pregnancy well. However, RV function is altered and is associated with impaired placentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Altered hemodynamics, endothelial function, and protein expression occur with aortic coarctation and persist after repair

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Arjun; Eddinger, Thomas J.; Wang, Hongfeng; Wendell, David C.; Toth, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is associated with substantial morbidity despite treatment. Mechanically induced structural and functional vascular changes are implicated; however, their relationship with smooth muscle (SM) phenotypic expression is not fully understood. Using a clinically representative rabbit model of CoA and correction, we quantified mechanical alterations from a 20-mmHg blood pressure (BP) gradient in the thoracic aorta and related the expression of key SM contractile and focal adhesion proteins with remodeling, relaxation, and stiffness. Systolic and mean BP were elevated for CoA rabbits compared with controls leading to remodeling, stiffening, an altered force response, and endothelial dysfunction both proximally and distally. The proximal changes persisted for corrected rabbits despite >12 wk of normal BP (∼4 human years). Computational fluid dynamic simulations revealed reduced wall shear stress (WSS) proximally in CoA compared with control and corrected rabbits. Distally, WSS was markedly increased in CoA rabbits due to a stenotic velocity jet, which has persistent effects as WSS was significantly reduced in corrected rabbits. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly increased nonmuscle myosin and reduced SM myosin heavy chain expression in the proximal arteries of CoA and corrected rabbits but no differences in SM α-actin, talin, or fibronectin. These findings indicate that CoA can cause alterations in the SM phenotype contributing to structural and functional changes in the proximal arteries that accompany the mechanical stimuli of elevated BP and altered WSS. Importantly, these changes are not reversed upon BP correction and may serve as markers of disease severity, which explains the persistent morbidity observed in CoA patients. PMID:23023871

  19. Impact of Hospital Volume on Outcomes of Endovascular Stenting for Adult Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Parth; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Achint; Sonani, Rajesh; Patel, Aashay; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Thakkar, Badal; Savani, Chirag; Jhamnani, Sunny; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nish; Pant, Sadip; Patel, Samir; Arora, Shilpkumar; Dave, Abhishek; Singh, Vikas; Chothani, Ankit; Patel, Jay; Ansari, Mohammad; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Bhimani, Ronak; Grines, Cindy; Cleman, Michael; Mangi, Abeel; Forrest, John K; Badheka, Apurva O

    2015-11-01

    Use of transcatheter endovascular stenting has been increasing in the treatment of coarctation of aorta (CoA). The present study was undertaken on adults with CoA who underwent stent placement from 2000 to 2011 to analyze the relation of hospital volumes to the outcomes of stenting in adults with CoA. It was a retrospective study based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2000 to 2011 and identified subjects using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure code of 747.10 (CoA). Annual hospital volume was calculated using unique hospital identifiers. Weights provided by the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were used to generate national estimates. A total of 105 (weighted 521) subjects were identified with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code of 39.90 (Endovascular stent). Hospital volumes were divided into tertiles. We compared the highest tertile (≥3 procedures annually) with other tertiles (<3 procedure annually). The composite outcomes of the analysis were procedure-related complications, length of stay (LOS), and cost in relation to the hospital volume. No inhospital death was reported in either group. Hospitals with ≥3 procedures annually had significantly lower incidence of complications (9.5% vs 23.0%) compared to the hospitals with <3 procedures annually (p-value 0.002). Similar results were obtained after multivariate regression analysis in relation to hospital volume. Shorter LOS and lower cost were observed with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. In conclusion, stenting adults for CoA is remarkably safe, and the outcomes of the procedure have improved in centers with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. There is also decreasing trend of procedure-related complications, shorter LOS, and lower costs compared to centers with annual volume <3 procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm during echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Aboyans, Victor; Bataille, Vincent; Bliscaux, Pascale; Ederhy, Stéphane; Filliol, Didier; Honton, Benjamin; Kurtz, Baptiste; Messas, Emmanuel; Mohty, Dania; Brochet, Eric; Kownator, Serge

    2014-10-01

    Screening patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is associated with reduced AAA-related mortality, but population screening is poorly implemented. Opportunistic screening during imaging for other indications might be efficient. Single-center series reported AAA rates of 0.8% to 6.5% in patients undergoing transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), with disparities due to selection bias. In this first multicenter study, we aimed to assess the feasibility and criteria for screening AAA during TTE in real-life practice. During a week of May 2011, 79 centers participated in a nationwide survey. All patients aged ≥65 years requiring TTE for any indication were eligible, except for those with operated abdominal aorta. We defined AAA by an anteroposterior diameter of the infrarenal aorta≥30 mm. Of 1,382 consecutive patients, abdominal aorta imaging was feasible in 96.7%, with a median delay of 1.7 minutes (>3 minutes in 3.6% of cases). We found AAA in 50 patients (3.7%). Unknown AAA (2.7%) was more frequent in men than women (3.7% vs 1.3%, respectively, p=0.007) and increased by age at 2.2%, 2.5%, and 5.8% in age bands of 65 to 74, 75 to 84, and 85+ years, respectively. None of the female participants aged <75 years had AAA. Smoking status and family history of AAA were significantly more frequent among patients with AAA. The ascending aorta was larger in those with AAA (36.2±4.7 vs 34.0±5.2 mm, p=0.006), and bicuspid aortic valve and/or major aortic regurgitation were also more frequent (8% vs 2.6%, p=0.017). In conclusion, rapid AAA screening during TTE is feasible and should be limited to men ≥65 years and women≥75 years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATIONS DEMONSTRATE ALTERED WALL SHEAR STRESS IN AORTIC COARCTATION PATIENTS TREATED BY RESECTION WITH END-TO-END ANASTOMOSIS

    PubMed Central

    LaDisa, John F.; Dholakia, Ronak J.; Figueroa, C. Alberto; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.; Chan, Frandics P.; Samyn, Margaret M.; Cava, Joseph R.; Taylor, Charles A.; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic plaque in the descending thoracic aorta (dAo) is related to altered wall shear stress (WSS) for normal patients. Resection with end-to-end anastomosis (RWEA) is the gold standard for coarctation of the aorta (CoA) repair, but may lead to altered WSS indices that contribute to morbidity. Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were created from imaging and blood pressure data for control subjects and age- and gender-matched CoA patients treated by RWEA (4 male, 2 female, 15±8 years). CFD analysis incorporated downstream vascular resistance and compliance to generate blood flow velocity, time-averaged WSS (TAWSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) results. These indices were quantified longitudinally and circumferentially in the dAo, and several visualization methods were used to highlight regions of potential hemodynamic susceptibility. Results The total dAo area exposed to subnormal TAWSS and OSI was similar between groups, but several statistically significant local differences were revealed. Control subjects experienced left-handed rotating patterns of TAWSS and OSI down the dAo. TAWSS was elevated in CoA patients near the site of residual narrowings and OSI was elevated distally, particularly along the left dAo wall. Differences in WSS indices between groups were negligible more than 5 dAo diameters distal to the aortic arch. Conclusions Localized differences in WSS indices within the dAo of CoA patients treated by RWEA suggest that plaque may form in unique locations influenced by the surgical repair. These regions can be visualized in familiar and intuitive ways allowing clinicians to track their contribution to morbidity in longitudinal studies. PMID:21801315

  2. Androgen Receptor (AR) Promotes Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Development via Modulating Inflammatory IL1α and TGFβ1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Luo, Jie; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Wang, Ronghao; Pang, Haiyan; Chang, Eugene; Yan, Chen; Sparks, Janet; Lee, Soo Ok; Cho, Joshua; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    Gender difference is a risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurism formation yet the reason for male predominance remains unclear. Androgen and the androgen receptor influence the male gender difference, indicating that androgen receptor signaling may affect abdominal aortic aneurism development. Using angiotensin II induced abdominal aortic aneurism in apolipoprotein E null mouse models (82.4% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence), we found that mice lacking androgen receptor failed to develop abdominal aortic aneurism and aorta had dramatically reduced macrophages infiltration and intact elastic fibers. These findings suggested that androgen receptor expression in endothelial cells, macrophages or smooth muscle cells might play a role in abdominal aortic aneurism development. Selective knockout of androgen receptor in each of these cell types further demonstrated that mice lacking androgen receptor in macrophages (20% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence) or smooth muscle cells (12.5% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence), but not in endothelial cells (71.4% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence) had suppressed abdominal aortic aneurism development. Mechanism dissection showed that androgen receptor functioned through modulation of interleukin 1α and transforming growth factor β1 signals and by targeting androgen receptor with androgen receptor degradation enhancer ASC-J9® led to significant suppression of abdominal aortic aneurism development. These results demonstrate the underlying mechanism by which androgen receptor influences abdominal aortic aneurism development through interleukin 1α and transforming growth factor β1, and provides a potential new therapy to suppress/prevent abdominal aortic aneurism by targeting androgen receptor with ASC-J9®. PMID:26324502

  3. Measuring abdominal aortic aneurysms on digital subtraction arteriograms

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, S.D.; Illescas, F.F.; Fagert, T.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    Digital intravenous subtraction angiography (DISA) has provided an additional method of imaging abdominal aortic aneurysms. DISA has the advantage of depicting an aneurysm in the same projection as standard arteriography but without the risks of arterial puncture and catheterization. With conventional angiography, the more constant focal spot-object-film distances both minimize magnification and reduce the variation among patients of differing size. However, with digital systems, the variations in height of the image intensifier and patient size result in wide differences in magnification. The authors have devised a simple technique to measure the size of aneurysms on digital images.

  4. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Kunihide; Matsuyama, Masakazu; Endou, Jouji; Nishimura, Masanori; Ishii, Hirohito; Yokota, Atsuko; Ikenoue, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed 575 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair performed in our institution from 1979 to 2010. In this group, 7 (1.2%) patients (mean age, 72.6 years) had evidence of inflammatory AAA (IAAA). Mean aneurysmal diameter was 70.4 mm as measured on CT, and the mantle sign was present in all cases. They were male smokers. Two patients had hydronephrosis, and required a ureteral stent before surgery. All patients underwent laparotomy, and no perioperative deaths occured. We suggest that operative technique should be modified to avoid excessive dissection on both the proximal and distal sides of the IAAA.

  5. Unusual complications in an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, K; Hirota, J; Taniyasu, N; Asano, S

    1999-11-01

    An unusual case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) associated with coronary aneurysms and pathological fracture of the adjacent lumbar vertebrae. The associated coronary lesions in cases of IAAA are usually occlusions. In the present case, it was concluded that a possible cause of the coronary aneurysm was coronary arteritis and the etiology of the pathological fracture of the lumbar vertebrae was occlusion of the lumbar penetrating arteries due to vasculitis resulting in aseptic necrosis. Inflammatory AAA can be associated with aneurysms in addition to occlusive disease in systemic arteries. The preoperative evaluation of systemic arterial lesions and the function of systemic organs is essential.

  6. Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Report of Seven Cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed 575 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair performed in our institution from 1979 to 2010. In this group, 7 (1.2%) patients (mean age, 72.6 years) had evidence of inflammatory AAA (IAAA). Mean aneurysmal diameter was 70.4 mm as measured on CT, and the mantle sign was present in all cases. They were male smokers. Two patients had hydronephrosis, and required a ureteral stent before surgery. All patients underwent laparotomy, and no perioperative deaths occured. We suggest that operative technique should be modified to avoid excessive dissection on both the proximal and distal sides of the IAAA. PMID:24386030

  7. Secondary scoliosis after thoracotomy in patients with aortic coarctation and patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Roclawski, Marek; Pankowski, Rafal; Smoczynski, Andrzej; Ceynowa, Marcin; Kloc, Wojciech; Wasilewski, Wojciech; Jende, Piotr; Liczbik, Wieslaw; Beldzinski, Piotr; Libionka, Witold; Pierzak, Olaf; Adamski, Stanislaw; Niedbala, Miroslaw

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of lateral thoracotomy on the development of scoliosis in subjects undergoing repair of coarctation of the aorta (CoAo) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). A group of 133 patients with CoAo and PDA was evaluated. Forty-five patients with CoAo and 38 with PDA were operated on using lateral thoracotomy (operative group) while 12 patients with CoAo and 31 with PDA were treated using balloon dilatation and stent or coil implantation (non-operative group). Clinical examination and the evaluation of spinal roentgenograms were performed. Among the operated patients 46.6% of those with CoAo and 39.5% of those with PDA had clinical scoliosis. In the non-operated patients scoliosis was present in only 16.6% of those with CoAo and 12.9% of those with PDA. Scoliosis ranged between 10° and 42° and it was mild in the majority of cases. In 90.4% of the operated scoliotic patients with CoAo and 73.3% of those with PDA the curve was thoracic and in 47.6% of the CoAo group and 53,3% of the PDA group the curve was left sided. All curves were right sided in non-operated subjects. Scoliosis in the operated group was higher in males than in females (63.3% versus 60% in CoAo and 68.2% versus 37.5% in PDA). The prevalence of scoliosis after thoracotomy was significantly higher than after non-surgical methods of treatment of both CoAo and PDA as well as in the general population. The rate of single thoracic and the rate of left thoracic curves in patients after thoracotomy is higher than in patients treated non-surgically or in idiopathic scoliosis. The rate of scoliosis after thoracotomy is higher in males than females especially following thoracotomy for PDA.

  8. Cutting balloon angioplasty for in-stent restenosis of the aortic coarctation in a young boy presenting with systemic hypertension of the upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Luen

    2013-12-01

    An 8.25-year-old boy was incidentally found to have systemic hypertension of the upper extremities. Blood pressures of the upper extremities were 142-150/86-98 mmHg, and those of the lower extremities 110-116/60-66 mmHg. Doppler echocardiography showed in-stent restenosis of the aortic coarctation. Traditional high-pressure balloon angioplasty failed to dilate this inveterate in-stent restenosis. Instead, a cutting balloon angioplasty was performed. The lumen was dilated from 4.80 mm to 7.89 mm. The pressure gradient dropped from 32 mmHg to 9 mmHg. Blood pressures of the upper extremities were 112-116/76-78 mmHg, and those of the lower extremities 100-104/70-72 mmHg. This paper highlights that a cutting balloon angioplasty can serve as a juste milieu to relieve in-stent restenosis of the aortic coarctation when traditional high-pressure balloon angioplasty is debatable.

  9. Simultaneous repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and resection of unexpected, associated abdominal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Lorusso, Riccardo; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Vietri, Francesco

    2004-12-15

    The management of unexpected intra-abdominal malignancy, discovered at laparotomy for elective treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), is controversial. It is still unclear whether both conditions should be treated simultaneously or a staged approach is to be preferred. To contribute in improving treatment guidelines, we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients undergoing laparotomy for elective AAA repair. From January 1994 to March 2003, 253 patients underwent elective, trans-peritoneal repair of an AAA. In four patients (1.6%), an associated, unexpected neoplasm was detected at abdominal exploration, consisting of one renal, one gastric, one ileal carcinoid, and one ascending colon tumor. All of them were treated at the same operation, after aortic repair and careful isolation of the prosthetic graft. The whole series' operative mortality was 3.6%. None of the patients simultaneously treated for AAA and tumor resection died in the postoperative period. No graft-related infections were observed. Simultaneous treatment of AAA and tumor did not prolong significantly the mean length of stay in the hospital, compared to standard treatment of AAA alone. Except for malignancies of organs requiring major surgical resections, simultaneous AAA repair and resection of an associated, unexpected abdominal neoplasm can be safely performed, in most of the patients, sparing the need for a second procedure. Endovascular grafting of the AAA can be a valuable tool in simplifying simultaneous treatment, or in staging the procedures with a very short delay.

  10. Systemic oxidant/antioxidant balance in human abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Menteşe, Umit; Turan, Ibrahim; Usta, Sefer; Demir, Selim; Koral, Özgür; Öztaş Menteşe, Seda; Çavuşoğlu, Ismail Gökhan; Karahan, Süleyman Caner; Alver, Ahmet; Doğan, Orhan Veli; Aykan, Ahmet Çağrı

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant-antioxidant balance in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Forty-two consecutive patients with AAA and 46 control subjects were included. Total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) levels were measured and the oxidative stress index (OSI) value determined. Serum TOS and OSI values in patients with AAA were higher than those in the controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). There was a positive correlation between abdominal aortic diameters, serum TOS levels (r = 0.592, p < 0.001) and OSI values (r = 0.598, p < 0.001). A cut-off value of 17.68 µmol H₂O₂equivalent/L for TOS was associated with 86% sensitivity and 83% specificity and a cut-off value of 1.77 for OSI was associated with 86% sensitivity and 81% specificity for predicting AAA. Systemic oxidative imbalance develops in patients with AAA, particularly as a result of an increase in TOS. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. An Aortic Tampon for Emergency Control of Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Heimbecker, R. O.

    1964-01-01

    Ruptured abdominal aneurysm has now become a common surgical emergency, frequently amenable to successful resection and cure. The final result is often marred, however, by the effects of renal, coronary or cerebral ischemia resulting from dangerous hypotension during transportation of the patient to a vascular centre. An aortic catheter has been developed which is passed by way of a brachial artery cut-down so that it rests in the abdominal aorta. The balloon at its tip is then filled with sodium diatrizoate (Hypaque) so that it completely obstructs the aortic lumen just above the level of the aneurysm. Accurate positioning of the balloon to carefully preserve renal blood flow is facilitated by fluoroscopic control. The use of this procedure in three patients has been very satisfactory, with a dramatic return of consciousness and of normal blood pressure, without the need for further blood replacement. Subsequent surgery with dissection of the aneurysm was aided by the presence of the palpable inflated balloon. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:14222672

  12. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    Saratzis, Athanasios; Mohamed, Saif

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a relatively common pathology among the elderly. More people above the age of 80 will have to undergo treatment of an AAA in the future. This review aims to summarize the literature focusing on endovascular repair of AAA in the geriatric population. A systematic review of the literature was performed, including results from endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) registries and studies comparing open repair and EVAR in those above the age of 80. A total of 15 studies were identified. EVAR in this population is efficient with a success rate exceeding 90% in all cases, and safe, with early mortality and morbidity being superior among patients undergoing EVAR against open repair. Late survival can be as high as 95% after 5 years. Aneurysm-related death over long-term follow-up was low after EVAR, ranging from 0 to 3.4%. Endovascular repair can be offered safely in the geriatric population and seems to compare favourably with open repair in all studies in the literature to date. PMID:23097659

  13. In vivo strain assessment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Satriano, Alessandro; Rivolo, Simone; Martufi, Giampaolo; Finol, Ender A; Di Martino, Elena S

    2015-01-21

    The only criteria currently used to inform surgical decision for abdominal aortic aneurysms are maximum diameter (>5.5 cm) and rate of growth, even though several studies have identified the need for more specific indicators of risk. Patient-specific biomechanical variables likely to affect rupture risk would be a valuable addition to the science of understanding rupture risk and prove to be a life saving benefit for patients. Local deformability of the aorta is related to the local mechanical properties of the wall and may provide indication on the state of weakening of the wall tissue. We propose a 3D image-based approach to compute aortic wall strain maps in vivo. The method is applicable to a variety of imaging modalities that provide sequential images at different phases in the cardiac cycle. We applied the method to a series of abdominal aneurysms imaged using cine-MRI obtaining strain maps at different phases in the cardiac cycle. These maps could be used to evaluate the distensibility of an aneurysm at baseline and at different follow-up times and provide an additional index to clinicians to facilitate decisions on the best course of action for a specific patient.

  14. Aorfix™ device for abdominal aortic aneurysm with challenging anatomy.

    PubMed

    Sbarzaglia, P; Grattoni, C; Oshoala, K; Castriota, F; D'Alessandro, G; Cremonesi, A

    2014-02-01

    Anatomical characteristics of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are the most critical factors for successful endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). Of these, severe proximal aortic neck angulation and iliac axis tortuosity increase the complexity of EVAR. Neck angulation seems to have a pivotal potential for fixation failure, a situation that may lead to complications, including endoleak and late rupture. Bench-test studies identified that the relative stiffness of a stent-graft was responsible for its inability to conform to neck angulation, therefore creating leaks through gaps between the stent graft and the neck. Aorfix™ stent graft (Lombard Medical, Didcot, UK) is a flexible stent-graft designed and manufactured with the purpose of overcoming the issue of stent-graft stiffness. Many studies have shown good results in term of procedural success and mid-term type-I endoleak. PYTHAGORAS trial evaluated mainly patients with highly angulated infrarenal neck and showed that high performance of Aorfix™ stent graft did not present any significant difference between neck >60° and <60°. In the series of 27 patients treated at our Institution we had a primary technical success of 96.3% and an assisted primary technical success of 100%. In this review we will analyze the available data in literature regarding Aorfix™ stent graft and will discuss the outcome of the patients treated with Aorfix™ stent graft at our centre.

  15. A Contained Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Presenting with Vertebral Erosion.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqi; Li, Lei; Zhang, Dongming; Wang, Xiaomei; Sun, Weidong; Wang, Han

    2017-02-24

    Chronic contained rupture (CCR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with vertebral erosion is a rare condition. Although it has been reported previously, it is still liable to be misdiagnosed. We present a case of CCR of AAA with vertebral erosion. A brief analysis of similar cases reported in the last 5 years is presented. A 71-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of severe prickling pain in his left thigh. Computerized tomography angiography revealed an AAA which had caused erosion of L3 vertebral body and the left psoas muscle. An aortotomy was performed, and the excised aortic aneurysm replaced with a Dacron graft. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) angiography indicated a normal aortic graft. The patient was discharged 13 days after the surgery. In conclusion, pain in lower back and leg could be associated with vertebral erosion caused by CCR of AAA. Ultrasonography, CT, or magnetic resonance imaging of abdomen should be routinely performed in cases of lumbago that have associated risk factors for AAA.

  16. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and histological, clinical, radiological correlation.

    PubMed

    Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita; Bonomini, Francesca; Peroni, Michele; Cocchi, Marco Angelo; Hirtler, Lena; Bonardelli, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    To date, the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) still remains unclear. As such, the aim of this study was to evaluate changes of the aortic structure during AAA. We analysed the microscopic frame of vessels sections, starting from the primum movens leading to abnormal dilatation. AAA samples were collected and processed through various staining methods (Verhoeff-Van Gieson, Masson Goldner, Sirius Red). Subsequently, the vessel morphology and collagenic web of the tunica media and adventitia were determined and the amount of type I and type III collagen was measured. We also applied immune-histochemistry markers for CD34 and PGP 9.5 in order to identify vascular and nerve structures in the aorta. Immune-positivity quantification was used to calculate the percentage of the stained area. We found increasing deposition of type I collagen and reduced type III collagen in both tunica media and adventitia of AAA. The total amount of vasa vasorum, marked with CD34, and nerva vasorum, marked with PGP 9.5, was also higher in AAA samples. Cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, dyslipidemia, cigarette smoking) and radiological data (maximum aneurism diameter, intra-luminal thrombus, aortic wall calcification) increased these changes. These results suggest that the tunica adventitia may have a central role in the pathogenesis of AAA as clearly there are major changes characterized by rooted inflammatory infiltration. The presence of immune components could explain these modifications within the framework of the aorta.

  17. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm as a result of an initial preventive physical examination (as... for an abdominal aortic aneurysm under Medicare program; and (3) Is included in at least one of...

  18. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm as a result of an initial preventive physical examination (as... for an abdominal aortic aneurysm under Medicare program; and (3) Is included in at least one of...

  19. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm as a result of an initial preventive physical examination (as... for an abdominal aortic aneurysm under Medicare program; and (3) Is included in at least one of...

  20. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm as a result of an initial preventive physical examination (as... for an abdominal aortic aneurysm under Medicare program; and (3) Is included in at least one of...

  1. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... ultrasound screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm under Medicare program; and (2) Is included in at least one of the following risk categories: (i) Has a family history of an abdominal aortic aneurysm....

  2. Aortic stiffening and its impact on left atrial volumes and function in patients after successful coarctation repair: a multiparametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Voges, Inga; Kees, Julian; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Gottschalk, Hannes; Trentmann, Jens; Hart, Christopher; Gabbert, Dominik D; Pardun, Eileen; Pham, Minh; Andrade, Ana C; Wegner, Philip; Kristo, Ines; Jansen, Olav; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Rickers, Carsten

    2016-09-12

    The increased cardiovascular morbidity of adults with late repair of aortic coarctation (CoA) has been well documented. In contrast, successful CoA repair in early childhood has a generally good prognosis, though adverse vascular and ventricular characteristics may be abnormal, which could increase long-term risk. This study sought to perform a comprehensive analysis of aortic elasticity and left ventricular (LV) function in patients with aortic coarctation (CoA) using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). In a subgroup of patients, we assessed structure and function of the common carotid arteries to probe for signs of systemic vascular remodeling. Fifty-one patients (median age 17.3 years), 13.9 ± 7.5 years after CoA repair, and 54 controls (median age 19.8 years) underwent CMR. We determined distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV) at different aortic locations. In a subgroup, common carotid artery distensibility, PWV, wall thickness and wall area were measured. LV ejection fraction (EF), volumes, and mass were measured from short axis views. Left atrial (LA) volumes and functional parameters (LAEFPassive, LAEFContractile, LAEFReservoir) were assessed from axial cine images. In patients distensibility of the whole thoracic aorta was reduced (p < 0.05) while PWV was only significantly higher in the aortic arch (p < 0.01). Distensibility of the descending aorta at the level of the pulmonary arteries and PWV in the descending aorta, both correlated negatively with age at CoA repair. LA volume before atrial contraction and minimal LA volume were higher in patients (p < 0.05). LAEFPassive and LAEFReservoir were reduced (p < 0.05), and LAEFReservoir correlated negatively with aortic arch PWV (p < 0.05). LVEF, volumes and mass were not different from controls. Carotid wall thickness and PWV were higher in patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). Patients after CoA repair have impaired bioelastic properties of the thoracic aorta

  3. Differential gene expression in human abdominal aortic aneurysm and aortic occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Corey S.; Schreurs, Charlotte; Lindeman, Jan H. N.; Walker, Philip J.; Nataatmadja, Maria; West, Malcolm; Holdt, Lesca M.; Hinterseher, Irene; Pilarsky, Christian; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and aortic occlusive disease (AOD) represent common causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly populations which were previously believed to have common aetiologies. The aim of this study was to assess the gene expression in human AAA and AOD. We performed microarrays using aortic specimen obtained from 20 patients with small AAAs (≤ 55mm), 29 patients with large AAAs (> 55mm), 9 AOD patients, and 10 control aortic specimens obtained from organ donors. Some differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative-PCR (qRT-PCR)/immunohistochemistry. We identified 840 and 1,014 differentially expressed genes in small and large AAAs, respectively. Immune-related pathways including cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and T-cell-receptor signalling were upregulated in both small and large AAAs. Examples of validated genes included CTLA4 (2.01-fold upregulated in small AAA, P = 0.002), NKTR (2.37-and 2.66-fold upregulated in small and large AAA with P = 0.041 and P = 0.015, respectively), and CD8A (2.57-fold upregulated in large AAA, P = 0.004). 1,765 differentially expressed genes were identified in AOD. Pathways upregulated in AOD included metabolic and oxidative phosphorylation categories. The UCP2 gene was downregulated in AOD (3.73-fold downregulated, validated P = 0.017). In conclusion, the AAA and AOD transcriptomes were very different suggesting that AAA and AOD have distinct pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25944698

  4. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzardi, Giuseppe Fossaceca, Rita; Divenuto, Ignazio; Musiani, Antonello; Brustia, Piero; Carriero, Alessandro

    2010-08-15

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. The features of the AAA made it suitable for endovascular repair. To prevent pulmonary embolism caused by the presence of sac thrombosis near the vena cava lumen, a temporary vena cava filter was deployed before the procedure. A bifurcated stent-graft was placed with the patient under local anaesthesia, and the AAA was successfully treated. A transient type II endoleak was detected on CT 3 days after endograft placement. At routine follow-up 6 and 12 months after the procedure, the patient was in good clinical condition, and the type II endoleak had sealed completely. Endovascular treatment offers an attractive therapeutic alternative to open repair in case of ACF; however, only small numbers of patients have been treated, and long-term follow-up interval is lacking.

  5. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm treated by endovascular surgery: a case report].

    PubMed

    Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Cobo-Sánchez, José Luis; Casaus-Pérez, María; García-Campo, María Elena; García-Zarrabeitia, María José; Calvo-Diez, Marta; Mirones-Valdeolivas, Luz Elena

    2008-01-01

    An aneurysm is an abnormal dilation or irreversible convex of a portion of an artery. The most common site of aneurysms is the abdominal aorta and their appearance is often due to degeneration of the arterial wall, associated with atherosclerosis and favored by risk factors such as smoking and hypertension, among others. Left untreated, aneurysm of the abdominal aorta usually leads to rupture. Treatment is surgical, consisting of the introduction of a prosthesis, composed basically of a stent and an introducer, into the aorta. We report the case of a person diagnosed with abdominal aortic aneurysm in a routine examination who was admitted for ambulatory surgical treatment. We designed a nursing care plan, following Virginia Henderson's conceptual model. The care plan was divided into 2 parts, a first preoperative phase and a second postimplantation or monitoring phase. The care plan contained the principal nursing diagnoses, based on the taxonomies of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), nursing interventions classification (NIC) and nursing outcomes classifications (NOC), and collaboration problems/potential complications. The patient was discharged to home after contact was made with his reference nurse in the primary health center, since during the hospital phase, some NOC indicators remained unresolved.

  6. Extensive Erosion of Vertebral Bodies Due to a Chronic Contained Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Alecio Fernando; Cardoso, Fabiano Nassar; da Rocha Fernandes, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a case of chronically ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm contained within the lumbar vertebral bodies that presented with dull abdominal pain. Sudden, massive hemorrhage is an uncommon, yet well-known complication of an untreated abdominal aortic aneurysm. In addition, misleading clinical and radiological findings present difficult diagnostic challenges in such cases. This report emphasizes the findings obtained with multidetector computed tomography and delineates the differentiation of this condition from similar pathologies. PMID:27200153

  7. Continuous cerebral and myocardial perfusion during one-stage repair for aortic coarctation with ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiwen; Hong, Haifa; Zhu, Zhongqun; Liu, Jinfen

    2013-04-01

    Controversy still exists concerning the use of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) for repair of aortic coarctation (CoA) with ventricular septal defect (VSD). This report therefore describes outcomes of patients undergoing continuous cerebral and myocardial perfusion (CCMP) under mild hypothermia compared with DHCA and SACP. Retrospective analysis was performed for 110 consecutive patients undergoing anatomic reconstruction of CoA with VSD closure between 1999 and 2011. Patients repaired under CCMP with mild hypothermia (32 °C) (group A, n = 60) were compared with those repaired under DHCA (18 °C) and SACP (group B, n = 50). In group A, the single arterial cannula perfusion technique was used for 15 patients (25 %), and the dual arterial cannula perfusion technique was used for 45 patients (75 %). The preoperative data were similar in the two groups. Group A had no hospital mortalities, compared with two mortalities (4 %) in group B. Group A had shorter myocardial ischemic and cardiopulmonary times, fewer delayed sternal closures, a shorter time to extubation, lower postoperative lactate levels, and fewer patients with low cardiac output requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or with multiorgan failure than group B. During the postoperative course, no clinical or electrical neurologic events occurred in either group. The mean follow-up period was 5.2 ± 3.2 years for group A and 7.5 ± 3.1 years for group B (P = 0.048). One late death occurred in group B and no late deaths in group A. The actuarial survival for the two groups was similar (100 % for group A vs 96 % for group B; P = 0.264). The freedom from all types of cardiac reintervention was 96.7 % in group A and 89.6 % in group B (P = 0.688). All the patients were free of neurologic symptoms. The authors' perfusion strategy using CCMP with mild hypothermia for repair of CoA with VSD is feasible, safe, and associated with improved postoperative

  8. Reproducibility of aortic pulsatility measurements from ECG-gated abdominal CTA in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, Joel G.; Wentz, Robert J.; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Siddiki, Hassan; Nielson, Theresa

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: ECG-gated abdominal CT angiography with reconstruction of multiple, temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets has been proposed for measuring aortic pulsatility. The purpose of this work is to develop algorithms to segment the aorta from surrounding structures from CTA datasets across cardiac phases, calculate registered centerlines and measurements of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with AAA, and to assess the reproducibility of these measurements. Methods: ECG-gated CTA was performed with a temporal resolution of 165 ms, reconstructed to 1 mm slices ranging at 14 cardiac phase points. Data sets were obtained from 17 patients on which two such scans were performed 6 to 12 months apart. Automated segmentation, centerline generation, and registration of centerlines between phases was performed, followed by calculation of cross-sectional areas and regional and local pulsatility. Results: Pulsatility calculations for the supraceliac region were very reproducible between earlier and later scans of the same patient, with average differences less than 1% for pulsatility values ranging from 2% to 13%. Local radial pulsatilities were also reproducible to within ~1%. Aneurysm volume changes between scans can also be quantified. Conclusion: Automated segmentation, centerline generation, and registration of temporally resolved CTA datasets permit measurements of regional changes in cross-sectional area over the course of the cardiac cycle (i.e., regional aortic pulsatility). These measurements are reproducible between scans 6-12 months apart, with differences in aortic areas reflecting both aneurysm remodeling and changes in blood pressure. Regional pulsatilities ranged from 2 to 13% but were reproducible at the 1% level.

  9. Circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and abdominal aortic pathology: from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Grodin, Justin L; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Ayers, Colby R; Kumar, Darpan S; Rohatgi, Anand; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A; Das, Sandeep R

    2011-10-01

    Prior reports have associated increased circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an endopeptidase active in the extracellular matrix, with the formation and rupture of aortic aneurysms, raising the possibility that MMP-9 may be a useful diagnostic or therapeutic target for aortic pathology. However, associations between MMP-9 and pathological abdominal aortic phenotypes in the general population have not been reported. In the Dallas Heart Study, a population-based sample of Dallas County residents (n = 2304), we measured MMP-9 and performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdominal aorta, measuring aortic compliance, plaque, wall thickness and luminal diameter. After adjustment for traditional cardiac risk factors and body size, higher MMP-9 quartiles were independently associated with higher aortic wall thickness and larger luminal diameter (p < 0.0001 for each), but not abdominal aortic plaque (p = 0.08), coronary artery calcium (p = 0.20) or the aortic luminal diameter/aortic wall thickness ratio (p = 0.37), supporting the hypothesis that therapies targeting MMP-9 may affect the abdominal aortic wall and modify aortic pathology.

  10. Circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and abdominal aortic pathology: From the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Grodin, Justin L; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Ayers, Colby R; Kumar, Darpan S; Rohatgi, Anand; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A; Das, Sandeep R

    2012-01-01

    Prior reports have associated increased circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an endopeptidase active in the extracellular matrix, with the formation and rupture of aortic aneurysms, raising the possibility that MMP-9 may be a useful diagnostic or therapeutic target for aortic pathology. However, associations between MMP-9 and pathological abdominal aortic phenotypes in the general population have not been reported. In the Dallas Heart Study, a population-based sample of Dallas County residents (n = 2304), we measured MMP-9 and performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdominal aorta, measuring aortic compliance, plaque, wall thickness and luminal diameter. After adjustment for traditional cardiac risk factors and body size, higher MMP-9 quartiles were independently associated with higher aortic wall thickness and larger luminal diameter (p < 0.0001 for each), but not abdominal aortic plaque (p = 0.08), coronary artery calcium (p = 0.20) or the aortic luminal diameter/aortic wall thickness ratio (p = 0.37), supporting the hypothesis that therapies targeting MMP-9 may affect the abdominal aortic wall and modify aortic pathology. PMID:22002999

  11. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm treatment in the stent graft era.

    PubMed

    Tulga, Ulus A; Fahrettin, Kucukay; Erdal, Simsek; Sarper, Oktem; Serkan, Mola; Mustafa, Ozdemir; Ahmet, Saritas; Kerem, Vural; Levent, Birincioglu

    2014-01-01

    We aim to decrease mortality and morbidity by early diagnosis and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) or by using open surgery. The patients who had underwent open surgery and EVAR with a diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms were evaluated retrospectively. Patients with EVAR were separated as group I and the patients with surgical operations constituted group II. The risk factors, duration of the operation, blood product usage, drainage amounts, complications, mortality, and morbidity rates were evaluated. The duration of the operation and the required blood and blood products were lower in group I (P < .05). There is no any significant difference between the groups in terms of mortality, complications, short-, and long-term results. We support the idea that better results can be obtained by showing regard to suitable patient, suitable clinical condition, and suitable anatomy together with the correct choice of operation type. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysm-an independent disease to atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Toghill, Bradley J; Saratzis, Athanasios; Bown, Matthew J

    Atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are multifactorial and polygenic diseases with known environmental and genetic risk factors that contribute toward disease development. Atherosclerosis represents an important independent risk factor for AAA, as people with AAA often have atherosclerosis. Studies have shown that comorbidity is usually between ~25% and 55%, but it is still not fully known whether this association is causal or a result of common shared risk profiles. Most recent epidemiological, clinical, and biological evidence suggests that the two pathologies are more distinct than traditionally thought. For instance diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity are high risk for atherosclerosis development but are not as pronounced in AAA, whereas smoking, gender, and ethnicity are particularly high risk for AAA but less so for atherosclerosis. In addition, genetic and epigenetic studies have identified independent risk loci involved in AAA susceptibility that are not associated with other cardiovascular diseases, and research on important common cardiovascular biomarkers has illustrated discrepancies in those with AAA.

  13. Anesthetic considerations for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Kothandan, Harikrishnan; Haw Chieh, Geoffrey Liew; Khan, Shariq Ali; Karthekeyan, Ranjith Baskar; Sharad, Shah Shitalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm is defined as a localized and permanent dilatation with an increase in normal diameter by more than 50%. It is more common in males and can affect up to 8% of elderly men. Smoking is the greatest risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and other risk factors include hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of aneurysms, inflammatory vasculitis, and trauma. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair [EVAR] is a common procedure performed for AAA, because of its minimal invasiveness as compared with open surgical repair. Patients undergoing EVAR have a greater incidence of major co-morbidities and should undergo comprehensive preoperative assessment and optimization within the multidisciplinary settings. In majority of cases, EVAR is extremely well-tolerated. The aim of this article is to outline the Anesthetic considerations related to EVAR. PMID:26750684

  14. Hybrid Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Thrombosis Presenting with Paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Azzarone, Matteo; De Troia, Alessandro; Iazzolino, Luigi; Nabulsi, Bilal; Tecchio, Tiziano

    2016-05-01

    Acute thrombotic or embolic occlusion of the abdominal aorta is a rare vascular emergency associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Classically, the clinical presentation is a severe peripheral ischemia with bilateral leg pain as the predominant feature. Aortic occlusion presenting as an isolated acute onset of paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia is very rare and requires improved awareness to prevent adverse outcomes associated with delayed diagnosis. We report the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia due to the thrombotic occlusion of the infrarenal aorta involving the first segment of the common iliac arteries on both sides; emergent transperitoneal aorto iliac thrombectomy combined with the endovascular iliac kissing-stent technique were performed achieving perioperative complete regression of the symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recent Advances in Molecular Mechanisms of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Annambhotla, Suman; Bourgeois, Sebastian; Wang, Xinwen; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is an increasingly common clinical condition with fatal implications. It is associated with advanced age, male gender, cigarette smoking, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and genetic predisposition. Although significant evidence has emerged in the last decade, the molecular mechanisms of AAA formation remains poorly understood. Currently, the treatment for AAA remains primarily surgical with the lone innovation of endovascular therapy. With advance in the human genome, understanding precisely which molecules and genes mediate AAA development and blocking their activity at the molecular level could lead to important new discoveries and therapies. This review summarizes recent updates in molecular mechanisms of AAA formation including animal models, autoimmune components, infection, key molecules and cytokines, mechanical forces, genetics and pharmacotherapy. This review will be helpful to those who want to recognize the newest endeavors within the field and identify possible lines of investigation in AAA. PMID:18259804

  16. Novel Molecular Imaging Approaches to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Risk Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Toczek, Jakub; Meadows, Judith L.; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2015-01-01

    Selection of patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is currently based on aneurysm size, growth rate and symptoms. Molecular imaging of biological processes associated with aneurysm growth and rupture, e.g., inflammation and matrix remodeling, could improve patient risk stratification and lead to a reduction in AAA morbidity and mortality. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO) magnetic resonance imaging are two novel approaches to AAA imaging evaluated in clinical trials. A variety of other tracers, including those that target inflammatory cells and proteolytic enzymes (e.g., integrin αvβ3 and matrix metalloproteinases), have proven effective in preclinical models of AAA and show great potential for clinical translation. PMID:26763279

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 gene variants and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, L; Warrington, N; Allcock, R; van Bockxmeer, F; Palmer, L J; Iacopetta, B; Golledge, J; Norman, P E

    2009-08-01

    To investigate associations between two polymorphisms of the matrix metalloproteinase-2 gene (MMP2) and the incidence and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Cases and controls were recruited from a trial of screening for AAAs. The association between two variants of MMP2 (-1360C>T, and +649C>T) in men with AAA (n=678) and in controls (n=659) was examined using multivariate analyses. The association with AAA expansion (n=638) was also assessed. In multivariate analyses with adjustments for multiple testing, no association between either SNP and AAA presence or expansion was detected. MMP2 -1360C>T and +649C>T variants are not risk factors for AAA.

  18. Complex pathologies of angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms*

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.; Lu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is the primary bioactive peptide of the renin angiotensin system that plays a critical role in many cardiovascular diseases. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII into mice induces the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Like human AAAs, AngII-induced AAA tissues exhibit progressive changes and considerable heterogeneity. This complex pathology provides an impediment to the quantification of aneurysmal tissue composition by biochemical and immunostaining techniques. Therefore, while the mouse model of AngII-induced AAAs provides a salutary approach to studying the mechanisms of the evolution of AAAs in humans, meaningful interpretation of mechanisms requires consideration of the heterogeneous nature of the diseased tissue. PMID:21796801

  19. Infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bouzas, Miguel; Tchana-Sato, Vincent; Lavigne, Jean Paul

    2016-10-19

    Early diagnosis of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is still a medical challenge due to its diverse and non-specific symptoms and signs. The most common responsible pathogens are Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Campylobacter and Streptococcus species. The authors report the case of a 67-year-old man, admitted for high fever and finally diagnosed with Escherichia coli (E.coli)-related IAAA. The IAAA ruptured during the general anaesthesia induction, leading to an emergency surgery. The authors successfully proceeded to an open aneurysmectomy with extensive debridement and in situ graft replacement. This case emphasizes the potential for rapid IAAA expansion, its high-rupture risk and the importance of computed tomography as a diagnostic tool.

  20. A new image-based process for quantifying hemodynamic contributions to long-term morbidity in a rabbit model of aortic coarctation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, David C.; Dholakia, Ronak J.; Larsen, Paul M.; Menon, Arjun; LaDisa, John F., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is associated with reduced life expectancy despite successful surgical treatment. Interestingly, much of the related long-term morbidity can be explained by abnormal hemodynamics, vascular biomechanics and cardiac function. MRI has played an important role in assessing coarctation severity, but the heterogeneity and small number of patients at each center presents an obstacle for determining causality. This work describes optimized imaging parameters to create computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models revealing changes in hemodynamics and vascular biomechanics from a rabbit model. CoA was induced surgically at 10 weeks using silk or dissolvable ligatures to replicate native and end-to-end treatment cases, respectively. Cardiac function was evaluated at 32 weeks using a fastcard SPGR sequence in 6-8 two-chamber short-axis views. Left ventricular (LV) volume, ejection fraction, and mass were quantified and compared to control rabbits. Phase contrast (PC) and angiographic MRI were used to create CFD models. Ascending aortic PCMRI data were mapped to the model inflow and outflow boundary conditions replicated measured pressure (BP) and flow. CFD simulations were performed using a stabilized finite element method to calculate indices including velocity, BP and wall shear stress (WSS). CoA models displayed higher velocity through the coarctation region and decreased velocity elsewhere, leading to decreased WSS above and below the stenosis. Pronounced wall displacement was associated with CoA-induced changes in BP. CoA caused reversible LV hypertrophy. Cardiac function was maintained, but caused a persistent hyperdynamic state. This model may now be used to investigate potential mechanisms of long-term morbidity.

  1. Alcohol consumption, specific alcoholic beverages, and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stackelberg, Otto; Björck, Martin; Larsson, Susanna C; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-08-19

    Studies investigating the role of alcohol consumption in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are scarce. We aimed to examine associations between total alcohol consumption and specific alcoholic beverages and the hazard of AAA. The study population was made up of 44 715 men from the Cohort of Swedish Men and 35 569 women from the Swedish Mammography Cohort who were 46 to 84 years of age at baseline in 1998. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals for the associations between alcohol consumption, assessed through a food frequency questionnaire, and AAA, identified by means of linkage to the Swedish Inpatient Register and the Swedish Vascular Registry (Swedvasc). Over the 14-year follow-up until December 2011 (1 019 954 person-years), AAAs occurred in 1020 men and 194 women. Compared with the consumption of 1 glass of alcohol per week (12 g of ethanol), the hazard ratio of AAA among men who consumed 10 glasses per week was 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.94). The corresponding hazard ratio among women who consumed 5 glasses per week was 0.57 (95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.82). Among participants free from cardiovascular disease, total alcohol consumption did not seem to be associated with hazard of the disease. The most commonly consumed alcoholic beverages, beer among men and wine among women, were inversely associated, whereas no association was observed for liquor. Moderate alcohol consumption, specifically wine and beer, was associated with a lower hazard of abdominal aortic aneurysm. The associations between higher doses of alcohol and risk of the disease remain unknown. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Flow Mediated Dilatation and Progression of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Regent; Bellamkonda, Kirthi; Jones, Amy; Killough, Nicholas; Woodgate, Felicity; Williams, Matthew; Cassimjee, Ismail; Handa, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Objective/Background Biomarker(s) for prediction of the future progression rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) may be useful to stratify the management of individual patients. AAAs are associated with features of systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Flow mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery is a recognised non-invasive measurement for endothelial function. We hypothesised that FMD is a potential biomarker of AAA progression and reflects the temporal changes of endothelial function during AAA progression. Methods In a prospectively recruited cohort of patients with AAAs (Oxford Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Study), AAA size was recorded by antero-posterior diameter (APD) (outer to outer) on ultrasound. Annual AAA progression was calculated by (ΔAPD/APD at baseline)/(number of days lapsed/365 days). FMD was assessed at the same time as AAA size measurement. Analyses of data were performed in the overall cohort, and further in subgroups of AAA by size (small: 30–39 mm; moderate: 40–55 mm; large: > 55 mm). Results FMD is inversely correlated with the diameter of AAAs in all patients (n = 162, Spearman’s r = −.28, p < .001). FMD is inversely correlated with AAA diameter progression in the future 12 months (Spearman’s r = −.35, p = .001), particularly in the moderate size group. Furthermore, FMD deteriorates during the course of AAA surveillance (from a median of 2.0% at baseline to 1.2% at follow-up; p = .004), while surgical repair of AAAs (n = 50 [open repair n = 22, endovascular repair n = 28)] leads to an improvement in FMD (from 1.1% pre-operatively to 3.8% post-operatively; p < .001), irrespective of the type of surgery. Conclusion FMD is inversely correlated with future AAA progression in humans. FMD deteriorates during the natural history of AAA, and is improved by surgery. The utility of FMD as a potential biomarker in the context of AAA warrants further investigation. PMID:28416190

  3. Ultrasonography Performed by Primary Care Residents for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Raymond P; Ault, Mark; Greengold, Nancy L; Rosendahl, Thomas; Cossman, David

    2001-01-01

    A prospective pilot study was undertaken to assess a protocol to educate primary care residents in how to personally perform ultrasonography for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening. Resident exams were proctored by a primary care physician trained in ultrasonography and were scored on the level of competence in doing the examination. Patients had ultrasound performed by a resident, followed by repeat examination by the vascular lab. Primary care resident abdominal aortic imaging was achieved in 79 of 80 attempts. Four abdominal aortic aneurysms were identified. There were 75 normal examinations; resident ultrasonography results were consistent with the results of the vascular lab. Ten residents achieved an abdominal aortic ultrasound-independent competence level after an average of 3.4 proctored exams. The main outcome of this study is that a primary care resident, with minimal training in ultrasonography imaging, is able to rapidly learn the technique of ultrasonography imaging of the abdominal aorta. PMID:11903764

  4. Metformin treatment status and abdominal aortic aneurysm disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Naoki; Xiong, Jiang; Kettler, Ellen B; Xuan, Haojun; Glover, Keith J; Mell, Matthew W; Xu, Baohui; Dalman, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In population-based studies performed on multiple continents over the past two decades, diabetes mellitus has been negatively associated with the prevalence and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease. We investigated the possibility that metformin, the primary oral hypoglycemic agent in use worldwide, may influence the progression of AAA disease Methods Pre-operative AAA patients with diabetes were identified from an institutional database. After tabulating individual cardiovascular and demographic risk factors and prescription drug regimens, odds ratios for categorical influences on annual AAA enlargement were calculated via nominal logistical regression. Experimental AAA modeling experiments were subsequently performed in normoglycemic mice to validate the database-derived observations, as well as suggest potential mechanisms of metformin-mediated aneurysm suppression. Results Fifty eight patients met criteria for study inclusion. Of 11 distinct classes of medication considered, only metformin usage was negatively associated with AAA enlargement. This association remained significant after controlling for gender, age, cigarette smoking status and obesity. The median enlargement rate in AAA patients not taking oral diabetic medication was 1.5 mm/year; by nominal logistic regression, metformin, hyperlipidemia, and age ≥70 years were associated with below median enlargement, whereas sulfonylurea therapy, initial aortic diameter ≥40 mm and statin usage were associated with above median enlargement. In experimental modeling, metformin dramatically suppressed the formation and progression, with medial elastin and smooth muscle preservation and reduced aortic mural macrophage, CD8 T cell and neovessel density. Conclusions Epidemiologic evidence of AAA suppression in diabetes may be attributable to concurrent therapy with the oral hypoglycemic agent metformin. PMID:27106243

  5. Possible Dual Role of Decorin in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Koshiro; Yoshimura, Koichi; Yamashita, Osamu; Harada, Takasuke; Morikage, Noriyasu; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by chronic inflammation, which leads to pathological remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Decorin, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan, has been suggested to regulate inflammation and stabilize the extracellular matrix. Therefore, the present study investigated the role of decorin in the pathogenesis of AAA. Decorin was localized in the aortic adventitia under normal conditions in both mice and humans. AAA was induced in mice using CaCl2 treatment. Initially, decorin protein levels decreased, but as AAA progressed decorin levels increased in all layers. Local administration of exogenous decorin prevented the development of CaCl2-induced AAA. However, decorin was highly expressed in the degenerative lesions of human AAA walls, and this expression positively correlated with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expression. In cell culture experiments, the addition of decorin inhibited secretion of MMP-9 in vascular smooth muscle cells, but had the opposite effect in macrophages. The results suggest that decorin plays a dual role in AAA. Adventitial decorin in normal aorta may protect against the development of AAA, but macrophages expressing decorin in AAA walls may facilitate the progression of AAA by up-regulating MMP-9 secretion. PMID:25781946

  6. Blood flow in abdominal aortic aneurysms: pulsatile flow hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Finol, E A; Amon, C H

    2001-10-01

    Numerical predictions of blood flow patterns and hemodynamic stresses in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs) are performed in a two-aneurysm, axisymmetric, rigid wall model using the spectral element method. Physiologically realistic aortic blood flow is simulated under pulsatile conditions for the range of time-averaged Reynolds numbers 50< or =Re(m)< or =300, corresponding to a range of peak Reynolds numbers 262.5< or =Re(peak) < or = 1575. The vortex dynamics induced by pulsatile flow in AAAs is characterized by a sequence of five different flow phases in one period of the flow cycle. Hemodynamic disturbance is evaluated for a modified set of indicator functions, which include wall pressure (p(w)), wall shear stress (tau(w)), and Wall Shear Stress Gradient (WSSG). At peak flow, the highest shear stress and WSSG levels are obtained downstream of both aneurysms, in a pattern similar to that of steady flow. Maximum values of wall shear stresses and wall shear stress gradients obtained at peak flow are evaluated as a function of the time-average Reynolds number resulting in a fourth order polynomial correlation. A comparison between predictions for steady and pulsatile flow is presented, illustrating the importance of considering time-dependent flow for the evaluation of hemodynamic indicators.

  7. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease.

  8. Elevated homocysteine in human abdominal aortic aneurysmal tissues.

    PubMed

    Chan, Crystal Yin Tung; Cheng, Stephen Wing Keung

    2017-10-01

    An abnormally high level of homocysteine (Hcy) has been consistently observed in the blood of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. However, the expression of Hcy in human AAA tissues has not been investigated. In this study, the expression of Hcy in aneurysmal tissues from AAA patients ( n=30) was compared with non-aneurysmal tissues from organ donors ( n=31) by dot blotting and immunohistochemistry. A significantly higher expression of Hcy was observed in AAA than control tissues ( p<0.001). Furthermore, the associations of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism, detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, with both AAA and tissue Hcy expression were evaluated. Our results showed MTHFR C677T polymorphism was not significantly associated with AAA or tissue Hcy expression. Lastly, the expression of Hcy in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which were isolated from human aortic tissues by explant culture, and their release to cultured media was investigated by dot blotting. The AAA VSMCs expressed and released a significantly higher level of Hcy than the control VSMCs ( p<0.001). In summary, our novel findings showed Hcy expression was abnormally elevated in human AAA tissues, which may not be dependent on MTHFR C677T polymorphism.

  9. [Genetic aspects of the pathogenesis of aortic abdominal aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Słomski, Ryszard; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Majewski, Wacław

    2005-01-01

    In industrialized countries the number of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is continuously rising. In recent years the mortality rate tripled and it is the number 13 cause of death in United States. Despite many identified risk factors and understanding of their pathomechanisms, the pathogenesis of AAA remains unclear. Thanks to the epidemiological researches and improvement of molecular techniques it was noted that AAA may have a genetic bases. The diversity between the possible genomic defects that could lead to the development of aneurytic changes was also suggested. This has a direct relationship with the complexity of the aortic wall structure and therefore with the number of potential injury locations. Current genetic research confirms the changes in expression and the many polymorphic variants of genes coding structural and enzymatic proteins. Thus, AAA seems to be a disease with multifactor pathogenesis and numerous possible genome anomaly variants. Hence, it seems that the complete understanding of the genetic bases of AAA continuous to be distant. However, efforts in this matter remain valuable, giving hope for an improved diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of this disease. This article is a review of the available knowledge regarding the genetic origin of AAA.

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: how can we improve their treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Scobie, T K

    1980-01-01

    Arteriosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms are present in a least 2% of the elderly population of the Western world and their number is increasing. Without treatment 30% of patients with asymptomatic aneurysms live for 5 years, although the risk of rupture becomes greater as the size of the aneurysm increases. Of those with untreated symptomatic aneurysms 80% are dead within a year. Elective repair of aneurysms has a low mortality, and 50% of the patients live for at least 5 years. Symptomatic aneurysms all cause pain and may produce other symptoms from pressure on adjacent structures, distal embolism, acute thrombosis or rupture. In 88% of cases an aneurysm can be diagnosed by physical examination alone; confirmatory tests include soft-tissue roentgenography of the abdomen, ultrasonography, computer-assisted tomography and aortography. Repair is indicated for symptomatic or ruptured aortic aneurysms and for asymptomatic aneurysms over 5 cm in diameter. Early diagnosis and referral for repair is essential for optimum treatment of this common condition. PMID:7004617

  11. Association of statin prescription with small abdominal aortic aneurysm progression

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Craig D.; Clancy, Paula; Bourke, Bernard; Walker, Philip J.; Dear, Anthony; Buckenham, Tim; Norman, Paul; Golledge, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Background Statins have been suggested to reduce expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) independent of lipid lowering effects. Methods We assessed the association of statin treatment and serum low density lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations with small AAA expansion. 652 patients undergoing surveillance of small AAAs were entered into the study from five vascular centers. In a subset fasting lipids (n=451) and other biomarkers (n=216) were measured. AAA diameter was followed by ultrasound surveillance for a median of 5 years. Results 349 (54%) of the patients were prescribed statins. Adjusting for other risk factors statin prescription was not associated with AAA growth (odds ratio, OR, 1.23, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.86–1.76). Above median AAA growth was positively associated with initial diameter (OR 1.78 per 4.35mm larger initial aortic diameter, 95% CI 1.49–2.14) and negatively associated with diabetes (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.22–0.62). Above median serum LDL concentration was not associated with AAA growth. Patients receiving statins had lower serum C-reactive protein concentrations but similar matrix metalloproteinase-9 and interleukin-6 concentrations to those not prescribed these medications. Conclusions We found no association between statin prescription or LDL concentration with AAA expansion. The results do not support the findings of smaller studies and suggest that statins may have no benefit in reducing AAA progression. PMID:20152231

  12. Polymorphisms of the MMP-9 gene and abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Linda; Allcock, Richard; van Bockxmeer, Frank; Warrington, Nicole; Palmer, Lyle J; Iacopetta, Barry; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Background Increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity has been implicated in the formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). The aim of the present study was to explore the association between potentially functional variants of the MMP-9 gene and AAA. Method The −1562C>T and −1811A>T variants of the MMP-9 gene were genotyped in 678 men with AAAs (>30mm in diameter) and 659 controls (aortic diameter 19−22mm) recruited from a population-based trial of screening for AAAs. The levels of MMP-9 were measured in a random subset of 300 cases and 84 controls. The association between genetic variants (including haplotypes) and AAA was assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Results There was no association between the MMP-9 −1562C>T (OR 0.70 95%CI 0.27, 1.82) or −1811A>T (OR 0.71, 95%CI 0.28, 1.85) genotypes, or the most common haplotype (OR 0.81 95%CI 0.62, 1.05), and AAA. The serum MMP-9 concentration (ng/mL) was higher in cases than controls and in minor allele carriers in cases and controls although the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The results suggest that a genetic tendency to have higher levels of circulating MMP-9 is not associated with AAAs. PMID:18763261

  13. Proteomic comparison between abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Satoh, Kazumi; Maniwa, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Okunishi, Hideki; Oda, Teiji

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and that of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) is distinct. In this study, to reveal the differences in their biochemical properties, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis of AAAs and TAAs compared with adjacent normal aorta (NA) tissues. The proteomic analysis revealed 176 non-redundant differentially expressed proteins in the AAAs and 189 proteins in the TAAs which were common in at least 5 samples within 7 samples of each. Among the identified proteins, 55 and 68 proteins were unique to the AAAs and TAAs, respectively, whereas 121 proteins were identified in both the AAAs and TAAs. Panther overrepresentation analysis of the unique proteins in the AAAs and TAAs revealed a significant downregulation of the blood coagulation pathway in the AAAs and that of the integrin signaling pathway in the TAAs. On the other hand, Genesis analysis revealed distinct expression patterns of 58 proteins among the 121 proteins. Panther overrepresentation analysis of these 58 proteins revealed that the expression of these proteins in the blood coagulation and the plasminogen activating cascade was decreased in the AAAs, whereas it was increased in the TAAs compared with the NA tissues. On the other hand, the protein expression in the integrin signaling pathway was increased in the AAAs, whereas it was decreased in the TAAs compared with the NA tissues. Thus, the data presented in this study indicate that the proteins that show differential expression patterns in AAAs and TAAs may be involved in the distinct pathogenesis of AAAs and TAAs.

  14. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm. Role of corticosteroid therapy].

    PubMed

    Testart, J; Plissonnier, D; Peillon, C; Watelet, J

    2000-06-01

    For more than 20 years it has been generally acknowledged that operation for inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) using the common in-lay-graft procedure will induce the regression of peri-aortic fibrosis. However in prospective studies, after a 2 years follow-up, no regression appeared in approximated 8% of the cases (table I). Moreover in some IAAA a corticosteroid treatment (CS) was prescribed and it produced a regression of fibrosis and therefore facilitated the operation. Nevertheless the usefulness of the CS remains debated. We report 4 new cases of IAAA with CS. Based on our cases and an analysis of the literature we conclude that when there is no urgency to operate (diameter inferior to 50 mm) CS is the best option in IAAA with either severe inflammation or ureter involvement. Due to the regression of the fibrosis it can facilitate the surgical procedure. However it needs to be conducted with an adequate dose and duration. Finally the CS is the only possibility when the inflammation persist following the treatment of the IAAA.

  15. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  16. Abdominal Pain in the Presence of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: If in Doubt, Cut It Out!

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Koufopoulos, Georgios; Paulou, Konstantinos; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2017-02-03

    Although small (<5 cm) abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have been associated with symptoms and indication for intervention scarcely, the clinicians should never exclude such potential association especially in the absence of other overt pathological findings. In such cases, a surgical exploration with consequent intervention, if feasible, should be justified to prevent a detrimental evolution in a dubious scenario. In this article, we present 2 cases of patients with small AAA presenting with severe abdominal pain. In the absence of other solid clinical and radiological pathological findings, both patients underwent laparotomy where an inflammatory small AAA was identified and subjected either to resection and restoration with a tube graft or secondary endovascular repair because the periaortic fibrosis precluded the open repair. The characteristics and rationale of treatment modalities are exemplified and discussed.

  17. Contained Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm With Extensive Vertebral Body and Retroperitoneal Space Destruction.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sean T; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Johanning, Jason M; Vargo, Christopher J

    Chronic contained rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with vertebral body erosion most commonly presents with symptoms of low back pain. Although not well known, vertebral body erosion or destruction may be seen in up to 25% of patients with sealed or contained rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. This appearance on cross-sectional imaging may mimic a malignant or infectious process. Although these cases can present a diagnostic challenge, published cases of chronic contained rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with vertebral body erosion demonstrate clinical and imaging similarities that, when recognized, can assist in diagnosis.

  18. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms--comparisons of clinical features and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S; Yasuda, K; Takigami, K; Yamauchi, H; Shiiya, N; Sakuma, M

    1997-03-01

    A total of 274 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms due to atherosclerosis (AAA) and 16 patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) were reviewed to compare and contrast the clinical characteristics of the 2 groups. The AAA group comprised 243 men and 31 women with a mean age of 69.2 +/- 0.4 (range 51-86) years. The IAAA group comprised 15 men and 1 woman with a mean age of 67.4 +/- 2.0 (range 53-81) years. Most patients with IAAA (12/16; 75.0%) had pain at presentation, whereas only 37 out of 274 patients (13.5%) with AAA had pain (p < 0.001). Fifty out of 274 patients (18.2%) with AAA were asymptomatic, the most common principal complaint being a pulsatile tumor, which was found in 150 out of 274 patients (54.7%; p < 0.005 vs IAAA). Regarding laboratory findings of inflammation, preoperative erythrocyte sedimentation rate values were elevated in 15 out of 16 (93.8%) patients, and C-reactive protein values were elevated in 13 out of 16 (81.3%) patients with IAAA. The incidence of perioperative complications was similar in the 2 groups. The 30-day postoperative mortality among AAA patients was 6.2% (17/274 cases), including 12 cases of non-ruptured and 5 cases of ruptured AAA; in contrast, no early deaths occurred among patients with IAAA. The cumulative 5-year survival rate was 80.2% for IAAA patients and 74.6% for AAA patients (NS). The results of our review suggest that careful diagnosis and intra- and postoperative management could lead to patients with IAAA having a similar survival rate to those with AAA.

  19. Pressure fields by flow-sensitive, 4D, velocity-encoded CMR in patients with aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Riesenkampff, Eugénie; Fernandes, Joao Filipe; Meier, Sebastian; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kropf, Siegfried; Schubert, Stephan; Berger, Felix; Hennemuth, Anja; Henneumuth, Anja; Kuehne, Titus

    2014-09-01

    This study compared pressure fields by 4-dimensional (4D), velocity-encoded cine (VEC) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) with pressures measured by the clinical gold standard catheterization. Thirteen patients (n = 7 male, n = 6 female) with coarctation were studied. The 4D-VEC-CMR pressure fields were computed by solving the Pressure-Poisson equation. The agreement between catheterization and CMR-based methods was determined at 5 different measurement sites along the aorta. For all sites, the correlation coefficients between measures varied between 0.86 and 0.97 (p < 0.001). The Bland-Altman test showed good agreement between peak systolic pressure gradients across the coarctation. The nonsignificant (p > 0.2) bias was +2.3 mm Hg (± 6.4 mm Hg, 2 SDs) for calibration with dynamic pressures and +1.5 mm Hg (± 4.6 mm Hg, 2 SDs) for calibration with static pressure. In a clinical setting of coarctation, pressure fields can be accurately computed from 4D-VEC-CMR-derived flows. In patients with coarctation, this noninvasive technique might evolve to an alternative to invasive catheterization.

  20. Assessment of ventriculo-vascular properties in repaired coarctation using cardiac magnetic resonance-derived aortic, left atrial and left ventricular strain.

    PubMed

    Shang, Quanliang; Sarikouch, Samir; Patel, Shivani; Schuster, Andreas; Steinmetz, Michael; Ou, Phalla; Danford, David A; Beerbaum, Philipp; Kutty, Shelby

    2017-01-01

    In patients with repaired coarctation of aorta (CoA), we assessed ventriculo-vascular characteristics using CMR-derived aortic area strain (AAS), left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) longitudinal and circumferential strain (LS, CS). Seventy-five subjects including 50 with repaired CoA divided into hypertensive (n = 25), normotensive (n = 25) and 25 controls were studied. AAS was measured at 3 levels: ascending aorta, proximal descending and descending aorta. LA and LV LS were measured using CMR-feature tracking. LA and LV end-diastolic volumes, ejection fraction (EF) and mass were measured. Mean patient age was 19.7 ± 6.7 and controls 23 ± 15 (years). All strains (LA, LV, ascending and descending aortic) were lower in CoA subgroups compared to controls except the AAS at diaphragm, which was not different. Comparisons between hypertensive and normotensive CoA showed no differences in LV mass, LV volumetric indices, and LA and LV strain indices; however, ascending AAS was lower in hypertensive subgroup (p = 0.02). Ascending AAS was correlated with LV mass (r = -0.4, p = 0.005), LVEF (r = -0.4, p = 0.004), systolic blood pressure (r = -0.5, p = 0.0001) and LVLS (r = 0.5, p = 0.001). Ascending AAS correlated with LV mass, EF and LVLS. In hypertensive CoA, ascending AAS was reduced compared to normotensive CoA and controls, indicating vascular remodelling differences influenced by ongoing hypertension. • Impaired arterial strain is a measure of increased stiffness in arteries • Ascending aorta strain correlates with left ventricular mass and longitudinal strain • Ascending aorta strain is significantly lower in hypertensive coarctation patients • Hypertension may be a consequence of vascular pathology persisting despite repair.

  1. Acute thrombosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm subsequent to Heimlich maneuver: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, R L; Green, R M

    1985-07-01

    We report a case of acute thrombosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to a correctly applied and successful Heimlich maneuver. Although the Heimlich maneuver is generally safe and effective, this possible catastrophic consequence needs to be recognized.

  2. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Renal Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.; Arya, N. Lee, B.; Hannon, R.J.; Loan, W.; Soong, C.V.

    2004-09-15

    Patients with functioning renal transplant who develop abdominal aortic aneurysm can safely be treated with endovascular repair. Endovascular repair of aneurysm avoids renal ischemia associated with cross-clamping of aorta.

  3. Wegener's granulomatosis presenting as an abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Aortic aneurysm is not common in young patient. When a young patient presents with abdominal aortic aneurysm, there may be an underlying cause. Case presentation Here, we describe a case of a 33-year-old gentleman who presented with flu like illness, chest and abdominal pains following a tooth extraction. A chest X-ray and subsequent computerised tomogram of the chest and abdomen demonstrated lung nodules and an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm was repaired and his serology was positive for Wegener's granulomatosis. A nasal mucosal biopsy confirmed WG. He was treated with oral steroids and cyclophosphamide. His graft leaked and had to be replaced with a synthetic graft. Two months after his re-operation, he remains well. Conclusion Whenever a young patient presents with an abdominal aortic aneurysm, an underlying connective disease should be excluded because early steroid/immunosuppressive treatment may prevent the development of further aneurysms. PMID:20066062

  4. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® pulsatile abdominal mass, suspected abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Benoit; Dill, Karin E; Flamm, Scott D; Francois, Christopher J; Gerhard-Herman, Marie D; Kalva, Sanjeeva P; Mansour, M Ashraf; Mohler, Emile R; Oliva, Isabel B; Schenker, Matthew P; Weiss, Clifford; Rybicki, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical palpation of a pulsating abdominal mass alerts the clinician to the presence of a possible abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Generally an arterial aneurysm is defined as a localized arterial dilatation ≥50% greater than the normal diameter. Imaging studies are important in diagnosing the cause of a pulsatile abdominal mass and, if an AAA is found, in determining its size and involvement of abdominal branches. Ultrasound (US) is the initial imaging modality of choice when a pulsatile abdominal mass is present. Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) may be substituted in patients for whom US is not suitable. When aneurysms have reached the size threshold for intervention or are clinically symptomatic, contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CTA) is the best diagnostic and preintervention planning study, accurately delineating the location, size, and extent of aneurysm and the involvement of branch vessels. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) may be substituted if CT cannot be performed. Catheter arteriography has some utility in patients with significant contraindications to both CTA and MRA. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria(®) are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  5. Abdominal compartment syndrome after endovascular repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm leads to acute intestinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiyang; Zhao, Jichun; Huang, Bin; Yuan, Ding; Yang, Yi; Ma, Yukui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) after endovascular repair (EVAR) of rupture abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is a rare emergency situation, which has a high mortality. However, the progression of ACS is rapid and the diagnosis is usually been delayed, which increase the difficulties in treatment and affect the prognosis. We describe a case of a sever complication (acute intestinal necrosis) resulting from ACS after endovascular repair of rAAA. Clinical Finding: An elderly man, 81 years old, complained a sudden lower abdominal and back pain without any predisposing cause. He had a history of hypertension for 20 years without any regular anti-hypertensive therapy. Physical Examination revealed that the blood pressure was 89/54 mmHg, pulse was 120/min, oxygen saturation was 91%. The abdominal ultrasound and the CTA (computed tomography angiography) scan revealed a rAAA. Emergency EVAR under general anesthesia was performed for this patient. Diagnosis: Fourteen hours after endovascular repair, sudden decreased of blood pressure (70/50 mmHg) and oxygen saturation (70%) was observed. ACS or bleeding of retroperitoneal space was diagnosed. Interventions: Abdominal laparotomy was immediately performed. ACS was verified and a severe complication (acute intestinal necrosis) was observed, intestinal resection was performed for this patient. Outcomes: Unfortunately, this patient died after operation because of multi-organ failure in a very short period, which is very rare regarding to this condition. Surgical pathology, diagnosis and management were discussed. Conclusion: ACS was occurred with a severe complication (acute intestinal necrosis) in a very short period, which is very rare regarding to this condition after EVAR, it reminds us the severe result of ACS and more methods to prevent it happened after surgical management. PMID:27893667

  6. Cyclic transition to turbulence in rigid abdominal aortic aneurysm models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, T. H.; Yu, S. C. M.

    2001-08-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of cyclic flows inside rigid abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) models was investigated. Rectified sine waveforms were used to simulate aortic flow conditions (Re mean=1600-2100 and α=7.2-12.2). Depending on the bulge geometry ( D/ d and L/ d ratios), AAA flows can be broadly classified into three regimes, namely types A, B and C, respectively. While type A has no vortex formation, type B and C have distinctive laminar vortical structures that are very different from one another. The type of flow regimes would also determine where and when the transition to turbulence would occur and the portion of the cycle at which the flow remains turbulent in the bulge. The stability characteristics of types B and C are obtained from the linear stability analysis performed on the unsteady velocity profiles measured at different phases of a cycle. Based on the linear stability analyses, instability is found to initiate in the bulge for types B and C through the formation of vortical structures. Instability grows progressively during the acceleration phase and transition to turbulence in the bulge occurs shortly after the commencement of the deceleration phase in all cases investigated. The mechanisms of transition to turbulence for types B and C are discussed. Although transition to turbulence appears in all the cases investigated here, fully laminar flows in types B and C are predicted to exist by the linear stability theory under extreme flow conditions. Finally, the in vivo biological implications of the in vitro results were discussed.

  7. Modification of an endovascular stent graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloye, Olajompo Busola

    Endovascular surgery is currently used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). A stent graft is deployed to exclude blood flow from the aneurysm sac. It is an effective procedure used in preventing aneurysm rupture, with reduced patient morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. Migration and leakage around the device ("endoleak") due to poor sealing of the stent graft to the aorta have raised concerns about the long-term durability of endovascular repair. A preliminary study of cell migration and proliferation is presented as a prelude to a more extensive in vivo testing. A method to enhance the biological seal between the stent graft and the aorta is proposed to eliminate this problem. This can be achieved by impregnating the stent graft with 50/50 poly (DL-lactide co glycolic acid) (PLGA) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), at the proximal and distal ends. It is hypothesized that as PLGA degrades it will release the growth factors that will promote proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells to the coated site, leading to a natural seal between the aorta and the stent graft. In addition, growth factor release should promote smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction that will help keep the stent graft in place at the proximal and distal ends. It is shown that a statistically significant effect of increased cell proliferation and migration is observed for CTGF release. Less of an effect is noted for bFGF or just the PLGA. The effect is estimated to be large enough to be clinically significant in a future animal study. The long term goal of this study is to reduce migration encounter after graft deployment and to reduce secondary interventions of EVAR especially for older patients who are unfit for open surgical treatment.

  8. Validation of ultrasonic image boundary recognition in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ravhon, R; Adam, D; Zelmanovitch, L

    2001-08-01

    An aneurysm of the abdominal aorta (AAA) is characterized by modified wall properties, and a balloon-like area usually filled by a thrombus. A rupture of an aortic aneurysm can be fatal, yet there is no way to accurately predict such an occurrence. The study of the wall and thrombus cross-sectional distension, due to a pressure wave, is important as a way of assessing the degradation of the mechanical properties of the vessel wall and the risk of a rupture. Echo ultrasound transverse cross-sectional imaging is used here to study the thrombus and the aortic wall distension, requiring their segmentation within the image. Polar coordinates are defined, and a search is performed for minimizing a cost function, which includes a description of the boundary (based on a limited series of sine and cosine functions) and information from the image intensity gradients along the radii. The method is based on filtering by a modified Canny-Deriche edge detector and then on minimization of an energy function based on five parts. Since echoes from blood in the lumen and the thrombus produce similar patterns and speckle noise, a modified version for identifying the lumen-thrombus border was developed. The method has been validated by various ways, including parameter sensitivity testing and comparison to the performance of an expert. It is robust enough to track the lumen and total arterial cross-sectional area changes during the cardiac cycle. In 34 patients where sequences of images were acquired, the border between the thrombus and the arterial wall was detected with errors less than 2%, while the lumen-thrombus border was detected with a mean error of 4%. Thus, a noninvasive measurement of the AAA cross-sectional area is presented, which has been validated and found to be accurate.

  9. Influence of atmospheric pressure on infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Robert, Nicolas; Frank, Michael; Avenin, Laure; Hemery, Francois; Becquemin, Jean Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Meteorologic conditions have a significant impact on the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Previous studies have shown that abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture (AAAR) may be associated with atmospheric pressure, with conflicting results. Therefore, we aimed to further investigate the nature of the correlation between atmospheric pressure variations and AAAR. Hospital admissions related to AAAR between 2005-2009 were assessed in 19 districts of metropolitan France and correlated with geographically and date-matched mean atmospheric pressures. In parallel and from 2005-2009, all fatal AAARs as reported by death certificates were assessed nationwide and correlated to local atmospheric pressures at the time of aortic rupture. Four hundred ninety-four hospital admissions related to AAAR and 6,358 deaths nationwide by AAAR were identified between 2005-2009. Both in-hospital ruptures and aneurysm-related mortality had seasonal variations, with peak/trough incidences in January and June, respectively. Atmospheric pressure peaks occurred during winter. Univariate analysis revealed a significant association (P < 0.001) of high mean atmospheric pressure values and AAAR. After multivariate analysis, mean maximum 1-month prerupture atmospheric pressure had a persistent correlation with both in-hospital relative risk (1.05 [95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.06]; P < 0.0001) and aneurysm rupture-related mortality relative risk (1.02 [95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.03]; P < 0.0001). The annual incidence of AAAR is nonhomogeneous with a peak incidence in winter, and is independently associated with mean maximum 1-month prerupture atmospheric pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Patients' opinions regarding research and management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Regent; Jones, Amy; Cassimjee, Ismail; Handa, Ashok

    2017-08-30

    The epidemiology of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is changing. Outcomes for aortic surgery have improved. Biomarkers of AAA progression are emerging. We recently reported the opinions of international vascular surgery colleagues regarding research and management for AAAs. This study aimed to ascertain a real-world patients' opinion regarding the same questions. We administered a survey to patients with AAAs. We first ascertained their views on the priority topics for research in AAA. Using contemporary epidemiologic and surgical outcome data. We asked their preferences for different aspects of management in the hypothetical scenario where they had been diagnosed with a small (4cm) AAA and a hypothetical biomarker predicted it to be fast growing. We received 191 responses from patient with AAAs (males 91%, median-age-group 75-79 years). Amongst the topics of research for AAA, the top priorities for research chosen by patients were: "discovering why AAA develops in a person" and "discovering new medications that can make an AAA shrink back to normal size". In the hypothetical scenario, 42% of patients would prefer to have surgery early, while they are younger and fitter. 52% would follow the surgeon's recommendation as to whether to have early surgery or not. A high proportion of respondents would likely consider taking part in a clinical trial to test if early surgery in such a scenario will be beneficial. The results represent a snapshot of patient's views in terms of priorities for AAA research. We further demonstrate how patient's opinions can signpost the potential path for biomarker research to impact clinical practice.

  11. Lumbosacral radiculopathy secondary to abdominal aortic aneurysms. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Wilberger, J E

    1983-06-01

    Focal neurological deficits as the initial manifestation of expanding or ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are uncommon. When such a situation does occur, the femoral nerve is most often involved due to retroperitoneal or iliopsoas hematoma. Three cases of typical lumbosacral radiculopathy caused by an abdominal aortic aneurysm are reported to emphasize the importance of considering this diagnosis in the older patient with leg pain and radiculopathic findings.

  12. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Mean Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  13. [Management and methods of delivery in women with aortic coarctation--results of 64 pregnancies in 41 women].

    PubMed

    Janků, K; Unzeitig, V; Mikulík, R; Uchytil, B; Janků, P; Volková, N

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate maternal morbidity and mortality of women suffering from coarctation of the aorta as well as the perinatal mortality of babies delivered by women with this anomaly of the aorta. According to our experience we recommend a suitable form of a follow up and suggest an optimal mode of delivery for these patients. Original paper. 1st and 2nd Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the Masaryk University of Brno--Maternity Hospital, Obilní Trh 11, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic. Our set consists of 34 pregnant women with coarctation of the aorta. These patients were followed up during the pregnancy in the years 1964-1998 by the Centre for Cardiovascular Diseases in Pregnancy in the Maternity Hospital in Brno. Seven women who were not operated on for the coarctation of the aorta (group A) were pregnant 14 times. Twenty seven women who were operated on for the coarctation (group B) had 50 pregnancies. There were no maternal deaths in our set. From the 12 delivered babies of women with non operated coarctation of the aorta one child was SGA (small for gestational age). From 42 babies born by women who underwent an radical operation of the coarctation of the aorta previously we had to face one death of a newborn who was SGA as well. The radical operation of the aorta should be carried out during the first year of age if possible, between the 9th to 12th month, at best. With women who were not operated on there is a greater risk of rupture of the aneurysm of the aorta and aneurysm of the cerebral arteries in the 2nd and 3rd trimester, during the labor and in the early puerperium. We would advise therefore a through follow up during the whole pregnancy. The high BP should be lowered medicamentally. As to the mode of delivery Caesarean section is preferred. With women who were successfully operated on in their early infancy and whose BP is normal or the systolic BP does not exceed 160 mmHg the Caesarean section is not mandatory but elective. We would mostly advise a

  14. Epithelioid Angiosarcoma With Metastatic Disease After Endovascular Therapy of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Schmehl, Joerg; Scharpf, Marcus; Brechtel, Klaus; Kalender, Guenay; Heller, Stephan; Claussen, Claus D.; Lescan, Mario

    2012-02-15

    Malignancies of the aortic wall represent a rare condition, and only a few reports have covered cases of sarcomas arising at the site of a prosthesis made of Dacron. A coincidence with endovascular repair has only been reported in one case to date. We report a patient with epithelioid angiosarcoma and metastatic disease, which was found in an aneurysmal sac after endovascular aortic repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  15. NOX isoforms in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Siu, Kin Lung; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Yixuan; Guo, Jun; Youn, Ji Youn; Du, Jie; Cai, Hua

    2017-04-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the formation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and we have recently established a causal role of uncoupled eNOS in this severe human disease. We have also shown that activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX) lies upstream of uncoupled eNOS. Therefore, identification of the specific NOX isoforms that are required for eNOS uncoupling and AAA formation would ultimately lead to novel therapies for AAA. In the present study, we used the Ang II infused hph-1 mice to examine the roles of NOX isoforms in the development of AAA. We generated double mutants of hph-1-NOX1, hph-1-NOX2, hph-1-p47phox, and hph-1-NOX4. After two weeks of Ang II infusion, the incidence rate of AAA substantially dropped from 76.5% in Ang II infused hph-1 mice (n=34) to 11.1%, 15.0%, 9.5% and 0% in hph-1-NOX1 (n=27), hph-1-NOX2 (n=40), hph-1-p47phox (n=21), and hph-1-NOX4 (n=33) double mutant mice, respectively. The size of abdominal aortas of the four double mutant mice, determined by ultrasound analyses, was significantly smaller than the hph-1 mice. Aortic nitric oxide and H4B bioavailabilities were markedly improved in the double mutants, while superoxide production and eNOS uncoupling activity were substantially diminished. These effects seemed attributed to an endothelial specific restoration of dihydrofolate reductase expression and activity, deficiency of which has been shown to induce eNOS uncoupling and AAA formation in both Ang II-infused hph-1 and apoE null animals. In addition, over-expression of human NOX4 N129S or T555S mutant newly identified in aneurysm patients increased hydrogen peroxide production, further implicating a relationship between NOX and human aneurysm. Taken together, these data indicate that NOX isoforms 1, 2 or 4 lies upstream of dihydrofolate reductase deficiency and eNOS uncoupling to induce AAA formation. These findings may promote development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of the disease by inhibiting NOX signaling.

  16. Neutrophil depletion inhibits experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Eliason, Jonathan L; Hannawa, Kevin K; Ailawadi, Gorav; Sinha, Indranil; Ford, John W; Deogracias, Michael P; Roelofs, Karen J; Woodrum, Derek T; Ennis, Terri L; Henke, Peter K; Stanley, James C; Thompson, Robert W; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-07-12

    Neutrophils may be an important source of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), two matrix-degrading enzymes thought to be critical in the formation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that neutrophil depletion would limit experimental AAA formation by altering one or both of these enzymes. Control, rabbit serum-treated (RS; n=27) or anti-neutrophil-antibody-treated (anti-PMN; n=25) C57BL/6 mice underwent aortic elastase perfusion to induce experimental aneurysms. Anti-PMN-treated mice became neutropenic (mean, 349 cells/microL), experiencing an 84% decrease in the circulating absolute neutrophil count (P<0.001) before elastase perfusion. Fourteen days after elastase perfusion, control mice exhibited a mean aortic diameter (AD) increase of 104+/-14% (P<0.0001), and 67% developed AAAs, whereas anti-PMN-treated mice exhibited a mean AD increase of 42+/-33%, with 8% developing AAAs. The control group also had increased tissue neutrophils (20.3 versus 8.6 cells per 5 high-powered fields [HPFs]; P=0.02) and macrophages (6.1 versus 2.1 cells per 5 HPFs, P=0.005) as compared with anti-PMN-treated mice. There were no differences in monocyte chemotactic protein-1 or macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha chemokine levels between groups by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neutrophil collagenase (MMP-8) expression was detected only in the 14-day control mice, with increased MMP-8 protein levels by Western blotting (P=0.017), and MMP-8-positive neutrophils were seen almost exclusively in this group. Conversely, there were no statistical differences in MMP-2 or MMP-9 mRNA expression, protein levels, enzyme activity, or immunostaining patterns between groups. When C57BL/6 wild-type (n=15) and MMP-8-deficient mice (n=17) were subjected to elastase perfusion, however, ADs at 14 days were no different in size (134+/-7.9% versus 154+/-9.9%; P=0.603), which suggests that MMP-8

  17. Endovascular Exclusion of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Initial Experience with Stent-Grafts in Cardiology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Marcus H.; Zaqqa, Munir; Villareal, Rollo P.; Strickman, Neil E.; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2000-01-01

    The use of an endovascular stent-graft prosthesis for the treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms is receiving increasing attention as an option that may avoid the significant morbidity and mortality associated with open surgical treatment. We studied the clinical effectiveness of stent-grafts in patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms. Between October 1995 and May 1998, 33 patients underwent infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm exclusion with a homemade polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent, and between November 1998 and September 1999, 56 patients underwent abdominal aortic aneurysm exclusion with the Medtronic AneuRx stent-graft. Overall, these patients represented a high-risk surgical group. The technical success rate was 100% in both groups. No patient required immediate conversion to open repair. With the polytetrafluoroethy-lene-covered stent, the primary success rate was 33%, and the secondary success rate was 76%. In the AneuRx group, the primary success rate was 82.8%, and the secondary success rate was 85.3% at 6 months. There was no procedural or 1-month mortality or major morbidity in either group. By showing that infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms can be treated safely and successfully with an endoluminal stent-graft, our early results provide additional support for the endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Further follow-up studies will determine the long-term ability of such treatment to prevent aneurysmal rupture and death. PMID:10928501

  18. Modeling the Growth of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Marc A.; Baxter, Paul D.; Jiang, Tao; Charnell, Aimee M.; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Johnson, Anne B.; Bridge, Katherine I.; Sohrabi, Soroush; Scott, D. Julian A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth is a complex process that is incompletely understood. Significant heterogeneity in growth trajectories between patients has led to difficulties in accurately modeling aneurysm growth across cohorts of patients. We set out to compare four models of aneurysm growth commonly used in the literature and confirm which best fits the patient data of our AAA cohort. Methods: Patients with AAA were included in the study if they had two or more abdominal ultrasound scans greater than 3 months apart. Patients were censored from analysis once their AAA exceeded 5.5 cm. Four models were applied using the R environment for statistical computing. Growth estimates and goodness of fit (using the Akaike Information Criterion, AIC) were compared, with p-values based on likelihood ratio testing. Results: Of 510 enrolled patients, 264 met the inclusion criteria, yielding a total of 1861 imaging studies during 932 cumulative years of surveillance. Overall, growth rates were: (1) 0.35 (0.31,0.39) cm/yr in the growth/time calculation, (2) 0.056 (0.042,0.068) cm/yr in the linear regression model, (3) 0.19 (0.17,0.21) cm/yr in the linear multilevel model, and (4) 0.21 (0.18,0.24) cm/yr in the quadratic multilevel model at time 0, slowing to 0.15 (0.12,0.17) cm/yr at 10 years. AIC was lowest in the quadratic multilevel model (1508) compared to other models (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: AAA growth was heterogeneous between patients; the nested nature of the data is most appropriately modeled by multilevel modeling techniques. PMID:26798704

  19. Modeling the Growth of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Marc A; Baxter, Paul D; Jiang, Tao; Charnell, Aimee M; Griffin, Kathryn J; Johnson, Anne B; Bridge, Katherine I; Sohrabi, Soroush; Scott, D Julian A

    2013-12-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth is a complex process that is incompletely understood. Significant heterogeneity in growth trajectories between patients has led to difficulties in accurately modeling aneurysm growth across cohorts of patients. We set out to compare four models of aneurysm growth commonly used in the literature and confirm which best fits the patient data of our AAA cohort. Patients with AAA were included in the study if they had two or more abdominal ultrasound scans greater than 3 months apart. Patients were censored from analysis once their AAA exceeded 5.5 cm. Four models were applied using the R environment for statistical computing. Growth estimates and goodness of fit (using the Akaike Information Criterion, AIC) were compared, with p-values based on likelihood ratio testing. Of 510 enrolled patients, 264 met the inclusion criteria, yielding a total of 1861 imaging studies during 932 cumulative years of surveillance. Overall, growth rates were: (1) 0.35 (0.31,0.39) cm/yr in the growth/time calculation, (2) 0.056 (0.042,0.068) cm/yr in the linear regression model, (3) 0.19 (0.17,0.21) cm/yr in the linear multilevel model, and (4) 0.21 (0.18,0.24) cm/yr in the quadratic multilevel model at time 0, slowing to 0.15 (0.12,0.17) cm/yr at 10 years. AIC was lowest in the quadratic multilevel model (1508) compared to other models (P < 0.0001). AAA growth was heterogeneous between patients; the nested nature of the data is most appropriately modeled by multilevel modeling techniques.

  20. Endovascular vs open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nedeau, April E.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hsu, Richard; Sachs, Teviah; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Schermerhorn, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) has become first-line therapy at our institution and is performed under a standardized protocol. We compare perioperative mortality, midterm survival, and morbidity after EVAR and open surgical repair (OSR). Methods Records were retrospectively reviewed from May 2000 to September 2010 for repair of infrarenal rAAAs. Primary end points included perioperative mortality and midterm survival. Secondary end points included acute limb ischemia, length of stay, ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, renal failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, and secondary intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test,X2 test, the Fisher exact test, and logistic regression calculations. Midterm survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Seventy-four infrarenal rAAAs were repaired, 19 by EVAR and 55 by OSR. Despite increased age and comorbidity in the EVAR patients, perioperative mortality was 15.7% for EVAR, which was significantly lower than the 49% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.74; P = .008). Midterm survival also favored EVAR (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.77; P = .028, adjusted for age and sex). Mean follow-up was 20 months, and 1-year survival was 60% for EVAR vs 45% for OSR. Mean length of stay for patients surviving >1 day was 10 days for EVAR and 21 days for OSR (P = .004). Ventilator-dependent respiratory failure was 5% in the EVAR group vs 42% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.62; P = .001). Conclusions EVAR of rAAA has a superior perioperative survival advantage and decreased morbidity vs OSR. Although not statistically significant, overall survival favors EVAR. We recommend that EVAR be considered as the first-line treatment of rAAAs and practiced as the standard of care. PMID:22626871

  1. [Anesthesia and recovery of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery].

    PubMed

    Beye, S A; Kane, O; Tchikangoua, T N; Ndiaye, A; Dieng, P A; Ciss, G; Ba, P S; Ndiaye, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anaesthetic assumption of responsibility of the surgery of the aneurism of under renal abdominal aorta. It was a retrospective study over two years (April 2005 - April 2007). Seven patients were operated, the mean age was 69,4 years. An operational pre evaluation was carried out among all patients including/understanding an interrogation, a clinical examination and a clinical assessment. All the patients profited from a general anaesthesia with controlled ventilation. Arterial hypertension (5 cases) was the independent factor of risk followed by the nicotinism (2 cases) with a patient at the stage of obstructive chronic broncho-pneumonopathy (BPCO). A patient was allowed in a table of rupture with acute abdominal pain and a cardiovascular collapse. Electrocardioscopic anomalies were noted among three patients with type of: HVD+ HBAG; HVG; HAG. A patient presented a hypertrophy cardiopathy with deterioration of the function of the VG and an important pulmonary arterial hypertension. A tensionnelle fall was found among three patients after induction with the midazolam. The aortic time of clampage varied between 20 and 120 mn with an average of 57, 6 mn. The incidents at the time of the clampage were: a bradycardia, a hypertensive push and a hypotension. No incident was observed at the time of the declampage. The blood losses per operational were estimated on average at 1000 ml and the numbers of transfusion by patient was on average of 4 pockets. The post operative issue was simple among 5 patients. A surgical recovery was necessary in front of a case of thrombosis of prosthesis. An oligoanurie, an acute respiratory insufficiency was found at the patient admitted in a table of rupture. The intermediate duration of stay threw 11 days. The maintenance of a homodynamic stability per and post operational remainder a good strategy to prevent the operational complications post.

  2. Stent graft types for endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Duffy, James M N; Rolph, Rachel; Waltham, Matthew

    2015-09-24

    The UK prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is estimated at 4.9% in over 65-year olds. Progressive and unpredictable enlargement can lead to rupture. Endovascular repair of AAAs involves a stent graft system being introduced via the femoral artery and manipulated within the aorta under radiological guidance. Following endograft deployment, a seal is formed at the proximal and distal landing zones to exclude the aneurysm sac from the circulation. With the increasing popularity of endovascular repair there has been an increase in the number of commercially available stent graft designs on the market. This is an update of the review first published in 2013. This review aimed to assess the different stent graft types for endovascular repair of AAA. The Cochrane Vascular Group Trials Search Co-ordinator (TSC) searched the Specialised Register (last searched February 2015) and the Cochrane Register of Studies (2015, Issue 1). Trial databases were searched by the TSC for details of ongoing and unpublished studies. All published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of stent graft types in the repair of AAAs were sought without language restriction and in consultation with the Cochrane Vascular Group TSC. We planned to conduct data collection and analysis in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. No studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. It was not possible to review the quality of the evidence in the absence of studies eligible for inclusion in the review. Unfortunately, no data exist regarding direct comparisons of the performance of different stent graft types. High quality randomised controlled trials evaluating stent graft types in abdominal endovascular aneurysm repair are required.

  3. Four-dimensional visualization of thoracic blood flow by magnetic resonance imaging in a patient following correction of transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and uncorrected aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Ley-Zaporozhan, J; Unterhinninghofen, R; Rengier, F; Markl, M; Eichhorn, J; von Tengg-Kobligk, H; Ley, S

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and data analysis allow for comprehensive noninvasive three-dimensional (3D) visualization of complex blood flow. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated three-directional (3dir) flow measurements were employed to assess and visualize time-resolved 3D blood flow in the pulmonary arteries (PA) and thoracic aorta. We present findings in a juvenile patient with surgically corrected transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and aortic coarctation. For the first time, the complex flow patterns in the PA following d-TGA were visualized. Morphologically, a slight asymmetry of the PA was found, with considerable impact on vascular hemodynamics, resulting in diastolic retrograde flow in the larger vessel and diastolic filling of the smaller PA. Additionally, increased flow to the supraaortic vessels was found due to aortic coarctation.

  4. [Inflammatory aortic aneurysms: Single center experiences with endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Strube, H; Treitl, M; Reiser, M; Steckmeier, B; Sadeghi-Azandaryani, M

    2010-10-01

    We report our single center experience of renal function, hydronephrosis and changes in perianeurysmal fibrosis (PAF) after endovascular repair (EVAR) of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA). A total of 6 patients were treated for IAAA with EVAR and the technical success was 100%. During the follow-up period 5 patients showed regression of PAF and 1 patient showed minor progression of PAF on computed tomography scans. In 2 patients hydronephrosis was regressive postoperatively but no patients died within 30 days. There were no secondary complications to report and no secondary intervention was necessary. In the long-term course one patient exhibited complete regression of PAF.In appropriate cases EVAR is a safe method for aneurysm repair for IAAA. In patients with acute inflammation or hydronephrosis individual treatment concepts are required.

  5. Effectiveness of open versus endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in population settings: A systematic review of statewide databases.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christopher R; Brooke, Benjamin S

    2017-10-01

    Patient outcomes after open abdominal aortic aneurysm and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair have been widely reported from several large, randomized, controlled trials. It is not clear whether these trial outcomes are representative of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair procedures performed in real-world hospital settings across the United States. This study was designed to evaluate population-based outcomes after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair versus open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using statewide inpatient databases and examine how they have helped improve our understanding of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases was performed to identify articles comparing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using data from statewide inpatient databases. This search was limited to studies published in the English language after 1990, and abstracts were screened and abstracted by 2 authors. Our search yielded 17 studies published between 2004 and 2016 that used data from 29 different statewide inpatient databases to compare endovascular aortic aneurysm repair versus open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. These studies support the randomized, controlled trial results, including a lower mortality associated with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair extended from the perioperative period up to 3 years after operation, as well as a higher complication rate after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. The evidence from statewide inpatient database analyses has also elucidated trends in procedure volume, patient case mix, volume-outcome relationships, and health care disparities associated with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair versus open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Population analyses of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using statewide inpatient databases have confirmed short- and long-term mortality outcomes obtained from

  6. The effect of aortic morphology on peri-operative mortality of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    To investigate whether aneurysm shape and extent, which indicate whether a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is eligible for endovascular repair (EVAR), influence the outcome of both EVAR and open surgical repair. The influence of six morphological parameters (maximum aortic diameter, aneurysm neck diameter, length and conicality, proximal neck angle, and maximum common iliac diameter) on mortality and reinterventions within 30 days was investigated in rAAA patients randomized before morphological assessment in the Immediate Management of the Patient with Rupture: Open Versus Endovascular strategies (IMPROVE) trial. Patients with a proven diagnosis of rAAA, who underwent repair and had their admission computerized tomography scan submitted to the core laboratory, were included. Among 458 patients (364 men, mean age 76 years), who had either EVAR (n = 177) or open repair (n = 281) started, there were 155 deaths and 88 re-interventions within 30 days of randomization analysed according to a pre-specified plan. The mean maximum aortic diameter was 8.6 cm. There were no substantial correlations between the six morphological variables. Aneurysm neck length was shorter in those undergoing open repair (vs. EVAR). Aneurysm neck length (mean 23.3, SD 16.1 mm) was inversely associated with mortality for open repair and overall: adjusted OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.57, 0.92) for each 16 mm (SD) increase in length. There were no convincing associations of morphological parameters with reinterventions. Short aneurysm necks adversely influence mortality after open repair of rAAA and preclude conventional EVAR. This may help explain why observational studies, but not randomized trials, have shown an early survival benefit for EVAR. ISRCTN 48334791. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  7. The effect of aortic morphology on peri-operative mortality of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether aneurysm shape and extent, which indicate whether a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is eligible for endovascular repair (EVAR), influence the outcome of both EVAR and open surgical repair. Methods and results The influence of six morphological parameters (maximum aortic diameter, aneurysm neck diameter, length and conicality, proximal neck angle, and maximum common iliac diameter) on mortality and reinterventions within 30 days was investigated in rAAA patients randomized before morphological assessment in the Immediate Management of the Patient with Rupture: Open Versus Endovascular strategies (IMPROVE) trial. Patients with a proven diagnosis of rAAA, who underwent repair and had their admission computerized tomography scan submitted to the core laboratory, were included. Among 458 patients (364 men, mean age 76 years), who had either EVAR (n = 177) or open repair (n = 281) started, there were 155 deaths and 88 re-interventions within 30 days of randomization analysed according to a pre-specified plan. The mean maximum aortic diameter was 8.6 cm. There were no substantial correlations between the six morphological variables. Aneurysm neck length was shorter in those undergoing open repair (vs. EVAR). Aneurysm neck length (mean 23.3, SD 16.1 mm) was inversely associated with mortality for open repair and overall: adjusted OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.57, 0.92) for each 16 mm (SD) increase in length. There were no convincing associations of morphological parameters with reinterventions. Conclusion Short aneurysm necks adversely influence mortality after open repair of rAAA and preclude conventional EVAR. This may help explain why observational studies, but not randomized trials, have shown an early survival benefit for EVAR. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25627357

  8. Characterization of human aortic elastase found in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J R; Mandell, C; Wise, L

    1987-10-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the homeostatic balance between elastase and antiprotease activity is altered in the infrarenal aorta of those patients with different types of aortic pathologic findings. The specific properties of elastase found in the aorta of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are discussed herein. Activity of elastase extracted from ten pooled AAA specimens was observed when incubated with several inhibitors: 13.2 per cent for phenyl-suphonyl flouride (PSF); 43.3 per cent for ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); 77.7 per cent for pepstatin; 137.0 per cent for leupeptin, and 24.0 per cent for alpha-1-antitrypsin. Irreversible inhibition by PSF indicates that the elastase is a serine protease. The elastase is most likely not a metallo enzyme, since it had no absolute requirement for divalent cations as indicated by only partial inhibition by EDTA. Elastase activity is most likely not due to cathepsins B or D, since cathepsins are active in an acid pH and selectively inhibited by leupeptin and pepstatin. The pH curve revealed a maximum activity at pH 8.2 and elastase activity was significantly inhibited by alpha-1-antitrypsin in a dose response manner determining functional elastase activity. These data indicate that the elastase in the aorta of patients with an AAA has the exact properties of the serine elastase found in the smooth muscle cells of the aorta in rats. These results also confirm the critical role of alpha-1-antitrypsin in determining functional elastase activity. Smooth muscle cell regulation of elastin metabolism may be important in determining why some patients have AAA and others have occlusive aortic disease develop.

  9. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Mark; Giannakopoulos, Triantafillos; Al-Khoury, Georges E; Chaer, Rabih A; Avgerinos, Efthymios D

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but also for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs [endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)] has increased the need for repeat imaging, especially in the postoperative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution, and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While computed tomographic angiography and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, US technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D, or 4D contrast-enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume, and most importantly, it can detect endoleaks post-EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast-enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post-EVAR follow-up, techniques, and diagnostic accuracy.

  10. The effect of flow recirculation on abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taib, Ishkrizat; Amirnordin, Shahrin Hisham; Madon, Rais Hanizam; Mustafa, Norrizal; Osman, Kahar

    2012-06-01

    The presences of flow recirculation at the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) region yield the unpredictable failure of aneurismal wall. The failure of the aneurismal wall is closely related to the hemodynamic factor. Hemodynamic factor such as pressure and velocity distribution play a significance role of aneurysm growth and rupture. By using the computational approach, the influence of hemodynamic factor is investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method on the virtual AAA model. The virtual 3D AAAs model was reconstructed from Spiral Computed Tomography scan (CT-scan). The blood flow is assumed as being transient, laminar and Newtonian within a rigid section of the vessel. The blood flow also driven by an imposed of pressure gradient in the form of physiological waveform. The pulsating blood flow is also considered in this simulation. The results on pressure distribution and velocity profile are analyzed to interpret the behaviour of flow recirculation. The results show the forming of vortices is seen at the aneurysm bulge. This vortices is form at the aneurysm region then destroyed rapidly by flow recirculation. Flow recirculation is point out much higher at distal end of aneurysm closed to iliac bifurcation. This phenomenon is managed to increase the possibility of aneurysm growth and rupture.

  11. Distribution of Wall Stress in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasheras, Juan

    2005-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is believed to occur when the mechanical stress acting on the wall exceeds the strength of the wall tissue. Therefore, knowledge of the AAA wall stress distribution could be useful in assessing its risk of rupture. In our research, a finite element analysis was used to determine the wall stresses both in idealized models and in a real clinical model in which the aorta was considered isotropic with nonlinear material properties and was loaded with a given pressure. In the idealized models, both maximum diameter and asymmetry were found to have substantial influence on the distribution of the wall stress. The thrombus inside the AAA was also found to help protecting the walls from high stresses. Using CT scans of the AAA, the actual geometry of the aneurysm was reconstructed and we found that wall tension increases on the flatter surface (typically corresponds to the posterior surface) and at the inflection points of the bulge. In addition to the static analysis, we also performed simulations of the effect of unsteady pressure wave propagation inside the aneurysm.

  12. Lipoprotein(a) Levels in Patients With Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Kazuhiko; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Serban, Maria-Corina; Ursoniu, Sorin; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Jones, Steven R; Martin, Seth; Blaha, Michael J; Toth, Peter P; Rizzo, Manfredi; Kostner, Karam; Rysz, Jacek; Banach, Maciej

    2017-02-01

    Circulating markers relevant to the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are currently required. Lipoprotein(a), Lp(a), is considered a candidate marker associated with the presence of AAA. The present meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the association between circulating Lp(a) levels and the presence of AAA. The PubMed-based search was conducted up to April 30, 2015, to identify the studies focusing on Lp(a) levels in patients with AAA and controls. Quantitative data synthesis was performed using a random effects model, with standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) as summary statistics. Overall, 9 studies were identified. After a combined analysis, patients with AAA were found to have a significantly higher level of Lp(a) compared to the controls (SMD: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.41-1.33, P < .001). This result remained robust in the sensitivity analysis, and its significance was not influenced after omitting each of the included studies from the meta-analysis. The present meta-analysis confirmed a higher level of circulating Lp(a) in patients with AAA compared to controls. High Lp(a) levels can be associated with the presence of AAA, and Lp(a) may be a marker in screening for AAA. Further studies are needed to establish the clinical utility of measuring Lp(a) in the prevention and management of AAA.

  13. Large eddy simulations of blood dynamics in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Christian; Le Van, Davide; Quadrio, Maurizio; Formaggia, Luca; Domanin, Maurizio

    2017-09-01

    We study the effects of transition to turbulence in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The presence of transitional effects in such districts is related to the heart pulsatility and the sudden change of diameter of the vessels, and has been recorded by means of clinical measures as well as of computational studies. Here we propose, for the first time, the use of a large eddy simulation (LES) model to accurately describe transition to turbulence in realistic scenarios of AAA obtained from radiological images. To this aim, we post-process the obtained numerical solutions to assess significant quantities, such as the ensemble-averaged velocity and wall shear stress, the standard deviation of the fluctuating velocity field, and vortical structures educed via the so-called Q-criterion. The results demonstrate the suitability of the considered LES model and show the presence of significant transitional effects around the impingement region during the mid-deceleration phase. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of Hypertension with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    Hypertension is positively associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) presence, which supports a hypothesis that hypertension may also be positively associated with AAA expansion. To determine whether hypertension is associated with AAA expansion, we reviewed currently available studies with a systematic literature search and meta-analytic estimate. Databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched through July 2015 using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). Studies considered for inclusion met the following criteria: the study population was AAA patients with and without hypertension, and outcomes included data regarding AAA expansion. For each study, expansion rates in both the hypertensive and nonhypertensive groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Of 614 potentially relevant publications screened initially, we identified 20 eligible studies including data on 6,619 AAA patients. No individual study indicated a statistically significant (positive or negative) association of hypertension with AAA expansion rates. A pooled analysis of all the 20 studies demonstrated that hypertension was not associated with AAA expansion rates in the fixed-effect model (SMD 0.03, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.17, P = 0.19). There was no evidence of significant publication bias. Hypertension is not associated with AAA expansion. Further investigations would be required to elucidate why hypertension is not associated with AAA expansion despite its positive association with AAA presence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral Steroid Use and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion - Positive Association.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yuta; Goto, Hitoshi; Ohara, Masato; Hashimoto, Munetaka; Akamatsu, Daijiro; Shimizu, Takuya; Miyama, Noriyuki; Tsuchida, Ken; Kawamura, Keiichiro; Umetsu, Michihisa; Suzuki, Shunya; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2017-06-30

    The maximum axial diameter (MAD) of a fusiform abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an indicator of the risk of expansion or rupture. Apart from smoking and MAD itself, few expansion risk factors have been reported. In this study, we investigated expansion risk factors for AAA.Methods and Results:This retrospective cohort study included 176 patients who attended Tohoku University Hospital with infrarenal fusiform AAA. AAA expansion rate was determined on multidetector computed tomography, and the correlations between expansion rate and the clinical data were analyzed. The median expansion rate was 2.405 mm/year. On univariate analysis, a significant positive correlation with expansion rate was observed for the initial MAD (P<0.001) and significant negative correlations for oral angiotensin receptor blocker usage (P=0.025), height (P=0.005), body weight (P=0.017), total cholesterol (P=0.007), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.004), and HbA1c (P=0.037). On logistic regression analysis, significant positive associations with expansion rate were observed for initial MAD (P<0.001) and oral steroid usage (P=0.029) and a negative association for height (P=0.041). Oral steroid usage is an important risk factor for AAA expansion, independent of other risk factors of atherosclerosis and MAD.

  16. The biaxial biomechanical behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Siobhan A; Healey, Donagh A; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M; Doyle, Barry J

    2014-12-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when the local wall stress exceeds the local wall strength. Knowledge of AAA wall mechanics plays a fundamental role in the development and advancement of AAA rupture risk assessment tools. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the biaxial mechanical properties of AAA tissue. Multiple biaxial test protocols were performed on AAA samples harvested from 28 patients undergoing open surgical repair. Both the Tangential Modulus (TM) and stretch ratio (λ) were recorded and compared in both the circumferential (ϴ) and longitudinal (L) directions at physiologically relevant stress levels, the influence of patient specific factors such as sex, age AAA diameter and status were examined. The biomechanical response was also fit to a hyperplastic material model. The AAA tissue was found to be anisotropic with a greater tendency to stiffen in the circumferential direction compared to the longitudinal direction. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model represented the data well and the properties were not influenced by the investigated patient specific factors however, a future study utilizing a larger cohort of patients is warranted to confirm these findings. This work provides further insights on the biomechanical behavior of AAA and may be useful in the development of more reliable rupture risk assessment tools.

  17. Determination of linear viscoelastic behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm thrombus.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Evelyne A; Dams, Susanne D; Peters, Gerrit W M; Rutten, Marcel C M; Schurink, Geert Willem H; Buth, Jaap; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether the linear viscoelastic properties of an abdominal aortic aneurysm thrombus can be determined by rheometry. Although large strains occur in the in vivo situation, in this work only linear behavior is studied to show the applicability of the described methods. A thrombus exists of several layers that vary in composition, structure and mechanical properties. Two types of thrombus are described. In discrete transition thrombi the layers are not or at most weakly attached to each other and the structure of each layer is different. Continuous transition thrombi consist of strongly attached layers whose structure changes gradually throughout the thickness of the thrombus. Shear experiments are performed on samples from both types of thrombus on a rotational rheometer using a parallel plate geometry. In the discrete type the storage modulus G' cannot be assumed equal for the different layers. In the continuous thrombus, G', changes gradually throughout the layered structure. In both types the loss modulus, G'', does not vary throughout the thrombus. Furthermore, it was found that Time-Temperature Superposition is applicable to thrombus tissue. Since results were reproducible it can be concluded that the method we used to determine the viscoelastic properties is applicable to thrombus tissue.

  18. Non-linear viscoelastic behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm thrombus.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Evelyne A; Dams, Susanne D; Peters, Gerrit W M; Rutten, Marcel C M; Schurink, Geert Willem H; Buth, Jaap; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the linear and non-linear viscoelastic behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm thrombus and to study the changes in mechanical properties throughout the thickness of the thrombus. Samples are gathered from thrombi of seven patients. Linear viscoelastic data from oscillatory shear experiments show that the change of properties throughout the thrombus is different for each thrombus. Furthermore the variations found within one thrombus are of the same order of magnitude as the variation between patients. To study the non-linear regime, stress relaxation experiments are performed. To describe the phenomena observed experimentally, a non-linear multimode model is presented. The parameters for this model are obtained by fitting this model successfully to the experiments. The model cannot only describe the average stress response for all thrombus samples but also the highest and lowest stress responses. To determine the influence on the wall stress of the behavior observed the model proposed needs to implemented in the finite element wall stress analysis.

  19. Application of Metabolic Profiling to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Research.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Mahim I; Greco, Michele; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Holmes, Elaine; Davies, Alun H

    2017-07-07

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease posing diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Metabonomics may aid in the diagnosis of AAA, determination of individualized risk, discovery of therapeutic targets, and improve understanding of pathogenesis. A systematic review of the diversity and outcomes of existing AAA metabonomic research has been performed. Original research studies applying metabonomics to human aneurysmal disease are included. Seven relevant articles were identified: four studies were based on plasma/serum metabolite profiling, and three studies examined aneurysmal tissue. Aminomalonic acid, guanidinosuccinic acid, and glycerol emerge as potential plasma biomarkers of large aneurysm. Lipid profiling improves predictive models of aneurysm presence. Patterns of metabolite variation associated with AAA relate to carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Perioperative perturbations in metabolites suggest differential systemic inflammatory responses to surgery, generating hypotheses for adjunctive perioperative therapy. Significant limitations include small study sizes, lack of correction for multiple testing false discovery rates, and single time-point sampling. Metabolic profiling carries the potential to identify biomarkers of AAA and elucidate pathways underlying aneurysmal disease. Statistically and methodologically robust studies are required for validation, addressing the hiatus in understanding mechanisms of aneurysm growth and developing effective treatment strategies.

  20. Matricellular protein CCN3 mitigates abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; van der Voort, Dustin; Shi, Hong; Qing, Yulan; Hiraoka, Shuichi; Takemoto, Minoru; Yokote, Koutaro; Moxon, Joseph V.; Norman, Paul; Rittié, Laure; Atkins, G. Brandon; Gerson, Stanton L.; Shi, Guo-Ping; Golledge, Jonathan; Dong, Nianguo; Perbal, Bernard; Prosdocimo, Domenick A.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; however, the mechanisms that are involved in disease initiation and progression are incompletely understood. Extracellular matrix proteins play an integral role in modulating vascular homeostasis in health and disease. Here, we determined that the expression of the matricellular protein CCN3 is strongly reduced in rodent AAA models, including angiotensin II–induced AAA and elastase perfusion–stimulated AAA. CCN3 levels were also reduced in human AAA biopsies compared with those in controls. In murine models of induced AAA, germline deletion of Ccn3 resulted in severe phenotypes characterized by elastin fragmentation, vessel dilation, vascular inflammation, dissection, heightened ROS generation, and smooth muscle cell loss. Conversely, overexpression of CCN3 mitigated both elastase- and angiotensin II–induced AAA formation in mice. BM transplantation experiments suggested that the AAA phenotype of CCN3-deficient mice is intrinsic to the vasculature, as AAA was not exacerbated in WT animals that received CCN3-deficient BM and WT BM did not reduce AAA severity in CCN3-deficient mice. Genetic and pharmacological approaches implicated the ERK1/2 pathway as a critical regulator of CCN3-dependent AAA development. Together, these results demonstrate that CCN3 is a nodal regulator in AAA biology and identify CCN3 as a potential therapeutic target for vascular disease. PMID:26974158

  1. Osteoclastogenesis in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A new therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander D; Yamanouchi, Dai

    2017-09-25

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are a major cause of death. Currently, the mainstay of treatment for AAA is surgical repair and there are no FDA approved medical therapies for AAA. Much research is in progress to discover new medical therapies for AAA. The pathophysiology of AAA is understood to be a complex interplay of inflammatory and proteolytic processes that degenerate the aneurysm wall. Arterial calcification, which is observed in AAA but to a lesser extent than in arterial occlusive disease, occurs in a highly regulated manner in a similar process as mineral deposition in bone. Osteoblasts-like cells are responsible for mineral deposition in atherosclerotic plaques. Recently, osteoclast-like cells - the catabolic counterpart to osteoblasts - were discovered in atherosclerotic plaques. Additionally, osteoclast-like cells are present in the wall of AAA but not in healthy aortas. Osteoclast-like cells secrete matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) - proteases implicated in arterial aneurysm wall degeneration - and may contribute to the degredation of the aneurysm wall. Inhibiting osteoclast-like cells may prevent aneurysm progression by reducing tissue levels of MMPs. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of AAA formation and the current role of medical therapy in treatment of AAA. Furthermore, we highlight the emerging hypothesis that osteoclasts play a key role in the development of AAA and discuss therapies to inhibit osteoclastogenesis in AAA. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Animal models in the research of abdominal aortic aneurysms development.

    PubMed

    Patelis, N; Moris, D; Schizas, D; Damaskos, C; Perrea, D; Bakoyiannis, C; Liakakos, T; Georgopoulos, S

    2017-09-22

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a prevalent and potentially life threatening disease. Many animal models have been developed to simulate the natural history of the disease or test preclinical endovascular devices and surgical procedures. The aim of this review is to describe different methods of AAA induction in animal models and report on the effectiveness of the methods described in inducing an analogue of a human AAA. The PubMed database was searched for publications with titles containing the following terms "animal" or ''animal model(s)'' and keywords "research", ''aneurysm(s)'', "aorta", ''pancreatic elastase'', "Angiotensin", "AngII" "Calcium Chloride" or "CaCl(2)". Starting date for this search was set to 2004, since previously bibliography was already covered by the review of Daugherty A. and Cassis L.A. We focused on animal studies that reported a model of aneurysm development and progression. A number of different approaches of AAA induction in animal models has been developed, used and combined since the first report in the 1960's. Although specific methods are successful in AAA induction in animal models, it is necessary that these methods and their respective results are inline with the pathophysiology and the mechanisms involved in human AAA development. A researcher should know the advantages/disadvantages of each animal model and choose the appropriate model.

  3. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms in cardiovascular patients.

    PubMed

    Hanly, Ann M; Javad, Shazia; Anderson, Louise P; Horgan, John; Kelly, Cathal J

    2006-05-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the incidence of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) in a population of symptomatic cardiac patients. A retrospective cohort study of investigations was done at the cardiology clinic, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin. There were 415 men and women recruited by referral to the cardiology clinic. All participants underwent routine ultrasound screening for AAA, and full assessment of all cardiac risk factors. Data were analyzed and correlated with age, sex, and diagnosis. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of aneurysm was based on an anteroposterior diameter of 3 cm or more. Of the 415 patients screened, 47 aneurysms were detected. Total incidence of AAA was 9.9% (male 14.1%, female 3.95%). All aneurysms were detected in patients over 60 years, detection rate 11.7% (male 16.3%, female 3.9%). The incidence of AAA was significantly higher in those who were subsequently proven to have cardiovascular disease, 13.8% (male 18%, female 5.15%). Screening the general population for those at risk of AAA is an ongoing debate. This study supports the concept of screening a higher risk population of patients over 60 years with cardiovascular disease.

  4. Current modalities for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: Implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Debra Ann

    2010-12-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) represent a significant health problem in the United States as more than 1 million people are afflicted and the prevalence is only expected to increase. Given that AAA rupture carries a high mortality rate, there is interest in repairing the aneurysm electively before aneurysm rupture. Two approaches to aneurysm repair are open repair and endovascular repair. However, limited data comparing the outcomes of these different methods exist. A systematic review of recent clinical trials was conducted to identify and compare the short- and long-term clinical outcomes between open and endovascular repair. Prospective, controlled trials published in the last 5 years were acquired using PubMed, Ovid, and Scopus databases. Four studies were identified during the search. Study trends suggest a perioperative advantage using endovascular repair. However, this advantage does not appear to be maintained in the long term. Each type of repair carries its own risk profile that is likely influenced by additional factors, such as the patient's age and comorbidities. It is critical that healthcare providers are aware of the risks associated with each approach in order to provide optimal patient care. Copyright © 2010 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Arteriomegaly and inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm. Case report.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, M; Uccini, S; Luzi, G; Murante, G; Tagliacozzo, S

    1997-02-01

    In this case report inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) was superimposed on an arteriomegaly condition complicated by bilateral aneurysm of the common iliac arteries. Obstruction of the right ureter, mild hydronephrosis of the left system and a slight impairment of renal function were also present. Preoperative cellular and humoral immunological parameters were within normal limits while the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was elevated (74 mm). Histological analysis showed numerous scattered lymphoid cells or organized in follicles with germinal centers within the adventitial thickening of the IAAA wall. Immunohistochemical analysis on frozen sections demonstrated that dispersed and perivascular lymphoid cells were mainly composed of similar amounts of CD3+/CD4+ and CD3+/CD8+ T lymphocytes. Histological analysis of the common iliac artery aneurysm showed a mild intimal thickening will small aggregates of macrophages. After aneurysm repair all peripheral blood analysis normalized within one month after surgery. The IAAA observed in our patient with arteriomegaly as underlying arterial disease cannot be interpreted as an inflammatory variation of an atherosclerotic aneurysm. The histological pattern of the inflammatory reaction and its resolution after surgery give, in our opinion, more credit to the etiopathogenetic hypothesis of a reaction elicited by an antigen within the arterial wall of the infrarenal aorta which might be enhanced by the lymphatic stasis subsequent to aneurysm compression.

  6. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management

    PubMed Central

    Scaife, Mark; Giannakopoulos, Triantafillos; Al-Khoury, Georges E.; Chaer, Rabih A.; Avgerinos, Efthymios D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but also for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs [endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)] has increased the need for repeat imaging, especially in the postoperative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution, and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While computed tomographic angiography and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, US technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D, or 4D contrast-enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume, and most importantly, it can detect endoleaks post-EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast-enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post-EVAR follow-up, techniques, and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27303669

  7. The potential role of DNA methylation in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ryer, Evan J; Ronning, Kaitryn E; Erdman, Robert; Schworer, Charles M; Elmore, James R; Peeler, Thomas C; Nevius, Christopher D; Lillvis, John H; Garvin, Robert P; Franklin, David P; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Tromp, Gerard

    2015-05-18

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disorder that has a significant impact on the aging population. While both genetic and environmental risk factors have been implicated in AAA formation, the precise genetic markers involved and the factors influencing their expression remain an area of ongoing investigation. DNA methylation has been previously used to study gene silencing in other inflammatory disorders and since AAA has an extensive inflammatory component, we sought to examine the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in mononuclear blood cells of AAA cases and matched non-AAA controls. To this end, we collected blood samples and isolated mononuclear cells for DNA and RNA extraction from four all male groups: AAA smokers (n = 11), AAA non-smokers (n = 9), control smokers (n = 10) and control non-smokers (n = 11). Methylation data were obtained using the Illumina 450k Human Methylation Bead Chip and analyzed using the R language and multiple Bioconductor packages. Principal component analysis and linear analysis of CpG island subsets identified four regions with significant differences in methylation with respect to AAA: kelch-like family member 35 (KLHL35), calponin 2 (CNN2), serpin peptidase inhibitor clade B (ovalbumin) member 9 (SERPINB9), and adenylate cyclase 10 pseudogene 1 (ADCY10P1). Follow-up studies included RT-PCR and immunostaining for CNN2 and SERPINB9. These findings are novel and suggest DNA methylation may play a role in AAA pathobiology.

  8. Mitochondrial adaptations during myocardial hypertrophy induced by abdominal aortic constriction.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhusong; Wang, Xinxing; Liu, Weili; Gong, Jingbo; Gao, Xiujie; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Fang; Qian, Lingjia

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is an adaptive response of the heart to work overload. Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is usually associated with the ultimate development of cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. The mitochondria have an important function in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, mitochondrial adaptations to hypertrophic stimulus remain ambiguous. A rat model of myocardial hypertrophy was established using abdominal aortic constriction. The expression of mitochondrial complexes was evaluated through electrophoresis using blue native and blue native/sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme activity of mitochondrial complexes was detected through in-gel activity. Mitochondrial function and biogenesis decreased in hypertrophied myocardium. The content and activity of mitochondrial Complex V dimers and Complex I significantly decreased during hypertrophy, as well as those of the α, β, B, and D chains of the Complex V dimers. However, the content and activity of mitochondrial Complex V oligomers and Complexes II, III, and IV did not change. The decreased content and activity of Complex V dimers and Complex I caused the decline in mitochondrial function and biogenesis during cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hemodynamic Influences on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Disease: Application of Biomechanics to Aneurysm Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Monica M.; Dalman, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    “Atherosclerotic” abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur with the greatest frequency in the distal aorta. The unique hemodynamic environment of this area predisposes it to site-specific degenerative changes. In this review, we summarize the differential hemodynamic influences present along the length of the abdominal aorta, and demonstrate how alterations in aortic flow and wall shear stress modify AAA progression in experimental models. Improved understanding of aortic hemodynamic risk profiles provides an opportunity to modify patient activity patterns to minimize risk of aneurysmal degeneration. PMID:20347049

  10. Rare Complication of non-Treated Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Extensive Thrombus in Right Cardiac Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Bluemke, David A.; Staszko, Kamila Fernanda; Pereira, Ana Neri Rodrigues Epitacio; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old patient presented with shortness of breath after falling down. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed an extensive thrombus in the right atrium (RA), extensive thrombosis of the inferior vena cava (IVC), and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A magnetic resonance confirmed the thrombosis of the RA extending to the IVC, which was apparently fused to the abdominal aortic aneurysm (compression? erosion?). This case illustrates a severe and rare complication of a non-treated AAA. There probably was IVC erosion by the aortic aneurysm, leading to blood stasis and extensive thrombosis of the IVC and right cardiac chambers. PMID:27849260

  11. Clear Depiction of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orta Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm incidentally detected clearly with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) during the examination of a patient with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia that later converted to acute myeloid leukemia. DW-MRI revealed a hyperintense halo surrounding the abdominal aorta with aneurysmatic dilatation, establishing the diagnosis.

  12. [Costs evaluation of operation treatment of ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Gnus, Jan; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Hauzer, Willy; Grzanka, Magdalena

    2006-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm operation, performed in the emergency mode, has a much larger mortality than the operation of the aneurysm in scheduled mode. The aim of this study is to compare the treatment costs of the aneurysm operated in the emergency mode and scheduled mode. MATERIAL AND METHODS. 125 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm were take under consideration, 18 of whom were admitted because of the abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture, and 107 of them were admitted without the signs of rupture. From 107 patients admitted in the scheduled mode, 25 were not qualified to the operation because of: other coexisting illnesses (10), recent stroke (1), not agreeing to the surgical intervention (4) and 10 were observed because of the small diameter of the aneurysm and lack of pain. After receiving the costs from the accountants, we analyzed the costs of treatment in the ruptured and non-ruptured aortic aneurysms. The total cost of the treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is almost as twice higher as the treatment cost of non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  13. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in the evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Amparo, E G; Hoddick, W K; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R; Justich, E; Filly, R A; Higgins, C B

    1985-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate abdominal aortic aneurysms in 27 patients. The findings were compared retrospectively with CT, ultrasound (US), and angiography in 17 cases and prospectively with US in 10 cases. MRI identified the renal arteries in all cases, demonstrated involvement at or above the origin of the renal arteries in eight patients, and showed extension of the aneurysm into the iliac arteries in 12 cases. The outer dimension of the aneurysm, the diameter of the residual lumen, and the length of the aneurysm were measured easily from the MR images. The measurements of transverse dimension of the abdominal aortic aneurysm were similar for MRI, CT, and US. MRI more accurately defined extension above the renal arteries and below the aortic bifurcation. It is concluded that MRI provides the necessary information for the surveillance and preoperative evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  14. The association of simple renal cysts with abdominal aortic aneurysms and their impact on renal function after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Konstantinos; Rountas, Christos; Saleptsis, Vasileios; Athanasoulas, Athanasios; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2016-04-01

    We validated the association of simple renal cysts with abdominal aortic aneurysm and other cardiovascular factors and assessed simple renal cysts' impact on renal function before and after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted. Computed tomography angiograms of 100 consecutive male patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm who underwent endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (Group 1) were reviewed and compared with 100 computed tomography angiogram of aged-matched male patients without abdominal aortic aneurysm (Group 2). Patients' demographic data, risk factors, abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter, the presence of simple renal cyst and laboratory tests were recorded. No difference was observed between the two groups in respect to other cardiovascular risk factors except hyperlipidemia with higher prevalence in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Presence of simple renal cysts was independently associated with age (p < 0.05) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (p = 0.0157). There was no correlation between simple renal cysts and abdominal aortic aneurysm size or pre-operative creatinine and urea levels. No difference was observed in post-operative creatinine and urea levels either immediately after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair or in 12-month follow-up. In male patients, the presence of simple renal cysts is associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm and is increasing with age. However, their presence is neither associated with impaired renal function pre-endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and post-endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair nor after 12-month follow-up.

  15. Staged endourologic and endovascular repair of an infrarenal inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting with forniceal rupture.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Rebecca D; Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J; Jackman, Stephen V; Chaer, Rabih A

    2008-11-01

    We present the case of a 79-year-old female who presented with severe left flank pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. She was diagnosed with left peripelvic urinary extravasation and forniceal rupture secondary to an intact infrarenal inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive periaortic fibrosis. Successful operative repair was performed with staged ureteral and endovascular stenting with subsequent resolution of periaortic inflammation and ureteral obstruction, and shrinkage of the aneurysm sac. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAAs) represent 5% to 10% of all abdominal aortic aneurysms. The distinguishing features of inflammatory aneurysms include thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis, and adhesions to adjacent retroperitoneal structures. The most commonly involved adjacent structures are the duodenum, left renal vein, and ureter. Adhesions to the urinary system can cause hydronephrosis or hydroureter and result in obstructive uropathy. An unusual case of IAAA presenting with forniceal rupture is presented, with successful endovascular and endourologic repair.

  16. Effect of coarctation of the aorta and bicuspid aortic valve on flow dynamics and turbulence in the aorta using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Garcia, Julio; Gaillard, Emmanuel; Maftoon, Nima; Di Labbio, Giuseppe; Cloutier, Guy; Kadem, Lyes

    2014-03-01

    Blood flow in the aorta has been of particular interest from both fluid dynamics and physiology perspectives. Coarctation of the aorta (COA) is a congenital heart disease corresponding to a severe narrowing in the aortic arch. Up to 85 % of patients with COA have a pathological aortic valve, leading to a narrowing at the valve level. The aim of the present work was to advance the state of understanding of flow through a COA to investigate how narrowing in the aorta (COA) affects the characteristics of the velocity field and, in particular, turbulence development. For this purpose, particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted at physiological flow and pressure conditions, with three different aorta configurations: (1) normal case: normal aorta + normal aortic valve; (2) isolated COA: COA (with 75 % reduction in aortic cross-sectional area) + normal aortic valve and (3) complex COA: COA (with 75 % reduction in aortic cross-sectional area) + pathological aortic valve. Viscous shear stress (VSS), representing the physical shear stress, Reynolds shear stress (RSS), representing the turbulent shear stress, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), representing the intensity of fluctuations in the fluid flow environment, were calculated for all cases. Results show that, compared with a healthy aorta, the instantaneous velocity streamlines and vortices were deeply changed in the presence of the COA. The normal aorta did not display any regions of elevated VSS, RSS and TKE at any moment of the cardiac cycle. The magnitudes of these parameters were elevated for both isolated COA and complex COA, with their maximum values mainly being located inside the eccentric jet downstream of the COA. However, the presence of a pathologic aortic valve, in complex COA, amplifies VSS (e.g., average absolute peak value in the entire aorta for a total flow of 5 L/min: complex COA: = 36 N/m2; isolated COA = 19 N/m2), RSS (e.g., average peak value in the entire aorta for a total flow of 5

  17. Geometric Predictors of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Maximum Wall Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Solórzano, Luis R.; Finol, Ender

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a dilation of the abdominal aorta (above 50 % of its original diameter), which can cause death upon rupturing. It usually grows asymptomatically leading to late clinical intervention. The medical criteria to indicate surgery are based on measuring the diameter and growth rate, but in many cases aneurysms fail at uncharacterized critical values. In search of a more efficient technique in predicting AAA failure, there is consensus on the importance of studying its geometric characteristics and estimation of the wall stress, but no fully successful correlation has been found between the two yet. This work examines the relationship between a parameterized geometry (18 input variables and 10 dependent indices) and 1 output variable: the maximum wall stress. Design of Experiments (DOE) techniques are used to generate 183 geometric configurations, for which Finite Element Analyses are performed using ANSYS™ state-of-the-art solver with a hyperelastic, isotropic and homogeneous arterial model for the wall, considering systolic internal pressure (steady state) and the restriction of longitudinal movement at the blood vessel end-sections. Due to the large number of independent parameters to consider, a preliminary Parameters Correlation analysis was performed to determine if a correlation between all input parameters and the maximum stress existed. The correlations between input parameters and the output variable were determined using the Spearman Rank correlation. Correlations with the maximum wall stress for: maximum diameter (ρ = 0.46), wall thickness (ρ = 0.35), dc parameter (ρ = 0.21) and tortuosity (ρ = 0.55) were found. The response surface function between geometry and maximum wall stress was estimated by three models: Universal Kriging geostatistical regression (18 parameters), multiple linear regression (4 parameters) and multiple exponential regression (4 parameters). The models accounted for the stress variance by 99 %, 61

  18. Aortic transection and diverting bypass as treatment of repetitive recurrent abdominal aortic false aneurysm rupture in a patient with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Dong; Won, Yong-Sung; Yun, Sang-Seob; Park, Sun-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Koh, Yong-Bok

    2011-02-01

    Abdominal aortic false aneurysms in patients with Behcet's disease have been reported frequently and repaired successfully by various procedures; however, anastomotic false aneurysms have often been reported to occur after the operation. In this article, we report a case of four-time repetitive, recurrent suprarenal abdominal aortic false aneurysm ruptures that lasted for 7 years. The location of this aneurysm was not easy to repair not only by open surgical procedures but by endovascular stent because the aortic defect was too close to the visceral arterial branches. The last operation consisted of primary repair of aortic defect, transection of abdominal aorta at the level of supraceliac aorta with end closure, and a thoracic aorta to abdominal aorta bypass with Dacron graft. An 8-year follow-up revealed no more abdominal aortic aneurysm recurrence.

  19. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.

  20. Interleukin-6 receptor pathways in abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Seamus C.; Smith, Andrew J.P.; Jones, Gregory T.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Rampuri, Riaz; Bown, Matthew J.; Folkersen, Lasse; Baas, Annette F.; de Borst, Gert Jan; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Price, Jacqueline F.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; McLachlan, Stela; Agu, Obi; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Ruigrok, Ynte M.; van't Hof, F.N.; Powell, Janet T.; van Rij, Andre M.; Casas, Juan P.; Eriksson, Per; Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Humphries, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting circulating IL-6 in AAA, and new investigations of the association between a common non-synonymous functional variant (Asp358Ala) in the IL-6R gene (IL6R) and AAA, followed the analysis of the variant both in vitro and in vivo. Inflammation may play a role in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Interleukin-6 (IL-6) signalling through its receptor (IL-6R) is one pathway that could be exploited pharmacologically. We investigated this using a Mendelian randomization approach. Results Up to October 2011, we identified seven studies (869 cases, 851 controls). Meta-analysis demonstrated that AAA cases had higher levels of IL-6 than controls [standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.46 SD, 95% CI = 0.25–0.66, I2 = 70%, P = 1.1 × 10–5 random effects]. Meta-analysis of five studies (4524 cases/15 710 controls) demonstrated that rs7529229 (which tags the non-synonymous variant Asp358Ala, rs2228145) was associated with a lower risk of AAA, per Ala358 allele odds ratio 0.84, 95% CI: 0.80–0.89, I2 = 0%, P = 2.7 × 10–11). In vitro analyses in lymphoblastoid cell lines demonstrated a reduction in the expression of downstream targets (STAT3, MYC and ICAM1) in response to IL-6 stimulation in Ala358 carriers. Conclusions A Mendelian randomization approach provides robust evidence that signalling via the IL-6R is likely to be a causal pathway in AAA. Drugs that inhibit IL-6R may play a role in AAA management. PMID:23111417

  1. Abdominal aortic calcification: A reappraisal of epidemiological and pathophysiological data.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    In men and women, there is a significant association between the risk of cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, stroke) and risk of major fragility fracture (hip, vertebra). Abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) can be assessed using semiquantitative scores on spine radiographs and spine scans obtained by DXA. Severe AAC is associated with higher risk of major cardiovascular event. Not only does severe AAC reflect poor cardiovascular health status, but also directly disturbs blood flow in the vascular system. Severe (but not mild or moderate) AAC is associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), faster bone loss and higher risk of major fragility fracture. The fracture risk remains increased after adjustment for BMD and other potential risk factors. The association between severe AAC and fracture risk was found in both sexes, mainly in the follow-ups of less than 10years. Many factors contribute to initiation and progression of AAC: lifestyle, co-morbidities, inorganic ions, dyslipidemia, hormones, cytokines (e.g. inflammatory cytokines, RANKL), matrix vesicles, microRNAs, structural proteins (e.g. elastin), vitamin K-dependent proteins, and medications (e.g. vitamin K antagonists). Osteogenic transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and circulating osteoprogenitors penetrating into vascular wall plays a major role in the AAC initiation and progression. Vitamin K-dependent proteins protect vascular tunica media against formation of calcified deposits (matrix GLA protein, GLA-rich protein) and against VSMC apoptosis (Gas6). Further studies are needed to investigate clinical utility of AAC for the assessment of fracture and cardiovascular risk at the individual level and develop new medications permitting to prevent AAC progression.

  2. Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Wierzba, Waldemar; Sliwczynski, Andrzej; Pinkas, Jaroslaw; Jawien, Arkadiusz; Karnafel, Waldemar

    2017-09-01

    The publication is a polemical response to reports that present data that diabetes reduces the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The study analyzed all cases of developing AAA in patients with and without diabetes in 2012 in Poland. Data for the analysis were obtained with a unique and complete resources of the National Health Fund (NFZ) and population data from the Central Statistical Office (GUS). In Poland during 2012 2,227,453 patients with diabetes were treated, 975,364 males and 1,252,089 females. The incidence of AAA without rupture in patients without diabetes calculated per 100,000 of the non-diabetes general population was 25.0 +/- 9.0 in males and 5.6 +/- 2.3 in females. The incidence of ruptured AAA in the general population without diabetes was 3.6 +/- 0.9 in males, and 0.6 +/- 0.3 in females calculated per 100,000 of inhabitants without diabetes. The incidence of AAA without rupture in patients with diabetes was 184.897 +/- 70.653 in males and 35.364 +/- 24.925 in females calculated per 100,000 of patients diagnosed with diabetes. The incidence of ruptured AAA in patients with diabetes was 21.090 +/- 6.050 in males and 5.170 +/- 3.053 in females calculated per 100,000 of patients diagnosed with diabetes. The incidence rate for ruptured AAA in 2012 in Poland is statistically higher both in females and males in the population with diabetes. The incidence rate for AAA without rupture in 2012 in Poland is statistically higher in patients diagnosed with diabetes.

  3. Mediators of neutrophil recruitment in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Houard, Xavier; Touat, Ziad; Ollivier, Véronique; Louedec, Liliane; Philippe, Monique; Sebbag, Uriel; Meilhac, Olivier; Rossignol, Patrick; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2009-01-01

    Aims Neutrophils/platelet interactions are involved in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The intraluminal thrombus (ILT) is a human model of platelet/neutrophil interactions. The present study focused on mediators involved in neutrophil recruitment in AAA. Methods and results Conditioned media from luminal, intermediate, and abluminal layers of 29 human ILTs were analysed for neutrophil markers [elastase/α1-antitrypsin and MMP9/NGAL complexes, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and α-defensin peptides], RANTES, platelet factor 4 (PF4), and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Their time-dependent release into serum from clots generated in vitro and their plasma concentrations in AAA patients and controls were determined. Immunohistochemistry for neutrophils, platelets, IL-8, PF4, and RANTES on AAA sections was performed; and molecules involved in ILT neutrophil chemotactic function were analysed in vitro. Neutrophils and platelets colocalized in the luminal layer of the thrombus. Consistently, neutrophil markers and platelet-derived RANTES and PF4 were released predominantly by the luminal thrombus pole, where their concentrations were significantly correlated. The luminal ILT layer was also the main source of IL-8, whose immunostaining colocalized with neutrophils. All were also released time dependently from clots and were increased in plasma of AAA patients. Luminal ILT layers displayed potent neutrophil chemotactic activity in vitro, which was inhibited by RANTES- and IL-8-blocking antibodies as well as by reparixin, an antagonist of the IL-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that platelet-derived RANTES and neutrophil-derived IL-8 are involved in attracting neutrophils to the luminal layer of AAA ILT. PMID:19201759

  4. Biomechanics and gene expression in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Reeps, Christian; Kehl, Sebastian; Tanios, Fadwa; Biehler, Jonas; Pelisek, Jaroslav; Wall, Wolfgang A; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Gee, Michael W

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to detect inter-relations between the mechanical conditions and material properties of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall and the underlying local gene expression of destabilizing inflammatory, proteolytic, and structural factors. During open surgery, 51 tissue samples from 31 AAA patients were harvested. Gene expression of collagen types I and III, inflammatory factors CD45 and MSR1, proteolytic enzymes matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Material properties of corresponding AAA tissue samples were assessed by cyclic sinusoidal and destructive testing. Local mechanical conditions of stress and strain were determined by advanced nonlinear finite element analysis based on patient-specific three-dimensional AAA models derived from preoperative computed tomography data. In the AAA wall, all parameters analyzed were significantly expressed at the messenger RNA level. With respect to mechanical properties of the aneurysmatic wall, expression of collagen III correlated with the stiffness parameter α (r = -0.348; P = .017), and matrix metalloprotease 2 correlated with the stiffness parameter β and wall strength (r = -0.438 and -0.593; P = .005 and P < .001). Furthermore, significant relationships were observed between local AAA diameter and the expression of CD45, MSR1, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (r = 0.285, 0.551, 0.328; P < .05). However, we found no inter-relation of local calculated wall stresses and strains with gene expression. Our results show for the first time that gene expressions of destabilizing factors within AAA tissue might be correlated to geometric and mechanical properties of the AAA wall. However, we found no influence of local mechanical conditions on gene expression of these factors. Therefore, these preliminary results are still ambiguous. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery

  5. Imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysm: the present and the future

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan; Liu, Bo; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a common, progressive, and potentially lethal vascular disease. A major obstacle in AAA research, as well as patient care, is the lack of technology that enables non-invasive acquisition of molecular/cellular information in the developing AAA. In this review we will briefly summarize the current techniques (e.g. ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) for anatomical imaging of AAA. We also discuss the various functional imaging techniques that have been explored for AAA imaging. In many cases, these anatomical and functional imaging techniques are not sufficient for providing surgeons/clinicians enough information about each individual AAA (e.g. rupture risk) to optimize patient management. Recently, molecular imaging techniques (e.g. optical and radionuclide-based) have been employed to visualize the molecular alterations associated with AAA, which are discussed in this review. Lastly, we try to provide a glance into the future and point out the challenges for AAA imaging. We believe that the future of AAA imaging lies in the combination of anatomical and molecular imaging techniques, which are largely complementary rather than competitive. Ultimately, with the right molecular imaging probe, clinicians will be able to monitor AAA growth and evaluate the risk of rupture accurately, so that the life-saving surgery can be provided to the right patients at the right time. Equally important, the right imaging probe will also allow scientists/clinicians to acquire critical data during AAA development and to more accurately evaluate the efficacy of potential treatments. PMID:20180767

  6. Imaging of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: the present and the future.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan; Liu, Bo; Cai, Weibo

    2010-11-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a common, progressive, and potentially lethal vascular disease. A major obstacle in AAA research, as well as patient care, is the lack of technology that enables non-invasive acquisition of molecular/cellular information in the developing AAA. In this review we will briefly summarize the current techniques (e.g. ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) for anatomical imaging of AAA. We also discuss the various functional imaging techniques that have been explored for AAA imaging. In many cases, these anatomical and functional imaging techniques are not sufficient for providing surgeons/clinicians enough information about each individual AAA (e.g. rupture risk) to optimize patient management. Recently, molecular imaging techniques (e.g. optical and radionuclide-based) have been employed to visualize the molecular alterations associated with AAA, which are discussed in this review. Lastly, we try to provide a glance into the future and point out the challenges for AAA imaging. We believe that the future of AAA imaging lies in the combination of anatomical and molecular imaging techniques, which are largely complementary rather than competitive. Ultimately, with the right molecular imaging probe, clinicians will be able to monitor AAA growth and evaluate the risk of rupture accurately, so that the life-saving surgery can be provided to the right patients at the right time. Equally important, the right imaging probe will also allow scientists/clinicians to acquire critical data during AAA development and to more accurately evaluate the efficacy of potential treatments.

  7. Functional characterization of T cells in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Forester, Nerys D; Cruickshank, Sheena M; Scott, D Julian A; Carding, Simon R

    2005-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) exhibit features of a chronic inflammatory disorder. The functional attributes of the T cells in AAA tissue are unclear, with little quantitative or functional data. Using a novel, non-enzymatic method to isolate viable cells from AAA tissue, functional properties of AAA T cells were investigated for the first time. Composition and phenotype of AAA T cells was determined by flow cytometry and verified by immunohistochemistry. Tissue mononuclear cells (MNCs) were cultured in the presence of T-cell mitogens, and cell cycle analysis and cytokine production assessed. Typical cell yield was 4·5 × 106 cells per gram of AAA tissue. The majority (58·1 ± 5·3%) of haematopoietic (CD45+) cells recovered were CD3+ T cells, B cells comprised 41·1 ± 5·7%, natural killer cells 7·3 ± 2·5%, and macrophages 2%. Freshly isolated T cells were in resting (G1) state, with 25% expressing the activation-associated cell surface antigens major histocompatibility complex II and CD25. When stimulated in vitro, a significant proportion entered S and G2 phase of the cell cycle, up-regulated CD25, and secreted tumour necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-6. Despite patient differences, the composition of the AAA inflammatory infiltrate was remarkably consistent, and when re-stimulated ex-vivo T cells produced a stereotypical cytokine response, consistent with the hypothesis that AAA T cells can promote tissue inflammation by secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and in addition provide signals for B-cell help. PMID:15885133

  8. Functional characterization of T cells in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Forester, Nerys D; Cruickshank, Sheena M; Scott, D Julian A; Carding, Simon R

    2005-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) exhibit features of a chronic inflammatory disorder. The functional attributes of the T cells in AAA tissue are unclear, with little quantitative or functional data. Using a novel, non-enzymatic method to isolate viable cells from AAA tissue, functional properties of AAA T cells were investigated for the first time. Composition and phenotype of AAA T cells was determined by flow cytometry and verified by immunohistochemistry. Tissue mononuclear cells (MNCs) were cultured in the presence of T-cell mitogens, and cell cycle analysis and cytokine production assessed. Typical cell yield was 4.5 x 10(6) cells per gram of AAA tissue. The majority (58.1+/-5.3%) of haematopoietic (CD45+) cells recovered were CD3+ T cells, B cells comprised 41.1+/-5.7%, natural killer cells 7.3+/-2.5%, and macrophages 2%. Freshly isolated T cells were in resting (G1) state, with 25% expressing the activation-associated cell surface antigens major histocompatibility complex II and CD25. When stimulated in vitro, a significant proportion entered S and G2 phase of the cell cycle, up-regulated CD25, and secreted tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-6. Despite patient differences, the composition of the AAA inflammatory infiltrate was remarkably consistent, and when re-stimulated ex-vivo T cells produced a stereotypical cytokine response, consistent with the hypothesis that AAA T cells can promote tissue inflammation by secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and in addition provide signals for B-cell help.

  9. Biomechanical Indices for Rupture Risk Estimation in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Leemans, Eva L; Willems, Tineke P; van der Laan, Maarten J; Slump, Cornelis H; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2017-04-01

    To review the use of biomechanical indices for the estimation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk, emphasizing their potential use in a clinical setting. A search of the PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Compendex databases was made up to June 2015 to identify articles involving biomechanical analysis of AAA rupture risk. Outcome variables [aneurysm diameter, peak wall stress (PWS), peak wall shear stress (PWSS), wall strain, peak wall rupture index (PWRI), and wall stiffness] were compared for asymptomatic intact AAAs vs symptomatic or ruptured AAAs. For quantitative analysis of the pooled data, a random effects model was used to calculate the standard mean differences (SMDs) with the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the biomechanical indices. The initial database searches yielded 1894 independent articles of which 19 were included in the analysis. The PWS was significantly higher in the symptomatic/ruptured group, with a SMD of 1.11 (95% CI 0.93 to 1.26, p<0.001). Likewise, the PWRI was significantly higher in the ruptured or symptomatic group, with a SMD of 1.15 (95% CI 0.30 to 2.01, p=0.008). After adjustment for the aneurysm diameter, the PWS remained higher in the ruptured or symptomatic group, with a SMD of 0.85 (95% CI 0.46 to 1.23, p<0.001). Less is known of the wall shear stress and wall strain indices, as too few studies were available for analysis. Biomechanical indices are a promising tool in the assessment of AAA rupture risk as they incorporate several factors, including geometry, tissue properties, and patient-specific risk factors. However, clinical implementation of biomechanical AAA assessment remains a challenge owing to a lack of standardization.

  10. Growth rate and associated factors in small abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Vega de Céniga, M; Gómez, R; Estallo, L; Rodríguez, L; Baquer, M; Barba, A

    2006-03-01

    To study the growth rate and factors influencing progression of small infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Observational, longitudinal, prospective study. We followed patients with AAA <5 cm in diameter in two groups. Group I (AAA 3-3.9 cm, n = 246) underwent annual ultrasound scans. Group II (AAA 4-4.9 cm, n = 106) underwent 6-monthly CT scans. We included 352 patients (333 men and 19 women) followed for a mean of 55.2+/-37.4 months (6.3-199.8). The mean growth rate was significantly greater in group II (4.72+/-5.93 vs. 2.07+/-3.23 mm/year; p<0.0001). Group II had a greater percentage of patients with rapid aneurysm expansion (>4 mm/year) (36.8 vs. 13.8%; p<0.0001). The classical cardiovascular risk factors did not influence the AAA growth rate in group I. Chronic limb ischemia was associated with slower expansion (< or = 4 mm/year) (OR 0.47; CI 95% 0.22-0.99; p = 0.045). Diabetic patients in group II had a significantly smaller mean AAA growth rate than non-diabetics (1.69+/-3.51 vs. 5.22+/-6.11 mm/year; p = 0.032). The expansion rate of small AAA increases with the AAA size. AAA with a diameter of 3-3.9 cm expand slowly, and they are very unlikely to require surgical repair in 5 years. Many 4-4.9 cm AAA can be expected to reach a surgical size in the first 2 years of follow-up. Chronic limb ischemia and diabetes are associated with reduced aneurysm growth rates.

  11. [Identification and treatment of coronary atherosclerosis, before resection of abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    López Rodríguez, R; Rangel, A; Cruz, E; Chávez, E; Velasco, C; Murillo, H; Badui, E

    1997-01-01

    Atherosclerotic aortic aneurysm, is frequently associated to coronary atherosclerosis. When myocardial ischemia is asymptomatic, aortic surgery commonly is deferred because unexpected ischemic cardiopathy. To diminish the risk of aortic surgery, aortocoronary bypass must be installed before the aortic graft. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty is an alternative treatment of coronary atherosclerosis, principally in elderly patients. We present the case of a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm and myocardial silent ischemia secondary to right coronary artery stenosis treated by mean the percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) before aortic surgery, with the objective of decreasing surgical risk and its possible complications (myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock, death, etc.). Nine months after the PTCA, the patient is asymptomatic and stress test on treadmill is negative.

  12. Endovascular Management of Concomitant Thoracic and Abdominal Aortic Ruptures Resulting from Brucellosis Aortitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Samuel L; Kuo, Isabella J; Fujitani, Roy M; Kabutey, Nii-Kabu

    2017-01-01

    Acute aortic symptomatology is an unusual manifestation of Brucella melitensis infection. We present a rare case of acute multifocal thoracic and abdominal aortic ruptures arising from Brucellosis aortitis managed exclusively with endovascular surgery. A 71-year-old Hispanic male with a history of atrial fibrillation and prior stroke on chronic anticoagulation presented with shortness of breath and malaise. In addition, he had been treated approximately 1 year previously in Mexico for B. melitensis bacteremia after eating fresh unpasteurized cheese. Computed tomography (CT) angiography demonstrated an acute rupture of the descending thoracic aorta just proximal to the celiac trunk and synchronous rupture at the abdominal aortic bifurctation. The patient was taken emergently to the hybrid operating room, where synchronous supraceliac thoracic aorta and abdominal aortoiliac stent grafts were deployed under local anesthesia. Completion angiography demonstrated total exclusion of the thoracic and abdominal extravasation with no evidence of endoleak. Twenty hours postoperatively, the patient became acutely obtunded and hypotensive. Repeat CT angiography demonstrated contrast extravasation at the level of the excluded aortic bifurcation. Emergent angiography confirmed a type II endoleak with free extraluminal rupture. Multiple coils were placed at the level of the aortic bifurcation between the left limb of the stent graft and the aortic wall to tamponade the endoleak. No further extravasation was noted on final aortography. Postoperatively, blood cultures confirmed the diagnosis of B. melitensis. The patient was treated with systemic doxycycline, gentamicin, and rifampin. Resolution of the acute event occurred without additional sequelae and he was discharged from the hospital to a rehabilitation facility. Concomitant multifocal aortic ruptures arising from Brucellosis aortic infection is a very rare event. In this case, the patient was successfully treated with

  13. A Combination of Thoracic and Abdominal Stent-Grafts to Treat An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Hostile Proximal Neck.

    PubMed

    Massara, Mafalda; Prunella, Roberto; Gerardi, Pasquale; De Caridi, Giovanni; Serra, Raffaele; Notarstefano, Stefano; Impedovo, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) actually represents the treatment of choice for most patients affected by abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). However, the feasibility of EVAR depends on anatomical characteristics of abdominal aorta and iliofemoral axis. We present the case of an 82-year-old man affected by severe left hydronephrosis, kidney tumor, and ureteral tumor requiring nephrectomy, who also presented a very voluminous AAA with a large diameter (96 mm), and a large proximal neck (39 mm) with severe angulation of the proximal neck (>60°). The patient was considered unfit for traditional EVAR and open surgery. Possible alternatives such as fenestrated endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and chimney technique were excluded; therefore he was treated combining Valiant Captivia endoprosthesis with the AFX unibody, with a good final result. However, this particular alternative adopted for hostile proximal neck needs long-term follow-up.

  14. High pulse pressure is not associated with abnormal activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, T A L; Pedersen, E B; Munk, K; Hjortdal, V E; Emmertsen, K; Andersen, N H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between pulse pressure (PP)--a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness-and activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in adult patients with repaired coarctation and normal left ventricular (LV) function. A total of 114 patients (44 (26-74) years, 13 (0.1-40) years at repair) and 20 healthy controls were examined with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography, vasoactive hormone levels and magnetic resonance of the thoracic aorta. Forty-one patients (36%) were taking antihypertensives (28 RAAS inhibitors). Fifty-one had mean 24-h blood pressures >130/80 mm Hg. Hypertension was not associated with age at repair (P=0.257). Patients had higher PP and LV mass compared with controls (52±11 vs. 45±5 mm Hg and 221±71 vs. 154±55 g, respectively; both P<0.05). Differences were more pronounced in the presence of recoarctation, but independently of RAA levels. Even normotensive patients had higher LV mass than controls. LV mass and recoarctation were correlated with PP levels. In conclusion, adult patients with repaired coarctation have increased PP and LV mass compared with controls. PP increased with increasing recoarctation. Hypertension was present also in the absence of recoarctation. These changes could not be explained by abnormal activation of the RAAS.

  15. Long-term results of aortic banding for complex infrarenal neck anatomy and type I endoleak after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Krajcer, Zvonimir; Dougherty, Kathryn G; Gregoric, Igor D

    2012-01-01

    For many patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm, unsuitable anatomy of the infrarenal aortic neck precludes endovascular aortic aneurysm repair or causes type I endoleak after the procedure. In an attempt to overcome these challenges, we retrospectively examined the usefulness of aortic banding as an adjunctive procedure to endovascular repair in 8 patients who had an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a complex infrarenal aortic neck. The procedures were performed with the patients under general anesthesia and involved making an 8-cm upper-midline laparotomy incision to expose the aneurysmal aorta. Three patients underwent aortic banding before endovascular repair; the other 5 underwent banding after the repair because of persistent type I endoleak. After banding, the abdominal aortic aneurysm was successfully excluded in all 8 patients. Long-term follow-up (mean, 38±20 mo) revealed no type I endoleak and no procedure-related complications. In patients who have an abdominal aortic aneurysm with complex infrarenal neck anatomy or a refractory type I endoleak, performing aortic banding as an adjunctive procedure to endovascular aortic repair appears to be a safe strategy with good long-term results.

  16. Abdominal MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... An abnormal result may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscess Cancer or tumors that involves the adrenal ... Churchill Livingstone; 2015:chap 5. Read More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open Abscess Acute arterial ...

  17. Mycotic Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in an Infant after Cardiac Catheterization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Benrashid, Ehsan; McCoy, Christopher C; Rice, Henry E; Shortell, Cynthia K; Cox, Mitchell W

    2015-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a rare entity in the pediatric population. Children with mycotic (infectious) AAA in particular are at risk of life-threatening rupture due to their rapid expansion coupled with aortic wall thinning and deterioration. Here, we present the case of a 10-month-old infant with prior 2-staged repair for hypoplastic left heart syndrome that was incidentally discovered to have a mycotic AAA on abdominal ultrasound (US) for evaluation of renovascular hypertension. Before the time of evaluation with US, the infant had developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia 3 days after cardiac catheterization with percutaneous thoracic aortic balloon angioplasty. She had normal aortic contours on contrasted computed tomography scan of the abdomen approximately 2 weeks before the aforementioned US evaluation. This infant subsequently underwent open aneurysmorrhaphy with cryopreserved vein patch angioplasty with resolution of her aneurysmal segment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Logistic considerations for a successful institutional approach to the endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Dieter; Rancic, Zoran; Pfammatter, Thomas; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Veith, Frank J; Donas, Konstantin; Lachat, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The value of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in the setting of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remains controversial owing to differing results. However, interpretation of published results remains difficult as there is a lack of generally accepted protocols or standard operating procedures. Furthermore, such protocols and standard operating procedures often are reported incompletely or not at all, thereby making interpretation of results difficult. We herein report our integrated logistic system for the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. Important components of this system are prehospital logistics, in-hospital treatment logistics, and aftercare. Further studies should include details about all of these components, and a description of these logistic components must be included in all future studies of emergency EVAR for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  19. A critical appraisal of endovascular stent-grafts in the management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Ktenidis, Kiriakos; Georgiadis, George S

    2017-04-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has widely replaced the open surgical repair due to its minimal invasive nature and the accompanying lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. During the past two decades, certain improvements and developments have provided a wide variety of endograft structural designs and geometric patterns, enabling the physician to approach a more patient-specific treatment of AAA. This review presents the currently available aortic endografts and describes the clinical, technical and mechanical characteristics of them.

  20. Outcome after Turndown for Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Surgery.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joshua D; Meecham, Lewis; Summerour, Virginia; Khalil, Sheirin; Layton, Georgia; Yousif, Marianne; Jennings, Adrian; Wall, Micheal; Newman, Jeremy

    2017-09-02

    The aim was to assess the survival of patients who had been turned down for repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and to examine the factors influencing this. This was a retrospective observational study of a prospectively maintained database of all patients turned down for AAA intervention by the Black Country Vascular Network multidisciplinary team (MDT) from January 2013 to December 2015. Data on AAA size, cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and cause of death were recorded. There were 112 patients. The median age at turndown was 83.9 years (IQR 10.2 years). The median AAA size at turndown was 63 mm (IQR 16.7 mm). The median follow-up time after turndown was 324 days (IQR 537.5 days). Sixty-four patients (57.1%) were deceased after 2 years, with a median survival time of 462 days (IQR 579 days). Patients who died had a significantly larger AAA dimension (median 65 mm, IQR 18.5 mm) than those surviving to date (median 59 mm, IQR 10 mm, p = .004). Using Cox regression analysis, the probability of 1 year survival in the whole population was 0.614. The probability of 2 year survival was 0.388. When accounting for age, gender, AAA dimension, and British Aneurysm Repair risk score, no factors had significant influence over survival. Of the 64 deceased patients, 30 had an accessible cause of death: 36.7% of these were due to ruptured AAAs. There was no significant difference in AAA size between those dying of ruptures and those dying of other causes (p = .225, mean 74 mm and 67 mm respectively). Being turned down for AAA repair carries a significant short-term risk of mortality. Those turned down for repair carried significant levels of comorbid disease but no factors considered were found to be independently predictive of the length of survival. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors associated with small abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion rate.

    PubMed

    Bhak, Rachel H; Wininger, Michael; Johnson, Gary R; Lederle, Frank A; Messina, Louis M; Ballard, David J; Wilson, Samuel E

    2015-01-01

    Because of the high mortality rate after rupture of small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), surveillance is recommended to detect aneurysm expansion; however, the effects of clinical risk factors on long-term patterns of AAA expansion are poorly characterized. To identify significant clinical risk factors associated with the AAA expansion rate for both constant and accelerated expansion trajectories. A multivariate mixed-effects model was established to identify clinical risk factors associated with the AAA expansion rate. Separate shape factor analysis was used to characterize steady vs accelerated expansion over time. Five hundred sixty-seven patients hospitalized at Veterans Affairs medical centers were randomized to the surveillance arm of the Aneurysm Detection and Management (ADAM) study conducted by the Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program from 1992 to 2000. The patients had an AAA with a maximum diameter from 3.0 to 5.4 cm, which was monitored until a 5.5-cm maximum diameter was reached or the aneurysm became symptomatic. Thirty-three participants were not included in this analysis owing to missing or extraneous values in key predictor variables. The mean (SD) follow-up time was 3.7 (2.0) years. The primary outcome measure was the AAA expansion rate, determined by measurement of the maximum diameter by ultrasonography at regular intervals. The objective to assess the association of clinical variables with the expansion of the AAA was formulated after data collection. The mean (SD) linear expansion rate of AAAs was 0.26 (0.01) cm/y. Current smoking was associated with a 0.05 (0.01)-cm/y increase in the linear expansion rate (95% CI, 0.25-0.28; P < .001), diastolic blood pressure with a 0.02 (0.01)-cm/y increase per 10 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.01-0.04; P = .001), and diabetes mellitus with a 0.11 (0.02)-cm/y decrease (95% CI, 0.07-0.16; P < .001). Diastolic blood pressure and baseline AAA diameter were associated with accelerated AAA expansion

  2. Incidental Finding of Intercostal Artery Aneurysm During Coarctation Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Ghasemi, Fahime

    2017-06-01

    Intercostal artery aneurysms (ICAA) are very rare vascular complication of coarctation. The most cases are asymptomatic and could be found incidentally during thoracotomy for others vascular pathology or may present with fatal problems such as rupture that is leading to bleeding and hypovolemic shock. Intercostal artery aneurysm most commonly accompanies with neurofibromatosis, aortic coarctation, or in chest trauma. We report a 10-year-old girl who complained of lower extremities pain and hypertension for a few months. His final diagnosis was coarctation of the aorta. She was scheduled for thoracotomy and coarctation repair by resection and end to end anastomosis. During thoracotomy at lateral side of coarctation, an ICAA distal to coarctation site was seen that by a collateral artery connects to its upper intercostals artery. The patient was treated by ligation and resection of the affected intercostal artery and subsequent coarctation repair. The postoperative course was uneventful and, she was discharged on 7th postoperative day.

  3. Simulation of bifurcated stent grafts to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, J.; Großkopf, S.; Freisleben, B.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper a method is introduced, to visualize bifurcated stent grafts in CT-Data. The aim is to improve therapy planning for minimal invasive treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Due to precise measurement of the abdominal aortic aneurysm and exact simulation of the bifurcated stent graft, physicians are supported in choosing a suitable stent prior to an intervention. The presented method can be used to measure the dimensions of the abdominal aortic aneurysm as well as simulate a bifurcated stent graft. Both of these procedures are based on a preceding segmentation and skeletonization of the aortic, right and left iliac. Using these centerlines (aortic, right and left iliac) a bifurcated initial stent is constructed. Through the implementation of an ACM method the initial stent is fit iteratively to the vessel walls - due to the influence of external forces (distance- as well as balloonforce). Following the fitting process, the crucial values for choosing a bifurcated stent graft are measured, e.g. aortic diameter, right and left common iliac diameter, minimum diameter of distal neck. The selected stent is then simulated to the CT-Data - starting with the initial stent. It hereby becomes apparent if the dimensions of the bifurcated stent graft are exact, i.e. the fitting to the arteries was done properly and no ostium was covered.

  4. [Quantitative changes of elastin, fibrillin and collagen in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Osakabe, T; Okada, N; Wachi, H; Sato, A; Sasaki, S; Wada, N; Seyama, Y

    2000-12-01

    To examine quantitative changes of elastin, fibrillin and collagen in abdominal aortic aneurysms, including ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA), inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) were measured. Items measured included the desmosine content of the aorta (desmosine 1) or of the elastin fraction (desmosine 2), fibrillin content in the aorta, hydroxyproline in the aorta, collagen percent and elastin percent, and were compared with control samples from the nonaneurysmal aortic segments. The elastin contents (desmosine 2) in RAAA, IAAA and AAA were significantly lower than those of controls. The content of the desmosine 2 from IAAA and AAA did not show a negative association with Ca. The fibrillin contents of the aorta from RAAA, IAAA and AAA were significantly higher than those of controls. The collagen content in the RAAA aorta was significantly higher than that of controls. There was a correlation of the ratio of fibrillin to elastin components (fibrillin/desmosine 1 or fibrillin/desmosine 2 or fibrillin/elastin%) and the ratio of collagen to elastin components (collagen/desmosine 1 or collagen/desmosine 2 or collagen/elastin%). These results indicated that increasing fibrillin and collagen might be a complementary result of decreasing elastin crosslinks in the aorta. This phenomenon was markedly in RAAA.

  5. Renal flow studies after abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy and axillo-bifemoral bypass graft: case report

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Yussen, P.S.

    1988-03-01

    Vascular disorders affecting the kidneys are either acquired or congenital. Included in this category are common multiplicity of renal arteries, the rare arteriovenous malformation, stresses due to fibromuscular disease or atherosclerosis including abdominal aortic aneurysms, arterial thrombosis, venous thrombosis, and infarction. In contrast to the group of cystic and neoplastic kidneys where scintigraphic or pathologic are not diagnostic, scintigraphic or pathologic anatomy in vascular disease is often diagnostic by nuclear medicine techniques. The authors present an interesting case of evaluation of acute renal failure in a patient abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy and axillo-bifemoral bypass graft.

  6. Unusual presentation of silently growing abdominal aortic aneurysm causing biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Changal, Khalid Hamid; Lim, Francis; Sunkara, Tejasvi; Hamdani, Syed Uzair

    2017-09-25

    Biliary obstruction is a rare presentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The most common symptoms of AAA are abdominal or back pain and limb ischaemia from thromboembolism. We report a case of a 67-year-old male who was diagnosed with obstructive jaundice secondary to an AAA. CT angiogram revealed compression of the common bile duct by the large AAA, causing diffuse intrahepatic and extrahepatic ductal dilatation. Surgical repair of the aortic aneurysm was successful, and patient's symptoms improved. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Caval and ureteral obstruction secondary to an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Vikram S; Fang, Raymond; Fitzpatrick, Colleen M; Hagino, Ryan T

    2003-12-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) represent 3% to 10% of all abdominal aortic aneurysms. Obstructive uropathy is a well-described feature of IAAAs, but venous complications are unusual secondary to IAAA. The authors report a patient presenting with acute renal failure and deep venous thrombosis secondary to an IAAA. We believe this represents the first case of an IAAA manifesting as combined inferior vena cava compression and associated obstructive uropathy. Successful operative repair was performed. With resolution of the retroperitoneal inflammation, long-term follow-up revealed spontaneous release of both ureteral and caval compression.

  8. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm followed by disseminated intravascular coagulation and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Machida, Hisanori; Kobayashi, Makoto; Taguchi, Hirokuni

    2002-11-01

    A 71-year-old man was diagnosed as having an abdominal aortic aneurysm when he was treated for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP). Three years later, he developed severe thrombocytopenia and had disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) that was associated with the inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA). The coagulation abnormalities were corrected by low-molecular weight heparin, however the platelet count remained low. Bone marrow showed normocellularity with an increase of immature and mature forms of megakaryocytes. Platelet-associated IgG level was high. These findings suggested that the patient had severe thrombocytopenia caused by unusual complications of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and IAAA-associated DIC.

  9. Surgical Treatment of a Voluminous Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Horseshoe Kidney: Tips and Tricks

    PubMed Central

    Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Mastrojeni, Claudio; Serra, Raffaele; Salomone, Ignazio; La Spada, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a common urology anomaly, while its association with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm represents a very rare condition. Surgical approach remains controversial however, we believe that the left retroperitoneal approach should be preferred in order to avoid isthmus resection with any subsequent renal infarction, urinary tract damage and to facilitate renal arteries reimplantation, when required. We present a case of voluminous infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with horseshoe kidney, successfully treated through a left retroperitoneal approach on the retro-renal space. PMID:26730260

  10. Axillofemoral Bypass Markedly Improved Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Kidney Injury in a Patient with Severely Calcified Stenosis of Thoracoabdominal Aorta (Atypical Aortic Coarctation).

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Masato; Yamada, Shintaro; Maemura, Sonoko; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Takizawa, Masataka; Uozumi, Hiroki; Minegishi, Sachito; Kobayashi, Jotaro; Ikenouchi, Hiroshi

    2017-09-30

    Atypical aortic coarctation (AAC) has been reported to occur anywhere along the aorta, except for the ascending aorta. The associated symptoms include hypotension in the lower half of the body, secondary hypertension in the upper half of the body, and heart failure. Here we present an 80-year-old Asian woman complaining of progressive exertional dyspnea. She was diagnosed with acute decompensated heart failure and kidney injury due to severely calcified stenosis of the thoracoabdominal aorta, the so called AAC. She received hemodiafiltration, and pulmonary congestion improved in part. Generally, surgical treatments are quite invasive in elderly patients. Endovascular stent graft placement is less invasive, however, fracture and rupture should be considered at severely calcified lesions like this case. Therefore, we selected extra-anatomical axillofemoral bypass. Her recovery after the surgery was remarkable. In a few days, she became free from hemodiafiltration, intravenous diuretics, and oxygen administration. We thought the contributive factors are the increase in kidney blood flow and the correction of afterload mismatch. The decrease in pulse pressure may reflect the reduction in systemic arterial compliance by axillofemoral bypass. The operative mortality of axillofemoral bypass was reported to be acceptable, although the patency of the axillofemoral bypass graft was not high enough. In conclusion, axillofemoral bypass is effective and feasible for elderly patients with acute decompensated heart failure and kidney injury due to AAC.

  11. Holt-Oram syndrome with intermediate atrioventricular canal defect, and aortic coarctation: functional characterization of a de novo TBX5 mutation.

    PubMed

    Baban, Anwar; Pitto, Letizia; Pulignani, Silvia; Cresci, Monica; Mariani, Laura; Gambacciani, Carolina; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Pongiglione, Giacomo; Albanese, Sonia

    2014-06-01

    Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by upper limb defects and congenital heart defects (CHD), which are often simple septal and conduction defects, less frequently complex CHDs. We report on a 9 year-old boy with clinical and radiologic features of HOS consisting of bilateral asymmetric hypoplastic thumbs, generalized brachydactyly, limited supination due to radioulnar synostosis, and sloping shoulders, and intermediate atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD) with aortic coarctation. A de novo, previously described mutation, (Arg279ter) was identified in the TBX5 gene. Molecular characterization of this mutation was carried out due to the atypical CHD. In order to investigate whether the mutated transcript of TBX5 was able to escape the post-transcriptional surveillance mechanism and to produce a truncated TBX5 protein, we analyzed the TBX5 transcript, and protein pattern in HOS, and WT cardiac tissues. Our results demonstrate that the mutant TBX5 transcript is cleared by the cellular mechanism of surveillance. This data provides some support for the hypothesis that a dominant negative mutation, which strongly impairs the WT allele, might be too hazardous to be maintained. The literature suggests that HOS is relatively common among syndromes associated with AVCD.

  12. Sac enlargement due to seroma after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with the Endologix PowerLink device.

    PubMed

    Nano, Giovanni; Dalainas, Ilias; Bianchi, Paolo G; Gotti, Riccardo; Casana, Renato; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico G

    2006-01-01

    A patient who had undergone endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with the Endologix PowerLink bifurcated system presented with delayed aortic aneurysm enlargement due to assumed endotension. He was treated with aortic sac evacuation and wrapping of the endograft. This is the first report of endotension and aneurysm sac enlargement after implantation of the PowerLink endograft.

  13. Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Tomofumi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common feature of aging and is related to coronary artery disease. Although abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays fundamental roles in coronary artery disease, the relationship between abdominal VAT and AVC is not fully understood. Methods. We investigated 259 patients who underwent cardiac and abdominal computed tomography (CT). AVC was defined as calcified lesion on the aortic valve by CT. %abdominal VAT was calculated as abdominal VAT area/total adipose tissue area. Results. AVC was detected in 75 patients, and these patients showed higher %abdominal VAT (44% versus 38%, p < 0.05) compared to those without AVC. When the cutoff value of %abdominal VAT was set at 40.9%, the area under the curve to diagnose AVC was 0.626. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR 1.120, 95% CI 1.078–1.168, p < 0.01), diabetes (OR 2.587, 95% CI 1.323–5.130, p < 0.01), and %abdominal VAT (OR 1.032, 95% CI 1.003–1.065, p < 0.05) were independent risk factors for AVC. The net reclassification improvement value for detecting AVC was increased when %abdominal VAT was added to the model: 0.5093 (95% CI 0.2489–0.7697, p < 0.01). Conclusion. We determined that predominance of VAT is associated with AVC. PMID:26904670

  14. Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Tomofumi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-Ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common feature of aging and is related to coronary artery disease. Although abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays fundamental roles in coronary artery disease, the relationship between abdominal VAT and AVC is not fully understood. Methods. We investigated 259 patients who underwent cardiac and abdominal computed tomography (CT). AVC was defined as calcified lesion on the aortic valve by CT. %abdominal VAT was calculated as abdominal VAT area/total adipose tissue area. Results. AVC was detected in 75 patients, and these patients showed higher %abdominal VAT (44% versus 38%, p < 0.05) compared to those without AVC. When the cutoff value of %abdominal VAT was set at 40.9%, the area under the curve to diagnose AVC was 0.626. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR 1.120, 95% CI 1.078-1.168, p < 0.01), diabetes (OR 2.587, 95% CI 1.323-5.130, p < 0.01), and %abdominal VAT (OR 1.032, 95% CI 1.003-1.065, p < 0.05) were independent risk factors for AVC. The net reclassification improvement value for detecting AVC was increased when %abdominal VAT was added to the model: 0.5093 (95% CI 0.2489-0.7697, p < 0.01). Conclusion. We determined that predominance of VAT is associated with AVC.

  15. Endovascular treatment of a small infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm causing duodenal obstruction: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Andrea; Menna, Danilo; Mansour, Wassim; Sirignano, Pasqualino; Capoccia, Laura; Speziale, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Duodenal obstruction caused by abdominal aortic aneurysm was first described by Osler in 1905 and is named "aortoduodenal syndrome." This condition has always been treated by open surgical repair. We report the first case of aortoduodenal syndrome successfully treated by endovascular aneurysm repair. A 74-year-old male patient referred to our hospital complaining postprandial vomit, reporting a consistent weight loss in the latest weeks. Enhanced computed tomography scans showed a small saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm compressing duodenum and inferior vena cava without any other evident pathological finding. As the patient underwent a successful endovascular treatment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm, symptoms immediately resolved so that he started back to feed and progressively gained body weight. Despite aortoduodenal syndrome is generally caused by large abdominal aortic aneurysm, this condition has to be suspected also in case of small abdominal aortic aneurysm. Differently from what has been reported in literature, endovascular aneurysm repair could be effective in the treatment of aortoduodenal syndrome.

  16. Risk Stratification of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Using Aortic Augmentation Index

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Marianne; Husmann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Central augmentation index (cAIx) is an indicator for vascular stiffness. Obstructive and aneurysmatic vascular disease can affect pulse wave propagation and reflection, causing changes in central aortic pressures. Aim To assess and compare cAIx in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and / or abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods cAIx was assessed by radial applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) in a total of 184 patients at a tertiary referral centre. Patients were grouped as having PAD only, AAA only, or both AAA and PAD. Differences in cAIx measurements between the three patient groups were tested by non-parametric tests and stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis to investigate associations with obstructive or aneurysmatic patterns of vascular disease. Results In the study sample of 184 patients, 130 had PAD only, 20 had AAA only, and 34 patients had both AAA and PAD. Mean cAIx (%) was 30.5 ± 8.2 across all patients. It was significantly higher in females (35.2 ± 6.1, n = 55) than males (28.4 ± 8.2, n = 129), and significantly higher in patients over 80 years of age (34.4 ± 6.9, n = 22) than in those under 80 years (30.0 ± 8.2, n = 162). Intergroup comparison revealed a significant difference in cAIx between the three patient groups (AAA: 27.3 ± 9.5; PAD: 31.4 ± 7.8; AAA & PAD: 28.8 ± 8.5). cAIx was significantly lower in patients with AAA, higher in patients with both AAA and PAD, and highest in patients with PAD only (beta = 0.21, p = 0.006). Conclusion Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness in high-risk patients indicates that cAIx differs according to the pattern of vascular disease. Measurements revealed significantly higher cAIx values for patients with obstructive peripheral arterial disease than for patients with aneurysmatic disease. PMID:26452151

  17. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting as bilateral hydroureteronephrosis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Galosi, Andrea Benedetto; Grilli Cicilioni, Carlo; Sbrollini, Giulia; Angelini, Andrea; Maselli, Guevar; Carbonari, Luciano

    2014-12-30

    We report a case of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (IAAA) producing bilateral hydro-ureteronephrosis. A 74-year-old patient presented to urologist office for bilateral hydronephrosis detected by kidney and bladder ultrasound (US). Patient reported lower urinary tract symptoms and inconstant and slight low back pain irradiated to inguinal region dating 3 weeks. Renal function, urine analysis and abdominal examination were normal. However the repeated ultrasound in the urologist office revealed abdominal aortic aneurism extended to iliac vessels. The patient was sent directly to vascular surgery unit where contrast computerized tomography (CT) and successful surgical repair were done. Final diagnosis was IAAA. The post-operative course was uneventful. Renal function was regular and the hydronephrosis reduced spontaneously under monitoring by CT and US. We review diagnosis and management of hydronephrosis that is sometimes linked to IAAA rather than standard AAA. Abdominal ultrasound is mandatory in any bilateral hydronephrosis and it could save lives.

  18. Superior outcomes for rural patients after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair supports a systematic regional approach to abdominal aortic aneurysm care.

    PubMed

    Mell, Matthew W; Bartels, Christie; Kind, Amy; Leverson, Glen; Smith, Maureen

    2012-09-01

    The impact of geographic isolation on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) care in the United States is unknown. It has been postulated but not proven that rural patients have less access to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), vascular surgeons, and high-volume treatment centers than their urban counterparts, resulting in inferior AAA care. The purpose of this study was to compare the national experience for treatment of intact AAA for patients living in rural areas or towns with those living in urban areas. Patients who underwent intact AAA repair in 2005 to 2006 were identified from a standard 5% random sample of all Medicare beneficiaries. Data on patient demographics, comorbidities, type of repair, and specialty of operating surgeon were collected. Hospitals were stratified into quintiles by yearly AAA volume. Primary outcomes included 30-day mortality and rehospitalization. A total of 2616 patients had repair for intact AAA (40% open, 60% EVAR). Patients from rural and urban areas were equally likely to receive EVAR (rural 60% vs urban 61%; P = .99) and be treated by a vascular surgeon (rural 48% vs urban 50%; P = .82). Most rural patients (86%) received care in urban centers. Primary outcomes occurred in 11.6% of rural patients (1.3% 30-day mortality; 10.3% rehospitalization) vs 16.0% of urban patients (3% 30-day mortality, 13% rehospitalization; P = .04). In multivariate analyses, rural residence was independently associated with treatment at high-volume centers (odds ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.01; P < .0001) and decreased death or rehospitalization (odds ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.97; P = .03). Despite geographic isolation, patients in rural areas needing treatment for intact AAAs have equivalent access to EVAR and vascular surgeons, increased referral to high-volume hospitals, and improved outcomes after repair. This suggests that urban patients may be disadvantaged even with nearby access to high-quality centers. This study

  19. Evaluation of aortic stiffness (aortic pulse-wave velocity) before and after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair procedures: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Bessias, Nikolaos; Psathas, Chrysovalantis; Akridas, Konstantinos; Dragios, Theodoros; Nikitas, Georgios; Andrikopoulos, Vassilios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Kyriakides, Zenon S

    2009-12-09

    The main clinical criterion for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair operations is an AAA diameter >/=5.5 cm. When AAAs increase in size, specific changes occur in the mechanical properties of the aortic wall. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV) has been used as an indicator of vascular stiffness. A low PWV may predict AAA rupture risk and is an early predictor of cardiovascular mortality. We investigated the prognostic value of PWV before and after elective AAA repair procedures. Twenty four patients scheduled for an open AAA repair underwent a preoperative carotid-femoral aortic PWV measurement. A second aortic PWV measurement was carried out 6 months postoperatively. The mean aortic PWV increased from 7.84 +/- 1.85 preoperatively to 10.08 +/- 1.57 m/sec 6 months postoperatively (mean change: 2.25; 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 3.1 m/sec; p<0.0001). The preprocedural PWV measurement did not correlate with AAA diameter (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rho=0.12; p=0.59). Whether the increase in aortic PWV postoperatively suggests a decreased cardiovascular risk following AAA repair remains to be established. Aortic PWV should also be investigated as an adjunct tool for assessing AAA rupture risk.

  20. Management of a large abdominal aortic aneurysm in conjunction with a massive inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Wartman, Sarah M; Woo, Karen; Brewer, Michael; Weaver, Fred A

    2017-04-04

    The majority of inguinal hernias that are concomitant with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are clinically insignificant. However, management of AAA associated with a complex hernia can be challenging. We report a case of a 72-year-old male with a 7 cm AAA and a massive inguinal hernia involving loss of abdominal domain. Using a multidisciplinary approach, a staged hybrid endovascular and open repair of the AAA was performed followed by hernia repair.

  1. The incidence of small abdominal aortic aneurysms and the change in normal infrarenal aortic diameter: implications for screening.

    PubMed

    Wilmink, A B; Hubbard, C S; Day, N E; Quick, C R

    2001-02-01

    to study the incidence of small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), and to investigate what proportion of normal infrarenal aortic diameters (IAD) expand with age. longitudinal follow-up in a population-based aneurysm screening programme. The infrarenal aortic diameter (IAD) was measured by ultrasound. A second scan was performed in subjects with a normal aorta after an average of 5.5 years. data were analysed from 4072 subjects, 464 with a small AAA and 3608 with a normal aorta. The infrarenal aorta expanded in 15% of subjects, but significant growth (>5 mm) occurred in only 7%. Age and initial diameter were independent predictors for aortic dilatation. The effect of diameter at first screen was non-linear. The relative risk for expansion increased dramatically for IADs over 2.5 cm (test for departure of trend: chi2=52, p<0.0001). The effect of age was also non-linear, the risk of expansion was highest in the 60-69 year old age group; test for departure of trend (chi2=13, p=0.002). The incidence of new aneurysms was 3.5 per 1000 person-years (py) (95% CI: 2.8-4.4). The highest incidence of new aneurysms was found in the 60 to 69 year old age group. only a small proportion of the population is prone to aortic dilatation. Patients over 70 with an IAD <2.5 cm can be discharged from follow-up.

  2. Abdominal aortic atherosclerosis at MR imaging is associated with cardiovascular events: the Dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Maroules, Christopher D; Rosero, Eric; Ayers, Colby; Peshock, Ronald M; Khera, Amit

    2013-10-01

    To determine the value of two abdominal aortic atherosclerosis measurements at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for predicting future cardiovascular events. This study was approved by the institutional review board and complied with HIPAA regulations. The study consisted of 2122 participants from the multiethnic, population-based Dallas Heart Study who underwent abdominal aortic MR imaging at 1.5 T. Aortic atherosclerosis was measured by quantifying mean aortic wall thickness (MAWT) and aortic plaque burden. Participants were monitored for cardiovascular death, nonfatal cardiac events, and nonfatal extracardiac vascular events over a mean period of 7.8 years ± 1.5 (standard deviation [SD]). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess independent associations of aortic atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Increasing MAWT was positively associated with male sex (odds ratio, 3.66; P < .0001), current smoking (odds ratio, 2.53; P < .0001), 10-year increase in age (odds ratio, 2.24; P < .0001), and hypertension (odds ratio, 1.66; P = .0001). A total of 143 participants (6.7%) experienced a cardiovascular event. MAWT conferred an increased risk for composite events (hazard ratio, 1.28 per 1 SD; P = .001). Aortic plaque was not associated with increased risk for composite events. Increasing MAWT and aortic plaque burden both conferred an increased risk for nonfatal extracardiac events (hazard ratio of 1.52 per 1 SD [P < .001] and hazard ratio of 1.46 per 1 SD [P = .03], respectively). MR imaging measures of aortic atherosclerosis are predictive of future adverse cardiovascular events. © RSNA, 2013.

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and congenital pelvic kidney. A rare association.

    PubMed Central

    Glock, Y; Blasevich, R; Laghzaoui, A; Roux, D; Fournial, G

    1997-01-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm in association with a congenital right pelvic kidney vascularized by 2 aortic arteries, 1 of which arose from the aneurysmal aorta and the other from the common right iliac artery. Successful surgery consisted of excising the aneurysmal aortic segment and replacing it with a Dacron tube graft, then implanting the upper renal artery (supplemented by a short segment of saphenous venous graft) in the Dacron prosthesis. We review 6 other cases of this rare pathologic association, found in our search of the literature, and discuss techniques of renal protection and (when necessary) reimplantation of the anomalous arteries. Images PMID:9205990

  4. Endovascular Treatment of Proximal Bilateral Iliac Limb Dislocation and Kinking following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Alerci, Mario; Wyttenbach, Rolf Bogen, Marcel; Segesser, Ludwig K. von; Gallino, Augusto; Inglese, Luigi

    2005-05-15

    We report the case of a 69-year-old man with a late type 1b endoleak due to proximal migration of both iliac limbs 5 years after endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The endovascular method used to correct bilaterally this condition is described. Final angiographic control shows patency of the stent-graft without signs of endoleak.

  5. Association of ficolin-3 with abdominal aortic aneurysm presence and progression.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-García, C-E; Burillo, E; Lindholt, J S; Martinez-Lopez, D; Pilely, K; Mazzeo, C; Michel, J-B; Egido, J; Garred, P; Blanco-Colio, L M; Martin-Ventura, J L

    2017-03-01

    Essentials Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is asymptomatic and its evolution unpredictable. To find novel potential biomarkers of AAA, microvesicles are an excellent source of biomarkers. Ficolin-3 is increased in microvesicles obtained from activated platelets and AAA tissue. Increased ficolin-3 plasma levels are associated with AAA presence and progression.

  6. Gum chewing enhances early recovery of bowel function following transperitoneal abdominal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kazuyoshi; Teshima, Hideki; Arinaga, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Hori, Hidetsugu; Kashikie, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Katsuhiko

    2012-08-01

    Postoperative bowel dysfunction is still a major unsolved problem following transperitoneal abdominal aortic surgery. We conducted this study to establish if gum chewing during the postoperative period promotes recovery of bowel function following abdominal aortic surgery. The subjects were 44 patients who underwent elective abdominal aortic surgery. The patients were allocated to a control group (n = 21), who received standard postoperative care, or a "gum group" (n = 23), who received standard postoperative care and were also given gum to chew three times a day from postoperative day (POD) 0-5. The patient characteristics, intraoperative, and postoperative care were equivalent in both groups. Flatus was passed on POD 1.49 in the gum group and on POD 2.35 in the control group (P = .0004) and the time to oral intake was 3.09 days in the gum group and 3.86 days in the control group (P = .023). The number of days to full mobilization in the hospital room was 3.35 versus 5.59 for the gum and control groups, respectively (P < .0001). Gum chewing enhances early recovery of bowel function following transperitoneal abdominal aortic surgery. Moreover, it is a physiologically sound, safe, and an inexpensive part of the postoperative care.

  7. The influence of computational assumptions on analysing abdominal aortic aneurysm haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ene, Florentina; Delassus, Patrick; Morris, Liam

    2014-08-01

    The variation in computational assumptions for analysing abdominal aortic aneurysm haemodynamics can influence the desired output results and computational cost. Such assumptions for abdominal aortic aneurysm modelling include static/transient pressures, steady/transient flows and rigid/compliant walls. Six computational methods and these various assumptions were simulated and compared within a realistic abdominal aortic aneurysm model with and without intraluminal thrombus. A full transient fluid-structure interaction was required to analyse the flow patterns within the compliant abdominal aortic aneurysms models. Rigid wall computational fluid dynamics overestimates the velocity magnitude by as much as 40%-65% and the wall shear stress by 30%-50%. These differences were attributed to the deforming walls which reduced the outlet volumetric flow rate for the transient fluid-structure interaction during the majority of the systolic phase. Static finite element analysis accurately approximates the deformations and von Mises stresses when compared with transient fluid-structure interaction. Simplifying the modelling complexity reduces the computational cost significantly. In conclusion, the deformation and von Mises stress can be approximately found by static finite element analysis, while for compliant models a full transient fluid-structure interaction analysis is required for acquiring the fluid flow phenomenon.

  8. Immunoglobulin G4-Related Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Associated With Myasthenia Gravis, With Contained Rupture.

    PubMed

    Jun, Heungman; Jung, Cheol Woong

    2016-11-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related disease is reportedly among the various causes of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA). Many IgG4-related diseases are closely related to allergic constitution and autoimmune disease. We report a case of a 72-year-old man with IgG4-related IAAA associated with myasthenia gravis, with contained rupture.

  9. Late Rupture of a Totally Thrombosed Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadou, Christiana; Giannakakis, Sotirios; Papapetrou, Anastasios; Galyfos, George; Papacharalampous, Gerasimos; Maltezos, Chrisostomos

    2017-09-06

    Chronic totally thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) comprise a rare medical situation, with only a few cases reported in literature. Optimal management has been controversial, although an early risk for rupture is present. Therefore, we present a rare case of late rupture in a patient with a totally thrombosed AAA, and we discuss proper treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Rare Presentation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm-Renal Pelvis Rupture Due to Compression.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Christopher; Bashaeb, Khalid; Antoniou, George A

    2017-09-06

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are usually asymptomatic. The compressive effects of internal iliac aneurysms are well described in the literature; however, we report what we believe to be the first case of rupture of the renal pelvis caused by compression by an infrarenal AAA. We describe the subsequent management and briefly review the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. First long-term evidence supporting endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Muhs, Bart E; Dardik, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The traditional method of treating abdominal aortic aneurysms with open surgical repair has been steadily replaced by endovascular repair, thought to be a more minimally invasive approach. It is not known, however, whether the endovascular approach is truly less invasive for operative physiology; in addition, this approach has a different spectrum of complications. As such, it is uncertain whether elective endovascular repair of nonruptured aortic aneurysms reduces long-term morbidity and mortality compared with traditional open approaches. In this article, the authors evaluate a recent publication investigating long-term outcomes of a prospective randomized multicenter trial evaluating patients with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms treated with either endovascular or open repair, and discuss the results in the context of current evidence.

  12. Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy for Thrombocytopenia after Surgery for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Daichi; Okada, Hiroshi; Date, Kazuma; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is known to be rarely accompanied by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We report a case of AAA with DIC. An 81-year-old man with abdominal pain referred to our hospital. Computed tomography demonstrated an AAA (maximum diameter: 90 mm). The patient underwent a laparotomy, and an abdominal aorta replacement was performed. At the 3-month follow-up, the patient underwent Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment for 1 week. After treatment, the platelet count dramatically increased. The mechanism by which H. pylori eradication therapy improves hematological parameters has not been elucidated; however, this noninvasive treatment effectively resolved DIC associated with AAA. PMID:28018509

  13. Repair of anastomotic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm utilizing sequential AneuRx aortic cuffs in an overlapping configuration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Bush, Ruth L; Bhama, Jay K; Lin, Peter H; Safaya, Rakesh; Lumsden, Alan B

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic aortic pseudoaneurysm is a known late complication following aortic repair and presents a considerable surgical challenge. We herein evaluate the endovascular alternative of using sequential AneuRx aortic cuffs to bridge the degenerative anastomotic pseudoaneurysms as a definitive treatment. Over a 3-year period, six patients with a mean age of 68.7 years (range 58-75) were identified who had proximal anastomotic aortic pseudoaneurysms secondary to previously implanted bifurcated aortic grafts (mean 15, range 12-20 years) following open surgical correction of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Five patients (83%) presented with concomitant palpable femoral anastomotic pseudoaneurysms and one patient (16%) had a pulsatile abdominal mass. All patients had computed tomographic (CT) scans confirming proximal anastomotic pseudoaneuryms without evidence of infection. The mean diameter of the pseudoaneurysms was 5.3 cm (range 4.0-7.0). Five patients were treated with endovascular methods, while one patient was not suitable for endovascular repair due to the diameter of the native aorta as seen on imaging study at the time of the procedure. AneuRx aortic extender cuffs (3.75 cm length) were deployed sequentially in five patients via a femoral approach. Devices were overlapped approximately 1.5 cm in order to achieve total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms, and all concomitant femoral aneurysms were repaired surgically at the same time. Successful exclusion of the anastomotic pseudoaneurysm was achieved in four patients (80%) using a combination of two or three overlapping aortic cuffs. One patient had a small residual endoleak that had sealed by 1 month, evidenced by follow-up CT. The renal arteries were preserved in all patients. The average estimated blood loss and operative time were 355 +/- 25 cc and 84 +/- 21 min, respectively. The average length of hospital stay was 2.1 days, and there was no mortality or major morbidity. All patients underwent CT scanning

  14. The preventive effect of fish oil on abdominal aortic aneurysm development.

    PubMed

    Kugo, Hirona; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Mouri, Youhei; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yanagimoto, Kenichi; Urano, Tetsumei; Unno, Naoki; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease involving gradual dilation of the abdominal aorta and high rupture-related mortality rates. AAA is histologically characterized by oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and extracellular matrix degradation in the vascular wall. We previously demonstrated that aortic hypoperfusion could cause the vascular inflammation and AAA formation. However, the preventive method for hypoperfusion-induced AAA remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the effect of fish oil on AAA development using a hypoperfusion-induced AAA animal model. Dilation of the abdominal aorta in the fish oil administration group was smaller than in the control group. Collagen destruction and oxidative stress were suppressed in the fish oil administration group than in the control group. These results suggested that fish oil could prevent the development of AAA induced by hypoperfusion.

  15. Innovative Chimney-Graft Technique for Endovascular Repair of a Pararenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  16. Adventitial adipogenic degeneration is an unidentified contributor to aortic wall weakening in the abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Doderer, Stefan A; Gäbel, Gabor; Kokje, Vivianne B C; Northoff, Bernd H; Holdt, Lesca M; Hamming, Jaap F; Lindeman, Jan H N

    2017-09-11

    The processes driving human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) progression are not fully understood. Although antiinflammatory and proteolytic strategies effectively quench aneurysm progression in preclinical models, so far all clinical interventions failed. These observations hint at an incomplete understanding of the processes involved in AAA progression and rupture. Interestingly, strong clinical and molecular associations exist between popliteal artery aneurysms (PAAs) and AAAs; however, PAAs have an extremely low propensity to rupture. We thus reasoned that differences between these aneurysms may provide clues toward (auxiliary) processes involved in AAA-related wall debilitation. A better understanding of the pathophysiologic processes driving AAA growth can contribute to pharmaceutical treatments in the future. Aneurysmal wall samples were collected during open elective and emergency repair. Control perirenal aorta was obtained during kidney transplantation, and reference popliteal tissue obtained from the anatomy department. This study incorporates various techniques including (immuno)histochemistry, Western Blot, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, microarray, and cell culture. Histologic evaluation of AAAs, PAAs, and control aorta shows extensive medial (PAA) and transmural fibrosis (AAA), and reveals abundant adventitial adipocytes aggregates as an exclusive phenomenon of AAAs (P < .001). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and microarray analysis showed enrichment of adipogenic mediators (C/EBP family P = .027; KLF5 P < .000; and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ, P = .032) in AAA tissue. In vitro differentiation tests indicated a sharply increased adipogenic potential of AAA adventitial mesenchymal cells (P < .0001). Observed enrichment of adipocyte-related genes and pathways in ruptured AAA (P < .0003) supports an association between the extent of fatty degeneration and rupture. This

  17. Spectrum of Abdominal Aortic Disease in a Tertiary Health Care Setup: MDCT Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, DG Santosh; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Kalyanpur, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Abdominal aortic disease is an important cause of clinical disability that requires early detection by imaging methods for prompt and effective management. Understanding regional disease pattern and prevalence has a bearing on healthcare management and resource planning. Non-invasive, conclusive imaging strategy plays an important role in the detection of disease. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) with its technological developments provides affordable, accurate and comprehensive imaging solution. Aim To evaluate regional demography of abdominal aortic disease spectrum detected using MDCT imaging data in a tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods A descriptive study was conducted based on MDCT imaging data of patients who were investigated with clinical diagnosis of abdominal aortic disease, from March 2008-2010, over a period of 24 months. Patients were examined with the contrast-enhanced MDCT examination. Morphological diagnosis of the aortic disease was based on changes in relative aortic caliber, luminal irregularity, presence of wall calcification, dissection or thrombus and evidence of major branch occlusion. Patients were categorized into four groups based on imaging findings. MDCT information and associated clinical parameters were examined and correlated to management of patient. Descriptive statistical data, namely mean, standard deviation and frequency of disease were evaluated. Results A total of 90 out of 210 patients (43%) were detected with the abdominal aortic abnormality defined by imaging criteria. Group I, comprising of patients with atherosclerosis –including those with complications, constituted 65.5% of the patients. Group II represented patients with aneurysms (45.5%). Group III, consisting of 32.2% of the patients, contained those with dissections. The rest of the patients, including patients with aorto-arteritis, were classified as group IV. Eight patients with aneurysm and one patient with aorto-arteritis were

  18. MRI‐based computational hemodynamics in patients with aortic coarctation using the lattice Boltzmann methods: Clinical validation study

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Thomas; Krause, Mathias J.; Goubergrits, Leonid; Schumann, Christian; Neugebauer, Mathias; Kuehne, Titus; Preusser, Tobias; Hennemuth, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a scheme based on a recent technique in computational hemodynamics, known as the lattice Boltzmann methods (LBM), to noninvasively measure pressure gradients in patients with a coarctation of the aorta (CoA). To provide evidence on the accuracy of the proposed scheme, the computed pressure drop values are compared against those obtained using the reference standard method of catheterization. Materials and Methods Pre‐ and posttreatment LBM‐based pressure gradients for 12 patients with CoA were simulated for the time point of peak systole using the open source library OpenLB. Four‐dimensional (4D) flow‐sensitive phase‐contrast MRI at 1.5 Tesla was used to acquire flow and to setup the simulation. The vascular geometry was reconstructed using 3D whole‐heart MRI. Patients underwent pre‐ and postinterventional pressure catheterization as a reference standard. Results There is a significant linear correlation between the pretreatment catheter pressure drops and those computed based on the LBM simulation, r=.85, P<.001. The bias was ‐0.58 ± 4.1 mmHg and was not significant ( P=0.64) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of ‐3.22 to 2.06. For the posttreatment results, the bias was larger and at ‐2.54 ± 3.53 mmHg with a 95% CI of ‐0.17 to ‐4.91 mmHg. Conclusion The results indicate a reasonable agreement between the simulation results and the catheter measurements. LBM‐based computational hemodynamics can be considered as an alternative to more traditional computational fluid dynamics schemes for noninvasive pressure calculations and can assist in diagnosis and therapy planning. Level of Evidence: 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:139–146. PMID:27384018

  19. MRI-based computational hemodynamics in patients with aortic coarctation using the lattice Boltzmann methods: Clinical validation study.

    PubMed

    Mirzaee, Hanieh; Henn, Thomas; Krause, Mathias J; Goubergrits, Leonid; Schumann, Christian; Neugebauer, Mathias; Kuehne, Titus; Preusser, Tobias; Hennemuth, Anja

    2017-01-01

    To introduce a scheme based on a recent technique in computational hemodynamics, known as the lattice Boltzmann methods (LBM), to noninvasively measure pressure gradients in patients with a coarctation of the aorta (CoA). To provide evidence on the accuracy of the proposed scheme, the computed pressure drop values are compared against those obtained using the reference standard method of catheterization. Pre- and posttreatment LBM-based pressure gradients for 12 patients with CoA were simulated for the time point of peak systole using the open source library OpenLB. Four-dimensional (4D) flow-sensitive phase-contrast MRI at 1.5 Tesla was used to acquire flow and to setup the simulation. The vascular geometry was reconstructed using 3D whole-heart MRI. Patients underwent pre- and postinterventional pressure catheterization as a reference standard. There is a significant linear correlation between the pretreatment catheter pressure drops and those computed based on the LBM simulation, r=.85, P<.001. The bias was -0.58 ± 4.1 mmHg and was not significant ( P=0.64) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of -3.22 to 2.06. For the posttreatment results, the bias was larger and at -2.54 ± 3.53 mmHg with a 95% CI of -0.17 to -4.91 mmHg. The results indicate a reasonable agreement between the simulation results and the catheter measurements. LBM-based computational hemodynamics can be considered as an alternative to more traditional computational fluid dynamics schemes for noninvasive pressure calculations and can assist in diagnosis and therapy planning. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:139-146. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Epidemiology of Noncomplex Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction Malformations (Aortic Valve Stenosis, Coarctation of the Aorta, Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome) in Texas, 1999 –2001

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Kim L.; Marengo, Lisa; Canfield, Mark; Langlois, Peter; Fixler, David; Belmont, John W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND The left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) malformations aortic valve stenosis (AVS), coarctation of the aorta (CoA), and hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) contribute significantly to infant mortality due to birth defects. Previous epidemiology data showed rate differences between male and female and white and black ethnic groups. The Texas Birth Defects Registry, an active surveillance program, enables study in a large, diverse population including Hispanics. METHODS Records of children up to 1 year old with AVS, CoA, and HLHS born in Texas from 1999 to 2001, were collected from the registry. Those including additional heart defects or a chromosomal anomaly were excluded. Multivariate analysis included: infant sex; United States–Mexico border county residence; and maternal age, race/ethnicity, birthplace, and education. RESULTS There were 910 cases among 1.08 million live births, of which 499 met inclusion criteria. Multivariate modeling of all LVOT malformations combined demonstrated lower prevalence rate ratios (PRRs) for black males (0.26) and Hispanic males (0.70). Similar results were found for CoA but not AVS or HLHS. Higher PRRs were noted for increased maternal age for LVOT (1.3 for 24–34 years; 1.7 for >34 years), AVS, and HLHS, but not CoA, and higher PRRs across all diagnoses for males (LVOT PRR, 2.4) were noted. CoA PRRs were higher in border county vs. non–border county residents (PRR, 2.1). Maternal education and birthplace were not significant factors. CONCLUSIONS There are rate differences for males among all 3 ethnic groups. Sex and ethnic differences suggest genetic etiologies, where the ethnic differences could be used to find susceptibility loci with mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium. Increased CoA rates along the U.S.–Mexico border suggest environmental causes that will require further monitoring. PMID:16007587

  1. [Coarctation of the aorta with aortic arch hypoplasia in newborn with partial trisomy 11q associated to 4q interstitial deletion].

    PubMed

    Palano, G M; Licata, F; Carpinato, C; Sottile, F; Sciuto, R; Mattina, T; Distefano, G

    2010-12-01

    This article reports the case of newborn with multiple dimorphisms (microcephaly, hypertelorism, wide and flat nasal bridge, small nose, long philtrum, microretrognathia, malformed and low-set ears, short neck, redundant nuchal skin, genital anomalies), admitted in the hospital after two days from delivery for torpor, poor food and cyanosis. Babies were affected, at color-Doppler echocardiography, by coarctation of the aorta (CoA) with aortic arch hypoplasia. CoA is often associated to genetic and environmental factors that interact frequently. In this study the anamnestic absence of teratogen noxae and the presence of facial and genital anomalies suggest a genetic study to provide appropriate genetic information to parents. G-banding chromosomic analysis revealed a 46, XX der 4t(4;11) karyotype with partial 11q trisomy confirmed with FISH chromosome painting 4;11 and with FISH subtelomere specific 4(p/q)11(p/q). These techniques showed that derivative chromosome 4 was constituted by chromosome 4 with partial deletion in the q35 region and by 11q21 translocation. This rare anomaly is often inherited by an unbalanced segregation of a balanced translocation, present in one of the two parents. In the present study, the father carried a t(4q;11q) balanced translocation. A CGH-array analysis was executed to the child for the breakpoints definition. As 11q trisomy cases reported in literature are still few, this case can contribute to improve our knowledge on the genotype-phenotype correlation in this rare genetic anomaly.

  2. Extra-anatomic endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a horseshoe kidney supplied by the aneurysmal aorta.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jorge; Golpanian, Samuel; Yang, Jane K; Moreno, Enrique; Velazquez, Omaida C; Goldstein, Lee J; Chahwala, Veer

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by a horseshoe kidney (HSK, fused kidney) represents a unique challenge for repair. Renal arteries arising from the aneurysmal aorta can further complicate intervention. Reports exist describing the repair of these complex anatomies using fenestrated endografts, hybrid open repairs (debranching), and open aneurysmorrhaphy with preservation of renal circulation. We describe an extra-anatomic, fully endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a HSK partially supplied by a renal artery arising from the aneurysm. We successfully applied aortouni-iliac endografting, femorofemoral bypass, and retrograde renal artery perfusion via the contralateral femoral artery to exclude the abdominal aortic aneurysm and preserve circulation to the HSK.

  3. On the prediction of monocyte deposition in abdominal aortic aneurysms using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hardman, David; Doyle, Barry J; Semple, Scott I K; Richards, Jennifer M J; Newby, David E; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2013-10-01

    In abdominal aortic aneurysm disease, the aortic wall is exposed to intense biological activity involving inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated degradation of the extracellular matrix. These processes are orchestrated by monocytes and rather than affecting the aorta uniformly, damage and weaken focal areas of the wall leaving it vulnerable to rupture. This study attempts to model numerically the deposition of monocytes using large eddy simulation, discrete phase modelling and near-wall particle residence time. The model was first applied to idealised aneurysms and then to three patient-specific lumen geometries using three-component inlet velocities derived from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The use of a novel, variable wall shear stress-limiter based on previous experimental data significantly improved the results. Simulations identified a critical diameter (1.8 times the inlet diameter) beyond which significant monocyte deposition is expected to occur. Monocyte adhesion occurred proximally in smaller abdominal aortic aneurysms and distally as the sac expands. The near-wall particle residence time observed in each of the patient-specific models was markedly different. Discrete hotspots of monocyte residence time were detected, suggesting that the monocyte infiltration responsible for the breakdown of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall occurs heterogeneously. Peak monocyte residence time was found to increase with aneurysm sac size. Further work addressing certain limitations is needed in a larger cohort to determine clinical significance.

  4. Nuclear cardiac ejection fraction and cardiac index in abdominal aortic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Fiser, W.P.; Thompson, B.W.; Thompson, A.R.; Eason, C.; Read, R.C.

    1983-11-01

    Since atherosclerotic heart disease results in more than half of the perioperative deaths that follow abdominal aortic surgery, a prospective protocol was designed for preoperative evaluation and intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring. Twenty men who were prepared to undergo elective operation for aortoiliac occlusive disease (12 patients) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (eight patients) were evaluated with a cardiac scan and right heart catheterization. The night prior to operation, each patient received volume loading with crystalloid based upon ventricular performance curves. At the time of the operation, all patients were anesthetized with narcotics and nitrous oxide, and hemodynamic parameters were recorded throughout the operation. Aortic crossclamping resulted in a marked depression in CI in all patients. CI remained depressed after unclamping in the majority of patients. There were two perioperative deaths, both from myocardial infarction or failure. Both patients had ejection fractions less than 30% and initial CIs less than 2 L/M2, while the survivors' mean ejection fraction was 63% +/- 1 and their mean CI was 3.2 L/M2 +/- 0.6. The authors conclude that preoperative evaluation of ejection fraction can select those patients at a high risk of cardiac death from abdominal aortic operation. These patients should receive intensive preoperative monitoring with enhancement of ventricular performance.

  5. A numerical framework for studying the biomechanical behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalalahmadi, Golnaz; Linte, Cristian; Helguera, María.

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is known as a leading cause of death in the United States. AAA is an abnormal dilation of the aorta, which usually occurs below the renal arteries and causes an expansion at least 1.5 times its normal diameter. It has been shown that biomechanical parameters of the aortic tissue coupled with a set of specific geometric parameters characterizing the vessel expansion, affect the risk of aneurysm rupture. Here, we developed a numerical framework that incorporates both biomechanical and geometrical factors to study the behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our workflow enables the extraction of the aneurysm geometry from both clinical quality, as well as low-resolution MR images. We used a two-parameter, hyper-elastic, isotropic, incompressible material to model the vessel tissue. Our numerical model was tested using both synthetic and mouse data and we evaluated the effects of the geometrical and biomechanical properties on the developed peak wall stress. In addition, we performed several parameter sensitivity studies to investigate the effect of different factors affecting the AAA and its behavior and rupture. Lastly, relationships between different geometrical and biomechanical parameters and peak wall stress were determined. These studies help us better understand vessel tissue response to various loading, geometry and biomechanics conditions, and we plan to further correlate these findings with the pathophysiological conditions from a patient population diagnosed with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  6. Aortocaval fistula in ruptured inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm. A report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Farid, A; Sullivan, T M

    1996-12-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) occur infrequently in clinical practice. The reported incidence varies from 2.5-15% of all abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Four percent of all AAA rupture into the vena cava. IAAA rupturing into the vena cava is exceedingly rare. To date, four such cases have been reported. IAAA are associated with a thick, rigid aortic wall which may be thin posteriorly and posterolaterally, where they are likely to rupture. A dense, fibrotic, desmoplastic reaction is found in the periaortic tissues often involving the duodenum, the inferior vena cava, the left renal vein, and ureters. IAAA may present with abdominal, back, or flank pain even in the absence of rupture. The diagnosis of IAAA can be made preoperatively by CT scan and at the time of laparotomy. Aortocaval fistula (ACF) can occur as a complication of AAA. The triad of low back pain, a palpable AAA, and a machinery murmur is diagnostic. ACF in association with IAAA is even more rare. It is amenable to surgical correction using a standard technique of fistula repair from within the aneurysm and prosthetic aortic graft replacement. Two cases of AAA with aortocaval fistula (ACF) are presented. In both, the diagnosis of ACF was made preoperatively. Repair of ACF was performed from within the aneurysm, with subsequent graft replacement. Despite complicated postoperative courses, both patients survived.

  7. In vivo quantification of murine aortic cyclic strain, motion, and curvature: implications for abdominal aortic aneurysm growth.

    PubMed

    Goergen, Craig J; Barr, Kyla N; Huynh, Diem T; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey R; Choi, Gilwoo; Hedehus, Maj; Dalman, Ronald L; Connolly, Andrew J; Taylor, Charles A; Tsao, Philip S; Greve, Joan M

    2010-10-01

    To develop methods to quantify cyclic strain, motion, and curvature of the murine abdominal aorta in vivo. C57BL/6J and apoE(-/-) mice underwent three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight MR angiography to position cardiac-gated 2D slices at four locations along the abdominal aorta where circumferential cyclic strain and lumen centroid motion were calculated. From the 3D data, a centerline through the aorta was created to quantify geometric curvature at 0.1-mm intervals. Medial elastin content was quantified with histology postmortem. The location and shape of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), created from angiotensin II infusion, were evaluated qualitatively. Strain waveforms were similar at all locations and between groups. Centroid motion was significantly larger and more leftward above the renal vessels than below (P < 0.05). Maximum geometric curvature occurred slightly proximal to the right renal artery. Elastin content was similar around the circumference of the vessel. AAAs developed in the same location as the maximum curvature and grew in the same direction as vessel curvature and motion. The methods presented provide temporally and spatially resolved data quantifying murine aortic motion and curvature in vivo. This noninvasive methodology will allow serial quantification of how these parameters influence the location and direction of AAA growth.

  8. Endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic ruptures: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    İslim, Filiz; Erbahçeci Salık, Aysun; Güven, Koray; Bakuy, Vedat; Çukurova, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to present our preliminary single-center experience of the endovascular management of thoracic and abdominal aortic ruptures. Between September 2010 and May 2012, 11 consecutive patients (nine males, two females; age range, 26-80 years) with thoracic and abdominal aortic ruptures underwent endovascular repair in our unit. Thoracoabdominal computed tomography (CT) angiography was performed for diagnosis and follow-up. Patients were selected for endovascular repair by a cardiovascular surgeon, anesthesiologist, and interventional radiologist. All repairs were performed using commercially available stent-grafts. The patients were followed up with CT angiography before discharge, at six months, and yearly thereafter. Three patients died by day 30. One patient died due to an unsuccessful procedure and hemodynamic instability; two patients died because of comorbidities. The other eight patients were followed for six to 24 months after the procedure. No endoleaks or late ruptures were observed during the follow-up period. The patient with iatrogenic thoracic aortic rupture developed paraplegia after the procedure. Reduced mortality due to aortic rupture has been reported with the expanding use of endovascular repair. Reports of small centers are important because of the rarity of these pathologies, and because transferring patients with aortic rupture to a referral center is not usually possible.

  9. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a patient with a congenital solitary pelvic kidney. A case report.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Makino, Y; Suto, Y; Yasuda, K

    2004-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is rarely associated witha congenital pelvic kidney. To date only 11 cases have been reported in the literature in which a solitary pelvic' kidney was associated in only 1 patient. Repair of thesaneurysm is technically demanding because the abnormal origin of the renal arteries presents the problem of renal ischemia duringaortic cross-clamping. We report a case of a 77-year-old man who was found to have an AAA associated with a congenital solitary pelvic kidney. An abdominal aortography dearly showed 2 aberrant renal arteries, one of which originated from the aortic wall just above the aortic bifurcation and the other from the left common iliac artery. At surgery, we found other associated anomalies including malrotation of the gut and a left undescended testis. The surgical procedure consisted of an aneurysmorrhaphy followed by a tube graft replacement with therenal arteries being left intact to the distal aortic wall or below. Renal preservation during aortic cross-clamping was achieved by direct perfusion of the upper renal artery with cold lactated Ringer's solution together with topical cooling with ice slush. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. Urinary output was satisfactory and serum creatinine level remained unchanged throughout his hospital stay. The renal preservation method used in this case was simple and effective.

  10. [The operations of the abdominal hernias with the use propylene material in patients operated due to abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Pupka, Artur; Lepiesza, Agnieszka; Skóra, Jan; Nega, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between abdominal hernias and aortic aneurysm has been well documented in literature. The pathophysiology of aneurysm and hernia formation is seen within the abnormal collagen metabolism, resulting in extracellular matrix defects. This study presents a group of 8 men in the age of 36 to 78 years old (average 63, 5 years old) who underwent both an operation for the aneurysm and for the abdominal hernia. Of the reported 8 patients, 7 had postoperative hernias, where 4 of the cases there were recurrent postoperative hernias. The remaining patient had an inguinal hernia. In 7 cases patients underwent an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) operation and in one case a hepatic artery aneurysm endovascular operation was performed. Due to the fact that postoperative hernias are an immense problem, especially within the group of patient with collagen defects, the area of research and improvement of the materials that are used in prosthetic hernia surgery today needs to progress. This study also presents a short review of the various types of prosthetic materials used in the production of hernial meshes. This is to emphasize the necessity of improving operational techniques to minimize the risk of herniation, especially within a group of patients with collagen defects.

  11. Human thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysmal tissues: Damage experiments, statistical analysis and constitutive modeling.

    PubMed

    Pierce, David M; Maier, Franz; Weisbecker, Hannah; Viertler, Christian; Verbrugghe, Peter; Famaey, Nele; Fourneau, Inge; Herijgers, Paul; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2015-01-01

    Development of aortic aneurysms includes significant morphological changes within the tissue: collagen content increases, elastin content reduces and smooth muscle cells degenerate. We seek to quantify the impact of these changes on the passive mechanical response of aneurysms in the supra-physiological loading range via mechanical testing and constitutive modeling. We perform uniaxial extension tests on circumferentially and axially oriented strips from five thoracic (65.6 years ± 13.4, mean ± SD) and eight abdominal (63.9 years ± 11.4) aortic fusiform aneurysms to investigate both continuous and discontinuous softening during supra-physiological loading. We determine the significance of the differences between the fitted model parameters: diseased thoracic versus abdominal tissues, and healthy (Weisbecker et al., J. Mech. Behav. Biomed. Mater. 12, 93-106, 2012) versus diseased tissues. We also test correlations among these parameters and age, Body Mass Index (BMI) and preoperative aneurysm diameter, and investigate histological cuts. Tissue response is anisotropic for all tests and the anisotropic pseudo-elastic damage model fits the data well for both primary loading and discontinuous softening which we interpret as damage. We found statistically relevant differences between model parameters fitted to diseased thoracic versus abdominal tissues, as well as between those fitted to healthy versus diseased tissues. Only BMI correlated with fitted model parameters in abdominal aortic aneurysmal tissues.

  12. A study of the mortality from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in a district community.

    PubMed

    Budd, J S; Finch, D R; Carter, P G

    1989-08-01

    In a 6-year period (1982-1987), 197 cases of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm were identified in the area covered by the Swindon Health District. Of these, 135 (69%) reached hospital alive, 88 (45%) were operated on, and only 28 (14%) survived. This represents an overall mortality of 86%. In comparison, the mortality from elective aneurysm repair for the same period was only 3.3%. These findings suggest that early detection of aortic aneurysms, leading to elective rather than emergency repair, would be of much greater benefit than the small increase in overall survival one would expect from improving treatment in cases of rupture.

  13. Factors influencing the long-term results of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Geroulakos, G; Lumley, J S; Wright, J G

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of late graft complications such as para-anastomotic aneurysms, aortoenteric fistulas and graft infections following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is a major determinant of its overall benefit, yet most published reports of AAA repair have concentrated almost exclusively on the early postoperative mortality and morbidity. Accurate knowledge regarding the incidence of late complications is essential to making any decision regarding the operative vs nonoperative management of AAAs. A similar analysis must be applied to endovascular repair of AAAs before this technique is accepted as an alternative method of treating AAAs. In this article we review the current knowledge and understanding on the late results following aortic aneurysm repair.

  14. Repair of Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Pseudoaneurysm Using N-Butyl-2-Cyano-Acrylate Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Tanihata, Hirohiko; Sahara, Shinya; Takasaka, Isao; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki

    2010-04-15

    Embolization using N-butyl-2-cyano-acrylate (NBCA) has been highly regarded for treating pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous malformation, and hemorrhage of the visceral arteries. We report the case of a patient who fell from a cliff and sustained hemorrhagic shock with blunt abdominal aortic rupture and who underwent embolization using NBCA. This treatment achieved immediate hemostasis and stabilization of vital signs. Although the long-term durability of NBCA is unknown, it appears that certain types of acute aortic hemorrhage with narrow-necked pseudoaneurysm can be controlled by embolization using NBCA.

  15. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: serial changes of periaortic fibrosis demonstrated by CT.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Eijun; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is characterized by inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes in the periaortic regions of the retroperitoneum. Surgical repair is usually selected for this disease. However, the perioperative mortality associated with open surgical repair of IAAs is three times higher than that with noninflammatory aortic aneurysms due to inflammation and periaortic fibrosis (PAF). Endovascular aneurysm repair of IAAs excludes the aneurysm and seems to reduce the size of the aneurysmal sac and the extent of PAF with acceptable peri-interventional and long-term morbidity. We describe the successful endovascular repair of an IAAA and the serial CT findings after repair.

  16. Acute rectal ischaemia following emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Frances R.; Akhtar, Sobia; George, Rina; Pillay, Woolagasen R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of isolated rectal ischaemia, a rare complication after emergency surgery for a ruptured abdominal aneurysm. We discuss the possible aetiology of this condition and how this rare condition may be missed unless care is taken at the time of reoperation. PMID:28344761

  17. Lower limb myalgias in a man who used to "climb the stairs": an atypical abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Dognini, Giuseppina Patrizia; Cadeo, Gianluca; Dolcino, Luigi; Gilardoni, Lodovico; Stringhi, Enrico; Forloni, Franco

    2012-07-01

    Atypical presentation of emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm comprises a wide spectrum of symptoms. Lower limbs' involvement is infrequent, usually monolateral and with clear vascular features. We report the case of a 58-year-old patient who complained exclusively about symmetric lower limb myalgias without vascular features, after having repeatedly climbed the stairs of the school he worked in. The surprising final diagnosis was of rupturing abdominal aortic aneurysm; the patient was sent to emergency surgery and survived.

  18. Simultaneous xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis and gallbladder cancer in a patient with a large abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Al-Abed, Yahya; Elsherif, Mohammed; Firth, John; Borgstein, Rudi; Myint, Fiona

    2012-09-01

    There have been reports of the coexistence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with intra-abdominal malignancy including gastric, colonic, pancreatic, and renal. We herein report a case of a previously undiagnosed AAA and a presenting complaint consistent with acute cholecystitis. Following cholecystectomy, this was noted to be a rare form of chronic cholecystitis: xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis. There is a known possible association of this uncommon condition with gallbladder cancer. The management of concomitant pathologies can present a real challenge to the multidisciplinary team, especially with large aneurysms.

  19. Aortoiliac Artery Reconstruction Using Bilateral Reversed Superficial Femoral Veins for an Infected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Hanako; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hatori, Kyohei; Miki, Takao; Obayashi, Tamiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is difficult and the ideal graft material is a subject of debate. A 60-year-old man with untreated diabetes mellitus was referred to our hospital presenting with fever and left lower abdominal pain. The patient was diagnosed with an IAAA by blood culture and computed tomography. We treated the patient surgically for the IAAA using bilateral reversed superficial femoral veins which were shaped into a bifurcated graft. No signs of recurrent infection or aneurysmal dilation were observed for 3 years after the procedure. PMID:27087879

  20. Aortoiliac Artery Reconstruction Using Bilateral Reversed Superficial Femoral Veins for an Infected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Satoshi; Hirai, Hanako; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hatori, Kyohei; Miki, Takao; Obayashi, Tamiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is difficult and the ideal graft material is a subject of debate. A 60-year-old man with untreated diabetes mellitus was referred to our hospital presenting with fever and left lower abdominal pain. The patient was diagnosed with an IAAA by blood culture and computed tomography. We treated the patient surgically for the IAAA using bilateral reversed superficial femoral veins which were shaped into a bifurcated graft. No signs of recurrent infection or aneurysmal dilation were observed for 3 years after the procedure.

  1. Listeriosis Infection of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Papadoulas, Spyros I; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kraniotis, Pantelis A; Manousi, Maria E; Marangos, Markos N; Tsolakis, Ioannis A

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) infected by Listeria monocytogenes in a 72-year-old male diabetic farmer, is reported. Our patient had a history of a recent pneumonia that could have been caused by Listeria too. Aneurysm infection was manifested by fever and abdominal and back pain, which prompted investigation with CT scanning that revealed a 4.9 cm AAA with typical signs of infection. He underwent urgent AAA repair with aortobifemoral bypass grafting and had an uneventful course. Aneurysm content microbiology revealed Listeria monocytogenes and following a 9-week course of antibiotics our patient remains asymptomatic 11 months later. PMID:23599616

  2. Impact of the Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Very Efficiently (SAAAVE) Act on abdominal ultrasonography use among Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Shreibati, Jacqueline Baras; Baker, Laurence C; Hlatky, Mark A; Mell, Matthew W

    2012-10-22

    Since January 1, 2007, Medicare has covered abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening for new male enrollees with a history of smoking under the Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Very Efficiently (SAAAVE) Act. We examined the association between this program and abdominal ultrasonography for AAA screening, elective AAA repair, hospitalization for AAA rupture, and all-cause mortality. We used a 20% sample of traditional Medicare enrollees from 2004 to 2008 to identify 65-year-old men eligible for screening and 3 control groups not eligible for screening (70-year-old men, 76-year-old men, and 65-year-old women). We used logistic regression to examine the change in outcomes at 365 days for eligible vs ineligible beneficiaries before and after SAAAVE Act implementation, adjusting for comorbidities, state-level smoking prevalence, geographic variation, and time trends. Fewer than 3% of abdominal ultrasonography claims after 2007 were for SAAAVE-specific AAA screening. There was a significantly greater increase in abdominal ultrasonography use among SAAAVE-eligible beneficiaries (2.0 percentage points among 65-year-old men, from 7.6% in 2004 to 9.6% in 2008; 0.7 points [8.9% to 9.6%] among 70-year-old men; 0.7 points [10.8% to 11.5%] among 76-year-old men; and 0.9 points [7.5% to 8.4%] among 65-year-old women) (P < .001 for all comparisons with 65-year-old men). The SAAAVE Act was associated with increased use of abdominal ultrasonography in 65-year-old men compared with 70-year-old men (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.15; 95% CI, 1.11-1.19) (P < .001), and this increased use remained even when SAAAVE-specific AAA screening was excluded (AOR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.08-1.16) (P < .001). Implementation of the SAAAVE Act was not associated with changes in rates of AAA repair, AAA rupture, or all-cause mortality. The impact of the SAAAVE Act on AAA screening was modest and was based on abdominal ultrasonography use that it did not directly reimburse. The SAAAVE Act had no

  3. Characterization of the transport topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by disturbed blood flow patterns that are hypothesized to contribute to disease progression. The transport topology in six patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was studied. Velocity data were obtained by image-based computational fluid dynamics modeling, with magnetic resonance imaging providing the necessary simulation parameters. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from the velocity data, and used to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS). The combination of FTLE fields and LCS was used to characterize topological flow features such as separation zones, vortex transport, mixing regions, and flow impingement. These measures offer a novel perspective into AAA flow. It was observed that all aneurysms exhibited coherent vortex formation at the proximal segment of the aneurysm. The evolution of the systolic vortex strongly influences the flow topology in the aneurysm. It was difficult to predict the vortex dynamics from the aneurysm morphology, motivating the application of image-based flow modeling.

  4. Current status of endoluminal grafting for exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The beauty and the beast.

    PubMed Central

    Diethrich, E B

    1998-01-01

    The exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysms with endoluminal grafts has generated a great deal of interest since the early 1990s, and many centers are currently evaluating the procedure and comparing it to classic surgical exclusion. Although endoluminal grafting procedures show promise, development and clinical testing of devices is a time-consuming process that is influenced greatly by the regulatory climate in the country where the clinical trials take place. Nevertheless, a number of devices are currently under study, and the advantages of 2nd- and 3rd-generation technology are reflected in reduced rates of complications such as endoleaks and thrombosis. Further study will be required to perfect these devices and observe their long-term success in the exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Images PMID:9566057

  5. Hypoperfusion of the Adventitial Vasa Vasorum Develops an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takeshi; Sano, Masaki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Saito, Takaaki; Inuzuka, Kazunori; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Sugiura, Yuki; Sato, Kohji; Kugo, Hirona; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Konno, Hiroyuki; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Unno, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The aortic wall is perfused by the adventitial vasa vasorum (VV). Tissue hypoxia has previously been observed as a manifestation of enlarged abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). We sought to determine whether hypoperfusion of the adventitial VV could develop AAAs. We created a novel animal model of adventitial VV hypoperfusion with a combination of a polyurethane catheter insertion and a suture ligation of the infrarenal abdominal aorta in rats. VV hypoperfusion caused tissue hypoxia and developed infrarenal AAA, which had similar morphological and pathological characteristics to human AAA. In human AAA tissue, the adventitial VV were stenotic in both small AAAs (30–49 mm in diameter) and in large AAAs (> 50 mm in diameter), with the sac tissue in these AAAs being ischemic and hypoxic. These results indicate that hypoperfusion of adventitial VV has critical effects on the development of infrarenal AAA. PMID:26308526

  6. Hypoperfusion of the Adventitial Vasa Vasorum Develops an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Takeshi; Sano, Masaki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Saito, Takaaki; Inuzuka, Kazunori; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Sugiura, Yuki; Sato, Kohji; Kugo, Hirona; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Konno, Hiroyuki; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Unno, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The aortic wall is perfused by the adventitial vasa vasorum (VV). Tissue hypoxia has previously been observed as a manifestation of enlarged abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). We sought to determine whether hypoperfusion of the adventitial VV could develop AAAs. We created a novel animal model of adventitial VV hypoperfusion with a combination of a polyurethane catheter insertion and a suture ligation of the infrarenal abdominal aorta in rats. VV hypoperfusion caused tissue hypoxia and developed infrarenal AAA, which had similar morphological and pathological characteristics to human AAA. In human AAA tissue, the adventitial VV were stenotic in both small AAAs (30-49 mm in diameter) and in large AAAs (> 50 mm in diameter), with the sac tissue in these AAAs being ischemic and hypoxic. These results indicate that hypoperfusion of adventitial VV has critical effects on the development of infrarenal AAA.

  7. A Case of Infective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm due to Haemophilus influenzae Type B

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Toshimitsu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Infective abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is relatively rare, but a case which is caused by Haemophilus influenzae type B is very rare. We experienced one IAAA case due to H. influenzae type B. The patient was 69-year-old man presenting with severe abdominal and back pain and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), as inflammatory marker. The patient was found to have saccular aneurysm infrarenal aorta on computed tomography scanning. First, we started to treat him with antibiotic agent and second, we operated him at day 8 after admission with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft. Revascularization was made in situ reconstruction. As the result of culture with aneurysm wall, we found that the cause of this aneurysm was the infection of H. influenzae type B. As far as we know, this bacterium is scarcely reported as the cause of infective aortic aneurysms. We reported this IAAA case with the review of the English literature. PMID:23997558

  8. A Case of Infective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm due to Haemophilus influenzae Type B.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshimitsu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2012-09-01

    Infective abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is relatively rare, but a case which is caused by Haemophilus influenzae type B is very rare. We experienced one IAAA case due to H. influenzae type B. The patient was 69-year-old man presenting with severe abdominal and back pain and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), as inflammatory marker. The patient was found to have saccular aneurysm infrarenal aorta on computed tomography scanning. First, we started to treat him with antibiotic agent and second, we operated him at day 8 after admission with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft. Revascularization was made in situ reconstruction. As the result of culture with aneurysm wall, we found that the cause of this aneurysm was the infection of H. influenzae type B. As far as we know, this bacterium is scarcely reported as the cause of infective aortic aneurysms. We reported this IAAA case with the review of the English literature.

  9. Characterization of the transport topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    PubMed

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by disturbed blood flow patterns that are hypothesized to contribute to disease progression. The transport topology in six patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was studied. Velocity data were obtained by image-based computational fluid dynamics modeling, with magnetic resonance imaging providing the necessary simulation parameters. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from the velocity data, and used to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS). The combination of FTLE fields and LCS was used to characterize topological flow features such as separation zones, vortex transport, mixing regions, and flow impingement. These measures offer a novel perspective into AAA flow. It was observed that all aneurysms exhibited coherent vortex formation at the proximal segment of the aneurysm. The evolution of the systolic vortex strongly influences the flow topology in the aneurysm. It was difficult to predict the vortex dynamics from the aneurysm morphology, motivating the application of image-based flow modeling.

  10. Extracellular Matrix Disarray as A Mechanism for Greater Abdominal vs. Thoracic Aortic Stiffness with Aging in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Xin; Vatner, Dorothy E; McNulty, Tara; Bishop, Sanford; Sun, Zhe; Shen, You-Tang; Chen, Li; Meininger, Gerald A; Vatner, Stephen F

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increased vascular stiffness is central to the pathophysiology of aging, hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. However, relatively few studies have examined vascular stiffness in both the thoracic and abdominal aorta with aging, despite major differences in anatomy, embryological origin and relation to aortic aneurysm. Approach and Results The two other unique features of this study were 1) to study young (9±1 years) and old (26±1 years) male monkeys, and 2) to study direct and continuous measurements of aortic pressure and thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters in conscious monkeys. As expected, aortic stiffness, β, was increased p<0.05, 2–3 fold, in old vs. young thoracic aorta, and augmented further with superimposition of acute hypertension with phenylephrine. Surprisingly, stiffness was not greater in old thoracic aorta than young abdominal aorta. These results can be explained in part by the collagen/elastin ratio, but more importantly, by disarray of collagen and elastin, which correlated best with vascular stiffness. However, vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness, was not different in thoracic vs. abdominal aorta in either young or old monkeys. Conclusions Thus, aortic stiffness increases with aging as expected, but the most severe increases in aortic stiffness observed in the abdominal aorta is novel, where values in young monkeys equaled, or even exceeded, values of thoracic aortic stiffness in old monkeys. These results can be explained by alterations in collagen/elastin ratio, but even more importantly by collagen and elastin disarray. PMID:26891739

  11. Automatic segmentation and co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Robert; Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, J. G.; Siddiki, Hassan; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri; Spencer, Garrett; Primak, Andrew N.; Zhang, Jie; Nielson, Theresa; McCollough, Cynthia; Yu, Lifeng

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79% of datasets, requiring either no editing (70%) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12%). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, nonvascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and coregistration of temporally resolved datasets.

  12. Cysteine protease cathepsins and matrix metalloproteinases in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yanwen; Cao, Xu; Yang, Yaoguo; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Both cysteine protease cathepsins and matrix metalloproteinases are implicated in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in humans and animals. Blood and aortic tissues from humans or animals with AAAs contain much higher levels of these proteases, and often lower levels of their endogenous inhibitors, than do blood and aortic tissues from healthy subjects. Protease- and protease inhibitor-deficient mice and synthetic protease inhibitors have affirmed that cysteinyl cathepsins and matrix metalloproteinases both participate directly in AAA development in several experimental model systems. Here, we summarize our current understanding of how proteases contribute to the pathogenesis of AAA, and discuss whether proteases or their inhibitors may serve as diagnostic biomarkers or potential therapeutic targets for this common human arterial disease. PMID:23259477

  13. Mycotic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Secondary to Septic Embolism of a Thoracic Aorta Graft Infection.

    PubMed

    Blanco Amil, Carla Lorena; Vidal Rey, Jorge; López Arquillo, Irene; Pérez Rodríguez, María Teresa; Encisa de Sá, José Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Mycotic aneurysms account for 1% of abdominal aortic aneurysms. There are very few cases published that describe the formation of mycotic aneurysms after septic embolism due to graft infection. We present the first case to our knowledge to be described in the literature of a mycotic aneurysm caused by septic embolism derived from a thoracic aorta graft infection, treated with conventional surgery leading to a successful outcome and evolution.

  14. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the Presence of a Kidney Transplant: Therapeutic Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Karkos, Christos D. McMahon, Greg; Fishwick, Guy; Lambert, Kelly; Bagga, Ajay; McCarthy, Mark J.

    2006-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the presence of a kidney transplant can be extremely challenging, as it carries significant risks of renal ischemia. Endovascular repair is an attractive option, as it can be performed with little or no impairment of renal arterial flow. We describe the endovascular management of a recurrent AAA in a patient with a functioning renal transplant using a custom-made aorto-uni-iliac device. We discuss the planning and the potential problems of the technique.

  15. Simultaneous carotid endarterectomy, coronary artery bypass grafting and abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Abul Hasan Muhammad; Kazui, Teruhisa; Washiyama, Naoki; Yamashita, Katsushi; Terada, Hitoshi

    2002-06-01

    A case with a disease triad of an ulcerative lesion in the left internal carotid artery (LICA), severe coronary insufficiency, and an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is presented in whom we performed simultaneous carotid endarterectomy (CEA), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and Y-graft replacement of the AAA. The operative technique is detailed and justification of the simultaneous approach in such patients is discussed.

  16. The quality of research on physical examination for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nunnelee, Janice D; Spaner, Steven D

    2004-03-01

    A review of nursing literature revealed no studies regarding physical examination or other interventions (except unit based) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The physician literature was explored, revealing an excellent meta-analysis in 1999 of studies before that date with regard to physician accuracy in physical examination for AAA. These are reviewed for quality and recommendations made for nursing research and the role of the Society for Vascular Nursing in teaching nurses.

  17. Inferior vena cava occlusion secondary to an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Tomoya; Tabuchi, Noriyuki; Makita, Satoru

    2007-02-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAAs) represent 3% to 10% of all AAAs. However, inferior vena cava occlusion secondary to an IAAA is rarely reported. We report a case of inferior vena cava occlusion secondary to an IAAA presenting deep venous thrombosis. As it is crucial to avoid pulmonary embolism and excessive blood loss during an operation, we pre-operatively implanted a venous filter and minimized intra-operative dissection that allowed successful operative repair.

  18. [Percutaneous exclusion of traumatic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm from a brachial approach].

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Ricardo; Ríos-Méndez, Raúl E; Solernó, Raúl; Giachello, Federico; Videla-Lynch, Ángeles; Sarmiento, Ricardo A

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm (AAP) is a rare lesion, although traumatic aortic injury is described as one of the main causes; both the rupture as the surgical treatment of the defect has high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, endovascular treatment either by chemical embolization or exclusion of defect with devices has emerged as an alternative treatment. However, there are risks such as occlusion of visceral vessels near the neck of the defect, embolization material or aortic rupture. Therefore, the choice of material and method of approach should be planned carefully in each case. We report a patient who ten years after abdominal wound firearm was diagnosed with AAP 17 x 13 cm, with short neck originated close to the ostium of the celiac trunk at an acute angle with the aortic axis. We perform the exclusion of the defect with a device designed for closing atrial septal defect from the left brachial access due to the angulation of the neck defect. There were no complications. At 72 hours was granted discharge. A month later, CT scan control showed the false aneurysm of equal size and no residual flow. The monitoring to date is five months and the patient remained asymptomatic.

  19. Family history of atherosclerotic vascular disease is associated with the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi; Bailey, Kent R; Austin, Erin; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether family history (FHx) of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) was associated with presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The study cohort comprised of 696 patients with AAA (70±8 years, 84% men) and 2686 controls (68±10 years, 61% men) recruited from noninvasive vascular and stress electrocardiogram (ECG) laboratories at Mayo Clinic. AAA was defined as a transverse diameter of abdominal aorta ⩾ 3 cm or history of AAA repair. Controls were not known to have AAA. FHx was defined as having at least one first-degree relative with aortic aneurysm or with onset of ASCVD (coronary, cerebral or peripheral artery disease) before age 65 years. FHx of aortic aneurysm or ASCVD were each associated with presence of AAA after adjustment for age, sex, conventional risk factors and ASCVD: adjusted odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval): 2.17 (1.66-2.83, p < 0.01) and 1.31 (1.08-1.59, p < 0.01), respectively. FHx of ASCVD remained associated with AAA after additional adjustment for FHx of aortic aneurysm: adjusted OR: 1.27 (1.05-1.55, p = 0.01). FHx of ASCVD in multiple arterial locations was associated with higher odds of having AAA: the adjusted odds were 1.23 times higher for each additionally affected arterial location reported in the FHx (1.08-1.40, p = 0.01). Our results suggest both unique and shared environmental and genetic factors mediating susceptibility to AAA and ASCVD.

  20. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms: a disease entity? Histological analysis of 60 cases of inflammatory aortic aneurysms of unknown aetiology.

    PubMed

    Leu, H J

    1990-01-01

    Sixty inflammatory aortic aneurysms of unknown aetiology were examined by serial sections. The histological findings failed to reveal significant differences in either thoracic or abdominal aneurysms with or without marked adventitial fibrosis. Their identical morphology does not favour the existence of a special disease entity of so-called inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA). Absence or existence of giant cells of any type, occurrence of plasma cells, eosinophils, granulomas, fibrinoid necrosis and adventitial fibrotic thickening cannot be considered as variables which help in differentiation. IAAA are characterized by a marked predominance of male patients and a rather benign clinical course. They usually affect the age group around 60 years. They are not rare and do not seem to be restricted to certain races. Their aetiology, like that of the cases affecting the thoracic aorta (Takayasu's disease, non-specific aortitis) remains unknown, although autoimmune diseases, the retroperitoneal fibrosis of Ormond and arteriosclerosis may be related. However, on the basis of the present evidence we cannot consider them to be one of these diseases. There are no morphological findings which would justify the separation of IAAA from Takaysu's disease.

  1. Histological characteristics of the abdominal aortic wall in patients with vascular chronic Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Hagenaars, Julia C J P; Koning, Olivier H J; van den Haak, Ronald F F; Verhoeven, Bart A N; Renders, Nicole H M; Hermans, Mirjam H A; Wever, Peter C; van Suylen, Robert Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe specific histological findings of the Coxiella burnetii-infected aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall. Tissue samples of the aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall from seven patients with chronic Q fever and 15 patients without evidence of Q fever infection were analysed and compared. Chronic Q fever was diagnosed using serology and tissue PCR analysis. Histological sections were stained using haematoxylin and eosin staining, Elastica van Gieson staining and immunohistochemical staining for macrophages (CD68), T lymphocytes (CD3), T lymphocyte subsets (CD4 and CD8) and B lymphocytes (CD20). Samples were scored by one pathologist, blinded for Q fever status, using a standard score form. Seven tissue samples from patients with chronic Q fever and 15 tissue samples from patients without Q fever were collected. Four of seven chronic Q fever samples showed a necrotizing granulomatous response of the vascular wall, which was characterized by necrotic core of the arteriosclerotic plaque (P = 0.005) and a presence of high numbers of macrophages in the adventitia (P = 0.007) distributed in typical palisading formation (P = 0.005) and surrounded by the presence of high numbers of T lymphocytes located diffusely in media and adventitia. Necrotizing granulomas are a histological finding in the C. burnetii-infected aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall. Chronic Q fever should be included in the list of infectious diseases with necrotizing granulomatous response, such as tuberculosis, cat scratch disease and syphilis. PMID:24953727

  2. Mega aorta syndrome: a case of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wu, William C; Mitchell, Christopher A; Linklater, Derek

    2010-07-01

    An 83-year-old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) via emergency medical services with the chief complaint of "strokelike symptoms." Physical examination revealed altered mental status, tachycardia, hypotension, and a large nonpulsatile periumbilical mass. Bedside ultrasound revealed a 9-cm abdominal aortic aneurysm with absent central flow. Computed tomography scan demonstrated diffuse thoracic and abdominal aortic dilation with rupture into the mediastinum along with left hemothorax. Repeat beside ultrasound demonstrated abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture not seen on the computed tomography scan. Despite aggressive resuscitation, the patient developed bradycardia, which devolved into pulseless electric activity cardiac arrest. She was unable to be resuscitated. The patient's diffuse aneurysmal dilation places her into the small category of patients with a disease entity known as mega aorta syndrome (MAS). Mega aorta syndrome is defined as aneurysmal dilation of the aorta to greater than 6 cm in diameter. Although not in our case, most cases of MAS are symptomatic before catastrophic presentation. The disease progression for these patients is slow and occurs over years. When this disease is recognized early, a surgery known as the elephant trunk procedure can be performed. This operation replaces the entire aorta in multiple stages. This gives the emergency physician a critical role in the diagnosis and outcome of these patients because they may come through the ED for an unrelated complaint early in the disease process. This case report illustrates an advanced case of MAS.

  3. The value of computed tomography in the assessment of suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Adam, D J; Bradbury, A W; Stuart, W P; Woodburn, K R; Murie, J A; Jenkins, A M; Ruckley, C V

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of computed tomography (CT) in patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The study was an interrogation of a prospectively gathered computerized database. The study was performed at a regional vascular surgery unit. Six hundred fifty-two consecutive patients were admitted to this unit with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm between January 1, 1989, and December 31, 1996. Seventy-four patients (11.3%) in whom the diagnosis was in doubt on clinical grounds alone underwent urgent CT. A total of 47 men and 27 women with a median age of 73 years (range, 52 to 86 years) were evaluated. CT and operative findings were compared. CT correctly diagnosed rupture in 22 of 28 patients who underwent operation and correctly excluded rupture in 30 of 39 patients who underwent operation. The sensitivity and specificity of CT when compared with operative findings were therefore 79% and 77%, respectively. These data indicate that CT has little additional diagnostic value. If in the opinion of an experienced vascular surgeon rupture cannot be excluded on clinical grounds alone, and the patient has no medical contraindications to abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, then the patient should be taken directly to the operating department.

  4. Open versus endovascular stent graft repair for abdominal aortic aneurysms: an historical view.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Robert B

    2012-03-01

    Development of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysms repair (EVAR), now in its 4th decade, has involved at least 16 different devices, not counting major modifications of some, only 4 of which have emerged from clinical trials and gained US Food and Drug Administration approval. The main impetus behind EVAR has been its potential for significantly reducing procedural mortality and morbidity, but it was also expected to speed recovery and reduce costs through decreased use of hospital resources. At the outset, EVAR was touted as a better alternative to OPEN in high-risk patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms, and to "watchful waiting" (periodic ultrasound surveillance) for those with small abdominal aortic aneurysms. This new technology has evoked a mixed response with enthusiasts and detractors debating its pros and cons. Bias and conflict of interest exist on both sides. This review will attempt to present a balanced review of the development and current status of this controversial competition between EVAR and OPEN, comparing them in terms of the following key considerations: mortality and morbidity, complications, failure modes and durability, and costs.

  5. Are we cross-matching too much blood for elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair?

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Emily; Quarmby, John

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to identify current blood transfusion requirements in elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and to compare this to an existing maximum surgical blood order schedule. Methods: We retrospectively identified patients who underwent elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair over a 40-month period in our institution. Pre-operative number of units cross-matched and the number of units actually transfused were identified. The cross-match to transfusion ratio was then calculated. Results: Blood transfusion at any time post-operatively was required in 23 (48.9%) cases. Patients needing an intra-operative blood transfusion had a median of 2 units. Of the pre-operative cross-matched units (123), only 43 were used, giving a cross-match to transfusion ratio of 2.86. Conclusion: Our current maximum surgical blood order schedule is poorly followed and a cross-match to transfusion ratio of 2.86 indicates we are cross-matching too many units for elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A carefully considered individualised management of blood products, with the requirement of at least a valid group and save sample, may be more appropriate. PMID:28228951

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm events in the women's health initiative: cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lederle, Frank A; Larson, Joseph C; Margolis, Karen L; Allison, Matthew A; Freiberg, Matthew S; Cochrane, Barbara B; Graettinger, William F; Curb, J David

    2008-10-14

    To assess the association between potential risk factors and subsequent clinically important abdominal aortic aneurysm events (repairs and ruptures) in women. Large prospective observational cohort study with mean follow-up of 7.8 years. 40 clinical centres across the United States. 161 808 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 enrolled in the women's health initiative. Association of self reported or measured baseline variables with confirmed abdominal aortic aneurysm events assessed with multiple logistic regression. Events occurred in 184 women and were strongly associated with age and smoking. Ever smoking, current smoking, and amount smoked all contributed independent risk. Diabetes showed a negative association (odds ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.13, 0.68), as did postmenopausal hormone therapy. Positive associations were also seen for height, hypertension, cholesterol lowering treatment, and coronary and peripheral artery disease. Our findings confirm the strong positive associations of clinically important abdominal aortic aneurysm with age and smoking in women and the negative association with diabetes previously reported in men.

  7. [Early detection of abdominal aortic aneurysm in risk population].

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Vega, María Elizabeth; Solorio-Rosete, Hugo Francisco; Cossío-Zazueta, Alfonso; Bizueto-Rosas, Héctor; Cruz-Castillo, Juan Ernesto; Iturburu-Enríquez, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: aneurisma es el incremento del diámetro de una arteria > 50 %; los más frecuentes son los aneurismas de la aorta abdominal (AAA). La ecografía abdominal es el estudio de escrutinio para su diagnóstico. La detección oportuna del AAA en población de riesgo disminuye la morbimortalidad. El objetivo fue estimar la frecuencia de AAA en pacientes mayores de 65 años.Métodos: Se realizó un estudio transversal entre junio y octubre del 2012 en pacientes de ambos sexos mayores de 65 años que cubrieron los criterios de selección. Se les practicó ultrasonidoDoppler dúplex y se midió el diámetro anteroposterior de la aorta abdominal infrarrenal, se definió como AAA a una aorta abdominal con un diámetro mayor a 3 cm. Se empleó estadística descriptiva y regresión logística para factores de riesgo.Resultados: se incluyeron 144 pacientes, edad media (72.7 ± 6.7), el 95.1 % sexo masculino. El 13 % continuaban fumando. En 127 el diámetro de la aorta fue normal. Se detectaron 10 pacientes con AAA, todos del sexo masculino, el diámetro de los aneurismas identificados variaron de 3.2 a 7.11 cm, el diámetro promedio de 3 - 4 cm (n = 5). Solo el tabaquismo activo fue un factor predictivo significativo para AAA.Conclusión: Se demostró frecuencia significativa de AAA no detectada en masculinos mayores de 65 años, el tabaquismo fue el factor de riesgo más importante.

  8. Interleukin-10 appearance following thoraco-abdominal and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is associated with the duration of visceral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, H S; Burress Welborn, M; Pruitt, J H; Boelens, P G; Seeger, J M; Martin, T D; Wesdorp, R I; Rauwerda, J A; van Leeuwen, P A; Moldawer, L L

    2000-08-01

    to evaluate the plasma IL-10 levels during elective operative repair of thoraco-abdominal and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To study whether IL-10 plasma levels are associated with the duration of cross-clamping (ischaemia) and clinical outcome. fifteen consecutive patients undergoing surgery for TAAA and 10 consecutive patients undergoing surgical repair of AAA were included. plasma concentrations of IL-10 were measured by ELISA technique. Clinical outcome of the TAAA patients was prospectively analysed. during aortic clamping IL-10 was produced in both populations. The plasma IL-10 peak (934+/-172 pg/ml) of the TAAA group was seen at 4 h after declamping and remained detectable after 48 h. The plasma IL-10 peak (212+/-32 pg/ml) of the AAA group was seen 30 min after declamping and fell to undetectable levels by 24 h. These data show that the peak IL-10 plasma levels in TAAA repair are significantly (p<0.05) higher compared to the peak IL-10 plasma levels as seen during AAA repair. A positive correlation was seen between cross-clamping and peak plasma IL-10 and organ dysfunction. IL-10 plasma concentrations appear higher, later and are longer detectable in patients undergoing TAAA. Correlations were seen with duration of cross-clamping and MSOD. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  9. Incidence of abdominal wall hernias in patients undergoing aortic surgery for aneurysm or occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, D; Pitoulias, G; Papaziogas, B; Koutsias, S; Vretzakis, G; Argiriadou, H; Papaziogas, T

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of abdominal and incisional hernias in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) versus patients with aortoiliac occlusive disease (AOD). The study included retrospectively 121 patients, who underwent elective aortic surgery due to AAA (n = 63) or AOD (n = 58) in the period between January 1998 and January 2000. The patients were examined for the presence of abdominal hernias upon admission, as well as for the development of incisional hernias on follow-up. The incidence of inguinal hernias was significantly higher in the group AAA (21/6-33.3%) compared to the group with AOD (6/58-10.3%) (p < 0.01). The incidence of other abdominal wall hernias (umbilical, epigastric or miscellaneous hernias) was also significant higher in AAA group. Furthermore, the incidence of inguinal hernias was significantly higher in the subgroup of patients with an aneurysm diameter more than 6 cm (41.5% vs 18.2%, p < 0.05). The mean follow-up of the patients was 1.7 +/- 0.3 years. 7 cases of incisional hernia were noted in the AAA group (11.1%) and only 2 cases in the AOD group (3.4%) (p < 0.05). The size of the aneurysm had no influence on the incidence of incisional hernias in the AAA group. We conclude that there seems to be an increased incidence of abdominal wall hernias as well as postoperative incisional hernias in patients undergoing aortic surgery for aneurysm disease compared with aortoiliac occlusive disease.

  10. The agreement between oscillometric and intra-arterial technique for blood pressure monitoring in the lower extremities for infants and toddlers undergoing aortic coarctation repair.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhe-Zhe; Zhang, Ma-Zhong; Sun, Ying; Bai, Jie; Gu, Hong-Bin; Liu, Pei-Pei; Li, Min; Cai, Mei-Hua

    2016-11-01

    Anesthetic management for patients undergoing surgical repair of aortic coarctation (CoA) should include constant blood pressure monitoring of the right upper extremity and a lower extremity. The delayed or absent pulse in the lower limbs often leads to unsuccessful arterial cannulation in infants and the oscillometric technique used for blood pressure measurement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between the oscillometric method and intra-arterial technique for blood pressure monitoring in the lower limbs of infants undergoing CoA. A total of 45 infants diagnosed with isolated CoA were initially enrolled in this study and five were excluded because of cannulation failure. Thus, 40 patients had their blood pressure measured simultaneously by both oscillometric technique on the thigh and femoral artery catheterization. After induction and intubation, five pairs of blood pressure readings from each patient were collected in an interval of 3 min. Statistical analysis was accomplished by revised Bland-Altman analysis. There was a strong correlation between oscillometric and invasive blood pressure measurements [systolic blood pressure (SBP) r = 0.771, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) r = 0.704 and mean artery pressure (MAP) r = 0.850]. The mean difference and 95% limits of agreement (95% LOA) between oscillometric and femoral artery blood pressure readings was 3.830 mmHg (-19.297, 26.957) for SBP, -8.725 mmHg (-26.236, 8.786) for DBP, and -3.235 mmHg (-18.842, 12.372) for MAP. There were only one pair of MAP (1/40) and two pairs of SBP readings (2/40) out of range (95% LOA), and all of paired DBP readings were within 95% LOA. There was a good agreement between oscillometric and invasive blood pressure measurements of lower extremities in infants with isolated CoA statistically. However, the oscillometry-measured SBP showed a tendency to overestimate the intra-arterial blood pressure reference, while oscillometry-measured DBP underestimated its

  11. Hemodynamic Study of Flow Remodeling Stent Graft for the Treatment of Highly Angulated Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yeow, Siang Lin; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a novel flow remodeling stent graft (FRSG) on the hemodynamic characteristics in highly angulated abdominal aortic aneurysm based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. An idealized aortic aneurysm with varying aortic neck angulations was constructed and CFD simulations were performed on nonstented models and stented models with FRSG. The influence of FRSG intervention on the hemodynamic performance is analyzed and compared in terms of flow patterns, wall shear stress (WSS), and pressure distribution in the aneurysm. The findings showed that aortic neck angulations significantly influence the velocity flow field in nonstented models, with larger angulations shifting the mainstream blood flow towards the center of the aorta. By introducing FRSG treatment into the aneurysm, erratic flow recirculation pattern in the aneurysm sac diminishes while the average velocity magnitude in the aneurysm sac was reduced in the range of 39% to 53%. FRSG intervention protects the aneurysm against the impacts of high velocity concentrated flow and decreases wall shear stress by more than 50%. The simulation results highlighted that FRSG may effectively treat aneurysm with high aortic neck angulations via the mechanism of promoting thrombus formation and subsequently led to the resorption of the aneurysm. PMID:27247612

  12. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms: a valuable alternative?--Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Volker; Verrel, Frauke; Kellner, Wolfgang; Brandl, Thomas; Reininger, Cornelia B; Steckmeier, Bernd

    2004-05-01

    While endovascular repair (ER) has become a routine procedure in the treatment of arteriosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms with a suitable configuration, only rare reports of interventional treatment of inflammatory aortic abdominal aneurysms (IAAA) exist. We present a case study of a male patient with IAAA, who presented with inflammatory thickening involving the entire circumference of the aortic vessel wall. The MRI performed 8 months after successful ER demonstrated complete regression of vessel wall induration. A patient with the appropriate anatomical configuration of IAAA should benefit from the lower morbidity and mortality of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). In our view, EVAR is preferable to open surgical repair in the specific situation of IAAA.

  13. Novel risk predictor for thrombus deposition in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, M. G. C.; Gizzi, A.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.; Succi, S.

    2015-10-01

    The identification of the basic mechanisms responsible for cardiovascular diseases stands as one of the most challenging problems in modern medical research including various mechanisms which encompass a broad spectrum of space and time scales. Major implications for clinical practice and pre-emptive medicine rely on the onset and development of intraluminal thrombus in which effective clinical therapies require synthetic risk predictors/indicators capable of informing real-time decision-making protocols. In the present contribution, two novel hemodynamics synthetic indicators, based on a three-band decomposition (TBD) of the shear stress signal, are introduced. Extensive fluid-structure computer simulations of patient-specific scenarios confirm the enhanced risk-prediction capabilities of the TBD indicators. In particular, they permit a quantitative and accurate localization of the most likely thrombus deposition in realistic aortic geometries, where previous indicators would predict healthy operation. The proposed methodology is also shown to provide additional information and discrimination criteria on other factors of major clinical relevance, such as the size of the aneurysm.

  14. CT evaluation of complications of abdominal aortic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, A.; Moss, A.A.; Lusby, R.; Kaiser, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of the CT findings in 29 consecutive patients being studied to detect complications of aortofemoral bypass surgery. Presenting symptoms included fever in 22 (76%), gastrointestinal bleeding in 2 (7%), a pulsating mass in 3 (10%), jaundice in 1 (3%), and back pain in 1 (3%). The complications observed most frequently were groin infection in 7 (24%), abdominal perigraft abscess in 11 (38%), pseudoaneurysm in 6 (21%), aorto-enteric fistula in 3 (10%), and lymphocystic hematoma in 3 (10%). There were no false negatives, and overall accuracy and sensitivity of CT in detecting complications was 100%. The authors recommend that CT be performed prior to angiography or surgery whenever an abscess, pseudoaneurysm, or aorto-enteric fistula is suspected.

  15. Influence of IABP-Induced Abdominal Occlusions on Aortic Hemodynamics: A Patient-Specific Computational Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Maria Vittoria; Renzulli, Attilio; Fragomeni, Gionata

    Intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) is used as temporary mechanical assistance in case of cardiovascular diseases, even if different hemodynamic problems and, thus, clinical complications may happen, such as the decrease of visceral perfusion. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study was carried out to investigate the effects of different IABP-induced abdominal occlusions on patient-specific aortic flow. Two possible sizes (25 and 34 cm) and two locations (2 and 3 cm) of the balloon were compared, modeling four abdominal occlusions and numerically reproducing IAB inflation/deflation behavior. The results highlighted that the perfusion in renal, mesenteric, and iliac arteries decreases when the abdominal occlusion increases with balloon inflation. The study illustrates also how the balloon size affects the flow in aorta vessels in both locations, and that the positioning is of little relevance for the 34 cm balloon, whereas it influences the aortic flow very much in case of 25 cm IAB. This analysis demonstrates how the IAB-induced occlusion may vary the abdominal circulation; therefore, the correct size and positioning are emphasized for patient's outcome.

  16. Differential diagnosis of a patient referred to physical therapy with low back pain: abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mechelli, Filippo; Preboski, Zachary; Probaski, Zachory; Boissonnault, William G

    2008-09-01

    Resident's case problem. A 38-year-old man with a history of chronic episodic low back pain (LBP) was referred to physical therapy by his physician. Concerns ascertained from the patient's history included an insidious onset of unrelenting, deep, boring pain that was constant, irrespective of movements or posture changes, or time of day. In addition, the patient reported night pain and the inability to find relief in recumbent positions. The primary warning signs associated with the physical examination were unremarkable examination of the lumbar spine, pelvis, and hip regions (symptoms not altered and minimal impairments detected), and a strong nontender, palpable pulse noted over the left lateral lumbar region, with the patient prone, and over the midline and left upper/lower abdominal quadrants, with the patient supine. Suspicion of the presence of an abdominal aortic aneurysm led the therapist to immediately refer the patient to an allopathic physician. The subsequent abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography scanning revealed a 10-cm-diameter abdominal aortic aneurysm. The patient was immediately hospitalized and underwent surgical repair within two days. LBP is the most frequent condition for patients seeking care from physical therapists in outpatient settings. The challenge for clinicians is to recognize patients in whom LBP may be related to underlying pathological conditions. A prompt referral of patients presenting with suspicious findings to the appropriate physician may lead to a more timely diagnosis, with the goal of minimizing or preventing morbidity and mortality.

  17. [Ultrasound diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 52 year old woman].

    PubMed

    Romero-Hernández, Juan José; Lozano-Corona, Marco Antonio; Díaz-Méndez, Macrina; Aspeitia-León, Jorge Alejandro; Hernández-Díaz, Víctor; Magaña-Cabrera, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as increasing the diameter of the aorta in more than 50 % of its original size and the infra-renal location is the most common (90 %). AAA disease mainly affects older men and white smokers, and has a male: female ratio of 4:1, as well the diagnosis is rare in women under age 55. Aneurysm rupture is the most common complication and cause of death in the general population, its etiology is unclear, but is commonly associated with atherosclerosis. The AAA do not exhibit rupture and it is usually asymptomatic diagnosed incidentally, however, as the aneurysm grows, appears symptoms such as back pain, abdominal or groin pain, well as palpation of a pulse mass on umbilical and supra-umbilical region. Imaging study such as ultrasound and CT scan are the mainstay of diagnosis. We present a case of 52 years old patient with no history related to the diagnosis, who presented sudden and severe abdominal pain. She was admitted to the emergency room with a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis vs. acute pancreatitis. After ultrasound and CT studies, the diagnosis was a complicated abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  18. Associations of coronary and peripheral artery disease with presence, expansion, and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm - a grin without a cat!

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-05-01

    Both coronary and peripheral artery disease are representative atherosclerotic diseases, which are also known to be positively associated with presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm. It is still controversial, however, whether coronary and peripheral artery disease are positively associated with expansion and rupture as well as presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In the present article, we overviewed epidemiological evidence, i. e. meta-analyses, regarding the associations of coronary and peripheral artery disease with presence, expansion, and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm through a systematic literature search. Our exhaustive search identified seven meta-analyses, which suggest that both coronary and peripheral artery disease are positively associated with presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm, may be negatively associated with expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm, and might be unassociated with rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  19. Relation between low serum cholesteryl-ester transfer activity and abdominal aortic calcification in normolipidemic elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Y; Morimoto, S; Fukuo, K; Masuyama, T; Yasuda, O; Koh, E; Tamatani, M; Nakahashi, T; Ogihara, T

    1993-01-01

    We studied the relation between cholesteryl-ester transfer activity (CETA) and abdominal aortic calcification in elderly subjects. Compared with 10 young healthy subjects (mean +/- S.D. age, 27 +/-2 years) and to 26 elderly subjects without abdominal aortic calcification (79 +/- 7 years), 16 elderly patients with abdominal aortic calcification (82 +/- 6 years) had significantly lower levels of serum CETA. However, there were no differences in the levels of serum lipids and apolipoproteins, including total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, B, C-II and E, between the two elderly groups. When the two groups of elderly subjects were considered together, the level of serum CETA did not correlate significantly with any lipids and apolipoproteins. These results provide evidence that CETA may prevent the development of aortic calcification in normolipidemic elderly people.

  20. Coarctation of the aorta: Management from infancy to adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Rachel D; Campbell, Michael J; Fleming, Gregory A; Hill, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a relatively common form of congenital heart disease, with an estimated incidence of approximately 3 cases per 10000 births. Coarctation is a heterogeneous lesion which may present across all age ranges, with varying clinical symptoms, in isolation, or in association with other cardiac defects. The first surgical repair of aortic coarctation was described in 1944, and since that time, several other surgical techniques have been developed and modified. Additionally, transcatheter balloon angioplasty and endovascular stent placement offer less invasive approaches for the treatment of coarctation of the aorta for some patients. While overall morbidity and mortality rates are low for patients undergoing intervention for coarctation, both surgical and transcatheter interventions are not free from adverse outcomes. Therefore, patients must be followed closely over their lifetime for complications such as recoarctation, aortic aneurysm, persistent hypertension, and changes in any associated cardiac defects. Considerable effort has been expended investigating the utility and outcomes of various treatment approaches for aortic coarctation, which are heavily influenced by a patient’s anatomy, size, age, and clinical course. Here we review indications for intervention, describe and compare surgical and transcatheter techniques for management of coarctation, and explore the associated outcomes in both children and adults. PMID:26635924

  1. Enhanced production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A. E.; Kunkel, S. L.; Pearce, W. H.; Shah, M. R.; Parikh, D.; Evanoff, H. L.; Haines, G. K.; Burdick, M. D.; Strieter, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory leukocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of human atherosclerotic disease, from early atherogenesis to the late stages of atherosclerosis, such as aneurysm formation. We have shown previously that human abdominal aortic aneurysms are characterized by the presence of numerous chronic inflammatory cells throughout the vessel wall (Am J Pathol 1990, 137: 1199-1213). The signals that attract lymphocytes and monocytes into the aortic wall in aneurysmal disease remain to be precisely defined. We have studied the production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by aortic tissues obtained from 47 subjects. We compared the antigenic production of these cytokines by explants of: 1) human abdominal aneurysmal tissue, 2) occlusive (atherosclerotic) aortas, and 3) normal aortas. IL-8, which is chemotactic for neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells was liberated in greater quantities by abdominal aortic aneurysms than by occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, macrophages, and to a lesser degree endothelial cells, were found to be positive for the expression of antigenic IL-8. Similarly, MCP-1, a potent chemotactic cytokine for monocytes/macrophages, was released by explants from abdominal aortic aneurysms in greater quantities than by explants from occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, the predominant MCP-1 antigen-positive cells were macrophages and to a lesser extent smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate that human abdominal aortic aneurysms produce IL-8 and MCP-1, both of which may serve to recruit additional inflammatory cells into the abdominal aortic wall, hence perpetuating the inflammatory reaction that may result in the pathology of vessel wall destruction and aortic aneurysm formation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8494046

  2. Intervisceral artery origins in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysmal disease; evidence for systemic vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Damian M; Evans, Tom G; Thomas, Kate Gower; White, Richard D; Twine, Chistopher P; Lewis, Michael H; Williams, Ian M

    2016-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? To what extent focal abdominal aortic aneurysmal (AAA) disease is associated with systemic remodelling of the vascular tree remains unknown. The present study examined whether anatomical differences exist between distances of the intervisceral artery origins and AAA location/size in patients with disease compared with healthy patients. What is the main finding and its importance? Intervisceral artery distances were shown to be consistently greater in AAA patients, highlighting the systemic nature of AAA disease that extends proximally to the abdominal aorta and its branches. The anatomical description of the natural variation in visceral artery origins has implications for the design of stent grafts and planning complex open aortic surgery. The initial histopathology of abdominal aortic aneurysmal (AAA) disease is atherosclerotic, later diverting towards a distinctive dilating rather than occlusive aortic phenotype. To what extent focal AAA disease is associated with systemic remodelling of the vascular tree remains unknown. The present study examined whether anatomical differences exist between the intervisceral artery origins and AAA location/size in patients with AAA disease (AAA+) relative to those without (AAA-). Preoperative contrast-enhanced computerized tomograms were reviewed in 90 consecutive AAA+ patients scheduled for open repair who underwent an infrarenal (n = 45), suprarenal (n = 26) or supracoeliac clamp (n = 19). These were compared with 39 age-matched AAA- control patients. Craniocaudal measurements were recorded from the distal origin of the coeliac artery to the superior mesenteric artery and from the origin of the superior mesenteric artery to both renal artery origins. Serial blood samples were obtained for estimation of the glomerular filtration rate before and after surgery. Intervisceral artery origins were shown to be consistently greater in AAA+ patients (P < 0.05 versus AAA-), although

  3. Endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm with aortocaval fistula based on aortic and inferior vena cava stent-graft placement.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Pierre Galvagni; Cunha, Josué Rafael Ferreira; Lima, Guilherme Baumgardt Barbosa; Franklin, Rafael Narciso; Bortoluzzi, Cristiano Torres; Galego, Gilberto do Nascimento

    2014-11-01

    A ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), complicated by an aortocaval fistula (ACF), is usually associated with high morbidity and mortality during open operative repair. We report a case of endovascular treatment of an RAAA with ACF. After accessing both common femoral arteries, a bifurcated aortic stent graft was placed. Subsequently, we accessed the fistula from the right femoral vein and a cava vein angiography showed a persistent massive flow from the cava to the excluded aneurysm sac. We proceeded by covering the fistula with an Excluder aortic stent-graft cuff to prevent pressurization of the aneurysm sac and secondary endoleaks. This procedure is feasible and may reduce the chances of posterior endoleaks.

  4. Automated Delineation of Vessel Wall and Thrombus Boundaries of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Multispectral MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Vila, B.; Tarjuelo-Gutierrez, J.; Sánchez-González, P.; Verbrugghe, P.; Fourneau, I.; Maleux, G.; Herijgers, P.; Gomez, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    A correct patient-specific identification of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is useful for both diagnosis and treatment stages, as it locates the disease and represents its geometry. The actual thickness and shape of the arterial wall and the intraluminal thrombus are of great importance when predicting the rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysms. The authors describe a novel method for delineating both the internal and external contours of the aortic wall, which allows distinguishing between vessel wall and intraluminal thrombus. The method is based on active shape model and texture statistical information. The method was validated with eight MR patient studies. There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the vessel wall area. Resulting segmented images presented a mean Dice coefficient with respect to manual segmentations of 0.88 and a mean modified Hausdorff distance of 1.14 mm for the internal face and 0.86 and 1.33 mm for the external face of the arterial wall. Preliminary results of the segmentation show high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the vessel wall and thrombus areas. However, since the dataset is small the conclusions cannot be generalized. PMID:26236390

  5. Surgical treatment of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms: Outcome and predictors analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nuellari, Edmond; Esposito, Giampiero; Kuci, Saimir; Kapedani, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to report our experience on the postoperative outcome of surgical treatment of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA). Materials and Methods Between 1997–2014, 35 patients with IAAA underwent surgery. The mean age was 63 ± 18 years. Chronic renal failure was identified in 11 (31.4%) patients and confirmed ischemic heart disease in 15 (43%) patients. The mean aortic aneurysm diameter was 68 ± 25 mm. The abdominal aorta was clamped above the renal arteries in 6 (17%) patients. Results The hospital mortality was 5.7% (2 patients). Three patients developed an aortic pseudoaneurysm and underwent a redo operation. Another patient developed a femoral anastomotic pseudoaneurysm 7 years after operation and he was treated surgically. The actuarial free-reoperation actuarial survival at 1, 5 and 7 years was 94%, 62% and 50%, respectively. The Cox model revealed the delta erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p = 0.002), ischemic heart disease (p = 0.006) and renal failure (p = 0.036) as strong predictors for poor overall outcome. Conclusion Early postoperative outcome in terms of mortality and morbidity seems acceptable, however, patients with IAAA have an increased risk for reoperation due to pseudonaneurysm formation. Strong predictors for poor overall outcome seem to be the elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, ischemic heart disease and chronic renal failure. PMID:25243075

  6. Surgical Treatment of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Outcome and Predictors Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nuellari, Edmond; Prifti, Edvin; Esposito, Giampiero; Kapedani, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to report our experience on the postoperative outcome of surgical treatment of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA). Materials and Methods: Between 1997-2014, 35 patients with IAAA underwent surgery. The mean age was 63+/-18years. Chronic renal failure was identified in 11(31.4%)patients and confirmed ischemic heart disease in 15(43%)patients. The mean aortic aneurysm diameter was 68+/-25mm. The abdominal aorta was clamped above the renal arteries in 6 (17%) patients. Results: The hospital mortality was 5.7% (2 patients). Three patients developed an aortic pseudoaneurysm and underwent a redo operation. Another patient developed a femoral anastomotic pseudoaneurysm 7 years after operation and he was treated surgically. The actuarial free-reoperation actuarial survival at 1, 5 and 7 years was 94%, 62% and 50% respectively. The Cox model revealed the delta ESR (p=0.002), ischemic heart disease (p=0.006) and renal failure (p=0.036) as strong predictors for poor overall outcome. Conclusion: Early postoperative outcome in terms of mortality and morbidity seems acceptable, however patients with IAAA have an increased risk for reoperation due to pseudonaneurysm formation. Strong predictors for poor overall outcome seems to be the elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, ischemic heart disease and chronic renal failure. PMID:25568545

  7. Extended use of endovascular aneurysm sealing for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Böckler, Dittmar; Holden, Andrew; Krievins, Dainis; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Peters, Andreas S; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Reijnen, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) is now an established treatment modality for suitable patients presenting with aneurysm rupture. EVAR for ruptured aneurysms reduces transfusion, mechanical ventilation, intensive care. and hospital stay when compared with open surgery. In the emergency setting, however, EVAR is limited by low applicability due to adverse clinical or anatomical characteristics and increased need for reintervention. In addition, ongoing bleeding from aortic side branches post-EVAR can cause hemodynamic instability, larger hematomas, and abdominal compartment syndrome. Endovascular aneurysm sealing, based on polymer filling of the aneurysm, has the potential to overcome some of the limitations of EVAR for ruptured aneurysms and to improve outcomes. Recent literature suggests that endovascular aneurysm sealing can be performed with early mortality similar to that of EVAR for ruptured aortic aneurysms, but experience is limited to a few centers and a small number of patients. The addition of chimney grafts can increase the applicability of endovascular aneurysm sealing in order to treat short-neck and juxtarenal aneurysms as an alternative to fenestrated endografts. Further evaluation of the technique, with larger longitudinal studies, is necessary before advocating wider implementation of endovascular aneurysm sealing in the emergency setting.

  8. [Ultrasound screening of abdominal aortic aneurysm: Lessons from Vesale 2013].

    PubMed

    Laroche, J P; Becker, F; Baud, J M; Miserey, G; Jaussent, A; Picot, M C; Bura-Rivière, A; Quéré, I

    2015-12-01

    Although aneurysm of the abdominal infra-renal aorta (AAA) meets criteria warranting B mode ultrasound screening, the advantages of mass screening versus selective targeted opportunistic screening remain a subject of debate. In France, the French Society of Vascular Medicine (SFMV) and the Health Authority (HAS) published recommendations for targeted opportunistic screening in 2006 and 2013 respectively. The SFMV held a mainstream communication day on November 21, 2013 in France involving participants from metropolitan France and overseas departments that led to a proposal for free AAA ultrasound screening: the Vesalius operation. Being a consumer operation, the selection criteria were limited to age (men and women between 60 and 75 years); the age limit was lowered to 50 years in case of direct family history of AAA. More than 7000 people (as many women as men) were screened in 83 centers with a 1.70% prevalence of AAA in the age-based target population (3.12% for men, 0.27% for women). The median diameter of detected AAA was 33 mm (range 20 to 74 mm). The prevalence of AAA was 1.7% in this population. Vesalius data are consistent with those of the literature both in terms of prevalence and for cardiovascular risk factors with the important role of smoking. Lessons from Vesalius to take into consideration are: screening is warranted in men 60 years and over, especially smokers, and in female smokers. Screening beyond 75 years should be discussed. Given the importance of screening, the SFMV set up a year of national screening for AAA (Vesalius operation 2014/2015) in order to increase public and physician awareness about AAA detection, therapeutic management, and monitoring. AAA is a serious, common, disease that kills 6000 people each year. The goal of screening is cost-effective reduction in the death toll.

  9. Overexpression of Catalase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Prevents the Formation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Parastatidis, Ioannis; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Taylor, W Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been reported in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), but which reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes the development of AAA remains unclear. Here we investigate the effect of the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) degrading enzyme catalase on the formation of AAA. Approach and Results AAA were induced with the application of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on mouse infrarenal aortas. The administration of PEG-catalase, but not saline, attenuated the loss of tunica media and protected against AAA formation (0.91±0.1 mm vs. 0.76±0.09 mm). Similarly, in a transgenic mouse model, catalase over-expression in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) preserved the thickness of tunica media and inhibited aortic dilatation by 50% (0.85±0.14 mm vs. 0.57±0.08 mm). Further studies showed that injury with CaCl2 decreased catalase expression and activity in the aortic wall. Pharmacologic administration or genetic over-expression of catalase restored catalase activity and subsequently decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity. In addition, a profound reduction in inflammatory markers and VSMC apoptosis was evident in aortas of catalase over-expressing mice. Interestingly, as opposed to infusion of PEG-catalase, chronic over-expression of catalase in VSMC did not alter the total aortic H2O2 levels. Conclusions The data suggest that a reduction in aortic wall catalase activity can predispose to AAA formation. Restoration of catalase activity in the vascular wall enhances aortic VSMC survival and prevents AAA formation primarily through modulation of matrix metalloproteinase activity. PMID:23950141

  10. Mast cells modulate the pathogenesis of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiusong; Sukhova, Galina K.; Yang, Min; Wolters, Paul J.; MacFarlane, Lindsey A.; Libby, Peter; Sun, Chongxiu; Zhang, Yadong; Liu, Jian; Ennis, Terri L.; Knispel, Rebecca; Xiong, Wanfen; Thompson, Robert W.; Baxter, B. Timothy; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), an inflammatory disease, involves leukocyte recruitment, immune responses, inflammatory cytokine production, vascular remodeling, neovascularization, and vascular cell apoptosis, all of which contribute to aortic dilatation. This study demonstrates that mast cells, key participants in human allergic immunity, participate in AAA pathogenesis in mice. Mast cells were found to accumulate in murine AAA lesions. Mast cell–deficient KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice failed to develop AAA elicited by elastase perfusion or periaortic chemical injury. KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice had reduced aortic expansion and internal elastic lamina degradation; decreased numbers of macrophages, CD3+ T lymphocytes, SMCs, apoptotic cells, and CD31+ microvessels; and decreased levels of aortic tissue IL-6 and IFN-γ. Activation of mast cells in WT mice via C48/80 injection resulted in enhanced AAA growth while mast cell stabilization with disodium cromoglycate diminished AAA formation. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that mast cells participated in angiogenesis, aortic SMC apoptosis, and matrix-degrading protease expression. Reconstitution of KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice with bone marrow–derived mast cells from WT or TNF-α–/– mice, but not from IL-6–/– or IFN-γ–/– mice, caused susceptibility to AAA formation to be regained. These results demonstrate that mast cells participate in AAA pathogenesis in mice by releasing proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IFN-γ, which may induce aortic SMC apoptosis, matrix-degrading protease expression, and vascular wall remodeling, important hallmarks of arterial aneurysms. PMID:17932568

  11. Atmospheric Pressure Changes Are Associated with Type A Acute Aortic Dissections and Spontaneous Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture in Tuzla Canton

    PubMed Central

    Krdzalic, Alisa; Rifatbegovic, Zijah; Krdzalic, Goran; Jahic, Elmir; Adam, Visnja Nesek; Golic, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate a relationship between seasonal variation and incidence of type A acute aortic dissection (AAD) and spontaneous abdominal aneurysm rupture (rAAA) in Canton Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Patients and methods: A total of 81 cases, 41 AAD and 40 of ruptured AAA were identified from one center over a 6-year, from 2008 till 2013. In 2012 were admitted (45.6% or 36 patients). Results: Seasonal analysis showed that 19(23.4%) patients were admitted in spring, 15(18.5) in summer, 26(32%) in autumn and 21(25.9) in winter. The most frequent period was autumn/winter with 47 or 58% patients. A causal link between atmospheric pressure (AP) and incidence of rAAA and AAD on seasonal and monthly basis was found. PMID:25568523

  12. Diagnosis of aortic coarctation by tardus-parvus renal artery Doppler signal in an infant with multicystic dysplastic kidney: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Kate; McHugh, Kieran; vant Hoff, William

    2007-03-01

    We report an infant with known unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) who underwent renal ultrasonography and Doppler spectral waveform analysis for investigation of hypertension. A tardus-parvus waveform was demonstrated in the renal artery on the normal side suggesting either renal artery or more proximal stenosis. Coarctation of the aorta was subsequently demonstrated.

  13. Metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene by aortic subcellular fractions in the setting of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, A; Prins, P A; Perati, P R; Rekhadevi, P V; Sampson, U K

    2016-01-01

    As exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; a family of environmental toxicants) have been implicated in cardiovascular diseases, the ability of the aortic tissue to process these toxicants is important from the standpoint of abdominal aortic aneurysms and atherosclerosis. Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), a representative PAH compound is released into the environment from automobile exhausts, industrial emissions, and considerable intake of B(a)P is also expected in people who are smokers and barbecued red meat eaters. Therefore, knowledge of B(a)P metabolism in the cardiovascular system will be of importance in the management of vascular disorders. Toward this end, subcellular fractions (nuclear, cytosolic, mitochondrial, and microsomal) were isolated from the aortic tissues of Apo E mice that received a 5 mg/kg/week of B(a)P for 42 days and 0.71 mg/kg/day for 60 days. The fractions were incubated with 1 and 3 μM B(a)P. Post incubation, samples were extracted with ethyl acetate and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC. Microsomal B(a)P metabolism was greater than the rest of the fractions. The B(a)P metabolite levels generated by all the subcellular fractions showed a B(a)P exposure concentration-dependent increase for both the weekly and daily B(a)P treatment categories. The preponderance of B(a)P metabolites such as 7,8-dihydrodiol, 3,6-, and 6,12-dione metabolites are interesting due to their reported involvement in B(a)P-induced toxicity through oxidative stress.

  14. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: vascular anatomy, device selection, procedure, and procedure-specific complications.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Yolanda; Rogoff, Philip; Romanelli, Donald; Reichle, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is abnormal dilatation of the aorta, carrying a substantial risk of rupture and thereby marked risk of death. Open repair of AAA involves lengthy surgery time, anesthesia, and substantial recovery time. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) provides a safer option for patients with advanced age and pulmonary, cardiac, and renal dysfunction. Successful endovascular repair of AAA depends on correct selection of patients (on the basis of their vascular anatomy), choice of the correct endoprosthesis, and familiarity with the technique and procedure-specific complications. The type of aneurysm is defined by its location with respect to the renal arteries, whether it is a true or false aneurysm, and whether the common iliac arteries are involved. Vascular anatomy can be divided more technically into aortic neck, aortic aneurysm, pelvic perfusion, and iliac morphology, with grades of difficulty with respect to EVAR, aortic neck morphology being the most common factor to affect EVAR appropriateness. When choosing among the devices available on the market, one must consider the patient's vascular anatomy and choose between devices that provide suprarenal fixation versus those that provide infrarenal fixation. A successful technique can be divided into preprocedural imaging, ancillary procedures before AAA stent-graft placement, the procedure itself, postprocedural medical therapy, and postprocedural imaging surveillance. Imaging surveillance is important in assessing complications such as limb thrombosis, endoleaks, graft migration, enlargement of the aneurysm sac, and rupture. Last, one must consider the issue of radiation safety with regard to EVAR.

  15. CD14 Directs Adventitial Macrophage Precursor Recruitment: Role in Early Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Blomkalns, Andra L.; Gavrila, Daniel; Thomas, Manesh; Neltner, Bonnie S.; Blanco, Victor M.; Benjamin, Stephanie B.; McCormick, Michael L.; Stoll, Lynn L.; Denning, Gerene M.; Collins, Sean P.; Qin, Zhenyu; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.; Thompson, Robert W.; Weiss, Robert M.; Lindower, Paul D.; Pinney, Susan M.; Chatterjee, Tapan; Weintraub, Neal L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recruitment of macrophage precursors to the adventitia plays a key role in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), but molecular mechanisms remain undefined. The innate immune signaling molecule CD14 was reported to be upregulated in adventitial macrophages in a murine model of AAA and in monocytes cocultured with aortic adventitial fibroblasts (AoAf) in vitro, concurrent with increased interleukin‐6 (IL‐6) expression. We hypothesized that CD14 plays a crucial role in adventitial macrophage precursor recruitment early during AAA formation. Methods and Results CD14−/− mice were resistant to AAA formation induced by 2 different AAA induction models: aortic elastase infusion and systemic angiotensin II (AngII) infusion. CD14 gene deletion led to reduced aortic macrophage infiltration and diminished elastin degradation. Adventitial monocyte binding to AngII‐infused aorta in vitro was dependent on CD14, and incubation of human acute monocytic leukemia cell line‐1 (THP‐1) monocytes with IL‐6 or conditioned medium from perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) upregulated CD14 expression. Conditioned medium from AoAf and PVAT induced CD14‐dependent monocyte chemotaxis, which was potentiated by IL‐6. CD14 expression in aorta and plasma CD14 levels were increased in AAA patients compared with controls. Conclusions These findings link CD14 innate immune signaling via a novel IL‐6 amplification loop to adventitial macrophage precursor recruitment in the pathogenesis of AAA. PMID:23537804

  16. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Lesions With or Without Common Iliac Artery Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Oender, Hakan; Oguzkurt, Levent; Guer, Serkan; Tekbas, Gueven; Guerel, Kamil; Coskun, Isa; Oezkan, Ugur

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the results of stent placement for obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease with or without involvement of the common iliac artery. Forty patients had self-expanding stents primarily or after balloon dilatation in the abdominal aorta between January 2005 and May 2011. All patients had trouble walking. Follow-up examinations were performed with clinical visits; these included color Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography. Technical, clinical, and hemodynamic success was achieved in all patients. None of the patients underwent reintervention during the follow-up period, which ranged from 3 months to 6 years (median 24 months). Nine complications occurred in six patients. Of the nine complications, four were distal thromboembolisms, which were successfully treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis or anticoagulation therapy. Endovascular treatment of the obstructive aortic disease using self-expanding stents was safe and effective, with high technical success and long-term patency. Thromboembolic complications were high even though direct stenting was considered protective for thromboembolism formation. Particularly for infrarenal aortic stenosis, it can be recommended as the first-line treatment option for patients with obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor protects against abdominal aortic aneurysm in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Fukuda, Yamato; Takayanagi, Takehiko; Taro, Yoshinori; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Elliott, Katherine J; Choi, Eric; Daugherty, Alan; Rizzo, Victor; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been implicated in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), Ang II activates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediating growth promotion. We hypothesized that inhibition of EGFR prevents Ang II-dependent AAA. C57BL/6 mice were co-treated with Ang II and β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) to induce AAA with or without treatment with EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib. Without erlotinib, 64.3% of mice were dead due to aortic rupture. All surviving mice had AAA associated with EGFR activation. Erlotinib-treated mice did not die and developed far fewer AAA. The maximum diameters of abdominal aortas were significantly shorter with erlotinib treatment. In contrast, both erlotinib-treated and non-treated mice developed hypertension. The erlotinib treatment of abdominal aorta was associated with lack of EGFR activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, interleukin-6 induction and matrix deposition. EGFR activation in AAA was also observed in humans. In conclusion, EGFR inhibition appears to protect mice from AAA formation induced by Ang II plus BAPN. The mechanism seems to involve suppression of vascular EGFR and ER stress.

  18. Optimization of the model of abdominal aortic aneurysm--experiment in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Molácek, Jirí; Treska, Vladislav; Kobr, Jirí; Certík, Bohuslav; Skalický, Tomás; Kuntscher, Vilém; Krízková, Vera

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have been performed in order to model abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in an experimental animal, most commonly in small laboratory animals. In our study, we tried to find the best AAA model in a pig by using various mechanical and enzymatic mechanisms. Twenty-two pigs were operated on. We combined 3 mechanisms of creating an AAA, using an intraluminal infusion of porcine pancreatic elastase into the abdominal aortic segment, application of plastic cuff below the renal arteries causing turbulent blood flow, and inserting a patch into the longitudinal aortotomy. We found different results in different groups according to the mechanisms used. In group A, with a combination of the intraluminal elastase infusion and application of a stenosing cuff, AAA developed in all 7 animals (100%). In this group, we also found the largest histological changes in the abdominal aorta samples. The use of intraluminal pancreatic elastase infusion, together with increased turbulent flow caused by the stenosing cuff, seems to be the best model of AAA in pigs. This model is suitable for further research in the etiopathology of AAA. In fact, it is the first successful approach to a large-caliber native aneurysm model. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: Mechanisms, animal models, and potential treatment.

    PubMed

    Meital, Lara T; Sandow, Shaun L; Calder, Philip C; Russell, Fraser D

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an inflammatory disease associated with macrophage accumulation in the adventitia, oxidative stress, medial elastin degradation and aortic dilation. Progression of AAA is linked to increased risk of rupture, which carries a high mortality rate. Drug therapies trialled to date lack efficacy and although aneurysm repair is available for patients with large aneurysm, peri-surgical morbidity and mortality have been widely reported. Recent studies using rodent models of AAA suggest that long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) and their metabolites can moderate inflammation and oxidative stress perpetuated by infiltrating macrophages and intervene in the destruction of medial elastin. This review examines evidence from these animal studies and related reports of inhibition of inflammation and arrest of aneurysm development following prophylactic supplementation with LC n-3 PUFAs. The efficacy of LC n-3 PUFAs for management of existing aneurysm is unclear and further investigations involving human clinical trials are warranted.

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with congenital solitary pelvic kidney treated with novel hybrid technique.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Michael J; Al-Nouri, Omar; Hershberger, Richard; Halandras, Pegge M; Aulivola, Bernadette; Cho, Jae S

    2014-08-01

    Renal ectopia in the rare condition of associated abdominal aortic aneurysm presents a difficult clinical challenge with respect to access to the aorto-iliac segment and preservation of renal function because of its anomalous renal arterial anatomy and inevitable renal ischemia at the time of open repair. Multiple operative techniques are described throughout the literature to cope with both problems. We report a case of a 57-year-old male with an aorto-iliac aneurysm and a congenital solitary pelvic kidney successfully treated by hybrid total renal revascularization using iliorenal bypass followed by unilateral internal iliac artery coil embolization and conventional endovascular aortic aneurysm repair without any clinical evidence of renal impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a patient with bilateral autotransplanted kidneys.

    PubMed

    Neelakandhan, K S; Muralidhar, R; Unnikrishnan, M; Ravimandalam, K

    1994-04-01

    The case is presented of a 38-year-old male who presented with a large 10 cm x 8 cm pulsatile swelling in his abdomen. Thirteen years before, internal iliac arteries had been used to treat long segment occlusions and diseased state of both renal arteries. At the same time both kidneys had been transplanted to the iliac fossae. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a huge abdominal aortic aneurysm. Both kidneys were fully functional. As the renal transplants had been done extraperitoneally an easy transperitoneal approach was now possible. The maximum diameter of the aneurysm was 12 cm. An inclusion graft repair was carried out using a 16-mm woven Dacron graft. In the light of the favourable circumstances it was decided not to take any special protective measures against renal ischemia apart from keeping the aortic cross-clamp time short. The patient could be discharged with patent and normally functioning kidneys 10 days after surgery.

  2. Diagnosis and monitoring of abdominal aortic aneurysm: Current status and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Moxon, Joseph V.; Parr, Adam; Emeto, Theophilus I.; Walker, Philip; Norman, Paul E.; Golledge, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly men, and prevalence is predicted to increase in parallel with a global ageing population. AAA is commonly asymptomatic, and in the absence of routine screening, diagnosis is usually incidental when imaging to assess unrelated medical complaints. In the absence of approved diagnostic and prognostic markers, AAAs are monitored conservatively via medical imaging until aortic diameter approaches 50–55mm and surgical repair is performed. There is currently significant interest in identifying molecular markers of diagnostic and prognostic value for AAA. Here we outline the current guidelines for AAA management, and discuss modern scientific techniques currently employed to identify improved diagnostic and prognostic markers. PMID:20932435

  3. The Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Intraluminal Thrombus: Current Concepts of Development and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Piechota-Polanczyk, Aleksandra; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Nowak, Witold; Eilenberg, Wolf; Neumayer, Christoph; Malinski, Tadeusz; Huk, Ihor; Brostjan, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) shows several hallmarks of atherosclerotic and atherothrombotic disease, but comprises an additional, predominant feature of proteolysis resulting in the degradation and destabilization of the aortic wall. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on AAA development, involving the accumulation of neutrophils in the intraluminal thrombus and their central role in creating an oxidative and proteolytic environment. Particular focus is placed on the controversial role of heme oxygenase 1/carbon monoxide and nitric oxide synthase/peroxynitrite, which may exert both protective and damaging effects in the development of the aneurysm. Treatment indications as well as surgical and pharmacological options for AAA therapy are discussed in light of recent reports. PMID:26664891

  4. Three-Stage Esophagectomy Combined with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: First Case in the Literature.

    PubMed

    Klonaris, Chris; Schizas, Dimitrios; Karaolanis, Georgios; Athanasiadis, Dimitrios; Alexandrou, Andreas; Liakakos, Theodore

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the synchronous surgical treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with concomitant esophageal cancer with a 3-stage esophagectomy, a real management challenge especially in establishing the therapeutic priorities and the ideal treatment approach. A 65-year-old male was referred for treatment in our hospital with the diagnosis of AAA. He complained of general fatigue, weight loss, and intermittent dysphagia. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography and upper endoscopy showed the AAA and a large gastroesophageal junction tumor, respectively. Considering his age and the absence of severe comorbidities, he underwent 3-stage esophagectomy combined with AAA repair. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged on the 15th postoperative day. He was offered adjuvant chemotherapy and remains free of disease and with a patent aortic graft at 18 months of follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Screening results from a large United Kingdom abdominal aortic aneurysm screening center in the context of optimizing United Kingdom National Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Programme protocols.

    PubMed

    Benson, Ruth A; Poole, Rebecca; Murray, Shelagh; Moxey, Paul; Loftus, Ian M

    2016-02-01

    After its introduction in six pilot centers in 2009, the National Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Programme (NAAASP) is now established across the United Kingdom, demonstrating significant benefit in terms of fewer emergency surgeries and reduced 30-day surgical mortality. However, according to publication of data on annual screened abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) detection, a lower incidence than predicted in the original screening trials has been found. In this audit we assessed features and risk factors of men found to have a positive scan result in the southwest London AAA screening program, to determine screening yield for subgroups of populations and assess the case for a more targeted screening program. Data from the NAAASP screening database for England were extracted for all men who attended screening from the April 1, 2009 through October 16, 2013 in the southwest London area. Primary outcomes were aneurysm prevalence, risk factors, and incidence within subgroups. Results were reviewed against nationally reported data and London census data. Of 24,891 men who were screened in the southwest London program during this period, 292 AAAs were identified (1.18%). Patients were asked to categorize their ethnic background according to classifications provided by the office of national statistics. Those at highest risk of AAA were white-British (1.35%), followed by black and black British (0.65%), and Asian/Asian British (0.23%). Number needed to screen to identify one AAA was calculated as 78, 154, and 431, respectively. The relative proportions of patients screened were similar to that described in the most recent United Kingdom census, except for white-British patients, indicating a shortfall in acceptance of screening invitations in this group. There were no AAA identified in Chinese men. A positive smoking history was found in 90%, a confirmed diagnosis of hypertension in 50%, hypercholesterolemia in 34%, and ischemic heart disease in 21%. Within

  6. Oxidative stress during abdominal aortic aneurysm repair--biomarkers and antioxidant's protective effect: a review.

    PubMed

    Aivatidi, C; Vourliotakis, G; Georgopoulos, S; Sigala, F; Bastounis, E; Papalambros, E

    2011-03-01

    Oxidative stress during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is likely to result as a response to an ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) to the lower limbs and gastrointestinal tract. This paper reviews the oxidative stress during AAA repair, with specific reference to biological markers and the potential antioxidant's protective effect. The current literature (1966 to July 2010) was reviewed specifically for all articles describing human studies relevant with the particular subject: oxidative stress in patients with AAA repair. Key-words used as single or combined searches included "abdominal aortic aneurysm", "open repair", "EVAR", "oxidative stress", "oxidation" and "antioxidant". A total of 14 relevant human studies were identified. In the majority of studies all samples (blood samples or/and muscle biopsies) were obtained from the patients using regional sampling techniques before or after anaesthesia, during aortic clamping or balloon occlusion (ischemic time) and after aortic clamp removal (reperfusion time) in different time intervals up to 24 or 48 hours. The oxidative status during AAA repair operation was evaluated by measuring quantitative changes of different substances including mainly vascular endothelial adhesion molecules, lipid peroxidation by-products or reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their metabolites. Two studies compared two groups of patients with AAA treated either by open or endovascular repair (EVAR), while four studies used different types of antioxidant supplementation in order to correlate it with a reduction in oxidative stress and damage in the antioxidant group of patients. Current evidence suggests that there is a high-grade oxidative stress during AAA repair operation. This was higher in cases of open repair beside EVAR and in cases with ruptured AAAs beside elective cases. The beneficial effect of an antioxidant supplementation in reducing the oxidative stress during AAA repair was also demonstrated. The use of a biological

  7. Analysis of expansion patterns in 4-4.9 cm abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Vega de Céniga, M; Gómez, R; Estallo, L; de la Fuente, N; Viviens, B; Barba, A

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to analyze the growth pattern of 4-4.9 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). We used an observational, longitudinal, prospective study design. We followed 4-4.9 cm AAAs with 6-monthly abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scans (January 1988-August 2004). AAA growth was defined as an increase in aortic diameter > or =2 mm in each surveillance period. We established the aortic expansion pattern in AAA with three or more CT scans as continuous, discontinuous. The latter includes at least one period of nongrowth (<2 mm/6 months). We studied the influence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), comorbidity, and AAA anatomical characteristics using the chi-squared test, t-test, life tables, and Kaplan-Meier for statistical analysis. We included 195 patients: 183 (93.8%) men, age 71 +/- 8.3 years (50-90). The follow-up period was 50 +/- 36.4 months (6.5-193.7). The growth pattern (n =131) was continuous in 15 (11.5%) and discontinuous in 116 (88.5%) AAA. The mean expansion rate was higher in AAAs with continuous expansion (7.92 +/- 3.74 vs. 2.74 +/- 2.94 mm/year, p < 0.0001). No CVRFs or comorbidity influenced the expansion pattern (p > 0.05). The eccentric thrombus was associated with a greater incidence of continuous growth (p = 0.05), with no influence of aortic calcification (p > 0.1). The expansion of 4-4.9 cm AAA is mostly irregular and unpredictable. We have not found any modifiable risk factors which influence their growth pattern. The eccentric distribution of the thrombus is associated with continuous expansion.