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Sample records for abdominal aortic rupture

  1. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:25705591

  2. Chronic rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Thomas; Thomas, Kotsis; Tympa, Aliki; Aliki, Tympa; Kalinis, Aris; Aris, Kalinis; Vasilopoulos, Ioannis; Ioannis, Vasilopoulos; Theodoraki, Kassiani; Kassiani, Theodoraki

    2011-10-01

    Although the mortality rate after abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture approximates 90% despite the urgent management, a few cases of chronic rupture and delayed repair have been reported in the world literature; anatomic and hemodynamic reasons occasionally allow for the fortunate course of these patients. We report in this article the case of 76-year-old man with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm who was transferred to our facility 4 weeks after his initial hospitalization in a district institution and who finally had a successful open repair. PMID:21620664

  3. Can release of urinary retention trigger abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture?

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Andreas; Powell-Bowns, Matilda; Elseedawy, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Only 50% of abdominal aortic aneurysms present with the classic triad of hypotension, back pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. This variability in symptoms can delay diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a patient presenting with a unique combination of symptoms suggesting that decompression of urinary retention can lead to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. PMID:24964430

  4. Endovascular approach for ruptured abdominal aortic aneursyms.

    PubMed

    Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; De Donato, G; Chisci, E; Galzerano, G; Cappelli, A; Palasciano, G; Setacci, C

    2010-06-01

    The rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) causes about 15000 deaths/year in the USA alone. Even though over the last 50 years progress in surgical techniques and in postoperative intensive care have been outstanding, the analysis of registries has shown either no decrease in the mortality rate for surgically treated rAAAs. Some reports asserted better out come for endovascular repair (EVAR) compared with surgery in case of rAAA. Despite this evidence, EVAR for rAAA remains prerogative of few centers worldwide. In conclusion only larger study or registry could assest the real role of EVAR in the management of rAAA. PMID:20523280

  5. Type B Aortic Dissection with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture 1 Year after Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Guillaume; Ben Ahmed, Sabrina; Warein, Edouard; Gallon, Arnaud; Rosset, Eugenio

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient who developed a type B aortic dissection and ruptured his aneurysmal sac 1 year after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), despite standard follow-up. This 79-year-old man was presented to emergency room with acute abdominal pain and an acute lower limb ischemia. Computed tomography scan showed an acute type B aortic dissection feeding the aneurysmal sac of the EVAR. The aneurysm rupture occurred during imaging. Type B aortic dissection is a rare cause of aneurysmal rupture after EVAR. The first postoperative computed tomography scan should maybe include the arch and the descending thoracic aorta to rule out an iatrogenic dissection after EVAR. PMID:26902937

  6. Survivors of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: the iceberg's tip.

    PubMed Central

    Armour, R H

    1977-01-01

    In four and a half years 25 patients in one community suffered a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Eleven died at home, nine died without operation in hospital, and only five had the aneurysm removed. There were four survivors. A further seven patients might have lived had they had a prompt operation. The average operative mortality for ruptured aneurysms among series reported in British journals is 53%, but the survivors are a small minority of the total number of people in the community whose aneurysms rupture. No basis could be found for the view that replacing an aortic aneurysm with a straight graft (while leaving behind aneurysmal common iliac arteries) lowers the operative mortality. On the contrary, oversimplifying the operation may be hazardous. PMID:922418

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzardi, Giuseppe Fossaceca, Rita; Divenuto, Ignazio; Musiani, Antonello; Brustia, Piero; Carriero, Alessandro

    2010-08-15

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. The features of the AAA made it suitable for endovascular repair. To prevent pulmonary embolism caused by the presence of sac thrombosis near the vena cava lumen, a temporary vena cava filter was deployed before the procedure. A bifurcated stent-graft was placed with the patient under local anaesthesia, and the AAA was successfully treated. A transient type II endoleak was detected on CT 3 days after endograft placement. At routine follow-up 6 and 12 months after the procedure, the patient was in good clinical condition, and the type II endoleak had sealed completely. Endovascular treatment offers an attractive therapeutic alternative to open repair in case of ACF; however, only small numbers of patients have been treated, and long-term follow-up interval is lacking.

  8. Endovascular vs. Open Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Patelis, Nikolaos; Moris, Demetrios; Karaolanis, Georgios; Georgopoulos, Sotiris

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients presenting with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are most often treated with open repair despite the fact that endovascular aneurysm repair is a less invasive and widely accepted method with clear benefits for elective aortic aneurysm patients. A debate exists regarding the definitive benefit in endovascular repair for patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aim of this literature review was to determine if any trends exist in favor of either open or endovascular repair. Material/Methods A literature search was performed using PUBMED, OVID, and Google Scholar databases. The search yielded 64 publications. Results Out of 64 publications, 25 were retrospective studies, 12 were population-based, 21 were prospective, 5 were the results of RCTs, and 1 was a case-series. Sixty-one studies reported on early mortality and provided data comparing endovascular repair (rEVAR) and open repair (rOR) for ruptured abdominal aneurysm groups. Twenty-nine of these studies reported that rEVAR has a lower early mortality rate. Late mortality after rEVAR compared to that of rOR was reported in 21 studies for a period of 3 to 60 months. Results of 61.9% of the studies found no difference in late mortality rates between these 2 groups. Thirty-nine publications reported on the incidence of complications. Approximately half of these publications support that the rEVAR group has a lower complication rate and the other half found no difference between the groups. Length of hospital stay has been reported to be shorter for rEVAR in most studies. Blood loss and need for transfusion of either red cells or fresh frozen plasma was consistently lower in the rEVAR group. Conclusions Differences between the included publications affect the outcomes. Randomized control trials have not been able to provide clear conclusions. rEVAR can now be considered a safe method of treating rAAA, and is at least equal to the well-established rOR method. PMID:27090791

  9. Biomechanical rupture risk assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on a novel probabilistic rupture risk index.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Stanislav; Gasser, T Christian

    2015-12-01

    A rupture risk assessment is critical to the clinical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. The biomechanical AAA rupture risk assessment quantitatively integrates many known AAA rupture risk factors but the variability of risk predictions due to model input uncertainties remains a challenging limitation. This study derives a probabilistic rupture risk index (PRRI). Specifically, the uncertainties in AAA wall thickness and wall strength were considered, and wall stress was predicted with a state-of-the-art deterministic biomechanical model. The discriminative power of PRRI was tested in a diameter-matched cohort of ruptured (n = 7) and intact (n = 7) AAAs and compared to alternative risk assessment methods. Computed PRRI at 1.5 mean arterial pressure was significantly (p = 0.041) higher in ruptured AAAs (20.21(s.d. 14.15%)) than in intact AAAs (3.71(s.d. 5.77)%). PRRI showed a high sensitivity and specificity (discriminative power of 0.837) to discriminate between ruptured and intact AAA cases. The underlying statistical representation of stochastic data of wall thickness, wall strength and peak wall stress had only negligible effects on PRRI computations. Uncertainties in AAA wall stress predictions, the wide range of reported wall strength and the stochastic nature of failure motivate a probabilistic rupture risk assessment. Advanced AAA biomechanical modelling paired with a probabilistic rupture index definition as known from engineering risk assessment seems to be superior to a purely deterministic approach. PMID:26631334

  10. Endovascular vs open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nedeau, April E.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hsu, Richard; Sachs, Teviah; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Schermerhorn, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) has become first-line therapy at our institution and is performed under a standardized protocol. We compare perioperative mortality, midterm survival, and morbidity after EVAR and open surgical repair (OSR). Methods Records were retrospectively reviewed from May 2000 to September 2010 for repair of infrarenal rAAAs. Primary end points included perioperative mortality and midterm survival. Secondary end points included acute limb ischemia, length of stay, ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, renal failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, and secondary intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test,X2 test, the Fisher exact test, and logistic regression calculations. Midterm survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Seventy-four infrarenal rAAAs were repaired, 19 by EVAR and 55 by OSR. Despite increased age and comorbidity in the EVAR patients, perioperative mortality was 15.7% for EVAR, which was significantly lower than the 49% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.74; P = .008). Midterm survival also favored EVAR (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.77; P = .028, adjusted for age and sex). Mean follow-up was 20 months, and 1-year survival was 60% for EVAR vs 45% for OSR. Mean length of stay for patients surviving >1 day was 10 days for EVAR and 21 days for OSR (P = .004). Ventilator-dependent respiratory failure was 5% in the EVAR group vs 42% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.62; P = .001). Conclusions EVAR of rAAA has a superior perioperative survival advantage and decreased morbidity vs OSR. Although not statistically significant, overall survival favors EVAR. We recommend that EVAR be considered as the first-line treatment of rAAAs and practiced as the standard of care. PMID:22626871

  11. Extensive Erosion of Vertebral Bodies Due to a Chronic Contained Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Alecio Fernando; Cardoso, Fabiano Nassar; da Rocha Fernandes, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a case of chronically ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm contained within the lumbar vertebral bodies that presented with dull abdominal pain. Sudden, massive hemorrhage is an uncommon, yet well-known complication of an untreated abdominal aortic aneurysm. In addition, misleading clinical and radiological findings present difficult diagnostic challenges in such cases. This report emphasizes the findings obtained with multidetector computed tomography and delineates the differentiation of this condition from similar pathologies. PMID:27200153

  12. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms: review of 33 cases treated surgically and discussion of prognostic indicators.

    PubMed

    Sink, J D; Myers, R T; James, P M

    1976-05-01

    Over an eight-year peroid at NCBH, 33 patients were operated for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Factors associated with an increased mortality included preoperative blood urea nitrogen levels of more than 20 mg per cent, severe preoperative hypotension, duration of symptoms of less than 24 hours, free peritoneal rupture and blood transfusions of greater than 19 units. Preoperative hypotension was the most selective preoperative prognostic parameter. From a review of this and other reported series, it was concluded that reduced mortality from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm can best be achieved by prompt diagnosis followed by surgical treatment before cardiovascular collapse can occur. PMID:1267283

  13. The effect of aortic morphology on peri-operative mortality of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether aneurysm shape and extent, which indicate whether a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is eligible for endovascular repair (EVAR), influence the outcome of both EVAR and open surgical repair. Methods and results The influence of six morphological parameters (maximum aortic diameter, aneurysm neck diameter, length and conicality, proximal neck angle, and maximum common iliac diameter) on mortality and reinterventions within 30 days was investigated in rAAA patients randomized before morphological assessment in the Immediate Management of the Patient with Rupture: Open Versus Endovascular strategies (IMPROVE) trial. Patients with a proven diagnosis of rAAA, who underwent repair and had their admission computerized tomography scan submitted to the core laboratory, were included. Among 458 patients (364 men, mean age 76 years), who had either EVAR (n = 177) or open repair (n = 281) started, there were 155 deaths and 88 re-interventions within 30 days of randomization analysed according to a pre-specified plan. The mean maximum aortic diameter was 8.6 cm. There were no substantial correlations between the six morphological variables. Aneurysm neck length was shorter in those undergoing open repair (vs. EVAR). Aneurysm neck length (mean 23.3, SD 16.1 mm) was inversely associated with mortality for open repair and overall: adjusted OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.57, 0.92) for each 16 mm (SD) increase in length. There were no convincing associations of morphological parameters with reinterventions. Conclusion Short aneurysm necks adversely influence mortality after open repair of rAAA and preclude conventional EVAR. This may help explain why observational studies, but not randomized trials, have shown an early survival benefit for EVAR. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25627357

  14. Aortocaval Fistula Resulting From Rupture of Abdominal Aortic Dissecting Aneurysm Treated by Delayed Endovascular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiehao; Huang, Bin; Zhao, Jichun; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortocaval fistula (ACF) after rupture of an abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm is a rare emergency situation, which has a high mortality. However, the diagnosis is usually delayed, which increases the difficulties of treatment. We describe a case that successfully delayed use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for ACF resulting from rupture of abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm. We describe a special case of a 70-year-old male with an abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm rupturing into inferior vena cava (IVC). On account of his atypical presentation, the diagnosis had been delayed for half a year. Due to severe metabolic sequelaes of the ACF and preexisting conditions, the traditional open repair was too risky. Minimally invasive EVAR was performed with a successful result. There were no endoleak or fistula at the follow-up of 9th month. EVAR is the most suitable method in patients with ACF from rupture of abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm. Further educational programs should be developed, which may give rise to earlier diagnosis and treatment with better outcomes. PMID:27149481

  15. Successful Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskarelis, Ioannis S. Koukoulaki, Maria; Lappas, Ioannis; Karkatzia, Fani; Dimopoulos, Nikitas; Filias, Vasilios; Bellenis, Ion; Vougas, Vasilios; Drakopoulos, Spiros

    2006-04-15

    A renal transplant recipient presented in the early post-transplantation period with rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The high mortality rate of the surgical repair of ruptured aneurysm in addition to the concern of preserving the renal graft prompted us to seek alternative approaches, such as repairing the aneurysm by means of endovascular techniques. The ruptured aneurysm was confirmed by performing computed tomography and digital angiography and thereafter was successfully repaired by endovascular stenting technique (Talent stent-graft), which seems to be a safe and effective method of preserving a renal graft.

  16. The Role of Geometric and Biomechanical Factors in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Samarth S.; Chandra, Santanu; Shum, Judy; Finol, Ender A.

    2013-01-01

    The current clinical management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease is based to a great extent on measuring the aneurysm maximum diameter to decide when timely intervention is required. Decades of clinical evidence show that aneurysm diameter is positively associated with the risk of rupture, but other parameters may also play a role in causing or predisposing the AAA to rupture. Geometric factors such as vessel tortuosity, intraluminal thrombus volume, and wall surface area are implicated in the differentiation of ruptured and unruptured AAAs. Biomechanical factors identified by means of computational modeling techniques, such as peak wall stress, have been positively correlated with rupture risk with a higher accuracy and sensitivity than maximum diameter alone. The objective of this review is to examine these factors, which are found to influence AAA disease progression, clinical management and rupture potential, as well as to highlight on-going research by our group in aneurysm modeling and rupture risk assessment. PMID:23508633

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... main blood vessel that supplies blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs ... dissection). Symptoms of rupture include: Pain in the abdomen or back. The pain may be severe, sudden, ...

  18. Adipocyte in vascular wall can induce the rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kugo, Hirona; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Mouri, Youhei; Yanagimoto, Kenichi; Hayamizu, Kohsuke; Hashimoto, Keisuke; Sasaki, Takeshi; Sano, Masaki; Yata, Tatsuro; Urano, Tetsumei; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Unno, Naoki; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease involving the gradual dilation of the abdominal aorta. It has been reported that development of AAA is associated with inflammation of the vascular wall; however, the mechanism of AAA rupture is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying AAA rupture using a hypoperfusion-induced animal model. We found that the administration of triolein increased the AAA rupture rate in the animal model and that the number of adipocytes was increased in ruptured vascular walls compared to non-ruptured walls. In the ruptured group, macrophage infiltration and the protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were increased in the areas around adipocytes, while collagen-positive areas were decreased in the areas with adipocytes compared to those without adipocytes. The administration of fish oil, which suppresses adipocyte hypertrophy, decreased the number and size of adipocytes, as well as decreased the risk of AAA rupture ratio by 0.23 compared to the triolein administered group. In human AAA samples, the amount of triglyceride in the adventitia was correlated with the diameter of the AAA. These results suggest that AAA rupture is related to the abnormal appearance of adipocytes in the vascular wall. PMID:27499372

  19. Adipocyte in vascular wall can induce the rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kugo, Hirona; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Mouri, Youhei; Yanagimoto, Kenichi; Hayamizu, Kohsuke; Hashimoto, Keisuke; Sasaki, Takeshi; Sano, Masaki; Yata, Tatsuro; Urano, Tetsumei; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Unno, Naoki; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease involving the gradual dilation of the abdominal aorta. It has been reported that development of AAA is associated with inflammation of the vascular wall; however, the mechanism of AAA rupture is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying AAA rupture using a hypoperfusion-induced animal model. We found that the administration of triolein increased the AAA rupture rate in the animal model and that the number of adipocytes was increased in ruptured vascular walls compared to non-ruptured walls. In the ruptured group, macrophage infiltration and the protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 were increased in the areas around adipocytes, while collagen-positive areas were decreased in the areas with adipocytes compared to those without adipocytes. The administration of fish oil, which suppresses adipocyte hypertrophy, decreased the number and size of adipocytes, as well as decreased the risk of AAA rupture ratio by 0.23 compared to the triolein administered group. In human AAA samples, the amount of triglyceride in the adventitia was correlated with the diameter of the AAA. These results suggest that AAA rupture is related to the abnormal appearance of adipocytes in the vascular wall. PMID:27499372

  20. Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm after spine surgery in the patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Im, Jung Sik; Lim, Yun-Hee; Park, Jung Sun; Lee, Sang Seok; Kim, Kye-Min

    2010-06-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare inherited disorder of the connective tissue that is characterized by hyperextensible skin, hypermobile joints and abnormalities of the cardiovascular system. A 15-year-old girl with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome underwent thoracolumbar surgery for deformity correction. After surgery, an abdominal aortic rupture occurred, and she complained of abdominal distension had an abdominal circumference of 80 cm. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a pseudoaneurysm and a large hematoma at the retroperitoneum. She died of a massive hemorrhage during subsequent abdominal aortic surgery. PMID:20589181

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  2. Chronic Contained Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: From Diagnosis to Endovascular Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto Chiocchi, Marcello; Maresca, Luciano; Pipitone, Vincenzo; Messina, Massimo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-07-15

    A male patient, 69 years old, presented with fever, leucocytosis, and persistent low back pain; he also had an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), as previously diagnosed by Doppler UltraSound (US), and was admitted to our hospital. On multislice computed tomography (msCT), a large abdominal mass having no definite border and involving the aorta and both of the psoas muscles was seen. This mass involved the forth-lumbar vertebra with lysis, thus simulating AAA rupture into a paraspinal collection; it was initially considered a paraspinal abscess. After magnetic resonance imaging examination and culture of the fluid aspirated from the mass, no infective organisms were found; therefore, a diagnosisof chronically contained AAA rupture was made, and an aortic endoprosthesis was subsequently implanted. The patient was discharged with decreased lumbar pain. At 12-month follow-up, no evidence of leakage was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first case of endoprosthesis implantation in a patient, who was a poor candidate for surgical intervention due to renal failure, leucocytosis and high fever, having a chronically contained AAA ruptured simulatingspodilodiscitis abscess. Appropriate diagnosis and therapy resolved potentially crippling pathology and avoided surgical graft-related complications.

  3. Surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm with non-bleeding aortocaval fistula.

    PubMed

    Unosawa, Satoshi; Kimura, Haruka; Niino, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of an aortocaval fistula (ACF) without bleeding because a clot was covering the fistula. A 60-year-old man was diagnosed as having a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and an aortocaval fistula, by enhanced computed tomography (CT). After the aneurysm had been opened, the fistula was detected, but there was no bleeding because it was covered with clot. After graft repair, bleeding from the fistula occurred when the clot was removed by suction. Direct closure of the fistula was achieved after bleeding was controlled by digital compression. PMID:23825505

  4. Increased 18F-FDG Uptake Is Predictive of Rupture in a Novel Rat Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture Model

    PubMed Central

    English, Sean J.; Piert, Morand R.; Diaz, Jose A.; Gordon, David; Ghosh, Abhijit; D'Alecy, Louis G.; Whitesall, Steven E.; Sharma, Ashish K.; DeRoo, Elise P.; Watt, Tessa; Su, Gang; Henke, Peter K.; Eliason, Jonathan L.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Upchurch, Gilbert R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) micro–positron emission tomography (micro-PET) can predict abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture. Background An infrarenal AAA model is needed to study inflammatory mechanisms that drive rupture. 18F-FDG PET can detect vascular inflammation in animal models and patients. Methods After exposing Sprague-Dawley rats to intra-aortic porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) (12 U/mL), AAA rupture was induced by daily, subcutaneous, β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN, 300 mg/kg, N = 24) administration. Negative control AAA animals (N = 15) underwent daily saline subcutaneous injection after PPE exposure. BAPN-exposed animals that did not rupture served as positive controls [nonruptured AAA (NRAAA) 14d, N = 9]. Rupture was witnessed using radiotelemetry. Maximum standard uptakes for 18F-FDG micro-PET studies were determined. Aortic wall PAI-1, uPA, and tPA concentrations were determined by western blot analyses. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and MIP-2 were determined by Bio-Plex bead array. Neutrophil and macrophage populations per high-power field were quantified. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities were determined by zymography. Results When comparing ruptured AAA (RAAA) to NRAAA 14d animals, increased focal 18F-FDG uptakes were detected at subsequent sites of rupture (P = 0.03). PAI-1 expression was significantly less in RAAA tissue (P = 0.01), with comparable uPA and decreased tPA levels (P = 0.02). IL-1β (P = 0.04), IL-6 (P = 0.001), IL-10 (P = 0.04), and MIP-2 (P = 0.02)expression, neutrophil (P = 0.02) and macrophage presence (P = 0.002), and MMP9 (P < 0.0001) activity were increased in RAAA tissue. Conclusions With this AAA rupture model, increased prerupture 18F-FDG uptake on micro-PET imaging was associated with increased inflammation in the ruptured AAA wall. 18F-FDG PET imaging may be used to monitor inflammatory changes before AAA rupture. PMID:24651130

  5. Early and delayed rupture after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a 10-year multicenter registry

    PubMed Central

    Candell, Leah; Tucker, Lue-Yen; Goodney, Philip; Walker, Joy; Okuhn, Steven; Hill, Bradley; Chang, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective Rupture after abdominal endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a function of graft maintenance of the seal and fixation. We describe our 10-year experience with rupture after EVAR. Methods From 2000 to 2010, 1736 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) from 17 medical centers underwent EVAR in a large, regional integrated health care system. Preoperative demographic and clinical data of interest were collected and stored in our registry. We retrospectively identified patients with postoperative rupture, characterized as “early” and “delayed” rupture (≤30 days and >30 days after the initial EVAR, respectively), and identified predictors associated with delayed rupture. Results The overall follow-up rate was 92%, and the median follow-up was 2.7 years (interquartile range, 1.2–4.4 years) in these 1736 EVAR patients. We identified 20 patients with ruptures; 70% were male, the mean age was 79 years, and mean AAA size at the initial EVAR was 6.3 cm. Six patients underwent initial EVAR for rupture (n = 2) or symptomatic presentation (n = 4). Of the 20 post-EVAR ruptures, 25% (five of 20) were early, all occurring within 2 days after the initial EVAR. Of these five patients, four had intraoperative adverse events leading directly to rupture, with one type I and one type III endoleak. Of the five early ruptures, four patients underwent endovascular repair and one received repair with open surgery, resulting in two perioperative deaths. Among the remaining 15 patients, the median time from initial EVAR to rupture was 31.1 months (interquartile range, 13.8–57.3 months). Most of these delayed ruptures (10 of 15) were preceded by AAA sac increases, including three patients with known endoleaks who underwent reintervention. At the time of delayed rupture, nine of 15 patients had new endoleaks. Among all 20 patients, six patients did not undergo repair (all delayed patients) and died, nine underwent repeated EVAR, and five had open repair

  6. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  7. Non-aneurysmal abdominal aortic rupture in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ng, Eugene; Tewksbury, Robert; Choong, Andrew Mtl; Walker, Philip J; Aziz, Maged

    2016-09-01

    Aortic rupture in the presence of aneurysmal disease is well understood and extensively described in the literature. However, aortic rupture in a non-aneurysmal aorta is far less common. In the few reported cases, perforations are believed to result from a penetrating atheromatous ulcer of the aorta. We describe a rare case of non-aneurysmal aortic rupture in a 68-year-old man with Marfan syndrome and a history of proximal aortic surgery. The urgent need for hemorrhage control precluded any consideration of an endovascular repair. PMID:26113733

  8. [Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms - a rational measure to prevent sudden rupture].

    PubMed

    Torsello, Giovanni; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Grundmann, Reinhart Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has still a high hospital mortality rate of about 50 % (intervention and non-corrective treatment combined). With an easy non-invasive and inexpensive measure such as the ultrasound screening rupture threatened aneurysms can be recognized in time and then treated prophylactically, hemorrhagic shock can be avoided. Screening programs in England and Sweden currently describe an AAA prevalence of 1.5 % among screened 65-year-old males. With an absolute risk reduction for aneurysm-related death of 15.1 per 10,000 men invited for screening and a cost of £ 7,370 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), screening for this target group is highly cost-effective. Comprehensive AAA screening requires defined criteria for the quality of the aortic ultrasound examination and for the surgical treatment of detected large AAA. These interventions should be concentrated in centers obligated to quality registry documentation. Patients with smaller AAA, requiring no repair, should be included in a surveillance program, also with registry of their long-term data. PMID:27404935

  9. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Yuya Nishimura, Jun-ichi Hase, Soichiro Yamasaki, Motoshige

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  10. Endoluminal Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Small Intestinal Submucosa Sandwich Endografts: A Pilot Study in Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Katsuyuki; Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry T.; Timmermans, Hans A.; Corless, Christopher L.; Yin, Qiang; Yamakado, Koichiro; Wha Park, Joong; Roesch, Josef; Keller, Frederick S.; Sato, Morio; Yamada, Ryusaku

    2001-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) Sandwich endografts for the treatment of acute rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and to explore the short-term reaction of the aorta to this material.Methods: In eight adult sheep, an infrarenal AAA was created transluminally by dilation of a short Palmaz stent. In six sheep, the aneurysm was then ruptured by overdilation of the stent with a large angioplasty balloon. Two sheep with AAAs that were not ruptured served as controls. A SIS Sandwich endograft, consisting of a Z stent frame with 5 bodies and covered inside and out with SIS, was used to exclude the ruptured and non-ruptured AAAs. Follow-up aortography was done immediately after the procedure and before sacrifice at 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Autopsy and histologic studies followed.Results: Endograft placement was successful in all eight sheep. Both ruptured and non-ruptured AAAs were successfully excluded. Three animals with AAA rupture developed hind leg paralysis due to compromise of the arterial supply to the lower spinal cord and were sacrificed 1 day after the procedure. In five animals, three with rupture and two controls, follow-up aortograms revealed no aortic stenoses and no perigraft leaks. Gross and histologic studies revealed incorporation of the endografts into the aortic wall with replacement of SIS by dense neointima that was completely endothelialized in areas where the endograft was in direct contact with the aortic wall. In central portions of the endograft, in contact with the thrombosed aneurysm, endothelialization was incomplete even at 12 weeks.Conclusion: The SIS Sandwich endografts effectively excluded simple AAAs and ruptured AAAs. They were rapidly incorporated into the aortic wall. A detailed long-term study is warranted.

  11. Endovascular Management of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: An 8-year Single-Centre Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimidis, Thomas S.; Karkos, Christos D. Karamanos, Dimitrios G.; Papazoglou, Konstantinos O.; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios N.; Demiropoulos, Filippos P.; Malkotsis, Dimitrios P.; Kamparoudis, Apostolos G.

    2009-03-15

    We aimed to review our experience with the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). During an 8-year period, 69 patients with a RAAA presented to our department; 67 underwent assessment by computed axial tomography, and 2 died on arrival before any evaluation was possible. A total of 42 patients (63%) were suitable for stent-grafting, and all but 1 (c-arm failure) proceeded to endovascular repair. Of these, 27 underwent surgery with local anaesthesia; 3 did so under general anaesthesia; and a further 11 procedures were commenced with the patient under local anaesthesia and then converted to general anaesthesia. A total of 28 bifurcated and 14 aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafts were implanted. Aortic occlusion balloons were used in 2 (5%) patients. The in-hospital and the 30-day mortality rates were 36% and 41%, respectively. After surgery, 21 complications were encountered in 17 patients. Two patients required reintervention during their hospital stay (1 type I endoleak and 1 limb occlusion). During the follow-up (median 730 days [range 90 to 580 days]), the 1-year and 5-year cumulative survival probabilities were 53% (SE 7.9%) and 50% (SE 8.0%), respectively. Three reinterventions were necessary during follow-up (2 type I endoleaks and 1 graft occlusion). We conclude that endovascular treatment is feasible in the emergency setting, and the early experience is promising. Whether such an approach is superior to open surgery remains to be determined.

  12. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  13. Percutaneous Treatment of Sac Rupture in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Mangini, Monica Fontana, Federico; Nicotera, Paolo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of percutaneous endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) previously treated by EVAR. In the last year, two male patients with AAAs, treated 8 and 23 months ago with bifurcated stent-graft, were observed because of lumbar pain and hemorragic shock. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) showed a retroperitoneal hematoma; in both cases a type III endoleak was detected, in one case associated with a type II endoleak from the iliolumbar artery. The procedures were performed in the theater, in emergency. Type II endoleak was treated with transcatheter superselective glue injection; type III endoleaks were excluded by a stent-graft extension. The procedures were successful in both patients, with immediate hemodynamic stabilization. MDCT after the procedure showed complete exclusion of the aneurysms. In conclusion, endovascular treatment is a safe and feasible option for the treatment of ruptured AAAs previously treated by EVAR; this approach allows avoidance of surgical conversion, which is technical very challenging, with a high morbidity and mortality rate.

  14. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, Harjeet Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; {kappa} = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  15. Successful surgical repair of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in a nonagenarian.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, M; Coratti, A; Tani, F

    2001-12-01

    Mortality due to the surgical treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) is high, more than 40%, especially in elderly patients. The literature concerning RAAA in very elderly patients is analyzed by Internet research (Medline). Only rare examples of emergency surgical management in nonagenarian patients are reported, and even fewer reports of successfully operated patients. A case report of a successful surgical repair of RAAA in a nonagenarian is presented. After ultrasound (US) and CT scans, the patient (in good condition as regards blood pressure, respiratory, cardiac and renal function) underwent uneventful aneurysmectomy and reconstruction of the aorta and common iliac arteries by means of a bifurcated prosthesis. The length of hospitalization was 30 days and the patient is still alive and in good condition four years and two months after the operation. The advisability of emergency surgical repair in these patients, questionable because of the excessive surgical risk and poor survival benefit, is discussed. However many other factors affect the outcome of emergency repair (mainly cardiac, respiratory and renal function), independently of age. The authors conclude that age per se does not limit the indication for or success of surgery in very elderly patients. PMID:11782704

  16. Protease inhibitor 15, a candidate gene for abdominal aortic internal elastic lamina ruptures in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Falak, Samreen; Schafer, Sebastian; Baud, Amelie; Hummel, Oliver; Schulz, Herbert; Gauguier, Dominique; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The inbred Brown Norway (BN) rat develops spontaneous ruptures of the internal elastic lamina (RIEL) of the abdominal aorta (AA) and iliac arteries. Prior studies with crosses of the BN/Orl RJ (susceptible) and LOU/M (resistant) showed the presence of a significant QTL on chromosome 5 and the production of congenic rats proved the involvement of this locus. In this study, we further dissected the above-mentioned QTL by creating a new panel of LOU.BN(chr5) congenic and subcongenic lines and reduced the locus to 5.2 Mb. Then we studied 1,002 heterogeneous stock (HS) rats, whose phenotyping revealed a low prevalence and high variability for RIEL. High-resolution mapping in the HS panel detected the major locus on chromosome 5 (log P > 35) and refined it to 1.4 Mb. Subsequently, RNA-seq analysis on AA of BN, congenics, and LOU revealed expression differences for only protease inhibitor 15 (Pi15) gene and a putative long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) within the linkage region. The high abundance of lincRNA with respect to reduced Pi15 expression, in conjunction with exertion of longitudinal strain, may be related to RIEL, indicating the potential importance of proteases in biological processes related to defective aortic internal elastic lamina structure. Similar mechanisms may be involved in aneurysm initiation in the human AA. PMID:24790086

  17. A Review of Computational Methods to Predict the Risk of Rupture of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Canchi, Tejas; Kumar, S. D.; Ng, E. Y. K.; Narayanan, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods have played an important role in health care in recent years, as determining parameters that affect a certain medical condition is not possible in experimental conditions in many cases. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to accurately determine the nature of blood flow in the cardiovascular and nervous systems and air flow in the respiratory system, thereby giving the surgeon a diagnostic tool to plan treatment accordingly. Machine learning or data mining (MLD) methods are currently used to develop models that learn from retrospective data to make a prediction regarding factors affecting the progression of a disease. These models have also been successful in incorporating factors such as patient history and occupation. MLD models can be used as a predictive tool to determine rupture potential in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) along with CFD-based prediction of parameters like wall shear stress and pressure distributions. A combination of these computer methods can be pivotal in bridging the gap between translational and outcomes research in medicine. This paper reviews the use of computational methods in the diagnosis and treatment of AAA. PMID:26509168

  18. TGF-β Neutralization Enhances AngII-Induced Aortic Rupture and Aneurysm in Both Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2016-01-01

    AngII and TGF-β interact in development of thoracic and abdominal aortic diseases, although there are many facets of this interaction that have not been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of TGF-β neutralization on AngII induced-aortic pathologies. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered with either a rabbit or mouse TGF-β neutralizing antibody and then infused with AngII. The rabbit TGF-β antibody modestly reduced serum TGF-β concentrations, with no significant enhancements to AngII-induced aneurysm or rupture. Administration of this rabbit TGF-β antibody in mice led to high serum titers against rabbit IgG that may have attenuated the neutralization. In contrast, a mouse TGF-β antibody (1D11) significantly increased rupture in both the ascending and suprarenal aortic regions, but only at doses that markedly decreased serum TGF-β concentrations. High doses of 1D11 antibody significantly increased AngII-induced ascending and suprarenal aortic dilatation. To determine whether TGF-β neutralization had effects in mice previously infused with AngII, the 1D11 antibody was injected into mice that had been infused with AngII for 28 days and were observed during continued infusion for a further 28 days. Despite near ablations of serum TGF-β concentrations, the mouse TGF-β antibody had no effect on aortic rupture or dimensions in either ascending or suprarenal region. These data provide further evidence that AngII-induced aortic rupture is enhanced greatly by TGF-β neutralization when initiated before pathogenesis. PMID:27104863

  19. TGF-β Neutralization Enhances AngII-Induced Aortic Rupture and Aneurysm in Both Thoracic and Abdominal Regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Rateri, Debra L; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2016-01-01

    AngII and TGF-β interact in development of thoracic and abdominal aortic diseases, although there are many facets of this interaction that have not been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of TGF-β neutralization on AngII induced-aortic pathologies. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered with either a rabbit or mouse TGF-β neutralizing antibody and then infused with AngII. The rabbit TGF-β antibody modestly reduced serum TGF-β concentrations, with no significant enhancements to AngII-induced aneurysm or rupture. Administration of this rabbit TGF-β antibody in mice led to high serum titers against rabbit IgG that may have attenuated the neutralization. In contrast, a mouse TGF-β antibody (1D11) significantly increased rupture in both the ascending and suprarenal aortic regions, but only at doses that markedly decreased serum TGF-β concentrations. High doses of 1D11 antibody significantly increased AngII-induced ascending and suprarenal aortic dilatation. To determine whether TGF-β neutralization had effects in mice previously infused with AngII, the 1D11 antibody was injected into mice that had been infused with AngII for 28 days and were observed during continued infusion for a further 28 days. Despite near ablations of serum TGF-β concentrations, the mouse TGF-β antibody had no effect on aortic rupture or dimensions in either ascending or suprarenal region. These data provide further evidence that AngII-induced aortic rupture is enhanced greatly by TGF-β neutralization when initiated before pathogenesis. PMID:27104863

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ... blood pressure Male gender Genetic factors An abdominal aortic aneurysm is most often seen in males over age ...

  1. Endovascular repair or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: a Cochrane systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Badger, S A; Harkin, D W; Blair, P H; Ellis, P K; Kee, F; Forster, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) may improve outcomes for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). The study aim was to compare the outcomes for eEVAR with conventional open surgical repair for the treatment of RAAA. Setting A systematic review of relevant publications was performed. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing eEVAR with open surgical repair for RAAA were included. Participants 3 RCTs were included, with a total of 761 patients with RAAA. Interventions Meta-analysis was performed with fixed-effects models with ORs and 95% CIs for dichotomous data and mean differences with 95% CIs for continuous data. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome was short-term mortality. Secondary outcome measures included aneurysm-specific and general complication rates, quality of life and economic analysis. Results Overall risk of bias was low. There was no difference between the 2 interventions on 30-day (or in-hospital) mortality, OR 0.91 (95% CI 0.67 to 1.22; p=0.52). 30-day complications included myocardial infarction, stroke, composite cardiac complications, renal complications, severe bowel ischaemia, spinal cord ischaemia, reoperation, amputation and respiratory failure. Reporting was incomplete, and no robust conclusion was drawn. For complication outcomes that did include at least 2 studies in the meta-analysis, there was no clear evidence to support a difference between eEVAR and open repair. Longer term outcomes and cost per patient were evaluated in only a single study, thus precluding definite conclusions. Conclusions Outcomes between eEVAR and open repair, specifically 30-day mortality, are similar. However, further high-quality trials are required, as the paucity of data currently limits the conclusions. PMID:26873043

  2. BIOMECHANICS OF ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM

    PubMed Central

    Vorp, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a condition whereby the terminal aorta permanently dilates to dangerous proportions, risking rupture. The biomechanics of AAA has been studied with great interest since aneurysm rupture is a mechanical failure of the degenerated aortic wall and is a significant cause of death in developed countries. In this review article, the importance of considering the biomechanics of AAA is discussed, and then the history and the state-of-the-art of this field is reviewed - including investigations into the biomechanical behavior of AAA tissues, modeling AAA wall stress and factors which influence it, and the potential clinical utility of these estimates in predicting AAA rupture. PMID:17254589

  3. Monoparesis after graft replacement of non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hitoshi; Ogino, Hitoshi; Saito, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Minatoya, Kenji; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Kitamura, Soichiro

    2006-10-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted with a saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. Preoperative CT revealed cylindrical calcification of the abdominal aorta and the patent internal iliac arteries (IIAs). At the elective surgery, a cylinder-shaped and severely calcified intimal layer was found, and the lumbar arteries were totally occluded. Hypotension caused by the loose iliac clamp due to severe calcification continued for 15 minutes and long-time cross clamp was necessary. Monoparesis of the left lower extremity and dysuria occurred postoperatively. Spinal MRI revealed small infarction at the Th10 level. Symptoms improved and he could walk with a cane and within a few months no uninary catheter support was needed. Thoracic spinal cord infarction after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and a severely calcified abdominal aorta indicated the importance of the blood flow in the IIA as the significant source of spinal blood supply. To prevent spinal cord injury (SCI) which is rare but significant complication of AAA surgery, understanding of the spinal blood supply, quick surgery, and complete revascularization of pelvic arteries are important. PMID:17095985

  4. Endovascular strategy or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: one-year outcomes from the IMPROVE randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Bruce; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hassan, Tajek B.; Hinchliffe, Robert; Howell, Simon; Moore, Fionna; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Soong, Chee V.; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Heatley, Francine; Anjum, Aisha; Kalinowska, Gosia; Sweeting, Michael J.; Thompson, Simon G.; Gomes, Manuel; Grieve, Richard; Powell, Janet T.; Ashleigh, Ray; Gomes, Manuel; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hinchliffe, Robert; Sweeting, Michael; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Roberts, Ian; Bell, Peter R. F.; Cheetham, Anne; Stephany, Jenny; Warlow, Charles; Lamont, Peter; Moss, Jonathan; Tijssen, Jan; Braithwaite, Bruce; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Thompson, Matthew; Ashleigh, Ray; Thompson, Luke; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Jonathan R.; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Thompson, Matt M.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Bell, Rachel; Wilson, Noel; Bown, Matt; Dennis, Martin; Davis, Meryl; Ashleigh, Ray; Howell, Simon; Wyatt, Michael G.; Valenti, Domenico; Bachoo, Paul; Walker, Paul; MacSweeney, Shane; Davies, Jonathan N.; Rittoo, Dynesh; Parvin, Simon D.; Yusuf, Waquar; Nice, Colin; Chetter, Ian; Howard, Adam; Chong, Patrick; Bhat, Raj; McLain, David; Gordon, Andrew; Lane, Ian; Hobbs, Simon; Pillay, Woolagasen; Rowlands, Timothy; El-Tahir, Amin; Asquith, John; Cavanagh, Steve; Dubois, Luc; Forbes, Thomas L.; Ashworth, Emily; Baker, Sara; Barakat, Hashem; Brady, Claire; Brown, Joanne; Bufton, Christine; Chance, Tina; Chrisopoulou, Angela; Cockell, Marie; Croucher, Andrea; Dabee, Leela; Dewhirst, Nikki; Evans, Jo; Gibson, Andy; Gorst, Siobhan; Gough, Moira; Graves, Lynne; Griffin, Michelle; Hatfield, Josie; Hogg, Florence; Howard, Susannah; Hughes, Cían; Metcalfe, David; Lapworth, Michelle; Massey, Ian; Novick, Teresa; Owen, Gareth; Parr, Noala; Pintar, David; Spencer, Sarah; Thomson, Claire; Thunder, Orla; Wallace, Tom; Ward, Sue; Wealleans, Vera; Wilson, Lesley; Woods, Janet; Zheng, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report the longer term outcomes following either a strategy of endovascular repair first or open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, which are necessary for both patient and clinical decision-making. Methods and results This pragmatic multicentre (29 UK and 1 Canada) trial randomized 613 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm; 316 to an endovascular first strategy (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) and 297 to open repair. The principal 1-year outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were re-interventions, hospital discharge, health-related quality-of-life (QoL) (EQ-5D), costs, Quality-Adjusted-Life-Years (QALYs), and cost-effectiveness [incremental net benefit (INB)]. At 1 year, all-cause mortality was 41.1% for the endovascular strategy group and 45.1% for the open repair group, odds ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62, 1.17], P = 0.325, with similar re-intervention rates in each group. The endovascular strategy group and open repair groups had average total hospital stays of 17 and 26 days, respectively, P < 0.001. Patients surviving rupture had higher average EQ-5D utility scores in the endovascular strategy vs. open repair groups, mean differences 0.087 (95% CI 0.017, 0.158), 0.068 (95% CI −0.004, 0.140) at 3 and 12 months, respectively. There were indications that QALYs were higher and costs lower for the endovascular first strategy, combining to give an INB of £3877 (95% CI £253, £7408) or €4356 (95% CI €284, €8323). Conclusion An endovascular first strategy for management of ruptured aneurysms does not offer a survival benefit over 1 year but offers patients faster discharge with better QoL and is cost-effective. Clinical trial registration ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25855369

  5. Micromanaging abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M; Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Tsao, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to "fine tune" the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility. PMID:23852016

  6. Comparison of the strain field of abdominal aortic aneurysm measured by magnetic resonance imaging and stereovision: a feasibility study for prediction of the risk of rupture of aortic abdominal aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Joannic, David; Delassus, Patrick; Lalande, Alain; Juillion, Patrick; Fontaine, Jean-François

    2015-04-13

    The prediction of the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex problem. Currently the criteria to predict rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms are aneurysm diameter and growth rates. It is generally believed that study of the wall strain distribution could be helpful to find a better decision criterion for surgery of aortic aneurysms before their rupture. The wall strain distribution depends on many biological and biomechanical factors such as elastic properties of the aorta, turbulent blood flow, anatomy of the aorta, presence of thrombus or not and so on. Recently, numerical simulations to estimate rupture-potential have received many attentions. However, none of the medical imaging tools for screening and monitoring of AAAs were studied in terms of mechanical behavior and experimentally to demonstrate their capability to measure relevant variables. The aim of this study was to develop a metrological approach for deployment testing of the ability of techniques for measuring local in-vitro deformations based on comparison of stereovision and MRI. In this paper, we present the implementation approach and results of the study based on cylindrical phantoms with or without AAA representing, respectively, healthy and unhealthy artery. Through this study, an experimental device was developed for the behavior study of AAA during a cardiac cycle. The results show that the stereovision techniques used in laboratory is well suited and is qualitatively and quantitatively equivalent with MRI measurements. PMID:25661521

  7. CT of acute abdominal aortic disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Sanjeev; Menias, Christine O; Heiken, Jay P

    2003-11-01

    Aortic aneurysm rupture, aortic dissection, PAU, acute aortic occlusion, traumatic aortic injury, and aortic fistula represent acute abdominal aortic conditions. Because of its speed and proximity to the emergency department, helical CT is the imaging test of choice for these conditions. MR imaging also plays an important role in the imaging of aortic dissection and PAU, particularly when the patient is unable to receive intravenous contrast material. In this era of MDCT, conventional angiography is used as a secondary diagnostic tool to clarify equivocal findings on cross-sectional imaging. Ultrasound is helpful when CT is not readily available and the patient is unable or too unstable to undergo MR imaging. PMID:14661663

  8. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in association with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in the endovascular era: vigilance remains critical.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, Matthew C; Ross, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are common complications of ruptured abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms (rAAAs) and other abdominal vascular catastrophes even in the age of endovascular therapy. Morbidity and mortality due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) are significant. Recognition and management of IAH are key critical care measures which may decrease morbidity and improve survival in these vascular patients. Two strategies have been utilized: expectant management with prompt decompressive laparotomy upon diagnosis of threshold levels of IAH versus prophylactic, delayed abdominal closure based upon clinical parameters at the time of initial repair. Competent management of the abdominal wound with preservation of abdominal domain is also an important component of the care of these patients. In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events. PMID:22454763

  9. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Francesco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; De Donato, Gianmarco; Benevento, Domenico; Guerrieri, Massimiliano W; Ruzzi, Umberto; Borrelli, Maria P; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has become a milestone in the treatment of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. Technological improvement allows treatment in more and more complex cases. This review summarizes all grafts available on the market. A complete review of most important trial on this topic is provided to the best of our knowledge, and technical tips and tricks for standard cases are also included. PMID:26771730

  10. Endovascular stent-graft repair of spontaneous aorto-caval fistula secondary to a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: An emergency management of hostile anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyuan; Wang, Haofu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Although endovascular aneurysm repair of aorto-caval fistula offers a safe and efficient approach compared to traditional open repair, endovascular techniques for the treatment of aorto-caval fistula with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in emergency circumstance are not well established. This study aims to evaluate the effect of endovascular repair of aorto-caval fistula of a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and hostile anatomy. Methods: we report a case of an aorto-caval fistula endovascular repaired in a 78-year-old male using a hybrid stent-graft technique. Results: The patient had an uneventful recovery and CTA follow up showed no sign of ACF or any endoleak. Conclusion: This case highlights ACF might be managed by composite endograft implantation with careful and solid sealing of anchoring zones on the two sides. PMID:27489717

  11. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  12. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, George; Johansen, Kaj

    1984-01-01

    Aneurysms are common in our increasingly elderly population, and are a major threat to life and limb. Until the advent of vascular reconstructive techniques, aneurysm patients were subject to an overwhelming risk of death from exsanguination. The first successful repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using an interposed arterial homograft was reported by Dubost in 1952. A milestone in the evolution of vascular surgery, this event and subsequent diagnostic, operative and prosthetic graft refinements have permitted patients with an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to enjoy a better prognosis than patients with almost any other form of major systemic illness. Images PMID:6702193

  13. Risk Factors for Survival following Open Surgical Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A 13-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Anil; Hanedan, Muhammet Onur; Songur, Çetin Murat; Boysan, Emre; Unal, Ertekin Utku; Mola, Serkan; Erkengel, Halil Ibrahim; Kubat, Emre; Iscan, Zafer; Tutun, Ufuk; Sarıtas, Ahmet; Birincioglu, Cemal Levent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of a ruptured abdominal aorta aneurysm (RAAA) continues to present a significant challenge to surgeons. There are some patient factors such as age and gender that cannot be changed, and comorbid conditions can be optimized but not eliminated. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors affecting high mortality after the surgical repair of an RAAA. Methods: Data on 121 patients who underwent surgical repair for RAAAs between January 1997 and June 2011 in our institution were collected retrospectively. All the patients had been diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) scans, and intraoperative extra-luminal blood was visualized intraoperatively. Variables studied comprised demographic data; preoperative, operative, and postoperative data; and the causes of mortality. Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of mortality. Results: One hundred eight (89.2%) patients were male and 13 (10.7%) were female at an average age of 68.9 ± 10.5 years. Totally, 121 patients underwent surgery for RAAAs. Fifty-four patients had aortic tube grafts, 32 aortobiiliac grafts, 20 aortobifemoral grafts, 1 aortoiliac graft, and 1 aortofemoral graft for the replacement of the RAAAs. Seven patients had only surgical exploration. Operative mortality was 41.3% (50 patients). The factors associated with mortality were preoperative shock, free blood, positive inotropic agent, hematocrit value, and need for blood and plasma. In the multivariate analysis, preoperative shock and positive inotropic agents were found to be significant as the predictors of death (OR: 19.8, 95%CI: 3.2-122.8 and OR: 8.6, 95% CI: 2.9-26.3, respectively). Conclusion: This study revealed that the preoperative clinical findings affected the mortality associated with RAAAs. PMID:26697083

  14. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality following open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wanpin; Wang, Yan; Yao, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Open surgical repair (OSR) is a conventional surgical method used in the repair a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however, OSR results in high perioperative mortality rates. The level of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been reported to be an independent risk factor for postoperative in-hospital mortality following major cardiopulmonary surgery. In the present study, the association of serum ACE2 levels with postoperative in-hospital mortality was investigated in patients undergoing OSR for ruptured AAA. The study enrolled 84 consecutive patients underwent OSR for ruptured AAA and were subsequently treated in the intensive care unit. Patients who succumbed postoperatively during hospitalization were defined as non-survivors. Serum ACE2 levels were measured in all patients prior to and following the surgery using ELISA kits. The results indicated that non-survivors showed significantly lower mean preoperative and postoperative serum ACE2 levels when compared with those in survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that, subsequent to adjusting for potential confounders, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 showed a significant negative association with the postoperative in-hospital mortality. This was confirmed by multivariate hazard ratio analysis, which showed that, subsequent to adjusting for the various potential confounders, the risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality remained significantly higher in the two lowest serum ACE2 level quartiles compared with that in the highest quartile on preoperative day 1. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence supporting that the serum ACE2 level is an independent risk factor for the in-hospital mortality following OSR for ruptured AAA. Furthermore, low serum ACE2 levels on preoperative day 1 were found to be associated with increased postoperative in-hospital mortality. Therefore, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 may be a potential

  15. Understanding the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, Helena; Ryer, Evan J.; Elmore, James R.; Tromp, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Summary An aortic aneurysm is a dilatation in which the aortic diameter is ≥ 3.0 cm. If left untreated, the aortic wall continues to weaken and becomes unable to withstand the forces of the luminal blood pressure resulting in progressive dilatation and rupture, a catastrophic event associated with a mortality of 50 – 80%. Smoking and positive family history are important risk factors for the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Several genetic risk factors have also been identified. On the histological level, visible hallmarks of AAA pathogenesis include inflammation, smooth muscle cell apoptosis, extracellular matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. We expect that large genetic, genomic, epigenetic, proteomic and metabolomic studies will be undertaken by international consortia to identify additional risk factors and biomarkers, and to enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of AAA. Collaboration between different research groups will be important in overcoming the challenges to develop pharmacological treatments for AAA. PMID:26308600

  16. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. PMID:25398912

  17. Novel mechanisms of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Rateri, Debra L; Bruemmer, Dennis; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2012-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a common but asymptomatic disease that has high susceptibility to rupture. Current therapeutic options are limited to surgical procedures because no pharmacological approaches have been proven to decrease either expansion or rupture of human AAAs. The current dearth of effective medical treatment is attributed to insufficient understanding of the mechanisms underlying the initiation, propagation and rupture of AAAs. This review will emphasize recent advances in mechanistic studies that may provide insights into potential pharmacological treatments for this disease. While we primarily focus on recent salient findings, we also discuss mechanisms that continue to be controversial depending on models under study. Despite the progress on exploring mechanisms of experimental AAAs, ultimate validation of mechanisms will require completion of prospective double-blinded clinical trials. In addition, we advocate increased emphasis of collaborative studies using animal models and human tissues for determination of mechanisms that explore expansion and rupture of existing AAAs. PMID:22833280

  18. Imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Amy R; Johnson, Philip L; Meyer, Mark C

    2002-04-15

    Given the high rate of morbidity and mortality associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), accurate diagnosis and preoperative evaluation are essential for improved patient outcomes. Ultrasonography is the standard method of screening and monitoring AAAs that have not ruptured. In the past, aortography was commonly used for preoperative planning in the repair of AAAs. More recently, computed tomography (CT) has largely replaced older, more invasive methods. Recent advances in CT imaging technology, such as helical CT and CT angiography, offer significant advantages over traditional CT. These methods allow for more rapid scans and can produce three-dimensional images of the AAA and important adjacent vascular structures. Use of endovascular stent grafts has increased recently and is less invasive for the repair of AAAs in selected cases. Aortography and CT angiography can precisely determine the size and surrounding anatomy of the AAA to identify appropriate candidates for the use of endovascular stent grafts. Helical CT and CT angiography represent an exciting future in the preoperative evaluation of AAAs. However, this technology is not the standard of care because of the lack of widespread availability, the cost associated with obtaining new equipment, and the lack of universal protocols necessary for acquisition and reconstruction of these images. PMID:11989632

  19. Distribution and length of osteophytes in the lumbar vertebrae and risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a study of dry bones from Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chanapa, Patcharin; Yoshiyuki, Tohno; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2014-09-01

    Vertebral osteophytes are a characteristic feature of intervertebral disc degeneration. In the lumbar spinal region, the two major structures in close proximity anterior to the spine are the inferior vena cava and the abdominal aorta, both of which have been reported to be affected by osteophytes. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution, classification and lengths of osteophytes in the lumbar vertebrae. One hundred and eighty lumbar columns of 90 males and 90 females from Chiang Mai, Thailand, in the age range 15 to 96 years (mean age, 63 years) were collected. The measuring length of osteophytes was assessed on vertebral body and articular facet. Statistical analysis was performed by descriptive analysis, chi-square and Pearson Correlation. Lumbar osteophytes were presented in 175 specimens (97.2%), 88 males and 87 females. The highest frequency was at L4, most were on the superior, inferior surface of body and articular facet (39.7%, 38.4%, and 22%), respectively. The greatest mean length was 3.47±2.21 mm at L5, and the longest length of anterior superior surface of body was 28.56 mm. The osteophyte length was significantly correlated directly with age (P<0.01), and males were significantly greater than females (P<0.05). The highest prevalence of osteophytes was on the anterior side of superior surface of body (30.4%), and the classification was traction. It can be proposed that the abdominal aorta could be damaged, especially a risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:25276474

  20. Ultrasound Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Clinical Need Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a localized abnormal dilatation of the aorta greater than 3 cm. In community surveys, the prevalence of AAA is reported to be between 2% and 5.4%. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are found in 4% to 8% of older men and in 0.5% to 1.5% of women aged 65 years and older. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are largely asymptomatic. If left untreated, the continuing extension and thinning of the vessel wall may eventually result in rupture of the AAA. Often rupture may occur without warning, causing acute pain. Rupture is always life threatening and requires emergency surgical repair of the ruptured aorta. The risk of death from ruptured AAA is 80% to 90%. Over one-half of all deaths attributed to a ruptured aneurysm take place before the patient reaches hospital. In comparison, the rate of death in people undergoing elective surgery is 5% to 7%; however, symptoms of AAA rarely occur before rupture. Given that ultrasound can reliably visualize the aorta in 99% of the population, and its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing AAA approaches 100%, screening for aneurysms is worth considering as it may reduce the incidence of ruptured aneurysms and hence reduce unnecessary deaths caused by AAA-attributable mortality. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Case reports, letters, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, non-human studies, and comments were excluded. Questions asked: Is population-based AAA screening effective in improving health outcomes in asymptomatic populations? Is AAA screening acceptable to the population? Does this affect the

  1. Long-term survival following emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Milner, Q J; Burchett, K R

    2000-05-01

    Survival following emergency surgery for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remains poor and is in stark contrast to that for elective repair. We have carried out a 5-year retrospective observational study to determine the long-term (5-year) survival of patients following emergency surgery for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm at a district general hospital in East Anglia. A total of 99 patients presented to the operating theatre for emergency repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in this 5-year study period. In-hospital mortality was 70% and was unchanged over the 5 years. Overall long-term survival in those patients discharged from hospital was good. The ICU cost per long-term survivor was calculated to be pound sterling 36750. PMID:10792133

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysm--the forgotten diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Contini, S.; McMaster, P.

    1980-01-01

    A review of all cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting to Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, in a 4-year period revealed that there were 118 such patients and confirmed the relatively low operative mortality for elective aneurysmal surgery (6.6%) compared with the high mortality (66.6%) for ruptured or leaking abdominal aneurysm. In only 50% of the cases was the correct diagnosis made during the lifetime of the patient; nor was the correct diagnosis always made after admission to hospital. The need for an early and accurate diagnosis of abdominal aneurysms is stressed and an increased awareness of this condition, based on well established clinical features, would undoubtedly reduce the overall mortality. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7393787

  3. Novel Molecular Imaging Approaches to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Risk Stratification.

    PubMed

    Toczek, Jakub; Meadows, Judith L; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2016-01-01

    Selection of patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is currently based on aneurysm size, growth rate, and symptoms. Molecular imaging of biological processes associated with aneurysm growth and rupture, for example, inflammation and matrix remodeling, could improve patient risk stratification and lead to a reduction in abdominal aortic aneurysm morbidity and mortality. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging are 2 novel approaches to abdominal aortic aneurysm imaging evaluated in clinical trials. A variety of other tracers, including those that target inflammatory cells and proteolytic enzymes (eg, integrin αvβ3 and matrix metalloproteinases), have proven effective in preclinical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm and show great potential for clinical translation. PMID:26763279

  4. Successful Occlusion of a Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug: A Technical Note

    SciTech Connect

    Zander, Tobias Baldi, Sebastian; Rabellino, Martin; Blasco, Oscar; Febles, Tomas; Wisniewska, Katarzyna; Maynar, Manuel

    2011-02-15

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is related with a 100% mortality rate if left untreated. Even with surgical intervention or endovascular repair, mortality is still extremely high. However, there are conditions in which neither open surgical aneurysm repair nor endovascular aneurysm repair can be considered a viable therapeutic option because of comorbidities or anatomic reasons. We report a case of successful endovascular treatment in a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm by occluding the abdominal aneurysm using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP II).

  5. Non-invasive in vivo time-dependent strain measurement method in human abdominal aortic aneurysms: Towards a novel approach to rupture risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Róbert; Csobay-Novák, Csaba; Lovas, Attila; Sótonyi, Péter; Bojtár, Imre

    2015-07-16

    We aim to introduce a novel, inverse method for in vivo material parameter identification of human abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), which could overcome one of the greatest sources of uncertainty in patient-specific simulations, and could also serve as a rapid, patient-calibrated, novel measure of aneurysm rupture risk. As an initial step, the determination of the kinematic fields is presented here. Images of the AAA lumen, acquired in 10 discrete time-steps through a stabilized cardiac cycle by electrocardiogram-gated computer tomography angiography, are used to approximate the in vivo, time dependent kinematic fields of the arterial wall using a novel, incompressible Kirchhoff-Love shell element implemented into the isogeometric analysis framework. Defining a smoothing parametric surface via 2D bicubic spline fitting in the spatial, and by harmonic regression in the temporal domain, we are able to adequately mitigate the measurement inaccuracy. The ill-posedness of the problem requires certain assumptions on the displacement. In our case, based on numerical fluid structure interaction simulation observations, we hypothesized the incremental displacement vector of the reference surface to coincide with its corrected normal; hence the periodic movement was assured. Finally, we present two examples: an AAA and an undilated calcificated aorta. Strains in the diseased part were compared to those in a healthy arterial section of the same patient and found to have significant differences in both specimens. In the case of AAAs, high spatial gradients surrounding the dilated part indicate abrupt changes in material properties, a phenomenon less significant for the atherosclerotic case. PMID:25980555

  6. Vertebral destruction due to abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Viseu Pinheiro, J.F.; Blanco Blanco, J.F.; Pescador Hernández, D.; García García, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain is a common cause of medical consultation, and usually supposes a non-malignant prognostic. Presentation of case We report an atypical appearance of low back pain associated to shock and pulsatile abdominal mass that made us diagnose an abdominal aortic aneurysm as reason of vertebral lysis and pain. Discusion Surgical repair of contained AAA should be directed to secondary re-rupture prevention, with an approximate survival near to 100% at selected patients for elective surgery. Consequently, orthopedic surgery for back spine stabilization has to be elective in those cases when vertebral destruction is above 30% and clinic is directly related to spine instability. Conclusion We should consider AAA as other cause of low back pain and routinely examine the abdomen and seek complementary imaging proves when risk factors for AAA are present. PMID:25569196

  7. Unoperated abdominal aortic aneurysm: presentation and natural history.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, E. M.; Hopkinson, B. R.; Makin, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    The natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is death from rupture unless the patient dies from another cause prior to rupture. Elective aortic grafting is the treatment of choice. Following rupture, emergency operation is the only treatment which will prolong the patient's survival. Controversy still exists as to the optimum management in poor risk patients and in those with a small aneurysm. This paper describes the presentation and natural history of 65 patients presenting with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm who did not have an emergency operation, and a further 27 patients in whom the diagnosis of intact AAA was made who did not have an elective aortic replacement graft. The correct diagnosis was made at the time of admission in only 43 of the 65 patients with ruptured aneurysms. The diagnostic errors and appropriate investigations in cases of doubt are discussed. The mean time from admission to hospital to death was 8 hours. The reasons for not performing an elective operation in the 27 patients known to have AAA are given. Nine have subsequently died from rupture. There have been 7 deaths from other causes. PMID:6614767

  8. Lymphangiogenesis and Angiogenesis in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Masaki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Sakabe, Junichi; Ogawa, Mikako; Baba, Satoshi; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Inuzuka, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Naoto; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Sato, Kohji; Konno, Hiroyuki; Unno, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized to be inflammation-associated degeneration of vascular wall. Neovascularization is regularly found in human AAA and considered to play critical roles in the development and rupture of AAA. However, little is known about lymphangiogenesis in AAA. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate both angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in AAA. Abdominal aortic tissue was harvested either from autopsy (control group) and during open-repair surgery for AAA (AAA group). Adventitial lymphatic vasa vasorum was observed in both groups, but seemed to be no significant morphological changes in AAA. Immunohistochemical studies identified infiltration of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE) −1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9-positive macrophages and podoplanin and Prox-1-positive microvessels in the intima/media in AAA wall, where hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF)-1α was expressed. VEGF-C and MMP-9 were not expressed in macrophages infiltrating in the adventitia. Intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence lymphography revealed lymph stasis in intima/medial in AAA. Fluorescence microscopy of the collected samples also confirmed the accumulation of lymph in the intima/media but not in adventitia. These results demonstrate that infiltration of macrophages in intima/media is associated with lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis in AAA. Lymph-drainage appeared to be insufficient in the AAA wall. PMID:24651519

  9. Coexistence of expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm and aggravated intervertebral disc extrusion -a case report-.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nan Seol; Kang, Sung Hyun; Park, Sun Young

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is included in the differential diagnosis of lower back pain. Although rare, this important disease can cause potentially lethal complications. In this case, expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm coexisted with intervertebral disc extrusion. The diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm was delayed, putting the patient at risk of aneurysmal rupture. In the management of patients with degenerative spinal diseases, we should not overlook the possibility of comorbidities such as an abdominal aortic aneurysm. We also suggest the importance of interpreting images more carefully, especially for elderly male patients. PMID:24228150

  10. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  11. Spontaneous aortic pseudoaneurysm rupture into the sigmoid colon in Behçet’s disease patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Lim; Ku, Young Mi; Won, Yoodong

    2015-01-01

    Behçet’s disease (BD) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent orogenital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. The vascular manifestations include thrombophlebitis, stenosis, occlusion, and pseudoaneurysm. BD infrequently precipitates aortic pseudoaneurysm rupture into the sigmoid mesocolon and lumen of the adjacent colon. Here we report an extremely rare case of spontaneous abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm rupture via the sigmoid mesocolon into the lumen of the sigmoid colon in a 37-year-old patient with BD. PMID:26675745

  12. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms and Risk Factors for Adverse Events.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Raheel; Ghoorah, Kuldeepa; Kunadian, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a focal full thickness dilatation of the abdominal aorta, greater than 1.5 times its normal diameter. Although some patients with AAA experience back or abdominal pain, most remain asymptomatic until rupture. The prognosis after AAA rupture is poor. Management strategies for patients with asymptomatic AAAs include risk factor reduction, such as smoking cessation, optimizing antihypertensive treatment, and treating dyslipidemia, as well as surveillance by ultrasound. Currently, aneurysm diameter alone is often used to assess risk of rupture. Once the aneurysm diameter reaches 5.5 cm, the risk of rupture is considered greater than the risk of intervention and elective aneurysm repair is undertaken. There is increasing interest in detecting AAAs early, and national screening programs are now in place. Furthermore, there is increasing research interest in biomarkers, genetics, and functional imaging to improve detection of AAAs at risk of progression and rupture. In this review, we discuss risk factors for AAA rupture, which should be considered during the management process, to advance current deficiencies in management pathways. PMID:25580705

  13. Segmental Aortic Stiffening Contributes to Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Development

    PubMed Central

    Raaz, Uwe; Zöllner, Alexander M.; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Brandt, Moritz; Emrich, Fabian C.; Kayama, Yosuke; Eken, Suzanne; Adam, Matti; Maegdefessel, Lars; Hertel, Thomas; Deng, Alicia; Jagger, Ann; Buerke, Michael; Dalman, Ronald L.; Spin, Joshua M.; Kuhl, Ellen; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stiffening of the aortic wall is a phenomenon consistently observed in age and in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). However, its role in AAA pathophysiology is largely undefined. Methods and Results Using an established murine elastase-induced AAA model, we demonstrate that segmental aortic stiffening (SAS) precedes aneurysm growth. Finite element analysis (FEA) reveals that early stiffening of the aneurysm-prone aortic segment leads to axial (longitudinal) wall stress generated by cyclic (systolic) tethering of adjacent, more compliant wall segments. Interventional stiffening of AAA-adjacent aortic segments (via external application of surgical adhesive) significantly reduces aneurysm growth. These changes correlate with reduced segmental stiffness of the AAA-prone aorta (due to equalized stiffness in adjacent segments), reduced axial wall stress, decreased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), attenuated elastin breakdown, and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines and macrophage infiltration, as well as attenuated apoptosis within the aortic wall. Cyclic pressurization of segmentally stiffened aortic segments ex vivo increases the expression of genes related to inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Finally, human ultrasound studies reveal that aging, a significant AAA risk factor, is accompanied by segmental infrarenal aortic stiffening. Conclusions The present study introduces the novel concept of segmental aortic stiffening (SAS) as an early pathomechanism generating aortic wall stress and triggering aneurysmal growth, thereby delineating potential underlying molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets. In addition, monitoring SAS may aid the identification of patients at risk for AAA. PMID:25904646

  14. Genes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, nearly 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. The studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, if appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called CNTN3 which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. Two follow-up studies, however, could not replicate the association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33 were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense RNA that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute to AAA pathogenesis. PMID:21146954

  15. INFLAMMATORY ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM--A FORM OF CHRONIC PERIAORTITIS.

    PubMed

    Pop, Corina; Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Jantea, Petruţa; Tomescu, Alina; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periaortitis represents a unique pathogenic concept for three entities: Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Idiopathic Retroperitoneal Fibrosis and Perianeurysmal Retroperitoneal Fibrosis. The fundamental meaning of an inflammatory reaction to advanced atherosclerosis has been developed on the bottom of clinical and histological features. The triad of abdominal pain, weight loss and elevated inflammatory markers: erythrocyte sedimentation rate/C-reactive protein in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms revealed on contrast-enhanced computer tomography is highly suggestive for inflammatory aneurysm. We report a case of a heavy-smoker adult male presented with suddenly abdominal symptoms suggestive for mesenteric ischemia which have proved to be due to inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm. The most favorable management of patients with inflammatory aneurysm is ambiguous. Surgical approach seems reasonable even supposing inflammatory aneurysm emerges less likely to rupture than the atherosclerotic variant. Corticosteroids are used in inoperable inflammatory aneurysm, even if is well known that this treatment does not change the long-term outcome of the disease. Surgical-open or Endovascular Repair of the aneurysm is the elective treatment. PMID:26793850

  16. Osteoprotegerin Prevents Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Koichi; Aoki, Hiroki; Orita, Yuichi; Ishida, Takafumi; Ohtaki, Megu; Nagao, Masataka; Ishida, Mari; Yoshizumi, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), which commonly occur among elderly individuals, are accompanied by a risk of rupture and subsequent high mortality. Establishment of medical therapies for the prevention of AAAs requires further understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this condition. This report details the possible involvement of Osteoprotegerin (OPG) in the prevention of AAAs through inhibition of Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). In CaCl2-induced AAA models, both internal and external diameters were significantly increased with destruction of elastic fibers in the media in Opg knockout (KO) mice, as compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, up-regulation of TRAIL expression was observed in the media by immunohistochemical analyses. Using a culture system, both the TRAIL-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and the chemoattractive effect of TRAIL on SMCs were inhibited by OPG. These data suggest that Opg may play a preventive role in the development of AAA through its antagonistic effect on Trail. PMID:26783750

  17. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  18. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    ... Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  19. Quadricuspid aortic valve with ruptured sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Akerem Khan, Shamruz Khan; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Burkhart, Harold M; Araoz, Philip A; Young, Phillip M

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of a 24-year-old woman who was diagnosed with quadricuspid aortic valve with ruptured sinus of Valsalva. Quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly. The recognition of quadricuspid aortic valve has clinical significance as it causes aortic valve dysfunction, and is often associated with other congenital cardiac abnormalities. We showed the important role of multimodality imaging in diagnosing a quadricuspid aortic valve associated with ruptured sinus of Valsalva. PMID:22874066

  20. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Riambau, Vicente; Guerrero, Francisco; Montañá, Xavier; Gilabert, Rosa

    2007-06-01

    Recent technological advances in the diagnosis and therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease are continuing to bring about changes in the way patients suffering from these conditions are treated. The prevalence of both these conditions is increasing. This is due to greater life-expectancy in patients with arteriosclerosis, a pathogenetic factor underlying both conditions. The application of diagnostic imaging techniques to non-vascular conditions has led to the early diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Clinical suspicion of reno-vascular disease can be confirmed easily using high-resolution diagnostic imaging modalities such as CT angiography and magnetic resonance angiography. Endovascular intervention is successfully replacing conventional surgical repair techniques, with the result that it may be possible to improve outcome in both conditions using effective and minimally invasive approaches. Future technological developments will enable these endovascular techniques to be applied in the large majority of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm or renovascular disease. PMID:17580053

  1. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). If AAA isn't found and treated ...

  2. Monitoring the biological activity of abdominal aortic aneurysms Beyond Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Newby, David E; Robson, Jennifer M J

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are an important cause of morbidity and, when ruptured, are associated with >80% mortality. Current management decisions are based on assessment of aneurysm diameter by abdominal ultrasound. However, AAA growth is non-linear and rupture can occur at small diameters or may never occur in those with large AAAs. There is a need to develop better imaging biomarkers that can identify the potential risk of rupture independent of the aneurysm diameter. Key pathobiological processes of AAA progression and rupture include neovascularisation, necrotic inflammation, microcalcification and proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix. These processes represent key targets for emerging imaging techniques and may confer an increased risk of expansion or rupture over and above the known patient-related risk factors. Magnetic resonance imaging, using ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide, can identify and track hotspots of macrophage activity. Positron emission tomography, using a variety of targeted tracers, can detect areas of inflammation, angiogenesis, hypoxia and microcalcification. By going beyond the simple monitoring of diameter expansion using ultrasound, these cellular and molecular imaging techniques may have the potential to allow improved prediction of expansion or rupture and to better guide elective surgical intervention. PMID:26879242

  3. Monitoring the biological activity of abdominal aortic aneurysms Beyond Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Newby, David E; Robson, Jennifer M J

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are an important cause of morbidity and, when ruptured, are associated with >80% mortality. Current management decisions are based on assessment of aneurysm diameter by abdominal ultrasound. However, AAA growth is non-linear and rupture can occur at small diameters or may never occur in those with large AAAs. There is a need to develop better imaging biomarkers that can identify the potential risk of rupture independent of the aneurysm diameter. Key pathobiological processes of AAA progression and rupture include neovascularisation, necrotic inflammation, microcalcification and proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix. These processes represent key targets for emerging imaging techniques and may confer an increased risk of expansion or rupture over and above the known patient-related risk factors. Magnetic resonance imaging, using ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide, can identify and track hotspots of macrophage activity. Positron emission tomography, using a variety of targeted tracers, can detect areas of inflammation, angiogenesis, hypoxia and microcalcification. By going beyond the simple monitoring of diameter expansion using ultrasound, these cellular and molecular imaging techniques may have the potential to allow improved prediction of expansion or rupture and to better guide elective surgical intervention. PMID:26879242

  4. Improving the Efficiency of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall Stress Computations

    PubMed Central

    Zelaya, Jaime E.; Goenezen, Sevan; Dargon, Phong T.; Azarbal, Amir-Farzin; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a pathological dilation of the abdominal aorta, which carries a high mortality rate if ruptured. The most commonly used surrogate marker of rupture risk is the maximal transverse diameter of the aneurysm. More recent studies suggest that wall stress from models of patient-specific aneurysm geometries extracted, for instance, from computed tomography images may be a more accurate predictor of rupture risk and an important factor in AAA size progression. However, quantification of wall stress is typically computationally intensive and time-consuming, mainly due to the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the abdominal aortic aneurysm walls. These difficulties have limited the potential of computational models in clinical practice. To facilitate computation of wall stresses, we propose to use a linear approach that ensures equilibrium of wall stresses in the aneurysms. This proposed linear model approach is easy to implement and eliminates the burden of nonlinear computations. To assess the accuracy of our proposed approach to compute wall stresses, results from idealized and patient-specific model simulations were compared to those obtained using conventional approaches and to those of a hypothetical, reference abdominal aortic aneurysm model. For the reference model, wall mechanical properties and the initial unloaded and unstressed configuration were assumed to be known, and the resulting wall stresses were used as reference for comparison. Our proposed linear approach accurately approximates wall stresses for varying model geometries and wall material properties. Our findings suggest that the proposed linear approach could be used as an effective, efficient, easy-to-use clinical tool to estimate patient-specific wall stresses. PMID:25007052

  5. Current aortic endografts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Colvard, Benjamin; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil; Swanstrom, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular Aneurysm Repair is a widely adopted method of treatment for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The minimally invasive approach offered with EVAR has become popular not only among physicians and patients, but in the medical device industry as well. Over the past 25 years the global market for aortic endografts has increased rapidly, resulting in a wide range of devices from various companies. Currently, there are seven endografts approved by the FDA for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. These devices offer a wide range of designs intended to increase inclusion criteria while decreasing technical complications such as endoleak and migration. Despite advances in device design, secondary interventions and follow-up requirements remain a significant issue. New devices are currently being studied in the U.S. and abroad and may significantly reduce complications and secondary interventions. PMID:26959727

  6. Infected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Helicobacter cinaedi

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, Takamasa; Tamura, Atsushi; Lefor, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi is a rare human pathogen which has various clinical manifestations such as cellulitis, bacteremia, arthritis, meningitis, and infectious endocarditis. We report an abdominal aortic aneurysm infected with Helicobacter cinaedi, treated successfully with surgical repair and long-term antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26885430

  7. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  8. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  9. Medical treatment of small abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Assar, A N

    2012-08-01

    Conventional open repair or endovascular aneurysm repair is indicated for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) when the diameter of the latter is ≥ 5.5 cm. This therapeutic strategy is based on results of randomized trials of open repair versus ultrasound surveillance of small AAA (<5.5 cm). Studies of screening for AAA have shown that >90% of aneurysms detected are small aneurysms (<5.5 cm). Despite the low annual risk of rupture of these aneurysms, patients with small AAA are left with a potentially life-threatening disease for which no immediate treatment is available. Hence, medical treatment directed at limiting the expansion of small AAA has emerged as an alternative therapeutic strategy. Randomized trials of doxycycline, roxithromycin, and propranolol in patients with small AAA have been published. The results of the doxycycline and roxithromycin trials suggest that both medications can limit AAA expansion, especially during the first year of treatment. Propranolol did not limit AAA expansion, and the trials were stopped because of its serious side effects. In other studies, statins and indomethacin have also been shown to limit AAA expansion. However, these studies were observational with relatively small numbers of patients. Thus, large randomized controlled trials with long follow-up are needed to objectively assess the efficacy of medications that have shown potential in limiting AAA expansion. In addition, recent evidence of regression of AAA in experimental animal models is likely to change our concepts of the molecular pathogenesis of AAA, and could make medical treatment of small AAA a possibility. PMID:22854530

  10. Chylous complications after abdominal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Haug, E S; Saether, O D; Odegaard, A; Johnsen, G; Myhre, H O

    1998-12-01

    Two patients developed chylous complications following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. One patient had chylous ascitis and was successfully treated by a peritoneo-caval shunt. The other patient developed a lymph cyst, which gradually resorbed after puncture. Chylous complications following aortic surgery are rare. Patients in bad a general condition should be treated by initial paracentesis and total parenteral nutrition, supplemented by medium-chain triglyceride and low-fat diet. If no improvement is observed on this regimen, the next step should be implementation of a peritoneo-venous shunt, whereas direct ligation of the leak should be reserved for those who are not responding to this treatment. PMID:10204656

  11. Thrombus Volume Change Visualization after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiora, Josu; García, Guillermo; Macía, Iván; Legarreta, Jon Haitz; Boto, Fernando; Paloc, Céline; Graña, Manuel; Abuín, Javier Sanchez

    A surgical technique currently used in the treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) is the Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR). This minimally invasive procedure involves inserting a prosthesis in the aortic vessel that excludes the aneurysm from the bloodstream. The stent, once in place acts as a false lumen for the blood current to travel down, and not into the surrounding aneurysm sac. This procedure, therefore, immediately takes the pressure off the aneurysm, which thromboses itself after some time. Nevertheless, in a long term perspective, different complications such as prosthesis displacement or bloodstream leaks into or from the aneurysmatic bulge (endoleaks) could appear causing a pressure elevation and, as a result, increasing the danger of rupture. The purpose of this work is to explore the application of image registration techniques to the visual detection of changes in the thrombus in order to assess the evolution of the aneurysm. Prior to registration, both the lumen and the thrombus are segmented

  12. Incidental discovery of a chronically thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chris Y; Rectenwald, John E

    2015-07-01

    Chronic spontaneously thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are rare. We present a patient with a completely thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm found incidentally on imaging for evaluation of unrelated abdominal pain. The patient was asymptomatic with regards to the aneurysm due to extensive collateralization of the intercostal and lumbar arteries to the bilateral hypogastric and internal mammary arteries to the common femoral arteries bilaterally. Follow-up imaging after 10 months showed no aneurysmal change. Further study is needed regarding indications for elective repair, medical therapy, and surveillance modality and schedule for patients with chronically occluded AAAs as these patients are at risk for aneurysm rupture and thrombus propagation. PMID:25770381

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, M

    1986-01-01

    Five patients who had undergone renal transplantation 3 months to 23 years ago were operated on successfully for an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In the first case, dating from 1973, the kidney was protected by general hypothermia. In the remaining patients, no measure was used to protect the kidney. Only one patient showed a moderate increase of blood creatinine in the postoperative period; renal function returned to normal in 15 days. All five patients have normal renal function 6 months to 11 years after aortic repair. Results obtained in this series show that protection of the transplant during aortic surgery is not necessary, provided adequate surgical technique is used. Such a technique is described in detail. Its use simplifies surgical treatment of such lesions and avoids the complex procedures employed in the seven previously published cases. Images FIGS. 1A and B. FIGS. 2A and B. FIGS. 3A and B. FIGS. 4A and B. FIGS. 5A and B. PMID:3510592

  14. The vanishing giant abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Krivoshei, Lian; Halak, Moshe; Schneiderman, Jacob; Silverberg, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Spontaneous sac size regression of a giant abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a rare event that has not been previously described. We report a case of an 89-year-old woman with a known 9-cm AAA, which was diagnosed in 2003. The patient had refused any kind of treatment at that time. Recent imaging studies obtained 7 years later revealed an AAA of 4 cm diameter. This is the first recorded case of significant spontaneous AAA sac shrinkage. PMID:21444348

  15. Immunoglobulin G4-related large thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yuji; Yamamoto, Shin; Fujikawa, Takuya; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of immunoglobulin G4-related large thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 38-year old man. Preoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed that the mid-descending thoracic aorta was extremely enlarged and the maximum diameter of the aneurysm was 92 mm. The patient underwent thoraco-abdominal aortic replacement through a thoraco-abdominal incision under left heart bypass. The postoperative pathological examination diagnosed immunoglobulin G4-related aortic aneurysm. PMID:27059069

  16. Delayed aortic rupture resulting from postoperative superficial sternal wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Wan; Chang, Jee Won

    2016-01-01

    While deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) after cardiac surgery is a significant contributor to patient morbidity and mortality, superficial sternal wound infection (SSWI) mostly has a benign course. We report a mortality case of aortic rupture resulting from SSWI after cardiac surgery. A 50-year-old male underwent an aortic valve replacement (AVR). Three months after the valve operation, he presented with severe dyspnea, which had never before been observed, and chest computed tomography revealed an ascending aortic rupture with large hematoma compressing the main pulmonary artery. We performed an emergent operation for aortic rupture that possibly originated from the SSWI. Postoperatively, the patient died of hypovolemic shock due to recurrent aortic rupture despite efforts to resuscitate him. PMID:27499988

  17. Multiple 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Scans Showing Progression of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Toshihiro; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Nishimura, Masanori; Nakamura, Kunihide; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Although the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remain unclear, aortic wall inflammation has been implicated in AAA development. Several studies have reported the use of fluoro-deoxyglucose (F-FDG)/positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the nature of AAA.We present a case of 77-year-old Japanese male with juxta-anastomotic AAA who was followed up with multiple F-FDG-PET/CT scans over 7 years. The scans revealed chronological changes in aortic wall inflammation leading to progress and eventual rupture.This case supports a notion that aortic wall inflammation plays a role in AAA progression and rupture. PMID:27175690

  18. Diagnosis of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm using 67-gallium citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Blumoff, R.L.; McCartney, W.; Jaques, P.; Johnson, G. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    Mycotic aneurysms of the abdominal aorta are uncommon, but potentially lethal problems. Clinical subtleties may suggest their presence, but in the past, definitive diagnosis has been dependent on surgical exploration or autopsy findings. A case is presented in which 67-gallium citrate abdominal scanning localized the site of sepsis in an abdominal aortic aneurysm and allowed for prompt and successful surgical therapy. This noninvasive technique is recommended as a adjunct in the diagnosis of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  19. Experimental Models of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Janice C

    2010-01-01

    Despite being a leading cause of death in the West, the pathophysiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is still incompletely understood. Pharmacotherapy to reduce the growth of small AAAs is limited and techniques for repairing aneurysms continue to evolve. Experimental models play a key role in AAA research, as they allow a detailed evaluation of the pathogenesis of disease progression. This review focuses on in vivo experimental models, which have improved our understanding of the potential mechanisms of AAA development and contributed to the advancement of new treatments. PMID:21270944

  20. Management of Traumatic Aortic and Splenic Rupture in a Patient With Ascending Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Topcu, Ahmet Can; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Bolukcu, Ahmet; Dagsali, Sabri

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is rupture of all or part of the aortic wall, mostly resulting from blunt trauma to the chest. The most common site of rupture is the aortic isthmus. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta is rare. A 62-year-old man with a family history of ascending aortic aneurysm was referred to our hospital after a motor vehicle accident. He had symptoms of cardiogenic shock. A contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed rupture of the proximal ascending aorta and an ascending aortic aneurysm with a diameter of 55 mm at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. Transthoracic echocardiography at the bedside revealed severe aortic valvular insufficiency. We performed a successful Bentall procedure. During postoperative recovery, the patient experienced a cerebrovascular accident. Transesophageal echocardiography did not reveal thrombosis of the mechanical prosthesis. The patient's symptoms resolved in time, and he was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 47 without any sequelae. He has been symptom free during a 6-month follow-up period. We suggest that individuals who have experienced blunt trauma to the chest and have symptoms of traumatic aortic rupture and a known medical history of ascending aortic aneurysm should be evaluated for a rupture at the ascending aorta and the aortic isthmus. PMID:27449463

  1. The biaxial biomechanical behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Siobhan A; Healey, Donagh A; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M; Doyle, Barry J

    2014-12-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when the local wall stress exceeds the local wall strength. Knowledge of AAA wall mechanics plays a fundamental role in the development and advancement of AAA rupture risk assessment tools. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the biaxial mechanical properties of AAA tissue. Multiple biaxial test protocols were performed on AAA samples harvested from 28 patients undergoing open surgical repair. Both the Tangential Modulus (TM) and stretch ratio (λ) were recorded and compared in both the circumferential (ϴ) and longitudinal (L) directions at physiologically relevant stress levels, the influence of patient specific factors such as sex, age AAA diameter and status were examined. The biomechanical response was also fit to a hyperplastic material model. The AAA tissue was found to be anisotropic with a greater tendency to stiffen in the circumferential direction compared to the longitudinal direction. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model represented the data well and the properties were not influenced by the investigated patient specific factors however, a future study utilizing a larger cohort of patients is warranted to confirm these findings. This work provides further insights on the biomechanical behavior of AAA and may be useful in the development of more reliable rupture risk assessment tools. PMID:25201606

  2. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis caused by paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, G; Bucciarelli, V; Bisceglia, N; Totaro, G; Scotti, L; Aceto, A; Martini, F; Gallina, S; Bucciarelli, T; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis is a rare and potential fatal event, which occurs in adult subjects. We present the case of a 72-year-old-man, who referred to the emergency Department of our hospital because of persistent severe abdominal and perineal pain. Doppler ultrasounds and computerized tomography angiography revealed the acute thrombosis of the abdominal aorta. Immediate revascularization through aortic thrombo-endoarterectomy resolved the disease. PMID:23830410

  3. Emergent Endovascular Stent Grafts for Ruptured Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jennifer P; Kolbeck, Kenneth J; Kaufman, John A

    2015-09-01

    Ruptured aortic aneurysms uniformly require emergent attention. Historically, urgent surgical repair or medical management was the only treatment options. The development of covered stent grafts has introduced a third approach in the care of these critical patients. The clinical status of the patient and local physician expertise drive the treatment modalities in the majority of cases. The goal of therapy in these patients is to stabilize the patient as quickly as possible, establish maximum survival with minimum morbidity, and provide a long lasting result. The endovascular approach has become an acceptable treatment option in an increasing number of patients presenting with ruptured aneurysmal disease of both the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta. Major factors influencing treatment include patient clinical status, characteristics of the aorta, physician preference, institutional experience, and availability of appropriate equipment. Planning, experience, and the ability to improvise effective solutions are keys to the success of the procedure when endovascular techniques are utilized. Three separate cases, requiring intraprocedural improvisation, are presented followed by a review of the literature. PMID:26327743

  4. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm treated by endovascular surgery: a case report].

    PubMed

    Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Cobo-Sánchez, José Luis; Casaus-Pérez, María; García-Campo, María Elena; García-Zarrabeitia, María José; Calvo-Diez, Marta; Mirones-Valdeolivas, Luz Elena

    2008-01-01

    An aneurysm is an abnormal dilation or irreversible convex of a portion of an artery. The most common site of aneurysms is the abdominal aorta and their appearance is often due to degeneration of the arterial wall, associated with atherosclerosis and favored by risk factors such as smoking and hypertension, among others. Left untreated, aneurysm of the abdominal aorta usually leads to rupture. Treatment is surgical, consisting of the introduction of a prosthesis, composed basically of a stent and an introducer, into the aorta. We report the case of a person diagnosed with abdominal aortic aneurysm in a routine examination who was admitted for ambulatory surgical treatment. We designed a nursing care plan, following Virginia Henderson's conceptual model. The care plan was divided into 2 parts, a first preoperative phase and a second postimplantation or monitoring phase. The care plan contained the principal nursing diagnoses, based on the taxonomies of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), nursing interventions classification (NIC) and nursing outcomes classifications (NOC), and collaboration problems/potential complications. The patient was discharged to home after contact was made with his reference nurse in the primary health center, since during the hospital phase, some NOC indicators remained unresolved. PMID:18448049

  5. “Don Juan-Fracture” as a Hint to Aortic Isthmus Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Suksompong, Sirilak; von Bormann, Benno

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of thoracic aortic rupture after blunt trauma in a 23-year-old male patient. The initial investigation found no external injury or bleeding, only a slightly widened mediastinum and a broken left calcaneus. Abdominal lavage was negative, biochemistry was normal, and breathing and oxygenation were not compromised. When changing his position during diagnostics, the patient all of a sudden developed cardiac arrest and typical signs of hypovolemic shock. An immediate sternotomy was done without any further diagnostics on suspicion of aortic isthmus injury. A circular avulsion at the ligamentum arteriosum was found as assumed and repaired under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient left the hospital for rehabilitation after 12 days in adequate health status. Biodynamics of blunt trauma after high-speed frontal impact and the relationship between calcaneus fracture, called “Don-Juan fracture,” and aortic rupture at the site of ligamentum arteriosum are discussed. PMID:25478249

  6. Successful repair of aortic annulus rupture during transcatheter aortic valve replacement using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support.

    PubMed

    Negi, Smita I; Patel, Jay; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Kar, Biswajit; Gregoric, Igor

    2015-09-01

    Aortic annular rupture is a rare and much dreaded complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Device oversizing to prevent post-procedural paravalvular leak is the most commonly identified cause of this complication. However, mechanical stress in a heavily calcified non-compliant vessel can also lead to annular rupture in this older population. We describe a case of aortic annular rupture with involvement of right coronary artery ostium leading to cardiac tamponade and cardiac arrest, successfully managed by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support, open drainage of the pericardial space, pericardial patching of the defect and bypass of the affected vessel with excellent post-procedural results. PMID:23990118

  7. MicroRNAs in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are an important source of morbidity and mortality in the U.S. and worldwide. Treatment options are limited, with open surgery or endovascular repair remaining the only curative treatments. Classical cardiovascular medications have generally failed to prevent or significantly alter AAA formation or progression. Therefore, there is a tremendous need for better therapeutic approaches. With increasing knowledge of microRNA (miR) regulation in the context of cardiovascular disease, and with improving technical options permitting alteration of miRexpression levels in vitro and in vivo, we are offered a glimpse into the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of using miRs to treat vascular pathobiology. This review focuses on the role of miRs in aneurysmal disease of the abdominal aorta, summarizing recent publications regarding this topic, and outlining known effects of relevant miRs in AAA formation, including miR-21 and miR-29b. Despite there being only limited studies available, several other miRs also display clear potential for alteration of the disease process including miR-26a, the miR-17-92-cluster, miRs-221/222, miR-133 and miR-146a. While studies have shown that miRs can regulate the activity and interplay of vascular inflammatory cells, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, all key elements leading to AAA formation, much work remains to be done. PMID:23713862

  8. Advances in determining abdominal aortic aneurysm size and growth

    PubMed Central

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Lioudaki, Stella; Pantidis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, George; Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Ioannou, Christos V

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common pathology in the aging population of the developed world which carries a significant mortality in excess of 80% in case of rupture. Aneurysmal disease probably represents the only surgical condition in which size is such a critical determinant of the need for intervention and therefore the ability to accurately and reproducibly record aneurysm size and growth over time is of outmost importance. In the same time that imaging techniques may be limited by intra- and inter-observer variability and there may be inconsistencies due to different modalities [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT)], rapid technologic advancement have taken aortic imaging to the next level. Digital imaging, multi-detector scanners, thin slice CT and most- importantly the ability to perform 3-dimensional reconstruction and image post-processing have currently become widely available rendering most of the imaging modalities used in the past out of date. The aim of the current article is to report on various imaging methods and current state of the art techniques used to record aneurysm size and growth. Moreover we aim to emphasize on the future research directions and report on techniques which probably will be widely used and incorporated in clinical practice in the near future. PMID:26981224

  9. Advances in determining abdominal aortic aneurysm size and growth.

    PubMed

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Lioudaki, Stella; Pantidis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, George; Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Ioannou, Christos V

    2016-02-28

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common pathology in the aging population of the developed world which carries a significant mortality in excess of 80% in case of rupture. Aneurysmal disease probably represents the only surgical condition in which size is such a critical determinant of the need for intervention and therefore the ability to accurately and reproducibly record aneurysm size and growth over time is of outmost importance. In the same time that imaging techniques may be limited by intra- and inter-observer variability and there may be inconsistencies due to different modalities [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT)], rapid technologic advancement have taken aortic imaging to the next level. Digital imaging, multi-detector scanners, thin slice CT and most- importantly the ability to perform 3-dimensional reconstruction and image post-processing have currently become widely available rendering most of the imaging modalities used in the past out of date. The aim of the current article is to report on various imaging methods and current state of the art techniques used to record aneurysm size and growth. Moreover we aim to emphasize on the future research directions and report on techniques which probably will be widely used and incorporated in clinical practice in the near future. PMID:26981224

  10. Emergency endovascular aortic repair of a ruptured mycotic aorto-iliac aneurysm presenting with lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Ying; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Lin, Yi-Chanag; Hsu, Po-Shun

    2014-01-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is life-threatening without immediate management. The initial clinical presentation is non-specific and impending rupture is easily missed, especially without a CT scan. We present a case of a 56-year-old man with low-back pain and left lower-extremity numbness, which was diagnosed as a herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) with left acute sciatica syndrome. He also complained of persistent fever and abdominal discomfort. Routine blood work-up revealed leukocytosis and decreasing haemoglobin levels. CT angiography (CTA) showed impending rupture of the left aorto-iliac aneurysm. We therefore performed endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Blood culture revealed Salmonella enterica, for which he received antibiotics. No acute sciatica syndrome was present immediately after the EVAR. No EVAR-related complications were noted in the one-year CTA follow up. PMID:25000523

  11. Genetic and Environmental Effects on the Abdominal Aortic Diameter Development

    PubMed Central

    Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Littvay, Levente; Garami, Zsolt; Karlinger, Kinga; Berczi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Background Configuration of the abdominal aorta is related to healthy aging and a variety of disorders. Objectives We aimed to assess heritable and environmental effects on the abdominal aortic diameter. Methods 114 adult (69 monozygotic, 45 same-sex dizygotic) twin pairs (mean age 43.6 ± 16.3 years) underwent abdominal ultrasound with Esaote MyLab 70X ultrasound machine to visualize the abdominal aorta below the level of the origin of the renal arteries and 1-3 cm above the bifurcation. Results Age- and sex-adjusted heritability of the abdominal aortic diameter below the level of the origin of the renal arteries was 40% [95% confidence interval (CI), 14 to 67%] and 55% above the aortic bifurcation (95% CI, 45 to 70%). None of the aortic diameters showed common environmental effects, but unshared environmental effects were responsible for 60% and 45% of the traits, respectively. Conclusions Our analysis documents the moderate heritability and its segment-specific difference of the abdominal aortic diameter. The moderate part of variance was explained by unshared environmental components, emphasizing the importance of lifestyle factors in primary prevention. Further studies in this field may guide future gene-mapping efforts and investigate specific lifestyle factors to prevent abdominal aortic dilatation and its complications. PMID:26559855

  12. Ruptured Mycotic Aortic Aneurysm in a Sooty Mangabey (Cercocebus atys)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prachi; Cohen, Joyce K; Lockhart, Shawn R; Hurst, Steven F; Drew, Clifton P

    2011-01-01

    Mycotic aortic aneurysm is a local, irreversible dilatation of the aorta associated with destruction of the vessel wall by infection and is a grave clinical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality in humans. Rupture of aortic aneurysms can be spontaneous, idiopathic, or due to severe trauma, and the condition has been associated with bacterial and, rarely, fungal infections in humans and animals. Here, we describe a case of ruptured spontaneous aortic aneurysm associated with zygomycetic infection in a 21-y-old female sooty mangabey. The animal did not present with any significant clinical signs before being found dead. At necropsy, she was in good body condition, and the thoracic cavity had a large amount of clotted blood filling the left pleural space and surrounding the lung lobes. Near the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta was focally perforated (diameter, approximately 0.15 cm), and clotted blood adhered to the tunica adventitia. The aortic intima had multiple, firm, pale-yellow nodules (diameter, 0.25 to 0.5 cm). Histopathologically, these nodules consisted of severe multifocal pyogranulomatous inflammation intermixed with necrosis, fibrin, and broad, infrequently septate, thin-walled fungal hyphae. Immunohistochemistry revealed fungal hyphae characteristic of Mucormycetes (formerly Zygomycetes), and PCR analysis identified the organism as Basidiobolus spp. Dissemination of the fungus beyond the aorta was not noted. Spontaneous aortic aneurysms have been described in nonhuman primates, but this is the first reported case of a ruptured spontaneous aortic aneurysm associated with entomophthoromycetic infection in a sooty mangabey. PMID:22330581

  13. The Potential Role of Kallistatin in the Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiaze; Krishna, Smriti Murali; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular condition that causes permanent dilation of the abdominal aorta, which can lead to death due to aortic rupture. The only treatment for AAA is surgical repair, and there is no current drug treatment for AAA. Aortic inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, angiogenesis, oxidative stress and vascular remodeling are implicated in AAA pathogenesis. Kallistatin is a serine proteinase inhibitor, which has been shown to have a variety of functions, potentially relevant in AAA pathogenesis. Kallistatin has been reported to have inhibitory effects on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) signaling induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Kallistatin also inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Wnt canonical signaling, which promote inflammation, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling in various pre-clinical experimental models. This review explores the potential protective role of kallistatin in AAA pathogenesis. PMID:27529213

  14. The Potential Role of Kallistatin in the Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaze; Krishna, Smriti Murali; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular condition that causes permanent dilation of the abdominal aorta, which can lead to death due to aortic rupture. The only treatment for AAA is surgical repair, and there is no current drug treatment for AAA. Aortic inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, angiogenesis, oxidative stress and vascular remodeling are implicated in AAA pathogenesis. Kallistatin is a serine proteinase inhibitor, which has been shown to have a variety of functions, potentially relevant in AAA pathogenesis. Kallistatin has been reported to have inhibitory effects on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) signaling induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Kallistatin also inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Wnt canonical signaling, which promote inflammation, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling in various pre-clinical experimental models. This review explores the potential protective role of kallistatin in AAA pathogenesis. PMID:27529213

  15. Preoperative evaluation of a patient for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed Central

    Chonchubhair, A. N.; Cunningham, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Coexistent cardiovascular disease is common in patients presenting for repair of aortic aneurysms. However, preoperative cardiac evaluation prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery remains contentious with significant variations in practice between countries, institutions and individual anesthetists. The following case report raises some everyday issues confronting clinical anesthetists. PMID:10604782

  16. Aortic regurgitation caused by rupture of the abnormal fibrous band between the aortic valve and aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroya; Asada, Tatsuro; Gan, Kunio; Yamada, Akitoshi; Sato, Masanobu

    2011-07-01

    This report documents the sudden onset of aortic regurgitation (AR) by an exceptional cause. A 68-year-old woman suddenly experienced general fatigue, and AR was diagnosed. One year later, we performed aortic valve replacement. At surgery, three aortic cusps with a larger noncoronary cusp had prolapsed along with a free-floating fibrous band that had previously anchored the cusp to the aortic wall. Its rupture had induced the sudden onset of AR. There was no sign of infectious endocarditis. We performed successful aortic valve replacement. PMID:21751110

  17. The preventive effect of fish oil on abdominal aortic aneurysm development.

    PubMed

    Kugo, Hirona; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Mouri, Youhei; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yanagimoto, Kenichi; Urano, Tetsumei; Unno, Naoki; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease involving gradual dilation of the abdominal aorta and high rupture-related mortality rates. AAA is histologically characterized by oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and extracellular matrix degradation in the vascular wall. We previously demonstrated that aortic hypoperfusion could cause the vascular inflammation and AAA formation. However, the preventive method for hypoperfusion-induced AAA remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the effect of fish oil on AAA development using a hypoperfusion-induced AAA animal model. Dilation of the abdominal aorta in the fish oil administration group was smaller than in the control group. Collagen destruction and oxidative stress were suppressed in the fish oil administration group than in the control group. These results suggested that fish oil could prevent the development of AAA induced by hypoperfusion. PMID:27022887

  18. [Clinical study on the surgical cases of the ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ayabe, T; Nakamura, K; Yano, M; Onitsuka, T

    2003-07-01

    The prognosis of the ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm is poor. Even if the surgical treatment was performed, the clinical outcome does not sufficiently satisfy us. Between January 1978 to July 1999, 171 cases of thoracic aortic surgery were operated in our department, in which 12 patients were with the ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm without acute dissection. The aneurysm was located in ascending aorta (2), aortic arch (6), descending aorta (3), and thoracoabdominal aorta (1). The aneurysm was ruptured into thorax (4), pericardium (2), mediastinum (3), lung (2), and esophagus (1). The operative procedure was artificial vascular graft replacement (9), patch closure (2), and aneurysmal interposition (1) [bypass with ascending aorta to abdominal aorta)]. The operations were performed during hypothermic circulatory arrest with antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (6), under total (1) or partial complete extracorporeal circulation (5). The hospital death was 33% (4/12). The causes of death were cerebral complication (2), sepsis (1), and multiple organ failure (1). The 12 patients were divided into 2 groups: group A; 8 cases with alive; group D; 4 cases with hospital death. We compared and analyzed the perioperative factors of these 2 groups. On intraoperative factors, operation time (minute) demonstrated a significant difference (498 +/- 129 in group A v.s. 851 +/- 227 in group D, p < 0.05). No significant difference was observed between the groups on extracorporeal circulation time, aortic clumping time, selective cerebral perfusion time, systemic circulatory arrest time, intraoperative blood loss, and blood transfusion. The postoperative major complication was revealed in 6 cases (50%, 6/12), cerebral infarction (3), sepsis (2), and hoarsness (1). In conclusions, to make an effort to shorten an operative time as possible, and to prevent the postoperative neurological dysfunction under selective cerebral perfusion, those efforts should contribute to a good

  19. Molecular Imaging of Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Aneesh K.; Hamilton, Mark; Joshi, Rucha V.; Kline, Benjamin P.; Li, Rui; Wang, Pu; Goergen, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Current laboratory research in the field of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease often utilizes small animal experimental models induced by genetic manipulation or chemical application. This has led to the use and development of multiple high-resolution molecular imaging modalities capable of tracking disease progression, quantifying the role of inflammation, and evaluating the effects of potential therapeutics. In vivo imaging reduces the number of research animals used, provides molecular and cellular information, and allows for longitudinal studies, a necessity when tracking vessel expansion in a single animal. This review outlines developments of both established and emerging molecular imaging techniques used to study AAA disease. Beyond the typical modalities used for anatomical imaging, which include ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), previous molecular imaging efforts have used magnetic resonance (MR), near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF), bioluminescence, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Mouse and rat AAA models will hopefully provide insight into potential disease mechanisms, and the development of advanced molecular imaging techniques, if clinically useful, may have translational potential. These efforts could help improve the management of aneurysms and better evaluate the therapeutic potential of new treatments for human AAA disease. PMID:23737735

  20. Diabetes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Growth.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We performed a systematic literature search and a meta-analysis to assess the association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth. Databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched through June 2015 using PubMed and OVID. For each study, data regarding AAA growth rates in both the DM and the non-DM groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Our search identified 19 relevant studies including data on 9777 patients with AAA. Pooled analyses demonstrated a statistically significant slower growth rates in DM patients than in non-DM patients (unadjusted SMD, -0.32; 95% CI, -0.40 to -0.24; P < .00001; adjusted SMD, -0.29; 95% CI, -0.417 to -0.18; P < .00001). Despite possible publication bias in favor of DM based on funnel plot asymmetry, even adjustment of the asymmetry did not alter the beneficial effect of DM. In conclusion, on the basis of a meta-analysis of data on a total of 9777 patients (19 studies) identified through a systematic literature search, we confirmed the association of DM with slower growth rates of AAA. PMID:26311742

  1. Steady flow in abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    PubMed

    Budwig, R; Elger, D; Hooper, H; Slippy, J

    1993-11-01

    Steady flow in abdominal aortic aneurysm models has been examined for four aneurysm sizes over Reynolds numbers from 500 to 2600. The Reynolds number is based on entrance tube diameter, and the inlet condition is fully developed flow. Experimental and numerical methods have been used to determine: (i) the overall features of the flow, (ii) the stresses on the aneurysm walls in laminar flow, and (iii) the onset and characteristics of turbulent flow. The laminar flow field is characterized by a jet of fluid (passing directly through the aneurysm) surrounded by a recirculating vortex. The wall shear stress magnitude in the recirculation zone is about ten times less than in the entrance tube. Both wall shear stress and wall normal stress profiles exhibit large magnitude peaks near the reattachment point at the distal end of the aneurysm. The onset of turbulence in the model is intermittent for 2000 < Re < 2500. The results demonstrate that a slug of turbulence in the entrance tube grows much more rapidly in the aneurysm than in a corresponding length of uniform cross section pipe. When turbulence is present in the aneurysm the recirculation zone breaks down and the wall shear stress returns to a magnitude comparable to that in the entrance tube. PMID:8309237

  2. Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Buck, Dominique B; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Schermerhorn, Marc L; Moll, Frans L

    2014-02-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are usually treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), which has become the standard of care in many hospitals for patients with suitable anatomy. Clinical evidence indicates that EVAR is associated with superior perioperative outcomes and similar long-term survival compared with open repair. Since the randomized, controlled trials that provided this evidence were conducted, however, the stent graft technology for infrarenal AAA has been further developed. Improvements include profile downsizing, optimization of sealing and fixation, and the use of low porosity fabrics. In addition, imaging techniques have improved, enabling better preoperative planning, stent graft placement, and postoperative surveillance. Also in the past few years, fenestrated and branched stent grafts have increasingly been used to manage anatomically challenging aneurysms, and experiments with off-label use of stent grafts have been performed to treat patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for other treatment strategies. Overall, the indications for endovascular management of AAA are expanding to include increasingly complex and anatomically challenging aneurysms. Ongoing studies and optimization of imaging, in addition to technological refinement of stent grafts, will hopefully continue to broaden the utilization of EVAR. PMID:24343568

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open - discharge ... You had open aortic aneurysm surgery to repair an aneurysm (a widened part) in your aorta, the large artery that carries blood to your ...

  4. Abdominal aortic thrombosis and tuberculosis: an uncommon association.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alka; Sharma, Vishal

    2014-11-01

    Thrombosis of the abdominal aorta is an uncommon event and usually occurs in a diseased vessel. We report a case of a 42-year-old male who presented with abdominal distension and was found to have tuberculosis-related ascites and was incidentally found to have aortic thrombosis. The patient improved with four-drug anti-tubercular therapy and anticoagulation. The occurrence of non-occlusive thrombosis of the abdominal aorta in tuberculosis is unusual. PMID:24759354

  5. Association between abdominal aortic plaque and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Luo, Songyuan; Luo, Jianfang; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Jiyan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Currently, the association between abdominal aortic plaques and coronary artery disease (CAD) has not yet been clarified clearly. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques by ultrasound imaging and to explore its association with CAD in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methods Between October 2014 and June 2015, a prospective study was conducted in the Department of Cardiology at Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China. Ultrasound scanning of the abdominal aortas was performed in 1,667 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography. Clinical characteristics and coronary profile were collected from the patients. Results Of the 1,667 study patients (male, 68.9%; mean age, 63±11 years) undergoing coronary angiography, 1,268 had CAD. Compared with 399 patients without CAD, 1,268 patients with CAD had higher prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques (37.3% vs 17%, P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, abdominal aortic plaques served as independent factors associated with the presence of CAD (odds ratio =2.08; 95% confidence interval =1.50–2.90; P<0.001). Of the 1,268 patients with CAD, the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques was 27.0% (98/363) in patients with one-vessel disease, 35.0% (107/306) in patients with two-vessel disease, and 44.7% (268/599) in patients with three-vessel disease. Stepwise increases in the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaque was found depending on the number of stenotic coronary vessels (P<0.001; P-value for trend <0.001). In an ordinal logistic regression model, abdominal aortic plaques served as independent factors associated with the severity of CAD according to the number of stenotic coronary vessels (P<0.001). Conclusion The prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques was higher in patients with CAD than in those without CAD. Abdominal aortic plaque was an independent factor associated with the presence and severity of CAD. PMID:27279740

  6. Modification of an endovascular stent graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloye, Olajompo Busola

    Endovascular surgery is currently used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). A stent graft is deployed to exclude blood flow from the aneurysm sac. It is an effective procedure used in preventing aneurysm rupture, with reduced patient morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. Migration and leakage around the device ("endoleak") due to poor sealing of the stent graft to the aorta have raised concerns about the long-term durability of endovascular repair. A preliminary study of cell migration and proliferation is presented as a prelude to a more extensive in vivo testing. A method to enhance the biological seal between the stent graft and the aorta is proposed to eliminate this problem. This can be achieved by impregnating the stent graft with 50/50 poly (DL-lactide co glycolic acid) (PLGA) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), at the proximal and distal ends. It is hypothesized that as PLGA degrades it will release the growth factors that will promote proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells to the coated site, leading to a natural seal between the aorta and the stent graft. In addition, growth factor release should promote smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction that will help keep the stent graft in place at the proximal and distal ends. It is shown that a statistically significant effect of increased cell proliferation and migration is observed for CTGF release. Less of an effect is noted for bFGF or just the PLGA. The effect is estimated to be large enough to be clinically significant in a future animal study. The long term goal of this study is to reduce migration encounter after graft deployment and to reduce secondary interventions of EVAR especially for older patients who are unfit for open surgical treatment.

  7. Recent Advances in Pharmacotherapy Development for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Koichi; Aoki, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease causing segmental expansion and rupture of the aorta with a high mortality rate. The lack of nonsurgical treatment represents a large and unmet need in terms of pharmacotherapy. Advances in AAA research revealed that activation of inflammatory signaling pathways through proinflammatory mediators shifts the balance of extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism toward tissue degradation. This idea is supported by experimental evidence in animal models that pharmacologic intervention at each pathological step can prevent AAA development. Previously, we identified c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), a pro-inflammatory signaling molecule, as a therapeutic target for AAA. Abnormal activation of JNK in AAA tissue regulates multiple pathological processes in a coordinated manner. Pharmacologic inhibition of JNK tips the ECM balance back towards repair rather than degradation. Interventions targeting signaling molecules such as JNK in order to manipulate multiple pathological processes may be an ideal therapeutic strategy for AAA. Furthermore, the development of biomarkers as well as appropriate drug delivery systems is essential to produce clinically practical pharmacotherapy for AAA. PMID:22957259

  8. Involvement of the renin-angiotensin system in abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Rateri, Debra L; Bruemmer, Dennis; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2012-11-01

    Aortic aneurysms are relatively common maladies that may lead to the devastating consequence of aortic rupture. AAAs (abdominal aortic aneurysms) and TAAs (thoracic aortic aneurysms) are two common forms of aneurysmal diseases in humans that appear to have distinct pathologies and mechanisms. Despite this divergence, there are numerous and consistent demonstrations that overactivation of the RAS (renin-angiotensin system) promotes both AAAs and TAAs in animal models. For example, in mice, both AAAs and TAAs are formed during infusion of AngII (angiotensin II), the major bioactive peptide in the RAS. There are many proposed mechanisms by which the RAS initiates and perpetuates aortic aneurysms, including effects of AngII on a diverse array of cell types and mediators. These experimental findings are complemented in humans by genetic association studies and retrospective analyses of clinical data that generally support a role of the RAS in both AAAs and TAAs. Given the lack of a validated pharmacological therapy for any form of aortic aneurysm, there is a pressing need to determine whether the consistent findings on the role of the RAS in animal models are translatable to humans afflicted with these diseases. The present review compiles the recent literature that has shown the RAS as a critical component in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms. PMID:22788237

  9. Delayed paraplegia following infrarenal abdominal aortic endograft placement: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Daniel L; Atkins, B Zane; Chiou, Andy C

    2004-03-01

    The treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) has changed over the past 12 years, with increased numbers of endovascular procedures being performed. Early morbidity is decreased following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair, and long-term studies of EVAR have focused on freedom from death, rupture, and conversion to open repair. Other less commonly encountered complications of EVAR are rarely reported. For instance, spinal cord ischemia (SCI) is a devastating complication infrequently seen after open AAA repair. This report discusses a case of delayed paraplegia after EVAR and reviews the pertinent literature. The incidence of SCI after EVAR is similar to open repair, but the mechanisms may be different. Atheroembolization and occlusion of pelvic inflow appear to be the predominant etiologies for SCI after EVAR. Careful consideration of the potential for SCI should be made in elderly patients undergoing EVAR, particularly if difficult arterial anatomy is present. PMID:15248644

  10. On the prediction of monocyte deposition in abdominal aortic aneurysms using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hardman, David; Doyle, Barry J; Semple, Scott I K; Richards, Jennifer M J; Newby, David E; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2013-10-01

    In abdominal aortic aneurysm disease, the aortic wall is exposed to intense biological activity involving inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated degradation of the extracellular matrix. These processes are orchestrated by monocytes and rather than affecting the aorta uniformly, damage and weaken focal areas of the wall leaving it vulnerable to rupture. This study attempts to model numerically the deposition of monocytes using large eddy simulation, discrete phase modelling and near-wall particle residence time. The model was first applied to idealised aneurysms and then to three patient-specific lumen geometries using three-component inlet velocities derived from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The use of a novel, variable wall shear stress-limiter based on previous experimental data significantly improved the results. Simulations identified a critical diameter (1.8 times the inlet diameter) beyond which significant monocyte deposition is expected to occur. Monocyte adhesion occurred proximally in smaller abdominal aortic aneurysms and distally as the sac expands. The near-wall particle residence time observed in each of the patient-specific models was markedly different. Discrete hotspots of monocyte residence time were detected, suggesting that the monocyte infiltration responsible for the breakdown of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall occurs heterogeneously. Peak monocyte residence time was found to increase with aneurysm sac size. Further work addressing certain limitations is needed in a larger cohort to determine clinical significance. PMID:23886969

  11. [Ultrasound diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 52 year old woman].

    PubMed

    Romero-Hernández, Juan José; Lozano-Corona, Marco Antonio; Díaz-Méndez, Macrina; Aspeitia-León, Jorge Alejandro; Hernández-Díaz, Víctor; Magaña-Cabrera, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as increasing the diameter of the aorta in more than 50 % of its original size and the infra-renal location is the most common (90 %). AAA disease mainly affects older men and white smokers, and has a male: female ratio of 4:1, as well the diagnosis is rare in women under age 55. Aneurysm rupture is the most common complication and cause of death in the general population, its etiology is unclear, but is commonly associated with atherosclerosis. The AAA do not exhibit rupture and it is usually asymptomatic diagnosed incidentally, however, as the aneurysm grows, appears symptoms such as back pain, abdominal or groin pain, well as palpation of a pulse mass on umbilical and supra-umbilical region. Imaging study such as ultrasound and CT scan are the mainstay of diagnosis. We present a case of 52 years old patient with no history related to the diagnosis, who presented sudden and severe abdominal pain. She was admitted to the emergency room with a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis vs. acute pancreatitis. After ultrasound and CT studies, the diagnosis was a complicated abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:22882988

  12. [Successful endovascular repair of a ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with severe mural thrombus].

    PubMed

    Nakao, Yoshihisa; Akagi, Haruhiko; Irie, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Sakai, Kei

    2014-11-01

    A 51-year-old man was transferred to our hospital on an emergency basis complaining of a sudden onset of severe left lumbar back pain. An emergency contrasted computed tomography showed a ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm( rTAAA:Crawford classification type III). The ruptured site was near the aortic bifurcation, and the aneurysm had a relatively narrow segment with an extensive mural thrombus just below the renal arteries. Considering the high mortality of open surgery for the rTAAA and the poor general condition of the patient, we decided to perform endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a rescue procedure using the narrowed segment by the thrombus for a proximal landing zone. The abdominal part of the thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) was successfully excluded with a stent graft to obtain complete hemostasis. The postoperative course was uneventful except for the need for hemodialysis. Even though there is a risk of developing late type 1 endoleak, this procedure can be a feasible option as a rescue procedure or a bridge to radical open surgery for ruptured TAAA in a specially anatomical setting like this case. PMID:25391465

  13. [Sudden deaths due to non-traumatic aortic aneurysms rupture].

    PubMed

    Bury, Anna; Meissner, Ewa; Szram, Stefan; Berent, Jarosław

    2011-01-01

    In this work we review two cases of ruptured aortic aneurysms which arose from congenital abnormalities of the aortic wall structure. In the first case, a 16-year old, previously untreated boy died, with no previous symptoms of an aortic aneurysm. The boy was suspected of taking drugs and even of committing suicide. A young couple found the boy's body in the wood close to the bus stop. There were no signs of violence on the corpse and the body was fully and properly dressed. The autopsy revealed enlarged (true aneurysm) and ruptured ascending aorta with about 700 ml of blood in the pericardial sac. Toxicological examination was negative. Histopathology showed abnormalities in the structure of the wall of aorta in the place of the rupture. All other body organs and vessels seemed to be normal and properly developed except the thoracic aorta, and no other morphologic abnormalities were present. In the second case, the corpse of a 30-year-old man was found in his apartment (he lived with his parents). The parents claimed he did not use drugs or alcohol. The autopsy, as in the previous case, revealed a ruptured true aneurysm of the ascending aorta with 370 g of blood in the pericardial sac. The concaved thoracic cavity was also observed. After the autopsy, the man's parents reported that in childhood, their son was diagnosed to suffer from Marfan syndrome. PMID:22715682

  14. Rare presentation of ruptured syphilitic aortic aneurysm with pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Feitosa, Israel Nilton; Dantas Leite Figueiredo, Magda; de Sousa Belem, Lucia; Evelin Soares Filho, Antônio Wilon

    2015-11-01

    We report the interesting case of a rare form of presentation of rupture of the ascending aorta with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, diagnosed following the development of a large mass on the surface of the chest over a period of about eight months. Serological tests were positive for syphilis. Echocardiography and computed tomography angiography were essential to confirm the diagnosis and therapeutic management. Cardiovascular syphilis is a rare entity since the discovery of penicillin. Rupture of an aortic aneurysm with formation of a pseudoaneurysm is a potentially fatal complication. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged from hospital within days of surgery. PMID:26481180

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Attenuates Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Sarbani; Loftin, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a chronic inflammatory disease that increase the risk of life-threatening aortic rupture. In humans, AAAs have been characterized by increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and the inactivation of COX-2 prior to disease initiation reduces AAA incidence in a mouse model of the disease. The current study examined the effectiveness of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition on reducing AAA progression when administered after the initiation of AAA formation. AAAs were induced in hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice by chronic angiotensin II (AngII) infusion and the effect of treatment with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib was examined when initiated at different stages of the disease. Celecoxib treatment that was started 1 week after initiating AngII infusion reduced AAA incidence by 61% and significantly decreased AAA severity. Mice treated with celecoxib also showed significantly reduced aortic rupture and mortality. Treatment with celecoxib that was started at a late stage of AAA development also significantly reduced AAA incidence and severity. Celecoxib treatment significantly increased smooth muscle alpha-actin expression in the abdominal aorta and did not reduce expression of markers of macrophage-dependent inflammation. These findings indicate that COX-2 inhibitor treatment initiated after formation of AngII-induced AAAs effectively reduces progression of the disease in hyperlipidemic mice. PMID:23209546

  16. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  17. Traumatic rupture of the aortic isthmus: program of selective management.

    PubMed

    Pate, J W; Gavant, M L; Weiman, D S; Fabian, T C

    1999-01-01

    Two hypotheses were investigated: (1) helical computed tomography (CT) of the chest on victims of decelerating trauma can yield a diagnosis of, or "rule out," a traumatic rupture of the aorta (TRA) without the need for an aortogram; and (2) selective delay of aortic repair can be safely accomplished through a medical management protocol. Screening helical CT examinations were done on 6169 victims of blunt thoracic trauma; 47 were found to have TRA; in 8, indirect but nondiagnostic findings not clarified by an aortogram led to surgical exploration. The sensitivity of helical CT was higher than that of aortograms, and a "normal" helical CT scan was never associated with a proved TRA. It is estimated that the use of helical CT has resulted in at least a 40% to 50% decrease in the need for aortograms, in addition to yielding rapid, noninvasive valuable information about other injuries. Drugs (beta-blockers +/- vasodilators) to decrease the stress in the aortic wall were used in 93 patients when the diagnosis was suspected and were continued as necessary through the evaluation, stabilization, and until the aorta was cross-clamped at operation. Elective, delayed operation was done between 2 days and 25 months in 15 patients who were deemed to be excessive risks for emergency aortic repair; there were 2 deaths (13. 3%). Eleven patients never had aortic repair. No patient maintained on this protocol, whether repaired emergently, electively, or not at all, developed free rupture of the periaortic hematoma and death from TRA. PMID:9841764

  18. Transcatheter wiring of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, P.; Simonetti, G.; Passariello, R.; Stipa, S.; Cavallaro, A.

    1983-04-01

    A new technique of transcatheder wiring of unresectable aortic aneurysm is described that provides simultaneous transcatheder occlusion of both common iliac arteries followed by exillofemoral bypass. The spring coil used for aortic aneurysm wiring was of our own making. The outer portion of a movable core stainless steel guidewire was bent in a coil shape and introduced into the aneurysm through a 7 French Teflon catheder via the right femoral artery. The same catheder was also used for coil embolus occlusion of both iliac arteries.

  19. [Emergency Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Ruptured Kommerell's Diverticulum with an Acute Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Seguchi, Ryuta; Ohtake, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Takahiro; Shintani, Yoshiko; Nishida, Yuji; Kiuchi, Ryuta; Yamaguchi, Shojiro; Tomita, Shigeyuki; Sanada, Junichiro; Matsui, Osamu; Watanabe, Go

    2016-06-01

    This case report describes emergency thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of a ruptured Kommerell's diverticulum associated with a type B acute aortic dissection in a patient with a right aortic arch. A 64-year-old male was admitted with symptoms of sudden paraplegia and shock. The computed tomography imaging showed right aortic arch anomaly, with mirror image branching of the major arteries. The aorta was dissected from the origin of the right subclavian artery to the terminal aorta, with a thrombosed false lumen. Rupture was found in a 6.3 cm aneurysm located in the distal arch, which was diagnosed as Kommerell's diverticulum. We performed emergency TEVAR, and the aneurysm was successfully excluded using deployment of a Gore Tag stent-graft. At 3 months' follow-up, the patient was doing well and showed shrinkage of the aneurysm was confirmed. TEVAR is considered to be a suitable procedure for an emergency aortic catastrophe even in patients with aortic anomaly. PMID:27246128

  20. Inhibition of microRNA-29b reduces murine abdominal aortic aneurysm development.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Azuma, Junya; Toh, Ryuji; Merk, Denis R; Deng, Alicia; Chin, Jocelyn T; Raaz, Uwe; Schoelmerich, Anke M; Raiesdana, Azad; Leeper, Nicholas J; McConnell, Michael V; Dalman, Ronald L; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2012-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and play crucial roles in vascular integrity. As such, they may have a role in modifying abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) expansion, the pathophysiological mechanisms of which remain incompletely explored. Here, we investigate the role of miRs in 2 murine models of experimental AAA: the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) infusion model in C57BL/6 mice and the AngII infusion model in Apoe-/- mice. AAA development was accompanied by decreased aortic expression of miR-29b, along with increased expression of known miR-29b targets, Col1a1, Col3a1, Col5a1, and Eln, in both models. In vivo administration of locked nucleic acid anti-miR-29b greatly increased collagen expression, leading to an early fibrotic response in the abdominal aortic wall and resulting in a significant reduction in AAA progression over time in both models. In contrast, overexpression of miR-29b using a lentiviral vector led to augmented AAA expansion and significant increase of aortic rupture rate. Cell culture studies identified aortic fibroblasts as the likely vascular cell type mediating the profibrotic effects of miR-29b modulation. A similar pattern of reduced miR-29b expression and increased target gene expression was observed in human AAA tissue samples compared with that in organ donor controls. These data suggest that therapeutic manipulation of miR-29b and its target genes holds promise for limiting AAA disease progression and protecting from rupture. PMID:22269326

  1. Rectal strictures following abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. M.; Bentley, P. G.

    2000-01-01

    Rectal stricture formation is a rare complication of aortic aneurysm repair. Two case are described here. A combination of hypotension, a compromised internal iliac circulation and poor collateral supply following inferior mesenteric artery ligation can result in acute ischaemic proctitis--an infrequently described clinical entity. Ulceration and necrosis are the sequelae of prolonged ischaemia and fibrous stricture formation may result. One patient responded to dilatation and posterior mid-rectal myotomy; the other failed to respond to conservative measures and eventually had an end colostomy fashioned following intractable symptoms. PMID:11103163

  2. Blunt Abdominal Aortic Injury Associated with L2 Vertebral Fracture.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Yuki; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Takaki; Arase, Hiroki; Araki, Kota

    2016-07-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is very rare. In general, BAAI occurs in high-energy accidents. Here, we present a case of BAAI in a low-energy accident. A 70-year-old female was injured after falling 3 m. Her vital signs were stable. She had lumbar fractures (L1, L2) and BAAI associated with a fragment of the fractured L2 vertebral body. On the fifth posttrauma day, we performed an operation because computed tomography showed a bone fragment of the lumbar fractures (L1, L2) threatening the abdominal aorta. The aortic injury site was transected, and the fragment of the L2 vertebral body was removed. Even in low-energy accidents, BAAI should be considered. BAAI with stable vital signs can be electively treated. PMID:27126715

  3. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopinski, Piotr

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  4. Impending rupture in an aortic arch aneurysm by Candida infection.

    PubMed

    Minami, H; Wakita, N; Kawanishi, Y; Kitano, I; Sakata, M

    2001-03-01

    A 68-year-old man was hospitalized with the complaints of left back pain and fever. He had a history of using steroids to treat uveitis for about thirty years. Computed tomography on the chest demonstrated an impending rupture in an aortic arch aneurysm, which was consequently surgically excised. Candida albicans was identified in the wall of the aneurysm, so fluconazole and itraconazole were administered. The patient was discharged at 120 days after surgery without recrudescence of the candida. To our knowledge, this is the fifteenth case of a successfully treated aneurysm caused by candida infection. PMID:11305059

  5. Aortic rupture due to pneumococcal infection in aortoiliac stents.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Amélie; Mordant, Pierre; Dufour, Guillaume; Augustin, Pascal; Lesèche, Guy; Castier, Yves

    2011-06-01

    We report a rare case of pneumococcal aortitis secondary to endovascular bare-metal stent infection. The patient was a 70-year-old man presenting with back pain 1 year after aortoiliac implantation of bare-metal kissing stents. Final diagnosis was microbial aortitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae involving the stents that resulted in a contained aortic rupture requiring urgent surgical treatment. Emergency extra-anatomic revascularization, excision of the infected tissues, and appropriate antibiotic therapy led to a favorable outcome. A high index of suspicion is required in such a situation because the mortality rate is very high in the absence of appropriate treatment. PMID:21498029

  6. Stent-Grafts for Unruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, John

    2006-06-15

    Aortic stent-grafts were introduced at the beginning of the 1990s as a less invasive method of dealing with aortic aneurysms in patients with poor cardiovascular reserve. The numbers of procedures performed worldwide has increased exponentially despite the current lack of any substantial evidence for long-term efficacy in comparison with the gold standard of open surgical grafting. This review summarizes the evolution of the abdominal aortic stent-graft, the techniques used for assessment and deployment, and the effect of the procedure on both the patient and the device. The recent publication of two national multicenter trials has confirmed that the endovascular technique confers a 2.5-fold reduction in 30-day mortality in comparison with open surgery. However, over 4 years of follow-up, there is a 3-fold increase in the risk of reintervention and the overall costs are 30% greater with endovascular repair. Although the improvement in aneurysm-related mortality persists in the mid-term, because of the initial reduction in perioperative mortality, the all-cause mortality rate at 4 years is actually no better than for open surgery. Longer-term data from the randomized trials are awaited as well as results from the latest trials utilizing state-of-the-art devices. Whilst the overall management of abdominal aortic aneurysms has undoubtedly benefited from the introduction of stent-grafts, open repair currently remains the gold standard treatment.

  7. A rare but potentially lethal case of tuberculous aortic aneurysm presenting with repeated attacks of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yao-Min; Chang, Yun-Te; Wang, Jyh-Seng; Wang, Paul Yung-Pou; Wann, Shue-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculous aortic aneurysm is an extremely rare disease with a high mortality rate. The clinical features of this condition are highly variable, ranging from asymptomatic with or without constitutional symptoms, abdominal pain to frank rupture, bleeding and shock. We herein report the case of a 56-year-old man with a large tuberculous mycotic aneurysm in the abdominal aorta with an initial presentation of repeated attacks of abdominal pain lasting for several months. Due to the vague nature of the initial symptoms, tuberculous aortic aneurysms may take several months to diagnose. This case highlights the importance of having a high index of suspicion and providing timely surgery for this rare but potentially lethal disease. PMID:25948366

  8. Automated Delineation of Vessel Wall and Thrombus Boundaries of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Multispectral MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Vila, B.; Tarjuelo-Gutierrez, J.; Sánchez-González, P.; Verbrugghe, P.; Fourneau, I.; Maleux, G.; Herijgers, P.; Gomez, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    A correct patient-specific identification of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is useful for both diagnosis and treatment stages, as it locates the disease and represents its geometry. The actual thickness and shape of the arterial wall and the intraluminal thrombus are of great importance when predicting the rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysms. The authors describe a novel method for delineating both the internal and external contours of the aortic wall, which allows distinguishing between vessel wall and intraluminal thrombus. The method is based on active shape model and texture statistical information. The method was validated with eight MR patient studies. There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the vessel wall area. Resulting segmented images presented a mean Dice coefficient with respect to manual segmentations of 0.88 and a mean modified Hausdorff distance of 1.14 mm for the internal face and 0.86 and 1.33 mm for the external face of the arterial wall. Preliminary results of the segmentation show high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the vessel wall and thrombus areas. However, since the dataset is small the conclusions cannot be generalized. PMID:26236390

  9. Computational hemodynamics of abdominal aortic aneurysms: Three-dimensional ultrasound versus computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Owen, Benjamin; Lowe, Christopher; Ashton, Neil; Mandal, Parthasarathi; Rogers, Steven; Wein, Wolfgang; McCollum, Charles; Revell, Alistair

    2016-03-01

    The current criterion for surgical intervention in abdominal aortic aneurysms, based upon a maximal aortic diameter, is considered conservative due to the high mortality rate in case of rupture. The research community is actively investigating the use of computational mechanics tools combined with patient-specific imaging to help identify more accurate criteria. Widespread uptake of a successful metric will however be limited by the need for computed tomography, which is at present the primary image extraction method on account of the location and complex shape of the aneurysms. The use of three-dimensional ultrasound as the scanning method is more attractive on account of increased availability, reduced cost and reduced risk to patients. The suitability of three-dimensional ultrasound is assessed for this purpose in the present work; computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed on geometries obtained from the same patient using both ultrasound and computed tomography. The influence of different smoothing algorithms is investigated in the geometry preparation stage and Taubin's low-pass filter was found to best preserve geometry features. Laminar, Newtonian, steady-state simulation analysis identified haemodynamic characteristics to be qualitatively similar in terms of wall shear stress, velocity and vorticity. The study demonstrates the potential for three-dimensional ultrasound to be integrated into a more accessible patient-specific modelling tool able to identify the need for surgical intervention of abdominal aortic aneurysms. PMID:26893226

  10. Fatal Aortic Rupture Complicating Stent Plasty in a Case of Aortoarteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Deshmukh, Hemant L.; Rathod, Krantikumar R. Sheth, Rahul J.; Garg, Ashwin

    2003-09-15

    Endovascular stenting has emerged as an effective alternative for unsuccessful angioplasty of the aorta in aortoarteritis. This is a single case report of fatal aortic rupture following balloon angioplasty of post-patch aortoplasty restenosis in aortoarteritis. We report a fatal aortic rupture during angioplasty of the primarily stented stenotic segment of the aorta in a case of aortoarteritis.

  11. Elevated expression of runt-related transcription factors in human abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Dubis, J; Litwin, M; Michalowska, D; Zuk, N; Szczepanska-Buda, A; Grendziak, R; Baczynska, D; Barc, P; Witkiewicz, W

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease of unknown etiology. AAA is caused by segmental weakening of the aortic walls and progressive aortic dilation leading to the eventual rupture of the aorta, accompanied by intense inflammation. Additionally, studies have indicated a close relationship between the pathogenesis and progression of AAA and cellular immune responses in aneurysm wall tissue. The Runt-related genes (RUNX) encode multifunctional mediators of the of intracellular signal transduction pathways in vascular remodeling, endothelial function, immune response and inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression level of RUNX regulatory genes in AAA tissues and to assess the correlations between them. The study was performed on AAA wall-tissue samples obtained from patients with AAA during open aneurysm repair and normal aortic tissues collected from healthy organ donors. There are no proven clinical management strategies or pharmaco-therapeutics to prevent AAA progression once an AAA has been detected. Moreover, so far no biomarkers have been established to indicate the disease status of AAA. Hence, understanding the pathogenesis of AAA has recently become an increasing priority in basic and translational vascular research. We identified significantly higher mRNA and protein level of all of three Runt-related genes in aneurysmal aorta compared to a normal aorta. Increased expression of RUNX2 was demonstrated for the first time in abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue. Additionally, relationships between the activity of RUNX genes in the pathological tissue were identified. The results of elevated expression of RUNX genes and their relationships in the AAA tissues suggest the involvement of conserved Runt-related genes in the pathophysiology of AAA development. PMID:27358138

  12. A Computational Model of Biochemomechanical Effects of Intraluminal Thrombus on the Enlargement of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Virag, Lana; Wilson, John S; Humphrey, Jay D; Karšaj, Igor

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) typically develop an intraluminal thrombus (ILT), yet most computational models of AAAs have focused on either the mechanics of the wall or the hemodynamics within the lesion, both in the absence of ILT. In the few cases wherein ILT has been modeled directly, as, for example, in static models that focus on the state of stress in the aortic wall and the associated rupture risk, thrombus has been modeled as an inert, homogeneous, load-bearing material. Given the biochemomechanical complexity of an ILT, there is a pressing need to consider its diverse effects on the evolving aneurysmal wall. Herein, we present the first growth and remodeling model that addresses together the biomechanics, mechanobiology, and biochemistry of thrombus-laden AAAs. Whereas it has been shown that aneurysmal enlargement in the absence of ILT depends primarily on the stiffness and turnover of fibrillar collagen, we show that the presence of a thrombus within lesions having otherwise the same initial wall composition and properties can lead to either arrest or rupture depending on the biochemical effects (e.g., release of proteases) and biomechanical properties (e.g., stiffness of fibrin) of the ILT. These computational results suggest that ILT should be accounted for when predicting the potential enlargement or rupture risk of AAAs and highlight specific needs for further experimental and computational research. PMID:26070724

  13. Risk Profiles for Aortic Dissection and Ruptured or Surgically Treated Aneurysms: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Landenhed, Maya; Engström, Gunnar; Gottsäter, Anders; Caulfield, Michael P.; Hedblad, Bo; Newton‐Cheh, Christopher; Melander, Olle; Smith, J. Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Background Community screening to guide preventive interventions for acute aortic disease has been recommended in high‐risk individuals. We sought to prospectively assess risk factors in the general population for aortic dissection (AD) and severe aneurysmal disease in the thoracic and abdominal aorta. Methods and Results We studied the incidence of AD and ruptured or surgically treated aneurysms in the abdominal (AAA) or thoracic aorta (TAA) in 30 412 individuals without diagnosis of aortic disease at baseline from a contemporary, prospective cohort of middle‐aged individuals, the Malmö Diet and Cancer study. During up to 20 years of follow‐up (median 16 years), the incidence rate per 100 000 patient‐years at risk was 15 (95% CI 11.7 to 18.9) for AD, 27 (95% CI 22.5 to 32.1) for AAA, and 9 (95% CI 6.8 to 12.6) for TAA. The acute and in‐hospital mortality was 39% for AD, 34% for ruptured AAA, and 41% for ruptured TAA. Hypertension was present in 86% of individuals who subsequently developed AD, was strongly associated with incident AD (hazard ratio [HR] 2.64, 95% CI 1.33 to 5.25), and conferred a population‐attributable risk of 54%. Hypertension was also a risk factor for AAA with a smaller effect. Smoking (HR 5.07, 95% CI 3.52 to 7.29) and high apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio (HR 2.48, 95% CI 1.73 to 3.54) were strongly associated with AAA and conferred a population‐attributable risk of 47% and 25%, respectively. Smoking was also a risk factor for AD and TAA with smaller effects. Conclusions This large prospective study identified distinct risk factor profiles for different aortic diseases in the general population. Hypertension accounted for more than half of the population risk for AD, and smoking for half of the population risk of AAA. PMID:25609416

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor protects against abdominal aortic aneurysm in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Fukuda, Yamato; Takayanagi, Takehiko; Taro, Yoshinori; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Elliott, Katherine J; Choi, Eric; Daugherty, Alan; Rizzo, Victor; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been implicated in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), Ang II activates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediating growth promotion. We hypothesized that inhibition of EGFR prevents Ang II-dependent AAA. C57BL/6 mice were co-treated with Ang II and β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) to induce AAA with or without treatment with EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib. Without erlotinib, 64.3% of mice were dead due to aortic rupture. All surviving mice had AAA associated with EGFR activation. Erlotinib-treated mice did not die and developed far fewer AAA. The maximum diameters of abdominal aortas were significantly shorter with erlotinib treatment. In contrast, both erlotinib-treated and non-treated mice developed hypertension. The erlotinib treatment of abdominal aorta was associated with lack of EGFR activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, interleukin-6 induction and matrix deposition. EGFR activation in AAA was also observed in humans. In conclusion, EGFR inhibition appears to protect mice from AAA formation induced by Ang II plus BAPN. The mechanism seems to involve suppression of vascular EGFR and ER stress. PMID:25531554

  15. Monocytes, Macrophages and Other Inflammatory Mediators of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Potteaux, Stephane; Tedgui, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages early invade the forming abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and greatly contribute to its pathogenesis. Recent findings have shown that Ly-6C(high) and Ly-6C(low) monocytes are rapidly mobilized from the splenic reservoir in response to angiotensin II infusion and sequentially infiltrate the abdominal aorta. The first wave of Ly-6C(high) monocytes prevails in the aorta and promotes the accumulation of inflammatory macrophages, which most likely cause irreversible changes in the abdominal aorta. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the cellular mechanisms that initiate AAA in mice. We particularly focus on the role of monocyte and macrophage subsets during the early steps of the aneurysmal process. PMID:26306839

  16. Intraoperative Sac Pressure Measurement During Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ohta, Takashi; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Iwata, Hirohide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tadakoshi, Masao; Hida, Noriyuki; Orimoto, Yuki; Kamei, Seiji

    2010-10-15

    PurposeIntraoperative sac pressure was measured during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) to evaluate the clinical significance of sac pressure measurement.MethodsA microcatheter was placed in an aneurysm sac from the contralateral femoral artery, and sac pressure was measured during EVAR procedures in 47 patients. Aortic blood pressure was measured as a control by a catheter from the left brachial artery.ResultsThe systolic sac pressure index (SPI) was 0.87 {+-} 0.10 after main-body deployment, 0.63 {+-} 0.12 after leg deployment (P < 0.01), and 0.56 {+-} 0.12 after completion of the procedure (P < 0.01). Pulse pressure was 55 {+-} 21 mmHg, 23 {+-} 15 mmHg (P < 0.01), and 16 {+-} 12 mmHg (P < 0.01), respectively. SPI showed no significant differences between the Zenith and Excluder stent grafts (0.56 {+-} 0.13 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.10, NS). Type I endoleak was found in seven patients (15%), and the SPI decreased from 0.62 {+-} 0.10 to 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (P = 0.10) after fixing procedures. Type II endoleak was found in 12 patients (26%) by completion angiography. The SPI showed no difference between type II endoleak positive and negative (0.58 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.55 {+-} 0.12, NS). There were no significant differences between the final SPI of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter decreased in the follow-up and that of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter did not change (0.53 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.57 {+-} 0.12, NS).ConclusionsSac pressure measurement was useful for instant hemodynamic evaluation of the EVAR procedure, especially in type I endoleaks. However, on the basis of this small study, the SPI cannot be used to reliably predict sac growth or regression.

  17. Endovascular Repair of an Anastomotic Leak Following Open Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Flett, M.; Milne, A.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of an early postoperative anastomotic leak following elective open repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm which was successfully treated by endovascular stent-grafting. A 71-year-old man underwent open tube graft repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Twelve days later he presented with a contained leak from the distal anastomosis, which was confirmed on CT scan. This was successfully treated with a bifurcated aortic stent-graft. This case illustrates the usefulness of the endovascular approach for resolving this rare surgical complication of open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and the challenges associated with the deployment of such a device within an aortic tube graft.

  18. Coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection: the role of 64-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Das, K M; Abdou, Sayed M; El-Menyar, Ayman; Ayman, El Menyar; Khulaifi, A A; Nabti, A L

    2008-01-01

    A rare case of bilateral coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection is described. 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) was able to demonstrate both this findings along with involvement of other neck vessels. TEE demonstrated the severity and mechanisms of aortic valve damage and assisted the surgeon in valve repair. MDCT has played an invaluable role in the diagnosis of the abnormal details of such life-threatening vascular complications. PMID:18384568

  19. Genetic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

    SciTech Connect

    St. Jean, P.L.; Hart, B.K.; Zhang, X.C.

    1994-09-01

    The association between AAA and gender, smoking (SM), hypertension (HTN) and inguinal herniation (IH) was examined in 141 AAA probands and 139 of their 1st degree relatives with aortic exam (36 affected, 103 unaffected). There was no significant difference between age at diagnosis of affecteds and age at exam of unaffecteds. Of 181 males, 142 had AAA; of 99 females, 35 had AAA. Using log-linear modeling AAA was significantly associated at the 5% level with gender, SM and HTN but not IH. The association of AAA with SM and HTN held when males and females were analyzed separately. HTN was -1.5 times more common in both affected males and females, while SM was 1.5 and 2 times more common in affected males and females, respectively. Tests of association and linkage analyses were performed with relevant candidate genes: 3 COL3A1 polymorphisms (C/T, ALA/THR, AvaII), 2 ELN polymorphisms (SER/GLY, (CA)n), FBN1(TAAA)n, 2 APOB polymorphisms (Xbal,Ins/Del), CLB4B (CA)n, PI and markers D1S243 (CA)n, HPR (CA)n and MFD23(CA)n. The loci were genotyped in > 100 AAA probands and > 95 normal controls. No statistically significant evidence of association at the 5% level was obtained for any of the loci using chi-square test of association. 28 families with 2 or more affecteds were analyzed using the affected pedigree member method (APM) and lod-score analyses. There was no evidence for linkage with any loci using APM. Lod-score analysis under an autosomal recessive model resulted in excluding linkage (lod score < -2) of all loci to AAA at {theta}=0.0. Under an autosomal dominant model, linkage was excluded at {theta}=0.0 to ELN, APOB, CLG4B, D1S243, HPR and MFD23. The various genes previously proposed in AAA pathogenesis are neither associated nor casually related in our study population.

  20. Tracheo-Bronchial Obstruction and Esophageal Perforation after TEVAR for Thoracic Aortic Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Daisuke; Tanaka, Haruki; Komatsu, Kazunori; Ohtsu, Yoshinori; Terasaki, Takamitsu; Wada, Yuko; Takano, Tamaki; Koike, Shoichiro; Amano, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old man was referred to our hospital for an ascending aortic aneurysm, thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm and aortic regurgitation. Graft repair of the thoracic aortic arch and aortic valve replacement was given priority and completed, however he developed descending aortic rupture before the second scheduled surgery, and endovascular stent grafting was performed. He subsequently developed tracheobronchial obstruction and esophageal perforation. The patient underwent urgent esophagectomy and enterostomy with continuity later reestablished. However, he died of sepsis 5 months after surgery. Despite the less invasive nature of endovascular treatment, esophageal perforation can nevertheless occur and postoperative vigilance is well warranted. PMID:25593630

  1. When a Patient Declines Curative Care: Management of a Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Bonanni, Megan; Courage, Cheryl A.; Nagurka, Roxanne; Zalenski, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The management of major vascular emergencies in the emergency department (ED) involves rapid, aggressive resuscitation followed by emergent definitive surgery. However, for some patients this traditional approach may not be consistent with their goals and values. We explore the appropriate way to determine best treatment practices when patients elect to forego curative care in the ED, while reviewing such a case. We present the case of a 72-year-old patient who presented to the ED with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, but refused surgery. We discuss the transition of the patient from a curative to a comfort care approach with appropriate direct referral to hospice from the ED. Using principles of autonomy, decision-making capacity, informed consent, prognostication, and goals-of-care, ED clinicians are best able to align their approach with patients’ goals and values. PMID:24106558

  2. When a patient declines curative care: management of a ruptured aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Bonanni, Megan; Courage, Cheryl A; Nagurka, Roxanne; Zalenski, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    The management of major vascular emergencies in the emergency department (ED) involves rapid, aggressive resuscitation followed by emergent definitive surgery. However, for some patients this traditional approach may not be consistent with their goals and values. We explore the appropriate way to determine best treatment practices when patients elect to forego curative care in the ED, while reviewing such a case. We present the case of a 72-year-old patient who presented to the ED with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, but refused surgery. We discuss the transition of the patient from a curative to a comfort care approach with appropriate direct referral to hospice from the ED. Using principles of autonomy, decision-making capacity, informed consent, prognostication, and goals-of-care, ED clinicians are best able to align their approach with patients' goals and values. PMID:24106558

  3. Evidence of deregulated cholesterol efflux in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mourmoura, Evanthia; Vasilaki, Anna; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanouel; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Tsezou, Aspasia

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies indicated that lipids may be associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however the molecular mechanism involved is unclear. Our study aimed to investigate the expression pattern of cholesterol efflux related proteins in AAA. Liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), ATP-binding-cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), Apolipoprotein AI (ApoAI), smooth muscle α-actin (α-SM) and vimentin expression levels were evaluated in human AAA, atherosclerotic (ATH) and normal abdominal aortic tissues. We found significant differences in LXRα, LXRβ and ABCA1 mRNA expression levels between AAA, ATH and normal whole aortic tissues and also within the AAA, ATH and normal "intima-media" layers. Specifically, LXRα, LXRβ and ABCA1 mRNA levels were decreased in AAA compared to ATH-whole tissues, as well as in AAA "intima-media" compared to ATH and normal "intima-media" layers. Moreover, immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that LXRα and ABCA1 immunoreactivities (IR) were reduced in the AAA media compared to the normal and ATH media layers and that they were also reduced in the intima layer of AAA and ATH tissues, whereas ApoAI-IR was increased in the AAA and ATH aortic walls compared to normal pointing to possible deregulation of the cholesterol efflux mechanism in AAA. Furthermore, double staining for vimentin and α-SM showed vimentin expression in the intima and inner media layer of AAA with sparse vimentin positive SMCs designating possible SMCs phenotype switch from contractile to synthetic form. In addition, histochemical analysis showed excessive lipid accumulation in the AAA wall, while co-staining using Oil Red O with α-SM or CD68 revealed lipid accumulation in SMCs and macrophages, respectively. Our study provides novel evidence for impaired cholesterol efflux in AAA associated with lipid accumulation in SMCs and macrophages, as well as switch of SMCs phenotype from contractile to synthetic form. PMID:26725543

  4. Clinical outcomes of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms that underwent endovascular repair in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Jau-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) in patients at a district general hospital. Methods A retrospective clinical study was conducted using data on 16 patients with elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and nine patients with consecutive rAAA treated with EVAR from January 2010 to December 2014 in a district general hospital in Taiwan. Results The preoperative characteristics of the two groups are listed. Thirty-six percent (9/25) of the patients were referred from other hospitals that did not offer surgical services. The percentage of patients with rAAA that were transferred from other hospitals was 55.5% (5/9). The stay durations in the intensive care unit for elective EVAR cases were shorter than those for emergent EVAR (1.75±1 d elective vs. 10±13.37 d emergent; P<0.019). The hospitalization days (11.06±4.07 d elective vs. 21.89±18.36 d emergent; P<0.031), operative time (183.63±57.24 min elective vs. 227.11±59.92 min emergent; P<0.009), and blood loss volumes (115.63±80.41 mL elective vs. 422.22±276.26 mL emergent; P<0.005) are shown; statistics for use of Perclose ProGlide® (7 cases elective vs. 0 case emergent; P<0.024) are compared. The overall 30-d mortality rate was 11.11% (1/9). Conclusions The results confirm that EVAR surgery can be safely performed in a district general hospital with an integrated health care system. Using Perclose ProGlide® for selected cases may reduce blood loss and operative time. PMID:27499945

  5. Oxidative stress and abdominal aortic aneurysm: potential treatment targets.

    PubMed

    Emeto, Theophilus I; Moxon, Joseph V; Au, Minnie; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a significant cause of mortality in older adults. A key mechanism implicated in AAA pathogenesis is inflammation and the associated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. These have been suggested to promote degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and vascular smooth muscle apoptosis. Experimental and human association studies suggest that ROS can be favourably modified to limit AAA formation and progression. In the present review, we discuss mechanisms potentially linking ROS to AAA pathogenesis and highlight potential treatment strategies targeting ROS. Currently, none of these strategies has been shown to be effective in clinical practice. PMID:26814202

  6. Colorectal infarction following resection of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Launer, D P; Miscall, B G; Beil, A R

    1978-01-01

    Infarctions of the colon and rectum (incidences approximately 1 and 0.5 per cent, respectively) are caused by compromised collateral circulation to the colon and rectum, usually as a result of arteriosclerotic disease of the superior and inferior mesenteric arterial systems, as well as the hypogastric arteries. Patients who have colorectal ischemia after operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms have diarrhea (sometimes bloody), abdominal pain, and distention. The diagnosis may be established by sigmoidoscopic examination. Treatment includes surgical removal of the compromised bowel and creation of a temporary or permanent end colostomy. Prevention of this complication is aided by preservation of primary and collateral circulation, avoidance of hypotension, and preoperative bowel preparation. PMID:738176

  7. Contained Ascending Aortic Rupture Disguised as a Right Atrial Mass

    PubMed Central

    Marzolino, Philip S.; Reynolds, Justin H.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Grigore, Alina M.

    2008-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography can incidentally detect cardiac masses. A right atrial mass has many possible causes, including metastatic extension from various solid organs, malignant melanoma, mediastinal cysts, hematoma, myxoma, lipoma, and artifact. Herein, we report our discovery of a right atrial mass during the initial intraoperative transesophageal echocardiographic examination of a patient who was undergoing repair of an ascending aortic aneurysm. The mass, with a smooth border and homogenous grayscale density, showed no flow during color-flow Doppler echocardiography. Further examination revealed tricuspid annular dilation and severe tricuspid insufficiency. When the mediastinum was opened, we found a large extracardiac hematoma along the right atrium within the pericardial space. These findings suggested an acute, contained rupture of the ascending aorta. After the hematoma was evacuated, imaging revealed complete resolution of the mass and reduction of tricuspid insufficiency. The patient underwent the scheduled aortic repair and was discharged from the hospital in good condition. In order to ensure an accurate diagnosis and to gain appropriate clinical guidance that can lead to a successful outcome, we suggest performing a thorough echocardiographic investigation to identify any such mass before planned surgery proceeds. PMID:18427651

  8. Office-based ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Blois, Beau

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the efficacy of an office-based, family physician–administered ultrasound examination to screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Design A prospective observational study. Consecutive patients were approached by nonphysician staff. Setting Rural family physician offices in Grand Forks and Revelstoke, BC. Participants The Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery screening recommendations for AAA were used to help select patients who were at risk of AAA. All men 65 years of age or older were included. Women 65 years of age or older were included if they were current smokers or had diabetes, hypertension, a history of coronary artery disease, or a family history of AAA. Main outcome measures A focused “quick screen,” which measured the maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta using point-of-care ultrasound technology, was performed in the office by a resident physician trained in emergency ultrasonography. Each patient was then booked for a criterion standard scan (ie, a conventional abdominal ultrasound scan performed by a technician and interpreted by a radiologist). The maximal abdominal aortic diameter measured by ultrasound in the office was compared with that measured by the criterion standard method. The time to screen each patient was recorded. Results Forty-five patients were included in data analysis; 62% of participants were men. The mean age was 73 years. The mean pairwise difference between the office-based ultrasound scan and the criterion standard scan was not statistically significant. The mean absolute difference between the 2 scans was 0.20 cm (95% CI 0.15 to 0.25 cm). Correlation between the scans was 0.81. The office-based ultrasound scan had both a sensitivity and a specificity of 100%. The mean time to screen each patient was 212 seconds (95% CI 194 to 230 seconds). Conclusion Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening can be safely performed in the office by family physicians who are trained to use point

  9. Computed tomography diagnosis of a primary aortoduodenal fistula in a patient with a partially thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Shree, Divya; Jeppu, Sandeep; Puneet, Pulak; Rani, Kanchan

    2010-08-01

    Primary aortoenteric fistula is a rare but fatal cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and requires urgent intervention. A high index of clinical suspicion in conjunction with imaging is required because a favorable outcome relies on prompt diagnosis. The primary forms of aortoduodenal fistulas are nearly always associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm, mostly atherosclerotic. Technological advances in imaging, particularly computed tomography (CT), play a pivotal role in the preoperative detection of these fistulas. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who was diagnosed with a large abdominal aortic aneurysm with associated contained rupture and suggestion of an aortoduodenal fistula on CT. This case demonstrated the effectiveness, ease, and low cost of the preoperative evaluation and documentation of a primary aortoduodenal fistula using CT scans. PMID:20799019

  10. ACE2 Decreases Formation and Severity of Angiotensin II-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Sean E.; Zhang, Xuan; Howatt, Deborah A.; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Gurley, Susan B.; Ennis, Terri; Curci, John A.; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) cleaves angiotensin II (AngII) to form angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)), which generally opposes effects of AngII. AngII infusion into hypercholesterolemic male mice induces formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). This study tests the hypothesis that deficiency of ACE2 promotes AngII-induced AAAs, while ACE2 activation suppresses aneurysm formation. Approach and Results ACE2 protein was detectable by immunostaining in mice and human AAAs. Whole body deficiency of ACE2 significantly increased aortic lumen diameters and external diameters of suprarenal aortas from AngII-infused mice. Conversely, ACE2 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells had no effect on AngII-induced AAAs. In contrast to AngII-induced AAAs, ACE2 deficiency had no significant effect on external aortic diameters of elastase-induced AAAs. Since ACE2 deficiency promoted AAA formation in AngII-infused mice, we determined if ACE2 activation suppressed AAAs. ACE2 activation by administration of diminazine aceturate (DIZE, 30 mg/kg/day) to Ldlr−/− mice increased kidney ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and elevated plasma Ang-(1-7) concentrations. Unexpectedly, administration of DIZE significantly reduced total sera cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol concentrations. Notably, DIZE significantly decreased aortic lumen diameters and aortic external diameters of AngII-infused mice resulting in a marked reduction in AAA incidence (from 73 to 29%). None of these effects of DIZE were observed in the Ace2−/y mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that ACE2 exerts a modulatory role in AngII-induced AAA formation, and that therapeutic stimulation of ACE2 could be a benefit to reduce AAA expansion and rupture in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system. PMID:25301841

  11. Castration of male mice prevents the progression of established angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Thatcher, Sean; Wu, Congqing; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Male sex is a non-modifiable risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. Similar to humans, male mice are more susceptible to angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AAAs than females. Previous studies demonstrated that castration of males markedly reduced the formation of AngII-induced AAAs. Progression of AAA size is associated with increased risk of aneurysm rupture. In this study, we hypothesized that castration of male mice would reduce the progression of established AngII-induced AAAs. Methods Male apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-/- mice were infused with AngII for 1 month to induce AAA formation. Aortic diameters were measured by ultrasound and mice were stratified into 2 groups that were either sham-operated or castrated. AngII infusions were continued for a further 2 months. Ultrasound was used to quantify lumen diameters, and excised aortas were processed for quantification of AAA size, volume, and tissue characteristics. Results Sham-operated mice exhibited progressive dilation of suprarenal aortic lumen diameters during continued AngII infusion. Castration significantly decreased aortic lumen diameters (study endpoint: 1.88 ± 0.05 mm vs 1.63 ± 0.04 mm; P<.05; sham-operated [n = 15] vs castration [n = 17], respectively). However, maximal external AAA diameters were not significantly different between sham-operated and castrated mice. The vascular volume/lumen volume ratio of excised AAAs imaged by ultrasound was significantly increased by castration (sham-operated, 4.8 ± 0.9; castration, 9.5 ± 2.0 %; n = 11/group; P<.05). Moreover, compared to thin walled AAAs of sham-operated mice, aneurysm sections from castrated mice exhibited increased smooth muscle -actin and collagen. Conclusions Removal of endogenous male hormones by castration selectively reduces aortic lumen expansion while not altering the external AAA dimensions. PMID:24439319

  12. Intracranial and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Similarities, Differences, and Need for a New Class of Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J.D.; Taylor, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms result from different underlying disease processes and exhibit different rupture potentials, yet they share many histopathological and biomechanical characteristics. Moreover, as in other vascular diseases, hemodynamics and wall mechanics play important roles in the natural history and possible treatment of these two types of lesions. The goals of this review are twofold: first, to contrast the biology and mechanics of intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms to emphasize that separate advances in our understanding of each disease can aid in our understanding of the other disease, and second, to suggest that research on the biomechanics of aneurysms must embrace a new paradigm for analysis. That is, past biomechanical studies have provided tremendous insight but have progressed along separate lines, focusing on either the hemodynamics or the wall mechanics. We submit that that there is a pressing need to couple in a new way the separate advances in vascular biology, medical imaging, and computational biofluid and biosolid mechanics to understand better the mechanobiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of these lesions, which continue to be responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. We shall refer to this needed new class of computational tools as Fluid-Solid-Growth (FSG) Models. PMID:18647115

  13. Layer-dependent wall properties of abdominal aortic aneurysms: Experimental study and material characterization.

    PubMed

    Sassani, Sophia G; Kakisis, John; Tsangaris, Sokrates; Sokolis, Dimitrios P

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical testing and in-depth characterization of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall from fifteen patients undergoing open surgery was performed to establish the layer-dependent tissue properties that are non-available in the literature. Quantitative microscopic evaluation was performed to identify the spatial organization of collagen-fiber network. Among a number of candidate models, the four-fiber family (microstructure-motivated) model, especially that including dispersions of fiber angles about the main directions, was superior to the Fung- and Gasser-type models in the fitting quality allowed, though it presented a practical difficulty in parameter estimation, so that an analysis was conducted aiding the identification of a more specific diagonal- and circumferential-fiber family model for all three layers. The adventitia was stiffer and stronger than the other layers, owing to its increased collagen content, and its contribution to the response of the intact wall was augmented being under greater residual tension than the media, whereas the intima was under residual compression. All layers were stiffer circumferentially than longitudinally, due to preferential collagen arrangement along that axis. The histologically-guided material characterization of layered wall presented herein is expected to assist clinical decision, by developing reliable criteria to predict the rupture risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms, and optimize endovascular interventions. PMID:26011656

  14. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Para-Anastomotic Aneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Sfyroeras, Giorgos S.; Lioupis, Christos Bessias, Nikolaos; Maras, Dimitris; Pomoni, Maria; Andrikopoulos, Vassilios

    2008-07-15

    We report a case of a ruptured para-anastomotic aortic aneurysm treated with implantation of a bifurcated stent-graft. A 72-year-old patient, who had undergone aortobifemoral bypass for aortoiliac occlusive disease 16 years ago, presented with a ruptured para-anastomotic aortic aneurysm. A bifurcated stent-graft was successfully deployed into the old bifurcated graft. This is the first report of a bifurcated stent-graft being placed through an 'end-to-side' anastomosed old aortobifemoral graft. Endovascular treatment of ruptured para-anastomotic aortic aneurysms can be accomplished successfully, avoiding open surgery which is associated with increased mortality and morbidity.

  15. Clinical features of isolated dissections of abdominal aortic branches.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Michio; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Isolated dissection of an abdominal aortic branch is a rare entity, and previous reports regarding the condition have been based only on small case-series studies. Using a national inpatient database in Japan, we describe the clinical features of patients with isolated celiac, superior mesenteric, splenic, and hepatic artery dissections (ICAD, ISMAD, ISAD, and IHAD). We extracted data on inpatients who were diagnosed with ICAD, ISMAD, ISAD, or IHAD from the Japanese diagnosis procedure combination database, including patients' age and sex, putative risk factors (smoking status and specific comorbidities), treatments (blood transfusion, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) and surgical procedures), and outcomes (in-hospital complications and death). Among 18.3 million inpatients in the database between July 2010 and March 2013, we identified 276 ICAD, 715 ISMAD, 23 ISAD and 11 IHAD. The percentage of males was 78-92 %, and the mean age was 54.7-56.8 years. Hypertension was seen in 48-65, and 35-65 % were smokers. Fourteen in-hospital deaths were identified in total. In the ICAD group, splenectomy was performed in one patient and TAE was performed in 26 patients. In the ISMAD group, 16 patients received surgical intervention. Most patients with isolated dissection of an abdominal aortic branch were treated conservatively, while a small percentage required TAE or open surgery. A small proportion of dissections resulted in death. PMID:25421008

  16. Systemic oxidant/antioxidant balance in human abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Menteşe, Umit; Turan, Ibrahim; Usta, Sefer; Demir, Selim; Koral, Özgür; Öztaş Menteşe, Seda; Çavuşoğlu, Ismail Gökhan; Karahan, Süleyman Caner; Alver, Ahmet; Doğan, Orhan Veli; Aykan, Ahmet Çağrı

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant-antioxidant balance in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Forty-two consecutive patients with AAA and 46 control subjects were included. Total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) levels were measured and the oxidative stress index (OSI) value determined. Serum TOS and OSI values in patients with AAA were higher than those in the controls (p<0.001, p<0.001, respectively). There was a positive correlation between abdominal aortic diameters, serum TOS levels (r=0.592, p<0.001) and OSI values (r=0.598, p<0.001). A cut-off value of 17.68 µmol H2O2equivalent/L for TOS was associated with 86% sensitivity and 83% specificity and a cut-off value of 1.77 for OSI was associated with 86% sensitivity and 81% specificity for predicting AAA. Systemic oxidative imbalance develops in patients with AAA, particularly as a result of an increase in TOS. PMID:26228275

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and histological, clinical, radiological correlation.

    PubMed

    Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita; Bonomini, Francesca; Peroni, Michele; Cocchi, Marco Angelo; Hirtler, Lena; Bonardelli, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    To date, the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) still remains unclear. As such, the aim of this study was to evaluate changes of the aortic structure during AAA. We analysed the microscopic frame of vessels sections, starting from the primum movens leading to abnormal dilatation. AAA samples were collected and processed through various staining methods (Verhoeff-Van Gieson, Masson Goldner, Sirius Red). Subsequently, the vessel morphology and collagenic web of the tunica media and adventitia were determined and the amount of type I and type III collagen was measured. We also applied immune-histochemistry markers for CD34 and PGP 9.5 in order to identify vascular and nerve structures in the aorta. Immune-positivity quantification was used to calculate the percentage of the stained area. We found increasing deposition of type I collagen and reduced type III collagen in both tunica media and adventitia of AAA. The total amount of vasa vasorum, marked with CD34, and nerva vasorum, marked with PGP 9.5, was also higher in AAA samples. Cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, dyslipidemia, cigarette smoking) and radiological data (maximum aneurism diameter, intra-luminal thrombus, aortic wall calcification) increased these changes. These results suggest that the tunica adventitia may have a central role in the pathogenesis of AAA as clearly there are major changes characterized by rooted inflammatory infiltration. The presence of immune components could explain these modifications within the framework of the aorta. PMID:26858185

  18. New experimental protocols for tensile testing of abdominal aortic analogues.

    PubMed

    Bailly, L; Deplano, V; Lemercier, A; Boiron, O; Meyer, C

    2014-06-01

    This work proposes an in vitro tensile testing protocol that is able to characterize abdominal aortic (AA) analogues under physiologically inspired mechanical loadings. Kinematic parameters are defined in agreement with in vivo measurements of aortic dynamics. A specific focus is given to the choice of the applied loading rates, deriving from the knowledge of aortic Peterson modulus and blood pressure variations from diastolic to systolic instants. The influence of physiological elongation rates has been tested on both porcine AAs and a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) material used to elaborate AA analogues. The diastolic and systolic elongation rates estimates vary between orders of magnitude O(10(-2)) and O(10(-1))s(-1). Negligible differences are obtained when comparing stress-elongation responses between both physiological elongation rates. In contrast, a noticeable stiffening of the TPU mechanical response is observed compared to that obtained under the common low traction rate of O(10(-3))s(-1). This work shows how relevant physiological elongation rates can be evaluated as a function of age, gender and pathological context. PMID:24613685

  19. CFD Modelling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Hemodynamic Loads Using a Realistic Geometry with CT

    PubMed Central

    Ng, E. Y. K.; Loong, T. H.; Bordone, Maurizio; Pua, Uei; Narayanan, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS), abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT), and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT) images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m3 and a kinematic viscosity of 4 × 10−3 Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index (β), saccular index (γ), deformation diameter ratio (χ), and tortuosity index (ε)) and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation. PMID:23864906

  20. An update on the etiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms: implications for future diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Miner, Grace H; Faries, Peter L; Costa, Kevin D; Hanss, Basil G; Marin, Michael L

    2015-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease is multifactorial with both environmental and genetic risk factors. The current research in AAA revolves around genetic profiles and expression studies in both human and animal models. Variants in genes involved in extracellular matrix degradation, inflammation, the renin-angiotensin system, cell growth and proliferation and lipid metabolism have been associated with AAA using a variety of study designs. However, the results have been inconsistent and without a standard animal model for validation. Thus, despite the growing body of knowledge, the specific variants responsible for AAA development, progression and rupture have yet to be determined. This review explores some of the more significant genetic studies to provide an overview of past studies that have influenced the current understanding of AAA etiology. Expanding our understanding of disease pathogenesis will inform research into novel diagnostics and therapeutics and ultimately to improve outcomes for patients with AAA. PMID:26401919

  1. Protective Role of Diabetes Mellitus on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Pathogenesis: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed

    Radak, Djordje; Tanaskovic, Slobodan; Katsiki, Niki; Isenovic, Esma R

    2016-01-01

    An inverse association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) risk have been reported. Apart from a lower AAA prevalence among patients with vs without DM, there are data showing that DM may exert a protective role on aneurysmal growth in patients with small AAAs, thus decreasing the risk of rupture. As atherosclerosis has almost the same risk factors as aneurysms, the decreased AAA prevalence in patients with DM may indicate that atherosclerosis is an associated feature and not a cause of the aneurysms. Alternatively, DM may be associated with factors that influence AAA formation. In this narrative review, we discuss the inverse association between DM and AAA. We also comment on underlying cellular and genetic pathophysiological mechanisms of DM, AAA and atherosclerosis. The effects of drugs, commonly prescribed in DM patients, on AAA development and growth are also considered. PMID:26022380

  2. Paraoxonase-1 overexpression prevents experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm progression.

    PubMed

    Burillo, Elena; Tarin, Carlos; Torres-Fonseca, Monica-Maria; Fernandez-García, Carlos-Ernesto; Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Martinez-Lopez, Diego; Llamas-Granda, Patricia; Camafeita, Emilio; Lopez, Juan Antonio; Vega de Ceniga, Melina; Aviram, Michael; Egido, Jesus; Blanco-Colio, Luis-Miguel; Martín-Ventura, Jose-Luis

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent dilation of the aorta due to excessive proteolytic, oxidative and inflammatory injury of the aortic wall. We aimed to identify novel mediators involved in AAA pathophysiology, which could lead to novel therapeutic approaches. For that purpose, plasma from four AAA patients and four controls were analysed by a label-free proteomic approach. Among identified proteins, paraoxonase-1 (PON1) was decreased in plasma of AAA patients compared with controls, which was further validated in a bigger cohort of samples by ELISA. The phenylesterase enzymatic activity of PON1 was also decreased in serum of AAA patients compared with controls. To address the potential role of PON1 as a mediator of AAA, experimental AAA was induced by aortic elastase perfusion in wild-type (WT) mice and human transgenic PON1 (HuTgPON1) mice. Similar to humans, PON1 activity was also decreased in serum of elastase-induced AAA mice compared with healthy mice. Interestingly, overexpression of PON1 was accompanied by smaller aortic dilation and higher elastin and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) content in the AAA of HuTgPON1 compared with WT mice. Moreover, HuTgPON1 mice display decreased oxidative stress and apoptosis, as well as macrophage infiltration and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1) expression, in elastase-induced AAA. In conclusion, decreased circulating PON1 activity is associated with human and experimental AAA. PON1 overexpression in mice protects against AAA progression by reducing oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation, suggesting that strategies aimed at increasing PON1 activity could prevent AAA. PMID:26993251

  3. Association between abdominal aortic diameter and peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, C; Bonapace, S; Starr, J; Radia, M; Bulpitt, C J

    1997-09-01

    Fifty-four elderly people 81.2 years +/- 7.4 (mean age +/- s.d., range 66-98 years) were selected. These included 20 men (78.6 +/- 6.4 years, range 70-91 years) and 34 women (82.2 +/- 7.6 years, range 66-98 years). The relationship between the size of the abdominal aorta and various cardiovascular risk indicators such as calf:-brachial systolic pressure ratio, plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and random blood glucose were examined. Abdominal aortic diameter correlated well with calf:-brachial systolic ratio measured by Doppler method over the posterior tibial artery and taking the lowest result of the right and left side (r = -0.28, P = 0.04). This correlation tended to be stronger in men (r = -0.55, P = 0.02) compared to women (r = -0.10, P = 0.57). However, the relationship tended to be confined to the systolic pressure in the left leg, raising the hypothesis that left-sided vascular disease is better related to aortic diameter, possibly due to a difference in the effects of reflected waves between the two sides. This needs further investigation. The contrast between the sexes was seen in the absence of any significant difference in resting blood pressure and calf:brachial systolic pressure ratio between the two. This finding suggests that the sex differences in the relationship between the size of the abdominal aorta and calf:brachial systolic pressure ratio are related to intrinsic properties of the arterial wall. PMID:9364278

  4. Cytokine amplification and macrophage effector functions in aortic inflammation and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, Talha; Tilton, Ronald G; Brasier, Allan R

    2016-08-01

    On April 29, 2015, Son and colleagues published an article entitled "Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma" in Nature Communications. The authors observed that the heterozygous Kruppel-like transcription factor 6 (KLF6) deficiency or absence of myeloid-specific KLF6 led to upregulation of macrophage GM-CSF expression, promoted the development of aortic hematoma/dissection, and stimulated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation when the vessel wall was subjected to an inflammatory stimulus. The additional findings of increased adventitial fibrotic deposition, marked infiltration of macrophages, and increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and IL-6 were blocked with neutralizing GM-CSF antibodies, or recapitulated in normal mice with excess GM-CSF administration. The authors concluded that GM-CSF is a key regulatory molecule in the development of AAA and further suggested that activation of GM-CSF is independent of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-Smad pathway associated with the Marfan aortic pathology. In this perspective, we expand on this mechanism, drawing from previous studies implicating a similar essential role for IL-6 signaling in macrophage activation, Th17 expansion and aortic dissections. We propose a sequential "two-hit" model of vascular inflammation involving initial vascular injury followed by recruitment of Ly6C(hi) macrophages. Aided by fibroblast interactions inflammatory macrophages produce amplification of IL-6 and GM-CSF expression that converge on a common, pathogenic Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activations of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. This pathway stimulates effector functions of macrophages, promotes differentiation of Th17 lymphocytes and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression, ultimately resulting in deterioration of vascular wall structural integrity. Further research evaluating the impact of

  5. Cytokine amplification and macrophage effector functions in aortic inflammation and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Talha; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    On April 29, 2015, Son and colleagues published an article entitled “Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma” in Nature Communications. The authors observed that the heterozygous Kruppel-like transcription factor 6 (KLF6) deficiency or absence of myeloid-specific KLF6 led to upregulation of macrophage GM-CSF expression, promoted the development of aortic hematoma/dissection, and stimulated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation when the vessel wall was subjected to an inflammatory stimulus. The additional findings of increased adventitial fibrotic deposition, marked infiltration of macrophages, and increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and IL-6 were blocked with neutralizing GM-CSF antibodies, or recapitulated in normal mice with excess GM-CSF administration. The authors concluded that GM-CSF is a key regulatory molecule in the development of AAA and further suggested that activation of GM-CSF is independent of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-Smad pathway associated with the Marfan aortic pathology. In this perspective, we expand on this mechanism, drawing from previous studies implicating a similar essential role for IL-6 signaling in macrophage activation, Th17 expansion and aortic dissections. We propose a sequential “two-hit” model of vascular inflammation involving initial vascular injury followed by recruitment of Ly6Chi macrophages. Aided by fibroblast interactions inflammatory macrophages produce amplification of IL-6 and GM-CSF expression that converge on a common, pathogenic Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activations of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. This pathway stimulates effector functions of macrophages, promotes differentiation of Th17 lymphocytes and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression, ultimately resulting in deterioration of vascular wall structural integrity. Further research evaluating the impact of

  6. Air travel of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm: urgent air medical evacuation and nonurgent commercial air repatriation.

    PubMed

    Barros, Andrew; Haffner, Faith; Duchateau, François-Xavier; Huff, J Stephen; Verner, Laurent; O'Connor, Robert E; Brady, William J

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) presents across a spectrum of severity. Although some resources suggest a theoretic risk for rupture related to air travel, this claim remains unproven. In fact, there are little data from which to make evidence-based recommendations. Air medical evacuation of a patient with either an AAA at risk of imminent rupture or status post recent rupture can be performed, assuming that local surgical care is not available and that transfer is taking the patient to a higher level of medical intervention. Furthermore, medical opinion suggests that patients with asymptomatic and/or surgically corrected AAA can safely travel by commercial aircraft for nonurgent reasons, assuming that other issues including postoperative needs are appropriately addressed. In this discussion, answers to the following issues are sought: flight safety for urgent evacuation and nonurgent repatriation scenarios, waiting time to fly nonurgently after AAA diagnosis, and the need for medical accompaniment. PMID:24787514

  7. An Animal Model of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Created with Peritoneal Patch: Technique and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Maynar, Manuel Hernandez, Javier; Sun Fei; Miguel, Carmen de; Crisostomo, Veronica; Uson, Jesus; Pineda, Luis-Fernando

    2003-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop an abdominal aortic aneurysm model that more closely resembles themorphology of human aneurysms with potential for further growth of the sac. An infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) model was created with a double-layered peritoneal patch in 27 domestic swine. The patch,measuring in average from 6 to 12 cm in length and from 2 to 3 cm in width, was sutured to the edge of an aortotomy. Pre- and postsurgical digital subtraction aortograms (DSA) were obtained to document the appearance and dimensions of the aneurysm. All animals were followed with DSA for up to 5 months. Laparoscopic examination enhanced by the use of laparoscopic ultrasound was also carried out in 2 animals to assess the aneurysm at 30 and 60 days following surgery. Histological examination was performed on 4 animals. All the animals that underwent the surgical creation of the AAA survived the surgical procedure.Postsurgical DSA demonstrated the presence of the AAA in all animals,defined as more than 50% increase in diameter. The aneurysmal mean diameter increased from the baseline of 10.27 {+-} 1.24 to 16.69{+-} 2.29 mm immediately after surgery, to 27.6 {+-} 6.59 mm at 14 days, 32.45 {+-} 8.76 mm at 30 days (p <0.01), and subsequently decreased to 25.98 {+-} 3.75 mm at 60 days. A total of 15 animals died of aneurysmal rupture that occurred more frequently in the long aneurysms ({>=}6 cm in length) than the short aneurysms (<6 cm in length) during the first 2 weeks after surgery(p < 0.05). No rupture occurred beyond 16 days after surgery. Four animals survived and underwent 60-day angiographic follow-up. Laparoscopic follow-up showed strong pulses, a reddish external appearance and undetectable suture lines on the aneurysmal wall. On pathology, the patches were well incorporated into the aortic wall, the luminal wall appeared almost completely endothelialized, and cellular and matrix proliferation were noted in the aneurysmal wall. A reproducible

  8. 3-D segmentation and quantitative analysis of inner and outer walls of thrombotic abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Yin, Yin; Wahle, Andreas; Olszewski, Mark E.; Sonka, Milan

    2008-03-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an area of a localized widening of the abdominal aorta, with a frequent presence of thrombus. A ruptured aneurysm can cause death due to severe internal bleeding. AAA thrombus segmentation and quantitative analysis are of paramount importance for diagnosis, risk assessment, and determination of treatment options. Until now, only a small number of methods for thrombus segmentation and analysis have been presented in the literature, either requiring substantial user interaction or exhibiting insufficient performance. We report a novel method offering minimal user interaction and high accuracy. Our thrombus segmentation method is composed of an initial automated luminal surface segmentation, followed by a cost function-based optimal segmentation of the inner and outer surfaces of the aortic wall. The approach utilizes the power and flexibility of the optimal triangle mesh-based 3-D graph search method, in which cost functions for thrombus inner and outer surfaces are based on gradient magnitudes. Sometimes local failures caused by image ambiguity occur, in which case several control points are used to guide the computer segmentation without the need to trace borders manually. Our method was tested in 9 MDCT image datasets (951 image slices). With the exception of a case in which the thrombus was highly eccentric, visually acceptable aortic lumen and thrombus segmentation results were achieved. No user interaction was used in 3 out of 8 datasets, and 7.80 +/- 2.71 mouse clicks per case / 0.083 +/- 0.035 mouse clicks per image slice were required in the remaining 5 datasets.

  9. Fenestrated endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a less invasive option for the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Bryan A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair has become the predominant surgical therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Whereas anatomical limitations had become the major contraindication to endovascular treatment, fenestrated stent grafts were developed to overcome such obstacles. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair now provides an additional treatment option for patients felt to be unsuitable for an invasive open repair whose anatomy is not compatible with more traditional stent grafts. We review the evolution of fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and compare its safety and efficacy to other endovascular options. PMID:27092859

  10. Decreased vascular smooth muscle cell density in medial degeneration of human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    López-Candales, A.; Holmes, D. R.; Liao, S.; Scott, M. J.; Wickline, S. A.; Thompson, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by structural deterioration of the aortic wall leading to progressive aortic dilatation and eventual rupture. The histopathological changes in AAAs are particularly evident within the elastic media, which is normally dominated by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To determine whether a decrease in vascular SMCs contributes to medial degeneration, we measured SMC density in 21 normal and pathological human abdominal aortic tissue specimens using immunohistochemistry for alpha-SMC actin and direct cell counts (medial SMCs per high-power field (HPF)). Medial SMC density was not significantly different between normal aorta (n = 5; 199.5 +/- 14.9 SMCs/HPF) and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (n = 6; 176.4 +/- 13.9 SMCs/HPF), but it was reduced by 74% in AAA (n = 10; 50.9 +/- 6.1 SMCs/HPF; P < 0.01 versus normal aorta). Light and electron microscopy revealed no evidence of overt cellular necrosis, but SMCs in AAAs exhibited ultrastructural changes consistent with apoptosis. Using in situ end-labeling (ISEL) of fragmented DNA to detect apoptotic cells, up to 30% of aortic wall cells were ISEL positive in AAAs. By double-labeling techniques, many of these cells were alpha-actin-positive SMCs distributed throughout the degenerative media. In contrast, ISEL-positive cells were observed only within the intimal plaque in atherosclerotic occlusive disease. The amount of p53 protein detected by immunoblotting was increased nearly fourfold in AAA compared with normal aorta and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (P < 0.01), and immunoreactive p53 was localized to lymphocytes and residual SMCs in the aneurysm wall. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays a substantial amount of p53 mRNA expression was observed in AAAs. These results demonstrate that medial SMC density is significantly decreased in human AAA tissues associated with evidence of SMC apoptosis and increased production of p53, a potential

  11. Anesthetic considerations for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Kothandan, Harikrishnan; Haw Chieh, Geoffrey Liew; Khan, Shariq Ali; Karthekeyan, Ranjith Baskar; Sharad, Shah Shitalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm is defined as a localized and permanent dilatation with an increase in normal diameter by more than 50%. It is more common in males and can affect up to 8% of elderly men. Smoking is the greatest risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and other risk factors include hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of aneurysms, inflammatory vasculitis, and trauma. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair [EVAR] is a common procedure performed for AAA, because of its minimal invasiveness as compared with open surgical repair. Patients undergoing EVAR have a greater incidence of major co-morbidities and should undergo comprehensive preoperative assessment and optimization within the multidisciplinary settings. In majority of cases, EVAR is extremely well-tolerated. The aim of this article is to outline the Anesthetic considerations related to EVAR. PMID:26750684

  12. Hybrid Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Thrombosis Presenting with Paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Azzarone, Matteo; De Troia, Alessandro; Iazzolino, Luigi; Nabulsi, Bilal; Tecchio, Tiziano

    2016-05-01

    Acute thrombotic or embolic occlusion of the abdominal aorta is a rare vascular emergency associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Classically, the clinical presentation is a severe peripheral ischemia with bilateral leg pain as the predominant feature. Aortic occlusion presenting as an isolated acute onset of paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia is very rare and requires improved awareness to prevent adverse outcomes associated with delayed diagnosis. We report the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia due to the thrombotic occlusion of the infrarenal aorta involving the first segment of the common iliac arteries on both sides; emergent transperitoneal aorto iliac thrombectomy combined with the endovascular iliac kissing-stent technique were performed achieving perioperative complete regression of the symptoms. PMID:26968371

  13. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms does not increase psychological morbidity.

    PubMed Central

    Khaira, H. S.; Herbert, L. M.; Crowson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Screening can lead to harmful psychological effects in the screened population--an argument used against abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening. However, there is no evidence for this in AAA screening. We applied the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to a group of men undergoing screening for AAA. The HADS questionnaire was completed by subjects found not to have AAA, subjects with known small aneurysms attending for follow-up scans, subjects with known AAA on waiting lists for surgery, and controls not involved in the screening programme. The groups were well matched for age and the number of additional diseases. There was no significant difference in the distribution of patients for anxiety and depression according to the HADS questionnaire (chi 2 test, P > 0.1). The results from this study suggest that AAA screening does not increase anxiety or depression in the screened subjects--contrary to the argument put forward against screening for this condition. PMID:9849335

  14. In vitro assessment of mouse fetal abdominal aortic vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, Mark R.; Greenwood, Susan L.; Sibley, Colin P.; Wareing, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) affects 3–8% of human pregnancies. Mouse models have provided important etiological data on FGR; they permit the assessment of treatment strategies on the physiological function of both mother and her developing offspring. Our study aimed to 1) develop a method to assess vascular function in fetal mice and 2) as a proof of principle ascertain whether a high dose of sildenafil citrate (SC; Viagra) administered to the pregnant dam affected fetal vascular reactivity. We developed a wire myography methodology for evaluation of fetal vascular function in vitro using the placenta-specific insulin-like growth factor II (Igf2) knockout mouse (P0; a model of FGR). Vascular function was determined in abdominal aortas isolated from P0 and wild-type (WT) fetuses at embryonic day (E) 18.5 of gestation. A subset of dams received SC 0.8 mg/ml via drinking water from E12.5; data were compared with water-only controls. Using wire myography, we found that fetal aortic rings exhibited significant agonist-induced contraction, and endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation. Sex-specific alterations in reactivity were noted in both strains. Maternal treatment with SC significantly attenuated endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of fetal aortic rings. Mouse fetal abdominal aortas reproducibly respond to vasoactive agents. Study of these vessels in mouse genetic models of pregnancy complications may 1) help to delineate early signs of abnormal vascular reactivity and 2) inform whether treatments given to the mother during pregnancy may impact upon fetal vascular function. PMID:25056105

  15. Coronary artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm growth.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2016-06-01

    To determine whether coronary artery disease (CAD) is associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth, we performed a meta-analysis of currently available studies. Databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched through October 2015 using PubMed and OVID. Search terms included enlargement, expansion, growth, or progression; rate or rates; and abdominal aortic aneurysm Studies considered for inclusion met the following criteria: the design was unrestricted; the study population was AAA patients with and without CAD; and outcomes included data regarding AAA growth. For each study, growth rates in both the CAD and non-CAD groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Of 664 potentially relevant publications screened initially, we identified 20 eligible studies including data on a total of 7238 AAA patients. A pooled analysis of all 20 studies demonstrated a statistically significant association of CAD with slower AAA growth rates (i.e. a significantly negative association of CAD with AAA growth) in the fixed-effect model (SMD, -0.06 [-0.0592]; 95% CI, -0.12 [-0.1157] to -0.00 [-0.0027]; p = 0.04). There was minimal between-study heterogeneity (p = 0.16) and a statistically non-significant association of CAD with slower AAA growth rates (i.e. a non-significantly negative association of CAD with AAA growth) in the pooled result from random-effects modeling (SMD, -0.06; 95% CI, -0.13 to 0.01; p = 0.12). In conclusion, CAD may be negatively associated with AAA growth. PMID:26842623

  16. Phosphorylation of AKT and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Lu, Guanyi; Su, Gang; McEvoy, Brendan; Sadiq, Omar; DiMusto, Paul D; Laser, Adriana; Futchko, John S; Henke, Peter K; Eliason, Jonathan L; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2014-01-01

    It is hypothesized that differential AKT phosphorylation between sexes is important in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation. Male C57BL/6 mice undergoing elastase treatment showed a typical AAA phenotype (80% over baseline, P < 0.001) and significantly increased phosphorylated AKT-308 (p308) and total-AKT (T-AKT) at day 14 compared with female mice. Elastase-treated Raw cells produced increased p308 and significant amounts of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and these effects were suppressed by LY294002 treatment, a known AKT inhibitor. Male and female rat aortic smooth muscle cells treated with elastase for 1, 6, or 24 hours demonstrated that the p308/T-AKT and AKT-Ser-473/T-AKT ratios peaked at 6 hours and were significantly higher in the elastase-treated cells compared with controls. Similarly, male cells had higher phosphorylated AKT/T-AKT levels than female cells. LY294002 also inhibited elastase-induced p308 formation more in female smooth muscle cells than in males, and the corresponding cell media had less pro-MMP-9. AKT siRNA significantly decreased secretion of pro-MMP-9, as well as pro-MMP-2 and active MMP-2 from elastase-treated male rat aortic smooth muscle cells. IHC of male mice AAA aortas showed increased p308, AKT-Ser-473, and T-AKT compared with female mice. Aortas from male AAA patients had a significantly higher p308/T-AKT ratio than female AAA tissues. These data suggest that AKT phosphorylation is important in the upstream regulation of MMP activity, and that differential phosphorylation may be important in sex differences in AAA. PMID:24332015

  17. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  19. Novel pathways in the pathobiology of human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Erdman, Robert; Elmore, James R; Stahl, Elizabeth; Pahl, Matthew C; Derr, Kimberly; Golden, Alicia; Lillvis, John H; Cindric, Matthew C; Jackson, Kathryn; Bowen, William D; Schworer, Charles M; Chernousov, Michael A; Franklin, David P; Gray, John L; Garvin, Robert P; Gatalica, Zoran; Carey, David J; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), a dilatation of the infrarenal aorta, typically affects males > 65 years. The pathobiological mechanisms of human AAA are poorly understood. The goal of this study was to identify novel pathways involved in the development of AAAs. Methods A custom-designed “AAA-chip” was used to assay 43 of the differentially expressed genes identified in a previously published microarray study between AAA (n = 15) and control (n = 15) infrarenal abdominal aorta. Protein analyses were performed on selected genes. Results Altogether 38 of the 43 genes on the “AAA-chip” showed significantly different expression. Novel validated genes in AAA pathobiology included ADCY7, ARL4C, BLNK, FOSB, GATM, LYZ, MFGE8, PRUNE2, PTPRC, SMTN, TMODI and TPM2. These genes represent a wide range of biological functions, such as calcium signaling, development and differentiation, as well as cell adhesion not previously implicated in AAA pathobiology. Protein analyses for GATM, CD4, CXCR4, BLNK, PLEK, LYZ, FOSB, DUSP6, ITGA5 and PTPRC confirmed the mRNA findings. Conclusion The results provide new directions for future research into AAA pathogenesis to study the role of novel genes confirmed here. New treatments and diagnostic tools for AAA could potentially be identified by studying these novel pathways. PMID:22797469

  20. Sotalol for the protection of turkeys from the development of β-aminopropionitrile-induced aortic ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Charles F.

    1972-01-01

    1. The influence of feeding 2 levels of sotalol on the incidence of β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN)-induced aortic ruptures of immature turkeys was determined. 2. Four of 22 turkeys fed 0·12% sotalol and 0·07% BAPN died of aortic ruptures, but 6 of 21 turkeys fed only BAPN died of the syndrome. 3. Blood pressure, heart rate, aortic tensile strength, and aortic structure as seen by light- and electron-microscope were similar in turkeys fed BAPN alone or both BAPN and 0·12% sotalol concurrently. 4. In a second experiment, 13 of 24 turkeys fed 0·7% BAPN alone died of aortic ruptures, but only 2 of 24 turkeys fed BAPN and 0·2% sotalol concurrently died of the disease. 5. Aortic tensile strength was lower, heart rate was faster, alterations of aortic elastic fibres as seen by light- and electron-microscope were more severe, and aortic salt soluble collagen with a higher amino acid content was increased in turkeys fed only BAPN, as compared to turkeys fed both BAPN and 0·2% sotalol. PMID:4561180

  1. A Literature Review of the Numerical Analysis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Endovascular Stent Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Roy, David; Kauffmann, Claude; Delorme, Sébastien; Lerouge, Sophie; Cloutier, Guy; Soulez, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the basic principles and relevant advances in the computational modeling of abdominal aortic aneurysms and endovascular aneurysm repair, providing the community with up-to-date state of the art in terms of numerical analysis and biomechanics. Frameworks describing the mechanical behavior of the aortic wall already exist. However, intraluminal thrombus nonhomogeneous structure and porosity still need to be well characterized. Also, although the morphology and mechanical properties of calcifications have been investigated, their effects on wall stresses remain controversial. Computational fluid dynamics usually assumes a rigid artery wall, whereas fluid-structure interaction accounts for artery compliance but is still challenging since arteries and blood have similar densities. We discuss alternatives to fluid-structure interaction based on dynamic medical images that address patient-specific hemodynamics and geometries. We describe initial stresses, elastic boundary conditions, and statistical strength for rupture risk assessment. Special emphasis is accorded to workflow development, from the conversion of medical images into finite element models, to the simulation of catheter-aorta interactions and stent-graft deployment. Our purpose is also to elaborate the key ingredients leading to virtual stenting and endovascular repair planning that could improve the procedure and stent-grafts. PMID:22997538

  2. Technical adjunct for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patient with renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Anna R; Sirignano, Pasqualino; Capoccia, Laura; Menna, Danilo; Ippoliti, Francesco; Speziale, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    One of the most discussed issues in abdominal aortic surgery in kidney-transplanted patients is represented by organ protection during aortic cross-clamping. We report the case of a kidney-transplanted woman who underwent surgical correction for an abdominal aortic aneurysm after she refused any endovascular approach. To maintain kidney perfusion, during surgical aortic reconstruction, a biopump was chosen. Nowadays, abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair, when feasible, allows avoiding cross-clamping-related renal ischemia, although a potential risk for contrast-induced nephrotoxicity still exists. When open surgical repair is chosen, several different techniques to protect the transplanted organ have been proposed, with different potential advantages and results. In the case we reported, the use of biopump allowed an effective protection from ischemia, minimizing perioperative stress and complications. PMID:24531028

  3. Evolving Anisotropy and Degree of Elastolytic Insult in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Potential Clinical Relevance?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John S.; Humphrey, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Accurately estimating patient-specific rupture risk remains a primary challenge in timing interventions for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). By re-analyzing published biaxial mechanical testing data from surgically repaired human AAAs, material anisotropy emerged as a potentially important determinant of patient-specific lesion progression. That is, based on a new classification scheme, we discovered that anisotropic aneurysmal specimens correlated with increased patient age at surgery when compared with more isotropic specimens (79.7 vs. 70.9 years, p<0.002), despite no significant difference in maximum diameter. Furthermore, using an idealized axisymmetric, finite-element growth and remodeling model of AAA progression, we found that both the initial axial extent of elastin loss and ongoing damage to elastin in the shoulder region of the AAA directly affected the degree of anisotropy as the lesion evolved, with more extensive insults increasing the anisotropy. This effect appeared to be mediated by alterations in axial loading and subsequent differences in orientation of deposited collagen fibers. While the observed increased age before surgical intervention may suggest a potential benefit of anisotropic remodeling, future biaxial tests coupled with pre-surgical data on expansion rates and detailed theoretical analyses of the biostability of a lesion as a function of anisotropy will be required to verify its clinical relevance to patient-specific rupture risk. PMID:25086482

  4. A simulation framework for estimating wall stress distribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Chui, Chee-Kong; Huang, Wei-Min; Yang, Tao; Pang, Wai-Man; Sudhakar, Venkatesh; Chang, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is believed to occur when the mechanical stress acting on the wall exceeds the strength of the wall tissue. In endovascular aneurysm repair, a stent-graft in a catheter is released at the aneurysm site to form a new blood vessel and protect the weakened AAA wall from the pulsatile pressure and, hence, possible rupture. In this paper, we propose a framework to estimate the wall stress distribution of non-stented/stented AAA based on fluid-structure interaction, which is utilized in a surgical simulation system (IRAS). The 3D geometric model of AAA is reconstructed from computed tomography angiographic (CTA) images. Based on our experiments, a combined logarithm and polynomial strain energy equation is applied to model the elastic properties of arterial wall. The blood flow is modeled as laminar, incompressible, and non-Newtonian flow by applying Navier-Stokes equation. The obtained pressure of blood flow is applied as load on the AAA meshes with and without stent-graft and the wall stress distribution is calculated by fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver equipped in ANSYS. Experiments demonstrate that our analytical results are consistent with clinical observations. PMID:22254456

  5. Determining the influence of calcification on the failure properties of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Siobhan A; Mulvihill, John J; Barrett, Hilary E; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M; Doyle, Barry J

    2015-02-01

    Varying degrees of calcification are present in most abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, their impact on AAA failure properties and AAA rupture risk is unclear. The aim of this work is evaluate and compare the failure properties of partially calcified and predominantly fibrous AAA tissue and investigate the potential reasons for failure. Uniaxial mechanical testing was performed on AAA samples harvested from 31 patients undergoing open surgical repair. Individual tensile samples were divided into two groups: fibrous (n=31) and partially calcified (n=38). The presence of calcification was confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A total of 69 mechanical tests were performed and the failure stretch (λf), failure stress (σf) and failure tension (Tf) were recorded for each test. Following mechanical testing, the failure sites of a subset of both tissue types were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to investigate the potential reasons for failure. It has been shown that the failure properties of partially calcified tissue are significantly reduced compared to fibrous tissue and SEM and EDS results suggest that the junction between a calcification deposit and the fibrous matrix is highly susceptible to failure. This study implicates the presence of calcification as a key player in AAA rupture risk and provides further motivation for the development of non-invasive methods of measuring calcification. PMID:25482218

  6. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Renal Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.; Arya, N. Lee, B.; Hannon, R.J.; Loan, W.; Soong, C.V.

    2004-09-15

    Patients with functioning renal transplant who develop abdominal aortic aneurysm can safely be treated with endovascular repair. Endovascular repair of aneurysm avoids renal ischemia associated with cross-clamping of aorta.

  7. Nifedipine attenuation of abdominal aortic aneurysm in hypertensive and non-hypertensive mice: Mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiao Niu; Siu, Kin Lung; Cai, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a lethal event. No oral medicine has been available to prevent or treat AAA. We have recently identified a novel mechanism of eNOS uncoupling by which AAA develops, in angiotensin II (Ang II) infused hyperphenylalaninemia 1 (hph-1) mice. Using this unique model we investigated effects on AAA formation of the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine, in view of the unclear relationship between hypertension and AAA, and unclear mechanisms of aneurysm protective effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs. Six-month old hph-1 mice were infused with Ang II (0.7 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks, and fed nifedipine chow at two different doses (5 and 20 mg/kg/day). While the high dose of nifedipine reduced blood pressure, the lower dose had no effect. Interestingly, the incidence rate of AAA dropped from 71% to 7 and 12.5% for low and high dose nifedipine, respectively. Expansion of abdominal aorta, determined by ultrasound imaging, was abolished by both doses of nifedipine, which recoupled eNOS completely to improve NO bioavailability. Both also abrogated aortic superoxide production. Of note, Ang II activation of NADPH oxidase in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, known to uncouple eNOS, was also attenuated by nifedipine. Although low dose was a sub-pressor while the high dose reduced blood pressure via inhibition of calcium channels, both doses were highly effective in preventing AAA by preserving eNOS coupling activity to eliminate sustained oxidative stress from uncoupled eNOS. These data demonstrate that oral treatment of nifedipine is highly effective in preserving eNOS function to attenuate AAA formation. Nifedipine may be used for AAA prevention either at low dose in AAA risk group, or at high dose in patients with co-existing hypertension. PMID:26254182

  8. Increased Expression of Lamin A/C Correlate with Regions of High Wall Stress in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Malkawi, Amir; Pirianov, Grisha; Torsney, Evelyn; Chetter, Ian; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Loftus, Ian M.; Nordon, Ian; Huggins, Christopher; Charolidi, Nicoletta; Thompson, Matt; Xu, Xie Yun; Cockerill, Gillian W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Since aortic diameter is the most ­significant risk factor for rupture, we sought to identify stress-dependent changes in gene expression to illuminate novel molecular processes in aneurysm rupture. Materials and Methods We constructed finite element maps of abdominal computerized tomography scans (CTs) of seven abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients to map wall stress. Paired biopsies from high- and low-stress areas were collected at surgery using vascular landmarks as coordinates. Differential gene expression was evaluated by Illumina Array analysis, using the whole genome DNA-mediated, annealing, selection, extension, and ligation (DASL) gene chip (n = 3 paired samples). Results The sole significant candidate from this analysis, Lamin A/C, was validated at the protein level, using western blotting. Lamin A/C expression in the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV) of AAA patients was compared to a control group and in aortic smooth muscle cells in culture in response to physiological pulsatile stretch. ­Areas of high wall stress (n = 7) correlate to those ­regions which have the thinnest walls [778 µm (585–1120 µm)] in comparison to areas of lowest wall stress [1620 µm (962–2919 µm)]. Induced expression of Lamin A/C ­correlated with areas of high wall stress from AAAs but was not significantly induced in the IMV from AAA patients compared to controls (n = 16). Stress-induced expression of Lamin A/C was mimicked by exposing aortic smooth muscle cells to prolonged pulsatile stretch. Conclusion Lamin A/C protein is specifically increased in areas of high wall stress in AAA from patients, but is not increased on other vascular beds of aneurysm patients, suggesting that its elevation may be a compensatory response to the pathobiology leading to aneurysms. PMID:27175366

  9. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  10. A mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a patient with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Gunst, Jesper Damsgaard; Jensen-Fangel, Søren

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with HIV infection presented with acute severe abdominal pain radiating to the back. A CT scan revealed an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, and an aortobifemoral bypass was undertaken. Subsequently, tissue specimens from the aortic wall grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient received 8 weeks of intravenous antibiotic treatment followed by oral sulfotrim as secondary prophylaxis and made an uneventful recovery. PMID:24443338

  11. Epithelioid Angiosarcoma With Metastatic Disease After Endovascular Therapy of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Schmehl, Joerg; Scharpf, Marcus; Brechtel, Klaus; Kalender, Guenay; Heller, Stephan; Claussen, Claus D.; Lescan, Mario

    2012-02-15

    Malignancies of the aortic wall represent a rare condition, and only a few reports have covered cases of sarcomas arising at the site of a prosthesis made of Dacron. A coincidence with endovascular repair has only been reported in one case to date. We report a patient with epithelioid angiosarcoma and metastatic disease, which was found in an aneurysmal sac after endovascular aortic repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  12. External transabdominal manipulation of vessels: a useful adjunct with endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Sternbergh, W C; Money, S R; Yoselevitz, M

    2001-04-01

    During endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, a severely angulated aortic neck or tortuous iliac arteries can make delivery of endografts difficult. We describe a simple adjunct in which transabdominal manipulation of vessels is used, which can greatly facilitate delivery of these devices in patients with challenging anatomy. PMID:11296348

  13. Fluid-structure interaction in abdominal aortic aneurysms: effects of asymmetry and wall thickness

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Christine M; Shkolnik, Alexander D; Muluk, Satish C; Finol, Ender A

    2005-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a prevalent disease which is of significant concern because of the morbidity associated with the continuing expansion of the abdominal aorta and its ultimate rupture. The transient interaction between blood flow and the wall contributes to wall stress which, if it exceeds the failure strength of the dilated arterial wall, will lead to aneurysm rupture. Utilizing a computational approach, the biomechanical environment of virtual AAAs can be evaluated to study the affects of asymmetry and wall thickness on this stress, two parameters that contribute to increased risk of aneurysm rupture. Methods Ten virtual aneurysm models were created with five different asymmetry parameters ranging from β = 0.2 to 1.0 and either a uniform or variable wall thickness to study the flow and wall dynamics by means of fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses. The AAA wall was designed to have a (i) uniform 1.5 mm thickness or (ii) variable thickness ranging from 0.5 – 1.5 mm extruded normally from the boundary surface of the lumen. These models were meshed with linear hexahedral elements, imported into a commercial finite element code and analyzed under transient flow conditions. The method proposed was then compared with traditional computational solid stress techniques on the basis of peak wall stress predictions and cost of computational effort. Results The results provide quantitative predictions of flow patterns and wall mechanics as well as the effects of aneurysm asymmetry and wall thickness heterogeneity on the estimation of peak wall stress. These parameters affect the magnitude and distribution of Von Mises stresses; varying wall thickness increases the maximum Von Mises stress by 4 times its uniform thickness counterpart. A pre-peak systole retrograde flow was observed in the AAA sac for all models, which is due to the elastic energy stored in the compliant arterial wall and the expansion force of the artery

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease effect on the prevalence and postoperative outcome of abdominal aortic aneurysms: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jiang; Wu, Zhongyin; Chen, Chen; Guo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggested chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) might increase risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). However, the association between COPD and AAA remains inconclusive. We searched PubMed and Cochrane databases until June 2015. Forty-eight articles were included for meta-analysis. COPD was found to be positively associated with AAA, regardless of study design and smoking status. AAA mortality is higher among COPD patients compared with non-COPD patients (postoperative [adjusted OR 2.11; 95% CI 1.33-3.34]; long-term [adjusted OR 1.70; 95% CI 1.37-2.12]). But the association between postoperative mortality and COPD was not found to be significant in patients underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (mixed OR 2.53; 95% CI 0.70-9.18). Rupture AAA may increase the postoperative mortality in COPD patients (rupture [adjusted OR 4.75; 95% CI 2.07-10.89]; non-rupture [adjusted OR 1.97; 95% CI 1.11-3.49]). The AAA postoperative morbidity was found to be positively associated with COPD (adjusted OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.14-2.21). Increased COPD severity may increase the long-term mortality (medical versus oxygen dependent: [OR 1.26; 95% CI 1.07-1.49] versus [OR 2.79; 95% CI 2.24-3.49]). In conclusion, COPD may increase the risk of AAA, morbidity and mortality of AAA patients underwent endovascular aortic repair. PMID:27112336

  15. Hemodynamic Influences on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Disease: Application of Biomechanics to Aneurysm Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Monica M.; Dalman, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    “Atherosclerotic” abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur with the greatest frequency in the distal aorta. The unique hemodynamic environment of this area predisposes it to site-specific degenerative changes. In this review, we summarize the differential hemodynamic influences present along the length of the abdominal aorta, and demonstrate how alterations in aortic flow and wall shear stress modify AAA progression in experimental models. Improved understanding of aortic hemodynamic risk profiles provides an opportunity to modify patient activity patterns to minimize risk of aneurysmal degeneration. PMID:20347049

  16. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Mark; Giannakopoulos, Triantafillos; Al-Khoury, Georges E; Chaer, Rabih A; Avgerinos, Efthymios D

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but also for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs [endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)] has increased the need for repeat imaging, especially in the postoperative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution, and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While computed tomographic angiography and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, US technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D, or 4D contrast-enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume, and most importantly, it can detect endoleaks post-EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast-enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post-EVAR follow-up, techniques, and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27303669

  17. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management

    PubMed Central

    Scaife, Mark; Giannakopoulos, Triantafillos; Al-Khoury, Georges E.; Chaer, Rabih A.; Avgerinos, Efthymios D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but also for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs [endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)] has increased the need for repeat imaging, especially in the postoperative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution, and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While computed tomographic angiography and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, US technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D, or 4D contrast-enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume, and most importantly, it can detect endoleaks post-EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast-enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post-EVAR follow-up, techniques, and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27303669

  18. Macrophage inflammasome mediates hyperhomocysteinemia-aggravated abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weiliang; Pang, Yanli; Liu, Ziyi; Sun, Lulu; Liu, Bo; Xu, Mingjiang; Dong, Yongqiang; Feng, Juan; Jiang, Changtao; Kong, Wei; Wang, Xian

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a serious vascular disease with high mortality. Our previous study suggested that hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) exaggerates the occurrence of AAA. Here, we investigated whether macrophage inflammasome is involved in HHcy-aggravated AAA formation. Two independent HHcy-aggravated AAA models, perivascular calcium phosphate-treated C57BL/6 mice and angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice were used. NLPR3, caspase 1, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels were higher in aneurysmal lesions of both HHcy models compared to controls, preferentially in macrophages. Similarly, macrophage inflammasome activation was observed in vitro. Folic acid administration reversed the HHcy-accelerated AAA, with ameliorated activation of inflammasome in the tunica adventitia. Lentiviral silencing of NLRP3 significantly ameliorated HHcy-aggravated AAA formation. We observed increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and energy switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis with excess Hcy in macrophages. Blocking mitochondrial ROS production in macrophages abolished inflammasome activation. Our study highlights the potential importance of macrophage inflammasome in the pathogenesis and development of HHcy-aggravated AAA. PMID:25680906

  19. The Potential Role of DNA Methylation in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ryer, Evan J.; Ronning, Kaitryn E.; Erdman, Robert; Schworer, Charles M.; Elmore, James R.; Peeler, Thomas C.; Nevius, Christopher D.; Lillvis, John H.; Garvin, Robert P.; Franklin, David P.; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Tromp, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disorder that has a significant impact on the aging population. While both genetic and environmental risk factors have been implicated in AAA formation, the precise genetic markers involved and the factors influencing their expression remain an area of ongoing investigation. DNA methylation has been previously used to study gene silencing in other inflammatory disorders and since AAA has an extensive inflammatory component, we sought to examine the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in mononuclear blood cells of AAA cases and matched non-AAA controls. To this end, we collected blood samples and isolated mononuclear cells for DNA and RNA extraction from four all male groups: AAA smokers (n = 11), AAA non-smokers (n = 9), control smokers (n = 10) and control non-smokers (n = 11). Methylation data were obtained using the Illumina 450k Human Methylation Bead Chip and analyzed using the R language and multiple Bioconductor packages. Principal component analysis and linear analysis of CpG island subsets identified four regions with significant differences in methylation with respect to AAA: kelch-like family member 35 (KLHL35), calponin 2 (CNN2), serpin peptidase inhibitor clade B (ovalbumin) member 9 (SERPINB9), and adenylate cyclase 10 pseudogene 1 (ADCY10P1). Follow-up studies included RT-PCR and immunostaining for CNN2 and SERPINB9. These findings are novel and suggest DNA methylation may play a role in AAA pathobiology. PMID:25993294

  20. Matricellular protein CCN3 mitigates abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; van der Voort, Dustin; Shi, Hong; Qing, Yulan; Hiraoka, Shuichi; Takemoto, Minoru; Yokote, Koutaro; Moxon, Joseph V.; Norman, Paul; Rittié, Laure; Atkins, G. Brandon; Gerson, Stanton L.; Shi, Guo-Ping; Golledge, Jonathan; Dong, Nianguo; Perbal, Bernard; Prosdocimo, Domenick A.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; however, the mechanisms that are involved in disease initiation and progression are incompletely understood. Extracellular matrix proteins play an integral role in modulating vascular homeostasis in health and disease. Here, we determined that the expression of the matricellular protein CCN3 is strongly reduced in rodent AAA models, including angiotensin II–induced AAA and elastase perfusion–stimulated AAA. CCN3 levels were also reduced in human AAA biopsies compared with those in controls. In murine models of induced AAA, germline deletion of Ccn3 resulted in severe phenotypes characterized by elastin fragmentation, vessel dilation, vascular inflammation, dissection, heightened ROS generation, and smooth muscle cell loss. Conversely, overexpression of CCN3 mitigated both elastase- and angiotensin II–induced AAA formation in mice. BM transplantation experiments suggested that the AAA phenotype of CCN3-deficient mice is intrinsic to the vasculature, as AAA was not exacerbated in WT animals that received CCN3-deficient BM and WT BM did not reduce AAA severity in CCN3-deficient mice. Genetic and pharmacological approaches implicated the ERK1/2 pathway as a critical regulator of CCN3-dependent AAA development. Together, these results demonstrate that CCN3 is a nodal regulator in AAA biology and identify CCN3 as a potential therapeutic target for vascular disease. PMID:26974158

  1. Clear Depiction of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orta Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm incidentally detected clearly with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) during the examination of a patient with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia that later converted to acute myeloid leukemia. DW-MRI revealed a hyperintense halo surrounding the abdominal aorta with aneurysmatic dilatation, establishing the diagnosis.

  2. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta and aortic valve following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Charles, K P; Davidson, K G; Miller, H; Caves, P K

    1977-02-01

    Traumatic rupture of the aorta at the level of the isthmus is a well-recognized injury following blunt chest trauma. By contrast, rupture of the ascending aorta and of the aortic valve in a road traffic accident is rare and does not appear to have been previously reported. The occurrence of such an injury in a 56-year-old man involved in a road traffic accident is reported. The diagnosis was made preoperatively following aortography and successful surgical correction involved aortic valve replacement with resection and grafting of the damaged area of the ascending aorta. The probable mechanisms involved in the production of this unusual injury are discussed. PMID:834060

  3. Interactive segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysms in CTA images.

    PubMed

    de Bruijne, Marleen; van Ginneken, Bram; Viergever, Max A; Niessen, Wiro J

    2004-06-01

    A model-based approach to interactive segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysms from CTA data is presented. After manual delineation of the aneurysm sac in the first slice, the method automatically detects the contour in subsequent slices, using the result from the previous slice as a reference. If an obtained contour is not sufficiently accurate, the user can intervene and provide an additional manual reference contour. The method is inspired by the active shape model (ASM) segmentation scheme (), in which a statistical shape model, derived from corresponding landmark points in manually labeled training images, is fitted to the image in an iterative manner. In our method, a shape model of the contours in two adjacent image slices is progressively fitted to the entire volume. The contour obtained in one slice thus constrains the possible shapes in the next slice. The optimal fit is determined on the basis of multi-resolution gray level models constructed from gray value patches sampled around each landmark. We propose to use the similarity of adjacent image slices for this gray level model, and compare these to single-slice features that are more generally used with ASM. The performance of various image features is evaluated in leave-one-out experiments on 23 data sets. Features that use the similarity of adjacent image slices outperform measures based on single-slice features in all cases. The average number of slices in our datasets is 51, while on average eight manual initializations are required, which decreases operator segmentation time by a factor of 6. PMID:15063862

  4. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.

  5. Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kurzencwyg, David; Filion, Kristian B; Pilote, Louise; Nault, Patrice; Platt, Robert W; Rahme, Elham; Steinmetz, Oren; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2006-09-01

    Open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is a common surgical procedure associated with high mortality rates. Our objective was to describe the use of in-hospital cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing open AAA repair and to examine the effect of perioperative cardiac medical therapy on in-hospital mortality. We examined clinical data and in-hospital medication use among 223 patients who underwent open AAA repair at three North American hospitals, all of which used the Transition resource and cost accounting system. Medication use was described [angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, aspirin, ss-blockers, and statins] within the cohort at five specific periods of time: presurgery, day of surgery, 1 day after surgery, postsurgery, and discharge. We then performed a matched case-control study where cases were defined as patients who died in-hospital. We compared medication use between cases and controls to assess its impact on in-hospital mortality. Most patients were elderly (mean age 72.5 +/- 9.8 years), 70.4% were male, and in-hospital mortality within the cohort was 10.8%. Medication use in all periods of administration was low. ss-Blocker use was highest among all classes on the day of surgery, with 20.6% of patients undergoing AAA repair receiving the medication. Less than 50% of patients received any of the medications at discharge. After adjusting for baseline differences, perioperative ACE inhibitor use showed a trend toward a protective effect [odds ratio (OR) = 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01-1.31, p = 0.08], and perioperative ss-blocker use was significantly associated with a decrease in mortality (OR = 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.87, p = 0.04). Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing AAA repair is low throughout all periods of hospitalization. ACE inhibitor and ss-blocker use may be associated with decreased in-hospital mortality. PMID:16794911

  6. Abdominal aortic calcification: A reappraisal of epidemiological and pathophysiological data.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    In men and women, there is a significant association between the risk of cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, stroke) and risk of major fragility fracture (hip, vertebra). Abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) can be assessed using semiquantitative scores on spine radiographs and spine scans obtained by DXA. Severe AAC is associated with higher risk of major cardiovascular event. Not only does severe AAC reflect poor cardiovascular health status, but also directly disturbs blood flow in the vascular system. Severe (but not mild or moderate) AAC is associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), faster bone loss and higher risk of major fragility fracture. The fracture risk remains increased after adjustment for BMD and other potential risk factors. The association between severe AAC and fracture risk was found in both sexes, mainly in the follow-ups of less than 10years. Many factors contribute to initiation and progression of AAC: lifestyle, co-morbidities, inorganic ions, dyslipidemia, hormones, cytokines (e.g. inflammatory cytokines, RANKL), matrix vesicles, microRNAs, structural proteins (e.g. elastin), vitamin K-dependent proteins, and medications (e.g. vitamin K antagonists). Osteogenic transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and circulating osteoprogenitors penetrating into vascular wall plays a major role in the AAC initiation and progression. Vitamin K-dependent proteins protect vascular tunica media against formation of calcified deposits (matrix GLA protein, GLA-rich protein) and against VSMC apoptosis (Gas6). Further studies are needed to investigate clinical utility of AAC for the assessment of fracture and cardiovascular risk at the individual level and develop new medications permitting to prevent AAC progression. PMID:26688274

  7. Semiautomatic vessel wall detection and quantification of wall thickness in computed tomography images of human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, Judy; DiMartino, Elena S.; Goldhammer, Adam; Goldman, Daniel H.; Acker, Leah C.; Patel, Gopal; Ng, Julie H.; Martufi, Giampaolo; Finol, Ender A.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Quantitative measurements of wall thickness in human abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) may lead to more accurate methods for the evaluation of their biomechanical environment. Methods: The authors describe an algorithm for estimating wall thickness in AAAs based on intensity histograms and neural networks involving segmentation of contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography images. The algorithm was applied to ten ruptured and ten unruptured AAA image data sets. Two vascular surgeons manually segmented the lumen, inner wall, and outer wall of each data set and a reference standard was defined as the average of their segmentations. Reproducibility was determined by comparing the reference standard to lumen contours generated automatically by the algorithm and a commercially available software package. Repeatability was assessed by comparing the lumen, outer wall, and inner wall contours, as well as wall thickness, made by the two surgeons using the algorithm. Results: There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the lumen area (r=0.978 and r=0.996 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively) and between vascular surgeons (r=0.987 and r=0.992 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively). The authors' automatic algorithm showed better results when compared to the reference with an average lumen error of 3.69%, which is less than half the error between the commercially available application Simpleware and the reference (7.53%). Wall thickness measurements also showed good agreement between vascular surgeons with average coefficients of variation of 10.59% (ruptured aneurysms) and 13.02% (unruptured aneurysms). Ruptured aneurysms exhibit significantly thicker walls (1.78{+-}0.39 mm) than unruptured ones (1.48{+-}0.22 mm), p=0.044. Conclusions: While further refinement is needed to fully automate the outer wall segmentation algorithm, these preliminary results demonstrate the method's adequate reproducibility

  8. Mechanisms and prevention of anterior spinal artery syndrome following abdominal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Aydin, A

    2015-01-01

    Paraplegia or paraparesis occurring as a complication of thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair is a well known phenomenon, but the vast majority of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs are performed without serious neurological complications. Nevertheless, there have been many reported cases of spinal cord ischaemia following the elective repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA); giving rise to paraplegia, sphincter incontinence and, often, dissociated sensory loss. According to the classification made by Gloviczki et al. (1991), this presentation is classified as type II spinal cord ischaemia, more commonly referred to as anterior spinal artery syndrome (ASAS). It is the most common neurological complication occurring following abdominal aortic surgery with an incidence of 0.1-0.2%. Several aetiological factors, including intra-operative hypotension, embolisation and prolonged aortic crossclamping, have been suggested to cause anterior spinal artery syndrome, but the principal cause has almost always been identified as an alteration in the blood supply to the spinal cord. A review of the literature on the anatomy of the vascular supply of the spinal cord highlights the significance of the anterior spinal artery as well as placing additional emphasis on the great radicular artery of Adamkiewicz (arteria radicularis magna) and the pelvic collateral circulation. Although there have been reported cases of spontaneous recovery, complete recovery is uncommon and awareness and prevention remains the mainstay of treatment. However, being so tragically unpredictable and random, spinal cord ischaemia after abdominal aortic operations appears to be an unpreventable event. PMID:25757179

  9. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Detection and Follow-Up of an Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aorto-Caval Fistula and Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Clevert, D.-A. Stickel, M.; Flach, P.; Strautz, T.; Horng, A.; Jauch, K. W.; Reiser, M.

    2007-06-15

    An aorto-caval fistula is a rare complication of a symptomatic or ruptured infrarenal aortic aneurysm having a frequency of 3-6%. Patients typically present with clinical signs of diffuse abdominal pain associated with increasing venous congestion and tachycardia, rapid cardiopulmonary decompensation with acute dyspnea, and an audible machinerylike bruit. Perioperative mortality is high, ranging from 20% to 60%. We report a case of an endovascular aortic repair in a patient with a symptomatic infrarenal aortic aneurysm and an aorto-caval fistula. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound seems to be a promising new diagnostic option for the diagnosis and preoperative treatment planning for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms with rupture into the inferior vena cava. It is in addition to computed tomography angiography. It might allow a more rapid and noninvasive diagnosis, especially for patients in intensive care because of its bedside availability. Because the examination is dynamic, additional information about blood flow between the aorta and inferior cava vein can be evaluated.

  10. Patient-specific modelling of abdominal aortic aneurysms: The influence of wall thickness on predicted clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Conlisk, Noel; Geers, Arjan J; McBride, Olivia M B; Newby, David E; Hoskins, Peter R

    2016-06-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is linked to aneurysm morphology. This study investigates the influence of patient-specific (PS) AAA wall thickness on predicted clinical outcomes. Eight patients under surveillance for AAAs were selected from the MA(3)RS clinical trial based on the complete absence of intraluminal thrombus. Two finite element (FE) models per patient were constructed; the first incorporated variable wall thickness from CT (PS_wall), and the second employed a 1.9mm uniform wall (Uni_wall). Mean PS wall thickness across all patients was 1.77±0.42mm. Peak wall stress (PWS) for PS_wall and Uni_wall models was 0.6761±0.3406N/mm(2) and 0.4905±0.0850N/mm(2), respectively. In 4 out of 8 patients the Uni_wall underestimated stress by as much as 55%; in the remaining cases it overestimated stress by up to 40%. Rupture risk more than doubled in 3 out of 8 patients when PS_wall was considered. Wall thickness influenced the location and magnitude of PWS as well as its correlation with curvature. Furthermore, the volume of the AAA under elevated stress increased significantly in AAAs with higher rupture risk indices. This highlights the sensitivity of standard rupture risk markers to the specific wall thickness strategy employed. PMID:27056256

  11. Mediastinitis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus with ruptured aortic pseudoaneurysm in a heart transplant recipient: case study.

    PubMed

    Byl, B; Jacobs, F; Antoine, M; Depierreux, M; Serruys, E; Primo, G; Thys, J P

    1993-01-01

    The case of a heart transplant recipient with a ruptured aortic pseudoaneurysm caused by an Aspergillus fumigatus mediastinitis is reported. Contamination of surgical fields occurring by air seeding during surgery appears to be the most probable source of infection. Subtle infectious signs of the wound and subacute course are remarkable features of this case. PMID:8449757

  12. Comparison of risk-scoring systems in predicting hospital mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Supsamutchai, Chaiyarat; Wilasrusmee, Chumpon; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Proprom, Napaphat; Kittur, Dilip S

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity, Portsmouth adjustment (P-POSSUM), the Hardman index and the Glasgow aneurysm score (GAS) in the prediction of hospital mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. METHODS: Medical charts of 146 AAA patients treated between January 1996 and January 2007 were reviewed. The P-POSSUM, Hardman index and GAS were calculated for each patient. The scores were tested and compared for their discriminatory ability to predict hospital death. RESULTS: Of the 146 patients with ruptured and unruptured AAAs (133 underwent open repair, five underwent extra-anatomical bypass and eight underwent endovascular aneurysm repair), 18 died (12%) after AAA repair. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the GAS, Hardman index and P-POSSUM for predicting hospital mortality were 0.740, 0.730 and 0.886, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the P-POSSUM was significantly higher than those of other scores. CONCLUSION: In the present study, the P-POSSUM was the best predictor of hospital mortality for patients undergoing AAA repair. PMID:22477446

  13. Fluid-structure interaction in axially symmetric models of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Fraser, K H; Li, M-X; Lee, W T; Easson, W J; Hoskins, P R

    2009-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm disease progression is probably influenced by tissue stresses and blood flow conditions and so accurate estimation of these will increase understanding of the disease and may lead to improved clinical practice. In this work the blood flow and tissue stresses in axially symmetric aneurysms are calculated using a complete fluid-structure interaction as a benchmark for calculating the error introduced by simpler calculations: rigid walled for the blood flow, homogeneous pressure for the tissue stress, as well as one-way-coupled interactions. The error in the peak von Mises stress in a homogeneous pressure calculation compared with a fluid-structure interaction calculation was less than 3.5 per cent for aneurysm diameters up to 7 cm. The error in the mean wall shear stress, in a rigid-walled calculation compared with a fluid-structure interaction calculation, varied from 30 per cent to 60 per cent with increasing aneurysm diameter. These results suggest that incorporation of the fluid-structure interaction is unnecessary for purely mechanical modelling, with the aim of evaluating the current rupture probability. However, for more complex biological modelling, perhaps with the aim of predicting the progress of the disease, where accurate estimation of the wall shear stress is essential, some form of fluid-structure interaction is necessary. PMID:19278197

  14. Late Sac Behavior after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Masahiro; Onohara, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Shimoe, Yasushi; Yamashita, Masafumi; Takahashi, Toshiki; Kishimoto, Jyunji; Mizuno, Akihiro; Kei, Junichi; Nakai, Mikizou; Sakaki, Masayuki; Suhara, Hitoshi; Kasashima, Fuminori; Endo, Masamitsu; Nishina, Takeshi; Furuyama, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Masakazu; Iwata, Keiji; Marumoto, Akira; Urata, Yasuhisa; Sato, Katsutoshi; Ryugo, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sac behavior after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is considered as a surrogate for the risk of late rupture. The purpose of the study is to assess the sac behavior of AAAs after EVAR. Methods and Results: Late sac enlargement (LSE) (≥5 mm) and late sac shrinkage (LSS) (≥5 mm) were analyzed in 589 consecutive patients who were registered at 14 national centers in Japan. The proportions of patients who had LSE at 1, 3 and 5 years were 2.6% ± 0.7%, 10.0% ± 1.6% and 19.0% ± 2.9%. The proportions of patients who had LSS at 1, 3 and 5 years were 50.1% ± 0.7%, 59.2% ± 2.3% and 61.7% ± 2.7%. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two variables as a risk factor for LSE; persistent endoleak (Odds ratio 9.56 (4.84–19.49), P <0.001) and low platelet count (Odds ratio 0.92 (0.86–0.99), P = 0.0224). The leading cause of endoleak in patients with LSE was type II. Conclusions: The incidence of LSE is not negligible over 5 year period. Patients with persistent endoleak and/or low platelet count should carefully be observed for LSE. Clinical Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR (UMIN000008345). PMID:27375803

  15. The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural analgesia in open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David; Bright, Elizabeth; London, N J M

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Complications of epidural catheterisation can cause significant morbidity. Epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation is rare and the reported incidence is variable. The purpose of this study was to review the incidence of epidural abscess in patients undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective case note review of all patients having open AAA repair over a 5-year period. RESULTS A total of 415 patients underwent open AAA repair between January 2003 and March 2008. Of these, 290 were elective procedures and 125 were for ruptured aneurysms. Six patients underwent postoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the spine for clinical suspicion of an epidural abscess. Two of these (0.48%) had confirmed epidural abscess and two superficial infection at the epidural site. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural analgesia in patients undergoing open AAA repair within our department was 0.48%. Although a rare complication, epidural abscess can cause significant morbidity. Epidural abscesses rarely develop before the third postoperative day. PMID:19887020

  16. Fluid-structure interaction in abdominal aortic aneurysms: Structural and geometrical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesri, Yaser; Niazmand, Hamid; Deyranlou, Amin; Sadeghi, Mahmood Reza

    2015-08-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the result of the relatively complex interaction of blood hemodynamics and material behavior of arterial walls. In the present study, the cumulative effects of physiological parameters such as the directional growth, arterial wall properties (isotropy and anisotropy), iliac bifurcation and arterial wall thickness on prediction of wall stress in fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis of five idealized AAA models have been investigated. In particular, the numerical model considers the heterogeneity of arterial wall and the iliac bifurcation, which allows the study of the geometric asymmetry due to the growth of the aneurysm into different directions. Results demonstrate that the blood pulsatile nature is responsible for emerging a time-dependent recirculation zone inside the aneurysm, which directly affects the stress distribution in aneurismal wall. Therefore, aneurysm deviation from the arterial axis, especially, in the lateral direction increases the wall stress in a relatively nonlinear fashion. Among the models analyzed in this investigation, the anisotropic material model that considers the wall thickness variations, greatly affects the wall stress values, while the stress distributions are less affected as compared to the uniform wall thickness models. In this regard, it is confirmed that wall stress predictions are more influenced by the appropriate structural model than the geometrical considerations such as the level of asymmetry and its curvature, growth direction and its extent.

  17. Deformable Surface Model for the Evaluation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with an Endovascular Sealing System.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, Mariano E; El-Batti, Salma; Chironi, Gilles; Simon, Alain; Mousseaux, Elie; Armentano, Ricardo L; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Craiem, Damian

    2016-05-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is responsible for 1-3% of all deaths among the elderly population in developed countries. A novel endograft proposes an endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) system that isolates the aneurysm wall from blood flow using a polymer-filled endobag that surrounds two balloon-expandable stents. The volume of injected polymer is determined by monitoring the endobag pressure but the final AAA expansion remains unknown. We conceived and developed a fully deformable surface model for the comparison of pre-operative sac lumen size and final endobag size (measured using a follow-up scan) with the volume of injected polymer. Computed tomography images were acquired for eight patients. Aneurysms were manually and automatically segmented twice by the same observer. The injected polymer volume resulted 9% higher than the aneurysm pre-operative lumen size (p < 0.05), and 11% lower than the final follow-up endobag volume (p < 0.01). The automated method required minimal user interaction; it was fast and used a single set of parameters for all subjects. Intra-observer and manual vs. automated variability of measured volumes were 0.35 ± 2.11 and 0.07 ± 3.04 mL, respectively. Deformable surface models were used to quantify AAA size and showed that EVAS system devices tended to expand the sac lumen size. PMID:26350505

  18. Pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms: microRNAs, proteases, genetic associations.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease is a common, morbid, and highly lethal pathology. Extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of AAAs. Although surgery is highly effective in preventing death by rupture for larger AAAs, no guidance or preventive therapy is currently available for the >90% of patients whose aneurysms are below the surgical threshold. Predictive animal models of AAA as well as human pathological samples have revealed a complex circuit of AAA formation and progression. The proteolytic destruction of matrix components of the aorta by different proteases has been extensively studied over many years. Recently, a novel class of small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, was identified as "fine-tuners" of the translational output of target genes; they act by promoting mRNA degradation. Their therapeutic potential in limiting AAA development appears very intriguing. Further, current studies assessing genetic and heritable associations for AAA disease have provided great insight into its pathogenesis, potentially enabling us to better clinically manage affected patients. PMID:24274177

  19. A numerical study of fluid-structure coupled effect of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yingbo; Wang, Liya; Liu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Three numerical models of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with different geometric parameters are established in order to examine the coupled effect of the fluid-structure of AAA. The study is focused on examining the roles of the dilatation parameter and the aspect ratio of an AAA in the flow dynamic within a pulse period. The numerical results demonstrate that the vortex dominates the dynamic flow behavior within an AAA. During a pressure impulse cycle, an AAA is influenced by the entirety of the vortex, from its generation to its subsequent disappearance. As an indirect effect of the vortex dynamic acting on vessels, a series of alternate impulse responses of the wall shear stress (WSS) is generated in an AAA as eddies induced by the vortex move along the axis of the vessels, and the strength of the responses is proportional to the strength of the eddies. The alternated impulse of WSS may be one of the main influencing factors on AAA rupture. The results of this study aided in understanding the mechanisms underlying the evolutionary processes of AAAs. PMID:26406009

  20. Fatal Delayed Esophageal Rupture Following Aortic Clamping for Treatment of Stanford Type B Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hisao; Yamada, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Nakame, Takahiko; Ito, Yasuhiro; Konnai, Toshiaki

    2003-11-15

    A 65-year-old man underwent a thromboexclusionoperation for management of chronic Stanford type B dissecting aneurysmin 1991. However, long-term follow-up CT scans after the operation revealed that the ascending aorta gradually enlarged and was eventually complicated by recurrent aortic dissection. The patient complained of frequent bloody sputum, whereas chest roentogenography showed no pulmonary abnormalities. Subsequent swallow esophagogram demonstrated that the upper esophagus was deviated to the right and the middle esophagus was greatly compressed by the aortic clamp. Esophageal endoscopy showed a bloody inner surface and marked swelling of the middle esophagus. The patient eventually died of massive hematemesis in 2001. We describe the imaging features of unanticipated complications such as recurrent dissecting aneurysm or impending esophageal rupture.Furthermore, we discuss the cause of hematemesis and document that the aortic clamp migrated and resulted in development of a recurrent aneurysmal dissection, which in turn resulted in esophageal rupture with aneurysmal disruption.

  1. Late Pseudocoarctation Syndrome After Stent-Graft Implantation For Traumatic Aortic Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Letocart, Vincent Fau, Georges Tirouvanziam, Ashok; Toquet, Claire; Al Habash, Oussama Guerin, Patrice; Rousseau, Herve; Crochet, Dominique

    2013-06-15

    The present observation illustrates an unusual complication occurring after stent-grafting (S-graft) for aortic isthmus rupture. A 22-year-old patient, treated by S-graft in the emergency department for traumatic aortic rupture, was readmitted 10 months later with pseudocoarctation syndrome. A membrane was found inside the stent-graft that had induced a pseudo-dissection, which caused the pseudocoarctation syndrome. Surgical treatment consisted of removing the stent-graft and membrane and replacing it with a vascular implant. The patient's clinical course was fair. The suggested mechanism was circumferential neoendothelialization of the stent-graft. Dehiscence caused the superior part of the membrane to drop into the lumen of the stent-graft creating a 'false channel' that compressed the 'true lumen' and induced 'pseudocoarctation' syndrome. The cause of the extensive neointimalization remains unexplained. Thoracic aortic stent-grafts require regular follow-up monitoring by angioscan or angio-magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Benzo[a]pyrene Potentiates the Pathogenesis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Petra A.; Perati, Prudhvidhar R.; Kon, Valentina; Guo, Zhongmao; Ramesh, Aramandla; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio; Sampson, Uchechukwu K.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), an abundant environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compound, on the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Earlier studies have shown that BaP promotes vasculopathy, including atherosclerosis, a predisposing factor for AAA development. In two experimental arms, 203 apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice were evaluated in 4 groups: BaP, angiotensin II (AngII), BaP+AngII and control. Mice in the first arm were exposed to 5mg/kg/week of BaP for 42 days, and in the second arm to 0.71mg/kg daily for 60 days. In arm one, AAA incidence was higher in the BaP+AngII (14/28) versus AngII (8/27) group (p < 0.05), rupture (n=3) was observed only in BaP+AngII treated mice (p < 0.05). In the second arm, AAA incidence did not differ between AngII (17/30) and BaP+AngII (16/29) groups. However, intact AAA diameter was larger in the BaP+AngII (2.3 ± 0.1mm) versus AngII (1.9 ± 0.1mm) group (p < 0.05), but AAA rupture did not differ (p=NS). In both experimental arms, BaP+AngII mice showed increased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), cyclophilin A (Cyp A), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) (p < 0.05). No AAA occurred in control or BaP groups. These findings suggest the role of BaP exposure in potentiating AAA pathogenesis, which may have potential public health significance. PMID:22415081

  3. A simple, effective and clinically applicable method to compute abdominal aortic aneurysm wall stress.

    PubMed

    Joldes, Grand Roman; Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Doyle, Barry

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent and irreversible dilation of the lower region of the aorta. It is a symptomless condition that if left untreated can expand to the point of rupture. Mechanically-speaking, rupture of an artery occurs when the local wall stress exceeds the local wall strength. It is therefore desirable to be able to non-invasively estimate the AAA wall stress for a given patient, quickly and reliably. In this paper we present an entirely new approach to computing the wall tension (i.e. the stress resultant equal to the integral of the stresses tangent to the wall over the wall thickness) within an AAA that relies on trivial linear elastic finite element computations, which can be performed instantaneously in the clinical environment on the simplest computing hardware. As an input to our calculations we only use information readily available in the clinic: the shape of the aneurysm in-vivo, as seen on a computed tomography (CT) scan, and blood pressure. We demonstrate that tension fields computed with the proposed approach agree well with those obtained using very sophisticated, state-of-the-art non-linear inverse procedures. Using magnetic resonance (MR) images of the same patient, we can approximately measure the local wall thickness and calculate the local wall stress. What is truly exciting about this simple approach is that one does not need any information on material parameters; this supports the development and use of patient-specific modelling (PSM), where uncertainty in material data is recognised as a key limitation. The methods demonstrated in this paper are applicable to other areas of biomechanics where the loads and loaded geometry of the system are known. PMID:26282385

  4. A biophysical and histological analysis of factors that lead to aortic rupture in normal and lathyritic turkeys.

    PubMed

    Terpin, T; Roach, M R

    1987-03-01

    These experiments were designed to determine if local differences in elastic properties or wall structure contributed to the development of aortic rupture in turkeys. Static elastic properties were measured from pressure-volume curves of cylindrical segments of upper and lower thoracic aorta and innominate artery in two groups of lathyritic birds and two age-matched control groups. The biggest changes were in the young lathyritic group that was on 0.04% beta-aminoproprionitrile at 3 weeks of age and continued for 2, 3, or 4 weeks. Much smaller changes were seen in the older group that started on 0.05% beta-aminoproprionitrile at 6 weeks of age for 10 days and then 0.02% beta-aminoproprionitrile for the next 9-12 weeks. The biggest changes were seen in the abdominal aorta, which ruptured spontaneously in 50% of the young lathyritic group. The birds had a marked decrease in the number of elastin layers per unit wall thickness. Analysis of the elastic diagrams showed that the elastance of both elastin and collagen were altered in the young lathyritic group. Rupture appeared to follow partial dissection of plaques, but true longitudinal dissection did not occur. PMID:3555748

  5. Low-dose Computed Tomography in a Pregnant Woman with a Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Ramac, Jelena Popić; Vidjak, Vinko; Skegro, Dinko; Duić, Zeljko; Blasković, Darko; Erdelez, Lidija; Skopljanac-Macina, Andrija; Suknaić, Slaven; Slavica, Marko; Leder, Nikola Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Imaging the pregnant patient presents a unique challenge to radiologist due to the risk of radiation to the conceptus (embryo/fetus). A rare case of a successfully recognized and treated pseudoaneurysm (PA) of the abdominal aorta is to be presented. The pseudoaneurysm occurred in the third trimester and had a favorable outcome for the mother and the baby. Emergent abdominal ultrasound (US) is the first modality in diagnostic algorithm for the rupture of aortic aneurysm in a pregnant woman. It provides the most rapid diagnostic information, although intestinal gas and abdominal tenderness may limit its accuracy. To confirm the findings, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or CT angiography (CTA) can be used. In our case, the diagnosis was established using a color Doppler ultrasonography of the abdomen and was later confirmed by a low dose CT scan of the abdominal aorta. MRA in such cases have some disadvantages. At many health centers, the monitoring of patients with acute ruptures is more difficult in the MR suite than at the CT scanner. MRA angiographic images are also subject to degradation by multiple artifacts and the visualization of the distal vasculature is suboptimal and inferior to the one done by CTA. Due to fetal movements, a small quantity of fresh blood can be overlooked by MR. MRA is often not available on a 24-hours basis, and the time required for making a diagnosis can preclude the use of MRA in an unstable patient. For this reason, we used a low dose CTA protocol to confirm the diagnosis. Low dose scanning protocols in CT can obtain sufficient diagnostic information while reducing the risk of radiation. A particular focus is put on the outline of new concepts for dose management and optimization. We used new approaches based on tube current modulation. The birth was induced by an urgent Caesarean section followed by a resection of a pseudoaneurysm and a reconstruction of the aorta with an end-to-end vascular prosthesis. PMID:26898082

  6. Ruptured Pneumococcal Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoyue Mona; Bonde, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured mycotic aneurysms occur infrequently in current clinical practice, and a pneumococcal etiology is even more rare. This case report describes a patient who initially presented with catheter lab activation for an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction, receiving a full Plavix load. She was subsequently found to have a ruptured aortic aneurysm and underwent emergency surgical repair, with intraoperative findings of an aorta seeded with Streptococcus pneumonia. A retrospective evaluation of her history revealed clues of a previous upper respiratory infection and long-standing back pain. The subsequent literature review summarizes presentations and outcomes in previously reported, ruptured pneumococcal aneurysms and describes the relatively common occurrence of aortic conditions masquerading as acute myocardial infarctions. We provide recommendations to help approach similar situations in the future. PMID:26798754

  7. Reduction of aneurysm pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Marston, W A; Criado, E; Baird, C A; Keagy, B A

    1996-03-01

    A canine model was designed to evaluate the changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair. Eight canines underwent laparotomy and creation of an AAA. The aneurysm was then excluded with a transluminally placed endovascular graft (TPEG) inserted through the right femoral artery and deployed across the AAA to exclude the infrarenal aortic branches from aortic perfusion. Blood pressure and flow data were recorded for 6 hours. The AAA blood pressure decreased from 135 +/- 9.3 mm Hg before exclusion to 45 +/- 17.6 mm Hg at 10 minutes after exclusion (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, AAA blood pressure had declined further to 26 +/- 12.5 mm Hg. Blood flow in the excluded iliac artery decreased from a baseline of 242 +/- 58 ml/min to 41 +/- 29 ml/min 10 minutes after TPEG placement (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, flow was reduced to 12 +/- 3.5 ml/min (p < 0.05 compared with that at 10 minutes). Aortic wall stress was significantly reduced by TPEG placement but was only slightly lower than baseline aortic wall stress before AAA creation. The lumbar arteries were patent with retrograde flow in all cases and were found to be the major contributors to postexclusion aneurysm pressure. Endovascular AAA exclusion results in an immediate decrease in blood pressure and wall stress within the excluded aneurysm, but the aneurysm remains perfused by retrograde flow through the lumbar arteries, which resulted in near-baseline levels of aneurysm wall stress in this canine model. Embolization of patient lumbar vessels at prosthesis placement may further reduce the risk of late rupture. PMID:8733869

  8. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage. (a) Definitions: As used in this section, the following... screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm as a result of an initial preventive physical examination...

  9. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage. (a) Definitions: As used in this section, the following... screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm as a result of an initial preventive physical examination...

  10. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage. (a) Definitions: As used in this section, the following... screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm as a result of an initial preventive physical examination...

  11. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage. (a) Definitions: As used in this section, the following... ultrasound screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm under Medicare program; and (2) Is included in at...

  12. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms... aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage. (a) Definitions: As used in this section, the following... screening for an abdominal aortic aneurysm as a result of an initial preventive physical examination...

  13. Spontaneous uterine rupture after abdominal myomectomy at the gestational age of 20 weeks in pregnancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Pakniat, Hamideh; Soofizadeh, Nasrin; Khezri, Marzieh Beigom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uterine rupture in pregnancy is rare and often could be life threatening and catastrophic. Myomectomy is one of very common surgeries in gynecology, performed as the vaginal, abdominal and laparoscopic surgeries. Pregnancies occured after abdominal and laparoscopic myomectomy are high risk for uterine rapture. Case: Patient was a 28 Years old female, pregnant woman at the 20 wks of gestational age with abdominal pain and a history of abdominal myomectomy 6 yrs ago. Uterus was ruptured and fetus in amniotic sac was found in abdominal cavity. Conclusion: Early diagnosis of uterine rupture after myomectomy can save patients from death. PMID:27525334

  14. [Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with transplanted kidney].

    PubMed

    Khabazov, R I; Chupin, A V; Kolosov, R V; Deriabin, S V

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular repair of the abdominal aorta is a method of choice in pronounced concomitant pathology and high risk of open surgical treatment. The article deals with a clinical case report of successful surgical management of a patient with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm, transplanted kidney, chronic renal insufficiency, secondary diabetes mellitus, multifocal atherosclerosis with predominant involvement of coronary arteries and lower-limb arteries, in whom open surgical treatment was associated with high risk. Endoprosthetic repair of the abdominal aortic aneurysm was performed with a good postoperative outcome. PMID:27626264

  15. Renal flow studies after abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy and axillo-bifemoral bypass graft: case report

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Yussen, P.S.

    1988-03-01

    Vascular disorders affecting the kidneys are either acquired or congenital. Included in this category are common multiplicity of renal arteries, the rare arteriovenous malformation, stresses due to fibromuscular disease or atherosclerosis including abdominal aortic aneurysms, arterial thrombosis, venous thrombosis, and infarction. In contrast to the group of cystic and neoplastic kidneys where scintigraphic or pathologic are not diagnostic, scintigraphic or pathologic anatomy in vascular disease is often diagnostic by nuclear medicine techniques. The authors present an interesting case of evaluation of acute renal failure in a patient abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy and axillo-bifemoral bypass graft.

  16. Surgical Treatment of a Voluminous Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Horseshoe Kidney: Tips and Tricks.

    PubMed

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Mastrojeni, Claudio; Serra, Raffaele; Salomone, Ignazio; La Spada, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a common urology anomaly, while its association with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm represents a very rare condition. Surgical approach remains controversial however, we believe that the left retroperitoneal approach should be preferred in order to avoid isthmus resection with any subsequent renal infarction, urinary tract damage and to facilitate renal arteries reimplantation, when required. We present a case of voluminous infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with horseshoe kidney, successfully treated through a left retroperitoneal approach on the retro-renal space. PMID:26730260

  17. Surgical Treatment of a Voluminous Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Horseshoe Kidney: Tips and Tricks

    PubMed Central

    Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Mastrojeni, Claudio; Serra, Raffaele; Salomone, Ignazio; La Spada, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a common urology anomaly, while its association with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm represents a very rare condition. Surgical approach remains controversial however, we believe that the left retroperitoneal approach should be preferred in order to avoid isthmus resection with any subsequent renal infarction, urinary tract damage and to facilitate renal arteries reimplantation, when required. We present a case of voluminous infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with horseshoe kidney, successfully treated through a left retroperitoneal approach on the retro-renal space. PMID:26730260

  18. Restoration of the pelvic circulation in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms receiving aortobifemoral grafts.

    PubMed

    Cardia, G; Tumolo, R; Cafagna, L

    1998-04-01

    When operating on abdominal aortic aneurysms associated with stenoses or occlusions of iliac vessels, surgeons may face the problem of reestablishing circulation to pelvic or gluteal territories. A new technique consists of anastomosing a posterior opening in the body or one of the branches of a bifurcated graft, distally sutured to the femoral artery, to the distal aortic stump, which contains all the patent vessels arising from the end of the aorta, such as inferior mesenteric and lumbar arteries. This technique, successfully performed in two cases, has the advantages of avoiding closure of the distal aortic stump and a possible backflow leak and of ensuring adequate pelvic circulation. PMID:9576094

  19. Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Tomofumi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common feature of aging and is related to coronary artery disease. Although abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays fundamental roles in coronary artery disease, the relationship between abdominal VAT and AVC is not fully understood. Methods. We investigated 259 patients who underwent cardiac and abdominal computed tomography (CT). AVC was defined as calcified lesion on the aortic valve by CT. %abdominal VAT was calculated as abdominal VAT area/total adipose tissue area. Results. AVC was detected in 75 patients, and these patients showed higher %abdominal VAT (44% versus 38%, p < 0.05) compared to those without AVC. When the cutoff value of %abdominal VAT was set at 40.9%, the area under the curve to diagnose AVC was 0.626. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR 1.120, 95% CI 1.078–1.168, p < 0.01), diabetes (OR 2.587, 95% CI 1.323–5.130, p < 0.01), and %abdominal VAT (OR 1.032, 95% CI 1.003–1.065, p < 0.05) were independent risk factors for AVC. The net reclassification improvement value for detecting AVC was increased when %abdominal VAT was added to the model: 0.5093 (95% CI 0.2489–0.7697, p < 0.01). Conclusion. We determined that predominance of VAT is associated with AVC. PMID:26904670

  20. Pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture following blunt abdominal trauma: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Abou Hussein, Bassem; Khammas, Ali; Kaiyasah, Hadiel; Swaleh, Abeer; Al Rifai, Nazim; Al-Mazrouei, Alya; Badri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture (TDR) occurs in 0–5% of patients with major blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma, in most of them on the left side, and an early correct diagnosis is made in less than half of the cases (Meyers and McCabe, 1993; Ball et al., 1982). Presentation of the case We report a case of a forty-eight years old man who had a pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture after a high-velocity blunt abdominal trauma that was diagnosed and treated successfully. Discussion Pericardio-diaphragmatic rupture (PDR) is an uncommon problem that poses a diagnostic challenge to surgeons. The incidence of PDR is between 0.2% and 3.3% of cases with TDR (Sharma, 1999 [3]). Conclusion PDR should be suspected in any patient with high velocity thoraco-abdominal trauma. Early diagnosis is essential and needs a high index of suspicion. Early Management is important in decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26773877

  1. Infected abdominal aortic aneurysm caused by nontyphoid Salmonella in an immunocompromised patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kayoko; Nonomura, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Kaori; Koike, Ryuji; Kubota, Tetsuo; Harigai, Masayoshi; Inoue, Yoshinori; Iwai, Takehisa; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki

    2009-10-01

    Nontyphoid Salmonella strains are important pathogens commonly found worldwide, typically causing gastrointestinal illness. Here, we report a case of a 66-yearold man with an abdominal aortic infected (or so-called mycotic) aneurysm caused by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). He had multiple risk factors for atherosclerosis: age over 60, a long history of smoking, an 8-year history of diabetes mellitus, and a 10-year history of rheumatoid arthritis treated with low-dose corticosteroids. Although he had presented with no episode of diarrhea or abdominal pain, the abdominal aortic infected aneurysm was diagnosed by blood cultures and was carefully followed up by computed tomography. An abdominal aneurysmectomy and autogenous in situ reconstruction were successfully performed consequently. Alertness to the possibility of endovascular infection is important, even if there are no symptoms except for persistent fever, when treating Salmonella bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient, particularly when there are associated atherosclerotic risk factors. PMID:19856069

  2. Mechanical behaviour and rupture of normal and pathological human ascending aortic wall.

    PubMed

    García-Herrera, C M; Atienza, J M; Rojo, F J; Claes, E; Guinea, G V; Celentano, D J; García-Montero, C; Burgos, R L

    2012-06-01

    The mechanical properties of aortic wall, both healthy and pathological, are needed in order to develop and improve diagnostic and interventional criteria, and for the development of mechanical models to assess arterial integrity. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour and rupture conditions of the human ascending aorta and its relationship with age and pathologies. Fresh ascending aortic specimens harvested from 23 healthy donors, 12 patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and 14 with aneurysm were tensile-tested in vitro under physiological conditions. Tensile strength, stretch at failure and elbow stress were measured. The obtained results showed that age causes a major reduction in the mechanical parameters of healthy ascending aortic tissue, and that no significant differences are found between the mechanical strength of aneurysmal or BAV aortic specimens and the corresponding age-matched control group. The physiological level of the stress in the circumferential direction was also computed to assess the physiological operation range of healthy and diseased ascending aortas. The mean physiological wall stress acting on pathologic aortas was found to be far from rupture, with factors of safety (defined as the ratio of tensile strength to the mean wall stress) larger than six. In contrast, the physiological operation of pathologic vessels lays in the stiff part of the response curve, losing part of its function of damping the pressure waves from the heart. PMID:22391945

  3. Risk Stratification of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Using Aortic Augmentation Index

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Marianne; Husmann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Central augmentation index (cAIx) is an indicator for vascular stiffness. Obstructive and aneurysmatic vascular disease can affect pulse wave propagation and reflection, causing changes in central aortic pressures. Aim To assess and compare cAIx in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and / or abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods cAIx was assessed by radial applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) in a total of 184 patients at a tertiary referral centre. Patients were grouped as having PAD only, AAA only, or both AAA and PAD. Differences in cAIx measurements between the three patient groups were tested by non-parametric tests and stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis to investigate associations with obstructive or aneurysmatic patterns of vascular disease. Results In the study sample of 184 patients, 130 had PAD only, 20 had AAA only, and 34 patients had both AAA and PAD. Mean cAIx (%) was 30.5 ± 8.2 across all patients. It was significantly higher in females (35.2 ± 6.1, n = 55) than males (28.4 ± 8.2, n = 129), and significantly higher in patients over 80 years of age (34.4 ± 6.9, n = 22) than in those under 80 years (30.0 ± 8.2, n = 162). Intergroup comparison revealed a significant difference in cAIx between the three patient groups (AAA: 27.3 ± 9.5; PAD: 31.4 ± 7.8; AAA & PAD: 28.8 ± 8.5). cAIx was significantly lower in patients with AAA, higher in patients with both AAA and PAD, and highest in patients with PAD only (beta = 0.21, p = 0.006). Conclusion Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness in high-risk patients indicates that cAIx differs according to the pattern of vascular disease. Measurements revealed significantly higher cAIx values for patients with obstructive peripheral arterial disease than for patients with aneurysmatic disease. PMID:26452151

  4. A ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm managed endovascularly using the telescoping chimney technique.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Steve; Popori, R K; Pichel, Adam C; Farquharson, Finn; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand

    2011-04-01

    Extending the proximal landing zone to facilitate endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms with short proximal necks using the chimney, top-fenestration, or snorkel technique has been previously reported. In addition, extending the distal landing zone using the periscope technique has also been recently described. In this study, we used an extended chimney technique, the "telescoping technique," to successfully treat a ruptured Crawford type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with pre-existing renal failure and an occluded superior mesenteric artery. PMID:21396567

  5. Delayed rupture of the middle colic artery secondary to blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ferrella, T J

    1992-04-01

    The case of a 46-year-old man complaining of acute abdominal discomfort is presented. The patient fell 3 ft and injured his abdomen in the right upper quadrant four days before his emergency department visit. The complete workup revealed an acutely ruptured middle colic artery. The presenting symptoms, laboratory work, differential diagnosis, computed tomography scan, treatment, and follow-up are reviewed. This case is unusual in that delayed rupture of the middle colic artery secondary to blunt abdominal trauma had not been described previously. PMID:1554184

  6. Interaction of expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm with surrounding tissue: Retrospective CT image studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sebastian T.; Burek, William; Dupay, Alexander C.; Farsad, Mehdi; Baek, Seungik; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) that rupture have a high mortality rate. Rupture occurs when local mechanical stress exceeds the local mechanical strength of an AAA, so stress profiles such as those from finite element analysis (FEA) are useful. The role and effect of surrounding tissues, like the vertebral column, which have not been extensively studied, are examined in this paper. Methods Longitudinal CT scans from ten patients with AAAs were studied to see the effect of surrounding tissues on AAAs. Segmentation was performed to distinguish the AAA from other tissues and we studied how these surrounding tissues affected the shape and curvature of the AAA. Previously established methods by Veldenz et al. were used to split the AAA into 8 sections and examine the specific effects of surrounding tissues on these sections [1]. Three-dimensional models were created to better examine these effects over time. Registration was done in order to compare AAAs longitudinally. Results The vertebral column and osteophytes were observed to have been affecting the shape and the curvature of the AAA. Interaction with the spine caused focal flattening in certain areas of the AAA. In 16 of the 41 CT scans, the right posterior dorsal section (section 5), had the highest radius of curvature, which was by far the section that had the maximum radius for a specified CT scan. Evolution of the growing AAA showed increased flattening in this section when comparing the last CT scan to the first scan. Conclusion Surrounding tissues have a clear influence on the geometry of an AAA, which may in turn affect the stress profile of AAA. Incorporating these structures in FEA and G&R models will provide a better estimate of stress. Clinical Relevance Currently, size is the only variable considered when deciding whether to undergo elective surgery to repair AAA since it is an easy enough measure for clinicians to utilize. However, this may not be the best indicator of rupture risk

  7. Liver Hydatid Cyst Rupture Into the Peritoneal Cavity After Abdominal Trauma: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Akbulut, Sami; Kahraman, Aysegul; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature regarding the rupture of hydatid cysts into the abdominal cavity after trauma. We present both a new case of hydatid cyst rupture that occurred after blunt abdominal trauma and a literature review of studies published in the English language about hydatid cyst rupture after trauma; studies were accessed from PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, EMBASE, and MEDLINE databases. We identified 22 articles published between 2000 and 2011 about hydatid cyst rupture after trauma. Of these, 5 articles were excluded because of insufficient data, duplication, or absence of intra-abdominal dissemination. The other 17 studies included 68 patients (38 males and 30 females) aged 8 to 76 years who had a ruptured hydatid cyst detected after trauma. The most common trauma included traffic accidents and falls. Despite optimal surgical and antihelmintic therapy, 7 patients developed recurrence. Complications included biliary fistula in 5 patients, incisional hernia in 2 patients, and gastrocutaneous fistula in 1 patient. Death occurred from intraoperative anaphylactic shock in 1 patient and gastrointestinal bleeding and pulmonary failure in 1 patient. Rupture of a hydatid cyst into the peritoneal cavity is rare and challenging for the surgeon. This condition is included in the differential diagnosis of the acute abdomen in endemic areas, especially in young patients. PMID:23113853

  8. Successful Hybrid Treatment for a Ruptured Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman with a 27-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was admitted to our hospital with sudden-onset severe back pain. An emergency multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) revealed a ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) 80 mm in diameter. Considering her condition and comorbidities, we performed an emergency hybrid treatment: visceral reconstruction followed by endoluminal aneurysm exclusion. She recovered uneventfully, except for the need for temporary hemodialysis. TAAA complicated with SLE is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first successful report in the English literature of a ruptured TAAA in a patient with SLE who underwent hybrid treatment. PMID:23825503

  9. Blunt traumatic aortic rupture of the proximal ascending aorta repaired by resection and direct anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Harmouche, Majid; Slimani, Eric Karim; Heraudeau, Adeline; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Traumatic aortic injury represents 15% of motor vehicle related deaths with death occurring at the scene in 85% of the cases. Aortic disruptions usually occur at the isthmus in a transverse fashion with all three of the aortic layers being involved. Herein, we report the case of a 68-year old man with no prior medical history who was struck by a vehicle while riding his bicycle. The ruptured segment of aorta was resected circumferentially and interrupted horizontal mattress pledgeted prolene sutures were used to ensure full thickness aortic integrity of the proximal and distal aortic segments. The aorta was closed with a single-layer technique using 4/0 prolene suture. There were no postoperative complications and patient was discharged on Day 44. The case here discussed demonstrates a rare presentation of blunt aortic injury. The proximal ascending aorta is an unusual site of transection following blunt trauma with few reports in the literature. We were able to repair the aorta with direct suture, thus avoiding the use of artificial material. PMID:23838337

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease effect on the prevalence and postoperative outcome of abdominal aortic aneurysms: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jiang; Wu, Zhongyin; Chen, Chen; Guo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggested chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) might increase risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). However, the association between COPD and AAA remains inconclusive. We searched PubMed and Cochrane databases until June 2015. Forty-eight articles were included for meta-analysis. COPD was found to be positively associated with AAA, regardless of study design and smoking status. AAA mortality is higher among COPD patients compared with non-COPD patients (postoperative [adjusted OR 2.11; 95% CI 1.33–3.34]; long-term [adjusted OR 1.70; 95% CI 1.37–2.12]). But the association between postoperative mortality and COPD was not found to be significant in patients underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (mixed OR 2.53; 95% CI 0.70–9.18). Rupture AAA may increase the postoperative mortality in COPD patients (rupture [adjusted OR 4.75; 95% CI 2.07–10.89]; non-rupture [adjusted OR 1.97; 95% CI 1.11–3.49]). The AAA postoperative morbidity was found to be positively associated with COPD (adjusted OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.14–2.21). Increased COPD severity may increase the long-term mortality (medical versus oxygen dependent: [OR 1.26; 95% CI 1.07–1.49] versus [OR 2.79; 95% CI 2.24–3.49]). In conclusion, COPD may increase the risk of AAA, morbidity and mortality of AAA patients underwent endovascular aortic repair. PMID:27112336

  11. Fusobacterium necrophorum in an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Treated by Once Daily Ertapenem

    PubMed Central

    Wotherspoon, D.; Street, J. A.; Hedderwick, S.; Baker, R.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory aneurysms may make up a small percentage of the total number of abdominal aortic aneurysms, but they present their own unique challenges. We present a case of a 65-year-old man whose aneurysm was found to be colonized by Fusobacterium necrophorum. PMID:23997565

  12. Acute Limb Ischemia from Sudden Thrombosis of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Subram, Aswath N.; Duncan, J. Michael

    1982-01-01

    Thrombosis of a previously undiagnosed aneurysm of the abdominal aorta in a 64-year-old woman resulted in acute and severe ischemia in both legs. Prompt surgical resection of the aneurysm and restoration of aortic continuity with a fabric graft brought about complete resolution of her symptoms, with excellent functional results one year after the operation. Images PMID:15226820

  13. Embolization with Histoacryl Glue of an Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysm following Surgical Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Walid, Ayesha; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Ur Rehman, Zia

    2013-01-01

    We report a 62-year-old female who had surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm with a bifurcated graft 2 years ago. She presented with a distal anastomotic pseudoaneurysm which was successfully embolized with histoacryl glue. Only one such similar case has been reported in the literature so far (Yamagami et al. (2006)). PMID:23476883

  14. Repair of anastomotic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm utilizing sequential AneuRx aortic cuffs in an overlapping configuration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Bush, Ruth L; Bhama, Jay K; Lin, Peter H; Safaya, Rakesh; Lumsden, Alan B

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic aortic pseudoaneurysm is a known late complication following aortic repair and presents a considerable surgical challenge. We herein evaluate the endovascular alternative of using sequential AneuRx aortic cuffs to bridge the degenerative anastomotic pseudoaneurysms as a definitive treatment. Over a 3-year period, six patients with a mean age of 68.7 years (range 58-75) were identified who had proximal anastomotic aortic pseudoaneurysms secondary to previously implanted bifurcated aortic grafts (mean 15, range 12-20 years) following open surgical correction of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Five patients (83%) presented with concomitant palpable femoral anastomotic pseudoaneurysms and one patient (16%) had a pulsatile abdominal mass. All patients had computed tomographic (CT) scans confirming proximal anastomotic pseudoaneuryms without evidence of infection. The mean diameter of the pseudoaneurysms was 5.3 cm (range 4.0-7.0). Five patients were treated with endovascular methods, while one patient was not suitable for endovascular repair due to the diameter of the native aorta as seen on imaging study at the time of the procedure. AneuRx aortic extender cuffs (3.75 cm length) were deployed sequentially in five patients via a femoral approach. Devices were overlapped approximately 1.5 cm in order to achieve total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms, and all concomitant femoral aneurysms were repaired surgically at the same time. Successful exclusion of the anastomotic pseudoaneurysm was achieved in four patients (80%) using a combination of two or three overlapping aortic cuffs. One patient had a small residual endoleak that had sealed by 1 month, evidenced by follow-up CT. The renal arteries were preserved in all patients. The average estimated blood loss and operative time were 355 +/- 25 cc and 84 +/- 21 min, respectively. The average length of hospital stay was 2.1 days, and there was no mortality or major morbidity. All patients underwent CT scanning

  15. [Extracorporeal lung support and endovascular stent in traumatic aortic rupture and severe lung failure].

    PubMed

    Schmid, F X; Philipp, A; Faltermeier, H; Schädinger, U; Link, J; Birnbaum, D

    2002-07-01

    Blunt thoracic injury in association with aortic rupture represents a life-threatening situation. Surgical repair used to be the preferred method of treatment. Because most patients are multiple trauma patients including head injuries, bone fractures and respiratory failure, urgent surgical procedures portend excessively high morbidity and mortality rates. Delay in operative management bears the risk of exsanguinating hemorrhage, secondary complications, prolonged hospital stay with increased costs. We present here an alternative treatment protocol including pumpless extracorporal lung assist and endovascular aortic stent graft placement in a 20-year old traffic accident victim. This procedure may be an especially useful treatment option in managing patients with complex lung and aortic pathology primarily not suitable for transportation or surgery. PMID:12219652

  16. Ameliorative role of gemfibrozil against partial abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit Pal; Singh, Randhir; Krishan, Pawan

    2015-04-01

    Fibrates are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α agonists and are clinically used for treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Fenofibrate is reported as a cardioprotective agent in various models of cardiac dysfunction; however, limited literature is available regarding the role of gemfibrozil as a possible cardioprotective agent, especially in a non-obese model of cardiac remodelling. The present study investigated the role of gemfibrozil against partial abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy in rats. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by partial abdominal aortic constriction in rats and they survived for 4 weeks. The cardiac hypertrophy was assessed by measuring left ventricular weight to body weight ratio, left ventricular wall thickness, and protein and collagen content. The oxidative stress in the cardiac tissues was assessed by measuring thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, superoxide anion generation, and reduced glutathione level. The haematoxylin-eosin and picrosirius red staining was used to observe cardiomyocyte diameter and collagen deposition, respectively. Moreover, serum levels of cholesterol, high-density lipoproteins, triglycerides, and glucose were also measured. Gemfibrozil (30 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered since the first day of partial abdominal aortic constriction and continued for 4 weeks. The partial abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac oxidative stress and hypertrophy are indicated by significant change in various parameters used in the present study that were ameliorated with gemfibrozil treatment in rats. No significant change in serum parameters was observed between various groups used in the present study. It is concluded that gemfibrozil ameliorates partial abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac oxidative stress and hypertrophy and in rats. PMID:24905340

  17. Acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm presenting as left vocal fold immobility.

    PubMed

    Gnagi, Sharon H; Howard, Brittany E; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Lott, David G

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding the upper descending aortic stent graft consistent with an acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm. She was referred to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment by vascular surgery. She was counseled regarding surgical options and ultimately decided not to pursue further treatment. Her vocal fold immobility was subsequently treated via office-based injection medialization two weeks after presentation and again 5 months after the initial injection which dramatically improved her voice. Follow-up CT scan at 8 months demonstrated a reduction of the hematoma. The left vocal cord remains immobile to date. Conclusion. Ortner's syndrome, or cardiovocal syndrome, is hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by cardiovascular pathology. It is a rare condition and, while typically presenting gradually, may also present with acute symptomatology. PMID:25648215

  18. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Barchiche, R; Bové, T; Demanet, H; Goldstein, J P; Deuvaert, F E

    1999-08-01

    A traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta is a rare entity, occurring as the result of a missed aortic lesion at the time of the initial injury. Therefore, clinical suspicion and careful abdominal exploration at first laparotomy is mandatory to prevent aortic pseudoaneurysm formation and its risk of delayed rupture. We present a case of successful surgical treatment of a suprarenal aortic false aneurysm, presenting 4 weeks after a life-threatening gunshot wound in a 13-year-old child. PMID:10499389

  19. Innovative chimney-graft technique for endovascular repair of a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-02-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  20. Innovative Chimney-Graft Technique for Endovascular Repair of a Pararenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  1. Leukocyte mimetic polysaccharide microparticles tracked in vivo on activated endothelium and in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Thomas; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Journé, Clément; Ho Tin Noe, Benoît; Arnaud, Denis; Louedec, Liliane; Derkaoui, Sidi Mohammed; Letourneur, Didier; Chauvierre, Cédric; Le Visage, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    We have developed injectable microparticles functionalized with fucoidan, in which sulfated groups mimic the anchor sites of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), one of the principal receptors supporting leukocyte adhesion. These targeted microparticles were combined with a fluorescent dye and a T2(∗) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, and then tracked in vivo with small animal imaging methods. Microparticles of 2.5μm were obtained by a water-in-oil emulsification combined with a cross-linking process of polysaccharide dextran, fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran, pullulan and fucoidan mixed with ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide. Fluorescent intravital microscopy observation revealed dynamic adsorption and a leukocyte-like behaviour of fucoidan-functionalized microparticles on a calcium ionophore induced an activated endothelial layer of a mouse mesentery vessel. We observed 20times more adherent microparticles on the activated endothelium area after the injection of functionalized microparticles compared to non-functionalized microparticles (197±11 vs. 10±2). This imaging tool was then applied to rats presenting an elastase perfusion model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and 7.4T in vivo MRI was performed. Visual analysis of T2(∗)-weighted MR images showed a significant contrast enhancement on the inner wall of the aneurysm from 30min to 2h after the injection. Histological analysis of AAA cryosections revealed microparticles localized inside the aneurysm wall, in the same areas in which immunostaining shows P-selectin expression. The developed leukocyte mimetic imaging tool could therefore be relevant for molecular imaging of vascular diseases and for monitoring biologically active areas prone to rupture in AAA. PMID:24769117

  2. ABDOMINAL PREGNANCY IN A SERVAL (LEPTAILURUS SERVAL) SECONDARY TO UTERINE RUPTURE.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Laura K; Blue-McLendon, Alice; Hoffmann, Aline Rodrigues

    2015-06-01

    A 14-yr-old female serval (Leptailurus serval) died unexpectedly after 2 wk of inappetence and lethargy. Necropsy revealed a pyoabdomen with a full-term, well-developed fetus in the caudal abdomen covered by a mesenteric sac. The mesenteric sac communicated with a tear in the wall of the right uterine horn, supporting a diagnosis of secondary abdominal pregnancy. The uterine wall had evidence of adenomyosis at the rupture site with no evidence of pyometra. The fetus, supporting mesentery, and peritoneum were coated with mixed bacteria, which may have ascended through an open cervix to the site of uterine rupture. This is the first case of abdominal pregnancy related to uterine rupture reported in a large felid species. PMID:26056905

  3. Analysis of multiple genetic polymorphisms in aggressive- and slow-growing abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Duellman, Tyler; Warren, Christopher L.; Matsumura, Jon; Yang, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) suggests that some remain slow in growth rate while many develop a more accelerated growth rate reaching a threshold for intervention. We hypothesized that different mechanisms are responsible for AAA that remain slow-growth and never become actionable versus the aggressive-AAA that require intervention may be reflected by distinct associations with genetic polymorphisms. Methods 168 control and 141 AAA subjects all with ultrasound or CT imaging studies covering about 5 years were identified and the AAA growth rate determined from the serial imaging data. Genetic polymorphisms all previously reported as showing significant correlation with AAA: angiotensin 1 receptor (AT1R) (rs5186), interleukin-10 (IL-10) (rs1800896), methyl-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (rs1801133), low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) (rs1466535), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) (rs1799752) and several MMP9 SNPs with functional effects on the expression or function were determined by analysis of the genomic DNA. Results AAA subjects were classified as slow-growth rate- (<3.25 mm /yr; n=81) vs. aggressive-AAA (growth rate >3.25 mm /yr, those presenting with a rupture, or those with maximal aortic diameter >5.5 cm (male) or >5.0 cm (female); n=60) and discriminating confounds between the groups identified by logistic regression. Analyses identified MMP9 p-2502 SNP (P=0.029, OR=0.54 (0.31-0.94)) as a significant confound discriminating between control- vs. slow-growth AAA, MMP-9 D165N (P=0.035) and LRP1 (P=0.034) between control vs. aggressive-AAA, and MTHFR (P=0.048, OR=2.99 (1.01-8.86)), MMP9 p-2502 (P=0.037, OR=2.19 (1.05-4.58), and LRP1 (P=0.046, OR= 4.96 (1.03-23.9)) as the statistically significant confounds distinguishing slow- vs. aggressive-AAA. Conclusion Logistic regression identified different genetic confounds for the slow-growth rate-and aggressive-AAA indicating a potential for different

  4. Extra-anatomic endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a horseshoe kidney supplied by the aneurysmal aorta.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jorge; Golpanian, Samuel; Yang, Jane K; Moreno, Enrique; Velazquez, Omaida C; Goldstein, Lee J; Chahwala, Veer

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by a horseshoe kidney (HSK, fused kidney) represents a unique challenge for repair. Renal arteries arising from the aneurysmal aorta can further complicate intervention. Reports exist describing the repair of these complex anatomies using fenestrated endografts, hybrid open repairs (debranching), and open aneurysmorrhaphy with preservation of renal circulation. We describe an extra-anatomic, fully endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a HSK partially supplied by a renal artery arising from the aneurysm. We successfully applied aortouni-iliac endografting, femorofemoral bypass, and retrograde renal artery perfusion via the contralateral femoral artery to exclude the abdominal aortic aneurysm and preserve circulation to the HSK. PMID:25770382

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm into the Inferior Vena Cava in Patient After Stent Graft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert; Pukacki, Fryderyk; Zarzecka, Anna; Kulesza, Jerzy; Majewski, Waclaw

    2009-07-15

    We report the case of a patient who underwent endovascular repair and then reintervention as a result of the presence of a persistent endoleak complicated by an aortocaval fistula. A 76-year-old patient with a history of endovascular treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm 2 years earlier had a palpable abdominal mass, high-output cardiac failure, and renal failure. A computed tomographic scan and angiography revealed bending of the right iliac limb, a type I endoleak, and rupture of the aneurysm into the inferior vena cava with aortocaval fistula formation. An iliac extension was positioned in the right external iliac artery. The procedure was finished successfully. Control angiography showed normal flow within the endoprosthesis, and both iliac arteries were without signs of endoleakage and aortocaval fistula. Ectatic common iliac artery may lead to a late distal attachment site endoleak. The application of a stent graft in cases of secondary aortocaval fistula after stent graft repair is a good option, particularly in emergency cases.

  6. Nuclear cardiac ejection fraction and cardiac index in abdominal aortic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Fiser, W.P.; Thompson, B.W.; Thompson, A.R.; Eason, C.; Read, R.C.

    1983-11-01

    Since atherosclerotic heart disease results in more than half of the perioperative deaths that follow abdominal aortic surgery, a prospective protocol was designed for preoperative evaluation and intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring. Twenty men who were prepared to undergo elective operation for aortoiliac occlusive disease (12 patients) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (eight patients) were evaluated with a cardiac scan and right heart catheterization. The night prior to operation, each patient received volume loading with crystalloid based upon ventricular performance curves. At the time of the operation, all patients were anesthetized with narcotics and nitrous oxide, and hemodynamic parameters were recorded throughout the operation. Aortic crossclamping resulted in a marked depression in CI in all patients. CI remained depressed after unclamping in the majority of patients. There were two perioperative deaths, both from myocardial infarction or failure. Both patients had ejection fractions less than 30% and initial CIs less than 2 L/M2, while the survivors' mean ejection fraction was 63% +/- 1 and their mean CI was 3.2 L/M2 +/- 0.6. The authors conclude that preoperative evaluation of ejection fraction can select those patients at a high risk of cardiac death from abdominal aortic operation. These patients should receive intensive preoperative monitoring with enhancement of ventricular performance.

  7. Snorkel/chimney and fenestrated endografts for complex abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ullery, B W; Lee, J T; Dalman, R L

    2015-10-01

    Complex endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) involves extension of the proximal aortic seal zone with preservation of branch vessel patency, thereby expanding the applicability of endografting from the infrarenal to the suprarenal aorta. Snorkel/chimney (Sn-EVAR) and fenestrated EVAR (f-EVAR) serve as the two most commonly utilized advanced endovascular techniques to combat hostile proximal neck anatomy. The purpose of this article is to describe the principles and evolution of these advanced endovascular strategies, technical considerations, and results of sn- and f-EVAR in the management of challenging neck anatomy in abdominal aortic aneurysm disease. PMID:25800354

  8. Axillofemoral bypass for kidney transplant protection during open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Monnot, Antoine; Rouer, Martin; Horion, Julien; Plissonnier, Didier

    2015-08-01

    The need to treat an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in kidney transplanted patient is a rare event. To date, no method to protect the kidney during the aneurysm treatment has been identified as undeniably relevant. On the other hand, the advantage of endovascular treatment of the aneurysm (EVAR) is to avoid transplanted kidney injury. Unfortunately, EVAR is not always available leading to open repair and then aortic cross clamping. We report here 3 cases of AAA open repair in kidney transplanted patients using a temporary axillofemoral bypass to protect the renal function. PMID:25958120

  9. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Sac Rupture for Type IIIa Endoleak in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Mangini, Monica Bracchi, Elena Recaldini, Chiara; Cocozza, Eugenio; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Carlo Lagana, Domenico Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    Elective endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pathology has been applied in a variety of conditions. The complications of thoracic aortic stenting are also well recognized. Endoleak after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is the most frequent complication; among them, type III is the least frequent. Endovascular treatment of type III endoleak is generally performed under elective conditions; less frequently, in emergency. We report a successful emergency endovascular management of post-thoracic endovascular repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture due to type IIIa endoleak.

  10. Delayed aortic rupture after aortic endograft placement in patient with spinal hardware.

    PubMed

    Bavare, Charudatta; Kim, Min; Blackmon, Shanda; Ellsworth, Warren; Davies, Mark G; Reardon, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    Aortic injuries presenting in a delayed fashion after attempted repair of an acute injury are uncommon. We report a case of a patient presenting with an initial aortic injury associated with thoracic spinal hardware placement, which was repaired with an open and endovascular approach, and 5 months later presented with hemoptysis. The cause of hemoptysis was erosion of the descending thoracic aorta between the spinal hardware and the thoracic endograft. The patient underwent descending aorta replacement with a Dacron tube graft, removal of the hardware, and coverage with a pedicled omental flap. This is a unique presentation of erosion of the aorta between the spinal hardware and the earlier placed endovascular stent-graft. PMID:21958807

  11. [Successful management of ruptured aortic arch aneurysm infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Kawahira, T; Tsukube, T; Hayashi, T; Kozawa, S; Ogawa, K

    2008-09-01

    A 64-year-old woman was admitted due to back pain and dyspnea. She was suffering from fever of unknown origin for a few weeks without aortic aneurysm by enhanced chest computed tomography (CT). Chest CT taken 1 month later revealed rupture of aortic arch aneurysm. Total arch replacement was performed with in situ grafting under selective cerebral perfusion combined with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Rifampicin (RFP) was sprinkled on the graft at operation and omentopexy was done 5 days after the 1st operation. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated on the culture of the aneurysmal wall, therefore, polymyxin B immobilized fiber with direct hemoperfusion (PMX-DHP) was also conducted with antibiotic therapy. Her clinical course after the 2nd operation was uneventful with no infective complication. We report a successful case of ruptured aneurysm of aortic arch infected with MRSA and review our strategy as one of feasible options without using homograft or preparative RFP-bonded vascular prosthesis. PMID:18788376

  12. Quantification of Particle Residence Time in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Ga-Young; Les, Andrea S.; Tenforde, Adam S.; Shadden, Shawn C.; Spilker, Ryan L.; Yeung, Janice J.; Cheng, Christopher P.; Herfkens, Robert J.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Taylor, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Hemodynamic conditions are hypothesized to affect the initiation, growth, and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), a vascular disease characterized by progressive wall degradation and enlargement of the abdominal aorta. This study aims to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to quantify flow stagnation and recirculation in eight AAAs by computing particle residence time (PRT). Specifically, we used gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography to obtain images of the vessel lumens, which were used to generate subject-specific models. We also used phase-contrast MRI to measure blood flow at supraceliac and infrarenal locations to prescribe physiologic boundary conditions. CFD was used to simulate pulsatile flow, and PRT, particle residence index, and particle half-life of PRT in the aneurysms were computed. We observed significant regional differences of PRT in the aneurysms with localized patterns that differed depending on aneurysm geometry and infrarenal flow. A bulbous aneurysm with the lowest mean infrarenal flow demonstrated the slowest particle clearance. In addition, improvements in particle clearance were observed with increase of mean infrarenal flow. We postulate that augmentation of mean infrarenal flow during exercise may reduce chronic flow stasis that may influence mural thrombus burden, degradation of the vessel wall, and aneurysm growth. PMID:21103933

  13. The ovation abdominal stent graft for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms: current evidence and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Ioannou, Christos V; Georgiadis, George S; Storck, Martin; Trellopoulos, George; Koutsias, Stylianos; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2016-01-01

    The Ovation Abdominal Stent Graft System is a trimodular endoprosthesis recently introduced for the endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). It uncouples the stages of stent-graft fixation and sealing with the suprarenal fixation achieved with a long, rigid anchored stent while the sealing onto the neck is accomplished via a pair of polymer-filled inflatable rings that accommodate to each patient's individual anatomy. Moreover, the lack of Nitinol support enables lower profiles of the endograft's delivery system, thus facilitating the navigation through angulated and stenosed iliac vessels. Ovation's novel design expands further the AAA eligibility to endovascular repair. This article discusses the clinical and hemodynamic consequences of the Ovation design and contributes to better understanding of current and future implications. PMID:26822951

  14. [Traumatic rupture of the aortic isthmus in a patient with severe head injury].

    PubMed

    Lassié, P; Tentillier, E; Thicoïpé, M; Pinaquy, C; Laborde, N

    1993-01-01

    A 32-year-old man sustained a severe head injury in a road traffic accident. On admission, he was in deep coma (6 on the Glasgow coma scale). The aortic knuckle was difficult to identify on a plain chest film. Twenty hours after admission, the aortic knuckle had completely disappeared and the mediastinal shadow had become enlarged. The diagnosis of a ruptured aortic isthmus was confirmed by angiography. Surgical repair of this lesion may be carried out either with simple aortic cross-clamping, or by using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Either technique may worsen other injuries, especially head injury, by initiating severe arterial hypertension or coagulation disturbances. In this patient, the technique chosen was aortic cross-clamping with permanent monitoring of the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Anaesthesia was obtained with 5 mg.kg-1 of thiopentone, 30 mg.kg-1 x h-1 of sodium gamma hydroxybutyrate and 8 micrograms.kg-1 x h-1 of fentanyl. Surgery lasted for 90 min, with 33 min of aortic clamping. The increase in arterial blood pressure was controlled with 0.25 mg.kg-1 x h-1 of thiopentone and nicardipine which was stopped 8 min before unclamping. The postoperative course was uneventful. Sedation was stopped after 8 days, and the patient regained consciousness two days later. These remained a paraplegia with no sensory deficit, which had totally receded 15 months later. Carrying out this emergency surgery without CPB means that the intracranial pressure must imperatively be monitored during surgery. Any intracranial hypertension should delay the surgery. PMID:8338263

  15. A Large Pleural Effusion following Abdominal Aortic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ramsaran, Vinoo K.; Seeram, Vandana K.; Cury, James; Shujaat, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Chylous ascites and coexistent chylothorax is a rare but important complication following retroperitoneal abdominal surgery. We report a 70-year-old male who developed gradual abdominal distension, chest tightness, and dyspnea five months after having an uncomplicated aortobifemoral bypass performed. Physical examination was consistent with a large right sided effusion and ascites which were confirmed by computed tomography. Thoracentesis yielded an opaque milky fluid with analysis consistent with a chylothorax with a paracentesis revealing fluid that was similar in both appearance and biochemistry. The patient failed initial conservative management so a chest tube was placed followed by chemical pleurodesis. We review the literature of the pathophysiology and treatment approach to such a pleural effusion. PMID:26635989

  16. Aortoiliac Artery Reconstruction Using Bilateral Reversed Superficial Femoral Veins for an Infected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Hanako; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hatori, Kyohei; Miki, Takao; Obayashi, Tamiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is difficult and the ideal graft material is a subject of debate. A 60-year-old man with untreated diabetes mellitus was referred to our hospital presenting with fever and left lower abdominal pain. The patient was diagnosed with an IAAA by blood culture and computed tomography. We treated the patient surgically for the IAAA using bilateral reversed superficial femoral veins which were shaped into a bifurcated graft. No signs of recurrent infection or aneurysmal dilation were observed for 3 years after the procedure. PMID:27087879

  17. Considerations for patients undergoing endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Brant W; Lee, Jason T

    2014-09-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has taken over open surgery as the primary strategy for treatment of patients with abdominal and thoracic aneurysms. The minimally invasive nature of these techniques requires alterations in preoperative workup, intraoperative management, and familiarity with unique complications that can occur. Familiarity from the anesthetic standpoint of endovascular techniques, including treatment of patients with fenestrated, chimney, snorkel, and periscope grafts, is necessary for the contemporary cardiac anesthesiologist. PMID:25113729

  18. Hypoperfusion of the Adventitial Vasa Vasorum Develops an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takeshi; Sano, Masaki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Saito, Takaaki; Inuzuka, Kazunori; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Sugiura, Yuki; Sato, Kohji; Kugo, Hirona; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Konno, Hiroyuki; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Unno, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The aortic wall is perfused by the adventitial vasa vasorum (VV). Tissue hypoxia has previously been observed as a manifestation of enlarged abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). We sought to determine whether hypoperfusion of the adventitial VV could develop AAAs. We created a novel animal model of adventitial VV hypoperfusion with a combination of a polyurethane catheter insertion and a suture ligation of the infrarenal abdominal aorta in rats. VV hypoperfusion caused tissue hypoxia and developed infrarenal AAA, which had similar morphological and pathological characteristics to human AAA. In human AAA tissue, the adventitial VV were stenotic in both small AAAs (30–49 mm in diameter) and in large AAAs (> 50 mm in diameter), with the sac tissue in these AAAs being ischemic and hypoxic. These results indicate that hypoperfusion of adventitial VV has critical effects on the development of infrarenal AAA. PMID:26308526

  19. Characterization of the transport topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by disturbed blood flow patterns that are hypothesized to contribute to disease progression. The transport topology in six patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was studied. Velocity data were obtained by image-based computational fluid dynamics modeling, with magnetic resonance imaging providing the necessary simulation parameters. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from the velocity data, and used to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS). The combination of FTLE fields and LCS was used to characterize topological flow features such as separation zones, vortex transport, mixing regions, and flow impingement. These measures offer a novel perspective into AAA flow. It was observed that all aneurysms exhibited coherent vortex formation at the proximal segment of the aneurysm. The evolution of the systolic vortex strongly influences the flow topology in the aneurysm. It was difficult to predict the vortex dynamics from the aneurysm morphology, motivating the application of image-based flow modeling.

  20. Automatic segmentation and co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Robert; Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, J. G.; Siddiki, Hassan; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri; Spencer, Garrett; Primak, Andrew N.; Zhang, Jie; Nielson, Theresa; McCollough, Cynthia; Yu, Lifeng

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79% of datasets, requiring either no editing (70%) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12%). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, nonvascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and coregistration of temporally resolved datasets.

  1. Periadventitial adipose-derived stem cell treatment halts elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm progression

    PubMed Central

    Blose, Kory J; Ennis, Terri L; Arif, Batool; Weinbaum, Justin S; Curci, John A; Vorp, David A

    2014-01-01

    Aim Demonstrate that periadventitial delivery of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) slows aneurysm progression in an established murine elastase-perfusion model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Materials & methods AAAs were induced in C57BL/6 mice using porcine elastase. During elastase perfusion, a delivery device consisting of a subcutaneous port, tubing and porous scaffold was implanted. Five days after elastase perfusion, 100,000 ADMSCs were delivered through the port to the aorta. After sacrifice at day 14, analyzed metrics included aortic diameter and structure of aortic elastin. Results ADMSC treated aneurysms had a smaller diameter and less fragmented elastin versus saline controls. Conclusion Periadventitial stem cell delivery prevented the expansion of an established aneurysm between days 5 and 14 after elastase perfusion. PMID:25431910

  2. Experimental characterization of rupture in human aortic aneurysms using a full-field measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hwan; Avril, Stéphane; Duprey, Ambroise; Favre, Jean-Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The present study aims at investigating biomechanical failure behaviour of human aneurismal aortic tissues so as to diagnose the rupture risk of aneurysms more accurately. An inflation test is performed on aneurismal aortic tissues up to failure and full-field measurements are achieved using stereo digital image correlation. Then, an appropriate constitutive model derived from histological structure of arteries is adopted to retrieve the Cauchy stress. The virtual fields method is used as an inverse procedure to identify material parameters. Next, the Cauchy stress components are calculated from the identified parameters and the measured Lagrange strain fields. Finally, an important stress parameter which can quantify the strength of aneurismal tissues is derived from the failure stress of aneurismal tissues. PMID:22048330

  3. Aseptic lysis L2-L3 as complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Federico; Ascoli-Marchetti, Andrea; Garro, Luca; Caterini, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    Osteolytic vertebral erosion is usually related to tumours, spondylitis or spondylodiscitis. Few reports in the literature describe lytic lesions of anterior lumbar vertebral bodies resulting from abdominal aortic aneurysm or false aneurysm. We report a case of abdominal aortic false aneurysm that caused lytic lesions of the second and third vertebral bodies in an 80-year-old man who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair. Fluoroscopy guided biopsy excluded infection or tumour. We performed a posterior spinal fusion and decompression because of bone loss of the second and third lumbar vertebral bodies and central stenosis. Postoperatively the patient showed satisfactory relief in low-back and thigh pain but, unfortunately, he died 1 month after surgery because of respiratory complications. This case suggests that when a lytic lesion of a lumbar vertebral body is discovered in a patient who has undergone endovascular aneurysm repair, an abdominal aortic false aneurysm may be the cause of the vertebral erosion even in cases without infective pathogenesis. PMID:25017025

  4. Histological characteristics of the abdominal aortic wall in patients with vascular chronic Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Hagenaars, Julia C J P; Koning, Olivier H J; van den Haak, Ronald F F; Verhoeven, Bart A N; Renders, Nicole H M; Hermans, Mirjam H A; Wever, Peter C; van Suylen, Robert Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe specific histological findings of the Coxiella burnetii-infected aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall. Tissue samples of the aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall from seven patients with chronic Q fever and 15 patients without evidence of Q fever infection were analysed and compared. Chronic Q fever was diagnosed using serology and tissue PCR analysis. Histological sections were stained using haematoxylin and eosin staining, Elastica van Gieson staining and immunohistochemical staining for macrophages (CD68), T lymphocytes (CD3), T lymphocyte subsets (CD4 and CD8) and B lymphocytes (CD20). Samples were scored by one pathologist, blinded for Q fever status, using a standard score form. Seven tissue samples from patients with chronic Q fever and 15 tissue samples from patients without Q fever were collected. Four of seven chronic Q fever samples showed a necrotizing granulomatous response of the vascular wall, which was characterized by necrotic core of the arteriosclerotic plaque (P = 0.005) and a presence of high numbers of macrophages in the adventitia (P = 0.007) distributed in typical palisading formation (P = 0.005) and surrounded by the presence of high numbers of T lymphocytes located diffusely in media and adventitia. Necrotizing granulomas are a histological finding in the C. burnetii-infected aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall. Chronic Q fever should be included in the list of infectious diseases with necrotizing granulomatous response, such as tuberculosis, cat scratch disease and syphilis. PMID:24953727

  5. Histological characteristics of the abdominal aortic wall in patients with vascular chronic Q fever.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, Julia C J P; Koning, Olivier H J; van den Haak, Ronald F F; Verhoeven, Bart A N; Renders, Nicole H M; Hermans, Mirjam H A; Wever, Peter C; van Suylen, Robert Jan

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe specific histological findings of the Coxiella burnetii-infected aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall. Tissue samples of the aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall from seven patients with chronic Q fever and 15 patients without evidence of Q fever infection were analysed and compared. Chronic Q fever was diagnosed using serology and tissue PCR analysis. Histological sections were stained using haematoxylin and eosin staining, Elastica van Gieson staining and immunohistochemical staining for macrophages (CD68), T lymphocytes (CD3), T lymphocyte subsets (CD4 and CD8) and B lymphocytes (CD20). Samples were scored by one pathologist, blinded for Q fever status, using a standard score form. Seven tissue samples from patients with chronic Q fever and 15 tissue samples from patients without Q fever were collected. Four of seven chronic Q fever samples showed a necrotizing granulomatous response of the vascular wall, which was characterized by necrotic core of the arteriosclerotic plaque (P = 0.005) and a presence of high numbers of macrophages in the adventitia (P = 0.007) distributed in typical palisading formation (P = 0.005) and surrounded by the presence of high numbers of T lymphocytes located diffusely in media and adventitia. Necrotizing granulomas are a histological finding in the C. burnetii-infected aneurysmal abdominal aortic wall. Chronic Q fever should be included in the list of infectious diseases with necrotizing granulomatous response, such as tuberculosis, cat scratch disease and syphilis. PMID:24953727

  6. Metabolomics with LC-QTOF-MS Permits the Prediction of Disease Stage in Aortic Abdominal Aneurysm Based on Plasma Metabolic Fingerprint

    PubMed Central

    Ciborowski, Michal; Teul, Joanna; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis; Egido, Jesús; Barbas, Coral

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent and localized aortic dilation, defined as aortic diameter ≥3 cm. It is an asymptomatic but potentially fatal condition because progressive enlargement of the abdominal aorta is spontaneously evolving towards rupture. Biomarkers may help to explain pathological processes of AAA expansion, and allow us to find novel therapeutic strategies or to determine the efficiency of current therapies. Metabolomics seems to be a good approach to find biomarkers of AAA. In this study, plasma samples of patients with large AAA, small AAA, and controls were fingerprinted with LC-QTOF-MS. Statistical analysis was used to compare metabolic fingerprints and select metabolites that showed a significant change. Results presented here reveal that LC-QTOF-MS based fingerprinting of plasma from AAA patients is a very good technique to distinguish small AAA, large AAA, and controls. With the use of validated PLS-DA models it was possible to classify patients according to the disease stage and predict properly the stage of additional AAA patients. Identified metabolites indicate a role for sphingolipids, lysophospholipids, cholesterol metabolites, and acylcarnitines in the development and progression of AAA. Moreover, guanidinosuccinic acid, which mimics nitric oxide in terms of its vasodilatory action, was found as a strong marker of large AAA. PMID:22384120

  7. Ruptured aortic aneurysm in a coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Kilgo, John; Ray, Scott; Miller, Karl V.

    2007-07-01

    Abstract – A radio-collared adult female coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina was found dead with no apparent signs of trauma or struggle. Necropsy revealed a ruptured aortic aneurysm within the thoracic cavity as well as severe heartworm infection, with paracites present in the caudal vena cava. Histologically, inflammatory cell infiltrates were frequent in the aneurysm and consisted of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Bacteria, fungi, and paracites were not found in the aneurysm. Death was due to exsanguinations. This represents a first report of an aneurysm in a coyote.

  8. The quasi-static failure properties of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall estimated by a mixed experimental-numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Forsell, Caroline; Swedenborg, Jesper; Roy, Joy; Gasser, T Christian

    2013-07-01

    Assessing the risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is critical in the management of aneurysm patients and an individual assessment is possible with the biomechanical rupture risk assessment. Such an assessment could potentially be improved by a constitutive AAA wall model that accounts for irreversible damage-related deformations. Because of that the present study estimated the elastic and inelastic properties of the AAA wall through a mixed experimental-numerical approach. Specifically, finite element (FE) models of bone-shaped tensile specimens were used to merge data from failure testing of the AAA wall with their measured collagen orientation distribution. A histo-mechanical constitutive model for collagen fibers was employed, where plastic fibril sliding determined not only remaining deformations but also weakening of the fiber. The developed FE models were able to replicate the experimentally recorded load-displacement property of all 16 AAA wall specimens that were investigated in the study. Tensile testing in longitudinal direction of the AAA defined a Cauchy strength of 569(SD 411) kPa that was reached at a stretch of 1.436(SD 0.118). The stiffness and strength of specimens decreased with the wall thickness and were elevated (p = 0.018; p = 0.030) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Smoking affected the tissue parameters that were related to the irreversible deformation response, and no correlation with gender and age was found. The observed effects on the biomechanical properties of the AAA wall could have long-term consequences for the management of aneurysm patients, i.e., specifically they might influence future AAA rupture risk assessments. However, in order to design appropriate clinical validation studies our findings should firstly be verified in a larger patient cohort. PMID:23263935

  9. Hemodynamic Study of Flow Remodeling Stent Graft for the Treatment of Highly Angulated Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yeow, Siang Lin; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a novel flow remodeling stent graft (FRSG) on the hemodynamic characteristics in highly angulated abdominal aortic aneurysm based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. An idealized aortic aneurysm with varying aortic neck angulations was constructed and CFD simulations were performed on nonstented models and stented models with FRSG. The influence of FRSG intervention on the hemodynamic performance is analyzed and compared in terms of flow patterns, wall shear stress (WSS), and pressure distribution in the aneurysm. The findings showed that aortic neck angulations significantly influence the velocity flow field in nonstented models, with larger angulations shifting the mainstream blood flow towards the center of the aorta. By introducing FRSG treatment into the aneurysm, erratic flow recirculation pattern in the aneurysm sac diminishes while the average velocity magnitude in the aneurysm sac was reduced in the range of 39% to 53%. FRSG intervention protects the aneurysm against the impacts of high velocity concentrated flow and decreases wall shear stress by more than 50%. The simulation results highlighted that FRSG may effectively treat aneurysm with high aortic neck angulations via the mechanism of promoting thrombus formation and subsequently led to the resorption of the aneurysm. PMID:27247612

  10. Novel risk predictor for thrombus deposition in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, M. G. C.; Gizzi, A.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.; Succi, S.

    2015-10-01

    The identification of the basic mechanisms responsible for cardiovascular diseases stands as one of the most challenging problems in modern medical research including various mechanisms which encompass a broad spectrum of space and time scales. Major implications for clinical practice and pre-emptive medicine rely on the onset and development of intraluminal thrombus in which effective clinical therapies require synthetic risk predictors/indicators capable of informing real-time decision-making protocols. In the present contribution, two novel hemodynamics synthetic indicators, based on a three-band decomposition (TBD) of the shear stress signal, are introduced. Extensive fluid-structure computer simulations of patient-specific scenarios confirm the enhanced risk-prediction capabilities of the TBD indicators. In particular, they permit a quantitative and accurate localization of the most likely thrombus deposition in realistic aortic geometries, where previous indicators would predict healthy operation. The proposed methodology is also shown to provide additional information and discrimination criteria on other factors of major clinical relevance, such as the size of the aneurysm.

  11. Hybrid procedure for a traumatic aortic rupture consisting of endovascular repair and minimally invasive arch vessel transposition without sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yang Gi; Choo, Suk Jung; Lim, Ju Yong; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chung, Cheol Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Emergency surgical repair for acute traumatic aortic ruptures has been associated with a high peri-procedural mortality rate. Endovascular stent-grafting, as a less invasive procedure, has shown encouraging results. This report describes a patient with a short landing zone, who was treated by transposing the supra-aortic branch without sternotomy, followed by covered stent-grafting with an extended proximal bare portion to enhance fixation. PMID:20052360

  12. Opposing changes in thoracic and abdominal aortic biomechanical properties in rodent models of vascular calcification and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ameer, Omar Z; Salman, Ibrahim M; Avolio, Alberto P; Phillips, Jacqueline K; Butlin, Mark

    2014-07-15

    This study investigated the effects of hypertension on regional aortic biomechanical and structural properties in three rat models of vascular calcification: the hypertensive Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK; n = 13) model of chronic kidney disease, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs; n = 12), and calcification in normotensive Lewis rats induced by vitamin D3 and nicotine (VDN; n = 8). Lewis and Wistar-Kyoto rats were controls. Thoracic and abdominal aortic stiffness parameters were assessed by tensile testing. In models where aortic stiffness differences compared with controls existed in both thoracic and abdominal segments, an additional cohort was quantified by histology for thoracic and abdominal aortic elastin, collagen, and calcification. LPK and VDN animals had higher thoracic breaking strain than control animals (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively) and lower energy absorption within the tensile curve of the abdominal aorta (P < 0.05). SHRs had a lower abdominal breaking stress than Wistar-Kyoto rats. LPK and VDN rats had more elastic lamellae fractures than control rats (P < 0.001), which were associated with calcium deposition (thoracic R = 0.37, P = 0.048; abdominal: R = 0.40, P = 0.046). LPK rats had higher nuclear density than control rats (P < 0.01), which was also evident in the thoracic but not abdominal aorta of VDN rats (P < 0.01). In LPK and VDN rats, but not in control rats, media thickness and cross-sectional area were at least 1.5-fold greater in thoracic than abdominal regions. The calcification models chronic kidney disease and induced calcification in normotension caused differences in regional aortic stiffness not seen in a genetic form of hypertension. Detrimental abdominal aortic remodeling but lower stiffness in the thoracic aorta with disease indicates possible compensatory mechanisms in the proximal aorta. PMID:24838503

  13. Informed consent for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: Assessing variations in surgeon opinion through a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Dardik, Alan; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Gusberg, Richard J.; Fraenkel, Liana

    2009-01-01

    Objective Informed consent discussions for elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair should reflect appropriate risks of the open or endovascular repair (EVAR), but few guidelines exist describing what surgeons should discuss. This study examines expert opinion regarding what constitutes informed consent. Methods Design We conducted an anonymous, web-based, national survey of vascular surgeons. Associations between surgeon characteristics and opinions regarding informed consent were measured using bivariate statistics; multivariable logistic regression was performed to estimate effects adjusted for covariates. Setting Academic and private practice surgeons were surveyed. Subjects United States members of the International Society for Vascular Surgery membership. Main Outcome Measure. Surgeons' self-reported opinions regarding the content of informed consent for AAA repair. Results A total of 199 surgeons completed the survey (response rate 51%). More than 90% of respondents reported that it was essential to discuss mortality risk for both procedures. However, only 60% and 30% of respondents reported that it was essential to discuss the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, respectively. Opinions varied by procedure regarding the risks of impotence (32% vs 62%; EVAR vs open repair), reintervention (78% vs 17%), and rupture during long-term follow-up (57% vs 17%). Younger and private practice surgeons were more likely to discuss complications compared with older surgeons and those in academic practice. Surgeons who perform predominantly EVAR were more likely to quote higher mortality rates for open repair (odds ration [OR] = 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-6.4) and lower reintervention rates for EVAR (OR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1-0.7) compared with other surgeons. Conclusions This is the first study of the practice of informed consent for AAA repair. The only risk that the vast majority of surgeons agreed should be included in informed consent for AAA

  14. Relation between low serum cholesteryl-ester transfer activity and abdominal aortic calcification in normolipidemic elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Y; Morimoto, S; Fukuo, K; Masuyama, T; Yasuda, O; Koh, E; Tamatani, M; Nakahashi, T; Ogihara, T

    1993-01-01

    We studied the relation between cholesteryl-ester transfer activity (CETA) and abdominal aortic calcification in elderly subjects. Compared with 10 young healthy subjects (mean +/- S.D. age, 27 +/-2 years) and to 26 elderly subjects without abdominal aortic calcification (79 +/- 7 years), 16 elderly patients with abdominal aortic calcification (82 +/- 6 years) had significantly lower levels of serum CETA. However, there were no differences in the levels of serum lipids and apolipoproteins, including total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, B, C-II and E, between the two elderly groups. When the two groups of elderly subjects were considered together, the level of serum CETA did not correlate significantly with any lipids and apolipoproteins. These results provide evidence that CETA may prevent the development of aortic calcification in normolipidemic elderly people. PMID:15374350

  15. Complete regression of a symptomatic, mycotic juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm after treatment with fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Durgin, Jonathan M; Arous, Edward J; Kumar, Shivani; Robinson, William P; Simons, Jessica P; Schanzer, Andres

    2016-09-01

    Mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms are rare and present unique challenges when potential treatment options are considered. Although aortic resection with in situ grafting techniques or extra-anatomic reconstruction are the treatments of choice, endovascular aortic repair has emerged as a suitable alternative in critically ill patients. We report the successful endovascular repair of a symptomatic, mycotic juxtarenal aortic aneurysm using a physician-modified fenestrated endograft. In this patient, with >6 months of follow-up, the aneurysm has completely regressed, illustrating that in select patients with complex mycotic aneurysms, endovascular repair combined with appropriate medical management is a viable treatment strategy. PMID:26747681

  16. Endovascular management of lap belt-related abdominal aortic injury in a 9-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Konstantinos O; Karkos, Christos D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Giagtzidis, Ioakeim T

    2015-02-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic trauma is a rare occurrence in children with only a few patients having been reported in the literature. Most such cases have been described in the context of lap belt injuries. We report a 9-year-old boy who suffered lap belt trauma to the abdomen during a high-speed road traffic accident resulting to the well-recognized pattern of blunt abdominal injury, that is, the triad of intestinal perforation, fractures of the lumbar spine, and abdominal aortic injury. The latter presented with lower limb ischemia due to dissection of the infrarenal aorta and right common iliac artery. Revascularization was achieved by endovascular means using 2 self-expanding stents in the infrarenal aorta and the right common iliac artery. This case is one of the few reports of lap belt-related acute traumatic abdominal aortic dissection in a young child and highlights the feasibility of endovascular management in the pediatric population. PMID:25463338

  17. Early Experiences with the Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Sung; Oh, Se Jin; Sung, Yong Won; Moon, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jung Sang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to report our early experiences with the endovascular repair of ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (rDTAAs), which are a rare and life-threatening condition. Methods Among 42 patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) between October 2010 and September 2015, five patients (11.9%) suffered an rDTAA. Results The mean age was 72.4±5.1 years, and all patients were male. Hemoptysis and hemothorax were present in three (60%) and two (40%) patients, respectively. Hypovolemic shock was noted in three patients who underwent emergency operations. A hybrid operation was performed in three patients. The mean operative time was 269.8±72.3 minutes. The mean total length of aortic coverage was 186.0±49.2 mm. No 30-day mortality occurred. Stroke, delirium, and atrial fibrillation were observed in one patient each. Paraplegia did not occur. Endoleak was found in two patients (40%), one of whom underwent an early and successful reintervention. During the mean follow-up period of 16.8±14.8 months, two patients died; one cause of death was a persistent type 1 endoleak and the other cause was unknown. Conclusion TEVAR for rDTAA was associated with favorable early mortality and morbidity outcomes. However, early reintervention should be considered if persistent endoleak occurs. PMID:27064672

  18. Mast cells modulate the pathogenesis of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiusong; Sukhova, Galina K.; Yang, Min; Wolters, Paul J.; MacFarlane, Lindsey A.; Libby, Peter; Sun, Chongxiu; Zhang, Yadong; Liu, Jian; Ennis, Terri L.; Knispel, Rebecca; Xiong, Wanfen; Thompson, Robert W.; Baxter, B. Timothy; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), an inflammatory disease, involves leukocyte recruitment, immune responses, inflammatory cytokine production, vascular remodeling, neovascularization, and vascular cell apoptosis, all of which contribute to aortic dilatation. This study demonstrates that mast cells, key participants in human allergic immunity, participate in AAA pathogenesis in mice. Mast cells were found to accumulate in murine AAA lesions. Mast cell–deficient KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice failed to develop AAA elicited by elastase perfusion or periaortic chemical injury. KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice had reduced aortic expansion and internal elastic lamina degradation; decreased numbers of macrophages, CD3+ T lymphocytes, SMCs, apoptotic cells, and CD31+ microvessels; and decreased levels of aortic tissue IL-6 and IFN-γ. Activation of mast cells in WT mice via C48/80 injection resulted in enhanced AAA growth while mast cell stabilization with disodium cromoglycate diminished AAA formation. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that mast cells participated in angiogenesis, aortic SMC apoptosis, and matrix-degrading protease expression. Reconstitution of KitW-sh/KitW-sh mice with bone marrow–derived mast cells from WT or TNF-α–/– mice, but not from IL-6–/– or IFN-γ–/– mice, caused susceptibility to AAA formation to be regained. These results demonstrate that mast cells participate in AAA pathogenesis in mice by releasing proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IFN-γ, which may induce aortic SMC apoptosis, matrix-degrading protease expression, and vascular wall remodeling, important hallmarks of arterial aneurysms. PMID:17932568

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Lesions With or Without Common Iliac Artery Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Oender, Hakan; Oguzkurt, Levent; Guer, Serkan; Tekbas, Gueven; Guerel, Kamil; Coskun, Isa; Oezkan, Ugur

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the results of stent placement for obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease with or without involvement of the common iliac artery. Forty patients had self-expanding stents primarily or after balloon dilatation in the abdominal aorta between January 2005 and May 2011. All patients had trouble walking. Follow-up examinations were performed with clinical visits; these included color Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography. Technical, clinical, and hemodynamic success was achieved in all patients. None of the patients underwent reintervention during the follow-up period, which ranged from 3 months to 6 years (median 24 months). Nine complications occurred in six patients. Of the nine complications, four were distal thromboembolisms, which were successfully treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis or anticoagulation therapy. Endovascular treatment of the obstructive aortic disease using self-expanding stents was safe and effective, with high technical success and long-term patency. Thromboembolic complications were high even though direct stenting was considered protective for thromboembolism formation. Particularly for infrarenal aortic stenosis, it can be recommended as the first-line treatment option for patients with obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease.

  20. Metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene by aortic subcellular fractions in the setting of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, A; Prins, P A; Perati, P R; Rekhadevi, P V; Sampson, U K

    2016-01-01

    As exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; a family of environmental toxicants) have been implicated in cardiovascular diseases, the ability of the aortic tissue to process these toxicants is important from the standpoint of abdominal aortic aneurysms and atherosclerosis. Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), a representative PAH compound is released into the environment from automobile exhausts, industrial emissions, and considerable intake of B(a)P is also expected in people who are smokers and barbecued red meat eaters. Therefore, knowledge of B(a)P metabolism in the cardiovascular system will be of importance in the management of vascular disorders. Toward this end, subcellular fractions (nuclear, cytosolic, mitochondrial, and microsomal) were isolated from the aortic tissues of Apo E mice that received a 5 mg/kg/week of B(a)P for 42 days and 0.71 mg/kg/day for 60 days. The fractions were incubated with 1 and 3 μM B(a)P. Post incubation, samples were extracted with ethyl acetate and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC. Microsomal B(a)P metabolism was greater than the rest of the fractions. The B(a)P metabolite levels generated by all the subcellular fractions showed a B(a)P exposure concentration-dependent increase for both the weekly and daily B(a)P treatment categories. The preponderance of B(a)P metabolites such as 7,8-dihydrodiol, 3,6-, and 6,12-dione metabolites are interesting due to their reported involvement in B(a)P-induced toxicity through oxidative stress. PMID:26530167

  1. An Update on the Inflammatory Response after Endovascular Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Arnaoutoglou, Eleni; Kouvelos, George; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Patelis, Nikolaos; Lazaris, Andreas; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2015-01-01

    Postimplantation syndrome (PIS) is the clinical and biochemical expression of an inflammatory response following endovascular repair of an aortic aneurysm (EVAR). The goal of this review is to provide an update on the inflammatory response after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm, discussing its causes and effects on the clinical outcome of the patient. PIS concerns nearly one-third of patients after EVAR. It is generally a benign condition, although in some patients it may negatively affect outcome. The different definitions and conclusions drawn from several studies reveal that PIS needs to be redefined with standardized diagnostic criteria. The type of the endograft's material seems to play a role in the inflammatory response. Future studies should focus on a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, predictors, and risk factors as well as determining whether effective preventive strategies are necessary. PMID:26166953

  2. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may also be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscesses Appendicitis Bowel wall thickening Retroperitoneal fibrosis Renal ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 4. Read More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open Abscess Acute cholecystitis ...

  3. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor-1α attenuates abdominal aortic aneurysm progression through the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Huang, Po-Hsun; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Peng, Yi-Jen; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Wang, Jen-Chun; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway is associated with many vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, arterial aneurysms, pulmonary hypertension and chronic venous diseases. Significant HIF-1α expression could be found at the rupture edge at human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) tissues. While our initial in vitro experiments had shown that deferoxamine (DFO) could attenuate angiotensin II (AngII) induced endothelial activations; we unexpectedly found that DFO augmented the severity of AngII-induced AAA, at least partly through increased accumulation of HIF-1α. The findings promoted us to test whether aneurysmal prone factors could up-regulate the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 through aberrantly increased HIF-1α and promote AAA development. AngII induced AAA in hyperlipidemic mice model was used. DFO, as a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, stabilized HIF-1α and augmented MMPs activities. Aneurysmal-prone factors induced HIF-1α can cause overexpression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and promote aneurysmal progression. Pharmacological HIF-1α inhibitors, digoxin and 2-ME could ameliorate AngII induced AAA in vivo. HIF-1α is pivotal for the development of AAA. Our study provides a rationale for using HIF-1α inhibitors as an adjunctive medical therapy in addition to current cardiovascular risk-reducing regimens. PMID:27363580

  4. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor-1α attenuates abdominal aortic aneurysm progression through the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Huang, Po-Hsun; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Peng, Yi-Jen; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Wang, Jen-Chun; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway is associated with many vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, arterial aneurysms, pulmonary hypertension and chronic venous diseases. Significant HIF-1α expression could be found at the rupture edge at human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) tissues. While our initial in vitro experiments had shown that deferoxamine (DFO) could attenuate angiotensin II (AngII) induced endothelial activations; we unexpectedly found that DFO augmented the severity of AngII-induced AAA, at least partly through increased accumulation of HIF-1α. The findings promoted us to test whether aneurysmal prone factors could up-regulate the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 through aberrantly increased HIF-1α and promote AAA development. AngII induced AAA in hyperlipidemic mice model was used. DFO, as a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, stabilized HIF-1α and augmented MMPs activities. Aneurysmal-prone factors induced HIF-1α can cause overexpression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and promote aneurysmal progression. Pharmacological HIF-1α inhibitors, digoxin and 2-ME could ameliorate AngII induced AAA in vivo. HIF-1α is pivotal for the development of AAA. Our study provides a rationale for using HIF-1α inhibitors as an adjunctive medical therapy in addition to current cardiovascular risk-reducing regimens. PMID:27363580

  5. Fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sinead; O'Rourke, Malachy

    2012-04-01

    This article describes the use of fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on three patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. All simulations were carried out using OpenFOAM, which uses the finite volume method to solve both fluid and solid equations. Initially a fluid-only simulation was carried out on a single patient-based geometry and results from this simulation were compared with experimental results. There was good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, suggesting that OpenFOAM is capable of predicting the main features of unsteady flow through a complex patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometry. The intraluminal thrombus and arterial wall were then included, and solid stress and fluid-structure interaction simulations were performed on this, and two other patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. It was found that the solid stress simulations resulted in an under-estimation of the maximum stress by up to 5.9% when compared with the fluid-structure interaction simulations. In the fluid-structure interaction simulations, flow induced pressure within the aneurysm was found to be up to 4.8% higher than the value of peak systolic pressure imposed in the solid stress simulations, which is likely to be the cause of the variation in the stress results. In comparing the results from the initial fluid-only simulation with results from the fluid-structure interaction simulation on the same patient, it was found that wall shear stress values varied by up to 35% between the two simulation methods. It was concluded that solid stress simulations are adequate to predict the maximum stress in an aneurysm wall, while fluid-structure interaction simulations should be performed if accurate prediction of the fluid wall shear stress is necessary. Therefore, the decision to perform fluid-structure interaction simulations should be based on the particular variables of interest in a given

  6. Renal replacement therapies after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair--a review.

    PubMed

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovricević, Ivo; Brkić, Petar; Ahel, Zaky; Vicić-Hudorović, Visnja

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the incidence of postoperative acute renal failure that necessitates the application of hemofiltration and to determine the factors that influence the outcome in patients undergoing surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In addition, the review aims to assess the outcomes of postoperative early hemofiltration as compared to late intensive hemofiltration. Different forms of renal replacement therapies for use in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery patients are discussed. Electronic literature searches were performed using Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Sumsearch, Cinahil, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Excerpta Medica. The search identified 419 potentially eligible studies, of which 119 were excluded based on the title and abstract. Of the remaining 300 studies, full articles were collected and re-evaluated. Forty-five articles satisfied our inclusion criteria, of which only 12 were of the IA Level of evidence. The search results indicated that the underlying disease, its severity and stage, the etiology of acute renal failure, clinical and hemodynamic status of the patient, the resources available, and different costs of therapy might all influence the choice of the renal replacement therapy strategy. However, clear guidelines on renal replacement therapy duration are still lacking. Moreover, it is not known whether in acute renal failure patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, renal replacement therapy modalities can eliminate significant amounts of clinically relevant inflammatory mediators. This review gives current information available in the literature on the possible mechanisms underlying acute renal failure and recent developments in continuous renal replacement treatment modalities. PMID:22384777

  7. Fluid-structure interaction of a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with an endovascular stent-graft

    PubMed Central

    Molony, David S; Callanan, Anthony; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M

    2009-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are local dilatations of the infrarenal aorta. If left untreated they may rupture and lead to death. One form of treatment is the minimally invasive insertion of a stent-graft into the aneurysm. Despite this effective treatment aneurysms may occasionally continue to expand and this may eventually result in post-operative rupture of the aneurysm. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is a particularly useful tool for investigating aneurysm biomechanics as both the wall stresses and fluid forces can be examined. Methods Pre-op, Post-op and Follow-up models were reconstructed from CT scans of a single patient and FSI simulations were performed on each model. The FSI approach involved coupling Abaqus and Fluent via a third-party software - MpCCI. Aneurysm wall stress and compliance were investigated as well as the drag force acting on the stent-graft. Results Aneurysm wall stress was reduced from 0.38 MPa before surgery to a value of 0.03 MPa after insertion of the stent-graft. Higher stresses were seen in the aneurysm neck and iliac legs post-operatively. The compliance of the aneurysm was also reduced post-operatively. The peak Post-op axial drag force was found to be 4.85 N. This increased to 6.37 N in the Follow-up model. Conclusion In a patient-specific case peak aneurysm wall stress was reduced by 92%. Such a reduction in aneurysm wall stress may lead to shrinkage of the aneurysm over time. Hence, post-operative stress patterns may help in determining the likelihood of aneurysm shrinkage post EVAR. Post-operative remodelling of the aneurysm may lead to increased drag forces. PMID:19807909

  8. Use of spiral computed tomographic angiography in monitoring abdominal aortic aneurysms after transfemoral endovascular repair.

    PubMed Central

    Balm, R; Jacobs, M J

    1997-01-01

    Transfemoral endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has proved to be technically feasible in a selected group of patients. However, long-term efficacy has not been proved. Graft performance after implantation can be monitored by a single imaging technique: spiral computed tomographic angiography. With this technique, the parameters for continuing clinical success of the procedure-graft patency, endoleaks, graft migration, attachment site diameter, attachment system failure, and aneurysm diameter-can be monitored. Only in selected cases will an additional imaging technique be necessary. PMID:9339508

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Blunt Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion With Kissing Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Idoguchi, Koji Yamaguchi, Masato; Okada, Takuya; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Sugimura, Kazuro; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-10-15

    Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic dissection is extremely rare and potentially deadly. We present the case of a 62-year-old man involved in a frontal car crash. After emergency undergoing laparotomy for bowel injuries, he was referred to our hospital due to acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities on day 3 after the trauma. Computed tomography and aortography showed an aortobiiliac dissection with complete occlusion. This injury was successfully treated by endovascular treatment with 'kissing'-technique stent placement, which appears to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment.

  10. Chronic Q-Fever (Coxiella burnetii) Causing Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Lumbar Osteomyelitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Leahey, P. Alexander; Tahan, Steven R.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Albrecht, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a rare cause of chronic infection that most frequently presents as endocarditis. We report a case of C burnetii causing an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm with contiguous lumbar osteomyelitis resulting in spinal cord compromise. The diagnosis was established by serologic studies consistent with chronic Q-fever (ratio of C burnetii immunoglobulin [Ig]G phase II titer to IgG phase I titer <1) and was confirmed by positive C burnetii polymerase chain reaction of vertebral tissue in addition to pathology of vertebral bone showing intracellular Gram-negative coccobacillary bacteria. The patient clinically improved after surgical decompression and prolonged treatment with doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine. PMID:26730393

  11. Colorectal cancer associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm: results of EVAR followed by colectomy.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria A; Pizzardi, Giulia; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The association of colorectal cancer and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is infrequent but poses special problems of priority of treatment under elective circumstances. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcome of 16 consecutive patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) followed by colectomy. Operative mortality was nil. Operative morbidity included two transient rise of serum creatinine level and one extraperitoneal anastomotic leakage which evolved favourably with conservative treatment. EVAR allowed a very short delay of treatment of colorectal cancer after aneurysm repair, minimizing operative complications. PMID:23151840

  12. Chylous Ascites Following Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: An Unusual Complication

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Georgios; Konstantopoulos, Theofanis; Theodorou, Stavros; Tsoutsas, Ioannis; Xanthopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaperonis, Elias; Papavassiliou, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Chylous ascites is a rare complication after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Accumulation of chyle within the close space of the peritoneal cavity may cause severe discomfort to the patient, complicating the postoperative course. Prompt diagnosis is needed to adopt measures for reducing lymph leakage and contributing to lymphatic fistula closure. Fortunately, conservative treatment is successful in the majority of cases. In the rare cases that do not respond to conservative treatment, surgery becomes mandatory. Accurate preoperative localization of lymph leakage is a prerequisite for a successful outcome. Postoperative chyloperitoneum has a benign course and an excellent prognosis. PMID:27486496

  13. Treatment of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Infected by Coxiella Burnetii Using a Cryopreserved Allograft.

    PubMed

    Jayet, Jérémie; Raux, Maxime; Allaire, Eric; Desgranges, Pascal; Cochennec, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by an intracellular bacillus named Coxiella burnetii (CB) and is a rare cause of vascular infections. We report a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm infected by CB with bilateral paravertebral abscesses and contiguous spondylodiscitis treated by open repair using a cryopreserved allograft and long-term antibiotic therapy by oral doxycycline and oral hydroxychloroquine for a duration of 18 months. Twenty months after the operation, the patient had no infections signs and vascular complication. PMID:26968369

  14. Chronic Q-Fever (Coxiella burnetii) Causing Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Lumbar Osteomyelitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Leahey, P Alexander; Tahan, Steven R; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Albrecht, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a rare cause of chronic infection that most frequently presents as endocarditis. We report a case of C burnetii causing an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm with contiguous lumbar osteomyelitis resulting in spinal cord compromise. The diagnosis was established by serologic studies consistent with chronic Q-fever (ratio of C burnetii immunoglobulin [Ig]G phase II titer to IgG phase I titer <1) and was confirmed by positive C burnetii polymerase chain reaction of vertebral tissue in addition to pathology of vertebral bone showing intracellular Gram-negative coccobacillary bacteria. The patient clinically improved after surgical decompression and prolonged treatment with doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine. PMID:26730393

  15. Successful endovascular treatment of a 13 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm. Case report.

    PubMed

    Santagata, A; Giribono, A M; Ferrara, D; Viviani, E; Narese, D; Midiri, F; Albano, D; Padricelli, A; Del Guercio, L

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence in the literature that endovascular aneurysm repair is the first-line approach for most of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Furthermore aortouniiliac stent graft placement is, in high risk patients or during emergency setting, a safe procedure over the mid- and long-term period and compares well with the results of bifurcated stent grafts. We present a case of a 66 -year-old gentleman, with pneumothorax after therapeutic thoracentesis and a giant AAA, successfully treated with an aortomonoiliac stent grafting and femoro-femoral crossover bypass. PMID:27212572

  16. Hemoptysis as a first symptom of endoleak after thoracic endovascular aortic repair, which caused aortic rupture and required complex management

    PubMed Central

    Warot, Marcin; Burchard, Paweł; Paschke, Łukasz; Łysiak, Zuzanna; Chęciński, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has become the most common procedure in the treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysms. However, potential long-term complications of this technique could be life-threatening. Hemoptysis is a common symptom of lung tumor, especially cancer. On the other hand, hemoptysis can also be caused by bronchitis, tuberculosis, mycosis, and trauma. In this case report, we present a patient with hemoptysis and lung tumor suggesting lung cancer, which was a unique symptom of type IA endoleak after TEVAR and led to rupture of the thoracic aneurysm. It was decided to perform next an endovascular procedure due to the severe state of the patient. Next the thoracotomy was performed because drainage of the left pleural cavity was unsuccessful. In the last stage bronchoscopy was needed to remove the thrombus, which occluded the left main bronchi. Successful management has led to the patient's full recovery. Despite justified popularity of endovascular procedures in the treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysms, we should remember about potential long-term complications. Hemoptysis could be a unique symptom of the endoleak after TEVAR and treatment of such complications could be complex and demanding. PMID:23837105

  17. [Frequency of occurrence of traumatic aortic rupture in automobile passengers involved in a frontal crash with a static or dynamic obstacle].

    PubMed

    Hazuková, R; Hottmar, P; Lonský, V; Safr, M; Kunes, P

    2002-10-01

    There is a lesion of aortic thoracic complex in car-passengers during the frontal clash to a static or to a dynamic antipodal obstacle is described in this study. It is a retrospective analysis. Facts were noted especially from dissectional documents. All from 298 men died. The main cause of car-passengers death was a weighty traumatic lesion of cardiovascular system in 58.7%. The aortic rupture was noted in 98 (32.9%) people, the death was in 90.8% directly on the road and 9.2% at hospital. From the whole people who were accepted to a hospital were 9 (8.9%) with a traumatic aortic rupture. But nobody of them was transported to a special center and everyone died due to traumatic lesion of cardiovascular system. Statistical significant cofactors of aortic rupture were atherosclerosis of aortic wall and intensity of clash. Therefore we can expect an aortic rupture in every third dead frontal car crash participant on a dynamic or static obstacle. Nearly 10% from men with traumatic aortic rupture were transported to a hospital. No aortic rupture was diagnosed. PMID:12629869

  18. Sexual dimorphism of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a striking example of "male disadvantage" in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Lisa D S; Bown, Matthew J; Tomaszewski, Maciej

    2012-11-01

    The abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent, localised, dilation of the abdominal aorta that causes death in 80% of patients if left untreated. An apparent male predominance in AAA has been observed in most studies, with a male: female gender ratio of ∼6:1 between the ages 60 years-64 years. The majority of risk factors for AAA exhibit sexual dimorphism but no single risk factor shows a higher magnitude of "male disadvantage" than AAA itself. This in turn suggests that the additive effects of risk factors may better explain the higher prevalence of AAA in men than women compared to each individual factor. Amongst others, sex steroids and sex chromosomes have been hypothesised to act as the drivers of this sexual dimorphism. Future research should focus on the major biological differences between the sexes identifying why men are at more risk of AAA than women. PMID:22840688

  19. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  1. Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 augments angiotensin II-induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms in male apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenescu, Violeta; Arsenescu, Razvan; Parulkar, Madhura; Karounos, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Baker, Nicki; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2011-11-15

    Infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) to hyperlipidemic mice augments atherosclerosis and causes formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Each of these AngII-induced vascular pathologies exhibit pronounced inflammation. Previous studies demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) promote inflammation in endothelial cells and adipocytes, two cell types implicated in AngII-induced vascular pathologies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that administration of PCB77 to male apolipoprotein E (ApoE) -/- mice promotes AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. Male ApoE-/- mice were administered vehicle or PCB77 (49 mg/kg, i.p.) during week 1 and 4 (2 divided doses/week) of AngII infusion. Body weights and total serum cholesterol concentrations were not influenced by administration of PCB77. Systolic blood pressure was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (156 {+-} 6 vs 137 {+-} 5 mmHg, respectively). The percentage of aortic arch covered by atherosclerotic lesions was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (2.0 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.9 {+-} 0.1%, respectively). Lumen diameters of abdominal aortas determined by in vivo ultrasound and external diameters of excised suprarenal aortas were increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle. In addition, AAA incidence increased from 47 to 85% in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77. Adipose tissue in close proximity to AAAs from mice administered PCB77 exhibited increased mRNA abundance of proinflammatory cytokines and elevated expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensinogen, angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1aR)). These results demonstrate that PCB77 augments AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 (PCB77) promotes AngII-induced hypertension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCB77 augments Ang

  2. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair by Means of the Chimney Technique in a Patient with Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Elias; Almanfi, Abdelkader; Dougherty, Kathryn G.

    2016-01-01

    Crossed fused renal ectopia, a congenital anomaly in 1 of 7,000 individuals, presents a challenge during endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Most treatment approaches in these patients have involved open surgical repair of the aneurysm or endovascular repair with coverage of the ectopic renal artery. We present what we think is the first case of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with use of the chimney technique (parallel stent-grafting) to preserve an ectopic renal artery, in an 88-year-old man who was at high risk for open surgery. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:27303239

  3. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair by Means of the Chimney Technique in a Patient with Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Elias; Almanfi, Abdelkader; Dougherty, Kathryn G; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2016-06-01

    Crossed fused renal ectopia, a congenital anomaly in 1 of 7,000 individuals, presents a challenge during endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Most treatment approaches in these patients have involved open surgical repair of the aneurysm or endovascular repair with coverage of the ectopic renal artery. We present what we think is the first case of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with use of the chimney technique (parallel stent-grafting) to preserve an ectopic renal artery, in an 88-year-old man who was at high risk for open surgery. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:27303239

  4. An unusual duplication of the inferior vena cava in a patient with endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Polguj, Michał; Szubert, Wojciech; Topol, Mirosław; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old Caucasian male, with sensation of abdominal pulsation was admitted to our hospital. In multidetector 64-row computed tomography (CT) angiography, an abdominal aortic aneurysm was observed. Endovascular aortic repair was performed. Control CT confirmed prosperity with stent graft fixation and absence of any vascular complications. Investigation also showed asymmetrical duplication of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Right (RIVC) and left (LIVC) inferior vena cava arose from the confluence of the right and left iliac veins. The LIVC continued as left renal vein. PMID:26429190

  5. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Silverberg, Daniel Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  6. Impairment of erectile function after elective repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Majd, P; Ahmad, W; Luebke, Th; Gawenda, M; Brunkwall, J

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the functional change of erectile dysfunction after endovascular repair (EVAR) and open repair (OR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm.Between April 2009 and December 2011, male patients admitted for elective treatment of an asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm were included. The erectile function was evaluated by using a validated KEED questionnaire. All patients filled out the questionnaire preoperatively and postoperatively after one year.The number of patients with an increase of erectile dysfunction was 8 (26.6%) to 16 (53.3%) in open repair group vs. 30 (42.6%) to 40 (58.8%) in endovascular aneurysm repair. There was no statistically significant difference between open repair and endovascular aneurysm repair groups in order of new incidence of erectile dysfunction (p = 0.412). The study showed an increase in the mean value of Erectile Dysfunction -Score postoperatively in both the groups as well.The present study showed an increase of erectile dysfunction postoperatively, but the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. PMID:25761855

  7. The Benefits of Internal Thoracic Artery Catheterization in Patients With Chronic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ilic, Nikola Davidovic, Lazar; Koncar, Igor; Dragas, Marko; Markovic, Miroslav; Colic, Momcilo; Cinara, Ilijas

    2011-04-15

    Occlusion of the abdominal aorta may be caused by an embolic lesion, but more commonly by thrombotic disease at the aortoiliac area, progressing retrograde. However, the visualization of the distal run-off via internal thoracic-epigastric inferior artery collateral channel may be a very important diagnostic tool, especially in countries with poor technical equipment. This study was designed to show the benefit of the selective internal thoracic angiography in cases with complete aortic occlusion. We present 30 patients with chronic aortic abdominal occlusion who were submitted to the transaxillary aortography and selective ITA angiography with purpose of distal run off evaluation. Angiographic evaluation was performed by two independent radiologists according to previously defined classification. Good angiographic score via internal thoracic angiography by first observer was achieved in 19 (63.3%) patients and in 18 (60%) by a second observer. Transaxillary aortography showed inferior results: good angiographic score by the first observer in six (20%) patients and by the second observer in three (3%) patients. Low extremity run-off is better visualized during internal thoracic angiography than during transaxillary aortography.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Elastography of the in vivo Abdominal Aorta: A Feasibility Study for Comparing Aortic Stiffness between Hypertensives and Normotensives

    PubMed Central

    Kolipaka, Arunark; Woodrum, David; Araoz, Philip A.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to demonstrate feasibility of using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) to identify hypertensive changes in the abdominal aorta when compared to normotensives based on the stiffness measurements. Methods MRE was performed on 8 volunteers (4 normotensives and 4 hypertensives) to measure the effective stiffness of the abdominal aorta. MRE wave images are directionally filtered and phase gradient analysis was performed to determine the stiffness of the aorta. Student’s t-test was performed to determine significant difference in stiffness measurements between normotensives and hypertensives. Results The normotensive group demonstrated an average abdominal aortic stiffness of 3.7 ± 0.8 kPa, while the controlled-hypertensive demonstrated an average abdominal aortic stiffness of 9.3 ± 1.9kPa. MRE effective stiffness of abdominal aorta in hypertensives was significantly greater than that of normotensives with p=0.02. Conclusion Feasibility of in vivo aortic MRE is demonstrated. Hypertensives have significantly higher aortic stiffness assessed through MRE than normotensives. PMID:22045617

  9. Elastin-Derived Peptides Promote Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Modulating M1/M2 Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Dale, Matthew A; Xiong, Wanfen; Carson, Jeffrey S; Suh, Melissa K; Karpisek, Andrew D; Meisinger, Trevor M; Casale, George P; Baxter, B Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a dynamic vascular disease characterized by inflammatory cell invasion and extracellular matrix degradation. Damage to elastin in the extracellular matrix results in release of elastin-derived peptides (EDPs), which are chemotactic for inflammatory cells such as monocytes. Their effect on macrophage polarization is less well known. Proinflammatory M1 macrophages initially are recruited to sites of injury, but, if their effects are prolonged, they can lead to chronic inflammation that prevents normal tissue repair. Conversely, anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages reduce inflammation and aid in wound healing. Thus, a proper M1/M2 ratio is vital for tissue homeostasis. Abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue reveals a high M1/M2 ratio in which proinflammatory cells and their associated markers dominate. In the current study, in vitro treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with EDPs induced M1 macrophage polarization. By using C57BL/6 mice, Ab-mediated neutralization of EDPs reduced aortic dilation, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and proinflammatory cytokine expression at early and late time points after aneurysm induction. Furthermore, direct manipulation of the M1/M2 balance altered aortic dilation. Injection of M2-polarized macrophages reduced aortic dilation after aneurysm induction. EDPs promoted a proinflammatory environment in aortic tissue by inducing M1 polarization, and neutralization of EDPs attenuated aortic dilation. The M1/M2 imbalance is vital to aneurysm formation. PMID:27183603

  10. [Perioperative management of endovascular stent graft placement for abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, A; Ishida, K; Aratake, K; Wakamatsu, H; Kawata, R; Kunihiro, M; Sakabe, T

    2000-09-01

    We retrospectively examined the changes in hemodynamics, oxygen index and renal function along with the complications in 25 patients who had undergone endovascular stent graft placement (ESG) surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm. During stent graft placement, mean arterial pressure decreased to 58 +/- 8 mmHg by increasing the dose of anesthetics and/or using vasodilators. Except for this intended hypotensive period, mean arterial pressure and heart rate were relatively stable and adequately maintained during surgical manipulation. Oxygenation index was well maintained. A patient with a high preoperative creatinine level underwent prophylactic hemodialysis postoperatively. In other patients except one who died in early postoperative period, both BUN and creatinine levels were kept within normal ranges. Four patients died postoperatively and the causes of the death in two patients are related to the surgical procedure; one with multiple emboli possibly due to released atheloma from the aortic wall during procedure, the other with sepsis due to infected stent graft. Although ESG is a well tolerated procedure, embolism is the most serious complication. Careful preoperative evaluation of the ascending arch and descending aortic wall and monitoring with transcranial doppler are necessary. PMID:11025953

  11. Helical CT Angiography of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Suprarenal Stent Grafting: A Pictorial Essay

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhonghua

    2003-06-15

    The endovascular repair of abdominal aorticaneurysm (AAA) with stent grafts is rapidly becoming an important alternative to open repair. Suprarenal stent grafting, recently modified from conventional infrarenal stent grafting, is a technique for the purpose of treating patients with inappropriate aneurysm necks.Unlike open repair, the success of endoluminal repair cannot be ascertained by means of direct examination and thus relies on imaging results. The use of conventional angiography for arterial imaging has become less dominant, while helical computed tomography angiography(CTA) has become the imaging modality of choice for both preoperative assessment and postoperative followup after treatment with stent graft implants. There is an increasing likelihood that radiologists will become more and more involved in the procedure of aortic stent grafting and in giving the radiological report on these patients treated with stent grafts. It is necessary for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging findings, including common and uncommon appearances following aortic stent grafting. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe and present normal and abnormal imaging appearances following aortic stent grafting based on helical CTA.

  12. MicroRNA-21 blocks abdominal aortic aneurysm development and nicotine-augmented expansion.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Azuma, Junya; Toh, Ryuji; Deng, Alicia; Merk, Denis R; Raiesdana, Azad; Leeper, Nicholas J; Raaz, Uwe; Schoelmerich, Anke M; McConnell, Michael V; Dalman, Ronald L; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2012-02-22

    Identification and treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remains among the most prominent challenges in vascular medicine. MicroRNAs are crucial regulators of cardiovascular pathology and represent possible targets for the inhibition of AAA expansion. We identified microRNA-21 (miR-21) as a key modulator of proliferation and apoptosis of vascular wall smooth muscle cells during development of AAA in two established murine models. In both models (AAA induced by porcine pancreatic elastase or infusion of angiotensin II), miR-21 expression increased as AAA developed. Lentiviral overexpression of miR-21 induced cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis in the aortic wall, with protective effects on aneurysm expansion. miR-21 overexpression substantially decreased expression of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) protein, leading to increased phosphorylation and activation of AKT, a component of a pro-proliferative and antiapoptotic pathway. Systemic injection of a locked nucleic acid-modified antagomir targeting miR-21 diminished the pro-proliferative impact of down-regulated PTEN, leading to a marked increase in the size of AAA. Similar results were seen in mice with AAA augmented by nicotine and in human aortic tissue samples from patients undergoing surgical repair of AAA (with more pronounced effects observed in smokers). Modulation of miR-21 expression shows potential as a new therapeutic option to limit AAA expansion and vascular disease progression. PMID:22357537

  13. miR-24 limits aortic vascular inflammation and murine abdominal aneurysm development.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M; Raaz, Uwe; Eken, Suzanne M; Toh, Ryuji; Azuma, Junya; Adam, Matti; Nakagami, Futoshi; Nagakami, Futoshi; Heymann, Helen M; Chernogubova, Ekaterina; Chernugobova, Ekaterina; Jin, Hong; Roy, Joy; Hultgren, Rebecka; Caidahl, Kenneth; Schrepfer, Sonja; Hamsten, Anders; Eriksson, Per; McConnell, Michael V; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Identification and treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remain among the most prominent challenges in vascular medicine. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial regulators of cardiovascular pathology and represent intriguing targets to limit AAA expansion. Here we show, by using two established murine models of AAA disease along with human aortic tissue and plasma analysis, that miR-24 is a key regulator of vascular inflammation and AAA pathology. In vivo and in vitro studies reveal chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1) to be a major target and effector under the control of miR-24, regulating cytokine synthesis in macrophages as well as their survival, promoting aortic smooth muscle cell migration and cytokine production, and stimulating adhesion molecule expression in vascular endothelial cells. We further show that modulation of miR-24 alters AAA progression in animal models, and that miR-24 and CHI3L1 represent novel plasma biomarkers of AAA disease progression in humans. PMID:25358394

  14. Endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm as a late complication of inferior vena cava filter placement.

    PubMed

    Medina, Carlos R; Indes, Jeffrey; Smith, Christopher

    2006-06-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of abdominal aorta after inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement are uncommon, with associated morbidity and mortality. We report a case in which an abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm resulted from erosion of a Bird's Nest (Cook, Bloomington, IN) IVC filter into the wall of the abdominal aorta. A 64-year-old woman with an IVC filter placed 10 years prior presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed a 1.4-cm x 2.0-cm infrarenal aortic pseudoaneurysm adjacent to the IVC filter site. A Zenith endograft (Cook) was used via an open femoral artery exposure to successfully treat the pseudoaneurysm. PMID:16765254

  15. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  16. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases and TIMPs in human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Elmore, J R; Keister, B F; Franklin, D P; Youkey, J R; Carey, D J

    1998-05-01

    Degradation of extracellular matrix, especially elastin, within the aortic wall is a hallmark of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Normal turnover of matrix proteins is mediated by a family of enzymes called matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMP activity is regulated by proteins called tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). We analyzed the expression of all known MMPs with established elastolytic activity and TIMPs in human AAA and control tissue. mRNA coding for MMP-9, MMP-2, human macrophage metalloelastase, MMP-7, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were amplified by reverse transcriptase-PCR in control and AAA tissue. A Northern blot assay was used to measure the levels of mRNA coding for MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2. Control aortic tissue was obtained from patients with occlusive disease and from organ donors. The expression of MMP-7 and human macrophage metalloelastase was not detected in any aortic specimens. By Northern blot analysis the mean level of MMP-2 mRNA was not significantly different between control groups and AAAs (normalized values: occlusive, 1.5 +/- 0.8, n = 3; donor, 4.5 +/- 2.2, n = 6; AAA, 4.0 +/- 0.95, n = 15). There was a significant increase in the level of MMP-9 mRNA in AAA specimens (occlusive, 16.8 +/- 3, n = 3; donor, 5.7 +/- 1.2, n = 6; AAA, 56.7 +/- 11, n = 15, p = 0.0069). The levels of mRNA coding for TIMP-1 were not significantly different. There was a small but statistically significant increase in TIMP-2 mRNA in AAA tissue. These data support the hypothesis that increased activity of MMP-9, but not MMP-2, is an important factor in the etiology of AAAs. This enhanced MMP-9 activity could then result in degradation of the ECM, leading to aneurysmal dilatation. PMID:9588507

  17. Diaphragmatic rupture precipitated by intercostal chest tube drainage in a patient of blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Ashok Kumar; Feroz, Asif; Dawar, Sachet; Kumar, Prem; Singh, Anupam; Khublani, Trilok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma in collision injuries in road traffic accident (RTA) occasionally results in diaphragmatic injury and rupture besides other serious multisystem injuries. These diaphragmatic injuries (DI) frequently go undetected specially when occur on the right side. DI associated with hemothorax need insertion of intercostal tube drainage (ICTD). ICTD has never been reported to precipitate diaphragmatic rupture and hernia. We are reporting such a rare case for the first time in medical literature. PMID:26933316

  18. Traumatic rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum due to blunt abdominal trauma in a soccer game: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, W.S.; van der Vorst, J.R.; Swank, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction a Meckel’s diverticulum is one of the most common congenital anomalies of the digestive tract. The reported lifetime complication rate is 4%, mostly due to hemorrhage, obstruction, perforation or inflammation. A symptomatic Meckel’s diverticulum due to rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is very rare. We believe this case report is the first reporting a rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum after a low velocity blunt abdominal trauma and outlining the importance of a thorough and complete examination of the patient after blunt abdominal trauma. Presentation of case a 17-year-old male presented with abdominal pain after blunt abdominal trauma during a soccer game. Physical examination showed signs of peritonitis in all quadrants of the abdomen. During admission the patient deteriorated with decreasing blood pressure and raising pulse rate. A CT-scan showed free abdominal fluid. Our patient was scheduled for an emergent laparotomy where a perforated Meckel’s diverticulum with fecal spill was found. A segmental ileal resection was performed. Post-operative, patient developed a pneumonia and also intra-abdominal abscesses treated with percutaneous drainage. After an admission period of 17-days the patient was discharged. Conclusion perforation of a Meckel’s diverticulum is rarely suspected as a cause of acute deterioration following blunt abdominal trauma. This case shows the importance of awareness of this kind of injury especially in male patients. PMID:26701844

  19. A cost-effectiveness analysis of standard versus endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Thomas L.; DeRose, Guy; Kribs, Stewart; Harris, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To compare endovascular and standard open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in terms of initial in-hospital costs and the costs of secondary interventions and surveillance. Design A retrospective study. Setting A university-affiliated tertiary care medical centre. Patients Seven patients who underwent elective endovascular (EV) repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in 1998 and 31 patients anatomically suitable for endovascular repair who underwent standard (STAN) elective repair. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 14 months. Interventions Elective repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with use of the standard technique or endovascular technology. Outcome measures Costs common to both groups were not determined. Costs were determined for total hospital stay, preoperative or postoperative embolization, grafts, additional endovascular equipment, and follow-up computed tomography. Results Groups were similar with respect to demographic data and aneurysm size (EV = 6.23 cm v. STAN = 6.05 cm). All patients were in American Society of Anesthesiologists class III or IV. Vanguard bifurcated grafts and extensions were used in the EV group. The total cost for both groups in Canadian dollars included: cost of stay (EV, 5.6 d, $2092.63 v. STAN, 10.7 d, $4449.19; p = 0.009); cost of embolization (EV, n = 3; $900/procedure); cost of follow-up CT (EV, 5.4 per patient; $450/CT); cost of grafts (EV = $8571.43, STAN = $374); additional radiologic equipment costs (EV = $1475). The mean total cost differed significantly between the 2 groups (EV = $14 967.63 v. STAN = $4823.19; p = 0.004). The additional cost associated with a reduction in hospital stay was calculated by determining the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER: difference in mean costs/difference in mean length of stay = $1604.51). Conclusions Endovascular repair continues to be more expensive than standard open repair determined according to procedural and follow-up costs. The technology is still in the

  20. ApoA-I/HDL-C levels are inversely associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm progression.

    PubMed

    Burillo, Elena; Lindholt, Jes S; Molina-Sánchez, Pedro; Jorge, Immaculada; Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Tarin, Carlos; Torres-Fonseca, Monica Maria; Esteban, Margarita; Laustsen, Jesper; Ramos-Mozo, Priscilla; Calvo, Enrique; Lopez, Juan Antonio; Vega de Ceniga, Melina; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Egido, Jesus; Andrés, Vicente; Vazquéz, Jesús; Meilhac, Olivier; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis

    2015-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) evolution is unpredictable, and there is no therapy except surgery for patients with an aortic size> 5 cm (large AAA). We aimed to identify new potential biomarkers that could facilitate prognosis and treatment of patients with AAA. A differential quantitative proteomic analysis of plasma proteins was performed in AAA patients at different stages of evolution [small AAA (aortic size=3-5 cm) vs large AAA] using iTRAQ labelling, high-throughput nano-LC-MS/MS and a novel multi-layered statistical model. Among the proteins identified, ApoA-I was decreased in patients with large AAA compared to those with small AAA. These results were validated by ELISA on plasma samples from small (n=90) and large AAA (n=26) patients (150± 3 vs 133± 5 mg/dl, respectively, p< 0.001). ApoA-I levels strongly correlated with HDL-Cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration (r=0.9, p< 0.001) and showed a negative correlation with aortic size (r=-0.4, p< 0.01) and thrombus volume (r=-0.3, p< 0.01), which remained significant after adjusting for traditional risk factors. In a prospective study, HDL-C independently predicted aneurysmal growth rate in multiple linear regression analysis (n=122, p=0.008) and was inversely associated with need for surgical repair (Adjusted hazard ratio: 0.18, 95 % confidence interval: 0.04-0.74, p=0.018). In a nation-wide Danish registry, we found lower mean HDL-C concentration in large AAA patients (n=6,560) compared with patients with aorto-iliac occlusive disease (n=23,496) (0.89± 2.99 vs 1.59± 5.74 mmol/l, p< 0.001). Finally, reduced mean aortic AAA diameter was observed in AngII-infused mice treated with ApoA-I mimetic peptide compared with saline-injected controls. In conclusion, ApoA-I/HDL-C systemic levels are negatively associated with AAA evolution. Therapies targeting HDL functionality could halt AAA formation. PMID:25789510

  1. A Case Report on the Successful Treatment of Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Infectious Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Initially Presenting with Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2015-01-01

    Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms often present with abdominal and lower back pain, but prolonged fever may be the only symptom. Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms initially presenting with meningitis are extremely rare; there are no reports of their successful treatment. Cases with Streptococcus pneumoniae as the causative bacteria are even rarer with a higher mortality rate than those caused by other bacteria. We present the case of a 65-year-old man with lower limb weakness and back pain. Examination revealed fever and neck stiffness. Cerebrospinal fluid showed leukocytosis and low glucose levels. The patient was diagnosed with meningitis and bacteremia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with antibiotics. Fever, inflammatory response, and neurologic findings showed improvement. However, abdominal computed tomography revealed an aneurysm not present on admission. Antibiotics were continued, and a rifampicin soaked artificial vascular graft was implanted. Tissue cultures showed no bacteria, and histological findings indicated inflammation with high leukocyte levels. There were no postoperative complications or neurologic abnormalities. Physical examination, blood tests, and computed tomography confirmed there was no relapse over the following 13 months. This is the first reported case of survival of a patient with an infectious abdominal aortic aneurysm initially presenting with meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26779361

  2. In situ repair of a primary Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Goudard, Yvain; Pierret, Charles; de La Villéon, Bruno; Mlynski, Amélie; de Kerangal, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    Infected aortic aneurysms represent 0.85 to 1.3% of aortic aneurysms. Most often, the implicated bacteria species are Salmonella sp., Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Brucella-related infected aortic aneurysms are very rare. Most often, they result from endocarditis or from a local septic focus. Combined treatment by antibiotics and surgery is the standard for infectious aneurysms. In the absence of formal factual data, the surgical treatment is still discussed in the literature, especially since endovascular treatments have been in full expansion. We are reporting the case of a female patient presenting with a Brucella-related infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm, without primitive infectious source (area) or identified endocarditis. Surgical treatment with in situ prosthetic replacement and omentoplasty in association with adapted antibiotics allowed a favorable outcome with an excellent result after an 8-year follow up. PMID:23380562

  3. Uncluttered single-image visualization of the abdominal aortic vessel tree: Method and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Joong-Ho; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Napel, Sandy

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The authors develop a method to visualize the abdominal aorta and its branches, obtained by CT or MR angiography, in a single 2D stylistic image without overlap among branches. Methods: The abdominal aortic vasculature is modeled as an articulated object whose underlying topology is a rooted tree. The inputs to the algorithm are the 3D centerlines of the abdominal aorta, its branches, and their associated diameter information. The visualization problem is formulated as an optimization problem that finds a spatial configuration of the bounding boxes of the centerlines most similar to the projection of the input into a given viewing direction (e.g., anteroposterior), while not introducing intersections among the boxes. The optimization algorithm minimizes a score function regarding the overlap of the bounding boxes and the deviation from the input. The output of the algorithm is used to produce a stylistic visualization, made of the 2D centerlines modulated by the associated diameter information, on a plane. The authors performed a preliminary evaluation by asking three radiologists to label 366 arterial branches from the 30 visualizations of five cases produced by the method. Each of the five patients was presented in six different variant images, selected from ten variants with the three lowest and three highest scores. For each label, they assigned confidence and distortion ratings (low/medium/high). They studied the association between the quantitative metrics measured from the visualization and the subjective ratings by the radiologists. Results: All resulting visualizations were free from branch overlaps. Labeling accuracies of the three readers were 93.4%, 94.5%, and 95.4%, respectively. For the total of 1098 samples, the distortion ratings were low: 77.39%, medium: 10.48%, and high: 12.12%. The confidence ratings were low: 5.56%, medium: 16.50%, and high: 77.94%. The association study shows that the proposed quantitative metrics can predict a reader

  4. Uncluttered single-image visualization of the abdominal aortic vessel tree: Method and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Won, Joong-Ho; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Napel, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors develop a method to visualize the abdominal aorta and its branches, obtained by CT or MR angiography, in a single 2D stylistic image without overlap among branches. Methods: The abdominal aortic vasculature is modeled as an articulated object whose underlying topology is a rooted tree. The inputs to the algorithm are the 3D centerlines of the abdominal aorta, its branches, and their associated diameter information. The visualization problem is formulated as an optimization problem that finds a spatial configuration of the bounding boxes of the centerlines most similar to the projection of the input into a given viewing direction (e.g., anteroposterior), while not introducing intersections among the boxes. The optimization algorithm minimizes a score function regarding the overlap of the bounding boxes and the deviation from the input. The output of the algorithm is used to produce a stylistic visualization, made of the 2D centerlines modulated by the associated diameter information, on a plane. The authors performed a preliminary evaluation by asking three radiologists to label 366 arterial branches from the 30 visualizations of five cases produced by the method. Each of the five patients was presented in six different variant images, selected from ten variants with the three lowest and three highest scores. For each label, they assigned confidence and distortion ratings (low∕medium∕high). They studied the association between the quantitative metrics measured from the visualization and the subjective ratings by the radiologists. Results: All resulting visualizations were free from branch overlaps. Labeling accuracies of the three readers were 93.4%, 94.5%, and 95.4%, respectively. For the total of 1098 samples, the distortion ratings were low: 77.39%, medium: 10.48%, and high: 12.12%. The confidence ratings were low: 5.56%, medium: 16.50%, and high: 77.94%. The association study shows that the proposed quantitative metrics can predict a

  5. Three-band decomposition analysis in multiscale FSI models of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, Maria G. C.; Gizzi, Alessio; Cherubini, Christian; Filippi, Simonetta

    2016-07-01

    Computational modeling plays an important role in biology and medicine to assess the effects of hemodynamic alterations in the onset and development of vascular pathologies. Synthetic analytic indices are of primary importance for a reliable and effective a priori identification of the risk. In this scenario, we propose a multiscale fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modeling approach of hemodynamic flows, extending the recently introduced three-band decomposition (TBD) analysis for moving domains. A quantitative comparison is performed with respect to the most common hemodynamic risk indicators in a systematic manner. We demonstrate the reliability of the TBD methodology also for deformable domains by assuming a hyperelastic formulation of the arterial wall and a Newtonian approximation of the blood flow. Numerical simulations are performed for physiologic and pathologic axially symmetric geometry models with particular attention to abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Risk assessment, limitations and perspectives are finally discussed.

  6. Treatment of Type II Endoleaks After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Transcaval Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mansueto, Giancarlo Cenzi, Daniela; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Petrella, Enrico; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2005-06-15

    The purpose of the note is to describe a new technique for type II endoleak treatment, using an alternative approach through femoral venous access. Three patients who developed type II endoleak after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm were treated with direct transcaval puncture and embolization inside the aneurysm sac. The detailed technique is described. All patients were treated without any complications and discharged 48 hours after the treatment. At 1 month follow-up the computed tomograph scan did not show a recurrence of a type II endoleak. The management of patients with type II endoleak is a controversial issue and different techniques have been proposed. We suggest an alternative technique for type II endoleak treatment. The feasibility and the advantages of this approach can offer new possibilities for the diagnosis as well as for the treatment of this complication.

  7. Endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in the presence of a hydronephrotic horseshoe kidney.

    PubMed

    Krivoshei, Lian; Akin-Olugbade, Yemi; McWilliams, Glen; Halak, Moshe; Silverberg, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to report an unusual case of a patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and a hydronephrotic horseshoe kidney (HSK) that was repaired by endovascular means. An 81-year-old male patient with a known HSK was found to have hydronephrosis and an AAA. The patient's aneurysm was treated with an endovascular stent graft which required the covering of accessory renal arteries. He had an uneventful recovery with complete resolution of the hydronephrosis evident on a computed tomography scan performed seven months after the surgery. In conclusion, endovascular aneurysm repair is a feasible therapeutic option for an AAA coexisting with an HSK and may be considered as a valid alternative to open repair when concomitant hydronephrosis is present. PMID:22328622

  8. MicroRNA-29b regulation of abdominal aortic aneurysm development.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Azuma, Junya; Tsao, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous efforts have been initiated to elucidate the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease, which is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Recently, a novel class of small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, was identified as important transcriptional and posttranscriptional inhibitors of gene expression thought to simultaneously "fine tune" the translational output of multiple target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. Several research groups were able to identify the miR-29 family, and miR-29b in particular, as crucial regulators of-not only vascular fibrosis-but also cardiac-, kidney-, liver-, and skin-fibrosis. The current review briefly points out data indicating a causal role for miR-29 in various diseases, while focusing on its potential benefit during AAA initiation and propagation. PMID:23871588

  9. Synchronous colorectal malignancy and abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with endovascular aneurysm repair followed by laparoscopic colectomy.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kazushige; Sunami, Eiji; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Hosaka, Akihiro; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Although the incidence of synchronous abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and malignancies is increasing, there has been no clear consensus in the surgical treatment of such patients. The focus on surgical treatments with minimal invasiveness, such as endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for AAA and laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer, has increased; however, the clinical applicability of combination treatment with EVAR and laparoscopic colectomy has not been established. A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with AAA, advanced sigmoid colon cancer, and coronary artery stenosis. Because the patient also had chronic renal failure with nephrotic syndrome, among several other comorbidities, surgery was considered to be associated with high risks in this patent. Sequential treatments with percutaneous coronary intervention, EVAR, and laparoscopic colectomy were successfully performed. Staged treatment of EVAR followed by laparoscopic colectomy may be a promising strategy for high-risk patients with AAA associated with malignancy. PMID:25875539

  10. Feasibility of Three-Dimensional MR Angiography Image Fusion Guidance for Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Tacher, Vania; Desgranges, Pascal; You, Ketsakin; Ridouani, Fourat; Marzelle, Jean; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography image fusion (IF) with live fluoroscopy guidance was used while performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) in five patients with a history of chronic renal disease or severe contrast allergy. Intraprocedural technical success was 100%. Median procedure time was 120 minutes (range, 60-180 min), fluoroscopy time was 40 minutes (range, 17-65 min), dose-area product was 245,867 mGy × cm(2) (range, 68,435-690,053 mGy × cm(2)), and iodinated contrast volume injected was 15 mL (range, 0-40 mL). Technical success was achieved in four of five patients (80%); one case was complicated by a type 1 endoleak on follow-up MR angiography, which was successfully treated. EVAR with MR angiography IF guidance was technically feasible and safe in five patients and reduced or eliminated the use of iodinated contrast media. PMID:26830935

  11. Synchronous Colorectal Malignancy and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Treated With Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Followed by Laparoscopic Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Kazushige; Sunami, Eiji; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Hosaka, Akihiro; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the incidence of synchronous abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and malignancies is increasing, there has been no clear consensus in the surgical treatment of such patients. The focus on surgical treatments with minimal invasiveness, such as endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for AAA and laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer, has increased; however, the clinical applicability of combination treatment with EVAR and laparoscopic colectomy has not been established. A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with AAA, advanced sigmoid colon cancer, and coronary artery stenosis. Because the patient also had chronic renal failure with nephrotic syndrome, among several other comorbidities, surgery was considered to be associated with high risks in this patent. Sequential treatments with percutaneous coronary intervention, EVAR, and laparoscopic colectomy were successfully performed. Staged treatment of EVAR followed by laparoscopic colectomy may be a promising strategy for high-risk patients with AAA associated with malignancy. PMID:25875539

  12. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period. PMID:23489768

  13. Contemporary management of the demanding infra-renal neck in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Mees, B M; Peppelenbosch, A G; De Haan, M W; Jacobs, M J; Schurink, G W

    2015-04-01

    Proximal infrarenal neck anatomy is a crucial factor in determining outcome of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Unfavorable or demanding infrarenal neck anatomy significantly increases the complexity of both standard endovascular and open repair resulting in increased rates of morbidity and mortality. While technological improvements and expanding institutional experience have resulted in an increased proportion of patients with an AAA with unfavorable infrarenal neck treated by (fenestrated) endovascular techniques, open repair has also remained a valid technique. The purpose of this manuscript was to describe the wide array of endovascular and open techniques in use to treat patients with an AAA with a demanding infrarenal neck and discuss their results and indications. PMID:25592277

  14. Fused ureters in patient with horseshoe kidney and aortic abdominal aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Obidike, Stephen; Woha, Akeh; Aftab, Fuad

    2014-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney (HSK) is a very common developmental abnormality in the kidney. They are associated with abnormalities like multiple renal arteries, abnormal position of the ureter in the renal pelvis and highly placed ureteropelvic junction. These can result in urological complications. However, the ureters run their separate course and empty individually into the urinary bladder. Surprisingly, anatomical anomalies do occur and can lead to unexpected findings on investigation or surgical treatment. Such anomalies can present diagnostic and management challenges to unsuspecting clinicians. This report deals with one of such anomalies that seem not to have been reported before in the literature. This case is a rare finding of fused ureters over the renal isthmus in a patient with HSK who also has aortic abdominal aneurysm (AAA). Simultaneous occurrences of HSK and AAA have been reported severally in the past, and the authors are paying attention on the ureteral anomaly. PMID:25433080

  15. Genetic Algorithm for Analysis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in Radiology Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Robert M; Beckerman, Barbara G; Treadwell, Jim N; Potok, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a problem in which the wall of the artery that supplies blood to the abdomen and lower extremities expands under pressure or balloons outward. Patients must undergo surgery to repair such aneurysm, and there is currently no known indicator of success or failure from this surgery. Our work uses a genetic algorithm to analyze radiology reports from these patients to look for common patterns in the language used as well as common features of both successful and unsuccessful surgieries. The results of the genetic algorithm show that patients with complications or unusual characteristics can be identified from a set of radiology reports without the use of search keywords, clustering, categorization, or ontology. This allows medical researchers to search and identify interesting patient records without the need for explicitly defining what interesting patient records are.

  16. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Mudassar; Fowler, Kathryn J; Mellnick, Vincent M; Sicard, Gregorio A; Narra, Vamsi R

    2016-06-01

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR. PMID:26721588

  17. Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of EHR: Simulation of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Ben-Assuli, Ofir; Ziv, Amitai; Sagi, Doron; Ironi, Avinoah; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-06-01

    Health care organizations have installed electronic systems to increase efficiency in health care. Empirically assessing the cost-effectiveness of technologies to the health care system is a challenging and complex task. This study examined cost-effectiveness of additional clinical information supplied via an EHR system by simulating a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm devised and acted professionally by the Israel Center of Medical Simulation. We conducted a simulation-based study on physicians who were asked to treat a simulated patient for the prevalent medical scenario of hip and leg pain that actually corresponded to an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Half of the participating physicians from the Department of Emergency Medicine at Tel-Hashomer Hospital - Israel's largest - had access to an EHR system that integrates medical data from multiple health providers (community and hospitals) in addition to the local health record, and half did not. To model medical decision making, the results of the simulation were combined with a Markov Model within a decision tree. Cost-effectiveness was analyzed by comparing the effects of the admission/discharge decision in units of quality adjusted life years (QALYs) to the estimated costs. The results showed that using EHR in the ED increases the QALY of the patient and improves medical decision-making. The expenditure per patient for one QALY unit as a result of using the EHR was $1229, which is very cost-effective according to many accepted threshold values (less than all these values). Thus, using the EHR contributes to making a cost-effective decision in this specific but prevalent case. PMID:27114352

  18. Induction of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in human abdominal aortic aneurysm: therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Galán, María; Varona, Saray; Orriols, Mar; Rodríguez, José Antonio; Aguiló, Silvia; Dilmé, Jaume; Camacho, Mercedes; Martínez-González, José; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Clinical management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is currently limited to elective surgical repair because an effective pharmacotherapy is still awaited. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity could be a promising therapeutic option in cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to characterise HDAC expression in human AAA and to evaluate the therapeutic potential of class I and IIa HDAC inhibitors in the AAA model of angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry evidenced an increased expression of HDACs 1, 2 (both class I), 4 and 7 (both class IIa) in abdominal aorta samples from patients undergoing AAA open repair (n=22) compared with those from donors (n=14). Aortic aneurysms from Ang-II-infused ApoE(-/-) mice exhibited a similar HDAC expression profile. In these animals, treatment with a class I HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) or a class IIa inhibitor (MC-1568) improved survival, reduced the incidence and severity of AAA and limited aneurysmal expansion evaluated by Doppler ultrasonography. These beneficial effects were more potent in MC-1568-treated mice. The disorganisation of elastin and collagen fibres and lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration were effectively reduced by both inhibitors. Additionally, HDAC inhibition attenuated the exacerbated expression of pro-inflammatory markers and the increase in metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activity induced by Ang II in this model. Therefore, our data evidence that HDAC expression is deregulated in human AAA and that class-selective HDAC inhibitors limit aneurysm expansion in an AAA mouse model. New-generation HDAC inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic approach to overcome human aneurysm progression. PMID:26989193

  19. Induction of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in human abdominal aortic aneurysm: therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Galán, María; Varona, Saray; Orriols, Mar; Rodríguez, José Antonio; Aguiló, Silvia; Dilmé, Jaume; Camacho, Mercedes; Martínez-González, José; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clinical management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is currently limited to elective surgical repair because an effective pharmacotherapy is still awaited. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity could be a promising therapeutic option in cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to characterise HDAC expression in human AAA and to evaluate the therapeutic potential of class I and IIa HDAC inhibitors in the AAA model of angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry evidenced an increased expression of HDACs 1, 2 (both class I), 4 and 7 (both class IIa) in abdominal aorta samples from patients undergoing AAA open repair (n=22) compared with those from donors (n=14). Aortic aneurysms from Ang-II-infused ApoE−/− mice exhibited a similar HDAC expression profile. In these animals, treatment with a class I HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) or a class IIa inhibitor (MC-1568) improved survival, reduced the incidence and severity of AAA and limited aneurysmal expansion evaluated by Doppler ultrasonography. These beneficial effects were more potent in MC-1568-treated mice. The disorganisation of elastin and collagen fibres and lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration were effectively reduced by both inhibitors. Additionally, HDAC inhibition attenuated the exacerbated expression of pro-inflammatory markers and the increase in metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activity induced by Ang II in this model. Therefore, our data evidence that HDAC expression is deregulated in human AAA and that class-selective HDAC inhibitors limit aneurysm expansion in an AAA mouse model. New-generation HDAC inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic approach to overcome human aneurysm progression. PMID:26989193

  20. An abdominal aortic aneurysm segmentation method: Level set with region and statistical information

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuge Feng; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Sun Shaohua; Napel, Sandy

    2006-05-15

    We present a system for segmenting the human aortic aneurysm in CT angiograms (CTA), which, in turn, allows measurements of volume and morphological aspects useful for treatment planning. The system estimates a rough 'initial surface', and then refines it using a level set segmentation scheme augmented with two external analyzers: The global region analyzer, which incorporates a priori knowledge of the intensity, volume, and shape of the aorta and other structures, and the local feature analyzer, which uses voxel location, intensity, and texture features to train and drive a support vector machine classifier. Each analyzer outputs a value that corresponds to the likelihood that a given voxel is part of the aneurysm, which is used during level set iteration to control the evolution of the surface. We tested our system using a database of 20 CTA scans of patients with aortic aneurysms. The mean and worst case values of volume overlap, volume error, mean distance error, and maximum distance error relative to human tracing were 95.3%{+-}1.4% (s.d.); worst case=92.9%, 3.5%{+-}2.5% (s.d.); worst case=7.0%, 0.6{+-}0.2 mm (s.d.); worst case=1.0 mm, and 5.2{+-}2.3mm (s.d.); worstcase=9.6 mm, respectively. When implemented on a 2.8 GHz Pentium IV personal computer, the mean time required for segmentation was 7.4{+-}3.6min (s.d.). We also performed experiments that suggest that our method is insensitive to parameter changes within 10% of their experimentally determined values. This preliminary study proves feasibility for an accurate, precise, and robust system for segmentation of the abdominal aneurysm from CTA data, and may be of benefit to patients with aortic aneurysms.

  1. First genetic analysis of aneurysm genes in familial and sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    van de Luijtgaarden, Koen M; Heijsman, Daphne; Maugeri, Alessandra; Weiss, Marjan M; Verhagen, Hence J M; IJpma, Arne; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Majoor-Krakauer, Danielle

    2015-08-01

    Genetic causes for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have not been identified and the role of genes associated with familial thoracic aneurysms in AAA has not been explored. We analyzed nine genes associated with familial thoracic aortic aneurysms, the vascular Ehlers-Danlos gene COL3A1 and the MTHFR p.Ala222Val variant in 155 AAA patients. The thoracic aneurysm genes selected for this study were the transforming growth factor-beta pathway genes EFEMP2, FBN1, SMAD3, TGBF2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, and the smooth muscle cells genes ACTA2, MYH11 and MYLK. Sanger sequencing of all coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of these genes was performed. Patients with at least one first-degree relative with an aortic aneurysm were classified as familial AAA (n = 99), the others as sporadic AAA. We found 47 different rare heterozygous variants in eight genes: two pathogenic, one likely pathogenic, twenty-one variants of unknown significance (VUS) and twenty-three unlikely pathogenic variants. In familial AAA we found one pathogenic and segregating variant (COL3A1 p.Arg491X), one likely pathogenic and segregating (MYH11 p.Arg254Cys), and fifteen VUS. In sporadic patients we found one pathogenic (TGFBR2 p.Ile525Phefs*18) and seven VUS. Thirteen patients had two or more variants. These results show a previously unknown association and overlapping genetic defects between AAA and familial thoracic aneurysms, indicating that genetic testing may help to identify the cause of familial and sporadic AAA. In this view, genetic testing of these genes specifically or in a genome-wide approach may help to identify the cause of familial and sporadic AAA. PMID:26017485

  2. Regulatory T cells in human and angiotensin II-induced mouse abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Wu, Wenxue; Lindholt, Jes S.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Libby, Peter; Yu, Xueqing; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aims Regulatory T cells (Tregs) protect mice from angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). This study tested whether AAA patients are Treg-insufficient and the Treg molecular mechanisms that control AAA pathogenesis. Methods and results ELISA determined the Foxp3 concentration in blood cell lysates from 485 AAA patients and 204 age- and sex-matched controls. AAA patients exhibited lower blood cell Foxp3 expression than controls (P < 0.0001). Pearson's correlation test demonstrated a significant but negative correlation between Foxp3 and AAA annual expansion rate before (r = –0.147, P = 0.007) and after (r = –0.153, P = 0.006) adjustment for AAA risk factors. AAA in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe–/–) mice that received different doses of Ang-II exhibited a negative correlation of lesion Foxp3+ Treg numbers with AAA size (r = –0.883, P < 0.0001). Adoptive transfer of Tregs from wild-type (WT) and IL10-deficient (Il10–/–) mice increased AAA lesion Treg content, but only WT mice Tregs reduced AAA size, AAA incidence, blood pressure, lesion macrophage and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell accumulation, and angiogenesis with concurrent increase of lesion collagen content. Both AAA lesion immunostaining and plasma ELISA demonstrated that adoptive transfer of WT Tregs, but not Il10–/– Tregs, reduced the expression of MCP-1. In vitro cell culture and aortic ring assay demonstrated that only Tregs from WT mice, but not those from Il10–/– mice, reduced macrophage MCP-1 secretion, macrophage and vascular cell protease expression and activity, and aortic ring microvessel formation. Conclusion This study supports a protective role of Tregs in human and experimental AAA by releasing IL10 to suppress inflammatory cell chemotaxis, arterial wall remodelling, and angiogenesis. PMID:25824145

  3. Autoradiography screening of potential positron emission tomography tracers for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Sergio; Hall, Håkan; Wanhainen, Anders; Björck, Martin; Sörensen, Jens; Antoni, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aetiology and early pathophysiological mechanisms of aortic aneurysm formation are still unknown and challenging to study in vivo. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potentially valuable instrument for non-invasive in vivo pathophysiological studies. No specific tracer to identify the pathophysiological process of aneurysmal dilatation is yet available, however. The aim of this study was to explore if different PET tracers could be useful to image aneurysmal disease. Methods and results Human aneurysmal aortic tissue, collected during elective resection of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) of asymptomatic patients, was investigated in vitro by means of autoradiography with [68Ga]CRP-binder targeting C-reactive protein, [11C]DAA1106 targeting translocator protein (18 kDa), [11C]D-deprenyl with unknown target receptor, [11C]deuterium-L-deprenyl targeting astrocytes, [18F]fluciclatide targeting integrin αVβ3, [68Ga]IMP461 and bi-specific antibody TF2 052107 targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, [18F]F-metomidate targeting mitochondrial cytochrome P-450 species in the adrenal cortex, and [18F]vorozole targeting aromatase. Of the investigated tracers, only [18F]fluciclatide exhibited specific binding, whereas the other PET tracers failed to show specific uptake in the investigated tissue and are probably not useful for the intended purpose. Conclusion It seems likely that αVβ3 integrin expression in AAA can be visualized with PET and that the αVβ3 selective tracer, [18F]fluciclatide, may be suitable for in vivo molecular imaging of asymptomatic AAA. Additional evaluation of [18F]fluciclatide and αVβ3 integrin expression in AAA will be performed in vitro as well as in vivo. PMID:24555564

  4. Abdominal aortic stiffness as a marker of atherosclerosis in childhood-onset asthma: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Ülger, Zülal; Gülen, Figen; Özyürek, Ruhi Arif

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Asthma is one of the chronic inflammatory diseases. It is known that chronic inflammation accelerates atherosclerosis. Abdominal aortic stiffness parameters can be used to detect the early development of atherosclerosis. Aim In this study, we aimed to evaluate abdominal aortic stiffness parameters in childhood-onset asthma compared with a control group. Methods In this cross-sectional, case–control study, we evaluated 50 patients with childhood-onset asthma, and 57 healthy children as controls. Patients with a diagnosis of asthma of at least three years’ duration were included in the study. Children with hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, a history of smoking contact, or systemic disease were excluded. The study and control groups were evaluated with transthoracic echocardiography, and abdominal aorta diameters were measured. Using the measured data, abdominal aortic stiffness parameters (aortic distensibility: DIS, aortic strain: S, pressure strain elastic modulus: Ep, and pressure strain normalised by diastolic pressure: Ep*) were calculated. Statistical evaluation was done with the Student’s t-test, chisquared test and Pearson’s correlation test. Results The study group consisted of 50 children (24 female, 26 male) with asthma. According to the GINA guidelines, 26 of the patients had mild intermittant asthma, six had mild persistent asthma and 18 had intermediate persistent asthma. None of the patients had severe asthma. In 37 of the asthma patients, spIgE was positive and these patients were accepted as having atopic asthma; 27 of these patients received immunotherapy. We did not detect any differences between the study and control groups in terms of gender, age and body mass index. No differences were evident between the groups with regard to systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, blood cholesterol levels and respiratory function test parameters. There was no difference between the asthma and control groups in the

  5. The Effect of Perioperative Ischemia and Reperfusion on Multiorgan Dysfunction following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Katseni, Konstantina; Kotsis, Thomas; Dafnios, Nikolaos; Arapoglou, Vassilis; Kaparos, Georgios; Logothetis, Emmanuel; Karvouni, Eleni; Katsenis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are relatively common and are potentially life-threatening medical problems. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of I/R injury on multiorgan failure following AAA repair. The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane Review, and Scopus databases were comprehensively searched for articles concerning the pathophysiology of I/R and its systemic effects. Cross-referencing was performed using the bibliographies from the articles obtained. Articles retrieved were restricted to those published in English. One of the most prominent characteristics of AAA open repair is the double physiological phenomenon of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) that happens either at the time of clamping or following the aortic clamp removal. Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes significant pathophysiological disturbances to distant organs, increasing the possibility for postoperative multiorgan failure. Although tissue injury is mediated by diverse mechanisms, microvascular dysfunction seems to be the final outcome of I/R. PMID:26798637

  6. Immunohistochemical Analysis of the Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity Pathway in Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Schworer, Charles M.; Lillvis, John H.; Stahl, Elizabeth; Erdman, Robert; Gatalica, Zoran; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Our previous analysis using genome-wide microarray expression data revealed extreme overrepresentation of immune related genes belonging the Natural Killer (NK) Cell Mediated Cytotoxicity pathway (hsa04650) in human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We followed up the microarray studies by immunohistochemical analyses using antibodies against nine members of the NK pathway (VAV1, VAV3, PLCG1, PLCG2, HCST, TYROBP, PTK2B, TNFA, and GZMB) and aortic tissue samples from AAA repair operations (n = 6) and control aortae (n = 8) from age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched donors from autopsies. The results confirmed the microarray results. Two different members of the NK pathway, HCST and GRZB, which act at different steps in the NK-pathway, were actively transcribed and translated into proteins in the same cells in the AAA tissue demonstrated by double staining. Furthermore, double staining with antibodies against CD68 or CD8 together with HCST, TYROBP, PTK2B or PLCG2 revealed that CD68 and CD8 positive cells expressed proteins of the NK-pathway but were not the only inflammatory cells involved in the NK-pathway in the AAA tissue. The results provide strong evidence that the NK Cell Mediated Cytotoxicity Pathway is activated in human AAA and valuable insight for future studies to dissect the pathogenesis of human AAA. PMID:25993291

  7. [Transanal Doppler ultrasound for prevention of colonic ischemia following abdominal aortic reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Sakurazawa, K

    1991-10-01

    Colonic gangrene is a fatal complication following aorto-iliac reconstruction. Preservation of a sufficient blood flow through both the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and the internal iliac artery (IIA) is believed to be important in its prevention. The transanal Doppler ultrasound technique is a new method to explore intraoperative pelvic hemodynamic changes. After identifying the artery responsible for rectal perfusion and then estimating the collateral rectal blood supply which was derived from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) after aortic clamping, the treatment for the IMA and the IIA was determined. Out of 49 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), 43 cases (88%) were considered to be SMA-dominant, with ligation of the IMA and the IIA being feasible. The IMA and bilateral IIAs could be ligated uneventfully in 14 AAA cases. And, in fact, the reconstruction of the IMA was performed in only 2 cases (4%). Among 21 cases of aorto-iliac occlusive disease (AIOD), 8 cases (38%) were found to be SMA-non-dominant, which suggests a greater importance in the preservation of intrapelvic circulation in AIOD than in AAA. Adequate intraoperative monitoring, by the transanal Doppler ultrasound technique, is essential for the successful prevention of postoperative colonic ischemia. PMID:1961189

  8. Expression of fibrinolytic genes in atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm wall. A possible mechanism for aneurysm expansion.

    PubMed Central

    Schneiderman, J; Bordin, G M; Engelberg, I; Adar, R; Seiffert, D; Thinnes, T; Bernstein, E F; Dilley, R B; Loskutoff, D J

    1995-01-01

    Expansion of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has been attributed to remodeling of the extracellular matrix by active proteolysis. We used in situ hybridization to analyze the expression of fibrinolytic genes in aneurysm wall from eight AAA patients. All specimens exhibited specific areas of inflammatory infiltrates with macrophage-like cells expressing urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and tissue-type PA (t-PA) mRNA. Type 1 PA inhibitor (PAI-1) mRNA was expressed at the base of the necrotic atheroma of all specimens and also within some of the inflammatory infiltrates where it frequently colocalized in regions containing u-PA and t-PA mRNA expressing cells. However, in these areas, the cellular distribution of the transcripts for t-PA and u-PA extended far beyond the areas of PAI-1 expression. These observations suggest a local ongoing proteolytic process, one which is only partially counteracted by the more restricted expression of PAI-1 mRNA. An abundance of capillaries was also obvious in all inflammatory infiltrates and may reflect local angiogenesis in response to active pericellular fibrinolysis. The increased fibrinolytic capacity in AAA wall may promote angiogenesis and contribute to local proteolytic degradation of the aortic wall leading to physical weakening and active expansion of the aneurysm. Images PMID:7615837

  9. Expression and Cellular Localization of 15-Hydroxy-Prostaglandin-Dehydrogenase in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Solà-Villà, David; Dilmé, Jaime-Félix; Rodríguez, Cristina; Soto, Begoña; Vila, Luis; Escudero, José-Román; Martínez-González, José; Camacho, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    PGE2 has been implicated in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) associated hypervascularization. PGE2-metabolism involves 15-hydroxyprostaglandin-dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) the expression of which in AAA is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and cell distribution of 15-PGDH in AAA. Here, we show that 15-PGDH mRNA levels were significantly higher in aorta samples from patients undergoing AAA repair than in those from healthy multiorgan donors. Consequently, the ratio of metabolized PGE2 secreted by aortic samples was significantly higher in AAA. AAA production of total PGE2 and PGE2 metabolites correlated positively with PGI2 production, while the percentage of metabolized PGE2 correlated negatively with the total amount of PGE2 and with PGI2. Transcript levels of 15-PGDH were statistically associated with leukocyte markers but did not correlate with microvascular endothelial cell markers. Immunohistochemistry revealed 15-PGDH in the areas of leukocyte infiltration in AAA samples, mainly associated with CD45-positive cells, but not in normal aorta samples. We provide new data concerning 15-PGDH expression in human AAA, showing that 15-PGDH is upregulated in AAA and mainly expressed in infiltrating leukocytes. Our data suggest that microvasculature was not involved in PGE2 catabolism, reinforcing the potential role of microvasculature derived PGE2 in AAA-associated hypervascularization. PMID:26287481

  10. Effects of microgravity elicited by parabolic flight on abdominal aortic pressure and heart rate in rats.

    PubMed

    Waki, Hidefumi; Shimizu, Tsuyoshi; Katahira, Kiyoaki; Nagayama, Tadanori; Yamasaki, Masao; Katsuda, Shin-Ichiro

    2002-12-01

    Abdominal aortic pressure (AAP), heart rate (HR), and aortic nerve activity (ANA) during parabolic flight were measured by using a telemetry system to clarify the acute effect of microgravity (microG) on hemodynamics in rats. While the animals were conscious, AAP increased up to 119 +/- 3 mmHg on exposure to microG compared with the value at 1 G (95 +/- 3 mmHg; P < 0.001), whereas AAP decreased immediately on exposure to microG under urethane anesthesia (microG: 72 +/- 9 mmHg vs. 1 G: 78 +/- 8 mmHg; P < 0.05). HR also increased during microG in conscious animals (microG: 349 +/- 12 beats/min vs. 1 G: 324+9 beats/min; P < 0.01), although no change was observed under anesthesia. ANA, which was measured under anesthesia, decreased in response to acute microG exposure (microG: 33 +/- 7 counts/s vs. 1 G: 49 +/- 5 counts/s; P < 0.01). These results suggest that microG essentially induces a decrease of arterial pressure; however, emotional stress and body movements affect the responses of arterial pressure and HR during exposure to acute microG. PMID:12391062

  11. The Effect of Perioperative Ischemia and Reperfusion on Multiorgan Dysfunction following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Katseni, Konstantina; Chalkias, Athanasios; Kotsis, Thomas; Dafnios, Nikolaos; Arapoglou, Vassilis; Kaparos, Georgios; Logothetis, Emmanuel; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Karvouni, Eleni; Katsenis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are relatively common and are potentially life-threatening medical problems. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of I/R injury on multiorgan failure following AAA repair. The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane Review, and Scopus databases were comprehensively searched for articles concerning the pathophysiology of I/R and its systemic effects. Cross-referencing was performed using the bibliographies from the articles obtained. Articles retrieved were restricted to those published in English. One of the most prominent characteristics of AAA open repair is the double physiological phenomenon of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) that happens either at the time of clamping or following the aortic clamp removal. Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes significant pathophysiological disturbances to distant organs, increasing the possibility for postoperative multiorgan failure. Although tissue injury is mediated by diverse mechanisms, microvascular dysfunction seems to be the final outcome of I/R. PMID:26798637

  12. High-density lipoprotein therapy inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm progression.

    PubMed

    Delbosc, Sandrine; Rouer, Martin; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Louedec, Liliane; Al Shoukr, Faisal; Rouzet, François; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have highlighted the potential implication of periondontal bacteria contamination in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In addition to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) display multiple functions, including anti-inflammatory and lipopolysaccharide scavenging properties. Low plasma levels of HDL-cholesterol have been reported in AAA patients. We tested the effect of a HDL therapy in Sprague-Dawley rat model of AAA, obtained by intraluminal elastase infusion followed by repeated injections of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg). HDLs, isolated by ultracentrifugation of plasma from healthy human volunteers, were co-injected intravenously (10 mg/kg) with Pg (1.107 Colony Forming Unit) one, eight and 15 days after elastase perfusion. Rats were sacrificed one week after the last injection. Our results show that Pg injections promote the formation of a persistent neutrophil-rich thrombus associated with increased aortic diameter in this AAA model. HDLs significantly reduced the increased AAA diameter induced by Pg. Histology showed the onset of a healing process in the Pg/HDL group. HDL injections also reduced neutrophil activation in Pg-injected rats associated with decreased cytokine levels in conditioned media and plasma. Scintigraphic analysis showed an intense uptake of 99mTc-HDL by the AAA suggesting that HDLs could exert their beneficial effect by acting directly on the thrombus components. HDL supplementation may therefore constitute a new therapeutic tool for AAA treatment. PMID:26676721

  13. Migration of a retained temporary epicardial pacing wire into an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mukaihara, Kosuke; Yotsumoto, Goichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhisa; Imoto, Yutaka

    2015-07-01

    A 69-year old male was referred to our hospital for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and a giant tumour of the left kidney. He underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) prior to aneurysmectomy and nephrectomy. Temporary epicardial pacing wires (TEPWs) were placed on the right atrium and right ventricle. The bipolar ventricular wire was removed and the unipolar atrial wire was cut flush with the skin surface on postoperative day 5. CT 7 days after the OPCAB procedure revealed a retained TEPW sutured to the right atrial wall. One month later, the patient underwent a repair of the AAA and left nephrectomy. We found that a TEPW had migrated inside the AAA intraoperatively. The retained TEPW was thus no longer observed on postoperative CT. Migration of the atrial pacing wire through the aortic lumen was suspected, although the detailed mechanism is unknown. This is the first reported case of a migrated temporary pacing wire into the aorta under noninfectious conditions. PMID:25173602

  14. Plasma cytokine levels and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms: A population-based prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Mengyang; Liu, Cong-Lin; Lv, Bing-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Ying; Cheng, Longxian; Cheng, Xiang; Lindholt, Jes S.; Rasmussen, Lars M.; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by inflammatory cell accumulation in AAA lesions that produce inflammatory cytokines and advance its pathogenesis. Peripheral cytokines may predict the degree or risk of AAA. Methods and Results ELISA determined plasma interleukin-6 (IL6), IL10, IL17A, IFN-γ, and C-reactive protein (CRP) from 476 AAA patients and 200 controls. AAA patients had lower IL6, IFN-γ, IL10, IL17A, and higher CRP than controls. IL10 correlated positively with IFN-γ, IL17A, or IL6, but not CRP in control or AAA populations. IL10 associated negatively with systolic blood pressure, whereas CRP associated positively with diastolic blood pressure and body mass index. CRP was an independent AAA risk factor and correlated positively with aortic diameters before and after adjustments for other risk factors. IFN-γ, IL17A, and CRP correlated positively with cross-sectional AAA area after adjustment. IL10 correlated positively with AAA growth rate before and after adjustment. AAA patients with CRP levels above the median doubled the risk of death. Conclusions Reduced IFN-γ, IL10, and IL17A in AAA patients, positive correlations of IFN-γ and IL17A with cross-sectional AAA area, IL10 with AAA growth rate, and IL10 with IFN-γ and IL17A suggest combined Th1, Th2, and Th17 immune responses in human AAAs. PMID:25856542

  15. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Prakash Hughes, John Patel, Ashish S. Donati, Tommaso Sallam, Morad Patel, Sanjay D. Bell, Rachel E.; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Modarai, Bijan Zayed, Hany A.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  16. Flow dynamics in anatomical models of abdominal aortic aneurysms: computational analysis of pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Finol, Ender A; Amon, Cristina H

    2003-01-01

    Blood flow in human arteries is dominated by time-dependent transport phenomena. In particular, in the abdominal segment of the aorta under a patient's average resting conditions, blood exhibits laminar flow patterns that are influenced by secondary flows induced by adjacent branches and in irregular vessel geometries. The flow dynamics becomes more complex when there is a pathological condition that causes changes in the normal structural composition of the vessel wall, for example, in the presence of an aneurysm. An aneurysm is an irreversible dilation of a blood vessel accompanied by weakening of the vessel wall. This work examines the importance of hemodynamics in the characterization of pulsatile blood flow patterns in individual Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) models. These patient-specific computational models have been developed for the numerical simulation of the momentum transport equations utilizing the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the spatial and temporal discretization. We characterize pulsatile flow dynamics in AAAs for average resting conditions by means of identifying regions of disturbed flow and quantifying the disturbance by evaluating wall pressure and wall shear stresses at the aneurysm wall. PMID:14515766

  17. Flow topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms during rest and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn

    2012-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent, localized widening of the abdominal aorta. Flow in AAA is dominated by recirculation, transitional turbulence and low wall shear stress. Image-based CFD has recently enabled high resolution flow data in patient-specific AAA. This study aims to characterize transport in different AAAs, and understand flow topology changes from rest to exercise, which has been a hypothesized therapy due to potential acute changes in flow. Velocity data in 6 patients with different AAA morphology were obtained using image-based CFD under rest and exercise conditions. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from integration of the velocity data to identify dominant Lagrangian coherent structures. The flow topology was compared between rest and exercise conditions. For all patients, the systolic inflow jet resulted in coherent vortex formation. The evolution of this vortex varied greatly between patients and was a major determinant of transport inside the AAA during diastole. During exercise, previously observed stagnant regions were either replaced with undisturbed flow, regions of uniform high mixing, or persisted relatively unchanged. A mix norm measure provided a quantitative assessment of mixing. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, grant number 5R21HL108272.

  18. In-Graft Endovascular Stenting Repair for Supravalvular Stenosis From Aortic Rupture After Balloon-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Haas, Nikolaus; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with high-grade aortic valve stenosis and status post-coronary artery bypass grafting and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. He was in New York Heart Association class III and had dyspnea. After appropriate screening, we implanted a 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA USA) through a transapical approach because of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Postinterventional aortography revealed correct positioning and function of the valve and free coronary ostia but contrast extravasation in the vicinity of the interposed vascular prosthesis, resulting in severe luminal narrowing. We chose to manage the stenosis with an endovascular stent. After stenting, extravascular compression was markedly reduced, and the pressure gradient disappeared. The patient was discharged home on the 20th postoperative day. Three months later, computed tomography depicted correct positioning of both grafts. The patient's general health is good, and he is now in New York Heart Association class II. This case illustrates a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation specific for patients with an ascending aortic graft. Although stenting may be a good solution, as depicted by this case, self-expanding transcatheter aortic valves should be preferred in patients with ascending aortic grafts to avoid the described complication. PMID:26355692

  19. Hybrid repair of ruptured type B aortic dissection extending into an aberrant right subclavian artery in a patient with Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hamidian-Jahromi, Alireza; Carroll, Jonathan D; Doucet, Linda D; Zhang, Wayne W

    2013-11-01

    Turner's syndrome (TS) has been documented as the most common cause of aortic dissection in young women. However, little attention from vascular surgery has been paid to these patients. We report the first case of ruptured type B aortic dissection with aberrant right subclavian artery treated successfully with hybrid endovascular and open procedures in a patient with TS. Left carotid to subclavian artery bypass, thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and coil embolization of the aberrant right subclavian and left subclavian arteries were performed in an emergency setting. Literature on epidemiology, causes, and management options of acute aortic dissection in TS patients are reviewed and discussed. PMID:24011806

  20. [Characteristics of duodenal ruptures depending on topographical and anatomical properties of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Dubrovin, I A; Chirkov, R N; Dubrovina, I A; Khachaturian, B S; Mosoian, A S; Dallakian, V F

    2013-01-01

    We have studied specific morphological properties of duodenal rupture depending on the topographic and anatomical features of this organ and circumstances of blunt abdominal trauma suffered in a car crash (with the victim found in the passenger compartment or involved in an automobile-pedestrian accident) and a railway crash (a train-pedestrian accident) or resulting from a blunt-force trauma, a fall from height, a fall on the stomach, and traumatic compression of the body. We took into consideration the anatomical peculiarities of the duodenal rupture, such as its circular, horseshoe, and loop-like shape. The study has demonstrated that the frequency of duodenal injury associated with a blunt abdominal trauma shows a stronger dependence on the topographical and anatomical peculiarities of duodenum than on the circumstances of the case. Specifically, the circular duodenum and especially its descending portion are more readily subjected to the damage than the organs of a different shape. The position of the break with respect to the duodenal axis is an important diagnostic signs allowing to clarify circumstances of the blunt injury. Transverse ruptures are typical of strong impacts associated with the short-term interaction between the damaging object and the affected part of the body whereas longitudinal ruptures more commonly occur as a result the long-term traumatic impact. Bile imbibition of paraduodenal and peripancreatic retroperitoneal adipose tissue may be used as an additional diagnostic sign of duodenal rupture. PMID:24428049

  1. Deficiency of endogenous acute phase serum amyloid A protects apoE−/− mice from angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    PubMed Central

    Webb, NR; De Beer, MC; Wroblewski, JM; Ji, A; Bailey, W; Shridas, P; Charnigo, RJ; Noffsinger, VP; Witta, J; Howatt, DA; Balakrishnan, A; Rateri, DL; Daugherty, A; De Beer, FC

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), a major cause of death in the aged population, is characterized by vascular inflammation and matrix degradation. Serum amyloid A (SAA), an acute phase reactant linked to inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase induction, correlates with aortic dimensions before aneurysm formation in humans. We investigated whether SAA deficiency in mice impacts AAA formation during angiotensin II (AngII) infusion. Approach and Results Plasma SAA increased ~60-fold in apoE−/− mice 24 hours after i.p. AngII injection (100 μg/kg; n = 4) and ~15-fold after chronic 28-day AngII infusion (1,000 ng/kg/min; n = 9). AAA incidence and severity after 28-day AngII infusion was significantly reduced in apoE−/− mice lacking both acute phase SAA isoforms (SAAKO; n = 20) compared to apoE−/− mice (SAAWT; n = 20) as assessed by in vivo ultrasound and ex vivo morphometric analyses, despite a significant increase in systolic blood pressure in SAAKO mice compared to SAAWT mice after AngII infusion. Atherosclerotic lesion area of the aortic arch was similar in SAAKO and SAAWT mice after 28-day AngII infusion. Immunostaining detected SAA in AAA tissues of AngII-infused SAAWT mice that co-localized with macrophages, elastin breaks, and enhanced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. MMP-2 activity was significantly lower in aortas of SAAKO mice compared to SAAWT mice after 10-day AngII infusion. Conclusion Lack of endogenous acute phase SAA protects against experimental AAA through a mechanism that may involve reduced MMP-2 activity. PMID:25745063

  2. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a visible thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Louise; Chayer, Boris; Qin Zhao; Soulez, Gilles; Roy, David; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: With the continuous development of new stent grafts and implantation techniques, it has now become technically feasible to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with challenging anatomy using endovascular repair with standard, fenestrated, or branched stent-grafts. In vitro experimentations are very useful to improve stent-graft design and conformability or imaging guidance for stent-graft delivery or follow-up. Vascular replicas also help to better understand the limitation of endovascular approaches in challenging anatomy and possibly improve surgical planning or training by practicing high risk clinical procedures in the laboratory to improve outcomes in the operating room. Most AAA phantoms available have a very basic anatomy, which is not representative of the clinical reality. This paper presents a method of fabrication of a realistic AAA phantom with a visible thrombus, as well as some mechanical properties characterizing such phantom. Methods: A realistic AAA geometry replica of a real patient anatomy taken from a multidetector computed tomography (CT) scan was manufactured. To demonstrate the multimodality imaging capability of this new phantom with a thrombus visible in magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, CT angiography (CTA), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and ultrasound, image acquisitions with all these modalities were performed by using standard clinical protocols. Potential use of this phantom for stent deployment was also tested. A rheometer allowed defining hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of phantom materials. Results: MR imaging measurements of SNR and CNR values on T1 and T2-weighted sequences and MR angiography indicated reasonable agreement with published values of AAA thrombus and abdominal components in vivo. X-ray absorption also lay within normal ranges of AAA patients and was representative of findings observed on CTA, fluoroscopy, and DSA. Ultrasound propagation speeds for developed materials were also in

  3. Adventitial Tertiary Lymphoid Organs as Potential Source of MicroRNA Biomarkers for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Spear, Rafaelle; Boytard, Ludovic; Blervaque, Renaud; Chwastyniak, Maggy; Hot, David; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Staels, Bart; Lemoine, Yves; Lamblin, Nicolas; Pruvot, François-René; Haulon, Stephan; Amouyel, Philippe; Pinet, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an inflammatory disease associated with marked changes in the cellular composition of the aortic wall. This study aims to identify microRNA (miRNA) expression in aneurysmal inflammatory cells isolated by laser microdissection from human tissue samples. The distribution of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, B and T lymphocytes, mast cells) was evaluated in human AAA biopsies. We observed in half of the samples that adventitial tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs) with a thickness from 0.5 to 2 mm were located exclusively in the adventitia. Out of the 850 miRNA that were screened by microarray in isolated ATLOs (n = 2), 164 miRNAs were detected in ATLOs. The three miRNAs (miR-15a-3p, miR-30a-5p and miR-489-3p) with the highest expression levels were chosen and their expression quantified by RT-PCR in isolated ATLOs (n = 4), M1 (n = 2) and M2 macrophages (n = 2) and entire aneurysmal biopsies (n = 3). Except for the miR-30a-5p, a similar modulation was found in ATLOs and the two subtypes of macrophages. The modulated miRNAs were then evaluated in the plasma of AAA patients for their potential as AAA biomarkers. Our data emphasize the potential of miR-15a-3p and miR-30a-5p as biomarkers of AAA but also as triggers of ATLO evolution. Further investigations will be required to evaluate their targets in order to better understand AAA pathophysiology. PMID:25993295

  4. Adventitial Tertiary Lymphoid Organs as Potential Source of MicroRNA Biomarkers for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Rafaelle; Boytard, Ludovic; Blervaque, Renaud; Chwastyniak, Maggy; Hot, David; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Staels, Bart; Lemoine, Yves; Lamblin, Nicolas; Pruvot, François-René; Haulon, Stephan; Amouyel, Philippe; Pinet, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an inflammatory disease associated with marked changes in the cellular composition of the aortic wall. This study aims to identify microRNA (miRNA) expression in aneurysmal inflammatory cells isolated by laser microdissection from human tissue samples. The distribution of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, B and T lymphocytes, mast cells) was evaluated in human AAA biopsies. We observed in half of the samples that adventitial tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs) with a thickness from 0.5 to 2 mm were located exclusively in the adventitia. Out of the 850 miRNA that were screened by microarray in isolated ATLOs (n = 2), 164 miRNAs were detected in ATLOs. The three miRNAs (miR-15a-3p, miR-30a-5p and miR-489-3p) with the highest expression levels were chosen and their expression quantified by RT-PCR in isolated ATLOs (n = 4), M1 (n = 2) and M2 macrophages (n = 2) and entire aneurysmal biopsies (n = 3). Except for the miR-30a-5p, a similar modulation was found in ATLOs and the two subtypes of macrophages. The modulated miRNAs were then evaluated in the plasma of AAA patients for their potential as AAA biomarkers. Our data emphasize the potential of miR-15a-3p and miR-30a-5p as biomarkers of AAA but also as triggers of ATLO evolution. Further investigations will be required to evaluate their targets in order to better understand AAA pathophysiology. PMID:25993295

  5. Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1) Regulates Macrophage Cytotoxicity in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiwei; Ren, Jun; Morgan, Stephanie; Liu, Zhenjie; Dou, Changlin; Liu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Aims In abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), macrophages are detected in the proximity of aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). We have previously demonstrated in a murine model of AAA that apoptotic SMCs attract monocytes and other leukocytes by producing MCP-1. Here we tested whether infiltrating macrophages also directly contribute to SMC apoptosis. Methods and Results Using a SMC/RAW264.7 macrophage co-culture system, we demonstrated that MCP-1-primed RAWs caused a significantly higher level of apoptosis in SMCs as compared to control macrophages. Next, we detected an enhanced Fas ligand (FasL) mRNA level and membrane FasL protein expression in MCP-1-primed RAWs. Neutralizing FasL blocked SMC apoptosis in the co-culture. In situ proximity ligation assay showed that SMCs exposed to primed macrophages contained higher levels of receptor interacting protein-1 (RIP1)/Caspase 8 containing cell death complexes. Silencing RIP1 conferred apoptosis resistance to SMCs. In the mouse elastase injury model of aneurysm, aneurysm induction increased the level of RIP1/Caspase 8 containing complexes in medial SMCs. Moreover, TUNEL-positive SMCs in aneurysmal tissues were frequently surrounded by CD68+/FasL+ macrophages. Conversely, elastase-treated arteries from MCP-1 knockout mice display a reduction of both macrophage infiltration and FasL expression, which was accompanied by diminished apoptosis of SMCs. Conclusion Our data suggest that MCP-1-primed macrophages are more cytotoxic. MCP-1 appears to modulate macrophage cytotoxicity by increasing the level of membrane bound FasL. Thus, we showed that MCP-1-primed macrophages kill SMCs through a FasL/Fas-Caspase8-RIP1 mediated mechanism. PMID:24632850

  6. Comparison of hetastarch to albumin for perioperative bleeding in patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. A prospective, randomized study.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, M S; Russo, J; Tissot, M; Weinhouse, G; Riles, T

    1990-01-01

    The effects of hetastarch and human albumin solutions on perioperative bleeding and coagulation parameters during abdominal aortic aneurysm repair were compared. In two randomized groups of 20 patients, albumin 5% (group 1) or hetastarch 6% (group 2) 1 g/kg was given during surgery. The remaining perioperative fluids consisted of lactated ringers and packed red blood cells. Perioperative coagulation measurements included partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, activated clotting time, platelet count, and bleeding time. Estimated blood loss and the total amount of crystalloid and blood infused were also measured. The surgeon, blind to the colloid used, subjectively rated bleeding on a scale of 1 to 10. There was no significant difference between groups for any measured parameter at any time. Measurements of coagulation function were within normal limits for both groups. Hetastarch does not cause clotting disorders in patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, at least if the quantities used in this study are not exceeded. PMID:1690974

  7. Decreased biglycan expression and differential decorin localization in human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2002-12-01

    The hallmark feature of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the progressive degeneration of aortic wall. Matrix proteoglycans (PGs) play important roles in the development of vascular diseases and the function of the tissue. In this study, we examined the concentration, expression and localization of the small extracellular matrix PG biglycan and decorin. The concentration of small PGs present in normal and aneurysmal aortas was determined by biochemical methods following extraction of the tissues with guanidine hydrochloride and treatment with collagenase/elastase, isolation by ion-exchange and gel chromatographies and identification by Western blotting. The levels of mRNA encoding for biglycan and decorin were evaluated in corresponding tissue samples by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Distribution of extracellular matrix macromolecules was examined using Movat's pentachrome staining and localization of biglycan and decorin by immunohistochemistry. Both normal and aneurysmal aortas contained almost equal amounts of decorin (1.13+/-0.08 and 1.22+/-0.10 mg uronic acid per g of dry defatted (dd) tissue, respectively). Furthermore, the expression of decorin was almost constant in both tissues. In normal specimens decorin accounts for 22% of total PGs, whereas in AAA ones for 60%, due to the significant loss of other matrix PGs. In contrast, the concentration of biglycan was markedly decreased in aneurysmal aortas (57%, 0.478+/-0.04 mg uronic acid per g of dd tissue) in comparison to normal ones (1.12+/-0.10 mg uronic acid per g of dd tissue). Biglycan accounts for 22% of total PGs in normal aortas and 25% of total in aneurysmal tissue. A similar decrease (60%) in the amounts of mRNA encoding for biglycan was observed in the AAA. Immunohistochemical study showed that all aortic layers of AAA were characterized by a significant loss of elastin, biglycan and other PGs/GAGs and replacement of these molecules with collagen fibrils and decorin. The

  8. Non-Invasive Pulse Wave Analysis in a Thrombus-Free Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm after Implantation of a Nitinol Aortic Endograft.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Georgiadis, George S; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV). This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall, and the presence of intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early post-operative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm containing no intraluminal thrombus, unremarkable past medical history, and absence of peripheral arterial disease. The estimated parameters were the systolic and diastolic pressure calculated at the aortic level (central pressures), PWV, augmentation pressure (AP) and augmentation index (AI), pressure wave reflection magnitude (RM), and peripheral resistance. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased post-operatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6 to 10.6 and 10.9 m/s at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the AI decreased from 28 to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The AP decreased gradually from 15 to 6 and 4 mmHg. The wave RM dropped from 68 to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn × s × cm(-5). Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the pressure wave reflection over the aortic bifurcation without causing significant alterations in PWV. PMID:26793712

  9. Non-Invasive Pulse Wave Analysis in a Thrombus-Free Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm after Implantation of a Nitinol Aortic Endograft

    PubMed Central

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Georgiadis, George S.; Lazarides, Miltos K.

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV). This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall, and the presence of intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early post-operative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm containing no intraluminal thrombus, unremarkable past medical history, and absence of peripheral arterial disease. The estimated parameters were the systolic and diastolic pressure calculated at the aortic level (central pressures), PWV, augmentation pressure (AP) and augmentation index (AI), pressure wave reflection magnitude (RM), and peripheral resistance. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased post-operatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6 to 10.6 and 10.9 m/s at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the AI decreased from 28 to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The AP decreased gradually from 15 to 6 and 4 mmHg. The wave RM dropped from 68 to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn × s × cm−5. Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the pressure wave reflection over the aortic bifurcation without causing significant alterations in PWV. PMID:26793712

  10. Using machine learning methods for predicting inhospital mortality in patients undergoing open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Monsalve-Torra, Ana; Ruiz-Fernandez, Daniel; Marin-Alonso, Oscar; Soriano-Payá, Antonio; Camacho-Mackenzie, Jaime; Carreño-Jaimes, Marisol

    2016-08-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is an abnormal dilatation of the aortic vessel at abdominal level. This disease presents high rate of mortality and complications causing a decrease in the quality of life and increasing the cost of treatment. To estimate the mortality risk of patients undergoing surgery is complex due to the variables associated. The use of clinical decision support systems based on machine learning could help medical staff to improve the results of surgery and get a better understanding of the disease. In this work, the authors present a predictive system of inhospital mortality in patients who were undergoing to open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Different methods as multilayer perceptron, radial basis function and Bayesian networks are used. Results are measured in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the classifiers, achieving an accuracy higher than 95%. The developing of a system based on the algorithms tested can be useful for medical staff in order to make a better planning of care and reducing undesirable surgery results and the cost of the post-surgical treatments. PMID:27395372

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and the challenges of management in a developing country: a review of three cases.

    PubMed

    Sule, Augustine Z; Ardil, Bill; Ojo, Emmanuel O

    2012-01-01

    There is an increase in the incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) over the last six decades, probably as a result of higher longevity and lifestyle changes witnessed in the years following World War II. Though earlier studies mainly from Southern Africa suggest abdominal aortic aneurysms as uncommon amongst black Africans, recent reports from Africa emphasized an increasing incidence of vascular diseases and its sequelae including AAA. There are, however, few documented case reports of AAA in our environment over the years suggesting the rarity of this disease. We report the management and outcome of three different types of infrarenal AAA with synthetic graft in a General Surgery Unit over a four-year period between 2001 and 2005. Follow-up evaluation confirmed a successful outcome in two patients. Abdominal aortic aneurysms may be occurring more frequently than reported in our environment and its management, using basic evaluation techniques, can be successfully achieved with reasonable outcome when performed in a non-specialized unit by General Surgeons in institutions with limited resources. Contrary to the popularly held view of rarity of AAA, the disease may be increasing in incidence amongst black African. Its evaluation and treatment is also feasible with the availability of reconstructive graft in a non-specialized surgical unit. PMID:22684137

  12. Agreement between objective and subjective assessment of image quality in ultrasound abdominal aortic aneurism screening

    PubMed Central

    Wolstenhulme, S; Keeble, C; Moore, S; Evans, J A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate agreement between objective and subjective assessment of image quality of ultrasound scanners used for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening. Methods: Nine ultrasound scanners were used to acquire longitudinal and transverse images of the abdominal aorta. 100 images were acquired per scanner from which 5 longitudinal and 5 transverse images were randomly selected. 33 practitioners scored 90 images blinded to the scanner type and subject characteristics and were required to state whether or not the images were of adequate diagnostic quality. Odds ratios were used to rank the subjective image quality of the scanners. For objective testing, three standard test objects were used to assess penetration and resolution and used to rank the scanners. Results: The subjective diagnostic image quality was ten times greater for the highest ranked scanner than for the lowest ranked scanner. It was greater at depths of <5.0 cm (odds ratio, 6.69; 95% confidence interval, 3.56, 12.57) than at depths of 15.1–20.0 cm. There was a larger range of odds ratios for transverse images than for longitudinal images. No relationship was seen between subjective scanner rankings and test object scores. Conclusion: Large variation was seen in the image quality when evaluated both subjectively and objectively. Objective scores did not predict subjective scanner rankings. Further work is needed to investigate the utility of both subjective and objective image quality measurements. Advances in knowledge: Ratings of clinical image quality and image quality measured using test objects did not agree, even in the limited scenario of AAA screening. PMID:25494526

  13. Spontaneous rupture of a hepatic hydatid cyst into the peritoneum causing only mild abdominal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Kemal

    2007-02-01

    Hydatid disease is an endemic disease in certain areas of the world. It is located mostly in the liver. Spontaneous rupture of the hydatid cyst into the peritoneum is a rare condition, which is accompanied by serious morbidity and mortality generally. We present herein a case with a spontaneous rupture of a hepatic hidatid disease into the peritoneum without any serious symptoms. A 15-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency room with a mild abdominal pain lasting for a day. Physical examination revealed only mild abdominal tenderness. There was no history of trauma or complaints related to hydatid diseases. Ultrasonography showed a large amount of free fluid and a cystic lesion with irregular borders in the liver. He was operated on. Postoperative albendazol therapy was given for 2 mo. No recurrence or secondary hydatidosis was seen on CT investigation in the 3rd, 6th and 12th mo following surgery. PMID:17278209

  14. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Following Axillo-femoral Bypass in a Patient with Stanford B Acute Aortic Dissection Accompanied by Abdominal Visceral Ischemia;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Takayuki; Bonkohara, Yukihiro; Azuma, Takashi; Iijima, Masaki; Higashidate, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    A 60-year-old woman was transfer-red to the emergency department of our medical center with worsening chest and back pain. Computed tomography revealed Stanford type B aortic dissection. There was a false lumen from the distal arch to the abdominal aorta just above the celiac artery. Although she was at 1st treated conservatively, she abruptly developed acute renal failure and lower limb ischemia because of an enlarged false lumen, and emergency axillo-femoral bypass surgery was performed with an 8 mm tube graft. However, renal failure gradually worsened, which necessitated continuous hemodiafiltration was performed. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair was then performed, and her renal function recovered. PMID:27586321

  15. Hyperhomocysteinaemia is an independent risk factor of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Wei Zuo, Shang; Li, Yue; Jia, Xin; Jia, Sen Hao; Zhang, Tao; Xiang Song, Yu; Qi Wei, Ying; Xiong, Jiang; Hua Hu, Yong; Guo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The associations between hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remain controversial, with only few studies focused on these associations within the Chinese population. We performed subgroup and interaction analyses in a Chinese Han population to investigate these associations. In all, 155 AAA patients and 310 control subjects were evaluated for serum total homocysteine levels and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate the aforementioned associations. Interaction and stratified analyses were conducted according to age, sex, smoking status, drinking status, and chronic disease histories. The multiple logistic analyses showed a significant association between HHcy and AAA but no significant association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and AAA. The interaction analysis showed that age and peripheral arterial disease played an interactive role in the association between HHcy and AAA, while drinking status played an interactive role in the association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and AAA. In conclusion, HHcy is an independent risk factor of AAA in a Chinese Han population, especially in the elderly and peripheral arterial disease subgroups. Longitudinal studies and clinical trials aimed to reduce homocysteine levels are warranted to assess the causal nature of these relationships PMID:26865327

  16. Inhibitory Effect of Statins on Inflammation-Related Pathways in Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Koichi; Nagasawa, Ayako; Kudo, Junichi; Onoda, Masahiko; Morikage, Noriyasu; Furutani, Akira; Aoki, Hiroki; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-01-01

    HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase inhibitors (statins) have been suggested to attenuate abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth. However, the effects of statins in human AAA tissues are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effects of statins on proinflammatory molecules in human AAA walls in ex vivo culture. Simvastatin strongly inhibited the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in human AAA walls, but showed little effect on c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Simvastatin, as well as pitavastatin significantly reduced the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-2 and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide (CXCL5) under both basal and TNF-α-stimulated conditions. Similar to statins, the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB, accompanied by a decreased secretion of MMP-9, MCP-2 and CXCL5. Moreover, the effect of simvastatin and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 was additive in inhibiting the secretion of MMP-9, MCP-2 and CXCL5. These findings indicate that statins preferentially inhibit the Rac1/NF-κB pathway to suppress MMP-9 and chemokine secretion in human AAA, suggesting a mechanism for the potential effect of statins in attenuating AAA progression. PMID:25993292

  17. Active-shape-model-based segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysms in CTA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; van Ginneken, Bram; Niessen, Wiro J.; Maintz, J. B. Antoine; Viergever, Max A.

    2002-05-01

    An automated method for the segmentation of thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms from CTA data is presented. The method is based on Active Shape Model (ASM) fitting in sequential slices, using the contour obtained in one slice as the initialisation in the adjacent slice. The optimal fit is defined by maximum correlation of grey value profiles around the contour in successive slices, in contrast to the original ASM scheme as proposed by Cootes and Taylor, where the correlation with profiles from training data is maximised. An extension to the proposed approach prevents the inclusion of low-intensity tissue and allows the model to refine to nearby edges. The applied shape models contain either one or two image slices, the latter explicitly restricting the shape change from slice to slice. To evaluate the proposed methods a leave-one-out experiment was performed, using six datasets containing 274 slices to segment. Both adapted ASM schemes yield significantly better results than the original scheme (p<0.0001). The extended slice correlation fit of a one-slice model showed best overall performance. Using one manually delineated image slice as a reference, on average a number of 29 slices could be automatically segmented with an accuracy within the bounds of manual inter-observer variability.

  18. Association of Intraluminal Thrombus, Hemodynamic Forces, and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion Using Longitudinal CT Images.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Byron A; Gharahi, Hamidreza; Lim, ChaeYoung; Jaberi, Farhad A; Choi, Jongeun; Lee, Whal; Baek, Seungik

    2016-05-01

    While hemodynamic forces and intraluminal thrombus (ILT) are believed to play important roles on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), it has been suggested that hemodynamic forces and ILT also interact with each other, making it a complex problem. There is, however, a pressing need to understand relationships among three factors: hemodynamics, ILT accumulation, and AAA expansion for AAA prognosis. Hence this study used longitudinal computer tomography scans from 14 patients and analyzed the relationship between them. Hemodynamic forces, represented by wall shear stress (WSS), were obtained from computational fluid dynamics; ILT accumulation was described by ILT thickness distribution changes between consecutives scans, and ILT accumulation and AAA expansion rates were estimated from changes in ILT and AAA volume. Results showed that, while low WSS was observed at regions where ILT accumulated, the rate at which ILT accumulated occurred at the same rate as the aneurysm expansion. Comparison between AAAs with and without thrombus showed that aneurysm with ILT recorded lower values of WSS and higher values of AAA expansion than those without thrombus. Findings suggest that low WSS may promote ILT accumulation and submit the idea that by increasing WSS levels ILT accumulation may be prevented. PMID:26429788

  19. Resolved Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Following Stent Graft Treatment: A Report of Five Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri; Garniek, Alexander; Golan, Gil; Bensaid, Paul; Galili, Yair; Schneiderman, Jacob; Morag, Benyamina

    2004-03-15

    Complete aneurysm resolution is the hallmark of successful endoluminal stent-graft treatment. We describe 5 patients in whom an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disappeared completely at mid-term follow-up after endovascular stent-graft placement. We reviewed 45 patients (43 men and 2 women) who underwent AAA repair using an endovascular technique, from April 1997 to December 2001. Mean AAA diameter was 58.3 mm. On 48-month follow-up, 12 aneurysms had not changed in size, 4 had grown, 16 had shrunk, and 5 had resolved completely. We describe these 5 patients in detail. The 5 patients were all men, mean age 68 years; their mean aneurysmal sac diameter was 54 mm. The only common finding in all of them was patency of lumbar and inferior mesenteric arteries at pre-procedure evaluation as well as at follow-up. Mean time to complete resolution was 18 months. No major complications were encountered. AAA may resolve completely after endovascular stent-graft implantation. Patent side branches may perhaps contribute to AAA disappearance by antegrade flow. A larger patient population should be reviewed, however, before any statistical conclusion can be drawn.

  20. Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Effectiveness of Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Nevala, Terhi; Biancari, Fausto; Manninen, Hannu; Aho, Pekka-Sakari; Matsi, Pekka; Maekinen, Kimmo; Roth, Wolf-Dieter; Yloenen, Kari; Lepaentalo, Mauri; Peraelae, Jukka

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in treating type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Two hundred eighteen patients underwent EVAR with a Zenith stent-graft from January 2000 to December 2005. During a follow-up period of 4.5 {+-} 2.3 years, solely type II endoleak was detected in 47 patients (22%), and 14 of them underwent secondary interventions to correct this condition. Ten patients had transarterial embolization, and four patients had translumbar/transabdominal embolization. The embolization materials used were coils, thrombin, gelatin, Onyx (ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer), and glue. Disappearance of the endoleak without enlargement of the aneurysm sac after the first secondary intervention was achieved in only five of these patients (5/13). One patient without surveillance imaging was excluded from analyses of clinical success. After additional interventions in four patients and the spontaneous disappearance of type II endoleak in two patients, overall clinical success was achieved in eight patients (8/12). One patient did not have surveillance imaging after the second secondary intervention. Clinical success after the first secondary intervention was achieved in two patients (2/9) in the transarterial embolization group and three patients (3/4) in the translumbar embolization group. The results of secondary interventions for type II endoleak are unsatisfactory. Although the small number of patients included in this study prevents reliable comparisons between groups, the results seem to favor direct translumbar embolization in comparison to transarterial embolization.

  1. A comprehensive analysis of differentially expressed genes and pathways in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Jiwei

    2015-08-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) via various bioinformatics techniques. Gene expression profiling analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between AAA samples and normal controls was conducted. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery tool was utilized to perform Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses for DEGs and clusters from the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, which was constructed using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes. In addition, important transcription factors (TFs) that regulated DEGs were investigated. A total of 346 DEGs were identified between AAA samples and healthy controls. Additionally, four clusters were identified from the PPI network. Cluster 1 was associated with sensory perception of smell and the olfactory transduction subpathway. The most significant GO function terms for cluster 2 and 3 were response to virus and defense response, respectively. Cluster 4 was associated with mitochondria-associated functions and the oxidative phosphorylation subpathway. Early growth response-1 (EGR-1), Myc, activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) and specificity protein (SP) 1:SP3 were identified to be critical TFs in this disease. The present study suggested that the olfactory transduction subpathway, mitochondria and oxidative phosphorylation pathways were involved in AAA, and TFs, such as EGR-1, Myc, ATF5 and SP1:SP3, may be potential candidate molecular targets for this disease. PMID:25936411

  2. Chemical Mediators of Inflammation and Resolution in Post-Operative Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Padmini S.; Leeson, Stanley; Porter, Timothy F.; Owens, Christopher D.; Kim, Ji Min; Conte, Michael S.; Serhan, Charles N.; Gelman, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Temporal–metabolomic studies of local mediators during inflammation and its resolution uncovered novel pathways and mediators, e.g., lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins that stimulate key resolution responses. Since these studies were carried out with isolated human cells and in animal models, it is important to determine in humans whether temporal profiles between pro-inflammatory mediators and pro-resolving mediators are demonstrable in vivo. To this end, we examined patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery. Profiles of mediators including eicosanoids were assessed in addition to pro-resolving mediators. The results demonstrate temporal relationships for local-acting peptides (e.g., VEGF, IL-10, TGFβ) and lipid mediators (leukotrienes and resolvins). In addition, profiles obtained for AAA patients divided into two groups based on their temporal profile: one group consistent with a pro-inflammatory and another with a resolving profile. Together, these translational metabolomic profiles demonstrate for the first time the temporal relationships between local mediators in humans relevant in inflammation resolution. PMID:21286796

  3. Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm have a high prevalence of popliteal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tuveson, Viktoria; Löfdahl, Hedvig E; Hultgren, Rebecka

    2016-08-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are more prone to develop popliteal artery aneurysms (PAA), but the prevalence is not well known. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of PAA in patients with AAA, and to determine whether a certain risk factor profile is more commonly found in patients with concurrent aneurysms. All AAA patients (ICD code I71.3, I71.4) attending the outpatient clinic at the Karolinska University Hospital between 2011 and 2013 were included in the study cohort (n=465); 48% (225) had been subjected to an ultrasound or computed tomography scan of their popliteal arteries. In these patients, three definitions of PAA were considered (⩾ 10.5, ⩾ 12, ⩾ 15 mm), although the overall analysis is based on PAA ⩾ 12 mm. The mean age was 70.7 years (SD 7.5), 89% were men, and the mean AAA diameter was 47 mm (SD 14). The prevalence of PAA was 19% (n=43) by definition ⩾ 12 mm, and 11% (n=25) with 15 mm. Claudication was more frequently found in AAA patients with PAA than patients without PAA. Sensitivity between clinical examination and radiology was 26%, and the specificity for clinical examination was 90%. In conclusion, owing to the high prevalence of PAA in AAA patients, described by us and others, the low cost and risks associated with ultrasound and the poor sensitivity at clinical examination, all women and men with AAA should undergo one radiological examination of their popliteal arteries. PMID:27216869

  4. The role of lysyl oxidase family members in the stabilization of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Remus, Ebony Washington; O'Donnell, Robert E; Rafferty, Kathryn; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Csiszar, Katalin; Fong, Sheri F T; Taylor, W Robert

    2012-10-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States today. We employed a model for AAA development using apolipoprotein E knock out mice fed a high-fat diet and treated with ANG II and β-aminopropionitrile (β-APN) for 4 wk. ANG II induces hypertension and atherosclerotic disease, whereas β-APN inhibits the activity of the lysyl oxidase/ lysyl oxidase-like protein (LOX/LOXL) family members. LOX/LOXL family members crosslink collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix and therefore contribute to the integrity and stabilization of a healthy vessel wall. In this model, cotreatment with ANG II and β-APN caused a 90% AAA incidence and increased atherosclerotic lesion formation from less than 5% to greater than 25% after 4 wk. In more atheroprotected mouse strains (C57BL/6 and BalbC), cotreatment with ANG II and β-APN caused 50% and 40% AAA incidence, respectively. These data demonstrate the importance of LOX/LOXL to the stability of the vessel wall. Therapeutic strategies to overexpress LOX/LOXL enzymes or to support the crosslinking of soluble matrix proteins in a polymeric scaffold are a promising opportunity to achieve stabilization of AAAs. PMID:22904155

  5. Micro-RNAs in abdominal aortic aneurysms: insights from animal models and relevance to human disease.

    PubMed

    Raffort, Juliette; Lareyre, Fabien; Clement, Marc; Mallat, Ziad

    2016-05-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a major health concern and may be associated with high rates of mortality linked to acute complications. Diagnosis and treatment are, respectively, based on imaging and surgical techniques. Drug-based therapies are still mostly ineffective, which highlight a real unmet need. Major pathophysiological mechanisms leading to aneurysm formation involve inflammatory processes, degradation of the extracellular matrix, and loss of smooth muscle cells. However, the precise cellular and molecular pathways are still poorly understood. Recently, microRNAs have emerged as major intracellular players in a wide range of biological processes, and their stability in extracellular medium within microvesicles has led to propose them as mediators of intercellular crosstalk and as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in a variety of disease settings. To date, several studies have been performed to address the involvement of micro-RNAs (miRs) in aneurysm formation and complications. Here, we discuss the roles and implications of miRs in animal models and their relevance to human AAA. PMID:26965051

  6. Hyperhomocysteinaemia is an independent risk factor of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wei Zuo, Shang; Li, Yue; Jia, Xin; Jia, Sen Hao; Zhang, Tao; Xiang Song, Yu; Qi Wei, Ying; Xiong, Jiang; Hua Hu, Yong; Guo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The associations between hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remain controversial, with only few studies focused on these associations within the Chinese population. We performed subgroup and interaction analyses in a Chinese Han population to investigate these associations. In all, 155 AAA patients and 310 control subjects were evaluated for serum total homocysteine levels and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms. Multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate the aforementioned associations. Interaction and stratified analyses were conducted according to age, sex, smoking status, drinking status, and chronic disease histories. The multiple logistic analyses showed a significant association between HHcy and AAA but no significant association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and AAA. The interaction analysis showed that age and peripheral arterial disease played an interactive role in the association between HHcy and AAA, while drinking status played an interactive role in the association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and AAA. In conclusion, HHcy is an independent risk factor of AAA in a Chinese Han population, especially in the elderly and peripheral arterial disease subgroups. Longitudinal studies and clinical trials aimed to reduce homocysteine levels are warranted to assess the causal nature of these relationships. PMID:26865327

  7. Role of preoperative radionuclide ejection fraction in direct abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmers, A.; Cerqueira, M.D.; Zierler, R.E.

    1988-08-01

    Preoperative radionuclide ventriculography was performed in 60 patients to assess whether such testing could define those at increased risk after direct abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. None of the patients had prophylactic coronary artery reconstruction to reduce the risk of AAA repair despite angina in 27% and previous myocardial infarction (MI) in 42%. The mean ejection fraction (EF) was 52% +/- 15% (range 14% to 78%). Low EF (normal greater than 50%) was present in 40%, whereas ventricular wall motion abnormalities were present in 39% of patients. The overall perioperative (30-day) mortality rate was 5%. MI occurred in 7% within 30 postoperative days; none was fatal. Life-table analysis revealed that overall survival after AAA repair was significantly lower in patients with an EF of 50% or less (p less than 0.025, Mantel-Cox) during a follow-up of 20.1 +/- 11.9 months. Overall survival differences were even more striking for those with an EF of 35% or less (p = 0.003, Mantel-Cox). There was a marked difference in the cumulative mortality rate during follow-up, being 50% in those patients with an EF of 35% or less (n = 10) compared with 14% in those with an EF greater than 35% (n = 50, p = 0.036, Fisher exact test). There was no statistical difference in the incidence of perioperative MI or perioperative death for those with an EF of 35% or less vs EF greater than 35%. 50 references.

  8. Predicting Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Target Genes by Level-2 Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi; Cui, Qinghua; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is frequently lethal and has no effective pharmaceutical treatment, posing a great threat to human health. Previous bioinformatics studies of the mechanisms underlying AAA relied largely on the detection of direct protein-protein interactions (level-1 PPI) between the products of reported AAA-related genes. Thus, some proteins not suspected to be directly linked to previously reported genes of pivotal importance to AAA might have been missed. In this study, we constructed an indirect protein-protein interaction (level-2 PPI) network based on common interacting proteins encoded by known AAA-related genes and successfully predicted previously unreported AAA-related genes using this network. We used four methods to test and verify the performance of this level-2 PPI network: cross validation, human AAA mRNA chip array comparison, literature mining, and verification in a mouse CaPO4 AAA model. We confirmed that the new level-2 PPI network is superior to the original level-1 PPI network and proved that the top 100 candidate genes predicted by the level-2 PPI network shared similar GO functions and KEGG pathways compared with positive genes. PMID:26496478

  9. Impact of poroelasticity of intraluminal thrombus on wall stress of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The predictions of stress fields in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) depend on constitutive descriptions of the aneurysm wall and the Intra-luminal Thrombus (ILT). ILT is a porous diluted structure (biphasic solid–fluid material) and its impact on AAA biomechanics is controversially discussed in the literature. Specifically, pressure measurements showed that the ILT cannot protect the wall from the arterial pressure, while other (numerical and experimental) studies showed that at the same time it reduces the stress in the wall. Method To explore this phenomenon further a poroelastic description of the ILT was integrated in Finite Element (FE) Models of the AAA. The AAA model was loaded by a pressure step and a cyclic pressure wave and their transition into wall tension was investigated. To this end ILT’s permeability was varied within a microstructurally motivated range. Results The two-phase model verified that the ILT transmits the entire mean arterial pressure to the wall while, at the same time, it significantly reduces the stress in the wall. The predicted mean stress in the AAA wall was insensitive to the permeability of the ILT and coincided with the results of AAA models using a single-phase ILT description. Conclusion At steady state, the biphasic ILT behaves like a single-phase material in an AAA model. Consequently, computational efficient FE single-phase models, as they have been exclusively used in the past, accurately predict the wall stress in AAA models. PMID:22931215

  10. Preoperative Predictors of Long-Term Mortality after Elective Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Saya; Kudo, Toshifumi; Inoue, Yoshinori; Akaza, Miho; Sasano, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to clarify long-term mortality and its predictors in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Materials and Methods: Patients with AAA who underwent elective EVAR at Tokyo Medical and Dental University hospital between 2008 and 2011 were reviewed. The patients’ data were retrospectively collected from medical records. Results: Sixty-four patients were identified for this study. In long-term follow-up, the survival rate was significantly lower in patients with high preoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Patients with obstructive lung disease (FEV1/FVC <70%) or anemia tended to have a poorer prognosis but the association was not statistically significant. Age, concurrent hyperlipidemia, and blood pressure levels were not predictors of mortality rates. Discussion: High CRP level, COPD, and anemia reflect inflammation, which is associated with the pathogenesis of AAA. These inflammatory markers are predictors of long-term mortality after EVAR for AAA as well as for other diseases. Conclusions: A high preoperative CRP level was a predictor of increased long-term mortality in patients with AAA who underwent EVAR. No specific leading causes of death were identified for this increase in the mortality rate. PMID:27087872

  11. The association between body mass index and abdominal aortic aneurysm growth: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes, a state of relative insulin resistance, is negatively associated with both the presence and growth abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), which could suggest a protective role of obesity against AAA presence or growth. A recent meta-analysis demonstrated a trend toward a positive, though statistically non-significant, association between body mass index (BMI) and the presence of AAA. With respect to the association between obesity and AAA growth, however, the evidence had been very limited. To determine whether obesity (or BMI) is associated with AAA growth, we reviewed currently available studies with a systematic literature search. Our comprehensive search identified seven eligible studies reporting the association of BMI and AAA growth rates, which included data on a total of 3,768 AAA patients. All seven identified studies demonstrated no association between BMI and AAA growth. Despite a trend toward a positive association between BMI and AAA presence, the reason why BMI is not associated with AAA growth (suggested in the present review) is unclear. A discrepancy between associated comorbidities (coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and AAA presence and between the same comorbidities and AAA growth, however, could be identified. Further investigations are required to elucidate why BMI is not associated with AAA growth despite the trend for a positive association with AAA presence. PMID:27058797

  12. Stochastic modelling of wall stresses in abdominal aortic aneurysms treated by a gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Mohand-Kaci, Faïza; Ouni, Anissa Eddhahak; Dai, Jianping; Allaire, Eric; Zidi, Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic mechanical model using the membrane theory was used to simulate the in vivo mechanical behaviour of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in order to compute the wall stresses after stabilisation by gene therapy. For that, both length and diameter of AAAs rats were measured during their expansion. Four groups of animals, control and treated by an endovascular gene therapy during 3 or 28 days were included. The mechanical problem was solved analytically using the geometric parameters and assuming the shape of aneurysms by a 'parabolic-exponential curve'. When compared to controls, stress variations in the wall of AAAs for treated arteries during 28 days decreased, while they were nearly constant at day 3. The measured geometric parameters of AAAs were then investigated using probability density functions (pdf) attributed to every random variable. Different trials were useful to define a reliable confidence region in which the probability to have a realisation is equal to 99%. The results demonstrated that the error in the estimation of the stresses can be greater than 28% when parameters uncertainties are not considered in the modelling. The relevance of the proposed approach for the study of AAA growth may be studied further and extended to other treatments aimed at stabilisation AAAs, using biotherapies and pharmacological approaches. PMID:21264784

  13. Fruit Intake and Abdominal Aortic Calcification in Elderly Women: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bondonno, Nicola P.; Lewis, Joshua R.; Prince, Richard L.; Lim, Wai H.; Wong, Germaine; Schousboe, John T.; Woodman, Richard J.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Bondonno, Catherine P.; Ward, Natalie C.; Croft, Kevin D.; Hodgson, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. There is a consistent inverse relationship between fruit intake with CVD events and mortality in cross-sectional and prospective observational studies, but the relationship of fruit intake with measurements of atherosclerosis in humans is less clear. Nutritional effects on abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), a marker for subclinical intimal and medial atherosclerotic vascular disease, have not been studied previously. The aim of this study was to examine the cross-sectional relationship of total and individual fruit (apple, pear, orange and other citrus, and banana) intake with AAC, scored between 0 and 24. The current study assessed baseline data for a cohort of 1052 women over 70 years of age who completed both a food frequency questionnaire assessing fruit intake, and underwent AAC measurement using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. AAC scores were significantly negatively correlated with total fruit and apple intakes (p < 0.05), but not with pear, orange or banana intakes (p > 0.25). In multivariable-adjusted logistic regression, each standard deviation (SD; 50 g/day) increase in apple intake was associated with a 24% lower odds of having severe AAC (AAC score >5) (odd ratio OR): 0.76 (0.62, 0.93), p = 0.009). Total and other individual fruit intake were not associated with increased odds of having severe AAC. Apple but not total or other fruit intake is independently negatively associated with AAC in older women. PMID:26978394

  14. Fruit Intake and Abdominal Aortic Calcification in Elderly Women: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Nicola P; Lewis, Joshua R; Prince, Richard L; Lim, Wai H; Wong, Germaine; Schousboe, John T; Woodman, Richard J; Kiel, Douglas P; Bondonno, Catherine P; Ward, Natalie C; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. There is a consistent inverse relationship between fruit intake with CVD events and mortality in cross-sectional and prospective observational studies, but the relationship of fruit intake with measurements of atherosclerosis in humans is less clear. Nutritional effects on abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), a marker for subclinical intimal and medial atherosclerotic vascular disease, have not been studied previously. The aim of this study was to examine the cross-sectional relationship of total and individual fruit (apple, pear, orange and other citrus, and banana) intake with AAC, scored between 0 and 24. The current study assessed baseline data for a cohort of 1052 women over 70 years of age who completed both a food frequency questionnaire assessing fruit intake, and underwent AAC measurement using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. AAC scores were significantly negatively correlated with total fruit and apple intakes (p < 0.05), but not with pear, orange or banana intakes (p > 0.25). In multivariable-adjusted logistic regression, each standard deviation (SD; 50 g/day) increase in apple intake was associated with a 24% lower odds of having severe AAC (AAC score >5) (odd ratio OR): 0.76 (0.62, 0.93), p = 0.009). Total and other individual fruit intake were not associated with increased odds of having severe AAC. Apple but not total or other fruit intake is independently negatively associated with AAC in older women. PMID:26978394

  15. Midterm results of endovascular infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, A David; Forbes, Thomas L; Novick, Teresa V; Lovell, Marge B; Kribs, Stewart W; Lawlor, D Kirk; Harris, Kenneth A; DeRose, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Short-term and midterm clinical outcomes after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) have been well documented. Evaluation of longer term outcomes is now possible. Here we describe our initial 100 high-risk patients treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), all with a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. A retrospective review of prospectively recorded data in a departmental database was undertaken for the first 100 consecutive EVAR patients with a minimum of 5 years (range, 60-105 months) of follow-up performed between December 1997 and June 2001. Information was obtained from surgical follow-up visits and family doctors' offices. Endovascular repair of AAA in high-risk patients can be achieved with acceptably low postoperative mortality and morbidity. Longer term results in this high-risk cohort suggest that EVAR is effective in preventing aneurysm-related deaths at 5 years and beyond. All late mortalities were due to patients' comorbid diseases. PMID:17704332

  16. Pre- and Intraoperative Predictors of Delirium after Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Akio; Narita, Hiroshi; Banno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Komori, Kimihiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We reviewed our series of patients who underwent open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and constructed a prediction model for postoperative delirium. Methods: 397 patients who underwent open AAA repair at our institution between April 2005 and June 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative delirium was diagnosed from the patients’ medical records according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria. Mental alterations resulting from postoperative cerebrovascular events or preexisting mental disorders were excluded. Parameters with significant differences on univariate analysis were subjected to a logistic regression analysis. Results: There were 46 patients (11.5%) diagnosed with postoperative delirium. The following parameters were significant in the univariate analysis: age, history of stroke, hyperlipidemia, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), percent vital capacity (%VC), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level. A logistic regression analysis revealed that an age ≥70 years (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 3.342 [1.437–7.774]), blood loss ≥1517 mL (2.707 [1.359–5.391]), and the absence of hyperlipidemia (2.154 [1.060–4.374]) were significant risk factors. Conclusions: Older patients with substantial intraoperative blood loss require highly vigilant postoperative care. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the relationship between cholesterol and delirium. PMID:26421070

  17. Effect of exercise on patient specific abdominal aortic aneurysm flow topology and mixing

    PubMed Central

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Les, Andrea S.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to investigate changes in blood transport topology between rest and exercise conditions in five patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to provide the vascular anatomy and necessary boundary conditions for simulating blood velocity and pressure fields inside each model. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields, and associated Lagrangian coherent structures, were computed from blood velocity data, and used to compare features of the transport topology between rest and exercise both mechanistically and qualitatively. A mix-norm and mix-variance measure based on fresh blood distribution throughout the aneurysm over time were implemented to quantitatively compare mixing between rest and exercise. Exercise conditions resulted in higher and more uniform mixing, and reduced the overall residence time in all aneurysms. Separated regions of recirculating flow were commonly observed in rest, and these regions were either reduced or removed by attached and unidirectional flow during exercise, or replaced with regional chaotic and transiently turbulent mixing, or persisted and even extended during exercise. The main factor that dictated the change in flow topology from rest to exercise was the behavior of the jet of blood penetrating into the aneurysm during systole. PMID:24493404

  18. Experimental and computational investigation of the patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm pressure field.

    PubMed

    Antón, R; Chen, C-Y; Hung, M-Y; Finol, E A; Pekkan, K

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present manuscript is three-fold: (i) to study the detailed pressure field inside a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) model experimentally and numerically and discuss its clinical relevance, (ii) to validate a number of possible numerical model options and their ability to predict the experimental pressure field and (iii) to compare the spatial pressure drop in the AAA before and after the formation of intraluminal thrombus (ILT) for a late disease development timeline. A finite volume method was used to solve the governing equations of fluid flow to simulate the flow dynamics in a numerical model of the AAA. Following our patient-specific anatomical rapid prototyping technique, physical models of the aneurysm were created with seven ports for pressure measurement along the blood flow path. A flow loop operating with a blood analogue fluid was used to replicate the patient-specific flow conditions, acquired with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging, and measure pressure in the flow model. The Navier-Stokes equations and two turbulent models were implemented numerically to compare the pressure estimations with experimental measurements. The relative pressure difference from experiments obtained with the best performing model (unsteady laminar simulation) was ∼1.1% for the AAA model without ILT and ∼15.4% for the AAA model with ILT (using Reynolds Stress Model). Future investigations should include validation of the 3D velocity field and wall shear stresses within the AAA sac predicted by the three numerical models. PMID:24460046

  19. Inhibitory effect of statins on inflammation-related pathways in human abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Koichi; Nagasawa, Ayako; Kudo, Junichi; Onoda, Masahiko; Morikage, Noriyasu; Furutani, Akira; Aoki, Hiroki; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-01-01

    HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase inhibitors (statins) have been suggested to attenuate abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth. However, the effects of statins in human AAA tissues are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effects of statins on proinflammatory molecules in human AAA walls in ex vivo culture. Simvastatin strongly inhibited the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in human AAA walls, but showed little effect on c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Simvastatin, as well as pitavastatin significantly reduced the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-2 and epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide (CXCL5) under both basal and TNF-α-stimulated conditions. Similar to statins, the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB, accompanied by a decreased secretion of MMP-9, MCP-2 and CXCL5. Moreover, the effect of simvastatin and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 was additive in inhibiting the secretion of MMP-9, MCP-2 and CXCL5. These findings indicate that statins preferentially inhibit the Rac1/NF-κB pathway to suppress MMP-9 and chemokine secretion in human AAA, suggesting a mechanism for the potential effect of statins in attenuating AAA progression. PMID:25993292

  20. A framework for the automatic generation of surface topologies for abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    PubMed

    Shum, Judy; Xu, Amber; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Finol, Ender A

    2011-01-01

    Patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by local curvature changes, which we assess using a feature-based approach on topologies representative of the AAA outer wall surface. The application of image segmentation methods yields 3D reconstructed surface polygons that contain low-quality elements, unrealistic sharp corners, and surface irregularities. To optimize the quality of the surface topology, an iterative algorithm was developed to perform interpolation of the AAA geometry, topology refinement, and smoothing. Triangular surface topologies are generated based on a Delaunay triangulation algorithm, which is adapted for AAA segmented masks. The boundary of the AAA wall is represented using a signed distance function prior to triangulation. The irregularities on the surface are minimized by an interpolation scheme and the initial coarse triangulation is refined by forcing nodes into equilibrium positions. A surface smoothing algorithm based on a low-pass filter is applied to remove sharp corners. The optimal number of iterations needed for polygon refinement and smoothing is determined by imposing a minimum average element quality index with no significant AAA sac volume change. This framework automatically generates high-quality triangular surface topologies that can be used to characterize local curvature changes of the AAA wall. PMID:20853025

  1. Use of intra-aortic balloon pump support for oozing-type cardiac rupture after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Su, Xi; Liu, Cheng-Wei; Song, Dan; Peng, Jian; Wu, Ming-Xiang; Yang, Yu-Chun; Liu, Bo; Xu, Cheng-Yi; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular free wall rupture usually leads to acute hemopericardium and sudden cardiac death resulting in cardiac tamponade. Rarely, only a few patients with subacute free wall rupture such as oozing-type ventricular rupture or left ventricular false aneurysm may permit time for pericardiocentesis and surgery. We report a 63-year-old man with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention about 12 hours from the onset, and cardiac tamponade occurred on the second day. An intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) was immediately inserted for hemodynamic support. After 100 mL of pericardial fresh blood was drained from the percardial cavity, his hemodynamic collapse was promptly improved with IABP support. In the following 24 hours, about 600 mL of hemorrhagic pericardial fluid was drained. The most likely diagnosis was concerning for oozing-type ventricular rupture, and a conservative approach was decided. The patient survived to the acute phase under IABP support and was discharged with complete recovery. PMID:26145582

  2. A case of syphilitic aortic aneurysm with sternal erosion and impending rupture.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Sarjun Basha, Khadhar; Raman, Karthik; Ahmed, Sheriff Ejaz; Latchumanadoss, Kalidoss; Rajan, Sethuratnam

    2016-02-01

    Syphilitic aortic aneurysm is a rare occurrence in the current antibiotic era. Cardiovascular syphilis has nearly disappeared in developed countries, although it remains a factor in differential diagnosis in developing nations. We report a case of syphilitic aortic aneurysm eroding through the sternum in a 52-year-old man who underwent successful surgical repair. PMID:25344618

  3. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  4. Exploring smooth muscle phenotype and function in a bioreactor model of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) are central to arterial structure and function yet their involvement in the progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease is not well studied. The progressive and silent nature of AAA in man essentially restricts research to the use of “end-stage” tissue recovered during surgical repair. This study aimed to generate an ex vivo model of AAA using protease-treated porcine carotid arteries maintained in a novel bioreactor, and to compare the structural and functional changes in SMC cultured from the recovered vessels with those from human tissue acquired at elective surgical repair. Methods Freshly isolated porcine arteries were pretreated with collagenase and/or elastase before culturing under flow in a bioreactor for 12 days. Human end-stage aneurysmal tissue and saphenous veins from age-matched controls were collected from patients undergoing surgery. SMC were cultured and characterised (immunocytochemistry, measurement of spread cell area) and assessed functionally at the level of proliferation (cell-counting) and matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion (gelatin zymography). Cellular senescence was investigated using β-galactosidase staining and apoptosis was quantified using a fluorescence-based caspase 3 assay. Results Co-expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain confirmed all cell populations as SMC. Porcine SMC harvested and cultivated after collagenase/elastase pretreatment displayed a prominent “rhomboid” morphology, increased spread area (32%, P < 0.01), impaired proliferation (47% reduction, P < 0.05), increased senescence (52%, P < 0.001), susceptibility to apoptosis and reduced MMP-2 secretion (60% decrease, P < 0.01) compared with SMC from vehicle, collagenase or elastase pre-treated vessels. Notably, these changes were comparable to those observed in human AAA SMC which were 2.4-fold larger than non-aneurysmal SMC (P < 0.001) and

  5. Abdominal aortic calcification is not superior over other vascular calcification in predicting mortality in hemodialysis patients: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) guidelines recommend that a lateral abdominal radiograph should be performed to assess vascular calcification (VC) in dialysis patients. However, abdominal aortic calcification is a prevalent finding, and it remains unclear whether other anatomical areas of VC can predict mortality more accurately. Methods A total of 217 maintenance hemodialysis patients were enrolled at the Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital between July 2010 and March 2011. Radiographs of the abdomen, pelvis and hands were evaluated by a radiologist to evaluate the presence of VC. The correlation between different areas of VC and all-cause or cardiovascular mortality was analyzed using univariate and multivariate models. Results The prevalence of VC was 70.0% (152 patients), and most had abdominal aortic calcification (90.1%). During 26 ± 7 months of follow-up, 37 patients died. The VC score was independently associated with patient mortality. VC observed on abdominal radiographs (abdominal aortic calcification) was associated with all-cause mortality in models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (HR, 4.69; 95%CI, 1.60-13.69) and dialysis factors (HR, 3.38; 95%CI, 1.18-9.69). VC in the pelvis or hands was associated with all-cause mortality in the model adjusted for dialysis factors. When three combinations of VC in different radiographs were included in models, the presence of abdominal VC was only significantly associated with all-cause mortality in the integrated model. VC in the abdomen and pelvis was associated with all-cause mortality in the model adjusted for cardiovascular factors and the integrated model, but neither was significantly associated with cardiovascular mortality. VC in all radiographs was significantly associated with a more than 6-fold risk of all-cause mortality and a more than 5-fold risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to patients without VC. Conclusions VC in different arteries as shown on

  6. Zinc Prevents Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Induction of A20-Mediated Suppression of NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ya-Wei; Fan, Jun; Bai, Shu-Ling; Hou, Wei-Jian; Li, Xiang; Tong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and degradation of elastin are the main processes in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Recent studies show that zinc has an anti-inflammatory effect. Based on these, zinc may render effective therapy for the treatment of the AAA. Currently, we want to investigate the effects of zinc on AAA progression and its related molecular mechanism. Rat AAA models were induced by periaortic application of CaCl2. AAA rats were treated by daily intraperitoneal injection of ZnSO4 or vehicle alone. The aorta segments were collected at 4 weeks after surgery. The primary rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were stimulated with TNF-α alone or with ZnSO4 for 3 weeks. The results showed that zinc supplementation significantly suppressed the CaCl2-induced expansion of the abdominal aortic diameter, as well as a preservation of medial elastin fibers in the aortas. Zinc supplementation also obviously attenuated infiltration of the macrophages and lymphocytes in the aortas. In addition, zinc reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 production in the aortas. Most importantly, zinc treatment significantly induced A20 expression, along with inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway in vitro in VSMCs and in vivo in rat AAA. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that zinc supplementation could prevent the development of rat experimental AAA by induction of A20-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway. PMID:26918963

  7. Zinc Prevents Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Induction of A20-Mediated Suppression of NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shu-Ling; Hou, Wei-Jian; Li, Xiang; Tong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and degradation of elastin are the main processes in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Recent studies show that zinc has an anti-inflammatory effect. Based on these, zinc may render effective therapy for the treatment of the AAA. Currently, we want to investigate the effects of zinc on AAA progression and its related molecular mechanism. Rat AAA models were induced by periaortic application of CaCl2. AAA rats were treated by daily intraperitoneal injection of ZnSO4 or vehicle alone. The aorta segments were collected at 4 weeks after surgery. The primary rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were stimulated with TNF-α alone or with ZnSO4 for 3 weeks. The results showed that zinc supplementation significantly suppressed the CaCl2-induced expansion of the abdominal aortic diameter, as well as a preservation of medial elastin fibers in the aortas. Zinc supplementation also obviously attenuated infiltration of the macrophages and lymphocytes in the aortas. In addition, zinc reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 production in the aortas. Most importantly, zinc treatment significantly induced A20 expression, along with inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway in vitro in VSMCs and in vivo in rat AAA. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that zinc supplementation could prevent the development of rat experimental AAA by induction of A20-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway. PMID:26918963

  8. Abdominal Aortic Intimal Flap Motion Characterization in Acute Aortic Dissection: Assessed with Retrospective ECG-Gated Thoracoabdominal Aorta Dual-Source CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shifeng; Li, Xia; Chao, Baoting; Wu, Lebin; Cheng, Zhaoping; Duan, Yanhua; Wu, Dawei; Zhan, Yiqiang; Chen, Jiuhong; Liu, Bo; Ji, Xiaopeng; Nie, Pei; Wang, Ximing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of dose-modulated retrospective ECG-gated thoracoabdominal aorta CT angiography (CTA) assessing abdominal aortic intimal flap motion and investigate the motion characteristics of intimal flap in acute aortic dissection (AAD). Materials and Methods 49 patients who had thoracoabdominal aorta retrospective ECG-gated CTA scan were enrolled. 20 datasets were reconstructed in 5% steps between 0 and 95% of the R-R interval in each case. The aortic intimal flap motion was assessed by measuring the short axis diameters of the true lumen and false lumen 2 cm above of celiac trunk ostium in different R-R intervals. Intimal flap motion and configuration was assessed by two independent observers. Results In these 49 patients, 37 had AAD, 7 had intramural hematoma, and 5 had negative result for acute aortic disorder. 620 datasets of 31 patients who showed double lumens in abdominal aorta were enrolled in evaluating intimal flap motion. The maximum and minimum true lumen diameter were 12.2±4.1 mm (range 2.6∼17.4) and 6.7±4.1 mm (range 0∼15.3) respectively. The range of intimal flap motion in all patients was 5.5±2.6 mm (range 1.8∼10.2). The extent of maximum true lumen diameter decreased during a cardiac cycle was 49.5%±23.5% (range 12%∼100%). The maximum motion phase of true lumen diameter was in systolic phase (5%∼40% of R-R interval). Maximum and minimum intimal flap motion was at 15% and 75% of the R-R interval respectively. Intimal flap configuration had correlation with the phase of cardiac cycle. Conclusions Abdominal intimal flap position and configuration varied greatly during a cardiac cycle. Retrospective ECG-gated thoracoabdominal aorta CTA can reflect the actual status of the true lumen and provide more information about true lumen collapse. This information may be helpful to diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dynamic abstraction. PMID:24503676

  9. MicroRNAs, fibrotic remodeling, and aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M

    2012-02-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common clinical condition that can cause death due to aortic dissection or rupture. The association between aortic aneurysm pathogenesis and altered TGF-β signaling has been the subject of numerous investigations. Recently, a TGF-β-responsive microRNA (miR), miR-29, has been identified to play a role in cellular phenotypic modulation during aortic development and aging. In this issue of JCI, Maegdefessel and colleagues demonstrate that decreasing the levels of miR-29b in the aortic wall can attenuate aortic aneurysm progression in two different mouse models of abdominal aortic aneurysms. This study highlights the relevance of miR-29b in aortic disease but also raises questions about its specific role. PMID:22269322

  10. Genetic analysis of polymorphisms in biologically relevant candidate genes in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Toru; Shibamura, Hidenori; Tromp, Gerard; Sinha, Moumita; Goddard, Katrina A. B.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Limet, Raymond; MacKean, Gerald L.; Arthur, Claudette; Sueda, Taijiro; Land, Susan; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2005-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by histologic signs of chronic inflammation, destructive remodeling of extracellular matrix, and depletion of vascular smooth muscle cells. We investigated the process of extracellular matrix remodeling by performing a genetic association study with polymorphisms in the genes for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and structural extracellular matrix molecules in AAA. Our hypothesis was that genetic variations in one or more of these genes contribute to greater or lesser activity of these gene products, and thereby contribute to susceptibility for developing AAAs. Methods DNA samples from 812 unrelated white subject (AAA, n = 387; controls, n = 425) were genotyped for 14 polymorphisms in 13 different candidate genes: MMP1(nt−1607), MMP2(nt−955), MMP3(nt−1612), MMP9(nt−1562), MMP10(nt+180), MMP12(nt−82), MMP13(nt−77), TIMP1(nt+434), TIMP1(rs2070584), TIMP2(rs2009196), TIMP3(nt−1296), TGFB1(nt−509), ELN(nt+422), and COL3A1(nt+581). Odds ratios and P values adjusted for gender and country of origin using logistic regression and stratified by family history of AAA were calculated to test for association between genotype and disease status. Haplotype analysis was carried out for the two TIMP1 polymorphisms in male subjects. Results Analyses with one polymorphism per test without interactions showed an association with the two TIMP1 gene polymorphisms (nt+434, P = .0047; rs2070584, P = .015) in male subjects without a family history of AAA. The association remained significant when analyzing TIMP1 haplotypes (χ2 P = .014 and empirical P = .009). In addition, we found a significant interaction between the polymorphism and gender for MMP10 (P = .037) in cases without a family history of AAA, as well as between the polymorphism and country of origin for ELN (P = .0169) and TIMP3 (P = .0023) in cases with a family history of AAA. Conclusions These

  11. Activity of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in the plasma of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Dubis, Joanna; Zuk, Natalia; Grendziak, Ryszard; Zapotoczny, Norbert; Pfanhauser, Monika; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) experience impaired balance between fibrinolysis and coagulation, manifested by increased prothrombotic tendency and intensified inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the TAFI activity level (thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) in the plasma of AAA patients. Plasma levels of PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1), urokinase-type plasminogen activator and uPAR (urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor) were measured as markers of fibrinolytic activity. The study showed that the activity of the thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in the plasma of AAA patients was significantly lower than in the plasma of the control individuals (64.6 ± 10.1 vs. 54.2 ± 10.9%, P < 0.0001). TAFI activity positively correlated with the white blood cell count (r = 0.486, P < 0.005). The uPAR concentration in the AAA patients was statistically significantly higher than in the control group and positively correlated with TAFI activity (r = 0.409, P = 0.02). The levels of PAI-1 and D-dimers (fibrin fragments) were significantly higher in patients with AAA than in the control group (44.3 ± 17.5 vs. 21.7 ± 8.7 ng/ml and 1869.6 ± 1490.1 vs. 181.5 ± 188.6 ng/ml, respectively). Lowered activity of the fibrinolysis inhibitor TAFI may heighten the blood fibrinolytic potential in AAA patients and contribute to the development of comorbidities. Therefore, TAFI participation in AAA pathogenesis cannot be excluded. PMID:24378973

  12. Maximum Diameter of Native Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Measured by Angio-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Caroline E.; Marcus, Claude D.; Barbe, Coralie M.; Ecarnot, Fiona B.; Long, Anne L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the reference technique for the measurement of native maximum abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameter when surgery is being considered. However, there is a wide choice available for the methodology of maximum AAA diameter measurement on CTA, and to date, no consensus has been reached on which method is best. We analyzed clinical decisions based on these various measures of native maximum AAA diameter with CTA, then analyzed their reproducibility and identified the method of measurement yielding the highest agreement in terms of patient management. Materials and Methods: Three sets of measures in 46 native AAA were obtained, double-blind by three radiologists (J, S, V) on orthogonal planes, curved multiplanar reconstructions, and semi-automated-software, based on the AAA-lumen centerline. From each set, the clinical decision was recorded as follows: "Follow-up" (if all diameters <50 mm), "ambiguous" (if at least one diameter <50 mm AND at least one ≥50 mm) or "Surgery " (if all diameters ≥50 mm). Intra- and interobserver agreements in clinical decisions were compared using the weighted Kappa coefficient. Results: Clinical decisions varied according to the measurement sets used by each observer, and according to intra and interobserver (lecture#1) reproducibility. Based on the first reading of each observer, the number of AAA proposed for surgery ranged from 11 to 24 for J, 5 to 20 for S, and 15 to 23 for V. The rate of AAAs classified as "ambiguous" varied from 11% (5/46) to 37% (17/46). The semi-automated method yielded very good intraand interobserver agreements in clinical decisions in all comparisons (Kappa range 0.83–1.00). Conclusion: The semi-automated method seems to be appropriate for native AAA maximum diameter measurement on CTA. In the absence of AAA outer-wallbased software more robust for complex AAA, clinical decisions might best be made with diameter values obtained using this technique

  13. Automatic detection of selective arterial devices for advanced visualization during abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Simon; Kauffmann, Claude; Pfister, Marcus; Cloutier, Guy; Thérasse, Éric; de Guise, Jacques A; Soulez, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Here we address the automatic segmentation of endovascular devices used in the endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) that deform vascular tissues. Using this approach, the vascular structure is automatically reshaped solving the issue of misregistration observed on 2D/3D image fusion for EVAR guidance. The endovascular devices we considered are the graduated pigtail catheter (PC) used for contrast injection and the stent-graft delivery device (DD). The segmentation of the DD was enhanced using an asymmetric Frangi filter. The segmented geometries were then analysed using their specific features to remove artefacts. The radiopaque markers of the PC were enhanced using a fusion of Hessian and newly introduced gradient norm shift filters. Extensive experiments were performed using a database of images taken during 28 AAA-EVAR interventions. This dataset was divided into two parts: the first half was used to optimize parameters and the second to compile performances using optimal values obtained. The radiopaque markers of the PC were detected with a sensitivity of 88.3% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 96%. The PC can therefore be positioned with a majority of its markers localized while the artefacts were all located inside the vessel lumen. The major parts of the DD, the dilatator tip and the pusher surfaces, were detected accurately with a sensitivity of 85.9% and a PPV of 88.7%. The less visible part of the DD, the stent enclosed within the sheath, was segmented with a sensitivity of 63.4% because the radiopacity of this region is low and uneven. The centreline of the DD in this stent region was alternatively traced within a 0.74 mm mean error. The automatic segmentation of endovascular devices during EVAR is feasible and accurate; it could be useful to perform elastic registration of the vascular lumen during endovascular repair. PMID:26362721

  14. Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cellular Inflammation in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    McBride, O.M.B.; Joshi, N.V.; Robson, J.M.J.; MacGillivray, T.J.; Gray, C.D.; Fletcher, A.M.; Dweck, M.R.; van Beek, E.J.R.; Rudd, J.H.F.; Newby, D.E.; Semple, S.I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation is critical in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease. Combined 18F-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET-CT) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are non-invasive methods of assessing tissue inflammation. The aim of this study was to compare these techniques in patients with AAA. Materials and methods Fifteen patients with asymptomatic AAA with diameter 46 ± 7 mm underwent PET-CT with 18F-FDG, and T2*-weighted MRI before and 24 hours after administration of USPIO. The PET-CT and MRI data were then co-registered. Standardised uptake values (SUVs) were calculated to measure 18F-FDG activity, and USPIO uptake was determined using the change in R2*. Comparisons between the techniques were made using a quadrant analysis and a voxel-by-voxel evaluation. Results When all areas of the aneurysm were evaluated, there was a modest correlation between the SUV on PET-CT and the change in R2* on USPIO-enhanced MRI (n = 70,345 voxels; r = .30; p < .0001). Although regions of increased 18F-FDG and USPIO uptake co-localised on occasion, this was infrequent (kappa statistic 0.074; 95% CI 0.026–0.122). 18F-FDG activity was commonly focused in the shoulder region whereas USPIO uptake was more apparent in the main body of the aneurysm. Maximum SUV was lower in patients with mural USPIO uptake. Conclusions Both 18F-FDG PET-CT and USPIO-MRI uptake identify vascular inflammation associated with AAA. Although they demonstrate a modest correlation, there are distinct differences in the pattern and distribution of uptake, suggesting a differential detection of macrophage glycolytic and phagocytic activity respectively. PMID:26919936

  15. Real-Time Magnetic Resonance-Guided Endovascular Repair of Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Venkatesh K.; Karmarkar, Parag V.; Guttman, Michael A.; Dick, Alexander J.; Peters, Dana C.; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Pessanha, Breno S. S.; Thompson, Richard B.; Raval, Amish N.; DeSilva, Ranil; Aviles, Ronnier J.; Atalar, Ergin; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study tested the hypotheses that endografts can be visualized and navigated in vivo solely under real-time magnetic resonance imaging (rtMRI) guidance to repair experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in swine, and that MRI can provide immediate assessment of endograft apposition and aneurysm exclusion. BACKGROUND Endovascular repair for AAA is limited by endoleak caused by inflow or outflow malapposition. The ability of rtMRI to image soft tissue and flow may improve on X-ray guidance of this procedure. METHODS Infrarenal AAA was created in swine by balloon overstretch. We used one passive commercial endograft, imaged based on metal-induced MRI artifacts, and several types of homemade active endografts, incorporating MRI receiver coils (antennae). Custom interactive rtMRI features included color coding the catheter-antenna signals individually, simultaneous multislice imaging, and real-time three-dimensional rendering. RESULTS Eleven repairs were performed solely using rtMRI, simultaneously depicting the device and soft-tissue pathology during endograft deployment. Active devices proved most useful. Intraprocedural MRI provided anatomic confirmation of stent strut apposition and functional corroboration of aneurysm exclusion and restoration of laminar flow in successful cases. In two cases, there was clear evidence of contrast accumulation in the aneurysm sac, denoting endoleak. CONCLUSIONS Endovascular AAA repair is feasible under rtMRI guidance. Active endografts facilitate device visualization and complement the soft tissue contrast afforded by MRI for precise positioning and deployment. Magnetic resonance imaging also permits immediate post-procedural anatomic and functional evaluation of successful aneurysm exclusion. PMID:15963411

  16. HOXA4 protein levels and localization in the aorta and in human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Christian; Auersperg, Nelly

    2011-01-01

    This report presents evidence for the specificities of select commercially available HOXA4 antibodies in regards to concerns about the specificity of the HOXA4 antibody used by Lillvis et al. (Regional expression of HOXA4 along the aorta and its potential role in human abdominal aortic aneurysms. BMC Physiol 2011, 11:9). Using an antibody characterized extensively by us, Lillvis et al. report detecting HOXA4 at a size of 33 kDa despite our previous reports that HOXA4 is detected at ~37-39 kDa and that the ~30-33 kDa band is non-specific. Using small interfering RNA targeting HOXA4, forced expression of full-length HOXA4 and HOXA4-positive and -negative ovarian cancer cell lines, we confirm our previous findings that the ~30-33 kDa band is non-specific and that HOXA4 is detected at ~37-39 kDa. Moreover, we demonstrate that HOXA4 small interfering RNA reduces the ~37-39 kDa HOXA4 band, but not the ~30-33 kDa non-specific band, in a human acute monocytic leukemia cell line used by Lillvis et al. Western blot analysis performed with two additional commercially available HOXA4 antibodies also detected HOXA4 at ~37-39 kDa. Lastly, immunofluorescent staining of a HOXA4-negative ovarian cancer cell line with the antibody used by Lillvis et al. yields strong perinuclear staining, similar to that observed by Lillvis et al., which cannot be attributed to HOXA4. Our results highlight and briefly discuss the importance of careful antibody validation and selection for use in various applications. PMID:22168796

  17. Influencing Factors for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Sac Shrinkage and Enlargement after EVAR: Clinical Reviews before Introduction of Preoperative Coil Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Arudo; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Tamura, Kentaro; Ishida, Atsuhisa; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Yoshitaka, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    Background: We previously reported effectiveness of coil embolization (CE) to aortic branched vessels before endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) because of significant shrinkage of aneurysmal sac. In this study, we investigated EVAR cases to clarify influential factors of aneurysmal shrinkage and enlargement. Methods: 148 consecutive cases before the introduction of CE were retrospectively reviewed based on the presence of PT2EL (persistent type 2 endoleak) and change in sac diameter after EVAR by multivariate analysis. Results: (A) PT2EL risk factors were patent inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and thinner mural thrombus inside aneurysmal sac. (B) Sac enlargement risk factors were antiplatelet intake, PT2EL, and female gender. (C) Sac shrinkage predictive factors were the absences of thoracic aortic aneurysm, antiplatelet intake, PT2EL, and coronary artery disease. Conclusion: CE to IMA was considered to be effective because patent IMA and antiplatelet intake were significant risk factors for sac enlargement. So, more meticulous therapeutic strategy, including treatment priority (AAA first or CAD first) and choice of treatment (EVAR vs. AAA) based on anatomical features of AAA was required to improve late outcomes. PMID:25298830

  18. Characterization of 75:25 poly(l-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) thin films for the endoluminal delivery of adipose-derived stem cells to abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Burks, Chris A; Bundy, Kirk; Fotuhi, Parwis; Alt, Eckhard

    2006-09-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms occur in 5-7% of men over the age of 60 and their incidence is rising. Current therapies remove the affected tissue or prevent blood flow through the aneurysm, but do not repair the underlying structural changes of the vascular wall. Adipose tissue derived stem cells (ADSCs) seeded on a biodegradable thin film and delivered endoluminally to the aneurysm site could potentially repair the vessel wall, preventing growth and rupture of the aneurysm. In this study, the mechanical and degradation properties of a novel 75:25 poly(l-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLCL) thin film, as well as, the effects of different surface structures on stem cell adherence and resistance to shear stress was investigated. It was possible to reproducibly create films of consistent physical properties. These films degraded approximately 50% in 6 month, which would be a sufficient time to allow cells to engraft in the aortic wall. Ethylene oxide treatment significantly increased the stiffness and yield stress of the films, which exhibit >700% elongation. Treatment of the films with NaOH and HCl induced the formation of surface texture on the films; however, this texture did not affect stem cell adherence or resistance to delamination by shear stress when compared to nontreated or fibronectin-coated films. These results indicate that PLCL thin films have a sufficient degradation time and mechanical strength to serve as a scaffold in vivo for ADSCs, and that ADSCs seeded on the thin film can withstand a range of physiologic shear stresses. PMID:16995792

  19. Application of a novel particle tracking algorithm in the flow visualization of an artificial abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yuan; He, Wenbo; Yang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    A novel Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) algorithm based on Voronoi Diagram (VD) is proposed and briefed as VD-PTV. The robustness of VD-PTV for pulsatile flow is verified through a test that includes a widely used artificial flow and a classic reference algorithm. The proposed algorithm is then applied to visualize the flow in an artificial abdominal aortic aneurysm included in a pulsatile circulation system that simulates the aortic blood flow in human body. Results show that, large particles tend to gather at the upstream boundary because of the backflow eddies that follow the pulsation. This qualitative description, together with VD-PTV, has laid a foundation for future works that demand high-level quantification. PMID:25226961

  20. Use of a Web-based clinical decision support system to improve abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in a primary care practice

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Rajeev; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M; Parks, Doug A; Angstman, Kurt B; Decker, Lindsay K; Stroebel, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends a one-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with ultrasonography for men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked. However, despite a mortality rate of up to 80% for ruptured AAAs, providers order the screening for a minority of patients. We sought to determine the effect of a Web-based point-of-care clinical decision support system on AAA screening rates in a primary care practice. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of medical records of male patients aged 65 to 75 years who were seen at any of our practice sites in 2007 and 2008, before and after implementation of the clinical decision support system. Results Overall screening rates were 31.36% in 2007 and 44.09% in 2008 (P-value: <0.001). Of patients who had not had AAA screening prior to the visit, 3.22% completed the screening after the visit in 2007, compared with 18.24% in 2008 when the clinical support system was implemented, 5.36 times improvement (P-value: <0.001). Conclusions A Web-based clinical decision support for primary care physicians significantly improved delivery of AAA screening of eligible patients. Carefully developed clinical decision support systems can optimize care delivery, ensuring that important preventive services are delivered to eligible patients. PMID:21401808

  1. Transcatheter stent implantation for the treatment of abdominal aortic coarctation and right renal artery stenosis in takayasu's arteritis: a case with a 4-year follow up.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Payam; Haji-Zeinali, Ali-Mohammad; Ghasemi, Masuood; Pour, Manijeh Zargham

    2011-01-01

    We describe a Takayasu arteritis patient who was admitted because of an abdominal aortic stenosis, further complicated by the presence of a stenotic right renal artery located in the area of the aortic stenosis. After treatment of the renal stenosis with a 4 × 15 mm Driver stent, a 16 × 60 self-expandable nitinol stent (OptiMed) was deployed through the stenosis of the abdominal aorta. Even though the right renal artery was initially compromised after stent deployment through the aortic stenosis, the patient was successfully treated with renal artery re-dilation by a balloon passed through open cells of the aortic stent. During follow up, the patient suffered no procedure-related complications. PMID:21478132

  2. Clinical examination for abdominal aortic aneurysm in general practice: report from the Medical Research Council's General Practice Research Framework.

    PubMed Central

    Zuhrie, S R; Brennan, P J; Meade, T W; Vickers, M

    1999-01-01

    At the time of the 1992-1994 annual reviews in the thrombosis prevention trial, general practitioners (GPs) carried out clinical examination for aneurysms by abdominal palpation in 4171 men. When an aneurysm was suspected, the patient was referred to hospital for further investigation. Aneurysm was suspected in 60 men (1.4%) and confirmed in 25 (0.6%), the mean diameter of confirmed aneurysms being 5.0 cm (range = 3.1-8.0 cm). Of the 25 men in whom aneurysm was confirmed, 10 (40%) underwent elective surgery and one died while under investigation. Examination by abdominal palpation for aortic aneurysm, which is not widely used in either general practice or in hospital practice, other than vascular surgery, is clinically worthwhile even though not all aneurysms will be detected by this means. PMID:10756617

  3. Rehospitalization to Primary Versus Different Facilities Following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Richard S.; Fernandes-Taylor, Sara; Kind, Amy J.H.; Engelbert, Travis L.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Smith, Maureen A.; Matsumura, Jon S.; Kent, K. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Objective Reducing readmissions represents a unique opportunity to improve care and reduce health care costs and is the focus of major payers. A large number of surgical patients are readmitted to hospitals other than where the primary surgery was performed, resulting in clinical decisions that do not incorporate the primary surgeon and potentially alter outcomes. This study characterizes readmission to primary versus different hospitals after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and examines the implications with regard to mortality and cost. Methods Patients who underwent open or endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for AAA were identified from the CMS Chronic Conditions Warehouse (CCW), a random 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries from 2005-2009. Outcomes for patients who underwent AAA repair and were readmitted within 30 days of initial discharge were compared based on readmission location (primary vs. different hospital). Results 885 patients underwent AAA repair and were readmitted within 30 days. 626 (70.7%) returned to the primary facility, and 259 (29.3%) returned to a different facility. Greater distance from patient residence to the primary hospital was the strongest predictor of readmission to a different facility. Patients living 50-100 miles from the primary hospital were more likely to be readmitted to a different hospital compared to patients living <10 miles away (OR = 8.50, P <.001). Patients with diagnoses directly related to the surgery (e.g. wound infection) were more likely to be readmitted to the primary hospital whereas medical diagnoses (e.g. pneumonia and congestive heart failure) were more likely to be treated at a different hospital. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality between patients readmitted to a different or the primary hospital. Median total 30-day payments were significantly lower at different versus primary hospitals ($11,978, primary vs. $11,168, different, P = .04). Conclusion Readmission

  4. Restrictive versus Standard Fluid Regimen in Elective Minilaparotomy Abdominal Aortic Repair-Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Piljic, Dragan; Petricevic, Mate; Piljic, Dilista; Ksela, Jus; Robic, Boris; Klokocovnik, Tomislav

    2016-06-01

    Objective Elective minilaparotomy abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is associated with a significant number of complications involving respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems, with mortality ranging up to 5%. In our study, we tested the hypothesis that intra- and postoperative intravenous restrictive fluid regimen reduces postoperative morbidity and mortality, and improves the outcome of minilaparotomy AAA repair. Methods From March 2009 to July 2013, 60 patients operated due to AAA were included in a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT). About the administration of fluid during the operation and in the early postoperative period, all the patients were randomized into two groups: the group of standard fluid administration (S-group, 30 patients) and the group of reduced fluid administration (R-group, 30 patients). The verification of the treatment success was measured by the length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, duration of hospitalization after the procedure, as well as the number and type of postoperative complications and mortality. This prospective RCT was registered in a publicly accessible database ClinicalTrials.gov with unique Identifier ID: NTC01939652. Results Total fluid administration and administration of blood products were significantly lower in R-group as compared with S-group (2,445.5 mL vs. 3308.7 mL, p = 0.004). Though the number of nonlethal complications was significantly lower in R-group (2 vs. 9 patients, p = 0.042), the difference in lethal complications remained nonsignificant (0 vs. 1 patient, p = ns). The average ICU stay (1.2 vs. 1.97 days, p = 0.003) and duration of postoperative hospital stay (4.33 vs. 6.20 days, p = 0.035 for R-group and S-group, respectively) were found to be significantly shorter in R-group. Conclusion Intra- and postoperative restrictive intravenous fluid regimen in patients undergoing minilaparotomy AAA repair significantly reduces

  5. Cardiopulmonary Function following Transfusion of Three Red Blood Cell Products in Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysmectomy

    PubMed Central

    Krausz, Michael M.; Dennis, Richard C.; Utsunomiya, Takayoshi; Grindlinger, Gene A.; Vegas, Armando M.; Churchill, W. Hallowell; Mannick, John A.; Valeri, C. Robert; Hechtman, Herbert B.

    1981-01-01

    In order to evaluate the importance of red cell O2 affinity of transfused blood on cardiac performance and adverse effects of transfusion on lung function, a prospective double-blind protocol was used in 27 patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy. Three types of blood were administered: packed red cells (PC), washed red cells (WC) and high 2,3 DPG red cells (2,3 DPG). An average of 4.5 units of blood was used per patient. Transfusion of 2,3 DPG blood resulted in maintenance of in vivo P50 during surgery and an increase to 31.2 torr after operation (p < 0.001). An intraoperative fall in in vivo P50 to 23.2 ± 2.0 torr was observed in patients who were transfused with PC (p < 0.001) and to 25.1 ± 2.6 torr with WC (p < 0.005). A fall in body temperature averaging 2.2 C intraoperatively was noticed in all three groups. After operation, in vitro P50 decreased in patients transfused with PC (p < 0.005) and WC (p < 0.005) while it remained unchanged in the high 2,3 DPG group. This was consistent with the decrease of red cell 2,3 DPG in the PC (p < 0.001) and WC groups (p < 0.01) and maintenance in the 2,3 DPG group. Left ventricular stroke work and volume loading Starling type myocardial performance curves were similar for the three groups. Microaggregates measured by Coulter counting and screen filtration pressure were the same for all three products in samples drawn on both sides of the 40 µm transfusion filter. There was no relationship of transfusion volumes or type of blood product to changes in lung function (physiologic shunting, dynamic compliance and pulmonary arterial pressure) in the three groups of patients. The false negative, β, error of missing a true 25% difference was less than 10%. It is concluded that 2,3 DPG enriched red cells improved oxygen availability, but that a 4.5 unit transfusion of any of the three blood products did not influence lung function or myocardial performance following aneurysmectomy. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:7294931

  6. Lower Extremity Microembolism in Open vs. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Toursavadkohi, Shahab; Kakkos, Stavros K.; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Shepard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have documented the occurrence of microembolization during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair by both open and endovascular approaches, no study has compared the downstream effects of these two repair techniques on lower extremity hemodynamics. In this prospective cohort study, 20 patients were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (11 Zenith, 8 Excluder, and 1 Medtronic) and 18 patients with open repair (OR) (16 bifurcated grafts, 2 tube grafts). Pre- and postoperative ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and toe-brachial indices (TBIs) were measured preoperatively and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 5. Demographics and preoperative ABIs/TBIs were identical in EVAR (0.97/0.63) and OR (0.96/0.63) patients (p = 0.21). There was a significant decrease in ABIs/TBIs following both EVAR (0.83/0.52, p = 0.01) and OR (0.73/0.39, p = 0.003) on POD #1, although this decrease was greater following OR than EVAR (p = 0.002). This difference largely resolved by POD #5 (p = 0.41). In the OR group, TBIs in the limb in which flow was restored first was significantly reduced compared to the contralateral limb (0.50 vs. 0.61, p = 0.03). In the EVAR group, there was also a difference in TBIs between the main body insertion side and the contralateral side (0.50 vs. 0.59, p = 0.02). Deterioration of lower extremity perfusion pressures occurs commonly after AAA repair regardless of repair technique. Toe perfusion is worse in the limb opened first during OR and on the main body insertion side following EVAR, suggesting that microembolization plays a major role in this deterioration. The derangement following OR is more profound than after EVAR on POD #1, but recovers rapidly. This finding suggests that microembolizarion may be worse with OR or alternatively that other factors associated with OR (e.g., the hemodynamic response to surgery with redistribution of flow to vital organs peri-operatively) may play a role. PMID

  7. Estimation of global and regional incidence and prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysms 1990 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Uchechukwu K A; Norman, Paul E; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Aboyans, Victor; Song, Yanna; Harrell, Frank E; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Naghavi, Mohsen; Denenberg, Julie O; McDermott, Mary M; Criqui, Michael H; Mensah, George A; Ezzati, Majid; Murray, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The global burden of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has not been studied previously. Such information is important given the emergence of cardiovascular diseases in developing countries. We conducted a systematic literature review and estimated the global and regional incidence and prevalence of AAA in 21 world regions by age and sex. The search for prevalence and incidence of AAA using standard clinical and epidemiological terms was conducted using MEDLINE (1950 to 2010), EMBASE (1980 to 2010), AMED (1985 to 2010), CINAHL (1982 to 2010), and LILACS (2008 to 2010). Data abstracted from the systematic review served as priors for Bayesian meta-regression analyses. The analysis drew from 26 high-quality studies to estimate AAA prevalence and incidence. In 1990, the global age-specific prevalence rate per 100,000 ranged from 8.43 (95% CI: 7.03 to 10.14) in the 40 to 44 years age group to 2,422.53 (95% CI: 2,298.63 to 2,562.25) in the 75 to 79 years age group; the corresponding range in 2010 was 7.88 (95% CI: 6.54 to 9.59) to 2,274.82 (95% CI: 2,149.77 to 2,410.17). Prevalence was higher in developed versus developing nations, and the rates within each development stratum decreased between 1990 and 2010. Globally, the age-specific annual incidence rate per 100,000 in 1990 ranged from 0.89 (95% CI: 0.66 to 1.17) in 40 to 44 years age group to 176.08 (95% CI: 162.72 to 190.28) in the 75 to 79 years age group. In 2010, this range was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.61 to 1.11) to 164.57 (95% CI: 152.20 to 178.78). The highest prevalence in 1990 was in Australasia and North America high income regions: 382.65 (95% CI: 356.27 to 410.88) and 300.59 (95% CI: 280.93 to 321.54), respectively. Australasia had the highest prevalence in 2010, although the prevalence decreased to 310.27 (95% CI: 289.01 to 332.94). Regional prevalence increased in Oceania, tropical Latin America, Asia Pacific high income, Southern Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), Central SSA, South Asia, Western SSA, and Central Asia. AAA

  8. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Structured Reporting Web Tool for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Sulafa; Fegeler, Christian; Boeckler, Dittmar; H Schwartz, Lawrence; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Background The majority of radiological reports are lacking a standard structure. Even within a specialized area of radiology, each report has its individual structure with regards to details and order, often containing too much of non-relevant information the referring physician is not interested in. For gathering relevant clinical key parameters in an efficient way or to support long-term therapy monitoring, structured reporting might be advantageous. Objective Despite of new technologies in medical information systems, medical reporting is still not dynamic. To improve the quality of communication in radiology reports, a new structured reporting system was developed for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), intended to enhance professional communication by providing the pertinent clinical information in a predefined standard. Methods Actual state analysis was performed within the departments of radiology and vascular surgery by developing a Technology Acceptance Model. The SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis focused on optimization of the radiology reporting of patients with AAA. Definition of clinical parameters was achieved by interviewing experienced clinicians in radiology and vascular surgery. For evaluation, a focus group (4 radiologists) looked at the reports of 16 patients. The usability and reliability of the method was validated in a real-world test environment in the field of radiology. Results A Web-based application for radiological “structured reporting” (SR) was successfully standardized for AAA. Its organization comprises three main categories: characteristics of pathology and adjacent anatomy, measurements, and additional findings. Using different graphical widgets (eg, drop-down menus) in each category facilitate predefined data entries. Measurement parameters shown in a diagram can be defined for clinical monitoring and be adducted for quick adjudications. Figures for optional use to guide and standardize the

  9. Lower Extremity Microembolism in Open vs. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Toursavadkohi, Shahab; Kakkos, Stavros K; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Shepard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have documented the occurrence of microembolization during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair by both open and endovascular approaches, no study has compared the downstream effects of these two repair techniques on lower extremity hemodynamics. In this prospective cohort study, 20 patients were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (11 Zenith, 8 Excluder, and 1 Medtronic) and 18 patients with open repair (OR) (16 bifurcated grafts, 2 tube grafts). Pre- and postoperative ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and toe-brachial indices (TBIs) were measured preoperatively and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 5. Demographics and preoperative ABIs/TBIs were identical in EVAR (0.97/0.63) and OR (0.96/0.63) patients (p = 0.21). There was a significant decrease in ABIs/TBIs following both EVAR (0.83/0.52, p = 0.01) and OR (0.73/0.39, p = 0.003) on POD #1, although this decrease was greater following OR than EVAR (p = 0.002). This difference largely resolved by POD #5 (p = 0.41). In the OR group, TBIs in the limb in which flow was restored first was significantly reduced compared to the contralateral limb (0.50 vs. 0.61, p = 0.03). In the EVAR group, there was also a difference in TBIs between the main body insertion side and the contralateral side (0.50 vs. 0.59, p = 0.02). Deterioration of lower extremity perfusion pressures occurs commonly after AAA repair regardless of repair technique. Toe perfusion is worse in the limb opened first during OR and on the main body insertion side following EVAR, suggesting that microembolization plays a major role in this deterioration. The derangement following OR is more profound than after EVAR on POD #1, but recovers rapidly. This finding suggests that microembolizarion may be worse with OR or alternatively that other factors associated with OR (e.g., the hemodynamic response to surgery with redistribution of flow to vital organs peri-operatively) may play a role. PMID

  10. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  11. Prevalence of previously undiagnosed abdominal aortic aneurysms in the area of Como: the ComoCuore "looking for AAA" ultrasonography screening.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Giovanni; Durante, Alessandro; Genchi, Vincenzo; Trabattoni, Loris; Beretta, Sandro; Rovelli, Enza; Foglia-Manzillo, Giovanni; Ferrari, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    The prognosis for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is poor. Long-term follow-up of population-based randomized trials has demonstrated that ultrasound (US) screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) measuring 3 cm or greater decreases AAA-related mortality rates and is cost-effective. We though to prospectively perform during a 26-month period a limited US examination of the infrarenal aorta in volunteers of both gender aged 60-85 years without history of AAA living in the area of Como, Italy. From September 2010 to November 2013 ComoCuore, a no-profit nongovernmental association, enrolled 1555 people (aged 68.8 ± 6.8 years; 48.6 % males). Clinical data and a US imaging of the aorta were collected for each participant. AAA was found in 22 volunteers (1.4 %) mainly males (2.5 % in males vs. 0.4 % in females p = 0.005). Overall, the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was higher in patients with vs. without AAA (mean 2.9 ± 3.0 vs. 1.4 ± 1.0 respectively, p < 0.0001). Independent predictors of AAA on multivariate analysis were age (OR 1.14, 1.06-1.22; p < 0.0001), male gender (OR 8.23, 1.79-37.91; p = 0.007), and both current (OR 4.98, 1.57-15.79; p = 0.007) and previous smoking (OR 2.76, 1.12-8.94; p = 0.03). Our study confirms the feasibility of one time US screening for AAA in a large cohort of asymptomatic people. Independent predictors of AAA were male sex, older age and a history of smoking. Accordingly to recent data the prevalence of AAA seems to be declining, maybe due to a reduction of smoking in Italy. PMID:27215751

  12. Paediatric case of a large gastric rupture after a blunt abdominal trauma: Report of a case in a District General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pafitanis, Georgios; Koulas, Spiros; Bikos, Stavros; Tsimoyiannis, Evangelos

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated gastric rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is rare. In current literature gastric rupture from blunt abdominal trauma ranges between 0.02% and 1.7%. This document reports the first non-motor-vehicle case of an isolated gastric rapture after blunt abdominal injury, which repaired after early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 14-year-old boy attended our emergency surgical department after sustained a blunt abdominal trauma following a fall from his bicycle. He presented with pain and left para-umbilical abdominal ecchymoses. Examination revealed subcutaneous emphysema and a palpable abdominal wall dimple. DISCUSSION Radiological examination with CT scan determined the need for exploratory laparotomy. Operation revealed, extensive rupture of the left lateral border of the rectus abdominus muscle, free intra-peritoneal position of the nasogastric tube with gross spillage of gastric contents and pneumo-peritoneum observed with 7-8cm full thickness rupture of anterior stomach wall, from the lesser towards the greater curvature. Primary, two-layer closure was performed. On the 5th post-operative day he developed gastrorrhagia. He was discharged on the 15th postoperative day. CONCLUSION We present this case report focusing on the paediatric patient to illustrate isolated gastric injury in terms of mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, and immediate surgical management. PMID:23295382

  13. Guilt by association: a paradigm for detection of silent aortic disease.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2016-05-01

    Detection of clinically silent thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is challenging due to the lack of symptoms (until aortic rupture or dissection occurs). A large proportion of TAA are identified incidentally while imaging a patient for other reasons. However, recently several clinical "associates" of TAA have been described that can aid in identification of silent TAA. These "associates" include intracranial aneurysm, aortic arch anomalies, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), simple renal cysts (SRC), bicuspid aortic valve, temporal arteritis, a positive family history of aneurysm disease, and a positive thumb-palm sign. In this article we examine these associates of TAA and the data supporting their involvement with asymptomatic TAA. PMID:27386404

  14. A computational simulation of the effect of hybrid treatment for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm on the hemodynamics of abdominal aorta

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jun; Yuan, Ding; Wang, Qingyuan; Hu, Yao; Zhao, Jichun; Zheng, Tinghui; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid visceral-renal debranching procedures with endovascular repair have been proposed as an appealing technique to treat conventional thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). This approach, however, still remained controversial because of the non-physiological blood flow direction of its retrograde visceral revascularization (RVR) which is generally constructed from the aortic bifurcation or common iliac artery. The current study carried out the numerical simulation to investigate the effect of RVR on the hemodynamics of abdominal aorta. The results indicated that the inflow sites for the RVR have great impact on the hemodynamic performance. When RVR was from the distal aorta, the perfusion to visceral organs were adequate but the flow flux to the iliac artery significantly decreased and a complex disturbed flow field developed at the distal aorta, which endangered the aorta at high risk of aneurysm development. When RVR was from the right iliac artery, the abdominal aorta was not troubled with low WSS or disturbed flow, but the inadequate perfusion to the visceral organs reached up to 40% and low WSS and flow velocity predominated appeared at the right iliac artery and the grafts, which may result in the stenosis in grafts and aneurysm growth on the host iliac artery. PMID:27029949

  15. A computational simulation of the effect of hybrid treatment for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm on the hemodynamics of abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Yuan, Ding; Wang, Qingyuan; Hu, Yao; Zhao, Jichun; Zheng, Tinghui; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid visceral-renal debranching procedures with endovascular repair have been proposed as an appealing technique to treat conventional thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). This approach, however, still remained controversial because of the non-physiological blood flow direction of its retrograde visceral revascularization (RVR) which is generally constructed from the aortic bifurcation or common iliac artery. The current study carried out the numerical simulation to investigate the effect of RVR on the hemodynamics of abdominal aorta. The results indicated that the inflow sites for the RVR have great impact on the hemodynamic performance. When RVR was from the distal aorta, the perfusion to visceral organs were adequate but the flow flux to the iliac artery significantly decreased and a complex disturbed flow field developed at the distal aorta, which endangered the aorta at high risk of aneurysm development. When RVR was from the right iliac artery, the abdominal aorta was not troubled with low WSS or disturbed flow, but the inadequate perfusion to the visceral organs reached up to 40% and low WSS and flow velocity predominated appeared at the right iliac artery and the grafts, which may result in the stenosis in grafts and aneurysm growth on the host iliac artery. PMID:27029949

  16. [Abdominal secondary aorto-enteric fistulae complicating aortic graft replacement: postoperative and long-term outcomes in 32 patients].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Jean-christophe; Schoell, Thibaut; Karoui, Mehdi; Chiche, Laurent; Gaudric, Julien; Gibert, Hadrien; Tresallet, Christophe; Koskas, Fabien; Hannoun, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Management of patients with abdominal secondary aorto-entericfistulae (SAEF) complicating aortic graft replacement is controversial. We retrospectively analyzed the postope- rative and long-term outcomes of all consecutive patients operated on for SAEF betwveen 2002 and2012. All were managed by in situ replacement with a cryopreserved allograft and treatment of the affected digestive tract. Thirty-two patients (median age 65 years) underwent aortic replacement for SAEFa median of 5 years after initial aortic surgery. The fistulae were located in the duodenum (n = 20), small bowel (n = 6), colon (n = 5) or stomach (n = 1). Treatment of the digestive tract included suture (n = 16), resection with anastomosis (n = 12) covered by a defunctioning stoma (n = 1), and Hartmann's procedure (n = 3). Omentoplasty was performed in 18 patients (56 %), and 17 patients (53 %) had afeedingjejunostomy. Eight patients (25 %) died post-operatively, 3 with a recurrent aorto-enteric fistula. Fifteen (62.5 %) of the remaining patients developed 27 complications, including 6 patients (19 %) with severe morbidity (Dindo III-IV). The reoperation rate was 21 %. The median hospital stay was 33 days. During follow-up (median 15 months), no further patients had a recurrent aorto-enteric fistula. We conclude that surgery for SAEF is a major procedure associated with high mortality and morbidity. Good long-term results can be obtained by excision of the prosthetic graft with cryopreserved allograft replacement, and by management in a tertialy referral center with expertise in both vascular and digestive surgery. PMID:25518163

  17. Endovascular management of a ruptured thoracoabdominal aneurysm-damage control with superior mesenteric artery snorkel and thoracic stent-graft exclusion.

    PubMed

    Riesenman, Paul J; Reeves, James G; Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of a large ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, which was stabilized with endovascular aortic exclusion and snorkel bypass of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). An 80-year-old African American woman with multiple medical comorbidities and previous open infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair presented with a ruptured 10.7 × 7.3 cm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm involving the origins of the renal and mesenteric vessels. The patient underwent emergent endovascular aortic repair with placement of a covered stent into the SMA coursing parallel to the aortic endograft. This technique was initially successful in clinically stabilizing the patient; however; 3 weeks after the initial procedure, she presented with recurrent rupture necessitating proximal extension of her snorkeled SMA bypass and aortic endograft into the mid-descending thoracic aorta. The patient stabilized and was successfully discharged home. PMID:21549926

  18. Pharmacological Inhibitor of Notch Signaling Stabilizes the Progression of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jeeyun; Koenig, Sara N.; Kuivaniemi, Helena S.; Garg, Vidu; Hans, Chetan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) involves a sustained influx of proinflammatory macrophages, which exacerbate tissue injury by releasing cytokines, chemokines, and matrix metalloproteinases. Previously, we showed that Notch deficiency reduces the development of AAA in the angiotensin II–induced mouse model by preventing infiltration of macrophages. Here, we examined whether Notch inhibition in this mouse model prevents progression of small AAA and whether these effects are associated with altered macrophage differentiation. Methods and Results Treatment with pharmacological Notch inhibitor (DAPT [N‐(N‐[3,5‐difluorophenacetyl]‐L‐alanyl)‐S‐phenylglycine t‐butyl ester]) at day 3 or 8 of angiotensin II infusion arrested the progression of AAA in Apoe−/− mice, as demonstrated by a decreased luminal diameter and aortic width. The abdominal aortas of Apoe−/− mice treated with DAPT showed decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinases and presence of elastin precursors including tropoelastin and hyaluronic acid. Marginal adventitial thickening observed in the aorta of DAPT‐treated Apoe−/− mice was not associated with increased macrophage content, as observed in the mice treated with angiotensin II alone. Instead, DAPT‐treated abdominal aortas showed increased expression of Cd206‐positive M2 macrophages and decreased expression of Il12‐positive M1 macrophages. Notch1 deficiency promoted M2 differentiation of macrophages by upregulating transforming growth factor β2 in bone marrow–derived macrophages at basal levels and in response to IL4. Protein expression of transforming growth factor β2 and its downstream effector pSmad2 also increased in DAPT‐treated Apoe−/− mice, indicating a potential link between Notch and transforming growth factor β2 signaling in the M2 differentiation of macrophages. Conclusions Pharmacological inhibitor of Notch signaling prevents the progression of AAA by macrophage

  19. Analysis of indium-111 platelet kinetics and imaging in patients with aortic grafts and abdominal aortic aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, S.R.; Kotze, H.F.; Pieters, H.; Heyns, A.D. )

    1990-11-01

    To quantitatively characterize processes of platelet thrombus formation in vivo, the kinetics and incorporation into thrombus of autologous In-111-labeled platelets were compared in six patients with aortic aneurysms and in seven patients with prosthetic aortic grafts. Although platelet survival was comparably shortened in both patient groups (mean, 5.8 days), the maximum radioactivity as determined by gamma camera imaging was higher in the aneurysms than in the grafts (3.3% +/- 1.6% vs. 1.6% +/- 1.1%, p = 0.05). Maximum In-111 uptake was also attained more quickly in the aneurysm patients (2.3 +/- 0.8 days vs. 3.5 +/- 1.3 days; p = 0.07). The experimental platelet kinetic and imaging data were subsequently evaluated by compartmental analysis to estimate both normal and disease-related components of platelet destruction. This analysis indicated that deposited platelet radioactivity had a longer residence time on grafts (2.9 +/- 1.7 days vs. 1.4 +/- 0.9 days, p = 0.07) but accumulated at a faster rate in aneurysms (5.0% +/- 3.4% per day vs. 1.4% +/- 0.9% per day, p = 0.02). As determined by imaging, only a proportion of increased platelet destruction was specifically due to the aneurysms (55% +/- 38%) or grafts (17% +/- 11%, p = 0.03). This result indicates additional components of platelet destruction unrelated to graft and aneurysm thrombus formation which, in some graft patients, may reflect a greater severity of vascular disease or other mechanisms causing a preferential shortening of platelet survival. Thus, the analytical approach described may be a useful one for discriminating components of in vivo platelet utilization including platelet removal due to normal hemostatic and senescent mechanisms, localized thrombus formation, and more generalized vascular disease.

  20. [Early Detection of Iliac Artery Rupture by Sudden Steep Reduction of Regional Saturation of Oxygen at the Ipsilateral Foot during Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Saito, Shun; Ishii, Hisanari

    2016-02-01

    An 80-year-old woman with severe aortic stenosis was planned to undergo transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) under general anesthesia. Due to severe stenosis of the femoral arteries, the left iliac artery was cut down and a 16 F Edwards SAPIEN Expandable Sheath (eSheath : Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) was inserted into the artery smoothly. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV), an artificial valve was tried to deploy but stuck in the middle of eSheath. Suddenly regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2) at the ipsilateral foot decreased steeply without other significant hemodynamic instabilities. At insertion site of eSheath, the left external iliac artery rupture occurred. To our surprise, there was almost no major bleeding because of the artery spasm and suppression of the large bore sheath. eSheath and the stuck valve were taken out together and TAVI was discontinued. The artery was replaced with a graft, and rSO2 of the foot recovered. Her aortic stenosis improved to moderate by balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) according to transthoracic echocardiography. The patient was discharged on foot without complications. To our knowledge, this is a first report of a silent rupture of the iliac artery during TAVI to be detected by sudden decrease of the foot rSO2 and treated with no fatal events. PMID:27017778

  1. [What is the evidence to support screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm and what is the role of the primary care physicians ?].

    PubMed

    Motte, S

    2015-09-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a serious and potentially fatal vascular disease. Surgical intervention is typically reserved for aneurysms 55 mm in diameter or greater. Randomized trials addressing the efficacy of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm have shown that screening reduced aneurysm-related mortality in men but not in women who have a lower prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Screening with ultrasonography is recommended in men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking and is suggested in women in this age group if they have risk factors such as smoking and hypertension. Men and women with a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo screening as well. Persons who have a stable aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Primary care physicians have to play a key role before prescribing screening in assessing risks and benefits of repair in each patient. For persons with an aneurysm of less than 55 mm in diameter, the primary care physicians should provide information and interventions for the prevention of cardiovascular disease such as screening for and treating hypertension and interventions for tobacco cessation for smokers. The family physicians should also ensure that radiological monitoring of aneurysms is complete. PMID:26591322

  2. The use of point-of-care ultrasound by a critical care retrieval team to diagnose acute abdominal aortic aneurysm in the field.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Stefan M; Sharley, Peter

    2007-02-01

    The potential benefit of point-of-care ultrasound by medical retrieval teams is unclear. In the present case report, the diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm by a critical care retrieval team equipped with a portable ultrasound machine resulted in significant corrective alteration in patient management and subsequent disposition at the receiving institution. PMID:17305666

  3. Renal failure after ruptured aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Abbott, W M; Abel, R M; Beck, C H; Fischer, J E

    1975-09-01

    The effectiveness of an intravenous nutritional program plus aggressive dialysis was studied in 32 patients with renal failure following ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Each patient was managed postoperatively with a renal failure fluid regimen, consisting of the eight essential amino acids plus dextrose in conjunction with peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. This regimen induced salutary metabolic effects temporarily improving the patient's condition in most instances. No technical or septic complications associated with the intravenous dietary therapy occurred. However, the incidence of recovery of renal function was low, and the overall patient survival was only 12.5%. The experience indicates that although this program has been shown to be efficacious in some patients with acute renal failure, it seems of little benefit in those whose renal failure follows ruptured aortic aneurysm. PMID:808197

  4. Feasibility of Angioplasty and Stenting for Abdominal Aortic Lesions Adjacent to Previously Stented Visceral Artery Lesions in Patients with Takayasu Arteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, George George, Paul V.; Pati, Purendra Kumar; Chandy, Sunil Thomas

    2007-04-15

    Two young female patients with Takayasu arteritis presented with symptomatic long-segment abdominal aortic stenosis in the vicinity of previously deployed celiac and renal artery stents that projected markedly into the narrowed aortic lumen. Crushing or distortion of the visceral artery stents during aortic angioplasty was avoided by performing simultaneous or alternating balloon dilatations in the aorta and in the visceral artery stents. Consequently, the visceral artery stents remained patent and shortened longitudinally, allowing unhindered deployment of Wallstents in the adjacent aorta and abolition of a pressure gradient across the aortic lesions. Access to side branches covered by the Wallstent was obtained without difficulty, enabling the performance of balloon dilatation in multiple side branches and ostial stent deployment in a renal artery. These techniques could increase the scope of endovascular therapy in the treatment of patients with Takayasu arteritis.

  5. Influence of the chronic abdominal aortic occlusion on the femoral artery disease pattern.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Nikola S; Koncar, Igor; Dragas, Marko; Golubovic, Milka; Bozic, Vesna; Ilijas, Cinara; Zivan, Maksimovic; Davidovic, Lazar

    2014-02-01

    We design a study to evaluate whether patients with chronic aortic occlusion have a different pattern of femoral artery atherosclerosis than patients with other forms of aortoiliac disease as well as to discuss potential causal mechanisms. From January 2008 to January 2010, 467 patients with aortoiliac occlusive disease were enrolled at Clinic of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery in Belgrade, Serbia. Among them 60 patients were divided into two groups, patients with chronic aortic occlusion (COA) and diffuse aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD, Leriche type II). Each group consisted of 30 patients. Those two groups were compared according to symptomatology, ABI values, femoral artery pressure gradient, atherosclerosis level in the femoral region and predictors of atherosclerosis.Patients with AIOD had severe atherosclerosis unlike patients with COA. Also, high elevation of postoperative ABIs in patients with an early atherosclerosis (0, I, II and III) was noted suggesting patent distal arterial tree. FAP gradient was significantly higher in COA group comparing with AIOD group (left: t=-10.963, P<0.01;right: t=-8.962, P<0.01). In conclusion, our data demonstrate that older patients have had more time to develop multilevel disease (AOID) and those with CAO have more isolated aortic disease chronic aortic occlusion. PMID:23550207

  6. Scientific second-order 'nudging' or lobbying by interest groups: the battle over abdominal aortic aneurysm screening programmes.

    PubMed

    Ploug, Thomas; Holm, Søren; Brodersen, John

    2014-11-01

    The idea that it is acceptable to 'nudge' people to opt for the 'healthy choice' is gaining currency in health care policy circles. This article investigates whether researchers evaluating Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Programmes (AAASP) attempt to influence decision makers in ways that are similar to popular 'nudging' techniques. Comparing two papers on the health economics of AAASP both published in the BMJ within the last 3 years, it is shown that the values chosen for the health economics modelling are not representative of the literature and consistently favour the conclusions of the articles. It is argued (1) that this and other features of these articles may be justified within a Libertarian Paternalist framework as 'nudging' like ways of influencing decision makers, but also (2) that these ways of influencing decision makers raise significant ethical issues in the context of democratic decision making. PMID:24807744

  7. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Decreases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation through GLP-1-Dependent Monocytic Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsin Ying; Huang, Chun Yao; Shih, Chun Ming; Chang, Wei Hung; Tsai, Chein Sung; Lin, Feng Yen; Shih, Chun Che

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening situation affecting almost 10% of elders. There has been no effective medication for AAA other than surgical intervention. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been shown to have a protective effect on cardiovascular disease. Whether DPP-4 inhibitors may be beneficial in the treatment of AAA is unclear. We investigated the effects of DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin on the angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused AAA formation in apoE-deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Mice with induced AAA were treated with placebo or 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day sitagliptin. Ang II-infused apoE-/- mice exhibited a 55.6% incidence of AAA formation, but treatment with sitagliptin decreased AAA formation. Specifically, administered sitagliptin in Ang II-infused mice exhibited decreased expansion of the suprarenal aorta, reduced elastin lamina degradation of the aorta, and diminished vascular inflammation by macrophage infiltration. Treatment with sitagliptin decreased gelatinolytic activity and apoptotic cells in aorta tissues. Sitaglipitn, additionally, was associated with increased levels of plasma active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). In vitro studies, GLP-1 decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cell migration, and MMP-2 as well as MMP-9 activity in Ang II-stimulated monocytic cells. The results conclude that oral administration of sitagliptin can prevent abdominal aortic aneurysm formation in Ang II-infused apoE-/-mice, at least in part, by increasing of GLP-1 activity, decreasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 production from macrophage infiltration. The results indicate that sitagliptin may have therapeutic potential in preventing the development of AAA. PMID:25876091

  8. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Liang; Qu, Lefeng; Raithel, Dieter

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  9. Circulating S100A12 Levels Are Associated with Progression of Abdominal Aortic Calcification in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eul Sik; Kim, Ae Jin; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung; Jung, Ji Yong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an important factor associated with mortality in dialysis patients. Recently, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end product (sRAGE) and extracellular RAGE binding protein S100A12 (EN-RAGE) have been reported to be involved in the process of vascular calcification. Therefore, we investigated whether sRAGE and S100A12 are useful indicators of progression of abdominal aortic calcification in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We analyzed annual changes in vascular calcification score (VCS) for up to 4 years, compared to clinical and biological parameters in 149 HD patients. VCS was assessed annually using plain X-ray images of the lateral lumbar spine. The progression group was defined as patients with an increase in VCS more than 1 point each year on average during the observation period. Time-averaged concentrations were also evaluated to examine the association between biological parameters and changes in VCS. The patients had a mean age of 58.59 ± 12.93 years; 53.7% were male, and 45% were diabetic. The VCS increased in 55 patients; the mean increase was 1.60 ± 2.91 points. In a stepwise multivariate logistic analysis, we found that higher levels of S100A12 were significantly associated with progression of VCS (odds ratio [OR], 2.622; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.371–5.016; P = 0.004). The relationship between sRAGE and VCS was not statistically significant (OR, 0.644; 95% CI, 0.302–1.374; P = 0.255). Our findings suggest that serum levels of S100A12 are associated with progression of abdominal aortic calcification in HD patients, independent of sRAGE level. PMID:26914918

  10. [Effect of antisense oligonucleotides on myo-intimal hyperplasia in a model of abdominal aortic injury in the rat].

    PubMed

    Chemla, E; Julia, P; Nierat, J; Eudes, D; Bruneval, P; Carpentier, A; Fabiani, J N

    1995-03-01

    Restenosis at a rate > 30% at 6 months is the major complication of both coronary and peripheral arterial angioplasty. Restenosis is mainly due to proliferation of smooth muscle cells, extracellular matrix and collagen which form a neointima. The proto-oncogene c-myb is a gene with an immediate response which has been implicated in the proliferation and alteration of the phenotype of smooth muscle cells. The antisenses are molecules of single-helix DNA the sequence of which is inverse to that of messenger RNA of the target proto-oncogene. They therefore have the possibility of forming a double helix with the messenger RNA and of preventing its translation. The antisenses of c-myb have already been successfully tested in in vitro and in vivo models of neointimal proliferation. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of c-myb antisenses on the proliferation of smooth muscle cells in a model of abdominal aortic injury in the rat. Thirty-five male Wistar rats with an average weight of 350 grams were operated. Smooth muscle cell proliferation was obtained by desendothelialisation of the abdominal aorta from the level of the left renal vein to the aortic bifurcation. Using a randomised, double-blind protocol, 17 rats were given 500 microliters of pluronic gel (control group), 9 a sense oligonucleotide of c-myb in 500 microliters of pluronic gel (sense group) and 9 a c-myb antisense oligonucleide in 500 microliters of pluronic gel (antisense group). Two rats were given fluorescinlabelled antisenses; one was sacrificed 4 hours and the other 24 hours later.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7487292

  11. Andrographolide Ameliorates Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression by Inhibiting Inflammatory Cell Infiltration through Downregulation of Cytokine and Integrin Expression.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Liu, Zhenjie; Wang, Qiwei; Giles, Jasmine; Greenberg, Jason; Sheibani, Nader; Kent, K Craig; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), characterized by exuberant inflammation and tissue deterioration, is a common aortic disease associated with a high mortality rate. There is currently no established pharmacological therapy to treat this progressive disease. Andrographolide (Andro), a major bioactive component of the herbaceous plant Andrographis paniculata, has been found to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activity in several disease models. In this study, we investigated the ability of Andro to suppress inflammation associated with aneurysms, and whether it may be used to block the progression of AAA. Whereas diseased aortae continued to expand in the solvent-treated group, daily administration of Andro to mice with small aneurysms significantly attenuated aneurysm growth, as measured by the diminished expansion of aortic diameter (165.68 ± 15.85% vs. 90.62 ± 22.91%, P < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that Andro decreased infiltration of monocytes/macrophages and T cells. Mechanistically, Andro inhibited arterial NF-κB activation and reduced the production of proinflammatory cytokines [CCL2, CXCL10, tumor necrosis factor α, and interferon-γ] in the treated aortae. Furthermore, Andro suppressed α4 integrin expression and attenuated the ability of monocytes/macrophages to adhere to activated endothelial cells. These results indicate that Andro suppresses progression of AAA, likely through inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration via downregulation of NF-κB-mediated cytokine production and α4 integrin expression. Thus, Andro may offer a pharmacological therapy to slow disease progression in patients with small aneurysms. PMID:26483397

  12. Calpain Inhibition Attenuates Angiotensin II-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms and Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Venkateswaran; Uchida, Haruhito Adam; Ijaz, Talha; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju

    2011-01-01

    Chronic infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) augments atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAAs) formation in hypercholesterolemic mice. AngII-induced AAAs are associated with medial macrophage accumulation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation. Inhibition of calpain, a calcium-activated neutral cysteine protease, by overexpression of its endogenous inhibitor, calpastatin, attenuates AngII-induced leukocyte infiltration, perivascular inflammation, and MMP activation in mice. The purpose of this study was to define whether pharmacological inhibition of calpain influences AngII-induced AAAs in hypercholesterolemic mice. Male LDL receptor −/− mice were fed a fat-enriched diet and administered with either vehicle or a calpain-specific inhibitor, BDA-410 (30 mg/kg/day) for 5 weeks. After 1 week of feeding, mice were infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min) for 4 weeks. AngII-infusion profoundly increased aortic calpain protein and activity. BDA-410 administration had no effect on plasma cholesterol concentrations or AngII-increased systolic blood pressure. Calpain inhibition significantly attenuated AngII-induced AAA formation and atherosclerosis development. BDA-410 administration attenuated activation of MMP12, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, MCP-1) and macrophage infiltration into the aorta. BDA-410 administration significantly attenuated thioglycollate-elicited macrophage accumulation in the peritoneal cavity. We conclude that calpain inhibition using BDA-410 attenuated AngII-induced AAA formation and atherosclerosis development in LDL receptor −/− mice. PMID:21964156

  13. Successful rescue from cardiac arrest in a patient with postinfarction left ventricular blow-out rupture: "extra-pericardial aortic cannulation" for establishment total cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Suguru; Yaku, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Akihiko

    2014-08-01

    We report a quick and simple technique to establish cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a left ventricular (LV) blow-out rupture. A 74-year-old woman with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction suddenly collapsed and lost consciousness. A venous-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) device was inserted by femoral cannulation. Emergent median sternotomy was performed. The pericardium was not opened first, and the thymus was divided to expose the ascending aorta just above the pericardial reflection. After placing two purse-string sutures on the distal ascending aorta, a 7-mm aortic cannula (Terumo, Tokyo, Japan) was inserted. The pericardium was then incised. A large volume of blood was expelled from the pericardial space, and CPB was initiated with suction drainage. A two-stage venous drainage cannula was then inserted from the right atrial appendage without hemodynamic collapse. After cardiac arrest, closure of ruptured LV wall and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting were performed. The patient was weaned from CPB with an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) and the previously inserted venous-arterial ECMO. Extra-pericardial aortic cannulation is an effective and reproducible method to prepare for CPB in emergent cases of LV rupture. PMID:25179976

  14. Fatal aortic aneurysm and rupture in a neotropical bush dog (Speothos venaticus) caused by Spirocerca lupi.

    PubMed

    Rinas, Miguel A; Nesnek, Raquel; Kinsella, John M; DeMatteo, Karen E

    2009-10-14

    This report details the post-mortem discovery of a larva of Spirocerca lupi in the caudal thoracic aorta of a 2-year, male bush dog (Speothos venaticus). This individual presented no clinical symptoms of the parasite's presence prior to its sudden death. The cause of death was determined to be acute bleeding following the rupture of an aneurysm in the caudal thoracic aorta as a result of the parasite located there. This is the first report of S. lupi in a bush dog. PMID:19515493

  15. Establishment of Rabbit Abdominal Aortic Atherosclerosis Model by Pancreatic Elastase Infiltration Associated with High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Song-Nian; Xu, Ke; Zhong, Hong-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a high fat diet (HFD) associated with pancreatic elastase (PE) infiltration, in establishing the rabbit aortic atherosclerosis model. Methods The HFD+PE method and the HFD+saccule injury (SI) method were simultaneously used to prepare the rabbit atherosclerosis model; the control group was established with the normal diet. Biochemical indicators, radiological imaging, pathomorphology and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the HFD+PE modeling results. Results There were significant changes in the blood lipid contents, as well as the pathomorphological and immunohistochemical results between the two experimental groups and the control group (p < 0.05). However, there was no difference between the two experimental groups. The rabbit aortic atherosclerosis model prepared by the HFD+PE method had no significant difference in the local vascular pathomorphological and immunohistochemical results with the traditional HFD+SI method. Conclusions The use of HFD with PE infiltration is feasible in establishing the rabbit aortic atherosclerosis model. PMID:27122900

  16. Endovascular repair of a ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm: hybrid open arch reconstruction with simultaneous thoracic stent-graft deployment within elephant trunk.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zamzam, Ahmed M; Zhang, Wayne; Wang, Nan; Razzouk, Anees

    2008-03-01

    Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta is now widely practiced. The extension of this technique to emergent settings is in evolution. Pathology of the ascending and transverse aortic arch may preclude thoracic aortic stent grafting due to the lack of a proximal seal zone. Several hybrid open/endovascular approaches have been described. We recently encountered the difficult case of a contained rupture of a 6.8 cm descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a 60-year-old patient with aneurysmal degeneration of the ascending and transverse aortic arch. This patient was treated with a hybrid approach of open ascending and transverse arch reconstruction along with simultaneous stent-graft repair of the descending thoracic aorta. The open repair established an excellent proximal landing zone by use of the "elephant trunk" technique. This technique also allowed direct suture fixation of the stent graft to the arch graft to prevent stent-graft migration. This hybrid surgical approach was successful and avoided the cumulative morbidity that a left thoracoabdominal approach would have added to the sternotomy. Further creative uses of these hybrid techniques will undoubtedly serve a larger role in the treatment of thoracic aortic pathology. PMID:18346569

  17. Simultaneous “traumatic Gerbode” and aortic rupture due to blunt chest trauma

    PubMed Central

    Anninos, Hector; Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis; Politis, Panagiotis; Gounopoulos, Pantelis; Koroneos, Apostolos; Charitos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The Gerbode defect is characterized by a perimembranous ventricular septal defect between the left ventricle and the right atrium. This intracardiac shunt is a congenital defect but may be iatrogenic after valve surgery or atrioventricular node ablation, may be the result of endocarditis or may be traumatic. It is really rarely encountered as sequelae of non-penetrating heart trauma, and their clinical manifestations may often be unrecognized in the multi-injured patient. However, they are serious complications, and their diagnostic approach is not always feasible. We hereby present a case of a young man with the left ventricle to the right atrium communication after blunt thoracic trauma due to a car accident and concomitant rupture of the thoracic aorta. We present also the case and the ways of treatment according to the international bibliography. PMID:26750699

  18. Outcomes of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Loftus, Ian; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length <10 mm. Eighty-seven patients with 0 adverse features (good necks) were compared with 60 patients with one or more adverse features (hostile necks). Results. Comparing the good neck with the hostile neck group, there were no significant differences in the incidence of primary technical success (p = 0.15), intraoperative adjunctive procedures (p = 0.22), early proximal type I endoleak (<30 days) (p = 1.0), late proximal type I endoleak (>30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy.

  19. Dipyridamole thallium scanning in the evaluation of coronary artery disease in elective abdominal aortic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Strawn, D.J.; Guernsey, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Dipyridamole thallium scanning was routinely performed on 68 consecutive patients who presented for elective aortic surgery. All 68 patients were judged by clinical assessment to be at low risk for perioperative cardiac complications. In addition, 42 of 68 patients had a history of myocardial infarction, stable angina, or abnormal echocardiographic findings (group 1). Twenty-six of 68 patients did not have a history of myocardial infarction, angina, or abnormal echocardiographic findings (group 2). In group 1, 34 of 4 patients had positive results on dipyridamole thallium scanning, and 15 of these patients were found to have critical coronary artery disease on subsequent cardiac catheterization; nine underwent immediate coronary artery bypass grafting, and six had their coronary artery disease treated medically and their vascular operations cancelled. The remaining 27 patients in group 1 underwent elective operations, with six (22%) of 27 sustaining postoperative cardiac complications. None of the group 2 patients was found to have critical coronary artery disease. All patients in group 2 underwent aortic operation without cardiac complication. Routine dipyridamole thallium scanning detected a 22% (15 of 68) incidence of critical coronary artery disease overall. There was a 36% (15 of 42) incidence of critical coronary artery disease in group 1 patients vs 0% in group 2 patients (95% confidence interval, 21% to 50%). The authors conclude that the use of dipyridamole thallium scanning in low-risk patients for cardiac screening prior to elective aortic operations is beneficial in selected patients who have a history of myocardial infarction, angina, or abnormal echocardiographic findings, but is not necessary in patients with no history of coronary artery disease.

  20. Evaluation of the CritiView in pig model of abdominal aortic occlusion and graded hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayevsky, A.; Preisman, S.; Willenz, P. E.; Castel, D.; Perel, A.; Givony, D.; Dekel, N.; Oren, L.; Pewzner, E.

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that in the presence of reduced oxygen delivery and extraction, blood flow will be redistributed in order to protect the most vital organs (e.g., brain and heart) by increasing their regional blood flow, while O2 delivery to the less vital organs (e.g., GI tract or urethral wall) will diminish. Evaluation of mitochondrial function in vivo could be done by monitoring the oxidation reduction state of the respiratory chain. Thus, the NADH redox state of less vital organs could serve as an indicator of overall O2 imbalance as well as an endpoint of resuscitation. We have therefore tested, in a pig model, a new medical device providing real time data on NADH redox state and tissue blood flow- TBF This device contains a modified three way Foley catheter with a fiber optic probe which connects the measurement unit to the tested tissue. Female pigs underwent graded hemorrhage (GH) or Aortic clamping (AC). The main effects of GH started when blood volume decreased by 30%. At 40% blood loss, minimal levels of TBF were correlated to the maximal NADH levels. The values of the 2 parameters returned to baseline after retransfusion of the shed blood. Aortic clamping led to significant decrease in TBF while NADH levels increased. After aortic declamping the parameters recovered to normal values. Due to the short length of the urethra in female pigs and the instable contact between the probe and the tissue, inconsistency of the responses was observed. Our preliminary results show that the CritiView may be a useful tool for the detection of body O2 imbalance.